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Sample records for efflux pump cmeabc

  1. Dual Repression of the Multidrug Efflux Pump CmeABC by CosR and CmeR in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Grinnage-Pulley, Tara; Mu, Yang; Dai, Lei; Zhang, Qijing

    2016-01-01

    During transmission and intestinal colonization, Campylobacter jejuni, a major foodborne human pathogen, experiences oxidative stress. CosR, a response regulator in C. jejuni, modulates the oxidative stress response and represses expression of the CmeABC multidrug efflux pump. CmeABC, a key component in resistance to toxic compounds including antimicrobials and bile salts, is also under negative regulation by CmeR, a TetR family transcriptional regulator. How CosR and CmeR interact in binding to the cmeABC promoter and how CosR senses oxidative stress are still unknown. To answer these questions, we conducted various experiments utilizing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and transcriptional fusion assays. CosR and CmeR bound independently to two separate sites of the cmeABC promoter, simultaneously repressing cmeABC expression. This dual binding of CosR and CmeR is optimal with a 17 base pair space between the two binding sites as mutations that shortened the distance between the binding sites decreased binding by CmeR and enhanced cmeABC expression. Additionally, the single cysteine residue (C218) of CosR was sensitive to oxidation, which altered the DNA-binding activity of CosR and dissociated CosR from the cmeABC promoter as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Replacement of C218 with serine rendered CosR insensitive to oxidation, suggesting a potential role of C218 in sensing oxidative stress and providing a possible mechanism for CosR-mediated response to oxidative stress. These findings reveal a dual regulatory role of CosR and CmeR in modulating cmeABC expression and suggest a potential mechanism that may explain overexpression of cmeABC in response to oxidative stress. Differential expression of cmeABC mediated by CmeR and CosR in response to different signals may facilitate adaptation of Campylobacter to various environmental conditions. PMID:27468281

  2. Multidrug Efflux Pumps in the Genus Erwinia: Physiology and Regulation of Efflux Pump Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Thekkiniath, J; Ravirala, R; San Francisco, M

    2016-01-01

    Plant pathogens belonging to the genus Erwinia cause diseases in several economically important plants. Plants respond to bacterial infection with a powerful chemical arsenal and signaling molecules to rid themselves of the microbes. Although our understanding of how Erwinia initiate infections in plants has become clear, a comprehensive understanding of how these bacteria rid themselves of noxious antimicrobial agents during the infection is important. Multidrug efflux pumps are key factors in bacterial resistance toward antibiotics by reducing the level of antimicrobial compounds in the bacterial cell. Erwinia induce the expression of efflux pump genes in response to plant-derived antimicrobials. The capability of Erwinia to co-opt plant defense signaling molecules such as salicylic acid to trigger multidrug efflux pumps might have developed to ensure bacterial survival in susceptible host plants. In this review, we discuss the developments in Erwinia efflux pumps, focusing in particular on efflux pump function and the regulation of efflux pump gene expression. PMID:27571694

  3. Biochemistry of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath; Varela, Manuel F.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens that are multi-drug resistant compromise the effectiveness of treatment when they are the causative agents of infectious disease. These multi-drug resistance mechanisms allow bacteria to survive in the presence of clinically useful antimicrobial agents, thus reducing the efficacy of chemotherapy towards infectious disease. Importantly, active multi-drug efflux is a major mechanism for bacterial pathogen drug resistance. Therefore, because of their overwhelming presence in bacterial pathogens, these active multi-drug efflux mechanisms remain a major area of intense study, so that ultimately measures may be discovered to inhibit these active multi-drug efflux pumps. PMID:22605991

  4. An overview of bacterial efflux pumps and computational approaches to study efflux pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Shirin; Sutton, J Mark; Rahman, Khondaker M

    2016-02-01

    Micro-organisms express a wide range of transmembrane pumps known as multidrug efflux pumps that improve the micro-organism's ability to survive in severe environments and contribute to resistance against antibiotic and antimicrobial agents. There is significant interest in developing efflux inhibitors as an adjunct to treatment with current and next generation of antibiotics. A greater understanding of drug recognition and transport by multidrug efflux pumps is needed to develop clinically useful inhibitors, given the breadth of molecules that can be effluxed by these systems. We summarize some structural and functional data that could provide insights into the inhibition of transport mechanisms of these intricate molecular nanomachines with a focus on the advances in computational approaches. PMID:26824720

  5. Development of efflux pump inhibitors in antituberculosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Lele; Wu, Xueqiong

    2016-06-01

    Resistance and tolerance to antituberculosis (anti-TB) drugs, especially the first-line drugs, has become a serious problem in anti-TB therapy. Efflux of antimicrobial agents via bacterial efflux pumps is one of the main reasons for drug resistance. Efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) bind to efflux pumps to inhibit drug efflux and thus enhance the drug effect and reduce drug resistance. Studies on EPIs targeting the efflux pumps of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) help to understand Mtb resistance and to identify the potential drug target and are of significance in guiding the development of new anti-TB drugs and optimal combinations. Currently, there are many potential EPIs under study, but none of them has been used clinically for anti-TB therapy. In this article, we will provide an overview on the current development of EPIs targeting the efflux pumps of Mtb and discuss their potential clinical applications. PMID:27211826

  6. Identification of a multidrug efflux pump in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ankita; Mallik, Dhriti; Kar, Debasish; Ghosh, Anindya S

    2016-07-01

    Cell wall impermeability and active efflux of drugs are among the primary reasons for drug resistance in mycobacteria. Efflux pumps are tripartite membrane localized transport proteins that expel drug molecules outside the cells. Several of such efflux pumps are annotated in mycobacteria, but few have been characterized, like MSMEG_2991, a putative efflux pump permease of Mycobacterium smegmatis To substantiate this, we overexpressed MSMEG_2991 protein in Escherichia coli 2443. Expression of MSMEG_2991 elevated the resistance towards structurally unrelated groups of antibiotics. An active antibiotic efflux pump nature of MSMEG_2991 was revealed by assessing the acquisition of ciprofloxacin in the absence and presence of the efflux pump inhibitor, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone, indicating the involvement of proton-motive force (pmf) during the efflux activity. MSMEG_2991 expression elevated biofilm formation in E. coli by 4-fold, keeping parity to some of the earlier reported efflux pumps. In silico analysis suggested the presence of 12 transmembrane helices in MSMEG_2991 resembling EmrD efflux pump of E. coli Based on in vivo and in silico analyses, MSMEG_2991 may be designated as a pmf-mediated multidrug efflux pump protein that expels diverse groups of antibiotics and might as well be involved in the biofilm enhancement. PMID:27190152

  7. Natural and Synthetic Polymers as Inhibitors of Drug Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Inhibition of efflux pumps is an emerging approach in cancer therapy and drug delivery. Since it has been discovered that polymeric pharmaceutical excipients such as Tweens® or Pluronics® can inhibit efflux pumps, various other polymers have been investigated regarding their potential efflux pump inhibitory activity. Among them are polysaccharides, polyethylene glycols and derivatives, amphiphilic block copolymers, dendrimers and thiolated polymers. In the current review article, natural and synthetic polymers that are capable of inhibiting efflux pumps as well as their application in cancer therapy and drug delivery are discussed. PMID:17896100

  8. How to Measure Export via Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jessica M A; Piddock, Laura J V

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps are an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and are required for many pathogens to cause infection. They are also being harnessed to improve microbial biotechnological processes, including biofuel production. Therefore, scientists of many specialties must be able to accurately measure efflux activity. However, myriad methodologies have been described and the most appropriate method is not always clear. Within the scientific literature, many methods are misused or data arising are misinterpreted. The methods for measuring efflux activity can be split into two groups, (i) those that directly measure efflux and (ii) those that measure the intracellular accumulation of a substrate, which is then used to infer efflux activity. Here, we review the methods for measuring efflux and explore the most recent advances in this field, including single-cell or cell-free technologies and mass spectrometry, that are being used to provide more detailed information about efflux pump activity. PMID:27381291

  9. How to Measure Export via Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Jessica M. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps are an important mechanism of antibiotic resistance and are required for many pathogens to cause infection. They are also being harnessed to improve microbial biotechnological processes, including biofuel production. Therefore, scientists of many specialties must be able to accurately measure efflux activity. However, myriad methodologies have been described and the most appropriate method is not always clear. Within the scientific literature, many methods are misused or data arising are misinterpreted. The methods for measuring efflux activity can be split into two groups, (i) those that directly measure efflux and (ii) those that measure the intracellular accumulation of a substrate, which is then used to infer efflux activity. Here, we review the methods for measuring efflux and explore the most recent advances in this field, including single-cell or cell-free technologies and mass spectrometry, that are being used to provide more detailed information about efflux pump activity. PMID:27381291

  10. Ethidium Bromide MIC Screening for Enhanced Efflux Pump Gene Expression or Efflux Activity in Staphylococcus aureus▿

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Diixa; Kosmidis, Christos; Seo, Susan M.; Kaatz, Glenn W.

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistance efflux pumps contribute to antimicrobial and biocide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. The detection of strains capable of efflux is time-consuming and labor-intensive using currently available techniques. A simple and inexpensive method to identify such strains is needed. Ethidium bromide is a substrate for all but one of the characterized S. aureus multidrug-resistant (MDR) efflux pumps (NorC), leading us to examine the utility of simple broth microtiter MIC determinations using this compound in identifying efflux-proficient strains. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR identified the increased expression of one or more MDR efflux pump genes in 151/309 clinical strains (49%). Ethidium bromide MIC testing was insensitive (48%) but specific (92%) in identifying strains with gene overexpression, but it was highly sensitive (95%) and specific (99%) in identifying strains capable of ethidium efflux. The increased expression of norA with or without other genes was most commonly associated with efflux, and in the majority of cases that efflux was inhibited by reserpine. Ethidium bromide MIC testing is a simple and straightforward method to identify effluxing strains and can provide accurate predictions of efflux prevalence in large strain sets in a short period of time. PMID:20855743

  11. Efflux pump inhibitors: targeting mycobacterial efflux systems to enhance TB therapy.

    PubMed

    Pule, Caroline M; Sampson, Samantha L; Warren, Robin M; Black, Philippa A; van Helden, Paul D; Victor, Tommie C; Louw, Gail E

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance continues to plague TB control, with a global increase in the prevalence of MDR-TB. This acts as a gateway to XDR-TB and thus emphasizes the urgency for drug development and optimal treatment options. Bedaquiline is the first new anti-TB drug approved by the FDA in 40 years and has been shown to be an effective treatment option for MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Bedaquiline has also recently been included in clinical trials for new regimens with the aim of improving and shortening treatment periods. Alarmingly, efflux-mediated bedaquiline resistance, as well as efflux-mediated cross-resistance to clofazimine, has been identified in treatment failures. This mechanism of resistance results in efflux of a variety of anti-TB drugs from the bacterial cell, thereby decreasing the intracellular drug concentration. In doing so, the bacillus is able to render the antibiotic treatment ineffective. Recent studies have explored strategies to reverse the resistance phenotype conferred by efflux pump activation. It was observed that the addition of efflux pump inhibitors partially restored drug susceptibility in vitro and in vivo. This has significant clinical implications, especially in MDR-TB management where treatment options are extremely limited. This review aims to highlight the current efflux pump inhibitors effective against M. tuberculosis, the effect of efflux pump inhibitors on mycobacterial growth and the clinical promise of treatment with efflux pump inhibitors and standard anti-TB therapy. PMID:26472768

  12. Clinically Relevant Chromosomally Encoded Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Piddock, Laura J. V.

    2006-01-01

    Efflux pump genes and proteins are present in both antibiotic-susceptible and antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Pumps may be specific for one substrate or may transport a range of structurally dissimilar compounds (including antibiotics of multiple classes); such pumps can be associated with multiple drug (antibiotic) resistance (MDR). However, the clinical relevance of efflux-mediated resistance is species, drug, and infection dependent. This review focuses on chromosomally encoded pumps in bacteria that cause infections in humans. Recent structural data provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of drug transport. MDR efflux pumps contribute to antibiotic resistance in bacteria in several ways: (i) inherent resistance to an entire class of agents, (ii) inherent resistance to specific agents, and (iii) resistance conferred by overexpression of an efflux pump. Enhanced efflux can be mediated by mutations in (i) the local repressor gene, (ii) a global regulatory gene, (iii) the promoter region of the transporter gene, or (iv) insertion elements upstream of the transporter gene. Some data suggest that resistance nodulation division systems are important in pathogenicity and/or survival in a particular ecological niche. Inhibitors of various efflux pump systems have been described; typically these are plant alkaloids, but as yet no product has been marketed. PMID:16614254

  13. Efflux Pump Control Alters Synthetic Gene Circuit Function.

    PubMed

    Diao, Junchen; Charlebois, Daniel A; Nevozhay, Dmitry; Bódi, Zoltán; Pál, Csaba; Balázsi, Gábor

    2016-07-15

    Synthetic biology aims to design new biological systems for predefined purposes, such as the controlled secretion of biofuels, pharmaceuticals, or other chemicals. Synthetic gene circuits regulating an efflux pump from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family could achieve this. However, ABC efflux pumps can also drive out intracellular inducer molecules that control the gene circuits. This will introduce an implicit feedback that could alter gene circuit function in ways that are poorly understood. Here, we used two synthetic gene circuits inducible by tetracycline family molecules to regulate the expression of a yeast ABC pump (Pdr5p) that pumps out the inducer. Pdr5p altered the dose-responses of the original gene circuits substantially in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While one aspect of the change could be attributed to the efflux pumping function of Pdr5p, another aspect remained unexplained. Quantitative modeling indicated that reduced regulator gene expression in addition to efflux pump function could fully explain the altered dose-responses. These predictions were validated experimentally. Overall, we highlight how efflux pumps can alter gene circuit dynamics and demonstrate the utility of mathematical modeling in understanding synthetic gene circuit function in new circumstances. PMID:27111147

  14. Current Advances in Developing Inhibitors of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Hannah Y; Jamshidi, Shirin; Sutton, J Mark; Rahman, Khondaker M

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance represents a significant challenge to future healthcare provision. An acronym ESKAPEE has been derived from the names of the organisms recognised as the major threats although there are a number of other organisms, notably Neisseria gonorrhoeae, that have become equally challenging to treat in the clinic. These pathogens are characterised by the ability to rapidly develop and/or acquire resistance mechanisms in response to exposure to different antimicrobial agents. A key part of the armoury of these pathogens is a series of efflux pumps, which effectively exclude or reduce the intracellular concentration of a large number of antibiotics, making the pathogens significantly more resistant. These efflux pumps are the topic of considerable interest, both from the perspective of basic understanding of efflux pump function, and its role in drug resistance but also as targets for the development of novel adjunct therapies. The necessity to overcome antimicrobial resistance has encouraged investigations into the characterisation of resistance-modifying efflux pump inhibitors to block the mechanisms of drug extrusion, thereby restoring antibacterial susceptibility and returning existing antibiotics into the clinic. A greater understanding of drug recognition and transport by multidrug efflux pumps is needed to develop clinically useful inhibitors, given the breadth of molecules that can be effluxed by these systems. This review discusses different bacterial EPIs originating from both natural source and chemical synthesis and examines the challenges to designing successful EPIs that can be useful against multidrug resistant bacteria. PMID:26947776

  15. Multidrug Efflux Pumps in Staphylococcus aureus: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sofia Santos; Viveiros, Miguel; Amaral, Leonard; Couto, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of infections caused by multi- or pan-resistant bacteria in the hospital or in the community settings is an increasing health concern. Albeit there is no single resistance mechanism behind multiresistance, multidrug efflux pumps, proteins that cells use to detoxify from noxious compounds, seem to play a key role in the emergence of these multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. During the last decades, experimental data has established their contribution to low level resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria and their potential role in the appearance of MDR phenotypes, by the extrusion of multiple, unrelated compounds. Recent studies suggest that efflux pumps may be used by the cell as a first-line defense mechanism, avoiding the drug to reach lethal concentrations, until a stable, more efficient alteration occurs, that allows survival in the presence of that agent. In this paper we review the current knowledge on MDR efflux pumps and their intricate regulatory network in Staphylococcus aureus, a major pathogen, responsible from mild to life-threatening infections. Particular emphasis will be given to the potential role that S. aureus MDR efflux pumps, either chromosomal or plasmid-encoded, have on resistance towards different antimicrobial agents and on the selection of drug - resistant strains. We will also discuss the many questions that still remain on the role of each specific efflux pump and the need to establish appropriate methodological approaches to address all these questions. PMID:23569469

  16. Recent advances toward a molecular mechanism of efflux pump inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Opperman, Timothy J.; Nguyen, Son T.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in Gram-negative pathogens, such as the Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, poses a significant threat to our ability to effectively treat infections caused by these organisms. A major component in the development of the MDR phenotype in Gram-negative bacteria is overexpression of Resistance-Nodulation-Division (RND)-type efflux pumps, which actively pump antibacterial agents and biocides from the periplasm to the outside of the cell. Consequently, bacterial efflux pumps are an important target for developing novel antibacterial treatments. Potent efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) could be used as adjunctive therapies that would increase the potency of existing antibiotics and decrease the emergence of MDR bacteria. Several potent inhibitors of RND-type efflux pump have been reported in the literature, and at least three of these EPI series were optimized in a pre-clinical development program. However, none of these compounds have been tested in the clinic. One of the major hurdles to the development of EPIs has been the lack of biochemical, computational, and structural methods that could be used to guide rational drug design. Here, we review recent reports that have advanced our understanding of the mechanism of action of several potent EPIs against RND-type pumps. PMID:25999939

  17. Tripartite assembly of RND multidrug efflux pumps

    PubMed Central

    Daury, Laetitia; Orange, François; Taveau, Jean-Christophe; Verchère, Alice; Monlezun, Laura; Gounou, Céline; Marreddy, Ravi K. R.; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle; Pos, Klaas M.; Lambert, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Tripartite multidrug efflux systems of Gram-negative bacteria are composed of an inner membrane transporter, an outer membrane channel and a periplasmic adaptor protein. They are assumed to form ducts inside the periplasm facilitating drug exit across the outer membrane. Here we present the reconstitution of native Pseudomonas aeruginosa MexAB–OprM and Escherichia coli AcrAB–TolC tripartite Resistance Nodulation and cell Division (RND) efflux systems in a lipid nanodisc system. Single-particle analysis by electron microscopy reveals the inner and outer membrane protein components linked together via the periplasmic adaptor protein. This intrinsic ability of the native components to self-assemble also leads to the formation of a stable interspecies AcrA–MexB–TolC complex suggesting a common mechanism of tripartite assembly. Projection structures of all three complexes emphasize the role of the periplasmic adaptor protein as part of the exit duct with no physical interaction between the inner and outer membrane components. PMID:26867482

  18. Tripartite assembly of RND multidrug efflux pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daury, Laetitia; Orange, François; Taveau, Jean-Christophe; Verchère, Alice; Monlezun, Laura; Gounou, Céline; Marreddy, Ravi K. R.; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle; Pos, Klaas M.; Lambert, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    Tripartite multidrug efflux systems of Gram-negative bacteria are composed of an inner membrane transporter, an outer membrane channel and a periplasmic adaptor protein. They are assumed to form ducts inside the periplasm facilitating drug exit across the outer membrane. Here we present the reconstitution of native Pseudomonas aeruginosa MexAB-OprM and Escherichia coli AcrAB-TolC tripartite Resistance Nodulation and cell Division (RND) efflux systems in a lipid nanodisc system. Single-particle analysis by electron microscopy reveals the inner and outer membrane protein components linked together via the periplasmic adaptor protein. This intrinsic ability of the native components to self-assemble also leads to the formation of a stable interspecies AcrA-MexB-TolC complex suggesting a common mechanism of tripartite assembly. Projection structures of all three complexes emphasize the role of the periplasmic adaptor protein as part of the exit duct with no physical interaction between the inner and outer membrane components.

  19. Engineering microbial biofuel tolerance and export using efflux pumps

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Mary J; Dossani, Zain Y; Szmidt, Heather L; Chu, Hou Cheng; Lee, Taek Soon; Keasling, Jay D; Hadi, Masood Z; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2011-01-01

    Many compounds being considered as candidates for advanced biofuels are toxic to microorganisms. This introduces an undesirable trade-off when engineering metabolic pathways for biofuel production because the engineered microbes must balance production against survival. Cellular export systems, such as efflux pumps, provide a direct mechanism for reducing biofuel toxicity. To identify novel biofuel pumps, we used bioinformatics to generate a list of all efflux pumps from sequenced bacterial genomes and prioritized a subset of targets for cloning. The resulting library of 43 pumps was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, where we tested it against seven representative biofuels. By using a competitive growth assay, we efficiently distinguished pumps that improved survival. For two of the fuels (n-butanol and isopentanol), none of the pumps improved tolerance. For all other fuels, we identified pumps that restored growth in the presence of biofuel. We then tested a beneficial pump directly in a production strain and demonstrated that it improved biofuel yields. Our findings introduce new tools for engineering production strains and utilize the increasingly large database of sequenced genomes. PMID:21556065

  20. First evidence for the presence of efflux pump in the earthworm Eisenia andrei.

    PubMed

    Hackenberger, Branimir K; Velki, Mirna; Stepić, Sandra; Hackenberger, Davorka K

    2012-01-01

    Efflux pumps are transport proteins involved in the extrusion of toxic substrates from cells to the external environment. Activities of efflux pumps have been found in many organisms, however such activity has not been evidenced in earthworms. Adult Eisenia andrei earthworms were exposed to efflux modulators - verapamil (a known inhibitor of efflux pump protein) and dexamethasone (a known inducer of efflux activity) - and the amount of absorbed fluorescent dye rhodamine B was measured. The results showed that verapamil inhibited efflux activity and decreased removal of rhodamine B, whereas dexamethasone induced efflux activity and increased removal of rhodamine B. This is the first evidence of the presence of efflux pump in earthworm Eisenia andrei. Since earthworms are often used as test organisms due to their sensitive reactions towards environmental influences, the discovery of efflux pump activity can contribute to the better understanding of toxicity of certain pollutants. PMID:22033226

  1. Active efflux of fluoroquinolones in Mycobacterium smegmatis mediated by LfrA, a multidrug efflux pump.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Takiff, H E; Nikaido, H

    1996-01-01

    The lfrA gene cloned from chromosomal DNA of quinolone-resistant Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2-552 conferred low-level resistance to fluoroquinolones when present on multicopy plasmids. Sequence analysis suggested that lfrA encodes a membrane efflux pump of the major facilitator family (H. E. Takiff, M. Cimino, M. C. Musso, T. Weisbrod, R. Martinez, M. B. Delgado, L Salazar, B. R. Bloom, and W. R. Jacbos, Jr., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93:362-366, 1996). In this work, we studied the role of LfrA in the accumulation of fluoroquinolones by M. smegmatis. The steady-state accumulation level of a hydrophilic quinolone, norfloxacin, by M. smegmatis harboring a plasmid carrying the lfrA gene was about 50% of that by the parent strain but was increased to the same level as that of the parent strain by addition of a proton conductor, carbonyl cyanide m-chorophenylhydrazone. Norfloxacin efflux mediated by LfrA was competed for strongly by ciprofloxacin but not by nalidixic acid. Furthermore, we showed that portions of norfloxacin accumulated by starved cells were pumped out upon reenergization of the cells, and the rates of this efflux showed evidence of saturation at higher intracellular concentrations of the drug. These results suggest that the LfrA polypeptide catalyzes the active efflux of several quinolones. PMID:8682782

  2. A mass spectrometry-based assay for improved quantitative measurements of efflux pump inhibition.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam R; Ettefagh, Keivan A; Todd, Daniel; Cole, Patrick S; Egan, Joseph M; Foil, Daniel H; Graf, Tyler N; Schindler, Bryan D; Kaatz, Glenn W; Cech, Nadja B

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial efflux pumps are active transport proteins responsible for resistance to selected biocides and antibiotics. It has been shown that production of efflux pumps is up-regulated in a number of highly pathogenic bacteria, including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, the identification of new bacterial efflux pump inhibitors is a topic of great interest. Existing assays to evaluate efflux pump inhibitory activity rely on fluorescence by an efflux pump substrate. When employing these assays to evaluate efflux pump inhibitory activity of plant extracts and some purified compounds, we observed severe optical interference that gave rise to false negative results. To circumvent this problem, a new mass spectrometry-based method was developed for the quantitative measurement of bacterial efflux pump inhibition. The assay was employed to evaluate efflux pump inhibitory activity of a crude extract of the botanical Hydrastis Canadensis, and to compare the efflux pump inhibitory activity of several pure flavonoids. The flavonoid quercetin, which appeared to be completely inactive with a fluorescence-based method, showed an IC50 value of 75 μg/mL with the new method. The other flavonoids evaluated (apigenin, kaempferol, rhamnetin, luteolin, myricetin), were also active, with IC50 values ranging from 19 μg/mL to 75 μg/mL. The assay described herein could be useful in future screening efforts to identify efflux pump inhibitors, particularly in situations where optical interference precludes the application of methods that rely on fluorescence. PMID:25961825

  3. A Mass Spectrometry-Based Assay for Improved Quantitative Measurements of Efflux Pump Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Adam R.; Ettefagh, Keivan A.; Todd, Daniel; Cole, Patrick S.; Egan, Joseph M.; Foil, Daniel H.; Graf, Tyler N.; Schindler, Bryan D.; Kaatz, Glenn W.; Cech, Nadja B.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial efflux pumps are active transport proteins responsible for resistance to selected biocides and antibiotics. It has been shown that production of efflux pumps is up-regulated in a number of highly pathogenic bacteria, including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, the identification of new bacterial efflux pump inhibitors is a topic of great interest. Existing assays to evaluate efflux pump inhibitory activity rely on fluorescence by an efflux pump substrate. When employing these assays to evaluate efflux pump inhibitory activity of plant extracts and some purified compounds, we observed severe optical interference that gave rise to false negative results. To circumvent this problem, a new mass spectrometry-based method was developed for the quantitative measurement of bacterial efflux pump inhibition. The assay was employed to evaluate efflux pump inhibitory activity of a crude extract of the botanical Hydrastis Canadensis, and to compare the efflux pump inhibitory activity of several pure flavonoids. The flavonoid quercetin, which appeared to be completely inactive with a fluorescence-based method, showed an IC50 value of 75 μg/mL with the new method. The other flavonoids evaluated (apigenin, kaempferol, rhamnetin, luteolin, myricetin), were also active, with IC50 values ranging from 19 μg/mL to 75 μg/mL. The assay described herein could be useful in future screening efforts to identify efflux pump inhibitors, particularly in situations where optical interference precludes the application of methods that rely on fluorescence. PMID:25961825

  4. Multidrug efflux pumps of Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Bryan D; Kaatz, Glenn W

    2016-07-01

    Gram-positive organisms are responsible for some of the most serious of human infections. Resistance to front-line antimicrobial agents can complicate otherwise curative therapy. These organisms possess multiple drug resistance mechanisms, with drug efflux being a significant contributing factor. Efflux proteins belonging to all five transporter families are involved, and frequently can transport multiple structurally unrelated compounds resulting in a multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. In addition to clinically relevant antimicrobial agents, MDR efflux proteins can transport environmental biocides and disinfectants which may allow persistence in the healthcare environment and subsequent acquisition by patients or staff. Intensive research on MDR efflux proteins and the regulation of expression of their genes is ongoing, providing some insight into the mechanisms of multidrug recognition and transport. Inhibitors of many of these proteins have been identified, including drugs currently being used for other indications. Structural modifications guided by structure-activity studies have resulted in the identification of potent compounds. However, lack of broad-spectrum pump inhibition combined with potential toxicity has hampered progress. Further work is required to gain a detailed understanding of the multidrug recognition process, followed by application of this knowledge in the design of safer and more highly potent inhibitors. PMID:27449594

  5. Inhibitors of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps Potentiate Antimicrobial Photoinactivation▿

    PubMed Central

    Tegos, George P.; Masago, Kayo; Aziz, Fatima; Higginbotham, Andrew; Stermitz, Frank R.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (APDI) combines a nontoxic photoactivatable dye or photosensitizer (PS) with harmless visible light to generate singlet oxygen and reactive oxygen species that kill microbial cells. Cationic phenothiazinium dyes, such as toluidine blue O (TBO), are the only PS used clinically for APDI, and we recently reported that this class of PS are substrates of multidrug efflux pumps in both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. We now report that APDI can be significantly potentiated by combining the PS with an efflux pump inhibitor (EPI). Killing of Staphylococcus aureus mediated by TBO and red light is greatly increased by coincubation with known inhibitors of the major facilitator pump (NorA): the diphenyl urea INF271, reserpine, 5′-methoxyhydnocarpin, and the polyacylated neohesperidoside, ADH7. The potentiation effect is greatest in the case of S. aureus mutants that overexpress NorA and least in NorA null cells. Addition of the EPI before TBO has a bigger effect than addition of the EPI after TBO. Cellular uptake of TBO is increased by EPI. EPI increased photodynamic inactivation killing mediated by other phenothiazinium dyes, such as methylene blue and dimethylmethylene blue, but not that mediated by nonphenothiazinium PS, such as Rose Bengal and benzoporphyrin derivative. Killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated by TBO and light was also potentiated by the resistance nodulation division pump (MexAB-OprM) inhibitor phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphthylamide but to a lesser extent than for S. aureus. These data suggest that EPI could be used in combination with phenothiazinium salts and light to enhance their antimicrobial effect against localized infections. PMID:18474586

  6. Genotypic and phenotypic detection of efflux pump in Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Gressler, Letícia Trevisan; de Vargas, Agueda Castagna; da Costa, Mateus Matiuzzi; Pötter, Luciana; da Silveira, Bibiana Petri; Sangioni, Luis Antônio; de Avila Botton, Sônia

    2014-01-01

    The req_39680 gene, associated to a putative efflux system, was detected in 60% (54/90) of R. equi isolates by PCR. The phenotypic expression of efflux mechanism was verified in 20% of the isolates using ethidium bromide. For the first time, the expression of efflux mechanism was demonstrated in R. equi. PMID:25242956

  7. Modulation of Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps of the Major Facilitator Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanath; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Varela, Manuel F.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial infections pose a serious public health concern, especially when an infectious disease has a multidrug resistant causative agent. Such multidrug resistant bacteria can compromise the clinical utility of major chemotherapeutic antimicrobial agents. Drug and multidrug resistant bacteria harbor several distinct molecular mechanisms for resistance. Bacterial antimicrobial agent efflux pumps represent a major mechanism of clinical resistance. The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is one of the largest groups of solute transporters to date and includes a significant number of bacterial drug and multidrug efflux pumps. We review recent work on the modulation of multidrug efflux pumps, paying special attention to those transporters belonging primarily to the MFS. PMID:25750934

  8. The role of efflux pumps in macrolide resistance in Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Liliana; Sampaio, Daniela; Couto, Isabel; Machado, Diana; Kern, Winfried V; Amaral, Leonard; Viveiros, Miguel

    2009-12-01

    Mycobacteriumavium complex (MAC) is clinically important since it can cause severe infections in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients and other immunocompromised individuals. Use of the macrolides clarithromycin and azithromycin has improved the outcome of MAC infections, but therapeutic failure is still a major problem. In this work, we studied efflux pump activity in MAC clinical strains and evaluated the contribution of active efflux to macrolide resistance. Eighteen clinical strains isolated from AIDS patients were evaluated for macrolide resistance in the presence and absence of the efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) thioridazine, chlorpromazine and verapamil. The efflux activity of these strains was then assessed by a semi-automated fluorometric method that detects extrusion of ethidium bromide (EtBr), a known efflux pump substrate. Resistance to clarithromycin was significantly reduced in the presence of thioridazine, chlorpromazine and verapamil. The same EPIs were effective in decreasing the efflux of EtBr from MAC cells. Moreover, increased retention of [(14)C]-erythromycin in the presence of these EPIs further demonstrated that active efflux contributes to MAC resistance to macrolides. This study demonstrates that efflux pumps play an important role in MAC resistance to antibiotics. PMID:19740629

  9. [Significance of efflux pumps in multidrug resistance of Gram-negative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Wiercińska, Olga; Chojecka, Agnieszka; Kanclerski, Krzysztof; Rőhm-Rodowald, Ewa; Jakimiak, Bożenna

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of multidrug. resistance of bacteria is a serious problem of modern medicine. This resistance largely is a consequence of abuse and improper use of antibacterial substances, especially antibiotics and chemotherapeutics in hospital settings. Multidrug resistance is caused by a number of interacting mechanisms of resistance. Recent studies have indicated that efflux pumps and systems of efflux pumps are an important determinant of this phenomenon. Contribute to this particular RND efflux systems of Gram-negative bacteria, which possess a wide range of substrates such as antibiotics, dyes, detergents, toxins and active substances of disinfectants and antiseptics. These transporters are usually encoded on bacterial chromosomes. Genes encoding efflux pumps' proteins may also be carried on plasmids and other mobile genetic elements. Such pumps are usually specific to a small group of substrates, but as an additional mechanism of resistance may contribute to the multidrug resistance. PMID:26084076

  10. The efflux pump SmeDEF contributes to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, María Blanca; Martínez, José Luis

    2015-07-01

    Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (co-trimoxazole) is one of the antimicrobials of choice for the treatment of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infections. The analysis of mutants either lacking or overexpressing the efflux pump SmeDEF shows that this efflux pump contributes to intrinsic and acquired co-trimoxazole resistance in S. maltophilia. Since SmeDEF can extrude a variety of antibiotics, selection with such antimicrobials, including quinolones, might also select for S. maltophilia co-trimoxazole resistance. PMID:25918144

  11. Multidrug efflux pumps as main players in intrinsic and acquired resistance to antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Hernando-Amado, Sara; Blanco, Paula; Alcalde-Rico, Manuel; Corona, Fernando; Reales-Calderón, Jose A; Sánchez, María B; Martínez, José L

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps constitute a group of transporters that are ubiquitously found in any organism. In addition to other functions with relevance for the cell physiology, efflux pumps contribute to the resistance to compounds used for treating different diseases, including resistance to anticancer drugs, antibiotics or antifungal compounds. In the case of antimicrobials, efflux pumps are major players in both intrinsic and acquired resistance to drugs currently in use for the treatment of infectious diseases. One important aspect not fully explored of efflux pumps consists on the identification of effectors able to induce their expression. Indeed, whereas the analysis of clinical isolates have shown that mutants overexpressing these resistance elements are frequently found, less is known on the conditions that may trigger expression of efflux pumps, hence leading to transient induction of resistance in vivo, a situation that is barely detectable using classical susceptibility tests. In the current article we review the structure and mechanisms of regulation of the expression of bacterial and fungal efflux pumps, with a particular focus in those for which a role in clinically relevant resistance has been reported. PMID:27620952

  12. Broad Specificity Efflux pumps and Their Role in Multidrug Resistance of Gram Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nikaido, Hiroshi; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance mechanisms reported in Gram-negative bacteria are producing a worldwide health problem. The continuous dissemination of «multi-drug resistant» (MDR) bacteria drastically reduces the efficacy of our antibiotic “arsenal” and consequently increases the frequency of therapeutic failure. In MDR bacteria, the over-expression of efflux pumps that expel structurally-unrelated drugs contributes to the reduced susceptibility by decreasing the intracellular concentration of antibiotics. During the last decade, several clinical data indicate an increasing involvement of efflux pumps in the emergence and dissemination of resistant Gram-negative bacteria. It is necessary to clearly define the molecular, functional and genetic bases of the efflux pump in order to understand the translocation of antibiotic molecules through the efflux transporter. The recent investigation on the efflux pump AcrB at its structural and physiological level, including the identification of drug affinity sites and kinetic parameters for various antibiotics, may open the way to rationally develop an improved new generation of antibacterial agents as well as efflux inhibitors in order to efficiently combat efflux-based resistance mechanisms. PMID:21707670

  13. Doxorubicin induces drug efflux pumps in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Kofla, Grzegorz; Turner, Vincent; Schulz, Bettina; Storch, Ulrike; Froelich, Daniela; Rognon, Bénédicte; Coste, Alix T; Sanglard, Dominique; Ruhnke, Markus

