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Sample records for efficient extreme ultra-violet

  1. Counter-facing plasma guns for efficient extreme ultra-violet plasma light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Akiko; Kuwabara, Hajime; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Kawamura, Tohru; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2013-11-01

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial guns was proposed as a long-pulse and/or repetitive high energy density plasma source. We applied Li as the source of plasma for improvement of the conversion efficiency, the spectral purity, and the repetition capability. For operation of the system with ideal counter-facing plasma focus mode, we changed the system from simple coaxial geometry to a multi-channel configuration. We applied a laser trigger to make synchronous multi-channel discharges with low jitter. The results indicated that the configuration is promising to make a high energy density plasma with high spectral efficiency.

  2. Complementary ion and extreme ultra-violet spectrometer for laser-plasma diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Ramakrishna, B.; Doria, D.; Sarri, G.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Ehrentraut, L.; Stiel, H.; Steinke, S.; Schnuerer, M.; Nickles, P. V.; Sandner, W.; Priebe, G.

    2009-10-15

    Simultaneous detection of extreme ultra-violet (XUV) and ion emission along the same line of sight provides comprehensive insight into the evolution of plasmas. This type of combined spectroscopy is applied to diagnose laser interaction with a spray target. The use of a micro-channel-plate detector assures reliable detection of both XUV and ion signals in a single laser shot. The qualitative analysis of the ion emission and XUV spectra allows to gain detailed information about the plasma conditions, and a correlation between the energetic proton emission and the XUV plasma emission can be suggested. The measured XUV emission spectrum from water spray shows efficient deceleration of laser accelerated electrons with energies up to keV in the initially cold background plasma and the collisional heating of the plasma.

  3. Extreme ultra-violet movie camera for imaging microsecond time scale magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Kil-Byoung; Bellan, Paul M.

    2013-12-15

    An ultra-fast extreme ultra-violet (EUV) movie camera has been developed for imaging magnetic reconnection in the Caltech spheromak/astrophysical jet experiment. The camera consists of a broadband Mo:Si multilayer mirror, a fast decaying YAG:Ce scintillator, a visible light block, and a high-speed visible light CCD camera. The camera can capture EUV images as fast as 3.3 × 10{sup 6} frames per second with 0.5 cm spatial resolution. The spectral range is from 20 eV to 60 eV. EUV images reveal strong, transient, highly localized bursts of EUV radiation when magnetic reconnection occurs.

  4. Exploring the temporally resolved electron density evolution in extreme ultra-violet induced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Horst, R. M.; Beckers, J.; Nijdam, S.; Kroesen, G. M. W.

    2014-07-01

    We measured the electron density in an extreme ultra-violet (EUV) induced plasma. This is achieved in a low-pressure argon plasma by using a method called microwave cavity resonance spectroscopy. The measured electron density just after the EUV pulse is 2.6 × 1016 m-3. This is in good agreement with a theoretical prediction from photo-ionization, which yields a density of 4.5 × 1016 m-3. After the EUV pulse the density slightly increases due to electron impact ionization. The plasma (i.e. electron density) decays in tens of microseconds.

  5. Analysis of observational data from Extreme Ultra-Violet Camera onboard Chang'E-3 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Hua-Ning; He, Han; He, Fei; Chen, Bo; Feng, Jian-Qing; Ping, Jin-Song; Shen, Chao; Xu, Rong-Lan; Zhang, Xiao-Xin

    2016-02-01

    The Extreme Ultra-Violet Camera (hereafter EUVC) is a scientific payload onboard the lander of the Chang'E-3 (hereafter CE-3) mission launched on December 1st, 2013. Centering on a spectral band around 30.4 nm, EUVC provides the global images of the Earth's plasmasphere from the meridian view, with a spatial resolution of 0.1 R_{oplus} in 150 × 150 pixels and a cadence of 10 minutes. Along with the data being publicly released online, some unsettled issues in the early stage have been clarified, including the geometrical preparations, the refined approach on the coefficient K for the background, and the alignment among the images. A demo of data after all the above processes is therefore presented as a guidance for users who are studying the structure and dynamics of the plasmasphere.

  6. Extreme Ultra-Violet Spectroscopy of the Lower Solar Atmosphere During Solar Flares (Invited Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milligan, Ryan O.

    2015-12-01

    The extreme ultra-violet (EUV) portion of the solar spectrum contains a wealth of diagnostic tools for probing the lower solar atmosphere in response to an injection of energy, particularly during the impulsive phase of solar flares. These include temperature- and density-sensitive line ratios, Doppler-shifted emission lines, nonthermal broadening, abundance measurements, differential emission measure profiles, continuum temperatures and energetics, among others. In this article I review some of the recent advances that have been made using these techniques to infer physical properties of heated plasma at footpoint and ribbon locations during the initial stages of solar flares. I primarily focus on studies that have utilised spectroscopic EUV data from Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and Solar Dynamics Observatory/EUV Variability Experiment (SDO/EVE), and I also provide some historical background and a summary of future spectroscopic instrumentation.

  7. True covariance simulation of the EUVE (extreme ultra violet explorer) update filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Itzhack, I. Y.; Harman, R. R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a covariance analysis of the performance and sensitivity of the attitude determination Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) used by the onboard computer (OBC) of the Extreme Ultra Violet Explorer (EUVE) spacecraft. The linearized dynamics and measurement equations of the error states are used in formulating the 'truth model' describing the order of the systems involved. The 'design model' used by the OBC EKF is then obtained by reducing the order of the truth model. The covariance matrix of the EKF which uses the reduced order model is not the correct covariance of the EKF estimation error. A 'true covariance analysis' has to be carried out in order to evaluate the correct accuracy of the OBC generated estimates. The results of such analysis are presented which indicate both the performance and the sensitivity of the OBC EKF.

  8. Carbon deposition on multi-layer mirrors by extreme ultra violet ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunari, S.; Aoki, T.; Murakami, K.; Gomei, Y.; Terashima, S.; Takase, H.; Tanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Kakutani, Y.; Niibe, M.; Fukuda, Y.

    2007-03-01

    Organic gases cause carbon depositions on the multi-layer mirrors by Extreme Ultra Violet (EUV) light irradiations in EUV lithography tool. The dependences on organic gas species, organic gas pressure and EUV light intensity in the carbon deposition were researched in order to understand this reaction. EUV light was irradiated on a (Si/Mo) multilayer mirror sample injecting organic gas like buthane, buthanol, methyl propionate, hexane, perfluoro octane, decane, decanol, methyl nonanoate, diethyl benzene, dimethyl phthalate and hexadecane. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements revealed that organic gases with heavier molecule weight or higher boiling temperature caused faster carbon deposition rates. Carbon deposition rates increased linearly with organic gas pressures. Dependence on EUV light intensity was estimated from comparisons between an EUV light profile and carbon distributions on irradiated samples. Carbon deposition rates increased rapidly, but became saturated at higher EUV light intensities. Three chemical reactions, an adsorption, a desorption and a carbon deposition by EUV light irradiation, were taken into account to explain the behavior of the carbon deposition. Electron irradiation on a mirror sample revealed that photoelectrons emitting from the mirror surface played an important role in carbon deposition.

  9. High-peak-power surface high-harmonic generation at extreme ultra-violet wavelengths from a tape

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, B. H.; Tilborg, J. van; Sokollik, T.; Schroeder, C. B.; McKinney, W. R.; Artemiev, N. A.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Gullikson, E. M.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-07-28

    Solid-based surface high-harmonic generation from a tape is experimentally studied. By operating at mildly relativistic normalized laser strengths a{sub 0}≲0.2, harmonics up to the 17th order are efficiently produced in the coherent wake emission (CWE) regime. CWE pulse properties, such as divergence, energy, conversion efficiency, and spectrum, are investigated for various tape materials and drive laser conditions. A clear correlation between surface roughness and harmonic beam divergence is found. At the measured pulse properties for the 15th harmonic (conversion efficiency ∼6.5×10{sup −7}, divergence ∼7−15 mrad), the 100-mJ-level drive laser produces several MWs of extreme ultra-violet pulses. The spooling tape configuration enables multi-Hz operation over thousands of shots, making this source attractive as a seed to the few-Hz laser-plasma-accelerator-driven free-electron laser (FEL). Models indicate that these CWE pulses with MW level powers are sufficient for seed-induced bunching and FEL gain.

  10. The solar extreme ultra-violet corona: Resolved loops and the unresolved active region corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirtain, Jonathan Wesley

    In this work, physical characteristics of the solar corona as observed in the Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) regime are investigated. The focus will be the regions of intense EUV radiation generally found near the locations of sunspots. These regions are commonly called active regions. Multiple space- based observing platforms have been deployed in the last decade; it is possible to use several of these observatories in combination to develop a more complete picture of the solar corona. Joint Observing Program 146 was created to collect spectroscopic intensities using the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer on Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and EUV images using NASA's Transition Region and Coronal Explorer. The emission line intensities are analyzed to develop an understanding of the temperature and density of the active region coronal plasma. However, the performance of the CDS instrument in the spatial and temporal domains is limited and to compensate for these limitations, data collected by the TRACE instrument provide a high spatial and temporal resolution set of observations. One of the most exciting unsolved problems in solar astrophysics is to understand why the corona maintains a temperature roughly two orders of magnitude higher than the underlying material. A detailed investigation of the coronal emission has provided constraints on models of the heating mechanism, since the temperature, density and evolution of emission rates for multiple ionic species are indicative of the mechanism(s) working to heat the corona. The corona appears to consist of multiple unresolved structures as well as resolved active region structures, called coronal loops. The purpose of the present work is to determine the characteristics of the unresolved background corona. Using the characterizations of the coronal unresolved background, results for loops after background subtraction are also presented. This work demonstrates the magnitude of the unresolved coronal emission with

  11. Beyond Extreme Ultra Violet (BEUV) Radiation from Spherically symmetrical High-Z plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kensuke; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Ugomori, Teruyuki; Tanaka, Nozomi; Kawasaki, Masato; Suzuki, Yuhei; Suzuki, Chihiro; Tomita, Kentaro; Hirose, Ryouichi; Eshima, Takeo; Ohashi, Hayato; Nishikino, Masaharu; Scally, Enda; Nshimura, Hiroaki; Azechi, Hiroshi; O'Sullivan, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    Photo-lithography is a key technology for volume manufacture of high performance and compact semiconductor devices. Smaller and more complex structures can be fabricated by using shorter wavelength light in the photolithography. One of the most critical issues in development of the next generation photo-lithography is to increase energy conversion efficiency (CE) from laser to shorter wavelength light. Experimental database of beyond extreme ultraviolet (BEUV) radiation was obtained by using spherically symmetrical high-Z plasmas generated with spherically allocated laser beams. Absolute energy and spectra of BEUV light emitted from Tb, Gd, and Mo plasmas were measured with a absolutely calibrated BEUV calorimeter and a transmission grating spectrometer. 1.0 x 1012 W/cm2 is the optimal laser intensity to produced efficient BEUV light source plasmas with Tb and Gd targets. Maximum CE is achieved at 0.8% that is two times higher than the published CEs obtained with planar targets.

  12. Optical proximity correction for extreme ultra-violet mask with pellicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Soo-Yeon; Kim, In-Seon; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2015-10-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is considered as one of the viable solutions for production of the next generation integrated devices. EUV mask defect control becomes more critical issue in order to sustain the quality of wafer fabrication process. Since pellicle is the essential component to prevent patterning deformations caused by particle defects on EUV mask[1-2], EUV OPC (optical proximity correction) that takes into account for pellicle effects on imaging quality is required for achieving better pattern fidelity and critical dimension control. In this study, image blurring effect induced by the EUV mask pellicle on mask pattern structures was investigated and it was found that the localized short-range OPC using commercial software performed as desired considering transmission intensity loss due to pellicle. For experiment, edge placement error differences of the same 2D logic patterns with 16 nm half pitch with and without pellicle were compared. Finally, a method was suggested how patterning throughput loss caused by the transmission loss can be compensated by EUV OPC, which may allow pellicle transmission even below 90%.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Second Extreme Ultra-Violet Explorer Catalog (2EUVE, 1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowyer, S.; Lampton, M.; Lewis, J.; Wu, X.; Jelinsky, P.; Malina, R. F.

    2001-04-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite was launched on June 7, 1992 from Cape Canaveral, Florida on a Delta II rocket. The payload contains three EUV scanning telescopes equipped with imaging detectors as well as a Deep Survey Spectrometer instrument which divides the light from a fourth telescope between an imaging detector and three EUV spectrometers. There are three source tables in this catalogue: - table1 lists count rates and positions of 514 objects detected during the all-sky survey. - table2 lists 35 sources detected by the deep survey of half the ecliptic plane; three deep survey objects are also detected in the all sky survey. - table3 lists 188 sources that have been detected in other ways, principally by deep exposures with the scanner telescopes as part of the Right Angle Program or by long exposures with the deep survey instrument; table3 includes right angle detections through December 24, 1994. Because the objects listed in table3 have been derived with a variety of instruments and exposure strategies, the flux limits and detection thresholds vary over a wide range; interested readers should consult the reference listed. Each table has an associated list of identified sources, id1, id2 and id3 (one EUVE source may by associated to 0, one or more counterparts); in nearly all cases they lie within 1 arcmin of the actual source position. The 534 objects in the "faint" part were detected jointly in the EUVE and in the ROSAT X-Ray Telescope 0.25keV band (50Å). This joint selection criterion permits use of a low count rate threshold in each survey, roughly 60% of the threshold used in the EUVE all-sky surveys, and 166 of the objects listed in the "faint" part are new EUV sources, appearing in neither the Second EUVE Source Catalog (tables 1 to 3) nor the ROSAT Wide Field Camera Second Catalog (J/MNRAS/274/1165) (7 data files).

  14. Extreme ultra-violet burst, particle heating, and whistler wave emission in fast magnetic reconnection induced by kink-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Kil-Byoung; Zhai, Xiang; Bellan, Paul M.

    2016-03-01

    A spatially localized energetic extreme ultra-violet (EUV) burst is imaged at the presumed position of fast magnetic reconnection in a plasma jet produced by a coaxial helicity injection source; this EUV burst indicates strong localized electron heating. A circularly polarized high frequency magnetic field perturbation is simultaneously observed at some distance from the reconnection region indicating that the reconnection emits whistler waves and that Hall dynamics likely governs the reconnection. Spectroscopic measurement shows simultaneous fast ion heating. The electron heating is consistent with Ohmic dissipation, while the ion heating is consistent with ion trajectories becoming stochastic.

  15. Microgap ultra-violet detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Bionta, Richard M.

    1994-01-01

    A microgap ultra-violet detector of photons with wavelengths less than 400 run (4000 Angstroms) which comprises an anode and a cathode separated by a gas-filled gap and having an electric field placed across the gap. Either the anode or the cathode is semi-transparent to UV light. Upon a UV photon striking the cathode an electron is expelled and accelerated across the gap by the electric field causing interactions with other electrons to create an electron avalanche which contacts the anode. The electron avalanche is detected and converted to an output pulse.

  16. Microgap ultra-violet detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.

    1994-09-20

    A microgap ultra-violet detector of photons with wavelengths less than 400 run (4,000 Angstroms) which comprises an anode and a cathode separated by a gas-filled gap and having an electric field placed across the gap is disclosed. Either the anode or the cathode is semi-transparent to UV light. Upon a UV photon striking the cathode an electron is expelled and accelerated across the gap by the electric field causing interactions with other electrons to create an electron avalanche which contacts the anode. The electron avalanche is detected and converted to an output pulse. 2 figs.

  17. Electronic states of thiophene/phenylene co-oligomers: Extreme-ultra violet excited photoelectron spectroscopy observations and density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Yoshizo; Sasaki, Fumio; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Ishitsuka, Tomoaki; Tomie, Toshihisa; Ootsuka, Teruhisa; Watanabe, Shuji; Shimoi, Yukihiro; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2013-02-01

    We have investigated electronic states in the valence electron bands for the thin films of three thiophene/phenylene co-oligomer (TPCO) compounds, 2,5-bis(4-biphenylyl)thiophene (BP1T), 1,4-bis(5-phenylthiophen-2-yl)benzene (AC5), and 1,4-bis{5-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]thiophen-2-yl}benzene (AC5-CF3), by using extreme-UV excited photoelectron spectroscopy (EUPS). By comparing both EUPS spectra and secondary electron spectra between AC5 and AC5-CF3, we confirm that CF3 substitution to AC5 deepens valence states by 2 eV, and increases the ionization energy by 3 eV. From the cut-off positions of secondary electron spectra, the work functions of AC5, AC5-CF3, and BP1T are evaluated to be 3.8 eV, 4.8 eV, and 4.0 eV, respectively. We calculate molecular orbital (MO) energy levels by the density functional theory and compare results of calculations with those of experiments. Densities of states obtained by broadening MO levels well explain the overall features of experimental EUPS spectra of three TPCOs.

  18. New Sub-nanometer Spectral Estimates of the 0-5 nm Solar Soft X-Ray Irradiance at Mars Using the Extreme UltraViolet Monitor (EUVM) Onboard MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemann, E.; Eparvier, F. G.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, T. N.; Peterson, W. K.; Mitchell, D. L.; Xu, S.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Extreme UltraViolet Monitor (EUVM) onboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) probe at Mars characterizes the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) input into the Martian atmosphere. EUVM measures solar irradiance at 0-7 nm, 17-22 nm and 121.6 nm at a nominal 1 second cadence. These bands were selected to capture variability originating at different heights in the solar atmosphere; and are used to drive the Flare Irradiance Solar Model at Mars (FISM-M) that is a model of the solar spectrum from 0.1-190 nm with 1 nm resolution and produced routinely as the EUVM Level 3 data product. The 0-5 nm range of the solar spectrum is of particular aeronomic interest because the primary species of the Mars upper atmosphere have Auger transitions in this range. When an Auger transition is excited by incident SXR radiation, secondary electrons are emitted with sufficient energy to further ionize the atmosphere. Because these transitions are highly structured, sub-nm resolution of the solar spectrum is needed in the 0-5 nm range to fully constrain the solar input and more accurately characterize the energetics of the upper atmosphere. At Earth, .1 nm resolution estimates of the solar 0-5 nm range are produced by the X-ray Photometer System (XPS) onboard the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite by combining broad-band SXR measurements with solar flare temperature measurements to drive an atomic physics based forward model of solar coronal emissions. This spectrum has been validated with other models as well as with photo-electron and day glow measurements at Earth. Similar to XPS, the EUVM 0-7 nm and 17-22 nm bands can be used to produce an XPS-like model at Mars, but with reduced precision due to differences in the available bands. We present first results of this technique applied to a set of solar flares observed by MAVEN EUVM and Earth assets. In addition to comparing EUVM and Earth-asset derived 0-5 nm solar spectra to

  19. STEREO's Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    At a pixel resolution of 2048x2048, the STEREO EUVI instrument provides views of the Sun in ultraviolet light that rivals the full-disk views of SOHO/EIT. This image is through the 171 Angstrom (ultraviolet) filter which is characteristic of iron ions (missing eight and nine electrons) at 1 million degrees. There is a short data gap in the latter half of the movie that creates a freeze and then jump in the data view. This is a movie of the Sun in 171 Angstrom ultraviolet light. The time frame is late January, 2007

  20. Can Ultra-violet Mie Lidar Be an Effective Instrument During High Pollution Episode?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiaojun; Wang, Zhangjun; Du, Libin; Cheng, Andrew Yuk Sun; Meng, Xiangqian; Chen, Chao; Li, Xianxin; Liu, Xingtao

    2016-06-01

    Vertical profiles of particulates were measured by a 355 nm Mie scattering lidar during a dust-storm event. A high energy pulse laser was employed as the light source to detect the extinction coefficient in the altitude up to 6 km in the day and 9 km at night. The extinction profiles showed layers of high aerosol concentrations in good agreement with ground-based pollution measurements, which indicated that such ultra-violet lidar is a very useful remote sensing instrument for monitoring extinction profiles during extreme high aerosol loading and low visibility atmospheric conditions when low energy lidar systems cannot obtain effective results.

  1. Tests and calibration on ultra violet imaging telescope (UVIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Ghosh, S. K.; Kamath, P. U.; Postma, Joe; Kathiravan, S.; Mahesh, P. K.; Nagbhushana, S.; Navalgund, K. H.; Rajkumar, N.; Rao, M. N.; Sarma, K. S.; Sriram, S.; Stalin, C. S.; Tandon, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    Ultra Violet Imaging Telescope on ASTROSAT Satellite mission is a suite of Far Ultra Violet (FUV; 130 - 180 nm), Near Ultra Violet (NUV; 200 - 300 nm) and Visible band (VIS; 320-550nm) imagers. ASTROSAT is a first multi wavelength mission of INDIA. UVIT will image the selected regions of the sky simultaneously in three channels & observe young stars, galaxies, bright UV Sources. FOV in each of the 3 channels is ~ 28 arc-minute. Targeted angular resolution in the resulting UV images is better than 1.8 arc-second (better than 2.0 arc-second for the visible channel). Two identical co-aligned telescopes (T1, T2) of Ritchey-Chretien configuration (Primary mirror of ~375 mm diameter) collect the celestial radiation and feed to the detector system via a selectable filter on a filter wheel mechanism; gratings are available in the filter wheels of FUV and NUV channels for slit-less low resolution spectroscopy. The detector system for each of the 3 channels is generically identical. One telescope images in the FUV channel, and other images in NUV and VIS channels. One time open-able mechanical cover on each telescope also works as Sun-shield after deployment. We will present the optical tests and calibrations done on the two telescopes. Results on vibrations test and thermo-vacuum tests on the engineering model will also be presented.

  2. Present Status and Future of EUV (Extreme Ultra Violet) Light Source Research 4.Laser Produced Plasma Light Sources 4.2High Average Power Laser Produced Plasma EUV Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Akira

    This paper reviews the research and development of the high average power, extreme ultraviolet light source based on laser produced plasma by EUVA. The technology is based on a liquid Xe micro jet, high repetition rate short pulse Nd:YAG laser, and various diagnostics for plasma optimization are described.

  3. Polyamide as an efficient sorbent for simultaneous interface-free determination of three Sudan dyes in saffron and urine using high-performance liquid chromatography-ultra violet detection.

    PubMed

    Saeidi, Iman; Barfi, Behruz; Payrovi, Moazameh; Feizy, Javid; Sheibani, Hojat A; Miri, Mina; Ghollasi Moud, Farahnaz

    2015-01-01

    With polyamide (PA) as an efficient sorbent for solid phase extraction (SPE) of Sudan dyes II, III and Red 7B from saffron and urine, their determination by HPLC was performed. The optimum conditions for SPE were achieved using 7 mL methanol/water (1:9, v/v, pH 7) as the washing solvent and 3 mL tetrahydrofuran for elution. Good clean-up and high (above 90%) recoveries were observed for all the analytes. The optimized mobile phase composition for HPLC analysis of these compounds was methanol-water (70:30, v/v). The SPE parameters, such as the maximum loading capacity and breakthrough volume, were also determined for each analyte. The limits of detection (LODs), limits of quantification (LOQs), linear ranges and recoveries for the analytes were 4.6-6.6 microg/L, 13.0-19.8 microg/L, 13.0-5000 microg/L (r2>0.99) and 92.5%-113.4%, respectively. The precisions (RSDs) of the overall analytical procedure, estimated by five replicate measurements for Sudan II, III and Red 7B in saffron and urine samples were 2.3%, 1.8% and 3.6%, respectively. The developed method is simple and successful in the application to the determination of Sudan dyes in saffron and urine samples with HPLC coupled with UV detection. PMID:25958664

  4. Cavity-enhanced frequency doubling from 795nm to 397.5nm ultra-violet coherent radiation with PPKTP crystals in the low pump power regime.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xin; Han, Yashuai; Bai, Jiandong; He, Jun; Wang, Yanhua; Yang, Baodong; Wang, Junmin

    2014-12-29

    We demonstrate a simple, compact and cost-efficient diode laser pumped frequency doubling system at 795 nm in the low power regime. In two configurations, a bow-tie four-mirror ring enhancement cavity with a PPKTP crystal inside and a semi-monolithic PPKTP enhancement cavity, we obtain 397.5nm ultra-violet coherent radiation of 35mW and 47mW respectively with a mode-matched fundamental power of about 110mW, corresponding to a conversion efficiency of 32% and 41%. The low loss semi-monolithic cavity leads to the better results. The constructed ultra-violet coherent radiation has good power stability and beam quality, and the system has huge potential in quantum optics and cold atom physics. PMID:25607194

  5. Investigation of ultra violet (UV) resistance for high strength fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, M. A.; Dingwall, Brenda; Gupta, A.; Seyam, A. M.; Mock, G.; Theyson, T.

    Ultra long duration balloons (ULDB), currently under development by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), requires the use of high strength fibers in the selected super-pressure pumpkin design. The pumpkin shape balloon concept allows clear separation of the load transferring functions of the major structural elements of the pneumatic envelope, the tendons and the film. Essentially, the film provides the gas barrier and transfers only local pressure load to the tendons. The tendons, in the mean time, provide the global pressure containing strength. In that manner, the strength requirement for the film only depends on local parameters. The tendon is made of p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole (PBO) fibers, which is selected due to its high strength to weight ratio when compared to other high performance, commercially available, fibers. High strength fibers, however, are known to degrade upon exposure to light, particularly at short wavelengths. This paper reports the results of an investigation of the resistance of four commercial high strength fibers to ultra violet (UV) exposure. The results indicate that exposing high strength fibers in continuous yarn form to UV led to serious loss in strength of the fibers except for Spectra® fibers. The adverse changes in mechanical behavior occurred over short duration of exposure compared to the 100 day duration targeted for these missions. UV blocking finishes to improve the UV resistance of these fibers are being investigated. The application of these specially formulated coatings is expected to lead to significant improvement of the UV resistance of these high performance fibers. In this publication, we report on the mechanical behavior of the fibers pre- and post-exposure to UV, but without application of the blocking finishes.

  6. Global Ultra-Violet Ionosphere-Thermosphere Observatory (GUVITO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, N.; Crowley, G.; Christensen, A. B.; Paxton, L. J.; Robichaud, J.; Barry, M. A.; Bust, G. S.

    2009-12-01

    UV spectrographic imagers such as SSUSI and GUVI provide measurements of the aurora, ionospheric electron density, ionospheric bubbles, and thermospheric temperature, composition, and density. These imagers have been a key element of the Air Force DMSP program, but to accommodate new satellite concepts and maintain flexibility in the choice of new space systems and launch options, lighter weight and more capable UV instruments are needed to replace the current series of SSUSI sensors. Here we describe a technological alternative to the currently flying SSUSI sensors. It is a spectrographic imaging capability known as the “Global Ultra-Violet Ionosphere-Thermosphere Observatory” (GUVITO) sensor and associated software. GUVITO improves upon current instruments by being smaller in size, weight and power but with improved functionality. The GUVITO sensor represents an upgrade of the SSUSI and GUVI sensors in terms of scan mirror functionality and reliability, sensor functionality, mass, and power requirements. In particular, this improved functionality is expected to lead to enhanced capability in observing ionospheric bubbles, which are thought to cause scintillation and serious technological challenges for communications, navigation and surveillance systems. Initial development and risk reduction activities are currently funded by AFRL through a SBIR Phase II contract. The enhanced reliability and performance of the GUVITO sensor system is achieved with flight heritage components, concepts, software, hardware and is guided by key personnel experienced with both the SSUSI and GUVI hardware, software and operations. GUVITO would meet DoD priority requirements in ionospheric density, scintillation, and satellite drag, meet NPOESS IORD-II requirements for space environment Environmental Data Records (EDRs), maintain current DMSP capability, ensure long-term continuity of space environmental monitoring and leverage new technology development for future operational

  7. World Space Observatory-UltraViolet: International Space Mission for the Nearest Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachkov, M.; Gómez de Castro, A. I.; Pagano, I.; Torres, F.; Zaiko, Y.; Shustov, B.

    2009-03-01

    The World Space Observatory UltraViolet (WSO-UV) project is an international space observatory designed for observations in the ultraviolet domain where some of the most important astrophysical processes can be efficiently studied with unprecedented sensitivity. WSO-UV is a multipurpose observatory, consisting of a 170 cm aperture telescope, capable of high-resolution spectroscopy, long slit low-resolution spectroscopy, and deep UV and optical imaging. With a nominal mission life time of 5 years, and a planned extension to 10 years, from a geosynchronous orbit with an inclination of 51.8 degrees, the WSO-UV will provide observations that are of exceptional importance for the study of many astrophysical problems. WSO-UV is implemented in the framework of a collaboration between Russia (chair), China, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Ukraine. This article is the first of three papers in this proceedings dedicated to the WSO-UV project This paper gives general information on the WSO-UV project and its status.

  8. Fabricating chiral polydiacetylene film by monolayer compression and circularly polarized ultra-violet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Gang; Kohn, Hideki; Ohshima, Yuki; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2007-07-01

    We study polydiacetylene films that are pertinent to the problems of mirror symmetry breaking induced by the effects of compression and circularly polarized ultra-violet (UV) light. The subphase is only pure water. After polymerization, polymerized 10,12-tricosadiynoic acid (PTDA) LB films that deposited at the surface pressure of 20 mN m -1 showed obviously chiral properties, however, no obvious Cotton effect was obtained for PTDA LB films that deposited at the surface pressure of 10 mN m -1. In addition, TDA LB films could be polymerized to a designed chirality by using chiral circular polarized ultra-violet light (CPUL).

  9. Consequences of Ultra-Violet Irradiation on the Mechanical Properties of Spider Silk.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wee Loong; Goh, Kheng Lim

    2015-01-01

    The outstanding combination of high tensile strength and extensibility of spider silk is believed to contribute to the material's toughness. Thus, there is great interest in engineering silk for biomedical products such as suture or implants. Additionally, over the years, many studies have also sought to enhance the mechanical properties of spider silk for wider applicability, e.g., by irradiating the material using ultra-violet radiation. However, the limitations surrounding the use of ultra-violet radiation for enhancing the mechanical properties of spider silk are not well-understood. Here, we have analyzed the mechanical properties of spider silk at short ultra-violet irradiation duration. Specimens of spider silk were subjected to ultra-violet irradiation (254-nm wavelength, i.e. UVC) for 10, 20, and 30 min, respectively, followed by tensile test to rupture to determine the strength (maximum stress), extensibility (rupture strain), and toughness (strain energy density to rupture). Controls, i.e., specimens that did not received UVC, were also subjected to tensile test to rupture to determine the respective mechanical properties. One-way analysis of variance reveals that these properties decrease significantly (p < 0.05) with increasing irradiation duration. Among the three mechanical parameters, the strength of the spider silk degrades most rapidly; the extensibility of the spider silk degrades the slowest. Overall, these changes correspond to the observed surface modifications as well as the bond rupture between the peptide chains of the treated silk. Altogether, this simple but comprehensive study provides some key insights into the dependence of the mechanical properties on ultra-violet irradiation duration. PMID:26378587

  10. Consequences of Ultra-Violet Irradiation on the Mechanical Properties of Spider Silk

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wee Loong; Goh, Kheng Lim

    2015-01-01

    The outstanding combination of high tensile strength and extensibility of spider silk is believed to contribute to the material’s toughness. Thus, there is great interest in engineering silk for biomedical products such as suture or implants. Additionally, over the years, many studies have also sought to enhance the mechanical properties of spider silk for wider applicability, e.g., by irradiating the material using ultra-violet radiation. However, the limitations surrounding the use of ultra-violet radiation for enhancing the mechanical properties of spider silk are not well-understood. Here, we have analyzed the mechanical properties of spider silk at short ultra-violet irradiation duration. Specimens of spider silk were subjected to ultra-violet irradiation (254-nm wavelength, i.e. UVC) for 10, 20, and 30 min, respectively, followed by tensile test to rupture to determine the strength (maximum stress), extensibility (rupture strain), and toughness (strain energy density to rupture). Controls, i.e., specimens that did not received UVC, were also subjected to tensile test to rupture to determine the respective mechanical properties. One-way analysis of variance reveals that these properties decrease significantly (p < 0.05) with increasing irradiation duration. Among the three mechanical parameters, the strength of the spider silk degrades most rapidly; the extensibility of the spider silk degrades the slowest. Overall, these changes correspond to the observed surface modifications as well as the bond rupture between the peptide chains of the treated silk. Altogether, this simple but comprehensive study provides some key insights into the dependence of the mechanical properties on ultra-violet irradiation duration. PMID:26378587

  11. Trend towards low cost, low power, ultra-violet (UV) based biological agent detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sickenberger, David

    2005-11-01

    Ultra-violet fluorescence remains a corner stone technique for the detection of biological agent aerosols. Historically, these UV based detectors have employed relatively costly and power demanding lasers that have influenced the exploitation of the technology to wider use. Recent advancements from the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency's (DARPA) Solid-state Ultra Violet Optical Sources (SUVOS) program has changed this. The UV light emitting diode (LED) devices based on Gallium Nitride offer a unique opportunity to produce small, low power, and inexpensive detectors. It may, in fact, be possible to extend the SUVOS technology into detectors that are potentially disposable. This report will present ongoing efforts to explore this possibility. It will present candidate UV fluorescence based detector designs along with the biological aerosol responses obtained from these designs.

  12. Low-Loss Optical Waveguides for the Near Ultra-Violet and Visible Spectral Regions with Al2O3 Thin Films from Atomic Layer Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Mustafa M.; Webster, Nathan A.; Byard, Courtney L.; Pereira, Marcelo B.; Hayes, Colin M.; Wiederkehr, Rodrigo S.; Mendes, Sergio B.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we report low-loss single-mode integrated optical waveguides in the near ultra-violet and visible spectral regions with aluminum oxide (Al2O3) films using an atomic layer deposition (ALD) process. Alumina films were deposited on glass and fused silica substrates by the ALD process at substrate/chamber temperatures of 200 °C and 300 °C. Transmission spectra and waveguide measurements were performed in our alumina films with thicknesses in the range of 210 – 380 nm for the optical characterization. Those measurements allowed us to determine the optical constants (nw and kw), propagation loss, and thickness of the alumina films. The experimental results from the applied techniques show good agreement and demonstrate a low-loss optical waveguide. Our alumina thin-film waveguides is well transparent in the whole visible spectral region and also in an important region of the UV; the measured propagation loss is below 4 dB/cm down to a wavelength as short as 250 nm. The low propagation loss of these alumina guiding films, in particular in the near ultra-violet region which lacks materials with high optical performance, is extremely useful for several integrated optic applications. PMID:21359156

  13. Oxidation preventative capping layer for deep-ultra-violet and soft x-ray multilayers

    DOEpatents

    Prisbrey, Shon T.

    2004-07-06

    The invention uses iridium and iridium compounds as a protective capping layer on multilayers having reflectivity in the deep ultra-violet to soft x-ray regime. The iridium compounds can be formed in one of two ways: by direct deposition of the iridium compound from a prepared target or by depositing a thin layer (e.g., 5-50 angstroms) of iridium directly onto an element. The deposition energy of the incoming iridium is sufficient to activate the formation of the desired iridium compound. The compounds of most interest are iridium silicide (IrSi.sub.x) and iridium molybdenide (IrMo.sub.x).

  14. An analysis on effecting factors of ultra-violet imaging appliance in corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao; Yang, Ning; Yuan, Shuai; Bi, Jiangang

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the operating principle of daylight UV imagers was introduced first, emphasizing the SBUV(solar blind UV) technology, which utilizes the fact that ultra violet between 240nm~280nm is being absorbed by the ozone so that signals detected on earth in this spectral range originate on earth. And then several influencing factors were explained, including observation distance, observing angle, imager gain settings and environmental conditions. Experimental data measured in the UHV(ultra high-voltage) DC converter station in Changzhi, Shanxi, China were analyzed using SRA(single regression analysis) method, and mathematical equations with acceptable deviation were calculated, with simulating curves plotted. The results show that environmental conditions including humidity and temperature, observation distance and imager gain settings all contribute to the measuring result, exhibiting as exponential function and convex function respectively. Concluded from the above analysis and calculation, observing conditions of a clear observing angle at the same observation distance with mediate gain settings on days of low humidity were recommended. This conclusion may guide further ultra-violet imaging appliance in high-voltage electrical devices corona discharge sensing.

  15. Bias Selectable Dual Band AlGaN Ultra-violet Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Feng; Miko, Laddawan; Franz, David; Guan, Bing; Stahle, Carl M.

    2007-01-01

    Bias selectable dual band AlGaN ultra-violet (UV) detectors, which can separate UV-A and UV-B using one detector in the same pixel by bias switching, have been designed, fabricated and characterized. A two-terminal n-p-n photo-transistor-like structure was used. When a forward bias is applied between the top electrode and the bottom electrode, the detectors can successfully detect W-A and reject UV-B. Under reverse bias, they can detect UV-B and reject UV-A. The proof of concept design shows that it is feasible to fabricate high performance dual-band UV detectors based on the current AlGaN material growth and fabrication technologies.

  16. Detection of biological warfare agents using ultra violet-laser induced fluorescence LIDAR.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Deepti; Kumar, Deepak; Maini, Anil K; Sharma, Ramesh C

    2013-08-01

    This review has been written to highlight the threat of biological warfare agents, their types and detection. Bacterial biological agent Bacillus anthracis (bacteria causing the disease anthrax) which is most likely to be employed in biological warfare is being discussed in detail. Standoff detection of biological warfare agents in aerosol form using Ultra violet-Laser Induced Fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectroscopy method has been studied. Range-resolved detection and identification of biological aerosols by both nano-second and non-linear femto-second LIDAR is also discussed. Calculated received fluorescence signal for a cloud of typical biological agent Bacillus globigii (Simulants of B. anthracis) at a location of ~5.0 km at different concentrations in presence of solar background radiation has been described. Overview of current research efforts in internationally available working UV-LIF LIDAR systems are also mentioned briefly. PMID:23719340

  17. Detection of biological warfare agents using ultra violet-laser induced fluorescence LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Deepti; Kumar, Deepak; Maini, Anil K.; Sharma, Ramesh C.

    This review has been written to highlight the threat of biological warfare agents, their types and detection. Bacterial biological agent Bacillus anthracis (bacteria causing the disease anthrax) which is most likely to be employed in biological warfare is being discussed in detail. Standoff detection of biological warfare agents in aerosol form using Ultra violet-Laser Induced Fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectroscopy method has been studied. Range-resolved detection and identification of biological aerosols by both nano-second and non-linear femto-second LIDAR is also discussed. Calculated received fluorescence signal for a cloud of typical biological agent Bacillus globigii (Simulants of B. anthracis) at a location of ˜5.0 km at different concentrations in presence of solar background radiation has been described. Overview of current research efforts in internationally available working UV-LIF LIDAR systems are also mentioned briefly.

  18. Effect of Montmorillonite Modification on Ultra Violet Radiation Cured Nanocomposite Filled with Glycidyl Methacrylate Modified Kenaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozyanty, A. R.; Rozman, H. D.; Zhafer, S. F.; Musa, L.; Zuliahani, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this study nanocomposite cured by ultra violet radiation, were produced using modified montmorillonite (MMT) as reinforcing agent, chemically modified kenaf bast fiber as filler and unsaturated polyester as the matrix. Kenaf bast fiber was chemically modified with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) whilst MMT were modified with cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). Fixed 12 percent of GMA modified kenaf bast fiber with different percentage (i.e., 1, 3 and 5) of unmodified and modified MMT loading was used to produce the composite. The performed of GMA reaction with hydroxyl group of cellulose in kenaf bast fiber was evaluated using Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. GMA-MMT filled composite showed higher mechanical properties than MMT and CTAB-MMT filled composite. However, the increase of MMT, CTAB-MMT and GMA- MMT loading resulted in the reduction of mechanical properties. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed the evidence of compatibility enhancement between MMT and kenaf bast fiber with unsaturated polyester matrix.

  19. Ultra-violet and visible absorption characterization of explosives by differential reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Dubroca, Thierry; Moyant, Kyle; Hummel, Rolf E

    2013-03-15

    This study presents some optical properties of TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene), RDX, HMX and tetryl, specifically their absorption spectra as a function of concentration in various solvents in the ultraviolet and visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. We utilize a standoff explosives detection method, called differential reflectometry (DR). TNT was diluted in six different solvents (acetone, acetonitrile, ethanol, ethyl acetate, methanol, and toluene), which allowed for a direct comparison of absorption features over a wide range of concentrations. A line-shape analysis was adopted with great accuracy (R(2)>0.99) to model the absorption features of TNT in differential reflectivity spectra. We observed a blue shift in the pertinent absorption band with decreasing TNT concentration for all solvents. Moreover, using this technique, it was found that for all utilized solvents the concentration of TNT as well as of RDX, HMX, and tetryl, measured as a function of the transition wavelength of the ultra-violet absorption edge in differential reflectivity spectra shows three distinct regions. A model is presented to explain this behavior which is based on intermolecular hydrogen bonding of explosives molecules with themselves (or lack thereof) at different concentrations. Other intermolecular forces such as dipole-dipole interactions, London dispersion forces and π-stacking contribute to slight variations in the resulting spectra, which were determined to be rather insignificant in comparison to hydrogen bonding. The results are aimed towards a better understanding of the DR spectra of explosives energetic materials. PMID:23299022

  20. Ultra-violet and visible absorption characterization of explosives by differential reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubroca, Thierry; Moyant, Kyle; Hummel, Rolf E.

    2013-03-01

    This study presents some optical properties of TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene), RDX, HMX and tetryl, specifically their absorption spectra as a function of concentration in various solvents in the ultraviolet and visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. We utilize a standoff explosives detection method, called differential reflectometry (DR). TNT was diluted in six different solvents (acetone, acetonitrile, ethanol, ethyl acetate, methanol, and toluene), which allowed for a direct comparison of absorption features over a wide range of concentrations. A line-shape analysis was adopted with great accuracy (R2 > 0.99) to model the absorption features of TNT in differential reflectivity spectra. We observed a blue shift in the pertinent absorption band with decreasing TNT concentration for all solvents. Moreover, using this technique, it was found that for all utilized solvents the concentration of TNT as well as of RDX, HMX, and tetryl, measured as a function of the transition wavelength of the ultra-violet absorption edge in differential reflectivity spectra shows three distinct regions. A model is presented to explain this behavior which is based on intermolecular hydrogen bonding of explosives molecules with themselves (or lack thereof) at different concentrations. Other intermolecular forces such as dipole-dipole interactions, London dispersion forces and π-stacking contribute to slight variations in the resulting spectra, which were determined to be rather insignificant in comparison to hydrogen bonding. The results are aimed towards a better understanding of the DR spectra of explosives energetic materials.

  1. Buried graphene electrodes on GaN-based ultra-violet light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byung-Jae; Lee, Chongmin; Mastro, Michael A.; Hite, Jennifer K.; Eddy, Charles R.; Ren, Fan; Pearton, Stephen J.; Kim, Jihyun

    2012-07-01

    We report that the oxidation of graphene-based highly transparent conductive layers to AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN ultra-violet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) was suppressed by the use of SiNX passivation layers. Although graphene is considered to be an ideal candidate as the transparent conductive layer to UV-LEDs, oxidation of these layers at high operating temperatures has been an issue. The oxidation is initiated at the un-saturated carbon atoms at the edges of the graphene and reduces the UV light intensity and degrades the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. The oxidation also can occur at defects, including vacancies. However, GaN-based UV-LEDs deposited with SiNX by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition showed minimal degradation of light output intensity and I-V characteristics because the graphene-based UV transparent conductive layers were shielded from the oxygen molecules. This is a simple and effective approach for maintaining the advantages of graphene conducting layers as electrodes on UV-LEDs.

  2. Sub-50 nm metrology on extreme ultra violet chemically amplified resist—A systematic assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, D. J.; Fliervoet, T.; Herfst, R.; van Veldhoven, E.; Meessen, J.; Vaenkatesan, V.; Sadeghian, H.

    2015-10-01

    With lithographic patterning dimensions decreasing well below 50 nm, it is of high importance to understand metrology at such small scales. This paper presents results obtained from dense arrays of contact holes (CHs) with various Critical Dimension (CD) between 15 and 50 nm, as patterned in a chemically amplified resist using an ASML EUV scanner and measured at ASML and TNO. To determine the differences between various (local) CD metrology techniques, we conducted an experiment using optical scatterometry, CD-Scanning Electron Microscopy (CD-SEM), Helium ion Microscopy (HIM), and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). CD-SEM requires advanced beam scan strategies to mitigate sample charging; the other tools did not need that. We discuss the observed main similarities and differences between the various techniques. To this end, we assessed the spatial frequency content in the raw images for SEM, HIM, and AFM. HIM and AFM resolve the highest spatial frequencies, which are attributed to the more localized probe-sample interaction for these techniques. Furthermore, the SEM, HIM, and AFM waveforms are analyzed in detail. All techniques show good mutual correlation, albeit the reported CD values systematically differ significantly. HIM systematically reports a 25% higher CD uniformity number than CD-SEM for the same arrays of CHs, probably because HIM has a higher resolution than the CD-SEM used in this assessment. A significant speed boost for HIM and AFM is required before these techniques are to serve the demanding industrial metrology applications like optical critical dimension and CD-SEM do nowadays.

  3. Sub-50 nm metrology on extreme ultra violet chemically amplified resist—A systematic assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Maas, D. J. Herfst, R.; Veldhoven, E. van; Fliervoet, T.; Meessen, J.; Vaenkatesan, V.; Sadeghian, H.

    2015-10-15

    With lithographic patterning dimensions decreasing well below 50 nm, it is of high importance to understand metrology at such small scales. This paper presents results obtained from dense arrays of contact holes (CHs) with various Critical Dimension (CD) between 15 and 50 nm, as patterned in a chemically amplified resist using an ASML EUV scanner and measured at ASML and TNO. To determine the differences between various (local) CD metrology techniques, we conducted an experiment using optical scatterometry, CD-Scanning Electron Microscopy (CD-SEM), Helium ion Microscopy (HIM), and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). CD-SEM requires advanced beam scan strategies to mitigate sample charging; the other tools did not need that. We discuss the observed main similarities and differences between the various techniques. To this end, we assessed the spatial frequency content in the raw images for SEM, HIM, and AFM. HIM and AFM resolve the highest spatial frequencies, which are attributed to the more localized probe-sample interaction for these techniques. Furthermore, the SEM, HIM, and AFM waveforms are analyzed in detail. All techniques show good mutual correlation, albeit the reported CD values systematically differ significantly. HIM systematically reports a 25% higher CD uniformity number than CD-SEM for the same arrays of CHs, probably because HIM has a higher resolution than the CD-SEM used in this assessment. A significant speed boost for HIM and AFM is required before these techniques are to serve the demanding industrial metrology applications like optical critical dimension and CD-SEM do nowadays.

  4. Two Types of Aurora on Mars as Observed by MAVEN's Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N. M.; Deighan, J.; Jain, S.; Stiepen, A.; Stewart, I. F.; Larson, D. E.; Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C. X.; Lee, C.; Lillis, R. J.; Evans, J. S.; Brain, D. A.; Stevens, M. H.; McClintock, W. E.; Chaffin, M.; Crismani, M. M. J.; Holsclaw, G. M.; Lefèvre, F.; Lo, D.; Clarke, J. T.; Montmessin, F.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph (IUVS) on the MAVEN spacecraft has detected two distinct types of auroral emission on Mars. First, we report the discovery of a low altitude, diffuse aurora spanning much of Mars' northern hemisphere coincident with a solar energetic particle outburst. IUVS observed northerly latitudes during late December 2014, detecting auroral emission in virtually all nightside observations for ~5 days spanning virtually all geographic longitudes. The vertical profile showed emission down to ~70 km altitude (1 microbar), deeper than confirmed at any other planet. The onset and duration of emission coincide with the observed arrival of solar energetic particles up to 200 keV precipitating directly and deeply into the atmosphere. Preliminary modeling of the precipitation, energy deposition and spectral line emission yields good matches to the observations. These observations represent a new class of planetary auroras produced in the Martian middle atmosphere. Given minimal magnetic fields over most of the planet, Mars is likely to exhibit aurora more globally than Earth. Second, we confirm the existence of small patches of discrete aurora near crustal magnetic fields in Mars' southern hemisphere, as observed previously by SPICAM on Mars Express (Bertaux et al., Nature, 435, 790-794 (2005)). IUVS observed southern latitudes in July and August 2015, detecting discrete auroral emission in ~1% of suitable observations. Limb scans resolved both vertically and along-slit indicate this type of auroral emission was patchy on the scale of ~40 km, and located at higher altitudes ~140 km. The higher altitudes imply a lower energy of precipitating particles. The mix of spectral emissions also differed signficiantly from the discrete aurora, indicating different excitation and quenching processes. We will discuss the observed properties of the aurora and associated charged particle precipitation, as well as the broader implications of this high

  5. Two Types of Aurora on Mars as Observed by MAVEN's Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Nicholas M.; Deighan, J.; Jain, S. K.; Stiepen, A.; Larson, D.; Mitchell, D. L.; Lee, C. O.; Lillis, R.; Brain, D.; McClintock, W. E.; Chaffin, M. S.; Crismani, M.; Holsclaw, G. M.; Jakosky, B. M.; Mazelle, C.; Evans, J. S.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Stevens, M. H.; Clarke, J. T.; Montmessin, F.; Lefevre, F.; Lo, D.

    2015-11-01

    The Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph (IUVS) on the MAVEN spacecraft has detected two distinct types of auroral emission on Mars. First, we report the discovery of a low altitude, diffuse aurora spanning much of Mars’ northern hemisphere coincident with a solar energetic particle outburst. IUVS observed northerly latitudes during late December 2014, detecting auroral emission in virtually all nightside observations for ~5 days spanning virtually all geographic longitudes. The vertical profile showed emission down to ~70 km altitude (1 microbar), deeper than confirmed at any other planet. The onset and duration of emission coincide with the observed arrival of solar energetic particles up to 200 keV precipitating directly and deeply into the atmosphere. Preliminary modeling of the precipitation, energy deposition and spectral line emission yields good matches to the observations. These observations represent a new class of planetary auroras produced in the Martian middle atmosphere. Given minimal magnetic fields over most of the planet, Mars is likely to exhibit aurora more globally than Earth.Second, we confirm the existence of small patches of discrete aurora near crustal magnetic fields in Mars' southern hemisphere, as observed previously by SPICAM on Mars Express (Bertaux et al., Nature, 435, 790-794 (2005)). IUVS observed southern latitudes in July and August 2015, detecting discrete auroral emission in ~1% of suitable observations. Limb scans resolved both vertically and along-slit indicate this type of auroral emission was patchy on the scale of ~40 km, and located at higher altitudes ~140 km. The higher altitudes imply a lower energy of precipitating particles. The mix of spectral emissions also differed signficiantly from the diffuse aurora, indicating different excitation and quenching processes.We will discuss the observed properties of the aurora and associated charged particle precipitation, as well as the broader implications of this high

  6. Boron nitride stamp for ultra-violet nanoimprinting lithography fabricated by focused ion beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Altun, Ali Ozhan; Jeong, Jun-Ho; Rha, Jong-Joo; Kim, Ki-Don; Lee, Eung-Sug

    2007-11-21

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN) is one of the hardest known materials (second after diamond). It has a high level of chemical resistance and high UV transmittance. In this study, a stamp for ultra-violet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) was fabricated using a bi-layered BN film deposited on a quartz substrate. Deposition of the BN was done using RF magnetron sputtering. A hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) layer was deposited for 30 min before c-BN was deposited for 30 min. The thickness of the film was measured as 160 nm. The phase of the c-BN layer was investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, and it was found that the c-BN layer has a 40% cubic phase. The deposited film was patterned using focused ion beam (FIB) lithography for use as a UV-NIL stamp. Line patterns were fabricated with the line width and line distance set at 150 and 150 nm, respectively. The patterning process was performed by applying different currents to observe the effect of the current value on the pattern profile. The fabricated patterns were investigated using AFM, and it was found that the pattern fabricated by applying a current value of 50 picoamperes (pA) has a better profile with a 65 nm line depth. The UV transmittance of the 160 nm thick film was measured to be 70-86%. The hardness and modulus of the BN was measured to be 12 and 150 GPa, respectively. The water contact angle of the stamp surface was measured at 75°. The stamp was applied to UV-NIL without coating with an anti-adhesion layer. Successful imprinting was proved via scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the imprinted resin. PMID:21730473

  7. Measuring SO2 ship emissions with an ultra-violet imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prata, A. J.

    2013-11-01

    Over the last few years fast-sampling ultra-violet (UV) imaging cameras have been developed for use in measuring SO2 emissions from industrial sources (e.g. power plants; typical fluxes ~1-10 kg s-1) and natural sources (e.g. volcanoes; typical fluxes ~10-100 kg s-1). Generally, measurements have been made from sources rich in SO2 with high concentrations and fluxes. In this work, for the first time, a UV camera has been used to measure the much lower concentrations and fluxes of SO2 (typical fluxes ~0.01-0.1 kg s-1) in the plumes from moving and stationary ships. Some innovations and trade-offs have been made so that estimates of the fluxes and path concentrations can be retrieved in real-time. Field experiments were conducted at Kongsfjord in Ny Ålesund, Svalbard, where emissions from cruise ships were made, and at the port of Rotterdam, Netherlands, measuring emissions from more than 10 different container and cargo ships. In all cases SO2 path concentrations could be estimated and fluxes determined by measuring ship plume speeds simultaneously using the camera, or by using surface wind speed data from an independent source. Accuracies were compromised in some cases because of the presence of particulates in some ship emissions and the restriction of single-filter UV imagery, a requirement for fast-sampling (>10 Hz) from a single camera. Typical accuracies ranged from 10-30% in path concentration and 10-40% in flux estimation. Despite the ease of use and ability to determine SO2 fluxes from the UV camera system, the limitation in accuracy and precision suggest that the system may only be used under rather ideal circumstances and that currently the technology needs further development to serve as a method to monitor ship emissions for regulatory purposes.

  8. Parametric Evaluation of an Innovative Ultra-Violet PhotocatalyticOxidation (UVPCO) Air Cleaning Technology for Indoor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2005-10-31

    An innovative Ultra-Violet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaning technology employing a semitransparent catalyst coated on a semitransparent polymer substrate was evaluated to determine its effectiveness for treating mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) representative of indoor environments at low, indoor-relevant concentration levels. The experimental UVPCO contained four 30 by 30-cm honeycomb monoliths irradiated with nine UVA lamps arranged in three banks. A parametric evaluation of the effects of monolith thickness, air flow rate through the device, UV power, and reactant concentrations in inlet air was conducted for the purpose of suggesting design improvements. The UVPCO was challenged with three mixtures of VOCs. A synthetic office mixture contained 27 VOCs commonly measured in office buildings. A building product mixture was created by combining sources including painted wallboard, composite wood products, carpet systems, and vinyl flooring. The third mixture contained formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Steady state concentrations were produced in a classroom laboratory or a 20-m{sup 3} chamber. Air was drawn through the UVPCO, and single-pass conversion efficiencies were measured from replicate samples collected upstream and downstream of the reactor. Thirteen experiments were conducted in total. In this UVPCO employing a semitransparent monolith design, an increase in monolith thickness is expected to result in general increases in both reaction efficiencies and absolute reaction rates for VOCs oxidized by photocatalysis. The thickness of individual monolith panels was varied between 1.2 and 5 cm (5 to 20 cm total thickness) in experiments with the office mixture. VOC reaction efficiencies and rates increased with monolith thickness. However, the analysis of the relationship was confounded by high reaction efficiencies in all configurations for a number of compounds. These reaction efficiencies approached or exceeded 90% for alcohols, glycol

  9. Vacuum ultra-violet emission of plasma discharges with high Xe partial pressure using a cathode protective layer with high secondary electron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Di; Song, Le; Zhang, Xiong; Kajiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-02-14

    In this work, the mechanism of the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) emission of plasma discharges, with high Xe partial pressure and high ion-induced secondary electrons emission protective layer, is studied by measuring the VUV light emission directly and comparing it with two-dimensional simulations. From the panel measurement, we find that the high intensity of excimer VUV mainly contributes to the high luminous efficacy of SrCaO-plasma display panels (PDP) at a low sustain voltage. The unchanged Xe excitation efficiency indicates that the electron temperature is not decreased by the high secondary electrons emission protective layer, even though the sustain voltage is much lower. From the two-dimensional simulations, we can find that the ratio of excimer VUV to resonant VUV, which is determined by the collision rate in the discharge, is only significantly affected by the Xe partial pressure, while it is independent of the sustain voltage and the secondary-electrons-emission capability of protective layer. The unchanged average electron energy at the moment when the electric field becomes maximum confirms that the improvement of the VUV production efficiency mainly is attributed to the increase in electron heating efficiency of a PDP with high ion-induced secondary electrons emission protective layer. Combining the experimental and the simulation results, we conclude about the mechanism by which the VUV production is improved for the plasma display panel with a high Xe partial pressure and a cold cathode with high ion-induced secondary electrons emission.

  10. Fabrication of SnO2-Reduced Graphite Oxide Monolayer-Ordered Porous Film Gas Sensor with Tunable Sensitivity through Ultra-Violet Light Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shipu; Sun, Fengqiang; Yang, Shumin; Pan, Zizhao; Long, Jinfeng; Gu, Fenglong

    2015-01-01

    A new graphene-based composite structure, monolayer-ordered macroporous film composed of a layer of orderly arranged macropores, was reported. As an example, SnO2-reduced graphite oxide monolayer-ordered macroporous film was fabricated on a ceramic tube substrate under the irradiation of ultra-violet light (UV), by taking the latex microsphere two-dimensional colloid crystal as a template. Graphite oxide sheets dispersed in SnSO4 aqueous solution exhibited excellent affinity with template microspheres and were in situ incorporated into the pore walls during UV-induced growth of SnO2. The growing and the as-formed SnO2, just like other photocatalytic semiconductor, could be excited to produce electrons and holes under UV irradiation. Electrons reduced GO and holes adsorbed corresponding negative ions, which changed the properties of the composite film. This film was directly used as gas-sensor and was able to display high sensitivity in detecting ethanol gas. More interestingly, on the basis of SnO2-induced photochemical behaviours, this sensor demonstrated tunable sensitivity when UV irradiation time was controlled during the fabrication process and post in water, respectively. This study provides efficient ways of conducting the in situ fabrication of a semiconductor-reduced graphite oxide film device with uniform surface structure and controllable properties. PMID:25758292

  11. Ultra-Violet Light Treatment Lowers Numbers of Listeria monocytogenes on Raw Chicken Fillets without Changing Antibiotic Resistance or Meat Color

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen and raw poultry meat has been shown to be a vector for its entrance into a poultry further-processing plant. Reduction of L. monocytogenes in these plants is a high priority for the industry. Ultra-violet (UV) light at a wavelength of 254 n...

  12. Driving Extreme Efficiency to Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbesi, Karina

    2014-03-01

    The rapid development of extremely energy efficient appliances and equipment is essential to curtail catastrophic climate disruption. This will require the on-going development of products that apply all best-practices and that take advantage of the synergies of hybridization and building integration. Beyond that, it requires the development of new disruptive technologies and concepts. To facilitate these goals, in 2011 the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy launched the Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition for Ultra-Low-Energy-Use Appliances and Equipment. Now in its third year, the competition supports faculty-lead student design teams at U.S. universities to develop and test new technology prototypes. This talk describes what the competition and the Max Tech Program are doing to drive such rapid technology progress and to facilitate the entry to the market of successful Max Tech prototypes. The talk also initiates a discussion of physicists' unique role in driving that technology progress faster and farther. Emerging Technologies, Building Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. Microextraction by packed sorbent-high-pressure liquid chromatographic-ultra violet analysis of endocrine disruptor pesticides in various matrices.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manpreet; Rani, Susheela; Malik, Ashok Kumar; Aulakh, Jatinder Singh

    2014-10-01

    Microextraction by a packed sorbent (MEPS) is the miniaturized version of solid-phase extraction whereby sample volumes as small as 10 μL can be used. A syringe (100-250 μL) is used in MEPS technique, which generally contains 4 mg of solid packing material inserted as a plug. The sample preparation occurs on the surface of this bed which can be modified to provide varied sampling conditions. In the present work, MEPS has been employed as a sample preparation technique for the analysis of endocrine disruptor (ED) and suspected ED pesticides in biological and environmental samples. The pesticides aldicarb, dimethoate, propazine and terbutryn have been successfully separated by high performance liquid chromatography-ultra violet (HPLC-UV) system with acetonitrile/water as the mobile phase in the ratio 60/40. Several factors affecting the performance of MEPS technique such as the number of extraction cycles, type of washing and elution solvent were optimized. This method has been applied to the analysis of these pesticides in urine, soil and tap water samples with good recoveries in the range of 81.4-97.8%. The detection limit ranged between 0.05 and 0.6 ng mL for the analyzed pesticides. PMID:24046162

  14. The effects of welding parameters on ultra-violet light emissions, ozone and CrVI formation in MIG welding.

    PubMed

    Dennis, J H; Mortazavi, S B; French, M J; Hewitt, P J; Redding, C R

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the relationships between ultra-violet emission, ozone generation and CrVI production in MIG welding which were measured as a function of shield gas flow rate, welding voltage, electrode stick-out and shield gas composition using an automatic welding rig that permitted MIG welding under reproducible conditions. The experimental results are interpreted in terms of the physico-chemical processes occurring in the micro- and macro-environments of the arc as part of research into process modification to reduce occupational exposure to ozone and CrVI production rates in MIG welding. We believe the techniques described here, and in particular the use of what we have termed u.v.-ozone measurements, will prove useful in further study of ozone generation and CrVI formation and may be applied in the investigation of engineering control of occupational exposure in MIG and other welding process such as Manual Metal Arc (MMA) and Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG). PMID:9072953

  15. Vacuum ultra-violet damage and damage mitigation for plasma processing of highly porous organosilicate glass dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Marneffe, J.-F.; Zhang, L.; Heyne, M.; Lukaszewicz, M.; Porter, S. B.; Vajda, F.; Rutigliani, V.; el Otell, Z.; Krishtab, M.; Goodyear, A.; Cooke, M.; Verdonck, P.; Baklanov, M. R.

    2015-10-01

    Porous organosilicate glass thin films, with k-value 2.0, were exposed to 147 nm vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) photons emitted in a Xenon capacitive coupled plasma discharge. Strong methyl bond depletion was observed, concomitant with a significant increase of the bulk dielectric constant. This indicates that, besides reactive radical diffusion, photons emitted during plasma processing do impede dielectric properties and therefore need to be tackled appropriately during patterning and integration. The detrimental effect of VUV irradiation can be partly suppressed by stuffing the low-k porous matrix with proper sacrificial polymers showing high VUV absorption together with good thermal and VUV stability. In addition, the choice of an appropriate hard-mask, showing high VUV absorption, can minimize VUV damage. Particular processing conditions allow to minimize the fluence of photons to the substrate and lead to negligible VUV damage. For patterned structures, in order to reduce VUV damage in the bulk and on feature sidewalls, the combination of both pore stuffing/material densification and absorbing hard-mask is recommended, and/or the use of low VUV-emitting plasma discharge.

  16. Ultra-violet Sensing Characteristic and Field Emission Properties of Vertically Aligned Aluminum Doped Zinc Oxide Nanorod Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Mamat, M. H.; Malek, M. F.; Musa, M. Z.; Khusaimi, Z.; Rusop, M.

    2011-05-25

    Ultra-violet (UV) sensing behavior and field emission characteristic have been investigated on vertically aligned aluminum (Al) doped zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod arrays prepared using sol-gel immersion method. Uniform and high coverage density of ZnO nanorod arrays have been successfully deposited on seeded-catalyst coated substrates. The synthesized nanorods have diameter sizes between 50 nm to 150 nm. The XRD spectra show Al doped ZnO nanorod array has high crystallinity properties with the dominancy of crystal growth along (002) plane or c-axis. UV photoresponse measurement indicates that Al doped ZnO nanorod array sensitively detects UV light as shown by conductance increment after UV illumination exposure. The nanorod array shows good field emission properties with low turn on field and threshold field at 2.1 V/{mu}m and 5.6 V/{mu}m, respectively. The result suggested that Al doped ZnO nanorod arrays prepared by low-cost sol-gel immersion method show promising result towards fabrication of multi applications especially in UV photoconductive sensor and field emission displays.

  17. Vacuum ultra-violet damage and damage mitigation for plasma processing of highly porous organosilicate glass dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Marneffe, J.-F. de Lukaszewicz, M.; Porter, S. B.; Vajda, F.; Rutigliani, V.; Verdonck, P.; Baklanov, M. R.; Zhang, L.; Heyne, M.; El Otell, Z.; Krishtab, M.; Goodyear, A.; Cooke, M.

    2015-10-07

    Porous organosilicate glass thin films, with k-value 2.0, were exposed to 147 nm vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) photons emitted in a Xenon capacitive coupled plasma discharge. Strong methyl bond depletion was observed, concomitant with a significant increase of the bulk dielectric constant. This indicates that, besides reactive radical diffusion, photons emitted during plasma processing do impede dielectric properties and therefore need to be tackled appropriately during patterning and integration. The detrimental effect of VUV irradiation can be partly suppressed by stuffing the low-k porous matrix with proper sacrificial polymers showing high VUV absorption together with good thermal and VUV stability. In addition, the choice of an appropriate hard-mask, showing high VUV absorption, can minimize VUV damage. Particular processing conditions allow to minimize the fluence of photons to the substrate and lead to negligible VUV damage. For patterned structures, in order to reduce VUV damage in the bulk and on feature sidewalls, the combination of both pore stuffing/material densification and absorbing hard-mask is recommended, and/or the use of low VUV-emitting plasma discharge.

  18. Durable silver mirror with ultra-violet thru far infra-red reflection

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, Jesse D.

    2010-11-23

    A durable highly reflective silver mirror characterized by high reflectance in a broad spectral range of about 300 nm in the UV to the far infrared (.about.10000 nm), as well as exceptional environmental durability. A high absorptivity metal underlayer is used which prevents the formation of a galvanic cell with a silver layer while increasing the reflectance of the silver layer. Environmentally durable overcoat layers are provided to enhance mechanical and chemical durability and protect the silver layer from corrosion and tarnishing, for use in a wide variety of surroundings or climates, including harsh or extreme environments.

  19. Transmission imaging of sodium in the vacuum ultra-violet spectral range: new application for an intense VUV source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daido, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Yoji; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Fukuda, Takeshi; Nakagiri, Toshio; Kaku, Masanori; Kubodera, Shoichi; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.

