Science.gov

Sample records for efficient finite element

  1. Efficient finite element method for grating profile reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruming; Sun, Jiguang

    2015-12-01

    This paper concerns the reconstruction of grating profiles from scattering data. The inverse problem is formulated as an optimization problem with a regularization term. We devise an efficient finite element method (FEM) and employ a quasi-Newton method to solve it. For the direct problems, the FEM stiff and mass matrices are assembled once at the beginning of the numerical procedure. Then only minor changes are made to the mass matrix at each iteration, which significantly saves the computation cost. Numerical examples show that the method is effective and robust.

  2. An Efficient Vector Finite Element Method for Nonlinear Electromagnetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, A C; White, D A; Rodrigue, G H

    2006-06-27

    We have developed a mixed Vector Finite Element Method (VFEM) for Maxwell's equations with a nonlinear polarization term. The method allows for discretization of complicated geometries with arbitrary order representations of the B and E fields. In this paper we will describe the method and a series of optimizations that significantly reduce the computational cost. Additionally, a series of test simulations will be presented to validate the method. Finally, a nonlinear waveguide mode mixing example is presented and discussed.

  3. Efficient algorithms for use in probabilistic finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dias, J. B.; Nagtegaal, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of Fast Probability Integration (FPI) algorithms in a Finite Element environment. A method allowing the representation of correlated fields in terms of a vector of uncorrelated transformed variables, based on the spectral decomposition of the variance-covariance matrix is developed. The response of the deterministic model corresponding to selected perturbations of these uncorrelated variables is then obtained via a Newton-type iterative scheme. The results of the perturbed problems are used to construct a local representation of the model's behavior in the neighborhood of the deterministic state, which the FPI algorithm will use to estimate the reliability of the system. Although the proposed strategy has thus far only been applied to linear elastostatics, the extension of the method to a broader class of problems appears to be feasible.

  4. Efficient finite element simulation of slot spirals, slot radomes and microwave structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, J.; Volakis, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    This progress report contains the following two documents: (1) 'Efficient Finite Element Simulation of Slot Antennas using Prismatic Elements' - A hybrid finite element-boundary integral (FE-BI) simulation technique is discussed to treat narrow slot antennas etched on a planar platform. Specifically, the prismatic elements are used to reduce the redundant sampling rates and ease the mesh generation process. Numerical results for an antenna slot and frequency selective surfaces are presented to demonstrate the validity and capability of the technique; and (2) 'Application and Design Guidelines of the PML Absorber for Finite Element Simulations of Microwave Packages' - The recently introduced perfectly matched layer (PML) uniaxial absorber for frequency domain finite element simulations has several advantages. In this paper we present the application of PML for microwave circuit simulations along with design guidelines to obtain a desired level of absorption. Different feeding techniques are also investigated for improved accuracy.

  5. Fuzzy logic to improve efficiency of finite element and finite difference schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.D.; Heger, A.S.

    1994-05-01

    This paper explores possible applications of logic in the areas of finite element and finite difference methods applied to engineering design problems. The application of fuzzy logic to both front-end selection of computational options and within the numerical computation itself are proposed. Further, possible methods of overcoming these limitations through the application of methods are explored. Decision strategy is a fundamental limitation in performing finite element calculations, such as selecting the optimum coarseness of the grid, numerical integration algorithm, element type, implicit versus explicit schemes, and the like. This is particularly true of novice analysts who are confronted with a myriad of choices in performing a calculation. The advantage of having the myriad of options available to the analyst is, however, that it improves and optimizes the design process if the appropriate ones are selected. Unfortunately, the optimum choices are not always apparent and only through the process of elimination or prior extensive experience can the optimum choices or combination of choices be selected. The knowledge of expert analysts could be integrated into a fuzzy ``front-end`` rule-based package to optimize the design process. The use of logic to capture the heuristic and human knowledge for selecting optimum solution strategies sets the framework for these proposed strategies.

  6. Efficient beam-column finite element including application to thermoelastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, F.D.

    1980-02-01

    During the study of the structural design of the core of the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR), there is evidence of undue frictional interaction between fuel rod claddings and their spacer grids. In cases for which thermal bowing of the rods is sufficient to cause two-sided contact between the rods and their supporting grids (and thus a tendency to lock up), subsequent rod deformation caused by the axial thermal expansion would result in excessive buckling of the rods between locked supports. The numerical solution is best served by the finite element method. Yet there is a large number of fuel rods in the reactor, of which each is multiply-supported by spacers. Hence, an efficient finite element is needed that would model each section between supports with not more than three elements. The new efficient finite element is developed, beginning with the principle of virtual work.

  7. A numerically efficient finite element hydroelastic analysis. Volume 1: Theory and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coppolino, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    Symmetric finite element matrix formulations for compressible and incompressible hydroelasticity are developed on the basis of Toupin's complementary formulation of classical mechanics. Results of implementation of the new technique in the NASTRAN structural analysis program are presented which demonstrate accuracy and efficiency.

  8. Automatic finite element generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    The design and implementation of a software system for generating finite elements and related computations are described. Exact symbolic computational techniques are employed to derive strain-displacement matrices and element stiffness matrices. Methods for dealing with the excessive growth of symbolic expressions are discussed. Automatic FORTRAN code generation is described with emphasis on improving the efficiency of the resultant code.

  9. Finite element strategies for the efficient analysis and evaluation of solar collector structures

    SciTech Connect

    Koteras, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Concentrating or reflecting structures for solar energy systems must be evaluated as to their structural integrity and optical performance. Computer studies can be used as an integral part of these evaluations. The computer studies make use of finite element structural codes coupled with post-processors that calculate optical data. If the analysis of a solar structure is to be carried out in an efficient manner, these computer codes must have certain capabilities. A number of solar energy projects at Sandia National Laboratories have made extensive use of finite element analyses. The analyses have been useful in evaluating design concepts which hold promise for large scale use in solar energy projects. Analysis procedures have been developed for some structures so that evaluations can be carried out in a straightforward manner.

  10. Efficient simulation of cardiac electrical propagation using high order finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthurs, Christopher J.; Bishop, Martin J.; Kay, David

    2012-05-01

    We present an application of high order hierarchical finite elements for the efficient approximation of solutions to the cardiac monodomain problem. We detail the hurdles which must be overcome in order to achieve theoretically-optimal errors in the approximations generated, including the choice of method for approximating the solution to the cardiac cell model component. We place our work on a solid theoretical foundation and show that it can greatly improve the accuracy in the approximation which can be achieved in a given amount of processor time. Our results demonstrate superior accuracy over linear finite elements at a cheaper computational cost and thus indicate the potential indispensability of our approach for large-scale cardiac simulation.

  11. An efficient Mindlin finite strip plate element based on assumed strain distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chulya, Abhisak; Thompson, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    A simple two node, linear, finite strip plate bending element based on Mindlin-Reissner plate theory for the analysis of very thin to thick bridges, plates, and axisymmetric shells is presented. The new transverse shear strains are assumed for constant distribution in the two node linear strip. The important aspect is the choice of the points that relate the nodal displacements and rotations through the locking transverse shear strains. The element stiffness matrix is explicitly formulated for efficient computation and ease in computer implementation. Numerical results showing the efficiency and predictive capability of the element for analyzing plates with different supports, loading conditions, and a wide range of thicknesses are given. The results show no sign of the shear locking phenomenon.

  12. Efficient modeling of flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments for vibroacoustic finite element analysis. Direct field formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimonti, L.; Atalla, N.

    2016-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a simplified model for noise control treatments to speed up finite element analysis in vibroacoustic applications. The methodology relies on the assumption that the acoustic treatment is flat and homogeneous. Moreover, its finite lateral extent is neglected. This hypothesis is justified by short wavelength and large dissipation, which suggest that the reflected field emanating from the acoustic treatment lateral boundaries does not substantially affect its dynamic response. Under these circumstances, the response of the noise control treatment can be formally obtained by means of convolution integrals involving simple analytical kernels (i.e. Green functions). Such fundamental solutions can be computed efficiently by the transfer matrix method. However, some arbitrariness arises in the formulation of the mathematical model, resulting in different baffling conditions at the two ends of the treatment to be considered. Thus, the paper investigates the possibility of different formulations (i.e. baffling conditions) within the same hybrid finite element-transfer matrix framework, seeking for the best strategy in terms of tradeoff between efficiency and accuracy. Numerical examples are provided to show strengths and limitations of the proposed methodology.

  13. Efficient evaluation of the Coulomb force in the Gaussian and finite-element Coulomb method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashige, Yuki; Nakajima, Takahito; Sato, Takeshi; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2010-06-01

    We propose an efficient method for evaluating the Coulomb force in the Gaussian and finite-element Coulomb (GFC) method, which is a linear-scaling approach for evaluating the Coulomb matrix and energy in large molecular systems. The efficient evaluation of the analytical gradient in the GFC is not straightforward as well as the evaluation of the energy because the SCF procedure with the Coulomb matrix does not give a variational solution for the Coulomb energy. Thus, an efficient approximate method is alternatively proposed, in which the Coulomb potential is expanded in the Gaussian and finite-element auxiliary functions as done in the GFC. To minimize the error in the gradient not just in the energy, the derived functions of the original auxiliary functions of the GFC are used additionally for the evaluation of the Coulomb gradient. In fact, the use of the derived functions significantly improves the accuracy of this approach. Although these additional auxiliary functions enlarge the size of the discretized Poisson equation and thereby increase the computational cost, it maintains the near linear scaling as the GFC and does not affects the overall efficiency of the GFC approach.

  14. Finite element three-dimensional direct current resistivity modelling: accuracy and efficiency considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bing, Zhou; Greenhalgh, S. A.

    2001-06-01

    The finite element method is a powerful tool for 3-D DC resistivity modelling and inversion. The solution accuracy and computational efficiency are critical factors in using the method in 3-D resistivity imaging. This paper investigates the solution accuracy and the computational efficiency of two common element-type schemes: trilinear interpolation within a regular 8-node solid parallelepiped, and linear interpolations within six tetrahedral bricks within the same 8-node solid block. Four iterative solvers based on the pre-conditioned conjugate gradient method (SCG, TRIDCG, SORCG and ICCG), and one elimination solver called the banded Choleski factorization are employed for the solutions. The comparisons of the element schemes and solvers were made by means of numerical experiments using three synthetic models. The results show that the tetrahedron element scheme is far superior to the parallelepiped element scheme, both in accuracy and computational efficiency. The tetrahedron element scheme may save 43 per cent storage for an iterative solver, and achieve an accuracy of the maximum relative error of <1 per cent with an appropriate element size. The two iterative solvers, SORCG and ICCG, are suitable options for 3-D resistivity computations on a PC, and both perform comparably in terms of convergence speed in the two element schemes. ICCG achieves the best convergence rate, but nearly doubles the total storage size of the computation. Simple programming codes for the two iterative solvers are presented. We also show that a fine grid, which doubles the density of a coarse grid, will require at least 27=128 times as much computing time when using the banded Choleski factorization. Such an increase, especially for 3-D resistivity inversion, should be compared with SORCG and ICCG solvers in order to find the computationally most efficient method when dealing with a large number of electrodes.

  15. Simulation of the ultrasonic array response from real branched cracks using an efficient finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, Maria V.; Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul D.; Barden, Tim J.; Dunhill, Tony K.

    2014-02-18

    A hybrid model to simulate the ultrasonic array response from stress corrosion cracks is presented. These cracks are branched and difficult to detect so the model is required to enable optimization of an array design. An efficient frequency-domain finite element method is described and selected to simulate the ultrasonic scattering. Experimental validation results are presented, followed by an example of the simulated ultrasonic array response from a real stress corrosion crack whose geometry is obtained from an X-ray Computed Tomography image. A simulation-assisted array design methodology, which includes the model and use of real crack geometries, is proposed.

  16. An efficient finite element with layerwise mechanics for smart piezoelectric composite and sandwich shallow shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, M. Yaqoob; Kapuria, S.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present a new efficient four-node finite element for shallow multilayered piezoelectric shells, considering layerwise mechanics and electromechanical coupling. The laminate mechanics is based on the zigzag theory that has only seven kinematic degrees of freedom per node. The normal deformation of the piezoelectric layers under the electric field is accounted for without introducing any additional deflection variables. A consistent quadratic variation of the electric potential across the piezoelectric layers with the provision of satisfying the equipotential condition of electroded surfaces is adopted. The performance of the new element is demonstrated for the static response under mechanical and electric potential loads, and for free vibration response of smart shells under different boundary conditions. The predictions are found to be very close to the three dimensional piezoelasticity solutions for hybrid shells made of not only single-material composite substrates, but also sandwich substrates with a soft core for which the equivalent single layer (ESL) theories perform very badly.

  17. General purpose software for efficient uncertainty management of large finite element models

    PubMed Central

    Patelli, Edoardo; Murat Panayirci, H.; Broggi, Matteo; Goller, Barbara; Beaurepaire, Pierre; Pradlwarter, Helmut J.; Schuëller, Gerhart I.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that stochastic analyses can be performed on large and complex models within affordable costs. Stochastic analyses offer a much more realistic approach for analysis and design of components and systems although generally computationally demanding. Hence, resorting to efficient approaches and high performance computing is required in order to reduce the execution time. A general purpose software that provides an integration between deterministic solvers (i.e. finite element solvers), efficient algorithms for uncertainty management and high performance computing is presented. The software is intended for a wide range of applications, which includes optimization analysis, life-cycle management, reliability and risk analysis, fatigue and fractures simulation, robust design. The applicability of the proposed tools for practical applications is demonstrated by means of a number of case studies of industrial interest involving detailed models. PMID:22474398

  18. Research related to improved computer aided design software package. [comparative efficiency of finite, boundary, and hybrid element methods in elastostatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walston, W. H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The comparative computational efficiencies of the finite element (FEM), boundary element (BEM), and hybrid boundary element-finite element (HVFEM) analysis techniques are evaluated for representative bounded domain interior and unbounded domain exterior problems in elastostatics. Computational efficiency is carefully defined in this study as the computer time required to attain a specified level of solution accuracy. The study found the FEM superior to the BEM for the interior problem, while the reverse was true for the exterior problem. The hybrid analysis technique was found to be comparable or superior to both the FEM and BEM for both the interior and exterior problems.

  19. On the Relationship Between Tooth Shape and Masticatory Efficiency: A Finite Element Study.

    PubMed

    Berthaume, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    Dental topography has successfully linked disparate tooth shapes to distinct dietary categories, but not to masticatory efficiency. Here, the relationship between four dental topographic metrics and brittle food item breakdown efficiency during compressive biting was investigated using a parametric finite element model of a bunodont molar. Food item breakdown efficiency was chosen to represent masticatory efficiency as it isolated tooth-food item interactions, where most other categories of masticatory efficiency include several aspects of the masticatory process. As relative food item size may affect the presence/absence of any relationship, four isometrically scaled, hemispherical, proxy food items were considered. Topographic metrics were uncorrelated to food item breakdown efficiency irrespective of relative food item size, and dental topographic metrics were largely uncorrelated to one another. The lack of a correlation between topographic metrics and food item breakdown efficiency is not unexpected as not all food items break down in the same manner (e.g., nuts are crushed, leaves are sheared), and only one food item shape was considered. In addition, food item breakdown efficiency describes tooth-food item interactions and requires location and shape specific information, which are absent from dental topographic metrics. This makes it unlikely any one efficiency metric will be correlated to all topographic metrics. These results emphasize the need to take into account how food items break down during biting, ingestion, and mastication when investigating the mechanical relationship between food item shape, size, mechanical properties, and breakdown, and tooth shape. Anat Rec, 299:679-687, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26910570

  20. Efficient uncertainty quantification in stochastic finite element analysis based on functional principal components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Ilaria; Argiento, Raffaele; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Lanzarone, Ettore

    2015-09-01

    The great influence of uncertainties on the behavior of physical systems has always drawn attention to the importance of a stochastic approach to engineering problems. Accordingly, in this paper, we address the problem of solving a Finite Element analysis in the presence of uncertain parameters. We consider an approach in which several solutions of the problem are obtained in correspondence of parameters samples, and propose a novel non-intrusive method, which exploits the functional principal component analysis, to get acceptable computational efforts. Indeed, the proposed approach allows constructing an optimal basis of the solutions space and projecting the full Finite Element problem into a smaller space spanned by this basis. Even if solving the problem in this reduced space is computationally convenient, very good approximations are obtained by upper bounding the error between the full Finite Element solution and the reduced one. Finally, we assess the applicability of the proposed approach through different test cases, obtaining satisfactory results.

  1. An Efficient Finite Element Approach for Modeling Fibrotic Clefts in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Caroline Mendonca; Campos, Fernando O.; Prassl, Anton J.; dos Santos, Rodrigo Weber; Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Ahammer, Helmut; Hofer, Ernst; Plank, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    Advanced medical imaging technologies provide a wealth of information on cardiac anatomy and structure at a paracellular resolution, allowing to identify micro-structural discontinuities which disrupt the intracellular matrix. Current state-of-the-art computer models built upon such datasets account for increasingly finer anatomical details, however, structural discontinuities at the paracellular level are typically discarded in the model generation process, owing to the significant costs which incur when using high resolutions for explicit representation. In this study, a novel discontinuous finite element (dFE) approach for discretizing the bidomain equations is presented, which accounts for fine-scale structures in a computer model without the need to increase spatial resolution. In the dFE method this is achieved by imposing infinitely thin lines of electrical insulation along edges of finite elements which approximate the geometry of discontinuities in the intracellular matrix. Simulation results demonstrate that the dFE approach accounts for effects induced by microscopic size scale discontinuities, such as the formation of microscopic virtual electrodes, with vast computational savings as compared to high resolution continuous finite element models. Moreover, the method can be implemented in any standard continuous finite element code with minor effort. PMID:24557691

  2. Development of a Computationally Efficient, High Fidelity, Finite Element Based Hall Thruster Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, David (Technical Monitor); Roy, Subrata

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the development of a two dimensional finite element based numerical model for efficient characterization of the Hall thruster plasma dynamics in the framework of multi-fluid model. Effect of the ionization and the recombination has been included in the present model. Based on the experimental data, a third order polynomial in electron temperature is used to calculate the ionization rate. The neutral dynamics is included only through the neutral continuity equation in the presence of a uniform neutral flow. The electrons are modeled as magnetized and hot, whereas ions are assumed magnetized and cold. The dynamics of Hall thruster is also investigated in the presence of plasma-wall interaction. The plasma-wall interaction is a function of wall potential, which in turn is determined by the secondary electron emission and sputtering yield. The effect of secondary electron emission and sputter yield has been considered simultaneously, Simulation results are interpreted in the light of experimental observations and available numerical solutions in the literature.

  3. Implicit modeling of screw threads for efficient finite element analysis of complex bone-implant systems.

    PubMed

    Inzana, Jason A; Varga, Peter; Windolf, Markus

    2016-06-14

    Finite element analysis is commonly used to assist in the development and evaluation of orthopedic devices. The physics of these models are simplified through approximations that enable more efficient simulations, without compromising the accuracy of the relative comparisons between implant designs or configurations. This study developed and evaluated a technique to approximate the behavior of a finely threaded screw using a smooth cylinder with the threads implicitly represented through interfacial contact conditions. This pseudo-threaded model was calibrated by comparing to simulations that explicitly modeled the thread geometry with frictional contact. A parametric analysis was performed with a single screw-in-bone system, five loading directions, and three Young׳s moduli that span the range of cancellous bone (200, 600, and 1,000MPa). Considering that screw cut-out from cancellous bone is a critical clinical issue in the osteoporotic proximal humerus, the pseudo-threaded model was compared with a bonded interface to examine three different screw configurations in a 3-part proximal humerus fracture across 10 patients. In the single screw-in-bone system, the pseudo-threaded model predicted the screw displacement of the explicitly threaded model with 1-5% difference and estimated the strain distributions and magnitudes more accurately than a bonded interface. Yet, the relative comparisons of implant stability across the three different screw configurations in the proximal humerus were not affected by the modeling choice for the bone-screw interface. Therefore, the bonded interface could serve as a more efficient methodology for making relative comparisons between implants that utilize the same thread profile. PMID:27157243

  4. Efficient assembly of finite-element subsystems with large relative rotations. [for rotorcraft dynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuh, Jon-Shen; Panda, Brahmananda; Peters, David A.

    1988-01-01

    A finite element approach is presented for the modeling of rotorcraft undergoing elastic deformation in addition to large rigid body motion with respect to inertial space, with particular attention given to the coupling of the rotor and fuselage subsystems subject to large relative rotations. The component synthesis technique used here allows the coupling of rotors to the fuselage for different rotorcraft configurations. The formulation is general and applicable to any rotorcraft vibration, aeroelasticity, and dynamics problem.

  5. Probabilistic Finite Element: Variational Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belytschko, T.; Liu, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    The goal of this research is to provide techniques which are cost-effective and enable the engineer to evaluate the effect of uncertainties in complex finite element models. Embedding the probabilistic aspects in a variational formulation is a natural approach. In addition, a variational approach to probabilistic finite elements enables it to be incorporated within standard finite element methodologies. Therefore, once the procedures are developed, they can easily be adapted to existing general purpose programs. Furthermore, the variational basis for these methods enables them to be adapted to a wide variety of structural elements and to provide a consistent basis for incorporating probabilistic features in many aspects of the structural problem. Tasks concluded include the theoretical development of probabilistic variational equations for structural dynamics, the development of efficient numerical algorithms for probabilistic sensitivity displacement and stress analysis, and integration of methodologies into a pilot computer code.

  6. A partitioning strategy for efficient nonlinear finite element dynamic analysis on multiprocessor computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1989-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for the nonlinear dynamic analysis of unsymmetric structures on vector multiprocessor systems. The procedure is based on a novel hierarchical partitioning strategy in which the response of the unsymmetric and antisymmetric response vectors (modes), each obtained by using only a fraction of the degrees of freedom of the original finite element model. The three key elements of the procedure which result in high degree of concurrency throughout the solution process are: (1) mixed (or primitive variable) formulation with independent shape functions for the different fields; (2) operator splitting or restructuring of the discrete equations at each time step to delineate the symmetric and antisymmetric vectors constituting the response; and (3) two level iterative process for generating the response of the structure. An assessment is made of the effectiveness of the procedure on the CRAY X-MP/4 computers.

  7. Partitioning strategy for efficient nonlinear finite element dynamic analysis on multiprocessor computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1989-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for the nonlinear dynamic analysis of unsymmetric structures on vector multiprocessor systems. The procedure is based on a novel hierarchical partitioning strategy in which the response of the unsymmetric and antisymmetric response vectors (modes), each obtained by using only a fraction of the degrees of freedom of the original finite element model. The three key elements of the procedure which result in high degree of concurrency throughout the solution process are: (1) mixed (or primitive variable) formulation with independent shape functions for the different fields; (2) operator splitting or restructuring of the discrete equations at each time step to delineate the symmetric and antisymmetric vectors constituting the response; and (3) two level iterative process for generating the response of the structure. An assessment is made of the effectiveness of the procedure on the CRAY X-MP/4 computers.

  8. Efficient Inverse Isoparametric Mapping Algorithm for Whole-Body Computed Tomography Registration Using Deformations Predicted by Nonlinear Finite Element Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mao; Wittek, Adam; Miller, Karol

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanical modeling methods can be used to predict deformations for medical image registration and particularly, they are very effective for whole-body computed tomography (CT) image registration because differences between the source and target images caused by complex articulated motions and soft tissues deformations are very large. The biomechanics-based image registration method needs to deform the source images using the deformation field predicted by finite element models (FEMs). In practice, the global and local coordinate systems are used in finite element analysis. This involves the transformation of coordinates from the global coordinate system to the local coordinate system when calculating the global coordinates of image voxels for warping images. In this paper, we present an efficient numerical inverse isoparametric mapping algorithm to calculate the local coordinates of arbitrary points within the eight-noded hexahedral finite element. Verification of the algorithm for a nonparallelepiped hexahedral element confirms its accuracy, fast convergence, and efficiency. The algorithm's application in warping of the whole-body CT using the deformation field predicted by means of a biomechanical FEM confirms its reliability in the context of whole-body CT registration. PMID:24828796

  9. Efficient Computation of Info-Gap Robustness for Finite Element Models

    SciTech Connect

    Stull, Christopher J.; Hemez, Francois M.; Williams, Brian J.

    2012-07-05

    A recent research effort at LANL proposed info-gap decision theory as a framework by which to measure the predictive maturity of numerical models. Info-gap theory explores the trade-offs between accuracy, that is, the extent to which predictions reproduce the physical measurements, and robustness, that is, the extent to which predictions are insensitive to modeling assumptions. Both accuracy and robustness are necessary to demonstrate predictive maturity. However, conducting an info-gap analysis can present a formidable challenge, from the standpoint of the required computational resources. This is because a robustness function requires the resolution of multiple optimization problems. This report offers an alternative, adjoint methodology to assess the info-gap robustness of Ax = b-like numerical models solved for a solution x. Two situations that can arise in structural analysis and design are briefly described and contextualized within the info-gap decision theory framework. The treatments of the info-gap problems, using the adjoint methodology are outlined in detail, and the latter problem is solved for four separate finite element models. As compared to statistical sampling, the proposed methodology offers highly accurate approximations of info-gap robustness functions for the finite element models considered in the report, at a small fraction of the computational cost. It is noted that this report considers only linear systems; a natural follow-on study would extend the methodologies described herein to include nonlinear systems.