    2011-02-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most important opportunistic fungal pathogens. It can cause serious fungal diseases in immunocompromised patients, including those with cancer. Treatment failures due to the emergence of drug-resistant C. albicans strains have become a serious clinical problem. Resistance incidents were often mediated by fungal efflux pumps which are closely related to the human ABC transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp). P-gp is often overexpressed in cancer cells and confers resistance to many cytotoxic drugs. We examined whether cytotoxic drugs commonly used for cancer treatment (doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide) could alter the expression of genes responsible for the development of fluconazole resistance in Candida cells in the way they can influence homologous genes in cancer cell lines. ABC transporters (CDR1 and CDR2) and other resistance genes (MDR1 and ERG11) were tested by real-time PCR for their expression in C. albicans cells at the mRNA level after induction by antineoplastic drugs. The results were confirmed by a lacZ gene reporter system and verified at the protein level using GFP and immunoblotting. We showed that doxorubicin is a potent inducer of CDR1/CDR2 expression in C. albicans at both the mRNA and protein level and thus causes an increase in fluconazole MIC values. However, cyclophosphamide, which is not a substrate of human P-gp, did not induce ABC transporter expression in C. albicans. Neither doxorubicin nor cyclophosphamide could influence the expression of the other resistance genes (MDR1 and ERG11). The induction of CDR1/CDR2 by doxorubicin in C. albicans and the resulting alteration of antifungal susceptibility might be of clinical relevance for the antifungal treatment of Candida infections occurring after anticancer chemotherapy with doxorubicin. PMID:20818920

  14. Overexpression of MexAB-OprM efflux pump in carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ya-Ping; Xu, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Zhong-Xin; Fang, Ya-Ping; Shen, Ji-Lu

    2016-08-01

    Efflux pump systems are one of the most important mechanisms conferring multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. MexAB-OprM efflux pump is one of the largest multi-drug resistant efflux pumps with high-level expression, which is controlled by regulatory genes mexR, nalC, and nalD. This study investigated the role of efflux pump MexAB-OprM in 75 strains of carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa and evaluated the influence of point mutation of the regulatory genes. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of imipenem and meropenem, with or without MC207110, an efflux pump inhibitor, were determined by agar dilution method to select the positive strains for an overexpressed active efflux pump. Carba NP test and EDTA-disk synergy test were used for the detection of carbapenemase and metallo-β-lactamases, respectively. The gene mexA, responsible for the fusion protein structure, and the reference gene rpoD of the MexAB-OprM pump were amplified by real-time PCR. The quantity of relative mRNA expression was determined simultaneously. By PCR method, the efflux regulatory genes mexR, nalC, and nalD and outer membrane protein OprD2 were amplified for the strains showing overexpression of MexAB-OprM and subsequently analyzed by BLAST. Among the 75 P. aeruginosa strains, the prevalence of efflux pump-positive phenotype was 17.3 % (13/75). Carba NP test and EDTA-disk synergy test were all negative in the 13 strains. PCR assay results showed that ten strains overexpressed the MexAB-OprM efflux pump and were all positive for the regulatory genes mexR, nalC, and nalD. Sequence analysis indicated that of the ten isolates, nine had a mutation (Gly → Glu) at 71st amino acid position in NalC, and eight also had a mutation (Ser → Arg) at 209th position in NalC. Only one strain had a mutation (Thr → Ile) at the 158th amino acid position in NalD, whereas eight isolates had mutations in MexR. In conclusion, overexpression of efflux pump MexAB-OprM plays an important role in

  15. The MexJK Efflux Pump of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Requires OprM for Antibiotic Efflux but Not for Efflux of Triclosan

    PubMed Central

    Chuanchuen, Rungtip; Narasaki, Craig T.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2002-01-01

    Using the biocide triclosan as a selective agent, several triclosan-resistant mutants of a susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain were isolated. Cloning and characterization of a DNA fragment conferring triclosan resistance from one of these mutants revealed a hitherto uncharacterized efflux system of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND) family, which was named MexJK and which is encoded by the mexJK operon. Expression of this operon is negatively regulated by the product of mexL, a gene located upstream of and transcribed divergently from mexJK. The triclosan-resistant mutant contained a single nucleotide change in mexL, which caused an amino acid change in the putative helix-turn-helix domain of MexL. The MexL protein belongs to the TetR family of repressor proteins. The MexJK system effluxed tetracycline and erythromycin but only in the presence of the outer membrane protein channel OprM; OprJ and OprN did not function with MexJK. Triclosan efflux required neither of the outer membrane protein channels tested but necessitated the MexJ membrane fusion protein and the MexK inner membrane RND transporter. The results presented in this study suggest that MexJK may function as a two-component RND pump for triclosan efflux but must associate with OprM to form a tripartite antibiotic efflux system. Furthermore, the results confirm that triclosan is an excellent tool for the study of RND multidrug efflux systems and that this popular biocide therefore readily selects mutants which are cross-resistant with antibiotics. PMID:12193619

  16. Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) extracts synergistically enhance the antibacterial activity of berberine via efflux pump inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ettefagh, Keivan A; Burns, Johnna T; Junio, Hiyas A; Kaatz, Glenn W; Cech, Nadja B

    2011-05-01

    Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) is used to combat inflammation and infection. Its antibacterial activity in vitRO has been attributed to its alkaloids, the most abundant of which is berberine. The goal of these studies was to compare the composition, antibacterial activity, and efflux pump inhibitory activity of ethanolic extracts prepared from roots and aerial portions of H. canadensis. Ethanolic extracts were prepared separately from roots and aerial portions of six H. canadensis plants. Extracts were analyzed for alkaloid concentration using LC-MS and tested for antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (NCTC 8325-4) and for inhibition of ethidium bromide efflux. Synergistic antibacterial activity was observed between the aerial extract (FIC 0.375) and to a lesser extent the root extract (FIC 0.750) and berberine. The aerial extract inhibited ethidium bromide efflux from wild-type S. aureus but had no effect on the expulsion of this compound from an isogenic derivative deleted for norA. Our studies indicate that the roots of H. canadensis contain higher levels of alkaloids than the aerial portions, but the aerial portions synergize with berberine more significantly than the roots. Furthermore, extracts from the aerial portions of H. canadensis contain efflux pump inhibitors, while efflux pump inhibitory activity was not observed for the root extract. The three most abundant H. canadensis alkaloids, berberine, hydrastine, and canadine, are not responsible for the efflux pump inhibitory activity of the extracts from H. canadensis aerial portions. PMID:21157683

  17. Identification of Acinetobacter baumannii Serum-Associated Antibiotic Efflux Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Catlyn; Barnett, Pamela; Perlmutter, Jessamyn

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive antibiotic resistance is a newly described phenomenon by which Acinetobacter baumannii induces efflux pump activity in response to host-associated environmental cues that may, in part, account for antibiotic treatment failures against clinically defined susceptible strains. To that end, during adaptation to growth in human serum, the organism induces approximately 22 putative efflux-associated genes and displays efflux-mediated minocycline tolerance at antibiotic concentrations corresponding to patient serum levels. Here, we show that in addition to minocycline, growth in human serum elicits A. baumannii efflux-mediated tolerance to the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, meropenem, tetracycline, and tigecycline. Moreover, using a whole-cell high-throughput screen and secondary assays, we identified novel serum-associated antibiotic efflux inhibitors that potentiated the activities of antibiotics toward serum-grown A. baumannii. Two compounds, Acinetobacter baumannii efflux pump inhibitor 1 (ABEPI1) [(E)-4-((4-chlorobenzylidene)amino)benezenesulfonamide] and ABEPI2 [N-tert-butyl-2-(1-tert-butyltetrazol-5-yl)sulfanylacetamide], were shown to lead to minocycline accumulation within A. baumannii during serum growth and inhibit the efflux potential of the organism. While both compounds also inhibited the antibiotic efflux properties of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, they did not display significant cytotoxicity toward human cells or mammalian Ca2+ channel inhibitory effects, suggesting that ABEPI1 and ABEPI2 represent promising structural scaffolds for the development of new classes of bacterial antibiotic efflux pump inhibitors that can be used to potentiate the activities of current and future antibiotics for the therapeutic intervention of Gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:25114126

  18. Expression of homologous RND efflux pump genes is dependent upon AcrB expression: implications for efflux and virulence inhibitor design

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Jessica M. A.; Smith, Helen E.; Ricci, Vito; Lawler, Amelia J.; Thompson, Louisa J.; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Enterobacteriaceae have multiple efflux pumps that confer intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. AcrB mediates clinically relevant multidrug resistance and is required for virulence and biofilm formation, making it an attractive target for the design of inhibitors. The aim of this study was to assess the viability of single transporters as a target for efflux inhibition using Salmonella Typhimurium as the model pathogen. Methods The expression of resistance–nodulation–division (RND) efflux pump genes in response to the inactivation of single or multiple homologues was measured using real-time RT–PCR. Phenotypes of mutants were characterized by measuring antimicrobial susceptibility, dye accumulation and the ability to cause infection in vitro. Results The expression of all RND efflux pump genes was increased when single or multiple acr genes were inactivated, suggesting a feedback mechanism that activates the transcription of homologous efflux pump genes. When two or three acr genes were inactivated, the mutants had further reduced efflux, altered susceptibility to antimicrobials (including increased susceptibility to some, but conversely and counterintuitively, decreased susceptibility to some others) and were more attenuated in the tissue culture model than mutants lacking single pumps were. Conclusions These data indicate that it is critical to understand which pumps an inhibitor is active against and the effect of this on the expression of homologous systems. For some antimicrobials, an inhibitor with activity against multiple pumps will have a greater impact on susceptibility, but an unintended consequence of this may be decreased susceptibility to other drugs, such as aminoglycosides. PMID:25288678

  19. A Simple Method for Assessment of MDR Bacteria for Over-Expressed Efflux Pumps.

    PubMed

    Martins, Marta; McCusker, Matthew P; Viveiros, Miguel; Couto, Isabel; Fanning, Séamus; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Amaral, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    It is known that bacteria showing a multi-drug resistance phenotype use several mechanisms to overcome the action of antibiotics. As a result, this phenotype can be a result of several mechanisms or a combination of thereof. The main mechanisms of antibiotic resistance are: mutations in target genes (such as DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV); over-expression of efflux pumps; changes in the cell envelope; down regulation of membrane porins, and modified lipopolysaccharide component of the outer cell membrane (in the case of Gram-negative bacteria). In addition, adaptation to the environment, such as quorum sensing and biofilm formation can also contribute to bacterial persistence. Due to the rapid emergence and spread of bacterial isolates showing resistance to several classes of antibiotics, methods that can rapidly and efficiently identify isolates whose resistance is due to active efflux have been developed. However, there is still a need for faster and more accurate methodologies. Conventional methods that evaluate bacterial efflux pump activity in liquid systems are available. However, these methods usually use common efflux pump substrates, such as ethidium bromide or radioactive antibiotics and therefore, require specialized instrumentation, which is not available in all laboratories. In this review, we will report the results obtained with the Ethidium Bromide-agar Cartwheel method. This is an easy, instrument-free, agar based method that has been modified to afford the simultaneous evaluation of as many as twelve bacterial strains. Due to its simplicity it can be applied to large collections of bacteria to rapidly screen for multi-drug resistant isolates that show an over-expression of their efflux systems. The principle of the method is simple and relies on the ability of the bacteria to expel a fluorescent molecule that is substrate for most efflux pumps, ethidium bromide. In this approach, the higher the concentration of ethidium bromide required to

  20. Efflux Pump Overexpression in Multiple-Antibiotic-Resistant Mutants of Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Pumbwe, Lilian; Glass, Daniel; Wexler, Hannah M.

    2006-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant mutants of a wild-type Bacteroides fragilis strain (strain ADB77) and a quadruple resistance nodulation division family efflux pump deletion mutant (ADB77 ΔbmeB1 ΔbmeB3 ΔbmeB12 ΔbmeB15) were selected with antimicrobials. Ampicillin, doripenem, imipenem, levofloxacin, and metronidazole selected for mutants from both strains; cefoxitin selected for mutants from strain ADB77 only; and sodium dodecyl sulfate selected mutants from ADB77ΔbmeB1 ΔbmeB3 ΔbmeB12 ΔbmeB15 only. The mutants overexpressed one or more efflux pumps. PMID:16940115

  1. Characterization of MATE-Type Multidrug Efflux Pumps from Klebsiella pneumoniae MGH78578

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Wakano; Minato, Yusuke; Dodan, Hayata; Onishi, Motoyasu; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa; Kuroda, Teruo

    2015-01-01

    We previously described the cloning of genes related to drug resistance from Klebsiella pneumoniae MGH78578. Of these, we identified a putative gene encoding a MATE-type multidrug efflux pump, and named it ketM. Escherichia coli KAM32 possessing ketM on a plasmid showed increased minimum inhibitory concentrations for norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime, acriflavine, Hoechst 33342, and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenyl indole (DAPI). The active efflux of DAPI was observed in E. coli KAM32 possessing ketM on a plasmid. The expression of mRNA for ketM was observed in K. pneumoniae cells, and we subsequently disrupted ketM in K. pneumoniae ATCC10031. However, no significant changes were observed in drug resistance levels between the parental strain ATCC10031 and ketM disruptant, SKYM. Therefore, we concluded that KetM was a multidrug efflux pump, that did not significantly contribute to intrinsic resistance to antimicrobial chemicals in K. pneumoniae. MATE-type transporters are considered to be secondary transporters; therefore, we investigated the coupling cations of KetM. DAPI efflux by KetM was observed when lactate was added to produce a proton motive force, indicating that KetM effluxed substrates using a proton motive force. However, the weak efflux of DAPI by KetM was also noted when NaCl was added to the assay mixture without lactate. This result suggests that KetM may utilize proton and sodium motive forces. PMID:25807080

  2. Action of cholecalciferol and alpha-tocopherol on Staphylococcus aureus efflux pumps

    PubMed Central

    Tintino, Saulo R.; Morais-Tintino, Cícera D.; Campina, Fábia F.; Pereira, Raimundo L.; Costa, Maria do S.; Braga, Maria Flaviana B.M.; Limaverde, Paulo W.; Andrade, Jacqueline C.; Siqueira-Junior, José P.; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Balbino, Valdir Q.; Leal-Balbino, Tereza C.; Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J.

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-tocopherol is one the most abundant and biologically active isoforms of vitamin E. This compound is a potent antioxidant and one of most studied isoforms of vitamin E. Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) is an important nutrient for calcium homeostasis and bone health, that has also been recognized as a potent modulator of the immune response. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most important causative agent of both nosocomial and community-acquired infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of alpha-tocopherol and cholecalciferol on both S. aureus and multidrug resistant S. aureus efflux pumps. The RN4220 strain has the plasmid pUL5054 that is the carrier of gene that encodes the macrolide resistance protein (an efflux pump) MsrA; the IS-58 strain possesses the TetK tetracycline efflux protein in its genome and the 1199B strain resists to hydrophilic fluoroquinolones via a NorA-mediated mechanism. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by determining the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and a possible inhibition of efflux pumps was associated to a reduction of the MIC. In this work we observed that in the presence of the treatments there was a decrease in the MIC for the RN4220 and IS-58 strains, suggesting that the substances presented an inhibitory effect on the efflux pumps of these strains. Significant efforts have been done to identify efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) from natural sources and, therefore, the antibacterial properties of cholecalciferol and alpha-tocopherol might be attributed to a direct effect on the bacterial cell depending on their amphipathic structure. PMID:27298617

  3. Action of cholecalciferol and alpha-tocopherol on Staphylococcus aureus efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Tintino, Saulo R; Morais-Tintino, Cícera D; Campina, Fábia F; Pereira, Raimundo L; Costa, Maria do S; Braga, Maria Flaviana B M; Limaverde, Paulo W; Andrade, Jacqueline C; Siqueira-Junior, José P; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Balbino, Valdir Q; Leal-Balbino, Tereza C; Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2016-01-01

    Alpha-tocopherol is one the most abundant and biologically active isoforms of vitamin E. This compound is a potent antioxidant and one of most studied isoforms of vitamin E. Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) is an important nutrient for calcium homeostasis and bone health, that has also been recognized as a potent modulator of the immune response. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most important causative agent of both nosocomial and community-acquired infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of alpha-tocopherol and cholecalciferol on both S. aureus and multidrug resistant S. aureus efflux pumps. The RN4220 strain has the plasmid pUL5054 that is the carrier of gene that encodes the macrolide resistance protein (an efflux pump) MsrA; the IS-58 strain possesses the TetK tetracycline efflux protein in its genome and the 1199B strain resists to hydrophilic fluoroquinolones via a NorA-mediated mechanism. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by determining the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and a possible inhibition of efflux pumps was associated to a reduction of the MIC. In this work we observed that in the presence of the treatments there was a decrease in the MIC for the RN4220 and IS-58 strains, suggesting that the substances presented an inhibitory effect on the efflux pumps of these strains. Significant efforts have been done to identify efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) from natural sources and, therefore, the antibacterial properties of cholecalciferol and alpha-tocopherol might be attributed to a direct effect on the bacterial cell depending on their amphipathic structure. PMID:27298617

  4. Alkylaminoquinolines inhibit the bacterial antibiotic efflux pump in multidrug-resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Malléa, Monique; Mahamoud, Abdallah; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Alibert-Franco, Sandrine; Brouant, Pierre; Barbe, Jacques; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2003-01-01

    Over the last decade, MDR (multidrug resistance) has increased worldwide in microbial pathogens by efflux mechanisms, leading to treatment failures in human infections. Several Gram-negative bacteria efflux pumps have been described. These proteinaceous channels are capable of expelling structurally different drugs across the envelope and conferring antibiotic resistance in various bacterial pathogens. Combating antibiotic resistance is an urgency and the blocking of efflux pumps is an attractive response to the emergence of MDR phenotypes in infectious bacteria. In the present study, various alkylaminoquinolines were tested as potential inhibitors of drug transporters. We showed that alkylaminoquinolines are capable of restoring susceptibilities to structurally unrelated antibiotics in clinical isolates of MDR Gram-negative bacteria. Antibiotic efflux studies indicated that 7-nitro-8-methyl-4-[2'-(piperidino)ethyl]aminoquinoline acts as an inhibitor of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump and restores a high level of intracellular drug concentration. Inhibitory activity of this alkylaminoquinoline is observed on clinical isolates showing different resistance phenotypes. PMID:12959639

  5. Efflux Pump, the Masked Side of ß-Lactam Resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Pages, Jean-Marie; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Leflon-Guibout, Véronique; Marcon, Estelle; Bert, Frédéric; Noussair, Latifa; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène

    2009-01-01

    Background β-lactamase production and porin decrease are the well-recognized mechanisms of acquired ß-lactam resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates. However, such mechanisms proved to be absent in K. pneumoniae isolates that are non susceptible to cefoxitin (FOX) and succeptible to amoxicillin+clavulanic acid in our hospital. Assessing the role of efflux pumps in this β-lactam phenotype was the aim of this study. Methodology/Findings MICs of 9 β-lactams, including cloxacillin (CLX), and other antibiotic families were tested alone and with an efflux pump inhibitor (EPI), then with both CLX (subinhibitory concentrations) and EPI against 11 unique bacteremia K. pneumoniae isolates displaying the unusual phenotype, and 2 ATCC strains. CLX and EPI-dose dependent effects were studied on 4 representatives strains. CLX MICs significantly decreased when tested with EPI. A similar phenomenon was observed with piperacillin+tazobactam whereas MICs of the other β-lactams significantly decreased only in the presence of both EPI and CLX. Thus, FOX MICs decreased 128 fold in the K. pneumoniae isolates but also16 fold in ATCC strain. Restoration of FOX activity was CLX dose-dependent suggesting a competitive relationship between CLX and the other β-lactams with regard to their efflux. For chloramphenicol, erythromycin and nalidixic acid whose resistance was also due to efflux, adding CLX to EPI did not increase their activity suggesting differences between the efflux process of these molecules and that of β-lactams. Conclusion This is the first study demonstrating that efflux mechanism plays a key role in the β-lactam susceptibility of clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae. Such data clearly evidence that the involvement of efflux pumps in ß-lactam resistance is specially underestimated in clinical isolates. PMID:19279676

  6. MAPK1 of Leishmania donovani Modulates Antimony Susceptibility by Downregulating P-Glycoprotein Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Mansi

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of resistance to pentavalent antimonials has become a severe obstacle in the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in the Indian subcontinent. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are well-known mediators of signal transduction of eukaryotes, regulating important processes, like proliferation, differentiation, stress response, and apoptosis. In Leishmania, MAPK1 has been shown to be consistently downregulated in antimony-resistant field isolates, suggesting that it has a role in antimony resistance. The present work investigates the molecular mechanism of MAPK1 in antimony resistance in Leishmania donovani. The L. donovani MAPK1 (LdMAPK1) single-allele replacement mutants exhibited increased resistance to Sb(III) (5.57-fold) compared to wild-type promastigotes, while overexpressing parasites became much more susceptible to antimony. The LdMAPK1-mediated drug sensitivity was directly related to antimony-induced apoptotic death of the parasite, as was evidenced by a 4- to 5-fold decrease in cell death parameters in deletion mutants and a 2- to 3-fold increase in MAPK1-overexpressing cells. LdMAPK1-underexpressing parasites also exhibited increased P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated efflux pump activity, while a significant decrease in pump activity was observed in overexpressing cells. This change in efflux pump activity was directly related to expression levels of P-gp in all cell lines. However, episomal complementation of the gene restored normal growth, drug sensitivity, P-gp expression, and efflux pump activity. The data indicate that LdMAPK1 negatively regulates the expression of P-glycoprotein-type efflux pumps in the parasite. The decrease in efflux pump activity with an increase in LdMAPK1 expression may result in increased antimony accumulation in the parasite, making it more vulnerable to the drug. PMID:25870075

  7. Functionally Cloned pdrM from Streptococcus pneumoniae Encodes a Na+ Coupled Multidrug Efflux Pump

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Kohei; Ogawa, Wakano; Nishioka, Toshihiro; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa; Kuroda, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps play an important role as a self-defense system in bacteria. Bacterial multidrug efflux pumps are classified into five families based on structure and coupling energy: resistance−nodulation−cell division (RND), small multidrug resistance (SMR), major facilitator (MF), ATP binding cassette (ABC), and multidrug and toxic compounds extrusion (MATE). We cloned a gene encoding a MATE-type multidrug efflux pump from Streptococcus pneumoniae R6, and designated it pdrM. PdrM showed sequence similarity with NorM from Vibrio parahaemolyticus, YdhE from Escherichia coli, and other bacterial MATE-type multidrug efflux pumps. Heterologous expression of PdrM let to elevated resistance to several antibacterial agents, norfloxacin, acriflavine, and 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) in E. coli KAM32 cells. PdrM effluxes acriflavine and DAPI in a Na+- or Li+-dependent manner. Moreover, Na+ efflux via PdrM was observed when acriflavine was added to Na+-loaded cells expressing pdrM. Therefore, we conclude that PdrM is a Na+/drug antiporter in S. pneumoniae. In addition to pdrM, we found another two genes, spr1756 and spr1877,that met the criteria of MATE-type by searching the S. pneumoniae genome database. However, cloned spr1756 and spr1877 did not elevate the MIC of any of the investigated drugs. mRNA expression of spr1756, spr1877, and pdrM was detected in S. pneumoniae R6 under laboratory growth conditions. Therefore, spr1756 and spr1877 are supposed to play physiological roles in this growth condition, but they may be unrelated to drug resistance. PMID:23555691

  8. Multidrug Efflux Pumps Attenuate the Effect of MGMT Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tomaszowski, Karl-Heinz; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Kaina, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    Various mechanisms of drug resistance attenuate the effectiveness of cancer therapeutics, including drug transport and DNA repair. The DNA repair protein O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is a key factor determining the resistance against alkylating anticancer drugs inducing the genotoxic DNA lesions O(6)-methylguanine and O(6)-chloroethylguanine, and MGMT inactivation or depletion renders cells more susceptible to treatment with methylating and chloroethylating agents. Highly specific and efficient inhibitors of the repair protein MGMT were designed, including O(6)-benzylguanine (O(6)BG) and O(6)-(4-bromothenyl)guanine (O(6)BTG) that are nontoxic on their own. Unfortunately, these inhibitors do not select between MGMT in normal and cancer cells, causing nontarget effects in the healthy tissue. Therefore, a targeting strategy for MGMT inhibitors is required. Here, we used O(6)BG and O(6)BTG conjugated to β-d-glucose (O(6)BG-Glu and O(6)BTG-Glu, respectively) in order to selectively inhibit MGMT in tumors, harnessing their high demand for glucose. Both glucose conjugates efficiently inhibited MGMT in several cancer cell lines, but with different extents of sensitization to DNA alkylating agents, with lomustine being more effective than temozolomide. We further show that the glucose conjugates are subject to ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter mediated efflux, involving P-glycoprotein, MRP1, and BCRP, which impacts the efficiency of MGMT inhibition. Surprisingly, also O(6)BG and O(6)BTG were subject to an active transport out of the cell. We also show that pharmacological inhibition of efflux transporters increases the induction of cell death following treatment with these MGMT inhibitors and temozolomide. We conclude that strategies of attenuating the efflux by ABC transporters are required for achieving successful MGMT targeting. PMID:26379107

  9. The ins and outs of RND efflux pumps in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Anes, João; McCusker, Matthew P.; Fanning, Séamus; Martins, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases remain one of the principal causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. Relevant authorities including the WHO and CDC have expressed serious concern regarding the continued increase in the development of multidrug resistance among bacteria. They have also reaffirmed the urgent need for investment in the discovery and development of new antibiotics and therapeutic approaches to treat multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. The extensive use of antimicrobial compounds in diverse environments, including farming and healthcare, has been identified as one of the main causes for the emergence of MDR bacteria. Induced selective pressure has led bacteria to develop new strategies of defense against these chemicals. Bacteria can accomplish this by several mechanisms, including enzymatic inactivation of the target compound; decreased cell permeability; target protection and/or overproduction; altered target site/enzyme and increased efflux due to over-expression of efflux pumps. Efflux pumps can be specific for a single substrate or can confer resistance to multiple antimicrobials by facilitating the extrusion of a broad range of compounds including antibiotics, heavy metals, biocides and others, from the bacterial cell. To overcome antimicrobial resistance caused by active efflux, efforts are required to better understand the fundamentals of drug efflux mechanisms. There is also a need to elucidate how these mechanisms are regulated and how they respond upon exposure to antimicrobials. Understanding these will allow the development of combined therapies using efflux inhibitors together with antibiotics to act on Gram-negative bacteria, such as the emerging globally disseminated MDR pathogen Escherichia coli ST131 (O25:H4). This review will summarize the current knowledge on resistance-nodulation-cell division efflux mechanisms in E. coli, a bacteria responsible for community and hospital-acquired infections, as well as foodborne outbreaks worldwide

  10. Focus on the Outer Membrane Factor OprM, the Forgotten Player from Efflux Pumps Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Gilles; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics have been used extensively during several decades and we are now facing the emergence of multidrug resistant strains. It has become a major public concern, urging the need to discover new strategies to combat them. Among the different ways used by bacteria to resist antibiotics, the active efflux is one of the main mechanisms. In Gram-negative bacteria the efflux pumps are comprised of three components forming a long edifice crossing the complete cell wall from the inside to the outside of the cell. Blocking these pumps would permit the restoration of the effectiveness of the current antibiotherapy which is why it is important to increase our knowledge on the different proteins involved in these complexes. A tremendous number of experiments have been performed on the inner membrane protein AcrB from Escherichia coli and, to a lesser extent, the protein partners forming the AcrAB-TolC pump, but less information is available concerning the efflux pumps from other virulent Gram-negative bacteria. The present review will focus on the OprM outer membrane protein from the MexAB-OprM pump of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, highlighting similarities and differences compare to the archetypal AcrAB-TolC in terms of structure, function, and assembly properties. PMID:27025640

  11. Focus on the Outer Membrane Factor OprM, the Forgotten Player from Efflux Pumps Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Phan, Gilles; Picard, Martin; Broutin, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics have been used extensively during several decades and we are now facing the emergence of multidrug resistant strains. It has become a major public concern, urging the need to discover new strategies to combat them. Among the different ways used by bacteria to resist antibiotics, the active efflux is one of the main mechanisms. In Gram-negative bacteria the efflux pumps are comprised of three components forming a long edifice crossing the complete cell wall from the inside to the outside of the cell. Blocking these pumps would permit the restoration of the effectiveness of the current antibiotherapy which is why it is important to increase our knowledge on the different proteins involved in these complexes. A tremendous number of experiments have been performed on the inner membrane protein AcrB from Escherichia coli and, to a lesser extent, the protein partners forming the AcrAB-TolC pump, but less information is available concerning the efflux pumps from other virulent Gram-negative bacteria. The present review will focus on the OprM outer membrane protein from the MexAB-OprM pump of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, highlighting similarities and differences compare to the archetypal AcrAB-TolC in terms of structure, function, and assembly properties. PMID:27025640

  12. Engineering bacterial efflux pumps for solar-powered bioremediation of surface waters.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Vikram; Wendell, David

    2013-05-01

    Antibiotics are difficult to selectively remove from surface waters by present treatment methods. Bacterial efflux pumps have evolved the ability to discriminately expel antibiotics and other noxious agents via proton and ATP driven pathways. Here, we describe light-dependent removal of antibiotics by engineering the bacterial efflux pump AcrB into a proteovesicle system. We have created a chimeric protein with the requisite proton motive force by coupling AcrB to the light-driven proton pump Delta-rhodopsin (dR) via a glycophorin A transmembrane domain. This creates a solar powered protein material capable of selectively capturing antibiotics from bulk solutions. Using environmental water and direct sunlight, our AcrB-dR vesicles removed almost twice as much antibiotic as the treatment standard, activated carbon. Altogether, the AcrB-dR system provides an effective means of extracting antibiotics from surface waters as well as potential antibiotic recovery through vesicle solubilization. PMID:23581993

  13. LmrS is a multidrug efflux pump of the major facilitator superfamily from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Jody L; Smith, Kenneth P; Kumar, Sanath H; Floyd, Jared T; Varela, Manuel F

    2010-12-01

    A multidrug efflux pump designated LmrS (lincomycin resistance protein of Staphylococcus aureus), belonging to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of transporters, was cloned, and the role of LmrS in antimicrobial efflux was evaluated. The highest relative increase in MIC, 16-fold, was observed for linezolid and tetraphenylphosphonium chloride (TPCL), followed by an 8-fold increase for sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), trimethoprim, and chloramphenicol. LmrS has 14 predicted membrane-spanning domains and is homologous to putative lincomycin resistance proteins of Bacillus spp., Lactobacillus spp., and Listeria spp. PMID:20855745

  14. Role of Efflux Pumps and Intracellular Thiols in Natural Antimony Resistant Isolates of Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Smita; Bhaskar; Goel, Sudhir K.; Nath Dwivedi, Upendra; Sundar, Shyam; Goyal, Neena

    2013-01-01

    Background In view of the recent upsurge in the phenomenon of therapeutic failure, drug resistance in Leishmania, developed under natural field conditions, has become a great concern yet little understood. Accordingly, the study of determinants of antimony resistance is urgently warranted. Efflux transporters have been reported in Leishmania but their role in clinical resistance is still unknown. The present study was designed to elucidate the mechanism of natural antimony resistance in L. donovani field isolates by analyzing the functionality of efflux pump(s) and expression profiles of known genes involved in transport and thiol based redox metabolism Methodology/Principal Findings We selected 7 clinical isolates (2 sensitive and 5 resistant) in addition to laboratory sensitive reference and SbIII resistant mutant strains for the present study. Functional characterization using flow cytometry identified efflux pumps that transported substrates of both P-gp and MRPA and were inhibited by the calmodulin antagonist trifluoperazine. For the first time, verapamil sensitive efflux pumps for rhodamine 123 were observed in L. donovani that were differentially active in resistant isolates. RT-PCR confirmed the over-expression of MRPA in isolates with high resistance index only. Resistant isolates also exhibited consistent down regulation of AQP1 and elevated intracellular thiol levels which were accompanied with increased expression of ODC and TR genes. Interestingly, γ-GCS is not implicated in clinical resistance in L. donovani isolates. Conclusions/Significance Here we demonstrate for the first time, the role of P-gp type plasma membrane efflux transporter(s) in antimony resistance in L. donovani field isolates. Further, decreased levels of AQP1 and elevated thiols levels have emerged as biomarkers for clinical resistance. PMID:24069359

  15. The Role of Efflux Pumps in Schistosoma mansoni Praziquantel Resistant Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Armada, Ana; Belo, Silvana; Carrilho, Emanuel; Viveiros, Miguel; Afonso, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a neglected disease caused by a trematode of the genus Schistosoma that is second only to malaria in public health significance in Africa, South America, and Asia. Praziquantel (PZQ) is the drug of choice to treat this disease due to its high cure rates and no significant side effects. However, in the last years increasingly cases of tolerance to PZQ have been reported, which has caused growing concerns regarding the emergency of resistance to this drug. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe the selection of a parasitic strain that has a stable resistance phenotype to PZQ. It has been reported that drug resistance in helminths might involve efflux pumps such as members of ATP-binding cassette transport proteins, including P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance-associated protein families. Here we evaluate the role of efflux pumps in Schistosoma mansoni resistance to PZQ, by comparing the efflux pumps activity in susceptible and resistant strains. The evaluation of the efflux activity was performed by an ethidium bromide accumulation assay in presence and absence of Verapamil. The role of efflux pumps in resistance to PZQ was further investigated comparing the response of susceptible and resistant parasites in the absence and presence of different doses of Verapamil, in an ex vivo assay, and these results were further reinforced through the comparison of the expression levels of SmMDR2 RNA by RT-PCR. Conclusions/Significance This work strongly suggests the involvement of Pgp-like transporters SMDR2 in Praziquantel drug resistance in S. mansoni. Low doses of Verapamil successfully reverted drug resistance. Our results might give an indication that a combination therapy with PZQ and natural or synthetic Pgp modulators can be an effective strategy for the treatment of confirmed cases of resistance to PZQ in S. mansoni. PMID:26445012

  16. Structural basis for the blockade of MATE multidrug efflux pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Radchenko, Martha; Symersky, Jindrich; Nie, Rongxin; Lu, Min

    2015-08-06

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters underpin multidrug resistance by using the H+ or Na+ electrochemical gradient to extrude different drugs across cell membranes. MATE transporters can be further parsed into the DinF, NorM and eukaryotic subfamilies based on their amino-acid sequence similarity. Here we report the 3.0 Å resolution X-ray structures of a protonation-mimetic mutant of an H+-coupled DinF transporter, as well as of an H+-coupled DinF and a Na+-coupled NorM transporters in complexes with verapamil, a small-molecule pharmaceutical that inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug extrusion. Combining structure-inspired mutational and functional studies, we confirm the biological relevance of our crystal structures, reveal the mechanistic differences among MATE transporters, and suggest how verapamil inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug efflux. Our findings offer insights into how MATE transporters extrude chemically and structurally dissimilar drugs and could inform the design of new strategies for tackling multidrug resistance.

  17. Structural basis for the blockade of MATE multidrug efflux pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchenko, Martha; Symersky, Jindrich; Nie, Rongxin; Lu, Min

    2015-08-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters underpin multidrug resistance by using the H+ or Na+ electrochemical gradient to extrude different drugs across cell membranes. MATE transporters can be further parsed into the DinF, NorM and eukaryotic subfamilies based on their amino-acid sequence similarity. Here we report the 3.0 Å resolution X-ray structures of a protonation-mimetic mutant of an H+-coupled DinF transporter, as well as of an H+-coupled DinF and a Na+-coupled NorM transporters in complexes with verapamil, a small-molecule pharmaceutical that inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug extrusion. Combining structure-inspired mutational and functional studies, we confirm the biological relevance of our crystal structures, reveal the mechanistic differences among MATE transporters, and suggest how verapamil inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug efflux. Our findings offer insights into how MATE transporters extrude chemically and structurally dissimilar drugs and could inform the design of new strategies for tackling multidrug resistance.