    2013-09-01

    Metallic sodium (Na) was proposed as a transparent material in the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) spectral range in 1930s and in 1960s. However no clear transmission has ever been demonstrated. In this paper we describe firstly the direct measurement of actual transmittance of a sodium samples in a spectral range longer than 115 nm which corresponds to the shortest transmission wavelength of magnesium fluoride (MgF2) windows, resulting in several tens of % transmittance of a 3 mm-thick solid sodium sample including MgF2 windows at the wavelength of ~120 nm. We also find very weak temperature dependency of the transmittance up to 150 degrees centigrade where the solid sample is melted at 97 degrees. The measured transmittance pushes us to make a simple imaging experiment illuminated by the VUV light through a 2-mm thick sodium sample, resulting in obtaining a clear image composed of 100 μm diameter tungsten mesh recorded on a two dimensional Charge Coupled Device detector. The result also opens a way to construct an optical imaging device for objects inside or through a solid or a liquid sodium medium. According to the present experiment, we can make a continuous real time transmission imaging for a liquid sodium sample if we use proper optical setup including an intense continuous VUV source or high repetition rated intense coherent source for holographic data acquisition. Such an experiment opens up a way to perform transmission imaging through or inside a sodium medium for characterization of hydrodynamic and material properties.

  20. Specific ultra-violet absorbance as an indicator measurement of merucry sources in an Adirondack River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.; Aiken, George R.; Bradley, Paul M.; Journey, Celeste A.; Schelker, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    The Adirondack region of New York has been identified as a hot spot where high methylmercury concentrations are found in surface waters and biota, yet mercury (Hg) concentrations vary widely in this region. We collected stream and groundwater samples for Hg and organic carbon analyses across the upper Hudson River, a 493 km2 basin in the central Adirondacks to evaluate and model the sources of variation in filtered total Hg (FTHg) concentrations. Variability in FTHg concentrations during the growing seasons (May-Oct) of 2007-2009 in Fishing Brook, a 66-km2 sub-basin, was better explained by specific ultra-violet absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA254), a measure of organic carbon aromaticity, than by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations, a commonly used Hg indicator. SUVA254 was a stronger predictor of FTHg concentrations during the growing season than during the dormant season. Multiple linear regression models that included SUVA254 values and DOC concentrations could explain 75 % of the variation in FTHg concentrations on an annual basis and 84 % during the growing season. A multiple linear regression landscape modeling approach applied to 27 synoptic sites across the upper Hudson basin found that higher SUVA254 values are associated with gentler slopes, and greater riparian area, and lower SUVA254 values are associated with an increasing influence of open water. We hypothesize that the strong Hg?SUVA254 relation in this basin reflects distinct patterns of FTHg and SUVA254 that are characteristic of source areas that control the mobilization of Hg to surface waters, and that the seasonal influence of these source areas varies in this heterogeneous basin landscape.

  1. Evaluating sanitization of toothbrushes using ultra violet rays and 0.2% chlorhexidine solution: A comparative clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, Poonam; Hongal, Sudheer; Saxena, Vrinda; Jain, Manish; Rana, Kuldeep; Ganavadiya, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Toothbrushes may play a significant role in plaque control. Toothbrushes should be correctly stored, disinfected and changed at regular intervals. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX) gluconate solution and ultra violet (UV) toothbrush-sanitizer for toothbrush disinfection. Materials and Methods: Fresh tooth brushes were distributed to fifteen study subjects, who were selected randomly and who met the study criteria. All the study participants were asked to brush their teeth with the tooth brush provided. No special instructions were given regarding the brushing techniques. Toothbrushes were collected after 7 days. All tooth brushes were randomly allocated to three groups. Tooth brushes were subjected to microbial analysis and total bacterial count was assessed. Tooth brushes allocated to Group I were soaked in 2% CHX mouthwash for 12 h, Group II were kept in UV-light toothbrush holder for 7 min, and Group III were soaked in normal saline for 12 h. All the toothbrushes were subjected for microbial analysis and mean bacterial count was determined. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between mean colony-forming unit count pre-sanitization and post-sanitization in all the groups, using 0.2% CHX gluconate, UV rays and normal saline (P < 0.007). However, the mean bacterial count reduced drastically after the treatment with UV rays (P = 0.001). Conclusions: CHX, UV rays and normal saline are effective in a reduction of bacterial count on toothbrushes. UV rays treatment was more effective, when compared to CHX and normal saline. PMID:25538466

  2. A preliminary estimate of the EUVE cumulative distribution of exposure time on the unit sphere. [Extreme Ultra-Violet Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, C. C. H.

    1984-01-01

    A preliminary study of an all-sky coverage of the EUVE mission is given. Algorithms are provided to compute the exposure of the celestial sphere under the spinning telescopes, taking into account that during part of the exposure time the telescopes are blocked by the earth. The algorithms are used to give an estimate of exposure time at different ecliptic latitudes as a function of the angle of field of view of the telescope. Sample coverage patterns are also given for a 6-month mission.

  3. Evaluation of Ultra-Violet Photocatalytic Oxidation for Indoor AirApplications

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, A.T.; Sullivan, D.P.; Fisk, W.J.

    2006-02-01

    Acceptable indoor air quality in office buildings may be achieved with less energy by combining effective air cleaning systems for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with particle filtration then by relying solely on ventilation. For such applications, ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) systems are being developed for VOC destruction. An experimental evaluation of a UVPCO system is reported. The evaluation was unique in that it employed complex mixtures of VOCs commonly found in office buildings at realistically low concentrations. VOC conversion efficiencies varied over a broad range, usually exceeded 20%, and were as high as {approx}80%. Conversion efficiency generally diminished with increased air flow rate. Significant amounts of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were produced due to incomplete mineralization. The results indicate that formaldehyde and acetaldehyde production rates may need to be reduced before such UVPCO systems can be deployed safely in occupied buildings.

  4. Optical alignment of a 0.5 meter ultra-violet spectrometer for Apollo 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroader, I. H.; Holliday, C. T.; Bush, G. B.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the design and performance of a 0.5 m Ebert spectrometer mounted on Apollo 17 for research on the ultraviolet spectrum of the lunar atmosphere. The instrument was designed for operation in the range 1175 to 1675 A. A method was developed for aligning subassemblies in such a way that the assembled instrument would be aligned in the ultraviolet to an accuracy of 2 A with maximum efficiency.

  5. Quantitative Detection of Combustion Species using Ultra-Violet Diode Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, J. S.; Peterson, K. A.

    2001-01-01

    Southwest Sciences is developing a new microgravity combustion diagnostic based on UV diode lasers. The instrument will allow absolute concentration measurements of combustion species on a variety of microgravity combustion platforms including the Space Station. Our approach uses newly available room temperature UV diode lasers, thereby keeping the instrument compact, rugged and energy efficient. The feasibility of the technique was demonstrated by measurement of CH radicals in laboratory flames. Further progress in fabrication technology of UV diode lasers at shorter wavelengths and higher power will result in detection of transient species in the deeper UV. High sensitivity detection of combustion radicals is provided with wavelength modulation absorption spectroscopy.

  6. Thermal annealing effects on ultra-violet luminescence properties of Gd doped AlN

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Takashi; Ishizu, Yuta; Tsuji, Kazuma; Harada, Yukihiro; Chigi, Yoshitaka; Nishimoto, Tetsuro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Mikihiro; Ishihara, Tsuguo; Izumi, Hirokazu

    2015-04-28

    We studied energy transfer from AlN to doped Gd{sup 3+} ions as a function of the post-thermal annealing temperature. Gd-doped AlN thin films were deposited on fused-silica substrates using a reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering technique. The film is a c-axis oriented polycrystal. The intra-orbital electron transition in Gd{sup 3+} showed an atomically sharp luminescence at 3.9 eV (318 nm). The photoluminescence (PL) excitation spectrum exhibited a resonant peak, indicating efficient energy transfer from the host AlN crystal to Gd{sup 3+} ions. The PL intensity increases approximately ten times by thermal annealing. The PL decay lifetime becomes long with annealing, and mid-gap luminescence relating to the crystal defects in AlN was also found to be reduced by annealing. These results suggest that energy dissipation of excited carriers in AlN was suppressed by annealing, and the efficiency of energy transfer into Gd{sup 3+} was improved.

  7. Evaluation of Ultra-Violet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) forIndoor Air Applications: Conversion of Volatile Organic Compounds at LowPart-per-Billion Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2005-09-30

    Efficient removal of indoor generated airborne particles and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in office buildings and other large buildings may allow for a reduction in outdoor air supply rates with concomitant energy savings while still maintaining acceptable indoor air quality in these buildings. Ultra-Violet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners have the potential to achieve the necessary reductions in indoor VOC concentrations at relatively low cost. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted with a scaled, prototype UVPCO device designed for use in a duct system. The experimental UVPCO contained two 30 by 30-cm honeycomb monoliths coated with titanium dioxide and 3% by weight tungsten oxide. The monoliths were irradiated with 12 UVC lamps arranged in four banks. The UVPCO was challenged with four mixtures of VOCs typical of mixtures encountered in indoor air. A synthetic office mixture contained 27 VOCs commonly measured in office buildings. A cleaning product mixture contained three cleaning products with high market shares. A building product mixture was created by combining sources including painted wallboard, composite wood products, carpet systems, and vinyl flooring. A fourth mixture contained formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Steady-state concentrations were produced in a classroom laboratory or a 20-m{sup 3} environmental chamber. Air was drawn through the UVPCO, and single pass conversion efficiencies were measured from replicate air samples collected upstream and downstream of the reactor section. Concentrations of the mixtures were manipulated, with concentrations of individual VOCs mostly maintained below 10 ppb. Device flow rates were varied between 165 and 580 m{sup 3}/h. Production of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, formic acid, and acetic acid as reaction products was investigated. Conversion efficiency data were generated for 48 individual VOCs or groups of closely related compounds. Alcohols and glycol ethers were the

  8. Diffractive element in extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit

    2001-01-01

    Condensers having a mirror with a diffraction grating in projection lithography using extreme ultra-violet significantly enhances critical dimension control. The diffraction grating has the effect of smoothing the illumination at the camera's entrance pupil with minimum light loss. Modeling suggests that critical dimension control for 100 nm features can be improved from 3 nm to less than about 0.5 nm.

  9. Diffractive element in extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Ray-Chaudhurl, Avijit K.

    2000-01-01

    Condensers having a mirror with a diffraction grating in projection lithography using extreme ultra-violet significantly enhances critical dimension control. The diffraction grating has the effect of smoothing the illumination at the camera's entrance pupil with minimum light loss. Modeling suggests that critical dimension control for 100 nm features can be improved from 3 nm to less than about 0.5 nm.

  10. Extreme ultraviolet response of a Tektronix 1024 x 1024 CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Daniel J.; Hochedez, Jean-Francois E.; Howard, Russell A.; Au, Benjamin D.; Wang, Dennis; Blouke, Morley

    1992-08-01

    The goal of the detector development program for the Solar and Heliospheric Spacecraft (SOHO) EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) is an Extreme UltraViolet (EUV) CCD (Charge Coupled Device) camera. The Naval Research Lab (NRL) SOHO COD Group has developed a design for the EIT camera and is screening CCDs for flight application. Tektronix Inc. have fabricated 1024x1024 CCDs for the EIT program. As a part of the CCD screening effort the quantum efficiency (QE) of a prototype CCD has been measured in the NRL EUV laboratory over the wavelength range of 256 to 735 Angstroms. A simplified model has been applied to these QE measurements to illustrate the relevant physical processes that determine the performance of the detector.

  11. Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.

    2013-07-15

    Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at 0.1 vol. %.

  12. Ultra-violet absorption induced modifications in bulk and nanoscale electrical transport properties of Al-doped ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Mohit; Basu, Tanmoy; Som, Tapobrata

    2015-08-07

    Using conductive atomic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy, we study local electrical transport properties in aluminum-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al or AZO) thin films. Current mapping shows a spatial variation in conductivity which corroborates well with the local mapping of donor concentration (∼10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3}). In addition, a strong enhancement in the local current at grains is observed after exposing the film to ultra-violet (UV) light which is attributed to persistent photocurrent. Further, it is shown that UV absorption gives a smooth conduction in AZO film which in turn gives rise to an improvement in the bulk photoresponsivity of an n-AZO/p-Si heterojunction diode. This finding is in contrast to the belief that UV absorption in an AZO layer leads to an optical loss for the underneath absorbing layer of a heterojunction solar cell.

  13. The analysis of beta-agonists by packed-column supercritical fluid chromatography with ultra-violet and atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Jones, D C; Dost, K; Davidson, G; George, M W

    1999-06-01

    Packed-column supercritical fluid chromatography (pSFC) using ultra-violet (UV) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) provides a versatile method for the identification and quantification of beta-agonists. We have achieved good separation of clenbuterol, salbutamol, terbutaline and fenoterol with good resolution and reasonable retention times using a high concentration of methanol modifier in the supercritical CO2, together with small amounts of both acidic (trifluoroacetic acid, TFAA) and basic (triethylamine, TEA, or diethylamine, DEA) additives. APCI-MS gave unambiguous identification of the 4 analytes, and increasing cone voltage provided informative fragmentation patterns. The pSFC-MS technique was shown to be linear (R2 > or = 0.996) over the concentration range 1-50 micrograms ml-1. Single ion monitoring (SIM) gave detection limits (on-column) of 2.5 ng (clenbuterol), 0.83 ng (terbutaline), 7.6 ng (salbutamol) and 2.7 ng (fenoterol). The pSFC-MS system was shown to be reproducible within a day, between days, and between restrictors. Analysis of milk samples 'spiked' with beta-agonists showed that the matrix caused no interference, with detection limits of approximately 500 micrograms l-1 of beta-agonists. More dilute solutions could be analysed by pre-concentration before the SFC stage. PMID:10736867

  14. Warm dark matter via ultra-violet freeze-in: reheating temperature and non-thermal distribution for fermionic Higgs portal dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, John

    2016-08-01

    Warm dark matter (WDM) of order keV mass may be able to resolve the disagreement between structure formation in cold dark matter simulations and observations. The detailed properties of WDM will depend upon its energy distribution, in particular how it deviates from the thermal distribution usually assumed in WDM simulations. Here we focus on WDM production via the Ultra-Violet (UV) freeze-in mechanism, for the case of fermionic Higgs portal dark matter ψ produced via the portal interaction bar psiψH†H/Λ. We introduce a new method to simplify the computation of the non-thermal energy distribution of dark matter from freeze-in. We show that the non-thermal energy distribution from UV freeze-in is hotter than the corresponding thermal distribution and has the form of a Bose-Einstein distribution with a non-thermal normalization. The resulting range of dark matter fermion mass consistent with observations is 5–7 keV. The reheating temperature must satisfy TR gtrsim 120 GeV in order to account for the observed dark matter density when mψ ≈ 5 keV, where the lower bound on TR corresponds to the limit where the fermion mass is entirely due to electroweak symmetry breaking via the portal interaction. The corresponding bound on the interaction scale is Λ gtrsim 6.0 × 109 GeV.

  15. Potentiating antilymphoma efficacy of chemotherapy using a liposome for integration of CD20 targeting, ultra-violet irradiation polymerizing, and controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Cong; Li, Huafei; Zhao, He; Zhang, Weiwei; Chen, Yan; Yue, Zhanyi; Lu, Qiong; Wan, Yuxiang; Tian, Xiaoyu; Deng, Anmei

    2014-08-01

    Unlike most malignancies, chemotherapy but not surgery plays the most important role in treating non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Currently, liposomes have been widely used to encapsulate chemotherapeutic drugs in treating solid tumors. However, higher in vivo stability owns a much more important position for excellent antitumor efficacy in treating hematological malignancies. In this study, we finely fabricated a rituximab Fab fragment-decorated liposome based on 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC), which can form intermolecular cross-linking through the diacetylenic group by ultra-violet (UV) irradiation. Our experimental results demonstrated that after the UV irradiation, the liposomes exhibit better serum stability and slower drug release with a decreased mean diameter of approximately 285 nm. The cellular uptake of adriamycin (ADR) by this Fab-navigated liposome was about four times of free drugs. Cytotoxicity assays against CD20+ lymphoma cells showed that the half maximal (50%) inhibitory concentration (IC50) of ADR-loaded immunoliposome was only one fourth of free ADR at the same condition. In vivo studies were evaluated in lymphoma-bearing SCID mice. With the high serum stability, finely regulated structure, active targeting strategy via antigen-antibody reaction and passive targeting strategy via enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, our liposome exhibits durable and potent antitumor activities both in the disseminated and localized human NHL xeno-transplant models.

  16. Strongly Time-Variable Ultra-Violet Metal Line Emission from the Circum-Galactic Medium of High-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sravan, Niharika; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; van de Voort, Freeke; Kereš, Dušan; Muratov, Alexander L.; Hopkins, Philip F.; Feldmann, Robert; Quataert, Eliot; Murray, Norman

    2016-08-01

    We use cosmological simulations from the Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) project, which implement a comprehensive set of stellar feedback processes, to study ultra-violet (UV) metal line emission from the circum-galactic medium of high-redshift (z = 2 - 4) galaxies. Our simulations cover the halo mass range Mh ˜ 2 × 1011 - 8.5 × 1012 M⊙ at z = 2, representative of Lyman break galaxies. Of the transitions we analyze, the low-ionization C III (977 Å) and Si III (1207 Å) emission lines are the most luminous, with C IV (1548 Å) and Si IV (1394 Å) also showing interesting spatially-extended structures. The more massive halos are on average more UV-luminous. The UV metal line emission from galactic halos in our simulations arises primarily from collisionally ionized gas and is strongly time variable, with peak-to-trough variations of up to ˜2 dex. The peaks of UV metal line luminosity correspond closely to massive and energetic mass outflow events, which follow bursts of star formation and inject sufficient energy into galactic halos to power the metal line emission. The strong time variability implies that even some relatively low-mass halos may be detectable. Conversely, flux-limited samples will be biased toward halos whose central galaxy has recently experienced a strong burst of star formation. Spatially-extended UV metal line emission around high-redshift galaxies should be detectable by current and upcoming integral field spectrographs such as the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on the Very Large Telescope and Keck Cosmic Web Imager (KCWI).

  17. Impact of BaB2O4 growth method on frequency conversion to the deep ultra-violet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyra, L.; Maillard, A.; Maillard, R.; Sangla, D.; Salin, F.; Balembois, F.; Kokh, A. E.; Georges, P.

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we report how the growth method used for barium beta-borate β-BaB2O4 (BBO) impacts its high power second harmonic generation properties in the deep-UV. We compared a BBO crystal grown by flux (Top Seeded Solution Growth or TSSG) and a BBO crystal grown by the Czochralski (CZ) method. We first characterized their transparency properties, then we measured their single-pass second harmonic conversion efficiencies with both a low average power and a high average power nanosecond pulsed lasers. We show that both crystals have comparable linear absorption and conversion efficiencies at low power, whereas in a high power experiment, the CZ-grown BBO yields higher conversion efficiency than the TSSG grown BBO. With a 30 W, 150 kHz, 8 ns green laser, the use of a CZ BBO led at best to a 40% increase in available average output power at 257 nm.

  18. Molecular beam epitaxy-grown wurtzite MgS thin films for solar-blind ultra-violet detection

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Y. H.; He, Q. L.; Cheung, W. Y.; Lok, S. K.; Wong, K. S.; Sou, I. K.; Ho, S. K.; Tam, K. W.

    2013-04-29

    Molecular beam epitaxy grown MgS on GaAs(111)B substrate was resulted in wurtzite phase, as demonstrated by detailed structural characterizations. Phenomenological arguments were used to account for why wurtzite phase is preferred over zincblende phase or its most stable rocksalt phase. Results of photoresponse and reflectance measurements performed on wurtzite MgS photodiodes suggest a direct bandgap at around 5.1 eV. Their response peaks at 245 nm with quantum efficiency of 9.9% and enjoys rejection of more than three orders at 320 nm and close to five orders at longer wavelengths, proving the photodiodes highly competitive in solar-blind ultraviolet detection.

  19. Fast carbohydrate analysis via liquid chromatography coupled with ultra violet and electrospray ionization ion trap detection in 96-well format.

    PubMed

    Rühmann, Broder; Schmid, Jochen; Sieber, Volker

    2014-07-11

    A fast carbohydrate screening platform processible in 96-well format is described. The method is suitable for the determination of various carbohydrates out of complex mixtures as obtained by acidic hydrolysis of carbohydrates polymers. The chromatographic conditions for an efficient separation (12min) and the derivatization process with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) were optimized for high resolution separation and simultaneous determination of deoxy-, amino-, anhydro-sugars as well as hexoses, pentoses, dimers, uronic acids and degradation products like furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). The potential to quantify with UV- and MS-detector in the same range has been demonstrated for 20 different compounds. Finally, the matrix effects of the hydrolysis were positively evaluated. The micro scale hydrolysis and PMP-derivatization without any extraction or drying steps, both in 96-well format, result in a fast and intuitive sample preparation. In combination with a fast liquid chromatography coupled to UV and electrospray ionization ion trap detection (LC-UV-ESI-MS/MS) for the qualification and quantification of various sugars, dimers and degradation products, this method shows great performance in carbohydrate analysis. PMID:24861788

  20. The role of graphene formed on silver nanowire transparent conductive electrode in ultra-violet light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Tae Hoon; Lee, Seula; Min, Kyung Hyun; Chandramohan, S.; Park, Ah Hyun; Lee, Gun Hee; Park, Min; Suh, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Myung Jong

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports a highly reliable transparent conductive electrode (TCE) that integrates silver nanowires (AgNWs) and high-quality graphene as a protecting layer. Graphene with minimized defects and large graphene domains has been successfully obtained through a facile two-step growth approach. Ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) were fabricated with AgNWs or hybrid electrodes where AgNWs were combined with two-step grown graphene (A-2GE) or conventional one-step grown graphene (A-1GE). The device performance and reliability of the UV-LEDs with three different electrodes were compared. The A-2GE offered high figure of merit owing to the excellent UV transmittance and reduced sheet resistance. As a consequence, the UV-LEDs made with A-2GE demonstrated reduced forward voltage, enhanced electroluminescence (EL) intensity, and alleviated efficiency droop. The effects of joule heating and UV light illumination on the electrode stability were also studied. The present findings prove superior performance of the A-2GE under high current injection and continuous operation of UV LED, compared to other electrodes. From our observation, the A-2GE would be a reliable TCE for high power UV-LEDs.

  1. The role of graphene formed on silver nanowire transparent conductive electrode in ultra-violet light emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Seo, Tae Hoon; Lee, Seula; Min, Kyung Hyun; Chandramohan, S; Park, Ah Hyun; Lee, Gun Hee; Park, Min; Suh, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Myung Jong

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a highly reliable transparent conductive electrode (TCE) that integrates silver nanowires (AgNWs) and high-quality graphene as a protecting layer. Graphene with minimized defects and large graphene domains has been successfully obtained through a facile two-step growth approach. Ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) were fabricated with AgNWs or hybrid electrodes where AgNWs were combined with two-step grown graphene (A-2GE) or conventional one-step grown graphene (A-1GE). The device performance and reliability of the UV-LEDs with three different electrodes were compared. The A-2GE offered high figure of merit owing to the excellent UV transmittance and reduced sheet resistance. As a consequence, the UV-LEDs made with A-2GE demonstrated reduced forward voltage, enhanced electroluminescence (EL) intensity, and alleviated efficiency droop. The effects of joule heating and UV light illumination on the electrode stability were also studied. The present findings prove superior performance of the A-2GE under high current injection and continuous operation of UV LED, compared to other electrodes. From our observation, the A-2GE would be a reliable TCE for high power UV-LEDs. PMID:27387274

  2. The role of graphene formed on silver nanowire transparent conductive electrode in ultra-violet light emitting diodes

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Tae Hoon; Lee, Seula; Min, Kyung Hyun; Chandramohan, S.; Park, Ah Hyun; Lee, Gun Hee; Park, Min; Suh, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Myung Jong

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a highly reliable transparent conductive electrode (TCE) that integrates silver nanowires (AgNWs) and high-quality graphene as a protecting layer. Graphene with minimized defects and large graphene domains has been successfully obtained through a facile two-step growth approach. Ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) were fabricated with AgNWs or hybrid electrodes where AgNWs were combined with two-step grown graphene (A-2GE) or conventional one-step grown graphene (A-1GE). The device performance and reliability of the UV-LEDs with three different electrodes were compared. The A-2GE offered high figure of merit owing to the excellent UV transmittance and reduced sheet resistance. As a consequence, the UV-LEDs made with A-2GE demonstrated reduced forward voltage, enhanced electroluminescence (EL) intensity, and alleviated efficiency droop. The effects of joule heating and UV light illumination on the electrode stability were also studied. The present findings prove superior performance of the A-2GE under high current injection and continuous operation of UV LED, compared to other electrodes. From our observation, the A-2GE would be a reliable TCE for high power UV-LEDs. PMID:27387274

  3. Extremely efficient Zevatron in rotating AGN magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanov, Z.; Mahajan, S.; Machabeli, G.; Chkheidze, N.

    2014-12-01

    A novel model of particle acceleration in the magnetospheres of rotating active galactic nuclei (AGN) is constructed. The particle energies may be boosted up to 1021 eV in a two-step mechanism: in the first stage, the Langmuir waves are centrifugally excited and amplified by means of a parametric process that efficiently pumps rotational energy to excite electrostatic fields. In the second stage, the electrostatic energy is transferred to particle kinetic energy via Landau damping made possible by rapid `Langmuir collapse'. The time-scale for parametric pumping of Langmuir waves turns out to be small compared to the kinematic time-scale, indicating high efficiency of the first process. The second process of `Langmuir collapse' - the creation of caverns or low-density regions - also happens rapidly for the characteristic parameters of the AGN magnetosphere. The Langmuir collapse creates appropriate conditions for transferring electric energy to boost up already high particle energies to much higher values. It is further shown that various energy loss mechanism are relatively weak, and do not impose any significant constraints on maximum achievable energies.

  4. The investigation of O and N2 densities from the OSO-7 extreme UV data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The results of solar radiation observations in the extreme ultra-violet spectrum from 200 A to 600 A made by the OSO-7 Satellite were studied. The results of the influence of attenuation by the atmosphere in the 250 to 500 km altitude range are presented. Using published molecular absorption cross-sections at 304 A and 256 A, the Jaccia atmospheric model is validated, and shows that a mean exospheric of 1050 K is appropriate for the sunset data.

  5. Deciphering the structure of isomeric oligosaccharides in a complex mixture by tandem mass spectrometry: photon activation with vacuum ultra-violet brings unique information and enables definitive structure assignment.

    PubMed

    Ropartz, David; Lemoine, Jérôme; Giuliani, Alexandre; Bittebière, Yann; Enjalbert, Quentin; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Rogniaux, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates have a wide variety of structures whose complexity and heterogeneity challenge the field of analytical chemistry. Tandem mass spectrometry, with its remarkable sensitivity and high information content, provides key advantages to addressing the structural elucidation of polysaccharides. Yet, classical fragmentation by collision-activated dissociation (CAD) in many cases fails to reach a comprehensive structural determination, especially when isomers have to be differentiated. In this work, for the first time, vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) synchrotron radiation is used as the activation process in tandem mass spectrometry of large oligosaccharides. Compared to low energy CAD (LE-CAD), photon activated dissociation brought more straightforward and valuable structural information. The outstanding feature was that complete series of informative ions were produced, with only minor neutral losses. Moreover, systematic fragmentation rules could be drawn thus facilitating the definitive assignments of fragment identities. As a result, most of the structures present in a complex mixture of oligogalacturonans could be comprehensively resolved, including many isomers differing in the position of methyl groups along the galacturonic acid backbone. PMID:24356224

  6. Depth-resolved ultra-violet spectroscopic photo current-voltage measurements for the analysis of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor epilayer deposited on Si

    SciTech Connect

    Ozden, Burcu; Yang, Chungman; Tong, Fei; Khanal, Min P.; Mirkhani, Vahid; Sk, Mobbassar Hassan; Ahyi, Ayayi Claude; Park, Minseo

    2014-10-27

    We have demonstrated that the depth-dependent defect distribution of the deep level traps in the AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) epi-structures can be analyzed by using the depth-resolved ultra-violet (UV) spectroscopic photo current-voltage (IV) (DR-UV-SPIV). It is of great importance to analyze deep level defects in the AlGaN/GaN HEMT structure, since it is recognized that deep level defects are the main source for causing current collapse phenomena leading to reduced device reliability. The AlGaN/GaN HEMT epi-layers were grown on a 6 in. Si wafer by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The DR-UV-SPIV measurement was performed using a monochromatized UV light illumination from a Xe lamp. The key strength of the DR-UV-SPIV is its ability to provide information on the depth-dependent electrically active defect distribution along the epi-layer growth direction. The DR-UV-SPIV data showed variations in the depth-dependent defect distribution across the wafer. As a result, rapid feedback on the depth-dependent electrical homogeneity of the electrically active defect distribution in the AlGaN/GaN HEMT epi-structure grown on a Si wafer with minimal sample preparation can be elucidated from the DR-UV-SPIV in combination with our previously demonstrated spectroscopic photo-IV measurement with the sub-bandgap excitation.

  7. Efficient extreme ultraviolet transmission gratings for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braig, Christoph; Predehl, Peter; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard

    2011-06-01

    We report on a theoretical study of free-standing phase transmission gratings for high-resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray spectroscopy and investigate their properties. Designed for wavelengths between about 2 and 40 nm, the devices may provide a first order diffraction efficiency beyond 30%. We use rigorous coupled wave analysis methods in order to optimize the grating design parameters and discuss features of segmented grating arrays. Elemental, as well as compound, materials such as Be, Mo, LiF, and poly-(methylmethacrylate) are considered with respect to their potential and practical limitations in terms of feasibility and sensitivity to radiation damage. Simulations are performed for several samples on the radiation produced by a table-top EUV plasma source and applications to astrophysical problems are considered.

  8. Detailed gas and diesel vehicle emissions: PTR-MS measurements of real-time VOC profiles and comprehensive characterization of primary emissions for IVOC, SVOC, and LVOC by gas chromatography with vacuum ultra-violet ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, G.; Frodin, B.; Zhao, Y.; Franklin, J. P.; Cross, E. S.; Saleh, R.; Saliba, G.; Lambe, A. T.; Sardar, S.; Maldonado, H.; Russell, L. M.; Kroll, J. H.; Robinson, A. L.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past fifteen years US vehicle emissions standards have dramatically improved, with the goal of reducing urban air pollution. Recent studies demonstrate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to be the dominant contributor to urban organic aerosol, but controversy remains regarding the contributions of different vehicle types to SOA. Increased potency for SOA formation from non methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) from newer vehicles that meet tighter emission standards has also been observed. Both speciation and temporal resolution of vehicular emissions are critical for predicting SOA formation. The relative importance of diesel and gasoline emissions to SOA formation depends critically on speciation. Experiments were conducted at the California Air Resources Board Haagen-Smit Laboratory to better understand SOA formation for low, ultra-low, super ultra-low and partial zero emission vehicles (LEV, ULEV, SULEV, PZEV). Exhaust was sampled on filters and adsorbent tubes to measure intermediate-, semi-, and low-volatility NMHC (IVOC, SVOC, LVOC). A proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) measured volatile organics (VOC) emissions with high time-resolution. Analysis of filters and adsorbent tubes using gas chromatography with vacuum-ultra-violet ionization mass spectrometry provided unprecedented characterization of emissions according to degree of branching, number of cyclic rings, aromaticity, and molecular weight. ULEV vehicles show the composition distributions of primary particulate emissions peak for compounds in the SVOC range. PZEV vehicle emissions peak in the IVOC range. Diesel vehicles have up to ten times higher emissions than gasoline vehicles; their distributions have significant IVOC levels and peak in the SVOC/LVOC range. Our measurements are used to predict potential SOA formation by vehicle standard class and the relative SOA formation for diesel and gasoline vehicles. PTR-MS measurement show VOC emissions after cold start occur almost entirely

  9. Laser produced plasma for efficient extreme ultraviolet light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Tony; Cummins, Thomas; O' Gorman, Colm; Li Bowen; Harte, Colm S.; O'Reilly, Fergal; Sokell, Emma; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2012-05-25

    Extreme ultraviolet emission from laser produced plasma and their relevance to EUV source development is discussed. The current state of the field for Sn LPP sources operating at 13.5 nm is described and initial results are given for EUV emission from CO{sub 2} laser irradiation of a bulk Sn target. A maximum conversion efficiency of 1.7% has been measured and the influence of the CO{sub 2} laser temporal profile on the CE is discussed. A double pulse irradiation scheme is shown to increase CE up to a maximum value of 2.1% for an optimum prepulse - pulse delay of 150 ns. The emergence of a new EUVL source wavelength at 6.7 nm based on Gd and Tb LPPs has been outlined. An initial experiment investigating picosecond laser irradiation as a means to produce strong 6.7 nm emission from a Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} target has been performed and verified.

  10. Luminescent properties of Eu{sup 2+}-doped BaGdF{sub 5} glass ceramics a potential blue phosphor for ultra-violet light-emitting diode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Weihuan; Zhang, Yuepin Ouyang, Shaoye; Zhang, Zhixiong; Wang, Qian; Xia, Haiping

    2015-01-14

    Eu{sup 2+} doped transparent oxyfluoride glass ceramics containing BaGdF{sub 5} nanocrystals were successfully fabricated by melt-quenching technique under a reductive atmosphere. The structure of the glass and glass ceramics were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The luminescent properties were investigated by transmission, excitation, and emission spectra. The decay time of the Gd{sup 3+} ions at 312 nm excited with 275 nm were also investigated. The results of XRD and TEM indicated the existence of BaGdF5 nanocrystals in the transparent glass ceramics. The excitation spectra of Eu{sup 2+} doped glass ceramics showed an excellent overlap with the main emission region of an ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV-LED). Compared with the as-made glass, the emission of glass ceramics is much stronger by a factor of increasing energy transfer efficiency from Gd{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} ions, the energy transfer efficiency from Gd{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} ions was discussed. In addition, the chromaticity coordinates of glass and glass ceramics specimens were also discussed, which indicated that the Eu{sup 2+} doped BaGdF{sub 5} glass ceramics may be used as a potential blue-emitting phosphor for UV-LED.

  11. The effects of He on ablation and inductively coupled plasma environment in ultra-violet, nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Lance M.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2015-11-01

    The effects of helium gas on ablation and ICP processes were investigated. Differences in the size, shape, and abundance of aerosol particles generated in argon and helium atmosphere were studied off-line using SEM imaging of aerosol particles impacted on polycarbonate filter disks. In general, ablation in helium generated fewer large particles, and larger, more densely-packed soft agglomerates. However, corresponding changes in the ion densities in the ICP, observed in high-resolution images obtained using LIF, were not always predictable. In all cases, higher He/Ar ratios led to lower ion densities in the ICP. This effect was attributed to increased rates of off-axis diffusion at higher He/Ar ratios. Differences in the ion densities produced during ablation in argon vs helium were highly dependent on sample type, the axial position of vaporization, and the He/Ar ratio. There was evidence that vaporization efficiencies of soft agglomerates were less affected than micron-sized particles by particle acceleration at higher He/Ar ratios.

  12. Near-ultraviolet LED of the External Quantum Efficiency Over 45% and its Application to High-color Rendering Phosphor Conversion White LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuta, Hiroaki; Fukui, Takeshi; Miyachi, Tsutomu; Kamon, Kunihito; Hayashi, Hideki; Nakamura, Nobutaka; Uchida, Yuji; Kurai, Satoshi; Taguchi, Tsunemasa

    Highly luminous efficiency and color rendering index (CRI) of 70 lm/W and 95 under low correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3177 K has been obtained by phosphor conversion (PC) white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) using near-ultra violet (n-UV) LEDs with the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 46.7%. The homogeneous spatial color uniformity on chromaticity of PC white LEDs excited by n-UV LEDs are particularly adequate to the general lighting applications.

  13. Ultra-Violet Induced Insulator Flashover

    SciTech Connect

    Javedani, J B; Houck, T L; Kelly, B T; Lahowe, D A; Shirk, M D; Goerz, D A

    2008-05-21

    Insulators are critical components in high-energy, pulsed power systems. It is known that the vacuum surface of the insulator will flashover when illuminated by ultraviolet (UV) radiation depending on the insulator material, insulator cone angle, applied voltage and insulator shot-history. A testbed comprised of an excimer laser (KrF, 248 nm, {approx} 2 MW/cm{sup 2}, 30 ns FWHM,), a vacuum chamber (low 1.0E-6 torr), and dc high voltage power supply (<60 kV) was assembled for insulator testing to measure the UV dose during a flashover event. Five in-house developed and calibrated fast D-Dot probes (>12 GHz, bandwidth) were embedded in the anode electrode underneath the insulator to determine the time of flashover with respect to UV arrival. A commercial energy meter were used to measure the UV fluence for each pulse. Four insulator materials High Density Polyethylene, Rexolite{reg_sign} 1400, Macor{trademark} and Mycalex with side-angles of 0, {+-}30, and {+-}45 degrees, 1.0 cm thick samples, were tested with a maximum UV fluence of 75 mJ/cm{sup 2} and at varying electrode charge (10 kV to 60 kV). This information clarified/corrected earlier published studies. A new phenomenon was observed related to the UV power level on flashover that as the UV pulse intensity was increased, the UV fluence on the insulator prior to flashover was also increased. This effect would bias the data towards higher minimum flashover fluence.

  14. The Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roming, P. W. A.; Hunsberger, S. D.; Gronwall, C.; Nousek, J. A.; Breeveld, A. A.; Mason, K. O.; UVOT PSU Team; UVOT MSSL Team; UVOT SwRI Team

    2004-12-01

    The UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT), in conjunction with the Burst Alert and X-Ray Telescopes, renders the Swift Gamma-ray Observatory a truly multi-wavelength mission. By utilizing UVOT's UV and optical broadband filters and grisms, the early UV and optical photons from the afterglow of GRBs are captured; long term observations of these afterglows are also obtained. The UVOT employs a micro-channel plate intensified charged-coupled device detector that records the arrival time of individual photons and provides sub-arcsecond positioning of sources. Some of the top level science goals of the UVOT are to capture the prompt emission of GRBs, rapidly provide sub-arcsecond positions to the ground, provide spectral or photometric redshifts, monitor GRB afterglows, and identify the GRB environment. We discuss the overall design of the instrument and some of the science that can be accomplished with the UVOT. This work is sponsored at Penn State by NASA's Office of Space Science through contract NAS5-00136, and at MSSL by funding from PPARC.

  15. Intermediate Band Solar Cell with Extreme Broadband Spectrum Quantum Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datas, A.; López, E.; Ramiro, I.; Antolín, E.; Martí, A.; Luque, A.; Tamaki, R.; Shoji, Y.; Sogabe, T.; Okada, Y.

    2015-04-01

    We report, for the first time, about an intermediate band solar cell implemented with InAs/AlGaAs quantum dots whose photoresponse expands from 250 to ˜6000 nm . To our knowledge, this is the broadest quantum efficiency reported to date for a solar cell and demonstrates that the intermediate band solar cell is capable of producing photocurrent when illuminated with photons whose energy equals the energy of the lowest band gap. We show experimental evidences indicating that this result is in agreement with the theory of the intermediate band solar cell, according to which the generation recombination between the intermediate band and the valence band makes this photocurrent detectable.

  16. Intermediate band solar cell with extreme broadband spectrum quantum efficiency.

    PubMed

    Datas, A; López, E; Ramiro, I; Antolín, E; Martí, A; Luque, A; Tamaki, R; Shoji, Y; Sogabe, T; Okada, Y

    2015-04-17

    We report, for the first time, about an intermediate band solar cell implemented with InAs/AlGaAs quantum dots whose photoresponse expands from 250 to ∼6000  nm. To our knowledge, this is the broadest quantum efficiency reported to date for a solar cell and demonstrates that the intermediate band solar cell is capable of producing photocurrent when illuminated with photons whose energy equals the energy of the lowest band gap. We show experimental evidence indicating that this result is in agreement with the theory of the intermediate band solar cell, according to which the generation recombination between the intermediate band and the valence band makes this photocurrent detectable. PMID:25933339

  17. Extreme ultraviolet quantum detection efficiency of rubidium bromide opaque photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Gaines, Geoffrey A.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the quantum detection efficiency (QDE) of three samples of RbBr photocathode layers over the 44-150-A wavelength range. The QDE of RbBr-coated microchannel plate (MCP) was measured using a back-to-back Z-stack MCP configuration in a detector with a wedge and strip position-sensitive anode, of the type described by Siegmund et al. (1984). To assess the stability of RbBr layer, the RbBr photocathode was exposed to air at about 30 percent humidity for 20 hr. It was found that the QDE values for the aged cathode were within the QDE measurement errors of the original values. A simple QDE model was developed, and it was found that its predictions are in accord with the QDE measurements.

  18. Design, fabrication, and characterization of high-efficiency extreme ultraviolet diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Liddle, J. Alexander; Salmassi, Farhad; Anderson, Erik H.; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2004-02-19

    As the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography progresses, interest grows in the extension of traditional optical components to the EUV regime. The strong absorption of EUV by most materials and its extremely short wavelength, however, makes it very difficult to implement many components that are commonplace in the longer wavelength regimes. One such example is the diffuser often implemented with ordinary ground glass in the visible light regime. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of reflective EUV diffusers with high efficiency within a controllable bandwidth. Using these techniques we have fabricated diffusers with efficiencies exceeding 10% within a moderate angular single-sided bandwidth of approximately 0.06 radians.

  19. Computation of reflected images from extreme ultraviolet masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollepalli, Srinivas B.; Cerrina, Franco

    1999-06-01

    With EUV lithography emerging as a promising technology for semiconductor device fabrication with critical dimensions extreme ultra violet mask. In particular, we show the effects caused due to diffraction, non-uniformities in the multilayer stack due to substrate defects, and partial spatial coherence. Several simulation examples are presented.

  20. Extremely efficient indium-tin-oxide-free green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Min; Ye, Zhuo; Xiao, Teng; Liu, Rui; Chen, Ying; Mayer, Robert W; Biswas, Rana; Ho, Kai-Ming; Shinar, Ruth; Shinar, Joseph

    2012-08-16

    This paper demonstrates extremely efficient (η(P,max) = 118 lm W(-1) ) ITO-free green phosphorescent OLEDs (PHOLEDs) with multilayered, highly conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) films as the anode. The efficiency is obtained without any outcoupling-enhancing structures and is 44% higher than the 82 lm W(-1) of similar optimized ITO-anode PHOLEDs. Detailed simulations show that this improvement is due largely to the intrinsically enhanced outcoupling that results from a weak microcavity effect. PMID:22786793

  1. Method for high-precision multi-layered thin film deposition for deep and extreme ultraviolet mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Ruffner, J.A.

    1999-06-15

    A method for coating (flat or non-flat) optical substrates with high-reflectivity multi-layer coatings for use at Deep Ultra-Violet (DUV) and Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) wavelengths. The method results in a product with minimum feature sizes of less than 0.10 [micro]m for the shortest wavelength (13.4 nm). The present invention employs a computer-based modeling and deposition method to enable lateral and vertical thickness control by scanning the position of the substrate with respect to the sputter target during deposition. The thickness profile of the sputter targets is modeled before deposition and then an appropriate scanning algorithm is implemented to produce any desired, radially-symmetric thickness profile. The present invention offers the ability to predict and achieve a wide range of thickness profiles on flat or figured substrates, i.e., account for 1/R[sup 2] factor in a model, and the ability to predict and accommodate changes in deposition rate as a result of plasma geometry, i.e., over figured substrates. 15 figs.

  2. Method for high-precision multi-layered thin film deposition for deep and extreme ultraviolet mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Ruffner, Judith Alison

    1999-01-01

    A method for coating (flat or non-flat) optical substrates with high-reflectivity multi-layer coatings for use at Deep Ultra-Violet ("DUV") and Extreme Ultra-Violet ("EUV") wavelengths. The method results in a product with minimum feature sizes of less than 0.10-.mu.m for the shortest wavelength (13.4-nm). The present invention employs a computer-based modeling and deposition method to enable lateral and vertical thickness control by scanning the position of the substrate with respect to the sputter target during deposition. The thickness profile of the sputter targets is modeled before deposition and then an appropriate scanning algorithm is implemented to produce any desired, radially-symmetric thickness profile. The present invention offers the ability to predict and achieve a wide range of thickness profiles on flat or figured substrates, i.e., account for 1/R.sup.2 factor in a model, and the ability to predict and accommodate changes in deposition rate as a result of plasma geometry, i.e., over figured substrates.

  3. Cluster beam targets for laser plasma extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray sources

    DOEpatents

    Kublak, Glenn D.; Richardson, Martin C. (CREOL

    1996-01-01

    Method and apparatus for producing extreme ultra violet (EUV) and soft x-ray radiation from an ultra-low debris plasma source are disclosed. Targets are produced by the free jet expansion of various gases through a temperature controlled nozzle to form molecular clusters. These target clusters are subsequently irradiated with commercially available lasers of moderate intensity (10.sup.11 -10.sup.12 watts/cm.sup.2) to produce a plasma radiating in the region of 0.5 to 100 nanometers. By appropriate adjustment of the experimental conditions the laser focus can be moved 10-30 mm from the nozzle thereby eliminating debris produced by plasma erosion of the nozzle.

  4. Extending the path for efficient extreme ultraviolet sources for advanced nanolithography

    SciTech Connect

    Sizyuk, Tatyana; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2015-09-15

    Developing efficient light sources for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is one of the most important problems of high volume manufacturing (HVM) of the next generation computer chips. Critical components of this technology are continued to face challenges in the demanding performance for HVM. Current investigations of EUV and beyond EUV (BEUV) community are focused on the dual-pulse laser produced plasma (LPP) using droplets of mass-limited targets. Two main objectives as well as challenges in the optimization of these light sources are related to enhancement of the conversion efficiency (CE) of the source and increase components lifetime of the collector optical system. These require significant experimental and computer simulation efforts. These requirements call for fine detail analysis of various plasma physics processes involved in laser target interactions and their effects on source optimization. We continued to enhance our comprehensive HEIGHTS simulation package and upgrade our CMUXE laboratories to study and optimize the efficiency of LPP sources. Integrated modeling and experimental research were done to both benchmark simulation results and to make projections and realistic predictions of the development path for powerful EUVL devices for HVM requirements. We continued the detail analysis of dual-pulse laser systems using various laser wavelengths and delay times between the two pulses. We showed that the efficiency of EUV sources can be improved utilizing the higher harmonics of Nd:YAG laser for the prepulse and the first harmonics for the main pulse, while still having lower efficiency than the combination involving CO{sub 2} laser in the range of parameters studied in this case. The differences in optimization process as well as in the source characteristics for two combinations of laser wavelengths were analyzed based on details of atomic and hydrodynamics processes during the evolving plasma plumes.

  5. Optimizing laser produced plasmas for efficient extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sizyuk, Tatyana; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-08-15

    Photon sources produced by laser beams with moderate laser intensities, up to 10{sup 14 }W/cm{sup 2}, are being developed for many industrial applications. The performance requirements for high volume manufacture devices necessitate extensive experimental research supported by theoretical plasma analysis and modeling predictions. We simulated laser produced plasma sources currently being developed for several applications such as extreme ultraviolet lithography using 13.5% ± 1% nm bandwidth, possibly beyond extreme ultraviolet lithography using 6.× nm wavelengths, and water-window microscopy utilizing 2.48 nm (La-α) and 2.88 nm (He-α) emission. We comprehensively modeled plasma evolution from solid/liquid tin, gadolinium, and nitrogen targets as three promising materials for the above described sources, respectively. Results of our analysis for plasma characteristics during the entire course of plasma evolution showed the dependence of source conversion efficiency (CE), i.e., laser energy to photons at the desired wavelength, on plasma electron density gradient. Our results showed that utilizing laser intensities which produce hotter plasma than the optimum emission temperatures allows increasing CE for all considered sources that, however, restricted by the reabsorption processes around the main emission region and this restriction is especially actual for the 6.× nm sources.

  6. Extremely high efficient nanoreactor with Au@ZnO catalyst for photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Su, Chung-Yi; Yang, Tung-Han; Gurylev, Vitaly; Huang, Sheng-Hsin; Wu, Jenn-Ming; Perng, Tsong-Pyng

    2015-10-01

    We fabricated a photocatalytic Au@ZnO@PC (polycarbonate) nanoreactor composed of monolayered Au nanoparticles chemisorbed on conformal ZnO nanochannel arrays within the PC membrane. A commercial PC membrane was used as the template for deposition of a ZnO shell into the pores by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Thioctic acid (TA) with sufficient steric stabilization was used as a molecular linker for functionalization of Au nanoparticles in a diameter of 10 nm. High coverage of Au nanoparticles anchored on the inner wall of ZnO nanochannels greatly improved the photocatalytic activity for degradation of Rhodamine B. The membrane nanoreactor achieved 63% degradation of Rhodamine B within only 26.88 ms of effective reaction time owing to its superior mass transfer efficiency based on Damköhler number analysis. Mass transfer limitation can be eliminated in the present study due to extremely large surface-to-volume ratio of the membrane nanoreactor. PMID:26358837

  7. Extremely high efficient nanoreactor with Au@ZnO catalyst for photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chung-Yi; Yang, Tung-Han; Gurylev, Vitaly; Huang, Sheng-Hsin; Wu, Jenn-Ming; Perng, Tsong-Pyng

    2015-10-01

    We fabricated a photocatalytic Au@ZnO@PC (polycarbonate) nanoreactor composed of monolayered Au nanoparticles chemisorbed on conformal ZnO nanochannel arrays within the PC membrane. A commercial PC membrane was used as the template for deposition of a ZnO shell into the pores by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Thioctic acid (TA) with sufficient steric stabilization was used as a molecular linker for functionalization of Au nanoparticles in a diameter of 10 nm. High coverage of Au nanoparticles anchored on the inner wall of ZnO nanochannels greatly improved the photocatalytic activity for degradation of Rhodamine B. The membrane nanoreactor achieved 63% degradation of Rhodamine B within only 26.88 ms of effective reaction time owing to its superior mass transfer efficiency based on Damköhler number analysis. Mass transfer limitation can be eliminated in the present study due to extremely large surface-to-volume ratio of the membrane nanoreactor.

  8. Load control and the provision of the efficiency of steam boilers equipped with an extremal governor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabanin, V. P.; Kormilitsyn, V. I.; Kostyk, V. I.; Smirnov, N. I.; Koroteev, A. V.; Repin, A. I.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an analysis of main problems of controlling small- and medium-size steam boilers. Noted are deficiencies of current normative and technical documents, as well as those of the traditional concept of the process of fuel firing, the methods for and algorithms of boiler control. There is established an approach to creation of such control systems in which a boiler is treated, as to control and load channels, as a nonlinear linked controlled objects. To control load and efficiency of a boiler, an universal schematic diagram is suggested that allows for the possibility of implementation in modern controllers of both known methods and a new method using an extremal governor, which would provide minimum fuel consumption at given thermal load of a boiler.

  9. Fluorescence efficiency and visible re-emission spectrum of tetraphenyl butadiene films at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehman, V. M.; Seibert, S. R.; Rielage, K.; Hime, A.; Sun, Y.; Mei, D.-M.; Maassen, J.; Moore, D.

    2011-10-01

    A large number of current and future experiments in neutrino and dark matter detection use the scintillation light from noble elements as a mechanism for measuring energy deposition. The scintillation light from these elements is produced in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) range, from 60 to 200 nm. Currently, the most practical technique for observing light at these wavelengths is to surround the scintillation volume with a thin film of tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) to act as a fluor. The TPB film absorbs EUV photons and re-emits visible photons, detectable with a variety of commercial photosensors. Here we present a measurement of the re-emission spectrum of TPB films when illuminated with 128, 160, 175, and 250 nm light. We also measure the fluorescence efficiency as a function of incident wavelength from 120 to 250 nm.

  10. Sensitivity calibration of an imaging extreme ultraviolet spectrometer-detector system for determining the efficiency of broadband extreme ultraviolet sources

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, S.; Roedel, C.; Bierbach, J.; Paz, A. E.; Foerster, E.; Paulus, G. G.; Krebs, M.; Haedrich, S.; Limpert, J.; Kuschel, S.; Wuensche, M.; Hilbert, V.; Zastrau, U.

    2013-02-15

    We report on the absolute sensitivity calibration of an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectrometer system that is frequently employed to study emission from short-pulse laser experiments. The XUV spectrometer, consisting of a toroidal mirror and a transmission grating, was characterized at a synchrotron source in respect of the ratio of the detected to the incident photon flux at photon energies ranging from 15.5 eV to 99 eV. The absolute calibration allows the determination of the XUV photon number emitted by laser-based XUV sources, e.g., high-harmonic generation from plasma surfaces or in gaseous media. We have demonstrated high-harmonic generation in gases and plasma surfaces providing 2.3 {mu}W and {mu}J per harmonic using the respective generation mechanisms.

  11. Physiological characteristics of the extreme thermophile Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus: an efficient hydrogen cell factory

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Global concerns about climate changes and their association with the use of fossil fuels have accelerated research on biological fuel production. Biological hydrogen production from hemicellulose-containing waste is considered one of the promising avenues. A major economical issue for such a process, however, is the low substrate conversion efficiency. Interestingly, the extreme thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus can produce hydrogen from carbohydrate-rich substrates at yields close to the theoretical maximum of the dark fermentation process (i.e., 4 mol H2/mol hexose). The organism is able to ferment an array of mono-, di- and polysaccharides, and is relatively tolerant to high partial hydrogen pressures, making it a promising candidate for exploitation in a biohydrogen process. The behaviour of this Gram-positive bacterium bears all hallmarks of being adapted to an environment sparse in free sugars, which is further reflected in its low volumetric hydrogen productivity and low osmotolerance. These two properties need to be improved by at least a factor of 10 and 5, respectively, for a cost-effective industrial process. In this review, the physiological characteristics of C. saccharolyticus are analyzed in view of the requirements for an efficient hydrogen cell factory. A special emphasis is put on the tight regulation of hydrogen production in C. saccharolyticus by both redox and energy metabolism. Suggestions for strategies to overcome the current challenges facing the potential use of the organism in hydrogen production are also discussed. PMID:21092203

  12. An efficient numerical calculation of gravitational waves from extreme mass ratio inspirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Ryuichi; Hikida, Wataru; Tagoshi, Hideyuki

    2009-03-01

    Gravitational waves from extreme mass ratio inspirals are one of the important sources of LISA. We should calculate these waves so accurately that we can extract physical information of source by data analysis. Recently, we developed an efficient numerical method to compute gravitational waves from binary systems in which a point particle moves in circular orbits on the equatorial plane of the black hole. In this paper, we apply this method to compute gravitational waves from binary systems in which a point particle moves in general bound geodesic orbits of the black hole. We check the accuracy of our code using spherical symmetry of Schwarzschild black hole such that energy flux radiated by a point particle is independent of the inclination angle from the equatorial plane of black hole. We find that the accuracy of our code may be limited only by truncation of l, k and n -modes, where l is the degree of the spin-weighted spheroidal harmonics, and k and n are harmonics of the polar and radial motion, respectively. Then we evaluate the rate of change of three constants of motion, energy, angular momentum and the Carter constant, due to the emission of gravitational waves from a particle around Kerr black hole. This is the first time to compute the rate of change of the Carter constant using the adiabatic approximation. We also show that we can calculate gravitational waves accurately even in the case of high eccentric orbits. In this work, we truncate l mode up to 20 and estimated that relative accuracy of our numerical results are better than 10-5 even in the high eccentric case, e = 0.9. Our numerical code may be useful to make templates of extreme mass ratio inspirals.

  13. An efficient pipeline wavefront phase recovery for the CAFADIS camera for extremely large telescopes.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Manuel; Rodríguez-Ramos, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we show a fast, specialized hardware implementation of the wavefront phase recovery algorithm using the CAFADIS camera. The CAFADIS camera is a new plenoptic sensor patented by the Universidad de La Laguna (Canary Islands, Spain): international patent PCT/ES2007/000046 (WIPO publication number WO/2007/082975). It can simultaneously measure the wavefront phase and the distance to the light source in a real-time process. The pipeline algorithm is implemented using Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). These devices present architecture capable of handling the sensor output stream using a massively parallel approach and they are efficient enough to resolve several Adaptive Optics (AO) problems in Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) in terms of processing time requirements. The FPGA implementation of the wavefront phase recovery algorithm using the CAFADIS camera is based on the very fast computation of two dimensional fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs). Thus we have carried out a comparison between our very novel FPGA 2D-FFTa and other implementations. PMID:22315523

  14. An Efficient Pipeline Wavefront Phase Recovery for the CAFADIS Camera for Extremely Large Telescopes

    PubMed Central

    Magdaleno, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Manuel; Rodríguez-Ramos, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we show a fast, specialized hardware implementation of the wavefront phase recovery algorithm using the CAFADIS camera. The CAFADIS camera is a new plenoptic sensor patented by the Universidad de La Laguna (Canary Islands, Spain): international patent PCT/ES2007/000046 (WIPO publication number WO/2007/082975). It can simultaneously measure the wavefront phase and the distance to the light source in a real-time process. The pipeline algorithm is implemented using Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). These devices present architecture capable of handling the sensor output stream using a massively parallel approach and they are efficient enough to resolve several Adaptive Optics (AO) problems in Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) in terms of processing time requirements. The FPGA implementation of the wavefront phase recovery algorithm using the CAFADIS camera is based on the very fast computation of two dimensional fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs). Thus we have carried out a comparison between our very novel FPGA 2D-FFTa and other implementations. PMID:22315523

  15. Extreme Thermophilic Enzyme CelB-m Efficiently Degrades the Cellulose in Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiandong; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Ruoxue

    2015-09-01

    Agricultural and forestry wastes abundant in the plant biomass are an important resource of green energy. However, little is known about how to exploit efficiently the resource. In this study, we isolated the CelB gene that encodes the extremely thermophilic cellulose-degrading enzyme from Thermotoga maritime. The enzyme-encoding gene CelB was optimized and reconstructed in N' codes by the code adaptability in Arabidopsis thaliana. Then, the optimized gene (CelB-m) or the recombinant gene (CBD-CelB) was fused with the plant binary vector which harbors the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene that was transferred into Arabidopsis, respectively. GUS assay results showed CelB gene ubiquitous expression in transgenic plants. The enzyme-activity assays exhibited that the cellulase activity in the leaves of CelB-m transgenic plants were significantly higher than that of wild-type plants. The highest amount of enzymatic activity obtained was 131.2 U for every gram of fresh leaves in CBD-CelB plants. In addition, the enzymatic activity was stable at the temperature of 90 °C. These results suggested that the ectopic expression of pertinent biomass-degrading enzymes in transgenic plants can degrade effectively the plant biomass and lay a foundation on the application for the transgenic technique to crops. PMID:26186956

  16. An evaluation of the differences in the rumen transcriptome among beef steers with extreme feed efficiency phenotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feed is the largest variable cost in beef production and the rumen likely has a critical role in an animal’s ability to efficiently utilize feed. We identified differentially expressed transcripts in animals with extreme differences in postweaning feed intake and gain. Rumen papillae RNA samples wer...

  17. LIMSAT: An Ultra-violet Time Domain Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phinney, E. S.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Ofek, E.; Waxman, E.; Scargle, J.; Worden, S.; Murthy, J.

    2013-01-01

    LIMSAT is a proposed joint US-Israel mini satellite aimed at systematic time domain studies of the UV Universe. The satellite consists of eight 12cm telescopes with a total instantaneous field of view of about 1100 square degrees in the spectral band 200-240nm. A sun-synchronous orbit allows continuous viewing of the anti-sun equatorial region. In one year LIMSAT would have covered an equatorial band (about 2.5% of the sky), providing about one month of continuous photometry of all objects in this field, with all data downlinked within 10 minutes of acquisition. While the primary objective of LIMSAT is the detection of shock breakout, secondary objectives include searches for tidal disruption of stars passing perilously close to nuclear black holes, systematic study of variability of AGN, cataclysmic variables, activity studies of young stars and late type stars, unique studies of extra-solar planets and eclipsing binaries. LIMSAT working along with ground-based synoptic surveys will usher in a new era of time domain studies.

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF RELATIVE SENSITIVITY OF AMPHIBIANS TO ULTRA VIOLET RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Different studies have demonstrated that solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation can adversely affect survival and development of embryonic and larval amphibians. However, because of among-laboratory variations in exposure profiles (artificial vs. natural sunlight; natural sunlight at d...

  19. Systematic investigation of self-absorption and conversion efficiency of 6.7 nm extreme ultraviolet sources

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, Takamitsu; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Kilbane, Deirdre; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Jiang, Weihua; Endo, Akira

    2010-12-06

    We have investigated the dependence of the spectral behavior and conversion efficiencies of rare-earth plasma extreme ultraviolet sources with peak emission at 6.7 nm on laser wavelength and the initial target density. The maximum conversion efficiency was 1.3% at a laser intensity of 1.6x10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} at an operating wavelength of 1064 nm, when self-absorption was reduced by use of a low initial density target. Moreover, the lower-density results in a narrower spectrum and therefore improved spectral purity. It is shown to be important to use a low initial density target and/or to produce low electron density plasmas for efficient extreme ultraviolet sources when using high-Z targets.

  20. A novel microfluidic approach for extremely fast and efficient photochemical transformations in fluoropolymer microcapillary films.

    PubMed

    Reis, N M; Li Puma, G

    2015-05-18

    The unique optical properties of the fluoropolymer microcapillary film (MCF) material combined with the extremely fast photoinactivation of Herpes HSV-1 virus, and photodegradation of indigo carmine, diclofenac and benzoylecgonine in the MCF array photoreactor, demonstrate a new, flexible and inexpensive platform for rapid photochemical transformations, high-throughput process analytics and photochemical synthesis. PMID:25849647

  1. Wavelength Shifting Efficiency of Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB) at Extreme Ultraviolet Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Christopher; Orebi Gann, Gabriel; Gehman, Victor

    2015-10-01

    Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB) is a commonly used wavelength shifter (WLS) in neutrino and dark matter liquid noble gas scintillator detectors. Thin films of wavelength shifters are used to shift ultraviolet scintillation light into the visible spectrum for event reconstruction. The wavelength shifting efficiency of TPB is a function of the incident ultraviolet photon wavelength and is an important parameter for detector design, simulation and reconstruction. The wavelength shifting efficiency and emission spectrum has been previously measured down to 120 nm [Gehman et al., 2011]. To build liquid noble gas scintillator detectors with lighter elements (Ne, He) that use TPB as a WLS medium, the wavelength shifting efficiency must be known closer to 80 nm. This talk will present the current status and preliminary results from a set of measurements that will improve the precision of the efficiency of 120 nm, and extend the data to wavelengths as low as 45 nm.

  2. Absolute intensity calibration of the Wendelstein 7-X high efficiency extreme ultraviolet overview spectrometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiche, Albert; Biel, Wolfgang; Marchuk, Oleksandr; Burhenn, Rainer

    2008-09-01

    The new high effiency extreme ultraviolet overview spectrometer (HEXOS) system for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X is now mounted for testing and adjustment at the tokamak experiment for technology oriented research (TEXTOR). One part of the testing phase was the intensity calibration of the two double spectrometers which in total cover a spectral range from 2.5 to 160.0 nm with overlap. This work presents the current intensity calibration curves for HEXOS and describes the method of calibration. The calibration was implemented with calibrated lines of a hollow cathode light source and the branching ratio technique. The hollow cathode light source provides calibrated lines from 16 up to 147 nm. We could extend the calibrated region in the spectrometers down to 2.8 nm by using the branching line pairs emitted by an uncalibrated pinch extreme ultraviolet light source as well as emission lines from boron and carbon in TEXTOR plasmas. In total HEXOS is calibrated from 2.8 up to 147 nm, which covers most of the observable wavelength region. The approximate density of carbon in the range of the minor radius from 18 to 35 cm in a TEXTOR plasma determined by simulating calibrated vacuum ultraviolet emission lines with a transport code was 5.5×1017 m-3 which corresponds to a local carbon concentration of 2%.

  3. Extremely efficient exciton fission and fusion and its dominant contribution to the photoluminescence yield in rubrene single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biaggio, Ivan; Irkhin, Pavel

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of photoluminescence yield over a wide range of excitation power in rubrene single crystals reveal a transition between a low-yield region and a region with a yield more than an order of magnitude larger. This transition occurs at an excitation density of 3 × 1020 cm-3 absorbed photons per second. This power dependence is predicted in case of an extremely efficient conversion between singlet and triplet excitons through fission and fusion. Triplet fusion starts contributing to rubrene's photoluminescence already at intensities of a few mW/cm2 at room temperature, corresponding to triplet densities of ˜1016 cm-3.

  4. Development of a liquid tin microjet target for an efficient laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source.

    PubMed

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Hamada, Masaya; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2007-03-01

    A regenerative tin liquid microjet target was developed for a high average power extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source. The diameter of the target was smaller than 160 microm and good vacuum lower than 0.5 Pa was maintained during the operation. A maximum EUV conversion efficiency of 1.8% at the Nd:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser intensity of around 2 x 10(11) Wcm(2) with a spot diameter of 175 microm (full width at half maximum) was observed. The angular distribution of the EUV emission remained almost isotropic, whereas suprathermal ions mainly emerged toward the target normal. PMID:17411231

  5. Development of a liquid tin microjet target for an efficient laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Hamada, Masaya; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2007-03-01

    A regenerative tin liquid microjet target was developed for a high average power extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source. The diameter of the target was smaller than 160 μm and good vacuum lower than 0.5 Pa was maintained during the operation. A maximum EUV conversion efficiency of 1.8% at the Nd:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser intensity of around 2×1011 W/cm2 with a spot diameter of 175 μm (full width at half maximum) was observed. The angular distribution of the EUV emission remained almost isotropic, whereas suprathermal ions mainly emerged toward the target normal.