  10. Finite Element Analysis Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-03-08

    MAPVAR-KD is designed to transfer solution results from one finite element mesh to another. MAPVAR-KD draws heavily from the structure and coding of MERLIN II, but it employs a new finite element data base, EXODUS II, and offers enhanced speed and new capabilities not available in MERLIN II. In keeping with the MERLIN II documentation, the computational algorithms used in MAPVAR-KD are described. User instructions are presented. Example problems are included to demonstrate the operationmore » of the code and the effects of various input options. MAPVAR-KD is a modification of MAPVAR in which the search algorithm was replaced by a kd-tree-based search for better performance on large problems.« less

  11. Design synthesis and optimization of permanent magnet synchronous machines based on computationally-efficient finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizov, Gennadi Y.

    In this dissertation, a model-based multi-objective optimal design of permanent magnet ac machines, supplied by sine-wave current regulated drives, is developed and implemented. The design procedure uses an efficient electromagnetic finite element-based solver to accurately model nonlinear material properties and complex geometric shapes associated with magnetic circuit design. Application of an electromagnetic finite element-based solver allows for accurate computation of intricate performance parameters and characteristics. The first contribution of this dissertation is the development of a rapid computational method that allows accurate and efficient exploration of large multi-dimensional design spaces in search of optimum design(s). The computationally efficient finite element-based approach developed in this work provides a framework of tools that allow rapid analysis of synchronous electric machines operating under steady-state conditions. In the developed modeling approach, major steady-state performance parameters such as, winding flux linkages and voltages, average, cogging and ripple torques, stator core flux densities, core losses, efficiencies and saturated machine winding inductances, are calculated with minimum computational effort. In addition, the method includes means for rapid estimation of distributed stator forces and three-dimensional effects of stator and/or rotor skew on the performance of the machine. The second contribution of this dissertation is the development of the design synthesis and optimization method based on a differential evolution algorithm. The approach relies on the developed finite element-based modeling method for electromagnetic analysis and is able to tackle large-scale multi-objective design problems using modest computational resources. Overall, computational time savings of up to two orders of magnitude are achievable, when compared to current and prevalent state-of-the-art methods. These computational savings allow

  12. Efficient finite element modeling of laminated composite plates based on higher-order theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, Alexander; Saether, Erik

    1990-01-01

    A simple and efficient three-node plate bending element for the analysis of composite laminates is developed from a variational principle. The deformations due to transverse shear and transverse normal effects are accounted for, allowing accurate predictions in the range of thin to thick plates. The methodology incorporates C(exp 0) and C(exp 1) continuous displacement approximations and yields accurate ply-by-ply predictions of all displacement, strain, and stress variables.

  13. An efficient formulation of the coupled finite element-integral equation technique for solving large 3D scattering problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.; Zuffada, C.

    1993-01-01

    It is often desirable to calculate the electromagnetic fields inside and about a complicated system of scattering bodies, as well as in their far-field region. The finite element method (FE) is well suited to solving the interior problem, but the domain has to be limited to a manageable size. At the truncation of the FE mesh one can either impose approximate (absorbing) boundary conditions or set up an integral equation (IE) for the fields scattered from the bodies. The latter approach is preferable since it results in higher accuracy. Hence, the two techniques can be successfully combined by introducing a surface that encloses the scatterers, applying a FE model to the inner volume and setting up an IE for the tangential fields components on the surface. Here the continuity of the tangential fields is used bo obtain a consistent solution. A few coupled FE-IE methods have recently appeared in the literature. The approach presented here has the advantage of using edge-based finite elements, a type of finite elements with degrees of freedom associated with edges of the mesh. Because of their properties, they are better suited than the conventional node based elements to represent electromagnetic fields, particularly when inhomogeneous regions are modeled, since the node based elements impose an unnatural continuity of all field components across boundaries of mesh elements. Additionally, our approach is well suited to handle large size problems and lends itself to code parallelization. We will discuss the salient features that make our approach very efficient from the standpoint of numerical computation, and the fields and RCS of a few objects are illustrated as examples.

  14. Dynamic finite-element model for efficient modelling of electric currents in electroporated tissue.

    PubMed

    Langus, J; Kranjc, M; Kos, B; Šuštar, T; Miklavčič, D

    2016-01-01

    In silico experiments (numerical simulations) are a valuable tool for non-invasive research of the influences of tissue properties, electrode placement and electric pulse delivery scenarios in the process of electroporation. The work described in this article was aimed at introducing time dependent effects into a finite element model developed specifically for electroporation. Reference measurements were made ex vivo on beef liver samples and experimental data were used both as an initial condition for simulation (applied pulse voltage) and as a reference value for numerical model calibration (measured pulse current). The developed numerical model is able to predict the time evolution of an electric pulse current within a 5% error over a broad range of applied pulse voltages, pulse durations and pulse repetition frequencies. Given the good agreement of the current flowing between the electrodes, we are confident that the results of our numerical model can be used both for detailed in silico research of electroporation mechanisms (giving researchers insight into time domain effects) and better treatment planning algorithms, which predict the outcome of treatment based on both spatial and temporal distributions of applied electric pulses. PMID:27211822

  15. Dynamic finite-element model for efficient modelling of electric currents in electroporated tissue

    PubMed Central

    Langus, J.; Kranjc, M.; Kos, B.; Šuštar, T.; Miklavčič, D.

    2016-01-01

    In silico experiments (numerical simulations) are a valuable tool for non-invasive research of the influences of tissue properties, electrode placement and electric pulse delivery scenarios in the process of electroporation. The work described in this article was aimed at introducing time dependent effects into a finite element model developed specifically for electroporation. Reference measurements were made ex vivo on beef liver samples and experimental data were used both as an initial condition for simulation (applied pulse voltage) and as a reference value for numerical model calibration (measured pulse current). The developed numerical model is able to predict the time evolution of an electric pulse current within a 5% error over a broad range of applied pulse voltages, pulse durations and pulse repetition frequencies. Given the good agreement of the current flowing between the electrodes, we are confident that the results of our numerical model can be used both for detailed in silico research of electroporation mechanisms (giving researchers insight into time domain effects) and better treatment planning algorithms, which predict the outcome of treatment based on both spatial and temporal distributions of applied electric pulses. PMID:27211822

  16. Dynamic finite-element model for efficient modelling of electric currents in electroporated tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langus, J.; Kranjc, M.; Kos, B.; Šuštar, T.; Miklavčič, D.

    2016-05-01

    In silico experiments (numerical simulations) are a valuable tool for non-invasive research of the influences of tissue properties, electrode placement and electric pulse delivery scenarios in the process of electroporation. The work described in this article was aimed at introducing time dependent effects into a finite element model developed specifically for electroporation. Reference measurements were made ex vivo on beef liver samples and experimental data were used both as an initial condition for simulation (applied pulse voltage) and as a reference value for numerical model calibration (measured pulse current). The developed numerical model is able to predict the time evolution of an electric pulse current within a 5% error over a broad range of applied pulse voltages, pulse durations and pulse repetition frequencies. Given the good agreement of the current flowing between the electrodes, we are confident that the results of our numerical model can be used both for detailed in silico research of electroporation mechanisms (giving researchers insight into time domain effects) and better treatment planning algorithms, which predict the outcome of treatment based on both spatial and temporal distributions of applied electric pulses.

  17. Finite Element Analysis Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-05-07

    CONEX is a code for joining sequentially in time multiple exodusll database files which all represent the same base mesh topology and geometry. It is used to create a single results or restart file from multiple results or restart files which typically arise as the result of multiple restarted analyses. CONEX is used to postprocess the results from a series of finite element analyses. It can join sequentially the data from multiple results databases intomore » a single database which makes it easier to postprocess the results data.« less

  18. Finite Element Analysis Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-06-26

    Exotxt is an analysis code that reads finite element results data stored in an exodusII file and generates a file in a structured text format. The text file can be edited or modified via a number of text formatting tools. Exotxt is used by analysis to translate data from the binary exodusII format into a structured text format which can then be edited or modified and then either translated back to exodusII format or tomore » another format.« less

  19. Probabilistic fracture finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. K.; Belytschko, T.; Lua, Y. J.

    1991-01-01

    The Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics (PFM) is a promising method for estimating the fatigue life and inspection cycles for mechanical and structural components. The Probability Finite Element Method (PFEM), which is based on second moment analysis, has proved to be a promising, practical approach to handle problems with uncertainties. As the PFEM provides a powerful computational tool to determine first and second moment of random parameters, the second moment reliability method can be easily combined with PFEM to obtain measures of the reliability of the structural system. The method is also being applied to fatigue crack growth. Uncertainties in the material properties of advanced materials such as polycrystalline alloys, ceramics, and composites are commonly observed from experimental tests. This is mainly attributed to intrinsic microcracks, which are randomly distributed as a result of the applied load and the residual stress.

  20. Development of a Field Concentrator Coil by Finite Element Modeling for Power Efficiency Optimization in Eddy Current Thermography Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, M.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Luneau, F.; Bendada, H.; Maldague, X.

    2010-02-01

    Eddy current thermography is a relatively new inspection technique that takes advantage of the electromagnetic induction phenomenon to generate heat in electro conductive materials during inspection. An interesting advantage of eddy current heating compared to classical optical or ultrasonic heating is that the excitation source is smaller and can be conveniently shaped in order to provide energy efficient localized heating. Such excitation source is more suitable for the development of portable instruments and to perform field inspections. In this paper, finite element modeling (FEM) is used to optimize the eddy current coil configuration in terms of heating power efficiency. The performances of air-core coils, normally used in eddy current thermography, and a new field concentrator coil are compared and discussed. FEM results demonstrate that the proposed field concentrator coil improves the magnetic coupling with the inspected material and requires less energy than air-core coils to generate the same temperature variation.

  1. Space-time finite-element objects: Efficiently modeling physically complex flows

    SciTech Connect

    Dilts, G.A.

    1996-03-28

    Accurate modeling of high-explosive systems requires detailed consideration of many different physical properties and processes: These diverse processes generally occur in localized regions of the problem. Thus the very partial differential equations used to mathematically model the problem change from one region of space and time to another. The numerical algorithms generally used to solve these equations are frequently conceived in terms of data values for physical field variables u{sup i} defined at a number of spatial points indexed by multi-integer subscripts x{sub J}, resulting in a number of discrete state variables u{sup i}{sub J}. Instead of using as the fundamental object a physical field, which naturally maps to an array, the authors imagine a small piece of space modeled for a small amount of time, a space-time ``element``. Within it, various physical processes occur at various times. Self-contained, it gives account of what happens within its borders. It cooperates with a set of neighbors that organize into meshes, which organize into problems. The authors achieve in the software model a decoupling between the where and the how and the what, lack of which historically has been the source of a great deal of the software overhead of modelling continuum systems, and which is a necessary consequence of writing down u{sup i}{sub J}. An efficient implementation of this idea requires a reformulation of the discretization and solution of systems of conservation laws, and careful class design. A working prototype for systems in one space dimension using Mathematica and C++ is provided.

  2. A Stiffness Reduction Method for efficient absorption of waves at boundaries for use in commercial Finite Element codes.

    PubMed

    Pettit, J R; Walker, A; Cawley, P; Lowe, M J S

    2014-09-01

    Commercially available Finite Element packages are being used increasingly for modelling elastic wave propagation problems. Demand for improved capability has resulted in a drive to maximise the efficiency of the solver whilst maintaining a reliable solution. Modelling waves in unbound elastic media to high levels of accuracy presents a challenge for commercial packages, requiring the removal of unwanted reflections from model boundaries. For time domain explicit solvers, Absorbing Layers by Increasing Damping (ALID) have proven successful because they offer flexible application to modellers and, unlike the Perfectly Matched Layers (PMLs) approach, they are readily implemented in most commercial Finite Element software without requiring access to the source code. However, despite good overall performance, this technique requires the spatial model to extend significantly outside the domain of interest. Here, a Stiffness Reduction Method (SRM) has been developed that operates within a significantly reduced spatial domain. The technique is applied by altering the damping and stiffness matrices of the system, inducing decay of any incident wave. Absorbing region variables are expressed as a function of known model constants, helping to apply the technique to generic elastodynamic problems. The SRM has been shown to perform significantly better than ALID, with results confirmed by both numerical and analytical means. PMID:24359871

  3. The Coupling of Finite Element and Integral Equation Representations for Efficient Three-Dimensional Modeling of Electromagnetic Scattering and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom; Zuffada, Cinzia; Jamnejad, Vahraz

    1996-01-01

    Finite element modeling has proven useful for accurtely simulating scattered or radiated fields from complex three-dimensional objects whose geometry varies on the scale of a fraction of a wavelength.

  4. Spectral finite element based on an efficient layerwise theory for wave propagation analysis of composite and sandwich beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanda, Namita; Kapuria, S.; Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we present a spectral finite element model (SFEM) using an efficient and accurate layerwise (zigzag) theory, which is applicable for wave propagation analysis of highly inhomogeneous laminated composite and sandwich beams. The theory assumes a layerwise linear variation superimposed with a global third-order variation across the thickness for the axial displacement. The conditions of zero transverse shear stress at the top and bottom and its continuity at the layer interfaces are subsequently enforced to make the number of primary unknowns independent of the number of layers, thereby making the theory as efficient as the first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT). The spectral element developed is validated by comparing the present results with those available in the literature. A comparison of the natural frequencies of simply supported composite and sandwich beams obtained by the present spectral element with the exact two-dimensional elasticity and FSDT solutions reveals that the FSDT yields highly inaccurate results for the inhomogeneous sandwich beams and thick composite beams, whereas the present element based on the zigzag theory agrees very well with the exact elasticity solution for both thick and thin, composite and sandwich beams. A significant deviation in the dispersion relations obtained using the accurate zigzag theory and the FSDT is also observed for composite beams at high frequencies. It is shown that the pure shear rotation mode remains always evanescent, contrary to what has been reported earlier. The SFEM is subsequently used to study wavenumber dispersion, free vibration and wave propagation time history in soft-core sandwich beams with composite faces for the first time in the literature.

  5. Computational efficiency of numerical approximations of tangent moduli for finite element implementation of a fiber-reinforced hyperelastic material model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haofei; Sun, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated computational efficiency of finite element (FE) simulations when a numerical approximation method was used to obtain the tangent moduli. A fiber-reinforced hyperelastic material model for nearly incompressible soft tissues was implemented for 3D solid elements using both the approximation method and the closed-form analytical method, and validated by comparing the components of the tangent modulus tensor (also referred to as the material Jacobian) between the two methods. The computational efficiency of the approximation method was evaluated with different perturbation parameters and approximation schemes, and quantified by the number of iteration steps and CPU time required to complete these simulations. From the simulation results, it can be seen that the overall accuracy of the approximation method is improved by adopting the central difference approximation scheme compared to the forward Euler approximation scheme. For small-scale simulations with about 10,000 DOFs, the approximation schemes could reduce the CPU time substantially compared to the closed-form solution, due to the fact that fewer calculation steps are needed at each integration point. However, for a large-scale simulation with about 300,000 DOFs, the advantages of the approximation schemes diminish because the factorization of the stiffness matrix will dominate the solution time. Overall, as it is material model independent, the approximation method simplifies the FE implementation of a complex constitutive model with comparable accuracy and computational efficiency to the closed-form solution, which makes it attractive in FE simulations with complex material models. PMID:26692168

  6. The finite element method in thermomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, T.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal stress analysis is critical in the design and operation of energy-efficient power plant components and engines as well as in nuclear and aerospace systems. The Finite Element Method in Thermomechanics attempts to embrace a wide range of topics in the nonlinear thermomechanical analysis. The book covers the basic principles of the finite element method: the formulations for the base thermomechanical analysis, including thermoelastic-plastic-creep stress analysis; the use of Fourier series for nonaxisymmetric loadings, and stress waves in solids in thermal environments; and the base finite element code called TEPSAC.

  7. Efficiency of group implicit concurrent algorithms for transient finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, M.; Sotelino, E. D.; Nour-Omid, B.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of group implicit algorithms is assessed on actual concurrent computers. It is shown that, as the number of subdomains is increased, performance enhancements are derived from two sources: the increased parallelism in the computations; and a reduction in equation solving effort. Moreover, these two performance enhancements are synergistic, in the sense that the corresponding speed-ups are multiplied, rather than merely added. Simulations on a 32-node hypercube are presented for which the interprocessor communications efficiencies obtained are consistently in excess of 90 percent.

  8. Computationally-efficient finite-element-based thermal and electromagnetic models of electric machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kan

    With the modern trend of transportation electrification, electric machines are a key component of electric/hybrid electric vehicle (EV/HEV) powertrains. It is therefore important that vehicle powertrain-level and system-level designers and control engineers have access to accurate yet computationally-efficient (CE), physics-based modeling tools of the thermal and electromagnetic (EM) behavior of electric machines. In this dissertation, CE yet sufficiently-accurate thermal and EM models for electric machines, which are suitable for use in vehicle powertrain design, optimization, and control, are developed. This includes not only creating fast and accurate thermal and EM models for specific machine designs, but also the ability to quickly generate and determine the performance of new machine designs through the application of scaling techniques to existing designs. With the developed techniques, the thermal and EM performance can be accurately and efficiently estimated. Furthermore, powertrain or system designers can easily and quickly adjust the characteristics and the performance of the machine in ways that are favorable to the overall vehicle performance.

  9. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Finite element analysis as applied to the broad spectrum of computational fluid mechanics is analyzed. The finite element solution methodology is derived, developed, and applied directly to the differential equation systems governing classes of problems in fluid mechanics. The heat conduction equation is used to reveal the essence and elegance of finite element theory, including higher order accuracy and convergence. The algorithm is extended to the pervasive nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. A specific fluid mechanics problem class is analyzed with an even mix of theory and applications, including turbulence closure and the solution of turbulent flows.

  10. The Efficiency of Various Computers and Optimizations in Performing Finite Element Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, Martin H.; Broduer, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    With the advent of computers with many processors, it becomes unclear how to best exploit this advantage. For example, matrices can be inverted by applying several processors to each vector operation, or one processor can be applied to each matrix. The former approach has diminishing returns beyond a handful of processors, but how many processors depends on the computer architecture. Applying one processor to each matrix is feasible with enough ram memory and scratch disk space, but the speed at which this is done is found to vary by a factor of three depending on how it is done. The cost of the computer must also be taken into account. A computer with many processors and fast interprocessor communication is much more expensive than the same computer and processors with slow interprocessor communication. Consequently, for problems that require several matrices to be inverted, the best speed per dollar for computers is found to be several small workstations that are networked together, such as in a Beowulf cluster. Since these machines typically have two processors per node, each matrix is most efficiently inverted with no more than two processors assigned to it.

  11. Toward automatic finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kela, Ajay; Perucchio, Renato; Voelcker, Herbert

    1987-01-01

    Two problems must be solved if the finite element method is to become a reliable and affordable blackbox engineering tool. Finite element meshes must be generated automatically from computer aided design databases and mesh analysis must be made self-adaptive. The experimental system described solves both problems in 2-D through spatial and analytical substructuring techniques that are now being extended into 3-D.

  12. Second order tensor finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. Tinsley; Fly, J.; Berry, C.; Tworzydlo, W.; Vadaketh, S.; Bass, J.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a research and software development effort are presented for the finite element modeling of the static and dynamic behavior of anisotropic materials, with emphasis on single crystal alloys. Various versions of two dimensional and three dimensional hybrid finite elements were implemented and compared with displacement-based elements. Both static and dynamic cases are considered. The hybrid elements developed in the project were incorporated into the SPAR finite element code. In an extension of the first phase of the project, optimization of experimental tests for anisotropic materials was addressed. In particular, the problem of calculating material properties from tensile tests and of calculating stresses from strain measurements were considered. For both cases, numerical procedures and software for the optimization of strain gauge and material axes orientation were developed.

  13. The NESSUS finite element code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dias, J. B.; Nagiegaal, J. C.; Nakazawa, S.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this development is to provide a new analysis tool which integrates the structural modeling versatility of a modern finite element code with the latest advances in the area of probabilistic modeling and structural reliability. Version 2.0 of the NESSUS finite element code was released last February, and is currently being exercised on a set of problems which are representative of typical Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) applications. NESSUS 2.0 allows linear elastostatic and eigenvalue analysis of structures with uncertain geometry, material properties and boundary conditions, which are subjected to a random mechanical and thermal loading environment. The NESSUS finite element code is a key component in a broader software system consisting of five major modules. NESSUS/EXPERT is an expert system under development at Southwest Research Institute, with the objective of centralizing all component-specific knowledge useful for conducting probabilistic analysis of typical Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) components. NESSUS/FEM contains the finite element code used for the structural analysis and parameter sensitivity evaluation of these components. The task of parametrizing a finite element mesh in terms of the random variables present is facilitated with the use of the probabilistic data preprocessor in NESSUS/PRE. An external database file is used for managing the bulk of the data generated by NESSUS/FEM.

  14. Finite elements: Theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwoyer, D. L. (Editor); Hussaini, M. Y. (Editor); Voigt, R. G. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances in FEM techniques and applications are discussed in reviews and reports presented at the ICASE/LaRC workshop held in Hampton, VA in July 1986. Topics addressed include FEM approaches for partial differential equations, mixed FEMs, singular FEMs, FEMs for hyperbolic systems, iterative methods for elliptic finite-element equations on general meshes, mathematical aspects of FEMS for incompressible viscous flows, and gradient weighted moving finite elements in two dimensions. Consideration is given to adaptive flux-corrected FEM transport techniques for CFD, mixed and singular finite elements and the field BEM, p and h-p versions of the FEM, transient analysis methods in computational dynamics, and FEMs for integrated flow/thermal/structural analysis.

  15. Improved finite element methodology for integrated thermal structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechaumphai, P.; Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    An integrated thermal-structural finite element approach for efficient coupling of thermal and structural analyses is presented. New thermal finite elements which yield exact nodal and element temperature for one dimensional linear steady state heat transfer problems are developed. A nodeless variable formulation is used to establish improved thermal finite elements for one dimensional nonlinear transient and two dimensional linear transient heat transfer problems. The thermal finite elements provide detailed temperature distributions without using additional element nodes and permit a common discretization with lower order congruent structural finite elements. The accuracy of the integrated approach is evaluated by comparisons with analytical solutions and conventional finite element thermal-structural analyses for a number of academic and more realistic problems. Results indicate that the approach provides a significant improvement in the accuracy and efficiency of thermal stress analysis for structures with complex temperature distributions.

  16. Nonlinear, finite deformation, finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Nhung; Waas, Anthony M.

    2016-06-01

    The roles of the consistent Jacobian matrix and the material tangent moduli, which are used in nonlinear incremental finite deformation mechanics problems solved using the finite element method, are emphasized in this paper, and demonstrated using the commercial software ABAQUS standard. In doing so, the necessity for correctly employing user material subroutines to solve nonlinear problems involving large deformation and/or large rotation is clarified. Starting with the rate form of the principle of virtual work, the derivations of the material tangent moduli, the consistent Jacobian matrix, the stress/strain measures, and the objective stress rates are discussed and clarified. The difference between the consistent Jacobian matrix (which, in the ABAQUS UMAT user material subroutine is referred to as DDSDDE) and the material tangent moduli ( C e ) needed for the stress update is pointed out and emphasized in this paper. While the former is derived based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress, the latter is derived using the Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress. Understanding the difference between these two objective stress rates is crucial for correctly implementing a constitutive model, especially a rate form constitutive relation, and for ensuring fast convergence. Specifically, the implementation requires the stresses to be updated correctly. For this, the strains must be computed directly from the deformation gradient and corresponding strain measure (for a total form model). Alternatively, the material tangent moduli derived from the corresponding Jaumann rate of the Cauchy stress of the constitutive relation (for a rate form model) should be used. Given that this requirement is satisfied, the consistent Jacobian matrix only influences the rate of convergence. Its derivation should be based on the Jaumann rate of the Kirchhoff stress to ensure fast convergence; however, the use of a different objective stress rate may also be possible. The error associated

  17. Efficiency comparison of an augmented finite element formulation with standard return mapping algorithms for elastic-inelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempler, H.-U.; Wieners, C.; Ehlers, W.

    2011-11-01

    The numerical simulation of elastic-inelastic material behaviour is reviewed and an alternative method, i. e., an augmented Finite Element (FE) formulation is presented. For the augmented FE formulation, the history variables, which provide the information of inelastic deformations from previous time-steps, are represented as FE functions. The discretisation of the augmented system results in additional degrees of freedom (DOF). As a result, generally accepted standard formulations for evaluating inelastic deformations in a numeric sub-step can now be replaced by a fully coupled Newton method. Then, it is not required to solve additional local systems. Both numerical methods are exemplarily applied to a viscoplastic Perzyna-type regularisation of softening material behaviour within a geometrically linear approach in order to simulate the development of shear bands occurring in a tensile bar. Numerical studies prove comparative results, while exhibiting a computational speed-up for the augmented FE formulation.