  18. Structural basis for the blockade of MATE multidrug efflux pumps

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Radchenko, Martha; Symersky, Jindrich; Nie, Rongxin; Lu, Min

    2015-08-06

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters underpin multidrug resistance by using the H+ or Na+ electrochemical gradient to extrude different drugs across cell membranes. MATE transporters can be further parsed into the DinF, NorM and eukaryotic subfamilies based on their amino-acid sequence similarity. Here we report the 3.0 Å resolution X-ray structures of a protonation-mimetic mutant of an H+-coupled DinF transporter, as well as of an H+-coupled DinF and a Na+-coupled NorM transporters in complexes with verapamil, a small-molecule pharmaceutical that inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug extrusion. Combining structure-inspired mutational and functional studies, we confirm the biological relevance of our crystalmore » structures, reveal the mechanistic differences among MATE transporters, and suggest how verapamil inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug efflux. Our findings offer insights into how MATE transporters extrude chemically and structurally dissimilar drugs and could inform the design of new strategies for tackling multidrug resistance.« less

  19. Structural basis for the blockade of MATE multidrug efflux pumps

    PubMed Central

    Radchenko, Martha; Symersky, Jindrich; Nie, Rongxin; Lu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) transporters underpin multidrug resistance by using the H+ or Na+ electrochemical gradient to extrude different drugs across cell membranes. MATE transporters can be further parsed into the DinF, NorM and eukaryotic subfamilies based on their amino-acid sequence similarity. Here we report the 3.0 Å resolution X-ray structures of a protonation-mimetic mutant of an H+-coupled DinF transporter, as well as of an H+-coupled DinF and a Na+-coupled NorM transporters in complexes with verapamil, a small-molecule pharmaceutical that inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug extrusion. Combining structure-inspired mutational and functional studies, we confirm the biological relevance of our crystal structures, reveal the mechanistic differences among MATE transporters, and suggest how verapamil inhibits MATE-mediated multidrug efflux. Our findings offer insights into how MATE transporters extrude chemically and structurally dissimilar drugs and could inform the design of new strategies for tackling multidrug resistance. PMID:26246409

  20. Pharmacophore generation of 2-substituted benzothiazoles as AdeABC efflux pump inhibitors in A. baumannii.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, S; Altinkanat-Gelmez, G; Bolelli, K; Guneser-Merdan, D; Over-Hasdemir, M U; Yildiz, I; Aki-Yalcin, E; Yalcin, I

    2014-01-01

    RND family efflux pumps are important for multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. To date no efflux pump inhibitors for clinical use have been found, so developing the specific inhibitors of this pump system will be beneficial for the treatment of infections caused by these multidrug-resistant pathogens. A set of BSN-coded 2-substituted benzothiazoles were tested alone and in combination with ciprofloxacin (CIP) against the RND family efflux pump AdeABC overexpressor Acinetobacter baumannii SbMox-2 strain. The results indicated that the BSN compounds did not have antimicrobial activity when tested alone. However, if they were applied in combination with CIP, it was observed that the antibiotic had antimicrobial activity against the tested pathogen, possessing a minimum inhibitory concentration value that could be utilized in clinical treatment. A 3D-common features pharmacophore model was applied by using the HipHop method and the generated pharmacophore hypothesis revealed that the hydrogen bond acceptor property of nitrogen in the thiazole ring and the oxygen of the amide substituted at the second position of the benzothiazole ring system were significant for binding to the target protein. Moreover, three hydrophobic aromatic features were found to be essential for inhibitory activity. PMID:24905472

  1. Efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) as new antimicrobial agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Askoura, Momen; Mottawea, Walid; Abujamel, Turki; Taher, Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen and one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections worldwide. The difficulty in treatment of pseudomonas infections arises from being multidrug resistant (MDR) and exhibits resistance to most antimicrobial agents due to the expression of different mechanisms overcoming their effects. Of these resistance mechanisms, the active efflux pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that belong to the resistance nodulation division (RND) plays a very important role in extruding the antibiotics outside the bacterial cells providing a protective means against their antibacterial activity. Beside its role against the antimicrobial agents, these pumps can extrude biocides, detergents, and other metabolic inhibitors. It is clear that efflux pumps can be targets for new antimicrobial agents. Peptidomimetic compounds such as phenylalanine arginyl β-naphthylamide (PAβN) have been introduced as efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs); their mechanism of action is through competitive inhibition with antibiotics on the efflux pump resulting in increased intracellular concentration of antibiotic, hence, restoring its antibacterial activity. The advantage of EPIs is the difficulty to develop bacterial resistance against them, but the disadvantage is their toxic property hindering their clinical application. The structure activity relationship of these compounds showed other derivatives from PAβN that are higher in their activity with higher solubility in biological fluids and decreased toxicity level. This raises further questions on how can we compact Pseudomonas infections. Of particular importance, the recent resurgence in the use of older antibiotics such as polymyxins and probably applying stricter control measures in order to prevent their spread in clinical sittings. PMID:21594004

  2. Structure of the periplasmic adaptor protein from a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) multidrug efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Greene, Nicholas P; Paterson, Neil G; Crow, Allister; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2014-08-25

    Periplasmic adaptor proteins are key components of bacterial tripartite efflux pumps. The 2.85 Å resolution structure of an MFS (major facilitator superfamily) pump adaptor, Aquifex aeolicus EmrA, shows linearly arranged α-helical coiled-coil, lipoyl, and β-barrel domains, but lacks the fourth membrane-proximal domain shown in other pumps to interact with the inner membrane transporter. The adaptor α-hairpin, which binds outer membrane TolC, is exceptionally long at 127 Å, and the β-barrel contains a conserved disordered loop. The structure extends the view of adaptors as flexible, modular components that mediate diverse pump assembly, and suggests that in MFS tripartite pumps a hexamer of adaptors could provide a periplasmic seal. PMID:24996185

  3. Structure of the periplasmic adaptor protein from a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) multidrug efflux pump

    PubMed Central

    Hinchliffe, Philip; Greene, Nicholas P.; Paterson, Neil G.; Crow, Allister; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2014-01-01

    Periplasmic adaptor proteins are key components of bacterial tripartite efflux pumps. The 2.85 Å resolution structure of an MFS (major facilitator superfamily) pump adaptor, Aquifex aeolicus EmrA, shows linearly arranged α-helical coiled-coil, lipoyl, and β-barrel domains, but lacks the fourth membrane-proximal domain shown in other pumps to interact with the inner membrane transporter. The adaptor α-hairpin, which binds outer membrane TolC, is exceptionally long at 127 Å, and the β-barrel contains a conserved disordered loop. The structure extends the view of adaptors as flexible, modular components that mediate diverse pump assembly, and suggests that in MFS tripartite pumps a hexamer of adaptors could provide a periplasmic seal. PMID:24996185

  4. Sarothrin from Alkanna orientalis is an antimicrobial agent and efflux pump inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Bame, Jessica R.; Graf, Tyler N.; Junio, Hiyas A.; Bussey, R. Owen; Jarmusch, Scott A.; El-Elimat, Tamam; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Cech, Richard A.; Cech, Nadja B.

    2015-01-01

    An Alkanna orientalis leaf and flower extract inhibited the growth of Staphylococcus aureus, a pathogen that causes an estimated 478,000 hospitalizations in the US annually. Bioassay-guided fractionation of A. orientalis resulted in isolation of the flavonoid sarothrin (5,7,4′-trihydroxy-3,6,8-trimethoxyflavone), which inhibited the growth of Mycobacterium smegmatis (MIC 75 μM) and S. aureus (MIC >800 μM), and possessed efflux pump inhibitory activity. This is the first report of antimicrobial or efflux pump inhibitory activity of sarothrin, and of its presence in A. orientalis. Our findings suggest that the effectiveness of A. orientalis extracts is due to a combination of multiple constituents, including sarothrin. PMID:23468310

  5. Use of a yeast-based membrane protein expression technology to overexpress drug resistance efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Lamping, Erwin; Cannon, Richard D

    2010-01-01

    Azole antifungal drugs are used widely to treat people with oral fungal infections. Unfortunately, fungi can develop resistance to these drugs. This resistance can be due to the overexpression or mutation of cytochrome P450 14alpha-lanosterol demethylase, also known as ERG11 or CYP51, and/or the overexpression of membrane-located multidrug efflux pumps. We have developed a heterologous membrane protein expression system that can be used to study the structure and function of these proteins in the non-pathogenic, genetically stable, and versatile eukaryotic model organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this chapter we describe the techniques used to express the Candida albicans efflux pump Cdr1p in S. cerevisiae. PMID:20717788

  6. Structure and function of efflux pumps that confer resistance to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Borges-Walmsley, M Ines; McKeegan, Kenneth S; Walmsley, Adrian R

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to therapeutic drugs encompasses a diverse range of biological systems, which all have a human impact. From the relative simplicity of bacterial cells, fungi and protozoa to the complexity of human cancer cells, resistance has become problematic. Stated in its simplest terms, drug resistance decreases the chance of providing successful treatment against a plethora of diseases. Worryingly, it is a problem that is increasing, and consequently there is a pressing need to develop new and effective classes of drugs. This has provided a powerful stimulus in promoting research on drug resistance and, ultimately, it is hoped that this research will provide novel approaches that will allow the deliberate circumvention of well understood resistance mechanisms. A major mechanism of resistance in both microbes and cancer cells is the membrane protein-catalysed extrusion of drugs from the cell. Resistant cells exploit proton-driven antiporters and/or ATP-driven ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters to extrude cytotoxic drugs that usually enter the cell by passive diffusion. Although some of these drug efflux pumps transport specific substrates, many are transporters of multiple substrates. These multidrug pumps can often transport a variety of structurally unrelated hydrophobic compounds, ranging from dyes to lipids. If we are to nullify the effects of efflux-mediated drug resistance, we must first of all understand how these efflux pumps can accommodate a diverse range of compounds and, secondly, how conformational changes in these proteins are coupled to substrate translocation. These are key questions that must be addressed. In this review we report on the advances that have been made in understanding the structure and function of drug efflux pumps. PMID:13678421

  7. Novel epitopes identified from efflux pumps of Mycobacterium tuberculosis could induce cytotoxic T lymphocyte response

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Ming-xia; Chen, Fei; Zhao, Yuan-yuan; Wu, Ya-hong; Li, Guo-dong; Qi, Yuan-ming

    2015-01-01

    Overcoming drug-resistance is one of the major challenges to control tuberculosis (TB). The up-regulation of efflux pumps is one common mechanism that leads to drug-resistance. Therefore, immunotherapy targeting these efflux pump antigens could be promising strategy to be combined with current chemotherapy. Considering that CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) induced by antigenic peptides (epitopes) could elicit HLA-restricted anti-TB immune response, efflux pumps from classical ABC family (Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mtb) were chosen as target antigens to identify CTL epitopes. HLA-A2 restricted candidate peptides from Rv2937, Rv2686c and Rv2687c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were predicted, synthesized and tested. Five peptides could induce IFN-γ release and cytotoxic activity in PBMCs from HLA-A2+ PPD+ donors. Results from HLA-A2/Kb transgenic mice immunization assay suggested that four peptides Rv2937-p168, Rv2937-p266, Rv2686c-p151, and Rv2686c-p181 could induce significant CTL response in vivo. These results suggested that these novel epitopes could be used as immunotherapy candidates to TB drug-resistance. PMID:26417538

  8. Multidrug Efflux Pumps from Enterobacteriaceae, Vibrio cholerae and Staphylococcus aureus Bacterial Food Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jody L.; He, Gui-Xin; Kakarla, Prathusha; KC, Ranjana; Kumar, Sanath; Lakra, Wazir Singh; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Ranaweera, Indrika; Shrestha, Ugina; Tran, Thuy; Varela, Manuel F.

    2015-01-01

    Foodborne illnesses caused by bacterial microorganisms are common worldwide and constitute a serious public health concern. In particular, microorganisms belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae families of Gram-negative bacteria, and to the Staphylococcus genus of Gram-positive bacteria are important causative agents of food poisoning and infection in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. Recently, variants of these bacteria have developed resistance to medically important chemotherapeutic agents. Multidrug resistant Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, Enterobacter spp., and Staphylococcus aureus are becoming increasingly recalcitrant to clinical treatment in human patients. Of the various bacterial resistance mechanisms against antimicrobial agents, multidrug efflux pumps comprise a major cause of multiple drug resistance. These multidrug efflux pump systems reside in the biological membrane of the bacteria and actively extrude antimicrobial agents from bacterial cells. This review article summarizes the evolution of these bacterial drug efflux pump systems from a molecular biological standpoint and provides a framework for future work aimed at reducing the conditions that foster dissemination of these multidrug resistant causative agents through human populations. PMID:25635914

  9. Structure of the AcrAB-TolC multidrug efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Du, Dijun; Wang, Zhao; James, Nathan R; Voss, Jarrod E; Klimont, Ewa; Ohene-Agyei, Thelma; Venter, Henrietta; Chiu, Wah; Luisi, Ben F

    2014-05-22

    The capacity of numerous bacterial species to tolerate antibiotics and other toxic compounds arises in part from the activity of energy-dependent transporters. In Gram-negative bacteria, many of these transporters form multicomponent 'pumps' that span both inner and outer membranes and are driven energetically by a primary or secondary transporter component. A model system for such a pump is the acridine resistance complex of Escherichia coli. This pump assembly comprises the outer-membrane channel TolC, the secondary transporter AcrB located in the inner membrane, and the periplasmic AcrA, which bridges these two integral membrane proteins. The AcrAB-TolC efflux pump is able to transport vectorially a diverse array of compounds with little chemical similarity, thus conferring resistance to a broad spectrum of antibiotics. Homologous complexes are found in many Gram-negative species, including in animal and plant pathogens. Crystal structures are available for the individual components of the pump and have provided insights into substrate recognition, energy coupling and the transduction of conformational changes associated with the transport process. However, how the subunits are organized in the pump, their stoichiometry and the details of their interactions are not known. Here we present the pseudo-atomic structure of a complete multidrug efflux pump in complex with a modulatory protein partner from E. coli. The model defines the quaternary organization of the pump, identifies key domain interactions, and suggests a cooperative process for channel assembly and opening. These findings illuminate the basis for drug resistance in numerous pathogenic bacterial species. PMID:24747401

  10. Evaluation of the tannic acid inhibitory effect against the NorA efflux pump of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Tintino, Saulo R; Oliveira-Tintino, Cícera D M; Campina, Fábia F; Silva, Raimundo L P; Costa, Maria do S; Menezes, Irwin R A; Calixto-Júnior, João T; Siqueira-Junior, José P; Coutinho, Henrique D M; Leal-Balbino, Tereza C; Balbino, Valdir Q

    2016-08-01

    During the early periods of antibiotic usage, bacterial infections were considered tamed. However, widespread antibiotic use has promoted the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens, including multidrug resistant strains. Active efflux is a mechanism for bacterial resistance to inhibitory substances, known simply as drug efflux pumps. The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogenic bacterium responsible for an array of infections. The NorA efflux pump has been shown to be responsible for moderate fluoroquinolone resistance of S. aureus. The inhibition of the efflux pump was assayed using a sub-inhibitory concentration of standard efflux pump inhibitors and tannic acid (MIC/8), where its capacity to decrease the MIC of Ethidium bromide (EtBr) and antibiotics due to the possible inhibitory effect of these substances was observed. The MICs of EtBr and antibiotics were significantly reduced in the presence of tannic acid, indicating the inhibitory effect of this agent against the efflux pumps of both strains causing a three-fold reduction of the MIC when compared with the control. These results indicate the possible usage of tannic acid as an adjuvant in antibiotic therapy against multidrug resistant bacteria (MDR). PMID:27057677

  11. NorA efflux pump inhibitory activity of coumarins from Mesua ferrea.

    PubMed

    Roy, Somendu K; Kumari, Neela; Pahwa, Sonika; Agrahari, Udai C; Bhutani, Kamlesh K; Jachak, Sanjay M; Nandanwar, Hemraj

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the modulator and efflux pump inhibitor activity of coumarins isolated from Mesua ferrea against clinical strains as well as NorA-over expressed strain of Staphylococcus aureus 1199B. Seven coumarins were tested for modulator activity using ethidium bromide (EtBr) as a substrate. Compounds 1, 4-7 modulated the MIC of EtBr by ≥ 2 fold against wild type clinical strains of S. aureus 1199 and S. aureus 1199B, whereas compounds 4-7 modulated the MIC of EtBr by ≥ 16 fold against MRSA 831. Compounds 1, 4-7 also reduced the MIC of norfloxacin by ≥ 8 fold against S. aureus 1199B, and 4-6 reduced the MIC of norfloxacin by ≥ 8 fold against MRSA 831 at half of their MICs. Inhibition of EtBr efflux by NorA-overproducing S. aureus 1199B and MRSA 831 confirmed the role of compounds 4-6 as NorA efflux pump inhibitors (EPI). Dose-dependent activity at sub-inhibitory concentration (6.25 μg/mL) suggested that compounds 4 and 5 are promising EPI compared to verapamil against 1199B and MRSA 831 strains. PMID:23892000

  12. Adaptive and Mutational Resistance: Role of Porins and Efflux Pumps in Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The substantial use of antibiotics in the clinic, combined with a dearth of new antibiotic classes, has led to a gradual increase in the resistance of bacterial pathogens to these compounds. Among the various mechanisms by which bacteria endure the action of antibiotics, those affecting influx and efflux are of particular importance, as they limit the interaction of the drug with its intracellular targets and, consequently, its deleterious effects on the cell. This review evaluates the impact of porins and efflux pumps on two major types of resistance, namely, mutational and adaptive types of resistance, both of which are regarded as key phenomena in the global rise of antibiotic resistance among pathogenic microorganisms. In particular, we explain how adaptive and mutational events can dramatically influence the outcome of antibiotic therapy by altering the mechanisms of influx and efflux of antibiotics. The identification of porins and pumps as major resistance markers has opened new possibilities for the development of novel therapeutic strategies directed specifically against these mechanisms. PMID:23034325

  13. Protoporphyrin (PPIX) efflux by the MacAB-TolC pump in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Turlin, Evelyne; Heuck, Gesine; Simões Brandão, Maria Inês; Szili, Noémie; Mellin, J R; Lange, Norbert; Wandersman, Cécile

    2014-12-01

    In most organisms, heme biosynthesis is strictly controlled so as to avoid heme and heme precursor accumulation, which is toxic. Escherichia coli regulates heme biosynthesis by a feedback loop involving heme-induced proteolytic cleavage of HemA, glutamyl-tRNA reductase, which is the first enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway. We show here that heme homeostasis can be disrupted by overproduction of YfeX, a cytoplasmic protein that captures iron from heme that we named deferrochelatase. We also show that it is disrupted by iron chelation, which reduces the intracellular iron concentration necessary for loading iron into protoporphyrin IX (PPIX, the immediate heme precursor). In both cases, we established that there is an increased PPIX concentration and we demonstrate that this compound is expelled by the MacAB-TolC pump, an efflux pump involved in E. coli and Salmonella for macrolide efflux. The E. coli macAB and tolC mutants accumulate PPIX and are sensitive to photo-inactivation. The MacAB-TolC pump is required for Salmonella typhimurium survival in macrophages. We propose that PPIX is an endogenous substrate of the MacAB-TolC pump in E. coli and S. typhimurium and that this compound is produced inside bacteria when natural heme homeostasis is disrupted by iron shortage, as happens when bacteria invade the mammalian host. PMID:25257218

  14. The pseudo-atomic structure of an RND-type tripartite multidrug efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Du, Dijun; Voss, Jarrod; Wang, Zhao; Chiu, Wah; Luisi, Ben F

    2015-09-01

    Microorganisms encode several classes of transmembrane molecular pumps that can expel a wide range of chemically distinct toxic substances. These machines contribute to the capacity of the organisms to withstand harsh environments, and they help to confer resistance against clinical antimicrobial agents. In Gram-negative bacteria, some of the pumps comprise tripartite assemblies that actively transport drugs and other harmful compounds across the cell envelope. We describe recent structural and functional data that have provided insights into the architecture and transport mechanism of the AcrA-AcrB-TolC pump of Escherichia coli. This multidrug efflux pump is powered by proton electrochemical gradients through the activity of AcrB, a member of the resistance/nodulation/cell division (RND) transporter family. Crystallographic data reveal how the small protein AcrZ binds to AcrB in a concave surface of the transmembrane domain, and we discuss how this interaction may affect the efflux activities of the transporter. PMID:25803077

  15. Marinobacter adhaerens HP15 harbors two CzcCBA efflux pumps involved in zinc detoxification.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Antje; Pletzer, Daniel; Mehmood, Amna; Ullrich, Matthias S

    2015-09-01

    Several members of the ubiquitously found γ-proteobacterial genus Marinobacter were described or assumed to inhabit marine environments naturally enriched in heavy metals. However, direct studies that describe the ability of this genus to occupy such environments have not been conducted. To cope with heavy metal stress, bacteria possess specific efflux pumps as tools for detoxification, among which the CzcCBA type efflux system is one representative. Previous studies showed that this system plays an important role in resistance towards cadmium, zinc, and cobalt. Up to now, no study had focused on characterization of Czc pumps in Marinobacter sp. or other marine prokaryotes. Herein, we elucidated the function of two CzcCBA pumps encoded by Marinobacter adhaerens HP15's genome during exposure to cadmium, zinc, and cobalt. Single and double knock-out mutants lacking the corresponding two czcCBA operons were generated and analyzed in terms of their resistance profiles. Both operons appeared to be important for zinc resistance but had no role in tolerance towards cadmium or cobalt. One of the mutations was genetically complemented thereby restoring the wild type phenotype. In accordance with the resistance pattern, expression of the genes coding for both CzcCBA pumps was induced by zinc but neither by cadmium nor cobalt. PMID:26122890

  16. Structure of the AcrAB-TolC multidrug efflux pump

    PubMed Central

    Du, Dijun; Wang, Zhao; James, Nathan R.; Voss, Jarrod E.; Klimont, Ewa; Ohene-Agyei, Thelma; Venter, Henrietta; Chiu, Wah; Luisi, Ben F.

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of numerous bacterial species to tolerate antibiotics and other toxic compounds arises in part from the activity of energy-dependent transporters. In Gram-negative bacteria, many of these transporters form multicomponent ‘pumps’ that span both inner and outer membranes and are driven energetically by a primary or secondary transporter component1-7. A model system for such a pump is the acridine resistance complex of Escherichia coli1. This pump assembly comprises the outer-membrane channel TolC, the secondary transporter AcrB located in the inner membrane, and the periplasmic AcrA, which bridges these two integral membrane proteins. The AcrAB-TolC efflux pump is able to vectorially transport a diverse array of compounds with little chemical similarity, and accordingly confers resistance to a broad spectrum of antibiotics. Homologous complexes are found in many Gram-negative species, including pathogens of animals and plants. Crystal structures are available for the individual pump components2-7 and these have provided insights into substrate recognition, energy coupling and the transduction of conformational changes associated with the transport process. How the subunits are organised in the pump, their stoichiometry and the details of their interactions are not known and are under debate. In this manuscript, we present the pseudoatomic structure of a complete multidrug efflux pump in complex with a modulatory protein partner8. The model defines the quaternary organization of the pump, identifies key domain interactions, and suggests a cooperative process for channel assembly and opening. These findings illuminate the basis for drug resistance in numerous pathogenic bacterial species. PMID:24747401

  17. A data-driven approach to modeling the tripartite structure of multidrug resistance efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Joshua L; Gnanakaran, S

    2015-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotic treatments, and a detailed understanding of the molecular basis of antibiotic resistance is critical for the development of next-generation approaches for combating bacterial infections. Studies focusing on pathogens have revealed the profile of resistance in these organisms to be due primarily to the presence of multidrug resistance efflux pumps: tripartite protein complexes which span the periplasm bridging the inner and outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. An atomic-level resolution tripartite structure remains imperative to advancing our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of pump function using both theoretical and experimental approaches. We develop a fast and consistent method for constructing tripartite structures which leverages existing data-driven models and provide molecular modeling approaches for constructing tripartite structures of multidrug resistance efflux pumps. Our modeling studies reveal that conformational changes in the inner membrane component responsible for drug translocation have limited impact on the conformations of the other pump components, and that two distinct models derived from conflicting experimental data are both consistent with all currently available measurements. Additionally, we investigate putative drug translocation pathways via geometric simulations based on the available crystal structures of the inner membrane pump component, AcrB, bound to two drugs which occupy distinct binding sites: doxorubicin and linezolid. These simulations suggest that smaller drugs may enter the pump through a channel from the cytoplasmic leaflet of the inner membrane, while both smaller and larger drug molecules may enter through a vestibule accessible from the periplasm. PMID:24957790

  18. Pgp efflux pump decreases the cytostatic effect of CENP-E inhibitor GSK923295.

    PubMed

    Tcherniuk, Sergey O; Oleinikov, Andrew V

    2015-05-28

    Human kinesin CENP-E is an attractive target for cancer chemotherapy. The allosteric CENP-E inhibitor GSK923295 was proposed as a promising anticancer compound with potent cytostatic effect. In our work, we have analyzed the influence of the Pgp efflux pump on the cytostatic effect of GSK923295. We have demonstrated that multidrug resistant MESSA Dx5 cells overexpressing Pgp are 70-80 times more resistant to GSK923295 than their parental counterpart MESSA cells. Addition of 20 µM verapamil restored the drug sensibility of MESSA Dx5 cells. Combinations of GSK923295 with verapamil showed nearly additive effects in MESSA and synergistic effects in MESSA Dx5 cells. Our results demonstrate that tumors possessing Pgp could be more resistant to GSK923295, and that overexpression of Pgp can decrease the therapeutic effect of this drug. Development of structural analogs of GSK923295 which would not be a substrate of the Pgp efflux pump or addition of Pgp pump inhibitors can significantly improve the cytostatic effect of this drug. PMID:25725449

  19. Characterization of a Novel Pyranopyridine Inhibitor of the AcrAB Efflux Pump of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kwasny, Steven M.; Kim, Hong-Suk; Nguyen, Son T.; Houseweart, Chad; D'Souza, Sanjay; Walker, Graham C.; Peet, Norton P.; Nikaido, Hiroshi; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) family of efflux pumps, such as AcrAB-TolC of Escherichia coli, play major roles in multidrug resistance (MDR) in Gram-negative bacteria. A strategy for combating MDR is to develop efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) for use in combination with an antibacterial agent. Here, we describe MBX2319, a novel pyranopyridine EPI with potent activity against RND efflux pumps of the Enterobacteriaceae. MBX2319 decreased the MICs of ciprofloxacin (CIP), levofloxacin, and piperacillin versus E. coli AB1157 by 2-, 4-, and 8-fold, respectively, but did not exhibit antibacterial activity alone and was not active against AcrAB-TolC-deficient strains. MBX2319 (3.13 μM) in combination with 0.016 μg/ml CIP (minimally bactericidal) decreased the viability (CFU/ml) of E. coli AB1157 by 10,000-fold after 4 h of exposure, in comparison with 0.016 μg/ml CIP alone. In contrast, phenyl-arginine-β-naphthylamide (PAβN), a known EPI, did not increase the bactericidal activity of 0.016 μg/ml CIP at concentrations as high as 100 μM. MBX2319 increased intracellular accumulation of the fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342 in wild-type but not AcrAB-TolC-deficient strains and did not perturb the transmembrane proton gradient. MBX2319 was broadly active against Enterobacteriaceae species and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. MBX2319 is a potent EPI with possible utility as an adjunctive therapeutic agent for the treatment of infections caused by Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:24247144

  20. In vivo evaluation of anionic thiolated polymers as oral delivery systems for efflux pump inhibition.

    PubMed

    Palmberger, Thomas F; Laffleur, Flavia; Greindl, Melanie; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Recently, the cationic polymer thiolated chitosan has been reported to modulate drug absorption by inhibition of intestinal efflux pumps. The objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro and in vivo whether thiolated anionic biopolymers also show an efflux pump inhibitory effect in order to improve intestinal transcellular drug uptake. Therefore, three thiomers have been synthesized due covalent attachment of cysteine to various polymer backbones: pectin-cysteine (pect-cys), carboxymethylcellulose-cysteine (CMC-cys) and alginate-cysteine (alg-cys). In vitro, the permeation enhancing properties of these thiomers and their corresponding unmodified polymers have been evaluated on rat small intestine in Ussing-type chambers, using sulforhodamine 101 (SR-101) as MRP2 model substrate. In comparison to buffer only, SR-101 transport in presence of pect-cys, CMC-cys and alg-cys was improved 1.5-fold, 1.8-fold and 3.0-fold, respectively. Due to the comparatively best in vitro performance of thiolated alginate, it has been chosen for in vivo studies: a SR-101 solution containing 4% (w/v) alg-cys led to an AUC0 ≥ 12 of SR-101 of 109 ng ml(-1)h in rats representing a 3.8-fold improvement in comparison to a SR-101 buffer solution. Unmodified alginate improved the AUC0 ≥ 12 of SR-101 by a factor of 1.9. These findings suggest thiolated alginate as promising auxiliary agent for drugs being anionic efflux pump substrates, since the oral bioavailability of a MRP2 substrate could be significantly improved. PMID:26095915

  1. A novel nanoparticle formulation overcomes multiple types of membrane efflux pumps in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Preethy; Cheng, Ji; Shuhendler, Adam; Rauth, Andrew M; Wu, Xiao Yu

    2012-04-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells can involve overexpression of different types of membrane drug efflux pumps and other drug resistance mechanisms. Hence, inhibition of one resistance mechanism may not be therapeutically effective. Previously we demonstrated a new polymer lipid hybrid nanoparticle (PLN) system was able to circumvent drug resistance of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpressing breast cancer cells. The objectives of the present study were 2-fold: (1) to evaluate the ability of the PLN system to overcome two other membrane efflux pumps-multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1+) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP+) overexpressed on human breast cancer cell lines MCF7 VP (MRP1+) and MCF7 MX (BCRP+); and (2) to evaluate possible synergistic effects of doxorubicin (Dox)-mitomycin C (MMC) in these cell lines. These objectives were accomplished by measuring in vitro cellular uptake, intracellular trafficking, and cytotoxicity (using a clonogenic assay and median effect analysis), of Dox, MMC, or Dox-MMC co-loaded PLN. Treatment of MDR cells with PLN encapsulating single anticancer agents significantly enhanced cell kill compared to free Dox or MMC solutions. Dox-MMC co-loaded PLN were 20-30-folds more effective in killing MDR cells than free drugs. Co-encapsulated Dox-MMC was more effective in killing MDR cells than single agent-encapsulated PLN. Microscopic images showed perinuclear localization of fluorescently labelled PLN in all cell lines. These results are consistent with our previous results for P-gp overexpressing breast cancer cells suggesting the PLN system can overcome multiple types of membrane efflux pumps increasing the cytotoxicity of Dox-MMC at significantly lower doses than free drugs. PMID:25786718

  2. Effects of Efflux Pump Inhibitors on Colistin Resistance in Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ni, Wentao; Li, Yanjun; Guan, Jie; Zhao, Jin; Cui, Junchang; Wang, Rui; Liu, Youning

    2016-05-01

    We tested the effects of various putative efflux pump inhibitors on colistin resistance in multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Addition of 10 mg/liter cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) to the test medium could significantly decrease the MICs of colistin-resistant strains. Time-kill assays showed CCCP could reverse colistin resistance and inhibit the regrowth of the resistant subpopulation, especially in Acinetobacter baumannii and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia These results suggest colistin resistance in Gram-negative bacteria can be suppressed and reversed by CCCP. PMID:26953203

  3. Chalcone inhibitors of the NorA efflux pump in Staphylococcus aureus whole cells and enriched everted membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Holler, Jes Gitz; Slotved, Hans-Christian; Mølgaard, Per; Olsen, Carl Erik; Christensen, Søren Brøgger

    2012-07-15

    A library of 117 chalcones was screened for efflux pump inhibitory (EPI) activity against NorA mediated ethidium bromide efflux. Five of the chalcones (5-7, 9, and 10) were active and two chalcones (9 and 10) were equipotent to reserpine with IC(50)-values of 9.0 and 7.7 μM, respectively. Twenty chalcones were subsequently proved to be inhibitors of the NorA efflux pump in everted membrane vesicles. Compounds 5, 7, and 9 synergistically increased the effect of ciprofloxacin on Staphylococcus aureus. Our results suggest that chalcones might be developed into drugs for overcoming multidrug resistance based on efflux transporters of microorganisms. PMID:22682300

  4. AdeIJK, a Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division Pump Effluxing Multiple Antibiotics in Acinetobacter baumannii▿

    PubMed Central

    Damier-Piolle, Laurence; Magnet, Sophie; Brémont, Sylvie; Lambert, Thierry; Courvalin, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    We have identified a second resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux pump, AdeIJK, in clinical isolate Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454. The adeI, adeJ, and adeK genes encode, respectively, the membrane fusion, RND, and outer membrane components of the pump. AdeJ belongs to the AcrB protein family (57% identity with AcrB from Escherichia coli). mRNA analysis by Northern blotting and reverse transcription-PCR indicated that the genes were cotranscribed. Overexpression of the cloned adeIJK operon was toxic in both E. coli and Acinetobacter. The adeIJK genes were detected in all of the 60 strains of A. baumannii tested. The two latter observations suggest that the AdeIJK complex might contribute to intrinsic but not to acquired antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter. To characterize the substrate specificity of the pump, we have constructed derivatives of BM4454 in which adeIJK (strain BM4579), adeABC (strain BM4561), or both groups of genes (strain BM4652) were inactivated by deletion-insertion. Determination of the antibiotic susceptibility of these strains and of BM4652 and BM4579, in which the adeIJK operon was provided in trans, indicated that the AdeIJK pump contributes to resistance to β-lactams, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, erythromycin, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, fusidic acid, novobiocin, rifampin, trimethoprim, acridine, safranin, pyronine, and sodium dodecyl sulfate. The chemical structure of these molecules suggests that amphiphilic compounds are the preferred substrates. The AdeABC and AdeIJK efflux systems contributed in a more than additive fashion to tigecycline resistance. PMID:18086852

  5. Disulphide cross linked pullulan based cationic polymer for improved gene delivery and efflux pump inhibition.

    PubMed

    S, Priya S; R, Rekha M

    2016-10-01

    Multidrug resistance is a hurdle to successful cancer chemotherapy. Over expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a prime contributing factor for drug resistance. In this study, a disulphide cross-linked pullulan-based cationic polymer (PPSS) was synthesized to act simultaneously as gene delivery vehicle and efflux pump inhibitor. The PPSS nanoplexes were of size <200nm with the zeta potential of +15 to +20mV. The cytotoxicity studies using C6 and L929 cells showed that PPSS polymers are non-toxic even at high polymer concentrations. The PPSS/pDNA nanoplex showed superior uptake in confocal microscopy with 97% uptake by flow cytometry. The efficacy of efflux pump inhibition by the PPSS nanoplex was established by the enhanced intracellular retention of DOX. The enhanced cell death by p53/PPSS/DOX nanoplexes was attributed to the synergistic effect of P-gp inhibition and p53 transfection efficiency. Therefore, this multifunctional polymeric system may have significant promise for therapeutic application against cancer drug resistance. PMID:27459414

  6. Virtual screening for novel Staphylococcus Aureus NorA efflux pump inhibitors from natural products.

    PubMed

    Thai, Khac-Minh; Ngo, Trieu-Du; Phan, Thien-Vy; Tran, Thanh-Dao; Nguyen, Ngoc-Vinh; Nguyen, Thien-Hai; Le, Minh-Tri

    2015-01-01

    NorA is a member of the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) drug efflux pumps that have been shown to mediate antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus (SA). In this study, QSAR analysis, virtual screening and molecular docking were implemented in an effort to discover novel SA NorA efflux pump inhibitors. Originally, a set of 47 structurally diverse compounds compiled from the literature was used to develop linear QSAR models and another set of 15 different compounds were chosen for extra validation. The final model which was estimated by statistical values for the full data set (n = 45, Q(2) = 0.80, RMSE = 0.20) and for the external test set (n = 15, R(2) = 0.60, |res|max = 0.75, |res|min = 0.02) was applied on the collection of 182 flavonoides and the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) database to screen for novel NorA inhibitors. Finally, 33 lead compounds that met the Lipinski's rules of five/three and had good predicted pIC50 values from in silico screening process were employed to analyze the binding ability by docking studies on NorA homology model in place of its unavailable crystal structures at two active sites, the central channel and the Walker B. PMID:25181985