  6. Numerical Research of Steam and Gas Plant Efficiency of Triple Cycle for Extreme North Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galashov, Nikolay; Tsibulskii, Svjatoslav; Matveev, Aleksandr; Masjuk, Vladimir

    2016-02-01

    The present work shows that temperature decrease of heat rejection in a cycle is necessary for energy efficiency of steam turbine plants. Minimum temperature of heat rejection at steam turbine plant work on water steam is 15°C. Steam turbine plant of triple cycle where lower cycle of steam turbine plant is organic Rankine cycle on low-boiling substance with heat rejection in air condenser, which safely allows rejecting heat at condensation temperatures below 0°C, has been offered. Mathematical model of steam and gas plant of triple cycle, which allows conducting complex researches with change of working body appearance and parameters defining thermodynamic efficiency of cycles, has been developed. On the basis of the model a program of parameters and index cycles design of steam and gas plants has been developed in a package of electron tables Excel. Numerical studies of models showed that energy efficiency of steam turbine plants of triple cycle strongly depend on low-boiling substance type in a lower cycle. Energy efficiency of steam and gas plants net 60% higher can be received for steam and gas plants on the basis of gas turbine plant NK-36ST on pentane and its condensation temperature below 0°C. It was stated that energy efficiency of steam and gas plants net linearly depends on condensation temperature of low-boiling substance type and temperature of gases leaving reco very boiler. Energy efficiency increases by 1% at 10% decrease of condensation temperature of pentane, and it increases by 0.88% at 15°C temperature decrease of gases leaving recovery boiler.

  7. Extreme ultraviolet quantum efficiency of opaque alkali halide photocathodes on microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Everman, E.; Vallerga, J. V.; Lampton, M.

    1988-01-01

    Comprehensive measurements are presented for the quantum detection efficiency (QDE) of the microchannel plate materials CsI, KBr, KCl, and MgF2, over the 44-1800 A wavelength range. QDEs in excess of 40 percent are achieved by several materials in specific wavelength regions of the EUV. Structure is noted in the wavelength dependence of the QDE that is directly related to the valence-band/conduction-band gap energy and the onset of atomic-like resonant transitions. A simple photocathode model allows interpretation of these features, together with the QDE efficiency variation, as a function of illumination angle.

  8. Silicon-Carbide Power MOSFET Performance in High Efficiency Boost Power Processing Unit for Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikpe, Stanley A.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Carr, Gregory A.; Hunter, Don; Ludwig, Lawrence L.; Wood, William; Del Castillo, Linda Y.; Fitzpatrick, Fred; Chen, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Silicon-Carbide device technology has generated much interest in recent years. With superior thermal performance, power ratings and potential switching frequencies over its Silicon counterpart, Silicon-Carbide offers a greater possibility for high powered switching applications in extreme environment. In particular, Silicon-Carbide Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors' (MOSFETs) maturing process technology has produced a plethora of commercially available power dense, low on-state resistance devices capable of switching at high frequencies. A novel hard-switched power processing unit (PPU) is implemented utilizing Silicon-Carbide power devices. Accelerated life data is captured and assessed in conjunction with a damage accumulation model of gate oxide and drain-source junction lifetime to evaluate potential system performance at high temperature environments.

  9. A modified hyperplane clustering algorithm allows for efficient and accurate clustering of extremely large datasets

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashok; Podolsky, Robert; Zhao, Jieping; McIndoe, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: As the number of publically available microarray experiments increases, the ability to analyze extremely large datasets across multiple experiments becomes critical. There is a requirement to develop algorithms which are fast and can cluster extremely large datasets without affecting the cluster quality. Clustering is an unsupervised exploratory technique applied to microarray data to find similar data structures or expression patterns. Because of the high input/output costs involved and large distance matrices calculated, most of the algomerative clustering algorithms fail on large datasets (30 000 + genes/200 + arrays). In this article, we propose a new two-stage algorithm which partitions the high-dimensional space associated with microarray data using hyperplanes. The first stage is based on the Balanced Iterative Reducing and Clustering using Hierarchies algorithm with the second stage being a conventional k-means clustering technique. This algorithm has been implemented in a software tool (HPCluster) designed to cluster gene expression data. We compared the clustering results using the two-stage hyperplane algorithm with the conventional k-means algorithm from other available programs. Because, the first stage traverses the data in a single scan, the performance and speed increases substantially. The data reduction accomplished in the first stage of the algorithm reduces the memory requirements allowing us to cluster 44 460 genes without failure and significantly decreases the time to complete when compared with popular k-means programs. The software was written in C# (.NET 1.1). Availability: The program is freely available and can be downloaded from http://www.amdcc.org/bioinformatics/bioinformatics.aspx. Contact: rmcindoe@mail.mcg.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19261720

  10. Drainage efficiency in the urban environment under non-extreme rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronica, G.; Lanza, L.

    2003-04-01

    It is a common experience that failures in urban drainage systems occur quite frequently as a consequence of rainfall events presenting relatively lower return periods than expected, even in the case of correctly designed sewer networks and pipes. Inlets are in those cases the critical nodes, and efficient drainage is only ensured when care is taken on their appropriate design and positioning within the drainage area. The lack of maintenance and overloads in the hydraulic system conducing street waters into the pipe network are often responsible for drainage failures and the consequent flooding of urban areas. Simulation of the drainage network efficiency should therefore take into account both the hydraulics of sewer pipes and the performances of the surface-subsurface connecting devices. Assuming correct dimensioning and positioning, still large uncertainties hold about the actual operation of such simple devices, due to unpredictable obstruction effects or anyway limited drainage capabilities. This contribution amplifies upon the evaluation of these uncertainties by employing a mixed approach made of some deterministic and stochastic components. The deterministic part is obtained by using an hyperbolic hydraulic model for the simulation of flood wave propagation over surface urban drainage structures, i.e. streets and pathways. The stochastic component is intended as the efficiency function controlling the inlets operation at various stages of the drainage process. The aim is to evaluate the effects of unpredictable drainage failures in a distributed form throughout the system in order to assess the efficiency of the drainage network as a whole.

  11. Efficient high-order diffraction of extreme-ultraviolet light and soft x-rays by nanostructured volume gratings.

    PubMed

    Hambach, D; Schneider, G; Gullikson, E M

    2001-08-01

    We report what is believed to be the first demonstration that volume gratings diffract extreme-ultraviolet light (EUV) or soft x-rays into high orders approximately an order of magnitude more efficiently than predicted by classical thin-grating theory. At the 13-nm wavelength, copolymer grating structures with 200-nm period and aspect ratios of ~10:1 achieved diffraction efficiencies of 11.2%, 15.3%, 11.5%, and 9.1% in the orders m of 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. In addition, the measured transmission spectra are consistent with electrodynamic calculations by coupled-wave theory. High-order diffraction can now be employed for substantially improved diffractive EUV and x-ray optics, e.g., highly resolving diffractive lenses and large-aperture condensers. PMID:18049562

  12. Cyanopyridine Based Bipolar Host Materials for Green Electrophosphorescence with Extremely Low Turn-On Voltages and High Power Efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Li, Jiuyan; Liu, Di; Li, Deli; Wang, Fang

    2016-08-24

    Low driving voltage and high power efficiency are basic requirements when practical applications of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) in displays and lighting are considered. Two novel host materials m-PyCNmCP and 3-PyCNmCP incorporating cyanopyridine moiety as electron-transporting unit are developed for use in fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine)iridium(III) (Ir(ppy)3) based green phosphorescent OLEDs (PhOLEDs). Extremely low turn-on voltages of 2.01 and 2.27 V are realized, which are even lower than the theoretical limit of the emitted photon energy (hv)/electron charge (e) (2.37 V) of Ir(ppy)3. High power efficiency of 101.4 lm/W (corresponding to a maximum external quantum efficiency of 18.4%) and 119.3 lm/W (24.7%) are achieved for m-PyCNmCP and 3-PyCNmCP based green PhOLEDs. The excellent EL performance benefits from the ideal parameters of host materials by combining cyano and pyridine to enhance the n-type feature. The energetic favorable alignment of HOMO/LUMO levels of hosts with adjacent layers and the dopant for easy charge injections and direct charge trapping by dopant, their bipolar feature to balance charge transportations, sufficiently high triplet energy and small singlet/triplet energy difference (0.38 and 0.43 eV) combine to be responsible for the extremely low driving voltages and high power efficiencies of the green PhOLEDs. PMID:27479511

  13. Extremely Accessible Potassium Nitrate (KNO3) as the Highly Efficient Electrolyte Additive in Lithium Battery.

    PubMed

    Jia, Weishang; Fan, Cong; Wang, Liping; Wang, Qingji; Zhao, Mingjuan; Zhou, Aijun; Li, Jingze

    2016-06-22

    The systematic investigation of RNO3 salts (R = Li, Na, K, and Cs) as electrolyte additives was carried out for lithium-battery systems. For the first time, the abundant and extremely available KNO3 was proved to be an excellent alternative of LiNO3 for suppression of the lithium dendrites. The reason was ascribed to the possible synergetic effect of K(+) and NO3(-) ions: The positively charged K(+) ion could surround the lithium dendrites by electrostatic attraction and then delay their further growth, while simultaneously the oxidative NO3(-) ion could be reduced and subsequently profitable to the reinforcement of the solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI). By adding KNO3 into the practical Li-S battery, the discharging capacity was enhanced to average 687 mAh g(-1) from the case without KNO3 (528 mAh g(-1)) during 100 cycles, which was comparable to the one with the well-known LiNO3 additive (637 mAh g(-1)) under the same conditions. PMID:27237827

  14. Efficient multiline nanosecond pulse amplification in planar waveguide CO₂ amplifier for extreme UV laser-produced plasma source.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Krzysztof M; Ohta, Takeshi; Suganuma, Takashi; Fujimoto, Junichi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru; Sumitani, Akira; Endo, Akira

    2014-04-01

    In this Letter, we report on recent experimental results of a short pulse amplification at 10.6 μm wavelength required to drive a tin laser-produced plasma (LPP) extreme ultraviolet (UV) source. We report for the first time, to our best knowledge, a highly efficient pulsed amplification in a multipass amplifier built on RF-discharge-excited, diffusion-cooled CO2, planar waveguide industrial CO2 laser. About 2 kW of output average power was obtained from about 100 W input average power in ∼15  ns pulses at 100 kHz pulse repetition frequency. As much as 60% relative extraction efficiency, as compared to continuous-wave amplification in similar conditions, and 5.8% wall-plug efficiency was recorded and believed to be the highest reported so far. An improvement of extraction efficiency by ∼10% is reported when driving the amplifier with two lines of CO2 regular band in good agreement with expectations. PMID:24686647

  15. Efficient pulse amplification using a transverse-flow CO2 laser for extreme ultraviolet light source.

    PubMed

    Tanino, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Nishimae, Junichi; Fujikawa, Shuichi

    2012-08-15

    We constructed a master oscillator power amplifier CO2 laser system using a transverse-flow, RF-pumped CW CO2 laser. We carried out an amplification test at a 100% duty cycle of pumping discharge with the electrical input for the discharge up to 60 kW. An output power of 1.90 kW was achieved at the oscillator repetition rate of 100 kHz and the optical input power of 13 W. The electrical-to-optical efficiency was 3.1%. PMID:23381237

  16. Hourglass-graded heterostructures as a possible route towards extremely efficient light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaux, Julien; Iqbal, Asif; Bevan, Kirk H.

    2015-08-01

    In this study a theoretical analysis of hourglass-graded light emitting diodes (LEDs) is provided. The term hourglass-grading refers to the placement of a wide band gap material at the diode contacts, smoothly tapering to a smaller band gap material in the active centre region. Utilizing AlGaN as our model system, we show that such a device can both effectively confine carrier recombination and mitigate overflow under high doping conditions. Moreover, by lowering the Auger coefficient of recombination in the active region, room temperature internal quantum efficiencies of 95% or more might be achieved in hourglass-graded LEDs at drive currents near 103 A cm-2.

  17. Extremely efficient and recyclable absorbents for oily pollutants enabled by ultrathin-layered functionalization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianqian; Wang, Hanghua; Xiong, Sen; Chen, Rizhi; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-12

    Oils and organic solvents that leak into water bodies must be promptly removed to avoid ecological disasters, for example, by selective absorption using oleophilic absorbents. However, it remains a challenge for the low-cost synthesis of efficient and recyclable absorbents for oily pollutants. By surface functionalization to inexpensive polyurethane (PU) foams, we synthesize oil absorbents exhibiting the highest absorption capacity and the best recyclability among all polymeric absorbents. The synthesis is enabled by atomic layer deposition of ∼5 nm-thick Al2O3 transition layer onto the skeleton surface of PU foams, followed by coupling a single-molecule layer of silanes to the Al2O3 layer. The sub-10 nm functionalization layer provides the PU foam an outstanding water-repelling and oil-absorbing functionality without compromising its high porosity and elasticity. The functionalized foam is able to quickly absorb oily pollutants spread on water surfaces or precipitated in water with a capacity more than 100 times its own weight. This ultrathin-layer-functionalization method is also applicable to renewable porous biomaterials, providing a sustainable solution for oil spills. Moreover, we propose devices than can continuously operate to efficiently collect oil spills from water surfaces based on the functionalized PU foam developed in this work. PMID:25315285

  18. Efficient Collection of Methane from Extremely Large Volumes of Water for Natural Radiocarbon Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, K. J.; Kessler, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Collecting sufficient amounts of natural methane sample for a high precision radiocarbon (14C-CH4) analysis was previously unfeasible when sampling from low methane concentration waters like the open ocean. A new method incorporating dissolved gas extraction technology (Liqui-Cel® membrane contactors) has been developed to circumvent the challenges that natural 14C-CH4 sampling presents. With this method, adequate amounts of methane-carbon for a traditional 14C-accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analysis can be cleanly and efficiently extracted from 1000s L water in a few hours. This technique is currently being improved to enable sampling from > 11,000 L water in less than 1 hr. For transport from the field to the laboratory, each extracted gas sample is compressed into a small (1.68 L) high-pressure aluminum cylinder using an oil-free compressor pump. Due to the small size and portability of the sample cylinders, high resolution sampling plans composed of 30+ samples are possible even in remote locations. The laboratory preparation of these methane samples for 14C-AMS analyses is carried out on a new flow-through vacuum line. While the bulk water vapor and carbon dioxide (CO2) are removed before the sample is compressed in the field, the residual trace amounts of these constituents are cryogenically removed from the sample in the initial phase of the vacuum line. Carbon monoxide in the sample is quantitatively oxidized at 290°C to CO2 and cryogenically removed. Finally, the sample methane is quantitatively oxidized at 950°C to products CO2 and water and then cryogenically isolated. The new vacuum line technique achieves low blanks and purifies and oxidizes the methane contained in the extracted gas sample with high efficiency. At an AMS facility, an aliquot of the methane-produced CO2 is graphitized and analyzed for radiocarbon content using traditional 14C-AMS. Supporting dual-inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometry measurements are conducted to determine both

  19. A highly efficient multi-core algorithm for clustering extremely large datasets

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In recent years, the demand for computational power in computational biology has increased due to rapidly growing data sets from microarray and other high-throughput technologies. This demand is likely to increase. Standard algorithms for analyzing data, such as cluster algorithms, need to be parallelized for fast processing. Unfortunately, most approaches for parallelizing algorithms largely rely on network communication protocols connecting and requiring multiple computers. One answer to this problem is to utilize the intrinsic capabilities in current multi-core hardware to distribute the tasks among the different cores of one computer. Results We introduce a multi-core parallelization of the k-means and k-modes cluster algorithms based on the design principles of transactional memory for clustering gene expression microarray type data and categorial SNP data. Our new shared memory parallel algorithms show to be highly efficient. We demonstrate their computational power and show their utility in cluster stability and sensitivity analysis employing repeated runs with slightly changed parameters. Computation speed of our Java based algorithm was increased by a factor of 10 for large data sets while preserving computational accuracy compared to single-core implementations and a recently published network based parallelization. Conclusions Most desktop computers and even notebooks provide at least dual-core processors. Our multi-core algorithms show that using modern algorithmic concepts, parallelization makes it possible to perform even such laborious tasks as cluster sensitivity and cluster number estimation on the laboratory computer. PMID:20370922

  20. Wavelength-Scale Structures as Extremely High Haze Films for Efficient Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Ham, Juyoung; Dong, Wan Jae; Jung, Gwan Ho; Lee, Jong-Lam

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength-scale inverted pyramid structures with low reflectance and excellent haze have been designed for application to polymer solar cells (PSCs). The wavelength-scale structured haze films are fabricated on the back surface of glass without damages to organic active layer by using a soft lithographic technique with etched GaN molds. With a rigorous coupled-wave analysis of optical modeling, we find the shift of resonance peaks with the increase of pattern's diameter. Wavelength-scale structures could provide the number of resonances at the long wavelength spectrum (λ = 650-800 nm), yielding enhancement of power conversion efficiency (PCE) in the PSCs. Compared with a flat device (PCE = 7.12%, Jsc = 15.6 mA/cm(2)), improved PCE of 8.41% is achieved in a haze film, which is mainly due to the increased short circuit current density (Jsc) of 17.5 mA/cm(2). Hence, it opens up exciting opportunities for a variety of PSCs with wavelength-scale structures to further improve performance, simplify complicated process, and reduce costs. PMID:26901630

  1. An Efficient Leave-One-Out Cross-Validation-Based Extreme Learning Machine (ELOO-ELM) With Minimal User Intervention.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhifei; Er, Meng Joo; Wang, Ning

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that the architecture of the extreme learning machine (ELM) significantly affects its performance and how to determine a suitable set of hidden neurons is recognized as a key issue to some extent. The leave-one-out cross-validation (LOO-CV) is usually used to select a model with good generalization performance among potential candidates. The primary reason for using the LOO-CV is that it is unbiased and reliable as long as similar distribution exists in the training and testing data. However, the LOO-CV has rarely been implemented in practice because of its notorious slow execution speed. In this paper, an efficient LOO-CV formula and an efficient LOO-CV-based ELM (ELOO-ELM) algorithm are proposed. The proposed ELOO-ELM algorithm can achieve fast learning speed similar to the original ELM without compromising the reliability feature of the LOO-CV. Furthermore, minimal user intervention is required for the ELOO-ELM, thus it can be easily adopted by nonexperts and implemented in automation processes. Experimentation studies on benchmark datasets demonstrate that the proposed ELOO-ELM algorithm can achieve good generalization with limited user intervention while retaining the efficiency feature. PMID:26259254

  2. Efficient hybrid white organic light-emitting diodes with extremely long lifetime: the effect of n-type interlayer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baiquan; Wang, Lei; Xu, Miao; Tao, Hong; Zou, Jianhua; Gao, Dongyu; Lan, Linfeng; Ning, Honglong; Peng, Junbiao; Cao, Yong

    2014-01-01

    The effect of n-type interlayer in hybrid white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) has been systematically investigated by using various n-type materials. A new finding, that the triplet energy rather than electron mobility or hole-blocking ability of interlayer plays a more positive role in the performance of hybrid WOLEDs, is demonstrated. Based on the new finding, a more efficient n-type interlayer bis[2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-pyridine] beryllium has been employed to realize a high-performance hybrid WOLED. The resulting device (without n-doping technology) exhibits low voltages (i.e., 2.8 V for 1 cd/m2, 3.9 V for 100 cd/m2) and low efficiency roll-off (i.e., 11.5 cd/A at 100 cd/m2 and 11.2 cd/A at 1000 cd/m2). At the display-relevant luminance of 100 cd/m2, a total power efficiency of 16.0 lm/W, a color rendering index of 73 and an extremely long lifetime of 12596265 h are obtained. Such superior results not only comprehensively indicate that the n-type materials are effective interlayers to develop high-performance hybrid WOLEDs but also demonstrate a significant step towards real commercialization in WOLEDs. PMID:25425090

  3. Extremely efficient exciton fission and fusion and its dominant contribution to the photoluminescence yield in rubrene single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Biaggio, Ivan; Irkhin, Pavel

    2013-12-23

    Measurements of photoluminescence yield over a wide range of excitation power in rubrene single crystals reveal a transition between a low-yield region and a region with a yield more than an order of magnitude larger. This transition occurs at an excitation density of 3 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} absorbed photons per second. This power dependence is predicted in case of an extremely efficient conversion between singlet and triplet excitons through fission and fusion. Triplet fusion starts contributing to rubrene's photoluminescence already at intensities of a few mW/cm{sup 2} at room temperature, corresponding to triplet densities of ∼10{sup 16} cm{sup −3}.

  4. Efficient extreme ultraviolet plasma source generated by a CO2 laser and a liquid xenon microjet target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Ariga, Tatsuya; Soumagne, George; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Kubodera, Shoichi; Pogorelsky, Igor; Pavlishin, Igor; Stolyarov, Daniil; Babzien, Marcus; Kusche, Karl; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2007-05-01

    We demonstrated efficacy of a CO2-laser-produced xenon plasma in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region at 13.5nm at variable laser pulse widths between 200ps and 25ns. The plasma target was a 30μm liquid xenon microjet. To ensure the optimum coupling of CO2 laser energy with the plasma, they applied a prepulse yttrium aluminum garnet laser. The authors measured the conversion efficiency (CE) of the 13.5nm EUV emission for different pulse widths of the CO2 laser. A maximum CE of 0.6% was obtained for a CO2 laser pulse width of 25ns at an intensity of 5×1010W/cm2.

  5. Low-debris, efficient laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source by use of a regenerative liquid microjet target containing tin dioxide (SnO2) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Dojyo, Naoto; Hamada, Masaya; Sasaki, Wataru; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2006-05-01

    We demonstrated a low-debris, efficient laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source by use of a regenerative liquid microjet target containing tin-dioxide (SnO2) nanoparticles. By using a low SnO2 concentration (6%) solution and dual laser pulses for the plasma control, we observed the EUV conversion efficiency of 1.2% with undetectable debris.

  6. AN AUTOMATIC DETECTION METHOD FOR EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET DIMMINGS ASSOCIATED WITH SMALL-SCALE ERUPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Alipour, N.; Safari, H.; Innes, D. E.

    2012-02-10

    Small-scale extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) dimming often surrounds sites of energy release in the quiet Sun. This paper describes a method for the automatic detection of these small-scale EUV dimmings using a feature-based classifier. The method is demonstrated using sequences of 171 Angstrom-Sign images taken by the STEREO/Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI) on 2007 June 13 and by Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on 2010 August 27. The feature identification relies on recognizing structure in sequences of space-time 171 Angstrom-Sign images using the Zernike moments of the images. The Zernike moments space-time slices with events and non-events are distinctive enough to be separated using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The SVM is trained using 150 events and 700 non-event space-time slices. We find a total of 1217 events in the EUVI images and 2064 events in the AIA images on the days studied. Most of the events are found between latitudes -35 Degree-Sign and +35 Degree-Sign . The sizes and expansion speeds of central dimming regions are extracted using a region grow algorithm. The histograms of the sizes in both EUVI and AIA follow a steep power law with slope of about -5. The AIA slope extends to smaller sizes before turning over. The mean velocity of 1325 dimming regions seen by AIA is found to be about 14 km s{sup -1}.

  7. Novel Nanophosphors for High Efficiency Fluorescent Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Alok M. Srivastava

    2005-09-30

    This is the Yearly Report of the Novel Nanophosphors for High Efficiency Fluorescent Lamps, Department of Energy (DOE). The overall goal of this three-year program is to develop novel hybrid phosphors by coating commercially available lamp phosphors with highly stable wide band-gap nanocrystalline phosphors (NCP). The novel hybrid phosphors will increase the efficiency of the fluorescent lamps by up to 32%, enabling total energy savings of 0.26 quads, the reduction in the U.S. energy bill by $6.5 billion and the reduction of the annual carbon emission by 4.1 billion kilogram. The prime technical approach is the development of NCP quantum-splitting phosphor (QSP) and ultra-violet emitting phosphors with quantum efficiencies exceeding that of the conventional phosphors at 185 nm. Our chief achievement, during the current contract period, pertains to the successful synthesis and characterization of coated phosphors. We demonstrated several synthesis techniques for the coating of micron sized commercial phosphors with quantum-splitting and UV emitting nanophosphors. We have also continued our fundamental investigations into the physical processes that determine the quantum efficiency of the nanophosphors and this has further helped codify a set of rules for the host lattice that support efficient quantum splitting and UV emission at room temperature. In this report we summarize the technical work completed under the Program, summarize our findings about the performance limits of the various technologies we investigated, and outline promising paths for future work.

  8. Using a Clean Energy Version of Moore's Law to Plan for the Extreme Efficiency of the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Buskirk, Robert

    2014-03-01

    In 1965, Gordon Moore predicted a decade of exponential growth in the transistor density growth (and hence computing power) for integrated circuits that--with some modification--has held to the present day. In this talk, we discuss to what extent clean energy technologies are subject to similar laws of long term exponential improvement and how these improvement rates may be accelerating due to recent developments. We review a range of long term energy efficiency and technology productivity improvement trends ranging from lighting, televisions, refrigerators, HVAC, batteries, motors, power electronics and solar PV. After reviewing historical and recent trends, we discuss several factors that may lead to an acceleration of improvement rates in the clean energy technology sector. Finally, we discuss the Baumol effect which predicts how differential trends in technology productivity may affect trends in relative prices in the economy. We conclude with a discussion of some of the implications that Baumol's theories may have for the development of extreme levels of energy efficiency in the coming decades.

  9. An efficient diagnosis system for Parkinson's disease using kernel-based extreme learning machine with subtractive clustering features weighting approach.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Ouyang, Jihong; Chen, Hui-Ling; Zhao, Xue-Hua

    2014-01-01

    A novel hybrid method named SCFW-KELM, which integrates effective subtractive clustering features weighting and a fast classifier kernel-based extreme learning machine (KELM), has been introduced for the diagnosis of PD. In the proposed method, SCFW is used as a data preprocessing tool, which aims at decreasing the variance in features of the PD dataset, in order to further improve the diagnostic accuracy of the KELM classifier. The impact of the type of kernel functions on the performance of KELM has been investigated in detail. The efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed method have been rigorously evaluated against the PD dataset in terms of classification accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC), f-measure, and kappa statistics value. Experimental results have demonstrated that the proposed SCFW-KELM significantly outperforms SVM-based, KNN-based, and ELM-based approaches and other methods in the literature and achieved highest classification results reported so far via 10-fold cross validation scheme, with the classification accuracy of 99.49%, the sensitivity of 100%, the specificity of 99.39%, AUC of 99.69%, the f-measure value of 0.9964, and kappa value of 0.9867. Promisingly, the proposed method might serve as a new candidate of powerful methods for the diagnosis of PD with excellent performance. PMID:25484912

  10. Efficient trans-cleavage by the Schistosoma mansoni SMα1 hammerhead ribozyme in the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Tello, Alejandro; Castán, Pablo; Moreno, Renata; Smith, James M.; Berenguer, José; Cedergren, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The catalytic hammerhead structure has been found in association with repetitive DNA from several animals, including salamanders, crickets and schistosomes, and functions to process in cis the long multimer transcripts into monomer RNA in vivo. The cellular role of these repetitive elements and their transcripts is unknown. Moreover, none of these natural hammerheads have been shown to trans-cleave a host mRNA in vivo. We analyzed the cis- and trans-cleavage properties of the hammerhead ribozyme associated with the SMα DNA family from the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. The efficiency of trans-cleavage of a target RNA in vitro was affected mainly by both the temperature-dependent chemical step and the ribozyme–product dissociation step. The optimal temperature for trans-cleavage was 70°C. This result was confirmed when both the SMα1 ribozyme and the target RNA were expressed in the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus. Moreover, SMα1 RNA showed a remarkable thermostability, equal or superior to that of the most stable RNAs in this species, suggesting that SMα1 RNA has been selected for stability. Computer analysis predicts that the monomer and multimer transcripts fold into highly compact secondary structures, which may explain their exceptional stability in vivo. PMID:11917021

  11. An Efficient Diagnosis System for Parkinson's Disease Using Kernel-Based Extreme Learning Machine with Subtractive Clustering Features Weighting Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chao; Ouyang, Jihong; Chen, Hui-Ling; Zhao, Xue-Hua

    2014-01-01

    A novel hybrid method named SCFW-KELM, which integrates effective subtractive clustering features weighting and a fast classifier kernel-based extreme learning machine (KELM), has been introduced for the diagnosis of PD. In the proposed method, SCFW is used as a data preprocessing tool, which aims at decreasing the variance in features of the PD dataset, in order to further improve the diagnostic accuracy of the KELM classifier. The impact of the type of kernel functions on the performance of KELM has been investigated in detail. The efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed method have been rigorously evaluated against the PD dataset in terms of classification accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC), f-measure, and kappa statistics value. Experimental results have demonstrated that the proposed SCFW-KELM significantly outperforms SVM-based, KNN-based, and ELM-based approaches and other methods in the literature and achieved highest classification results reported so far via 10-fold cross validation scheme, with the classification accuracy of 99.49%, the sensitivity of 100%, the specificity of 99.39%, AUC of 99.69%, the f-measure value of 0.9964, and kappa value of 0.9867. Promisingly, the proposed method might serve as a new candidate of powerful methods for the diagnosis of PD with excellent performance. PMID:25484912

  12. Efficiency droop enhancement in AlGaN deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes by making whole barriers but the bottom Mg doped

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Sun, Huiqing; Yi, Xinyan; Yang, Xian; Fan, Xuancong; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhuding; Guo, Zhiyou

    2016-09-01

    Ultra violet light-emitting diodes (UVLEDs) with different types of Mg-doped barriers have been studied. The energy band diagrams, internal quantum efficiency, total output power and radiative recombination rate are investigated by APSYS software. The simulation results show that the UVLED with only a p-doped top barrier get little enhancement comparing to the conventional one, on the contrary the structure with p-doping in all but the bottom barriers has a much better optical and electrical properties due to enhancement of the holes' injection and the electrons' confinement. The efficiency droop is significantly alleviated and the light output power is greatly enhanced. To avoid forming a PN junction by the bottom barrier and the n-AlGaN in the proposed structure, therefore, the bottom barrier isn't p-doped. Then structures with different hole densities in the Mg-doped barriers have been studied numerically and that confirmed the best.

  13. Low-debris efficient laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source by use of a regenerative liquid microtarget containing tin nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Dojyo, Naoto; Senba, Yusuke; Suetake, Sumihiro; Katto, Masahito; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2007-05-01

    We demonstrated a debris-free, efficient laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source by use of a regenerative liquid microjet target containing tin-dioxide (SnO II) nano-particles. By using a low SnO II concentration (6%) solution and dual laser pulses for the plasma control, we observed the EUV conversion efficiency of 1.2% with undetectable debris.

  14. Enhancement of conversion efficiency of extreme ultraviolet radiation from a liquid aqueous solution microjet target by use of dual laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Dojyo, Naoto; Hamada, Masaya; Kawasaki, Keita; Sasaki, Wataru; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2006-03-01

    We demonstrated a debris-free, efficient laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source by use of a regenerative liquid microjet target containing tin-dioxide (SnO II) nano-particles. By using a low SnO II concentration (6%) solution and dual laser pulses for the plasma control, we observed the EUV conversion efficiency of 1.2% with undetectable debris.

  15. Optimization of electrostatic chuck for mask-blank flatness control in extreme ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Emily Y.

    2007-05-01

    Overlay requirements of Extreme Ultra-violet Lithography (EUVL) dictate reticle flatness errors of 50nm or less. During the early phase of EUVL development, it was decided that an electrostatic chuck was required to flatten EUVL masks to these specifications. However current experience and test data have demonstrated that it will be very difficult to reach the desired mask flatness goal without a thorough understanding and advanced control of the echucking process. The results of a parametric model study are reported in this paper. In this study we calculated the chucking force dependence of activating voltage, e-chuck geometry, film material, and pin design, and then proposed an optimized chuck design. We have also engaged in a material study for the mask backside coating for the purpose of reducing flatness errors and minimizing backside particle generation. We have also designed and built an automated, vacuum based, interferometric metrology tool to enable e-chucking experimentation. An early status report of this tool will be included in this paper.

  16. Silicon Lightweight Mirrors (SLMS) for Ultraviolet and Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, W. A.; Keys, Andrew S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Subtopic 01-S1.06 requires mirrors with a diameter of 0.5-2.4 meters, areal density less than 20 kg/sq m, a figure specification of 0.02-0.005 waves root mean square (rms) at 633 nanometers, a surface roughness 0.5-1 nanometers rms, and a midfrequency error of 1.0-2.5 nanometers rms for use in the infrared (IR) to extreme ultra violet (EUV) waveband. Schafer's Phase II objective is to use Silicon Lightweight Mirrors (SLMS), a novel, all-silicon, foam-core, lightweight mirror technology, to build three imaging mirrors for the Next Generation Space Telescope Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) Engineering Test Unit: M0 (a flat), M2 (a concave sphere) and M3R (an oblate spheroid). The surface figure error specification for the NIRCam imaging mirrors is 8 nanometers rms (0.013 waves rms at 633 nanometers), equivalent to that required for ultraviolet (UV) and EUV mirrors, and this figure must be maintained at the 35 K operational temperature of NGST. The surface roughness required is 30 A rms since NIRCam operates in the visible to infrared (VIS/IR) (0.65-5 microns). We will produce mounts for mirrors M2 and M3R using the complementary thermally matched C/SiC material demonstrated by Schafer under another NASA SBIR, NAS8-98137.

  17. Diagnosis of energy transport in iron buried layer targets using an extreme ultraviolet laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shahzad, M.; Culfa, O.; Rossall, A. K.; Tallents, G. J.; Wilson, L. A.; Guilbaud, O.; Kazamias, S.; Delmas, O.; Demailly, J.; Maitrallain, A.; Pittman, M.; Baynard, E.; Farjardo, M.

    2015-02-15

    We demonstrate the use of extreme ultra-violet (EUV) laboratory lasers in probing energy transport in laser irradiated solid targets. EUV transmission through targets containing a thin layer of iron (50 nm) encased in plastic (CH) after irradiation by a short pulse (35 fs) laser focussed to irradiances 3 × 10{sup 16} Wcm{sup −2} is measured. Heating of the iron layer gives rise to a rapid decrease in EUV opacity and an increase in the transmission of the 13.9 nm laser radiation as the iron ionizes to Fe{sup 5+} and above where the ion ionisation energy is greater than the EUV probe photon energy (89 eV). A one dimensional hydrodynamic fluid code HYADES has been used to simulate the temporal variation in EUV transmission (wavelength 13.9 nm) using IMP opacity values for the iron layer and the simulated transmissions are compared to measured transmission values. When a deliberate pre-pulse is used to preform an expanding plastic plasma, it is found that radiation is important in the heating of the iron layer while for pre-pulse free irradiation, radiation transport is not significant.

  18. Phase defect mitigation strategy: fiducial mark requirements on extreme ultraviolet lithography mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murachi, Tetsunori; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Oh, Sung Hyun

    2012-03-01

    For Extreme Ultra-Violet Lithography (EUVL), fabrication of defect free multi-layered (ML) mask blanks is one of the difficult challenges. ML defects come from substrate defects and adders during ML coating, cannot be removed, and are called as phase defect. If we can accept ML blanks with certain number of phase defects, the blank yield will be drastically up. In order to use such blanks, the phase defects need to be identified and located during ML blank defect inspection before absorber patterning. To locate phase defects on the blanks accurately and precisely, Fiducial Marks (FM) on ML blanks are needed for mask alignment and defect location information. The proposed requirement of defect location accuracy is <=20 nm [1]. In this paper, we will present the result of feasibility study on the requirements of FM on EUVL mask by simulations & experiments to establish the phase defect mitigation method with EUV Actinic Blank Inspection (ABI) tool. And the optimum ranges of FM line width, depth, and fabrication method on EUVL mask based on above results are >= 5 um line width, >= 100 nm depth FM etched into ML respectively, and additional finer FMs for magnified optics.

  19. The composition and structure of white dwarf atmospheres revealed by extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barstow, Martin A.; Hubeny, Ivan; Lanz, Thierry; Holberg, Jay B.; Sion, Edward M.

    1995-01-01

    The ROentgen SATellite (ROSAT) and Extreme UltraViolet Explorer (EUVE) all-sky surveys have resulted in an important change in our understanding of the general composition of hydrogen-rich DA white dwarf atmospheres, with the photospheric opacity dominated by heavy elements rather than helium in the hottest stars (T > 40, 000 K). Most stars cooler than 40,000 K have more or less pure H atmospheres. However, one question, which has not been resolved, concerned the specific nature of the heavy elements and the role of helium in the hottest white dwarfs. One view of white dwarf evolution requires that H-rich DA stars form by gravitational settling of He from either DAO or He-rich central stars of planetary nebulae. In this case, the youngest (hottest) DA white dwarfs may still contain visible traces of He. Spectroscopic observations now available with EUVE provide a crucial test of these ideas. Analysis of data from the EUVE Guest Observer programme and EUVE public archive allows quantitative consideration of the sources of EUV opacity and places limits on the abundance of He which may be present.

  20. Nanostructure surface patterning of GaN thin films and application to AlGaN/AlN multiple quantum wells: A way towards light extraction efficiency enhancement of III-nitride based light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wei Kirste, Ronny; Bryan, Zachary; Bryan, Isaac; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko; Gerhold, Michael

    2015-03-21

    Enhanced light extraction efficiency was demonstrated on nanostructure patterned GaN and AlGaN/AlN Multiple-Quantum-Well (MQW) structures using mass production techniques including natural lithography and interference lithography with feature size as small as 100 nm. Periodic nanostructures showed higher light extraction efficiency and modified emission profile compared to non-periodic structures based on integral reflection and angular-resolved transmission measurement. Light extraction mechanism of macroscopic and microscopic nanopatterning is discussed, and the advantage of using periodic nanostructure patterning is provided. An enhanced photoluminescence emission intensity was observed on nanostructure patterned AlGaN/AlN MQW compared to as-grown structure, demonstrating a large-scale and mass-producible pathway to higher light extraction efficiency in deep-ultra-violet light-emitting diodes.

  1. Avian thermoregulation in the heat: efficient evaporative cooling allows for extreme heat tolerance in four southern hemisphere columbids.

    PubMed

    McKechnie, Andrew E; Whitfield, Maxine C; Smit, Ben; Gerson, Alexander R; Smith, Eric Krabbe; Talbot, William A; McWhorter, Todd J; Wolf, Blair O

    2016-07-15

    Birds show phylogenetic variation in the relative importance of respiratory versus cutaneous evaporation, but the consequences for heat tolerance and evaporative cooling capacity remain unclear. We measured evaporative water loss (EWL), resting metabolic rate (RMR) and body temperature (Tb) in four arid-zone columbids from southern Africa [Namaqua dove (Oena capensis, ∼37 g), laughing dove (Spilopelia senegalensis, ∼89 g) and Cape turtle dove (Streptopelia capicola, ∼148 g)] and Australia [crested pigeon (Ocyphaps lophotes), ∼186 g] at air temperatures (Ta) of up to 62°C. There was no clear relationship between body mass and maximum Ta tolerated during acute heat exposure. Maximum Tb at very high Ta was 43.1±1.0, 43.7±0.8, 44.7±0.3 and 44.3±0.8°C in Namaqua doves, laughing doves, Cape turtle doves and crested pigeons, respectively. In all four species, RMR increased significantly at Ta above thermoneutrality, but the increases were relatively modest with RMR at Ta=56°C being 32, 60, 99 and 11% higher, respectively, than at Ta=35°C. At the highest Ta values reached, evaporative heat loss was equivalent to 466, 227, 230 and 275% of metabolic heat production. The maximum ratio of evaporative heat loss to metabolic production observed in Namaqua doves, 4.66, exceeds by a substantial margin previous values reported for birds. Our results support the notion that cutaneous evaporation provides a highly efficient mechanism of heat dissipation and an enhanced ability to tolerate extremely high Ta. PMID:27207640

  2. EUV SpectroPhotometer (ESP) in Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE): Algorithms and Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didkovsky, L.; Judge, D.; Wieman, S.; Woods, T.; Jones, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Extreme ultraviolet SpectroPhotometer (ESP) is one of five channels of the Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The ESP channel design is based on a highly stable diffraction transmission grating and is an advanced version of the Solar Extreme ultraviolet Monitor (SEM), which has been successfully observing solar irradiance onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) since December 1995. ESP is designed to measure solar Extreme UltraViolet (EUV) irradiance in four first-order bands of the diffraction grating centered around 19 nm, 25 nm, 30 nm, and 36 nm, and in a soft X-ray band from 0.1 to 7.0 nm in the zeroth-order of the grating. Each band’s detector system converts the photo-current into a count rate (frequency). The count rates are integrated over 0.25-second increments and transmitted to the EVE Science and Operations Center for data processing. An algorithm for converting the measured count rates into solar irradiance and the ESP calibration parameters are described. The ESP pre-flight calibration was performed at the Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Calibration parameters were used to calculate absolute solar irradiance from the sounding-rocket flight measurements on 14 April 2008. These irradiances for the ESP bands closely match the irradiance determined for two other EUV channels flown simultaneously: EVE’s Multiple EUV Grating Spectrograph (MEGS) and SOHO’s Charge, Element and Isotope Analysis System/ Solar EUV Monitor (CELIAS/SEM).

  3. Efficient 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet emission from Sn plasma irradiated by a long CO{sub 2} laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Y.; Tillack, M. S.; Sequoia, K. L.; Burdt, R. A.; Yuspeh, S.; Najmabadi, F.

    2008-06-23

    The effect of pulse duration on in-band (2% bandwidth) conversion efficiency (CE) from a CO{sub 2} laser to 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light was investigated for Sn plasma. It was found that high in-band CE, 2.6%, is consistently obtained using a CO{sub 2} laser with pulse durations from 25 to 110 ns. Employing a long pulse, for example, 110 ns, in a CO{sub 2} laser system used in an EUV lithography source could make the system significantly more efficient, simpler, and cheaper as compared to that using a short pulse of 25 ns or shorter.

  4. STEREOSCOPIC DETERMINATION OF HEIGHTS OF EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET BRIGHT POINTS USING DATA TAKEN BY SECCHI/EUVI ABOARD STEREO

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Ryun-Young; Chae, Jongchul; Zhang Jie

    2010-05-01

    We measure the heights of EUV bright points (BPs) above the solar surface by applying a stereoscopic method to the data taken by the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory/SECCHI/Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI). We have developed a three-dimensional reconstruction method for point-like features such as BPs using the simple principle that the position of a point in the three-dimensional space is specified as the intersection of two lines of sight. From a set of data consisting of EUVI 171 A, 195 A, 284 A, and 304 A images taken on 11 days arbitrarily selected during a period of 14 months, we have identified and analyzed 210 individual BPs that were visible on all four passband images and smaller than 30 Mm. The BPs seen in the 304 A images have an average height of 4.4 Mm, and are often associated with the legs of coronal loops. In the 171 A, 195 A, and 284 A images the BPs appear loop-shaped, and have average heights of 5.1, 6.7, and 6.1 Mm, respectively. Moreover, there is a tendency that overlying loops are filled with hotter plasmas. The average heights of BPs in 171 A, 195 A, and 284 A passbands are roughly twice the corresponding average lengths. Our results support the notion that an EUV BP represents a system of small loops with temperature stratification like flaring loops, being consistent with the magnetic reconnection origin.

  5. Payloads with Resource-Efficient Integration for Science Missions (PRISM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emam, O.; FitzGeorge, T.; Whittaker, A.; Wishart, A.; Fowell, S.; Prochazka, M.; Bentley, R.; Cole, R.; Brown, P.; Carr, C.; Cupido, E.; Oddy, T.

    2009-05-01

    PRISM is a collaborative industry and academia project to demonstrate the practicality of a highly integrated payload processing architecture, in order to exploit improvements in spacecraft computer performance to reduce multi-instrument payload mass and power requirements. Integrated architectures also provide opportunities for a greater degree of autonomy and advanced target selection (e.g. inter-instrument triggering). The PRISM architecture has potential advantages for missions such as EJSM (Europa Jupiter System Mission) or Solar Orbiter. The key technology objectives of PRISM are application partitioning on a qualifiable operating system, supported by the software required for fault-tolerant centralised processing, and the development of an application development environment for writing and testing instrument control applications. A working demonstrator has been implemented on a LEON3 platform, with representative payload applications from an in-situ magnetometer and a remote sensing extreme ultra-violet imager, both proposed for Solar Orbiter. PRISM is supported by the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC).

  6. Test report: Low cost access and efficient use of TDRSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horan, S.

    1996-01-01

    In order to develop new ways to increase the number of users taking advantage of NASA's Space Network for space-to-ground communications links, researchers at New Mexico State University (NMSU) developed a technique for using non-gimballed antennas for accessing a Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) within the Space Network (SN). This concept would allow spin-stabilized satellites to access one of the TDRS spacecraft in the SN constellation as the user satellite sweeps past the TDRS position as the satellite approaches either its ascending or descending node if this node is relatively close to the TDRS subsatellite point. ne research team from NMSU developing this concept proposed to NASA the use of the Extreme Ultra Violet Explorer (EUVE) to test this concept on orbit. EUVE differs from the desired satellite configuration in that EUVE has a relatively high-gain parabolic antenna and, most importantly, EUVE has an inertially-stabilized attitude control system while the concept to be tested was for a spin-stabilized satellite. We believed that these limitations would not affect the basic proof-of-concept test we were trying to achieve. With the approval and coordination of NASA, a total of six satellite passes through the West TDRS were requested and the necessary equipment configured for data collection at the Second TDRS Ground Terminal (STGT), also known as Danzante, at the White Sands Complex.

  7. How extreme are extremes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchi, Marco; Petitta, Marcello; Calmanti, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    High temperatures have an impact on the energy balance of any living organism and on the operational capabilities of critical infrastructures. Heat-wave indicators have been mainly developed with the aim of capturing the potential impacts on specific sectors (agriculture, health, wildfires, transport, power generation and distribution). However, the ability to capture the occurrence of extreme temperature events is an essential property of a multi-hazard extreme climate indicator. Aim of this study is to develop a standardized heat-wave indicator, that can be combined with other indices in order to describe multiple hazards in a single indicator. The proposed approach can be used in order to have a quantified indicator of the strenght of a certain extreme. As a matter of fact, extremes are usually distributed in exponential or exponential-exponential functions and it is difficult to quickly asses how strong was an extreme events considering only its magnitude. The proposed approach simplify the quantitative and qualitative communication of extreme magnitude

  8. Extreme ultraviolet reflection efficiencies of diamond-turned aluminum, polished nickel, and evaporated gold surfaces. [for telescope mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malina, R. F.; Cash, W.

    1978-01-01

    Measured reflection efficiencies are presented for flat samples of diamond-turned aluminum, nickel, and evaporated gold surfaces fabricated by techniques suited for EUV telescopes. The aluminum samples were 6.2-cm-diameter disks of 6061-T6, the electroless nickel samples were formed by plating beryllium disks with 7.5-microns of Kanigen. Gold samples were produced by coating the aluminum and nickel samples with 5 strips of evaporated gold. Reflection efficiencies are given for grazing angles in the 5-75 degree range. The results indicate that for wavelengths over about 100 A, the gold-coated nickel samples yield highest efficiencies. For shorter wavelengths, the nickel samples yield better efficiencies. 500 A is found to be the optimal gold thickness.

  9. A white organic light-emitting diode with ultra-high color rendering index, high efficiency, and extremely low efficiency roll-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ning; Zhao, Yongbiao; Zhao, Fangchao; Chen, Yonghua; Yang, Dezhi; Chen, Jiangshan; Ma, Dongge

    2014-07-01

    Ultra-high color rendering index (>90) is considered to be crucial for lighting in museum, studio, art gallery, medical, and wide-color-gamut display. However, all relevant works reported to exhibit ultra-high color rendering index suffer from a low efficiency and serious efficiency roll-off. In order to achieve ultra-high color rendering index and maintain high device efficiency at the same time, we incorporate four organic dyes in an elaborate device structure. The resulting white organic light-emitting diode exhibits rather high color rendering index up to 94 over a wide brightness range and yields electroluminescence efficiencies up to 14.2%, 26.0 cd/A, and 21.9 lm/W at the brightness of 1000 cd m-2, which are the highest values reported to date for such ultra-high color rendering index white organic light-emitting diodes. In addition, the current issue on efficiency roll-off is well resolved in the resulting device. The critical current density jc is as high as 203 mA cm-2.

  10. Theoretical investigation of the spectrum and conversion efficiency of short wavelength extreme-ultraviolet light sources based on terbium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Akira; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Sunahara, Atsushi; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Koike, Fumihiro

    2010-12-06

    The emission spectrum and conversion efficiency of laser-produced terbium plasmas are theoretically investigated on the basis of computational atomic data. The theoretically calculated spectrum reproduces the main peak of observed spectrum at {lambda}=6.5 nm, which originates from 4d-4f transitions of near palladiumlike ions (Tb{sup 19+}). A simple model of the isothermal expansion of terbium plasma suggests that efficient emission can be achieved by pumping the plasma with a laser pulse at an intensity of approximately one order of magnitude greater than that used with tin sources at {lambda}=13.5 nm.

  11. Enhanced light out-coupling efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes with an extremely low haze by plasma treated nanoscale corrugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Ju Hyun; Lee, Hyun Jun; Shim, Yong Sub; Park, Cheol Hwee; Jung, Sun-Gyu; Kim, Kyu Nyun; Park, Young Wook; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Extremely low-haze light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) was achieved by utilizing nanoscale corrugation, which was simply fabricated with plasma treatment and sonication. The haze of the nanoscale corrugation for light extraction (NCLE) corresponds to 0.21% for visible wavelengths, which is comparable to that of bare glass. The OLEDs with NCLE showed enhancements of 34.19% in current efficiency and 35.75% in power efficiency. Furthermore, the OLEDs with NCLE exhibited angle-stable electroluminescence (EL) spectra for different viewing angles, with no change in the full width at half maximum (FWHM) and peak wavelength. The flexibility of the polymer used for the NCLE and plasma treatment process indicates that the NCLE can be applied to large and flexible OLED displays.Extremely low-haze light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) was achieved by utilizing nanoscale corrugation, which was simply fabricated with plasma treatment and sonication. The haze of the nanoscale corrugation for light extraction (NCLE) corresponds to 0.21% for visible wavelengths, which is comparable to that of bare glass. The OLEDs with NCLE showed enhancements of 34.19% in current efficiency and 35.75% in power efficiency. Furthermore, the OLEDs with NCLE exhibited angle-stable electroluminescence (EL) spectra for different viewing angles, with no change in the full width at half maximum (FWHM) and peak wavelength. The flexibility of the polymer used for the NCLE and plasma treatment process indicates that the NCLE can be applied to large and flexible OLED displays. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06547f

  12. Grain Yield and Water Use Efficiency in Extremely-Late Sown Winter Wheat Cultivars under Two Irrigation Regimes in the North China Plain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Zhang, Yinghua; Hao, Baozhen; Xu, Xuexin; Zhao, Zhigan; Wang, Zhimin; Xue, Qingwu

    2016-01-01

    Wheat production is threatened by water shortages and groundwater over-draft in the North China Plain (NCP). In recent years, winter wheat has been increasingly sown extremely late in early to mid-November after harvesting cotton or pepper. To improve water use efficiency (WUE) and guide the extremely late sowing practices, a 3-year field experiment was conducted under two irrigation regimes (W1, one-irrigation, 75 mm at jointing; W2, two-irrigation, 75 mm at jointing and 75 mm at anthesis) in 3 cultivars differing in spike size (HS4399, small spike; JM22, medium spike; WM8, large spike). Wheat was sown in early to mid-November at a high seeding rate of 800-850 seeds m-2. Average yields of 7.42 t ha-1 and WUE of 1.84 kg m-3 were achieved with an average seasonal evapotranspiration (ET) of 404 mm. Compared with W2, wheat under W1 did not have yield penalty in 2 of 3 years, and had 7.9% lower seasonal ET and 7.5% higher WUE. The higher WUE and stable yield under W1 was associated with higher 1000-grain weight (TGW) and harvest index (HI). Among the 3 cultivars, JM22 had 5.9%-8.9% higher yield and 4.2%-9.3% higher WUE than WM8 and HS4399. The higher yield in JM22 was attributed mainly to higher HI and TGW due to increased post-anthesis biomass and deeper seasonal soil water extraction. In conclusion, one-irrigation with a medium-sized spike cultivar JM22 could be a useful strategy to maintain yield and high WUE in extremely late-sown winter wheat at a high seeding rate in the NCP. PMID:27100187

  13. Grain Yield and Water Use Efficiency in Extremely-Late Sown Winter Wheat Cultivars under Two Irrigation Regimes in the North China Plain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Zhang, Yinghua; Hao, Baozhen; Xu, Xuexin; Zhao, Zhigan; Wang, Zhimin; Xue, Qingwu

    2016-01-01

    Wheat production is threatened by water shortages and groundwater over-draft in the North China Plain (NCP). In recent years, winter wheat has been increasingly sown extremely late in early to mid-November after harvesting cotton or pepper. To improve water use efficiency (WUE) and guide the extremely late sowing practices, a 3-year field experiment was conducted under two irrigation regimes (W1, one-irrigation, 75 mm at jointing; W2, two-irrigation, 75 mm at jointing and 75 mm at anthesis) in 3 cultivars differing in spike size (HS4399, small spike; JM22, medium spike; WM8, large spike). Wheat was sown in early to mid-November at a high seeding rate of 800–850 seeds m−2. Average yields of 7.42 t ha−1 and WUE of 1.84 kg m−3 were achieved with an average seasonal evapotranspiration (ET) of 404 mm. Compared with W2, wheat under W1 did not have yield penalty in 2 of 3 years, and had 7.9% lower seasonal ET and 7.5% higher WUE. The higher WUE and stable yield under W1 was associated with higher 1000-grain weight (TGW) and harvest index (HI). Among the 3 cultivars, JM22 had 5.9%–8.9% higher yield and 4.2%–9.3% higher WUE than WM8 and HS4399. The higher yield in JM22 was attributed mainly to higher HI and TGW due to increased post-anthesis biomass and deeper seasonal soil water extraction. In conclusion, one-irrigation with a medium-sized spike cultivar JM22 could be a useful strategy to maintain yield and high WUE in extremely late-sown winter wheat at a high seeding rate in the NCP. PMID:27100187

  14. Soft X-ray and extreme utraviolet quantum detection efficiency of potassium chloride photocathode layers on microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Everman, Elaine; Hull, Jeff; Vallerga, John V.; Lampton, Michael

    1988-01-01

    The quantum detection efficiency (QDE) of KCl photocathodes in the 44-1460 A range was investigated. An opaque layer of KCl, about 15,000-A-thick, was evaporated and applied the surface of a microchannel plate (MCP), and the contribution of the photocathode material in the channels (and on the interchannel web) to the QDE was measured using a Z stack MCP detector. It is shown that KCl is a relatively stable photocathode material, with the QDE equal to 30-40 percent in the EUV. At wavelengths above 200 A, the QDE is slightly better than the QDE of CsI, as reported by Siegmund et al. (1986). While the shape of the QDE curve as a function of wavelength is similar to those reported for CsI and KBr, KCl was found to lack the high QDE peak found in the curves of CsI and KBr at about 100 A. A simple QDE model is described, the predictions of which were found to agree with the measurements on the KCl photocathode.

  15. Mutations of photosystem II D1 protein that empower efficient phenotypes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under extreme environment in space.

    PubMed

    Giardi, Maria Teresa; Rea, Giuseppina; Lambreva, Maya D; Antonacci, Amina; Pastorelli, Sandro; Bertalan, Ivo; Johanningmeier, Udo; Mattoo, Autar K

    2013-01-01

    Space missions have enabled testing how microorganisms, animals and plants respond to extra-terrestrial, complex and hazardous environment in space. Photosynthetic organisms are thought to be relatively more prone to microgravity, weak magnetic field and cosmic radiation because oxygenic photosynthesis is intimately associated with capture and conversion of light energy into chemical energy, a process that has adapted to relatively less complex and contained environment on Earth. To study the direct effect of the space environment on the fundamental process of photosynthesis, we sent into low Earth orbit space engineered and mutated strains of the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which has been widely used as a model of photosynthetic organisms. The algal mutants contained specific amino acid substitutions in the functionally important regions of the pivotal Photosystem II (PSII) reaction centre D1 protein near the QB binding pocket and in the environment surrounding Tyr-161 (YZ) electron acceptor of the oxygen-evolving complex. Using real-time measurements of PSII photochemistry, here we show that during the space flight while the control strain and two D1 mutants (A250L and V160A) were inefficient in carrying out PSII activity, two other D1 mutants, I163N and A251C, performed efficient photosynthesis, and actively re-grew upon return to Earth. Mimicking the neutron irradiation component of cosmic rays on Earth yielded similar results. Experiments with I163N and A251C D1 mutants performed on ground showed that they are better able to modulate PSII excitation pressure and have higher capacity to reoxidize the QA (-) state of the primary electron acceptor. These results highlight the contribution of D1 conformation in relation to photosynthesis and oxygen production in space. PMID:23691201

  16. Mutations of Photosystem II D1 Protein That Empower Efficient Phenotypes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under Extreme Environment in Space

    PubMed Central

    Lambreva, Maya D.; Antonacci, Amina; Pastorelli, Sandro; Bertalan, Ivo; Johanningmeier, Udo; Mattoo, Autar K.

    2013-01-01

    Space missions have enabled testing how microorganisms, animals and plants respond to extra-terrestrial, complex and hazardous environment in space. Photosynthetic organisms are thought to be relatively more prone to microgravity, weak magnetic field and cosmic radiation because oxygenic photosynthesis is intimately associated with capture and conversion of light energy into chemical energy, a process that has adapted to relatively less complex and contained environment on Earth. To study the direct effect of the space environment on the fundamental process of photosynthesis, we sent into low Earth orbit space engineered and mutated strains of the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which has been widely used as a model of photosynthetic organisms. The algal mutants contained specific amino acid substitutions in the functionally important regions of the pivotal Photosystem II (PSII) reaction centre D1 protein near the QB binding pocket and in the environment surrounding Tyr-161 (YZ) electron acceptor of the oxygen-evolving complex. Using real-time measurements of PSII photochemistry, here we show that during the space flight while the control strain and two D1 mutants (A250L and V160A) were inefficient in carrying out PSII activity, two other D1 mutants, I163N and A251C, performed efficient photosynthesis, and actively re-grew upon return to Earth. Mimicking the neutron irradiation component of cosmic rays on Earth yielded similar results. Experiments with I163N and A251C D1 mutants performed on ground showed that they are better able to modulate PSII excitation pressure and have higher capacity to reoxidize the QA− state of the primary electron acceptor. These results highlight the contribution of D1 conformation in relation to photosynthesis and oxygen production in space. PMID:23691201

  17. Far-infrared-light shadowgraphy for high extraction efficiency of extreme ultraviolet light from a CO2-laser-generated tin plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukuma, Hiraku; Hosoda, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Yosuke; Yogo, Akifumi; Yanagida, Tatsuya; Kodama, Takeshi; Nishimura, Hiroaki

    2016-08-01

    The two-color, double-pulse method is an efficient scheme to generate extreme ultraviolet light for fabricating the next generation semiconductor microchips. In this method, a Nd:YAG laser pulse is used to expand a several-tens-of-micrometers-scale tin droplet, and a CO2 laser pulse is subsequently directed at the expanded tin vapor after an appropriate delay time. We propose the use of shadowgraphy with a CO2 laser probe-pulse scheme to optimize the CO2 main-drive laser. The distribution of absorption coefficients is derived from the experiment, and the results are converted to a practical absorption rate for the CO2 main-drive laser.

  18. β-FeOOH nanorod bundles with highly enhanced round-trip efficiency and extremely low overpotential for lithium-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaepyeong; Song, Kyeongse; Bae, Doo Ri; Lee, Sung Woo; Lee, Gaehang; Kang, Yong-Mook

    2013-12-01

    β-FeOOH nanorod (NR) catalysts prepared by ultrasonic-irradiated chemical synthesis enabled lithium-air cells to have high round-trip efficiency and extremely low overpotential as well as an outstanding rate capability. Good catalytic activities of the β-FeOOH NR bundle could be ascribed to its crystal structure, which consists of 2 × 2 tunnels formed by edge- and corner-sharing Fe(O,OH)6 octahedra as well as to its one-dimensional morphology, which makes the configured electrode highly porous, indicating that the -OOH-based catalyst can be a good substitute for oxide-base catalysts in lithium-air batteries. The ultrasonic-irradiated chemical synthesis suggested here may be a good solution to optimize the morphology of catalyst materials for maximum catalytic activity. PMID:24126857

  19. β-FeOOH nanorod bundles with highly enhanced round-trip efficiency and extremely low overpotential for lithium-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jaepyeong; Song, Kyeongse; Bae, Doo Ri; Lee, Sung Woo; Lee, Gaehang; Kang, Yong-Mook

    2013-11-01

    β-FeOOH nanorod (NR) catalysts prepared by ultrasonic-irradiated chemical synthesis enabled lithium-air cells to have high round-trip efficiency and extremely low overpotential as well as an outstanding rate capability. Good catalytic activities of the β-FeOOH NR bundle could be ascribed to its crystal structure, which consists of 2 × 2 tunnels formed by edge- and corner-sharing Fe(O,OH)6 octahedra as well as to its one-dimensional morphology, which makes the configured electrode highly porous, indicating that the -OOH-based catalyst can be a good substitute for oxide-base catalysts in lithium-air batteries. The ultrasonic-irradiated chemical synthesis suggested here may be a good solution to optimize the morphology of catalyst materials for maximum catalytic activity.β-FeOOH nanorod (NR) catalysts prepared by ultrasonic-irradiated chemical synthesis enabled lithium-air cells to have high round-trip efficiency and extremely low overpotential as well as an outstanding rate capability. Good catalytic activities of the β-FeOOH NR bundle could be ascribed to its crystal structure, which consists of 2 × 2 tunnels formed by edge- and corner-sharing Fe(O,OH)6 octahedra as well as to its one-dimensional morphology, which makes the configured electrode highly porous, indicating that the -OOH-based catalyst can be a good substitute for oxide-base catalysts in lithium-air batteries. The ultrasonic-irradiated chemical synthesis suggested here may be a good solution to optimize the morphology of catalyst materials for maximum catalytic activity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr04502a

  20. Effect of ultra violet irradiation on the interplay between Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Abo Elnazar, Salma Y.; Ghazy, Amany A.; Ghoneim, Hossam E.; Taha, Abdul-Rahman M.; Abouelella, Amira M.

    2015-01-01

    Although ultraviolet (UV) radiation is used to treat several types of diseases, including rickets, psoriasis, eczema, and jaundice, the prolonged exposure to its radiation may result in acute and chronic health effects particularly on the skin, eyes, and the immune system. Aim: This study was carried out to show the effect of UV on both of the lymphoproliferative response and their capacity to produce IL-12 and IL-10 in mice. Methods: Mice were exposed to whole body UVB and tested for the effect of recovery times on lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production. In addition, direct irradiation of spleens and lymphocyte suspension was carried out. Basal and mitogens-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation was assessed by MTT assay while IL-10 and IL-12 were measured using ELISA. Results: There was a significant suppression in lymphocyte proliferation in comparison with control. IL-12 level was significantly reduced while the level of IL-10 was increased. Con A and PWM mitogens had no significant changes in IL-10 while Con A caused a highly significant increase in IL-12 at day 6 of recovery in UVB body irradiation. Conclusion: Exposure to UVB radiation could cause a state of immune suppression and shifts Th1/Th2 cell response. This effect is closely associated with the reduction of Th1 cytokines’ expression and increase in Th2 cytokines’ levels. PMID:25852558

  1. Transmittance measurements of ultra violet and visible wavelength interference filters flown aboard LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, Thomas A.; Smajkiewicz, Ali

    1991-01-01

    A set of ten interference filters for the UV and VIS spectral region were flown on the surface of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Tray B-8 along with earth radiation budget (ERB) components from the Eppley Laboratory. Transmittance changes and other degradation observed after the return of the filters to Barr are reported. Substrates, coatings, and (where applicable) cement materials are identified. In general, all filters except those containing lead compounds survived well. Metal dielectric filters for the UV developed large numbers of pinholes which caused an increase in transmittance. Band shapes and spectral positioning, however, did not change.

  2. High-resolution ultra-violet observations of the interstellar diffuse clouds toward Mu Columbae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofia, Ulysses J.; Savage, Blair D.; Cardelli, Jason A.

    1993-01-01

    Data obtained from the Goddard High Resolution spectrograph (GHRS) are used to study differences in gas-phase abundances of ions occurring in the diffuse neutral clouds toward mu Col. The sight-line characteristics determined in previous studies are reviewed and results for the cloud velocities, absorption equivalent widths, ion column densities, and depletions are presented. It is found that interstellar features from four distinct absorption regions with low-ionization gas are apparent in the GHRS data at heliocentric velocities of 23, 41, 53, and 62 km/s. Absorption by Mg II, Si II, and possibly Al II also occurs over the heliocentric velocity range from -17 to 0 km/s. The presence of stronger Si III absorption over this velocity region indicates that the absorption arises from an ionized gas region.

  3. Electronic structure of germanium selenide investigated using ultra-violet photo-electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, P.; Lohani, H.; Kundu, A. K.; Patel, R.; Solanki, G. K.; Menon, Krishnakumar S. R.; Sekhar, B. R.

    2015-07-01

    The valence band electronic structure of GeSe single crystals has been investigated using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The experimentally observed bands from ARPES, match qualitatively with our LDA-based band structure calculations along the Γ-Z, Γ-Y and Γ-T symmetry directions. The valence band maximum occurs nearly midway along the Γ-Z direction, at a binding energy of -0.5 eV, substantiating the indirect band gap of GeSe. Non-dispersive features associated with surface states and indirect transitions have been observed. The difference in hybridization of Se and Ge 4p orbitals leads to the variation of dispersion along the three symmetry directions. The predominance of the Se 4pz orbitals, evidenced from theoretical calculations, may be the cause for highly dispersive bands along the Γ-T direction. Detailed electronic structure analysis reveals the significance of the cation-anion 4p orbitals hybridization in the valence band dispersion of IV-VI semiconductors. This is the first comprehensive report of the electronic structure of a GeSe single crystal using ARPES in conjugation with theoretical band structure analysis.

  4. An ultrashort pulse ultra-violet radiation undulator source driven by a laser plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Anania, M. P.; Brunetti, E.; Wiggins, S. M.; Grant, D. W.; Welsh, G. H.; Issac, R. C.; Cipiccia, S.; Shanks, R. P.; Manahan, G. G.; Aniculaesei, C.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Geer, S. B. van der; Loos, M. J. de; Poole, M. W.; Shepherd, B. J. A.; Clarke, J. A.; Gillespie, W. A.; MacLeod, A. M.