  18. An Efficient Finite Element Framework to Assess Flexibility Performances of SMA Self-Expandable Carotid Artery Stents

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Mauro; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Boatti, Elisa; Scalet, Giulia; Conti, Michele; Morganti, Simone; Reali, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Computer-based simulations are nowadays widely exploited for the prediction of the mechanical behavior of different biomedical devices. In this aspect, structural finite element analyses (FEA) are currently the preferred computational tool to evaluate the stent response under bending. This work aims at developing a computational framework based on linear and higher order FEA to evaluate the flexibility of self-expandable carotid artery stents. In particular, numerical simulations involving large deformations and inelastic shape memory alloy constitutive modeling are performed, and the results suggest that the employment of higher order FEA allows accurately representing the computational domain and getting a better approximation of the solution with a widely-reduced number of degrees of freedom with respect to linear FEA. Moreover, when buckling phenomena occur, higher order FEA presents a superior capability of reproducing the nonlinear local effects related to buckling phenomena. PMID:26184329

  19. A multigrid solution method for mixed hybrid finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, W.

    1996-12-31

    We consider the multigrid solution of linear equations arising within the discretization of elliptic second order boundary value problems of the form by mixed hybrid finite elements. Using the equivalence of mixed hybrid finite elements and non-conforming nodal finite elements, we construct a multigrid scheme for the corresponding non-conforming finite elements, and, by this equivalence, for the mixed hybrid finite elements, following guidelines from Arbogast/Chen. For a rectangular triangulation of the computational domain, this non-conforming schemes are the so-called nodal finite elements. We explicitly construct prolongation and restriction operators for this type of non-conforming finite elements. We discuss the use of plain multigrid and the multilevel-preconditioned cg-method and compare their efficiency in numerical tests.

  20. Domain decomposition finite element/finite difference method for the conductivity reconstruction in a hyperbolic equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilina, Larisa

    2016-08-01

    We present domain decomposition finite element/finite difference method for the solution of hyperbolic equation. The domain decomposition is performed such that finite elements and finite differences are used in different subdomains of the computational domain: finite difference method is used on the structured part of the computational domain and finite elements on the unstructured part of the domain. Explicit discretizations for both methods are constructed such that the finite element and the finite difference schemes coincide on the common structured overlapping layer between computational subdomains. Then the resulting approach can be considered as a pure finite element scheme which avoids instabilities at the interfaces. We derive an energy estimate for the underlying hyperbolic equation with absorbing boundary conditions and illustrate efficiency of the domain decomposition method on the reconstruction of the conductivity function in three dimensions.

  1. ANSYS duplicate finite-element checker routine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, R.

    1995-01-01

    An ANSYS finite-element code routine to check for duplicated elements within the volume of a three-dimensional (3D) finite-element mesh was developed. The routine developed is used for checking floating elements within a mesh, identically duplicated elements, and intersecting elements with a common face. A space shuttle main engine alternate turbopump development high pressure oxidizer turbopump finite-element model check using the developed subroutine is discussed. Finally, recommendations are provided for duplicate element checking of 3D finite-element models.

  2. Infinite Possibilities for the Finite Element.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlayson, Bruce A.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the uses of finite element methods in solving problems of heat transfer, fluid flow, etc. Suggests that engineers should know the general concepts and be able to apply the principles of finite element methods. (Author/WB)

  3. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Timothy; Bond, Stephen D.; Littlewood, David John; Moore, Stan Gerald

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  4. Parallel iterative procedures for approximate solutions of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.

    1994-12-31

    Parallel iterative procedures based on domain decomposition techniques are defined and analyzed for the numerical solution of wave propagation by finite element and finite difference methods. For finite element methods, in a Lagrangian framework, an efficient way for choosing the algorithm parameter as well as the algorithm convergence are indicated. Some heuristic arguments for finding the algorithm parameter for finite difference schemes are addressed. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effectiveness of the methods.

  5. A computationally efficient finite element model with perfectly matched layers applied to scattering from axially symmetric objects.

    PubMed

    Zampolli, Mario; Tesei, Alessandra; Jensen, Finn B; Malm, Nils; Blottman, John B

    2007-09-01

    A frequency-domain finite-element (FE) technique for computing the radiation and scattering from axially symmetric fluid-loaded structures subject to a nonsymmetric forcing field is presented. The Berenger perfectly matched layer (PML), applied directly at the fluid-structure interface, makes it possible to emulate the Sommerfeld radiation condition using FE meshes of minimal size. For those cases where the acoustic field is computed over a band of frequencies, the meshing process is simplified by the use of a wavelength-dependent rescaling of the PML coordinates. Quantitative geometry discretization guidelines are obtained from a priori estimates of small-scale structural wavelengths, which dominate the acoustic field at low to mid frequencies. One particularly useful feature of the PML is that it can be applied across the interface between different fluids. This makes it possible to use the present tool to solve problems where the radiating or scattering objects are located inside a layered fluid medium. The proposed technique is verified by comparison with analytical solutions and with validated numerical models. The solutions presented show close agreement for a set of test problems ranging from scattering to underwater propagation. PMID:17927408

  6. Finite element methods in numerical relativity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, P. J.

    The finite element method is very successful in Newtonian fluid simulations, and can be extended to relativitstic fluid flows. This paper describes the general method, and then outlines some preliminary results for spherically symmetric geometries. The mixed finite element - finite difference scheme is introduced, and used for the description of spherically symmetric collapse. Baker's (Newtonian) shock modelling method and Miller's moving finite element method are also mentioned. Collapse in double-null coordinates requires non-constant time slicing, so the full finite element method in space and time is described.

  7. Finite element and finite difference methods in electromagnetic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Michael A.

    Finite-difference and finite-element methods for the computational analysis of EM scattering phenomena are examined in chapters contributed by leading experts. Topics addressed include an FEM for composite scatterers, coupled finite- and boundary-element methods for EM scattering, absorbing boundary conditions for the direct solution PDEs arising in EM scattering problems, application of the control-region approximation to two-dimensional EM scattering, coupled potentials for EM fields in inhomogeneous media, the method of conforming boundary elements for transient electromagnetics, and the finite-difference time-domain method for numerical modeling of EM wave interactions with arbitrary structures. Extensive diagrams and graphs of typical results are provided.

  8. Probabilistic finite element analysis of a craniofacial finite element model.

    PubMed

    Berthaume, Michael A; Dechow, Paul C; Iriarte-Diaz, Jose; Ross, Callum F; Strait, David S; Wang, Qian; Grosse, Ian R

    2012-05-01

    We employed a probabilistic finite element analysis (FEA) method to determine how variability in material property values affects stress and strain values in a finite model of a Macaca fascicularis cranium. The material behavior of cortical bone varied in three ways: isotropic homogeneous, isotropic non-homogeneous, and orthotropic non-homogeneous. The material behavior of the trabecular bone and teeth was always treated as isotropic and homogeneous. All material property values for the cranium were randomized with a Gaussian distribution with either coefficients of variation (CVs) of 0.2 or with CVs calculated from empirical data. Latin hypercube sampling was used to determine the values of the material properties used in the finite element models. In total, four hundred and twenty six separate deterministic FE simulations were executed. We tested four hypotheses in this study: (1) uncertainty in material property values will have an insignificant effect on high stresses and a significant effect on high strains for homogeneous isotropic models; (2) the effect of variability in material property values on the stress state will increase as non-homogeneity and anisotropy increase; (3) variation in the in vivo shear strain values reported by Strait et al. (2005) and Ross et al. (2011) is not only due to variations in muscle forces and cranial morphology, but also due to variation in material property values; (4) the assumption of a uniform coefficient of variation for the material property values will result in the same trend in how moderate-to-high stresses and moderate-to-high strains vary with respect to the degree of non-homogeneity and anisotropy as the trend found when the coefficients of variation for material property values are calculated from empirical data. Our results supported the first three hypotheses and falsified the fourth. When material properties were varied with a constant CV, as non-homogeneity and anisotropy increased the level of variability in

  9. FESDIF -- Finite Element Scalar Diffraction theory code

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, H.G.

    1992-09-01

    This document describes the theory and use of a powerful scalar diffraction theory based computer code for calculation of intensity fields due to diffraction of optical waves by two-dimensional planar apertures and lenses. This code is called FESDIF (Finite Element Scalar Diffraction). It is based upon both Fraunhofer and Kirchhoff scalar diffraction theories. Simplified routines for circular apertures are included. However, the real power of the code comes from its basis in finite element methods. These methods allow the diffracting aperture to be virtually any geometric shape, including the various secondary aperture obstructions present in telescope systems. Aperture functions, with virtually any phase and amplitude variations, are allowed in the aperture openings. Step change aperture functions are accommodated. The incident waves are considered to be monochromatic. Plane waves, spherical waves, or Gaussian laser beams may be incident upon the apertures. Both area and line integral transformations were developed for the finite element based diffraction transformations. There is some loss of aperture function generality in the line integral transformations which are typically many times more computationally efficient than the area integral transformations when applicable to a particular problem.

  10. Variational approach to probabilistic finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belytschko, T.; Liu, W. K.; Mani, A.; Besterfield, G.

    1987-01-01

    Probabilistic finite element method (PFEM), synthesizing the power of finite element methods with second-moment techniques, are formulated for various classes of problems in structural and solid mechanics. Time-invariant random materials, geometric properties, and loads are incorporated in terms of their fundamental statistics viz. second-moments. Analogous to the discretization of the displacement field in finite element methods, the random fields are also discretized. Preserving the conceptual simplicity, the response moments are calculated with minimal computations. By incorporating certain computational techniques, these methods are shown to be capable of handling large systems with many sources of uncertainties. By construction, these methods are applicable when the scale of randomness is not very large and when the probabilistic density functions have decaying tails. The accuracy and efficiency of these methods, along with their limitations, are demonstrated by various applications. Results obtained are compared with those of Monte Carlo simulation and it is shown that good accuracy can be obtained for both linear and nonlinear problems. The methods are amenable to implementation in deterministic FEM based computer codes.

  11. Variational approach to probabilistic finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belytschko, T.; Liu, W. K.; Mani, A.; Besterfield, G.

    1991-01-01

    Probabilistic finite element methods (PFEM), synthesizing the power of finite element methods with second-moment techniques, are formulated for various classes of problems in structural and solid mechanics. Time-invariant random materials, geometric properties and loads are incorporated in terms of their fundamental statistics viz. second-moments. Analogous to the discretization of the displacement field in finite element methods, the random fields are also discretized. Preserving the conceptual simplicity, the response moments are calculated with minimal computations. By incorporating certain computational techniques, these methods are shown to be capable of handling large systems with many sources of uncertainties. By construction, these methods are applicable when the scale of randomness is not very large and when the probabilistic density functions have decaying tails. The accuracy and efficiency of these methods, along with their limitations, are demonstrated by various applications. Results obtained are compared with those of Monte Carlo simulation and it is shown that good accuracy can be obtained for both linear and nonlinear problems. The methods are amenable to implementation in deterministic FEM based computer codes.

  12. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  13. Finite Element Analysis of Reverberation Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunting, Charles F.; Nguyen, Duc T.

    2000-01-01

    The primary motivating factor behind the initiation of this work was to provide a deterministic means of establishing the validity of the statistical methods that are recommended for the determination of fields that interact in -an avionics system. The application of finite element analysis to reverberation chambers is the initial step required to establish a reasonable course of inquiry in this particularly data-intensive study. The use of computational electromagnetics provides a high degree of control of the "experimental" parameters that can be utilized in a simulation of reverberating structures. As the work evolved there were four primary focus areas they are: 1. The eigenvalue problem for the source free problem. 2. The development of a complex efficient eigensolver. 3. The application of a source for the TE and TM fields for statistical characterization. 4. The examination of shielding effectiveness in a reverberating environment. One early purpose of this work was to establish the utility of finite element techniques in the development of an extended low frequency statistical model for reverberation phenomena. By employing finite element techniques, structures of arbitrary complexity can be analyzed due to the use of triangular shape functions in the spatial discretization. The effects of both frequency stirring and mechanical stirring are presented. It is suggested that for the low frequency operation the typical tuner size is inadequate to provide a sufficiently random field and that frequency stirring should be used. The results of the finite element analysis of the reverberation chamber illustrate io-W the potential utility of a 2D representation for enhancing the basic statistical characteristics of the chamber when operating in a low frequency regime. The basic field statistics are verified for frequency stirring over a wide range of frequencies. Mechanical stirring is shown to provide an effective frequency deviation.

  14. Efficient combination of a 3D Quasi-Newton inversion algorithm and a vector dual-primal finite element tearing and interconnecting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voznyuk, I.; Litman, A.; Tortel, H.

    2015-08-01

    A Quasi-Newton method for reconstructing the constitutive parameters of three-dimensional (3D) penetrable scatterers from scattered field measurements is presented. This method is adapted for handling large-scale electromagnetic problems while keeping the memory requirement and the time flexibility as low as possible. The forward scattering problem is solved by applying the finite-element tearing and interconnecting full-dual-primal (FETI-FDP2) method which shares the same spirit as the domain decomposition methods for finite element methods. The idea is to split the computational domain into smaller non-overlapping sub-domains in order to simultaneously solve local sub-problems. Various strategies are proposed in order to efficiently couple the inversion algorithm with the FETI-FDP2 method: a separation into permanent and non-permanent subdomains is performed, iterative solvers are favorized for resolving the interface problem and a marching-on-in-anything initial guess selection further accelerates the process. The computational burden is also reduced by applying the adjoint state vector methodology. Finally, the inversion algorithm is confronted to measurements extracted from the 3D Fresnel database.

  15. Adaptive Finite Element Methods in Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, R.; Davies, H.; Hassan, O.; Morgan, K.; Nithiarasu, P.

    2006-12-01

    Adaptive finite element methods are presented for improving the quality of solutions to two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) convection dominated problems in geodynamics. The methods demonstrate the application of existing technology in the engineering community to problems within the `solid' Earth sciences. Two-Dimensional `Adaptive Remeshing': The `remeshing' strategy introduced in 2D adapts the mesh automatically around regions of high solution gradient, yielding enhanced resolution of the associated flow features. The approach requires the coupling of an automatic mesh generator, a finite element flow solver and an error estimator. In this study, the procedure is implemented in conjunction with the well-known geodynamical finite element code `ConMan'. An unstructured quadrilateral mesh generator is utilised, with mesh adaptation accomplished through regeneration. This regeneration employs information provided by an interpolation based local error estimator, obtained from the computed solution on an existing mesh. The technique is validated by solving thermal and thermo-chemical problems with known benchmark solutions. In a purely thermal context, results illustrate that the method is highly successful, improving solution accuracy whilst increasing computational efficiency. For thermo-chemical simulations the same conclusions can be drawn. However, results also demonstrate that the grid based methods employed for simulating the compositional field are not competitive with the other methods (tracer particle and marker chain) currently employed in this field, even at the higher spatial resolutions allowed by the adaptive grid strategies. Three-Dimensional Adaptive Multigrid: We extend the ideas from our 2D work into the 3D realm in the context of a pre-existing 3D-spherical mantle dynamics code, `TERRA'. In its original format, `TERRA' is computationally highly efficient since it employs a multigrid solver that depends upon a grid utilizing a clever

  16. FEBio: finite elements for biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Maas, Steve A; Ellis, Benjamin J; Ateshian, Gerard A; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2012-01-01

    In the field of computational biomechanics, investigators have primarily used commercial software that is neither geared toward biological applications nor sufficiently flexible to follow the latest developments in the field. This lack of a tailored software environment has hampered research progress, as well as dissemination of models and results. To address these issues, we developed the FEBio software suite (http://mrl.sci.utah.edu/software/febio), a nonlinear implicit finite element (FE) framework, designed specifically for analysis in computational solid biomechanics. This paper provides an overview of the theoretical basis of FEBio and its main features. FEBio offers modeling scenarios, constitutive models, and boundary conditions, which are relevant to numerous applications in biomechanics. The open-source FEBio software is written in C++, with particular attention to scalar and parallel performance on modern computer architectures. Software verification is a large part of the development and maintenance of FEBio, and to demonstrate the general approach, the description and results of several problems from the FEBio Verification Suite are presented and compared to analytical solutions or results from other established and verified FE codes. An additional simulation is described that illustrates the application of FEBio to a research problem in biomechanics. Together with the pre- and postprocessing software PREVIEW and POSTVIEW, FEBio provides a tailored solution for research and development in computational biomechanics. PMID:22482660

  17. Finite element coiled cochlea model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isailovic, Velibor; Nikolic, Milica; Milosevic, Zarko; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Radovic, Milos; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    Cochlea is important part of the hearing system, and thanks to special structure converts external sound waves into neural impulses which go to the brain. Shape of the cochlea is like snail, so geometry of the cochlea model is complex. The simplified cochlea coiled model was developed using finite element method inside SIFEM FP7 project. Software application is created on the way that user can prescribe set of the parameters for spiral cochlea, as well as material properties and boundary conditions to the model. Several mathematical models were tested. The acoustic wave equation for describing fluid in the cochlea chambers - scala vestibuli and scala timpani, and Newtonian dynamics for describing vibrations of the basilar membrane are used. The mechanical behavior of the coiled cochlea was analyzed and the third chamber, scala media, was not modeled because it does not have a significant impact on the mechanical vibrations of the basilar membrane. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Future work is needed for more realistic geometry model. Coiled model of the cochlea was created and results are compared with initial simplified coiled model of the cochlea.

  18. Element-topology-independent preconditioners for parallel finite element computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alexander, Scott

    1992-01-01

    A family of preconditioners for the solution of finite element equations are presented, which are element-topology independent and thus can be applicable to element order-free parallel computations. A key feature of the present preconditioners is the repeated use of element connectivity matrices and their left and right inverses. The properties and performance of the present preconditioners are demonstrated via beam and two-dimensional finite element matrices for implicit time integration computations.

  19. Graphics for Finite-Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Sawyer, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    ELPLOT program is a passive computer graphics system that could be utilized for display of models and responses of general finite-element analyses. Program includes: Wide range of view-orientation selections, number of alternative data-input formats, extensive family of finite-element types, and capabilities for both static and dynamic-response displays.

  20. 3-D Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-07-15

    TAURUS is an interactive post-processing application supporting visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. TAURUS provides the ability to display deformed geometries and contours or fringes of a large number of derived results on meshes consisting of beam, plate, shell, and solid type finite elements. Time history plotting is also available.

  1. Finite-Element Composite-Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Finite Element Composite Analysis Program, FECAP, special-purpose finite-element program for analyzing behavior of composite material with microcomputer. Procedure leads to set of linear simultaneous equations relating unknown nodal displacement to applied loads. Written in HP BASIC 3.0.

  2. Finite element analysis of helicopter structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Application of the finite element analysis is now being expanded to three dimensional analysis of mechanical components. Examples are presented for airframe, mechanical components, and composite structure calculations. Data are detailed on the increase of model size, computer usage, and the effect on reducing stress analysis costs. Future applications for use of finite element analysis for helicopter structures are projected.

  3. Implementation and efficiency analysis of an adaptive hp-finite element method for solving boundary value problems for the stationary reaction-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotareva, N. D.; Nikolaev, E. S.

    2016-05-01

    An iterative process implementing an adaptive hp-version of the finite element method (FEM) previously proposed by the authors for the approximate solution of boundary value problems for the stationary reaction-diffusion equation is described. The method relies on piecewise polynomial basis functions and makes use of an adaptive strategy for constructing a sequence of finite-dimensional subspaces based on the computation of correction indicators. Singularly perturbed boundary value test problems with smooth and not very smooth solutions are used to analyze the efficiency of the method in the situation when an approximate solution has to be found with high accuracy. The convergence of the approximate solution to the exact one is investigated depending on the value of the small parameter multiplying the highest derivative, on the family of basis functions and the quadrature formulas used, and on the internal parameters of the method. The method is compared with an adaptive h-version of FEM that also relies on correction indicators and with its nonadaptive variant based on the bisection of grid intervals.

  4. Fuzzy finite element analysis of smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpan, Unyime O.; Koko, Tamunoiyala S.; Orisamolu, Irewole R.; Gallant, B. Keith

    2000-06-01

    A fuzzy finite element based approach is developed for modelling smart structures with vague or imprecise uncertainties. Fuzzy sets are used to represent the uncertainties present in the piezoelectric, mechanical, thermal, and physical properties of the smart structure. In order to facilitate efficient computation, a sensitivity analysis procedure is used to streamline the number of input fuzzy variables, and the vertex fuzzy analysis technique is then used to compute the possibility distributions of the responses of the smart structural system. The methodology has been developed within the framework of the SMARTCOM computational tool for the design/analysis of smart composite structures. The methodology developed is found to be accurate and computationally efficient for solution of practical problems.

  5. Will Finite Elements Replace Structural Mechanics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojalvo, I. U.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a personal view regarding the need for a continued interest and activity in structural methods in general, while viewing finite elements and the computer as simply two specific tools for assisting in this endeavor. An attempt is made to provide some insight as to why finite element methods seem to have "won the war," and to give examples of their more (and less) intelligent use. Items addressed include a highlight of unnecessary limitations of many existing standard finite element codes and where it is felt that further development work is needed.

  6. Quantum algorithms and the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanaro, Ashley; Pallister, Sam

    2016-03-01

    The finite element method is used to approximately solve boundary value problems for differential equations. The method discretizes the parameter space and finds an approximate solution by solving a large system of linear equations. Here we investigate the extent to which the finite element method can be accelerated using an efficient quantum algorithm for solving linear equations. We consider the representative general question of approximately computing a linear functional of the solution to a boundary value problem and compare the quantum algorithm's theoretical performance with that of a standard classical algorithm—the conjugate gradient method. Prior work claimed that the quantum algorithm could be exponentially faster but did not determine the overall classical and quantum run times required to achieve a predetermined solution accuracy. Taking this into account, we find that the quantum algorithm can achieve a polynomial speedup, the extent of which grows with the dimension of the partial differential equation. In addition, we give evidence that no improvement of the quantum algorithm can lead to a superpolynomial speedup when the dimension is fixed and the solution satisfies certain smoothness properties.

  7. Assignment Of Finite Elements To Parallel Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Moktar A.; Flower, Jon W.; Otto, Steve W.

    1990-01-01

    Elements assigned approximately optimally to subdomains. Mapping algorithm based on simulated-annealing concept used to minimize approximate time required to perform finite-element computation on hypercube computer or other network of parallel data processors. Mapping algorithm needed when shape of domain complicated or otherwise not obvious what allocation of elements to subdomains minimizes cost of computation.

  8. Computationally Efficient Finite Element Analysis Method Incorporating Virtual Equivalent Projected Model For Metallic Sandwich Panels With Pyramidal Truss Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, Dae-Yong; Jung, Chang Gyun; Yang, Dong-Yol

    2007-05-17

    Metallic sandwich panels composed of two face sheets and cores with low relative density have lightweight characteristics and various static and dynamic load bearing functions. To predict the forming characteristics, performance, and formability of these structured materials, full 3D modeling and analysis involving tremendous computational time and memory are required. Some constitutive continuum models including homogenization approaches to solve these problems have limitations with respect to the prediction of local buckling of face sheets and inner structures. In this work, a computationally efficient FE-analysis method incorporating a virtual equivalent projected model that enables the simulation of local buckling modes is newly introduced for analysis of metallic sandwich panels. Two-dimensional models using the projected shapes of 3D structures have the same equivalent elastic-plastic properties with original geometries that have anisotropic stiffness, yield strength, and hardening function. The sizes and isotropic properties of the virtual equivalent projected model have been estimated analytically with the same equivalent properties and face buckling strength of the full model. The 3-point bending processes with quasi-two-dimensional loads and boundary conditions are simulated to establish the validity of the proposed method. The deformed shapes and load-displacement curves of the virtual equivalent projected model are found to be almost the same as those of a full three-dimensional FE-analysis while reducing computational time drastically.

  9. Visualization of higher order finite elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David C.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre; Crawford, Richard H.; Khardekar, Rahul Vinay

    2004-04-01

    Finite element meshes are used to approximate the solution to some differential equation when no exact solution exists. A finite element mesh consists of many small (but finite, not infinitesimal or differential) regions of space that partition the problem domain, {Omega}. Each region, or element, or cell has an associated polynomial map, {Phi}, that converts the coordinates of any point, x = ( x y z ), in the element into another value, f(x), that is an approximate solution to the differential equation, as in Figure 1(a). This representation works quite well for axis-aligned regions of space, but when there are curved boundaries on the problem domain, {Omega}, it becomes algorithmically much more difficult to define {Phi} in terms of x. Rather, we define an archetypal element in a new coordinate space, r = ( r s t ), which has a simple, axis-aligned boundary (see Figure 1(b)) and place two maps onto our archetypal element:

  10. A survey of mixed finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brezzi, F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to and an overview of mixed finite element methods. It discusses the mixed formulation of certain basic problems in elasticity and hydrodynamics. It also discusses special techniques for solving the discrete problem.

  11. Finite element modeling of the human pelvis

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, B.

    1995-11-01

    A finite element model of the human pelvis was created using a commercial wire frame image as a template. To test the final mesh, the model`s mechanical behavior was analyzed through finite element analysis and the results were displayed graphically as stress concentrations. In the future, this grid of the pelvis will be integrated with a full leg model and used in side-impact car collision simulations.