  7. An Inducible Fusaric Acid Tripartite Efflux Pump Contributes to the Fusaric Acid Resistance in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rouh-Mei; Liao, Sih-Ting; Huang, Chiang-Ching; Huang, Yi-Wei; Yang, Tsuey-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Background Fusaric acid (5-butylpicolinic acid), a mycotoxin, is noxious to some microorganisms. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia displays an intrinsic resistance to fusaric acid. This study aims to elucidate the mechanism responsible for the intrinsic fusaric acid resistance in S. maltophilia. Methodology A putative fusaric acid resistance-involved regulon fuaR-fuaABC was identified by the survey of the whole genome sequence of S. maltophilia K279a. The fuaABC operon was verified by reverse transcriptase-PCR. The contribution of the fuaABC operon to the antimicrobial resistance was evaluated by comparing the antimicrobials susceptibility between the wild-type strain and fuaABC knock-out mutant. The regulatory role of fuaR in the expression of the fuaABC operon was assessed by promoter transcription fusion assay. Results The fuaABC operon was inducibly expressed by fusaric acid and the inducibility was fuaR dependent. FuaR functioned as a repressor of the fuaABC operon in absence of a fusaric acid inducer and as an activator in its presence. Overexpression of the fuaABC operon contributed to the fusaric acid resistance. Significance A novel tripartite fusaric acid efflux pump, FuaABC, was identified in this study. Distinct from the formally classification, the FuaABC may constitute a new type of subfamily of the tripartite efflux pump. PMID:23236431

  8. Efflux Pump Blockers in Gram-Negative Bacteria: The New Generation of Hydantoin Based-Modulators to Improve Antibiotic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Otręebska-Machaj, Ewa; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Szymańska, Ewa; Schabikowski, Jakub; Boyer, Gérard; Bolla, Jean-Michel; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Alibert, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria are an increasing health problem with the shortage of new active antibiotic agents. Among effective mechanisms that contribute to the spread of MDR Gram-negative bacteria are drug efflux pumps that expel clinically important antibiotic classes out of the cell. Drug pumps are attractive targets to restore the susceptibility toward the expelled antibiotics by impairing their efflux activity. Arylhydantoin derivatives were investigated for their potentiation of activities of selected antibiotics described as efflux substrates in Enterobacter aerogenes expressing or not AcrAB pump. Several compounds increased the bacterial susceptibility toward nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol and sparfloxacin and were further pharmacomodulated to obtain a better activity against the AcrAB producing bacteria. PMID:27199950

  9. Importance of multidrug efflux pumps in the antimicrobial resistance property of clinical multidrug-resistant isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Golparian, Daniel; Shafer, William M; Ohnishi, Makoto; Unemo, Magnus

    2014-06-01

    The contribution of drug efflux pumps in clinical isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae that express extensively drug-resistant or multidrug-resistant phenotypes has heretofore not been examined. Accordingly, we assessed the effect on antimicrobial resistance of loss of the three gonococcal efflux pumps associated with a known capacity to export antimicrobials (MtrC-MtrD-MtrE, MacA-MacB, and NorM) in such clinical isolates. We report that the MIC of several antimicrobials, including seven previously and currently recommended for treatment was significantly impacted. PMID:24733458

  10. Role of the Tet38 Efflux Pump in Staphylococcus aureus Internalization and Survival in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Truong-Bolduc, Q. C.; Bolduc, G. R.; Medeiros, H.; Vyas, J. M.; Wang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified the protein Tet38 as a chromosomally encoded efflux pump of Staphylococcus aureus that confers resistance to tetracycline and certain unsaturated fatty acids. Tet38 also contributes to mouse skin colonization. In this study, we discovered a novel regulator of tet38, named tetracycline regulator 21 (TetR21), that bound specifically to the tet38 promoter and repressed pump expression. A ΔtetR21 mutant showed a 5-fold increase in tet38 transcripts and an 8-fold increase in resistance to tetracycline and fatty acids. The global regulator MgrA bound to the tetR21 promoter and indirectly repressed the expression of tet38. To further assess the full role of Tet38 in S. aureus adaptability, we tested its effect on host cell invasion using A549 (lung) and HMEC-1 (heart) cell lines. We used S. aureus RN6390, its Δtet38, ΔtetR21, and ΔmgrA mutants, and a Δtet38 ΔtetR21 double mutant. After 2 h of contact, the Δtet38 mutant was internalized in 6-fold-lower numbers than RN6390 in A549 and HMEC-1 cells, and the ΔtetR21 mutant was internalized in 2-fold-higher numbers than RN6390. A slight increase of 1.5-fold in internalization was found for the ΔmgrA mutant. The growth patterns of RN6390 and the ΔmgrA and ΔtetR21 mutants within A549 cells were similar, while no growth was observed for the Δtet38 mutant. These data indicate that the Tet38 efflux pump is regulated by TetR21 and contributes to the ability of S. aureus to internalize and replicate within epithelial cells. PMID:26324534

  11. Clonal relatedness is a predictor of spontaneous multidrug efflux pump gene overexpression in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Bryan D; Jacinto, Pauline L; Buensalido, Joseph Adrian L; Seo, Susan M; Kaatz, Glenn W

    2015-05-01

    Increased expression of genes encoding multidrug resistance efflux pumps (MDR-EPs) contributes to antimicrobial agent and biocide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. Previously identified associations between norA overexpression and spa type t002 meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and a similar yet weaker association between mepA overexpression and type t008 meticillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), in clinical isolates are suggestive of clonal dissemination. It is also possible that related strains are prone to mutations resulting in overexpression of specific MDR-EP genes. Exposure of non-MDR-EP-overexpressing clinical isolates to biocides and dyes can select for MDR-EP-overexpressing mutants. spa types t002 and t008 isolates are predominated by multilocus sequencing typing sequence types (STs) 5 and 8, respectively. In this study, non-MDR-EP gene-overexpressing clinical isolates (MRSA and MSSA) representing ST5 and ST8 were subjected to single exposures of ethidium bromide (EtBr) to select for EtBr-resistant mutants. Measurements of active EtBr transport among mutants were used to demonstrate an efflux-proficient phenotype. Using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, it was found that EtBr-resistant mutants of ST5 and ST8 parental strains predominantly overexpressed mepA (100%) and mdeA (83%), respectively, regardless of meticillin sensitivity. Associations between clonal lineage and MDR-EP gene overexpression differed from those previously observed and suggest the latter is due to clonal spread of efflux-proficient strains. The predilection of in vitro-selected mutants of related strains to overexpress the same MDR-EP gene indicates the presence of a consistent mutational process. PMID:25548027

  12. Crystal Structure of Escherichia coli CusC the Outer Membrane Component of a Heavy Metal Efflux Pump

    SciTech Connect

    R Kulathila; R Kulathila; M Indic; B van den Berg

    2011-12-31

    While copper has essential functions as an enzymatic co-factor, excess copper ions are toxic for cells, necessitating mechanisms for regulating its levels. The cusCBFA operon of E. coli encodes a four-component efflux pump dedicated to the extrusion of Cu(I) and Ag(I) ions. We have solved the X-ray crystal structure of CusC, the outer membrane component of the Cus heavy metal efflux pump, to 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. The structure has the largest extracellular opening of any outer membrane factor (OMF) protein and suggests, for the first time, the presence of a tri-acylated N-terminal lipid anchor. The CusC protein does not have any obvious features that would make it specific for metal ions, suggesting that the narrow substrate specificity of the pump is provided by other components of the pump, most likely by the inner membrane component CusA.

  13. Substrate path in the AcrB multidrug efflux pump of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Fasahath; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    A major tripartite multidrug efflux pump of Escherichia coli, AcrAB-TolC, confers resistance to a wide variety of compounds. The drug molecule is captured by AcrB probably from the periplasm or the periplasm/inner membrane interface, and is passed through AcrB and then TolC to the medium. Currently there exist numerous crystallographic and mutation data concerning the regions of AcrB and its homologs that may interact with substrates. Starting with these data, we devised fluorescence assays in whole cells to determine the entire substrate path through AcrB. We tested 48 residues in AcrB along the predicted substrate path and 25 gave positive results, based on the covalent labeling of cysteine residues by a lipophilic dye-maleimide and the blocking of Nile Red efflux by covalent labeling with bulky maleimide reagents. These residues are all located in the periplasmic domain, in regions we designate as the lower part of the large external cleft, the cleft itself, the crystallographically defined binding pocket, and the gate between the pocket and the funnel. Our observations suggest that the substrate is captured in the lower cleft region of AcrB, then transported through the binding pocket, the gate, and finally to the AcrB funnel that connects AcrB to TolC. PMID:20804453

  14. Dipeptide Prodrug Approach to Evade Efflux Pumps and CYP3A4 Metabolism of Lopinavir

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mitesh; Sheng, Ye; Mandava, Nanda K.; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2014-01-01

    Oral absorption of lopinavir (LPV) is limited due to P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein2 (MRP2) mediated efflux by intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, LPV is extensively metabolized by CYP3A4 enzymes. In the present study, dipeptide prodrug approach was employed to circumvent efflux pumps (P-gp and MRP2) and CYP3A4 mediated metabolism of LPV. Valine-isoleucine-LPV (Val-Ile-LPV) was synthesized and identified by LCMS and NMR techniques. The extent of LPV and Val-Ile-LPV interactions with P-gp and MRP2 was studied by uptake and transport studies across MDCK-MDR1 and MDCK-MRP2 cells. To determine the metabolic stability, time and concentration dependent degradation study was performed in liver microsomes. Val-Ile-LPV exhibited significantly higher aqueous solubility relative to LPV. This prodrug generated higher stability under acidic pH. Val-Ile-LPV demonstrated significantly lower affinity towards P-gp and MRP2 relative to LPV. Transepithelial transport of Val-Ile-LPV was significantly higher in the absorptive direction (apical to basolateral) relative to LPV. Importantly, Val-Ile-LPV was recognized as an excellent substrate by peptide transporter. Moreover, Val-Ile-LPV displayed significantly higher metabolic stability relative to LPV. Results obtained from this study suggested that dipeptide prodrug approach is a viable option to elevate systemic levels of LPV following oral administration PMID:25261710

  15. The human multidrug resistance-associated protein MRP is a plasma membrane drug-efflux pump.

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, G J; Flens, M J; van Leusden, M R; de Haas, M; Mülder, H S; Lankelma, J; Pinedo, H M; Scheper, R J; Baas, F; Broxterman, H J

    1994-01-01

    The multidrug-resistance associated protein MRP is a 180- to 195-kDa membrane protein associated with resistance of human tumor cells to cytotoxic drugs. We have investigated how MRP confers drug resistance in SW-1573 human lung carcinoma cells by generating a subline stably transfected with an expression vector containing MRP cDNA. MRP-overexpressing SW-1573 cells are resistant to doxorubicin, daunorubicin, vincristine, VP-16, colchicine, and rhodamine 123, but not to 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide or taxol. The intracellular accumulation of drug (daunorubicin, vincristine, and VP-16) is decreased and the efflux of drug (daunorubicin) is increased in the transfectant. The decreased accumulation of daunorubicin is abolished by permeabilization of the plasma membrane with digitonin, showing that MRP can lower the intracellular daunorubicin level against a concentration gradient. Anti-MRP antisera predominantly stain the plasma membrane of MRP-overexpressing cells. We conclude that MRP is a plasma membrane drug-efflux pump. Images PMID:7916458

  16. Adaptive drug resistance mediated by root-nodulation-cell division efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Daniels, C; Ramos, J L

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a major therapeutic problem. Bacteria use the same mechanisms for developing resistance to antibiotics as they do for developing resistance to biocide compounds present in some cleaning and personal care products. Root-nodulation-cell division (RND) family efflux pumps are a common means of multidrug resistance, and induction of their expression can explain the observed cross-resistance found between antibiotics and biocides in laboratory strains. Hence, there is a relationship between the active chemicals used in household products, organic solvents and antibiotics. The widespread use of biocide-containing modern-day household products may promote the development of microbial resistance and, in particular, cross-resistance to antibiotics. PMID:19220351

  17. The efflux pump inhibitor timcodar improves the potency of antimycobacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Trudy H; Shoen, Carolyn M; Jones, Steven M; Jones, Peter L; Cynamon, Michael H; Locher, Christopher P

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies indicated that inhibition of efflux pumps augments tuberculosis therapy. In this study, we used timcodar (formerly VX-853) to determine if this efflux pump inhibitor could increase the potency of antituberculosis (anti-TB) drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in in vitro and in vivo combination studies. When used alone, timcodar weakly inhibited M. tuberculosis growth in broth culture (MIC, 19 μg/ml); however, it demonstrated synergism in drug combination studies with rifampin, bedaquiline, and clofazimine but not with other anti-TB agents. When M. tuberculosis was cultured in host macrophage cells, timcodar had about a 10-fold increase (50% inhibitory concentration, 1.9 μg/ml) in the growth inhibition of M. tuberculosis and demonstrated synergy with rifampin, moxifloxacin, and bedaquiline. In a mouse model of tuberculosis lung infection, timcodar potentiated the efficacies of rifampin and isoniazid, conferring 1.0 and 0.4 log10 reductions in bacterial burden in lung, respectively, compared to the efficacy of each drug alone. Furthermore, timcodar reduced the likelihood of a relapse infection when evaluated in a mouse model of long-term, chronic infection with treatment with a combination of rifampin, isoniazid, and timcodar. Although timcodar had no effect on the pharmacokinetics of rifampin in plasma and lung, it did increase the plasma exposure of bedaquiline. These data suggest that the antimycobacterial drug-potentiating activity of timcodar is complex and drug dependent and involves both bacterial and host-targeted mechanisms. Further study of the improvement of the potency of antimycobacterial drugs and drug candidates when used in combination with timcodar is warranted. PMID:25534740

  18. Hyper Accumulation of Arsenic in Mutants of Ochrobactrum tritici Silenced for Arsenite Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Piedade, Ana Paula; Morais, Paula V.

    2015-01-01

    Ochrobactrum tritici SCII24T is a highly As-resistant bacterium, with two previously described arsenic resistance operons, ars1 and ars2. Among a large number of genes, these operons contain the arsB and Acr3 genes that encode the arsenite efflux pumps responsible for arsenic resistance. Exploring the genome of O. tritici SCII24T, an additional putative operon (ars3) was identified and revealed the presence of the Acr3_2 gene that encodes for an arsenite efflux protein but which came to prove to not be required for full As resistance. The genes encoding for arsenite efflux pumps, identified in this strain, were inactivated to develop microbial accumulators of arsenic as new tools for bioremediation. Six different mutants were produced, studied and three were more useful as biotools. O. tritici wild type and the Acr3-mutants showed the highest resistance to As(III), being able to grow up to 50 mM of arsenite. On the other hand, arsB-mutants were not able to grow at concentrations higher than 1 mM As(III), and were the most As(III) sensitive mutants. In the presence of 1 mM As(III), the strain with arsB and Acr3_1 mutated showed the highest intracellular arsenic concentration (up to 17 ng(As)/mg protein), while in assays with 5 mM As(III), the single arsB-mutant was able to accumulate the highest concentration of arsenic (up to 10 ng(As)/mg protein). Therefore, arsB is the main gene responsible for arsenite resistance in O. tritici. However, both genes arsB and Acr3_1 play a crucial role in the resistance mechanism, depending on the arsenite concentration in the medium. In conclusion, at moderate arsenite concentrations, the double arsB- and Acr3_1-mutant exhibited a great ability to accumulate arsenite and can be seen as a promising bioremediation tool for environmental arsenic detoxification. PMID:26132104

  19. Molecular Mechanism of MBX2319 Inhibition of Escherichia coli AcrB Multidrug Efflux Pump and Comparison with Other Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Vargiu, Attilio V.; Ruggerone, Paolo; Opperman, Timothy J.; Nguyen, Son T.

    2014-01-01

    Efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation division (RND) superfamily, such as AcrB, make a major contribution to multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. The development of inhibitors of the RND pumps would improve the efficacy of current and next-generation antibiotics. To date, however, only one inhibitor has been cocrystallized with AcrB. Thus, in silico structure-based analysis is essential for elucidating the interaction between other inhibitors and the efflux pumps. In this work, we used computer docking and molecular dynamics simulations to study the interaction between AcrB and the compound MBX2319, a novel pyranopyridine efflux pump inhibitor with potent activity against RND efflux pumps of Enterobacteriaceae species, as well as other known inhibitors (D13-9001, 1-[1-naphthylmethyl]-piperazine, and phenylalanylarginine-β-naphthylamide) and the binding of doxorubicin to the efflux-defective F610A variant of AcrB. We also analyzed the binding of a substrate, minocycline, for comparison. Our results show that MBX2319 binds very tightly to the lower part of the distal pocket in the B protomer of AcrB, strongly interacting with the phenylalanines lining the hydrophobic trap, where the hydrophobic portion of D13-9001 was found to bind by X-ray crystallography. Additionally, MBX2319 binds to AcrB in a manner that is similar to the way in which doxorubicin binds to the F610A variant of AcrB. In contrast, 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine and phenylalanylarginine-β-naphthylamide appear to bind to somewhat different areas of the distal pocket in the B protomer of AcrB than does MBX2319. However, all inhibitors (except D13-9001) appear to distort the structure of the distal pocket, impairing the proper binding of substrates. PMID:25114133

  20. Tigecycline Susceptibility and the Role of Efflux Pumps in Tigecycline Resistance in KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiong; Ruan, Zhi; Hua, Xiaoting; Zhou, Hua; Yu, Yunsong

    2015-01-01

    KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates have emerged as important pathogens of nosocomial infections, and tigecycline is one of the antibiotics recommended for severe infections caused by KPC-producing K. pneumoniae. To identify the susceptibility profile of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae to tigecycline and investigate the role of efflux pumps in tigecycline resistance, a total of 215 KPC-producing K. pneumoniae isolates were collected. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of tigecycline was determined by standard broth microdilution tests. Isolates showing resistance to tigecycline underwent susceptibility test with efflux pump inhibitors. Expression levels of efflux pump genes (acrB and oqxB) and their regulators (ramA, marA, soxS and rarA) were examined by real-time PCR, and the correlation between tigecycline MICs and gene expression levels were analysed. Our results show that the tigecycline resistance rate in these isolates was 11.2%. Exposure of the tigecycline-resistant isolates to the efflux pump inhibitor NMP resulted in an obvious decrease in MICs and restored susceptibility to tigecycline in 91.7% of the isolates. A statistically significant association between acrB expression and tigecycline MICs was observed, and overexpression of ramA was found in three tigecycline-resistant isolates, further analysis confirmed ramR mutations existed in these isolates. Transformation of one mutant with wild-type ramR restored susceptibility to tigecycline and repressed overexpression of ramA and acrB. These data indicate that efflux pump AcrAB, which can be up-regulated by ramR mutations and subsequent ramA activation, contributed to tigecycline resistance in K. pneumoniae clinical isolates. PMID:25734903

  1. P-glycoprotein in adriamycin-resistant cells functions as an efflux pump for benzopyrene, a chemical carcinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Chao Yeh, G.; Poore, C.M.; Lopaczynska, J.; Phang, J.M. )

    1991-03-15

    The physiological function of multidrug resistant gene (MDR 1) coded P-glycoprotein 170 (P-gp) in normal tissues remains unknown. The authors propose that P-gp functions as an efflux pump in normal tissues for benzopyrene and other xenobiotic substances. To examine their hypothesis the authors used a series of MDR human breast cancer MCF-7 cells with increasing degrees of drug resistance, expression of MDR and levels of P-gp. First, they found the IC{sub 50} for benzopyrene is linearly correlated with the levels of P-gp at different stages of adriamycin resistant MCF-7 cells. Using P-gp ({sup 3}H)azidopine labeling as a measurement of P-gp they found benzopyrene competes for labeling of P-gp. Finally, they directly measured cellular efflux of benzopyrene with adherent cell laser cytometry and found that resistant cells expressing high levels of P-gp showed rapid efflux of benzopyrene. By contrast, drug sensitive wild type cells with undetectable P-gp showed negligible efflux. They conclude that P-gp can function as an efflux pump for benzopyrene and suggest that P-gp may be a cellular mechanism for resistance to carcinogens.

  2. In vitro Investigation of the MexAB Efflux Pump From Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Verchère, Alice; Dezi, Manuela; Broutin, Isabelle; Picard, Martin

    2014-01-01

    There is an emerging scientific need for reliable tools for monitoring membrane protein transport. We present a methodology leading to the reconstitution of efflux pumps from the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a biomimetic environment that allows for an accurate investigation of their activity of transport. Three prerequisites are fulfilled: compartmentation in a lipidic environment, use of a relevant index for transport, and generation of a proton gradient. The membrane protein transporter is reconstituted into liposomes together with bacteriorhodopsin, a light-activated proton pump that generates a proton gradient that is robust as well as reversible and tunable. The activity of the protein is deduced from the pH variations occurring within the liposome, using pyranin, a pH-dependent fluorescent probe. We describe a step-by-step procedure where membrane protein purification, liposome formation, protein reconstitution, and transport analysis are addressed. Although they were specifically designed for an RND transporter, the described methods could potentially be adapted for use with any other membrane protein transporter energized by a proton gradient. PMID:24638061

  3. Development of a novel antimicrobial screening system targeting the pyoverdine-mediated iron acquisition system and xenobiotic efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuki; Ushioda, Kenichi; Akiba, Keiji; Matsumoto, Yoshimi; Maseda, Hideaki; Ando, Tasuke; Isogai, Emiko; Nakae, Taiji; Yoneyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The iron acquisition systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are inducible in response to low-iron conditions and important for growth of this organism under iron limitation. OprM is the essential outer membrane subunit of the MexAB-OprM xenobiotic efflux pump. We designed and constructed a new model antimicrobial screening system targeting both the iron-uptake system and xenobiotic efflux pumps. The oprM gene was placed immediately downstream of the ferri-pyoverdine receptor gene, fpvA, in the host lacking chromosomal oprM and the expression of oprM was monitored by an antibiotic susceptibility test under iron depleted and replete conditions. The recombinant cells showed wild-type susceptibility to pump substrate antibiotics, e.g., aztreonam, under iron limitation and became supersusceptible to them under iron repletion, suggesting that expression of oprM is under control of the iron acquisition system. Upon screening of a chemical library comprising 2952 compounds using this strain, a compound-ethyl 2-(1-acetylpiperidine-4-carboxamido)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[b]thiophene-3-carboxylate-was found to enhance the efficacy of aztreonam under iron limitation, suggesting that the compound inhibits either the iron acquisition system or the MexAB-OprM efflux pump. This compound was subsequently found to inhibit the growth of wild-type cells in the presence of sublethal amounts of aztreonam, regardless of the presence or absence of dipyridyl, an iron-chelator. The compound was eventually identified to block the function of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump, showing the validity of this new method. PMID:25939068

  4. Contribution of Efflux Pumps, Porins, and β-Lactamases to Multidrug Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Rumbo, C.; Gato, E.; López, M.; Ruiz de Alegría, C.; Fernández-Cuenca, F.; Martínez-Martínez, L.; Vila, J.; Pachón, J.; Cisneros, J. M.; Rodríguez-Baño, J.; Pascual, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems, aminoglycosides, glycylcyclines, tetracyclines, and quinolones in 90 multiresistant clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from two genetically unrelated A. baumannii clones: clone PFGE-ROC-1 (53 strains producing the OXA-58 β-lactamase enzyme and 18 strains with the OXA-24 β-lactamase) and clone PFGE-HUI-1 (19 strains susceptible to carbapenems). We used real-time reverse transcriptase PCR to correlate antimicrobial resistance (MICs) with expression of genes encoding chromosomal β-lactamases (AmpC and OXA-51), porins (OmpA, CarO, Omp33, Dcap-like, OprB, Omp25, OprC, OprD, and OmpW), and proteins integral to six efflux systems (AdeABC, AdeIJK, AdeFGH, CraA, AbeM, and AmvA). Overexpression of the AdeABC system (level of expression relative to that by A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 30- to 45-fold) was significantly associated with resistance to tigecycline, minocycline, and gentamicin and other biological functions. However, hyperexpression of the AdeIJK efflux pump (level of expression relative to that by A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 8- to 10-fold) was significantly associated only with resistance to tigecycline and minocycline (to which the TetB efflux system also contributed). TetB and TetA(39) efflux pumps were detected in clinical strains and were associated with resistance to tetracyclines and doxycycline. The absence of the AdeABC system and the lack of expression of other mechanisms suggest that tigecycline-resistant strains of the PFGE-HUI-1 clone may be associated with a novel resistance-nodulation-cell efflux pump (decreased MICs in the presence of the inhibitor Phe-Arg β-naphthylamide dihydrochloride) and the TetA(39) system. PMID:23939894

  5. Contribution of efflux pumps, porins, and β-lactamases to multidrug resistance in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Rumbo, C; Gato, E; López, M; Ruiz de Alegría, C; Fernández-Cuenca, F; Martínez-Martínez, L; Vila, J; Pachón, J; Cisneros, J M; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Pascual, A; Bou, G; Tomás, M

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of resistance to carbapenems, aminoglycosides, glycylcyclines, tetracyclines, and quinolones in 90 multiresistant clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from two genetically unrelated A. baumannii clones: clone PFGE-ROC-1 (53 strains producing the OXA-58 β-lactamase enzyme and 18 strains with the OXA-24 β-lactamase) and clone PFGE-HUI-1 (19 strains susceptible to carbapenems). We used real-time reverse transcriptase PCR to correlate antimicrobial resistance (MICs) with expression of genes encoding chromosomal β-lactamases (AmpC and OXA-51), porins (OmpA, CarO, Omp33, Dcap-like, OprB, Omp25, OprC, OprD, and OmpW), and proteins integral to six efflux systems (AdeABC, AdeIJK, AdeFGH, CraA, AbeM, and AmvA). Overexpression of the AdeABC system (level of expression relative to that by A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 30- to 45-fold) was significantly associated with resistance to tigecycline, minocycline, and gentamicin and other biological functions. However, hyperexpression of the AdeIJK efflux pump (level of expression relative to that by A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 8- to 10-fold) was significantly associated only with resistance to tigecycline and minocycline (to which the TetB efflux system also contributed). TetB and TetA(39) efflux pumps were detected in clinical strains and were associated with resistance to tetracyclines and doxycycline. The absence of the AdeABC system and the lack of expression of other mechanisms suggest that tigecycline-resistant strains of the PFGE-HUI-1 clone may be associated with a novel resistance-nodulation-cell efflux pump (decreased MICs in the presence of the inhibitor Phe-Arg β-naphthylamide dihydrochloride) and the TetA(39) system. PMID:23939894

  6. Antimicrobial and Efflux Pump Inhibitory Activity of Caffeoylquinic Acids from Artemisia absinthium against Gram-Positive Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fiamegos, Yiannis C.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Exarchou, Vassiliki; Han, Haley; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.; Vervoort, Jacques; Lewis, Kim; Hamblin, Michael R.; Tegos, George P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Traditional antibiotics are increasingly suffering from the emergence of multidrug resistance amongst pathogenic bacteria leading to a range of novel approaches to control microbial infections being investigated as potential alternative treatments. One plausible antimicrobial alternative could be the combination of conventional antimicrobial agents/antibiotics with small molecules which block multidrug efflux systems known as efflux pump inhibitors. Bioassay-driven purification and structural determination of compounds from plant sources have yielded a number of pump inhibitors which acted against gram positive bacteria. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we report the identification and characterization of 4′,5′-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid (4′,5′-ODCQA) from Artemisia absinthium as a pump inhibitor with a potential of targeting efflux systems in a wide panel of Gram-positive human pathogenic bacteria. Separation and identification of phenolic compounds (chlorogenic acid, 3′,5′-ODCQA, 4′,5′-ODCQA) was based on hyphenated chromatographic techniques such as liquid chromatography with post column solid-phase extraction coupled with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy. Microbial susceptibility testing and potentiation of well know pump substrates revealed at least two active compounds; chlorogenic acid with weak antimicrobial activity and 4′,5′-ODCQA with pump inhibitory activity whereas 3′,5′-ODCQA was ineffective. These intitial findings were further validated with checkerboard, berberine accumulation efflux assays using efflux-related phenotypes and clinical isolates as well as molecular modeling methodology. Conclusions/Significance These techniques facilitated the direct analysis of the active components from plant extracts, as well as dramatically reduced the time needed to analyze the compounds, without the need for prior isolation. The calculated energetics of the docking poses supported the

  7. Vulvovaginal candidiasis: species distribution, fluconazole resistance and drug efflux pump gene overexpression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie-Yu; Liu, Jin-Hui; Liu, Fa-Di; Xia, Yan-Hua; Wang, Jing; Liu, Xi; Zhang, Zhi-Qin; Zhu, Na; Yan-Yan; Ying, Ying; Huang, Xiao-Tian

    2014-10-01

    The increasing incidence of vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) and the emergence of fluconazole resistance are an indisputable fact. However, little information is available regarding the correlation between fluconazole resistance in vaginal Candida albicans and the expression of drug efflux pump genes. In this study, we investigated the species distribution, fluconazole susceptibility profiles and the mechanisms of fluconazole resistance in Candida strains. In total, 785 clinical Candida isolates were collected from patients with VVC. C. albicans was the most frequently isolated species(n = 529) followed by C. glabrata (n = 164) and C. krusei (n = 57). Of all Candida isolates, 4.7% were resistant to fluconazole. We randomly selected 18 fluconazole resistant isolates of C. albicans to evaluate the expression of CDR1, CDR2, MDR1 and FLU1 genes. Compared with fluconazole-susceptible C. albicans isolates, CDR1 gene expression displayed 3.16-fold relative increase, which was statistically significant. CDR2, MDR1 and FLU1 overexpression was observed in several fluconazole-resistant C. albicans isolates, but statistical significance was not achieved. These results demonstrate a high frequency of non-albicans species (32.6%); however, C. albicans is the most common Candida species implicated in vaginitis, and this strain displays considerable fluconazole resistance. Meanwhile, our study further indicates that fluconazole resistance in C. albicans may correlate with CDR1 gene overexpression. PMID:24962255

  8. Efflux pump-deficient mutants as a platform to search for microbes that produce antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Udaondo, Zulema; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Roca, Amalia; Martín, Jesús; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Reyes, Fernando; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2015-07-01

    Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E-18 is a strain deficient in the major antibiotic efflux pump (TtgABC) that exhibits an overall increased susceptibility to a wide range of drugs when compared with the wild-type strain. We used this strain as a platform to search for microbes able to produce antibiotics that inhibit growth. A collection of 2400 isolates from soil, sediments and water was generated and a drop assay developed to identify, via growth inhibition halos, strains that prevent the growth of DOT-T1E-18 on solid Luria-Bertani plates. In this study, 35 different isolates that produced known and unknown antibiotics were identified. The most potent inhibitor of DOT-T1E-18 growth was an isolate named 250J that, through multi-locus sequence analysis, was identified as a Pseudomonas sp. strain. Culture supernatants of 250J contain four different xantholysins that prevent growth of Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative and fungi. Two of the xantholysins were produced in higher concentrations and purified. Xantholysin A was effective against Bacillus, Lysinibacillus and Rhodococcus strains, and the effect against these microbes was enhanced when used in combination with other antibiotics such as ampicillin, gentamicin and kanamycin. Xantholysin C was also efficient against Gram-positive bacteria and showed an interesting antimicrobial effect against Pseudomonas strains, and a synergistic inhibitory effect with ampicillin, chloramphenicol and gentamicin. PMID:26059350

  9. Efflux pump inhibitor potentiates antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm.

    PubMed

    Kishen, Anil; Upadya, Megha; Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    Microbial biofilm architecture contains numerous protective features, including extracellular polymeric material that render biofilms impermeable to conventional antimicrobial agents. This study evaluated the efficacy of antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (aPDI) of Enterococcus faecalis biofilms. The ability of a cationic, phenothiazinium photosensitizer, methylene blue (MB) and an anionic, xanthene photosensitizer, rose bengal (RB) to inactivate biofilms of E. faecalis (OG1RF and FA 2-2) and disrupt the biofilm structure was evaluated. Bacterial cells were tested as planktonic suspensions, intact biofilms and biofilm-derived suspensions obtained by the mechanical disruption of biofilms. The role of a specific microbial efflux pump inhibitor (EPI), verapamil hydrochloride in the MB-mediated aPDI of E. faecalis biofilms was also investigated. The results showed that E. faecalis biofilms exhibited significantly higher resistance to aPDI when compared with E. faecalis in suspension (P < 0.001). aPDI with cationic MB produced superior inactivation of E. faecalis strains in a biofilm along with significant destruction of biofilm structure when compared with anionic RB (P < 0.05). The ability to inactivate biofilm bacteria was further enhanced when the EPI was used with MB (P < 0.001). These experiments demonstrated the advantage of a cationic phenothiazinium photosensitizer combined with an EPI to inactivate biofilm bacteria and disrupt biofilm structure. PMID:20860692

  10. Structure and function of Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrF illuminates a class of antimetabolite efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Su, Chih-Chia; Bolla, Jani Reddy; Kumar, Nitin; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Long, Feng; Delmar, Jared A; Chou, Tsung-Han; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Shafer, William M; Yu, Edward W

    2015-04-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an obligate human pathogen and the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. The control of this disease has been compromised by the increasing proportion of infections due to antibiotic-resistant strains, which are growing at an alarming rate. N. gonorrhoeae MtrF is an integral membrane protein that belongs to the AbgT family of transporters for which no structural information is available. Here, we describe the crystal structure of MtrF, revealing a dimeric molecule with architecture distinct from all other families of transporters. MtrF is a bowl-shaped dimer with a solvent-filled basin extending from the cytoplasm to halfway across the membrane bilayer. Each subunit of the transporter contains nine transmembrane helices and two hairpins, posing a plausible pathway for substrate transport. A combination of the crystal structure and biochemical functional assays suggests that MtrF is an antibiotic efflux pump mediating bacterial resistance to sulfonamide antimetabolite drugs. PMID:25818299

  11. Efflux pump-deficient mutants as a platform to search for microbes that produce antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Udaondo, Zulema; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Roca, Amalia; Martín, Jesús; Pérez-Victoria, Ignacio; Reyes, Fernando; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E-18 is a strain deficient in the major antibiotic efflux pump (TtgABC) that exhibits an overall increased susceptibility to a wide range of drugs when compared with the wild-type strain. We used this strain as a platform to search for microbes able to produce antibiotics that inhibit growth. A collection of 2400 isolates from soil, sediments and water was generated and a drop assay developed to identify, via growth inhibition halos, strains that prevent the growth of DOT-T1E-18 on solid Luria–Bertani plates. In this study, 35 different isolates that produced known and unknown antibiotics were identified. The most potent inhibitor of DOT-T1E-18 growth was an isolate named 250J that, through multi-locus sequence analysis, was identified as a Pseudomonas sp. strain. Culture supernatants of 250J contain four different xantholysins that prevent growth of Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative and fungi. Two of the xantholysins were produced in higher concentrations and purified. Xantholysin A was effective against Bacillus, Lysinibacillus and Rhodococcus strains, and the effect against these microbes was enhanced when used in combination with other antibiotics such as ampicillin, gentamicin and kanamycin. Xantholysin C was also efficient against Gram-positive bacteria and showed an interesting antimicrobial effect against Pseudomonas strains, and a synergistic inhibitory effect with ampicillin, chloramphenicol and gentamicin. PMID:26059350

  12. Expression of multidrug resistance efflux pump genes in clinical and environmental isolates of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kosmidis, Christos; Schindler, Bryan D; Jacinto, Pauline L; Patel, Diixa; Bains, Karanpreet; Seo, Susan M; Kaatz, Glenn W

    2012-09-01

    Increased expression of multidrug resistance efflux pump (MDR-EP) genes in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus occurs frequently, but its temporal and geographic variability is unknown. Such strains may contaminate the hospital environment, posing an infection control problem. Nearly 700 clinical isolates from different geographic locales as well as 91 environmental isolates recovered from two Detroit hospitals were studied. Ethidium bromide (EtBr) minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), quantitative expression of all characterised chromosomal MDR-EP genes, and the presence of qacA/B and smr were determined for all strains. In addition, for norA- and/or mepA-overexpressing strains, the spa type was established. MDR-EP gene overexpression varied temporally and geographically, and overexpressing strains were present in the hospital environment. Increased expression of norA was associated with meticillin resistance and spa type t002, a rare type among control strains, consistent with widespread dissemination of a norA-overexpressing, meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clone. Clonal spread also played a role for spa type t008, mepA-overexpressing, meticillin-susceptible strains. An EtBr MIC of ≤12.5 μg/mL was highly specific (>90%) in identifying strains lacking MDR-EP gene overexpression. PMID:22766161

  13. Tracking metal ions through a Cu/Ag efflux pump assigns the functional roles of the periplasmic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mealman, Tiffany D.; McEvoy, Megan M.; Blackburn, Ninian J.