    2014-06-30

    Narrow band undulator radiation tuneable over the wavelength range of 150–260 nm has been produced by short electron bunches from a 2 mm long laser plasma wakefield accelerator based on a 20 TW femtosecond laser system. The number of photons measured is up to 9 × 10{sup 6} per shot for a 100 period undulator, with a mean peak brilliance of 1 × 10{sup 18} photons/s/mrad{sup 2}/mm{sup 2}/0.1% bandwidth. Simulations estimate that the driving electron bunch r.m.s. duration is as short as 3 fs when the electron beam has energy of 120–130 MeV with the radiation pulse duration in the range of 50–100 fs.

  5. [Optical multi-channel detection and analysis on solar ultra-violet irradiance spectrum].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-yan; He, Jie; Zuo, Hao-yi; Liang, Hui-min; Yang, Jing-guo

    2007-05-01

    The present paper reports a new type of ultraviolet CCD optical multi-channel analyzer and its application to detecting solar ultraviolet irradiance spectrum. Spectral detecting range of 200-1 100 nm, spectral resolution of 0.1 nm and detecting sensitivity of 0.02 lx were reached in this instrument. The solar spectra of UVB and UVA were measured in real time in Chengdu area. The measurement results have good correlation with the detection using normal solar ultraviolet irradiance detector. Primary analysis on the detection results of solar spectra in UVB and UVA indicated that in the morning and in the afternoon the irradiance of solar ultraviolet is smaller than that at noon, and reverse correlation holds for the change of SZA (Solar Zenith Angle). In different wavelength interval of UVA and UVB, generally, the radiation flux of long wavelength is greater than that of short. Clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere have important influence on ultraviolet irradiance. PMID:17655086

  6. A Fourier transform spectrometer for visible and near ultra-violet measurements of atmospheric absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L.; Gerlach, J. C.; Whitehurst, M.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a prototype, ground-based, Sun-pointed Michelson interferometric spectrometer is described. Its intended use is to measure the atmospheric amount of various gases which absorb in the near-infrared, visible, and near-ultraviolet portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Preliminary spectra which contain the alpha, 0.8 micrometer, and rho sigma tau water vapor absorption bands in the near-infrared are presented to indicate the present capability of the system. Ultimately, the spectrometer can be used to explore the feasible applications of Fourier transform spectroscopy in the ultraviolet where grating spectrometers were used exclusively.

  7. Hospital hydrotherapy pools treated with ultra violet light: bad bacteriological quality and presence of thermophilic Naegleria.

    PubMed Central

    De Jonckheere, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The microbiological quality of eight halogenated and two u.v.-treated hydrotherapy pools in hospitals was investigated. The microbiological quality of halogenated hydrotherapy pools was comparable to halogenated public swimming pools, although in some Pseudomonas aeruginosa and faecal pollution indicators were more frequent due to bad management. On the other hand u.v.-treated hydrotherapy pools had very bad microbiological quality. Apart from faecal pollution indicators, P. aeruginosa was present in very high numbers. Halogenated hydrotherapy pools were not highly contaminated with amoebae, and Naegleria spp. were never detected. On the other hand u.v.-treated pools contained very high numbers of thermophilic Naegleria. The Naegleria isolated were identified as N. lovaniensis, a species commonly found in association with N. fowleri. Isoenzyme analysis showed a different type of N. lovaniensis was present in each of two u.v.-treated pools. Images Plate 1 PMID:7061835

  8. Observing the Forest Canopy with a New Ultra-Violet Compact Airborne Lidar

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta, Juan; Chazette, Patrick; Allouis, Tristan; Flamant, Pierre H.; Durrieu, Sylvie; Sanak, Joseph; Genau, Pascal; Guyon, Dominique; Loustau, Denis; Flamant, Cyrille

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a new airborne UV lidar for the forest canopy and deployed it in the Landes forest (France). It is the first one that: (i) operates at 355 nm for emitting energetic pulses of 16 mJ at 20 Hz while fulfilling eye-safety regulations and (ii) is flown onboard an ultra-light airplane for enhanced flight flexibility. Laser footprints at ground level were 2.4 m wide for a flying altitude of 300 m. Three test areas of ∼500 × 500 m2 with Maritime pines of different ages were investigated. We used a threshold method adapted for this lidar to accurately extract from its waveforms detailed forest canopy vertical structure: canopy top, tree crown base and undergrowth heights. Good detection sensitivity enabled the observation of ground returns underneath the trees. Statistical and one-to-one comparisons with ground measurements by field foresters indicated a mean absolute accuracy of ∼1 m. Sensitivity tests on detection threshold showed the importance of signal to noise ratio and footprint size for a proper detection of the canopy vertical structure. This UV-lidar is intended for future innovative applications of simultaneous observation of forest canopy, laser-induced vegetation fluorescence and atmospheric aerosols. PMID:22163608

  9. Germicidal ultra-violet light to eliminate low numbers of Listeria monocytogenes on raw chicken meat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes can be transferred from broiler slaughter plants to commercial cooking plants with raw product. Once in a cooking plant, this organism can become a long term resident and colonize floor drains. Earlier work showed that during plant wash down, an inadvertent short hose spray ...

  10. Mycosporine and mycosporine-like amino acids: A paramount tool against ultra violet irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Saurabh; Garg, Arun; Sharma, K.; Kumar, S.; Sharma, A.; Purohit, A. P.

    2011-01-01

    Various facts demonstrated that UVB is harmful to organisms. Sunscreen compounds are usually used to prevent the excessive damage caused by UVB. However, certain photosynthetic organisms have evolved mechanisms to counteract the toxicity of ultraviolet radiation by synthesizing UV screening compounds such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs). MAAs provide UV protection to primary and secondary consumers through food chain and to non-biological materials by photostabilizing action. Information related to the ecological consequence of MAAs and their spatial distribution from a wide range of organisms is accumulating. Hence, our studies seek a potent class of natural sun protective compounds to understand their relationship with environment and to develop a protocol for large-scale industrial production of these compounds so that they can find application as UV-protecting cosmetics. PMID:22279371

  11. White Light Coronograph (WLC) and Ultra-Violet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The white light coronagraph (WLC) and ultraviolet coronal spectrometer (UVCS) together reveal the corona and the roots of the solar wind from 1.5 to 6 solar radii from Sun center. The WLC measures the plasma density and spatial structure of the corona and coronal mass ejections at a resolution of about 20 arcseconds. The UVCS, in combination with the WLC, measures the temperature and radial outflow speed of the coronal plasma. These instruments will detect mass ejections from active regions and high speed solar wind streams from coronal holes a few days before the source regions rotate onto the face of the Sun, thus giving a week or more of advanced warning for disturbed geomagnetic conditions at Earth.

  12. White Light Coronagraph (WLC) and Ultra-Violet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1986-01-01

    The WLC and UVS together reveal the corona and the roots of the solar wind from 1.5 to 6 solar radii from sun center. The WLC measures the plasma density and spatial structure of the corona and coronal mass ejections at a plasma density and spatial structure of the corona and coronal mass ejections at a resolution of about 20 arcsec. The UVCS in combination with the WLC measures the temperature and radial outflow speed of the coronal plasma. These instruments will detect mass ejections from active regions and high speed solar wind streams from coronal holes a few days before the source regions rotate onto the face of the Sun, thus giving a week or more of advanced warning for disturbed geomagnetic conditions at Earth.

  13. Simultaneous Liquid Chromatographic Determination of 10 Ultra-Violet Filters in Sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Wharton, Mary; Geary, Michael; O'Connor, Niamh; Curtin, Laura; Ketcher, Krystal

    2015-09-01

    A rapid HPLC method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 10 UV filters found in sunscreen. The following UV filters were analyzed in this method; 2-phenylbenzimidazole-5-sulfonic acid, benzophenone-3, isoamyl p-methoxycinnamate, 4-methylbenzylidene camphor, octocrylene, ethylhexyl dimethyl 4-aminobenzoic acid, ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate, butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane, ethylhexyl salicylate and homosalate. The method was developed on two columns; a Thermo Hypersil C18 BDS, 3 µm column (4.6 × 100 mm) and a Chromolith RP-18e Monolithic column (4.6 × 100 mm). The same mobile phase of ethanol and 1% acetic acid (70:30, v/v) was employed for both columns. The separation of the 10 UV filters was carried out successfully on both columns; the optimal resolution was obtained on the Thermo Scientific Hypersil column in a time frame of 7 min. An isocratic elution utilizing ethanol and acetic acid (70:30, v/v) at a temperature of 35°C was employed. The method was applied to a number of commercial samples of sunscreen and lotions and was validated according to International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines for selectivity, linearity, accuracy, precision and robustness. A comparison of the performances of both columns was also carried out. PMID:25662967

  14. Solar Spectral Irradiance, Solar Activity, and the Near-Ultra-Violet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontenla, J. M.; Stancil, P. C.; Landi, E.

    2015-08-01

    The previous calculations of the Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) by the Solar Radiation Physical Modeling, version 2 system, are updated in this work by including new molecular photodissociation cross-sections of important species, and many more levels and lines in its treatment of non-LTE radiative transfer. The current calculations including the new molecular photodissociation opacities produce a reduced over-ionizaton of heavy elements in the lower chromosphere and solve the problems with prior studies of the UV SSI in the wavelength range 160-400 nm and now reproduce the available observations with much greater accuracy. Calculations and observations of the near-UV at 0.1 nm resolution and higher are compared. The current set of physical models includes four quiet-Sun and five active-region components, from which radiance is computed for ten observing angles. These radiances are combined with images of the solar disk to obtain the SSI and Total Solar Irradiance and their variations. The computed SSI is compared with measurements from space at several nm resolution and agreement is found within the accuracy level of these measurements. An important result is that the near-UV SSI increase with solar activity is significant for the photodissociation of ozone in the terrestrial atmosphere because a number of highly variable upper chromospheric lines overlap the ozone Hartley band.

  15. Mycosporine and mycosporine-like amino acids: A paramount tool against ultra violet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Saurabh; Garg, Arun; Sharma, K; Kumar, S; Sharma, A; Purohit, A P

    2011-07-01

    Various facts demonstrated that UVB is harmful to organisms. Sunscreen compounds are usually used to prevent the excessive damage caused by UVB. However, certain photosynthetic organisms have evolved mechanisms to counteract the toxicity of ultraviolet radiation by synthesizing UV screening compounds such as mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs). MAAs provide UV protection to primary and secondary consumers through food chain and to non-biological materials by photostabilizing action. Information related to the ecological consequence of MAAs and their spatial distribution from a wide range of organisms is accumulating. Hence, our studies seek a potent class of natural sun protective compounds to understand their relationship with environment and to develop a protocol for large-scale industrial production of these compounds so that they can find application as UV-protecting cosmetics. PMID:22279371

  16. Physical-Mechanical Properties of Nitrodopes Affected by Ultra-Violet Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Cakić, Suzana; Raskovic, Ljiljana; Lačnjevac, Časlav; Rajkovic, Milos; Barać, Miroljub; Stojanovic, Miodrag

    2007-01-01

    The FTIR spectroscopy has been employed in this research work to monitor the process of nitrodope photodegradation, by measuring surfaces of bands typical of a nitro group. Nitric esters are subject to degradation, which is reflected on a quantitative ratio of the surfaces of the IR bands that originate from the nitric ester. The obtained results show that the length of the UV rays' activity on the samples over the time periods of 240, 480 and 960 minutes directly affects the spectrum appearance of the same sample before and after the irradiation. The longer the action time of the UV rays and the higher a mass percentage of nitrocellulose in the nitrodope is, the smaller the bands' surfaces become, i.e. the level of degradation is higher. In order to confirm the degradation of nitrodope, the degree of crosslinking has also been examined by determining the König hardness and also the mean viscosity molar mass has been defined repeatedly applying the capillary viscosimetry method.

  17. Plasmas generated by ultra-violet light rather than electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, R. N.; Allen, J. E.; Thomas, D. M.; Benilov, M. S.

    2013-12-15

    We analyze, in both plane and cylindrical geometries, a collisionless plasma consisting of an inner region where generation occurs by UV illumination, and an un-illuminated outer region with no generation. Ions generated in the inner region flow outwards through the outer region and into a wall. We solve for this system's steady state, first in the quasi-neutral regime (where the Debye length λ{sub D} vanishes and analytic solutions exist) and then in the general case, which we solve numerically. In the general case, a double layer forms where the illuminated and un-illuminated regions meet, and an approximately quasi-neutral plasma connects the double layer to the wall sheath; in plane geometry, the ions coast through the quasi-neutral section at slightly more than the Bohm speed c{sub s}. The system, although simple, therefore has two novel features: a double layer that does not require counter-streaming ions and electrons, and a quasi-neutral plasma where ions travel in straight lines with at least the Bohm speed. We close with a précis of our asymptotic solutions of this system, and suggest how our theoretical conclusions might be extended and tested in the laboratory.

  18. Using JWST Heritage to Enable a Future Large Ultra-Violet Optical Infrared Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee

    2016-01-01

    To the extent it makes sense, leverage JWST knowledge, designs, architectures, GSE. Develop a scalable design reference mission (9.2 meter). Do just enough work to understand launch break points in aperture size. Demonstrate 10 pm stability is achievable on a design reference mission. Make design compatible with starshades. While segmented coronagraphs with high throughput and large bandpasses are important, make the system serviceable so you can evolve the instruments. Keep it room temperature to minimize the costs associated with cryo. Focus resources on the contrast problem. Start with the architecture and connect it to the technology needs.

  19. Crystallization of fused silica surfaces by ultra-violet laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Kazuya; Haraguchi, Koshi

    2012-07-01

    In recent years, the increased use of high power lasers has created problems in optical elements due to laser damage. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) describes in a publication ISO 11254 a laser-power resilience (LPR) test which we used to verify that by flattening the glass substrate of an optical element, we could improve the resistance to laser damage. We report on an evaluation of two types of samples of fused silica substrate whose surface roughness differed (Ra = 0.20 nm and Ra = 0.13 nm) using customized on-line laser damage testing. To induce laser damage to samples, we used the fifth harmonic generation from a Nd:YAG pulse laser (wavelength: 213 nm, pulse width: 4 ns, repetition frequency: 20 Hz). Results show that flattening reduced the progression of laser damage in the meta-phase laser damage phase by 1/3 of that without flattening. However, pro-phase laser damage which started at fluence 2.39 J/cm2 was unrelated to surface roughness. To analyze the pro-phase laser damage, we used x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and variable pressure-type scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM). From XRD data, we observed XRD patterns of cristobalite (111), cristobalite (102), α-quartz (111), and β-quartz (102). Raman spectrum data showed an increase in the three-membered ring vibration (600 cm-1), four-membered ring vibration (490 cm-1), and many-membered ring vibration (450 cm-1, 390 cm-1, and 300 cm-1). We observed patchy crystallized areas on the sample surfaces in the VP-SEM images. Based on these experimental results, we believe that the dominant factors in pro-phase laser damage are their physical properties. Substrate and thin film material must be appropriately selected in producing an optical element with a high level of resilience to laser exposure.

  20. Low-loss smile-insensitive external frequency-stabilization of high power diode lasers enabled by vertical designs with extremely low divergence angle and high efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, Paul; Knigge, Steffen; Maaßdorf, Andre; Bugge, Frank; Hengesbach, Stefan; Witte, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Hans-Dieter; Köhler, Bernd; Hubrich, Ralf; Kissel, Heiko; Biesenbach, Jens; Erbert, Götz; Traenkle, Guenther

    2013-02-01

    Broad area lasers with narrow spectra are required for many pumping applications and for wavelength beam combination. Although monolithically stabilized lasers show high performance, some applications can only be addressed with external frequency stabilization, for example when very narrow spectra are required. When conventional diode lasers with vertical far field angle, ΘV 95% ~ 45° (95% power) are stabilized using volume holographic gratings (VHGs), optical losses are introduced, limiting both efficiency and reliable output power, with the presence of any bar smile compounding the challenge. Diode lasers with designs optimized for extremely low vertical divergence (ELOD lasers) directly address these challenges. The vertical far field angle in conventional laser designs is limited by the waveguiding of the active region itself. In ELOD designs, quantum barriers are used that have low refractive index, enabling the influence of the active region to be suppressed, leading to narrow far field operation from thin vertical structures, for minimal electrical resistance and maximum power conversion efficiency. We review the design process, and show that 975 nm diode lasers with 90 μm stripes that use ELOD designs operate with ΘV 95% = 26° and reach 58% power conversion efficiency at a CW output power of 10 W. We demonstrate directly that VHG stabilized ELOD lasers have significantly lower loss and larger operation windows than conventional lasers in the collimated feedback regimes, even in the presence of significant (≥ 1 μm) bar smile. We also discuss the potential influence of ELOD designs on reliable output power and options for further performance improvement.

  1. Efficient, green laser based on a blue-diode pumped rare-earth-doped fluoride crystal in an extremely short resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strotkamp, Michael; Schwarz, Thomas; Jungbluth, Bernd; Faidel, Heinrich; Leers, Michael

    2010-02-01

    The green cw laser presented in this work is realized by means of a Pr:YLF crystal emitting at 523 nm that is pumped by a blue GaN laser diode in an extremely short resonator. With a 500 mW-diode a laser has been achieved with M2 = 1, a slope of 40 % and an output power of 140mW with an absorbed pump power of 410 mW which results in an electrooptical efficiency of 6.5 %. Despite the reduced overlap with a 1 W-diode the output power rises to 290 mW with an absorbed pump power of 850 mW and the M2 increases only slightly. Based on these results a compact laser package has been accomplished using a monolithic micro optics for the beam shaping of the diode light and joining all components with a low-shrinkage adhesive on a common base plate. In a first test of the alignment strategy a laser with an output power of 92 mW has been achieved by means of the 500 mW pump power.

  2. Comparison and characterization of efficient frequency doubling at 397.5 nm with PPKTP, LBO and BiBO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xin; Han, Yashuai; Wang, Junmin

    2016-04-01

    A continuous-wave Ti:sapphire laser at 795 nm is frequency doubled in a bow-tie type enhancement four-mirror ring cavity with LiB3O5 (LBO), BiB3O6 (BiBO), and periodically polled KTiOPO4 (PPKTP) crystals, respectively. The properties of 397.5 nm ultra-violet (UV) output power, beam quality, stability for these different nonlinear crystals are investigated and compared. For PPKTP crystal, the highest doubling efficiency of 58.1% is achieved from 191 mW of 795 nm mode-matched fundamental power to 111 mW of 397.5 nm UV output. For LBO crystal, with 1.34 W of mode-matched 795 nm power, 770 mW of 397.5 nm UV output is achieved, implying a doubling efficiency of 57.4%. For BiBO crystal, with 323 mW of mode-matched 795 nm power, 116 mW of 397.5 nm UV output is achieved, leading to a doubling efficiency of 35.9%. The generated UV radiation has potential applications in the fields of quantum physics.

  3. Extreme Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, Jeff; Larsen, Jon

    2013-11-01

    Acknowledgements; 1. Extreme environments: what, where, how; 2. Properties of dense and classical plasmas; 3. Laser energy absorption in matter; 4. Hydrodynamic motion; 5. Shocks; 6. Equation of state; 7. Ionization; 8. Thermal energy transport; 9. Radiation energy transport; 10. Magnetohydrodynamics; 11. Considerations for constructing radiation-hydrodynamics computer codes; 12. Numerical simulations; Appendix: units and constants, glossary of symbols; References; Bibliography; Index.

  4. Novel Nanophosphors for High Efficiency Fluorescent Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Alok Srivatava

    2007-03-31

    This is the Final Report of the Novel Nanophosphors for High Efficiency Fluorescent Lamps, Department of Energy (DOE). The overall goal of this three-year program is to develop novel hybrid phosphors by coating commercially available lamp phosphors with highly stable wide band-gap nanocrystalline phosphors (NCP). The prime technical approach is the development of NCP quantum-splitting phosphor (QSP) and ultra-violet (UV) emitting phosphors with quantum efficiencies exceeding that of the conventional phosphors at 185 nm. The novel hybrid phosphors will increase the efficiency of the fluorescent lamps by up to 32%, enabling total energy savings of 0.26 quads, the reduction in the U.S. energy bill by $6.5 billion and the reduction of the annual carbon emission by 4.1 billion kilogram. Our work started by investigating through modeling calculations the requirement for the particle size of the NCP. Our work to develop suitable nanocrystalline phosphors started with the known oxide quantum splitting and UV emitting phosphors. We demonstrated several synthesis techniques for the production of high quality nanocrystalline materials that crystallizes in the desired phase and with the desired particle size. In collaboration with our subcontractor we demonstrated the feasibility for the manufacture of NC phosphors. We also demonstrated novel techniques of coating the NCP on the surface of micron sized phosphors. Our chief achievement pertains to the successful testing of the coated hybrid phosphor systems in linear fluorescent lamps. In linear fluorescent lamp tests, we have demonstrated up to 7% increase in the efficacy of hybrid phosphors over the conventional (uncoated) phosphors. We have also demonstrated the improvement in the lumen maintenance of the coated phosphors. A hybrid phosphor system based on the commercial red emitting phosphor, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} did not show the anticipated improvement in lamp efficacy. We explored the reasons for this observation

  5. Extreme Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nott, Jonathan

    2006-04-01

    The assessment of risks posed by natural hazards such as floods, droughts, earthquakes, tsunamis or cyclones, is often based on short-term historical records that may not reflect the full range or magnitude of events possible. As human populations grow, especially in hazard-prone areas, methods for accurately assessing natural hazard risks are becoming increasingly important. In Extreme Events Jonathan Nott describes the many methods used to reconstruct such hazards from natural long-term records. He demonstrates how long-term (multi-century to millennial) records are essential in gaining a realistic understanding of the variability of natural hazards, and how short-term historical records can often misrepresent the likely risks associated with natural hazards. This book will form a useful resource for students taking courses covering natural hazards and risk assessment. It will also be valuable for urban planners, policy makers and non-specialists as a guide to understanding and reconstructing long-term records of natural hazards. Explains mechanisms that cause extreme events and discusses their prehistoric records Describes how to reconstruct long-term records of natural hazards in order to make accurate risk assessments Demonstrates that natural hazards can follow cycles over time and do not occur randomly

  6. Diffraction efficiency of 200-nm-period critical-angle transmission gratings in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet wavelength bands.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Ralf K; Ahn, Minseung; Bruccoleri, Alex; Chang, Chih-Hao; Gullikson, Eric M; Mukherjee, Pran; Schattenburg, Mark L

    2011-04-01

    We report on measurements of the diffraction efficiency of 200-nm-period freestanding blazed transmission gratings for wavelengths in the 0.96 to 19.4 nm range. These critical-angle transmission (CAT) gratings achieve highly efficient blazing over a broad band via total external reflection off the sidewalls of smooth, tens of nanometer thin ultrahigh aspect-ratio silicon grating bars and thus combine the advantages of blazed x-ray reflection gratings with those of more conventional x-ray transmission gratings. Prototype gratings with maximum depths of 3.2 and 6 μm were investigated at two different blaze angles. In these initial CAT gratings the grating bars are monolithically connected to a cross support mesh that only leaves less than half of the grating area unobstructed. Because of our initial fabrication approach, the support mesh bars feature a strongly trapezoidal cross section that leads to varying CAT grating depths and partial absorption of diffracted orders. While theory predicts broadband absolute diffraction efficiencies as high as 60% for ideal CAT gratings without a support mesh, experimental results show efficiencies in the range of ∼50-100% of theoretical predictions when taking the effects of the support mesh into account. Future minimization of the support mesh therefore promises broadband CAT grating absolute diffraction efficiencies of 50% or higher. PMID:21460902

  7. Diffraction efficiency of 200-nm-period critical-angle transmission gratings in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet wavelength bands

    SciTech Connect

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Ahn, Minseung; Bruccoleri, Alex; Chang, Chih-Hao; Gullikson, Eric M.; Mukherjee, Pran; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2011-04-01

    We report on measurements of the diffraction efficiency of 200-nm-period freestanding blazed transmission gratings for wavelengths in the 0.96 to 19.4 nm range. These critical-angle transmission (CAT) gratings achieve highly efficient blazing over a broad band via total external reflection off the sidewalls of smooth, tens of nanometer thin ultrahigh aspect-ratio silicon grating bars and thus combine the advantages of blazed x-ray reflection gratings with those of more conventional x-ray transmission gratings. Prototype gratings with maximum depths of 3.2 and 6 {mu}m were investigated at two different blaze angles. In these initial CAT gratings the grating bars are monolithically connected to a cross support mesh that only leaves less than half of the grating area unobstructed. Because of our initial fabrication approach, the support mesh bars feature a strongly trapezoidal cross section that leads to varying CAT grating depths and partial absorption of diffracted orders. While theory predicts broadband absolute diffraction efficiencies as high as 60% for ideal CAT gratings without a support mesh, experimental results show efficiencies in the range of {approx}50-100% of theoretical predictions when taking the effects of the support mesh into account. Future minimization of the support mesh therefore promises broadband CAT grating absolute diffraction efficiencies of 50% or higher.

  8. Stability and efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells based on papaya-leaf dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyitno, Suyitno; Saputra, Trisma Jaya; Supriyanto, Agus; Arifin, Zainal

    2015-09-01

    The present article reports on the enhancement of the performance and stability of natural dye-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Natural dyes extracted from papaya leaves (PL) were investigated as sensitizers in TiO2-based DSSCs and evaluated in comparison with N719 dye. The acidity of the papaya-leaf extract dyes was tuned by adding benzoic acid. The TiO2 film-coated fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrates were prepared using the doctor-blade method, followed by sintering at 450 °C. The counter electrode was coated by chemically deposited catalytic platinum. The working electrodes were immersed in N719 dye and papaya dye solutions with concentrations of 8 g/100 mL. The absorbance spectra of the dyes were obtained by ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy. The energy levels of the dyes were measured by the method of cyclic voltammetry. In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to determine the characteristic functionalities of the dye molecules. The DSSC based on the N719 dye displayed a highest efficiency of 0.87% whereas those based on papaya-leaf dye achieved 0.28% at pH 3.5. The observed improved efficiency of the latter was attributed to the increased current density value. Furthermore, the DSSCs based on papaya-leaf dye with pH 3.5-4 exhibited better stability than those based on N719 dye. However, further studies are required to improve the current density and stability of natural dye-based DSSCs, including the investigation of alternative dye extraction routes, such as isolating the pure chlorophyll from papaya leaves and stabilizing it.

  9. Stability and efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells based on papaya-leaf dye.

    PubMed

    Suyitno, Suyitno; Saputra, Trisma Jaya; Supriyanto, Agus; Arifin, Zainal

    2015-09-01

    The present article reports on the enhancement of the performance and stability of natural dye-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Natural dyes extracted from papaya leaves (PL) were investigated as sensitizers in TiO2-based DSSCs and evaluated in comparison with N719 dye. The acidity of the papaya-leaf extract dyes was tuned by adding benzoic acid. The TiO2 film-coated fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrates were prepared using the doctor-blade method, followed by sintering at 450 °C. The counter electrode was coated by chemically deposited catalytic platinum. The working electrodes were immersed in N719 dye and papaya dye solutions with concentrations of 8 g/100 mL. The absorbance spectra of the dyes were obtained by ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy. The energy levels of the dyes were measured by the method of cyclic voltammetry. In addition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to determine the characteristic functionalities of the dye molecules. The DSSC based on the N719 dye displayed a highest efficiency of 0.87% whereas those based on papaya-leaf dye achieved 0.28% at pH 3.5. The observed improved efficiency of the latter was attributed to the increased current density value. Furthermore, the DSSCs based on papaya-leaf dye with pH 3.5-4 exhibited better stability than those based on N719 dye. However, further studies are required to improve the current density and stability of natural dye-based DSSCs, including the investigation of alternative dye extraction routes, such as isolating the pure chlorophyll from papaya leaves and stabilizing it. PMID:25875031

  10. Optimization using Extremal Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Stefan

    2001-03-01

    We explore a new heuristic for finding high-quality solutions to NP-hard optimization problems which we have recently introduced [see ``Nature's Way of Optimizing," Artificial Intelligence 119, 275-286 (2000) and cond-mat/0010337]. The method, called extremal optimization, is inspired by self-organized criticality, a concept introduced to describe emergent complexity in physical systems. Extremal optimization successively replaces extremely undesirable elements of a single sub-optimal solution with new, random ones. Large fluctuations ensue that efficiently explore many local optima. With only one adjustable parameter, its performance has proved competitive with more elaborate methods, especially near phase transitions which are believed to contain the hardest instances. In particular, extremal optimization is superior to simulated annealing in the partitioning of sparse graphs, it finds the overlap of all ground-states at the phase transition of the 3-coloring problem, and it provides independent confirmation for the ground-state energy of spin glasses, previously obtained with elaborate genetic algorithms.

  11. On symmetric X-ray beam splitting with high efficiency by use of reflection gratings with rectangular profile in the extreme off-plane configuration.

    PubMed

    Jark, Werner; Eichert, Diane

    2015-08-24

    In order to be reflected or diffracted off a surface structure soft X-rays and hard X-rays need to impinge at grazing angles of incidence onto the surface. In case of a reflection grating of highly symmetric structure with rectangular groove profile these grooves can be oriented parallel to the beam trajectory. In such a symmetric situation the distribution of the diffracted intensity with respect to the plane of incidence is then expected to be symmetric. This is indeed observed with symmetrically oriented diffraction peaks. It can be predicted that for appropriate structure parameters the intensity can be contained mostly in two symmetrically oriented diffraction peaks. This will also be the case for hard X-rays. The diffraction efficiency will be particularly high, when the angle of grazing incidence is chosen in the total reflection regime below the critical angle of the grating coating. These predictions were experimentally verified in this work for hard X-rays with photon energies between 4 keV and 12.4 keV. In the experiment of the order of 30% of the incident intensity was diffracted into the two first orders. This is to be compared to reflectivities of the order of 50% measured at the same coating in an unruled area of the substrate. Consequently the relative structural diffraction efficiency for each first order was about 30%, while ideally it could have been 40%. The presented grating structure will thus be a rather efficient amplitude beam splitter for hard X-rays, e.g. in the coherent beam from a free electron laser. In addition such object could then be used as the first component in Michelson interferometers for the beam characterisation or for introducing a time delay between two coherent beams. PMID:26368244

  12. Extremely high current density over 1000 A/cm2 operation in M-GaN LEDs on bulk GaN substrates with low-efficiency droop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokogawa, Toshiya; Inoue, Akira

    2014-02-01

    A high current density over 1000 A/cm2 operation in small chip size m-plane GaN-LED has been successfully demonstrated. The LED with chip size 450 × 450 μm2 has emitted 1353 mW in light output power and 39.2% in external quantum efficiency (EQE) at 1000 A/cm2 (1134 mA). The m-plane GaN-LED has showed asymmetric radiation characteristics. The radiation patterns are controlled by the surface of LED package, the height of LED chip, and striped texture on top m-plane surface.

  13. Achieving Extreme Utilization of Excitons by an Efficient Sandwich-Type Emissive Layer Architecture for Reduced Efficiency Roll-Off and Improved Operational Stability in Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhongbin; Sun, Ning; Zhu, Liping; Sun, Hengda; Wang, Jiaxiu; Yang, Dezhi; Qiao, Xianfeng; Chen, Jiangshan; Alshehri, Saad M; Ahamad, Tansir; Ma, Dongge

    2016-02-10

    It has been demonstrated that the efficiency roll-off is generally caused by the accumulation of excitons or charge carriers, which is intimately related to the emissive layer (EML) architecture in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). In this article, an efficient sandwich-type EML structure with a mixed-host EML sandwiched between two single-host EMLs was designed to eliminate this accumulation, thus simultaneously achieving high efficiency, low efficiency roll-off and good operational stability in the resulting OLEDs. The devices show excellent electroluminescence performances, realizing a maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 24.6% with a maximum power efficiency of 105.6 lm W(-1) and a maximum current efficiency of 93.5 cd A(-1). At the high brightness of 5,000 cd m(-2), they still remain as high as 23.3%, 71.1 lm W(-1), and 88.3 cd A(-1), respectively. And, the device lifetime is up to 2000 h at initial luminance of 1000 cd m(-2), which is significantly higher than that of compared devices with conventional EML structures. The improvement mechanism is systematically studied by the dependence of the exciton distribution in EML and the exciton quenching processes. It can be seen that the utilization of the efficient sandwich-type EML broadens the recombination zone width, thus greatly reducing the exciton quenching and increasing the probability of the exciton recombination. It is believed that the design concept provides a new avenue for us to achieve high-performance OLEDs. PMID:26828128

  14. CMCTS stabilized Fe3O4 particles with extremely low toxicity as highly efficient near-infrared photothermal agents for in vivo tumor ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Song; Kong, Fenfen; Guo, Xiaomeng; Wu, Lin; Shen, Haijun; Xie, Meng; Wang, Xinshi; Jin, Yi; Ge, Yanru

    2013-08-01

    With the potential uses of photothermal therapy (PTT) in cancer treatment with excellent efficacy, and the growing concerns about the nanotoxicity of hyperthermia agents such as carbon nanotubes and gold-based nanomaterials, the importance of searching for a biocompatible hyperthermia agent cannot be emphasized too much. In this work, a novel promising hyperthermia agent employing magnetic Fe3O4 particles with fairly low toxicity was proposed. This hyperthermia agent showed rapid heat generation under NIR irradiation. After modification with carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCTS), the obtained Fe3O4@CMCTS particles could disperse stably in PBS and serum without any aggregation. The modification of CMCTS could decrease the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and improve the cellular uptake. In a comparative study with hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNS), Fe3O4@CMCTS particles exhibited a comparable photothermal effect and fairly low cytotoxicity. The in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) images of mice revealed that by attaching a magnet to the tumor, Fe3O4@CMCTS particles accumulated in the tumor after intravenous injection and showed a low distribution in the liver. After being exposed to a 808 nm laser for 5 min at a low power density of 1.5 W cm-2, the tumors on Fe3O4@CMCTS-injected mice reached a temperature of ~52 °C and were completely destroyed. Thus, a kind of multifunctional magnetic nanoparticle with extremely low toxicity and a simple structure for simultaneous MR imaging, targeted drug delivery and photothermal therapy can be easily fabricated.With the potential uses of photothermal therapy (PTT) in cancer treatment with excellent efficacy, and the growing concerns about the nanotoxicity of hyperthermia agents such as carbon nanotubes and gold-based nanomaterials, the importance of searching for a biocompatible hyperthermia agent cannot be emphasized too much. In this work, a novel promising hyperthermia agent employing magnetic Fe3O4 particles with fairly low

  15. Achieving extremely concentrated aqueous dispersions of graphene flakes and catalytically efficient graphene-metal nanoparticle hybrids with flavin mononucleotide as a high-performance stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Ayán-Varela, M; Paredes, J I; Guardia, L; Villar-Rodil, S; Munuera, J M; Díaz-González, M; Fernández-Sánchez, C; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2015-05-20

    The stable dispersion of graphene flakes in an aqueous medium is highly desirable for the development of materials based on this two-dimensional carbon structure, but current production protocols that make use of a number of surfactants typically suffer from limitations regarding graphene concentration or the amount of surfactant required to colloidally stabilize the sheets. Here, we demonstrate that an innocuous and readily available derivative of vitamin B2, namely the sodium salt of flavin mononucleotide (FMNS), is a highly efficient dispersant in the preparation of aqueous dispersions of defect-free, few-layer graphene flakes. Most notably, graphene concentrations in water as high as ∼50 mg mL(-1) using low amounts of FMNS (FMNS/graphene mass ratios of about 0.04) could be attained, which facilitated the formation of free-standing graphene films displaying high electrical conductivity (∼52000 S m(-1)) without the need of carrying out thermal annealing or other types of post-treatment. The excellent performance of FMNS as a graphene dispersant could be attributed to the combined effect of strong adsorption on the sheets through the isoalloxazine moiety of the molecule and efficient colloidal stabilization provided by its negatively charged phosphate group. The FMNS-stabilized graphene sheets could be decorated with nanoparticles of several noble metals (Ag, Pd, and Pt), and the resulting hybrids exhibited a high catalytic activity in the reduction of nitroarenes and electroreduction of oxygen. Overall, the present results should expedite the processing and implementation of graphene in, e.g., conductive inks, composites, and hybrid materials with practical utility in a wide range of applications. PMID:25915172

  16. Method and apparatus for generating coherent radiation in the ultra-violet region and above by use of distributed feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffren, M. M. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Helium in the superfluid state emits copious amounts of radiation in the ultraviolet region when excited by an electron stream. Conventional laser action using mirrors is impossible in superfluid helium because there are no mirrors that will reflect VUV radiation. By utilizing the distributed feedback method, the superfluid helium can be made to lase. By setting up a standing wave in superfluid helium that has a wavelength equal to, or harmonically related to, half the wavelength of the photon radiation chosen to be emitted as laser radiation by the superfluid helium, the need for end mirrors to produce reflection of the laser radiation is eliminated and reflection occurs instead at the wavefronts of the standing wave. The photons leave the superfluid helium at right angles to the standing wave as coherent radiation having a very high intensity. The standing wave established in the superfluid helium may be an acoustical standing wave, a thermal standing wave (second sound), or an electric standing wave.

  17. Sub-mm Scale Fiber Guided Deep/Vacuum Ultra-Violet Optical Source for Trapped Mercury Ion Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Lin; Burt, Eric A.; Huang, Shouhua; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the functionality of a mercury capillary lamp with a diameter in the sub-mm range and deep ultraviolet (DUV)/ vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation delivery via an optical fiber integrated with the capillary. DUV spectrum control is observed by varying the fabrication parameters such as buffer gas type and pressure, capillary diameter, electrical resonator design, and temperature. We also show spectroscopic data of the 199Hg+ hyper-fine transition at 40.5GHz when applying the above fiber optical design. We present efforts toward micro-plasma generation in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber with related optical design and theoretical estimations. This new approach towards a more practical DUV optical interface could benefit trapped ion clock developments for future ultra-stable frequency reference and time-keeping applications.

  18. LADEE UVS (UltraViolet Visible Spectrometer) and the Search for Lunar Exospheric Dust: A Detailed Spectral Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Cook, Amanda; Colaprete, Anthony; Shirley, Mark; Vargo, Kara; Elphic, Richard C.; Hermalyn, Brendan; Stubbs, Timothy John; Glenar, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) executed science observations in lunar orbit spanning 2013-Oct-16- 2014-04-18 UT. LADEE's Ultraviolet/Visible Spectrometer (UVS) studies the composition and temporal variations of the tenuous lunar exosphere and dust environment, utilizing two sets of optics: a limb-viewing telescope, and a solar-viewer. The limb-viewing telescope observes illuminated dust and emitting gas species while the Sun is just behind the lunar limb. The solar viewer, with its diffuser, allows UVS to also stare directly at the solar disk as it approaches the limb, sampling progressively lower exosphere altitudes. Solar viewer "Occultation" activities occur at the lunar sunrise limb, as the LADEE spacecraft passes into the lunar night side, facing the Sun (the spacecraft orbit is near-equatorial retrograde). A loss of transmission of sunlight occurs by the occultation of dust grains along the line-of-sight. So-called "Inertial Limb" activities have the limb-viewing telescope pointed at the lit exosphere just after the Sun has set. Inertial Limb activities follow a similar progression of diminishing sampling altitudes but hold the solar elongation angle constant so the zodiacal light contribution remains constant while seeking to observe the weak lunar horizon glow. On the dark side of the moon, "Sodium Tail" activities pointed the limb-viewing telescope in the direction of the Moon's sodium tail (similar to anti-sunward), during different lunar phases. Of the UVS data sets, these show the largest excess of scattered blue light, indicative of the presence of small (approximately 100 nm) dust grains in the tail. Correlations are sought between dust in the sodium tail and meteor streams and magnetotail crossings to investigate impact- versus electrostatic-lofting. Once lofted, nanoparticles can become charged and picked up by the solar wind. The LADEE UVS Occultation, Inertial Limb, and Sodium Tail spectral datasets provide evidence of a lunar dust exosphere.

  19. ZnO-based ultra-violet light emitting diodes and nanostructures fabricated by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Miin-Jang; Yang, Jer-Ren; Shiojiri, Makoto

    2012-07-01

    We have investigated ZnO-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD), demonstrating that ALD is one of the noteworthy techniques to prepare high-quality ZnO required for ultraviolet (UV) photonic devices. Here, we review our recent investigations on different ZnO-based heterojunction LEDs such as n-ZnO/p-GaN LEDS, n-ZnO:Al/ZnO nanodots-SiO2 composite/p-GaN LEDS, n-ZnO/ZnO nanodots-SiO2 composite/p-AlGaN LEDs, n-ZnO:Al/i-ZnO/p-SiC(4H) LEDs, and also on ZnO-based nanostructures including ZnO quantum dots embedded in SiO2 nanoparticle layer, ZnO nanopillars on sapphire substrates, Al-doped ZnO films on sapphire substrate and highly (0 0 0 1)-oriented ZnO films on amorphous glass substrate. The latest investigation also demonstrated p-type ZnO:P films prepared on amorphous silica substrates, which allow us to fabricate ZnO-based homojunction LEDs. These devices and structures were studied by x-ray diffraction and various analytical electron microscopy observations as well as electric and electro-optical measurements.

  20. Ultra-violet B (UVB)-induced skin cell death occurs through a cyclophilin D intrinsic signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Chao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Zhi; Tu, Ying; Yang, Yan-li; He, Li; Bi, Zhi-Gang

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UVB radiated skin keratinocytes show cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) upregulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NAC inhibits UVB induced Cyp-D expression, while H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyp-D-deficient cells are significantly less susceptible to UVB induced cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of Cyp-D causes spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. -- Abstract: UVB-induced skin cell damage involves the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), which leads to both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Cyclophilin D (Cyp-D) translocation to the inner membrane of mitochondrion acts as a key component to open the mPTP. Our Western-Blot results in primary cultured human skin keratinocytes and in HaCaT cell line demonstrated that UVB radiation and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) induced Cyp-D expression, which was inhibited by anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). We created a stable Cyp-D deficiency skin keratinocytes by expressing Cyp-D-shRNA through lentiviral infection. Cyp-D-deficient cells were significantly less susceptible than their counterparts to UVB- or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death. Further, cyclosporine A (Cs-A), a Cyp-D inhibitor, inhibited UVB- or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced keratinocytes cell death. Reversely, over-expression of Cyp-D in primary keratinocytes caused spontaneous keratinocytes cell death. These results suggest Cyp-D's critical role in UVB/oxidative stress-induced skin cell death.

  1. Double layers and other phenomena in low-pressure plasma columns generated by ultra-violet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, H.-B.; Kaiser, D.

    2015-12-01

    Low-pressure steady-state plasmas are analysed by means of a two-fluid model in both plane and cylindrical geometries. The charged particles are generated by UV illumination. Both a Gaussian and a one-step profile of the ionization are taken into account. Numerical results reveal various types of solutions depending on the ionization profile and the collisionality. The first state arises if the ionization spreads from the centre over a great part of the plasma. It has an almost quasineutral plasma core and a positively charged boundary sheath. The curvature of the number density of the charge particles is negative, except the boundary sheath. The second state occurs if the ionization is mainly localized in the vicinity of the centre and the collisionality is below a threshold. A slightly positive plasma core is surrounded by a double layer there where the ionization falls off steeply. Between the double layer and the boundary sheath a broad zone can exist where the plasma is nearly quasi-neutral and the electric field is small. Within the double layer the ion drift speed attains the Bohm velocity in collisionless plasmas, it is smaller in collisional cases. In a broad domain, the curvature of the number density of the charged particles can be positive. This is a feature of the so-called contracted columns. The transition between both the states occurs abruptly under collisonless conditions and becomes smooth as the collisionality increases. The minimum of the space charge density can become positive in this case. Several layers are possible, as well. Using the Gaussian profile analytical criteria can be given for a few of the mentioned phenomena. Probably, ionization profiles prescribed by photons allow to understand the origin of the contracted column more completely than up to now.

  2. Double layers and other phenomena in low-pressure plasma columns generated by ultra-violet light

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, H.-B.; Kaiser, D.

    2015-12-15

    Low-pressure steady-state plasmas are analysed by means of a two-fluid model in both plane and cylindrical geometries. The charged particles are generated by UV illumination. Both a Gaussian and a one-step profile of the ionization are taken into account. Numerical results reveal various types of solutions depending on the ionization profile and the collisionality. The first state arises if the ionization spreads from the centre over a great part of the plasma. It has an almost quasineutral plasma core and a positively charged boundary sheath. The curvature of the number density of the charge particles is negative, except the boundary sheath. The second state occurs if the ionization is mainly localized in the vicinity of the centre and the collisionality is below a threshold. A slightly positive plasma core is surrounded by a double layer there where the ionization falls off steeply. Between the double layer and the boundary sheath a broad zone can exist where the plasma is nearly quasi-neutral and the electric field is small. Within the double layer the ion drift speed attains the Bohm velocity in collisionless plasmas, it is smaller in collisional cases. In a broad domain, the curvature of the number density of the charged particles can be positive. This is a feature of the so-called contracted columns. The transition between both the states occurs abruptly under collisonless conditions and becomes smooth as the collisionality increases. The minimum of the space charge density can become positive in this case. Several layers are possible, as well. Using the Gaussian profile analytical criteria can be given for a few of the mentioned phenomena. Probably, ionization profiles prescribed by photons allow to understand the origin of the contracted column more completely than up to now.

  3. LADEE UVS (UltraViolet Visible Spectrometer) and the Search for Lunar Exospheric Dust: A Detailed Spectral Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooden, D. H.; Cook, A.; Colaprete, A.; Shirley, M.; Vargo, K.; Elphic, R. C.; Hermalyn, B.; Stubbs, T. J.; Glenar, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) executed science observations in lunar orbit spanning 2013-Oct-16- 2014-04-18 UT. LADEE's Ultraviolet/Visible Spectrometer (UVS) studies the composition and temporal variations of the tenuous lunar exosphere and dust environment, utilizing two sets of optics: a limb-viewing telescope, and a solar-viewer. The limb-viewing telescope observes illuminated dust and emitting gas species while the Sun is just behind the lunar limb. The solar viewer, with its diffuser, allows UVS to also stare directly at the solar disk as it approaches the limb, sampling progressively lower exosphere altitudes. Solar viewer "Occultation" activities occur at the lunar sunrise limb, as the LADEE spacecraft passes into the lunar night side, facing the Sun (the spacecraft orbit is near-equatorial retrograde). A loss of transmission of sunlight occurs by the occultation of dust grains along the line-of-sight [1, 2]. So-called "Inertial Limb" activities have the limb-viewing telescope pointed at the lit exosphere just after the Sun has set. Inertial Limb activities follow a similar progression of diminishing sampling altitudes but hold the solar elongation angle constant so the zodiacal light contribution remains constant while seeking to observe the weak lunar horizon glow [2,3,4]. On the dark side of the moon, "Sodium Tail" activities pointed the limb-viewing telescope in the direction of the Moon's sodium tail (~anti-sunward), during different lunar phases. Of the UVS data sets, these show the largest excess of scattered blue light, indicative of the presence of small (~100 nm) dust grains in the tail. Correlations are sought between dust in the sodium tail and meteor streams [5] and magnetotail [3] crossings to investigate impact- versus electrostatic-lofting [6]. Once lofted, nanoparticles can become charged and picked up by the solar wind [7,8]. The LADEE UVS Occultation, Inertial Limb, and Sodium Tail spectral datasets provide evidence of a lunar dust exosphere. [1] Wooden et al. 2014, LPSC 45, 2123 [2] Wooden et al. (2014) & [3] Colaprete et al. 2014, at http://nesf2014.arc.nasa.gov [4] Glenar et al. 2011, PSS 59, 1695 [5] Stubbs et al. 2014 LPSC 45, 2705 [6] Stubbs et al. (2014), PSS 90, 10 [7] Farrell et al., 2012, Icarus 219, 498 [8] Mayer-Vernet et al., 2009, Solar Phys. 256, 463

  4. MAVEN Primary Mission Results from the Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph: Aurora, Meteor Showers, Dayglow and Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Nicholas

    2016-07-01

    The Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) is one of nine science instruments aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile and EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft. Its payload is dedicated to exploring the upper atmosphere of Mars and understanding the magnitude and drivers of Mars' atmospheric escape rate. The instrument is among the most powerful spectrographs sent to another planet, with several key capabilities: (1) separate Far-UV & Mid-UV channels for stray light control, (2) a high resolution echelle mode to resolve deuterium and hydrogen emission, (3) internal instrument pointing and scanning capabilities to allow complete mapping and nearly continuous operation, and (4) optimization for airglow studies. I will present an overview of selected IUVS results, including: • The impact of Comet Siding Spring's tail on Mars' atmosphere; • The discovery of diffuse aurora at Mars, and its contrast with previously detected discrete aurora near crustal fields; • Significant seasonal and short-timescale variability in thermospheric dayglow emissions; • Global ozone maps spanning six months of seasonal evolution; and • Mapping of the Mars H and O coronas, to measure the escape rates of H and O and their variability.

  5. The effect of heat- or ultra violet ozone-treatment of titanium on complement deposition from human blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Linderbäck, Paula; Harmankaya, Necati; Askendal, Agneta; Areva, Sami; Lausmaa, Jukka; Tengvall, Pentti

    2010-06-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a well known metallic biomaterial extensively used in dental, orthopaedic-, and occasionally also in blood contacting applications. It integrates well to bone and soft tissues, and is shown upon blood plasma contact to activate the intrinsic pathway of coagulation and bind complement factor 3b. The material properties depend largely on those of the nm-thick dense layer of TiO(2) that becomes rapidly formed upon contact with air and water. The spontaneously formed amorphous Ti-oxide has a pzc approximately 5-6 and its water solubility is at the order of 1-2 micromolar. It is often subjected to chemical- and heat treatments in order to increase the anatase- and rutile crystallinity, to modify the surface topography and to decrease the water solubility. In this work, we prepared sol-gel derived titanium and smooth PVD titanium surfaces, and analysed their oxide and protein deposition properties in human blood plasma before and after annealing at 100-500 degrees C or upon UVO-treatment for up to 96 hours. The blood plasma results show that complement deposition vanished irreversibly after heat treatment at 250-300 degrees C for 30 minutes or after UVO exposure for 24 hours or longer. XPS and infrared spectroscopy indicated change of surface water/hydroxyl binding upon the heat- and UVO treatments, and increased Ti oxidation. XRD analysis confirmed an increased crystallinity and both control (untreated) and annealed smooth titanium displayed low XRD-signals indicating some nanocrystallinity, with predominantly anatase phase. The current results show that the behaviour of titanium dioxide in blood contact can be controlled through relatively simple means, such as mild heating and illumination in UV-light, which both likely irreversibly change the stoichiometry and structure of the outmost layers of titanium dioxide and its OH/H(2)O binding characteristics. PMID:20363497

  6. Discrimination Between Maturity and Composition from Integrated Clementine UltraViolet-Visible and Near-Infrared Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mouelic, S.; Langevin, Y.; Erard, S.; Pinet, P.; Daydou, Y.; Chevrel, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Clementine UV-VIS dataset has greatly improved our understanding of the Moon. The UV-VIS camera was limited to five spectral channels from 415 to 1000 nm. The Clementine near-infrared (NIR) camera was designed to complement this spectral coverage. The NIR filter at 2000 run allows the discrimination between olivine and pyroxene within identified mare basalts. In addition, we will show that the integration of Clementine UV-VIS and NIR datasets allows a better evaluation of the ferrous 1-micron absorption band depth and gives access to the slope of the continuum. The discrimination between maturity and FeO composition can be achieved by a principal component analysis performed on spectral parameters. We selected 952 Clementine UV-VIS and NIR images to compute a multispectral cube covering the Aristarchus Plateau. Aristarchus Plateau is one of the most heterogeneous areas on the Moon. Highland-type materials, mare basalts, and dark mantle deposits have previously been mentioned. The mosaic represents a set of about 500 x 600 nine-channel spectra. UV-VIS filters at 415, 750, 900, 950, and 1000 run were calibrated using the ISIS software. We applied the reduction method described elsewhere to reduce the NIR filters at 1100, 1250, 1500 and 2000 nm. Absolute gain and offset values were refined for the NIR images by using eight telescopic spectra acquired as references. With this calibration test, we were able to reproduce the eight telescopic spectra with a maximum error of 1.8%. The integration of UV-VIS and NIR spectral channels allows the visualization of complete low-resolution spectra. In order to investigate the spectral effects of the space-weathering processes, we focused our analysis on a small mare crater and its immediate surroundings. According to the small size of the crater (about 2-km) and its location on an homogeneous mare area, we can reasonably assume that the content in FeO is homogeneous. The impact event has induced a variation of the maturity of the soil by excavating fresh material. Graphs displays five absolute reflectance spectra extracted from this area. One graph displays the same spectra divided by a continuum, which is considered to be a right line fitting the spectra at 0.75 and 1.5 micron. Spectrum 1 is extracted from the brightest part of the crater interior, and spectrum 5 is extracted from the surrounding mare material. Spectra 2, 3, and 4 are extracted from intermediate distances between the two areas. The 1-and-2 micron absorption band depths and the overall reflectance increase from spectrum 5 (corresponding to a mature area) to spectrum 1 (the most immature area). Conversely, the continuum slope decreases from spectrum 5 to spectrum 1. These three spectral effects of maturity have also been identified on laboratory spectra of lunar samples. Most of the lunar soils exhibit a signature near 1 micron. This absorption band is due to the presence of Fe2+ in mafic minerals such as orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and olivine. In the case of Clementine UV-VIS data alone, the depth of the 1-micron feature is evaluated by the 950/750-nm reflectance ratio. This ratio combined to the reflectance at 750nm has been used to evaluate the global content in FeO of the lunar surface. Near-infrared data makes a more precise evaluation of the 1 micron band depth possible by providing the right side of the band. The continuum in the vicinity of the band can be evaluated by an arithmetic mean or a geometric interpolation of both sides of the band, which are taken at 750 and 1500nm. The geometric interpolation is less sensitive to residual calibration uncertainties. With this method, the 1-micron absorption band depth for the Aristarchus; Plateau can be refined by as much as 10%. The difference is maximum on Fe-poor, highland-type materials. Similarly, the NIR data provide the possibility to investigate the continuum slope of the spectra. The continuum slope is a key parameter in any spectral analysis. The continuum slope variations seem to be mainly dominated by maturity effects, as suggested by the high correlation with the independent evaluation of maturity (OMAT parameter). We have also found a good correlation between the continuum slope and the OMAT parameter on laboratory spectra of lunar samples of the J. B. Adams collection. The discrimination between maturity effects and composition effects can be achieved by using a principal component analysis (PCA) on three spectral parameters, which are the reflectance at 0.75 micron the depth of the 1-micron feature, and the continuum slope. These parameters are mostly affected by maturity and FeO content. The effects of various glass content are assimilated to maturity. The aim of the PCA is to decorrelate the FeO content and maturity effects in the three input parameters. The integration of UV-VIS and NIR datasets allows for a better understanding of the spectral properties of the lunar surface by giving access to key parameters such as the 1 and 2-micron band depths and the continuum slope. The continuum slope can be combined with the depth of the mafic 1-micron absorption feature and the reflectance at 750 nm to discriminate between maturity and composition. NIR images of the sample return stations will be very interesting to refine absolute FeO content and maturity evaluations. Additional information is available in original.

  7. Extreme Gas Kinematics in the z=2.2 Powerful Radio Galaxy MRC1138-262: Evidence for Efficient AGN Feedback in the Early Universe?

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvadba, N H; Lehnert, M D; Eisenhauer, F; Gilbert, A M; Tecza, M; Abuter, R

    2007-06-26

    To explain the properties of the most massive low-redshift galaxies and the shape of their mass function, recent models of galaxy evolution include strong AGN feedback to complement starburst-driven feedback in massive galaxies. Using the near-infrared integral-field spectrograph SPIFFI on the VLT, we searched for direct evidence for such a feedback in the optical emission line gas around the z = 2.16 powerful radio galaxy MRC1138-262, likely a massive galaxy in formation. The kpc-scale kinematics, with FWHMs and relative velocities {approx}< 2400 km s{sup -1} and nearly spherical spatial distribution, do not resemble large-scale gravitational motion or starburst-driven winds. Order-of-magnitude timescale and energy arguments favor the AGN as the only plausible candidate to accelerate the gas, with a total energy injection of {approx} few x 10{sup 60} ergs or more, necessary to power the outflow, and relatively efficient coupling between radio jet and ISM. Observed outflow properties are in gross agreement with the models, and suggest that AGN winds might have a similar, or perhaps larger, cosmological significance than starburst-driven winds, if MRC1138-262 is indeed archetypal. Moreover, the outflow has the potential to remove significant gas fractions ({approx}< 50%) from a > L* galaxy within a few 10 to 100 Myrs, fast enough to preserve the observed [{alpha}/Fe] overabundance in massive galaxies at low redshift. Using simple arguments, it appears that feedback like that observed in MRC1138-262 may have sufficient energy to inhibit material from infalling into the dark matter halo and thus regulate galaxy growth as required in some recent models of hierarchical structure formation.

  8. Method for detection of extremely low concentration

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Miller, Fred S.

    2002-01-01

    An ultratrace detector system for hand-held gas chromatography having high sensitivity, for example, to emissions generated during production of weapons, biological compounds, drugs, etc. The detector system is insensitive to water, air, helium, argon, oxygen, and CO.sub.2. The detector system is basically composed of a hand-held capillary gas chromatography (GC), an insulated heated redox-chamber, a detection chamber, and a vapor trap. For example, the detector system may use gas phase redox reactions and spectral absorption of mercury vapor. The gas chromatograph initially separates compounds that percolate through a bed of heated mercuric oxide (HgO) in a silica--or other metal--aerogel material which acts as an insulator. Compounds easily oxidized by HgO liberate atomic mercury that subsequently pass through a detection chamber which includes a detector cell, such as quartz, that is illuminated with a 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) mercury discharge lamp which generates the exact mercury absorption bands that are used to detect the liberated mercury atoms. Atomic mercury strongly absorbs 254 nm energy is therefore a specific signal for reducing compounds eluting from the capillary GC, whereafter the atomic mercury is trapped for example, in a silicon-aerogel trap.

  9. Food web efficiency differs between humic and clear water lake communities in response to nutrients and light.

    PubMed

    Faithfull, C L; Mathisen, P; Wenzel, A; Bergström, A K; Vrede, T

    2015-03-01

    This study demonstrates that clear and humic freshwater pelagic communities respond differently to the same environmental stressors, i.e. nutrient and light availability. Thus, effects on humic communities cannot be generalized from existing knowledge about these environmental stressors on clear water communities. Small humic lakes are the most numerous type of lake in the boreal zone, but little is known about how these lakes will respond to increased inflows of nutrients and terrestrial dissolved organic C (t-DOC) due to climate change and increased human impacts. Therefore, we compared the effects of nutrient addition and light availability on pelagic humic and clear water lake communities in a mesocosm experiment. When nutrients were added, phytoplankton production (PPr) increased in both communities, but pelagic energy mobilization (PEM) and bacterial production (BP) only increased in the humic community. At low light conditions, the addition of nutrients led to increased PPr only in the humic community, suggesting that, in contrast to the clear water community, humic phytoplankton were already adapted to lower ambient light levels. Low light significantly reduced PPr and PEM in the clear water community, but without reducing total zooplankton production, which resulted in a doubling of food web efficiency (FWE = total zooplankton production/PEM). However, total zooplankton production was not correlated with PEM, PPr, BP, PPr:BP or C:nutrient stoichiometry for either community type. Therefore, other factors such as food chain length, food quality, ultra-violet radiation or duration of the experiment, must have determined total zooplankton production and ultimately FWE. PMID:25373827

  10. Extreme Scale Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Shen, Han-Wei; Pascucci, Valerio

    2012-05-08

    Extreme-scale visual analytics (VA) is about applying VA to extreme-scale data. The articles in this special issue examine advances related to extreme-scale VA problems, their analytical and computational challenges, and their real-world applications.

  11. Tapioca starch: An efficient fuel in gel-combustion synthesis of photocatalytically and anti-microbially active ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasami, Alamelu K.; Raja Naika, H.; Nagabhushana, H.; Ramakrishnappa, T.; Balakrishna, Geetha R.; Nagaraju, G.

    2015-01-15

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by gel-combustion method using novel bio-fuel tapioca starch pearls, derived from the tubers of Manihotesculenta. The product is characterized using various techniques. The X-ray diffraction pattern correspond to a hexagonal zincite structure. Fourier transform infrared spectrum showed main absorption peaks at 394 and 508 cm{sup −} {sup 1} due to stretching vibration of Zn–O. Ultravoilet–visible spectrum of zinc oxide nanoparticles showed absorption maximum at 373 nm whereas the maximum of the bulk zinc oxide was 377 nm. The morphology of the product was studied using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscopic images showed that the products are agglomerated and porous in nature. The transmission electron microscopic images revealed spherical particles of 40–50 nm in diameter. The photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue was examined using zinc oxide nanoparticles and found more efficient in sunlight than ultra-violet light due to reduced band gap. The antibacterial properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles were investigated against four bacterial strains Klebsiella aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aereus, where Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aereus exhibited significant antibacterial activity in agar well diffusion method when compared to positive control. - Highlights: • ZnO nanoparticles have been prepared from a new bio-fuel, tapioca starch by gel combustion method. • XRD pattern revealed hexagonal zincite crystal structure with crystallite size 33 nm. • ZnO nanoparticles exhibited a band gap of 2.70 eV. • The ZnO nanoparticles exhibited superior degradation in sunlight in comparison with UV light. • The product showed a good anti-bacterial activity against two bacterial strains.

  12. Evolutions from extremality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    We examine the evolution of extremal spherically symmetric black holes, developing both general theory as well as the specific cases of (charged) null dust and massless scalar field spacetimes. As matter accretes onto extremal marginally trapped tubes, they generically evolve to become nonextremal, with the initial extremal horizon bifurcating into inner and outer nonextremal horizons. At the start of this process arbitrarily slow matter accretion can cause a geometrically invariant measure of horizon growth to jump from zero to infinity. We also consider dynamical horizons that are extremal throughout their evolution and see that such spacetimes contain two extremal black hole horizons: an inner isolated one and an outer dynamical one. We compare these extremal dynamical horizons with the dynamical extreme event horizon spacetimes of Murata, Reall and Tanahashi.

  13. 21st Birthday Drinking: Extremely Extreme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutledge, Patricia C.; Park, Aesoon; Sher, Kenneth J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite public recognition of the hazards of 21st birthday drinking, there is little empirical information concerning its prevalence, severity, and risk factors. Data from a sample of 2,518 college students suggest that 21st birthday drinking poses an extreme danger: (a) 4 of every 5 participants (83%) reported drinking to celebrate, (b) birthday…

  14. How extreme is extreme hourly precipitation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papalexiou, Simon Michael; Dialynas, Yannis G.; Pappas, Christoforos

    2016-04-01

    The importance of accurate representation of precipitation at fine time scales (e.g., hourly), directly associated with flash flood events, is crucial in hydrological design and prediction. The upper part of a probability distribution, known as the distribution tail, determines the behavior of extreme events. In general, and loosely speaking, tails can be categorized in two families: the subexponential and the hyperexponential family, with the first generating more intense and more frequent extremes compared to the latter. In past studies, the focus has been mainly on daily precipitation, with the Gamma distribution being the most popular model. Here, we investigate the behaviour of tails of hourly precipitation by comparing the upper part of empirical distributions of thousands of records with three general types of tails corresponding to the Pareto, Lognormal, and Weibull distributions. Specifically, we use thousands of hourly rainfall records from all over the USA. The analysis indicates that heavier-tailed distributions describe better the observed hourly rainfall extremes in comparison to lighter tails. Traditional representations of the marginal distribution of hourly rainfall may significantly deviate from observed behaviours of extremes, with direct implications on hydroclimatic variables modelling and engineering design.

  15. Extremity x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    An extremity x-ray is an image of the hands, wrist, feet, ankle, leg, thigh, forearm humerus or upper arm, hip, shoulder ... term "extremity" often refers to a human limb. X-rays are a form of radiation that passes through ...

  16. Bivariate extreme value distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elshamy, M.

    1992-01-01

    In certain engineering applications, such as those occurring in the analyses of ascent structural loads for the Space Transportation System (STS), some of the load variables have a lower bound of zero. Thus, the need for practical models of bivariate extreme value probability distribution functions with lower limits was identified. We discuss the Gumbel models and present practical forms of bivariate extreme probability distributions of Weibull and Frechet types with two parameters. Bivariate extreme value probability distribution functions can be expressed in terms of the marginal extremel distributions and a 'dependence' function subject to certain analytical conditions. Properties of such bivariate extreme distributions, sums and differences of paired extremals, as well as the corresponding forms of conditional distributions, are discussed. Practical estimation techniques are also given.

  17. Extreme Environments: Why NASA?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    Life on our planet is the only known example in the universe and so we are relegated to this planet for the study of life. However, life may be a natural consequence of planet formation, and so the study of the origin, evolution, distribution and future of life may be greatly informed by planetary exploration. Astrobiology has adopted several approaches to study life on Earth, for deducing our origins, for determining the likelihood of life elsewhere, and for enabling the search for evidence of past or present life. The first approach has been the Exobiology Program, centered around understanding the origins of life and which supports individual investigator research. Second has been the construction of consortia-type research in which researchers from different disciplines focus on a larger problem. This structure began with NASA Specialized Centers of Research and Training and has grown to include the Astrobiology Institute - a collection of competitively selected groups of researchers attacking problems in Astrobiology as individual teams and as a consolidated Institute. With the formation of an intellectual basis for exploring for life elsewhere, Astrobiology has initiated the competitive research and development program in instrument development (Astrobiology Science and Technology for Instrument Development [ASTID] Program) that would enable future mission instruments for the exploration of planetary bodies in the search for prebiotic chemistry, habitable environments (past or present), biomarkers, and possibly life itself. However, the act of exploring requires robust instrumentation, mobile robotic platforms, efficient operations, and a high level of autonomy. To this end, Astrobiology has started a new research activity that promotes scientifically-driven robotic exploration of extreme environments on Earth that are analogous to suspected habitable environments on other planetary bodies. The program is called Astrobiology Science and Technology for

  18. Time-of-flight electron spectrometer for a broad range of kinetic energies.

    PubMed

    Kothe, Alexander; Metje, Jan; Wilke, Martin; Moguilevski, Alexandre; Engel, Nicholas; Al-Obaidi, Ruba; Richter, Clemens; Golnak, Ronny; Kiyan, Igor Yu; Aziz, Emad F

    2013-02-01

    A newly constructed time-of-flight electron spectrometer of the magnetic bottle type is characterized for electron detection in a broad range of kinetic energies. The instrument is designed to measure the energy spectra of electrons generated from liquids excited by strong laser fields and photons in the range of extreme ultra violet and soft X-rays. Argon inner shell electrons were recorded to calibrate the spectrometer and investigate its characteristics, such as energy resolution and collection efficiency. Its energy resolution ΔE/E of 1.6% allows resolving the Ar 2p spin orbit structure at kinetic energies higher than 100 eV. The collection efficiency is determined and compared to that of the spectrometer in its field-free configuration. PMID:23464194

  19. Time-of-flight electron spectrometer for a broad range of kinetic energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothe, Alexander; Metje, Jan; Wilke, Martin; Moguilevski, Alexandre; Engel, Nicholas; Al-Obaidi, Ruba; Richter, Clemens; Golnak, Ronny; Kiyan, Igor Yu.; Aziz, Emad F.