  12. Finite-Element Modeling For Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Androlake, S. G.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents study of finite-element mathematical modeling as used in analyzing stresses and strains at joints between thin, shell-like components (e.g., ducts) and thicker components (e.g., flanges or engine blocks). First approach uses global/local model to evaluate system. Provides correct total response and correct representation of stresses away from any discontinuities. Second approach involves development of special transition finite elements to model transitions between shells and thicker structural components.

  13. Computationally efficient magnetic resonance imaging based surface contact modeling as a tool to evaluate joint injuries and outcomes of surgical interventions compared to finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joshua E; Lee, Phil; McIff, Terence E; Toby, E Bruce; Fischer, Kenneth J

    2014-04-01

    Joint injuries and the resulting posttraumatic osteoarthritis (OA) are a significant problem. There is still a need for tools to evaluate joint injuries, their effect on joint mechanics, and the relationship between altered mechanics and OA. Better understanding of injuries and their relationship to OA may aid in the development or refinement of treatment methods. This may be partially achieved by monitoring changes in joint mechanics that are a direct consequence of injury. Techniques such as image-based finite element modeling can provide in vivo joint mechanics data but can also be laborious and computationally expensive. Alternate modeling techniques that can provide similar results in a computationally efficient manner are an attractive prospect. It is likely possible to estimate risk of OA due to injury from surface contact mechanics data alone. The objective of this study was to compare joint contact mechanics from image-based surface contact modeling (SCM) and finite element modeling (FEM) in normal, injured (scapholunate ligament tear), and surgically repaired radiocarpal joints. Since FEM is accepted as the gold standard to evaluate joint contact stresses, our assumption was that results obtained using this method would accurately represent the true value. Magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the normal, injured, and postoperative wrists of three subjects were acquired when relaxed and during functional grasp. Surface and volumetric models of the radiolunate and radioscaphoid articulations were constructed from the relaxed images for SCM and FEM analyses, respectively. Kinematic boundary conditions were acquired from image registration between the relaxed and grasp images. For the SCM technique, a linear contact relationship was used to estimate contact outcomes based on interactions of the rigid articular surfaces in contact. For FEM, a pressure-overclosure relationship was used to estimate outcomes based on deformable body contact interactions. The SCM

  14. Finite element analysis of flexible, rotating blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, Oliver G.

    1987-01-01

    A reference guide that can be used when using the finite element method to approximate the static and dynamic behavior of flexible, rotating blades is given. Important parameters such as twist, sweep, camber, co-planar shell elements, centrifugal loads, and inertia properties are studied. Comparisons are made between NASTRAN elements through published benchmark tests. The main purpose is to summarize blade modeling strategies and to document capabilities and limitations (for flexible, rotating blades) of various NASTRAN elements.

  15. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alan

    2005-03-18

    Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many engineering applications, including finite elements, finite volumes, and others. The solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the desire to switch an application from one solver librwy to another, depending on the problem being solved. The interfaces provided by solver libraries differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application Can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer between solver libraries and the application, putting a common "face" on various solver libraries. One such abstraction layer is the Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (EEl), which has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  16. Quadrilateral finite element mesh coarsening

    SciTech Connect

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    Techniques for coarsening a quadrilateral mesh are described. These techniques include identifying a coarsening region within the quadrilateral mesh to be coarsened. Quadrilateral elements along a path through the coarsening region are removed. Node pairs along opposite sides of the path are identified. The node pairs along the path are then merged to collapse the path.

  17. Finite-element models of continental extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, H. David; Morgan, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Numerical models of the initial deformation of extending continental lithosphere, computed to investigate the control of preexisting thermal and mechanical heterogeneities on the style of deformation, are presented. The finite element method is used to calculate deformation with a viscoelastic-plastic model for the lithosphere. Comparisons of the results of analytic models and finite-element models using this method show that good results may be obtained by the numerical technique, even with elements containing both brittle and viscoelastic sampling points. It is shown that the gross style of initial extensional deformation is controlled by the depth and width of the initial heterogeneity which localizes deformation.

  18. Higher-Order Finite Elements for Computing Thermal Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, Dana C.

    2004-01-01

    unrealistic physical conditions are assumed. Instead, the equations of radiative heat transfer are integrated numerically over the parent finite elements by use of a computationally efficient Gaussian integration scheme.

  19. Finite element thermal analysis of convectively-cooled aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieting, A. R.; Thornton, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    The design complexity and size of convectively-cooled engine and airframe structures for hypersonic transports necessitate the use of large general purpose computer programs for both thermal and structural analyses. Generally thermal analyses are based on the lumped-parameter finite difference technique, and structural analyses are based on the finite element technique. Differences in these techniques make it difficult to achieve an efficient interface. It appears, therefore, desirable to conduct an integrated analysis based on a common technique. A summary is provided of efforts by NASA concerned with the development of an integrated thermal structural analysis capability using the finite element method. Particular attention is given to the development of conduction/forced-convection finite element methodology and applications which illustrate the capabilities of the developed concepts.

  20. Verification of Orthogrid Finite Element Modeling Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steeve, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    The stress analysis of orthogrid structures, specifically with I-beam sections, is regularly performed using finite elements. Various modeling techniques are often used to simplify the modeling process but still adequately capture the actual hardware behavior. The accuracy of such 'Oshort cutso' is sometimes in question. This report compares three modeling techniques to actual test results from a loaded orthogrid panel. The finite element models include a beam, shell, and mixed beam and shell element model. Results show that the shell element model performs the best, but that the simpler beam and beam and shell element models provide reasonable to conservative results for a stress analysis. When deflection and stiffness is critical, it is important to capture the effect of the orthogrid nodes in the model.

  1. Visualizing higher order finite elements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David C; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2005-11-01

    This report contains an algorithm for decomposing higher-order finite elements into regions appropriate for isosurfacing and proves the conditions under which the algorithm will terminate. Finite elements are used to create piecewise polynomial approximants to the solution of partial differential equations for which no analytical solution exists. These polynomials represent fields such as pressure, stress, and momentum. In the past, these polynomials have been linear in each parametric coordinate. Each polynomial coefficient must be uniquely determined by a simulation, and these coefficients are called degrees of freedom. When there are not enough degrees of freedom, simulations will typically fail to produce a valid approximation to the solution. Recent work has shown that increasing the number of degrees of freedom by increasing the order of the polynomial approximation (instead of increasing the number of finite elements, each of which has its own set of coefficients) can allow some types of simulations to produce a valid approximation with many fewer degrees of freedom than increasing the number of finite elements alone. However, once the simulation has determined the values of all the coefficients in a higher-order approximant, tools do not exist for visual inspection of the solution. This report focuses on a technique for the visual inspection of higher-order finite element simulation results based on decomposing each finite element into simplicial regions where existing visualization algorithms such as isosurfacing will work. The requirements of the isosurfacing algorithm are enumerated and related to the places where the partial derivatives of the polynomial become zero. The original isosurfacing algorithm is then applied to each of these regions in turn.

  2. Finite element radiation transport in one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, J.F.

    1997-05-09

    A new physics package solves radiation transport equations in one space dimension, multiple energy groups and directions. A discontinuous finite element method discretizes radiation intensity with respect to space and angle, and a continuous finite element method discretizes electron temperature `in space. A splitting method solves the resulting linear equations. This is a one-dimensional analog of Kershaw and Harte`s two-dimensional package. This package has been installed in a two-dimensional inertial confinement fusion code, and has given excellent results for both thermal waves and highly directional radiation. In contrast, the traditional discrete ordinate and spherical harmonic methods show less accurate results in both cases.

  3. Studies of finite element analysis of composite material structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, D. O.; Holzmacher, D. E.; Lane, Z. C.; Thornton, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Research in the area of finite element analysis is summarized. Topics discussed include finite element analysis of a picture frame shear test, BANSAP (a bandwidth reduction program for SAP IV), FEMESH (a finite element mesh generation program based on isoparametric zones), and finite element analysis of a composite bolted joint specimens.

  4. Slave finite elements: The temporal element approach to nonlinear analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellin, S.

    1984-01-01

    A formulation method for finite elements in space and time incorporating nonlinear geometric and material behavior is presented. The method uses interpolation polynomials for approximating the behavior of various quantities over the element domain, and only explicit integration over space and time. While applications are general, the plate and shell elements that are currently being programmed are appropriate to model turbine blades, vanes, and combustor liners.

  5. Numerical computation of transonic flows by finite-element and finite-difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Wellford, L. C.; Merkle, C. L.; Murman, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Studies on applications of the finite element approach to transonic flow calculations are reported. Different discretization techniques of the differential equations and boundary conditions are compared. Finite element analogs of Murman's mixed type finite difference operators for small disturbance formulations were constructed and the time dependent approach (using finite differences in time and finite elements in space) was examined.

  6. Quadrilateral/hexahedral finite element mesh coarsening

    SciTech Connect

    Staten, Matthew L; Dewey, Mark W; Scott, Michael A; Benzley, Steven E

    2012-10-16

    A technique for coarsening a finite element mesh ("FEM") is described. This technique includes identifying a coarsening region within the FEM to be coarsened. Perimeter chords running along perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region are identified. The perimeter chords are redirected to create an adaptive chord separating the coarsening region from a remainder of the FEM. The adaptive chord runs through mesh elements residing along the perimeter boundaries of the coarsening region. The adaptive chord is then extracted to coarsen the FEM.

  7. Evolution of assumed stress hybrid finite element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1984-01-01

    Early versions of the assumed stress hybrid finite elements were based on the a priori satisifaction of stress equilibrium conditions. In the new version such conditions are relaxed but are introduced through additional internal displacement functions as Lagrange multipliers. A rational procedure is to choose the displacement terms such that the resulting strains are now of complete polynomials up to the same degree as that of the assumed stresses. Several example problems indicate that optimal element properties are resulted by this method.

  8. Finite element modeling of nonisothermal polymer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roylance, D.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element formulation designed to simulate polymer melt flows in which both conductive and convective heat transfer are important is described, and the numerical model is illustrated by means of computer experiments using extruder drag flow and entry flow as trial problems. Fluid incompressibility is enforced by a penalty treatment of the element pressures, and the thermal convective transport is modeled by conventional Galerkin and optimal upwind treatments.

  9. A multidimensional finite element method for CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Darrell W.; Humphrey, Joseph W.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element method is used to solve the equations of motion for 2- and 3-D fluid flow. The time-dependent equations are solved explicitly using quadrilateral (2-D) and hexahedral (3-D) elements, mass lumping, and reduced integration. A Petrov-Galerkin technique is applied to the advection terms. The method requires a minimum of computational storage, executes quickly, and is scalable for execution on computer systems ranging from PCs to supercomputers.

  10. Finite Element Simulation of Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Y. Lawrence; Panahandeh, M.

    1996-01-01

    Finite element equations representing the behavior of piezoelectric materials when bounded to a typical structure and used as sensors and actuators were developed. Emphasis was placed on generating sensor output equations of piezoelectric sensors and responses of a typical structure bonded with piezoelectric sensors and actuators on the basis of finite element formulation. The model can predict not only structural responses due to both mechanical and electrical loading but also electrical potential due to mechanical or thermal effects. The resulted finite element equations were then used for simple control design and performance evaluation. In the control algorithm, voltages coming out from piezoelectric sensors, which are proportional to strains at sensing locations, are taken as input. The voltages applied to the piezoelectric actuators are used as output. The feasibility of integrating control algorithm with the element routine developed herein and FEAP was demonstrated. In particular, optimal independent modal space control was implemented in a software package on the basis of finite element formulation. A rudimentary finite element-control algorithm package was also developed to evaluate the performance of candidate control laws. A few numerical simulations using the software package developed herein were given. The integrated software package will provide a design tool to address issues such as how adaptive smart systems will scale to a full size aircraft, the amount of piezoelectric materials and the powers needed to actuate it for desired performance. It will also provide a viable new structural control design concept for practical applications in large flexible structures such as aerospace vehicles and aircraft.

  11. Finite element displacement analysis of a lung.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, F. L.; West, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    A method is given based on the technique of finite elements which determines theoretically the mechanical behavior of a lung-shaped body loaded by its own weight. The results of this theoretical analysis have been compared with actual measurements of alveolar size and pleural pressures in animal lungs.

  12. Animation of finite element models and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipman, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    This is not intended as a complete review of computer hardware and software that can be used for animation of finite element models and results, but is instead a demonstration of the benefits of visualization using selected hardware and software. The role of raw computational power, graphics speed, and the use of videotape are discussed.

  13. Finite Element Modelling and Analysis of Conventional Pultrusion Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishin, P.; Barkanov, E.; Bondarchuk, A.

    2015-11-01

    Pultrusion is one of many composite manufacturing techniques and one of the most efficient methods for producing fiber reinforced polymer composite parts with a constant cross-section. Numerical simulation is helpful for understanding the manufacturing process and developing scientific means for the pultrusion tooling design. Numerical technique based on the finite element method has been developed for the simulation of pultrusion processes. It uses the general purpose finite element software ANSYS Mechanical. It is shown that the developed technique predicts the temperature and cure profiles, which are in good agreement with those published in the open literature.

  14. Fourier analysis of finite element preconditioned collocation schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deville, Michel O.; Mund, Ernest H.

    1990-01-01

    The spectrum of the iteration operator of some finite element preconditioned Fourier collocation schemes is investigated. The first part of the paper analyses one-dimensional elliptic and hyperbolic model problems and the advection-diffusion equation. Analytical expressions of the eigenvalues are obtained with use of symbolic computation. The second part of the paper considers the set of one-dimensional differential equations resulting from Fourier analysis (in the tranverse direction) of the 2-D Stokes problem. All results agree with previous conclusions on the numerical efficiency of finite element preconditioning schemes.

  15. Adaptive finite-element method for diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Gang; Chen, Zhiming; Wu, Haijun

    2005-06-01

    A second-order finite-element adaptive strategy with error control for one-dimensional grating problems is developed. The unbounded computational domain is truncated to a bounded one by a perfectly-matched-layer (PML) technique. The PML parameters, such as the thickness of the layer and the medium properties, are determined through sharp a posteriori error estimates. The adaptive finite-element method is expected to increase significantly the accuracy and efficiency of the discretization as well as reduce the computation cost. Numerical experiments are included to illustrate the competitiveness of the proposed adaptive method.

  16. On Hybrid and mixed finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1981-01-01

    Three versions of the assumed stress hybrid model in finite element methods and the corresponding variational principles for the formulation are presented. Examples of rank deficiency for stiffness matrices by the hybrid stress model are given and their corresponding kinematic deformation modes are identified. A discussion of the derivation of general semi-Loof elements for plates and shells by the hybrid stress method is given. It is shown that the equilibrium model by Fraeijs de Veubeke can be derived by the approach of the hybrid stress model as a special case of semi-Loof elements.

  17. Revolution in Orthodontics: Finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Johar Rajvinder; Kambalyal, Prabhuraj; Jain, Megha; Khandelwal, Piyush

    2016-01-01

    Engineering has not only developed in the field of medicine but has also become quite established in the field of dentistry, especially Orthodontics. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a computational procedure to calculate the stress in an element, which performs a model solution. This structural analysis allows the determination of stress resulting from external force, pressure, thermal change, and other factors. This method is extremely useful for indicating mechanical aspects of biomaterials and human tissues that can hardly be measured in vivo. The results obtained can then be studied using visualization software within the finite element method (FEM) to view a variety of parameters, and to fully identify implications of the analysis. This is a review to show the applications of FEM in Orthodontics. It is extremely important to verify what the purpose of the study is in order to correctly apply FEM. PMID:27114948

  18. Finite element computation with parallel VLSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgregor, J.; Salama, M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a parallel processing computer consisting of a 16-bit microcomputer as a master processor which controls and coordinates the activities of 8086/8087 VLSI chip set slave processors working in parallel. The hardware is inexpensive and can be flexibly configured and programmed to perform various functions. This makes it a useful research tool for the development of, and experimentation with parallel mathematical algorithms. Application of the hardware to computational tasks involved in the finite element analysis method is demonstrated by the generation and assembly of beam finite element stiffness matrices. A number of possible schemes for the implementation of N-elements on N- or n-processors (N is greater than n) are described, and the speedup factors of their time consumption are determined as a function of the number of available parallel processors.

  19. Optimal mapping of irregular finite element domains to parallel processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, J.; Otto, S.; Salama, M.

    1987-01-01

    Mapping the solution domain of n-finite elements into N-subdomains that may be processed in parallel by N-processors is an optimal one if the subdomain decomposition results in a well-balanced workload distribution among the processors. The problem is discussed in the context of irregular finite element domains as an important aspect of the efficient utilization of the capabilities of emerging multiprocessor computers. Finding the optimal mapping is an intractable combinatorial optimization problem, for which a satisfactory approximate solution is obtained here by analogy to a method used in statistical mechanics for simulating the annealing process in solids. The simulated annealing analogy and algorithm are described, and numerical results are given for mapping an irregular two-dimensional finite element domain containing a singularity onto the Hypercube computer.

  20. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-03-18

    Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many engineering applications, including finite elements, finite volumes, and others. The solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the desire to switch an application from one solver librwy to another, depending on themore » problem being solved. The interfaces provided by solver libraries differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application Can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer between solver libraries and the application, putting a common "face" on various solver libraries. One such abstraction layer is the Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (EEl), which has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.« less

  1. Non-conforming finite element methods for transmission eigenvalue problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yidu; Han, Jiayu; Bi, Hai

    2016-08-01

    The transmission eigenvalue problem is an important and challenging topic arising in the inverse scattering theory. In this paper, for the Helmholtz transmission eigenvalue problem, we give a weak formulation which is a nonselfadjoint linear eigenvalue problem. Based on the weak formulation, we first discuss the non-conforming finite element approximation, and prove the error estimates of the discrete eigenvalues obtained by the Adini element, Morley-Zienkiewicz element, modified-Zienkiewicz element et. al. And we report some numerical examples to validate the efficiency of our approach for solving transmission eigenvalue problem.

  2. Finite Element Heat & Mass Transfer Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-10-10

    FEHM is a numerical simulation code for subsurface transport processes. It models 3-D, time-dependent, multiphase, multicomponent, non-isothermal, reactive flow through porous and fractured media. It can accurately represent complex 3-D geologic media and structures and their effects on subsurface flow and transport. Its capabilities include flow of gas, water, and heat; flow of air, water, and heat; multiple chemically reactive and sorbing tracers; finite element/finite volume formulation; coupled stress module; saturated and unsaturated media; andmore » double porosity and double porosity/double permeability capabilities.« less

  3. Modal Substructuring of Geometrically Nonlinear Finite-Element Models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kuether, Robert J.; Allen, Matthew S.; Hollkamp, Joseph J.

    2016-02-01

    The efficiency of a modal substructuring method depends on the component modes used to reduce each subcomponent model. Methods such as Craig–Bampton have been used extensively to reduce linear finite-element models with thousands or even millions of degrees of freedom down orders of magnitude while maintaining acceptable accuracy. A novel reduction method is proposed here for geometrically nonlinear finite-element models using the fixed-interface and constraint modes of the linearized system to reduce each subcomponent model. The geometric nonlinearity requires an additional cubic and quadratic polynomial function in the modal equations, and the nonlinear stiffness coefficients are determined by applying amore » series of static loads and using the finite-element code to compute the response. The geometrically nonlinear, reduced modal equations for each subcomponent are then coupled by satisfying compatibility and force equilibrium. This modal substructuring approach is an extension of the Craig–Bampton method and is readily applied to geometrically nonlinear models built directly within commercial finite-element packages. The efficiency of this new approach is demonstrated on two example problems: one that couples two geometrically nonlinear beams at a shared rotational degree of freedom, and another that couples an axial spring element to the axial degree of freedom of a geometrically nonlinear beam. The nonlinear normal modes of the assembled models are compared with those of a truth model to assess the accuracy of the novel modal substructuring approach.« less

  4. Diagonal multisoliton matrix elements in finite volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pálmai, T.; Takács, G.

    2013-02-01

    We consider diagonal matrix elements of local operators between multisoliton states in finite volume in the sine-Gordon model and formulate a conjecture regarding their finite size dependence which is valid up to corrections exponential in the volume. This conjecture extends the results of Pozsgay and Takács which were only valid for diagonal scattering. In order to test the conjecture, we implement a numerical renormalization group improved truncated conformal space approach. The numerical comparisons confirm the conjecture, which is expected to be valid for general integrable field theories. The conjectured formula can be used to evaluate finite temperature one-point and two-point functions using recently developed methods.

  5. Hybrid finite element-finite difference method for thermal analysis of blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C H; Gutierrez, G; White, J A; Roemer, R B

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid finite-difference/finite-element technique for the thermal analysis of blood vessels embedded in perfused tissue has been developed and evaluated. This method provides efficient and accurate solutions to the conjugated heat transfer problem of convection by blood coupled to conduction in the tissue. The technique uses a previously developed 3D automatic meshing method for creating a finite element mesh in the tissue surrounding the vessels, coupled iteratively with a 1-D marching finite difference method for the interior of the vessels. This hybrid technique retains the flexibility and ease of automated finite-element meshing techniques for modelling the complex geometry of blood vessels and irregularly shaped tissues, and speeds the solution time by using a simple finite-difference method to calculate the bulk mean temperatures within all blood vessels. The use of the 1D finite-difference technique in the blood vessels also eliminates the large computer memory requirements needed to accurately solve large vessel network problems when fine FE meshes are used in the interior of vessels. The accuracy of the hybrid technique has been verified against previously verified numerical solutions. In summary, the hybrid technique combines the accuracy and flexibility found in automated finite-element techniques, with the speed and reduction of computational memory requirements associated with the 1D finite-difference technique, something which has not been done before. This method, thus, has the potential to provide accurate, flexible and relatively fast solutions for the thermal analysis of coupled perfusion/blood vessel problems, and large vessel network problems. PMID:10949130

  6. Finite Element Analysis of Honeycomb Impact Attenuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Seung-Yong; Choi, Seung-Kyu; Kim, Nohyu

    To participate in Student Formula Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) competitions, it is necessary to build an impact attenuator that would give an average deceleration not to exceed 20g when it runs into a rigid wall. Students can use numerical simulations or experimental test data to show that their car satisfies this safety requirement. A student group to study formula cars at the Korea University of Technology and Education has designed a vehicle to take part in a SAE competition, and a honeycomb structure was adopted as the impact attenuator. In this paper, finite element calculations were carried out to investigate the dynamic behavior of the honeycomb attenuator. Deceleration and deformation behaviors were studied. Effect of the yield strength was checked by comparing the numerical results. ABAQUS/Explicit finite element code was used.

  7. Plasticity - Theory and finite element applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armen, H., Jr.; Levine, H. S.

    1972-01-01

    A unified presentation is given of the development and distinctions associated with various incremental solution procedures used to solve the equations governing the nonlinear behavior of structures, and this is discussed within the framework of the finite-element method. Although the primary emphasis here is on material nonlinearities, consideration is also given to geometric nonlinearities acting separately or in combination with nonlinear material behavior. The methods discussed here are applicable to a broad spectrum of structures, ranging from simple beams to general three-dimensional bodies. The finite-element analysis methods for material nonlinearity are general in the sense that any of the available plasticity theories can be incorporated to treat strain hardening or ideally plastic behavior.

  8. 2-d Finite Element Code Postprocessor

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1996-07-15

    ORION is an interactive program that serves as a postprocessor for the analysis programs NIKE2D, DYNA2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. ORION reads binary plot files generated by the two-dimensional finite element codes currently used by the Methods Development Group at LLNL. Contour and color fringe plots of a large number of quantities may be displayed on meshes consisting of triangular and quadrilateral elements. ORION can compute strain measures, interface pressures along slide lines, reaction forcesmore » along constrained boundaries, and momentum. ORION has been applied to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.« less

  9. Finite element analysis of human joints

    SciTech Connect

    Bossart, P.L.; Hollerbach, K.

    1996-09-01

    Our work focuses on the development of finite element models (FEMs) that describe the biomechanics of human joints. Finite element modeling is becoming a standard tool in industrial applications. In highly complex problems such as those found in biomechanics research, however, the full potential of FEMs is just beginning to be explored, due to the absence of precise, high resolution medical data and the difficulties encountered in converting these enormous datasets into a form that is usable in FEMs. With increasing computing speed and memory available, it is now feasible to address these challenges. We address the first by acquiring data with a high resolution C-ray CT scanner and the latter by developing semi-automated method for generating the volumetric meshes used in the FEM. Issues related to tomographic reconstruction, volume segmentation, the use of extracted surfaces to generate volumetric hexahedral meshes, and applications of the FEM are described.

  10. Finite element based electric motor design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. Warren

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this effort was to develop a finite element code for the analysis and design of permanent magnet electric motors. These motors would drive electromechanical actuators in advanced rocket engines. The actuators would control fuel valves and thrust vector control systems. Refurbishing the hydraulic systems of the Space Shuttle after each flight is costly and time consuming. Electromechanical actuators could replace hydraulics, improve system reliability, and reduce down time.