    2014-01-01

    Copper is an essential nutrient for all aerobic organisms but is toxic in excess. At the host–pathogen interface, macrophages respond to bacterial infection by copper-dependent killing mechanisms, whereas the invading bacteria are thought to counter with an up-regulation of copper transporters and efflux pumps. The tripartite efflux pump CusCBA and its metallochaperone CusF are vital to the detoxification of copper and silver ions in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. However, the mechanism of efflux by this complex, which requires the activation of the inner membrane pump CusA, is poorly understood. Here, we use selenomethionine (SeM) active site labels in a series of biological X-ray absorption studies at the selenium, copper, and silver edges to establish a “switch” role for the membrane fusion protein CusB. We determine that metal-bound CusB is required for activation of cuprous ion transfer from CusF directly to a site in the CusA antiporter, showing for the first time (to our knowledge) the in vitro activation of the Cus efflux pump. This metal-binding site of CusA is unlike that observed in the crystal structures of the CusA protein and is composed of one oxygen and two sulfur ligands. Our results suggest that metal transfer occurs between CusF and apo-CusB, and that, when metal-loaded, CusB plays a role in the regulation of metal ion transfer from CusF to CusA in the periplasm. PMID:25313055

  14. Functional Cloning and Characterization of a Multidrug Efflux Pump, MexHI-OpmD, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Hiroshi; Mima, Takehiko; Morita, Yuji; Kuroda, Teruo; Mizushima, Tohru; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa

    2003-01-01

    We isolated mutant YM644, which showed elevated resistance to norfloxacin, ethidium bromide, acriflavine, and rhodamine 6G, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa YM64, a strain that lacks four major multidrug efflux pumps. The genes responsible for the resistance were mexHI-opmD. Elevated ethidium extrusion was observed with cells of YM644 and YM64 harboring a plasmid carrying the genes. Disruption of the genes in the chromosomal DNA of YM644 made the cells sensitive to the drugs. PMID:12937010

  15. In vitro transport activity of the fully assembled MexAB-OprM efflux pump from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verchère, Alice; Dezi, Manuela; Adrien, Vladimir; Broutin, Isabelle; Picard, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a major public health issue and many bacteria responsible for human infections have now developed a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms. For instance, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a disease-causing Gram-negative bacteria, is now resistant to almost every class of antibiotics. Much of this resistance is attributable to multidrug efflux pumps, which are tripartite membrane protein complexes that span both membranes and actively expel antibiotics. Here we report an in vitro procedure to monitor transport by the tripartite MexAB-OprM pump. By combining proteoliposomes containing the MexAB and OprM portions of the complex, we are able to assay energy-dependent substrate translocation in a system that mimics the dual-membrane architecture of Gram-negative bacteria. This assay facilitates the study of pump transport dynamics and could be used to screen pump inhibitors with potential clinical use in restoring therapeutic activity of old antibiotics.

  16. The "racemic approach" in the evaluation of the enantiomeric NorA efflux pump inhibition activity of 2-phenylquinoline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Carotti, Andrea; Ianni, Federica; Sabatini, Stefano; Di Michele, Alessandro; Sardella, Roccaldo; Kaatz, Glenn W; Lindner, Wolfgang; Cecchetti, Violetta; Natalini, Benedetto

    2016-09-10

    Among the mechanisms adopted by bacteria, efflux pumps (EPs) have been recognized as being significantly involved in contributing to resistance to commonly used antibacterial agents. However, little is known about their three-dimensional structures or the steric requirements for their inhibition. Lack of such knowledge includes NorA, one of the most studied Staphylococcus aureus EPs. In the present study, the use of two commercialized Cinchona alkaloid-based zwitterionic chiral stationary phases allowed the enantioseparation of four 2-((2-(4-propoxyphenyl)quinolin-4-yl)oxy)alkylamines 1-4 previously found to be potent S. aureus NorA efflux pump inhibitors when tested as racemates. In the identified optimal polar-ionic conditions (MeOH/THF/H2O-49/49/2 (v/v/v)+25mM formic acid, 12.5mM diethylamine), repeated consecutive injections of 1 allowed the isolation of sufficient amount of its enantiomers (2.6mg and 2.8mg, for (R)-1 and (S)-1, respectively) and then to evaluate their ability to inhibit the S. aureus NorA efflux pump. The biological evaluation highlighted the main contribution of the (R)-1 enantiomer to both the EtBr efflux inhibition and synergistic effect with against SA-1199B (norA+/A116E GrlA) respect to the racemate activity. The comparison between the experimental electronic circular dichroism and the time-dependent density functional theory calculations spectra of the two isolated enantiomeric fractions allowed for all compounds a clear and easy assignment of the enantiomeric elution order. PMID:27429367

  17. Expression of Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pump Gene norA Is Iron Responsive in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xin; Sun, Fei; Ji, Quanjiang; Liang, Haihua; Missiakas, Dominique; Lan, Lefu

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus utilizes efflux transporter NorA to pump out a wide range of structurally dissimilar drugs, conferring low-level multidrug resistance. The regulation of norA expression has yet to be fully understood although past studies have revealed that this gene is under the control of the global transcriptional regulator MgrA and the two-component system ArlRS. To identify additional regulators of norA, we screened a transposon library in strain Newman expressing the transcriptional fusion norA-lacZ for altered β-galactosidase activity. We identify a transposon insertion in fhuB, a gene that encodes a ferric hydroxamate uptake system permease, and propose that the norA transcription is iron responsive. In agreement with this observation, addition of FeCl3 repressed the induction of norA-lacZ, suggesting that bacterial iron uptake plays an important role in regulating norA transcription. In addition, a fur (ferric uptake regulator) deletion exhibited compromised norA transcription and reduced resistance to quinolone compared to the wild-type strain, indicating that fur functions as a positive regulator of norA. A putative Fur box identified in the promoter region of norA was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift and DNase I footprint assays. Finally, by employing a siderophore secretion assay, we reveal that NorA may contribute to the export of siderophores. Collectively, our experiments uncover some novel interactions between cellular iron level and norA regulation in S. aureus. PMID:22267518

  18. Resistance-nodulation-division efflux pump acrAB is modulated by florfenicol and contributes to drug resistance in the fish pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Rodrigo; Oliver, Cristian; Valdivia, Sharin; Valenzuela, Karla; Haro, Ronie E; Sánchez, Patricio; Olavarría, Víctor H; Valenzuela, Paulina; Avendaño-Herrera, Rubén; Romero, Alex; Cárcamo, Juan G; Figueroa, Jaime E; Yáñez, Alejandro J

    2016-06-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis is a fastidious intracellular pathogen responsible for high mortality rates in farmed salmonids, with serious economic consequences for the Chilean aquaculture industry. Oxytetracycline and florfenicol are the most frequently used antibiotics against P. salmonis, but routine use could contribute to drug resistance. This study identified differentiated florfenicol susceptibilities in two P. salmonis strains, LF-89 and AUSTRAL-005. The less susceptible isolate, AUSTRAL-005, also showed a high ethidium bromide efflux rate, indicating a higher activity of general efflux pump genes than LF-89. The P. salmonis genome presented resistance nodulation division (RND) family members, a family containing typical multidrug resistance-related efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria. Additionally, efflux pump acrAB genes were overexpressed in AUSTRAL-005 following exposure to the tolerated maximal concentration of florfenicol, in contrast to LF-89. These results indicate that tolerated maximum concentrations of florfenicol can modulate RND gene expression and increase efflux pump activity. We propose that the acrAB efflux pump is essential for P. salmonis survival at critical florfenicol concentrations and for the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. PMID:27190287

  19. Structure-Activity Relationships of a Novel Pyranopyridine Series of Gram-negative Bacterial Efflux Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Son T.; Kwasny, Steven M.; Ding, Xiaoyuan; Cardinale, Steven C.; McCarthy, Courtney T.; Kim, Hong-Suk; Nikaido, Hiroshi; Peet, Norton P.; Williams, John D.; Bowlin, Terry L.; Opperman, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently we described a novel pyranopyridine inhibitor (MBX2319) of RND-type efflux pumps of the Enterobacteriaceae. MBX2319 (3,3-dimethyl-5-cyano-8-morpholino-6-(phenethylthio)-3,4-dihydro-1H-pyrano[3,4-c]pyridine) is structurally distinct from other known Gram-negative efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs), such as 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine (NMP), phenylalanylarginine-β-naphthylamide (PAβN), D13-9001, and the pyridopyrimidine derivatives. Here, we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 60 new analogs of MBX2319 that were designed to probe the structure activity relationships (SARs) of the pyranopyridine scaffold. The results of these studies produced a molecular activity map of the scaffold, which identifies regions that are critical to efflux inhibitory activities and those that can be modified to improve potency, metabolic stability and solubility. Several compounds, such as 22d–f, 22i and 22k, are significantly more effective than MBX2319 at potentiating the antibacterial activity of levofloxacin and piperacillin against Escherichia coli. PMID:25818767

  20. Molecular basis for inhibition of AcrB multidrug efflux pump by novel and powerful pyranopyridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Sjuts, Hanno; Vargiu, Attilio V; Kwasny, Steven M; Nguyen, Son T; Kim, Hong-Suk; Ding, Xiaoyuan; Ornik, Alina R; Ruggerone, Paolo; Bowlin, Terry L; Nikaido, Hiroshi; Pos, Klaas M; Opperman, Timothy J

    2016-03-29

    TheEscherichia coliAcrAB-TolC efflux pump is the archetype of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND) exporters from Gram-negative bacteria. Overexpression of RND-type efflux pumps is a major factor in multidrug resistance (MDR), which makes these pumps important antibacterial drug discovery targets. We have recently developed novel pyranopyridine-based inhibitors of AcrB, which are orders of magnitude more powerful than the previously known inhibitors. However, further development of such inhibitors has been hindered by the lack of structural information for rational drug design. Although only the soluble, periplasmic part of AcrB binds and exports the ligands, the presence of the membrane-embedded domain in AcrB and its polyspecific binding behavior have made cocrystallization with drugs challenging. To overcome this obstacle, we have engineered and produced a soluble version of AcrB [AcrB periplasmic domain (AcrBper)], which is highly congruent in structure with the periplasmic part of the full-length protein, and is capable of binding substrates and potent inhibitors. Here, we describe the molecular basis for pyranopyridine-based inhibition of AcrB using a combination of cellular, X-ray crystallographic, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations studies. The pyranopyridines bind within a phenylalanine-rich cage that branches from the deep binding pocket of AcrB, where they form extensive hydrophobic interactions. Moreover, the increasing potency of improved inhibitors correlates with the formation of a delicate protein- and water-mediated hydrogen bond network. These detailed insights provide a molecular platform for the development of novel combinational therapies using efflux pump inhibitors for combating multidrug resistant Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:26976576

  1. Contribution of the Ade Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-Type Efflux Pumps to Fitness and Pathogenesis of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Balloy, Viviane; Fiette, Laurence; Chignard, Michel; Courvalin, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Overexpression of chromosomal resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux systems with broad substrate specificity contributes to multidrug resistance (MDR) in Acinetobacter baumannii. We have shown that modulation of expression of the structural genes for the efflux systems AdeABC and AdeIJK confers MDR and results in numerous alterations of membrane-associated cellular functions, in particular biofilm formation. However, the contribution of these RND pumps to cell fitness and virulence has not yet been studied. The biological cost of an antibiotic resistance mechanism is a key parameter in determining its stability and dissemination. From an entirely sequenced susceptible clinical isolate, we have generated a set of isogenic derivatives having single point mutations resulting in overexpression of each efflux system or with every pump deleted by allelic replacement. We found that overproduction of the pumps results in a significant decrease in fitness of the bacterial host when measured by competition experiments in vitro. Fitness and virulence were also evaluated in vivo both in systemic and pulmonary infection models in immunocompetent mice. A diminished competitiveness of the AdeABC-overexpressing mutant was observed only after intraperitoneal inoculation, but not after intranasal inoculation, the latter mimicking the most frequent type of human A. baumannii infection. However, in mice infected intranasally, this mutant was more virulent and stimulated an enhanced neutrophil activation in the lungs. Altogether, these data account for the observation that adeABC overexpression is common in MDR A. baumannii frequently found in ventilator-associated pneumonia. PMID:27247231

  2. The Influence of Efflux Pump Inhibitors on the Activity of Non-Antibiotic NSAIDS against Gram-Negative Rods

    PubMed Central

    Laudy, Agnieszka E.; Mrowka, Agnieszka; Krajewska, Joanna; Tyski, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Most patients with bacterial infections suffer from fever and various pains that require complex treatments with antibiotics, antipyretics, and analgaesics. The most common drugs used to relieve these symptoms are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are not typically considered antibiotics. Here, we investigate the effects of NSAIDs on bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics and the modulation of bacterial efflux pumps. Methodology The activity of 12 NSAID active substances, paracetamol (acetaminophen), and eight relevant medicinal products was analyzed with or without pump inhibitors against 89 strains of Gram-negative rods by determining the MICs. Furthermore, the effects of NSAIDs on the susceptibility of clinical strains to antimicrobial agents with or without PAβN (Phe-Arg-β-naphtylamide) were measured. Results The MICs of diclofenac, mefenamic acid, ibuprofen, and naproxen, in the presence of PAβN, were significantly (≥4-fold) reduced, decreasing to 25–1600 mg/L, against the majority of the studied strains. In the case of acetylsalicylic acid only for 5 and 7 out of 12 strains of P. mirabilis and E. coli, respectively, a 4-fold increase in susceptibility in the presence of PAβN was observed. The presence of Aspirin resulted in a 4-fold increase in the MIC of ofloxacin against only two strains of E. coli among 48 tested clinical strains, which included species such as E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa, and S. maltophilia. Besides, the medicinal products containing the following NSAIDs, diclofenac, mefenamic acid, ibuprofen, and naproxen, did not cause the decrease of clinical strains’ susceptibility to antibiotics. Conclusions The effects of PAβN on the susceptibility of bacteria to NSAIDs indicate that some NSAIDs are substrates for efflux pumps in Gram-negative rods. Morever, Aspirin probably induced efflux-mediated resistance to fluoroquinolones in a few E. coli strains. PMID:26771525

  3. Impact of anatase and rutile titanium dioxide nanoparticles on uptake carriers and efflux pumps in Caco-2 gut epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorier, M.; Brun, E.; Veronesi, G.; Barreau, F.; Pernet-Gallay, K.; Desvergne, C.; Rabilloud, T.; Carapito, C.; Herlin-Boime, N.; Carrière, M.

    2015-04-01

    TiO2 microparticles are widely used in food products, where they are added as a white food colouring agent. This food additive contains a significant amount of nanoscale particles; still the impact of TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) on gut cells is poorly documented. Our study aimed at evaluating the impact of rutile and anatase TiO2-NPs on the main functions of enterocytes, i.e. nutrient absorption driven by solute-liquid carriers (SLC transporters) and protection against other xenobiotics driven by efflux pumps from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family. We show that acute exposure of Caco-2 cells to both anatase (12 nm) and rutile (20 nm) TiO2-NPs induce early upregulation of a battery of efflux pumps and nutrient transporters. In addition they cause overproduction of reactive oxygen species and misbalance redox repair systems, without inducing cell mortality or DNA damage. Taken together, these data suggest that TiO2-NPs may increase the functionality of gut epithelial cells, particularly their property to form a protective barrier against exogenous toxicants and to absorb nutrients.TiO2 microparticles are widely used in food products, where they are added as a white food colouring agent. This food additive contains a significant amount of nanoscale particles; still the impact of TiO2 nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) on gut cells is poorly documented. Our study aimed at evaluating the impact of rutile and anatase TiO2-NPs on the main functions of enterocytes, i.e. nutrient absorption driven by solute-liquid carriers (SLC transporters) and protection against other xenobiotics driven by efflux pumps from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family. We show that acute exposure of Caco-2 cells to both anatase (12 nm) and rutile (20 nm) TiO2-NPs induce early upregulation of a battery of efflux pumps and nutrient transporters. In addition they cause overproduction of reactive oxygen species and misbalance redox repair systems, without inducing cell mortality or DNA damage. Taken

  4. Efflux pump activity in fluoroquinolone and tetracycline resistant Salmonella and E. coli implicated in reduced susceptibility to household antimicrobial cleaning agents.

    PubMed

    Thorrold, C A; Letsoalo, M E; Dusé, A G; Marais, E

    2007-02-15

    It has been shown that the inappropriate use of antimicrobial household agents selects for organisms with resistance mechanisms (e.g. efflux pumps), which could lead to the development of antibiotic resistance. The reverse hypothesis, that antibiotic-resistant organisms become tolerant to other antibacterial agents (e.g. disinfectants) due to the action of efflux pumps, has however not been extensively examined. The objective of this study was to establish whether there is a link between antibiotic resistance in potential gastrointestinal pathogens and reduced sensitivity of these organisms to commonly used household antimicrobial agents. In this study, tetracycline and ofloxacin sensitive and resistant Escherichia coli (9 strains) and Salmonella spp. (8 strains) were isolated from poultry and clinical samples. In order to assess whether these bacteria had active efflux pumps, ethidium bromide accumulation assays were performed. Extrusion of the active components of three commercial household agents (triclosan, sodium salicylate, and ortho-phenylphenol) by efflux pumps was tested using spectrophotometric accumulation assays. In order to simulate the kitchen environment, in-use disinfectant testing using the commercial household agents was performed to determine changes in their efficacy due to antibiotic resistance. Active efflux pump activity and extrusion of all three active ingredients was observed only in the antibiotic resistant organisms. The antibiotic sensitive bacteria were also more susceptible than the resistant isolates to the household antimicrobial agents at concentrations below that recommended by the manufacturer. These resistant bacteria could potentially be selected for and result in hard to treat infections. PMID:17126442

  5. The SmeYZ efflux pump of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia contributes to drug resistance, virulence-related characteristics, and virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Tsung; Huang, Yi-Wei; Chen, Shiang-Jiuun; Chang, Chia-Wei; Yang, Tsuey-Ching

    2015-07-01

    The resistance-nodulation-division (RND)-type efflux pump is one of the causes of the multidrug resistance of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The roles of the RND-type efflux pump in physiological functions and virulence, in addition to antibiotic extrusion, have attracted much attention. In this study, the contributions of the constitutively expressed SmeYZ efflux pump to drug resistance, virulence-related characteristics, and virulence were evaluated. S. maltophilia KJ is a clinical isolate of multidrug resistance. The smeYZ isogenic deletion mutant, KJΔYZ, was constructed by a gene replacement strategy. The antimicrobial susceptibility, virulence-related physiological characteristics, susceptibility to human serum and neutrophils, and in vivo virulence between KJ and KJΔYZ were comparatively assessed. The SmeYZ efflux pump contributed resistance to aminoglycosides and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Inactivation of smeYZ resulted in attenuation of oxidative stress susceptibility, swimming, flagella formation, biofilm formation, and secreted protease activity. Furthermore, loss of SmeYZ increased susceptibility to human serum and neutrophils and decreased in vivo virulence in a murine model. These findings suggest the possibility of attenuation of the resistance and virulence of S. maltophilia with inhibitors of the SmeYZ efflux pump. PMID:25918140

  6. Antibiotic resistance and multidrug-resistant efflux pumps expression in lactic acid bacteria isolated from pozol, a nonalcoholic Mayan maize fermented beverage.

    PubMed

    Wacher-Rodarte, Maria Del Carmen; Trejo-Muñúzuri, Tanya Paulina; Montiel-Aguirre, Jesús Fernando; Drago-Serrano, Maria Elisa; Gutiérrez-Lucas, Raúl L; Castañeda-Sánchez, Jorge Ismael; Sainz-Espuñes, Teresita

    2016-05-01

    Pozol is a handcrafted nonalcoholic Mayan beverage produced by the spontaneous fermentation of maize dough by lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are carriers of chromosomal encoded multidrug-resistant efflux pumps genes that can be transferred to pathogens and/or confer resistance to compounds released during the fermentation process causing food spoiling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibiotic sensibility and the transcriptional expression of ABC-type efflux pumps in LAB isolated from pozol that contributes to multidrug resistance. Analysis of LAB and Staphylococcus (S.) aureus ATCC 29213 and ATCC 6538 control strains to antibiotic susceptibility, minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) to ethidium bromide were based in "standard methods" whereas the ethidium bromide efflux assay was done by fluorometric assay. Transcriptional expression of efflux pumps was analyzed by RT-PCR. LAB showed antibiotic multiresistance profiles, moreover, Lactococcus (L.) lactis and Lactobacillus (L.) plantarum displayed higher ethidium bromide efflux phenotype than S. aureus control strains. Ethidium bromide resistance and ethidium bromide efflux phenotypes were unrelated with the overexpression of lmrD in L. lactics, or the underexpression of lmrA in L. plantarum and norA in S. aureus. These findings suggest that, moreover, the analyzed efflux pumps genes, other unknown redundant mechanisms may underlie the antibiotic resistance and the ethidium bromide efflux phenotype in L. lactis and L. plantarum. Phenotypic and molecular drug multiresistance assessment in LAB may improve a better selection of the fermentation starter cultures used in pozol, and to control the antibiotic resistance widespread and food spoiling for health safety. PMID:27247772

  7. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Pentacyclic Strychnos Alkaloids as Selective Modulators of the ABCC10 (MRP7) Efflux Pump

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The selective modulation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) efflux pumps overexpressed in multidrug resistant cancers (MDR) and attendant resensitization to chemotherapeutic agents represent a promising strategy for treating cancer. We have synthesized four novel pentacyclic Strychnos alkaloids alstolucines B (2), F (3), and A (5) and N-demethylalstogucine (4), in addition to known Strychnos alkaloid echitamidine (16), and we evaluated compounds 1–5 in biochemical assays with ABCC10 and P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Alstolucines B (2) and F (3) inhibited ABCC10 ATPase activity at 12.5 μM without affecting P-gp function; moreover, they resensitized ABCC10-transfected cell lines to paclitaxel at 10 μM. Altogether, the alstolucines represent promising lead candidates in the development of modulators of ABCC10 for MDR cancers overexpressing this pump. PMID:25419978

  8. Multidrug efflux pumps: the structures of prokaryotic ATP-binding cassette transporter efflux pumps and implications for our understanding of eukaryotic P-glycoproteins and homologues.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Ian D; Jones, Peter M; George, Anthony M

    2010-02-01

    One of the Holy Grails of ATP-binding cassette transporter research is a structural understanding of drug binding and transport in a eukaryotic multidrug resistance pump. These transporters are front-line mediators of drug resistance in cancers and represent an important therapeutic target in future chemotherapy. Although there has been intensive biochemical research into the human multidrug pumps, their 3D structure at atomic resolution remains unknown. The recent determination of the structure of a mouse P-glycoprotein at subatomic resolution is complemented by structures for a number of prokaryotic homologues. These structures have provided advances into our knowledge of the ATP-binding cassette exporter structure and mechanism, and have provided the template data for a number of homology modelling studies designed to reconcile biochemical data on these clinically important proteins. PMID:19961540

  9. Hyperinduction of host beta interferon by a Listeria monocytogenes strain naturally overexpressing the multidrug efflux pump MdrT.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Kierstyn T; Carleton, Joshua D; Quillin, Sarah J; Rollins, Stuart D; Portnoy, Daniel A; Leber, Jess H

    2012-04-01

    Many pathogens regulate or modify their immune-stimulating ligands to avoid detection by their infected hosts. Listeria monocytogenes, a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen, interacts with multiple components of mammalian innate immunity during its infection cycle. During replication within the cytosol of infected cells, L. monocytogenes utilizes two multidrug efflux pumps, MdrM and MdrT, to secrete the small nucleic acid second messenger cyclic-di-AMP (c-di-AMP). Host recognition of c-di-AMP triggers the production of type I interferons, including beta interferon (IFN-β), which, surprisingly, promote L. monocytogenes virulence. In this study, we have examined the capacity of multiple laboratory and clinical isolates of L. monocytogenes to stimulate host production of IFN-β. We have identified the L. monocytogenes strain LO28 as able to hyperinduce IFN-β production in infected cells ∼30-fold more than the common laboratory clone L. monocytogenes strain 10403S. Genomic analyses determined that LO28 contains a naturally occurring loss-of-function allele of the transcriptional regulator BrtA and correspondingly derepresses expression of MdrT. Surprisingly, while derepression of MdrT resulted in hyperstimulation of IFN-β, it results in significant attenuation in multiple mouse models of infection. While type I interferons may promote L. monocytogenes virulence, this study demonstrates that unregulated expression of the c-di-AMP-secreting efflux pump MdrT significantly restricts virulence in vivo by an unknown mechanism. PMID:22290148

  10. Premature Termination of MexR Leads to Overexpression of MexAB-OprM Efflux Pump in Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Tertiary Referral Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The present study was undertaken to investigate the mutations that are present in mexR gene of multidrug resistant (MDR) isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa collected from a tertiary referral hospital of north east India. Methods 76 MDR clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were obtained from the patients who were admitted to or attended the clinics of Silchar medical college and hospital. They were screened phenotypically for the presence of efflux pump activity by an inhibitor based method. Acquired resistance mechanisms were detected by multiplex PCR. Real time PCR was performed to study the expression of mexA gene of MexAB-OprM efflux pump in isolates with increase efflux pump activity. mexR gene of the isolates with overexpressed MexAB-OprM efflux pump was amplified, sequenced and analysed. Results Out of 76 MDR isolates, 24 were found to exhibit efflux pump activity phenotypically against ciprofloxacin and meropenem. Acquired resistance mechanisms were absent in 11 of them and among those isolates, 8 of them overexpressed MexAB-OprM. All the 8 isolates possessed mutation in mexR gene. 11 transversions, 4 transitions, 2 deletion mutations and 2 insertion mutations were found in all the isolates. However, the most significant observation was the formation of a termination codon at 35th position which resulted in the termination of the polypeptide and leads to overexpression of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump. Conclusions This study highlighted emergence of a novel mutation which is probably associated with multi drug resistance. Therefore, further investigations and actions are needed to prevent or at least hold back the expansion and emergence of newer mutations in nosocomial pathogens which may compromise future treatment options. PMID:26866484

  11. Interaction of Ocular Hypotensive Agents (PGF2α Analogs—Bimatoprost, Latanoprost, and Travoprost) With MDR Efflux Pumps on the Rabbit Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Ashim K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this work were (i) to screen ocular hypotensive prostaglandin (PGF2α) analogs—bimatoprost, latanoprost, and travoprost as well as their free acid forms—for interaction with efflux pumps on the cornea and (ii) to assess the modulation of efflux upon co-administration of these prostaglandin analogs. Methods: Cultured rabbit primary corneal epithelial cells (rPCEC) were employed as an in vitro model for rabbit cornea. Transporter-specific interaction studies were carried out using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells overexpressing MDR1, MRP1, MRP2, MRP5, and BCRP. Freshly excised rabbit cornea was used as an ex vivo model to determine transcorneal permeability. Results: Cellular accumulation studies clearly showed that all prostaglandin analogs and their free acid forms are substrates of MRP1, MRP2, and MRP5. Bimatoprost was the only prostaglandin analog in this study to interact with P-gp. In addition, none of these molecules showed any affinity for BCRP. Ki values of these prostaglandin analogs obtained from dose-dependent inhibition of erythromycin efflux in rPCEC showed bimatoprost (82.54 μM) and travoprost (94.77 μM) to have similar but higher affinity to efflux pumps than latanoprost (163.20 μM). Ex vivo studies showed that the permeation of these molecules across cornea was significantly elevated in the presence of specific efflux modulators. Finally, both in vitro and ex vivo experiments demonstrated that the efflux of these prostaglandin analogs could be modulated by co-administering them together. Conclusion: Bimatoprost, latanoprost, travoprost, and their free acid forms are substrates of multiple drug efflux pumps on the cornea. Co-administration of these molecules together is a viable strategy to overcome efflux, which could simultaneously elicit a synergistic pharmacological effect, since these molecules have been shown to activate different receptor population for the reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP). PMID

  12. All0809/8/7 is a DevBCA-like ABC-type efflux pump required for diazotrophic growth in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Staron, Peter; Maldener, Iris

    2012-10-01

    Efflux pumps export a wide variety of proteinaceous and non-proteinaceous substrates across the Gram-negative cell wall. For the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the ATP-driven glycolipid efflux pump DevBCA-TolC has been shown to be crucial for the differentiation of N(2)-fixing heterocysts from photosynthetically active vegetative cells. In this study, a homologous system was described. All0809/8/7-TolC form a typical ATP-driven efflux pump as shown by surface plasmon resonance. This putative exporter is also involved in diazotrophic growth of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. A mutant in all0809 encoding the periplasmic membrane fusion protein of the pump was not able to grow without combined nitrogen. Although heterocysts of this mutant were not distinguishable from those of the wild-type in light and electron micrographs, they were impaired in providing the microoxic environment necessary for N(2) fixation. RT-PCR of all0809 transcripts and localization studies on All0807-GFP revealed that All0809/8/7 was initially downregulated during heterocyst maturation and upregulated at later stages of heterocyst formation in all cells of the filament. A substrate of the efflux pump could not be identified in ATP hydrolysis assays. We discuss a role for All0809/8/7-TolC in maintaining the continuous periplasm and how this would be of special importance for heterocyst differentiation. PMID:22859614

  13. Interaction Mediated by the Putative Tip Regions of MdsA and MdsC in the Formation of a Salmonella-Specific Tripartite Efflux Pump

    PubMed Central

    Song, Saemee; Hwang, Soonhye; Lee, Seunghwa; Ha, Nam-Chul; Lee, Kangseok

    2014-01-01

    To survive in the presence of a wide range of toxic compounds, gram-negative bacteria expel such compounds via tripartite efflux pumps that span both the inner and outer membranes. The Salmonella-specific MdsAB pump consists of MdsB, a resistance-nodulation-division (RND)-type inner membrane transporter (IMT) that requires the membrane fusion protein (MFP) MdsA, and an outer membrane protein (OMP; MdsC or TolC) to form a tripartite efflux complex. In this study, we investigated the role of the putative tip regions of MdsA and its OMPs, MdsC and TolC, in the formation of a functional MdsAB-mediated efflux pump. Comparative analysis indicated that although sequence homologies of MdsA and MdsC with other MFPs and OMPs, respectively, are extremely low, key residues in the putative tip regions of these proteins are well conserved. Mutagenesis studies on these conserved sites demonstrated their importance for the physical and functional interactions required to form an MdsAB-mediated pump. Our studies suggest that, despite differences in the primary amino acid sequences and functions of various OMPs and MFPs, interactions mediated by the conserved tip regions of OMP and MFP are required for the formation of functional tripartite efflux pumps in gram-negative bacteria. PMID:24960027

  14. Clinical Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Overproducing MexAB-OprM and MexXY Efflux Pumps Simultaneously

    PubMed Central

    Llanes, Catherine; Hocquet, Didier; Vogne, Christelle; Benali-Baitich, Dounia; Neuwirth, Catherine; Plésiat, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Simultaneous overexpression of the MexAB-OprM and MexXY efflux systems was demonstrated by real-time reverse transcription-PCR and immunoblotting experiments for 12 multiresistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. DNA sequencing analysis showed that nine of these strains (named agrZ mutants) harbored mutations in mexZ, the product of which downregulates the expression of the mexXY operon. In addition, 8 of the 12 strains exhibited mutations in genes known to control transcription of the mexAB-oprM operon. Four of them were nalB mutants with alterations in the repressor gene mexR, three of them appeared to be nalC mutants deficient in gene PA3721 and overexpressing gene PA3720, and one strain was a nalB nalC double mutant. For MexAB-OprM as well as for MexXY, no clear correlation could be established between (i) the types of mutations, (ii) the expression level of mexA or mexX, and (iii) resistance to effluxed antibiotics. Finally, three isolates, named agrW mutants, overproduced MexXY and had an intact mexZ gene, and four strains overproduced MexAB-OprM and had intact mexR and PA3721 genes (nalD mutants). These data show that clinical isolates are able to broaden their drug resistance profiles by coexpressing two Mex efflux pumps and suggest the existence of additional regulators for MexAB-OprM and MexXY. PMID:15105137

  15. Mutagenesis and Modeling To Predict Structural and Functional Characteristics of the Staphylococcus aureus MepA Multidrug Efflux Pump

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Bryan D.; Patel, Diixa; Seo, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    MepA is a multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE) family protein and the only MATE protein encoded within the Staphylococcus aureus genome. Structural data for MATE proteins are limited to a single high-resolution example, NorM of Vibrio cholerae. Substitution mutations were created in MepA using gradient plates containing both a substrate and reserpine as an efflux pump inhibitor. Site-directed mutagenesis of plasmid-based mepA was used to reproduce these mutations, as well as unique or low-frequency mutations identified in mepA-overexpressing clinical strains, and to mutagenize conserved acidic residues. The effect of these changes on protein function was quantitated in a norA-disrupted host strain by susceptibility testing with and without inhibitors and by determining the proficiency of ethidium efflux. Up-function substitutions clustered in the carboxy half of MepA, near the cytoplasmic face of the protein. Repeated application of the same gradient plate conditions frequently reproduced identical substitution mutations, suggesting that individual residues are required for interaction with specific substrates. Acidic residues critical to protein function were identified in helices 4 and 5. In silico modeling revealed an outward-facing molecule, with helices 1, 2, 4, 7, 8, and 10 having contact with a central cavity that may represent a substrate translocation pathway. Functionally important residues within this cavity included S81, A161, M291, and A302. These data provide a critical starting point for understanding how MATE multidrug efflux proteins function and will be useful in refining crystallographic data when they are available. PMID:23175649

  16. Amino acid amides of piperic acid (PA) and 4-ethylpiperic acid (EPA) as NorA efflux pump inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Wani, Naiem Ahmad; Singh, Samsher; Farooq, Saleem; Shankar, Sudha; Koul, Surrinder; Khan, Inshad Ali; Rai, Rajkishor

    2016-09-01

    A total of eighteen piperic acid (PA) and 4-ethylpiperic acid (EPA) amides (C1-C18) with α-, β- and γ-amino acids were synthesized, characterized and evaluated for their efflux pump inhibitory activity against ciprofloxacin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The amides were screened against NorA overexpressing S. aureus SA-1199B and wild type S. aureus SA-1199 using ethidium bromide as NorA efflux pump substrate. EPI C6 was found to be most potent and reduced the MIC of ciprofloxacin by 16 fold followed by C18 which showed 4 fold reduction of MIC. Ethidium bromide efflux inhibition and accumulation assay proved these compounds as NorA inhibitors. PMID:27503686

  17. An H+-Coupled Multidrug Efflux Pump, PmpM, a Member of the MATE Family of Transporters, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    He, Gui-Xin; Kuroda, Teruo; Mima, Takehiko; Morita, Yuji; Mizushima, Tohru; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa

    2004-01-01

    We cloned the gene PA1361 (we designated the gene pmpM), which seemed to encode a multidrug efflux pump belonging to the MATE family, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by the PCR method using the drug-hypersensitive Escherichia coli KAM32 strain as a host. Cells of E. coli possessing the pmpM gene showed elevated resistance to several antimicrobial agents. We observed energy-dependent efflux of ethidium from cells possessing the pmpM gene. We found that PmpM is an H+-drug antiporter, and this finding is the first reported case of an H+-coupled efflux pump in the MATE family. Disruption and reintroduction of the pmpM gene in P. aeruginosa revealed that PmpM is functional and that benzalkonium chloride, fluoroquinolones, ethidium bromide, acriflavine, and tetraphenylphosphonium chloride are substrates for PmpM in this microorganism. PMID:14679249

  18. Gallic acid-based indanone derivative interacts synergistically with tetracycline by inhibiting efflux pump in multidrug resistant E. coli.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Gaurav Raj; Tiwari, Nimisha; Singh, Aastha; Kumar, Akhil; Roy, Sudeep; Negi, Arvind Singh; Pal, Anirban; Chanda, Debabrata; Sharma, Ashok; Darokar, Mahendra P

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to study the synergy potential of gallic acid-based derivatives in combination with conventional antibiotics using multidrug resistant cultures of Escherichia coli. Gallic acid-based derivatives significantly reduced the MIC of tetracycline against multidrug resistant clinical isolate of E. coli. The best representative, 3-(3',4,'5'-trimethoxyphenyl)-4,5,6-trimethoxyindanone-1, an indanone derivative of gallic acid, was observed to inhibit ethidium bromide efflux and ATPase which was also supported by in silico docking. This derivative extended the post-antibiotic effect and decreased the mutation prevention concentration of tetracycline. This derivative in combination with TET was able to reduce the concentration of TNFα up to 18-fold in Swiss albino mice. This derivative was nontoxic and well tolerated up to 300 mg/kg dose in subacute oral toxicity study in mice. This is the first report of gallic acid-based indanone derivative as drug resistance reversal agent acting through ATP-dependent efflux pump inhibition. PMID:26658982

  19. Assembly and Channel Opening of Outer Membrane Protein in Tripartite Drug Efflux Pumps of Gram-negative Bacteria*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yongbin; Moeller, Arne; Jun, So-Young; Le, Minho; Yoon, Bo-Young; Kim, Jin-Sik; Lee, Kangseok; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2012-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are capable of expelling diverse xenobiotic substances from within the cell by use of three-component efflux pumps in which the energy-activated inner membrane transporter is connected to the outer membrane channel protein via the membrane fusion protein. In this work, we describe the crystal structure of the membrane fusion protein MexA from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa MexAB-OprM pump in the hexameric ring arrangement. Electron microscopy study on the chimeric complex of MexA and the outer membrane protein OprM reveals that MexA makes a tip-to-tip interaction with OprM, which suggests a docking model for MexA and OprM. This docking model agrees well with genetic results and depicts detailed interactions. Opening of the OprM channel is accompanied by the simultaneous exposure of a protein structure resembling a six-bladed cogwheel, which intermeshes with the complementary cogwheel structure in the MexA hexamer. Taken together, we suggest an assembly and channel opening model for the MexAB-OprM pump. This study provides a better understanding of multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:22308040

  20. Structures of Gate Loop Variants of the AcrB Drug Efflux Pump Bound by Erythromycin Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Ababou, Abdessamad; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli use tripartite efflux pumps such as AcrAB-TolC to expel antibiotics and noxious compounds. A key feature of the inner membrane transporter component, AcrB, is a short stretch of residues known as the gate/switch loop that divides the proximal and distal substrate binding pockets. Amino acid substitutions of the gate loop are known to decrease antibiotic resistance conferred by AcrB. Here we present two new AcrB gate loop variants, the first stripped of its bulky side chains, and a second in which the gate loop is removed entirely. By determining the crystal structures of the variant AcrB proteins in the presence and absence of erythromycin and assessing their ability to confer erythromycin tolerance, we demonstrate that the gate loop is important for AcrB export activity but is not required for erythromycin binding. PMID:27403665

  1. Effects of chlorophyll-derived efflux pump inhibitor pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a on growth and macrolide antibiotic resistance of indicator and anaerobic swine manure bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural plant compounds, such as the chlorophyll a catabolites pheophorbide a (php) and pyropheophorbide a (pyp), are potentially active in the gastrointestinal tracts and wastes of livestock as antimicrobial resistance-modifying agents through inhibition of bacterial efflux pumps. To investigate w...