    2013-02-01

    A newly constructed time-of-flight electron spectrometer of the magnetic bottle type is characterized for electron detection in a broad range of kinetic energies. The instrument is designed to measure the energy spectra of electrons generated from liquids excited by strong laser fields and photons in the range of extreme ultra violet and soft X-rays. Argon inner shell electrons were recorded to calibrate the spectrometer and investigate its characteristics, such as energy resolution and collection efficiency. Its energy resolution ΔE/E of 1.6% allows resolving the Ar 2p spin orbit structure at kinetic energies higher than 100 eV. The collection efficiency is determined and compared to that of the spectrometer in its field-free configuration.

  20. Time-of-flight electron spectrometer for a broad range of kinetic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, Alexander; Metje, Jan; Wilke, Martin; Moguilevski, Alexandre; Engel, Nicholas; Al-Obaidi, Ruba; Richter, Clemens; Golnak, Ronny; Kiyan, Igor Yu.; Aziz, Emad F.

    2013-02-15

    A newly constructed time-of-flight electron spectrometer of the magnetic bottle type is characterized for electron detection in a broad range of kinetic energies. The instrument is designed to measure the energy spectra of electrons generated from liquids excited by strong laser fields and photons in the range of extreme ultra violet and soft X-rays. Argon inner shell electrons were recorded to calibrate the spectrometer and investigate its characteristics, such as energy resolution and collection efficiency. Its energy resolution {Delta}E/E of 1.6% allows resolving the Ar 2p spin orbit structure at kinetic energies higher than 100 eV. The collection efficiency is determined and compared to that of the spectrometer in its field-free configuration.

  1. Survival of extreme opinions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jiann-wien; Huang, Ding-wei

    2009-12-01

    We study the survival of extreme opinions in various processes of consensus formation. All the opinions are treated equally and subjected to the same rules of changing. We investigate three typical models to reach a consensus in each case: (A) personal influence, (B) influence from surroundings, and (C) influence to surroundings. Starting with uniformly distributed random opinions, our calculated results show that the extreme opinions can survive in both models (A) and (B), but not in model (C). We obtain a conclusion that both personal influence and passive adaptation to the environment are not sufficient enough to eradicate all the extreme opinions. Only the active persuasion to change the surroundings eliminates the extreme opinions completely.

  2. Improving extreme value statistics.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Ashivni

    2014-11-01

    The rate of convergence in extreme value statistics is nonuniversal and can be arbitrarily slow. Further, the relative error can be unbounded in the tail of the approximation, leading to difficulty in extrapolating the extreme value fit beyond the available data. We introduce the T method, and show that by using simple nonlinear transformations the extreme value approximation can be rendered rapidly convergent in the bulk, and asymptotic in the tail, thus fixing both issues. The transformations are often parametrized by just one parameter, which can be estimated numerically. The classical extreme value method is shown to be a special case of the proposed method. We demonstrate that vastly improved results can be obtained with almost no extra cost. PMID:25493780

  3. Extreme environments and exobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, E. I.

    1993-01-01

    Ecological research on extreme environments can be applied to exobiological problems such as the question of life on Mars. If life forms (fossil or extant) are found on Mars, their study will help to solve fundamental questions about the nature of life on Earth. Extreme environments that are beyond the range of adaptability of their inhabitants are defined as "absolute extreme". Such environments can serve as terrestrial models for the last stages of life in the history of Mars, when the surface cooled down and atmosphere and water disappeared. The cryptoendolithic microbial community in porous rocks of the Ross Desert in Antarctica and the microbial mats at the bottom of frozen Antarctic lakes are such examples. The microbial communities of Siberian permafrost show that, in frozen but stable communities, long-term survival is possible. In the context of terraforming Mars, selected microorganisms isolated from absolute extreme environments are considered for use in creation of a biological carbon cycle.

  4. Hardware removal - extremity

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007644.htm Hardware removal - extremity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Surgeons use hardware such as pins, plates, or screws to help ...

  5. Recovery of EUVL substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, S.P.; Baker, S.L.

    1995-01-19

    Mo/Si multilayers, were removed from superpolished zerodur and fused silica substrates with a dry etching process that, under suitable processing conditions, produces negligible change in either the substrate surface figure or surface roughness. Full recovery of the initial normal incidence extreme ultra-violet (EUV) reflectance response has been demonstrated on reprocessed substrates.

  6. Extreme Programming: Maestro Style

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey; Fox, Jason; Rabe, Kenneth; Shu, I-Hsiang; Powell, Mark

    2009-01-01

    "Extreme Programming: Maestro Style" is the name of a computer programming methodology that has evolved as a custom version of a methodology, called extreme programming that has been practiced in the software industry since the late 1990s. The name of this version reflects its origin in the work of the Maestro team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory that develops software for Mars exploration missions. Extreme programming is oriented toward agile development of software resting on values of simplicity, communication, testing, and aggressiveness. Extreme programming involves use of methods of rapidly building and disseminating institutional knowledge among members of a computer-programming team to give all the members a shared view that matches the view of the customers for whom the software system is to be developed. Extreme programming includes frequent planning by programmers in collaboration with customers, continually examining and rewriting code in striving for the simplest workable software designs, a system metaphor (basically, an abstraction of the system that provides easy-to-remember software-naming conventions and insight into the architecture of the system), programmers working in pairs, adherence to a set of coding standards, collaboration of customers and programmers, frequent verbal communication, frequent releases of software in small increments of development, repeated testing of the developmental software by both programmers and customers, and continuous interaction between the team and the customers. The environment in which the Maestro team works requires the team to quickly adapt to changing needs of its customers. In addition, the team cannot afford to accept unnecessary development risk. Extreme programming enables the Maestro team to remain agile and provide high-quality software and service to its customers. However, several factors in the Maestro environment have made it necessary to modify some of the conventional extreme

  7. Electronics for Extreme Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, J. U.; Cressler, J.; Li, Y.; Niu, G.

    2001-01-01

    Most of the NASA missions involve extreme environments comprising radiation and low or high temperatures. Current practice of providing friendly ambient operating environment to electronics costs considerable power and mass (for shielding). Immediate missions such as the Europa orbiter and lander and Mars landers require the electronics to perform reliably in extreme conditions during the most critical part of the mission. Some other missions planned in the future also involve substantial surface activity in terms of measurements, sample collection, penetration through ice and crust and the analysis of samples. Thus it is extremely critical to develop electronics that could reliably operate under extreme space environments. Silicon On Insulator (SOI) technology is an extremely attractive candidate for NASA's future low power and high speed electronic systems because it offers increased transconductance, decreased sub-threshold slope, reduced short channel effects, elimination of kink effect, enhanced low field mobility, and immunity from radiation induced latch-up. A common belief that semiconductor devices function better at low temperatures is generally true for bulk devices but it does not hold true for deep sub-micron SOI CMOS devices with microscopic device features of 0.25 micrometers and smaller. Various temperature sensitive device parameters and device characteristics have recently been reported in the literature. Behavior of state of the art technology devices under such conditions needs to be evaluated in order to determine possible modifications in the device design for better performance and survivability under extreme environments. Here, we present a unique approach of developing electronics for extreme environments to benefit future NASA missions as described above. This will also benefit other long transit/life time missions such as the solar sail and planetary outposts in which electronics is out open in the unshielded space at the ambient space

  8. Advanced Instrumentation for Extreme Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Melin, Alexander M; Kisner, Roger; Fugate, David L

    2013-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is pursuing embedded instrumentation and controls (I&C) technology for next generation nuclear power generation applications. Embedded systems encompass a wide range of configurations and technologies; we define embedding in this instance as the integration of the sensors and the control system design into the component design using a systems engineering process. Embedded I&C systems are often an essential part of developing new capabilities, improving reliability, enhancing performance, and reducing operational costs. The new intrinsically safe, more efficient, and cost effective reactor technologies (Next Generation Nuclear Plant and Small Modular Reactors) require the development and application of new I&C technologies. These new designs raise extreme environmental challenges such as high temperatures (over 700 C) and material compatibility (e.g., molten salts). The desired reliability and functionality requires measurements in these extreme conditions including high radiation environments which were not previously monitored in real time. The DOE/NE Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program currently has several projects investigating I&C technologies necessary to make these reactor designs realizable. The project described in this paper has the specific goal of investigating embedded I&C with the following objectives: 1.Explore and quantify the potential gains from embedded I&C improved reliability, increased performance, and reduced cost 2.Identify practical control, sensing, and measurement techniques for the extreme environments found in high-temperature reactors 3.Design and fabricate a functional prototype high-temperature cooling pump for molten salts represents target demonstration of improved performance, reliability, and widespread usage There are many engineering challenges in the design of a high-temperature liquid salt cooling pump. The pump and motor are in direct contact with

  9. Adventure and Extreme Sports.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Andrew Thomas; Rao, Ashwin

    2016-03-01

    Adventure and extreme sports often involve unpredictable and inhospitable environments, high velocities, and stunts. These activities vary widely and include sports like BASE jumping, snowboarding, kayaking, and surfing. Increasing interest and participation in adventure and extreme sports warrants understanding by clinicians to facilitate prevention, identification, and treatment of injuries unique to each sport. This article covers alpine skiing and snowboarding, skateboarding, surfing, bungee jumping, BASE jumping, and whitewater sports with emphasis on epidemiology, demographics, general injury mechanisms, specific injuries, chronic injuries, fatality data, and prevention. Overall, most injuries are related to overuse, trauma, and environmental or microbial exposure. PMID:26900120

  10. Extremal entanglement witnesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Leif Ove; Hauge, Andreas; Myrheim, Jan; Sollid, Per Øyvind

    2015-02-01

    We present a study of extremal entanglement witnesses on a bipartite composite quantum system. We define the cone of witnesses as the dual of the set of separable density matrices, thus TrΩρ≥0 when Ω is a witness and ρ is a pure product state, ρ=ψψ† with ψ=ϕ⊗χ. The set of witnesses of unit trace is a compact convex set, uniquely defined by its extremal points. The expectation value f(ϕ,χ)=TrΩρ as a function of vectors ϕ and χ is a positive semidefinite biquadratic form. Every zero of f(ϕ,χ) imposes strong real-linear constraints on f and Ω. The real and symmetric Hessian matrix at the zero must be positive semidefinite. Its eigenvectors with zero eigenvalue, if such exist, we call Hessian zeros. A zero of f(ϕ,χ) is quadratic if it has no Hessian zeros, otherwise it is quartic. We call a witness quadratic if it has only quadratic zeros, and quartic if it has at least one quartic zero. A main result we prove is that a witness is extremal if and only if no other witness has the same, or a larger, set of zeros and Hessian zeros. A quadratic extremal witness has a minimum number of isolated zeros depending on dimensions. If a witness is not extremal, then the constraints defined by its zeros and Hessian zeros determine all directions in which we may search for witnesses having more zeros or Hessian zeros. A finite number of iterated searches in random directions, by numerical methods, leads to an extremal witness which is nearly always quadratic and has the minimum number of zeros. We discuss briefly some topics related to extremal witnesses, in particular the relation between the facial structures of the dual sets of witnesses and separable states. We discuss the relation between extremality and optimality of witnesses, and a conjecture of separability of the so-called structural physical approximation (SPA) of an optimal witness. Finally, we discuss how to treat the entanglement witnesses on a complex Hilbert space as a subset of the

  11. Extreme black hole holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Thomas Edward

    The connection between black holes in four dimensions and conformal field theories (CFTs) in two dimensions is explored, focusing on zero temperature (extreme) black holes and their low-temperature cousins. It is shown that extreme black holes in a theory of quantum gravity are holographically dual to field theories living in two dimensions without gravity, and that the field theory reproduces a variety of black hole phenomena in detail. The extreme black hole/CFT correspondence is derived from a symmetry analysis near the horizon of a Kerr black hole with mass M and maximal angular momentum J=M 2. The asymptotic symmetry generators form one copy of the Virasoro algebra with central charge c=12J, which implies that the near-horizon quantum states are identical to those of a two-dimensional CFT. We discuss extensions of this result to near-extreme black holes and cosmological horizons. Astrophysical black holes are never exactly extremal, but the black hole GRS1915+105 observed through X-ray and radio telescopy is likely within 1% of the extremal spin, suggesting that this extraordinary and well studied object is approximately dual to a two-dimensional CFT with c˜1079. As evidence for the correspondence, microstate counting in the CFT is used to derive the Bekenstein-Hawking area law for the Kerr entropy, S=Horizon area/4. Furthermore, the correlators in the dual CFT are shown to reproduce the scattering amplitudes of a charged scalar or spin-½ field by a near-extreme Kerr-Newman black hole, and a neutral spin-1 or spin-2 field by a near-extreme Kerr black hole. Scattering amplitudes probe the vacuum of fields living on the black hole background. For scalars, bound superradiant modes lead to an instability, while for fermions, it is shown that the bound superradiant modes condense and form a Fermi sea which extends well outside the ergosphere. Assuming no further instabilities, the low energy effective theory near the black hole is described by ripples in the

  12. Hydrological extremes and security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundzewicz, Z. W.; Matczak, P.

    2015-04-01

    Economic losses caused by hydrological extremes - floods and droughts - have been on the rise. Hydrological extremes jeopardize human security and impact on societal livelihood and welfare. Security can be generally understood as freedom from threat and the ability of societies to maintain their independent identity and their functional integrity against forces of change. Several dimensions of security are reviewed in the context of hydrological extremes. The traditional interpretation of security, focused on the state military capabilities, has been replaced by a wider understanding, including economic, societal and environmental aspects that get increasing attention. Floods and droughts pose a burden and serious challenges to the state that is responsible for sustaining economic development, and societal and environmental security. The latter can be regarded as the maintenance of ecosystem services, on which a society depends. An important part of it is water security, which can be defined as the availability of an adequate quantity and quality of water for health, livelihoods, ecosystems and production, coupled with an acceptable level of water-related risks to people, environments and economies. Security concerns arise because, over large areas, hydrological extremes - floods and droughts - are becoming more frequent and more severe. In terms of dealing with water-related risks, climate change can increase uncertainties, which makes the state's task to deliver security more difficult and more expensive. However, changes in population size and development, and level of protection, drive exposure to hydrological hazards.

  13. Going to Extremes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project which gave students a chance to explore the idea of using "extreme" materials in a sculpture. While the process was, at times, challenging and stressful for teacher and student alike, the results proved that, with proper planning, even young students can independently demonstrate multiple solutions…

  14. Climate Extremes and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, Philip

    2009-10-01

    In October 2005, as the United States still was reeling from Hurricane Katrina in August and as the alphabet was too short to contain all of that year's named Atlantic tropical storms (Hurricane Wilma was forming near Jamaica), a timely workshop in Bermuda focused on climate extremes and society (see Eos, 87(3), 25, 17 January 2006). This edited volume, which corresponds roughly to the presentations given at that workshop, offers a fascinating look at the critically important intersection of acute climate stress and human vulnerabilities. A changing climate affects humans and other living things not through the variable that most robustly demonstrates the role of rising greenhouse gases—globally averaged temperature—but through local changes, especially changes in extremes. The first part of this book, “Defining and modeling the nature of weather and climate extremes,” focuses on natural science. The second part, “Impacts of weather and climate extremes,” focuses on societal impacts and responses, emphasizing an insurance industry perspective because a primary sponsor of the workshop was the Risk Prediction Initiative, whose aim is to “support scientific research on topics of interest to its sponsors” (p. 320).

  15. Extreme Low Aspect Ratio Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Paul

    1997-11-01

    Recently proposed Spherical Stellarator (SS) concept [1] includes the devices with stellarator features and low aspect ratio, A <= 3.5, which is very unusual for stellarators (typical stellarators have A ≈ 7-10 or above). Strong bootstrap current and high-β equilibria are two distinguished elements of the SS concept leading to compact, steady-state, and efficient fusion reactor. Different coil configurations advantageous for the SS have been identified and analyzed [1-6]. In this report, we will present results on novel stellarator configurations which are unusual even for the SS approach. These are the extreme-low-aspect-ratio-stellarators (ELARS), with the aspect ratio A ≈ 1. We succeeded in finding ELARS configurations with extremely compact, modular, and simple design compatible with significant rotational transform (ι ≈ 0.1 - 0.15), large plasma volume, and good particle transport characteristics. [1] P.E. Moroz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 651 (1996); [2] P.E. Moroz, Phys. Plasmas 3, 3055 (1996); [3] P.E. Moroz, D.B. Batchelor et al., Fusion Tech. 30, 1347 (1996); [4] P.E. Moroz, Stellarator News 48, 2 (1996); [5] P.E. Moroz, Plasma Phys. Reports 23, 502 (1997); [6] P.E. Moroz, Nucl. Fusion 37, No. 8 (1997). *Supported by DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER54395.

  16. Observing extreme SFXTs with XMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, Enrico

    2013-10-01

    We propose a 130 ks-long XMM-Newton observation of the most extreme among the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transient, IGR J17544 2619, to unveil the mechanism regulating the unique behavior of these objects in the X-ray domain. This deep observation with XMM will secure: (i) enough sensitivity to study with the required accuracy soft spectral components, which are the most reliable tracers of the donor wind structure and can be used to efficiently probe the accretion flow geometry in wind-fed systems; (ii) catch at least one bright burst and 7-10 smaller flares, permitting an accurate spectral and statistical analysis of the triggering mechanism; (iii) measure pulsations down to pulsed fractions of 4-5% and spin periods of 3-4 ks, expected for magnetars in binaries.

  17. THE EXTREME HOSTS OF EXTREME SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Neill, James D.; Quimby, Robert; Ofek, Eran; Wyder, Ted K.; Martin, D. Christopher; Barlow, Tom A.; Foster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Morrissey, Patrick; Sullivan, Mark; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Howell, D. Andrew; Nugent, Peter; Seibert, Mark; Overzier, Roderik; Neff, Susan G.; Schiminovich, David; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, Jose; Heckman, Timothy M.

    2011-01-20

    We use GALEX ultraviolet (UV) and optical integrated photometry of the hosts of 17 luminous supernovae (LSNe, having peak M{sub V} < -21) and compare them to a sample of 26, 000 galaxies from a cross-match between the SDSS DR4 spectral catalog and GALEX interim release 1.1. We place the LSN hosts on the galaxy NUV - r versus M{sub r} color-magnitude diagram (CMD) with the larger sample to illustrate how extreme they are. The LSN hosts appear to favor low-density regions of the galaxy CMD falling on the blue edge of the blue cloud toward the low-luminosity end. From the UV-optical photometry, we estimate the star formation history of the LSN hosts. The hosts have moderately low star formation rates (SFRs) and low stellar masses (M{sub *}) resulting in high specific star formation rates (sSFR). Compared with the larger sample, the LSN hosts occupy low-density regions of a diagram plotting sSFR versus M{sub *} in the area having higher sSFR and lower M{sub *}. This preference for low M{sub *}, high sSFR hosts implies that the LSNe are produced by an effect having to do with their local environment. The correlation of mass with metallicity suggests that perhaps wind-driven mass loss is the factor that prevents LSNe from arising in higher-mass, higher-metallicity hosts. The massive progenitors of the LSNe (>100 M{sub sun}), by appearing in low-SFR hosts, are potential tests for theories of the initial mass function that limit the maximum mass of a star based on the SFR.

  18. Extremal quantum cloning machines

    SciTech Connect

    Chiribella, G.; D'Ariano, G. M.; Perinotti, P.; Cerf, N.J.

    2005-10-15

    We investigate the problem of cloning a set of states that is invariant under the action of an irreducible group representation. We then characterize the cloners that are extremal in the convex set of group covariant cloning machines, among which one can restrict the search for optimal cloners. For a set of states that is invariant under the discrete Weyl-Heisenberg group, we show that all extremal cloners can be unitarily realized using the so-called double-Bell states, whence providing a general proof of the popular ansatz used in the literature for finding optimal cloners in a variety of settings. Our result can also be generalized to continuous-variable optimal cloning in infinite dimensions, where the covariance group is the customary Weyl-Heisenberg group of displacement000.

  19. Simultaneous determination of substituted diphenylamine antioxidants and benzotriazole ultra violet stabilizers in blood plasma and fish homogenates by ultra high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhe; Peart, Thomas E; Cook, Cyril J; De Silva, Amila O

    2016-08-26

    Analytical methods were developed for the determination of eight substituted diphenylamines (SDPAs) and six benzotriazole UV stabilizers (BZT-UVs) in blood plasma and fish homogenate matrices. Liquid-liquid extraction by methyl tert-butyl ether and denaturation by KOH following silica gel packed column clean-up was employed for blood plasma preparation. For the fish homogenate samples, ultrasonic assisted solvent extraction combined with automated gel permeation chromatography and silica gel packed column clean-up was used. The target compounds were determined by optimized ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in positive electrospray ionization mode. The method limits of quantification (MLOQs) of the 14 analytes ranged from 0.002 to 1.5ngg(-1) and 0.001 to 2.3ngg(-1) (wet weight, w.w.) for blood plasma and fish homogenate, respectively. The total recoveries of the target compounds varied from 61% to 100% (mean 77±9%). Eleven targets including monobutyl- (C4), dibutyl- (C4C4), monooctyl- (C8), monobutyl monooctyl- (C4C8), dioctyl-(C8C8), monononyl- (C9), dinonly-(C9C9) and 4,4'-bis(α,α-dimethylbenzyl)-(diAMS) DPAs, as well as 2-(2H-Benzotriazol-2-yl)-4,6-bis(1-methyl-1-phenylethyl)phenol (UV234), 2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-(5-chloro-2H-benzotriazol-2-yl) phenol (UV327) and 2-(2H-Benzotriazol-2-yl)-4,6-di-tert-pentylphenol (UV328) were identified in the environmental biota samples, with concentrations in the range of 

  20. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms

    PubMed Central

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C.; Pan, C.-T.; Gwilliam, R.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes. PMID:27271352

  1. VUV dissociative excitation cross sections of H2O, NH3, and CH4 by electron impact. [Vacuum Ultra-Violet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, H. D.; Mentall, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute excitation functions for excited fragments resulting from electron bombardment of H2O, NH3, and CH4 by low-energy electrons (0 to 300 eV) have been measured in the vacuum ultraviolet (1100 to 1950 A). The predominant emission for each molecule was the H Lyman-alpha line, while the O I, N I, C I, and C II emissions were at least an order of magnitude weaker. Absolute cross sections at 100 eV are given along with the appearance potential of the various processes and the possible dissociative-excitation channels through which such processes proceed.

  2. A measurement strategy for non-dispersive ultra-violet detection of formaldehyde in indoor air: spectral analysis and interferent gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, J. J.; Hodgkinson, J.; Saffell, J. R.; Tatam, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted an extensive review of published spectra in order to identify a region with potential for detection of formaldehyde in indoor air. 85 chemicals and chemical groups common to the indoor environment were identified, 32 of which had absorption spectra in the UV-vis region. Of these, 11 were found to overlap with the formaldehyde UV region. It was found that the region between 320 to 360 nm is relatively free from interference from indoor gases, with NO2 being the only major interferent. A method is proposed for a low resolution (3 nm) spectroscopic detection method, specifically targeted at formaldehyde absorption features at 327 nm with a reference at 334 nm. 32 ppb of NO2 was found to have a cross-sensitivity with equivalent magnitude to 100 ppb of formaldehyde. A second reference at 348 nm would reduce this cross-sensitivity.

  3. Climatology of Ultra Violet (UV) irradiance as measured through the Belgian ground-based monitoring network during the time period of 1995-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Praveen; Gillotay, Didier; Depiesse, Cedric

    2016-04-01

    In this study we describe the network of ground-based ultraviolet (UV) radiation monitoring stations in Belgium. The evolution of the entire network, together with the details of measuring instruments is given. The observed cumulative irradiances -UVB, UVA and total solar irradiance (TSI)- over the course of measurement for three stations -a northern (Ostende), central (Uccle) and a southern (Redu)- are shown. The longest series of measurement shown in this study is at Uccle, Brussels, from 1995 till 2014. Thus, the variation of the UV index (UVI), together with the variation of irradiances during summer and winter months at Uccle are shown as a part of this climatological study. The trend of UVB irradiance over the above mentioned three stations is shown. This UVB trend is studied in conjunction with the long-term satellite-based total column ozone value over Belgium, which shows two distinct trends marked by a change point. The total column ozone trend following the change point is positive. It is also seen that the UVB trend is positive for the urban/sub-urban sites: Uccle and Redu. Whereas the UVB trend at Ostende, which is a coastal site, is not positive. A possible explanation of this relation between total column ozone and UVB trend could be associated with aerosols, which is shown in this paper by means of a radiative transfer model based study -as a part of a preliminary investigation. It is seen that the UVI is influenced by the type of aerosols.

  4. Sprayed zinc oxide films: Ultra-violet light-induced reversible surface wettability and platinum-sensitization-assisted improved liquefied petroleum gas response.

    PubMed

    Nakate, Umesh T; Patil, Pramila; Bulakhe, R N; Lokhande, C D; Kale, Sangeeta N; Naushad, Mu; Mane, Rajaram S

    2016-10-15

    We report the rapid (superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic) transition property and improvement in the liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) sensing response of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) on UV-irradiation and platinum (Pt) surface sensitization, respectively. The morphological evolution of ZnO NRs is evidenced from the field emission scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope digital images and for the structural elucidation X-ray diffraction pattern is used. Elemental survey mapping is obtained from energy dispersive X-ray analysis spectrum. The optical properties have been studied by UV-Visible and photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements. The rapid (120sec) conversion of superhydrophobic (154°) ZnO NRs film to superhydrophilic (7°) is obtained under UV light illumination and the superhydrophobicity is regained by storing sample in dark. The mechanism for switching wettability behavior of ZnO NRs has thoroughly been discussed. In second phase, Pt-sensitized ZnO NRs film has demonstrated considerable gas sensitivity at 260ppm concentration of LPG. At 623K operating temperature, the maximum LPG response of 58% and the response time of 49sec for 1040ppm LPG concentration of Pt- sensitized ZnO NRs film are obtained. This higher LPG response of Pt-sensitized ZnO NRs film over pristine is primarily due to electronic effect and catalytic effect (spill-over effect) caused by an additional of Pt on ZnO NRs film surface. PMID:27421113

  5. OH SENSOR BASED ON ULTRA-VIOLET, CONTINUOUS-WAVE ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY UTILIZING A FREQUENCY-QUADRUPLED, FIBER-AMPLIFIED EXTERNAL CAVITY DIODE LASER. (R828180)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  6. Proposal for Testing and Validation of Vacuum Ultra-Violet Atomic Laser-Induced Fluorescence as a Method to Analyze Carbon Grid Erosion in Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Previous investigation under award NAG3-25 10 sought to determine the best method of LIF to determine the carbon density in a thruster plume. Initial reports from other groups were ambiguous as to the number of carbon clusters that might be present in the plume of a thruster. Carbon clusters would certainly affect the ability to LIF; if they were the dominant species, then perhaps the LIF method should target clusters. The results of quadrupole mass spectroscopy on sputtered carbon determined that minimal numbers of clusters were sputtered from graphite under impact from keV Krypton. There were some investigations in the keV range by other groups that hinted at clusters, but at the time the proposal was presented to NASA, there was no data from low-energy sputtering available. Thus, the proposal sought to develop a method to characterize the population only of atoms sputtered from a graphite target in a test cell. Most of the ground work had been established by the previous two years of investigation. The proposal covering 2003 sought to develop an anti-Stokes Raman shifting cell to generate VUW light and test this cell on two different laser systems, ArF and YAG- pumped dye. The second goal was to measure the lowest detectable amounts of carbon atoms by 156.1 nm and 165.7 nm LIF. If equipment was functioning properly, it was expected that these goals would be met easily during the timeframe of the proposal, and that is the reason only modest funding was requested. The PI was only funded at half- time by Glenn during the summer months. All other work time was paid for by Whitworth College. The college also funded a student, Charles Shawley, who worked on the project during the spring.

  7. Direct cross-linking of snRNP proteins F and 70K to snRNAs by ultra-violet radiation in situ.

    PubMed Central

    Woppmann, A; Rinke, J; Lührmann, R

    1988-01-01

    Protein-RNA interactions in small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (UsnRNPs) from HeLa cells were investigated by irradiation of purified nucleoplasmic snRNPs U1 to U6 with UV light at 254 nm. The cross-linked proteins were analyzed on one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis systems, and the existence of a stable cross-linkage was demonstrated by isolating protein-oligonucleotide complexes from snRNPs containing 32P-labelled snRNAs after exhaustive digestion with a mixture of RNases of different specificities. The primary target of the UV-light induced cross-linking reaction between protein and RNA was protein F. It was also found to be cross-linked to U1 snRNA in purified U1 snRNPs. Protein F is known to be one of the common snRNP proteins, which together with D, E and G protect a 15-25 nucleotide long stretch of snRNAs U1, U2, U4 and U5, the so-called domain A or Sm binding site against nuclease digestion (Liautard et al., 1982). It is therefore likely that the core-protein may bind directly and specifically to the common snRNA domain A, or else to a sub-region of this. The second protein which was demonstrated to be cross-linked to snRNA was the U1 specific protein 70K. Since it has been shown that binding of protein 70K to U1 RNP requires the presence of the 5' stem and loop of U1 RNA (Hamm et al., 1987) it is likely that the 70K protein directly interacts with a sub-region of the first stem loop structure. Images PMID:2974540

  8. Influence of Alternative Tubulin Inhibitors on the Potency of a Epirubicin-Immunochemotherapeutic Synthesized with an Ultra Violet Light-Activated Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, C. P.; Jones, Toni; Bear, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Immunochemotherapeutics, epirubicin-(C3-amide)-SS-[anti-HER2/neu] with an internal disulfide bond, and epirubicin-(C3-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] were synthesized utilizing succinimidyl 2-[(4,4′-azipentanamido) ethyl]-1,3′-dithioproprionate or succinimidyl 4,4-azipentanoate respectively. Western blot analysis was used to determine the presence of any immunoglobulin fragmentation or IgG-IgG polymerization. Retained HER2/neu binding characteristics of epirubicin-(C3-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] and epirubicin-(C3-amide)-SS-[anti-HER2/neu] were validated by cell-ELISA using a mammary adenocarcinoma (SKBr-3) population that highly over-expresses trophic HER2/neu receptor complexes. Cytotoxic anti-neoplastic potency of epirubicin-(C3-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] and epirubicin-(C3-amide)-SS-[anti-HER2/neu] between epirubicin-equivalent concentrations of 10−10 M and 10−6 M was determined by measuring the vitality/proliferation of chemotherapeutic-resistant mammary adenocarcinoma (SKBr-3 cell type). Cytotoxic anti-neoplastic potency of benzimidazoles (albendazole, flubendazole, membendazole) and griseofulvin were assessed between 0-to-2 μg/ml and 0-to-100 μg/ml respectively while mebendazole and griseofulvin were analyzed at fixed concentrations of 0.35 μg/ml and 35 g/ml respectively in dual combination with gradient concentrations of epirubicin-(C3-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] and epirubicin-(C3-amide)-SS-[anti-HER2/neu]. Cytotoxic anti-neoplastic potency for epirubicin-(C3-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] and epirubicin-(C3-amide)-SS-[anti-HER2/neu] against chemotherapeutic-resistant mammary adenocarcinoma (SKBr-3) was nearly identical at epirubicin-equivalent concentrations of 10−10 M and 10−6 M. The benzimadazoles also possessed cytotoxic anti-neoplastic activity with flubendazole and albendazole being the most and least potent respectively. Similarly, griseofulvin had cytotoxic anti-neoplastic activity and was more potent than methylselenocysteine. Both mebendazole and griseofulvin when applied in dual combination with either epirubicin-(C3-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] or epirubicin-(C3-amide)-SS-[anti-HER2/neu] produced enhanced levels of cytotoxic anti-neoplatic potency. PMID:26225190

  9. Separation of water-soluble vitamins by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography with ultra-violet detection: application to polyvitaminated premixes.

    PubMed

    Heudi, Olivier; Kilinç, Tamara; Fontannaz, Patric

    2005-04-01

    Nine water-soluble vitamins: [thiamine (B1), ascorbic acid (C), nicotinamide (PP), pyridoxine (B6), calcium pantothenate (B5), folic acid (B9), cyanocobalamin (B12), riboflavin (B2) and biotin (B8)] were separated on a YMC-Pack Pro C18 column (250 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm particle size) in a single run with a gradient elution of mobile phase consisting of 0.025% trifluoroacetic acid pH 2.6 (solvent A) and acetonitrile (solvent B). The separation was achieved within 17 min with a flow rate of 0.8 ml min(-1) and the detection was performed at two wavelengths (210 and 275 nm). The calibration graphs plotted with six concentrations of each vitamin were linear with a regression coefficient R2 > 0.995. The method was applied for the quantification of vitamins B1, C, PP, B6, B5, B9 B2 and B8 in polyvitaminated premixes (premixes) used for the fortification of infant nutrition products. The sample preparation involves an aqueous extraction of vitamins and two different samples dilution were used prior the LC-analysis. The specificity of the method was demonstrated by the retention characteristics, UV spectra and by comparing the peak purity with the standard of each vitamin. The repeatability of the method was evaluated at different level of concentrations on 12 premixes and the coefficients of variation (CVr) were below 6.5%. The values of the intermediate precision (CV1) were below 9.6% (n = 6). The concentrations of vitamins found in premixes with our method were comparable to the declared values, since no bias was found between the two sets of results at 95% confidence. The simplicity of the procedure should make it highly desirable for quality control of premixes in the food industry. PMID:15861787

  10. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms.

    PubMed

    Bangert, U; Pierce, W; Boothroyd, C; Pan, C-T; Gwilliam, R

    2016-01-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes. PMID:27271352

  11. TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND ULTRA-VIOLET LIGHT: A SUSTAINABLE AND INEXPENSIVE SOLUTION FOR ADDRESSING DRINKING WATER QUALITY ISSUES IN THE DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ti02 based purification system reactor was built and tested by various diagnostic techniques for its efficacy in detoxification of water against organic and biological matter. Initial experiments were done with ultraviolet lamp as ...

  12. Vacuum ultra-violet emission of CF4 and CF3I containing plasmas and Their effect on low-k materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    el Otell, Z.; Šamara, V.; Zotovich, A.; Hansen, T.; de Marneffe, J.-F.; Baklanov, M. R.

    2015-10-01

    CF3I was suggested as a replacement of CF4 gas to decrease the plasma-induced damage (PID) on low-k dielectrics during etching. This proposal is investigated by means of plasma emission measurements and material characterisation. The experiments were conducted in a 300 mm capacitively coupled plasma source. The vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 30≤slant λ ≤slant 220 nm) plasma emission was measured for discharges generated in a pure or a mixture of argon, CF4 and/or CF3I, since VUV plays a major role in PID. However, CF3I containing discharges were found to have a stronger emission than CF4 in the VUV range. Nevertheless, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy and κ-value measurements showed that there is almost no difference between the damage caused by CF3I or CF4 containing plasmas, while etching in a capacitively coupled plasma source. It is proposed that the damage caused by CF3I with lower F*-density but higher VUV-photon flux is similar to the damage caused by CF4, with higher F*-density but lower VUV-photon flux.

  13. Collective electronic excitations in the ultra violet regime in 2-D and 1-D carbon nanostructures achieved by the addition of foreign atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, U.; Pierce, W.; Boothroyd, C.; Pan, C.-T.; Gwilliam, R.

    2016-06-01

    Plasmons in the visible/UV energy regime have attracted great attention, especially in nano-materials, with regards to applications in opto-electronics and light harvesting; tailored enhancement of such plasmons is of particular interest for prospects in nano-plasmonics. This work demonstrates that it is possible, by adequate doping, to create excitations in the visible/UV regime in nano-carbon materials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and graphene, with choice of suitable ad-atoms and dopants, which are introduced directly into the lattice by low energy ion implantation or added via deposition by evaporation. Investigations as to whether these excitations are of collective nature, i.e., have plasmonic character, are carried out via DFT calculations and experiment-based extraction of the dielectric function. They give evidence of collective excitation behaviour for a number of the introduced impurity species, including K, Ag, B, N, and Pd. It is furthermore demonstrated that such excitations can be concentrated at nano-features, e.g., along nano-holes in graphene through metal atoms adhering to the edges of these holes.

  14. Ultra-violet protection and water repellency of polyester fabrics treated by surface deposition of nickel under the effect of low temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, C. W.; Yuen, C. W. M.

    2007-12-01

    This paper is aimed at understanding the textile properties of nickel-deposited polyester fabric after treating with low temperature plasma treatment. Low temperature plasma treatment with oxygen gas was employed in this paper to activate a hydrophilic surface for the polyester fabrics and hence facilitate the nickel deposition through an electroless plating process. The textile properties of plasma-induced electroless nickel-plated polyester fabrics were evaluated by different standard testing methods in terms of both physical and chemical performances. The electroless nickel plating with plasma treatment improved significantly the performance of nickel-plated polyester fabrics as reflected by the scanning electron microscopy, tensile strength, ultraviolet protection as well as fabric weight. On the contrary, it also enhanced the fabric thickness and colour fastness to crocking. In addition, there was no influence on the performance of colour fastness to light and colourfastness to laundering. Moreover, the application of plasma treatment adversely affected slightly the performance of contact angle and wrinkle recovery property.

  15. Rehabilitation in extremity fractures.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, E

    1975-03-01

    General principles in the rehabilitation of a patient with an extremity fracture include: treat the patient, not the x-ray; move all joints not immobilized; prevent disuse atrophy; use gravity to assist in mobilizing a joint; stabilize proximal joints to avoid reverse action of biarticular muscles; permit early protected weight bearing until adequate joint mobility is achieved; appropriately instruct the patient in a home program, and avoid all stretching. PMID:1114932

  16. Penetrating extremity trauma.

    PubMed

    Ivatury, Rao R; Anand, Rahul; Ordonez, Carlos

    2015-06-01

    Penetrating extremity trauma (PET) usually becomes less important when present along with multiple truncal injuries. The middle eastern wars documented the terrible mortality and morbidity resulting from PET. Even in civilian trauma, PET can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. There are now well-established principles in the evaluation and management of vascular, bony, soft tissue, and neurologic lesions that will lead to a reduction of the poor outcomes. This review will summarize some of these recent concepts. PMID:25413177

  17. On extreme geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, Consuelo; Palacios, Judith; Saiz, Elena; Guerrero, Antonio; Cerrato, Yolanda

    2014-10-01

    Extreme geomagnetic storms are considered as one of the major natural hazards for technology-dependent society. Geomagnetic field disturbances can disrupt the operation of critical infrastructures relying on space-based assets, and can also result in terrestrial effects, such as the Quebec electrical disruption in 1989. Forecasting potential hazards is a matter of high priority, but considering large flares as the only criterion for early-warning systems has demonstrated to release a large amount of false alarms and misses. Moreover, the quantification of the severity of the geomagnetic disturbance at the terrestrial surface using indices as Dst cannot be considered as the best approach to give account of the damage in utilities. High temporal resolution local indices come out as a possible solution to this issue, as disturbances recorded at the terrestrial surface differ largely both in latitude and longitude. The recovery phase of extreme storms presents also some peculiar features which make it different from other less intense storms. This paper goes through all these issues related to extreme storms by analysing a few events, highlighting the March 1989 storm, related to the Quebec blackout, and the October 2003 event, when several transformers burnt out in South Africa.

  18. The Engineering for Climate Extremes Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, G. J.; Tye, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Hurricane Sandy and the recent floods in Thailand have demonstrated not only how sensitive the urban environment is to the impact of severe weather, but also the associated global reach of the ramifications. These, together with other growing extreme weather impacts and the increasing interdependence of global commercial activities point towards a growing vulnerability to weather and climate extremes. The Engineering for Climate Extremes Partnership brings academia, industry and government together with the goals encouraging joint activities aimed at developing new, robust, and well-communicated responses to this increasing vulnerability. Integral to the approach is the concept of 'graceful failure' in which flexible designs are adopted that protect against failure by combining engineering or network strengths with a plan for efficient and rapid recovery if and when they fail. Such an approach enables optimal planning for both known future scenarios and their assessed uncertainty.

  19. Tunable, rare earth-doped solid state lasers

    DOEpatents

    Emmett, John L.; Jacobs, Ralph R.; Krupke, William F.; Weber, Marvin J.

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus comprising combinations of an excimer pump laser and a rare earth-doped solid matrix, utilizing the 5d-4f radiative transition in a rare earth ion to produce visible and ultra-violet laser radiation with high overall efficiency in selected cases and relatively long radiative lifetimes.

  20. Metagenomics of extreme environments.

    PubMed

    Cowan, D A; Ramond, J-B; Makhalanyane, T P; De Maayer, P

    2015-06-01

    Whether they are exposed to extremes of heat or cold, or buried deep beneath the Earth's surface, microorganisms have an uncanny ability to survive under these conditions. This ability to survive has fascinated scientists for nearly a century, but the recent development of metagenomics and 'omics' tools has allowed us to make huge leaps in understanding the remarkable complexity and versatility of extremophile communities. Here, in the context of the recently developed metagenomic tools, we discuss recent research on the community composition, adaptive strategies and biological functions of extremophiles. PMID:26048196

  1. Upper Extremity Regional Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Joseph M.; Gerancher, J.C.; Hebl, James R.; Ilfeld, Brian M.; McCartney, Colin J.L.; Franco, Carlo D.; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2009-01-01

    Brachial plexus blockade is the cornerstone of the peripheral nerve regional anesthesia practice of most anesthesiologists. As part of the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine’s commitment to providing intensive evidence-based education related to regional anesthesia and analgesia, this article is a complete update of our 2002 comprehensive review of upper extremity anesthesia. The text of the review focuses on (1) pertinent anatomy, (2) approaches to the brachial plexus and techniques that optimize block quality, (4) local anesthetic and adjuvant pharmacology, (5) complications, (6) perioperative issues, and (6) challenges for future research. PMID:19282714

  2. Mineralogy under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Jinfu

    2012-02-07

    We have performed measurements of minerals based on the synchrotron source for single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, inelastic scattering, spectroscopy and radiography by using diamond anvil cells. We investigated the properties of iron (Fe), iron-magnesium oxides (Fe, Mg)O, silica(SiO{sub 2}), iron-magnesium silicates (Fe, Mg)SiO{sub 3} under simulated high pressure-high temperature extreme conditions of the Earth's crust, upper mantle, low mantle, core-mantle boundary, outer core, and inner core. The results provide a new window on the investigation of the mineral properties at Earth's conditions.

  3. Solar extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Hugh S.

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares and CMEs have a broad range of magnitudes. This review discusses the possibility of “extreme events,” defined as those with magnitudes greater than have been seen in the existing historical record. For most quantitative measures, this direct information does not extend more than a century and a half into the recent past. The magnitude distributions (occurrence frequencies) of solar events (flares/CMEs) typically decrease with the parameter measured or inferred (peak flux, mass, energy etc. Flare radiation fluxes tend to follow a power law slightly flatter than S-2, where S represents a peak flux; solar particle events (SPEs) follow a still flatter power law up to a limiting magnitude, and then appear to roll over to a steeper distribution, which may take an exponential form or follow a broken power law. This inference comes from the terrestrial 14C record and from the depth dependence of various radioisotope proxies in the lunar regolith and in meteorites. Recently major new observational results have impacted our use of the relatively limited historical record in new ways: the detection of actual events in the 14C tree-ring records, and the systematic observations of flares and “superflares” by the Kepler spacecraft. I discuss how these new findings may affect our understanding of the distribution function expected for extreme solar events.

  4. "Triangular" extremal dilatonic dyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal'tsov, Dmitri; Khramtsov, Mikhail; Orlov, Dmitri

    2015-04-01

    Explicit dyonic solutions in four-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory are known only for three particular values of the dilaton coupling constant: a = 0 , 1 ,√{ 3}. However, numerical evidence was presented on existence of dyons admitting an extremal limit in theories with more general sequence of dilaton couplings a =√{ n (n + 1) / 2 } labeled by an integer n. Apart from the lower members n = 0 , 1 , 2, this family of theories does not have motivation from supergravity/string theory, and analytical origin of the above sequence remained unclear so far. We fill the gap showing that this formula follows from analyticity of the dilaton function at the AdS2 ×S2 event horizon of the extremal dyonic black hole, with n being the leading dilaton power in the Taylor expansion. We also derive generalization of this rule for asymptotically anti-de Sitter dyonic black holes with spherical, planar and hyperbolic topology of the horizon.

  5. Extreme Scale Computational Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2009-11-01

    We live in extraordinary times. With increasingly sophisticated observatories opening up new vistas on the universe, astrophysics is becoming more complex and data-driven. The success in understanding astrophysical systems that are inherently multi-physical, nonlinear systems demands realism in our models of the phenomena. We cannot hope to advance the realism of these models to match the expected sophistication of future observations without extreme-scale computation. Just one example is the advent of gravitational wave astronomy. Detectors like LIGO are about to make the first ever detection of gravitational waves. The gravitational waves are produced during violent events such as the merger of two black holes. The detection of these waves or ripples in the fabric of spacetime is a formidable undertaking, requiring innovative engineering, powerful data analysis tools and careful theoretical modeling. I will discuss the computational and theoretical challenges ahead in our new understanding of physics and astronomy where gravity exhibits its strongest grip on our spacetime.

  6. Investigating NARCCAP Precipitation Extremes via Bivariate Extreme Value Theory (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, G. B.; Cooley, D. S.; Sain, S. R.; Bukovsky, M. S.; Mearns, L. O.

    2013-12-01

    We introduce methodology from statistical extreme value theory to examine the ability of reanalysis-drive regional climate models to simulate past daily precipitation extremes. Going beyond a comparison of summary statistics such as 20-year return values, we study whether the most extreme precipitation events produced by climate model simulations exhibit correspondence to the most extreme events seen in observational records. The extent of this correspondence is formulated via the statistical concept of tail dependence. We examine several case studies of extreme precipitation events simulated by the six models of the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) driven by NCEP reanalysis. It is found that the NARCCAP models generally reproduce daily winter precipitation extremes along the Pacific coast quite well; in contrast, simulation of past daily summer precipitation extremes in a central US region is poor. Some differences in the strength of extremal correspondence are seen in the central region between models which employ spectral nudging and those which do not. We demonstrate how these techniques may be used to draw a link between extreme precipitation events and large-scale atmospheric drivers, as well as to downscale extreme precipitation simulated by a future run of a regional climate model. Specifically, we examine potential future changes in the nature of extreme precipitation along the Pacific coast produced by the pineapple express (PE) phenomenon. A link between extreme precipitation events and a "PE Index" derived from North Pacific sea-surface pressure fields is found. This link is used to study PE-influenced extreme precipitation produced by a future-scenario climate model run.

  7. Masks for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinale, G; Goldsmith, J; Kearney, P A; Larson, C; Moore, C E; Prisbrey, S; Tong, W; Vernon, S P; Weber, F; Yan, P-Y

    1998-09-01

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), the technology specific requirements on the mask are a direct consequence of the utilization of radiation in the spectral region between 10 and 15 nm. At these wavelengths, all condensed materials are highly absorbing and efficient radiation transport mandates the use of all-reflective optical systems. Reflectivity is achieved with resonant, wavelength-matched multilayer (ML) coatings on all of the optical surfaces - including the mask. The EUV mask has a unique architecture - it consists of a substrate with a highly reflective ML coating (the mask blank) that is subsequently over-coated with a patterned absorber layer (the mask). Particulate contamination on the EUVL mask surface, errors in absorber definition and defects in the ML coating all have the potential to print in the lithographic process. While highly developed technologies exist for repair of the absorber layer, no viable strategy for the repair of ML coating defects has been identified. In this paper the state-of-the-art in ML deposition technology, optical inspection of EUVL mask blank defects and candidate absorber patterning approaches are reviewed.

  8. Workshop on Extreme Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundell, Carole; Sullivan, Mark

    2012-04-01

    abstract-type="normal">SummaryNever before has there been such a wealth of versatile ground- and space-based facilities with which to detect variable emission across the electromagnetic spectrum and beyond, to non-EM signals such as neutrinos and gravitational waves, to probe the most extreme phenomena in the Universe. The variable sky is already providing a wealth of new and surprising observations of phenomena such as GRBs, SNe and AGN that are pushing current theories beyond the state of the art. Multi-messenger follow-up will soon become de rigeur, and upcoming radio and optical all-sky transient surveys will revolutionise the study of the transient Universe. In addition to the technical and data challenges presented by such surveys, a major new challenge will be the interpretation of the wealth of available data and the identification of the underlying physics of new classes of variable (and potentially exotic) objects. Theoretical predictions will be vital for interpreting these future transient discoveries. The goal of this workshop was to bring together theorists and observers in order to identify unexplored synergies across three main research areas of extreme physics: gamma-ray bursts, supernovæ and, more generically, relativistic jets. It aimed to discuss key outstanding questions in these rapidly moving fields, such as the composition and acceleration of GRB and AGN jets, GRB progenitors and central engines, the origin of the wide range of observed variability time-scales in GRB prompt and after-glow light curves and related cosmological applications, the physics of the newly-discovered ultra-luminous SN-like optical transients-as well as to speculate on what we might hope to discover with future technology. The workshop absorbed two 90-minute sessions, selecting 3 main science topics (Relativistic Jets, GRBs and SNe) which it organised as structured discussions driven by a series of short but provocative questions. The final session featured a panel

  9. Detectors in Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Blaj, G.; Carini, G.; Carron, S.; Haller, G.; Hart, P.; Hasi, J.; Herrmann, S.; Kenney, C.; Segal, J.; Tomada, A.

    2015-08-06

    Free Electron Lasers opened a new window on imaging the motion of atoms and molecules. At SLAC, FEL experiments are performed at LCLS using 120Hz pulses with 1012 - 1013 photons in 10 femtoseconds (billions of times brighter than the most powerful synchrotrons). This extreme detection environment raises unique challenges, from obvious to surprising. Radiation damage is a constant threat due to accidental exposure to insufficiently attenuated beam, focused beam and formation of ice crystals reflecting the beam onto the detector. Often high power optical lasers are also used (e.g., 25TW), increasing the risk of damage or impeding data acquisition through electromagnetic pulses (EMP). The sample can contaminate the detector surface or even produce shrapnel damage. Some experiments require ultra high vacuum (UHV) with strict design, surface contamination and cooling requirements - also for detectors. The setup is often changed between or during experiments with short turnaround times, risking mechanical and ESD damage, requiring work planning, training of operators and sometimes continuous participation of the LCLS Detector Group in the experiments. The detectors used most often at LCLS are CSPAD cameras for hard x-rays and pnCCDs for soft x-rays.

  10. Extreme ultraviolet lithography machine

    DOEpatents

    Tichenor, Daniel A.; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Haney, Steven J.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    2000-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) machine or system for producing integrated circuit (IC) components, such as transistors, formed on a substrate. The EUVL machine utilizes a laser plasma point source directed via an optical arrangement onto a mask or reticle which is reflected by a multiple mirror system onto the substrate or target. The EUVL machine operates in the 10-14 nm wavelength soft x-ray photon. Basically the EUV machine includes an evacuated source chamber, an evacuated main or project chamber interconnected by a transport tube arrangement, wherein a laser beam is directed into a plasma generator which produces an illumination beam which is directed by optics from the source chamber through the connecting tube, into the projection chamber, and onto the reticle or mask, from which a patterned beam is reflected by optics in a projection optics (PO) box mounted in the main or projection chamber onto the substrate. In one embodiment of a EUVL machine, nine optical components are utilized, with four of the optical components located in the PO box. The main or projection chamber includes vibration isolators for the PO box and a vibration isolator mounting for the substrate, with the main or projection chamber being mounted on a support structure and being isolated.

  11. Stacked Extreme Learning Machines.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongming; Huang, Guang-Bin; Lin, Zhiping; Wang, Han; Soh, Yeng Chai

    2015-09-01

    Extreme learning machine (ELM) has recently attracted many researchers' interest due to its very fast learning speed, good generalization ability, and ease of implementation. It provides a unified solution that can be used directly to solve regression, binary, and multiclass classification problems. In this paper, we propose a stacked ELMs (S-ELMs) that is specially designed for solving large and complex data problems. The S-ELMs divides a single large ELM network into multiple stacked small ELMs which are serially connected. The S-ELMs can approximate a very large ELM network with small memory requirement. To further improve the testing accuracy on big data problems, the ELM autoencoder can be implemented during each iteration of the S-ELMs algorithm. The simulation results show that the S-ELMs even with random hidden nodes can achieve similar testing accuracy to support vector machine (SVM) while having low memory requirements. With the help of ELM autoencoder, the S-ELMs can achieve much better testing accuracy than SVM and slightly better accuracy than deep belief network (DBN) with much faster training speed. PMID:25361517

  12. Understanding water extremes with caution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehlík, Milan; Stehlíková, Silvia; Torres, Sebastián

    2016-06-01

    We discuss a sensitive topic, how to scientifically estimate extremes in water quality managements. Such extremes are incorporating establishment of thresholds or levels of certain chemicals in the drinking water. In particular, we address the water fluoridation and quality of drinking water in Chile. Statistical approaches demonstrating the necessary background of water manager will be given in a survey exposition to establish link between statistics of extremes and practice.

  13. Upper Extremity Amputations and Prosthetics

    PubMed Central

    Ovadia, Steven A.; Askari, Morad

    2015-01-01

    Upper extremity amputations are most frequently indicated by severe traumatic injuries. The location of the injury will determine the level of amputation. Preservation of extremity length is often a goal. The amputation site will have important implications on the functional status of the patient and options for prosthetic reconstruction. Advances in amputation techniques and prosthetic reconstructions promote improved quality of life. In this article, the authors review the principles of upper extremity amputation, including techniques, amputation sites, and prosthetic reconstructions. PMID:25685104

  14. Extreme horizontal branch stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.

    A review is presented on the properties, origin and evolutionary links of hot subluminous stars which are generally believed to be extreme Horizontal Branch stars or closely related objects. They exist both in the disk and halo populations (globular clusters) of the Galaxy. Amongst the field stars a large fraction of sdBs are found to reside in close binaries. The companions are predominantly white dwarfs, but also low mass main sequence stars are quite common. Systems with sufficiently massive white dwarf companions may qualify as Supernova Ia progenitors. Recently evidence has been found that the masses of some unseen companions might exceed the Chandrasekhar mass, hence they must be neutron stars or black holes. Even a planet has recently been detected orbiting the pulsating sdB star V391 Peg. Quite to the opposite,in globular clusters, only very few sdB binaries amongst are found indicating that the dominant sdB formation processes is different in a dense environment. Binary population synthesis models identify three formation channels, (i) stable Roche lobe overflow, (ii) one or two common envelope ejection phases and (iii) the merger of two helium white dwarfs. The latter channel may explain the properties of the He-enriched subluminous O stars, the hotter sisters of the sdB stars, because their binary fraction is lower than that of the sdBs by a factor of ten or more. The rivaling ''late hot flasher'' scenario is also discussed. Pulsating subluminous B (sdB) stars play an important role for asteroseismology as this technique has already led to mass determinations for a handful of stars. A unique hyper-velocity sdO star moving so fast that it is unbound to the Galaxy has probably been ejected by the super-massive black hole in the Galactic centre.

  15. Predictability of Extreme Events in Social Media

    PubMed Central

    Miotto, José M.; Altmann, Eduardo G.

    2014-01-01

    It is part of our daily social-media experience that seemingly ordinary items (videos, news, publications, etc.) unexpectedly gain an enormous amount of attention. Here we investigate how unexpected these extreme events are. We propose a method that, given some information on the items, quantifies the predictability of events, i.e., the potential of identifying in advance the most successful items. Applying this method to different data, ranging from views in YouTube videos to posts in Usenet discussion groups, we invariantly find that the predictability increases for the most extreme events. This indicates that, despite the inherently stochastic collective dynamics of users, efficient prediction is possible for the most successful items. PMID:25369138

  16. Predictability of extreme events in social media.

    PubMed

    Miotto, José M; Altmann, Eduardo G

    2014-01-01

    It is part of our daily social-media experience that seemingly ordinary items (videos, news, publications, etc.) unexpectedly gain an enormous amount of attention. Here we investigate how unexpected these extreme events are. We propose a method that, given some information on the items, quantifies the predictability of events, i.e., the potential of identifying in advance the most successful items. Applying this method to different data, ranging from views in YouTube videos to posts in Usenet discussion groups, we invariantly find that the predictability increases for the most extreme events. This indicates that, despite the inherently stochastic collective dynamics of users, efficient prediction is possible for the most successful items. PMID:25369138

  17. Upper extremity myoelectric prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Uellendahl, J E

    2000-08-01

    Myoelectric control of upper limb prostheses has proven to be an effective and efficient means of controlling prosthetic components. This means of control has been used extensively for over 30 years, during which time these systems have become reliable and durable in most situations. Myoelectric control, or any other prosthetic control scheme, should not be considered as the optimal control for arm prostheses, but rather as one of the several effective ways of producing desired function. Advanced clinical practice calls for a blending of all control schemes, as appropriate, to allow the prosthesis to serve the intentions of the user efficiently and with little mental effort. Technology continues to change, bringing with it new and sometimes better ways of fitting amputees. Microprocessors and programmable controllers have opened new and exciting avenues for improvement in function. New, and as of yet unidentified, electronic and mechanical advances are certainly on the horizon. There is much work to be done before upper limb prostheses rightfully are called arm replacements. But progress is occurring and advances are being made toward the goal of replacing the function and appearance of that marvelous tool, the human arm. PMID:10989484

  18. Extreme efficiency of mud volcanism in dewatering accretionary prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, Achim; Klaeschen, Dirk; Mascle, Jean

    2001-07-01

    Drilling results from two mud volcanoes on the Mediterranean Ridge accretionary complex as well as bottom sampling and the wealth of geophysical data acquired recently have provided fundamental knowledge of the 3D geometry of mud extrusions. Mud volcanism is generally related to buoyancy (density inversion), and is triggered by the collision of the African and Eurasian blocks, forcing undercompacted clayey sediments to extrude along faults in the central and hinterlandward parts of the prism. Volumetric estimates of extruded mud in several well-studied areas were based on pre-stack depth-migrated seismic profiles across the entire, up to >150 km wide, prism. The resulting volumes of mud were combined with ages from mud dome drilling, so that rates of mud extrusion were obtained. Subtracting the solid rock mass from the bulk mud volume using physical property data, fluid flux as a function of mud volcanism alone has been quantified for the first time. The volume of fluid extruding with the mud is found to be variable, but reaches up to 15 km 3 fluid per km trench length and Ma along cross sections with abundant mud volcanoes. Such large fluid quantities in a region some 50-150 km behind the deformation front exceed estimates from those elsewhere (where undoubtedly the majority of the interstitial fluid is lost due to compaction). Such fluids near the backstop are likely to result predominantly from mineral dehydration and diagenetic reactions at depth, and consequently provide a window to understand deeper processes along the deep décollement. More importantly, the enormous rates with which such fluids and liquified mud escape along the out-of-sequence faults alter fluid budget calculations in subduction zones drastically.

  19. Ethyl Lithiodiazoacetate: Extremely Unstable Intermediate Handled Efficiently in Flow.

    PubMed

    Müller, Simon T R; Hokamp, Tobias; Ehrmann, Svenja; Hellier, Paul; Wirth, Thomas

    2016-08-16

    Ethyl diazoacetate (EDA) is one of the most prominent diazo reagents. It is frequently used in metal-carbene-type reactions. However, EDA can also be used as a nucleophile under base catalysis. Whilst the addition of EDA to aldehydes can be performed using organic bases, the addition of EDA to other carbonyl electrophiles requires the use of organometallics such as lithium diisopropylamide (LDA). The generated ethyl lithiodiazoacetate is highly reactive and decomposes rapidly, even at low temperatures. Herein, we report a continuous flow protocol that overcomes the problems associated with the instantaneous decomposition of ethyl lithiodiazoacetate. The addition of ethyl lithiodiazoacetate to ketones provides direct access to tertiary diazoalcohols in good yields. PMID:27339757

  20. Denitrification by extremely halophilic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Tomlinson, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Extremely halophilic bacteria were isolated from widely separated sites by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. The anaerobic growth of several of these isolates was accompanied by the production of nitrite, nitrous oxide, and dinitrogen. These results are a direct confirmation of the existence of extremely halophilic denitrifying bacteria, and suggest that such bacteria may be common inhabitants of hypersaline environments.

  1. Gender, Education, Extremism and Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the complex relationships between gender, education, extremism and security. After defining extremism and fundamentalism, it looks first at the relationship of gender to violence generally, before looking specifically at how this plays out in more extremist violence and terrorism. Religious fundamentalism is also shown to have…

  2. Modeling extreme risks in ecology.

    PubMed

    Burgman, Mark; Franklin, James; Hayes, Keith R; Hosack, Geoffrey R; Peters, Gareth W; Sisson, Scott A

    2012-11-01

    Extreme risks in ecology are typified by circumstances in which data are sporadic or unavailable, understanding is poor, and decisions are urgently needed. Expert judgments are pervasive and disagreements among experts are commonplace. We outline approaches to evaluating extreme risks in ecology that rely on stochastic simulation, with a particular focus on methods to evaluate the likelihood of extinction and quasi-extinction of threatened species, and the likelihood of establishment and spread of invasive pests. We evaluate the importance of assumptions in these assessments and the potential of some new approaches to account for these uncertainties, including hierarchical estimation procedures and generalized extreme value distributions. We conclude by examining the treatment of consequences in extreme risk analysis in ecology and how expert judgment may better be harnessed to evaluate extreme risks. PMID:22817845

  3. Extremal properties of random trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.; Majumdar, Satya N.

    2001-09-01

    We investigate extremal statistical properties such as the maximal and the minimal heights of randomly generated binary trees. By analyzing the master evolution equations we show that the cumulative distribution of extremal heights approaches a traveling wave form. The wave front in the minimal case is governed by the small-extremal-height tail of the distribution, and conversely, the front in the maximal case is governed by the large-extremal-height tail of the distribution. We determine several statistical characteristics of the extremal height distribution analytically. In particular, the expected minimal and maximal heights grow logarithmically with the tree size, N, hmin~vmin ln N, and hmax~vmax ln N, with vmin=0.373365... and vmax=4.31107..., respectively. Corrections to this asymptotic behavior are of order O(ln ln N).

  4. Representing Extremes in Agricultural Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruane, Alex

    2015-01-01

    AgMIP and related projects are conducting several activities to understand and improve crop model response to extreme events. This involves crop model studies as well as the generation of climate datasets and scenarios more capable of capturing extremes. Models are typically less responsive to extreme events than we observe, and miss several forms of extreme events. Models also can capture interactive effects between climate change and climate extremes. Additional work is needed to understand response of markets and economic systems to food shocks. AgMIP is planning a Coordinated Global and Regional Assessment of Climate Change Impacts on Agricultural Production and Food Security with an aim to inform the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report.

  5. Extreme Mean and Its Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swaroop, R.; Brownlow, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    Extreme value statistics obtained from normally distributed data are considered. An extreme mean is defined as the mean of p-th probability truncated normal distribution. An unbiased estimate of this extreme mean and its large sample distribution are derived. The distribution of this estimate even for very large samples is found to be nonnormal. Further, as the sample size increases, the variance of the unbiased estimate converges to the Cramer-Rao lower bound. The computer program used to obtain the density and distribution functions of the standardized unbiased estimate, and the confidence intervals of the extreme mean for any data are included for ready application. An example is included to demonstrate the usefulness of extreme mean application.

  6. Magnetotactic Bacteria from Extreme Environments

    PubMed Central

    Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Lefèvre, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) represent a diverse collection of motile prokaryotes that biomineralize intracellular, membrane-bounded, tens-of-nanometer-sized crystals of a magnetic mineral called magnetosomes. Magnetosome minerals consist of either magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) and cause cells to align along the Earth’s geomagnetic field lines as they swim, a trait called magnetotaxis. MTB are known to mainly inhabit the oxic–anoxic interface (OAI) in water columns or sediments of aquatic habitats and it is currently thought that magnetosomes function as a means of making chemotaxis more efficient in locating and maintaining an optimal position for growth and survival at the OAI. Known cultured and uncultured MTB are phylogenetically associated with the Alpha-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria classes of the phylum Proteobacteria, the Nitrospirae phylum and the candidate division OP3, part of the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae (PVC) bacterial superphylum. MTB are generally thought to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments as they are cosmopolitan in distribution and have been found in every continent although for years MTB were thought to be restricted to habitats with pH values near neutral and at ambient temperature. Recently, however, moderate thermophilic and alkaliphilic MTB have been described including: an uncultured, moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacterium present in hot springs in northern Nevada with a probable upper growth limit of about 63 °C; and several strains of obligately alkaliphilic MTB isolated in pure culture from different aquatic habitats in California, including the hypersaline, extremely alkaline Mono Lake, with an optimal growth pH of >9.0. PMID:25369742

  7. Magnetotactic Bacteria from Extreme Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Lefère, Christopher T.

    2013-03-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) represent a diverse collection of motile prokaryotes that biomineralize intracellular, membrane-bounded, tens-of-nanometer-sized crystals of a magnetic mineral called magnetosomes. Magnetosome minerals consist of either magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) and cause cells to align along the Earth's geomagnetic field lines as they swim, a trait called magnetotaxis. MTB are known to mainly inhabit the oxic-anoxic interface (OAI) in water columns or sediments of aquatic habitats and it is currently thought that magnetosomes function as a means of making chemotaxis more efficient in locating and maintaining an optimal position for growth and survival at the OAI. Known cultured and uncultured MTB are phylogenetically associated with the Alpha-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria classes of the phylum Proteobacteria, the Nitrospirae phylum and the candidate division OP3, part of the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae (PVC) bacterial superphylum. MTB are generally thought to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments as they are cosmopolitan in distribution and have been found in every continent although for years MTB were thought to be restricted to habitats with pH values near neutral and at ambient temperature. Recently, however, moderate thermophilic and alkaliphilic MTB have been described including: an uncultured, moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacterium present in hot springs in northern Nevada with a probable upper growth limit of about 63 °C; and several strains of obligately alkaliphilic MTB isolated in pure culture from different aquatic habitats in California, including the hypersaline, extremely alkaline Mono Lake, with an optimal growth pH of >9.0.