  11. Finite element analysis of wrinkling membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. K.; Hedgepeth, J. M.; Weingarten, V. I.; Das, P.; Kahyai, S.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a nonlinear numerical algorithm for the analysis of stresses and displacements in partly wrinkled flat membranes, and its implementation on the SAP VII finite-element code are described. A comparison of numerical results with exact solutions of two benchmark problems reveals excellent agreement, with good convergence of the required iterative procedure. An exact solution of a problem involving axisymmetric deformations of a partly wrinkled shallow curved membrane is also reported.

  12. ExodusII Finite Element Data Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-05-14

    EXODUS II is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code data transfer. An EXODUS II data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface. (exodus II is based on netcdf)

  13. Finite Element Results Visualization for Unstructured Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Speck, Douglas E.; Dovey, Donald J.

    1996-07-15

    GRIZ is a general-purpose post-processing application supporting interactive visualization of finite element analysis results on unstructured grids. In addition to basic pseudocolor renderings of state variables over the mesh surface, GRIZ provides modern visualization techniques such as isocontours and isosurfaces, cutting planes, vector field display, and particle traces. GRIZ accepts both command-line and mouse-driven input, and is portable to virtually any UNIX platform which provides Motif and OpenGl libraries.

  14. Finite element model of needle electrode sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høyum, P.; Kalvøy, H.; Martinsen, Ø. G.; Grimnes, S.

    2010-04-01

    We used the Finite Element (FE) Method to estimate the sensitivity of a needle electrode for bioimpedance measurement. This current conducting needle with insulated shaft was inserted in a saline solution and current was measured at the neutral electrode. FE model resistance and reactance were calculated and successfully compared with measurements on a laboratory model. The sensitivity field was described graphically based on these FE simulations.

  15. Enhancements to modal testing using finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Brian

    In calculating the natural frequencies and mode shapes from a finite element analysis, there are generally many more degrees of freedom than can be handled for the eigensolution. A reduction process is employed to reduce the number to a master set and chosen so that the modes of interest are well defined. By choosing those freedoms where the inertia terms are high or the stiffness terms are low then an automatic procedure for selecting the best freedoms can be defined. For modal testing, these master freedoms also indicate the best transducer locations for optimum low order mode identification. Having carried out the modal test, the mode shapes obtained can be forced onto the finite element model giving greatly enhanced results. By examining terms in all mode shapes from the finite element model in the frequency range of interest, the best reference or excitation position can be found. An example of the use of this technique to study the modal properties of an aero-engine compressor blade is given.

  16. Nondestructive Evaluation Correlated with Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Azid, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.

    1999-01-01

    Advanced materials are being developed for use in high-temperature gas turbine applications. For these new materials to be fully utilized, their deformation properties, their nondestructive evaluation (NDE) quality and material durability, and their creep and fatigue fracture characteristics need to be determined by suitable experiments. The experimental findings must be analyzed, characterized, modeled and translated into constitutive equations for stress analysis and life prediction. Only when these ingredients - together with the appropriate computational tools - are available, can durability analysis be performed in the design stage, long before the component is built. One of the many structural components being evaluated by the NDE group at the NASA Lewis Research Center is the flywheel system. It is being considered as an energy storage device for advanced space vehicles. Such devices offer advantages over electrochemical batteries in situations demanding high power delivery and high energy storage per unit weight. In addition, flywheels have potentially higher efficiency and longer lifetimes with proper motor-generator and rotor design. Flywheels made of fiber-reinforced polymer composite material show great promise for energy applications because of the high energy and power densities that they can achieve along with a burst failure mode that is relatively benign in comparison to those of flywheels made of metallic materials Therefore, to help improve durability and reduce structural uncertainties, we are developing a comprehensive analytical approach to predict the reliability and life of these components under these harsh loading conditions. The combination of NDE and two- and three-dimensional finite element analyses (e.g., stress analyses and fracture mechanics) is expected to set a standardized procedure to accurately assess the applicability of using various composite materials to design a suitable rotor/flywheel assembly.

  17. Visualization of transient finite element analyses on large unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Dovey, D.

    1995-03-22

    Three-dimensional transient finite element analysis is performed on unstructured grids. A trend toward running larger analysis problems, combined with a desire for interactive animation of analysis results, demands efficient visualization techniques. This paper discusses a set of data structures and algorithms for visualizing transient analysis results on unstructured grids and introduces some modifications in order to better support large grids. In particular, an element grouping approach is used to reduce the amount of memory needed for external surface determination and to speed up ``point in element`` tests. The techniques described lend themselves to visualization of analyses carried out in parallel on a massively parallel computer (MPC).

  18. Finite element analysis of inviscid subsonic boattail flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.; Gerhart, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element code for analysis of inviscid subsonic flows over arbitrary nonlifting planar or axisymmetric bodies is described. The code solves a novel primitive variable formulation of the coupled irrotationality and compressible continuity equations. Results for flow over a cylinder, a sphere, and a NACA 0012 airfoil verify the code. Computed subcritical flows over an axisymmetric boattailed afterbody compare well with finite difference results and experimental data. Interative coupling with an integral turbulent boundary layer code shows strong viscous effects on the inviscid flow. Improvements in code efficiency and extensions to transonic flows are discussed.

  19. Stabilized tetrahedral elements for crystal plasticity finite element analysis overcoming volumetric locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jiahao; Shahba, Ahmad; Ghosh, Somnath

    2016-05-01

    Image-based CPFE modeling involves computer generation of virtual polycrystalline microstructures from experimental data, followed by discretization into finite element meshes. Discretization is commonly accomplished using three-dimensional four-node tetrahedral or TET4 elements, which conform to the complex geometries. It has been commonly observed that TET4 elements suffer from severe volumetric locking when simulating deformation of incompressible or nearly incompressible materials. This paper develops and examines three locking-free stabilized finite element formulations in the context of crystal plasticity finite element analysis. They include a node-based uniform strain (NUS) element, a locally integrated B-bar (LIB) based element and a F-bar patch (FP) based element. All three formulations are based on the partitioning of TET4 element meshes and integrating over patches to obtain favorable incompressibility constraint ratios without adding large degrees of freedom. The results show that NUS formulation introduces unstable spurious energy modes, while the LIB and FP elements stabilize the solutions and are preferred for reliable CPFE analysis. The FP element is found to be computationally efficient over the LIB element.

  20. Mixed Finite Element Method for Melt Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taicher, A. L.; Hesse, M. A.; Arbogast, T.

    2012-12-01

    Multi-phase flow arises during partial melting in the earth mantle, where the porosity is small and material has the characteristics of a compacting porous medium. The equations governing multi-phase flow have been specialized to partially molten materials by McKenzie and Fowler. Their model, also called a Darcy-Stokes system, is highly coupled and non-linear. Melt flow is governed by Darcy's Law while the high temperature, ductile creep of the solid matrix is modeled using viscous non-Newtonian Stokes rheology. In addition, the melt and solid pressures are related through a compaction relation. This nearly elliptic mechanical problem is then coupled with both solute transport and thermal evolution according to the enthalpy method developed by Katz. A suitable numerical method must solve the Darcy-Stokes problem in a manner compatible with the transport problem. Moreover, unlike most porous media problems, partially molten materials transition dynamically from non-porous solid to porous medium. Therefore, a numerical method must also carefully account for the limit of zero porosity. The Darcy-Stokes system for modeling partial melting in the mantle is a novel problem. As far as we know, there currently does not exist a finite element solution in the literature solving these coupled equations. The finite element framework provides support for additional analysis of error and convergence. Moreover, both mesh refinement and anisotropy are naturally incorporated into finite elements. In particular, the mixed finite element method presents a good candidate because it works in both limiting cases: Darcy and incompressible Stokes flow. Mixed methods also produce discretely conservative fluxes that are required for the transport problem to remains stable without violating conservation of mass. Based preliminary investigations in 1D and derived energy estimates, we present a mixed formulation for the Darcy-Stokes system. Next, using novel elements of lowest order and

  1. Modelling bucket excavation by finite element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecingina, O. M.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in geological components of the layers from lignite pits have an impact on the sustainability of the cup path elements and under the action of excavation force appear efforts leading to deformation of the entire assembly. Application of finite element method in the optimization of components leads to economic growth, to increase the reliability and durability of the studied machine parts thus the machine. It is obvious usefulness of knowledge the state of mechanical tensions that the designed piece or the assembly not to break under the action of tensions that must cope during operation. In the course of excavation work on all bucket cutting force components, the first coming into contact with the material being excavated cutting edge. Therefore in the study with finite element analysis is retained only cutting edge. To study the field of stress and strain on the cutting edge will be created geometric patterns for each type of cup this will be subject to static analysis. The geometric design retains the cutting edge shape and on this on the tooth cassette location will apply an areal force on the abutment tooth. The cutting edge real pattern is subjected to finite element study for the worst case of rock cutting by symmetrical and asymmetrical cups whose profile is different. The purpose of this paper is to determine the displacement and tensions field for both profiles considering the maximum force applied on the cutting edge and the depth of the cutting is equal with the width of the cutting edge of the tooth. It will consider the worst case when on the structure will act both the tangential force and radial force on the bucket profile. For determination of stress and strain field on the form design of cutting edge profile will apply maximum force assuming uniform distribution and on the edge surface force will apply a radial force. After geometric patterns discretization on the cutting knives and determining stress field, can be seen that at the

  2. Calculation of compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils by a finite element/finite difference method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Stuart L.; Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of a finite element/finite difference method (semidiscrete Galerkin method) used to calculate compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils, in which the group finite element scheme is applied to the Dorodnitsyn formulation of the boundary layer equations. The semidiscrete Galerkin (SDG) method promises to be fast, accurate and computationally efficient. The SDG method can also be applied to any smoothly connected airfoil shape without modification and possesses the potential capability of calculating boundary layer solutions beyond flow separation. Results are presented for low speed laminar flow past a circular cylinder and past a NACA 0012 airfoil at zero angle of attack at a Mach number of 0.5. Also shown are results for compressible flow past a flat plate for a Mach number range of 0 to 10 and results for incompressible turbulent flow past a flat plate. All numerical solutions assume an attached boundary layer.

  3. Traction free finite elements with the assumed stress hybrid model. M.S. Thesis, 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kafie, Kurosh

    1991-01-01

    An effective approach in the finite element analysis of the stress field at the traction free boundary of a solid continuum was studied. Conventional displacement and assumed stress finite elements were used in the determination of stress concentrations around circular and elliptical holes. Specialized hybrid elements were then developed to improve the satisfaction of prescribed traction boundary conditions. Results of the stress analysis indicated that finite elements which exactly satisfy the free stress boundary conditions are the most accurate and efficient in such problems. A general approach for hybrid finite elements which incorporate traction free boundaries of arbitrary geometry was formulated.

  4. Parallel, adaptive finite element methods for conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Devine, Karen D.; Flaherty, Joseph E.

    1994-01-01

    We construct parallel finite element methods for the solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in one and two dimensions. Spatial discretization is performed by a discontinuous Galerkin finite element method using a basis of piecewise Legendre polynomials. Temporal discretization utilizes a Runge-Kutta method. Dissipative fluxes and projection limiting prevent oscillations near solution discontinuities. A posteriori estimates of spatial errors are obtained by a p-refinement technique using superconvergence at Radau points. The resulting method is of high order and may be parallelized efficiently on MIMD computers. We compare results using different limiting schemes and demonstrate parallel efficiency through computations on an NCUBE/2 hypercube. We also present results using adaptive h- and p-refinement to reduce the computational cost of the method.

  5. Implicit extrapolation methods for multilevel finite element computations

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, M.; Ruede, U.

    1994-12-31

    The finite element package FEMGP has been developed to solve elliptic and parabolic problems arising in the computation of magnetic and thermomechanical fields. FEMGP implements various methods for the construction of hierarchical finite element meshes, a variety of efficient multilevel solvers, including multigrid and preconditioned conjugate gradient iterations, as well as pre- and post-processing software. Within FEMGP, multigrid {tau}-extrapolation can be employed to improve the finite element solution iteratively to higher order. This algorithm is based on an implicit extrapolation, so that the algorithm differs from a regular multigrid algorithm only by a slightly modified computation of the residuals on the finest mesh. Another advantage of this technique is, that in contrast to explicit extrapolation methods, it does not rely on the existence of global error expansions, and therefore neither requires uniform meshes nor global regularity assumptions. In the paper the authors will analyse the {tau}-extrapolation algorithm and present experimental results in the context of the FEMGP package. Furthermore, the {tau}-extrapolation results will be compared to higher order finite element solutions.

  6. PWSCC Assessment by Using Extended Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Jun; Lee, Sang-Hwan; Chang, Yoon-Suk

    2015-12-01

    The head penetration nozzle of control rod driving mechanism (CRDM) is known to be susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) due to the welding-induced residual stress. Especially, the J-groove dissimilar metal weld regions have received many attentions in the previous studies. However, even though several advanced techniques such as weight function and finite element alternating methods have been introduced to predict the occurrence of PWSCC, there are still difficulties in respect of applicability and efficiency. In this study, the extended finite element method (XFEM), which allows convenient crack element modeling by enriching degree of freedom (DOF) with special displacement function, was employed to evaluate structural integrity of the CRDM head penetration nozzle. The resulting stress intensity factors of surface cracks were verified for the reliability of proposed method through the comparison with those suggested in the American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME) code. The detailed results from the FE analyses are fully discussed in the manuscript.

  7. Computerized symbolic manipulation in nonlinear finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Andersen, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of using computerized symbolic manipulation in the development of nonlinear finite elements is discussed. Three tasks which can be efficiently performed using computerized symbolic manipulation are identified: (1) generation of algebraic expressions for the stiffness coefficients of nonlinear finite elements, (2) generation of FORTRAN source code for numerical evaluation of stiffness coefficients, and (3) checking the correctness of the FORTRAN statements for the arrays of coefficients. The symbolic and algebraic manipulation system MACSYMA is used in the present study. Two sample MACSYMA programs are presented for the development of the nonlinear stiffness coefficients of two-dimensional, shear-flexible, doubly-curved deep shell elements. The first program is for displacement models and the second program is for mixed models with discontinuous stress-resultant fields at interelement boundaries.

  8. Finite element modelling for materials with size effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaddiwudhipong, S.; Hua, J.; Tho, K. K.; Liu, Z. S.

    2006-10-01

    This paper involves the formulation of the C0 finite elements incorporating the conventional mechanism-based strain gradient plasticity theory. Higher-order variables and consequently higher-order continuity conditions are not required allowing the direct applications of conventional plasticity algorithms in the existing finite element package. Implementation of the model whether analytically or computationally is efficient and straightforward as the strain gradient effect is confined in the material constitutive relation. The accuracy of the proposed elements in simulating the response of materials with strong size effect is verified through several numerical examples. The approach is applicable and valid to any materials with non-uniform plastic deformation larger than about 100 nm onwards. The proposed model becomes imperative when the deformation is less than 10 µm as classical plasticity is unable to describe the phenomenon comprehensively at this low level of deformation.

  9. X-ray casting finite-element-modeling data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Feng; Cai, Wenli; Shi, Jiaoying

    1996-03-01

    An efficient technique is described for rendering Finite Element Modeling (FEM) volume data. The data are not a regular 3D grid. This algorithm can deal with most kinds of FEM data, such as hexahedron 8 nodes, hexahedron 20 nodes etc. Two methods to visualize the FEM data have been presented in the rendering stage. The comparison of these two methods have also been discussed later in this paper.

  10. Iterative methods for mixed finite element equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakazawa, S.; Nagtegaal, J. C.; Zienkiewicz, O. C.

    1985-01-01

    Iterative strategies for the solution of indefinite system of equations arising from the mixed finite element method are investigated in this paper with application to linear and nonlinear problems in solid and structural mechanics. The augmented Hu-Washizu form is derived, which is then utilized to construct a family of iterative algorithms using the displacement method as the preconditioner. Two types of iterative algorithms are implemented. Those are: constant metric iterations which does not involve the update of preconditioner; variable metric iterations, in which the inverse of the preconditioning matrix is updated. A series of numerical experiments is conducted to evaluate the numerical performance with application to linear and nonlinear model problems.

  11. Chemorheology of reactive systems: Finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, C.; Roylance, D.

    1982-01-01

    The equations which govern the nonisothermal flow of reactive fluids are outlined, and the means by which finite element analysis is used to solve these equations for the sort of arbitrary boundary conditions encountered in industrial practice are described. The performance of the computer code is illustrated by several trial problems, selected more for their value in providing insight to polymer processing flows than as practical production problems. Although a good deal remains to be learned as to the performance and proper use of this numerical technique, it is undeniably useful in providing better understanding of today's complicated polymer processing problems.

  12. Finite element solutions of free surface flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarda, P. R.; Marcus, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure is presented for using NASTRAN to determine the flow field about arbitrarily shaped bodies in the presence of a free surface. The fundamental unknown of the problem is the velocity potential which must satisfy Laplace's equation in the fluid region. Boundary conditions on the free surface may involve second order derivatives in space and time. In cases involving infinite domains either a tractable radiation condition is applied at a truncated boundary or a series expansion is used and matched to the local finite elements. Solutions are presented for harmonic, transient, and steady state problems and compared to either exact solutions or other numerical solutions.

  13. Algebraic surface design and finite element meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajaj, Chandrajit L.

    1992-01-01

    Some of the techniques are summarized which are used in constructing C sup 0 and C sup 1 continuous meshes of low degree, implicitly defined, algebraic surface patches in three dimensional space. These meshes of low degree algebraic surface patches are used to construct accurate computer models of physical objects. These meshes are also used in the finite element simulation of physical phenomena (e.g., heat dissipation, stress/strain distributions, fluid flow characteristics) required in the computer prototyping of both the manufacturability and functionality of the geometric design.

  14. Finite element methods in probabilistic mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wing Kam; Mani, A.; Belytschko, Ted

    1987-01-01

    Probabilistic methods, synthesizing the power of finite element methods with second-order perturbation techniques, are formulated for linear and nonlinear problems. Random material, geometric properties and loads can be incorporated in these methods, in terms of their fundamental statistics. By construction, these methods are applicable when the scale of randomness is not too large and when the probabilistic density functions have decaying tails. By incorporating certain computational techniques, these methods are shown to be capable of handling large systems with many sources of uncertainties. Applications showing the effects of combined random fields and cyclic loading/stress reversal are studied and compared with Monte Carlo simulation results.

  15. Shape optimization including finite element grid adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikuchi, N.; Taylor, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    The prediction of optimal shape design for structures depends on having a sufficient level of precision in the computation of structural response. These requirements become critical in situations where the region to be designed includes stress concentrations or unilateral contact surfaces, for example. In the approach to shape optimization discussed here, a means to obtain grid adaptation is incorporated into the finite element procedures. This facility makes it possible to maintain a level of quality in the computational estimate of response that is surely adequate for the shape design problem.

  16. 2-D Finite Element Heat Conduction

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1989-10-30

    AYER is a finite element program which implicitly solves the general two-dimensional equation of thermal conduction for plane or axisymmetric bodies. AYER takes into account the effects of time (transient problems), in-plane anisotropic thermal conductivity, a three-dimensional velocity distribution, and interface thermal contact resistance. Geometry and material distributions are arbitrary, and input is via subroutines provided by the user. As a result, boundary conditions, material properties, velocity distributions, and internal power generation may be mademore » functions of, e.g., time, temperature, location, and heat flux.« less

  17. Dynamic analysis of mechanisms by finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Botsali, F.M.; Uenuevar, A.

    1996-11-01

    The need to increase productivity in order to decrease manufacturing costs lead to an increase in the working speeds of machines and mechanical systems used in manufacturing. A method is presented for investigating the dynamics of mechanisms with elastic links. Finite element method is used in the formulation of the dynamic problem. Modal transformation is used in order to reduce the number of equations of motion. Using the presented technique, elastic and rigid body motions of mechanism links are solved simultaneously. The presented method may be applied to spatial and open loop mechanisms including robot manipulators as well.

  18. System software for the finite element machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, T. W.; Knott, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The Finite Element Machine is an experimental parallel computer developed at Langley Research Center to investigate the application of concurrent processing to structural engineering analysis. This report describes system-level software which has been developed to facilitate use of the machine by applications researchers. The overall software design is outlined, and several important parallel processing issues are discussed in detail, including processor management, communication, synchronization, and input/output. Based on experience using the system, the hardware architecture and software design are critiqued, and areas for further work are suggested.

  19. Moving finite elements in 2-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelinas, R. J.; Doss, S. K.; Vajk, J. P.; Djomehri, J.; Miller, K.

    1983-01-01

    The mathematical background regarding the moving finite element (MFE) method of Miller and Miller (1981) is discussed, taking into account a general system of partial differential equations (PDE) and the amenability of the MFE method in two dimensions to code modularization and to semiautomatic user-construction of numerous PDE systems for both Dirichlet and zero-Neumann boundary conditions. A description of test problem results is presented, giving attention to aspects of single square wave propagation, and a solution of the heat equation.

  20. Control volume finite element method with multidimensional edge element Scharfetter-Gummel upwinding. Part 1, formulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston

    2011-06-01

    We develop a new formulation of the Control Volume Finite Element Method (CVFEM) with a multidimensional Scharfetter-Gummel (SG) upwinding for the drift-diffusion equations. The formulation uses standard nodal elements for the concentrations and expands the flux in terms of the lowest-order Nedelec H(curl; {Omega})-compatible finite element basis. The SG formula is applied to the edges of the elements to express the Nedelec element degree of freedom on this edge in terms of the nodal degrees of freedom associated with the endpoints of the edge. The resulting upwind flux incorporates the upwind effects from all edges and is defined at the interior of the element. This allows for accurate evaluation of integrals on the boundaries of the control volumes for arbitrary quadrilateral elements. The new formulation admits efficient implementation through a standard loop over the elements in the mesh followed by loops over the element nodes (associated with control volume fractions in the element) and element edges (associated with flux degrees of freedom). The quantities required for the SG formula can be precomputed and stored for each edge in the mesh for additional efficiency gains. For clarity the details are presented for two-dimensional quadrilateral grids. Extension to other element shapes and three dimensions is straightforward.

  1. Finite-element calculations on alliant FX/80

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, B.C.; Kamat, M.P.

    1994-10-01

    The finite-element method has proven to be an invaluable tool for analysis and design of complex, high-performance systems, such as those typically encountered in the aerospace or automotive industries. However, as the size of the finite-element models of such systems increases, analysis computation time using conventional computers can become prohibitively high. Parallel processing computers provide the means to overcome these computation-time limits, provided the algorithms used in the analysis can take advantage of multiple processors. The writers have examined several algorithms for linear and nonlinear static analysis, as well as dynamic finite-element analysis. The performance of these algorithms on an Alliant FX/80 parallel supercomputer has been investigated. For single load-case linear static analysis, the optimal solution algorithm is strongly problem dependent. For multiple load cases or nonlinear static analysis through a modified Newton-Raphson method, decomposition algorithms are shown to have a decided advantage over element-by-element preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithms. For eigenvalue/eigenvector analysis, the subspace iteration algorithm with a parallel decomposition is shown to achieve a relatively high parallel efficiency. 12 refs.

  2. Modelling the core convection using finite element and finite difference methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. H.; Li, Ligang; Liao, Xinhao

    2006-08-01

    Applications of both parallel finite element and finite difference methods to thermal convection in a rotating spherical shell modelling the fluid dynamics of the Earth's outer core are presented. The numerical schemes are verified by reproducing the convection benchmark test by Christensen et al. [Christensen, U.R., Aubert, J., Cardin, P., Dormy, E., Gibbons, S., Glatzmaier, G.A., Grote, E., Honkura, Y., Jones, C., Kono, M., Matsushima, M., Sakuraba, A., Takahashi, F., Tilgner, A., Wilcht, J., Zhang, K., 2001. A numerical dynamo benchmark. Phys. Earth Planet. Interiors 128, 25-34.]. Both global average and local characteristics agree satisfactorily with the benchmark solution. With the element-by-element (EBE) parallelization technique, the finite element code demonstrates nearly optimal linear scalability in computational speed. The finite difference code is also efficient and scalable by utilizing a parallel library Aztec [Tuminaro, R.S., Heroux, M., Hutchinson, S.A., Shadid, J.N., 1999. Official AZTEC User's Guide: Version 2.1.].

  3. Finite element modeling of piezoelectric elements with complex electrode configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradies, R.; Schläpfer, B.