  2. From phenothiazine to 3-phenyl-1,4-benzothiazine derivatives as inhibitors of the Staphylococcus aureus NorA multidrug efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Stefano; Kaatz, Glenn W; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Brandini, David; Fravolini, Arnaldo

    2008-07-24

    Overexpression of efflux pumps is an important mechanism by which bacteria evade effects of substrate antimicrobial agents and inhibition of such pumps is a promising strategy to circumvent this resistance mechanism. NorA is a Staphylococcus aureus multidrug efflux pump, the activity of which confers decreased susceptibility to many structurally unrelated agents, including fluoroquinolones, resulting in a multidrug resistant (MDR) phenotype. In this work, a series of 1,4-benzothiazine derivatives were designed and synthesized as a minimized structural template of phenothiazine MDR efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) in an effort to identify more potent S. aureus NorA EPIs. Almost all derivatives evaluated showed good activity in combination with ciprofloxacin against S. aureus ATCC 25923; some were capable of completely restoring ciprofloxacin activity in a norA-overexpressing strain (SA-K2378). Compounds 6k and 7j displayed good activity against SA-1199B, a strain that also overexpresses norA, in an ethidium bromide (EtBr) efflux inhibition assay. PMID:18578473

  3. Evolution from a natural flavones nucleus to obtain 2-(4-Propoxyphenyl)quinoline derivatives as potent inhibitors of the S. aureus NorA efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Stefano; Gosetto, Francesca; Manfroni, Giuseppe; Tabarrini, Oriana; Kaatz, Glenn W; Patel, Diixa; Cecchetti, Violetta

    2011-08-25

    Overexpression of efflux pumps is an important mechanism by which bacteria evade the effects of substrate antimicrobial agents. Inhibition of such pumps is a promising strategy to circumvent this resistance mechanism. NorA is a Staphylococcus aureus efflux pump that confers reduced susceptibility to many structurally unrelated agents, including fluoroquinolones, resulting in a multidrug resistant phenotype. In this work, a series of 2-phenyl-4(1H)-quinolone and 2-phenyl-4-hydroxyquinoline derivatives, obtained by modifying the flavone nucleus of known efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs), were synthesized in an effort to identify more potent S. aureus NorA EPIs. The 2-phenyl-4-hydroxyquinoline derivatives 28f and 29f display potent EPI activity against SA-1199B, a strain that overexpresses norA, in an ethidium bromide efflux inhibition assay. The same compounds, in combination with ciprofloxacin, were able to completely restore its antibacterial activity against both S. aureus SA-K2378 and SA-1199B, norA-overexpressing strains. PMID:21751791

  4. Effects of chlorophyll-derived efflux pump inhibitor pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a on erythromycin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Salmonella Typhimurium and Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to validate the hypothesis that pheophorbide a and pyropheophorbide a reduce erythromycin resistance of reference strains of facultative anaerobic bacteria with multidrug or macrolide efflux pumps, as indicative of their effect on bacteria indigenous to anaerobic swine ...

  5. Crystal structures of OprN and OprJ, outer membrane factors of multidrug tripartite efflux pumps of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Yonehara, Ryo; Yamashita, Eiki; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    The genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes tripartite efflux pumps that extrude functionally and structurally dissimilar antibiotics from the bacterial cell. MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, MexEF-OprN, and MexXY-OprM are the main tripartite efflux pumps responsible for multidrug resistance in P. aeruginosa. The outer membrane factors OprN, OprJ, and OprM are essential components of functional tripartite efflux pumps. To elucidate the structural basis of multidrug resistance, we determined the crystal structures of OprN and OprJ. These structures revealed several features, including tri-acylation of the N-terminal cysteine, a small pore in the β-barrel domain, and a tightly sealed gate in the α-barrel domain. Despite the overall similarity of OprN, OprJ, and OprM, a comparison of their structures and electrostatic distributions revealed subtle differences at the periplasmic end of the α-barrel domain. These results suggested that the overall structures of these outer membrane factors are specifically optimized for particular tripartite efflux pumps. Proteins 2016; 84:759-769. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26914226

  6. Evolution and dissemination of OqxAB-like efflux pumps, an emerging quinolone resistance determinant among members of Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Wong, Marcus Ho Yin; Chan, Edward Wai Chi; Chen, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    The OqxAB efflux pump, a plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinant, has become increasingly prevalent among members of Enterobacteriaceae over the past decade. To investigate the evolution and dissemination routes of the oqxAB operon, we assessed the prevalence of oqxAB-like elements among various Gram-negative bacterial species and analyzed the genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of organisms harboring such elements. With a comprehensive genotyping approach, a chromosome-based oqxAB operon was detectable in all Klebsiella pneumoniae strains tested, including organisms isolated before the year 1984. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses confirmed that the oqxAB operon in K. pneumoniae isolates was genetically closest to their plasmid-borne counterparts recoverable only from Escherichia coli and Salmonella isolates collected from the year 2003 onward. Chromosomal elements with much lower sequence homology were also found among the Enterobacter spp. but not other Gram-negative species. Contrary to the quinolone resistance phenotypes which were consistently observable among organisms with oqxAB-harboring plasmids, chromosomal oqxAB elements generally did not confer quinolone resistance, except for K. pneumoniae strains, which exhibited a typical oqxAB-mediated phenotype characterized by cross-resistance to olaquindox, chloramphenicol, and the quinolones. Gene expression analysis illustrated that such phenotypes were due to elevated expression of the chromosomal oqxAB operon. Furthermore, transposition of the oqxAB operon from the bacterial chromosome to plasmids was found to result in a >80-fold increase in the level of expression of the OqxAB pump, confirming its status as the first constitutively expressed efflux system located in bacterial mobile elements. PMID:25801572

  7. Effect of six fluoroquinolones on the expression of four efflux pumps in the multidrug resistant Escherichia coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haixia; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Li, Yinqian; Hao, Caiju

    2015-07-01

    In this study, a total of 78 Escherichia coli clinical isolates were isolated from canines diagnosed with urinary tract infections. 23/78 isolates (29.5 %) showed multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype, including the isolates both susceptible to fluoroquinolones (FQs) (FQ(S)-MDR, n = 12) and resistant to FQs (FQ(R)-MDR, n = 11). For these MDR isolates, mutations within quinolone-resistance determining region of gyrA and parC were determined by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing. The relative quantification of emrE, acrB, macB, and mdfA genes expression in MDR isolates was determined by quantitative real-time PCR before and after exposure to the FQs (10 µg/ml). The results showed that a temporary exposure to FQs could lead to various degrees of up or down-regulation on the expression of four efflux pumps in MDR isolates depending on the resistant phenotype and the activities of the FQs. Generally, the FQ(R)-MDR isolates showed more obvious changes in average expression levels of these transporters versus the FQ(S)-MDR isolates, with a largest increase in emrE, and followed by acrB, while the expression of macB and mdfA did not change as radically. Meanwhile, there is a reverse relationship between the expression changes and the activities of the FQs tested. The expression was higher in the isolates exposed to enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and orbifloxacin, and followed by the marbofloxacin, gatifloxacin, and pradofloxacin, and the average expression levels of some efflux pumps even decreased as the isolates were exposed to gatifloxacin or pradofloxacin. PMID:25854862

  8. Identification and properties of plasma membrane azole efflux pumps from the pathogenic fungi Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Luiz R.; Gast, Charles E.; Bruzual, Igor; Wong, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cryptococcus gattii from the North American Northwest (NW) have higher azole MICs than do non-NW C. gattii or Cryptococcus neoformans. Since mechanisms of azole resistance in C. gattii are not known, we identified C. gattii and C. neoformans plasma membrane azole efflux pumps and characterized their properties. Methods The C. gattii R265 genome was searched for orthologues of known fungal azole efflux genes, expression of candidate genes was assessed by RT–PCR and the expressed genes' cDNAs were cloned and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Azole MICs and intracellular [3H]fluconazole were measured in C. gattii and C. neoformans and in S. cerevisiae expressing each cDNA of interest, as was [3H]fluconazole uptake by post-Golgi vesicles (PGVs) isolated from S. cerevisiae sec6-4 mutants expressing each cDNA of interest. Results Intracellular [3H]fluconazole concentrations were inversely correlated with fluconazole MICs only in 25 NW C. gattii strains. S. cerevisiae expressing three C. gattii cDNAs (encoded by orthologues of C. neoformans AFR1 and MDR1 and the previously unstudied gene AFR2) and their C. neoformans counterparts had higher azole MICs and lower intracellular [3H]fluconazole concentrations than did empty-vector controls. PGVs from S. cerevisiae expressing all six Cryptococcus cDNAs also accumulated more [3H]fluconazole than did controls, and [3H]fluconazole transport by all six transporters of interest was ATP dependent and was inhibited by excess unlabelled fluconazole, voriconazole, itraconazole and posaconazole. Conclusions We conclude that C. gattii and C. neoformans AFR1, MDR1 and AFR2 encode ABC transporters that pump multiple azoles out of S. cerevisiae cells, thereby causing azole resistance. PMID:25630649

  9. Antibiotic-potentiation activities of four Cameroonian dietary plants against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria expressing efflux pumps

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The continuous spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria, partially due to efflux pumps drastically reduced the efficacy of the antibiotic armory, increasing the frequency of therapeutic failure. The search for new compounds to potentiate the efficacy of commonly used antibiotics is therefore important. The present study was designed to evaluate the ability of the methanol extracts of four Cameroonian dietary plants (Capsicum frutescens L. var. facilulatum, Brassica oleacera L. var. italica, Brassica oleacera L. var. butyris and Basilicum polystachyon (L.) Moench.) to improve the activity of commonly used antibiotics against MDR Gram-negative bacteria expressing active efflux pumps. Methods The qualitative phytochemical screening of the plant extracts was performed using standard methods whilst the antibacterial activity was performed by broth micro-dilution method. Results All the studied plant extracts revealed the presence of alkaloids, phenols, flavonoids, triterpenes and sterols. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the studied extracts ranged from 256-1024 μg/mL. Capsicum frutescens var. facilulatum extract displayed the largest spectrum of activity (73%) against the tested bacterial strains whilst the lower MIC value (256 μg/mL) was recorded with Basilicum polystachyon against E. aerogenes ATCC 13048 and P. stuartii ATCC 29916. In the presence of PAβN, the spectrum of activity of Brassica oleacera var. italica extract against bacteria strains increased (75%). The extracts from Brassica oleacera var. butyris, Brassica oleacera var. italica, Capsicum frutescens var. facilulatum and Basilicum polystachyon showed synergistic effects (FIC ≤ 0.5) against the studied bacteria, with an average of 75.3% of the tested antibiotics. Conclusion These results provide promising information for the potential use of the tested plants alone or in combination with some commonly used antibiotics in the fight against MDR Gram-negative bacteria

  10. Biofilm Formation Caused by Clinical Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates Is Associated with Overexpression of the AdeFGH Efflux Pump

    PubMed Central

    He, Xinlong; Lu, Feng; Yuan, Fenglai; Jiang, Donglin; Zhao, Peng; Zhu, Jie; Cheng, Huali

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wound infections are associated with biofilm formation, which in turn has been correlated with drug resistance. However, the mechanism by which bacteria form biofilms in clinical environments is not clearly understood. This study was designed to investigate the biofilm formation potency of Acinetobacter baumannii and the potential association of biofilm formation with genes encoding efflux pumps, quorum-sensing regulators, and outer membrane proteins. A total of 48 clinically isolated A. baumannii strains, identified by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR as types A-II, A-III, and A-IV, were analyzed. Three representative strains, which were designated A. baumannii ABR2, ABR11, and ABS17, were used to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility, biofilm inducibility, and gene transcription (abaI, adeB, adeG, adeJ, carO, and ompA). A significant increase in the MICs of different classes of antibiotics was observed in the biofilm cells. The formation of a biofilm was significantly induced in all the representative strains exposed to levofloxacin. The levels of gene transcription varied between bacterial genotypes, antibiotics, and antibiotic concentrations. The upregulation of adeG correlated with biofilm induction. The consistent upregulation of adeG and abaI was detected in A-III-type A. baumannii in response to levofloxacin and meropenem (1/8 to 1/2× the MIC), conditions which resulted in the greatest extent of biofilm induction. This study demonstrates a potential role of the AdeFGH efflux pump in the synthesis and transport of autoinducer molecules during biofilm formation, suggesting a link between low-dose antimicrobial therapy and a high risk of biofilm infections caused by A. baumannii. This study provides useful information for the development of antibiofilm strategies. PMID:26033730

  11. Enhancing tolerance to short-chain alcohols by engineering the Escherichia coli AcrB efflux pump to secrete the non-native substrate n-butanol.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Michael A; Boyarskiy, Sergey; Yamada, Masaki R; Kong, Niwen; Bauer, Stefan; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2014-01-17

    The microbial conversion of sugars to fuels is a promising technology, but the byproducts of biomass pretreatment processes and the fuels themselves are often toxic at industrially relevant levels. One promising solution to these problems is to engineer efflux pumps to secrete fuels and inhibitory chemicals from the cell, increasing microbial tolerance and enabling higher fuel titer. Toward that end, we used a directed evolution strategy to generate variants of the Escherichia coli AcrB efflux pump that act on the non-native substrate n-butanol, enhancing growth rates of E. coli in the presence of this biofuel by up to 25%. Furthermore, these variants confer improved tolerance to isobutanol and straight-chain alcohols up to n-heptanol. Single amino acid changes in AcrB responsible for this phenotype were identified. We have also shown that both the chemical and genetic inactivation of pump activity eliminate the tolerance conferred by AcrB pump variants, supporting our assertion that the variants secrete the non-native substrates. This strategy can be applied to create an array of efflux pumps that modulate the intracellular concentrations of small molecules of interest to microbial fuel and chemical production. PMID:23991711

  12. Differential susceptibility to carbapenems due to the AdeABC efflux pump among nosocomial outbreak isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii in a Chinese hospital.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Sun, Liying; Xu, Guobing; Xia, Tiean

    2008-11-01

    A nosocomial outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii occurred from February to November 2004 in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) and the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of our hospital. Two separate clones prevailed, the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of which were different. The PICU isolates produced OXA-23 oxacillinase, whereas no carbapenemases were detected from SICU isolates. No obvious outer membrane protein change was seen. Efflux pump phenotype was detected from SICU isolates. Efflux pump-encoding gene adeB was positive in these isolates and negative in PICU isolates. Through further study, we found that AdeABC efflux system gene contents were common in the SICU isolates. Then we compared the expression level of adeB in resistant and susceptible isolates using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and found that increased expression of AdeABC efflux pump may play an important role in reduced meropenem susceptibility among A. baumannii in the SICU of our hospital. PMID:18687557

  13. Molecular basis of polyspecificity of the Small Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pump AbeS from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Lytvynenko, Iryna; Brill, Shlomo; Oswald, Christine; Pos, Klaas M

    2016-02-13

    Secondary multidrug efflux transporters play a key role in the bacterial resistance phenotype. One of the major questions concerns the polyspecific recognition of substrates by these efflux pumps. To understand the molecular basis of this promiscuous recognition, we compared the substrate specificity of the well-studied Escherichia coli small multidrug resistance protein EmrE with that of the poorly studied Acinetobacter baumannii homologue AbeS. The latter drug/H(+) antiporter is a 109-amino-acid membrane protein with predicted four transmembrane helices. It effectively confers resistance toward ethidium, acriflavine and benzalkonium in an E. coli ΔemrEΔmdfA background. Purified AbeS and the substrate-specific hyperactive variant A16G bind tetraphenylphosphonium with nanomolar affinity and exhibit electrogenic transport of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium after reconstitution into liposomes. A16G hyperactivity was apparent toward acriflavine and ethidium, resulting in 7- to 10-fold higher normalized IC50 values, respectively, but not toward substrates 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium and benzalkonium. Substitution of Y3 and A42 with Ala or Ser, respectively, also displayed a substrate-dependent phenotype, as these variants were strongly affected in their properties to confer resistance against acriflavine and ethidium, but not against benzalkonium. The size and planarity of the conjugated aromatic moieties appear to be a critical and subtle criterion for substrate recognition by these transporters. Rather moderate changes in the property of side chains postulated to be part of the substrate binding site result in a large phenotypical difference. These observations provide indications for the molecular basis of specificity within the binding pocket of polyspecific transporters. PMID:26707198

  14. Evidence for an Efflux Pump Mediating Multiple Antibiotic Resistance in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Piddock, Laura J. V.; White, David G.; Gensberg, Karl; Pumbwe, Lilian; Griggs, Deborah J.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism of multiple antibiotic resistance in six isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium recovered from a patient treated with ciprofloxacin was studied to investigate the role of efflux in the resistance phenotype. Compared to the patient's pretherapy isolate (L3), five of six isolates accumulated less ciprofloxacin, three of six isolates accumulated less chloramphenicol, and all six accumulated less tetracycline. The accumulation of one or more antibiotics was increased by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone to concentrations similar to those accumulated by L3 for all isolates except one, in which accumulation of all three agents remained approximately half that of L3. All isolates had the published wild-type sequences of marO and marR. No increased expression of marA, tolC, or soxS was observed by Northern blotting; however, three isolates showed increased expression of acrB, which was confirmed by quantitative competitive reverse transcription-PCR. However, there were no mutations within acrR or the promoter region of acrAB in any of the isolates. PMID:11036033

  15. Transcriptional Analysis of MexAB-OprM Efflux Pumps System of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Its Role in Carbapenem Resistance in a Tertiary Referral Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Carbapenem resistance presents severe threat to the treatment of multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. The study was undertaken to investigate the role of efflux pumps in conferring meropenem resistance and effect of single dose exposure of meropenem on transcription level of mexA gene in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa from a tertiary referral hospital of India. Further, in this investigation an effort was made to assess whether different components of MexAB-OprM operon expresses in the same manner and the extent of contributions of those components in meropenem resistance in its natural host (P. aeruginosa) and in a heterologous host (E. coli). Out of 83 meropenem nonsusceptible isolates, 22 isolates were found to possess efflux pump activity phenotypically. Modified hodge test and multiplex PCR confirmed the absence of carbapenemase genes in those isolates. All of them were of multidrug resistant phenotype and were resistant to all the carbepenem drug tested. MexAB-OprM efflux pump was found to be overexpressed in all the study isolates. It could be observed that single dose exposure meropenem could give rise to trivial increase in transcription of mexA gene. Different constructs of MexAB-OprM (mexR-mexA-mexB-OprM; mexA-mexB-OprM; mexA-mexB) could be expressed in both its natural (P. aeruginosa PAO1) and heterologous host (E. coli JM107) but transcription level of mexA gene varied in both the hosts before and after single dose exposure of meropenem. Different components of the operon failed to enhance meropenem resistance in E. coli JM107 and P. aeruginosa PAO1. This study could prove that MexAB-OprM efflux pump can significantly contribute to meropenem resistance in hospital isolates of P. aeruginosa where an acquired resistant mechanism is absent. Thus, equal importance should be given for diagnosis of intrinsic resistance mechanism so as to minimize treatment failure. As meropenem could not enhance mexA transcriptions significantly, there

  16. A Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division Family Xenobiotic Efflux Pump in an Obligate Anaerobe, Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Takeshi; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2002-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a gram-negative obligate anaerobe, contains two homologs of an Escherichia coli resistance-nodulation-cell division-type multidrug exporter gene, acrB, in putative operons, together with homologs of membrane fusion protein gene acrA and outer membrane channel gene tolC. MIC determination and accumulation assays with mutants with disruptions of one or more genes showed that one cluster, named xepCAB, pumped out multiple agents including rifampin, puromycin, and ethidium bromide. PMID:12234854

  17. Structure-function analysis of the ATP-driven glycolipid efflux pump DevBCA reveals complex organization with TolC/HgdD.

    PubMed

    Staron, Peter; Forchhammer, Karl; Maldener, Iris

    2014-01-31

    In Gram-negative bacteria, trans-envelope efflux pumps have periplasmic membrane fusion proteins (MFPs) as essential components. MFPs act as mediators between outer membrane factors (OMFs) and inner membrane factors (IMFs). In this study, structure-function relations of the ATP-driven glycolipid efflux pump DevBCA-TolC/HgdD from the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 were analyzed. The binding of the MFP DevB to the OMF TolC absolutely required the respective tip-regions. The interaction of DevB with the IMF DevAC mainly involved the β-barrel and the lipoyl domain. Efficient binding to DevAC and TolC, substrate recognition and export activity by DevAC were dependent on stable DevB hexamers. PMID:24361095

  18. Expression of the CDR1 efflux pump in clinical Candida albicans isolates is controlled by a negative regulatory element

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, Naseem Akhtar; Manoharlal, Raman; Saini, Preeti; Prasad, Tulika; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga; Hoefer, Milan; Morschhaeuser, Joachim; Prasad, Rajendra . E-mail: rp47@hotmail.com

    2005-06-24

    Resistance to azole antifungal drugs in clinical isolates of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans is often caused by constitutive overexpression of the CDR1 gene, which encodes a multidrug efflux pump of the ABC transporter superfamily. To understand the relevance of a recently identified negative regulatory element (NRE) in the CDR1 promoter for the control of CDR1 expression in the clinical scenario, we investigated the effect of mutation or deletion of the NRE on CDR1 expression in two matched pairs of azole-sensitive and resistant clinical isolates of C. albicans. Expression of GFP or lacZ reporter genes from the wild type CDR1 promoter was much higher in the azole-resistant C. albicans isolates than in the azole-susceptible isolates, reflecting the known differences in CDR1 expression in these strains. Deletion or mutation of the NRE resulted in enhanced reporter gene expression in azole-sensitive strains, but did not further increase the already high CDR1 promoter activity in the azole-resistant strains. In agreement with these findings, electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed a reduced binding to the NRE of nuclear extracts from the resistant C. albicans isolates as compared with extracts from the sensitive isolates. These results demonstrate that the NRE is involved in maintaining CDR1 expression at basal levels and that this repression is overcome in azole-resistant clinical C. albicans isolates, resulting in constitutive CDR1 overexpression and concomitant drug resistance.

  19. Carpobrotus edulis methanol extract inhibits the MDR efflux pumps, enhances killing of phagocytosed S. aureus and promotes immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Ordway, Diane; Hohmann, Judit; Viveiros, Miguel; Viveiros, Antonio; Molnar, Joseph; Leandro, Clara; Arroz, Maria Jorge; Gracio, Maria Amelia; Amaral, Leonard

    2003-05-01

    Although alkaloids from the family Aizoaceae have anticancer activity, species of this family have received little attention. Because these alkaloids also exhibit properties normally associated with compounds that have activity at the level of the plasma membrane, a methanol extract of Carpobrotus edulis, a common plant found along the Portuguese coast, was studied for properties normally associated with plasma membrane active compounds. The results of this study show that the extract is non-toxic at concentrations that inhibit a verapamil sensitive efflux pump of L5178 mouse T cell lymphoma cell line thereby rendering these multi-drug resistant cells susceptible to anticancer drugs. These non-toxic concentrations also prime THP-1 human monocyte-derived macrophages to kill ingested Staphylococcus aureus and to promote the release of lymphokines associated with cellular immune functions. The extract also induces the proliferation of THP-1 cells within 1 day of exposure to quantities normally associated with phytohaemagglutinin. The potential role of the compound(s) isolated from this plant in cancer biology is intriguing and is currently under investigation. It is supposed that the resistance modifier and immunomodulatory effect of this plant extract can be exploited in the experimental chemotherapy of cancer and bacterial or viral infections. PMID:12748989

  20. Azole resistance in Candida spp. isolated from Catú Lake, Ceará, Brazil: an efflux-pump-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Brilhante, Raimunda S.N.; Paiva, Manoel A.N.; Sampaio, Célia M.S.; Castelo-Branco, Débora S.C.M.; Teixeira, Carlos E.C.; de Alencar, Lucas P.; Bandeira, Tereza J.P.G.; Monteiro, André J.; Cordeiro, Rossana A.; Pereira-Neto, Waldemiro A.; Sidrim, José J.C.; Moreira, José L.B.; Rocha, Marcos F.G.

    2016-01-01

    Since, there is no study reporting the mechanism of azole resistance among yeasts isolated from aquatic environments; the present study aims to investigate the occurrence of antifungal resistance among yeasts isolated from an aquatic environment, and assess the efflux-pump activity of the azole-resistant strains to better understand the mechanism of resistance for this group of drugs. For this purpose, monthly water and sediment samples were collected from Catú Lake, Ceará, Brazil, from March 2011 to February 2012. The obtained yeasts were identified based on morphological and biochemical characteristics. Of the 46 isolates, 37 were Candida spp., 4 were Trichosporon asahii, 3 were Cryptococcus laurentii, 1 Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, and 1 was Kodamaea ohmeri. These isolates were subjected to broth microdilution assay with amphotericin B, itraconazole, and fluconazole, according to the methodology standardized by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of amphotericin B, itraconazole, and fluconazole were 0.03125–2 μg/mL, 0.0625 to ≥16 μg/mL, and 0.5 to ≥64 μg/mL, respectively, and 13 resistant azole-resistant Candida isolates were detected. A reduction in the azole MICs leading to the phenotypical reversal of the azole resistance was observed upon addition of efflux-pump inhibitors. These findings suggest that the azole resistance among environmental Candida spp. is most likely associated with the overexpression of efflux-pumps. PMID:26887224

  1. Genome Sequence of a Clinical Strain of Acinetobacter baumannii Belonging to the ST79/PFGE-HUI-1 Clone Lacking the AdeABC (Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-Type) Efflux Pump.

    PubMed

    López, M; Álvarez-Fraga, L; Gato, E; Blasco, L; Poza, M; Fernández-García, L; Bou, G; Tomás, M

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of chromosomal genes for resistance-nodulation-cell division-type efflux systems plays a major role in the multidrug resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii Little is known about the genetic characteristics of clinical strains of Acinetobacter baumannii lacking the AdeABC pump. In this study, we sequenced the genome of clinical strain Ab421 GEIH-2010 (belonging to clone ST79/PFGE-HUI-1 from the GEIH-REIPI Ab. 2010 project) which lacks this efflux pump. PMID:27609928

  2. A Linkage between SmeIJK Efflux Pump, Cell Envelope Integrity, and σE-Mediated Envelope Stress Response in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi-Wei; Liou, Rung-Shiuan; Lin, Yi-Tsung; Huang, Hsin-Hui; Yang, Tsuey-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Resistance nodulation division (RND) efflux pumps, such as the SmeIJK pump of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, are known to contribute to the multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. However, some RND pumps are constitutively expressed even though no antimicrobial stresses occur, implying that there should be some physical implications for these RND pumps. In this study, the role of SmeIJK in antimicrobials resistance, envelope integrity, and σE-mediated envelope stress response (ESR) of S. maltophilia was assessed. SmeIJK was involved in the intrinsic resistance of S. maltophilia KJ to aminoglycosides and leucomycin. Compared with the wild-type KJ, the smeIJK deletion mutant exhibited growth retardation in the MH medium, an increased sensitivity to membrane-damaging agents (MDAs), as well as activation of an σE-mediated ESR. Moreover, the expression of smeIJK was further induced by sub-lethal concentrations of MDAs or surfactants in an σE-dependent manner. These data collectively suggested an alternative physiological role of smeIJK in cell envelope integrity maintenance and σE-mediated ESR beyond the efflux of antibiotics. Because of the necessity of the physiological role of SmeIJK in protecting S. maltophilia from the envelope stress, smeIJK is constitutively expressed, which, in turn, contributes the intrinsic resistance to aminoglycoside and leucomycin. This is the first demonstration of the linkage among RND-type efflux pump, cell envelope integrity, and σE-mediated ESR in S. maltophilia. PMID:25390933

  3. A linkage between SmeIJK efflux pump, cell envelope integrity, and σE-mediated envelope stress response in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Wei; Liou, Rung-Shiuan; Lin, Yi-Tsung; Huang, Hsin-Hui; Yang, Tsuey-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Resistance nodulation division (RND) efflux pumps, such as the SmeIJK pump of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, are known to contribute to the multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. However, some RND pumps are constitutively expressed even though no antimicrobial stresses occur, implying that there should be some physical implications for these RND pumps. In this study, the role of SmeIJK in antimicrobials resistance, envelope integrity, and σE-mediated envelope stress response (ESR) of S. maltophilia was assessed. SmeIJK was involved in the intrinsic resistance of S. maltophilia KJ to aminoglycosides and leucomycin. Compared with the wild-type KJ, the smeIJK deletion mutant exhibited growth retardation in the MH medium, an increased sensitivity to membrane-damaging agents (MDAs), as well as activation of an σE-mediated ESR. Moreover, the expression of smeIJK was further induced by sub-lethal concentrations of MDAs or surfactants in an σE-dependent manner. These data collectively suggested an alternative physiological role of smeIJK in cell envelope integrity maintenance and σE-mediated ESR beyond the efflux of antibiotics. Because of the necessity of the physiological role of SmeIJK in protecting S. maltophilia from the envelope stress, smeIJK is constitutively expressed, which, in turn, contributes the intrinsic resistance to aminoglycoside and leucomycin. This is the first demonstration of the linkage among RND-type efflux pump, cell envelope integrity, and σE-mediated ESR in S. maltophilia. PMID:25390933

  4. Detection of AdeABC efflux pump genes in tetracycline-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from burn and ventilator-associated pneumonia patients

    PubMed Central

    Beheshti, Maryam; Talebi, Malihe; Ardebili, Abdollah; Bahador, Abbas; Lari, Abdolaziz Rastegar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Acinetobacter baumannii is the most prevalent nosocomial pathogen which have been emerged in the past three decades worldwide. The aim of this study was to assess the distribution of the AdeABC efflux pump genes, associated with tetracycline resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii isolates collected from burn infection and Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP). Materials and Methods: Ninety-eight A. baumannii isolates were collected from two different hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Tetracycline susceptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion and agar dilution methods according to the CLSI guidelines. The presence of adeSR, adeB, drug efflux system genes in resistant isolates was assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) was used as a chemical inhibitor agent to assess the contribution of AdeABC efflux pump in tetracycline resistance isolates. Results: Approximately 48% (47 out of 98) of isolates showed resistance to tetracycline which 14 (14.2%) isolates were corresponded to burn infection and the remaining 33 (33.8%) strains were isolated from VAP. All tetracycline resistant isolates have AdeABC in PCR assay. The reduction of tetracycline MICs by using 50 μg/ml CCCP were as follows: in 18 isolates 2-4 fold reduction in MICs, 26 isolates showed 8 fold reduction,1 isolate showed 16 fold, 1 isolate showed 32 fold and the remaining 1 isolate showed 128 fold reduction in MICs. Conclusion: The results showed significant correlation between tetracycline resistance and AdeABC efflux pump genes in resistant A. baumannii isolates. PMID:25400404

  5. Effect of iron on expression of efflux pump (adeABC) and quorum sensing (luxI, luxR) genes in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Modarresi, Farzan; Azizi, Omid; Shakibaie, Mohammad Reza; Motamedifar, Mohammad; Valibeigi, Behnaz; Mansouri, Shahla

    2015-11-01

    Resistance-nodulation-division efflux system (RND) adeABC contributes to intrinsic resistance to various drug classes in Acinetobacter baumannii. Similarly, quorum sensing (QS) plays an important role in the biofilm formation and pathogenicity of this bacterium. The aims of this study were to evaluate the influence of iron limitation on the expression of efflux pump (adeABC) genes and QS (luxI, luxR) system by relative quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). In addition, DNA sequence and phylogenetic relatedness of biofilm-associated protein (Bap) gene was also investigated. Sixty-five multidrug-resistant isolates of A. baumannii were recovered from ICU patients of three hospitals in Kerman, Iran. The isolates were highly resistant to at least 11 antibiotics (MIC ≥64 μg/mL); however, 87% and 89% were susceptible to colistin and tigecycline, respectively (MIC 0.05 μg/mL) (p ≤ 0.05). We detected the presence of RND efflux pump, QS, and bap genes with the frequencies of 92% (adeA), 61.5% (adeB), 84.6% (adeC), 80% (luxI), 61% (luxR), and 66% (bap), respectively. qRT-PCR analysis showed that in some isolates, expression of both adeABC and luxI/R was increased more than fourfold in the presence of low iron (20 μm), suggesting the additional regulatory role of iron on both efflux pump and QS system. Alignment and phylogenetic analysis on the strong biofilm forming isolates confirmed that the fragments amplified were indeed part of bap gene and deduced sequence was similar to A. baumannii K9B410. PMID:26350174

  6. Functional cloning and characterization of the multidrug efflux pumps NorM from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and YdhE from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Long, Feng; Rouquette-Loughlin, Corinne; Shafer, William M; Yu, Edward W

    2008-09-01

    Active efflux of antimicrobial agents is one of the most important adapted strategies that bacteria use to defend against antimicrobial factors that are present in their environment. The NorM protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and the YdhE protein of Escherichia coli have been proposed to be multidrug efflux pumps that belong to the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family. In order to determine their antimicrobial export capabilities, we cloned, expressed, and purified these two efflux proteins and characterized their functions both in vivo and in vitro. E. coli strains expressing norM or ydhE showed elevated (twofold or greater) resistance to several antimicrobial agents, including fluoroquinolones, ethidium bromide, rhodamine 6G, acriflavine, crystal violet, berberine, doxorubicin, novobiocin, enoxacin, and tetraphenylphosphonium chloride. When they were expressed in E. coli, both transporters reduced the levels of ethidium bromide and norfloxacin accumulation through a mechanism requiring the proton motive force, and direct measurements of efflux confirmed that NorM behaves as an Na(+)-dependent transporter. The capacities of NorM and YdhE to recognize structurally divergent compounds were confirmed by steady-state fluorescence polarization assays, and the results revealed that these transporters bind to antimicrobials with dissociation constants in the micromolar region. PMID:18591276

  7. Regulation of the AcrAB multidrug efflux pump in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in response to indole and paraquat.