  8. Magnetotactic bacteria from extreme environments.

    PubMed

    Bazylinski, Dennis A; Lefèvre, Christopher T

    2013-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) represent a diverse collection of motile prokaryotes that biomineralize intracellular, membrane-bounded, tens-of-nanometer-sized crystals of a magnetic mineral called magnetosomes. Magnetosome minerals consist of either magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) and cause cells to align along the Earth's geomagnetic field lines as they swim, a trait called magnetotaxis. MTB are known to mainly inhabit the oxic-anoxic interface (OAI) in water columns or sediments of aquatic habitats and it is currently thought that magnetosomes function as a means of making chemotaxis more efficient in locating and maintaining an optimal position for growth and survival at the OAI. Known cultured and uncultured MTB are phylogenetically associated with the Alpha-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria classes of the phylum Proteobacteria, the Nitrospirae phylum and the candidate division OP3, part of the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae (PVC) bacterial superphylum. MTB are generally thought to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments as they are cosmopolitan in distribution and have been found in every continent although for years MTB were thought to be restricted to habitats with pH values near neutral and at ambient temperature. Recently, however, moderate thermophilic and alkaliphilic MTB have been described including: an uncultured, moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacterium present in hot springs in northern Nevada with a probable upper growth limit of about 63 °C; and several strains of obligately alkaliphilic MTB isolated in pure culture from different aquatic habitats in California, including the hypersaline, extremely alkaline Mono Lake, with an optimal growth pH of >9.0. PMID:25369742

  9. Terrestrial Applications of Extreme Environment Stirling Space Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger. W.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been developing power systems capable of long-term operation in extreme environments such as the surface of Venus. This technology can use any external heat source to efficiently provide electrical power and cooling; and it is designed to be extremely efficient and reliable for extended space missions. Terrestrial applications include: use in electric hybrid vehicles; distributed home co-generation/cooling; and quiet recreational vehicle power generation. This technology can reduce environmental emissions, petroleum consumption, and noise while eliminating maintenance and environmental damage from automotive fluids such as oil lubricants and air conditioning coolant. This report will provide an overview of this new technology and its applications.

  10. Nonparametric Spatial Models for Extremes: Application to Extreme Temperature Data.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Montserrat; Henry, John; Reich, Brian

    2013-03-01

    Estimating the probability of extreme temperature events is difficult because of limited records across time and the need to extrapolate the distributions of these events, as opposed to just the mean, to locations where observations are not available. Another related issue is the need to characterize the uncertainty in the estimated probability of extreme events at different locations. Although the tools for statistical modeling of univariate extremes are well-developed, extending these tools to model spatial extreme data is an active area of research. In this paper, in order to make inference about spatial extreme events, we introduce a new nonparametric model for extremes. We present a Dirichlet-based copula model that is a flexible alternative to parametric copula models such as the normal and t-copula. The proposed modelling approach is fitted using a Bayesian framework that allow us to take into account different sources of uncertainty in the data and models. We apply our methods to annual maximum temperature values in the east-south-central United States. PMID:24058280

  11. Lower extremity muscle perforator flaps for lower extremity reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hallock, Geoffrey G

    2004-10-01

    A true muscle perforator flap is distinguished by the requisite intramuscular dissection of its musculocutaneous perforator to capture the same musculocutaneous territory but with total exclusion of the muscle, and thereby results in minimal functional impairment. Adhering to this definition, several lower extremity donor sites now are available, each with specific attributes especially useful for consideration in the treatment of lower extremity defects. In this author's experience over the past two decades, 20 lower extremity muscle perforator flaps using multiple donor sites proved advantageous for lower extremity coverage problems as either a local pedicled flap or as a microsurgical tissue transfer. Significant complications occurred in 30 percent of flaps (six of 20) in that further intervention was required. Venous insufficiency and bulkiness were found to be the major inherent shortcomings. However, giant flaps, lengthy and large-caliber vascular pedicles, and the possibility for combined flaps were important assets. The choice of a lower extremity muscle perforator flap for lower extremity reconstruction limited the surgical intervention and morbidity to a single body region. PMID:15457022

  12. Muscles of the Lower Extremity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules » Anatomy & Physiology » Muscular System » Muscle Groups » Lower Extremity Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules Anatomy & Physiology Intro to the Human Body Body Functions & Life Process Anatomical Terminology Review Quiz ...

  13. Extreme events in computational turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, P. K.; Zhai, X. M.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2015-01-01

    We have performed direct numerical simulations of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in a periodic box with 8,1923 grid points. These are the largest simulations performed, to date, aimed at improving our understanding of turbulence small-scale structure. We present some basic statistical results and focus on “extreme” events (whose magnitudes are several tens of thousands the mean value). The structure of these extreme events is quite different from that of moderately large events (of the order of 10 times the mean value). In particular, intense vorticity occurs primarily in the form of tubes for moderately large events whereas it is much more “chunky” for extreme events (though probably overlaid on the traditional vortex tubes). We track the temporal evolution of extreme events and find that they are generally short-lived. Extreme magnitudes of energy dissipation rate and enstrophy occur simultaneously in space and remain nearly colocated during their evolution. PMID:26424452

  14. Linking Extreme Weather Events and Extreme ENSO States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlwitz, J.; Hoerling, M. P.; Xu, T.; Hoell, A.; Cheng, L.; Wolter, K.

    2015-12-01

    To what extent are the risks of extreme weather events over the contiguous US, such as heavy precipitation, heat and cold waves, conditioned by the state of tropical east Pacific SSTs? Further, do extreme magnitudes of El Niño and La Niña events exert a unique and particularly strong controlling effect on weather extremes? Here, we utilize both observations and multi-model large ensemble historical simulations to characterize the behavior of 5-day maximum precipitation distributions. We focus on relations between ENSO impacts on seasonal means and weather extremes, and explore the distinction between effects based on ENSO phase and intensity. For the cold season (November to April), overall ENSO impacts on mean precipitation are shown to be consistent with observations. This signal includes enhanced seasonal mean precipitation over the southern part of the U.S. and central Great Plains during El Niño, and enhanced seasonal mean precipitation over the Midwest during La Nina. We further demonstrate how these signals change under the influence of the most extreme ENSO events, conditions that are difficult to verify from observations owing to small sample sizes, but are modeled via large ensemble methods. The statistics of 5-day maximum precipitation, with a focus on 20-year return levels that characterizes rare but potentially damaging events, are examined. We demonstrate substantial differences in changes in the risk of extreme 5-day precipitation and the seasonal mean precipitation signal, especially in such regions as California, and the western Great Plains including the Front Range of the Rockies from Montana to New Mexico. The plausibility of such behavior is discussed via physical considerations and by examining the structural uncertainty in such outcomes across three different climate models.

  15. Are hourly precipitation extremes increasing faster than daily precipitation extremes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Renaud; Fowler, Hayley; Blenkinsop, Stephen; Lenderink, Geert

    2016-04-01

    Extreme precipitation events appear to be increasing with climate change in many regions of the world, including the United States. These extreme events have large societal impacts, as seen during the recent Texas-Oklahoma flooding in May 2015 which caused several billion in damages and left 47 deaths in its path. Better understanding of past changes in the characteristics of extreme rainfall events is thus critical for reliable projections of future changes. Although it has been documented in several studies that daily precipitation extremes are increasing across parts of the contiguous United States, very few studies have looked at hourly extremes. However, this is of primary importance as recent studies on the temperature scaling of extreme precipitation have shown that increases above the Clausius-Clapeyron (~ 7% °C‑1) are possible for hourly precipitation. In this study, we used hourly precipitation data (HPD) from the National Climatic Data Center and extracted more than 1,000 stations across the US with more than 40 years of data spanning the period 1950-2010. As hourly measurements are often associated with a range of issues, the data underwent multiple quality control processes to exclude erroneous data. While no significant changes were found in annual maximum precipitation using both hourly and daily resolution datasets, significant increasing trends in terms of frequency of episodes exceeding present-day 95th percentiles of wet hourly/daily precipitation were observed across a significant portion of the US. The fraction of stations with significant increasing trends falls outside the confidence interval range during all seasons but the summer. While less than 12% of stations exhibit significant trends at the daily scale in the wintertime, more than 45% of stations, mostly clustered in central and Northern United States, show significant increasing trends at the hourly scale. This suggests that short-duration storms have increased faster than daily

  16. Study of extreme nuclear shapes in extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Sudhee Ranjan

    2014-08-14

    Studies of extreme nuclear shapes have always fascinated scientists and are being pursued quite strongly over the years. Nuclei present themselves with interesting shapes and structures at different conditions of spin, excitation and also with the number of neutrons and/or protons in them. Gamma decays from the Giant dipole Resonances in nuclei can probe directly their shapes at different extreme conditions by looking at their resonant line-shapes, e.g., Jacobi shapes and shape-transitions, super/hyper-deformation etc. Similar such studies, done for the first time, using the LAMBDA high energy gamma spectrometer developed at VECC, is discussed here.

  17. Study of extreme nuclear shapes in extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sudhee Ranjan

    2014-08-01

    Studies of extreme nuclear shapes have always fascinated scientists and are being pursued quite strongly over the years. Nuclei present themselves with interesting shapes and structures at different conditions of spin, excitation and also with the number of neutrons and/or protons in them. Gamma decays from the Giant dipole Resonances in nuclei can probe directly their shapes at different extreme conditions by looking at their resonant line-shapes, e.g., Jacobi shapes and shape-transitions, super/hyper-deformation etc. Similar such studies, done for the first time, using the LAMBDA high energy gamma spectrometer developed at VECC, is discussed here.

  18. Understanding extreme winds in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Gudrun Nina

    2015-04-01

    Iceland is a fairly windy country, due to it's location adjacent the North Atlantic storm track. The orography of the island is rugged, mountains are steep and fjords and valleys narrow, and this impacts local winds. Thus, mountain wind phenomena such as low level jets, gap winds, down-slope wind storms, mountain waves and wind wakes are common. To increase our knowledge of the behaviour of wind in Iceland an extreme value analysis was conducted based on observations from 61 automatic weather stations, applying the Peak Over Threshold technique on maximum daily wind speed and maximum daily wind gust at each site. The time series included at least 10 years of data and the threshold was chosen as the 0.9 quantile of maximum mean wind speed/maximum wind gust at each location. Among the results is the larger impact the local orography has on the extreme wind gusts compared to the mean wind. With extreme value models in place, a few significant weather events were selected from recent years and the observed wind speeds compared to the models in order to evaluate how extreme the events were and how large area they impacted. Actually, in most of these events the observed wind speed only turned out to be extreme at a few stations, emphasising the local effects. However, in an event from December 2007, when the observed maximum wind speed exceeded 23 m/s in most of western Iceland, the event was estimated as rare at a number of weather stations. Clearly this gives indication for further studying this particular weather event. An automatic system has been set up, running once an hour, comparing observed wind measurements to the extreme value models and producing maps of the return periods for all sites. This system gives us the possibility to, on a daily basis, evaluate the extremeness of each situation and simultaneously increase our knowledge of extreme wind behaviour in Iceland. This work is a foundation for studying changes in extreme winds in Iceland.

  19. Transverse deformations of extreme horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Carmen; Lucietti, James

    2016-04-01

    We consider the inverse problem of determining all extreme black hole solutions to the Einstein equations with a prescribed near-horizon geometry. We investigate this problem by considering infinitesimal deformations of the near-horizon geometry along transverse null geodesics. We show that, up to a gauge transformation, the linearised Einstein equations reduce to an elliptic PDE for the extrinsic curvature of a cross-section of the horizon. We deduce that for a given near-horizon geometry there exists a finite dimensional moduli space of infinitesimal transverse deformations. We then establish a uniqueness theorem for transverse deformations of the extreme Kerr horizon. In particular, we prove that the only smooth axisymmetric transverse deformation of the near-horizon geometry of extreme Kerr, such that cross-sections of the horizon are marginally trapped surfaces, corresponds to that of the extreme Kerr black hole. Furthermore, we determine all smooth and biaxisymmetric transverse deformations of the near-horizon geometry of the five-dimensional extreme Myers-Perry black hole with equal angular momenta. We find a three parameter family of solutions such that cross-sections of the horizon are marginally trapped, which is more general than the known black hole solutions. We discuss the possibility that they correspond to new five-dimensional vacuum black holes.

  20. Functional metagenomics of extreme environments.

    PubMed

    Mirete, Salvador; Morgante, Verónica; González-Pastor, José Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The bioprospecting of enzymes that operate under extreme conditions is of particular interest for many biotechnological and industrial processes. Nevertheless, there is a considerable limitation to retrieve novel enzymes as only a small fraction of microorganisms derived from extreme environments can be cultured under standard laboratory conditions. Functional metagenomics has the advantage of not requiring the cultivation of microorganisms or previous sequence information to known genes, thus representing a valuable approach for mining enzymes with new features. In this review, we summarize studies showing how functional metagenomics was employed to retrieve genes encoding for proteins involved not only in molecular adaptation and resistance to extreme environmental conditions but also in other enzymatic activities of biotechnological interest. PMID:26901403

  1. Extreme, expedition, and wilderness medicine.

    PubMed

    Imray, Christopher H E; Grocott, Michael P W; Wilson, Mark H; Hughes, Amy; Auerbach, Paul S

    2015-12-19

    Extreme, expedition, and wilderness medicine are modern and rapidly evolving specialties that address the spirit of adventure and exploration. The relevance of and interest in these specialties are changing rapidly to match the underlying activities, which include global exploration, adventure travel, and military deployments. Extreme, expedition, and wilderness medicine share themes of providing best available medical care in the outdoors, especially in austere or remote settings. Early clinical and logistics decision making can often have important effects on subsequent outcomes. There are lessons to be learned from out-of-hospital care, military medicine, humanitarian medicine, and disaster medicine that can inform in-hospital medicine, and vice-versa. The future of extreme, expedition, and wilderness medicine will be defined by both recipients and practitioners, and empirical observations will be transformed by evidence-based practice. PMID:26738718

  2. Extreme hydrological events and security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundzewicz, Z. W.; Matczak, P.

    2015-06-01

    Economic losses caused by hydrological extremes - floods and droughts - have been on the rise, worldwide. Hydrological extremes jeopardize human security and cause serious threats to human life and welfare and societal livelihood. Floods and droughts can undermine societies' security, understood as freedom from threat and the ability of societies to maintain their independent identity and their functional integrity against forces of change. Several dimensions of security are reviewed in the context of hydrological extremes. Floods and droughts pose a burden and serious challenges to the state, responsible to sustain economic development, societal and environmental security - the maintenance of ecosystem services, on which a society depends. It is shown that reduction of risk of hydrological disasters improves human security.

  3. Extreme Conditions Modeling Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, R. G.; Neary, V. S.; Lawson, M. J.; Yu, Y.; Weber, J.

    2014-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted the Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Extreme Conditions Modeling (ECM) Workshop in Albuquerque, NM on May 13th-14th, 2014. The objective of the workshop was to review the current state of knowledge on how to model WECs in extreme conditions (e.g. hurricanes and other large storms) and to suggest how U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and national laboratory resources could be used to improve ECM methods for the benefit of the wave energy industry.

  4. A systems approach to mechanisms for a white light coronagraph X-ray XUV telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastronardi, R.; Cabral, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    A combined instrument package containing nine mechanisms was designed and developed for the international solar polar mission (ISPM). This complement of instruments, commonly called the CXX, is the only imaging system on either the NASA or ESA spacecraft and consists of a white light coronagraph mounted parallel to a combined X-ray and extreme ultra-violet (XUV) telescope. Requirements for and implementation of mechanisms in the CXX instrument are discussed.

  5. Exploring intense attosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalambidis, D.; Tzallas, P.; Benis, E. P.; Skantzakis, E.; Maravelias, G.; Nikolopoulos, L. A. A.; Peralta Conde, A.; Tsakiris, G. D.

    2008-02-01

    After introducing the importance of non-linear processes in the extreme-ultra-violet (XUV) spectral regime to the attosecond (asec) pulse metrology and time domain applications, we present two successfully implemented techniques with excellent prospects in generating intense asec pulse trains and isolated asec pulses, respectively. For the generation of pulse trains two-color harmonic generation is exploited. The interferometric polarization gating technique appropriate for the generation of intense isolated asec pulses is discussed and compared to other relevant approaches.

  6. How Cells Endure Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    One of natures most gripping feats of survival is now better understood. For the first time, Berkeley Lab scientists observed the chemical changes in individual cells that enable them to survive in conditions that should kill them. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/07/07/cells-endure-extremes/

  7. Quorum Sensing in Extreme Environments

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Kate; Charlesworth, James C.; LeBard, Rebecca; Visscher, Pieter T.; Burns, Brendan P.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communication, particularly that of quorum sensing, plays an important role in regulating gene expression in a range of organisms. Although this phenomenon has been well studied in relation to, for example, virulence gene regulation, the focus of this article is to review our understanding of the role of microbial communication in extreme environments. Cell signaling regulates many important microbial processes and may play a pivotal role in driving microbial functional diversity and ultimately ecosystem function in extreme environments. Several recent studies have characterized cell signaling in modern analogs to early Earth communities (microbial mats), and characterization of cell signaling systems in these communities may provide unique insights in understanding the microbial interactions involved in function and survival in extreme environments. Cell signaling is a fundamental process that may have co-evolved with communities and environmental conditions on the early Earth. Without cell signaling, evolutionary pressures may have even resulted in the extinction rather than evolution of certain microbial groups. One of the biggest challenges in extremophile biology is understanding how and why some microbial functional groups are located where logically they would not be expected to survive, and tightly regulated communication may be key. Finally, quorum sensing has been recently identified for the first time in archaea, and thus communication at multiple levels (potentially even inter-domain) may be fundamental in extreme environments. PMID:25371335

  8. Extreme precipitation: Increases all round

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, William

    2016-05-01

    Globally, extreme rainfall is expected to increase with warming, but regional changes over land have been less certain. Now research shows that this intense precipitation has increased across both the wetter and the drier parts of the continents, and will continue to do so as global warming continues.

  9. Astrobiology: Life in Extreme Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaur, Preeti

    2011-01-01

    Astrobiology is the study of the origin, evolution and distribution of life in the universe. It seeks to answer two important scientific questions: how did we get here and are we alone in the universe? Scientists begin by studying life on Earth and its limits. The discovery of extremophiles on Earth capable of surviving extremes encourages the…

  10. Tetrasulfide extreme pressure lubricant additives

    SciTech Connect

    Gast, L.E.; Kenney, H.E.; Schwab, A.W.

    1980-08-19

    A novel class of compounds has been prepared comprising the tetrasulfides of /sup 18/C hydrocarbons, /sup 18/C fatty acids, and /sup 18/C fatty and alkyl and triglyceride esters. These tetrasulfides are useful as extreme pressure lubricant additives and show potential as replacements for sulfurized sperm whale oil.

  11. Applied extreme-value statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnison, R.R.

    1983-05-01

    The statistical theory of extreme values is a well established part of theoretical statistics. Unfortunately, it is seldom part of applied statistics and is infrequently a part of statistical curricula except in advanced studies programs. This has resulted in the impression that it is difficult to understand and not of practical value. In recent environmental and pollution literature, several short articles have appeared with the purpose of documenting all that is necessary for the practical application of extreme value theory to field problems (for example, Roberts, 1979). These articles are so concise that only a statistician can recognise all the subtleties and assumptions necessary for the correct use of the material presented. The intent of this text is to expand upon several recent articles, and to provide the necessary statistical background so that the non-statistician scientist can recognize and extreme value problem when it occurs in his work, be confident in handling simple extreme value problems himself, and know when the problem is statistically beyond his capabilities and requires consultation.

  12. Performance testing of extremity dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Harty, R.; Reece, W.D.; Hooker, C.D.

    1987-06-01

    The Health Physics Society Standing Committee (HPSSC) Working Group on Performance Testing of Extremity Dosimeters has issued a draft of a proposed standard for extremity dosimeters. The draft standard proposes methods to be used for testing dosimetry systems that determine occupational radiation dose to the extremities and the performance criterion used to determine compliance. The draft standard has been evaluated by testing the performance of existing processors of extremity dosimeters against the standard's proposed criterion. The proposed performance criterion is: absolute value of B + S less than or equal to 0.35, where B is the bias (calculated as the average of the performance quotients) of 15 dosimeter measurements and S is the standard deviation of the performance quotients. Dosimeter performance was tested in seven irradiation categories: low-energy photons (general and accident dosimetry), high-energy photons (general and accident dosimetry), beta particles, neutrons, and a mixture category. Twenty-one types of extremity dosimeters (both finger ring and wrist/ankle dosimeters) were received from 11 processors. The dosimeters were irradiated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to specific dose levels in one or more of the seven categories as specified in the draft standard and were returned to the processors. The processors evaluated the doses and returned the results to PNL for analysis. The results were evaluated against the performance criterion specified in the draft standard. The results indicate that approximately 60% of both the finger ring and the wrist/ankle dosimeters met the performance criterion. Two-thirds of the dosimeters that did not meet the performance criterion had large biases (ranging from 0.25 to 0.80) but small standard deviations (less than 0.15). 21 refs., 3 figs., 20 tabs.

  13. The Extreme Universe Space Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Jim; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This talk will describe the Extreme Universe Space Observatory (EUSO) mission. EUSO is an ESA mission to explore the most powerful energy sources in the universe. The mission objectives of EUSO are to investigate EECRs, those with energies above 3x10(exp 19) eV, and very high-energy cosmic neutrinos. These objectives are directly related to extreme conditions in the physical world and possibly involve the early history of the big bang and the framework of GUTs. EUSO tackles the basic problem posed by the existence of these extreme-energy events. The solution could have a unique impact on fundamental physics, cosmology, and/or astrophysics. At these energies, magnetic deflection is thought to be so small that the EECR component would serve as the particle channel for astronomy. EUSO will make the first measurements of EAS from space by observing atmospheric fluorescence in the Earth's night sky. With measurements of the airshower track, EUSO will determine the energy and arrival direction of these extreme-energy events. EUSO will make high statistics observations of CRs beyond the predicted GZK cutoff energy and widen the channel for high-energy neutrino astronomy. The energy spectra, arrival directions, and shower profiles will be analyzed to distinguish the nature of these events and search for their sources. With EUSO data, we will have the possibility to discover a local EECR source, test Z-burst scenarios and other theories, and look for evidence of the breakdown of the relativity principle at extreme Lorentz factors.

  14. Extremal higher spin black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bañados, Máximo; Castro, Alejandra; Faraggi, Alberto; Jottar, Juan I.

    2016-04-01

    The gauge sector of three-dimensional higher spin gravities can be formulated as a Chern-Simons theory. In this context, a higher spin black hole corresponds to a flat connection with suitable holonomy (smoothness) conditions which are consistent with the properties of a generalized thermal ensemble. Building on these ideas, we discuss a definition of black hole extremality which is appropriate to the topological character of 3 d higher spin theories. Our definition can be phrased in terms of the Jordan class of the holonomy around a non-contractible (angular) cycle, and we show that it is compatible with the zero-temperature limit of smooth black hole solutions. While this notion of extremality does not require supersymmetry, we exemplify its consequences in the context of sl(3|2) ⊕ sl(3|2) Chern-Simons theory and show that, as usual, not all extremal solutions preserve supersymmetries. Remarkably, we find in addition that the higher spin setup allows for non-extremal supersymmetric black hole solutions. Furthermore, we discuss our results from the perspective of the holographic duality between sl(3|2) ⊕ sl(3|2) Chern-Simons theory and two-dimensional CFTs with W (3|2) symmetry, the simplest higher spin extension of the N = 2 super-Virasoro algebra. In particular, we compute W (3|2) BPS bounds at the full quantum level, and relate their semiclassical limit to extremal black hole or conical defect solutions in the 3 d bulk. Along the way, we discuss the role of the spectral flow automorphism and provide a conjecture for the form of the semiclassical BPS bounds in general N = 2 two-dimensional CFTs with extended symmetry algebras.

  15. Climate Networks and Extreme Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurths, J.

    2014-12-01

    We analyse some climate dynamics from a complex network approach. This leads to an inverse problem: Is there a backbone-like structure underlying the climate system? For this we propose a method to reconstruct and analyze a complex network from data generated by a spatio-temporal dynamical system. This approach enables us to uncover relations to global circulation patterns in oceans and atmosphere. The global scale view on climate networks offers promising new perspectives for detecting dynamical structures based on nonlinear physical processes in the climate system. Moreover, we evaluate different regional climate models from this aspect. This concept is also applied to Monsoon data in order to characterize the regional occurrence of extreme rain events and its impact on predictability. Changing climatic conditions have led to a significant increase in magnitude and frequency of spatially extensive extreme rainfall events in the eastern Central Andes of South America. These events impose substantial natural hazards for population, economy, and ecology by floods and landslides. For example, heavy floods in Bolivia in early 2007 affected more than 133.000 households and produced estimated costs of 443 Mio. USD. Here, we develop a general framework to predict extreme events by combining a non-linear synchronization technique with complex networks. We apply our method to real-time satellite-derived rainfall data and are able to predict a large amount of extreme rainfall events. Our study reveals a linkage between polar and subtropical regimes as responsible mechanism: Extreme rainfall in the eastern Central Andes is caused by the interplay of northward migrating frontal systems and a low-level wind channel from the western Amazon to the subtropics, providing additional moisture. Frontal systems from the Antarctic thus play a key role for sub-seasonal variability of the South American Monsoon System.

  16. Matching biological motion at extreme distances.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Ian M; Wootton, Zac; Pedmanson, Pille

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the current paper was to determine the maximum distance at which an actor could be placed so that an observer would still be able to interpret their behavior. Although we know a great deal about the limits of action perception, particularly through studies of biological motion processing, this question of distance has not been previously documented. We began by reviewing the sizes of point-light figures used in 100 previous studies of biological motion. We found that with an average figure height of 6.6° [corrected] visual angle, actors were effectively 15 m from the observer, assuming average physical height of 1.75 m. No previous studies had explicitly examined extreme distances. Here, we introduce a new matching task in which we systematically varied the apparent distance of point-light figures relative to a fixed viewing position by manipulating size. Our results suggest that a variety of human actions could potentially be interpreted up to 1000 m away, a distance at which a human figure would subtend only 0.1° visual angle in height. Dynamic figures could be interpreted at further distances than static figures (Experiment 1), and upright figures were similarly processed more efficiently than inverted figures (Experiment 2). We discuss these findings in the context of the processing mechanisms thought to underlie action perception and suggest that the ability to match actions at extreme distance is another example of the robust nature of biological motion processing. PMID:24610956

  17. Extreme overbalance perforating improves well performance

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, J.M.; Handren, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    The application of extreme overbalance perforating, by Oryx Energy Co., is consistently outperforming the unpredictable, tubing-conveyed, underbalance perforating method which is generally accepted as the industry standard. Successful results reported from more than 60 Oryx Energy wells, applying this technology, support this claim. Oryx began this project in 1990 to address the less-than-predictable performance of underbalanced perforating. The goal was to improve the initial completion efficiency, translating it into higher profits resulting from earlier product sales. This article presents the concept, mechanics, procedures, potential applications and results of perforating using overpressured well bores. The procedure can also be used in wells with existing perforations if an overpressured surge is used. This article highlights some of the case histories that have used these techniques.

  18. Reaction Mechanism of Extreme Ultraviolet Resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Minoru; Kaneyama, Koji; Itani, Toshiro

    2008-06-01

    Molecular resist of polyphenol was evaluated as an extreme-ultraviolet resist compared with a polymer resist of poly(tert-butoxycarbonylhydroxystyrene). X-ray reflectometry was used to determine the resist-film density and measurement accuracy was improved. The molecular resist shows higher sensitivity of 3 mJ/cm2 than the polymer resist of 4 mJ/cm2. The deprotection mechanism was approximated by simple reaction equations and Fourier-transform infrared spectra was interpreted to give the products of a quantum yield and a deprotection rate constant as 9.7×10-8 and 8.1×10-8 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 for molecular and polymer resists. The higher sensitivity of the molecular resist is due to the larger efficiency of the reaction mechanism.

  19. Holographic optical elements for the extreme-ultravioletregime

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Salmassi, Farhad; Gullikson, Eric M.; Anderson, Erik H.

    2006-08-14

    As the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography progresses, interest grows in the extension of traditional optical components to the EUV regime. The strong absorption of EUV by most materials and its extremely short wavelength, however, makes it very difficult to implement many components that are commonplace in the longer wavelength regimes. One such component is the diffractive optical element used, for example, in illumination systems to efficiently generate modified pupil fills. Here we demonstrate the fabrication and characterization of EUV binary phase-only computer-generated holograms allowing arbitrary far-field diffraction patterns to be generated.

  20. Moving in extreme environments: what's extreme and who decides?

    PubMed

    Cotter, James David; Tipton, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Humans work, rest and play in immensely varied extreme environments. The term 'extreme' typically refers to insufficiency or excess of one or more stressors, such as thermal energy or gravity. Individuals' behavioural and physiological capacity to endure and enjoy such environments varies immensely. Adverse effects of acute exposure to these environments are readily identifiable (e.g. heat stroke or bone fracture), whereas adverse effects of chronic exposure (e.g. stress fractures or osteoporosis) may be as important but much less discernable. Modern societies have increasingly sought to protect people from such stressors and, in that way, minimise their adverse effects. Regulations are thus established, and advice is provided on what is 'acceptable' exposure. Examples include work/rest cycles in the heat, hydration regimes, rates of ascent to and duration of stay at altitude and diving depth. While usually valuable and well intentioned, it is important to realise the breadth and importance of limitations associated with such guidelines. Regulations and advisories leave less room for self-determination, learning and perhaps adaptation. Regulations based on stress (e.g. work/rest cycles relative to WBGT) are more practical but less direct than those based on strain (e.g. core temperature), but even the latter can be substantively limited (e.g. by lack of criterion validation and allowance for behavioural regulation in the research on which they are based). Extreme Physiology & Medicine is publishing a series of reviews aimed at critically examining the issues involved with self- versus regulation-controlled human movement acutely and chronically in extreme environments. These papers, arising from a research symposium in 2013, are about the impact of people engaging in such environments and the effect of rules and guidelines on their safety, enjoyment, autonomy and productivity. The reviews will cover occupational heat stress, sporting heat stress, hydration, diving

  1. Method for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods.

  2. Method for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    DOEpatents

    Felter, T. E.; Kubiak, Glenn D.

    1999-01-01

    A method of producing a patterned array of features, in particular, gate apertures, in the size range 0.4-0.05 .mu.m using projection lithography and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. A high energy laser beam is used to vaporize a target material in order to produce a plasma which in turn, produces extreme ultraviolet radiation of a characteristic wavelength of about 13 nm for lithographic applications. The radiation is transmitted by a series of reflective mirrors to a mask which bears the pattern to be printed. The demagnified focused mask pattern is, in turn, transmitted by means of appropriate optics and in a single exposure, to a substrate coated with photoresists designed to be transparent to EUV radiation and also satisfy conventional processing methods.

  3. On causality of extreme events

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Multiple metrics have been developed to detect causality relations between data describing the elements constituting complex systems, all of them considering their evolution through time. Here we propose a metric able to detect causality within static data sets, by analysing how extreme events in one element correspond to the appearance of extreme events in a second one. The metric is able to detect non-linear causalities; to analyse both cross-sectional and longitudinal data sets; and to discriminate between real causalities and correlations caused by confounding factors. We validate the metric through synthetic data, dynamical and chaotic systems, and data representing the human brain activity in a cognitive task. We further show how the proposed metric is able to outperform classical causality metrics, provided non-linear relationships are present and large enough data sets are available. PMID:27330866

  4. The 2014 Silba Precipitation Extreme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasol, Dubravka; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2015-04-01

    On 30 July 2014 a 24 h precipitation record of 218 mm was set at the island of Silba in the N-Adriatic Sea. The precipitation was of convective nature and significantly less precipitation was recorded only small distances away, at the coast of mainland Croatia. The event is reproduced numerically and discussed in terms of dynamics and predictability. On a large scale, the precipitation extreme was associated with a slow-moving upper tropospheric low that formed over the N-Atlantic several days earlier. At lower levels, there were humid mediterranean airmasses. On a smaller scale, there are indications that the extreme convection may have been triggered by an orographic disturbance.

  5. The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, Barry Y.

    1991-01-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) is a NASA astronomy mission which will operate in the 70-760A spectral band. The science payload consists of three grazing incidence scanning telescopes and an EUV spectrometer/deep survey instrument. An overview of the planned mission profile is given, and the instrumentation which comprises the science payload is discussed. The EUVE is scheduled for launch in late August 1991.

  6. [Genes for extreme violent behaviour?].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    A new genetic study focussing on the degree of violence in criminals and using both candidate gene and GWAS approaches finds statistically significant associations of extreme violent behaviour with low activity alleles of monoamine oxydase A (MAOA) and with the CD13 gene. However, the alleles implicated are common in the general population, thus they cannot be causal, and only represent potential indicators of increased risk. PMID:25658738

  7. Paediatric personnel extremity dose study.

    PubMed

    Gallet, J M C; Reed, M H

    2002-03-01

    Concern has been expressed in paediatric radiology regarding the magnitude of the extremity dose received by attending personnel during routine fluoroscopic procedures and CT. Common procedures that may be of short duration in adults can be quite the opposite in paediatric patients. The extremities of attending personnel are more likely to be exposed to the primary beam and for a longer period of time owing to a variety of reasons such as assisting in the procedure or physically restraining the patient during the examination. During the period mid 1998 to mid 2000, two paediatric radiologists, four senior radiographers and two paediatric nurses were monitored using ring thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). Each participant wore the ring TLD on either the left or right ring finger, depending on which hand the individual favoured. Left/right asymmetrical studies were not conducted, nor were records kept of whether an examination used a grid or gridless technique. Initial apprehension about higher paediatric fluoroscopic and CT extremity doses was dispelled as a result of this quantitative dosimetric study. PMID:11932219

  8. Attribution of climate extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenberth, Kevin E.; Fasullo, John T.; Shepherd, Theodore G.

    2015-08-01

    There is a tremendous desire to attribute causes to weather and climate events that is often challenging from a physical standpoint. Headlines attributing an event solely to either human-induced climate change or natural variability can be misleading when both are invariably in play. The conventional attribution framework struggles with dynamically driven extremes because of the small signal-to-noise ratios and often uncertain nature of the forced changes. Here, we suggest that a different framing is desirable, which asks why such extremes unfold the way they do. Specifically, we suggest that it is more useful to regard the extreme circulation regime or weather event as being largely unaffected by climate change, and question whether known changes in the climate system's thermodynamic state affected the impact of the particular event. Some examples briefly illustrated include 'snowmaggedon' in February 2010, superstorm Sandy in October 2012 and supertyphoon Haiyan in November 2013, and, in more detail, the Boulder floods of September 2013, all of which were influenced by high sea surface temperatures that had a discernible human component.

  9. Upper extremity injuries in golf.

    PubMed

    Bayes, Matthew C; Wadsworth, L Tyler

    2009-04-01

    Golf is an asymmetric sport with unique patterns of injury depending upon the skill level. Higher handicap players typically experience injuries that result from swing mechanics, whereas lower handicap and professional players have overuse as the major cause of their injuries. The majority of shoulder injuries affecting golfers occur in the nondominant shoulder. Common shoulder injuries include subacromial impingement, rotator cuff pathology, glenohumeral instability, and arthritis involving the acromioclavicular and/or glenohumeral joints. Lead arm elbow pain resulting from lateral epicondylosis (tennis elbow) is the leading upper extremity injury in amateur golfers. Tendon injury is the most common problem seen in the wrist and forearm of the golfer. Rehabilitation emphasizing improvement in core muscle streng is important in the treatment of golf injury. Emerging treatments for tendinopathy include topical nitrates, ultrasound-guided injection of therapeutic substances, and eccentric rehabilitation. There is evidence supporting physiotherapy, and swing modification directed by a teaching professional, for treatment of upper extremity golf injuries. This article focuses on upper extremity injuries in golf, including a discussion of the epidemiology, causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of injuries occurring in the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hand. PMID:20048492

  10. Typologies of Extreme Longevity Myths

    PubMed Central

    Young, Robert D.; Desjardins, Bertrand; McLaughlin, Kirsten; Poulain, Michel; Perls, Thomas T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Political, national, religious, and other motivations have led the media and even scientists to errantly accept extreme longevity claims prima facie. We describe various causes of false claims of extraordinary longevity. Design and Methods. American Social Security Death Index files for the period 1980–2009 were queried for individuals with birth and death dates yielding ages 110+ years of age. Frequency was compared to a list of age-validated supercentenarians maintained by the Gerontology Research Group who died during the same time period. Age claims of 110+ years and the age validation experiences of the authors facilitated a list of typologies of false age claims. Results. Invalid age claim rates increase with age from 65% at age 110-111 to 98% by age 115 to 100% for 120+ years. Eleven typologies of false claims were: Religious Authority Myth, Village Elder Myth, Fountain of Youth Myth (substance), Shangri-La Myth (geographic), Nationalist Pride, Spiritual Practice, Familial Longevity, Individual and/or Family Notoriety, Military Service, Administrative Entry Error, and Pension-Social Entitlement Fraud. Conclusions. Understanding various causes of false extreme age claims is important for placing current, past, and future extreme longevity claims in context and for providing a necessary level of skepticism. PMID:21461047

  11. Extreme weather events and global crop production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, D. K.; Gerber, J. S.; West, P. C.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme weather events can lead to significant loss in crop production and even trigger global price spikes. However it is still not clear where exactly and what types of extreme events have resulted in sharp declines in crop production. Neither is it clear how frequently such extreme events have resulted in extreme crop production losses. Using extreme event metrics with a newly developed high resolution and long time series of crop statistics database we identify the frequency and type of extreme event driven crop production losses globally at high resolutions. In this presentation we will present our results as global maps identifying the frequency and type of extreme weather events that resulted in extreme crop production losses and quantify the losses. Understanding how extreme events affects crop production is critical for managing risk in the global food system

  12. Outcomes for extremely premature infants.

    PubMed

    Glass, Hannah C; Costarino, Andrew T; Stayer, Stephen A; Brett, Claire M; Cladis, Franklyn; Davis, Peter J

    2015-06-01

    Premature birth is a significant cause of infant and child morbidity and mortality. In the United States, the premature birth rate, which had steadily increased during the 1990s and early 2000s, has decreased annually for 7 years and is now approximately 11.39%. Human viability, defined as gestational age at which the chance of survival is 50%, is currently approximately 23 to 24 weeks in developed countries. Infant girls, on average, have better outcomes than infant boys. A relatively uncomplicated course in the intensive care nursery for an extremely premature infant results in a discharge date close to the prenatal estimated date of confinement. Despite technological advances and efforts of child health experts during the last generation, the extremely premature infant (less than 28 weeks gestation) and extremely low birth weight infant (<1000 g) remain at high risk for death and disability with 30% to 50% mortality and, in survivors, at least 20% to 50% risk of morbidity. The introduction of continuous positive airway pressure, mechanical ventilation, and exogenous surfactant increased survival and spurred the development of neonatal intensive care in the 1970s through the early 1990s. Routine administration of antenatal steroids during premature labor improved neonatal mortality and morbidity in the late 1990s. The recognition that chronic postnatal administration of steroids to infants should be avoided may have improved outcomes in the early 2000s. Evidence from recent trials attempting to define the appropriate target for oxygen saturation in preterm infants suggests arterial oxygen saturation between 91% and 95% (compared with 85%-89%) avoids excess mortality; however, final analyses of data from these trials have not been published, so definitive recommendations are still pending. The development of neonatal neurocritical intensive care units may improve neurocognitive outcomes in this high-risk group. Long-term follow-up to detect and address

  13. Prospect for extreme field science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, T.

    2009-11-01

    The kind of laser extreme light infrastructure (ELI) provides will usher in a class of experiments we have only dreamed of for years. The characteristics that ELI brings in include: the highest intensity ever, large fluence, and relatively high repetition rate. A personal view of the author on the prospect of harnessing this unprecedented opportunity for advancing science of extreme fields is presented. The first characteristic of ELI, its intensity, will allow us to access, as many have stressed already, extreme fields that hover around the Schwinger field or at the very least the neighboring fields in which vacuum begins to behave as a nonlinear medium. In this sense, we are seriously probing the “material” property of vacuum and thus the property that theory of relativity itself described and will entail. We will probe both special theory and general theory of relativity in regimes that have been never tested so far. We may see a glimpse into the reach of relativity or even its breakdown in some extreme regimes. We will learn Einstein and may even go beyond Einstein, if our journey is led. Laser-driven acceleration both by the laser field itself and by the wakefield that is triggered in a plasma is huge. Energies, if not luminosity, we can access, may be unprecedented going far beyond TeV. The nice thing about ELI is that it has relatively high repetition rate and average fluence as compared with other extreme lasers. This high fluence can be a key element that leads to applications to high energy physics, such as gamma-gamma collider driver experiment, and some gamma ray experiments that may be relevant in the frontier of photo-nuclear physics, and atomic energy applications. Needless to say, high fluence is one of most important features that industrial and medical applications may need. If we are lucky, we may see a door opens at the frontier of novel physics that may not be available by any other means. Finally, as the last lecture of this workshop the

  14. Upper extremity hemodynamics and sensation with backpack loads.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sae Hoon; Neuschwander, Timothy B; Macias, Brandon R; Bachman, Larry; Hargens, Alan R

    2014-05-01

    Heavy backpacks are often used in extreme environments, for example by military during combat, therefore completion of tasks quickly and efficiently is of operational relevance. The purpose of this study was to quantify hemodynamic parameters (brachial artery Doppler and microvascular flow by photoplethysmography; tissue oxygenation by near-infrared spectroscopy; arterial oxygen saturation by pulse oximeter) and sensation in upper extremities and hands (Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test and 2-point discrimination test) while wearing a loaded backpack (12 kg) in healthy adults for 10 min. All values were compared to baseline before wearing a backpack. Moderate weight loaded backpack loads significantly decreased upper extremity sensation as well as all macrovascular and microvascular hemodynamic values. Decreased macrovascular and microvascular hemodynamics may produce neurological dysfunction and consequently, probably affect fine motor control of the hands. PMID:24075289

  15. Photostabilizing Efficiency of PVC in the Presence of Schiff Bases as Photostabilizers.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Emad; Al-Amiery, Ahmed A; Kadihum, Abdulhadi; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2015-01-01

    The photostabilization of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) films by Schiff bases was investigated. Polyvinyl chloride films containing 0.5 wt % Schiff bases were produced using the same casting method as that used for additive-free PVC films from tetrahydrofuran (THF) solvent. The photostabilization activities of these compounds were determined by monitoring the carbonyl, polyene and hydroxyl indices with irradiation time. The changes in viscosity average molecular weight of PVC with irradiation time were also monitored using THF as a solvent. The quantum yield of chain scission (Φcs) for the studied complexes in PVC was estimated to range between 4.72 and 8.99 × 10(-8). According to the experimental results, several mechanisms were suggested, depending on the structure of the additive. Ultra violet (UV) absorption, peroxide decomposition and radical scavenging were suggested as the photostabilizing mechanisms. PMID:26556323

  16. Moving in extreme environments: extreme loading; carriage versus distance.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Helge, Jørn W; Schütz, Uwe H W; Goldman, Ralph F; Cotter, James D

    2016-01-01

    This review addresses human capacity for movement in the context of extreme loading and with it the combined effects of metabolic, biomechanical and gravitational stress on the human body. This topic encompasses extreme duration, as occurs in ultra-endurance competitions (e.g. adventure racing and transcontinental races) and expeditions (e.g. polar crossings), to the more gravitationally limited load carriage (e.g. in the military context). Juxtaposed to these circumstances is the extreme metabolic and mechanical unloading associated with space travel, prolonged bedrest and sedentary lifestyle, which may be at least as problematic, and are therefore included as a reference, e.g. when considering exposure, dangers and (mal)adaptations. As per the other reviews in this series, we describe the nature of the stress and the associated consequences; illustrate relevant regulations, including why and how they are set; present the pros and cons for self versus prescribed acute and chronic exposure; describe humans' (mal)adaptations; and finally suggest future directions for practice and research. In summary, we describe adaptation patterns that are often U or J shaped and that over time minimal or no load carriage decreases the global load carrying capacity and eventually leads to severe adverse effects and manifest disease under minimal absolute but high relative loads. We advocate that further understanding of load carrying capacity and the inherent mechanisms leading to adverse effects may advantageously be studied in this perspective. With improved access to insightful and portable technologies, there are some exciting possibilities to explore these questions in this context. PMID:27110357

  17. Online Sequential Extreme Learning Machine With Kernels.

    PubMed

    Scardapane, Simone; Comminiello, Danilo; Scarpiniti, Michele; Uncini, Aurelio

    2015-09-01

    The extreme learning machine (ELM) was recently proposed as a unifying framework for different families of learning algorithms. The classical ELM model consists of a linear combination of a fixed number of nonlinear expansions of the input vector. Learning in ELM is hence equivalent to finding the optimal weights that minimize the error on a dataset. The update works in batch mode, either with explicit feature mappings or with implicit mappings defined by kernels. Although an online version has been proposed for the former, no work has been done up to this point for the latter, and whether an efficient learning algorithm for online kernel-based ELM exists remains an open problem. By explicating some connections between nonlinear adaptive filtering and ELM theory, in this brief, we present an algorithm for this task. In particular, we propose a straightforward extension of the well-known kernel recursive least-squares, belonging to the kernel adaptive filtering (KAF) family, to the ELM framework. We call the resulting algorithm the kernel online sequential ELM (KOS-ELM). Moreover, we consider two different criteria used in the KAF field to obtain sparse filters and extend them to our context. We show that KOS-ELM, with their integration, can result in a highly efficient algorithm, both in terms of obtained generalization error and training time. Empirical evaluations demonstrate interesting results on some benchmarking datasets. PMID:25561597

  18. Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX mission will be the first mission to catalogue the X-ray polarisation of many astrophysical objects including black-holes and pulsars. This first of its kind mission is enabled by the novel use of a time projection chamber as an X-ray polarimeter. The detector has been developed over the last 5 years, with the current effort charged toward a demonstration of it's technical readiness to be at level 6 prior to the preliminary design review. This talk will describe the design GEMS polarimeter and the results to date from the engineering test unit.

  19. Materials Response under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A; Lorenz, K T; Pollaine, S; McNaney, J M

    2005-10-06

    Solid state experiments at extreme pressures, 10-100 GPa (0.1-1 Mbar) and strain rates (10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} s{sup -1}) are being developed on high-energy laser facilities. The goal is an experimental capability to test constitutive models for high-pressure, solid-state strength for a variety of materials. Relevant constitutive models are discussed, and our progress in developing a quasi-isentropic, ramped-pressure, shockless drive is given. Designs to test the constitutive models with experiments measuring perturbation growth due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid-state samples are presented.

  20. Communication path for extreme environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles C. (Inventor); Betts, Bradley J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods and systems for using one or more radio frequency identification devices (RFIDs), or other suitable signal transmitters and/or receivers, to provide a sensor information communication path, to provide location and/or spatial orientation information for an emergency service worker (ESW), to provide an ESW escape route, to indicate a direction from an ESW to an ES appliance, to provide updated information on a region or structure that presents an extreme environment (fire, hazardous fluid leak, underwater, nuclear, etc.) in which an ESW works, and to provide accumulated thermal load or thermal breakdown information on one or more locations in the region.

  1. Extreme Events: The Indian Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murty, K. S.

    2008-05-01

    The geographical situation of India is such that it experiences varied types of climate in different parts of the country and invariably the natural events, extreme and normal, would affect such areas that are prone to them. Cyclones hit the eastern coast, while floods affect mostly northern India, while earthquakes hit any part of the country, particuarly when itbecame evident after the 1967 earthquake of Koyna that the peninsular part toois prone to seismic events. The National Commission on Floods estimated that nearly 40 millionn hectares of land is prone to flooding, which could rise to60 million soon. The cropped area thus affected annually is about 10 millionhectares. On an average 1500 lives are lost during floods annually, while the damage to property could run into billions of dollars. The total loss on account of floods damage to crops is estimated at about Rs 53,000 crores(crore= 100 lakhs), during the period 1953-1998. The other extreme natural event is drought which affects large parts of the country, except the northeast. Both floods and droughts can hit different parts of the country during the same period. The 2001 earthquake that hit Gujarat is perhaps the severest and studies on that event are still in progress. The 2004 tsunami which hit large parts of southeast Asia did not spare India. Its southern coast was battered and many lives were lost. In fact some geogrphic landmarks were lost, while some of the cities have suffered a shift in their position. It was estimated that about 1.2 billion dollars were required ro meet the rehabilitation and relief measures. The seismic zone map of India thus had to be revised more often than before. Apart from these, extreme rainfall has also caused floods in urban areas as in Mumbai in 2005, but this was mostly because of lack of proper drainage system and the existing system proved ineffective. Human hand in such cases is evident. There are systems working to forecast floods, cyclones, and droughts, though

  2. Extreme Geomagnetic Storms - 1868 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennerstrom, S.; Lefevre, L.; Dumbović, M.; Crosby, N.; Malandraki, O.; Patsou, I.; Clette, F.; Veronig, A.; Vršnak, B.; Leer, K.; Moretto, T.

    2016-05-01

    We present the first large statistical study of extreme geomagnetic storms based on historical data from the time period 1868 - 2010. This article is the first of two companion papers. Here we describe how the storms were selected and focus on their near-Earth characteristics. The second article presents our investigation of the corresponding solar events and their characteristics. The storms were selected based on their intensity in the aa index, which constitutes the longest existing continuous series of geomagnetic activity. They are analyzed statistically in the context of more well-known geomagnetic indices, such as the Kp and Dcx/Dst index. This reveals that neither Kp nor Dcx/Dst provide a comprehensive geomagnetic measure of the extreme storms. We rank the storms by including long series of single magnetic observatory data. The top storms on the rank list are the New York Railroad storm occurring in May 1921 and the Quebec storm from March 1989. We identify key characteristics of the storms by combining several different available data sources, lists of storm sudden commencements (SSCs) signifying occurrence of interplanetary shocks, solar wind in-situ measurements, neutron monitor data, and associated identifications of Forbush decreases as well as satellite measurements of energetic proton fluxes in the near-Earth space environment. From this we find, among other results, that the extreme storms are very strongly correlated with the occurrence of interplanetary shocks (91 - 100 %), Forbush decreases (100 %), and energetic solar proton events (70 %). A quantitative comparison of these associations relative to less intense storms is also presented. Most notably, we find that most often the extreme storms are characterized by a complexity that is associated with multiple, often interacting, solar wind disturbances and that they frequently occur when the geomagnetic activity is already elevated. We also investigate the semiannual variation in storm occurrence

  3. Will extreme climatic events facilitate biological invasions?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extreme climatic events, such as intense heat waves, hurricanes, floods and droughts, can dramatically affect ecological and evolutionary processes, and more extreme events are projected with ongoing climate change. However, the implications of these events for biological invasions, which themselves...

  4. Mitochondrial function at extreme high altitude.

    PubMed

    Murray, Andrew J; Horscroft, James A

    2016-03-01

    At high altitude, barometric pressure falls and with it inspired P(O2), potentially compromising O2 delivery to the tissues. With sufficient acclimatisation, the erythropoietic response increases red cell mass such that arterial O2 content (C(aO2)) is restored; however arterial P(O2)(P(aO2)) remains low, and the diffusion of O2 from capillary to mitochondrion is impaired. Mitochondrial respiration and aerobic capacity are thus limited, whilst reactive oxygen species (ROS) production increases. Restoration of P(aO2) with supplementary O2 does not fully restore aerobic capacity in acclimatised individuals, possibly indicating a peripheral impairment. With prolonged exposure to extreme high altitude (>5500 m), muscle mitochondrial volume density falls, with a particular loss of the subsarcolemmal population. It is not clear whether this represents acclimatisation or deterioration, but it does appear to be regulated, with levels of the mitochondrial biogenesis factor PGC-1α falling, and shows similarities to adapted Tibetan highlanders. Qualitative changes in mitochondrial function also occur, and do so at more moderate high altitudes with shorter periods of exposure. Electron transport chain complexes are downregulated, possibly mitigating the increase in ROS production. Fatty acid oxidation capacity is decreased and there may be improvements in biochemical coupling at the mitochondrial inner membrane that enhance O2 efficiency. Creatine kinase expression falls, possibly impairing high-energy phosphate transfer from the mitochondria to myofibrils. In climbers returning from the summit of Everest, cardiac energetic reserve (phosphocreatine/ATP) falls, but skeletal muscle energetics are well preserved, possibly supporting the notion that mitochondrial remodelling is a core feature of acclimatisation to extreme high altitude. PMID:26033622

  5. The Extremes of Quasar Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Variability is one of the key observational properties of quasars, and it can be used as a probe of their fueling, physics, and evolution. A new generation of synoptic sky surveys, in combination with the novel data analytics tools, offers unprecedented data sets for the studies of quasars in the time domain. I will illustrate this with examples from the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS), which has an open and growing archive of 500 million light curves, including 350,000 spectroscopically confirmed quasars, with the time baselines ranging from 10 minutes to 10 years. I will discuss a new approach to discover quasars using a combination of variability and mid-IR colors from WISE, which results in a catalog of over a million quasar candidates. I will then discuss quasars with extreme, anomolous light curves, including quasars that have gone through extreme brightening events over the past decade with concordant large changes in their spectroscopic properties. I will also discuss a small subset of quasars with periodic light curves which we interpret as a signature of close (milliparsec scale) supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries.

  6. Medical homicide and extreme negligence.

    PubMed

    Duncanson, Emily; Richards, Virginia; Luce, Kasey M; Gill, James R

    2009-03-01

    Deaths that occur during medical care for the treatment of a disease are rarely certified as homicides. Some "medical" deaths, however, have been criminally prosecuted for manslaughter, reckless endangerment, or reckless homicide. We describe 5 deaths due to medical complications that underwent criminal prosecution. Three of the deaths were certified as homicides. Deaths certified as homicides due to the actions (or inactions) of a caregiver occur in 3 circumstances. The first is when the medical caregiver intentionally causes the death of the patient. The second is a death due to treatment by an unlicensed fraud or quack. The final circumstance is due to extreme medical negligence that involves a gross and wanton disregard for the well-being of the patient and is the most controversial in the medical community. The law defines reckless endangerment as the conscious disregard of a known substantial likelihood of injury to the patient. Criminal neglect typically is defined as the failure to provide timely, safe, adequate, and appropriate services, treatment, and/or care to a patient. In instances of extreme medical negligence, a homicide manner of death is appropriate because the fatality is due to the criminal acts (or inactions) of another. It also furthers one of the major goals of the medicolegal death investigation system, which is to safeguard the public health. PMID:19237847

  7. Dome cities for extreme environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Raymond S.; Schwartz, Milton

    1992-01-01

    Extreme environments whether they be the frigid nights of the polar regions, the burning sands of the desert, or the harsh environment of space pose interesting challenges to the architect, the engineer, and the constructor in their efforts to create habitats for mankind. In space, the goals are to provide radiation protection while also providing an aesthetic living environment for long duration missions. Because of the need to provide both radiation protection and options for expansion of base facilities, a unique structural system which separates the radiation protection systems from the pressure envelope of the habitats was created. The system uses cable networks in a tensioned structural system, which supports the lunar regolith used for shielding above the facilities. The system is modular, easily expandable, and simple to construct. Additional innovations include the use of rock melting perpetrators for piles and anchoring deadmen, and various sized craters to provide side shielding. The reflective properties of the fabric used in the membrane are utilized to provide diffuse illumination. The use of craters along with the suspended shielding allows the dome to be utilized in fashions similar to those proposed by various designers unaware of the Moon's hostile radiation environment. Additional topics addressed deal with construction techniques for large domes, i.e., on the order of 100's to 1000's of meters, thermal control, the integration of tertiary water treatment schemes with architectural design, human factors, and its implications for the design of habitats for long term use in extreme environments.

  8. Dome cities for extreme environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Raymond S.; Schwartz, Milton

    Extreme environments whether they be the frigid nights of the polar regions, the burning sands of the desert, or the harsh environment of space pose interesting challenges to the architect, the engineer, and the constructor in their efforts to create habitats for mankind. In space, the goals are to provide radiation protection while also providing an aesthetic living environment for long duration missions. Because of the need to provide both radiation protection and options for expansion of base facilities, a unique structural system which separates the radiation protection systems from the pressure envelope of the habitats was created. The system uses cable networks in a tensioned structural system, which supports the lunar regolith used for shielding above the facilities. The system is modular, easily expandable, and simple to construct. Additional innovations include the use of rock melting perpetrators for piles and anchoring deadmen, and various sized craters to provide side shielding. The reflective properties of the fabric used in the membrane are utilized to provide diffuse illumination. The use of craters along with the suspended shielding allows the dome to be utilized in fashions similar to those proposed by various designers unaware of the Moon's hostile radiation environment. Additional topics addressed deal with construction techniques for large domes, i.e., on the order of 100's to 1000's of meters, thermal control, the integration of tertiary water treatment schemes with architectural design, human factors, and its implications for the design of habitats for long term use in extreme environments.

  9. Extreme Event impacts on Seafloor Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canals, Miquel; Sanchez-Vidal, Anna; Calafat, Antoni; Pedrosa-Pàmies, Rut; Lastras, Galderic

    2013-04-01

    a major DSWC event, the latest to date. Data show that DSWC modifies the properties of intermediate and deep waters, carries massive amounts of organic carbon to the basin thus fuelling the deep ecosystem, transports huge quantities of coarse and fine sedimentary particles that abrade canyon floors and rise the load of suspended particles, and also exports pollutants from the coastal area to deeper compartment. Our findings demonstrate that both types of climate-driven extreme events (coastal storms and DSWC) are highly efficient in transporting organic carbon from shallow to deep, thus contributing to its sequestration, and have the potential to tremendously impact the deep-sea ecosystems.

  10. Min and Max Extreme Interval Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jance, Marsha L.; Thomopoulos, Nick T.

    2011-01-01

    The paper shows how to find the min and max extreme interval values for the exponential and triangular distributions from the min and max uniform extreme interval values. Tables are provided to show the min and max extreme interval values for the uniform, exponential, and triangular distributions for different probabilities and observation sizes.

  11. Compact pulsed laser having improved heat conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A highly efficient, compact pulsed laser having high energy to weight and volume ratios is provided. The laser utilizes a cavity reflector that operates as a heat sink and is essentially characterized by having a high heat conductivity, by being a good electrical insulator and by being substantially immune to the deleterious effects of ultra-violet radiation. Manual portability is accomplished by eliminating entirely any need for a conventional circulating fluid cooling system.

  12. Nonstationary Extreme Value Analysis in a Changing Climate: A Software Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L.; AghaKouchak, A.; Gilleland, E.

    2013-12-01

    Numerous studies show that climatic extremes have increased substantially in the second half of the 20th century. For this reason, analysis of extremes under a nonstationary assumption has received a great deal of attention. This paper presents a software package developed for estimation of return levels, return periods, and risks of climatic extremes in a changing climate. This MATLAB software package offers tools for analysis of climate extremes under both stationary and non-stationary assumptions. The Nonstationary Extreme Value Analysis (hereafter, NEVA) provides an efficient and generalized framework for analyzing extremes using Bayesian inference. NEVA estimates the extreme value parameters using a Differential Evolution Markov Chain (DE-MC) which utilizes the genetic algorithm Differential Evolution (DE) for global optimization over the real parameter space with the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach and has the advantage of simplicity, speed of calculation and convergence over conventional MCMC. NEVA also offers the confidence interval and uncertainty bounds of estimated return levels based on the sampled parameters. NEVA integrates extreme value design concepts, data analysis tools, optimization and visualization, explicitly designed to facilitate analysis extremes in geosciences. The generalized input and output files of this software package make it attractive for users from across different fields. Both stationary and nonstationary components of the package are validated for a number of case studies using empirical return levels. The results show that NEVA reliably describes extremes and their return levels.

  13. Skeletal fluorosis in immobilized extremities.

    PubMed

    Rosenquist, J B

    1975-11-01

    The effect of immobilization on skeletal fluorosis was studied in growing rabbits. One hind leg was immobilized by an external fixation device extending below the wrist joint and above the knee joint, the extremity being in a straight position after severance of the sciatic nerve. The animals, aged 7 weeks at the beginning of the experiment, were given 10 mg of fluoride per kg body weight and day during 12 weeks. In the tibiae, development of the skeletal fluorosis was more irregular than that observed in previous studies of normally active animals, being most excessive in the mobile bone. The immobilization effect was most profound in the femora as the cortical thickness and the femur score were significantly higher than those in the mobile femora. It was suggested that an altered muscular activity was the reason for the observed changes. PMID:1189918

  14. Carbon tetrachloride under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Pravica, Michael; Sneed, Daniel; Wang, Yonggang; Smith, Quinlan; Subrahmanyam, Garimella

    2014-05-21

    We report on three experiments on carbon tetrachloride subjected to extreme conditions. In the first experiment, Raman spectra of CCl4 were acquired up to 28 GPa. Evidence was observed for at least two new phases of CCl4 above 14 GPa (phase VI) and above 22 GPa (phase VII). Decompression of the sample showed no evidence of pressure-induced decomposition. In the second experiment, a synchrotron x-ray diffraction study was performed up to 30 GPa verifying phase V and potential phases above 14 (VI) and 22 GPa (VII), respectively. In the third study, we examined irradiated CCl4 using synchrotron infrared spectroscopy to reduce fluorescent contamination. Some sort of carbon allotrope appears as a byproduct suggesting the following reaction with hard x-rays: CCl4+ hν → C + 2Cl2. PMID:24852546

  15. Advances in upper extremity prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Zlotolow, Dan A; Kozin, Scott H

    2012-11-01

    Until recently, upper extremity prostheses had changed little since World War II. In 2006, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency responded to an increasing number of military amputees with the Revolutionizing Prosthetics program. The program has yielded several breakthroughs both in the engineering of new prosthetic arms and in the control of those arms. Direct brain-wave control of a limb with 22° of freedom may be within reach. In the meantime, advances such as individually powered digits have opened the door to multifunctional full and partial hand prostheses. Restoring sensation to the prosthetic limb remains a major challenge to full integration of the limb into a patient's self-image. PMID:23101609

  16. Weather extremes could affect agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-05-01

    As Earth's climate warms, agricultural producers will need to adapt. Changes, especially increases in extreme events, are already having an impact on food production, according to speakers at a 1 May session on agriculture and food security at the AGU Science Policy Conference. Christopher Field, director of the Department of Global Ecology at the Carnegie Institution for Science of Washington, D. C., pointed out the complex factors that come into play in understanding food security, including spatially varying controls and stresses, incomplete models, and the potential for threshold responses. Factors that are likely to cause problems include increasing population; increasing preference for meat, which needs more land and energy inputs to produce; climate change; and increasing use of agricultural lands for biomass energy.

  17. Carbon tetrachloride under extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael Sneed, Daniel; Wang, Yonggang; Smith, Quinlan; Subrahmanyam, Garimella

    2014-05-21

    We report on three experiments on carbon tetrachloride subjected to extreme conditions. In the first experiment, Raman spectra of CCl{sub 4} were acquired up to 28 GPa. Evidence was observed for at least two new phases of CCl{sub 4} above 14 GPa (phase VI) and above 22 GPa (phase VII). Decompression of the sample showed no evidence of pressure-induced decomposition. In the second experiment, a synchrotron x-ray diffraction study was performed up to 30 GPa verifying phase V and potential phases above 14 (VI) and 22 GPa (VII), respectively. In the third study, we examined irradiated CCl{sub 4} using synchrotron infrared spectroscopy to reduce fluorescent contamination. Some sort of carbon allotrope appears as a byproduct suggesting the following reaction with hard x-rays: CCl{sub 4}+ hν → C + 2Cl{sub 2}.

  18. Zipf law: an extreme perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2016-04-01

    Extreme value theory (EVT) asserts that the Fréchet law emerges universally from linearly scaled maxima of collections of independent and identically distributed random variables that are positive-valued. Observations of many real-world sizes, e.g. city-sizes, give rise to the Zipf law: if we rank the sizes decreasingly, and plot the log-sizes versus the log-ranks, then an affine line emerges. In this paper we present an EVT approach to the Zipf law. Specifically, we establish that whenever the Fréchet law emerges from the EVT setting, then the Zipf law follows. The EVT generation of the Zipf law, its universality, and its associated phase transition, are analyzed and described in detail.

  19. Extreme solar energetic particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainio, Rami; Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Properties of extreme solar energetic particle (SEP) events, here defined as those leading to ground level enhancements (GLEs) of cosmic rays, are reviewed. We review recent efforts on modeling SEP acceleration to relativistic energies and present simulation results on particle acceleration at shocks driven by fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in different types of coronal magnetic structures and turbulent downstream compression regions. Based on these modeling results, we discuss the possible role of solar and CME parameters in the lack of GLEs during the present sunspot cycle. This work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA). The Academy of Finland is thanked for financial support.

  20. Extreme luminosity imaging conical spectrograph

    SciTech Connect

    Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Mitchell, M. D.; Chandler, K. M.; Douglass, J. D.; McBride, R. D.; Jackson, D. P.; Hammer, D. A.

    2006-10-15

    A new configuration for a two-dimensional (2D) imaging x-ray spectrograph based on a conically bent crystal is introduced: extreme luminosity imaging conical spectrograph (ELICS). The ELICS configuration has important advantages over spectrographs that are based on cylindrically and spherically bent crystals. The main advantages are that a wide variety of large-aperture crystals can be used, and any desired magnification in the spatial direction (the direction orthogonal to spectral dispersion) can be achieved by the use of different experimental arrangements. The ELICS can be set up so that the detector plane is almost perpendicular to the incident rays, a good configuration for time-resolved spectroscopy. ELICSs with mica crystals of 45x90 mm{sup 2} aperture have been successfully used for imaging on the XP and COBRA pulsed power generators, yielding spectra with spatial resolution in 2D of Z pinches and X pinches.