    2009-02-01

    It is well known that the material properties of piezoelectric materials strongly depend on the state of polarization of the individual element. While an unpolarized material exhibits mechanically isotropic material properties in the absence of global piezoelectric capabilities, the piezoelectric material properties become transversally isotropic with respect to the polarization direction after polarization. Therefore, for evaluating piezoelectric elements the material properties, including the coupling between the mechanical and the electromechanical behavior, should be addressed correctly. This is of special importance for the micromechanical description of piezoelectric elements with interdigitated electrodes (IDEs). The best known representatives of this group are active fiber composites (AFCs), macro fiber composites (MFCs) and the radial field diaphragm (RFD), respectively. While the material properties are available for a piezoelectric wafer with a homogeneous polarization perpendicular to its plane as postulated in the so-called uniform field model (UFM), the same information is missing for piezoelectric elements with more complex electrode configurations like the above-mentioned ones with IDEs. This is due to the inhomogeneous field distribution which does not automatically allow for the correct assignment of the material, i.e. orientation and property. A variation of the material orientation as well as the material properties can be accomplished by including the polarization process of the piezoelectric transducer in the finite element (FE) simulation prior to the actual load case to be investigated. A corresponding procedure is presented which automatically assigns the piezoelectric material properties, e.g. elasticity matrix, permittivity, and charge vector, for finite element models (FEMs) describing piezoelectric transducers according to the electric field distribution (field orientation and strength) in the structure. A corresponding code has been

  4. Impeller deflection and modal finite element analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Nathan A.

    2013-10-01

    Deflections of an impeller due to centripetal forces are calculated using finite element analysis. The lateral, or out of plane, deflections are an important design consideration for this particular impeller because it incorporates an air bearing with critical gap tolerances. The target gap distance is approximately 10 microns at a rotational velocity of 2500 rpm. The centripetal forces acting on the impeller cause it deflect in a concave fashion, decreasing the initial gap distance as a function of radial position. This deflection is characterized for a previous and updated impeller design for comparative purposes. The impact of design options such as material selection, geometry dimensions, and operating rotational velocity are also explored, followed by a sensitivity study with these parameters bounded by specific design values. A modal analysis is also performed to calculate the impeller's natural frequencies which are desired to be avoided during operation. The finite element modeling techniques continue to be exercised by the impeller design team to address specific questions and evaluate conceptual designs, some of which are included in the Appendix.

  5. Finite element analysis of multilayer coextrusion.

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Schunk, Peter Randall; Baer, Thomas A.; Mrozek, Randy A.; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Collins, Robert; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2011-09-01

    Multilayer coextrusion has become a popular commercial process for producing complex polymeric products from soda bottles to reflective coatings. A numerical model of a multilayer coextrusion process is developed based on a finite element discretization and two different free-surface methods, an arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) moving mesh implementation and an Eulerian level set method, to understand the moving boundary problem associated with the polymer-polymer interface. The goal of this work is to have a numerical capability suitable for optimizing and troubleshooting the coextrusion process, circumventing flow instabilities such as ribbing and barring, and reducing variability in layer thickness. Though these instabilities can be both viscous and elastic in nature, for this work a generalized Newtonian description of the fluid is used. Models of varying degrees of complexity are investigated including stability analysis and direct three-dimensional finite element free surface approaches. The results of this work show how critical modeling can be to reduce build test cycles, improve material choices, and guide mold design.

  6. A finite element model for ultrasonic cutting.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Margaret; MacBeath, Alan; McCulloch, Euan; Cardoni, Andrea

    2006-12-22

    Using a single-blade ultrasonic cutting device, a study of ultrasonic cutting of three very different materials is conducted using specimens of cheese, polyurethane foam and epoxy resin. Initial finite element models are created, based on the assumption that the ultrasonic blade causes a crack to propagate in a controlled mode 1 opening, and these are validated against experimental data from three point bend fracture tests and ultrasonic cutting experiments on the materials. Subsequently, the finite element model is developed to represent ultrasonic cutting of a multi-layered material. Materials are chosen whose properties allow a model to be developed that could represent a multi-layer food product or biological structure, to enable ultrasonic cutting systems to be designed for applications both in the field of food processing and surgical procedures. The model incorporates an estimation of the friction condition between the cutting blade and the material to be cut and allows adjustment of the frequency, cutting amplitude and cutting speed. PMID:16814351

  7. Overcoming element erosion limitations within Lagrangian finite element codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignjevic, Rade; Hughes, Kevin; Walker, Andrew; Taylor, Emma A.

    2001-10-01

    Lagrangian finite element methods have been used extensively in the past to study the non-linear transient behaviour of materials, ranging from crash test of cars to simulating bird strikes on planes.... However, as this type of space discretization does not allow for motion of the material through the mesh when modelling extremely large deformations, the mesh becomes highly distorted. This paper describes some limitations and applicability of this type of analysis for high velocity impacts. A method for dealing with this problem is by the erosion of elements is proposed where the main issue is the deformation of element failure strains. Results were compared with empirical perforation results and were found to be in good agreement. The results were then used to simulate high velocity impacts upon a multi-layered aluminium target, in order to predict a ballistic limit curve. LS-DYNA3D was used as the FE solver for all simulations. Meshes were generated with Truegrid.

  8. A suitable low-order, eight-node tetrahedral finite element for solids

    SciTech Connect

    Key, S.W.; Heinstein, M.S.; Stone, C.M.; Mello, F.J.; Blanford, M.L.; Budge, K.G.

    1998-03-01

    To use the all-tetrahedral mesh generation existing today, the authors have explored the creation of a computationally efficient eight-node tetrahedral finite element (a four-node tetrahedral finite element enriched with four mid-face nodal points). The derivation of the element`s gradient operator, studies in obtaining a suitable mass lumping, and the element`s performance in applications are presented. In particular they examine the eight-node tetrahedral finite element`s behavior in longitudinal plane wave propagation, in transverse cylindrical wave propagation, and in simulating Taylor bar impacts. The element samples only constant strain states and, therefore, has 12 hour-glass modes. In this regard it bears similarities to the eight-node, mean-quadrature hexahedral finite element. Comparisons with the results obtained from the mean-quadrature eight-node hexahedral finite element and the four-node tetrahedral finite element are included. Given automatic all-tetrahedral meshing, the eight-node, constant-strain tetrahedral finite element is a suitable replacement for the eight-node hexahedral finite element in those cases where mesh generation requires an inordinate amount of user intervention and direction to obtain acceptable mesh properties.

  9. Recent advances in hybrid/mixed finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1985-01-01

    In formulations of Hybrid/Mixed finite element methods respectively by the Hellinger-Reissner principle and the Hu-Washizu principle, the stress equilibrium equations are brought in as conditions of constraint through the introduction of additional internal displacement parameters. These two approaches are more flexible and have better computing efficiencies. A procedure for the choice of assumed stress terms for 3-D solids is suggested. Example solutions are given for plates and shells using the present formulations and the idea of semiloof elements.

  10. Mixed Finite Element Methods for Melt Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taicher, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    Multi-phase flow arises during partial melting in the earth mantle, where the porosity is small and material has the characteristics of a compacting porous medium. The equations governing multi-phase flow have been specialized to partially molten materials by McKenzie and Fowler. Their model, also called a Darcy-Stokes system, is highly coupled and non-linear. Melt flow is governed by Darcy's Law while the high temperature, ductile creep of the solid matrix is modeled using viscous non-Newtonian Stokes rheology. In addition, the melt and solid pressures are related through a compaction relation. This nearly elliptic mechanical problem is then coupled with both solute transport and thermal evolution according to the enthalpy method developed by Katz. A suitable numerical method must solve the Darcy-Stokes problem in a manner compatible with the transport problem. Moreover, unlike most porous media problems, partially molten materials transition dynamically from non-porous solid to porous medium so must carefully account for the limit of zero porosity. The Darcy-Stokes system for modeling partial melting in the mantle is a novel problem. As far as we know, there currently does not exist a finite element solution in the literature solving these coupled equations. In particular, the mixed finite element method presents a good candidate because it works in both limiting cases: Darcy and incompressible Stokes flow. We present a mixed formulation for the Darcy-Stokes system. Next, we present novel elements of lowest order and compatible with both Darcy and Stokes flow Finally, we present our 2D mixed FEM code result for solving Stokes and Darcy flow as well as the coupled Darcy-Stokes system the mid-ocean ridge or corner flow problem.

  11. Finite element analysis enhancement of cryogenic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiem, Clare D.; Norton, Douglas A.

    1991-12-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) of large space optics enhances cryogenic testing by providing an analytical method by which to ensure that a test article survives proposed testing. The analyses presented in this paper were concerned with determining the reliability of a half meter mirror in an environment where the exact environmental profile was unknown. FEA allows the interaction between the test object and the environment to be simulated to detect potential problems prior to actual testing. These analyses examined worse case scenerios related to cooling the mirror, its structural integrity for the proposed test environment, and deformation of the reflective surface. The FEA was conducted in-house on the System's Reliability Division's VAX 11-750 and Decstation 3100 using Engineering Mechanics Research Corporation's numerically integrated elements for systems analysis finite element software. The results of the analyses showed that it would take at least 48 hours to cool the mirror to its desired testing temperature. It was also determined that the proposed mirror mount would not cause critical concentrated thermal stresses that would fracture the mirror. FEA and actual measurements of the front reflective face were compared and good agreement between computer simulation and physical tests were seen. Space deployment of large optics requires lightweight mirrors which can perform under the harsh conditions of space. The physical characteristics of these mirrors must be well understood in order that their deployment and operation are successful. Evaluating design approaches by analytical simulation, like FEA, verifies the reliability and structural integrity of a space optic during design prior to prototyping and testing. Eliminating an optic's poor design early in its life saves money, materials, and human resources while ensuring performance.

  12. Elbow stress indices using finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lixin

    Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code) specifies rules for the design of nuclear power plant components. NB-3600 of the Code presents a simplified design method using stress indices---Scalar Coefficients used the modify straight pipe stress equations so that they can be applied to elbows, tees and other piping components. The stress indices of piping components are allowed to be determined both analytically and experimentally. This study concentrates on the determination of B2 stress indices for elbow components using finite element analysis (FEA). First, the previous theoretical, numerical and experimental investigations on elbow behavior were comprehensively reviewed, as was the philosophy behind the use of stress indices. The areas of further research was defined. Then, a comprehensive investigation was carried out to determine how the finite element method should be used to correctly simulate an elbow's structural behavior. This investigation included choice of element type, convergence of mesh density, use of boundary restraint and a reconciliation study between FEA and laboratory experiments or other theoretical formulations in both elastic and elasto-plastic domain. Results from different computer programs were also compared. Reasonably good reconciliation was obtained. Appendix II of the Code describes the experimental method to determine B2 stress indices based on load-deflection curves. This procedure was used to compute the B2 stress indices for various loading modes on one particular elbow configuration. The B2 stress indices thus determined were found to be about half of the value calculated from the Code equation. Then the effect on B2 stress indices of those factors such as internal pressure and flange attachments were studied. Finally, the investigation was extended to other configurations of elbow components. A parametric study was conducted on different elbow sizes and schedules. Regression analysis was then used to

  13. A comparison of the capabilities of three finite element programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loendorf, D. D.

    1972-01-01

    Three finite element programs are compared to assess their capabilities as an analysis tool in a structural design process. Because of the need for repetitive analyses as an integral part of a design loop, a candidate program must be capable of handling large problems, operate efficiently, and be readily adaptable for use in computer-aided design. The three programs considered in the study, ELAS,SNAP, and NASTRAN, range from a relatively small finite element program limited to static structural analysis (ELAS) to a large complex general analysis system (NASTRAN). Results are given for comparative speeds and computer resources required for each program in the analysis of sample fuselage problems representative of practical aircraft design.

  14. An emulator for minimizing finite element analysis implementation resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, R. J.; Utku, S.; Salama, M.; Islam, M.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element analysis emulator providing a basis for efficiently establishing an optimum computer implementation strategy when many calculations are involved is described. The SCOPE emulator determines computer resources required as a function of the structural model, structural load-deflection equation characteristics, the storage allocation plan, and computer hardware capabilities. Thereby, it provides data for trading analysis implementation options to arrive at a best strategy. The models contained in SCOPE lead to micro-operation computer counts of each finite element operation as well as overall computer resource cost estimates. Application of SCOPE to the Memphis-Arkansas bridge analysis provides measures of the accuracy of resource assessments. Data indicate that predictions are within 17.3 percent for calculation times and within 3.2 percent for peripheral storage resources for the ELAS code.

  15. A Viscoelastic Hybrid Shell Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Arthur

    1999-01-01

    An elastic large displacement thick-shell hybrid finite element is modified to allow for the calculation of viscoelastic stresses. Internal strain variables are introduced at he element's stress nodes and are employed to construct a viscous material model. First order ordinary differential equations relate the internal strain variables to the corresponding elastic strains at the stress nodes. The viscous stresses are computed from the internal strain variables using viscous moduli which are a fraction of the elastic moduli. The energy dissipated by the action of the viscous stresses in included in the mixed variational functional. Nonlinear quasi-static viscous equilibrium equations are then obtained. Previously developed Taylor expansions of the equilibrium equations are modified to include the viscous terms. A predictor-corrector time marching solution algorithm is employed to solve the algebraic-differential equations. The viscous shell element is employed to numerically simulate a stair-step loading and unloading of an aircraft tire in contact with a frictionless surface.

  16. A new finite element and finite difference hybrid method for computing electrostatics of ionic solvated biomolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Jinyong; Xie, Dexuan

    2015-10-01

    The Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE) is one widely-used implicit solvent continuum model for calculating electrostatics of ionic solvated biomolecule. In this paper, a new finite element and finite difference hybrid method is presented to solve PBE efficiently based on a special seven-overlapped box partition with one central box containing the solute region and surrounded by six neighboring boxes. In particular, an efficient finite element solver is applied to the central box while a fast preconditioned conjugate gradient method using a multigrid V-cycle preconditioning is constructed for solving a system of finite difference equations defined on a uniform mesh of each neighboring box. Moreover, the PBE domain, the box partition, and an interface fitted tetrahedral mesh of the central box can be generated adaptively for a given PQR file of a biomolecule. This new hybrid PBE solver is programmed in C, Fortran, and Python as a software tool for predicting electrostatics of a biomolecule in a symmetric 1:1 ionic solvent. Numerical results on two test models with analytical solutions and 12 proteins validate this new software tool, and demonstrate its high performance in terms of CPU time and memory usage.

  17. Finite element structural redesign by large admissible perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernitsas, Michael M.; Beyko, E.; Rim, C. W.; Alzahabi, B.

    1991-01-01

    In structural redesign, two structural states are involved; the baseline (known) State S1 with unacceptable performance, and the objective (unknown) State S2 with given performance specifications. The difference between the two states in performance and design variables may be as high as 100 percent or more depending on the scale of the structure. A Perturbation Approach to Redesign (PAR) is presented to relate any two structural states S1 and S2 that are modeled by the same finite element model and represented by different values of the design variables. General perturbation equations are derived expressing implicitly the natural frequencies, dynamic modes, static deflections, static stresses, Euler buckling loads, and buckling modes of the objective S2 in terms of its performance specifications, and S1 data and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) results. Large Admissible Perturbation (LEAP) algorithms are implemented in code RESTRUCT to define the objective S2 incrementally without trial and error by postprocessing FEA results of S1 with no additional FEAs. Systematic numerical applications in redesign of a 10 element 48 degree of freedom (dof) beam, a 104 element 192 dof offshore tower, a 64 element 216 dof plate, and a 144 element 896 dof cylindrical shell show the accuracy, efficiency, and potential of PAR to find an objective state that may differ 100 percent from the baseline design.

  18. Asymmetric quadrilateral shell elements for finite strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areias, P.; Dias-da-Costa, D.; Pires, E. B.; Van Goethem, N.

    2013-07-01

    Very good results in infinitesimal and finite strain analysis of shells are achieved by combining either the enhanced-metric technique or the selective-reduced integration for the in-plane shear energy and an assumed natural strain technique (ANS) in a non-symmetric Petrov-Galerkin arrangement which complies with the patch-test. A recovery of the original Wilson incompatible mode element is shown for the trial functions in the in-plane components. As a beneficial side-effect, Newton-Raphson convergence behavior for non-linear problems is improved with respect to symmetric formulations. Transverse-shear and in-plane patch tests are satisfied while distorted-mesh accuracy is higher than with symmetric formulations. Classical test functions with assumed-metric components are required for compatibility reasons. Verification tests are performed with advantageous comparisons being observed in all of them. Applications to large displacement elasticity and finite strain plasticity are shown with both low sensitivity to mesh distortion and (relatively) high accuracy. A equilibrium-consistent (and consistently linearized) updated-Lagrangian algorithm is proposed and tested. Concerning the time-step dependency, it was found that the consistent updated-Lagrangian algorithm is nearly time-step independent and can replace the multiplicative plasticity approach if only moderate elastic strains are present, as is the case of most metals.

  19. Finite element or Galerkin type semidiscrete schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durgun, K.

    1983-01-01

    A finite element of Galerkin type semidiscrete method is proposed for numerical solution of a linear hyperbolic partial differential equation. The question of stability is reduced to the stability of a system of ordinary differential equations for which Dahlquist theory applied. Results of separating the part of numerical solution which causes the spurious oscillation near shock-like response of semidiscrete scheme to a step function initial condition are presented. In general all methods produce such oscillatory overshoots on either side of shocks. This overshoot pathology, which displays a behavior similar to Gibb's phenomena of Fourier series, is explained on the basis of dispersion of separated Fourier components which relies on linearized theory to be satisfactory. Expository results represented.

  20. Finite-element modeling of nanoindentation

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Myers, S.M.; Barbour, J.C.; Friedmann, T.A.

    1999-02-01

    Procedures have been developed based on finite-element modeling of nanoindentation data to obtain the mechanical properties of thin films and ion-beam-modified layers independently of the properties of the underlying substrates. These procedures accurately deduce the yield strength, Young{close_quote}s elastic modulus, and layer hardness from indentations as deep as 50{percent} of the layer thickness or more. We have used these procedures to evaluate materials ranging from ion implanted metals to deposited, diamond-like carbon layers. The technique increases the applicability of indentation testing to very thin layers, composite layers, and modulated compositions. This article presents an overview of the procedures involved and illustrates them with selected examples. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Continuation finite element analysis of viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Tai-Whang

    A finite element procedure using a mixed formulation and a predictor-corrector type continuation algorithm for the analysis of two dimensional steady state flows of viscoelastic fluids is described. As a simple but nontrivial test example, radial flow immenating from a line by the numerical discretization and believed to be the cause for previous numerical failures, are shown and branch solution paths are followed by step length adjustment and by convergent tolerance relaxation. A technique for jumping over bifurcation points is presented and used to increase the Weissenberg number with no apparent limit for the radial flow problem. A second example related to extrusion of viscoelastic material is also analyzed. Steady state velocity fields, deviatoric stress distributions and pressure distributions for several different Weissenberg numbers are presented with bifurcation points and turning points noted.

  2. Quality management of finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, John

    1991-09-01

    A quality management system covering the use of finite element analysis is described. The main topics are as follows: acquisition, development and verification of software (including the software suppliers software quality control system), support, documentation, error control, internal software, software acceptance and release; development and qualification of analysis methods, including software evaluation, analysis procedure qualification and documentation, procedure quality checks, control of analysis procedure errors; product design and integrity analysis, including project quality assurance and analysis planning, task specification and allocation, analysis, execution, results checking and analysis records. Other issues include the commercial and business advantages of quality systems, project and technical management and the training and experience of personnel. The items are correlated with the requirements of International Standard Organization 9001.

  3. Optimizing electroslag cladding with finite element modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.V.; Atteridge, D.G.; Meekisho, L.

    1996-12-31

    Electroslag cladding of nickel alloys onto carbon steel propeller shafts was optimized in terms of interpass temperatures. A two dimensional finite element model was used in this study to analyze the heat transfer induced by multipass electroslag cladding. Changes of interpass temperatures during a cladding experiment with uniform initial temperature distribution on a section of shaft were first simulated. It was concluded that uniform initial temperature distribution would lead to interpass temperatures out of the optimal range if continuous cladding is expected. The difference in the cooling conditions among experimental and full size shafts and its impact on interpass temperatures during the cladding were discussed. Electroslag cladding onto a much longer shaft, virtually an semi infinite long shaft, was analyzed with specific reference to the practical applications of electroslag cladding. Optimal initial preheating temperature distribution was obtained for continuous cladding on full size shafts which would keep the interpass temperatures within the required range.

  4. Finite element simulation of pipe dynamic response

    SciTech Connect

    Slagis, G.C.; Litton, R.W.

    1996-12-01

    Nonlinear finite element dynamic analyses of the response of a pipe span to controlled-displacement, sinusoidal vibration have been performed. The objective of this preliminary study is to compare strain and acceleration response data to those generated by Beaney in the Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories experiments. Results for an unpressurized, 5 Hz, carbon steel pipe are in good agreement with the experiments. Hence, it appears that analytical simulation will be useful to assess seismic margins. Recommendations for additional studies are provided. The analyses confirm the test results--dynamic response is greatly attenuated by material plasticity. Analytical strains and accelerations are about 30% higher than test data. There are several possible explanations for the differences. To assess the effect of frequency on response, the length of the pipe span was increased. Analysis of the longer, 2 Hz, pipe span shows significantly greater cyclic strains than the 5 Hz span at the same input excitation levels.

  5. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-02-01

    TOPAZ3D is a three-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ3D can be used to solve for the steady-state or transient temperature field on three-dimensional geometries. Material properties may be temperature-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functionalmore » representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. TOPAZ3D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  6. Finite element analysis: A boon to dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Shilpa

    2014-01-01

    The finite element analysis (FEA) is an upcoming and significant research tool for biomechanical analyses in biological research. It is an ultimate method for modeling complex structures and analyzing their mechanical properties. In Implantology, FEA has been used to study the stress patterns in various implant components and also in the peri-implant bone. It is also useful for studying the biomechanical properties of implants as well as for predicting the success of implants in clinical condition. FEA of simulated traumatic loads can be used to understand the biomechanics of fracture. FEA has various advantages compared with studies on real models. The experiments are repeatable, there are no ethical considerations and the study designs may be modified and changed as per the requirement. There are certain limitations of FEA too. It is a computerized in vitro study in which clinical condition may not be completely replicated. So, further FEA research should be supplemented with clinical evaluation. PMID:25737944

  7. Finite-element solutions for geothermal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J. C.; Conel, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Vector potential and scalar potential are used to formulate the governing equations for a single-component and single-phase geothermal system. By assuming an initial temperature field, the fluid velocity can be determined which, in turn, is used to calculate the convective heat transfer. The energy equation is then solved by considering convected heat as a distributed source. Using the resulting temperature to compute new source terms, the final results are obtained by iterations of the procedure. Finite-element methods are proposed for modeling of realistic geothermal systems; the advantages of such methods are discussed. The developed methodology is then applied to a sample problem. Favorable agreement is obtained by comparisons with a previous study.

  8. Boundary element and finite element coupling for aeroacoustics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balin, Nolwenn; Casenave, Fabien; Dubois, François; Duceau, Eric; Duprey, Stefan; Terrasse, Isabelle

    2015-08-01

    We consider the scattering of acoustic perturbations in the presence of a flow. We suppose that the space can be split into a zone where the flow is uniform and a zone where the flow is potential. In the first zone, we apply a Prandtl-Glauert transformation to recover the Helmholtz equation. The well-known setting of boundary element method for the Helmholtz equation is available. In the second zone, the flow quantities are space dependent, we have to consider a local resolution, namely the finite element method. Herein, we carry out the coupling of these two methods and present various applications and validation test cases. The source term is given through the decomposition of an incident acoustic field on a section of the computational domain's boundary. Validations against analytic, another numerical method and measurements on different test cases are presented.

  9. Finite element analyses of CCAT preliminary design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarawit, Andrew T.; Kan, Frank W.

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the development of the CCAT telescope finite element model (FEM) and the analyses performed to support the preliminary design work. CCAT will be a 25 m diameter telescope operating in the 0.2 to 2 mm wavelength range. It will be located at an elevation of 5600 m on Cerro Chajnantor in Northern Chile, near ALMA. The telescope will be equipped with wide-field cameras and spectrometers mounted at the two Nasmyth foci. The telescope will be inside an enclosure to protect it from wind buffeting, direct solar heating, and bad weather. The main structures of the telescope include a steel Mount and a carbon-fiber-reinforced-plastic (CFRP) primary truss. The finite element model developed in this study was used to perform modal, frequency response, seismic response spectrum, stress, and deflection analyses of telescope. Modal analyses of telescope were performed to compute the structure natural frequencies and mode shapes and to obtain reduced order modal output at selected locations in the telescope structure to support the design of the Mount control system. Modal frequency response analyses were also performed to compute transfer functions at these selected locations. Seismic response spectrum analyses of the telescope subject to the Maximum Likely Earthquake were performed to compute peak accelerations and seismic demand stresses. Stress analyses were performed for gravity load to obtain gravity demand stresses. Deflection analyses for gravity load, thermal load, and differential elevation drive torque were performed so that the CCAT Observatory can verify that the structures meet the stringent telescope surface and pointing error requirements.

  10. Engine dynamic analysis with general nonlinear finite element codes. Part 2: Bearing element implementation overall numerical characteristics and benchmaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, J.; Adams, M.; Fertis, J.; Zeid, I.; Lam, P.

    1982-01-01

    Finite element codes are used in modelling rotor-bearing-stator structure common to the turbine industry. Engine dynamic simulation is used by developing strategies which enable the use of available finite element codes. benchmarking the elements developed are benchmarked by incorporation into a general purpose code (ADINA); the numerical characteristics of finite element type rotor-bearing-stator simulations are evaluated through the use of various types of explicit/implicit numerical integration operators. Improving the overall numerical efficiency of the procedure is improved.