    PubMed

    Nikaido, Eiji; Shirosaka, Ikue; Yamaguchi, Akihito; Nishino, Kunihiko

    2011-03-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has at least nine multidrug efflux pumps. Among these, AcrAB is constitutively expressed and is the most efficient, playing a role in both drug resistance and virulence. The acrAB locus is induced by indole, Escherichia coli-conditioned medium, and bile salts. This induction is dependent on RamA through the binding sequence in the upstream region of acrA that binds RamA. In the present study, we made a detailed investigation of the ramA and acrAB induction mechanisms in Salmonella in response to indole, a biological oxidant for bacteria. We found that acrAB and ramA induction in response to indole is dependent on RamR. However, the cysteine residues of RamR do not play a role in the induction of ramA in response to indole, and the oxidative effect of indole is therefore not related to ramA induction via RamR. Furthermore, we showed that paraquat, a superoxide generator, induces acrAB but not ramA. We further discovered that the mechanism of acrAB induction in response to paraquat is dependent on SoxS. The data indicate that there are at least two independent induction pathways for acrAB in response to extracellular signals such as indole and paraquat. We propose that Salmonella utilizes these regulators for acrAB induction in response to extracellular signals in order to adapt itself to environmental conditions. PMID:21148208

  8. Thiomers: Influence of molecular mass and thiol group content of poly(acrylic acid) on efflux pump inhibition.

    PubMed

    Grabovac, Vjera; Laffleur, Flavia; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2015-09-30

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of molecular mass and thiol group content of poly(acrylic acid)-cysteine conjugates on the permeation of sulforhodamine 101 and penicillin G. acting as substrates for multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 efflux pump. Poly(acrylic acids) of 2 kDa, 100 kDa, 250 kDa, 450 kDa and 3000 kDa were conjugated with cysteine. The thiol group content of all these polymers was in the range from 343.3 ± 48.4 μmol/g to 450.3 ± 76.1 μmol/g. Transport studies were performed on rat small intestine mounted in Ussing-type chambers. Since 250 kDa poly(acrylic acid) showed the highest permeation enhancing effect, additionally thiolated 250 kDa polyacrylates displaying 157.2 μmol/g, 223.0 ± 18.1 and 355.9 μmol/g thiol groups were synthesized in order to investigate the influence of thiol group content on the permeation enhancement. The permeation of sulforhodamine was 3.93- and 3.85-fold improved using 250 kDa poly(acrylic acid)-cysteine conjugate exhibiting 355.9 ± 39.5 μmol/g and 223.0 ± 18.1 μmol/g thiol groups. Using the same conjugates the permeation of penicillin G was 1.70- and 1.59-fold improved, respectively. The study demonstrates that thiolated poly(acrylic acid) inhibits Mrp2 mediated transport and that the extent of inhibition depends on the molecular mass and degree of thiolation of the polymer. PMID:26238816

  9. Hoechst 33342 Is a Hidden “Janus” amongst Substrates for the Multidrug Efflux Pump LmrP

    PubMed Central

    Neuberger, Arthur; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug transporters mediate the active extrusion of antibiotics and toxic ions from the cell. This reaction is thought to be based on a switch of the transporter between two conformational states, one in which the interior substrate binding cavity is available for substrate binding at the inside of the cell, and another in which the cavity is exposed to the outside of the cell to enable substrate release. Consistent with this model, cysteine cross-linking studies with the Major Facilitator Superfamily drug/proton antiporter LmrP from Lactococcus lactis demonstrated binding of transported benzalkonium to LmrP in its inward-facing state. The fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342 is a substrate for many multidrug transporters and is extruded by efflux pumps in microbial and mammalian cells. Surprisingly, and in contrast to other multidrug transporters, LmrP was found to actively accumulate, rather than extrude, Hoechst 33342 in lactococcal cells. Consistent with this observation, LmrP expression was associated with cellular sensitivity, rather than resistance to Hoechst 33342. Thus, we discovered a hidden “Janus” amongst LmrP substrates that is translocated in reverse direction across the membrane by binding to outward-facing LmrP followed by release from inward-facing LmrP. These findings are in agreement with distance measurements by electron paramagnetic resonance in which Hoechst 33342 binding was found to stabilize LmrP in its outward-facing conformation. Our data have important implications for the use of multidrug exporters in selective targeting of “Hoechst 33342-like” drugs to cells and tissues in which these transporters are expressed. PMID:26540112

  10. Metabolomics Analysis Reveals the Participation of Efflux Pumps and Ornithine in the Response of Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E Cells to Challenge with Propranolol

    PubMed Central

    Sayqal, Ali; Xu, Yun; Trivedi, Drupad K.; AlMasoud, Najla; Ellis, David I.; Rattray, Nicholas J. W.; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-01-01

    Efflux pumps are critically important membrane components that play a crucial role in strain tolerance in Pseudomonas putida to antibiotics and aromatic hydrocarbons that result in these toxicants being expelled from the bacteria. Here, the effect of propranolol on P. putida was examined by sudden addition of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 mg mL-1 of this β-blocker to several strains of P. putida, including the wild type DOT-T1E and the efflux pump knockout mutants DOT-T1E-PS28 and DOT-T1E-18. Bacterial viability measurements reveal that the efflux pump TtgABC plays a more important role than the TtgGHI pump in strain tolerance to propranolol. Mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy was then used as a rapid, high-throughput screening tool to investigate any phenotypic changes resulting from exposure to varying levels of propranolol. Multivariate statistical analysis of these MIR data revealed gradient trends in resultant ordination scores plots, which were related to the concentration of propranolol. MIR illustrated phenotypic changes associated with the presence of this drug within the cell that could be assigned to significant changes that occurred within the bacterial protein components. To complement this phenotypic fingerprinting approach metabolic profiling was performed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to identify metabolites of interest during the growth of bacteria following toxic perturbation with the same concentration levels of propranolol. Metabolic profiling revealed that ornithine, which was only produced by P. putida cells in the presence of propranolol, presents itself as a major metabolic feature that has important functions in propranolol stress tolerance mechanisms within this highly significant and environmentally relevant species of bacteria. PMID:27331395

  11. Potentiation of antibacterial activity of the MB-1 siderophore-monobactam conjugate using an efflux pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Tomaras, Andrew P; Crandon, Jared L; McPherson, Craig J; Nicolau, David P

    2015-04-01

    Preliminary enthusiasm over the encouraging spectrum and in vitro activities of siderophore conjugates, such as MB-1, was recently tempered by unexpected variability in in vivo efficacy. The need for these conjugates to compete for iron with endogenously produced siderophores has exposed a significant liability for this novel antibacterial strategy. Here, we have exploited dependence on efflux for siderophore secretion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and provide evidence that efflux inhibition may circumvent this in vivo-relevant resistance liability. PMID:25605364

  12. Potentiation of Antibacterial Activity of the MB-1 Siderophore-Monobactam Conjugate Using an Efflux Pump Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Crandon, Jared L.; McPherson, Craig J.; Nicolau, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary enthusiasm over the encouraging spectrum and in vitro activities of siderophore conjugates, such as MB-1, was recently tempered by unexpected variability in in vivo efficacy. The need for these conjugates to compete for iron with endogenously produced siderophores has exposed a significant liability for this novel antibacterial strategy. Here, we have exploited dependence on efflux for siderophore secretion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and provide evidence that efflux inhibition may circumvent this in vivo-relevant resistance liability. PMID:25605364

  13. The in-vitro antimicrobial effect of non-antibiotics and putative inhibitors of efflux pumps on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, O; Butterworth, T S; Kristiansen, J E

    2003-09-01

    The anti-microbial activity of six non-antibiotics (one amino-ethylchloride, three phenothiazines, two tricyclic antidepressives) were tested on 20 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one clinical isolate of Klebsiella pneumoniae, 2 ATTC strains and 14 clinical isolates of Staphylococccus aureus, using the plate dilution method. The effects on P. aeruginosa were independent of antibiotic resistance pattern and the species Stenotrophomonas maltophilia was found to be the most susceptible to the non-antibiotics, with MIC values as low as 20 mg/l for some of the substances. The 16 S. aureus strains tested were all particularly susceptible to the anti-microbial effects of the putative inhibitors of efflux pumps thioridazine and trifluoperazine with MIC values of < or =16 mg/l independently of the methicillin resistance profile of the strains. Because phenothiazines are well known to inhibit efflux pumps our results may indicate the existence of such pumps. Current works in progress are attempts at reversing the antibiotic resistance of selected bacterial strains using specific non-antibiotics and their stereo-chemical isomers. PMID:13678831

  14. FarR regulates the farAB-encoded efflux pump of Neisseria gonorrhoeae via an MtrR regulatory mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, E-H; Rouquette-Loughlin, C; Folster, J P; Shafer, W M

    2003-12-01

    The farAB operon of Neisseria gonorrhoeae encodes an efflux pump which mediates gonococcal resistance to antibacterial fatty acids. It was previously observed that expression of the farAB operon was positively regulated by MtrR, which is a repressor of the mtrCDE-encoded efflux pump system (E.-H. Lee and W. M. Shafer, Mol. Microbiol. 33:839-845, 1999). This regulation was believed to be indirect since MtrR did not bind to the farAB promoter. In this study, computer analysis of the gonococcal genome sequence database, lacZ reporter fusions, and gel mobility shift assays were used to elucidate the regulatory mechanism by which expression of the farAB operon is modulated by MtrR in gonococci. We identified a regulatory protein belonging to the MarR family of transcriptional repressors and found that it negatively controls expression of farAB by directly binding to the farAB promoter. We designated this regulator FarR to signify its role in regulating the farAB operon. We found that MtrR binds to the farR promoter, thereby repressing farR expression. Hence, MtrR regulates farAB in a positive fashion by modulating farR expression. This MtrR regulatory cascade seems to play an important role in adjusting levels of the FarAB and MtrCDE efflux pumps to prevent their excess expression in gonococci. PMID:14645274

  15. Efflux Pump Inhibitor Phenylalanine-Arginine Β-Naphthylamide Effect on the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of Imipenem in Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated From Hospitalized Patients in Shahid Motahari Burn Hospital, Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Mehrdad; Hashemi, Ali; Hakemi-Vala, Mojdeh; Goudarzi, Hossein; Hallajzadeh, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a highly troublesome pathogen and a leading cause of mortality and morbidity among hospitalized burn patients. Objectives: The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of the AdeABC genes and the role of the efflux pump (s) in the imipenem resistance of A. baumannii strains isolated from burn patients. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 60 A. baumannii isolates collected from 240 wound samples of burn patients admitted to the Burn Unit of Shahid Motahari Burn hospital, Tehran, Iran. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion and broth microdilution according to the clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) guidelines. The activity of the efflux pump was evaluated using the efflux pump inhibitor, the phenylalanine-arginine Β-naphthylamide (PAΒN). The AdeABC genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing. Results: In this study, 100% of the isolates were resistant to cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, cefepime, piperacillin, meropenem, co-trimoxazole, and piperacillin/tazobactam; 56 (94%) to gentamicin; 50 (81%) to amikacin; 58 (97%) to imipenem; and 45 (76%) to tetracycline. Additionally,all the isolates were susceptible to colistin. The susceptibility of the strains to imipenem was highly increased in the presence of the efflux pump inhibitor such that for 58 (96.6%) of the isolates, the PAΒN reduced the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) by 4- to 64-fold. The adeA and adeB genes were detected in 60 (100%) of the isolates, and the adeC gene was present in 51 (85%). Conclusions: The efflux pump may play a role in antibiotic resistance in A. baumannii isolates. The ability of A. baumannii isolates to acquire drug resistance by the efflux pump mechanism is a concern. Thus, new strategies are required in order to eliminate the efflux transport activity from resistant A. baumannii isolates causing

  16. Pyrazolo[4,3-c][1,2]benzothiazines 5,5-dioxide: a promising new class of Staphylococcus aureus NorA efflux pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Stefano; Gosetto, Francesca; Serritella, Serena; Manfroni, Giuseppe; Tabarrini, Oriana; Iraci, Nunzio; Brincat, Jean Pierre; Carosati, Emanuele; Villarini, Milena; Kaatz, Glenn W; Cecchetti, Violetta

    2012-04-12

    The increasing resistance to antibacterials commonly employed in the clinic and the growth of multidrug resistant strains suggest that the development of new therapeutic approaches should be of primary concern. In this context, EPIs may restore life to old drugs. In the present work, the EPI activity of the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib was confirmed and a new class of pyrazolo[4,3-c][1,2]benzothiazine 5,5-dioxide analogues acting as inhibitors of the Staphylococcus aureus NorA multidrug efflux pump was identified. PMID:22432682

  17. Induction of mexCD-oprJ operon for a multidrug efflux pump by disinfectants in wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuji; Murata, Takeshi; Mima, Takehiko; Shiota, Sumiko; Kuroda, Teruo; Mizushima, Tohru; Gotoh, Naomasa; Nishino, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa

    2003-04-01

    Induction of the MexCD-OprJ multidrug efflux pump was investigated in wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. MexCD-OprJ was induced by clinically important disinfectants such as benzalkonium chloride and chlorhexidine gluconate, and by some cytotoxic agents such as tetraphenylphosphonium chloride, ethidium bromide and rhodamine 6G. MexCD-OprJ was not induced by norfloxacin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, erythromycin or carbenicillin, although they are substrates for the pump. Cells of PAO1 showed increased resistance to norfloxacin when grown in the presence of the inducers of the mexCD-oprJ operon mentioned above. These results indicate that MexCD-OprJ plays an important role in intrinsic multidrug resistance in wild-type P. aeruginosa in hospitals where disinfectants are used frequently. PMID:12654738

  18. RND-Type Efflux Pumps in Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii: Major Role for AdeABC Overexpression and AdeRS Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Courvalin, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Increased expression of chromosomal genes for resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux systems plays a major role in the multidrug resistance (MDR) of Acinetobacter baumannii. However, the relative contributions of the three most prevalent pumps, AdeABC, AdeFGH, and AdeIJK, have not been evaluated in clinical settings. We have screened 14 MDR clinical isolates shown to be distinct on the basis of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) for the presence and overexpression of the three Ade efflux systems and analyzed the sequences of the regulators AdeRS, a two-component system, for AdeABC and AdeL, a LysR-type regulator, for AdeFGH. Gene adeB was detected in 13 of 14 isolates, and adeG and the intrinsic adeJ gene were detected in all strains. Significant overexpression of adeB was observed in 10 strains, whereas only 7 had moderately increased levels of expression of AdeFGH, and none overexpressed AdeIJK. Thirteen strains had reduced susceptibility to tigecycline, but there was no correlation between tigecycline MICs and the levels of AdeABC expression, suggesting the presence of other mechanisms for tigecycline resistance. No mutations were found in the highly conserved LysR regulator of the nine strains expressing AdeFGH. In contrast, functional mutations were found in conserved domains of AdeRS in all the strains that overexpressed AdeABC with two mutational hot spots, one in AdeS near histidine 149 suggesting convergent evolution and the other in the DNA binding domain of AdeR compatible with horizontal gene transfer. This report outlines the high incidence of AdeABC efflux pump overexpression in MDR A. baumannii as a result of a variety of single mutations in the corresponding two-component regulatory system. PMID:23587960

  19. RND-type efflux pumps in multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii: major role for AdeABC overexpression and AdeRS mutations.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Courvalin, Patrice; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2013-07-01

    Increased expression of chromosomal genes for resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux systems plays a major role in the multidrug resistance (MDR) of Acinetobacter baumannii. However, the relative contributions of the three most prevalent pumps, AdeABC, AdeFGH, and AdeIJK, have not been evaluated in clinical settings. We have screened 14 MDR clinical isolates shown to be distinct on the basis of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) for the presence and overexpression of the three Ade efflux systems and analyzed the sequences of the regulators AdeRS, a two-component system, for AdeABC and AdeL, a LysR-type regulator, for AdeFGH. Gene adeB was detected in 13 of 14 isolates, and adeG and the intrinsic adeJ gene were detected in all strains. Significant overexpression of adeB was observed in 10 strains, whereas only 7 had moderately increased levels of expression of AdeFGH, and none overexpressed AdeIJK. Thirteen strains had reduced susceptibility to tigecycline, but there was no correlation between tigecycline MICs and the levels of AdeABC expression, suggesting the presence of other mechanisms for tigecycline resistance. No mutations were found in the highly conserved LysR regulator of the nine strains expressing AdeFGH. In contrast, functional mutations were found in conserved domains of AdeRS in all the strains that overexpressed AdeABC with two mutational hot spots, one in AdeS near histidine 149 suggesting convergent evolution and the other in the DNA binding domain of AdeR compatible with horizontal gene transfer. This report outlines the high incidence of AdeABC efflux pump overexpression in MDR A. baumannii as a result of a variety of single mutations in the corresponding two-component regulatory system. PMID:23587960

  20. Microbicides Alter the Expression and Function of RND-Type Efflux Pump AdeABC in Biofilm-Associated Cells of Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Suvarna; Shah, Bhavikkumar P; Lee, Hiu Ham; Martinez, Luis R

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes nosocomial infections worldwide. This microbe's propensity to form biofilms allows it to persist and to survive on clinical abiotic surfaces for long periods. In fact, A. baumannii biofilm formation and its multidrug-resistant nature severely compromise our capacity to care for patients in hospital environments. In contrast, microbicides such as cetrimide (CT) and chlorhexidine (CHX) play important roles in the prevention and treatment of infections. We assessed the efficacy of CT and CHX, either alone or in combination, in eradicating A. baumannii biofilms formed by clinical isolates, by using stainless steel washers to mimic hard abiotic surfaces found in hospital settings. We demonstrated that increasing amounts of each microbicide, alone or in combination, were able to damage and to reduce the viability of A. baumannii biofilms efficaciously. Interestingly, the adeB gene of the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) family is predominantly associated with acquired resistance to antimicrobials in A. baumannii. We showed that CT and CHX adversely modified the expression and function of the RND-type efflux pump AdeABC in biofilm-associated A. baumannii cells. Furthermore, we established that these microbicides decreased the negative charges on A. baumannii cell membranes, causing dysregulation of the efflux pump and leading to cell death. Our findings suggest that CT and CHX, alone or in combination, can be used efficaciously for eradication of A. baumannii from hospital surfaces, in order to reduce infections caused by this nosocomial agent. PMID:26459900

  1. Regulation of the MtrC-MtrD-MtrE efflux-pump system modulates the in vivo fitness of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Warner, Douglas M; Folster, Jason P; Shafer, William M; Jerse, Ann E

    2007-12-15

    The Neisseria gonorrhoeae MtrC-MtrD-MtrE multidrug-resistance efflux pump expels macrolide antibiotics, penicillin, and antimicrobial effectors of the innate defense. Mutation of the mtrR locus, which encodes a transcriptional repressor of the mtrCDE operon, increases gonococcal resistance to these agents. Here we report that, in a mouse infection model, an mtrR mutant is more fit than the wild-type bacteria. Consistent with derepression of the mtrCDE operon as the primary reason for the fitness benefit, an mtrR,mtrE double mutant and an mtrE mutant showed no difference in survival phenotype. Gonococcal mutants deficient in MtrA, an activator of the mtrCDE operon, exhibited significantly reduced fitness in vivo, and mtrA mutants with spontaneous compensatory mtrR mutations were selected during infection. These results confirm the importance of the MtrC-MtrD-MtrE efflux-pump system during experimental gonococcal genital-tract infection and also illustrate an antibiotic-resistance mechanism that is accompanied by a fitness benefit rather than a fitness cost. PMID:18190261

  2. Upregulation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae efflux pump Tpo1 rescues an Imp2 transcription factor-deficient mutant from bleomycin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Berra, Siham; Ayachi, Sami; Ramotar, Dindial

    2014-07-01

    Yeast mutants lacking the transcriptional co-activator Imp2 are hypersensitive to the anticancer drug bleomycin, although the gene targets involved in this process remain elusive. A search for multicopy suppressors that rescue the imp2Δ mutant from bleomycin toxicity revealed the transcriptional activator Yap1, which can turn on many target genes such as transporters involved in regulating drug resistance. We show that YAP1 overexpression stimulated the expression of the TPO1 gene encoding a polyamine efflux pump, and that Yap1 failed to rescue the imp2Δ mutant from bleomycin toxicity in the absence of the TPO1 gene. Moreover, TPO1 overexpression, and not the related transporter gene QDR3, conferred upon the tpo1Δ imp2Δ double mutant parental resistance to bleomycin. We conclude that YAP1 overexpression rescues the imp2Δ mutant from bleomycin toxicity by triggering Tpo1 expression to expel the drug. Our data provide the first evidence that bleomycin could be a substrate for the Tpo1 efflux pump. PMID:24599794

  3. Chlorinated phenols control the expression of the multi-drug resistance efflux pump MexAB-OprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by activating NalC

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sudeshna; Cremers, Claudia M.; Jakob, Ursula; Love, Nancy G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary NalC is a TetR type regulator that represses the multidrug efflux pump MexAB-OprM in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we explain the mechanism of NalC mediated regulation of MexAB-OprM. We show that NalC non-covalently binds chlorinated phenols and chemicals containing chlorophenol sidechains such as triclosan. NalC-chlorinated phenol binding results in its dissociation from promoter DNA and up-regulation of NalC’s downstream targets, including the MexR antirepressor ArmR. ArmR up-regulation and MexR-ArmR complex formation have previously been shown to upregulate MexAB-OprM. In vivo mexB and armR expression analyses were used to corroborate in vitro NalC chlorinated phenol binding. We also show that the interaction between chlorinated phenols and NalC is reversible, such that removal of these chemicals restored NalC promoter DNA binding. Thus, the NalC-chlorinated phenol interaction is likely a pertinent physiological mechanism that P. aeruginosa uses to control expression of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump. PMID:21231970

  4. A Requirement of TolC and MDR Efflux Pumps for Acid Adaptation and GadAB Induction in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Ryoko; Rosner, Judah L.; Wachi, Masaaki; Slonczewski, Joan L.

    2011-01-01

    Background The TolC outer membrane channel is a key component of several multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pumps driven by H+ transport in Escherichia coli. While tolC expression is under the regulation of the EvgA-Gad acid resistance regulon, the role of TolC in growth at low pH and extreme-acid survival is unknown. Methods and Principal Findings TolC was required for extreme-acid survival (pH 2) of strain W3110 grown aerobically to stationary phase. A tolC deletion decreased extreme-acid survival (acid resistance) of aerated pH 7.0-grown cells by 105-fold and of pH 5.5-grown cells by 10-fold. The requirement was specific for acid resistance since a tolC defect had no effect on aerobic survival in extreme base (pH 10). TolC was required for expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GadA, GadB), a key component of glutamate-dependent acid resistance (Gad). TolC was also required for maximal exponential growth of E. coli K-12 W3110, in LBK medium buffered at pH 4.5–6.0, but not at pH 6.5–8.5. The TolC growth requirement in moderate acid was independent of Gad. TolC-associated pump components EmrB and MdtB contributed to survival in extreme acid (pH 2), but were not required for growth at pH 5. A mutant lacking the known TolC-associated efflux pumps (acrB, acrD, emrB, emrY, macB, mdtC, mdtF, acrEF) showed no growth defect at acidic pH and a relatively small decrease in extreme-acid survival when pre-grown at pH 5.5. Conclusions TolC and proton-driven MDR efflux pump components EmrB and MdtB contribute to E. coli survival in extreme acid and TolC is required for maximal growth rates below pH 6.5. The TolC enhancement of extreme-acid survival includes Gad induction, but TolC-dependent growth rates below pH 6.5 do not involve Gad. That MDR resistance can enhance growth and survival in acid is an important consideration for enteric organisms passing through the acidic stomach. PMID:21541325

  5. Bacterial multidrug efflux transporters.

    PubMed

    Delmar, Jared A; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by bacteria are a leading cause of death worldwide. Although antibiotics remain a key clinical therapy, their effectiveness has been severely compromised by the development of drug resistance in bacterial pathogens. Multidrug efflux transporters--a common and powerful resistance mechanism--are capable of extruding a number of structurally unrelated antimicrobials from the bacterial cell, including antibiotics and toxic heavy metal ions, facilitating their survival in noxious environments. Transporters of the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) superfamily typically assemble as tripartite efflux complexes spanning the inner and outer membranes of the cell envelope. In Escherichia coli, the CusCFBA complex, which mediates resistance to copper(I) and silver(I) ions, is the only known RND transporter specific to heavy metals. Here, we describe the current knowledge of individual pump components of the Cus system, a paradigm for efflux machinery, and speculate on how RND pumps assemble to fight diverse antimicrobials. PMID:24702006

  6. Insertion sequence disruption of adeR and ciprofloxacin resistance caused by efflux pumps and gyrA and parC mutations in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Lopes, B S; Amyes, S G B

    2013-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a pathogenic bacterium responsible for a wide range of infections in immunocompromised patients. This study examined the role of insertional inactivation of the adeR gene and its effect on adeABC gene expression along with characterisation of the gyrA and parC mutations involved in ciprofloxacin resistance in three A. baumannii clinical isolates and their derivatives. Primers designed for the detection of adeSRABC detected the presence of ISAba16, which disrupted the adeR gene in strain Ab12M, and ISAba1, which disrupted the same gene in strains Ab18 and Ab209. A second copy of ISAba1 was detected upstream of the adeA gene in Ab209 leading to AdeABC pump expression. AdeIJK pump expression was seen in all of the isolates but was not as significant as AdeABC expression. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin were ≥256 mg/L for all of the isolates and a decrease of ≥8-fold was seen following addition of the efflux pump inhibitor 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine. Fluorometric analysis also demonstrated active efflux, with upregulation of adeIJK and some genes of the adeABC operon in some strains. Sequencing of the quinolone resistance-determining region of the gyrA and parC genes revealed a Ser83→Leu change in the gyrA gene and a novel change of Ser80→Trp in the parC gene of Ab12, Ab12M and Ab209; in Ab18 there was a Ser80→Leu change in parC. This study shows the multifactorial contribution of different mechanisms in A. baumannii leading to ciprofloxacin resistance. PMID:23217848

  7. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump MexGHI-OpmD transports a natural phenazine that controls gene expression and biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Sakhtah, Hassan; Koyama, Leslie; Zhang, Yihan; Morales, Diana K; Fields, Blanche L; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Hogan, Deborah A; Shepard, Kenneth; Dietrich, Lars E P

    2016-06-21

    Redox-cycling compounds, including endogenously produced phenazine antibiotics, induce expression of the efflux pump MexGHI-OpmD in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa Previous studies of P. aeruginosa virulence, physiology, and biofilm development have focused on the blue phenazine pyocyanin and the yellow phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). In P. aeruginosa phenazine biosynthesis, conversion of PCA to pyocyanin is presumed to proceed through the intermediate 5-methylphenazine-1-carboxylate (5-Me-PCA), a reactive compound that has eluded detection in most laboratory samples. Here, we apply electrochemical methods to directly detect 5-Me-PCA and find that it is transported by MexGHI-OpmD in P. aeruginosa strain PA14 planktonic and biofilm cells. We also show that 5-Me-PCA is sufficient to fully induce MexGHI-OpmD expression and that it is required for wild-type colony biofilm morphogenesis. These physiological effects are consistent with the high redox potential of 5-Me-PCA, which distinguishes it from other well-studied P. aeruginosa phenazines. Our observations highlight the importance of this compound, which was previously overlooked due to the challenges associated with its detection, in the context of P. aeruginosa gene expression and multicellular behavior. This study constitutes a unique demonstration of efflux-based self-resistance, controlled by a simple circuit, in a Gram-negative pathogen. PMID:27274079

  8. Discovery of 4-acetyl-3-(4-fluorophenyl)-1-(p-tolyl)-5-methylpyrrole as a dual inhibitor of human P-glycoprotein and Staphylococcus aureus Nor A efflux pump.

    PubMed

    Bharate, Jaideep B; Singh, Samsher; Wani, Abubakar; Sharma, Sadhana; Joshi, Prashant; Khan, Inshad A; Kumar, Ajay; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Bharate, Sandip B

    2015-05-21

    Polysubstituted pyrrole natural products, lamellarins, are known to overcome multi-drug resistance in cancer via the inhibition of p-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) efflux pumps. Herein, a series of simplified polysubstituted pyrroles, prepared via a one-pot domino protocol, were screened for P-gp inhibition in P-gp overexpressing human adenocarcinoma LS-180 cells using a rhodamine 123 efflux assay. Several compounds showed the significant inhibition of P-gp at 50 μM, as indicated by increase in the intracellular accumulation of Rh123 in LS-180 cells. Furthermore, pyrrole 5i decreased the efflux of digoxin, a FDA approved P-gp substrate in MDCK-MDR1 cells with an IC50 of 11.2 μM. In in vivo studies, following the oral administration of a P-gp substrate drug, rifampicin, along with compound , the Cmax and AUC0-∞ of rifampicin was enhanced by 31% and 46%, respectively. All the compounds were then screened for their ability to potentiate ciprofloxacin activity via the inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus Nor A efflux pump. Pyrrole showed the significant inhibition of S. aureus Nor A efflux pump with 8- and 4-fold reductions in the MIC of ciprofloxacin at 50 and 6.25 μM, respectively. The molecular docking studies of compound with the human P-gp and S. aureus Nor A efflux pump identified its plausible binding site and key interactions. Thus, the results presented herein strongly indicate the potential of this scaffold for its use as multi-drug resistance reversal agent or bioavailability enhancer. PMID:25865846

  9. Catch me if you can: a biotinylated proteoliposome affinity assay for the investigation of assembly of the MexA-MexB-OprM efflux pump from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Ntsogo Enguéné, Véronique Yvette; Verchère, Alice; Phan, Gilles; Broutin, Isabelle; Picard, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Efflux pumps are membrane transporters that actively extrude various substrates, leading to multidrug resistance (MDR). In this study, we have designed a new test that allows investigating the assembly of the MexA-MexB-OprM efflux pump from the Gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The method relies on the streptavidin-mediated pull-down of OprM proteoliposomes upon interaction with MexAB proteoliposomes containing a biotin function carried by lipids. We give clear evidence for the importance of MexA in promoting and stabilizing the assembly of the MexAB-OprM complex. In addition, we have investigated the effect of the role of the lipid anchor of MexA as well as the role of the proton motive force on the assembly and disassembly of the efflux pump. The assay presented here allows for an accurate investigation of the assembly with only tens of microgram of protein and could be adapted to 96 wells plates. Hence, this work provides a basis for the medium-high screening of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). PMID:26082762

  10. Catch me if you can: a biotinylated proteoliposome affinity assay for the investigation of assembly of the MexA-MexB-OprM efflux pump from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ntsogo Enguéné, Véronique Yvette; Verchère, Alice; Phan, Gilles; Broutin, Isabelle; Picard, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Efflux pumps are membrane transporters that actively extrude various substrates, leading to multidrug resistance (MDR). In this study, we have designed a new test that allows investigating the assembly of the MexA-MexB-OprM efflux pump from the Gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The method relies on the streptavidin-mediated pull-down of OprM proteoliposomes upon interaction with MexAB proteoliposomes containing a biotin function carried by lipids. We give clear evidence for the importance of MexA in promoting and stabilizing the assembly of the MexAB-OprM complex. In addition, we have investigated the effect of the role of the lipid anchor of MexA as well as the role of the proton motive force on the assembly and disassembly of the efflux pump. The assay presented here allows for an accurate investigation of the assembly with only tens of microgram of protein and could be adapted to 96 wells plates. Hence, this work provides a basis for the medium-high screening of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). PMID:26082762

  11. Re-evolution of the 2-phenylquinolines: ligand-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a potent new class of Staphylococcus aureus NorA efflux pump inhibitors to combat antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Stefano; Gosetto, Francesca; Iraci, Nunzio; Barreca, Maria Letizia; Massari, Serena; Sancineto, Luca; Manfroni, Giuseppe; Tabarrini, Oriana; Dimovska, Mirjana; Kaatz, Glenn W; Cecchetti, Violetta

    2013-06-27

    Overexpression of efflux pumps is an important mechanism by which bacteria evade the effects of antimicrobial agents that are substrates. NorA is a Staphylococcus aureus efflux pump that confers reduced susceptibility to many structurally unrelated agents, including fluoroquinolones, biocides, and dyes, resulting in a multidrug resistant (MDR) phenotype. In this work, a series of 2-phenylquinoline derivatives was designed by means of ligand-based pharmacophore modeling in an attempt to identify improved S. aureus NorA efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). Most of the 2-phenylquinoline derivatives displayed potent EPI activity against the norA overexpressing strain SA-1199B. The antibacterial activity of ciprofloxacin, when used in combination with some of the synthesized compounds, was completely restored in SA-1199B and SA-K2378, a strain overexpressing norA from a multicopy plasmid. Compounds 3m and 3q also showed potent synergistic activity with the ethidium bromide dye in a strain overexpressing the MepA MDR efflux pump. PMID:23710549

  12. Integration Host Factor is required for FarR repression of the farAB-encoded efflux pump of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Hill, Stuart A; Napier, Ruth; Shafer, William M

    2006-06-01

    The farAB operon encodes an efflux pump system that mediates the resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to antimicrobial long-chain fatty acids. We previously observed that expression of farAB is negatively regulated by the FarR repressor. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanism by which FarR represses expression of farAB. DNase I footprinting analysis, coupled with a deletion analysis of the farAB promoter region, indicated that FarR binds to three sites (termed sites A, B and C) within the DNA sequence upstream of farA; genetic analysis revealed, however, that site B is not required for FarR repression of farAB. This repression also required the presence of Integration Host Factor (IHF), which was found to bind to sequences located between FarR binding sites A and C. We determined that IHF binding to the farAB promoter region could inhibit transcription in vitro and that such binding induced a bending of the target DNA, which we propose to be important in regulating this operon. IHF binding to the promoter region was found to stabilize the binding of FarR to its binding sites A and C and as a consequence, enhanced repression of farAB expression mediated by FarR. We propose a model in which expression of the farAB-encoded efflux pump in N. gonorrhoeae is modulated by the DNA binding activities of FarR and IHF. PMID:16796676