  1. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Saseedharan, Sanjith; Bhargava, Sunil

    2012-01-01

    A 56-year-old female, recently (3 months) diagnosed with chronic kidney disease (CKD), on maintenance dialysis through jugular hemodialysis lines with a preexisting nonfunctional mature AV fistula made at diagnosis of CKD, presented to the hospital for a peritoneal dialysis line. The recently inserted indwelling dialysis catheter in left internal jugular vein had no flow on hemodialysis as was the right-sided catheter which was removed a day before insertion of the left-sided line. The left-sided line was removed and a femoral hemodialysis line was cannulated for maintenance hemodialysis, and the next day, a peritoneal catheter was inserted in the operation theater. However, 3 days later, there was progressive painful swelling of the left hand and redness with minimal numbness. The radial artery pulsations were felt. There was also massive edema of forearm, arm and shoulder region on the left side. Doppler indicated a steal phenomena due to a hyperfunctioning AV fistula for which a fistula closure was done. Absence of relief of edema prompted a further computed tomography (CT) angiogram (since it was not possible to evaluate the more proximal venous segments due to edema and presence of clavicle). Ct angiogram revealed central vein thrombosis for which catheter-directed thrombolysis and venoplasty was done resulting in complete resolution of signs and symptoms. Upper extremity DVT (UEDVT) is a very less studied topic as compared to lower extremity DVT and the diagnostic and therapeutic modalities still have substantial areas that need to be studied. We present a review of the present literature including incidences, diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for this entity. Data Sources: MEDLINE, MICROMEDEX, The Cochrane database of Systematic Reviews from 1950 through March 2011. PMID:22624098

  2. Gut Microbiota and Extreme Longevity.

    PubMed

    Biagi, Elena; Franceschi, Claudio; Rampelli, Simone; Severgnini, Marco; Ostan, Rita; Turroni, Silvia; Consolandi, Clarissa; Quercia, Sara; Scurti, Maria; Monti, Daniela; Capri, Miriam; Brigidi, Patrizia; Candela, Marco

    2016-06-01

    The study of the extreme limits of human lifespan may allow a better understanding of how human beings can escape, delay, or survive the most frequent age-related causes of morbidity, a peculiarity shown by long-living individuals. Longevity is a complex trait in which genetics, environment, and stochasticity concur to determine the chance to reach 100 or more years of age [1]. Because of its impact on human metabolism and immunology, the gut microbiome has been proposed as a possible determinant of healthy aging [2, 3]. Indeed, the preservation of host-microbes homeostasis can counteract inflammaging [4], intestinal permeability [5], and decline in bone and cognitive health [6, 7]. Aiming at deepening our knowledge on the relationship between the gut microbiota and a long-living host, we provide for the first time the phylogenetic microbiota analysis of semi-supercentenarians, i.e., 105-109 years old, in comparison to adults, elderly, and centenarians, thus reconstructing the longest available human microbiota trajectory along aging. We highlighted the presence of a core microbiota of highly occurring, symbiotic bacterial taxa (mostly belonging to the dominant Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and Bacteroidaceae families), with a cumulative abundance decreasing along with age. Aging is characterized by an increasing abundance of subdominant species, as well as a rearrangement in their co-occurrence network. These features are maintained in longevity and extreme longevity, but peculiarities emerged, especially in semi-supercentenarians, describing changes that, even accommodating opportunistic and allochthonous bacteria, might possibly support health maintenance during aging, such as an enrichment and/or higher prevalence of health-associated groups (e.g., Akkermansia, Bifidobacterium, and Christensenellaceae). PMID:27185560

  3. Electronic Components for use in Extreme Temperature Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Electrical power management and control systems designed for use in planetary exploration missions and deep space probes require electronics that are capable of efficient and reliable operation under extreme temperature conditions. Space-based infra-red satellites, all-electric ships, jet engines, electromagnetic launchers, magnetic levitation transport systems, and power facilities are also typical examples where the electronics are expected to be exposed to harsh temperatures and to operate under severe thermal swings. Most commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) devices are not designed to function under such extreme conditions and, therefore, new parts must be developed or the conventional devices need to be modified. For example, spacecraft operating in the cold environment of deep space carry a large number of radioisotope heating units in order to maintain the surrounding temperature of the on-board electronics at approximately 20 C. At the other end, built-in radiators and coolers render the operation of electronics possible under hot conditions. These thermal measures lead to design complexity, affect development costs, and increase size and weight. Electronics capable of operation at extreme temperatures, thus, will not only tolerate the hostile operational environment, but also make the overall system efficient, more reliable, and less expensive. The Extreme Temperature Electronics Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on research and development of electronics suitable for applications in the aerospace environment and deep space exploration missions. Research is being conducted on devices, including COTS parts, for potential use under extreme temperatures. These components include semiconductor switching devices, passive devices, DC/DC converters, operational amplifiers, and oscillators. An overview of the program will be presented along with some experimental findings.

  4. Strain induced piezoelectric effect in black phosphorus and MoS2 van der Waals heterostructure

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Le; Li, Yan; Wei, Zhongming; Li, Jingbo

    2015-01-01

    The structural, electronic, transport and optical properties of black phosphorus/MoS2 (BP/MoS2) van der Waals (vdw) heterostructure are investigated by using first principles calculations. The band gap of BP/MoS2 bilayer decreases with the applied normal compressive strain and a semiconductor-to-metal transition is observed when the applied strain is more than 0.85 Å. BP/MoS2 bilayer also exhibits modulation of its carrier effective mass and carrier concentration by the applied compressive strain, suggesting that mobility engineering and good piezoelectric effect can be realized in BP/MoS2 heterostructure. Because the type-II band alignment can facilitate the separation of photo-excited electrons and holes, and it can benefit from the great absorption coefficient in ultra-violet region, the BP/MoS2 shows great potential to be a very efficient ultra-violet photodetector. PMID:26553370

  5. Strain induced piezoelectric effect in black phosphorus and MoS2 van der Waals heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Le; Li, Yan; Wei, Zhongming; Li, Jingbo

    2015-01-01

    The structural, electronic, transport and optical properties of black phosphorus/MoS2 (BP/MoS2) van der Waals (vdw) heterostructure are investigated by using first principles calculations. The band gap of BP/MoS2 bilayer decreases with the applied normal compressive strain and a semiconductor-to-metal transition is observed when the applied strain is more than 0.85 Å. BP/MoS2 bilayer also exhibits modulation of its carrier effective mass and carrier concentration by the applied compressive strain, suggesting that mobility engineering and good piezoelectric effect can be realized in BP/MoS2 heterostructure. Because the type-II band alignment can facilitate the separation of photo-excited electrons and holes, and it can benefit from the great absorption coefficient in ultra-violet region, the BP/MoS2 shows great potential to be a very efficient ultra-violet photodetector. PMID:26553370

  6. Extreme precipitation patterns reduced terrestrial ecosystem production across biomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Moran, S. M.; Nearing, M.; Ponce Campos, G. E.; Huete, A. R.; Buda, A. R.; Bosch, D. D.; Gunter, S. A.; Kitchen, S. G.; McNab, W.; Morgan, J. A.; McClaran, M. P.; Montoya, D. S.; Peters, D. P.; Starks, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Precipitation regimes are predicted to shift to more extreme patterns that are characterized by more intense rainfall events and longer dry intervals, yet their ecological impacts on vegetation production remain uncertain across biomes in natural climatic conditions. This in situ study investigated the effects of novel climatic conditions on aboveground net primary production (ANPP) by combining a greenness index from satellite measurements and climatic records during 2000 to 2009 from 11 long-term experimental sites in multiple biomes and climates. Results showed that extreme precipitation patterns decreased the sensitivity of ANPP to total annual precipitation (PT), at the regional and decadal scales, leading to a mean 20% decrease in rain-use efficiency across biomes. Relative decreases in ANPP were greatest for arid grassland (16%) and Mediterranean forest (20%), and less for mesic grassland and temperate forest (3%). The co-occurrence of more heavy rainfall events and longer dry intervals caused greater water stress that resulted in reduced vegetation production. A new generalized model was developed to improve predictions of the ANPP response to changes in extreme precipitation patterns by using a function of both PT and an index of precipitation extremes. These findings suggest that extreme precipitation patterns have more substantial and complex effects on vegetation production across biomes, and are as important as total annual precipitation in understanding vegetation processes. With predictions of more extreme weather events, forecasts of ecosystem production should consider these non-linear responses to altered precipitation patterns associated with climate change. Figure. Relation of production across precipitation gradients for 11 sites for two groups (Low: R95p% < 20%, High: R95p% ≥ 20%). See Table 2 for R95p% definitions. The relations were significantly different for the two groups (F2, 106 = 18.51, P < 0.0001).

  7. Undulator radiation driven by laser-wakefield accelerator electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, S. M.; Anania, M. P.; Welsh, G. H.; Brunetti, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Grant, P. A.; Reboredo, D.; Manahan, G.; Grant, D. W.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Laser-Plasma High-Energy Accelerators towards X-rays (ALPHA-X) programme is developing laserplasma accelerators for the production of ultra-short electron bunches with subsequent generation of coherent, bright, short-wavelength radiation pulses. The new Scottish Centre for the Application of Plasma-based Accelerators (SCAPA) will develop a wide range of applications utilising such light sources. Electron bunches can be propagated through a magnetic undulator with the aim of generating fully coherent free-electron laser (FEL) radiation in the ultra-violet and Xrays spectral ranges. Demonstration experiments producing spontaneous undulator radiation have been conducted at visible and extreme ultra-violet wavelengths but it is an on-going challenge to generate and maintain electron bunches of sufficient quality in order to stimulate FEL behaviour. In the ALPHA-X beam line experiments, a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser system with peak power 20 TW has been used to generate electron bunches of energy 80-150 MeV in a 2 mm gas jet laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and these bunches have been transported through a 100 period planar undulator. High peak brilliance, narrow band spontaneous radiation pulses in the vacuum ultra-violet wavelength range have been generated. Analysis is provided with respect to the magnetic quadrupole beam transport system and subsequent effect on beam emittance and duration. Requirements for coherent spontaneous emission and FEL operation are presented.

  8. Trends in extreme learning machines: a review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gao; Huang, Guang-Bin; Song, Shiji; You, Keyou

    2015-01-01

    Extreme learning machine (ELM) has gained increasing interest from various research fields recently. In this review, we aim to report the current state of the theoretical research and practical advances on this subject. We first give an overview of ELM from the theoretical perspective, including the interpolation theory, universal approximation capability, and generalization ability. Then we focus on the various improvements made to ELM which further improve its stability, sparsity and accuracy under general or specific conditions. Apart from classification and regression, ELM has recently been extended for clustering, feature selection, representational learning and many other learning tasks. These newly emerging algorithms greatly expand the applications of ELM. From implementation aspect, hardware implementation and parallel computation techniques have substantially sped up the training of ELM, making it feasible for big data processing and real-time reasoning. Due to its remarkable efficiency, simplicity, and impressive generalization performance, ELM have been applied in a variety of domains, such as biomedical engineering, computer vision, system identification, and control and robotics. In this review, we try to provide a comprehensive view of these advances in ELM together with its future perspectives. PMID:25462632

  9. Extreme Rainfall In A City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkemdirim, Lawrence

    Cities contain many structures and activities that are vulnerable to severe weather. Heavy precipitation cause floods which can damage structures, compromise transportation and water supply systems, and slow down economic and social activities. Rain induced flood patterns in cities must be well understood to enable effective placement of flood control and other regulatory measures. The planning goal is not to eliminate all floods but to reduce their frequency and resulting damage. Possible approaches to such planning include probability based extreme event analysis. Precipitation is normally the most variable hydrologic element over a given area. This variability results from the distribution of clouds and in cloud processes in the atmosphere, the storm path, and the distribution of topographical features on the ground along path. Some studies suggest that point rainfall patterns are also affected by urban industrial effects hence some agreement that cities are wetter than the country surrounding them. However, there are still questions regarding the intra- urban distribution of precipitation. The sealed surfaces, urban structures, and the urban heat anomaly increase convection in cities which may enhance the generation of clouds. Increased dust and gaseous aerosols loads are effective condensation and sublimation nuclei which may also enhance the generation of precipitation. Based on these associations, the greatest amount of convection type rainfall should occur at city center. A study of summer rainfall in Calgary showed that frequencies of trace amounts of rainfall and events under 0.2mm are highest downtown than elsewhere. For amounts greater than than 0.2 mm, downtown sites were not favored. The most compelling evidence for urban-industrial precipitation enhancement came from the Metromex project around St. Loius, Missouri where maximum increases of between 5 to 30 per cent in summer rainfall downwind of the city was linked to urbanization and

  10. Polyimide Resins Resist Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft and aerospace engines share a common threat: high temperature. The temperatures experienced during atmospheric reentry can reach over 2,000 F, and the temperatures in rocket engines can reach well over 5,000 F. To combat the high temperatures in aerospace applications, Dr. Ruth Pater of Langley Research Center developed RP-46, a polyimide resin capable of withstanding the most brutal temperatures. The composite material can push the service temperature to the limits of organic materials. Designed as an environmentally friendly alternative to other high-temperature resins, the RP-46 polyimide resin system was awarded a 1992 "R&D 100" award, named a "2001 NASA Technology of the Year," and later, due to its success as a spinoff technology, "2004 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year." The technology s commercial success also led to its winning the Langley s "Paul F. Holloway Technology Transfer Award" as well as "Richard T. Whitcom Aerospace Technology Transfer Award" both for 2004. RP-46 is relatively inexpensive and it can be readily processed for use as an adhesive, composite, resin molding, coating, foam, or film. Its composite materials can be used in temperatures ranging from minus 150 F to 2,300 F. No other organic materials are known to be capable of such wide range and extreme high-temperature applications. In addition to answering the call for environmentally conscious high-temperature materials, RP-46 provides a slew of additional advantages: It is extremely lightweight (less than half the weight of aluminum), chemical and moisture resistant, strong, and flexible. Pater also developed a similar technology, RP-50, using many of the same methods she used with RP-46, and very similar in composition to RP-46 in terms of its thermal capacity and chemical construction, but it has different applications, as this material is a coating as opposed to a buildable composite. A NASA license for use of this material outside of the Space Agency as well as

  11. Remembrance of ecohydrologic extremes past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, L. E.; Hwang, T.

    2013-12-01

    Ecohydrological systems operate at time scales that span several orders of magnitude. Significant processes and feedbacks range from subdaily physiologic response to meteorological drivers, to soil forming and geomorphic processes ranging up through 10^3-10^4 years. While much attention in ecohydrology has focused on ecosystem optimization paradigms, these systems can show significant transience in structure and function, with apparent memory of hydroclimate extremes and regime shifts. While optimization feedbacks can be reconciled with system transience, a better understanding of the time scales and mechanisms of adjustment to increased hydroclimate variability and to specific events is required to understand and predict dynamics and vulnerability of ecosystems. Under certain circumstances of slowly varying hydroclimate, we hypothesize that ecosystems can remain adjusted to changing climate regimes, without displaying apparent system memory. Alternatively, rapid changes in hydroclimate and increased hydroclimate variability, amplified with well expressed non-linearity in the processes controlling feedbacks between water, carbon and nutrients, can move ecosystems far from adjusted states. The Coweeta Hydrological Laboratory is typical of humid, broadleaf forests in eastern North America, with a range of forest biomes from northern hardwoods at higher elevations, to oak-pine assemblages at lower elevations. The site provides almost 80 years of rainfall-runoff records for a set of watersheds under different management, along with multi-decadal forest plot structural information, soil moisture conditions and stream chemistry. An initial period of multi-decadal cooling, was followed by three decades of warming and increased hydroclimate variability. While mean temperature has risen over this time period, precipitation shows no long term trends in the mean, but has had a significant rise in variability with repeated extreme drought and wet periods. Over this latter

  12. Plasma-surface interactions under extreme conditions: challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Temmerman, Gregory

    2013-09-01

    In a fusion reactor, power from the hot core plasma has to be exhausted by the plasma-facing components which are exposed to extreme heat (>10MW.m-2) and particle fluxes (up to 1024m-2s-1 or 1.6×105A.m-2) - orders of magnitude higher than in conventional plasma processing technique. Much of the fundamentals of the materials behaviour under such extreme ion irradiation conditions is not yet fully understood and limits our ability to develop materials able to survive those conditions. Combining a high efficiency plasma source and a strong magnetic field, linear plasma devices (LPD) allow to reproduce and even exceed the conditions expected in a fusion reactor. Owing to the good access to the plasma-material interaction zone for diagnostics and sample manipulation, those devices allow advanced experiments necessary to the fundamental understanding of plasma-surface interactions. In addition, the ion flux is such that a direct comparison with MD modelling, traditionally hampered by the large gap between fluxes in model and experiments, is now possible. This presentation will give an overview of the research performed to understand materials behaviour under extreme conditions with a focus on irradiation-driven modifications of metals. In parallel, the non-equilibrium conditions induced by the surface bombardment by extreme fluxes of low-energy particles open a novel route for the synthesis of advanced nanostructured materials, an illustration of which will be given.

  13. Robust efficient video fingerprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puri, Manika; Lubin, Jeffrey

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a video fingerprinting system with robustness and efficiency as the primary and secondary design criteria. In extensive testing, the system has shown robustness to cropping, letter-boxing, sub-titling, blur, drastic compression, frame rate changes, size changes and color changes, as well as to the geometric distortions often associated with camcorder capture in cinema settings. Efficiency is afforded by a novel two-stage detection process in which a fast matching process first computes a number of likely candidates, which are then passed to a second slower process that computes the overall best match with minimal false alarm probability. One key component of the algorithm is a maximally stable volume computation - a three-dimensional generalization of maximally stable extremal regions - that provides a content-centric coordinate system for subsequent hash function computation, independent of any affine transformation or extensive cropping. Other key features include an efficient bin-based polling strategy for initial candidate selection, and a final SIFT feature-based computation for final verification. We describe the algorithm and its performance, and then discuss additional modifications that can provide further improvement to efficiency and accuracy.

  14. Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, Jean; Kallman, Timothy R.; Jahoda, Keith M.

    2008-01-01

    Gas accreting ont,o black holes and neutron stars form a dynamic system generating X-rays with spectroscopic signatures and varying on time scales determined by the system. The radiation from various parts of these systems is surely polarized and compact sources have been calculated to give rise to net polarization from the unresolved sum of the radiation from the systems. Polarization has been looked to for some time as also bearing the imprint of strong gravity and providing complementary information that could resolve ambiguities between the physical models that can give rise to frequencies, time delays, and spectra. In the cases of both stellar black holes and supermassive black holes the net polarizations predicted for probable disk and corona models are less than 10 needed. This sensitivity can be achieved, even for sources as faint as 1 milliCrab, in the Gravity and Extreme Magnetism SMEX (GEMS) mission that uses foil mirrors and Time Projection Chamber detectors. Similarities have been pointed out between the timing and the spectral characteristics of low mass X-ray binaries and stellar black hole sources. Polarization measurements for these sources could play a role in determining the configuration of the disk and the neutron star.

  15. Lightcurves of Extreme Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, George; Meng, Huan; Su, Kate

    2012-12-01

    We have recently discovered that some planetary debris disks with extreme fractional luminosities are variable on the timescale of a few years. This behavior opens a new possibility to understand planet building. Two of the known variable disks are around solar-like stars in the age range of 30 to 100+ Myr, which is the expected era of the final stages of terrestrial planet building. Such variability can be attributed to violent collisions (up to ones on the scale of the Moon-forming event between the proto-Earth and another proto-planet). The collisional cascades that are the aftermaths of these events can produce large clouds of tiny dust grains, possibly even condensed from silica vapor. A Spitzer pilot program has obtained the lightcurve of such a debris disk and caught two minor outbursts. Here we propose to continue the lightcurve monitoring with higher sampling rates and to expand it to more disks. The proposed time domain observations are a new dimension of debris disk studies that can bring unique insight to their evolution, providing important constraints on the collisional and dynamical models of terrestrial planet formation.

  16. The Extreme Case of Magnetars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2011-01-01

    Magnetars are magnetically powered rotating neutron stars with extreme magnetic fields (over 10(exp 14) Gauss). They were discovered in the X- and gamma-rays where they predominantly emit their radiation. Very few sources (roughly 18) have been found since their discovery in 1987. NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was launched June 11, 2009; since then the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) recorded emission from four magnetar sources. Two of these were brand new sources, SGR J0501+4516, discovered with Swift and extensively monitored with Swift and GBM, SGR J0418+5729, discovered with GBM and the Interplanetary Network (IPN). A third was SGR J1550-5418, a source originally classified as an Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP 1E1547.0-5408), but exhibiting a very prolific outburst with over 400 events recorded in January 2009. In my talk I will give a short history of magnetars and describe how this, once relatively esoteric field, has emerged as a link between several astrophysical areas including Gamma-Ray Bursts. Finally, I will describe the exciting new results of Fermi in this field and the current status of our knowledge of the magnetar population properties and magnetic fields.

  17. Extreme times for volatility processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoliver, Jaume; Perelló, Josep

    2007-04-01

    Extreme times techniques, generally applied to nonequilibrium statistical mechanical processes, are also useful for a better understanding of financial markets. We present a detailed study on the mean first-passage time for the volatility of return time series. The empirical results extracted from daily data of major indices seem to follow the same law regardless of the kind of index thus suggesting an universal pattern. The empirical mean first-passage time to a certain level L is fairly different from that of the Wiener process showing a dissimilar behavior depending on whether L is higher or lower than the average volatility. All of this indicates a more complex dynamics in which a reverting force drives volatility toward its mean value. We thus present the mean first-passage time expressions of the most common stochastic volatility models whose approach is comparable to the random diffusion description. We discuss asymptotic approximations of these models and confront them to empirical results with a good agreement with the exponential Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model.

  18. Extremely Large Cusp Diamagnetic Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Fritz, T. A.

    2002-05-01

    Extremely large diamagnetic cavities with a size of as large as 6 Re have been observed in the dayside high-altitude cusp regions. Some of the diamagnetic cavities were independent of the IMF directions, which is unexpected by the current MHD (or ISM) models, suggesting that the cusp diamagnetic cavities are different from the magnetospheric sash, which provides a challenge to the existing MHD (or ISM) models. Associated with these cavities are ions with energies from 40 keV up to 8 MeV. The charge state distribution of these cusp cavity ions was indicative of their seed populations being a mixture of the ionospheric and the solar wind particles. The intensities of the cusp cavity energetic ions were observed to increase by as large as four orders of the magnitudes. During high solar wind pressure period on April 21, 1999, the POLAR spacecraft observed lower ion flux in the dayside high-latitude magnetosheath than that in the neighbouring cusp cavities. These observations indicate that the dayside high-altitude cusp diamagnetic cavity is a key region for transferring the solar wind energy, mass, and momentum into the Earth's magnetosphere. These energetic particles in the cusp diamagnetic cavity together with the cusp's connectivity have significant global impacts on the geospace environment research and will be shedding light on the long-standing unsolved fundamental issue about the origins of the energetic particles in the ring current and in upstream ion events.

  19. Extremely large cusp diamagnetic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Fritz, T.; Siscoe, G.

    Extremely large diamagnetic cavities with a size of as large as 6 Re have been observed in the dayside high-altitude cusp regions. These diamagnetic cavities are always there day by day. Some of the diamagnetic cavities have been observed in the morningside during intervals when the IMF By component was positive (duskward), suggesting that the cusp diamagnetic cavities are different from the magnetospheric sash predicted by MHD simulations. Associated with these cavities are ions with energies from 40 keV up to 8 MeV. The charge state distribution of these cusp cavity ions was indicative of their seed populations being a mixture of the ionospheric and the solar wind particles. The intensities of the cusp cavity energetic ions were observed to increase by as large as four orders of the magnitudes. These observations indicate that the dayside high-altitude cusp diamagnetic cavity is a key region for transferring the solar wind energy, mass, and momentum into the Earth's magnetosphere. These energetic particles in the cusp diamagnetic cavity together with the cusp's connectivity to the entire magnetopause may have significant global impacts on the geospace environment. They will possibly be shedding light on the long-standing unsolved fundamental issue about the origins of the energetic particles in the ring current and in the regions upstream of the subsolar magnetopause where energetic ion events frequently are observed.

  20. Extreme Mechanics of Growing Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhl, Ellen

    2013-03-01

    Growth is a distinguishing feature of all living things. Unlike standard materials, living matter can autonomously respond to alterations in its environment. As a result of a continuous ultrastructural turnover and renewal of cells and extracellular matrix, living matter can undergo extreme changes in composition, size, and shape within the order of months, weeks, or days. While hard matter typically adapts by increasing its density to grow strong, soft matter adapts by increasing its volume to grow large. Here we provide a state-of-the-art review of growing matter, and compare existing mathematical models for growth and remodeling of living systems. Applications are plentiful ranging from plant growth to tumor growth, from asthma in the lungs to restenosis in the vasculature, from plastic to reconstructive surgery, and from skeletal muscle adaptation to heart failure. Using these examples, we discuss current challenges and potential future directions. We hope to initiate critical discussions around the biophysical modeling of growing matter as a powerful tool to better understand biological systems in health and disease. This research has been supported by the NSF CAREER award CMMI 0952021.

  1. Extreme Programming in a Research Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Kleb, William L.

    2002-01-01

    This article explores the applicability of Extreme Programming in a scientific research context. The cultural environment at a government research center differs from the customer-centric business view. The chief theoretical difficulty lies in defining the customer to developer relationship. Specifically, can Extreme Programming be utilized when the developer and customer are the same person? Eight of Extreme Programming's 12 practices are perceived to be incompatible with the existing research culture. Further, six of the nine 'environments that I know don't do well with XP' apply. A pilot project explores the use of Extreme Programming in scientific research. The applicability issues are addressed and it is concluded that Extreme Programming can function successfully in situations for which it appears to be ill-suited. A strong discipline for mentally separating the customer and developer roles is found to be key for applying Extreme Programming in a field that lacks a clear distinction between the customer and the developer.

  2. [Injury mechanisms in extreme violence settings].

    PubMed

    Arcaute-Velazquez, Fernando Federico; García-Núñez, Luis Manuel; Noyola-Vilallobos, Héctor Faustino; Espinoza-Mercado, Fernando; Rodríguez-Vega, Carlos Eynar

    2016-01-01

    Extreme violence events are consequence of current world-wide economic, political and social conditions. Injury patterns found among victims of extreme violence events are very complex, obeying several high-energy injury mechanisms. In this article, we present the basic concepts of trauma kinematics that regulate the clinical approach to victims of extreme violence events, in the hope that clinicians increase their theoretical armamentarium, and reflecting on obtaining better outcomes. PMID:27036670

  3. Generalized extreme gust wind speeds distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, E.; Yeung, C.

    2002-01-01

    Since summer 1996, the US wind engineers are using the extreme gust (or 3-s gust) as the basic wind speed to quantify the destruction of extreme winds. In order to better understand these destructive wind forces, it is important to know the appropriate representations of these extreme gust wind speeds. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine the most suitable extreme value distributions for the annual extreme gust wind speeds recorded in large selected areas. To achieve this objective, we are using the generalized Pareto distribution as the diagnostic tool for determining the types of extreme gust wind speed distributions. The three-parameter generalized extreme value distribution function is, thus, reduced to either Type I Gumbel, Type II Frechet or Type III reverse Weibull distribution function for the annual extreme gust wind speeds recorded at a specific site.With the considerations of the quality and homogeneity of gust wind data collected at more than 750 weather stations throughout the United States, annual extreme gust wind speeds at selected 143 stations in the contiguous United States were used in the study. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Real World: Analog Testing in Extreme Environments

    NASA Video Gallery

    See how NASA uses analog testing to simulate space exploration. Explore extreme environments like the Aquarius underwater laboratory in Key Largo, Florida. Find out how scientists use mathematical ...

  5. Controlling extreme events on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-08-01

    Extreme events, a type of collective behavior in complex networked dynamical systems, often can have catastrophic consequences. To develop effective strategies to control extreme events is of fundamental importance and practical interest. Utilizing transportation dynamics on complex networks as a prototypical setting, we find that making the network ``mobile'' can effectively suppress extreme events. A striking, resonance-like phenomenon is uncovered, where an optimal degree of mobility exists for which the probability of extreme events is minimized. We derive an analytic theory to understand the mechanism of control at a detailed and quantitative level, and validate the theory numerically. Implications of our finding to current areas such as cybersecurity are discussed.

  6. Simulation and Estimation of Extreme Quantiles and Extreme Probabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Guyader, Arnaud; Hengartner, Nicolas; Matzner-Lober, Eric

    2011-10-15

    Let X be a random vector with distribution {mu} on Double-Struck-Capital-R {sup d} and {Phi} be a mapping from Double-Struck-Capital-R {sup d} to Double-Struck-Capital-R . That mapping acts as a black box, e.g., the result from some computer experiments for which no analytical expression is available. This paper presents an efficient algorithm to estimate a tail probability given a quantile or a quantile given a tail probability. The algorithm improves upon existing multilevel splitting methods and can be analyzed using Poisson process tools that lead to exact description of the distribution of the estimated probabilities and quantiles. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated in a problem related to digital watermarking.

  7. Plasmons under extreme dimensional confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitering, Hanno

    2012-02-01

    In our studies, we explore how surface and bulk plasmons emerge under extreme dimensional confinement, i.e., dimensions that are orders of magnitude smaller than those employed in `nanoplasmonics'. Atomically-smooth ultrathin Mg films were epitaxially grown on Si(111), allowing for atomically-precise tuning of the plasmon response.ootnotetextM.M. "Ozer, E.J. Moon, A.G. Eguiluz, and H.H. Weitering, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 197601 (2011). While the single-particle states in these 3-12 monolayer (ML) thick films consist of a series of two-dimensional subbands, the bulk-plasmon response is like that of a thin slice carved from bulk Mg subject to quantum-mechanical boundary conditions. Remarkably, this bulk-like behavior persists all the way down to 3 ML. In the 3-12 ML thickness range, bulk loss spectra are dominated by the n=1 and n=2 normal modes, consistent with the excitation of plasmons involving quantized electronic subbands. The collective response of the thinnest films is furthermore characterized by a thickness-dependent spectral weight transfer from the high-energy collective modes to the low-energy single-particle excitations, until the bulk plasmon ceases to exist below 3 ML. Surface- and multipole plasmon modes even persist down to 2 ML. These results are striking manifestations of the role of quantum confinement on plasmon resonances in precisely controlled nanostructures. They furthermore suggest the intriguing possibility of tuning resonant plasmon frequencies via precise dimensional control.

  8. Amorphous silicon carbide coatings for extreme ultraviolet optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kortright, J. B.; Windt, David L.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbide films formed by sputtering techniques are shown to have high reflectance in the extreme ultraviolet spectral region. X-ray scattering verifies that the atomic arrangements in these films are amorphous, while Auger electron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy show that the films have composition close to stoichiometric SiC, although slightly C-rich, with low impurity levels. Reflectance vs incidence angle measurements from 24 to 1216 A were used to derive optical constants of this material, which are presented here. Additionally, the measured extreme ultraviolet efficiency of a diffraction grating overcoated with sputtered amorphous silicon carbide is presented, demonstrating the feasibility of using these films as coatings for EUV optics.

  9. Data-driven prediction and prevention of extreme events in a spatially extended excitable system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialonski, Stephan; Ansmann, Gerrit; Kantz, Holger

    2015-10-01

    Extreme events occur in many spatially extended dynamical systems, often devastatingly affecting human life, which makes their reliable prediction and efficient prevention highly desirable. We study the prediction and prevention of extreme events in a spatially extended system, a system of coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo units, in which extreme events occur in a spatially and temporally irregular way. Mimicking typical constraints faced in field studies, we assume not to know the governing equations of motion and to be able to observe only a subset of all phase-space variables for a limited period of time. Based on reconstructing the local dynamics from data and despite being challenged by the rareness of events, we are able to predict extreme events remarkably well. With small, rare, and spatiotemporally localized perturbations which are guided by our predictions, we are able to completely suppress extreme events in this system.

  10. Extreme-UV lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Replogle, William C.; Sweatt, William C.

    2001-01-01

    A photolithography system that employs a condenser that includes a series of aspheric mirrors on one side of a small, incoherent source of radiation producing a series of beams is provided. Each aspheric mirror images the quasi point source into a curved line segment. A relatively small arc of the ring image is needed by the camera; all of the beams are so manipulated that they all fall onto this same arc needed by the camera. Also, all of the beams are aimed through the camera's virtual entrance pupil. The condenser includes a correcting mirror for reshaping a beam segment which improves the overall system efficiency. The condenser efficiently fills the larger radius ringfield created by today's advanced camera designs. The system further includes (i) means for adjusting the intensity profile at the camera's entrance pupil or (ii) means for partially shielding the illumination imaging onto the mask or wafer. The adjusting means can, for example, change at least one of: (i) partial coherence of the photolithography system, (ii) mask image illumination uniformity on the wafer or (iii) centroid position of the illumination flux in the entrance pupil. A particularly preferred adjusting means includes at least one vignetting mask that covers at least a portion of the at least two substantially equal radial segments of the parent aspheric mirror.

  11. Ultra-violet and resonant laser ablation coupled with microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry and determination of tin in nickel based alloys by electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption and laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong

    Chapter 1 reviews laser ablation in analytical atomic spectrometry. Laser ablation is categorized into two functions: one is used as a sample introduction method, the other function is used as a microprobe analysis method. Both fundamental and applicational aspects are reviewed with the citations of related papers. This chapter also serves as an introduction to the work which is described in chapter 2 and chapter 3 as laser ablation is a relatively new research area for the research group. In chapter 2, instrumentation for excimer (308nm) laser ablation of samples was coupled with a microwave induced plasma (MLP), and evaluated for its potential as an approach to solid sampling for atomic emission spectrometry. Operating parameters were optimized, and the effects of laser repetition rate and number of laser shots on the emission signal were investigated. The UV excimer laser removed more material than would be expected of an infrared laser of similar energy. The chromium detection limit in the solid steel sample was estimated to be about 500 mug/g. In chapter 3, a wavelength tunable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser was used to ablate a steel sample into the same apparatus described in chapter 2. The emission signal for the elements was selectively enhanced when the ablation wavelength was tuned to be in resonance with any atomic transition of that element. This was the first report of the observation of resonant ablation by use of optical detection, as prior reports of resonant ablation have used mass spectrometric detectors. Chapter 4 reviews the publications in laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in recent eight years. The focus of the review is on recent development on new instruments and applications of this technique. Chapter 5 studies the determination of tin in nickel-based alloys with laser excited atomic fluorescence in a graphite furnace. Zeeman electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry methods were also used. The laser excited atomic fluorescence method turned out to be as accurate as the other techniques. The atomic fluorescence method was simple to develop and did not need a sophisticated background correction technique to do the analyses.

  12. Ablation of (GeS{sub 2}){sub 0.3}(Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub 0.7} glass with an ultra-violet nano-second laser

    SciTech Connect

    Knotek, P.; Navesnik, J.; Cernohorsky, T.; Kincl, M.; Vlcek, M.; Tichy, L.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The interaction of (GeS{sub 2}){sub 0.3}(Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub 0.7} bulk glass and film with UV nanosecond laser. • Ablation process, topography of crater and structure of the material were studied. • Ablation threshold fluencies changed with the spot diameter and number of pulses. • The photo-thermal expansion of the material occurred for low laser fluency. • Laser direct writing process applicable for fabrication of passive optical elements. - Abstract: The results of an experimental study of the laser ablation of bulk and thin films of a GeSbS chalcogenide glass using UV nanosecond pulses are reported. The response of the samples to illumination conditions was studied through the use of atomic force spectroscopy, digital holographic microscopy, Raman scattering and scanning electron microscopy. The multi-pulse ablation thresholds were determined for both the bulk and thin film samples for varying number of pulses and illuminated spot diameter. The possible application of direct laser writing into the bulk and thin films of this material is presented.

  13. 3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione protects retinal pigment epithelium cells against Ultra-violet radiation via activation of Akt-mTORC1-dependent Nrf2-HO-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke-Ran; Yang, Su-Qing; Gong, Yi-Qing; Yang, Hong; Li, Xiu-Miao; Zhao, Yu-Xia; Yao, Jin; Jiang, Qin; Cao, Cong

    2016-01-01

    Excessive UV radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell injuries. Nrf2 regulates transcriptional activation of many anti-oxidant genes. Here, we tested the potential role of 3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione (D3T) against UV or ROS damages in cultured RPE cells (both primary cells and ARPE-19 line). We showed that D3T significantly inhibited UV-/H2O2-induced RPE cell death and apoptosis. UV-stimulated ROS production was dramatically inhibited by D3T pretreatment. D3T induced Nrf2 phosphorylation in cultured RPE cells, causing Nrf2 disassociation with KEAP1 and its subsequent nuclear accumulation. This led to expression of antioxidant response elements (ARE)-dependent gene heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Nrf2-HO-1 activation was required for D3T-mediated cytoprotective effect. Nrf2 shRNA knockdown or S40T dominant negative mutation as well as the HO-1 inhibitor Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) largely inhibited D3T's RPE cytoprotective effects against UV radiation. Yet, exogenous overexpression Nrf2 enhanced D3T's activity in RPE cells. Further studies showed that D3T activated Akt/mTORC1 in cultured RPE cells. Akt-mTORC1 inhibitors, or Akt1 knockdown by shRNA, not only inhibited D3T-induced Nrf2-HO-1 activation, but also abolished the RPE cytoprotective effects. In vivo, D3T intravitreal injection protected from light-induced retinal dysfunctions in mice. Thus, D3T protects RPE cells from UV-induced damages via activation of Akt-mTORC1-Nrf2-HO-1 signaling axis. PMID:27151674

  14. 3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione protects retinal pigment epithelium cells against Ultra-violet radiation via activation of Akt-mTORC1-dependent Nrf2-HO-1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke-ran; Yang, Su-qing; Gong, Yi-qing; Yang, Hong; Li, Xiu-miao; Zhao, Yu-xia; Yao, Jin; Jiang, Qin; Cao, Cong

    2016-01-01

    Excessive UV radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell injuries. Nrf2 regulates transcriptional activation of many anti-oxidant genes. Here, we tested the potential role of 3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thione (D3T) against UV or ROS damages in cultured RPE cells (both primary cells and ARPE-19 line). We showed that D3T significantly inhibited UV-/H2O2-induced RPE cell death and apoptosis. UV-stimulated ROS production was dramatically inhibited by D3T pretreatment. D3T induced Nrf2 phosphorylation in cultured RPE cells, causing Nrf2 disassociation with KEAP1 and its subsequent nuclear accumulation. This led to expression of antioxidant response elements (ARE)-dependent gene heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Nrf2-HO-1 activation was required for D3T-mediated cytoprotective effect. Nrf2 shRNA knockdown or S40T dominant negative mutation as well as the HO-1 inhibitor Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) largely inhibited D3T’s RPE cytoprotective effects against UV radiation. Yet, exogenous overexpression Nrf2 enhanced D3T’s activity in RPE cells. Further studies showed that D3T activated Akt/mTORC1 in cultured RPE cells. Akt-mTORC1 inhibitors, or Akt1 knockdown by shRNA, not only inhibited D3T-induced Nrf2-HO-1 activation, but also abolished the RPE cytoprotective effects. In vivo, D3T intravitreal injection protected from light-induced retinal dysfunctions in mice. Thus, D3T protects RPE cells from UV-induced damages via activation of Akt-mTORC1-Nrf2-HO-1 signaling axis. PMID:27151674

  15. Deep ultra violet and visible Raman spectroscopy studies of ion implanted 6H-SiC: Recrytallisation behaviour and thermal decomposition/thermal etching of the near surface region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhudzai, R. J.; Malherbe, J. B.; van der Berg, N. G.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; Odutemowo, O.; Prinsloo, L. C.; Buys, A. V.; Erasmus, R.; Wendler, E.

    2015-12-01

    The recystallisation behaviour and thermal decomposition of the near surface amorphised region of 6H-SiC have been investigated by Raman spectroscopy. 360 keV ions of iodine and silver were implanted at room temperature into wafers of 6H-SiC resulting in the amorphisation of the near surface region. Vacuum annealing of the samples was performed at 1200 °C for 5 h and then sequentially from 1200 to 1600 °C in steps of 100 °C for 30 h at each annealing temperature. Raman spectroscopy was performed using two laser wavelength excitation regimes, the 514 nm laser (visible region) and the 244 nm laser (deep ultraviolet region, DUV). Measurements in the visible region for samples annealed at 1200 °C for 5 h showed that the characteristic 6H-SiC peaks, namely, the Transverse Optical (TO) and Longitudinal Optical (LO) are similar to the virgin samples, albeit with lower intensity due to some retained defects upon recystallisation of the SiC surface region. The similarities between the virgin spectra and the annealed sample were due to the deep penetration of the 514 nm laser into 6H-SiC resulting in the signal from the bulk undamaged 6H-SiC contributing to the overall spectra. However, DUV laser excitation, which only probes the near surface region, shows that after annealing the peaks are broader and asymmetrical compared to the virgin samples. DUV Raman spectra of samples annealed at 1600 °C indicate that SiC has completely decomposed and the top surface layer is now covered by a carbon layer. However the deeper penetrating laser in the visible region showed that the extent of decomposition at 1600 °C was greater for the silver implanted samples than for the iodine implanted samples.

  16. Visible light absorbance enhanced by nitrogen embedded in the surface layer of Mn-doped sodium niobate crystals, detected by ultra violet - visible spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electric conductivity tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molak, A.; Pilch, M.

    2016-05-01

    Sodium niobate crystals doped with manganese ions, Na(NbMn)O3, were annealed in a nitrogen N2 flow at 600, 670, and 930 K. It was verified that simultaneous doping with Mn ions and annealing in nitrogen enhanced the photocatalytic features of sodium niobate. The transmission in the ultraviolet-visible range was measured at room temperature. The absorbance edge is in the range from 3.4 to 2.3 eV. The optical band gap Egap = 1.2-1.3 eV was evaluated using the Tauc relation. Crystals annealed at 670 K and 930 K exhibited an additional shift of the absorption edge of ˜20-40 nm toward longer wavelengths. The optical energy gap narrowed as a result of the superimposed effect of Mn and N co-doping. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy test showed that N ions incorporated into the surface layer. The valence band consisted of O 2p states hybridized with Nb 4d, Mn 3d, and N 2s states. The disorder detected in the surroundings of Nb and O ions decreased due to annealing. The binding energy of oxygen ions situated within the surface layer was EB ≈ 531 eV. The other contributions were assigned to molecular contamination. The contribution centered at 535.5 eV vanished after annealing at 600 K and 670 K. The contribution centered at 534 eV vanished after annealing at 930 K. The N2 annealing partly removed carbonates from the surfaces of the samples. In the 480-950 K range, the electric conductivity activation energy, Ea = 0.7-1.2 eV, was comparable with the optical Egap. The electric permittivity showed dispersion in the 0.1-800 kHz range that corresponds to the occurrence of defects.

  17. Reversed Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatographic Ultra-violet (Photo Diode Array) Quantification of Oleanolic Acid and its Isomer Ursolic Acid for Phytochemical Comparison and Pharmacological Evaluation of Four Leucas Species Used in Ayurveda

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Pushpendra Kumar; Misra, Ankita; Srivastava, Sharad; Rawat, Ajay K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Content: Different Leucas species are well known as “Dronpushpi,” a well-known herb of Ayurveda, used in the treatment of various ailments. Objective: Evaluation of four industrially important Leucas species for their in vitro antidiabetic potential and radical scavenging effect along with high-performance liquid chromatographic quantification of the bioactive triterpenes. Materials and Methods: The quantification of triterpenes was carried out on C-18 column with acetonitrile and water (90:10) as the solvent system at a detection wavelength of 210 nm. In vitro antidiabetic activity was evaluated by α-amylase inhibition assay based on starch–iodine and 3,5 dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) method. Antioxidant activity was calculated by five different models, namely total phenolic and total flavonoid content, free radical scavenging activity by 1-1-diphenyl-2-pic-rylhydrazyl (DPPH), ferric-reducing power assay, and the total antioxidant capacity. Results: Maximum concentration of oleanolic acid was found in Leucas cristata, followed by Leucas mollissima, Leucas Aspera, and Leucas biflora. Ursolic acid was highest in L. mollissima and then in L. biflora, L. cristata, and L. aspera, respectively. In in vitro antidiabetic activity, IC50 of L. aspera (1.56 ± 0.01 mg/ml) and L. mollissima (0.75 ± 0.005 mg/ml) were found to be highest in DNS and iodine starch assay. IC50 in DPPH assay ranges from 0.6 ± 0.011 to 1.68 ± 0.011 mg/ml. Antioxidant capacity follows the order; L. aspera > L. mollissima > L. biflora > L. cristata. Conclusion: Promising activities were observed in targeted species, thus L. mollissima, L. biflora, and L. cristata can be used alternatively as a substitute to L. aspera. SUMMARY Physicochemical parameters are within the limit as per the Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of IndiaMaximum concentration of oleanolic acid was found in Leucas cristata; however, ursolic acid was highest in Leucas mollissimaIn vitro antidiabetic activity of Leucas aspera and L. mollissima was found to be heighest as compared to other species. However, antioxidant capacity is almost similar in targeted species.Promising activities were observed in all the species, thus L. mollissima, Leucas biflora, and L. cristata can be used alternatively as a substitute to L. aspera. PMID:27279701

  18. Role of extreme events in vegetation dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extreme climatic events challenge the capacity of vegetation models, including Dynamic Global Vegetation Models, to predict changes in plant species dynamics at local and regional spatial scales and over time periods relevant to ecologists and managers. Extreme climatic events are defined as large,...

  19. Complex Plasma Research Under Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Osamu

    2008-09-07

    Complex plasma research under extreme conditions is described. The extreme conditions include low-dimensionality for self-organized structures of dust particles, dust magnetization in high magnetic field, criticality in phase transition, and cryogenic environment for Coulomb crystals and dust dynamics.

  20. Recent Developments in Statistical Downscaling of Extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertig, E.

    2014-12-01

    Based on the output of general circulation models (GCMs) regionalization techniques are usually applied to obtain fine-scale climate change information. Different types of regionalization techniques have been developed which comprise regional climate models and statistical downscaling approaches such as conditional weather generators, artificial neural networks, synoptic studies, and transfer functions. In the scope of climate variability and climate change the variations and changes of extremes are of special importance. Extreme events are not only of scientific interest but also have a profound impact on society. For the statistical downscaling of extremes, promising approaches have been introduced and/or developed further in the last few years. Aspects of recent developments in the scope of statistical downscaling of extremes will be presented. In this context, various approaches to downscale extremes, particularly those associated with extreme precipitation events, will be discussed. Key problems related to statistical downscaling of extremes will be addressed. Furthermore, information on Working Group 4 "Extremes" of the EU COST action VALUE (www.value-cost.eu) will be provided. VALUE systematically validates and develops downscaling methods for climate change research in order to improve regional climate change scenarios for use in climate impact studies.

  1. Generalized IRT Models for Extreme Response Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Kuan-Yu; Wang, Wen-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Extreme response style (ERS) is a systematic tendency for a person to endorse extreme options (e.g., strongly disagree, strongly agree) on Likert-type or rating-scale items. In this study, we develop a new class of item response theory (IRT) models to account for ERS so that the target latent trait is free from the response style and the tendency…

  2. Extreme events: The art of attribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Friederike E. L.

    2016-04-01

    A high-impact weather event that occurred at the end of a decade of weather extremes led to the emergence of extreme event attribution science. The challenge is now to move on to assessing the actual risks, rather than simply attributing meteorological variables to climate change.

  3. Surface atmospheric extremes (Launch and transportation areas)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The effects of extreme values of surface and low altitude atmospheric parameters on space vehicle design, tests, and operations are discussed. Atmospheric extremes from the surface to 150 meters for geographic locations of interest to NASA are given. Thermal parameters (temperature and solar radiation), humidity, pressure, and atmospheric electricity (lighting and static) are presented. Weather charts and tables are included.

  4. The Nature and Characteristics of Youthful Extremism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zubok, Iu. A.; Chuprov, V. I.

    2010-01-01

    Extremism is an acute problem of the present day. Moods of extremism are manifested in all spheres of the life and activities of young people--in education, work, business, political life, and leisure activity. They can be found in both individual and group social self-determination and are influenced by the immediate social environment as well as…

  5. Investigation of Star Formation: Instrumentation and Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veach, Todd Justin

    A thorough exploration of star formation necessitates observation across the electromagnetic spectrum. In particular, observations in the submillimeter and ultra-violet allow one to observe very early stage star formation and to trace the evolution from molecular cloud collapse to stellar ignition. Submillimeter observations are essential for piercing the heart of heavily obscured stellar nurseries to observe star formation in its infancy. Ultra-violet observations allow one to observe stars just after they emerge from their surrounding environment, allowing higher energy radiation to escape. To make detailed observations of early stage star formation in both spectral regimes requires state-of-the-art detector technology and instrumentation. In this dissertation, I discuss the calibration and feasibility of detectors developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and specially processed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to increase their quantum efficiency at far-ultraviolet wavelengths. A cursory treatment of the delta-doping process is presented, followed by a thorough discussion of calibration procedures developed at JPL and in the Laboratory for Astronomical and Space Instrumentation at ASU. Subsequent discussion turns to a novel design for a Modular Imager Cell forming one possible basis for construction of future large focal plane arrays. I then discuss the design, fabrication, and calibration of a sounding rocket imaging system developed using the MIC and these specially processed detectors. Finally, I discuss one scientific application of sub-mm observations. I used data from the Heinrich Hertz Sub-millimeter Telescope and the Sub-Millimeter Array (SMA) to observe sub-millimeter transitions and continuum emission towards AFGL 2591. I tested the use of vibrationally excited HCN emission to probe the protostellar accretion disk structure. I measured vibrationally excited HCN line ratios in order to elucidate the appropriate excitation mechanism. I find

  6. EPE The Extreme Physics Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Michael; Elvis, Martin; Bookbinder, Jay; Brenneman, Laura; Bulbul, Esra; Nulsen, Paul; Patnaude, Dan; Smith, Randall; Bandler, Simon; Okajima, Takashi; Ptak, Andy; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Danner, Rolf; Daily, Dean; Fraser, George; Willingale, Richard; Miller, Jon; Turner, T. J.; Risalti, Guido; Galeazzi, Massimiliano

    2012-01-01

    The Extreme Physics Explorer (EPE) is a mission concept that will address fundamental and timely questions in astrophysics which are primary science objectives of IXO. The reach of EPE to the areas outlined in NASA RFI NNH11ZDA018L is shown as a table. The dark green indicates areas in which EPE can do the basic IXO science, and the light green areas where EPE can contribute but will not reach the full IXO capability. To address these science questions, EPE will trace orbits close to the event horizon of black holes, measure black hole spin in active galactic nuclei (AGN), use spectroscopy to characterize outflows and the environment of AGN, map bulk motions and turbulence in galaxy clusters, and observe the process of cosmic feedback where black holes inject energy on galactic and intergalactic scales. EPE gives up the high resolution imaging of IXO in return for lightweight, high TRL foil mirrors which will provide >20 times the effective area of ASTRO-H and similar spatial resolution, with a beam sufficient to study point sources and nearby galaxies and clusters. Advances in micro-calorimeters allow improved performance at high rates with twice the energy resolution of ASTRO-H. A lower TRL option would provide 200 times the area of ASTRO-H using a micro-channel plate optic (MCPO) and a deployable optical bench. Both options are in the middle range of RFI missions at between $600M and $1000M. The EPE foil optic has direct heritage to ASTRO-H, allowing robust cost estimates. The spacecraft is entirely off the shelf and introduces no difficult requirements. The mission could be started and launched in this decade to an L2 orbit, with a three-year lifetime and consumables for 5 years. While ASTRO-H will give us the first taste of high-resolution, non-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, it will be limited to small numbers of objects in many categories. EPE will give us the first statistically significant samples in each of these categories.

  7. Microrover Design for Extreme Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, R.; van Winnendael, M.

    2003-04-01

    With the emergence of ESA's BepiColombo cornerstone mission to the Planet Mercury, a new class of operational environment has become relevant for the design of planetary surface systems. In the past years, Mars was a primary focus for planetary landers, planetary mobility elements such as rovers or moles, and payload instruments. The typical environmental conditions were characterized by a temperature range between -120 and +20°C, low atmospheric pressure in the range of 7 hPa, and a dust/regolith environment. For a Mercury mission including a planetary landing, this situation can change dramatically, depending on the landing site and landing season. Local temperatures can be as low as -170°C in shadow or during night, and they can easily reach 200 to 250°C in sun light, even in temperate zones, e.g. at high latitudes of 85°. Such an environment is of course a particular challenge for both, the payload instruments and the accommodating microrobotic system. The strong limitation in size, mass, and power does not allow to apply classical, large sized passive thermal control mechanisms, or to implement active thermal control techniques with high power demand. The situation is even worse, if - as in the case of the BepiColombo Surface Element - the system is powered by primary batteries, resulting in a severe limitation of energy and on-surface life time. In the last years, the Nanokhod microrover has been developed to the state of an advanced laboratory model with the primary focus of an Mars mission application. For BepiColombo, Nanokhod became part of the lander's model payload. As a consequence, the related ESA technology development activity "Robotic Technology for Planetary Exploration" (RTPE) has been re-oriented towards a Mercury mission application. This paper presents the results of the RTPE activity in the context of an application of the Nanokhod microrover in an extreme environment. It describes the design approach, focusing on the thermal and

  8. Batch efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwickerath, Ulrich; Silva, Ricardo; Uria, Christian

    2010-04-01

    A frequent source of concern for resource providers is the efficient use of computing resources in their centers. This has a direct impact on requests for new resources. There are two different but strongly correlated aspects to be considered: while users are mostly interested in a good turn-around time for their jobs, resource providers are mostly interested in a high and efficient usage of their available resources. Both things, the box usage and the efficiency of individual user jobs, need to be closely monitored so that the sources of the inefficiencies can be identified. At CERN, the Lemon monitoring system is used for both purposes. Examples of such sources are poorly written user code, inefficient access to mass storage systems, and dedication of resources to specific user groups. As a first step for improvements CERN has launched a project to develop a scheduler add-on that allows careful overloading of worker nodes that run idle jobs.

  9. Measuring Ionization at Extreme Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Dominik; Doeppner, Tilo; Kritcher, Andrea; Bachmann, Benjamin; Fletcher, Luke; Falcone, Roger; Gericke, Dirk; Glenzer, Siegfried; Masters, Nathan; Nora, Ryan; Boehm, Kurt; Divol, Laurent; Landen, Otto; Yi, Austin; Kline, John; Redmer, Ronald; Neumayer, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A precise knowledge of ionization at given temperature and density is crucial in order to properly model compressibility and heat capacity of ICF ablator materials for efficient implosions producing energy gain. Here, we present a new experimental platform to perform spectrally resolved x-ray scattering measurements of ionization, density and temperature in imploding CH or beryllium capsules on the National Ignition Facility. Recording scattered x-rays at 9 keV from a zinc He-alpha plasma source at a scattering angle of 120 degrees, first experiments show strong sensitivity to k-shell ionization, while at the same time constraining density and temperature. This platform will allow for x-ray Thomson scattering studies of dense plasmas with free electron densities up to 1025 cm-3, giving the possibility to investigate effects of continuum lowering and Pauli blocking on the ablator ionization state right before stagnation of the implosion.

  10. Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemen, J. R.; Freeland, S. L.

    1997-01-01

    Efforts concentrated on development and implementation of the SolarSoft (SSW) data analysis system. From an EIT analysis perspective, this system was designed to facilitate efficient reuse and conversion of software developed for Yohkoh/SXT and to take advantage of a large existing body of software developed by the SDAC, Yohkoh, and SOHO instrument teams. Another strong motivation for this system was to provide an EIT analysis environment which permits coordinated analysis of EIT data in conjunction with data from important supporting instruments, including Yohkoh/SXT and the other SOHO coronal instruments; CDS, SUMER, and LASCO. In addition, the SSW system will support coordinated EIT/TRACE analysis (by design) when TRACE data is available; TRACE launch is currently planned for March 1998. Working with Jeff Newmark, the Chianti software package (K.P. Dere et al) and UV /EUV data base was fully integrated into the SSW system to facilitate EIT temperature and emission analysis.

  11. The Influence of Altering Push Force Effectiveness on Upper Extremity Demand during Wheelchair Propulsion

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Jeffery W.; Kwarciak, Andrew M.; Richter, W. Mark; Neptune, Richard R.

    2010-01-01

    Manual wheelchair propulsion has been linked to a high incidence of overuse injury and pain in the upper extremity, which may be caused by the high load requirements and low mechanical efficiency of the task. Previous studies have suggested that poor mechanical efficiency may be due to a low effective handrim force (i.e. applied force that is not directed tangential to the handrim). As a result, studies attempting to reduce upper extremity demand have used various measures of force effectiveness (e.g. fraction effective force, FEF) as a guide for modifying propulsion technique, developing rehabilitation programs and configuring wheelchairs. However, the relationship between FEF and upper extremity demand is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to use forward dynamics simulations of wheelchair propulsion to determine the influence of FEF on upper extremity demand by quantifying individual muscle stress, work and handrim force contributions at different values of FEF. Simulations maximizing and minimizing FEF resulted in higher average muscle stresses (23% and 112%) and total muscle work (28% and 71%) compared to a nominal FEF simulation. The maximal FEF simulation also shifted muscle use from muscles crossing the elbow to those at the shoulder (e.g. rotator cuff muscles), placing greater demand on shoulder muscles during propulsion. The optimal FEF value appears to represent a balance between increasing push force effectiveness to increase mechanical efficiency and minimizing upper extremity demand. Thus, care should be taken in using force effectiveness as a metric to reduce upper extremity demand. PMID:20674921

  12. Climate extremes and the carbon cycle (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichstein, M.; Bahn, M.; Ciais, P.; Mahecha, M. D.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Zscheischler, J.

    2013-12-01

    The terrestrial biosphere is a key component of the global carbon cycle and its carbon balance is strongly influenced by climate. Ongoing environmental changes are thought to increase global terrestrial carbon uptake. But evidence is mounting that rare climate extremes can lead to a decrease in ecosystem carbon stocks and therefore have the potential to negate the expected increase in terrestrial carbon uptake. Here we explore the mechanisms and impacts of climate extremes on the terrestrial carbon cycle, and propose a pathway to improve our understanding of present and future impacts of climate extremes on the terrestrial carbon budget. In addition to direct impact on the carbon fluxes of photosynthesis and respiration via extreme temperature and (or) drought, effects of extreme events may also lead to lagged responses, such as wildfires triggered by heat waves and droughts, or pest and pathogen outbreaks following wind-throw caused by heavy storms, reduced plant health due to drought stress or due to less frequent cold extremes in presently cold regions. One extreme event can potentially override accumulated previous carbon sinks, as shown by the Western European 2003 heat wave.. Extreme events have the potential to affect the terrestrial ecosystem carbon balance through a single factor, or as a combination of factors. Climate extremes can cause carbon losses from accumulated stocks, as well as long-lasting impacts on (e.g. lagged effects) on plant growth and mortality, extending beyond the duration of the extreme event itself. The sensitivity of terrestrial ecosystems and their carbon balance to climate change and extreme events varies according to the type of extreme, the climatic region, the land cover, and the land management. Extreme event impacts are very relevant in forests due to the importance of lagged and memory effects on tree growth and mortality, the longevity of tree species, the large forest carbon stocks and their vulnerability, as well as the

  13. High resolution modelling of extreme precipitation events in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemerink, Martijn; Volp, Nicolette; Schuurmans, Wytze; Deckers, Dave

    2015-04-01

    The present day society needs to adjust to the effects of climate change. More extreme weather conditions are expected, which can lead to longer periods of drought, but also to more extreme precipitation events. Urban water systems are not designed for such extreme events. Most sewer systems are not able to drain the excessive storm water, causing urban flooding. This leads to high economic damage. In order to take appropriate measures against extreme urban storms, detailed knowledge about the behaviour of the urban water system above and below the streets is required. To investigate the behaviour of urban water systems during extreme precipitation events new assessment tools are necessary. These tools should provide a detailed and integral description of the flow in the full domain of overland runoff, sewer flow, surface water flow and groundwater flow. We developed a new assessment tool, called 3Di, which provides detailed insight in the urban water system. This tool is based on a new numerical methodology that can accurately deal with the interaction between overland runoff, sewer flow and surface water flow. A one-dimensional model for the sewer system and open channel flow is fully coupled to a two-dimensional depth-averaged model that simulates the overland flow. The tool uses a subgrid-based approach in order to take high resolution information of the sewer system and of the terrain into account [1, 2]. The combination of using the high resolution information and the subgrid based approach results in an accurate and efficient modelling tool. It is now possible to simulate entire urban water systems using extreme high resolution (0.5m x 0.5m) terrain data in combination with a detailed sewer and surface water network representation. The new tool has been tested in several Dutch cities, such as Rotterdam, Amsterdam and The Hague. We will present the results of an extreme precipitation event in the city of Schiedam (The Netherlands). This city deals with

  14. Extreme Learning Machine for Multilayer Perceptron.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiexiong; Deng, Chenwei; Huang, Guang-Bin

    2016-04-01

    Extreme learning machine (ELM) is an emerging learning algorithm for the generalized single hidden layer feedforward neural networks, of which the hidden node parameters are randomly generated and the output weights are analytically computed. However, due to its shallow architecture, feature learning using ELM may not be effective for natural signals (e.g., images/videos), even with a large number of hidden nodes. To address this issue, in this paper, a new ELM-based hierarchical learning framework is proposed for multilayer perceptron. The proposed architecture is divided into two main components: 1) self-taught feature extraction followed by supervised feature classification and 2) they are bridged by random initialized hidden weights. The novelties of this paper are as follows: 1) unsupervised multilayer encoding is conducted for feature extraction, and an ELM-based sparse autoencoder is developed via l1 constraint. By doing so, it achieves more compact and meaningful feature representations than the original ELM; 2) by exploiting the advantages of ELM random feature mapping, the hierarchically encoded outputs are randomly projected before final decision making, which leads to a better generalization with faster learning speed; and 3) unlike the greedy layerwise training of deep learning (DL), the hidden layers of the proposed framework are trained in a forward manner. Once the previous layer is established, the weights of the current layer are fixed without fine-tuning. Therefore, it has much better learning efficiency than the DL. Extensive experiments on various widely used classification data sets show that the proposed algorithm achieves better and faster convergence than the existing state-of-the-art hierarchical learning methods. Furthermore, multiple applications in computer vision further confirm the generality and capability of the proposed learning scheme. PMID:25966483

  15. Rapid canyon formation by extreme floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, M. P.; Mackey, B. H.; Lapotre, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    The formation of river gorges generally occurs over geomorphic timescales, with rates of river incision into bedrock infrequently exceeding millimeters per year. This is in contrast to relatively rare examples of bedrock canyons that have been cut in a matter of days or weeks by catastrophic floods. Here we report on several case studies of canyons inferred to have been cut by large magnitude, short-lived flood events. Canyon Lake Gorge, Texas, was cut ~ 10 m into jointed bedrock during a three-day historic flood event, illustrating that short lived floods can efficiently mobilize and transport large quantities of rock. New cosmogenic exposure dating of multiple features at Malad Gorge, Idaho, indicates that it was formed ~ 48 ka, equivalent to the age of Box Canyon located 18 km to the south, suggesting that flooding there was regional in scale. In all cases, we attribute extremely rapid canyon erosion (i.e., meters per day) to the dominance of plucking and toppling of jointed rock rather than the relatively slow process of fluvial abrasion. Large magnitude flows are inferred from the threshold required to topple blocks and transport boulders. The lack of upstream drainage-network development and the lack of fluvial abrasion features indicate the floods must have been short-lived. Canyons cut into plateau terrain by large magnitude, short duration floods appear to have distinctive morphologies including steep canyon headwalls with semi-circular planforms, suggesting flow focusing and toppling at the headwall, despite the largely flat initial topography. In contrast, neighboring canyons undergoing active fluvial abrasion tend to show potholes, polished and fluted rock, headwalls that are pointed in planform, and more gradual knickzones extending into well-developed drainage networks upstream. Modeling suggests that the rate of canyon cutting by large-scale floods in jointed rock may be limited only by the sediment transport capacity of the flow.

  16. Efficiency Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Donald

    2009-01-01

    The lighting of learning environments is an important focus in designing new schools and renovating older schools. Studies long have shown that appropriate lighting levels and daylighting improve learning; now, climbing energy budgets have spurred school administrators to seek more efficient use of lighting. Electricity rates are expected to rise…

  17. Operational efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, Dan; Davis, Tom; Griffin, Sandy

    1990-01-01

    Space transportation avionics technology operational efficiency issues are presented in viewgraph form. Information is given on ascent flight design, autonomous spacecraft control, operations management systems, advanced mission control, telerobotics/telepresence, advanced software integration, advanced test/checkout systems, advanced training systems, and systems monitoring.

  18. Interferometry in the Extreme Ultraviolet and X-Ray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, W.; Shipley, A.; Osterman, S.; Joy, M. K.

    2000-01-01

    We report on demonstration of an x-ray interferometer that uses plane mirrors at grazing incidence to create interference fringes in the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray portions of the spectrum. X-ray interferometry has historically been implemented through narrow band, diffractive systems that split the wavefront. Our system, by using two separate optical channels to create interference from two areas of the wavefront, has broad band response and much higher efficiency. We discuss some applications of this technique to astronomy and microscopy including the possibility of eventually capturing a micro-arcsecond image of a black hole.

  19. Chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide mirrors for extreme ultraviolet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Osantowski, John F.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Saha, Timo T.; Wright, Geraldine A.; Boucarut, Rene A.; Fleetwood, Charles M.; Madison, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in optical coating and materials technology have made possible the development of instruments with substantially improved efficiency in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). For example, the development of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) SiC mirrors provides an opportunity to extend the range of normal-incidence instruments dow to 60 nm. CVD SiC is a highly polishable material yielding low- scattering surfaces. High UV reflectivity and desirable mechanical and thermal properties make CVD SiC an attractive mirror and/or coating material for EUV applications. The EUV performance of SiC mirrors, as well as some strengths and problem areas, is discussed.