  11. A sweeping preconditioner for time-harmonic Maxwell's equations with finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Paul; Engquist, Bjorn; Ying, Lexing

    2012-05-01

    This paper is concerned with preconditioning the stiffness matrix resulting from finite element discretizations of Maxwell's equations in the high frequency regime. The moving PML sweeping preconditioner, first introduced for the Helmholtz equation on a Cartesian finite difference grid, is generalized to an unstructured mesh with finite elements. The method dramatically reduces the number of GMRES iterations necessary for convergence, resulting in an almost linear complexity solver. Numerical examples including electromagnetic cloaking simulations are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  12. A finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.; Nayani, S.

    1990-01-01

    Computation of the flow field inside a space shuttle main engine (SSME) requires the application of state of the art computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technology. Several computer codes are under development to solve 3-D flow through the hot gas manifold. Some algorithms were designed to solve the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations, either by implicit or explicit factorization methods, using several hundred or thousands of time steps to reach a steady state solution. A new iterative algorithm is being developed for the solution of the implicit finite element equations without assembling global matrices. It is an efficient iteration scheme based on a modified nonlinear Gauss-Seidel iteration with symmetric sweeps. The algorithm is analyzed for a model equation and is shown to be unconditionally stable. Results from a series of test problems are presented. The finite element code was tested for couette flow, which is flow under a pressure gradient between two parallel plates in relative motion. Another problem that was solved is viscous laminar flow over a flat plate. The general 3-D finite element code was used to compute the flow in an axisymmetric turnaround duct at low Mach numbers.

  13. Finite element solver for 3-D compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, K. C.; Reddy, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    The space shuttle main engine (SSME) has extremely complex internal flow structure. The geometry of the flow domain is three-dimensional with complicated topology. The flow is compressible, viscous, and turbulent with large gradients in flow quantities and regions of recirculations. The analysis of the flow field in SSME involves several tedious steps. One is the geometrical modeling of the particular zone of the SSME being studied. Accessing the geometry definition, digitalizing it, and developing surface interpolations suitable for an interior grid generator require considerable amount of manual labor. There are several types of grid generators available with some general-purpose finite element programs. An efficient and robust computational scheme for solving 3D Navier-Stokes equations has to be implemented. Post processing software has to be adapted to visualize and analyze the computed 3D flow field. The progress made in a project to develop software for the analysis of the flow is discussed. The technical approach to the development of the finite element scheme and the relaxation procedure are discussed. The three dimensional finite element code for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is listed.

  14. Finite element analysis of SMA beam bending using COMSOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shibin; Seelecke, Stefan S.; Li, Qifu

    2009-03-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) represent a class of smart materials that has been extensively used in many engineering applications due to their unique material properties. To facilitate these new developments, an efficient computational tool like the finite element method has to be used in order to simulate the highly nonlinear, load-history and temperature dependent responses of SMA materials. The particular focus of this paper is on the aspects of modeling and simulation of the inhomogeneous beam bending problem. Based on small deformation Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, the SMA beam is treated as consisting of several layers. Each governed by a 1-D free energy SMA model. The SMA beam is implemented in the finite element software COMSOL using its general PDE form. The ordinary differential equations describing the kinetics of the phase transformations are treated as degenerated PDEs without a flux term and coupled with the mechanical equilibrium equation and the heat transfer equation. In this paper, we study the quasiplastic and superelastic isothermal behavior of an SMA cantilever beam at constant low and high temperature, respectively. Keywords: finite element analysis, shape memory alloy, COMSOL

  15. Patient-specific geometrical modeling of orthopedic structures with high efficiency and accuracy for finite element modeling and 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huajun; Xiang, Chunling; Zeng, Canjun; Ouyang, Hanbin; Wong, Kelvin Kian Loong; Huang, Wenhua

    2015-12-01

    We improved the geometrical modeling procedure for fast and accurate reconstruction of orthopedic structures. This procedure consists of medical image segmentation, three-dimensional geometrical reconstruction, and assignment of material properties. The patient-specific orthopedic structures reconstructed by this improved procedure can be used in the virtual surgical planning, 3D printing of real orthopedic structures and finite element analysis. A conventional modeling consists of: image segmentation, geometrical reconstruction, mesh generation, and assignment of material properties. The present study modified the conventional method to enhance software operating procedures. Patient's CT images of different bones were acquired and subsequently reconstructed to give models. The reconstruction procedures were three-dimensional image segmentation, modification of the edge length and quantity of meshes, and the assignment of material properties according to the intensity of gravy value. We compared the performance of our procedures to the conventional procedures modeling in terms of software operating time, success rate and mesh quality. Our proposed framework has the following improvements in the geometrical modeling: (1) processing time: (femur: 87.16 ± 5.90 %; pelvis: 80.16 ± 7.67 %; thoracic vertebra: 17.81 ± 4.36 %; P < 0.05); (2) least volume reduction (femur: 0.26 ± 0.06 %; pelvis: 0.70 ± 0.47, thoracic vertebra: 3.70 ± 1.75 %; P < 0.01) and (3) mesh quality in terms of aspect ratio (femur: 8.00 ± 7.38 %; pelvis: 17.70 ± 9.82 %; thoracic vertebra: 13.93 ± 9.79 %; P < 0.05) and maximum angle (femur: 4.90 ± 5.28 %; pelvis: 17.20 ± 19.29 %; thoracic vertebra: 3.86 ± 3.82 %; P < 0.05). Our proposed patient-specific geometrical modeling requires less operating time and workload, but the orthopedic structures were generated at a higher rate of success as compared with the conventional method. It is expected to benefit the surgical planning of orthopedic

  16. Accelerated finite element elastodynamic simulations using the GPU

    SciTech Connect

    Huthwaite, Peter

    2014-01-15

    An approach is developed to perform explicit time domain finite element simulations of elastodynamic problems on the graphical processing unit, using Nvidia's CUDA. Of critical importance for this problem is the arrangement of nodes in memory, allowing data to be loaded efficiently and minimising communication between the independently executed blocks of threads. The initial stage of memory arrangement is partitioning the mesh; both a well established ‘greedy’ partitioner and a new, more efficient ‘aligned’ partitioner are investigated. A method is then developed to efficiently arrange the memory within each partition. The software is applied to three models from the fields of non-destructive testing, vibrations and geophysics, demonstrating a memory bandwidth of very close to the card's maximum, reflecting the bandwidth-limited nature of the algorithm. Comparison with Abaqus, a widely used commercial CPU equivalent, validated the accuracy of the results and demonstrated a speed improvement of around two orders of magnitude. A software package, Pogo, incorporating these developments, is released open source, downloadable from (http://www.pogo-fea.com/) to benefit the community. -- Highlights: •A novel memory arrangement approach is discussed for finite elements on the GPU. •The mesh is partitioned then nodes are arranged efficiently within each partition. •Models from ultrasonics, vibrations and geophysics are run. •The code is significantly faster than an equivalent commercial CPU package. •Pogo, the new software package, is released open source.

  17. Survey and development of finite elements for nonlinear structural analysis. Volume 2: Nonlinear shell finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The development of two new shell finite elements for applications to large deflection problems is considered. The elements in question are doubly curved and of triangular and quadrilateral planform. They are restricted to small strains of elastic materials, and can accommodate large rotations. The elements described, which are based on relatively simple linear elements, make use of a new displacement function approach specifically designed for strongly nonlinear problems. The displacement function development for nonlinear applications is based on certain beam element formulations, and the strain-displacement equations are of a shallow shell type. Additional terms were included in these equations in an attempt to avoid the large errors characteristic of shallow shell elements in certain types of problems. An incremental nonlinear solution procedure specifically adopted to the element formulation was developed. The solution procedure is of combined incremental and total Lagrangian type, and uses a new updating scheme. A computer program was written to evaluate the developed formulations. This program can accommodate small element groups in arbitrary arrangements. Two simple programs were successfully solved. The results indicate that this new type of element has definite promise and should be a fruitful area for further research.

  18. Improved finite-element methods for rotorcraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinnant, Howard E.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of the research directed at improving finite-element methods for rotorcraft airframes is presented. The development of a modification to the finite element method which eliminates interelement discontinuities is covered. The following subject areas are discussed: geometric entities, interelement continuity, dependent rotational degrees of freedom, and adaptive numerical integration. This new methodology is being implemented as an anisotropic, curvilinear, p-version, beam, shell, and brick finite element program.

  19. Impact of new computing systems on finite element computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Storassili, O. O.; Fulton, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Recent advances in computer technology that are likely to impact finite element computations are reviewed. The characteristics of supersystems, highly parallel systems, and small systems (mini and microcomputers) are summarized. The interrelations of numerical algorithms and software with parallel architectures are discussed. A scenario is presented for future hardware/software environment and finite element systems. A number of research areas which have high potential for improving the effectiveness of finite element analysis in the new environment are identified.

  20. Finite element model calibration using frequency responses with damping equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamsson, T. J. S.; Kammer, D. C.

    2015-10-01

    Model calibration is a cornerstone of the finite element verification and validation procedure, in which the credibility of the model is substantiated by positive comparison with test data. The calibration problem, in which the minimum deviation between finite element model data and experimental data is searched for, is normally characterized as being a large scale optimization problem with many model parameters to solve for and with deviation metrics that are nonlinear in these parameters. The calibrated parameters need to be found by iterative procedures, starting from initial estimates. Sometimes these procedures get trapped in local deviation function minima and do not converge to the globally optimal calibration solution that is searched for. The reason for such traps is often the multi-modality of the problem which causes eigenmode crossover problems in the iterative variation of parameter settings. This work presents a calibration formulation which gives a smooth deviation metric with a large radius of convergence to the global minimum. A damping equalization method is suggested to avoid the mode correlation and mode pairing problems that need to be solved in many other model updating procedures. By this method, the modal damping of a test data model and the finite element model is set to be the same fraction of critical modal damping. Mode pairing for mapping of experimentally found damping to the finite element model is thus not needed. The method is combined with model reduction for efficiency and employs the Levenberg-Marquardt minimizer with randomized starts to achieve the calibration solution. The performance of the calibration procedure, including a study of parameter bias and variance under noisy data conditions, is demonstrated by two numerical examples.

  1. A comparative study of finite element and finite difference methods for Cauchy-Riemann type equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G. J.; Rose, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    A least squares formulation of the system divu = rho, curlu = zeta is surveyed from the viewpoint of both finite element and finite difference methods. Closely related arguments are shown to establish convergence estimates.

  2. Beam and Truss Finite Element Verification for DYNA3D

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, H J

    2007-07-16

    The explicit finite element (FE) software program DYNA3D has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to simulate the dynamic behavior of structures, systems, and components. This report focuses on verification of beam and truss element formulations in DYNA3D. An efficient protocol has been developed to verify the accuracy of these structural elements by generating a set of representative problems for which closed-form quasi-static steady-state analytical reference solutions exist. To provide as complete coverage as practically achievable, problem sets are developed for each beam and truss element formulation (and their variants) in all modes of loading and physical orientation. Analyses with loading in the elastic and elastic-plastic regimes are performed. For elastic loading, the FE results are within 1% of the reference solutions for all cases. For beam element bending and torsion loading in the plastic regime, the response is heavily dependent on the numerical integration rule chosen, with higher refinement yielding greater accuracy (agreement to within 1%). Axial loading in the plastic regime produces accurate results (agreement to within 0.01%) for all integration rules and element formulations. Truss elements are also verified to provide accurate results (within 0.01%) for elastic and elastic-plastic loading. A sample problem to verify beam element response in ParaDyn, the parallel version DYNA3D, is also presented.

  3. Finite element analysis in a minicomputer/mainframe environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, O. O.; Murphy, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    Design considerations were evaluated for general purpose finite element systems to maximize performance when installed on distributed computer hardware/software systems. It is shown how the features of current minicomputers complement those of a modular implementation of the finite element method for increasing the control, speed, and visibility (interactive graphics) in solving structural problems at reduced cost. The approach used is to implement a finite element system in a distributed computer environment to solve structural problems and to explore alternatives in distributing finite element computations.

  4. A multi-microprocessor system for finite element structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, H. F.; Sawyer, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    During the last few years, advances in microprocessor technology have spurred a renewed interest in special-purpose computers. The microprocessor has become small, inexpensive, and powerful enough to be considered as a building block for special-purpose hardware. A description is presented of the architecture of a prototype 'finite element machine' currently being built. Attention is given to details regarding the finite element analysis problem, the arrangement of the processors as finite element nodes in the structural model, the influence of the architecture on the solution algorithm, interprocessor communication primitives, and the performance of the finite element machine.

  5. Ablative Thermal Response Analysis Using the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dec John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    A review of the classic techniques used to solve ablative thermal response problems is presented. The advantages and disadvantages of both the finite element and finite difference methods are described. As a first step in developing a three dimensional finite element based ablative thermal response capability, a one dimensional computer tool has been developed. The finite element method is used to discretize the governing differential equations and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals is used to derive the element equations. A code to code comparison between the current 1-D tool and the 1-D Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal Response Program (FIAT) has been performed.

  6. Turbomachinery flow calculation on unstructured grids using finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koschel, W.; Vornberger, A.

    An explicit finite-element scheme based on a two-step Taylor-Galerkin algorithm allows the solution of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured grids. Mesh generation methods for unstructured grids are described which lead to efficient flow calculations. Turbulent flow is calculated by using an algebraic turbulence model. To test the numerical accuracy, a laminar and turbulent flow over a flat plate and the supersonic flow in a corner has been calculated. For validation the method is applied to the simulation of the inviscid flow through a transonic turbine cascade and the viscous flow through a subsonic turbine cascade.

  7. Finite element analysis of laminated plates and shells, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seide, P.; Chang, P. N. H.

    1978-01-01

    The finite element method is used to investigate the static behavior of laminated composite flat plates and cylindrical shells. The analysis incorporates the effects of transverse shear deformation in each layer through the assumption that the normals to the undeformed layer midsurface remain straight but need not be normal to the mid-surface after deformation. A digital computer program was developed to perform the required computations. The program includes a very efficient equation solution code which permits the analysis of large size problems. The method is applied to the problem of stretching and bending of a perforated curved plate.

  8. Symbolic derivation of material property matrices in finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, H. Q.

    1988-01-01

    The principles and operation of MMAX, a symbolic-computation program which automates the process of generating property matrices for structural materials, are briefly described and illustrated with sample analyses of a rubberlike material and an elastoplastic material. MMAX is written in LISP under the symbolic finite-element generator FINGER and the general symbolic manipulator MACSYMA; it first derives the formulas required by mathematical manipulation, and then translates the formulas into FORTRAN code, adapted to the particular type of machine to be used for the numerical calculations. This approach is shown to combine efficiently the advantages of symbolic and numerical computation for engineering applications.

  9. Vector algorithms for geometrically nonlinear 3D finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, John D.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms for geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis are presented which exploit the vector processing capability of the VPS-32, which is closely related to the CYBER 205. By manipulating vectors (which are long lists of numbers) rather than individual numbers, very high processing speeds are obtained. Long vector lengths are obtained without extensive replication or reordering by storage of intermediate results in strategic patterns at all stages of the computations. Comparisons of execution times with those from programs using either scalar or other vector programming techniques indicate that the algorithms presented are quite efficient.

  10. Galerkin finite-element simulation of a geothermal reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, J.W., Jr.; Pinder, G.F.

    1973-01-01

    The equations describing fluid flow and energy transport in a porous medium can be used to formulate a mathematical model capable of simulating the transient response of a hot-water geothermal reservoir. The resulting equations can be solved accurately and efficiently using a numerical scheme which combines the finite element approach with the Galerkin method of approximation. Application of this numerical model to the Wairakei geothermal field demonstrates that hot-water geothermal fields can be simulated using numerical techniques currently available and under development. ?? 1973.

  11. Finite-element simulation of thermoemission electron guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, D.

    2006-05-01

    The peculiarity of the numeric simulation of the thermoemission electron guns consists in the principal necessity of taking into account the contribution of the electrons' charge into the potential distribution in the beam formation region. Ths fact makes the mathematical model essentially nonlinear especially in the high-perveance operation mode. Moreover, the charge density is extremely high in the vicinity of emitting surfaces, rising infinitely in the limit of zero initial velocities. A special semi-analytical approach has been applied to deal with the charge singularity. Being combined with traditional finite-element numerical techniques, this approach provides an efficient way to simulate thermoemission electron guns.

  12. Integrated finite element model of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teply, Jan L.; Herbein, William C.

    1989-05-01

    Two problems traditionally addressed in the area of micromechanics of composite materials can be briefly summarized as follows: (1) for a macroscopically uniform volume of composite material, which is subjected to macroscopically uniform boundary tractions, displacements or heat influx, find overall thermomechanical properties in terms of the thermomechanical properties of the individual constituents; and (2) for the same material volume and boundary conditions as above, find the local stress, strain, and temperature fields in the constituents and on the interfaces. Two different types of micromechanical models are usually applied to the solutions of these two types of problems. For linear elastic materials, the micromechanical models to solve problem (1) offer simple solutions of overall thermomechanical properties either in terms of bound which are derived from periodic or random microstructures, or in terms of single estimates, which are derived from a solution of an isolated inclusion. The finite element variational approaches are applied to integrate the solutions of problems (1) and (2) into one model. The application of displacement and equilibrium variational approaches to the calculation of overall elastic-plastic properties, are extended to the solution of the second problem. The integrated model is then applied to calculate the overall properties and local stress and strain fields of boron-aluminum composites subjected to transverse tension, in-plane shear and bending.

  13. Laterally displaced pipelines: Finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Altaee, A.; Boivin, R.

    1995-12-31

    The rate effect of lateral soil movement against buried pipes in clay soils is investigated in finite element analyzes using two different computer programs, AGAC and CRISP. Rapid and slow ground movements are considered in ideal undrained and ideal drained analysis, respectively, which represent the two extreme boundaries with respect to rate of loading (rate of ground movement). The analyses address a typical full-scale buried pipe as described by Rizkalla et al. (1992). The pipe considered for the analysis has a diameter of 0.914 m and is placed in a backfilled 2.0 m wide and 1.8 m deep excavation. Results from both AGAC and CRISP analyzes are similar in terms of total lateral force versus lateral pipe movement. For example, both programs indicate the same clear difference in the resulting pipe movement for cases of rapid and slow ground movement, especially at large movement. When the ground movement is rapid, the pipe moves both laterally and upward. One the other hand, when the ground movement is slow, the pipe experiences only lateral movement and no noticeable vertical movement. The total force acting on the pipe (and stresses and strains within the pipe) is larger for the slow rate of loading. The results of analyzes presented herein agree with results of tests on a 5.5 m beam centrifuge performed by the Center for Cold Oceans Resources Engineering.

  14. Finite Element Modeling of Human Placental Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mao; Manoogian, Sarah; Duma, Stefan M.; Stitzel, Joel D.

    2009-01-01

    Motor vehicle crashes account for a large portion of placental abruption and fetal losses. To better understand the material properties of the human placenta, a Finite Element (FE) model of human placenta tissue was created and verified using data from uniaxial tension tests. Sixty-four tensile tests at three different strain rates of 7% strain/s, 70% strain/s, and 700% strain/s from six whole human placentas were used for model development. Nominal stresses were calculated by dividing forces at the grips by the original cross-sectional area. Nominal strains were calculated by dividing cross-head displacement by the original gauge length. A detailed methodology for interpreting experimental data for application to material model development is presented. A model of the tension coupon was created in LS-DYNA and stretched in the same manner as the uniaxial tension tests. The behavior of the material was optimized to the uniaxial tension test using a multi-island genetic algorithm. The results demonstrate good correlation between experiments and the model, with an average difference of 2% between the optimized FE and experimental first principal stress at the termination state. The material parameters found in this study can be utilized in FE models of placental tissues for behavior under dynamic loading. PMID:20184849

  15. Finite element modeling of retinal prosthesis mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basinger, B. C.; Rowley, A. P.; Chen, K.; Humayun, M. S.; Weiland, J. D.

    2009-10-01

    Epiretinal prostheses used to treat degenerative retina diseases apply stimulus via an electrode array fixed to the ganglion cell side of the retina. Mechanical pressure applied by these arrays to the retina, both during initial insertion and throughout chronic use, could cause sufficient retinal damage to reduce the device's effectiveness. In order to understand and minimize potential mechanical damage, we have used finite element analysis to model mechanical interactions between an electrode array and the retina in both acute and chronic loading configurations. Modeling indicates that an acute tacking force distributes stress primarily underneath the tack site and heel edge of the array, while more moderate chronic stresses are distributed more evenly underneath the array. Retinal damage in a canine model chronically implanted with a similar array occurred in correlating locations, and model predictions correlate well with benchtop eyewall compression tests. This model provides retinal prosthesis researchers with a tool to optimize the mechanical electrode array design, but the techniques used here represent a unique effort to combine a modifiable device and soft biological tissues in the same model and those techniques could be extended to other devices that come into mechanical contact with soft neural tissues.

  16. TACO: a finite element heat transfer code

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, W.E. Jr.

    1980-02-01

    TACO is a two-dimensional implicit finite element code for heat transfer analysis. It can perform both linear and nonlinear analyses and can be used to solve either transient or steady state problems. Either plane or axisymmetric geometries can be analyzed. TACO has the capability to handle time or temperature dependent material properties and materials may be either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time and temperature dependent loadings and boundary conditions are available including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation boundary conditions and internal heat generation. Additionally, TACO has some specialized features such as internal surface conditions (e.g., contact resistance), bulk nodes, enclosure radiation with view factor calculations, and chemical reactive kinetics. A user subprogram feature allows for any type of functional representation of any independent variable. A bandwidth and profile minimization option is also available in the code. Graphical representation of data generated by TACO is provided by a companion post-processor named POSTACO. The theory on which TACO is based is outlined, the capabilities of the code are explained, the input data required to perform an analysis with TACO are described. Some simple examples are provided to illustrate the use of the code.

  17. Higher-order adaptive finite-element methods for Kohn-Sham density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motamarri, P.; Nowak, M. R.; Leiter, K.; Knap, J.; Gavini, V.

    2013-11-01

    We present an efficient computational approach to perform real-space electronic structure calculations using an adaptive higher-order finite-element discretization of Kohn-Sham density-functional theory (DFT). To this end, we develop an a priori mesh-adaption technique to construct a close to optimal finite-element discretization of the problem. We further propose an efficient solution strategy for solving the discrete eigenvalue problem by using spectral finite-elements in conjunction with Gauss-Lobatto quadrature, and a Chebyshev acceleration technique for computing the occupied eigenspace. The proposed approach has been observed to provide a staggering 100-200-fold computational advantage over the solution of a generalized eigenvalue problem. Using the proposed solution procedure, we investigate the computational efficiency afforded by higher-order finite-element discretizations of the Kohn-Sham DFT problem. Our studies suggest that staggering computational savings-of the order of 1000-fold-relative to linear finite-elements can be realized, for both all-electron and local pseudopotential calculations, by using higher-order finite-element discretizations. On all the benchmark systems studied, we observe diminishing returns in computational savings beyond the sixth-order for accuracies commensurate with chemical accuracy, suggesting that the hexic spectral-element may be an optimal choice for the finite-element discretization of the Kohn-Sham DFT problem. A comparative study of the computational efficiency of the proposed higher-order finite-element discretizations suggests that the performance of finite-element basis is competing with the plane-wave discretization for non-periodic local pseudopotential calculations, and compares to the Gaussian basis for all-electron calculations to within an order of magnitude. Further, we demonstrate the capability of the proposed approach to compute the electronic structure of a metallic system containing 1688 atoms using

  18. Higher-order adaptive finite-element methods for Kohn–Sham density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Motamarri, P.; Nowak, M.R.; Leiter, K.; Knap, J.; Gavini, V.

    2013-11-15

    We present an efficient computational approach to perform real-space electronic structure calculations using an adaptive higher-order finite-element discretization of Kohn–Sham density-functional theory (DFT). To this end, we develop an a priori mesh-adaption technique to construct a close to optimal finite-element discretization of the problem. We further propose an efficient solution strategy for solving the discrete eigenvalue problem by using spectral finite-elements in conjunction with Gauss–Lobatto quadrature, and a Chebyshev acceleration technique for computing the occupied eigenspace. The proposed approach has been observed to provide a staggering 100–200-fold computational advantage over the solution of a generalized eigenvalue problem. Using the proposed solution procedure, we investigate the computational efficiency afforded by higher-order finite-element discretizations of the Kohn–Sham DFT problem. Our studies suggest that staggering computational savings—of the order of 1000-fold—relative to linear finite-elements can be realized, for both all-electron and local pseudopotential calculations, by using higher-order finite-element discretizations. On all the benchmark systems studied, we observe diminishing returns in computational savings beyond the sixth-order for accuracies commensurate with chemical accuracy, suggesting that the hexic spectral-element may be an optimal choice for the finite-element discretization of the Kohn–Sham DFT problem. A comparative study of the computational efficiency of the proposed higher-order finite-element discretizations suggests that the performance of finite-element basis is competing with the plane-wave discretization for non-periodic local pseudopotential calculations, and compares to the Gaussian basis for all-electron calculations to within an order of magnitude. Further, we demonstrate the capability of the proposed approach to compute the electronic structure of a metallic system containing 1688

  19. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) in Design and Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waggoner, Todd C.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) enables industrial designers to analyze complex components by dividing them into smaller elements, then assessing stress and strain characteristics. Traditionally mainframe based, FEA is being increasingly used in microcomputers. (SK)

  20. High speed finite element simulations on the graphics card

    SciTech Connect

    Huthwaite, P.; Lowe, M. J. S.

    2014-02-18

    A software package is developed to perform explicit time domain finite element simulations of ultrasonic propagation on the graphical processing unit, using Nvidia’s CUDA. Of critical importance for this problem is the arrangement of nodes in memory, allowing data to be loaded efficiently and minimising communication between the independently executed blocks of threads. The initial stage of memory arrangement is partitioning the mesh; both a well established ‘greedy’ partitioner and a new, more efficient ‘aligned’ partitioner are investigated. A method is then developed to efficiently arrange the memory within each partition. The technique is compared to a commercial CPU equivalent, demonstrating an overall speedup of at least 100 for a non-destructive testing weld model.

  1. High speed finite element simulations on the graphics card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huthwaite, P.; Lowe, M. J. S.

    2014-02-01

    A software package is developed to perform explicit time domain finite element simulations of ultrasonic propagation on the graphical processing unit, using Nvidia's CUDA. Of critical importance for this problem is the arrangement of nodes in memory, allowing data to be loaded efficiently and minimising communication between the independently executed blocks of threads. The initial stage of memory arrangement is partitioning the mesh; both a well established `greedy' partitioner and a new, more efficient `aligned' partitioner are investigated. A method is then developed to efficiently arrange the memory within each partition. The technique is compared to a commercial CPU equivalent, demonstrating an overall speedup of at least 100 for a non-destructive testing weld model.

  2. Coupling finite element and integral equation solutions using decoupled boundary meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom

    1992-01-01

    A method is outlined for calculating scattered fields from inhomogeneous penetrable objects using a coupled finite element-integral equation solution. The finite element equation can efficiently model fields in penetrable and inhomogeneous regions, while the integral equation exactly models fields on the finite element mesh boundary and in the exterior region. By decoupling the interior finite element and exterior integral equation meshes, considerable flexibility is found in both the number of field expansion points as well as their density. Only the nonmetal portions of the object need be modeled using a finite element expansion; exterior perfect conducting surfaces are modeled using an integral equation with a single unknown field since E(tan) is identically zero on these surfaces. Numerical convergence, accuracy, and stability at interior resonant frequencies are studied in detail.

  3. Finite element meshing of ANSYS (trademark) solid models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, F. S.

    1987-01-01

    A large scale, general purpose finite element computer program, ANSYS, developed and marketed by Swanson Analysis Systems, Inc. is discussed. ANSYS was perhaps the first commercially available program to offer truly interactive finite element model generation. ANSYS's purpose is for solid modeling. This application is briefly discussed and illustrated.

  4. FINITE-ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE IMMISCIBLE FLOW THROUGH SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A finite-element model is developed for multiphase flow through soil involving three immiscible fluids: namely, air, water, and a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). A variational method is employed for the finite-element formulation corresponding to the coupled differential equation...

  5. A computer graphics program for general finite element analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Sawyer, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Documentation for a computer graphics program for displays from general finite element analyses is presented. A general description of display options and detailed user instructions are given. Several plots made in structural, thermal and fluid finite element analyses are included to illustrate program options. Sample data files are given to illustrate use of the program.

  6. Solution-adaptive finite element method in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element method in linear elastic two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element method for validating the applications of new methodology to fracture mechanics problems by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  7. Modular Finite Element Methods Library Version: 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-06-22

    MFEM is a general, modular library for finite element methods. It provides a variety of finite element spaces and bilinear/linear forms in 2D and 3D. MFEM also includes classes for dealing with various types of meshes and their refinement.

  8. Finite element simulation of articular contact mechanics with quadratic tetrahedral elements.

    PubMed

    Maas, Steve A; Ellis, Benjamin J; Rawlins, David S; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2016-03-21

    Although it is easier to generate finite element discretizations with tetrahedral elements, trilinear hexahedral (HEX8) elements are more often used in simulations of articular contact mechanics. This is due to numerical shortcomings of linear tetrahedral (TET4) elements, limited availability of quadratic tetrahedron elements in combination with effective contact algorithms, and the perceived increased computational expense of quadratic finite elements. In this study we implemented both ten-node (TET10) and fifteen-node (TET15) quadratic tetrahedral elements in FEBio (www.febio.org) and compared their accuracy, robustness in terms of convergence behavior and computational cost for simulations relevant to articular contact mechanics. Suitable volume integration and surface integration rules were determined by comparing the results of several benchmark contact problems. The results demonstrated that the surface integration rule used to evaluate the contact integrals for quadratic elements affected both convergence behavior and accuracy of predicted stresses. The computational expense and robustness of both quadratic tetrahedral formulations compared favorably to the HEX8 models. Of note, the TET15 element demonstrated superior convergence behavior and lower computational cost than both the TET10 and HEX8 elements for meshes with similar numbers of degrees of freedom in the contact problems that we examined. Finally, the excellent accuracy and relative efficiency of these quadratic tetrahedral elements was illustrated by comparing their predictions with those for a HEX8 mesh for simulation of articular contact in a fully validated model of the hip. These results demonstrate that TET10 and TET15 elements provide viable alternatives to HEX8 elements for simulation of articular contact mechanics. PMID:26900037

  9. An approach to directional drilling simulation: finite element and finite segment methods with contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbatani, Siamak; Callejo, Alfonso; Kövecses, József; Kalantari, Masoud; Marchand, Nick R.; Dargahi, Javad

    2016-03-01

    Directional drilling is a popular technique for oil well drilling. Accurate prediction of the directional performance is critical in order to achieve the desired well profile. Simplified geometry methods are, to date, the industry standard for predicting directional performance. A comprehensive, high-fidelity method for the simulation of directional drilling is presented here. It consists of a detailed discretization of the actual geometry and a rigorous application of two modeling techniques: the finite element and the finite segment methods. By doing so, the dynamic problem is addressed from two different yet complementary perspectives: structural mechanics and rigid-body motion. Collision detection and contact dynamics algorithms are also presented. Results show that both methods agree in terms of the dynamic response, and that the build rate estimations are consistent with available experimental data. Owing to the framework efficiency and physics-based nature, the presented tools are very well-suited for design engineering and real-time simulation.

  10. Finite element-finite difference thermal/structural analysis of large space truss structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Andrew H.; Arelt, Joseph E.; Eskew, William F.; Rogers, Karen M.

    1992-01-01

    A technique of automated and efficient thermal-structural processing of truss structures that interfaces the finite element and finite difference method was developed. The thermal-structural analysis tasks include development of the thermal and structural math models, thermal analysis, development of an interface and data transfer between the models, and finally an evaluation of the thermal stresses and displacements in the structure. Consequently, the objective of the developed technique was to minimize the model development time, in order to assure an automatic transfer of data between the thermal and structural models as well as to minimize the computer resources needed for the analysis itself. The method and techniques described are illustrated on the thermal/structural analysis of the Space Station Freedom main truss.

  11. A mixed finite element/finite volume approach for solving biodegradation transport in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Claudio; Manzini, Gianmarco

    1998-03-01

    A numerical model for the simulation of flow and transport of organic compounds undergoing bacterial oxygen- and nitrate-based respiration is presented. General assumptions regarding microbial population, bacteria metabolism and effects of oxygen, nitrogen and nutrient concentration on organic substrate rate of consumption are briefly described. The numerical solution techniques for solving both the flow and the transport are presented. The saturated flow equation is discretized using a high-order mixed finite element scheme, which provides a highly accurate estimation of the velocity field. The transport equation for a sorbing porous medium is approximated using a finite volume scheme enclosing an upwind TVD shock-capturing technique for capturing concentration-unsteady steep fronts. The performance and capabilities of the present approach in a bio-remediation context are assessed by considering a set of test problems. The reliability of the numerical results concerning solution accuracy and the computational efficiency in terms of cost and memory requirements are also estimated.

  12. An approach to directional drilling simulation: finite element and finite segment methods with contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbatani, Siamak; Callejo, Alfonso; Kövecses, József; Kalantari, Masoud; Marchand, Nick R.; Dargahi, Javad

    2016-06-01

    Directional drilling is a popular technique for oil well drilling. Accurate prediction of the directional performance is critical in order to achieve the desired well profile. Simplified geometry methods are, to date, the industry standard for predicting directional performance. A comprehensive, high-fidelity method for the simulation of directional drilling is presented here. It consists of a detailed discretization of the actual geometry and a rigorous application of two modeling techniques: the finite element and the finite segment methods. By doing so, the dynamic problem is addressed from two different yet complementary perspectives: structural mechanics and rigid-body motion. Collision detection and contact dynamics algorithms are also presented. Results show that both methods agree in terms of the dynamic response, and that the build rate estimations are consistent with available experimental data. Owing to the framework efficiency and physics-based nature, the presented tools are very well-suited for design engineering and real-time simulation.

  13. Finite Element analyses of soil bioengineered slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamagnini, Roberto; Switala, Barbara Maria; Sudan Acharya, Madhu; Wu, Wei; Graf, Frank; Auer, Michael; te Kamp, Lothar

    2014-05-01

    Soil Bioengineering methods are not only effective from an economical point of view, but they are also interesting as fully ecological solutions. The presented project is aimed to define a numerical model which includes the impact of vegetation on slope stability, considering both mechanical and hydrological effects. In this project, a constitutive model has been developed that accounts for the multi-phase nature of the soil, namely the partly saturated condition and it also includes the effects of a biological component. The constitutive equation is implemented in the Finite Element (FE) software Comes-Geo with an implicit integration scheme that accounts for the collapse of the soils structure due to wetting. The mathematical formulation of the constitutive equations is introduced by means of thermodynamics and it simulates the growth of the biological system during the time. The numerical code is then applied in the analysis of an ideal rainfall induced landslide. The slope is analyzed for vegetated and non-vegetated conditions. The final results allow to quantitatively assessing the impact of vegetation on slope stability. This allows drawing conclusions and choosing whenever it is worthful to use soil bioengineering methods in slope stabilization instead of traditional approaches. The application of the FE methods show some advantages with respect to the commonly used limit equilibrium analyses, because it can account for the real coupled strain-diffusion nature of the problem. The mechanical strength of roots is in fact influenced by the stress evolution into the slope. Moreover, FE method does not need a pre-definition of any failure surface. FE method can also be used in monitoring the progressive failure of the soil bio-engineered system as it calculates the amount of displacements and strains of the model slope. The preliminary study results show that the formulated equations can be useful for analysis and evaluation of different soil bio

  14. The mixed finite element multigrid method for stokes equations.

    PubMed

    Muzhinji, K; Shateyi, S; Motsa, S S

    2015-01-01

    The stable finite element discretization of the Stokes problem produces a symmetric indefinite system of linear algebraic equations. A variety of iterative solvers have been proposed for such systems in an attempt to construct efficient, fast, and robust solution techniques. This paper investigates one of such iterative solvers, the geometric multigrid solver, to find the approximate solution of the indefinite systems. The main ingredient of the multigrid method is the choice of an appropriate smoothing strategy. This study considers the application of different smoothers and compares their effects in the overall performance of the multigrid solver. We study the multigrid method with the following smoothers: distributed Gauss Seidel, inexact Uzawa, preconditioned MINRES, and Braess-Sarazin type smoothers. A comparative study of the smoothers shows that the Braess-Sarazin smoothers enhance good performance of the multigrid method. We study the problem in a two-dimensional domain using stable Hood-Taylor Q2-Q1 pair of finite rectangular elements. We also give the main theoretical convergence results. We present the numerical results to demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of the multigrid method and confirm the theoretical results. PMID:25945361

  15. A robust, finite element model for hydrostatic surface water flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Casulli, V.

    1998-01-01

    A finite element scheme is introduced for the 2-dimensional shallow water equations using semi-implicit methods in time. A semi-Lagrangian method is used to approximate the effects of advection. A wave equation is formed at the discrete level such that the equations decouple into an equation for surface elevation and a momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. The convergence rates and relative computational efficiency are examined with the use of three test cases representing various degrees of difficulty. A test with a polar-quadrant grid investigates the response to local grid-scale forcing and the presence of spurious modes, a channel test case establishes convergence rates, and a field-scale test case examines problems with highly irregular grids.A finite element scheme is introduced for the 2-dimensional shallow water equations using semi-implicit methods in time. A semi-Lagrangian method is used to approximate the effects of advection. A wave equation is formed at the discrete level such that the equations decouple into an equation for surface elevation and a momentum equation for the horizontal velocity. The convergence rates and relative computational efficiency are examined with the use of three test cases representing various degrees of difficulty. A test with a polar-quadrant grid investigates the response to local grid-scale forcing and the presence of spurious modes, a channel test case establishes convergence rates, and a field-scale test case examines problems with highly irregular grids.

  16. The Mixed Finite Element Multigrid Method for Stokes Equations

    PubMed Central

    Muzhinji, K.; Shateyi, S.; Motsa, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    The stable finite element discretization of the Stokes problem produces a symmetric indefinite system of linear algebraic equations. A variety of iterative solvers have been proposed for such systems in an attempt to construct efficient, fast, and robust solution techniques. This paper investigates one of such iterative solvers, the geometric multigrid solver, to find the approximate solution of the indefinite systems. The main ingredient of the multigrid method is the choice of an appropriate smoothing strategy. This study considers the application of different smoothers and compares their effects in the overall performance of the multigrid solver. We study the multigrid method with the following smoothers: distributed Gauss Seidel, inexact Uzawa, preconditioned MINRES, and Braess-Sarazin type smoothers. A comparative study of the smoothers shows that the Braess-Sarazin smoothers enhance good performance of the multigrid method. We study the problem in a two-dimensional domain using stable Hood-Taylor Q2-Q1 pair of finite rectangular elements. We also give the main theoretical convergence results. We present the numerical results to demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of the multigrid method and confirm the theoretical results. PMID:25945361

  17. Curved Thermopiezoelectric Shell Structures Modeled by Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun

    2000-01-01

    "Smart" structures composed of piezoelectric materials may significantly improve the performance of aeropropulsion systems through a variety of vibration, noise, and shape-control applications. The development of analytical models for piezoelectric smart structures is an ongoing, in-house activity at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field focused toward the experimental characterization of these materials. Research efforts have been directed toward developing analytical models that account for the coupled mechanical, electrical, and thermal response of piezoelectric composite materials. Current work revolves around implementing thermal effects into a curvilinear-shell finite element code. This enhances capabilities to analyze curved structures and to account for coupling effects arising from thermal effects and the curved geometry. The current analytical model implements a unique mixed multi-field laminate theory to improve computational efficiency without sacrificing accuracy. The mechanics can model both the sensory and active behavior of piezoelectric composite shell structures. Finite element equations are being implemented for an eight-node curvilinear shell element, and numerical studies are being conducted to demonstrate capabilities to model the response of curved piezoelectric composite structures (see the figure).

  18. Numerical algorithms for finite element computations on arrays of microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a multicolored successive over relaxation (SOR) program for the finite element machine is discussed. The multicolored SOR method uses a generalization of the classical Red/Black grid point ordering for the SOR method. These multicolored orderings have the advantage of allowing the SOR method to be implemented as a Jacobi method, which is ideal for arrays of processors, but still enjoy the greater rate of convergence of the SOR method. The program solves a general second order self adjoint elliptic problem on a square region with Dirichlet boundary conditions, discretized by quadratic elements on triangular regions. For this general problem and discretization, six colors are necessary for the multicolored method to operate efficiently. The specific problem that was solved using the six color program was Poisson's equation; for Poisson's equation, three colors are necessary but six may be used. In general, the number of colors needed is a function of the differential equation, the region and boundary conditions, and the particular finite element used for the discretization.

  19. Segment-to-segment contact elements for modelling joint interfaces in finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, M. H.; Gaul, L.

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents an efficient approach to model contact interfaces of joints in finite element analysis (FEA) with segment-to-segment contact elements like thin layer or zero thickness elements. These elements originate from geomechanics and have been applied recently in modal analysis as an efficient way to define the contact stiffness of fixed joints for model updating. A big advantage of these elements is that no global contact search algorithm is employed as used in master-slave contacts. Contact search algorithms are not necessary for modelling contact interfaces of fixed joints since the interfaces are always in contact and restricted to small relative movements, which saves much computing time. We first give an introduction into the theory of segment-to-segment contact elements leading to zero thickness and thin layer elements. As a new application of zero thickness elements, we demonstrate the implementation of a structural contact damping model, derived from a Masing model, as non-linear constitutive laws for the contact element. This damping model takes into account the non-linear influence of frictional microslip in the contact interface of fixed joints. With this model we simulate the non-linear response of a bolted structure. This approach constitutes a new way to simulate multi-degree-of-freedom systems with structural joints and predict modal damping properties.

  20. Advances in 3D electromagnetic finite element modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.M.

    1997-08-01

    Numerous advances in electromagnetic finite element analysis (FEA) have been made in recent years. The maturity of frequency domain and eigenmode calculations, and the growth of time domain applications is briefly reviewed. A high accuracy 3D electromagnetic finite element field solver employing quadratic hexahedral elements and quadratic mixed-order one-form basis functions will also be described. The solver is based on an object-oriented C++ class library. Test cases demonstrate that frequency errors less than 10 ppm can be achieved using modest workstations, and that the solutions have no contamination from spurious modes. The role of differential geometry and geometrical physics in finite element analysis is also discussed.

  1. Finite element solution of optimal control problems with inequality constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, Robert R.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    1990-01-01

    A finite-element method based on a weak Hamiltonian form of the necessary conditions is summarized for optimal control problems. Very crude shape functions (so simple that element numerical quadrature is not necessary) can be used to develop an efficient procedure for obtaining candidate solutions (i.e., those which satisfy all the necessary conditions) even for highly nonlinear problems. An extension of the formulation allowing for discontinuities in the states and derivatives of the states is given. A theory that includes control inequality constraints is fully developed. An advanced launch vehicle (ALV) model is presented. The model involves staging and control constraints, thus demonstrating the full power of the weak formulation to date. Numerical results are presented along with total elapsed computer time required to obtain the results. The speed and accuracy in obtaining the results make this method a strong candidate for a real-time guidance algorithm.

  2. Interpolation functions in the immersed boundary and finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingshi; Zhang, Lucy T.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we review the existing interpolation functions and introduce a finite element interpolation function to be used in the immersed boundary and finite element methods. This straightforward finite element interpolation function for unstructured grids enables us to obtain a sharper interface that yields more accurate interfacial solutions. The solution accuracy is compared with the existing interpolation functions such as the discretized Dirac delta function and the reproducing kernel interpolation function. The finite element shape function is easy to implement and it naturally satisfies the reproducing condition. They are interpolated through only one element layer instead of smearing to several elements. A pressure jump is clearly captured at the fluid-solid interface. Two example problems are studied and results are compared with other numerical methods. A convergence test is thoroughly conducted for the independent fluid and solid meshes in a fluid-structure interaction system. The required mesh size ratio between the fluid and solid domains is obtained.

  3. Phase-space finite elements in a least-squares solution of the transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, C.; Fan, W.; Pautz, S.

    2013-07-01

    The linear Boltzmann transport equation is solved using a least-squares finite element approximation in the space, angular and energy phase-space variables. The method is applied to both neutral particle transport and also to charged particle transport in the presence of an electric field, where the angular and energy derivative terms are handled with the energy/angular finite elements approximation, in a manner analogous to the way the spatial streaming term is handled. For multi-dimensional problems, a novel approach is used for the angular finite elements: mapping the surface of a unit sphere to a two-dimensional planar region and using a meshing tool to generate a mesh. In this manner, much of the spatial finite-elements machinery can be easily adapted to handle the angular variable. The energy variable and the angular variable for one-dimensional problems make use of edge/beam elements, also building upon the spatial finite elements capabilities. The methods described here can make use of either continuous or discontinuous finite elements in space, angle and/or energy, with the use of continuous finite elements resulting in a smaller problem size and the use of discontinuous finite elements resulting in more accurate solutions for certain types of problems. The work described in this paper makes use of continuous finite elements, so that the resulting linear system is symmetric positive definite and can be solved with a highly efficient parallel preconditioned conjugate gradients algorithm. The phase-space finite elements capability has been built into the Sceptre code and applied to several test problems, including a simple one-dimensional problem with an analytic solution available, a two-dimensional problem with an isolated source term, showing how the method essentially eliminates ray effects encountered with discrete ordinates, and a simple one-dimensional charged-particle transport problem in the presence of an electric field. (authors)

  4. Fuzzy finite-element analysis of smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpan, U. O.; Koko, T. S.; Orisamolu, I. R.; Gallant, B. K.

    2001-04-01

    A fuzzy finite element based approach is developed for modelling smart structures with vague or imprecise uncertainties. Fuzzy sets are used to represent the uncertainties present in the piezoelectric, mechanical, thermal, and physical properties of the smart structure. In order to facilitate efficient computation, a sensitivity analysis procedure is used to streamline the number of input fuzzy variables, and the vertex fuzzy analysis technique is then used to compute the possibility distributions of the responses of the smart structural system. The methodology has been developed within the framework of the SMARTCOM computational tool for the design/analysis of smart composite structures. The methodology developed is found to be accurate and computationally efficient for the solution of practical problems.

  5. A modified finite element procedure for underwater shock analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.K.

    1990-12-31

    Using the regular finite element method for analyzing wave propagation problems presents difficulties: (a) The finite element mesh gives spurious reflection of the traveling wave and (b) Since a finite element model has to have a finite boundary, the wave is reflected by the outside boundary. However, for underwater shock problems, only the response of the structure is of major interest, not the behavior of the wave itself, and the shock wave can be assumed to be spherical. By taking advantage of the limited scope of the underwater shock problem, a finite element procedure can be developed that eliminates the above difficulties. This procedure not only can give very accurate solutions but it may also include structural nonlinearities and effect of cavitation.

  6. Hybrid-finite-element analysis of some nonlinear and 3-dimensional problems of engineering fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atluri, S. N.; Nakagaki, M.; Kathiresan, K.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper, efficient numerical methods for the analysis of crack-closure effects on fatigue-crack-growth-rates, in plane stress situations, and for the solution of stress-intensity factors for arbitrary shaped surface flaws in pressure vessels, are presented. For the former problem, an elastic-plastic finite element procedure valid for the case of finite deformation gradients is developed and crack growth is simulated by the translation of near-crack-tip elements with embedded plastic singularities. For the latter problem, an embedded-elastic-singularity hybrid finite element method, which leads to a direct evaluation of K-factors, is employed.

  7. Finite element model reduction application to parametric studies and optimization of rotorcraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashemi-Kia, M.; Toossi, M.

    1990-01-01

    As a result of this work, a reduction procedure has been developed which can be applied to large finite element model of airframe type structures. This procedure, which is tailored to be used with MSC/NASTRAN finite element code, is applied to the full airframe dynamic finite element model of AH-64A Attack Helicopter. The applicability of the resulting reduced model to parametric and optimization studies is examined. Through application of the design sensitivity analysis, the viability and efficiency of this reduction technique has been demonstrated in a vibration reduction study.

  8. Application of the Finite Element Method to Rotary Wing Aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, F. K.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element method for the spatial discretization of the dynamic equations of equilibrium governing rotary-wing aeroelastic problems is presented. Formulation of the finite element equations is based on weighted Galerkin residuals. This Galerkin finite element method reduces algebraic manipulative labor significantly, when compared to the application of the global Galerkin method in similar problems. The coupled flap-lag aeroelastic stability boundaries of hingeless helicopter rotor blades in hover are calculated. The linearized dynamic equations are reduced to the standard eigenvalue problem from which the aeroelastic stability boundaries are obtained. The convergence properties of the Galerkin finite element method are studied numerically by refining the discretization process. Results indicate that four or five elements suffice to capture the dynamics of the blade with the same accuracy as the global Galerkin method.

  9. Modeling Progressive Failure of Bonded Joints Using a Single Joint Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Enhanced finite elements are elements with an embedded analytical solution which can capture detailed local fields, enabling more efficient, mesh-independent finite element analysis. In the present study, an enhanced finite element is applied to generate a general framework capable of modeling an array of joint types. The joint field equations are derived using the principle of minimum potential energy, and the resulting solutions for the displacement fields are used to generate shape functions and a stiffness matrix for a single joint finite element. This single finite element thus captures the detailed stress and strain fields within the bonded joint, but it can function within a broader structural finite element model. The costs associated with a fine mesh of the joint can thus be avoided while still obtaining a detailed solution for the joint. Additionally, the capability to model non-linear adhesive constitutive behavior has been included within the method, and progressive failure of the adhesive can be modeled by using a strain-based failure criteria and re-sizing the joint as the adhesive fails. Results of the model compare favorably with experimental and finite element results.

  10. Nonlinear finite element modeling of THUNDER piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.; Campbell, Joel F.

    1999-06-01

    A NASTRAN non-linear finite element model has been developed for predicting the dome heights of THUNDER (Thin Layer Unimorph Ferroelectric Driver) piezoelectric actuators. To analytically validate the finite element model, a comparison was made with a non-linear plate solution using Von Karmen's approximation. A 500 volt input was used to examine the actuator deformation. The NASTRAN finite element model was also compared with experimental results. Four groups of specimens were fabricated and tested. Four different input voltages, which included 120, 160, 200, and 240 Vp-p with a 0 volts offset, were used for this comparison.