  20. Keeping Cool in Extreme Heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Through a partnership with Unitika Ltd., NASA's Langley Research Center created a foam based on high temperature resistant polyimide chemistry. Licensed non-exclusively to SORDAL, Inc., the low-density foam, named TEEK, can be processed into forms or used to fill structures such as honeycomb. TEEK offers superior insulation and support qualities, with heat and flame resistance abilities.TEEK is a practical selection for hull insulation in the shipbuilding industry, with numerous potential applications in aerospace applications, fire-resistant construction materials, and a wide range of consumer products that will improve safety and energy efficiency. Other opportunities are available in the areas of automotive coatings and sealants, electrical components, and recreational equipment. SORDAL has introduced its new product in several different forms, under the name "SOLREX". The company is developing a new product called SORDAL Paper(TM) that will be used in conjunction with the polyimide foam to offer thermal protection in various products, such as fire resistant garments and prosthetics.

  1. Comparison of line x-ray emission from solid and porous nano-layer coated targets irradiated by double laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Fazeli, R.; Mahdieh, M. H.

    2015-11-15

    Enhancement of line x-ray emission from both solid and porous iron targets induced by irradiation of single and double laser pulses is studied numerically. The line emission from laser produced plasma is calculated within the extreme ultra-violet lithography wavelength range of 13.5–13.7 nm. The effects of pre-pulse intensity and delay time between two pulses (pre-pulse and main pulse) are examined. The results show that using double pulses irradiation in the conditions of porous target can reduce the x-ray enhancement. According to the results, the use of both pre-pulse and porous target leads to efficient absorption of the laser energy. Calculations also show that such enhanced laser absorption can ionize atoms of the target material to very high degrees of ionization, leading to decrease of the density of appropriate ions that are responsible for line emission in the selected wavelength region. By increasing the target porosity, x-ray yield was more reduced.

  2. Delayed light emission of Tetraphenyl-butadiene excited by liquid argon scintillation light. Current status and future plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segreto, E.; Machado, A. A.; Araujo, W.; Teixeira, V.

    2016-02-01

    Tetraphenyl-butadiene is the wavelength shifter most widely used in combination with liquid argon. The latter emits scintillation photons with a wavelength of 127 nm that need to be downshifted to be detected by photomultipliers with glass or quartz windows. Tetraphenyl-butadiene has been demonstrated to have an extremely high conversion efficiency, possibly higher than 100% for 127 nm photons, while there is no precise information about the time dependence of its emission. It is usually assumed to be exponentially decaying with a characteristic time of the order of one ns, as an extrapolation from measurements with exciting radiation in the near UV . This work shows that tetraphenyl-butadiene, when excited by 127 nm photons, re-emits photons not only with a very short decay time, but also with slower ones due to triplet states de-excitations. This fact can strongly contribute to clarifying the anomalies in liquid-argon scintillation light reported in the literature since the 1970s. Precision measurements of the properties of TPB, when excited by Vacuum Ultra Violet photons are being carried on at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory in Campinas (State of São Paulo).

  3. Fano-noise-limited CCDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janesick, James; Elliott, Tom; Bredthauer, Richard; Chandler, Charles; Burke, Barry

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments of scientific CCDs have produced sensors that achieve ultra low read noise performance (less than 2 electrons rms) and near perfect charge transfer efficiency (0.9999996) without the addition of a fat-zero. This progress has now made it possible to achieve Fano-noise-limited performance in the soft X-ray where the detector's energy resolution is primarily limited by the statistical variation in the charge generated by the interacting X-ray photon. In this paper, Fano-noise-limited test data is presented for two different CCD types and a CCD derived estimate of the Fano factor is determined. By evaluating ultra low-modulation images (less than 1 electron peak-to-peak) it is shown that the CCD's global CTE is now superior to its read noise floor. To capitalize on this capability CCD manufacturers are now focusing their attention on reducing the noise floor below the 1 electron level thereby matching the sensor's CTE performance. This improvement, if accomplished, will push Fano-noise-limited performance for the CCD into the extreme ultra-violet.

  4. Quasinormal modes of extremal black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richartz, Maurício

    2016-03-01

    The continued fraction method (also known as Leaver's method) is one of the most effective techniques used to determine the quasinormal modes of a black hole. For extremal black holes, however, the method does not work (since, in such a case, the event horizon is an irregular singular point of the associated wave equation). Fortunately, there exists a modified version of the method, devised by Onozawa et al. [Phys. Rev. D 53, 7033 (1996)], which works for neutral massless fields around an extremal Reissner-Nordström black hole. In this paper, we generalize the ideas of Onozawa et al. to charged massless perturbations around an extremal Reissner-Nordström black hole and to neutral massless perturbations around an extremal Kerr black hole. In particular, the existence of damped modes is analyzed in detail. Similarities and differences between the results of the original continued fraction method for near extremal black holes and the results of the new continued fraction method for extremal black holes are discussed. Mode stability of extremal black holes is also investigated.

  5. Extreme weather events and infectious disease outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    McMichael, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Human-driven climatic changes will fundamentally influence patterns of human health, including infectious disease clusters and epidemics following extreme weather events. Extreme weather events are projected to increase further with the advance of human-driven climate change. Both recent and historical experiences indicate that infectious disease outbreaks very often follow extreme weather events, as microbes, vectors and reservoir animal hosts exploit the disrupted social and environmental conditions of extreme weather events. This review article examines infectious disease risks associated with extreme weather events; it draws on recent experiences including Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and the 2010 Pakistan mega-floods, and historical examples from previous centuries of epidemics and ‘pestilence’ associated with extreme weather disasters and climatic changes. A fuller understanding of climatic change, the precursors and triggers of extreme weather events and health consequences is needed in order to anticipate and respond to the infectious disease risks associated with human-driven climate change. Post-event risks to human health can be constrained, nonetheless, by reducing background rates of persistent infection, preparatory action such as coordinated disease surveillance and vaccination coverage, and strengthened disaster response. In the face of changing climate and weather conditions, it is critically important to think in ecological terms about the determinants of health, disease and death in human populations. PMID:26168924

  6. Changes in Concurrent Precipitation and Temperature Extremes

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Zengchao; AghaKouchak, Amir; Phillips, Thomas J.

    2013-08-01

    While numerous studies have addressed changes in climate extremes, analyses of concurrence of climate extremes are scarce, and climate change effects on joint extremes are rarely considered. This study assesses the occurrence of joint (concurrent) monthly continental precipitation and temperature extremes in Climate Research Unit (CRU) and University of Delaware (UD) observations, and in 13 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) global climate simulations. Moreover, the joint occurrences of precipitation and temperature extremes simulated by CMIP5 climate models are compared with those derived from the CRU and UD observations for warm/wet, warm/dry, cold/wet, and cold/dry combinations of joint extremes. The number of occurrences of these four combinations during the second half of the 20th century (1951–2004) is assessed on a common global grid. CRU and UD observations show substantial increases in the occurrence of joint warm/dry and warm/wet combinations for the period 1978–2004 relative to 1951–1977. The results show that with respect to the sign of change in the concurrent extremes, the CMIP5 climate model simulations are in reasonable overall agreement with observations. The results reveal notable discrepancies between regional patterns and the magnitude of change in individual climate model simulations relative to the observations of precipitation and temperature.

  7. Threshold modeling of extreme spatial rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibaud, E.; Davison, A.

    2013-12-01

    Complex events such as sustained extreme precipitation have major effects on human populations and environmental sustainability, and there is a growing interest in modeling them realistically. For risk assessment based on spatial quantities such as the total amount of rainfall falling over a region, it is necessary to properly model the dependence among extremes over that region, based on data from perhaps only a few sites within it. We propose an approach to spatial modeling of extreme rainfall, based on max-stable processes fitted using partial duration series and a censored threshold likelihood function. The resulting models are coherent with classical extreme-value theory and allow the consistent treatment of spatial dependence of rainfall using ideas related to those of classical geostatistics. The method can be used to produce simulations needed for hydrological models, and in particular for the generation of spatially heterogeneous extreme rainfall fields over catchments. We illustrate the ideas through data from the Val Ferret watershed in the Swiss Alps, based on daily cumulative rainfall totals recorded at 24 stations for four summers, augmented by a longer series from nearby. References: Davison, A. C., Huser, R., Thibaud, E. (2013). Geostatistics of Dependent and Asymptotically Independent Extremes, Mathematical Geosciences, vol. 45, num. 5, p. 511-529, 2013, doi:10.1007/s11004-013-9469-y Thibaud, E., Mutzner, R., Davison A. C. (2013, to appear). Threshold modeling of extreme spatial rainfall, Water Resources Research, doi:10.1002/wrcr.20329

  8. Understanding hydrological extremes in the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mård, Johanna; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological extremes, from floods to droughts, pose one of the greatest challenges of the 21st century. Many of these challenges are associated with societal interactions with water, as people control or impact hydrological systems in a multitude of ways while they are also being affected and shaped by hydrological extremes, depending on their response to drought and flood events. However, the fact that the human and natural components of freshwater systems interact and co-evolve over time is often not taken into account. There is a need to study the two-way coupling between hydrology and society within a more comprehensive framework for hydrological extremes to anticipate future trajectories in a rapidly changing world. We present an interdisciplinary framework (and concepts) to identify internal controlling variables, processes and feedbacks, and the external system drivers and disturbances of the coupled human-water system with regard to hydrological extremes. To achieve this, the study (i) synthesizes existing research on coupled human-water system focusing on floods and droughts, (ii) analyzes hydrological extremes that have already occurred and their spatiotemporal patterns to investigate what patterns are observed in different regions of the world, and (iii) systematically describe the observed hydrological extremes, their causes and the interactions and feedbacks between hydrology and society. Advancing our understanding of mechanisms and feedbacks driving hydrological extremes is essential to better anticipate how the coupled human-water system will respond to future environmental change.

  9. Extreme weather events and infectious disease outbreaks.

    PubMed

    McMichael, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Human-driven climatic changes will fundamentally influence patterns of human health, including infectious disease clusters and epidemics following extreme weather events. Extreme weather events are projected to increase further with the advance of human-driven climate change. Both recent and historical experiences indicate that infectious disease outbreaks very often follow extreme weather events, as microbes, vectors and reservoir animal hosts exploit the disrupted social and environmental conditions of extreme weather events. This review article examines infectious disease risks associated with extreme weather events; it draws on recent experiences including Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and the 2010 Pakistan mega-floods, and historical examples from previous centuries of epidemics and 'pestilence' associated with extreme weather disasters and climatic changes. A fuller understanding of climatic change, the precursors and triggers of extreme weather events and health consequences is needed in order to anticipate and respond to the infectious disease risks associated with human-driven climate change. Post-event risks to human health can be constrained, nonetheless, by reducing background rates of persistent infection, preparatory action such as coordinated disease surveillance and vaccination coverage, and strengthened disaster response. In the face of changing climate and weather conditions, it is critically important to think in ecological terms about the determinants of health, disease and death in human populations. PMID:26168924

  10. Changes in Concurrent Precipitation and Temperature Extremes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hao, Zengchao; AghaKouchak, Amir; Phillips, Thomas J.

    2013-08-01

    While numerous studies have addressed changes in climate extremes, analyses of concurrence of climate extremes are scarce, and climate change effects on joint extremes are rarely considered. This study assesses the occurrence of joint (concurrent) monthly continental precipitation and temperature extremes in Climate Research Unit (CRU) and University of Delaware (UD) observations, and in 13 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) global climate simulations. Moreover, the joint occurrences of precipitation and temperature extremes simulated by CMIP5 climate models are compared with those derived from the CRU and UD observations for warm/wet, warm/dry, cold/wet, and cold/dry combinations of joint extremes.more » The number of occurrences of these four combinations during the second half of the 20th century (1951–2004) is assessed on a common global grid. CRU and UD observations show substantial increases in the occurrence of joint warm/dry and warm/wet combinations for the period 1978–2004 relative to 1951–1977. The results show that with respect to the sign of change in the concurrent extremes, the CMIP5 climate model simulations are in reasonable overall agreement with observations. The results reveal notable discrepancies between regional patterns and the magnitude of change in individual climate model simulations relative to the observations of precipitation and temperature.« less

  11. Fault Tolerant Magnetic Bearing Testing and Conical Magnetic Bearing Development for Extreme Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Clark, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    During the six month tenure of the grant, activities included continued research of hydrostatic bearings as a viable backup-bearing solution for a magnetically levitated shaft system in extreme temperature environments (1000 F), developmental upgrades of the fault-tolerant magnetic bearing rig at the NASA Glenn Research Center, and assisting in the development of a conical magnetic bearing for extreme temperature environments, particularly turbomachinery. It leveraged work from the ongoing Smart Efficient Components (SEC) and the Turbine-Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) program at NASA Glenn Research Center. The effort was useful in providing technology for more efficient and powerful gas turbine engines.

  12. Route to extreme events in excitable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnatak, Rajat; Ansmann, Gerrit; Feudel, Ulrike; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2014-08-01

    Systems of FitzHugh-Nagumo units with different coupling topologies are capable of self-generating and -terminating strong deviations from their regular dynamics that can be regarded as extreme events due to their rareness and recurrent occurrence. Here we demonstrate the crucial role of an interior crisis in the emergence of extreme events. In parameter space we identify this interior crisis as the organizing center of the dynamics by employing concepts of mixed-mode oscillations and of leaking chaotic systems. We find that extreme events occur in certain regions in parameter space, and we show the robustness of this phenomenon with respect to the system size.

  13. Computed Tomography Angiography of the Lower Extremities.

    PubMed

    Cook, Tessa Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    CT angiography (CTA) of the lower extremities is an important and versatile, noninvasive tool for diagnosis as well as surgical or endovascular interventional planning. Although lower extremity CTA is most commonly performed in patients with peripheral artery disease or trauma affecting the lower extremities, it also plays a role in the workup of nonischemic etiologies such as vasculitis, aneurysms, and congenital vascular malformations. CT scan protocols should adjust bolus timing and multiphasic imaging to account for the clinical question of interest, and 3-dimensional postprocessing plays an important role in the visualization and interpretation of these high-resolution imaging examinations. PMID:26654395

  14. How to assess extreme weather impacts - case European transport network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leviäkangas, P.

    2010-09-01

    To assess the impacts of climate change and preparing for impacts is a process. This process we must understand and learn to apply. EWENT (Extreme Weather impacts on European Networks of Transport) will be a test bench for one prospective approach. It has the following main components: 1) identifying what is "extreme", 2) assessing the change in the probabilities, 3) constructing the causal impact models, 4) finding appropriate methods of pricing and costing, 5) finding alternative strategy option, 6) assessing the efficiency of strategy option. This process follows actually the steps of standardized risk management process. Each step is challenging, but if EWENT project succeeds to assess the extreme weather impacts on European transport networks, it is one possible benchmark how to carry out similar analyses in other regions and on country level. EWENT approach could particularly useful for weather and climate information service providers, offering tools for transport authorities and financiers to assess weather risks, and then rationally managing the risks. EWENT project is financed by the European Commission and participated by met-service organisations and transport research institutes from different parts of Europe. The presentation will explain EWENT approach in detail and bring forth the findings of the first work packages.

  15. Magnetic Reconnection in Extreme Astrophysical Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri

    -positron pairs. The pairs make the reconnection layer optically thick, efficiently trapping gamma-ray photons and ensuring a local thermodynamic equilibrium between the radiation and the plasma. The plasma pressure inside the layer is then dominated by the radiation and pair pressure. At the same time, the timescale for radiation diffusion across the layer may still be much shorter than the global Alfven transit time along the layer, and hence the effects of radiative cooling on the thermodynamics of the layer need to be taken into account. In other words, the reconnection problem in this regime necessarily becomes a radiative transfer problem. In addition, the extremely high pair density, set by the local ther-modynamic equilibrium essentially independently of the upstream plasma density, can make the reconnection layer highly collisional, thereby justifying the use of resistive MHD (with Spitzer and Compton resistivities). The presence of all these processes calls for a substantial revision of our traditional physical picture of reconnection when applied to these environments. I will de-scribe how the corresponding new theory of reconnection of magnetar-strength magnetic fields ought to be constructed and will conclude by discussing its observational consequences and the prospects for future research.

  16. Golf injuries of the upper extremity.

    PubMed

    Wiesler, Ethan R; Lumsden, Boyd

    2005-01-01

    Golf has demonstrated increasing popularity and with this heightened enthusiasm has come an increased awareness of the significant number of injuries associated with playing golf. While back injuries represent the most commonly injured specific body part, upper extremity injuries are most frequent overall and the most likely to result in loss of play. Patterns of injury differ based on level of play and time spent playing or practicing golf. Among golf professionals, the hand/wrist is the most commonly injured upper extremity structure. Among amateurs, the elbow is most commonly injured. The vast majority of upper extremity injuries are due to overuse. Age, ability, equipment, and swing mechanics also play contributing roles. Most upper extremity golf injuries can be successfully treated with appropriate cessation or modification of play, anti-inflammatory modalities, and rehabilitation. Surgical treatment is rarely required, but if needed can prove successful in a high percentage of patients. PMID:15766435

  17. Controlling extreme events on complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Extreme events, a type of collective behavior in complex networked dynamical systems, often can have catastrophic consequences. To develop effective strategies to control extreme events is of fundamental importance and practical interest. Utilizing transportation dynamics on complex networks as a prototypical setting, we find that making the network “mobile” can effectively suppress extreme events. A striking, resonance-like phenomenon is uncovered, where an optimal degree of mobility exists for which the probability of extreme events is minimized. We derive an analytic theory to understand the mechanism of control at a detailed and quantitative level, and validate the theory numerically. Implications of our finding to current areas such as cybersecurity are discussed. PMID:25131344

  18. Controlling extreme events on complex networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Extreme events, a type of collective behavior in complex networked dynamical systems, often can have catastrophic consequences. To develop effective strategies to control extreme events is of fundamental importance and practical interest. Utilizing transportation dynamics on complex networks as a prototypical setting, we find that making the network "mobile" can effectively suppress extreme events. A striking, resonance-like phenomenon is uncovered, where an optimal degree of mobility exists for which the probability of extreme events is minimized. We derive an analytic theory to understand the mechanism of control at a detailed and quantitative level, and validate the theory numerically. Implications of our finding to current areas such as cybersecurity are discussed. PMID:25131344

  19. NASA Measures Extreme Precipitation From Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    From Jan. 25 through Feb. 3, IMERG data estimated that the most extreme precipitation over the United States during this period was over 200mm (7.9 inches) in an area where stormy weather frequentl...

  20. Forecaster's dilemma: Extreme events and forecast evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerch, Sebastian; Thorarinsdottir, Thordis; Ravazzolo, Francesco; Gneiting, Tilmann

    2015-04-01

    In discussions of the quality of forecasts in the media and public, attention often focuses on the predictive performance in the case of extreme events. Intuitively, accurate predictions on the subset of extreme events seem to suggest better predictive ability. However, it can be demonstrated that restricting conventional forecast verification methods to subsets of observations might have unexpected and undesired effects and may discredit even the most skillful forecasters. Hand-picking extreme events is incompatible with the theoretical assumptions of established forecast verification methods, thus confronting forecasters with what we refer to as the forecaster's dilemma. For probabilistic forecasts, weighted proper scoring rules provide suitable alternatives for forecast evaluation with an emphasis on extreme events. Using theoretical arguments, simulation experiments and a case study on probabilistic forecasts of wind speed over Germany, we illustrate the forecaster's dilemma and the use of weighted proper scoring rules.

  1. Astronomy and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, S.

    1994-01-01

    The extreme ultraviolet wave band (100 to 912 angstroms) was thought until recently to be useless to astronomy, primarily because the opacity of the interstellar medium would prevent observations at these wavelengths. However, the interstellar medium has been found to be markedly inhomogeneous in both density and ionization state and the sun is fortunately located in a region of low extreme ultraviolet opacity. The Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer, launched in June 1992, has surveyed the sky in this wave band and has detected a wide variety of astronomical sources at considerable distances, including some extragalactic objects. Studies in the extreme ultraviolet band have already begun to increase our understanding of the contents of the universe.

  2. Laboratory Investigations of the Extreme Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pisin

    2003-08-06

    Recent years have seen tremendous progress in our understanding of the extreme universe, which in turn points to even deeper questions to be further addressed. History has shown that the symbiosis between direct observations and laboratory investigation is instrumental in the progress of astrophysics. Current frontier astrophysical phenomena related to particle astrophysics and cosmology typically involve one or more of the following conditions: (1) extremely high energy events; (2) very high density, high temperature processes; (3) super strong field environments. Laboratory experiments using high intensity lasers and particle beams can calibrate astrophysical observation or detection processes, investigate the underlying dynamics of astrophysical phenomena, and probe into fundamental physics in extreme limits. We give examples of possible laboratory experiments that investigate into the extreme universe.

  3. Hidden conformal symmetry of extremal black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bin; Long Jiang; Zhang Jiaju

    2010-11-15

    We study the hidden conformal symmetry of extremal black holes. We introduce a new set of conformal coordinates to write the SL(2,R) generators. We find that the Laplacian of the scalar field in many extremal black holes, including Kerr(-Newman), Reissner-Nordstrom, warped AdS{sub 3}, and null warped black holes, could be written in terms of the SL(2,R) quadratic Casimir. This suggests that there exist dual conformal field theory (CFT) descriptions of these black holes. From the conformal coordinates, the temperatures of the dual CFTs could be read directly. For the extremal black hole, the Hawking temperature is vanishing. Correspondingly, only the left (right) temperature of the dual CFT is nonvanishing, and the excitations of the other sector are suppressed. In the probe limit, we compute the scattering amplitudes of the scalar off the extremal black holes and find perfect agreement with the CFT prediction.

  4. Extreme space weather studies: Addressing societal needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwira, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme space weather events can adversely impact the operations of critical modern-day technological infrastructure such as high-voltage electric power transmission grids. Understanding of coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere dynamics under extreme solar wind driving conditions is still a major challenge mainly because of a lack of data during such time intervals. This presentation will highlight some of the past and on-going investigations on extreme space weather events, and how these investigations are used to address societal needs. Particularly, I will describe how first principles physics-based 3-D global MHD models are playing a major role in advancing our knowledge on extreme geomagnetically induced currents. These MHD models represent a very important component of attempts to understand the response of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system to varying solar wind conditions.

  5. Characteristics of Extreme Auroral Charging Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Willis, Emily; Parker, Linda Neergaard

    2014-01-01

    Today’s presentation describes preliminary results from a study of extreme auroral charging in low Earth orbit. Goal of study is to document characteristics of auroral charging events of importance to spacecraft design, operations, and anomaly investigations.

  6. Extremal dynamics and punctuated co-evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneppen, Kim

    1995-02-01

    Extremal dynamics opens up a new way for understanding the coherence that is observed in some large non-equilibrium systems. Extremal dynamics is characterized by quasistatic motion where only one part of the large system is active at a given instant: the part where a local variable assumes a global extremum value. Extremal dynamics may apply when the parts of the system nearly always are caught in metastable states. Examples from physics may include earthquakes, fluid invasion in porous media and possibly also dynamical roughening of interfaces. We discuss a simple model of extremal dynamics and its application to biological macroevolution. The model can be formulated as an ecology of adapting interacting species. The environment of any given species is affected by other species; hence it may change with time. For low mutation rate the model ecology expands at a self-organized critical state where periods of statis alternate with avalanches of evolutionary changes.

  7. Nonstationary risk analysis of climate extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez-Demoulin, V.; Davison, A. C.; Suveges, M.

    2009-04-01

    There is growing interest in the modelling of the size and frequency of rare events in a changing climate. Standard models for extreme events are based on the modelling of annual maxima or exceedances over high or under low thresholds: in either case appropriate probability distributions are fitted to the data, and extrapolation to rare events is based on the fitted models. Very often, however, extremal models do not take full advantage of techniques that are standard in other domains of statistics. Smoothing methods are now well-established in many domains of statistics, and are increasingly used in analysis of extremal data. The crucial idea of smoothing is to replace a simple linear or quadratic form of dependence of one variable on another by a more flexible form, and thus to 'allow the data to speak for themselves,ánd thus, perhaps, to reveal unexpected features. There are many approaches to smoothing in the context of linear regression, of which the use of spline smoothing and of local polynomial modelling are perhaps the most common. Under the first, a basis of spline functions is used to represent the dependence; often this is called generalised additive modelling. Under the second, polynomial models are fitted locally to the data, resulting in a more flexible overall fit. The selection of the degree of smoothing is crucial, and there are automatic ways to do this. The talk will describe some applications of smoothing to data on temperature extremes, elucidating the relation between cold winter weather in the Alps and the North Atlantic Oscillation, and changes in the lengths of usually hot and cold spells in Britain. The work mixes classical models for extremes, generalised additive modelling, local polynomial smoothing, and the bootstrap. References Chavez-Demoulin, V. and Davison, A. C. (2005) Generalized additive modelling of sample extremes. Applied Statistics, 54, 207-222. Süveges, M. (2007) Likelihood estimation of the extremal index. Extremes, 10

  8. A Millennial Challenge: Extremism in Uncertain Times

    PubMed Central

    Fiske, Susan T.

    2014-01-01

    This comment highlights the relevance and importance of the uncertainty-extremism topic, both scientifically and societally, identifies common themes, locates this work in a wider scientific and social context, describes what we now know and what we still do not, acknowledges some limitations, foreshadowing future directions, and discusses some potential policy relevance. Common themes emerge around the importance of social justice as sound anti-extremism policy. PMID:24511155

  9. Anaerobic Life at Extremely High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetter, Karl O.

    1984-12-01

    Continental and submarine solfataric fields turned out to contain various extremely thermophilic anaerobic organisms which all belong to the archaebacteria. They are living autotrophically on sulphur, hydrogen and CO2 or by methanogenesis or heterotrophically on different organic substrates by sulphur respiration or, less frequently, by fermentation. The most extremely thermophilic isolates are growing between 80 and 110°C with an optimum around 105°C.

  10. Preconditioned iterations to calculate extreme eigenvalues

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, C.W.; Petrova, S.

    1994-12-31

    Common iterative algorithms to calculate a few extreme eigenvalues of a large, sparse matrix are Lanczos methods or power iterations. They converge at a rate proportional to the separation of the extreme eigenvalues from the rest of the spectrum. Appropriate preconditioning improves the separation of the eigenvalues. Davidson`s method and its generalizations exploit this fact. The authors examine a preconditioned iteration that resembles a truncated version of Davidson`s method with a different preconditioning strategy.

  11. Hydrometeorological signatures of global extreme precipitation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Efrat; Kushnir, Yochanan

    2015-04-01

    Extreme precipitation events are one of the main causes of flooding, a global phenomenon with high ecological and societal impact. The current research is aimed on characterizing space-time features and weather patterns of global extreme precipitation events and on identifying the most influential parameters controlling the generation of floods from these events. This is an on-going research and results of the first part will be presented. We use the term "global extreme precipitation event" to refer to an event producing high precipitation amounts over large areas, with a scale in the order of tens of kilometers, and with a typical time interval of 1 day; further, such events have a low frequency of occurrence in the region in which they are observed. The presented analysis is based on precipitation estimates from the GPCP dataset and on atmospheric data from the ERA-Interim database. A procedure for detecting extreme events was developed and applied for a 15 years record (1997-2012). Spatial-temporal features, surface characteristics and parameters characterizing the atmospheric environment were computed for all the extreme events. Examination of the extreme events according to their seasonal and spatial distribution reveals clustering around cores that follow general circulation systems (e.g., northern and southern winter storm tracks, ITCZ, the Monsoon and others). Moreover, some unique features of these extreme cores are revealed by analyzing their sea vs. land location, comparing southern and northern hemisphere cores and others. The unique meteorological characteristics of extreme event clusters are identified using standard and centered composite analyses. The main finding of this ongoing research will be presented.

  12. Extreme waves at Filyos, southern Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilyay, E.; Ozbahceci, B. O.; Yalciner, A. C.

    2011-03-01

    A wave measurement project was carried out for a new port planned in Filyos, in the Western Black Sea region of Turkey. The measurement at a depth of 12.5 m lasted for a period of two years and 7949 records were obtained. During the analysis, it was noticed that there were 209 records in which H/Hs ratio was higher than 2.0. These higher waves in a record are called extreme waves in this study. Although the purpose of wave measurement is not to investigate extreme waves, it is believed that studying these unexpected waves could be interesting. Therefore, detailed statistical and spectral analyses on the extreme waves were done for the records. The analyses results show that the distribution of surface profiles of the records containing extreme waves deviates from Gaussian distribution with the negative skewness changing between -0.01 and -0.4 and with the high kurtosis in the range of 3.1-4.2. Although the probability of occurrence of the extreme waves is over-predicted by the Rayleigh distribution, a higher ratio of Hs/ηrms indicates that the wave height distribution can be represented by Rayleigh. The average value of the slope of the frequency spectrum at the high frequency range is proportional to f-9 which is much steeper than the typical wind-wave frequency power law, f-4, -5. The directional spreading is measured with the parameter Smax and it is in the range of 5-70 for the extreme wave records. The wave and current interaction was also investigated and it was found that in most cases, extreme waves occur when the wave and the current are almost aligned. Furthermore, it is observed that extreme waves appear within a group of high waves.

  13. Flexible diaphragm-extreme temperature usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerma, Guillermo (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A diaphragm suitable for extreme temperature usage, such as encountered in critical aerospace applications, is fabricated by a unique method, and of a unique combination of materials. The materials include multilayered lay-ups of diaphragm materials sandwiched between layers of bleeder fabrics. After being formed in the desired shape on a mold, they are vacuum sealed and then cured under pressure, in a heated autoclave. A bond capable of withstanding extreme temperatures are produced.

  14. Test fields cannot destroy extremal black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natário, José; Queimada, Leonel; Vicente, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    We prove that (possibly charged) test fields satisfying the null energy condition at the event horizon cannot overspin/overcharge extremal Kerr–Newman or Kerr–Newman–anti de Sitter black holes, that is, the weak cosmic censorship conjecture cannot be violated in the test field approximation. The argument relies on black hole thermodynamics (without assuming cosmic censorship), and does not depend on the precise nature of the fields. We also discuss generalizations of this result to other extremal black holes.

  15. A spatial hybrid approach for downscaling of extreme precipitation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechler, Aurélien; Vrac, Mathieu; Bel, Liliane

    2015-05-01

    For a few decades, climate models are used to provide future scenarios of precipitation with increasingly higher spatial resolution. However, this resolution is not yet sufficient to describe efficiently what happens at local scale. Dynamical and statistical methods of downscaling have been developed and allow us to make the link between two levels of resolution and enable us to get values at a local scale based on large-scale information from global or regional climate models. Nevertheless, both the extreme behavior and the spatial structures are not well described by these downscaling methods. We propose a two-step methodology, called spatial hybrid downscaling (SHD), to solve this problem. The first step consists in applying a univariate (i.e., one-dimensional) statistical downscaling to link the high- and low-resolution variables at some given locations. Once this 1d-link is performed, a conditional simulation algorithm of max-stable processes adapted to the extremal t process enables us to get conditional distributions of extreme precipitation at any point of the region. An application is performed on precipitation data in the south of France where extreme (Cevenol) events have major impacts (e.g., floods). Different versions of the SHD approach are tested. Most of them show particularly good results regarding univariate and multivariate criteria and overcome classical downscaling techniques tested in comparison. Furthermore, these conclusions are robust to the choice of the 1d-link functions tested and to the choice of the conditioning points to drive the conditional local-scale simulations performed by the SHD approach.

  16. Evaluating the extreme precipitation events using a mesoscale atmopshere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucel, I.; Onen, A.

    2012-04-01

    Evidence is showing that global warming or climate change has a direct influence on changes in precipitation and the hydrological cycle. Extreme weather events such as heavy rainfall and flooding are projected to become much more frequent as climate warms. Mesoscale atmospheric models coupled with land surface models provide efficient forecasts for meteorological events in high lead time and therefore they should be used for flood forecasting and warning issues as they provide more continuous monitoring of precipitation over large areas. This study examines the performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in producing the temporal and spatial characteristics of the number of extreme precipitation events observed in West Black Sea Region of Turkey. Extreme precipitation events usually resulted in flood conditions as an associated hydrologic response of the basin. The performance of the WRF system is further investigated by using the three dimensional variational (3D-VAR) data assimilation scheme within WRF. WRF performance with and without data assimilation at high spatial resolution (4 km) is evaluated by making comparison with gauge precipitation and satellite-estimated rainfall data from Multi Precipitation Estimates (MPE). WRF-derived precipitation showed capabilities in capturing the timing of the precipitation extremes and in some extent spatial distribution and magnitude of the heavy rainfall events. These precipitation characteristics are enhanced with the use of 3D-VAR scheme in WRF system. Data assimilation improved area-averaged precipitation forecasts by 9 percent and at some points there exists quantitative match in precipitation events, which are critical for hydrologic forecast application.

  17. Evaluating environmental joint extremes for the offshore industry using the conditional extremes model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewans, Kevin; Jonathan, Philip

    2014-02-01

    Understanding extreme ocean environments and their interaction with fixed and floating structures is critical for the design of offshore and coastal facilities. The joint effect of various ocean variables on extreme responses of offshore structures is fundamental in determining the design loads. For example, it is known that mean values of wave periods tend to increase with increasing storm intensity, and a floating system responds in a complex way to both variables. Specification of joint extremes in design criteria has often been somewhat ad hoc, being based on fairly arbitrary combinations of extremes of variables estimated independently. Such approaches are even outlined in design guidelines. Mathematically more consistent estimates of the joint occurrence of extreme environmental variables fall into two camps in the offshore industry - response-based and response-independent. Both are outlined here, with emphasis on response-independent methods, particularly those based on the conditional extremes model recently introduced by (Heffernan and Tawn, 2004), which has a solid theoretical motivation. We illustrate an application of the conditional extremes model to joint estimation of extreme storm peak significant wave height and peak period at a northern North Sea location, incorporating storm direction as a model covariate. We also discuss joint estimation of extreme current profiles with depth off the North West Shelf of Australia. Methods such as the conditional extremes model provide valuable additions to the metocean engineer's toolkit.

  18. What weather features produce extreme precipitation globally?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdy, Andrew; Catto, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Extreme precipitation (defined as above the 99th percentile) has been examined previously in relation to a number of different weather events. Such events include cyclones, fronts, and thunderstorms. However, previous studies have not examined various combinations of these weather events, which highlights the potential for an improved understanding of what causes extreme precipitation. Here we make use of objective cyclone and front identification methods and a global dataset of lightning strikes, to examine different combinations of cyclone, front and thunderstorm events to provide a comprehensive climatological examination of observed extreme precipitation events throughout the world. This method allows a number of novel concepts to be explored, with results showing that the highest risk of extreme precipitation occurs for a type of "triple storm" event characterised by the simultaneous occurrence of a cyclone, front and thunderstorm. The physical properties of the various different combinations of weather systems are examined in relation to the occurrence of extreme precipitation. The results presented here are intended to lead to better preparedness for the impacts of extreme precipitation throughout the world including in relation to disaster risk reduction.

  19. Acclimatization and tolerance to extreme altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    During the last ten years, two major experiments have elucidated the factors determining acclimatization and tolerance to extreme altitude (over 7000 m). These were the American Medical Research Expedition to Everest, and the low pressure chamber simulation, Operation Everest II. Extreme hyperventilation is one of the most important responses to extreme altitude. Its chief value is that it allows the climber to maintain an alveolar PO2 which keeps the arterial PO2 above dangerously low levels. Even so, there is evidence of residual impairment of central nervous system function after ascents to extreme altitude, and maximal oxygen consumption falls precipitously above 7000 m. The term 'acclimatization' is probably not appropriate for altitudes above 8000 m, because the body steadily deteriorates at these altitudes. Tolerance to extreme altitude is critically dependent on barometric pressure, and even seasonal changes in pressure probably affect climbing performance near the summit of Mt Everest. Supplementary oxygen always improves exercise tolerance at extreme altitudes, and rescue oxygen should be available on climbing expeditions to 8000 m peaks.

  20. Energetic Extremes in Aquatic Locomotion by Coral Reef Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Christopher J.; Johansen, Jacob L.; Steffensen, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Underwater locomotion is challenging due to the high friction and resistance imposed on a body moving through water and energy lost in the wake during undulatory propulsion. While aquatic organisms have evolved streamlined shapes to overcome such resistance, underwater locomotion has long been considered a costly exercise. Recent evidence for a range of swimming vertebrates, however, has suggested that flapping paired appendages around a rigid body may be an extremely efficient means of aquatic locomotion. Using intermittent flow-through respirometry, we found exceptional energetic performance in the Bluelined wrasse Stethojulis bandanensis, which maintains tuna-like optimum cruising speeds (up to 1 metre s−1) while using 40% less energy than expected for their body size. Displaying an exceptional aerobic scope (22-fold above resting), streamlined rigid-body posture, and wing-like fins that generate lift-based thrust, S. bandanensis literally flies underwater to efficiently maintain high optimum swimming speeds. Extreme energetic performance may be key to the colonization of highly variable environments, such as the wave-swept habitats where S. bandanensis and other wing-finned species tend to occur. Challenging preconceived notions of how best to power aquatic locomotion, biomimicry of such lift-based fin movements could yield dramatic reductions in the power needed to propel underwater vehicles at high speed. PMID:23326566

  1. Evaluation of Advanced COTS Passive Devices for Extreme Temperature Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dones, Keishla R.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic sensors and circuits are often exposed to extreme temperatures in many of NASA deep space and planetary surface exploration missions. Electronics capable of operation in harsh environments would be beneficial as they simplify overall system design, relax thermal management constraints, and meet operational requirements. For example, cryogenic operation of electronic parts will improve reliability, increase energy density, and extend the operational lifetimes of space-based electronic systems. Similarly, electronic parts that are able to withstand and operate efficiently in high temperature environments will negate the need for thermal control elements and their associated structures, thereby reducing system size and weight, enhancing its reliability, improving its efficiency, and reducing cost. Passive devices play a critical role in the design of almost all electronic circuitry. To address the needs of systems for extreme temperature operation, some of the advanced and most recently introduced commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) passive devices, which included resistors and capacitors, were examined for operation under a wide temperature regime. The types of resistors investigated included high temperature precision film, general purpose metal oxide, and wirewound.

  2. Energetic extremes in aquatic locomotion by coral reef fishes.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Christopher J; Johansen, Jacob L; Steffensen, John F

    2013-01-01

    Underwater locomotion is challenging due to the high friction and resistance imposed on a body moving through water and energy lost in the wake during undulatory propulsion. While aquatic organisms have evolved streamlined shapes to overcome such resistance, underwater locomotion has long been considered a costly exercise. Recent evidence for a range of swimming vertebrates, however, has suggested that flapping paired appendages around a rigid body may be an extremely efficient means of aquatic locomotion. Using intermittent flow-through respirometry, we found exceptional energetic performance in the Bluelined wrasse Stethojulis bandanensis, which maintains tuna-like optimum cruising speeds (up to 1 metre s(-1)) while using 40% less energy than expected for their body size. Displaying an exceptional aerobic scope (22-fold above resting), streamlined rigid-body posture, and wing-like fins that generate lift-based thrust, S. bandanensis literally flies underwater to efficiently maintain high optimum swimming speeds. Extreme energetic performance may be key to the colonization of highly variable environments, such as the wave-swept habitats where S. bandanensis and other wing-finned species tend to occur. Challenging preconceived notions of how best to power aquatic locomotion, biomimicry of such lift-based fin movements could yield dramatic reductions in the power needed to propel underwater vehicles at high speed. PMID:23326566

  3. Climate extremes in the Pacific: improving seasonal prediction of tropical cyclones and extreme ocean temperatures to improve resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshov, Y.; Jones, D.; Spillman, C. M.

    2012-04-01

    Climate change and climate extremes have a major impact on Australia and Pacific Island countries. Of particular concern are tropical cyclones and extreme ocean temperatures, the first being the most destructive events for terrestrial systems, while the latter has the potential to devastate ocean ecosystems through coral bleaching. As a practical response to climate change, under the Pacific-Australia Climate Change Science and Adaptation Planning program (PACCSAP), we are developing enhanced web-based information tools for providing seasonal forecasts for climatic extremes in the Western Pacific. Tropical cyclones are the most destructive weather systems that impact on coastal areas. Interannual variability in the intensity and distribution of tropical cyclones is large, and presently greater than any trends that are ascribable to climate change. In the warming environment, predicting tropical cyclone occurrence based on historical relationships, with predictors such as sea surface temperatures (SSTs) now frequently lying outside of the range of past variability meaning that it is not possible to find historical analogues for the seasonal conditions often faced by Pacific countries. Elevated SSTs are the primary trigger for mass coral bleaching events, which can lead to widespread damage and mortality on reef systems. Degraded coral reefs present many problems, including long-term loss of tourism and potential loss or degradation of fisheries. The monitoring and prediction of thermal stress events enables the support of a range of adaptive and management activities that could improve reef resilience to extreme conditions. Using the climate model POAMA (Predictive Ocean-Atmosphere Model for Australia), we aim to improve accuracy of seasonal forecasts of tropical cyclone activity and extreme SSTs for the regions of Western Pacific. Improved knowledge of extreme climatic events, with the assistance of tailored forecast tools, will help enhance the resilience and

  4. Neurodevelopmental problems and extremes in BMI

    PubMed Central

    Tajnia, Armin; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lundström, Sebastian; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Nilsson, Thomas; Råstam, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background. Over the last few decades, an increasing number of studies have suggested a connection between neurodevelopmental problems (NDPs) and body mass index (BMI). Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) both seem to carry an increased risk for developing extreme BMI. However, the results are inconsistent, and there have been only a few studies of the general population of children. Aims. We had three aims with the present study: (1) to define the prevalence of extreme (low or high) BMI in the group of children with ADHD and/or ASDs compared to the group of children without these NDPs; (2) to analyze whether extreme BMI is associated with the subdomains within the diagnostic categories of ADHD or ASD; and (3) to investigate the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to BMI in boys and girls at ages 9 and 12. Method. Parents of 9- or 12-year-old twins (n = 12,496) were interviewed using the Autism—Tics, ADHD and other Comorbidities (A-TAC) inventory as part of the Child and Adolescent Twin Study in Sweden (CATSS). Univariate and multivariate generalized estimated equation models were used to analyze associations between extremes in BMI and NDPs. Results. ADHD screen-positive cases followed BMI distributions similar to those of children without ADHD or ASD. Significant association was found between ADHD and BMI only among 12-year-old girls, where the inattention subdomain of ADHD was significantly associated with the high extreme BMI. ASD scores were associated with both the low and the high extremes of BMI. Compared to children without ADHD or ASD, the prevalence of ASD screen-positive cases was three times greater in the high extreme BMI group and double as much in the low extreme BMI group. Stereotyped and repetitive behaviors were significantly associated with high extreme BMIs. Conclusion. Children with ASD, with or without coexisting ADHD, are more prone to have low or high extreme BMIs than children

  5. Ongoing climatic extreme dynamics in Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordov, E. P.; Shulgina, T. M.; Okladnikov, I. G.; Titov, A. G.

    2013-12-01

    Ongoing global climate changes accompanied by the restructuring of global processes in the atmosphere and biosphere are strongly pronounced in the Northern Eurasia regions, especially in Siberia. Recent investigations indicate not only large changes in averaged climatic characteristics (Kabanov and Lykosov, 2006, IPCC, 2007; Groisman and Gutman, 2012), but more frequent occurrence and stronger impacts of climatic extremes are reported as well (Bulygina et al., 2007; IPCC, 2012: Climate Extremes, 2012; Oldenborh et al., 2013). This paper provides the results of daily temperature and precipitation extreme dynamics in Siberia for the last three decades (1979 - 2012). Their seasonal dynamics is assessed using 10th and 90th percentile-based threshold indices that characterize frequency, intensity and duration of climatic extremes. To obtain the geographical pattern of these variations with high spatial resolution, the sub-daily temperature data from ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis and daily precipitation amounts from APHRODITE JMA dataset were used. All extreme indices and linear trend coefficients have been calculated using web-GIS information-computational platform Climate (http://climate.scert.ru/) developed to support collaborative multidisciplinary investigations of regional climatic changes and their impacts (Gordov et al., 2012). Obtained results show that seasonal dynamics of daily temperature extremes is asymmetric for tails of cold and warm temperature extreme distributions. Namely, the intensity of warming during cold nights is higher than during warm nights, especially at high latitudes of Siberia. The similar dynamics is observed for cold and warm day-time temperatures. Slight summer cooling was observed in the central part of Siberia. It is associated with decrease in warm temperature extremes. In the southern Siberia in winter, we also observe some cooling mostly due to strengthening of the cold temperature extremes. Changes in daily precipitation extremes

  6. Projections of Climate Extremes in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastrandrea, M. D.; Tebaldi, C.; Snyder, C.; Schneider, S. H.

    2008-12-01

    In the next few decades, it is likely that California must face the challenge of coping with increased impacts from extreme events such as heatwaves, wildfires, droughts, and floods. Such events can cause significant damages, and are responsible for a large fraction of near-term climate-related impacts every year. Some extreme events have already very likely changed in frequency and intensity over the past several decades, and these changes are expected to continue with relatively small changes in average conditions. We synthesize existing research to characterize current understanding of the direct impacts of extreme events across sectors, as well as the interactions between sectors as they are affected by extreme events. We also produce new projections of changes in the frequency and intensity of extreme events in the future across climate models, emissions scenarios, and downscaling methods for producing regional climate information, for each county in California. We evaluate historical and projected changes for a suite of temperature and precipitation-based climate indicators, and we conduct a return level analysis to investigate projected changes in extreme temperatures. Finally, we include an analysis of the future likelihood of events similar in magnitude to specific historical events, such as the July 2006 heat wave. Consistent with other studies, we find significant increases in the frequency and magnitude of both maximum and minimum temperature extremes in many areas, with the magnitude of change dependent on the magnitude of projected emissions and overall temperature increase. For example, in many regions of California, at least a ten-fold increase in frequency is projected for extreme temperatures currently estimated to occur once every 100 years, even under a moderate emissions scenario (SRES B1). Under a higher emissions scenario (SRES A2), these temperatures are projected to occur close to annually in most regions. Also consistent with other studies

  7. The Pace of Perceivable Extreme Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, X.; Gan, T. Y.

    2015-12-01

    When will the signal of obvious changes in extreme climate emerge over climate variability (Time of Emergence, ToE) is a key question for planning and implementing measures to mitigate the potential impact of climate change to natural and human systems that are generally adapted to potential changes from current variability. We estimated ToEs for the magnitude, duration and frequency of global extreme climate represented by 24 extreme climate indices (16 for temperature and 8 for precipitation) with different thresholds of the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio based on projections of CMIP5 global climate models under RCP8.5 and RCP4.5 for the 21st century. The uncertainty of ToE is assessed by using 3 different methods to calculate S/N for each extreme index. Results show that ToEs of the projected extreme climate indices based on the RCP4.5 climate scenarios are generally projected to happen about 20 years later than that for the RCP8.5 climate scenarios. Under RCP8.5, the projected magnitude, duration and frequency of extreme temperature on Earth will all exceed 2 standard deviations by 2100, and the empirical 50th percentile of the global ToE for the frequency and magnitude of hot (cold) extreme are about 2040 and 2054 (2064 and 2054) for S/N > 2, respectively. The 50th percentile of global ToE for the intensity of extreme precipitation is about 2030 and 2058 for S/N >0.5 and S/N >1, respectively. We further evaluated the exposure of ecosystems and human societies to the pace of extreme climate change by determining the year of ToE for various extreme climate indices projected to occur over terrestrial biomes, marine realms and major urban areas with large populations. This was done by overlaying terrestrial, ecoregions and population maps with maps of ToE derived, to extract ToEs for these regions. Possible relationships between GDP per person and ToE are also investigated by relating the mean ToE for each country and its average value of GDP per person.

  8. Addressing Extremes within the WCRP - GEWEX Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oevelen, P. J.; Stewart, R.; Detemmerman, V.

    2008-12-01

    For large international coordination programs such as the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) as part of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) it is difficult to strike a good balance between enabling as much international involvement as is possible and desirable and the achievability of the objectives. WCRP has decided that "Extremes Research" is one of several areas where it would like to see its efforts strengthened and scientific research pushed forward. The foci that are being selected should be phrased such that they are practical and achievable within a time span of 1 to 3 years. Preferably these foci build upon the expertise from cross WCRP activities and are not restricted to single core project activities. In this presentation an overview will be given of the various activities within GEWEX that are related to extremes and which ones would be most ideal to be addressed as WCRP foci from a GEWEX perspective. The rationale and context of extreme research will be presented as well links to other national and international programs. "Extremes Research" as a topic is attractive since it has a high societal relevance and impact. However, numerous definitions of extremes exist and they are being used in widely varying contexts making it not always clear of what exactly is being addressed. This presentation will give an outlook on what can be expected research wise in the near future based upon the outcomes of the Extremes Workshop organised last June in Vancouver in the context of the Coordinated Energy and water cycle Observations Project (CEOP) as part of GEWEX. In particular it will be shown how these activities, which will only address certain types of extremes, can be linked to adaptation and mitigation efforts taking place in other organisations and by national and international bodies.

  9. Extreme Storm Surges in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goennert, G.; Buß, Th.; Mueller, O.; Thumm, S.

    2009-04-01

    Extreme Storm Surges in the North Sea Gabriele Gönnert, Olaf Müller, Thomas Buß and Sigrid Thumm Climate Change will cause a rise of the sea level and probably more frequent and more violent storm surges. This has serious consequences for the safety of people as well as for their values and assets behind the dikes. It is therefore inevitable to first assess how sea level rise and an extreme storm surge event designes. In a second step it is possible to determine the risk for specific locations and develop strategies. The Project XtremRisk - Extreme Storm Surges at the North Sea Coast and in Estuaries. Risk calculation and risk strategies, funded by the German Federal Government will help answering these questions. The „Source-Pathway-Receptor" Concept will be used as a basis for risk analysis and development of new strategies. The Project offers methods to assess the development of extreme events under the conditions of today. Under conditions reflecting the climate change it will be tried to design an extreme event. For these three main points will be considered: a) Analysis and calculation of each factor, which produce a storm surge and its maximum level occurring in the last 100 years. These are: - maximum surge level: surge (due to the wind), - influence of the tide and the interaction between surge and tide, - influence of external surges , b) The hydrodynamics of a storm surge cause nonlinear effects in the interaction of the named factors. These factors and effects will both be taken into account to calculate the magnitude of the extreme storm surge. This step is very complex and need additional examination by numerical models. c) Analysis of the different scenarios to mean sea level rise and to the increase of wind speed due to the climate change. The presentation will introduce methods and show first results of the analysis of extreme events and the mean sea level rise.

  10. Eukaryotic diversity at pH extremes

    PubMed Central

    Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.

    2013-01-01

    Extremely acidic (pH < 3) and extremely alkaline (pH > 9) environments support a diversity of single-cell and to a lesser extent, multicellular eukaryotic life. This study compared alpha and beta diversity in eukaryotic communities from seven diverse aquatic environments with pH values ranging from 2 to 11 using massively-parallel pyrotag sequencing targeting the V9 hypervariable region of the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. A total of 946 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were recovered at a 6% cut-off level (94% similarity) across the sampled environments. Hierarchical clustering of the samples segregated the communities into acidic and alkaline groups. Similarity percentage (SIMPER) analysis followed by indicator OTU analysis (IOA) and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) were used to determine which characteristic groups of eukaryotic taxa typify acidic or alkaline extremes and the extent to which pH explains eukaryotic community structure in these environments. Spain's Rio Tinto yielded the fewest observed OTUs while Nebraska Sandhills alkaline lakes yielded the most. Distinct OTUs, including metazoan OTUs, numerically dominated pH extreme sites. Indicator OTUs included the diatom Pinnularia and unidentified opisthokonts (Fungi and Filasterea) in the extremely acidic environments, and the ciliate Frontonia across the extremely alkaline sites. Inferred from NMDS, pH explained only a modest fraction of the variation across the datasets, indicating that other factors influence the underlying community structure in these environments. The findings from this study suggest that the ability for eukaryotes to adapt to pH extremes over a broad range of values may be rare, but further study of taxa that can broadly adapt across diverse acidic and alkaline environments, respectively present good models for understanding adaptation and should be targeted for future investigations. PMID:23335919

  11. Atmosphere and water loss from early Mars under extreme solar wind and extreme ultraviolet conditions.

    PubMed

    Terada, Naoki; Kulikov, Yuri N; Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert I M; Tanaka, Takashi; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki; Zhang, Tielong

    2009-01-01

    The upper limits of the ion pickup and cold ion outflow loss rates from the early martian atmosphere shortly after the Sun arrived at the Zero-Age-Main-Sequence (ZAMS) were investigated. We applied a comprehensive 3-D multi-species magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model to an early martian CO(2)-rich atmosphere, which was assumed to have been exposed to a solar XUV [X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV)] flux that was 100 times higher than today and a solar wind that was about 300 times denser. We also assumed the late onset of a planetary magnetic dynamo, so that Mars had no strong intrinsic magnetic field at that early period. We found that, due to such extreme solar wind-atmosphere interaction, a strong magnetic field of about approximately 4000 nT was induced in the entire dayside ionosphere, which could efficiently protect the upper atmosphere from sputtering loss. A planetary obstacle ( approximately ionopause) was formed at an altitude of about 1000 km above the surface due to the drag force and the mass loading by newly created ions in the highly extended upper atmosphere. We obtained an O(+) loss rate by the ion pickup process, which takes place above the ionopause, of about 1.5 x 10(28) ions/s during the first < or =150 million years, which is about 10(4) times greater than today and corresponds to a water loss equivalent to a global martian ocean with a depth of approximately 8 m. Consequently, even if the magnetic protection due to the expected early martian magnetic dynamo is neglected, ion pickup and sputtering were most likely not the dominant loss processes for the planet's initial atmosphere and water inventory. However, it appears that the cold ion outflow into the martian tail, due to the transfer of momentum from the solar wind to the ionospheric plasma, could have removed a global ocean with a depth of 10-70 m during the first < or =150 million years after the Sun arrived at the ZAMS. PMID:19216683

  12. Near future changes of extremes and compound extremes on the regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlmeier, Katrin; Feldmann, Hendrik; Schädler, Gerd

    2013-04-01

    Reliable knowledge of near future changes of extreme and compound extreme events on the regional scale is of great importance for impact studies and planning of adaptation/mitigation strategies. Different types of extremes might intensify each other, e.g. heat waves and droughts via evapotranspiration and heat flux. Compared to projections for the end of the century, the climate change and variation signals for the near future are weaker and more contaminated by to natural variations. On the other hand several studies (e.g. Feldmann et al. [1]) have shown that extremes are likely to undergo more pronounced changes than mean values. To derive reliable estimates of these changes, ensembles of simulations are a useful method since the larger number of data allows for a better estimate of probability density function parameters and higher signal-to-noise ratios which are especially needed for the analysis of extreme events and compound extremes. Furthermore, using ensembles enables an assessment of the uncertainty of the deduced changes. Our work is based on an ensemble of high resolution regional climate simulations with a resolution of 7 km with the COSMO-CLM regional climate model using different global driving data. Our ensemble is enlarged by results from the ENSEMBLES project, thus also including different regional and global driving models. Changes between a control period (1971-200) and the near future (2011-2040) are assessed with a special focus on central Europe. The analysis focuses on extreme events related to temperature and precipitation such as heat and cold waves or dry spells with a subsequent examination of compound extreme events. Compound extreme events are defined as the simultaneous or successive occurrence of two or more extreme events (IPCC Special Report on extreme events, 2012), e.g. the simultaneous occurrence of dry periods and heat waves or cold spells and extreme precipitation. Extremes are expressed in terms of return values and

  13. Historical changes in Australian temperature extremes as inferred from extreme value distribution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolan L.; Trewin, Blair; Feng, Yang; Jones, David

    2013-02-01

    Abstract This study develops a generalized <span class="hlt">extreme</span> value (GEV) distribution analysis approach, namely, a GEV tree approach that allows for both stationary and nonstationary cases. This approach is applied to a century-long homogenized daily temperature data set for Australia to assess changes in temperature <span class="hlt">extremes</span> from 1910 to 2010. Changes in 20 year return values are estimated from the most suitable GEV distribution chosen from a GEV tree. Twenty year return values of <span class="hlt">extreme</span> low minimum temperature are found to have warmed strongly over the century in most parts of the continent. There is also a tendency toward warming of <span class="hlt">extreme</span> high maximum temperatures, but it is weaker than that for minimum temperatures, with the majority of stations not showing significant trends. The observed changes in <span class="hlt">extreme</span> temperatures are broadly consistent with observed changes in mean temperatures and in the frequency of temperatures above the ninetieth and below the tenth percentile (i.e., <span class="hlt">extreme</span> indices). The GEV tree analysis provides insight into behavior of <span class="hlt">extremes</span> with re-occurrence times of several years to decades that are of importance to engineering design/applications, while <span class="hlt">extreme</span> indices represent moderately <span class="hlt">extreme</span> events with re-occurrence times of a year or shorter.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016Nanot..27I2501P&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016Nanot..27I2501P&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">High aspect ratio tungsten grating on ultrathin Si membranes for <span class="hlt">extreme</span> UV lithography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Peng, Xinsheng; Ying, Yulong</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Extreme</span> ultraviolet lithography is one of the modern lithography tools for high-volume manufacturing with 22 nm resolution and beyond. But critical challenges exist to the design and fabrication of large-scale and highly <span class="hlt">efficient</span> diffraction transmission gratings, significantly reducing the feature sizes down to 22 nm and beyond. To achieve such a grating, the surface flatness, the line edge roughness, the transmission <span class="hlt">efficiency</span> and aspect ratio should be improved significantly. Delachat et al (2015 Nanotechnology 26 108262) develop a full process to fabricate a tungsten diffraction grating on an ultrathin silicon membrane with higher aspect ratio up to 8.75 that met all the aforementioned requirements for <span class="hlt">extreme</span> ultraviolet lithography. This process is fully compatible with standard industrial <span class="hlt">extreme</span> ultraviolet lithography.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27458188','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27458188"><span id="translatedtitle">High aspect ratio tungsten grating on ultrathin Si membranes for <span class="hlt">extreme</span> UV lithography.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Peng, Xinsheng; Ying, Yulong</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Extreme</span> ultraviolet lithography is one of the modern lithography tools for high-volume manufacturing with 22 nm resolution and beyond. But critical challenges exist to the design and fabrication of large-scale and highly <span class="hlt">efficient</span> diffraction transmission gratings, significantly reducing the feature sizes down to 22 nm and beyond. To achieve such a grating, the surface flatness, the line edge roughness, the transmission <span class="hlt">efficiency</span> and aspect ratio should be improved significantly. Delachat et al (2015 Nanotechnology 26 108262) develop a full process to fabricate a tungsten diffraction grating on an ultrathin silicon membrane with higher aspect ratio up to 8.75 that met all the aforementioned requirements for <span class="hlt">extreme</span> ultraviolet lithography. This process is fully compatible with standard industrial <span class="hlt">extreme</span> ultraviolet lithography. PMID:27458188</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1513897W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..1513897W"><span id="translatedtitle">Multidecadal oscillations in rainfall and hydrological <span class="hlt">extremes</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Willems, Patrick</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>Many studies have anticipated a worldwide increase in the frequency and intensity of precipitation <span class="hlt">extremes</span> and floods since the last decade(s). Natural variability by climate oscillations partly determines the observed evolution of precipitation <span class="hlt">extremes</span>. Based on a technique for the identification and analysis of changes in <span class="hlt">extreme</span> quantiles, it is shown that hydrological <span class="hlt">extremes</span> have oscillatory behaviour at multidecadal time scales. Results are based on nearly independent <span class="hlt">extremes</span> extracted from long-term historical time series of precipitation intensities and river flows. Study regions include Belgium - The Netherlands (Meuse basin), Ethiopia (Blue Nile basin) and Ecuador (Paute basin). For Belgium - The Netherlands, the past 100 years showed larger and more hydrological <span class="hlt">extremes</span> around the 1910s, 1950-1960s, and more recently during the 1990-2000s. Interestingly, the oscillations for southwestern Europe are anti-correlated with these of northwestern Europe, thus with oscillation highs in the 1930-1940s and 1970s. The precipitation oscillation peaks are explained by persistence in atmospheric circulation patterns over the North Atlantic during periods of 10 to 15 years. References: Ntegeka V., Willems P. (2008), 'Trends and multidecadal oscillations in rainfall <span class="hlt">extremes</span>, based on a more than 100 years time series of 10 minutes rainfall intensities at Uccle, Belgium', Water Resources Research, 44, W07402, doi:10.1029/2007WR006471 Mora, D., Willems, P. (2012), 'Decadal oscillations in rainfall and air temperature in the Paute River Basin - Southern Andes of Ecuador', Theoretical and Applied Climatology, 108(1), 267-282, doi:0.1007/s00704-011-0527-4 Taye, M.T., Willems, P. (2011). 'Influence of climate variability on representative QDF predictions of the upper Blue Nile Basin', Journal of Hydrology, 411, 355-365, doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2011.10.019 Taye, M.T., Willems, P. (2012). 'Temporal variability of hydro-climatic <span class="hlt">extremes</span> in the Blue Nile basin', Water</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1613307H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1613307H"><span id="translatedtitle">Detection and attribution of <span class="hlt">extreme</span> weather disasters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Huggel, Christian; Stone, Dáithí; Hansen, Gerrit</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Single disasters related to <span class="hlt">extreme</span> weather events have caused loss and damage on the order of up to tens of billions US dollars over the past years. Recent disasters fueled the debate about whether and to what extent these events are related to climate change. In international climate negotiations disaster loss and damage is now high on the agenda, and related policy mechanisms have been discussed or are being implemented. In view of funding allocation and effective risk reduction strategies detection and attribution to climate change of <span class="hlt">extreme</span> weather events and disasters is a key issue. Different avenues have so far been taken to address detection and attribution in this context. Physical climate sciences have developed approaches, among others, where variables that are reasonably sampled over climatically relevant time periods and related to the meteorological characteristics of the <span class="hlt">extreme</span> event are examined. Trends in these variables (e.g. air or sea surface temperatures) are compared between observations and climate simulations with and without anthropogenic forcing. Generally, progress has been made in recent years in attribution of changes in the chance of some single <span class="hlt">extreme</span> weather events to anthropogenic climate change but there remain important challenges. A different line of research is primarily concerned with losses related to the <span class="hlt">extreme</span> weather events over time, using disaster databases. A growing consensus is that the increase in asset values and in exposure are main drivers of the strong increase of economic losses over the past several decades, and only a limited number of studies have found trends consistent with expectations from climate change. Here we propose a better integration of existing lines of research in detection and attribution of <span class="hlt">extreme</span> weather events and disasters by applying a risk framework. Risk is thereby defined as a function of the probability of occurrence of an <span class="hlt">extreme</span> weather event, and the associated consequences</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.H43E1555L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.H43E1555L"><span id="translatedtitle">Water Cycle <span class="hlt">Extremes</span>: from Observations to Decisions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lawford, R. G.; Unninayar, S.; Berod, D.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Extremes</span> in the water cycle (droughts and floods) pose major challenges for water resource managers and emergency services. These challenges arise from observational and prediction systems, advisory services, impact reduction strategies, and cleanup and recovery operations. The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) through its Water Strategy ("GEOSS Water Strategy: from observations to decisions") is seeking to provide systems that will enable its members to more effectively meet their information needs prior to and during an <span class="hlt">extreme</span> event. This presentation reviews the wide range of impacts that arise from <span class="hlt">extremes</span> in the water cycle and the types of data and information needed to plan for and respond to these <span class="hlt">extreme</span> events. It identifies the capabilities and limitations of current observational and analysis systems in defining the scale, timing, intensity and impacts of water cycle <span class="hlt">extremes</span> and in directing society's response to them. This summary represents an early preliminary assessment of the global and regional information needs of water resource managers and begins to outline a strategy within GEO for using Earth Observations and ancillary information to address these needs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4437297','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4437297"><span id="translatedtitle">How does public opinion become <span class="hlt">extreme</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ramos, Marlon; Shao, Jia; Reis, Saulo D. S.; Anteneodo, Celia; Andrade, José S.; Havlin, Shlomo; Makse, Hernán A.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We investigate the emergence of <span class="hlt">extreme</span> opinion trends in society by employing statistical physics modeling and analysis on polls that inquire about a wide range of issues such as religion, economics, politics, abortion, extramarital sex, books, movies, and electoral vote. The surveys lay out a clear indicator of the rise of <span class="hlt">extreme</span> views. The precursor is a nonlinear relation between the fraction of individuals holding a certain <span class="hlt">extreme</span> view and the fraction of individuals that includes also moderates, e.g., in politics, those who are “very conservative” versus “moderate to very conservative” ones. We propose an activation model of opinion dynamics with interaction rules based on the existence of individual “stubbornness” that mimics empirical observations. According to our modeling, the onset of nonlinearity can be associated to an abrupt bootstrap-percolation transition with cascades of <span class="hlt">extreme</span> views through society. Therefore, it represents an early-warning signal to forecast the transition from moderate to <span class="hlt">extreme</span> views. Moreover, by means of a phase diagram we can classify societies according to the percolative regime they belong to, in terms of critical fractions of extremists and people’s ties. PMID:25989484</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JPhCS..75a2074S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007JPhCS..75a2074S"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Extreme</span> wind turbine response during operation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sørensen, John D.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.</p> <p>2007-07-01</p> <p>Estimation of <span class="hlt">extreme</span> response values is very important for structural design of wind turbines. Due to the influence of control system and nonlinear structural behavior the <span class="hlt">extreme</span> response is usually assessed based on simulation of turbulence time series. In this paper the problem of statistical load extrapolation is considered using techniques from structural reliability theory. Different simulation techniques to estimate <span class="hlt">extreme</span> response characteristics are described and compared, including crude Monte Carlo simulation, Importance Sampling, and splitting methods such as the Russian Roulette and the Double and Clump algorithm. A statistically consistent technique is described for including statistical uncertainty and assessing the <span class="hlt">extreme</span> 50-year response using simulated time series and conditioned on the model parameters. The peak over threshold method together with the Maximum Likelihood Method provides a tool to obtain consistent estimates incl. the statistical uncertainty. An illustrative example indicates that the statistical uncertainty is important compared to the coefficient of variation of the <span class="hlt">extreme</span> response when the number of 10 minutes simulations at each mean wind speed is limited to 10.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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