  13. Characterization and distribution of drug resistance associated β-lactamase, membrane porin and efflux pump genes in MDR A. baumannii isolated from Zhenjiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huijian; Huang, Lan; Barnie, Prince Amoah; Su, Zhaoliang; Mi, Zuhuang; Chen, Jianguo; Aparna, Vasudevan; Kumar, Dinesh; Xu, Huaxi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii), especially the multidrug resistant A. baumannii (MDR-AB) is becoming a common opportunistic pathogen in hospital, and constitutes significant public health threats. This study aimed at investigating the relationship between drug resistance with expression of class A-D β-lactamase genes, mutation in membrane porin and over-expression of efflux pump genes among A. baumannii isolated from Zhengjiang, China. Methods: Antibiotic susceptibility assays were performed using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. PCR was used to detect β-lactamase genes and carO, oprD, adeR, adeS. Real-time PCR was used to assess the mRNA expression level of efflux pump gene adeB. The software of DNAMAN was applied to assemble oprD and carO sequences, and the sequences were compared with those retrieved from GenBank (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/). Results: 27 isolates (61.4%) in this study were MDR-AB, in which five β-lactamases including TEM, CTX-M-2, ADC, OXA-23 and OXA-51 were found, and the positive rate was 96.3% (26), 14.8% (4), 92.6% (25), 88.9% (24) and 92.6% (25), respectively. In addition, the expression level of adeB mRNA was significantly increased in MDR-AB, it might due to adeR mutation. Some mutations were also found in carO and oprD. Conclusion: MDR-AB showed high relationship with β-lactamase, mutation in membrane porin and overexpression of adeB, which may directly relates to the mutation in regulating gene adeR. PMID:26629028

  14. Characterization of AcrD, a Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-type multidrug efflux pump from the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multidrug efflux pumps are membrane translocases that have the ability to extrude a variety of structurally unrelated compounds from the cell. AcrD, a resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) transporter, was shown to be involved in efflux of highly hydrophilic aminoglycosides and a limited number of amphiphilic compounds in E. coli. Here, a homologue of AcrD in the plant pathogen and causal agent of fire blight disease Erwinia amylovora was identified. Results The substrate specificity of AcrD was studied by overexpression of the corresponding gene from a high-copy plasmid in E. amylovora Ea1189-3, which is hypersensitive to many drugs due to a deficiency of the major multidrug pump AcrB. AcrD mediated resistance to several amphiphilic compounds including clotrimazole and luteolin, two compounds hitherto not described as substrates of AcrD in enterobacteria. However, AcrD was not able to expel aminoglycosides. An acrD mutant exhibited full virulence on apple rootstock and immature pear fruits. RT-PCR analysis revealed an induction of acrD expression in infected apple tissue but not on pear fruits. Moreover, a direct binding of BaeR, the response regulator of the two-component regulatory system BaeSR, to the acrD promoter was observed as has already been shown in other enterobacteria. Conclusions AcrD from E. amylovora is involved in resistance to a limited number of amphiphilic compounds, but in contrast to AcrD of E. coli, it is not involved in resistance to aminoglycosides. The expression of acrD was up-regulated by addition of the substrates deoxycholate, naringenin, tetracycline and zinc. AcrD appears to be regulated by the BaeSR two-component system, an envelope stress signal transduction pathway. PMID:24443882

  15. Inducible Expression of a Resistance-Nodulation-Division-Type Efflux Pump in Staphylococcus aureus Provides Resistance to Linoleic and Arachidonic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Alnaseri, Heba; Arsic, Benjamin; Schneider, James E. T.; Kaiser, Julienne C.; Scinocca, Zachariah C.; Heinrichs, David E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although Staphylococcus aureus is exposed to antimicrobial fatty acids on the skin, in nasal secretions, and in abscesses, a specific mechanism of inducible resistance to this important facet of innate immunity has not been identified. Here, we have sequenced the genome of S. aureus USA300 variants selected for their ability to grow at an elevated concentration of linoleic acid. The fatty acid-resistant clone FAR7 had a single nucleotide polymorphism resulting in an H121Y substitution in an uncharacterized transcriptional regulator belonging to the AcrR family, which was divergently transcribed from a gene encoding a member of the resistance-nodulation-division superfamily of multidrug efflux pumps. We named these genes farR and farE, for regulator and effector of fatty acid resistance, respectively. Several lines of evidence indicated that FarE promotes efflux of antimicrobial fatty acids and is regulated by FarR. First, expression of farE was strongly induced by arachidonic and linoleic acids in an farR-dependent manner. Second, an H121Y substitution in FarR resulted in increased expression of farE and was alone sufficient to promote increased resistance of S. aureus to linoleic acid. Third, inactivation of farE resulted in a significant reduction in the inducible resistance of S. aureus to the bactericidal activity of 100 μM linoleic acid, increased accumulation of [14C]linoleic acid by growing cells, and severely impaired growth in the presence of nonbactericidal concentrations of linoleic acid. Cumulatively, these findings represent the first description of a specific mechanism of inducible resistance to antimicrobial fatty acids in a Gram-positive pathogen. IMPORTANCE Staphylococcus aureus colonizes approximately 25% of humans and is a leading cause of human infectious morbidity and mortality. To persist on human hosts, S. aureus must have intrinsic defense mechanisms to cope with antimicrobial fatty acids, which comprise an important component of

  16. Coupling of remote alternating-access transport mechanisms for protons and substrates in the multidrug efflux pump AcrB

    PubMed Central

    Eicher, Thomas; Seeger, Markus A; Anselmi, Claudio; Zhou, Wenchang; Brandstätter, Lorenz; Verrey, François; Diederichs, Kay; Faraldo-Gómez, José D; Pos, Klaas M

    2014-01-01

    Membrane transporters of the RND superfamily confer multidrug resistance to pathogenic bacteria, and are essential for cholesterol metabolism and embryonic development in humans. We use high-resolution X-ray crystallography and computational methods to delineate the mechanism of the homotrimeric RND-type proton/drug antiporter AcrB, the active component of the major efflux system AcrAB-TolC in Escherichia coli, and one most complex and intriguing membrane transporters known to date. Analysis of wildtype AcrB and four functionally-inactive variants reveals an unprecedented mechanism that involves two remote alternating-access conformational cycles within each protomer, namely one for protons in the transmembrane region and another for drugs in the periplasmic domain, 50 Å apart. Each of these cycles entails two distinct types of collective motions of two structural repeats, coupled by flanking α-helices that project from the membrane. Moreover, we rationalize how the cross-talk among protomers across the trimerization interface might lead to a more kinetically efficient efflux system. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03145.001 PMID:25248080

  17. Modeling the tripartite drug efflux pump archetype: structural and functional studies of the macromolecular constituents reveal more than their names imply.

    PubMed

    Elkins, C A; Beenken, K E

    2005-12-01

    It is a remarkable age in molecular biology when one can argue that our current understanding of a process is influenced as much by structural studies as it is by genetic and physiological manipulations. This statement is particularly poignant with membrane proteins for which structural knowledge has been long impeded by the inability to easily obtain crystal structures in a lipid matrix. Thus, several high-resolution structures of the components comprising tripartite multidrug efflux pumps from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are now available and were received with much acclaim over ever-evolving crystal structures of soluble, aqueous proteins. These structures, in conjunction with functional mutagenesis studies, have provided insight into substrate capture and binding domains and redefined the potential interactions between individual pump constituents. However, correct assembly of the components is still a matter of debate as is the functional contribution of each to the translocation of drug substrates over long distances spanning the Gram-negative cell envelope. PMID:16433187

  18. [Investigation of the effect of efflux pump inhibitors to MIC values of ciprofloxacin in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Ebru; Coban, Ahmet Yilmaz; Durupinar, Belma

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of efflux pump inhibitors on the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of ciprofloxacin (CIP) in fluoroquinolone-resistant 42 Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n= 42), Escherichia coil (n= 97), Acinetobacter baumannii (n= 58) and Staphylococcus aureus (n= 80) strains isolated from clinical specimens. For this purpose phenylalanyl-arginyl-beta-naphthylamide (PA beta N) was used for P. aeruginosa, E. coli, A. baumannii and reserpine for S. aureus isolates as pump inhibitors. Fluoroquinolone resistance of the clinical isolates were determined by VITEK2 Compact (BioMerieux, France) automated system and confirmed with standard broth microdilution method. For the investigation of the effects of inhibitor agents, the MIC values were also determined in the presence of 25 microg/ml and 100 microg/ml PA beta N and 20 microg/ml reserpine. In the presence of 25 mg/l PA beta N, 61.9% of CIP resistant P. aeruginosa strains converted to susceptible ones, while this rate was 73.8% in the presence of 100 mg/l PA beta N. In A. baumannii clinical isolates, 8.6% and 15.5% of CIP-resistant strains have become susceptible in the presence of 25 mg/l and 100 mg/l PA beta N, respectively. Similarly the MIC values for CIP have decreased > or = 4 folds in 42.2%, and > or = 2 folds in 30.9% of E. coli isolates, in the presence of 25 mg/l PA beta N, however, there was no change in MICs of 26.9% of E. coli strains. The MIC values have also been lowered for > or = 4 folds in 83.6%, and two folds in 13.4% of E. coli strains by the use of 100 mg/l PA beta N concentration, however, no decrease in MIC values was detected in 3% of the isolates. 20 mg/l of reserpine have caused a decrease of > or = 4 folds in 8.75%, and two folds in 33.75% of S. aureus isolates, while there was no change in MIC values of 57.5% of S. aureus strains. Our results showed that PA beta N causes significant reduction in MIC values for CIP in the clinical isolates of P

  19. Inactivation of SmeSyRy Two-Component Regulatory System Inversely Regulates the Expression of SmeYZ and SmeDEF Efflux Pumps in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Tsung; Ning, Hsiao-Chen; Yang, Tsuey-Ching

    2016-01-01

    SmeYZ efflux pump is a critical pump responsible for aminoglycosides resistance, virulence-related characteristics (oxidative stress susceptibility, motility, and secreted protease activity), and virulence in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. However, the regulatory circuit involved in SmeYZ expression is little known. A two-component regulatory system (TCS), smeRySy, transcribed divergently from the smeYZ operon is the first candidate to be considered. To assess the role of SmeRySy in smeYZ expression, the smeRySy isogenic deletion mutant, KJΔRSy, was constructed by gene replacement strategy. Inactivation of smeSyRy correlated with a higher susceptibility to aminoglycosides concomitant with an increased resistance to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, and macrolides. To elucidate the underlying mechanism responsible for the antimicrobials susceptibility profiles, the SmeRySy regulon was firstly revealed by transcriptome analysis and further confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and promoter transcription fusion constructs assay. The results demonstrate that inactivation of smeRySy decreased the expression of SmeYZ pump and increased the expression of SmeDEF pump, which underlies the ΔsmeSyRy-mediated antimicrobials susceptibility profile. To elucidate the cognate relationship between SmeSy and SmeRy, a single mutant, KJΔRy, was constructed and the complementation assay of KJΔRSy with smeRy were performed. The results support that SmeSy-SmeRy TCS is responsible for the regulation of smeYZ operon; whereas SmeSy may be cognate with another unidentified response regulator for the regulation of smeDEF operon. The impact of inverse expression of SmeYZ and SmeDEF pumps on physiological functions was evaluated by mutants construction, H2O2 susceptibility test, swimming, and secreted protease activity assay. The increased expression of SmeDEF pump in KJΔRSy may compensate, to some extents, the SmeYZ downexpression

  20. Efflux-Mediated Antifungal Drug Resistance†

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Richard D.; Lamping, Erwin; Holmes, Ann R.; Niimi, Kyoko; Baret, Philippe V.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Tanabe, Koichi; Niimi, Masakazu; Goffeau, Andre; Monk, Brian C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Fungi cause serious infections in the immunocompromised and debilitated, and the incidence of invasive mycoses has increased significantly over the last 3 decades. Slow diagnosis and the relatively few classes of antifungal drugs result in high attributable mortality for systemic fungal infections. Azole antifungals are commonly used for fungal infections, but azole resistance can be a problem for some patient groups. High-level, clinically significant azole resistance usually involves overexpression of plasma membrane efflux pumps belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) or the major facilitator superfamily class of transporters. The heterologous expression of efflux pumps in model systems, such Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has enabled the functional analysis of efflux pumps from a variety of fungi. Phylogenetic analysis of the ABC pleiotropic drug resistance family has provided a new view of the evolution of this important class of efflux pumps. There are several ways in which the clinical significance of efflux-mediated antifungal drug resistance can be mitigated. Alternative antifungal drugs, such as the echinocandins, that are not efflux pump substrates provide one option. Potential therapeutic approaches that could overcome azole resistance include targeting efflux pump transcriptional regulators and fungal stress response pathways, blockade of energy supply, and direct inhibition of efflux pumps. PMID:19366916

  1. Mitochondria Influence CDR1 Efflux Pump Activity, Hog1-Mediated Oxidative Stress Pathway, Iron Homeostasis, and Ergosterol Levels in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Edwina; Roman, Elvira; Claypool, Steven; Manzoor, Nikhat; Pla, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in Candida albicans is known to be associated with drug susceptibility, cell wall integrity, phospholipid homeostasis, and virulence. In this study, we deleted CaFZO1, a key component required during biogenesis of functional mitochondria. Cells with FZO1 deleted displayed fragmented mitochondria, mitochondrial genome loss, and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and were rendered sensitive to azoles and peroxide. In order to understand the cellular response to dysfunctional mitochondria, genome-wide expression profiling of fzo1Δ/Δ cells was performed. Our results show that the increased susceptibility to azoles was likely due to reduced efflux activity of CDR efflux pumps, caused by the missorting of Cdr1p into the vacuole. In addition, fzo1Δ/Δ cells showed upregulation of genes involved in iron assimilation, in iron-sufficient conditions, characteristic of iron-starved cells. One of the consequent effects was downregulation of genes of the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway with a commensurate decrease in cellular ergosterol levels. We therefore connect deregulated iron metabolism to ergosterol biosynthesis pathway in response to dysfunctional mitochondria. Impaired activation of the Hog1 pathway in the mutant was the basis for increased susceptibility to peroxide and increase in reactive oxygen species, indicating the importance of functional mitochondria in controlling Hog1-mediated oxidative stress response. Mitochondrial phospholipid levels were also altered as indicated by an increase in phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine and decrease in phosphatidylcholine in fzo1Δ/Δ cells. Collectively, these findings reinforce the connection between functional mitochondria and azole tolerance, oxidant-mediated stress, and iron homeostasis in C. albicans. PMID:23979757

  2. Evidence of a Substrate-Discriminating Entrance Channel in the Lower Porter Domain of the Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pump AcrB.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Sabine; Vavra, Martina; Kern, Winfried V

    2016-07-01

    Efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND) transporter family, such as AcrB of Escherichia coli, play an important role in the development of multidrug resistance, but the molecular basis for their substrate promiscuity is not yet completely understood. From a collection of highly clarithromycin-resistant AcrB periplasmic domain mutants derived from in vitro random mutagenesis, we identified variants with an unusually altered drug resistance pattern characterized by increased susceptibility to many drugs of lower molecular weight, including fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, and oxazolidinones, but unchanged or increased resistance to drugs of higher molecular weight, including macrolides. Sequencing of 14 such "divergent resistance" phenotype mutants and 15 control mutants showed that this unusual phenotype was associated with mutations at residues I38 and I671 predominantly to phenylalanine and threonine, respectively, both conferring a similar susceptibility pattern. Reconstructed I38F and I671T single mutants as well as an engineered I38F I671T double mutant with proved efflux competence revealed an equivalent phenotype with enhanced or unchanged resistance to many large AcrB substrates but increased susceptibility to several lower-molecular-weight drugs known to bind within the distal binding pocket. The two isoleucines located in close vicinity to each other in the lower porter domain of AcrB beneath the bottom of the proximal binding pocket may be part of a preferential small-drug entrance pathway that is compromised by the mutations. This finding supports recent indications of distinct entrance channels used by compounds with different physicochemical properties, of which molecular size appears to play a prominent role. PMID:27161641

  3. Tolerance of Listeria monocytogenes to Quaternary Ammonium Sanitizers Is Mediated by a Novel Efflux Pump Encoded by emrE.

    PubMed

    Kovacevic, Jovana; Ziegler, Jennifer; Wałecka-Zacharska, Ewa; Reimer, Aleisha; Kitts, David D; Gilmour, Matthew W

    2016-02-01

    A novel genomic island (LGI1) was discovered in Listeria monocytogenes isolates responsible for the deadliest listeriosis outbreak in Canada, in 2008. To investigate the functional role of LGI1, the outbreak strain 08-5578 was exposed to food chain-relevant stresses, and the expression of 16 LGI1 genes was measured. LGI1 genes with putative efflux (L. monocytogenes emrE [emrELm]), regulatory (lmo1851), and adhesion (sel1) functions were deleted, and the mutants were exposed to acid (HCl), cold (4°C), salt (10 to 20% NaCl), and quaternary ammonium-based sanitizers (QACs). Deletion of lmo1851 had no effect on the L. monocytogenes stress response, and deletion of sel1 did not influence Caco-2 and HeLa cell adherence/invasion, whereas deletion of emrE resulted in increased susceptibility to QACs (P < 0.05) but had no effect on the MICs of gentamicin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, tetracycline, acriflavine, and triclosan. In the presence of the QAC benzalkonium chloride (BAC; 5 μg/ml), 14/16 LGI1 genes were induced, and lmo1861 (putative repressor gene) was constitutively expressed at 4 °C, 37 °C, and 52 °C and in the presence of UV exposure (0 to 30 min). Following 1 h of exposure to BAC (10 μg/ml), upregulation of emrE (49.6-fold), lmo1851 (2.3-fold), lmo1861 (82.4-fold), and sigB (4.1-fold) occurred. Reserpine visibly suppressed the growth of the ΔemrELm strain, indicating that QAC tolerance is due at least partially to efflux activity. These data suggest that a minimal function of LGI1 is to increase the tolerance of L. monocytogenes to QACs via emrELm. Since QACs are commonly used in the food industry, there is a concern that L. monocytogenes strains possessing emrE will have an increased ability to survive this stress and thus to persist in food processing environments. PMID:26590290

  4. Tolerance of Listeria monocytogenes to Quaternary Ammonium Sanitizers Is Mediated by a Novel Efflux Pump Encoded by emrE

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Jennifer; Wałecka-Zacharska, Ewa; Reimer, Aleisha; Kitts, David D.; Gilmour, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    A novel genomic island (LGI1) was discovered in Listeria monocytogenes isolates responsible for the deadliest listeriosis outbreak in Canada, in 2008. To investigate the functional role of LGI1, the outbreak strain 08-5578 was exposed to food chain-relevant stresses, and the expression of 16 LGI1 genes was measured. LGI1 genes with putative efflux (L. monocytogenes emrE [emrELm]), regulatory (lmo1851), and adhesion (sel1) functions were deleted, and the mutants were exposed to acid (HCl), cold (4°C), salt (10 to 20% NaCl), and quaternary ammonium-based sanitizers (QACs). Deletion of lmo1851 had no effect on the L. monocytogenes stress response, and deletion of sel1 did not influence Caco-2 and HeLa cell adherence/invasion, whereas deletion of emrE resulted in increased susceptibility to QACs (P < 0.05) but had no effect on the MICs of gentamicin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, tetracycline, acriflavine, and triclosan. In the presence of the QAC benzalkonium chloride (BAC; 5 μg/ml), 14/16 LGI1 genes were induced, and lmo1861 (putative repressor gene) was constitutively expressed at 4°C, 37°C, and 52°C and in the presence of UV exposure (0 to 30 min). Following 1 h of exposure to BAC (10 μg/ml), upregulation of emrE (49.6-fold), lmo1851 (2.3-fold), lmo1861 (82.4-fold), and sigB (4.1-fold) occurred. Reserpine visibly suppressed the growth of the ΔemrELm strain, indicating that QAC tolerance is due at least partially to efflux activity. These data suggest that a minimal function of LGI1 is to increase the tolerance of L. monocytogenes to QACs via emrELm. Since QACs are commonly used in the food industry, there is a concern that L. monocytogenes strains possessing emrE will have an increased ability to survive this stress and thus to persist in food processing environments. PMID:26590290

  5. Resistance-nodulation-cell division-type efflux pump involved in aminoglycoside resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii strain BM4454.

    PubMed

    Magnet, S; Courvalin, P; Lambert, T

    2001-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant strain Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454 was isolated from a patient with a urinary tract infection. The adeB gene, which encodes a resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) protein, was detected in this strain by PCR with two degenerate oligodeoxynucleotides. Insertional inactivation of adeB in BM4454, which generated BM4454-1, showed that the corresponding protein was responsible for aminoglycoside resistance and was involved in the level of susceptibility to other drugs including fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, trimethoprim, and ethidium bromide. Study of ethidium bromide accumulation in BM4454 and BM4454-1, in the presence or in the absence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, demonstrated that AdeB was responsible for the decrease in intracellular ethidium bromide levels in a proton motive force-dependent manner. The adeB gene was part of a cluster that included adeA and adeC which encodes proteins homologous to membrane fusion and outer membrane proteins of RND-type three-component efflux systems, respectively. The products of two upstream open reading frames encoding a putative two-component regulatory system might be involved in the regulation of expression of the adeABC gene cluster. PMID:11709311

  6. Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-Type Efflux Pump Involved in Aminoglycoside Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii Strain BM4454

    PubMed Central

    Magnet, Sophie; Courvalin, Patrice; Lambert, Thierry

    2001-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant strain Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454 was isolated from a patient with a urinary tract infection. The adeB gene, which encodes a resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) protein, was detected in this strain by PCR with two degenerate oligodeoxynucleotides. Insertional inactivation of adeB in BM4454, which generated BM4454-1, showed that the corresponding protein was responsible for aminoglycoside resistance and was involved in the level of susceptibility to other drugs including fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, trimethoprim, and ethidium bromide. Study of ethidium bromide accumulation in BM4454 and BM4454-1, in the presence or in the absence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, demonstrated that AdeB was responsible for the decrease in intracellular ethidium bromide levels in a proton motive force-dependent manner. The adeB gene was part of a cluster that included adeA and adeC which encodes proteins homologous to membrane fusion and outer membrane proteins of RND-type three-component efflux systems, respectively. The products of two upstream open reading frames encoding a putative two-component regulatory system might be involved in the regulation of expression of the adeABC gene cluster. PMID:11709311

  7. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Candida albicans: Macrocyclic Diterpenes from Euphorbia Species as Potent Inhibitors of Drug Efflux Pumps.

    PubMed

    Nim, Shweta; Mónico, Andreia; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Duarte, Noélia; Prasad, Rajendra; Di Pietro, Attilio; Ferreira, Maria-José U

    2016-08-01

    Thirteen macrocyclic diterpenes (1-13) of the jatrophane and lathyrane types, either isolated from Euphorbia species or obtained by chemical derivatization, were evaluated for their ability to inhibit the drug efflux activity of Candida albicans CaCdr1p and CaMdr1p multidrug transporters overexpressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. Their inhibitory potential was assessed through a functional assay of Nile Red accumulation monitored by flow cytometry. A chemosensitization assay, using the checkerboard method, was also performed with the active compounds in order to evaluate their type of interaction with fluconazole.In the transport assay, most compounds were found to inhibit both transporters, most likely as non-substrates, as shown by relative resistance indices close to unity. In contrast, the jatrophanes euphopubescenol (10) and euphomelliferene A (11) were selective for CaMdr1p and CaCdr1p, respectively. Moreover, when used in combination with fluconazole, compounds 12 and 13 displayed strong synergistic interactions (FICI = 0.071) against the yeast strain overexpressing CaMdr1p, decreasing the MIC80 of the antifungal agent 13-fold. Both compounds were also able to reduce the effective concentration of this antifungal agent by 4- to 8-fold against an azole-resistant clinical isolate of C. albicans (F5). PMID:27145238

  8. KpnEF, a New Member of the Klebsiella pneumoniae Cell Envelope Stress Response Regulon, Is an SMR-Type Efflux Pump Involved in Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rajamohan, Govindan

    2013-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae has been frequently associated with nosocomial infections. Efflux systems are ubiquitous transporters that also function in drug resistance. Genome analysis of K. pneumoniae strain NTUH-K2044 revealed the presence of ∼15 putative drug efflux systems. We discuss here for the first time the characterization of a putative SMR-type efflux pump, an ebrAB homolog (denoted here as kpnEF) with respect to Klebsiella physiology and the multidrug-resistant phenotype. Analysis of hypermucoviscosity revealed direct involvement of kpnEF in capsule synthesis. The ΔkpnEF mutant displayed higher sensitivity to hyperosmotic (∼2.8-fold) and high bile (∼4.0-fold) concentrations. Mutation in kpnEF resulted in increased susceptibility to cefepime, ceftriaxone, colistin, erythromycin, rifampin, tetracycline, and streptomycin; mutated strains changed from being resistant to being susceptible, and the resistance was restored upon complementation. The ΔkpnEF mutant displayed enhanced sensitivity toward structurally related compounds such as sodium dodecyl sulfate, deoxycholate, and dyes, including clinically relevant disinfectants such as benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine, and triclosan. The prevalence of kpnEF in clinical strains broadens the diversity of antibiotic resistance in K. pneumoniae. Experimental evidence of CpxR binding to the efflux pump promoter and quantification of its expression in a cpxAR mutant background demonstrated kpnEF to be a member of the Cpx regulon. This study helps to elucidate the unprecedented biological functions of the SMR-type efflux pump in Klebsiella spp. PMID:23836167

  9. Novel Piperazine Arylideneimidazolones Inhibit the AcrAB-TolC Pump in Escherichia coli and Simultaneously Act as Fluorescent Membrane Probes in a Combined Real-Time Influx and Efflux Assay.

    PubMed

    Bohnert, Jürgen A; Schuster, Sabine; Kern, Winfried V; Karcz, Tadeusz; Olejarz, Agnieszka; Kaczor, Aneta; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we tested five compounds belonging to a novel series of piperazine arylideneimidazolones for the ability to inhibit the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump. The biphenylmethylene derivative (BM-19) and the fluorenylmethylene derivative (BM-38) were found to possess the strongest efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) activities in the AcrAB-TolC-overproducingEscherichia colistrain 3-AG100, whereas BM-9, BM-27, and BM-36 had no activity at concentrations of up to 50 μM in a Nile red efflux assay. MIC microdilution assays demonstrated that BM-19 at 1/4 MIC (intrinsic MIC, 200 μM) was able to reduce the MICs of levofloxacin, oxacillin, linezolid, and clarithromycin 8-fold. BM-38 at 1/4 MIC (intrinsic MIC, 100 μM) was able to reduce only the MICs of oxacillin and linezolid (2-fold). Both compounds markedly reduced the MIC of rifampin (BM-19, 32-fold; and BM-38, 4-fold), which is suggestive of permeabilization of the outer membrane as an additional mechanism of action. Nitrocefin hydrolysis assays demonstrated that in addition to their EPI activity, both compounds were in fact weak permeabilizers of the outer membrane. Moreover, it was found that BM-19, BM-27, BM-36, and BM-38 acted as near-infrared-emitting fluorescent membrane probes, which allowed for their use in a combined influx and efflux assay and thus for tracking of the transport of an EPI across the outer membrane by an efflux pump in real time. The EPIs BM-38 and BM-19 displayed the most rapid influx of all compounds, whereas BM-27, which did not act as an EPI, showed the slowest influx. PMID:26824939

  10. Structures of the TetR-like simocyclinone efflux pump repressor, SimR, and the mechanism of ligand-mediated derepression.

    PubMed

    Le, Tung B K; Stevenson, Clare E M; Fiedler, Hans-Peter; Maxwell, Anthony; Lawson, David M; Buttner, Mark J

    2011-04-22

    Simocyclinone D8 (SD8), a potent DNA gyrase inhibitor made by Streptomyces antibioticus, is exported from the producing organism by the SimX efflux pump. The expression of simX is under the control of SimR, a member of the TetR family of transcriptional regulators. SimR represses simX transcription by binding to operators in the intergenic region between simR and simX. Previously, we have shown that the mature antibiotic SD8 or its biosynthetic intermediate, simocyclinone C4, can dissociate SimR from its operators, leading to derepression of simX and export of SD8 from the cell. This provides a mechanism that couples the biosynthesis of the antibiotic to its export. Here, we report the crystal structures of SimR alone and in complex with either SD8 or simocyclinone C4. The ligand-binding pocket is unusual compared to those of other characterized TetR-family transcriptional regulators: the structures show an extensive ligand-binding pocket spanning both monomers in the functional dimeric unit, with the aminocoumarin moiety of SD8 buried in the protein core, while the angucyclic polyketide moiety is partially exposed to bulk solvent. Through comparisons of the structures, we postulate a derepression mechanism for SimR that invokes rigid-body motions of the subunits relative to one another, coupled with a putative locking mechanism to restrict further conformational change. PMID:21354180

  11. Role of OXA-23 and AdeABC efflux pump for acquiring carbapenem resistance in an Acinetobacter baumannii strain carrying the blaOXA-66 gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yangsoon; Yum, Jong Hwa; Kim, Chang-Ki; Yong, Dongeun; Jeon, Eun Hee; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Ahn, Jee Young; Lee, Kyungwon

    2010-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the mechanisms for acquiring carbapenem resistance in six clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii. All isolates showed similar SmaI-macrorestriction patterns with less than 3 band differences by PFGE. The isolates showed a high level resistance (>32 mg/L) to both imipenem and meropenem by Etest. Phe-Arg-beta-naphthylamide lowered the MICs of carbapenems. Real-time PCR experiments showed that expression levels of the adeB gene in the six A. baumannii isolates were 10- to 40-times higher than those of imipenem-susceptible strains. Direct sequencing of PCR products showed that all isolates carried the bla(OXA-23) gene, which was preceded by ISAba1. The bla(OXA-23) probe hybridized with approximately 500-kb I-CeuI chromosomal fragments, but not with a plasmid. These findings suggest that overexpression of the AdeABC efflux pump as well as chromosome-borne OXA-23 may play a role in acquiring carbapenem resistance in our A. baumannii isolates. PMID:20124329

  12. Structural and biochemical characterization of MepR, a multidrug binding transcription regulator of the Staphylococcus aureus multidrug efflux pump MepA

    PubMed Central

    Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Schuman, Jason T.; Seo, Susan M.; Kaatz, Glenn W.; Brennan, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    MepR is a multidrug binding transcription regulator that represses expression of the Staphylococcus aureus multidrug efflux pump gene, mepA, as well as its own gene. MepR is induced by multiple cationic toxins, which are also substrates of MepA. In order to understand the gene regulatory and drug-binding mechanisms of MepR, we carried out biochemical, in vivo and structural studies. The 2.40 Å resolution structure of drug-free MepR reveals the most open MarR family protein conformation to date, which will require a huge conformational change to bind cognate DNA. DNA-binding data show that MepR uses a dual regulatory binding mode as the repressor binds the mepA operator as a dimer of dimers, but binds the mepR operator as a single dimer. Alignment of the six half sites reveals the consensus MepR binding site, 5'-GTTAGAT-3'. ‘Drug’ binding studies show that MepR binds to ethidium and DAPI with comparable affinities (Kd = 2.6 and 4.5 μM, respectively), but with significantly lower affinity to the larger rhodamine 6G (Kd = 62.6 μM). Mapping clinically relevant or in vitro selected MepR mutants onto the MepR structure suggests that their defective repressor phenotypes are due to structural and allosteric defects. PMID:19129225

  13. Efflux-Mediated Drug Resistance in Bacteria: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xian-Zhi; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Drug efflux pumps play a key role in drug resistance and also serve other functions in bacteria. There has been a growing list of multidrug and drug-specific efflux pumps characterized from bacteria of human, animal, plant and environmental origins. These pumps are mostly encoded on the chromosome although they can also be plasmid-encoded. A previous article (Li X-Z and Nikaido H, Drugs, 2004; 64[2]: 159–204) had provided a comprehensive review regarding efflux-mediated drug resistance in bacteria. In the past five years, significant progress has been achieved in further understanding of drug resistance-related efflux transporters and this review focuses on the latest studies in this field since 2003. This has been demonstrated in multiple aspects that include but are not limited to: further molecular and biochemical characterization of the known drug efflux pumps and identification of novel drug efflux pumps; structural elucidation of the transport mechanisms of drug transporters; regulatory mechanisms of drug efflux pumps; determining the role of the drug efflux pumps in other functions such as stress responses, virulence and cell communication; and development of efflux pump inhibitors. Overall, the multifaceted implications of drug efflux transporters warrant novel strategies to combat multidrug resistance in bacteria. PMID:19678712

  14. Prevalence of Genes of OXA-23 Carbapenemase and AdeABC Efflux Pump Associated with Multidrug Resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates in the ICU of a Comprehensive Hospital of Northwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Wei; Li, Caiyun; Zhang, Haiyun; Li, Gang; Liu, Xiaoming; Wei, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the molecular epidemiology and the genetic support of clinical multidrug resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) isolates in an ICU ward of a comprehensive hospital. A total of 102 non-duplicate drug-resistant A. baumannii isolates were identified and 93 (91.1%) of them were MDR strains. Molecular analysis demonstrated that carbapenemase genes blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-51 were presented in all 93 MDR isolates (100%), but other carbapenemase genes, including blaOXA-24, blaOXA-58, blaIMP-1, blaIMP-4, blaSIM, and blaVIM genes were completely absent in all isolates. In addition, genes of AdeABC efflux system were detected in 88.2% (90/102) isolates. Interestingly, an addition to efflux pump inhibitor, reserpine could significantly enhance the susceptibility of MDR isolates to moxifloxacin, cefotaxime, and imipenem (p < 0.01). Clonal relationship analysis further grouped these clinical drug-resistant isolates into nine clusters, and the MDR strains were mainly in clusters A, B, C, and D, which include 16, 13, 25, and 15 isolates, respectively. This study demonstrated that clinical isolates carrying carbapenemase-encoding genes blaOXA-23 and AdeABC efflux pump genes are the main prevalent MDR A. baumannii, and the co-expression of oxacillinase and efflux pump proteins are thus considered to be the important reason for the prevalence of this organism in the ICU of this hospital. PMID:26308027

  15. Two host-induced Ralstonia solanacearum genes, acrA and dinF, encode multidrug efflux pumps and contribute to bacterial wilt virulence.

    PubMed

    Brown, Darby G; Swanson, Jill K; Allen, Caitilyn

    2007-05-01

    Multidrug efflux pumps (MDRs) are hypothesized to protect pathogenic bacteria from toxic host defense compounds. We created mutations in the Ralstonia solanacearum acrA and dinF genes, which encode putative MDRs in the broad-host-range plant pathogen. Both mutations reduced the ability of R. solanacearum to grow in the presence of various toxic compounds, including antibiotics, phytoalexins, and detergents. Both acrAB and dinF mutants were significantly less virulent on the tomato plant than the wild-type strain. Complementation restored near-wild-type levels of virulence to both mutants. Addition of either dinF or acrAB to Escherichia coli MDR mutants KAM3 and KAM32 restored the resistance of these strains to several toxins, demonstrating that the R. solanacearum genes can function heterologously to complement known MDR mutations. Toxic and DNA-damaging compounds induced expression of acrA and dinF, as did growth in both susceptible and resistant tomato plants. Carbon limitation also increased expression of acrA and dinF, while the stress-related sigma factor RpoS was required at a high cell density (>10(7) CFU/ml) to obtain wild-type levels of acrA expression both in minimal medium and in planta. The type III secretion system regulator HrpB negatively regulated dinF expression in culture at high cell densities. Together, these results show that acrAB and dinF encode MDRs in R. solanacearum and that they contribute to the overall aggressiveness of this phytopathogen, probably by protecting the bacterium from the toxic effects of host antimicrobial compounds. PMID:17337552

  16. The binding of triclosan to SmeT, the repressor of the multidrug efflux pump SmeDEF, induces antibiotic resistance in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Alvaro; Ruiz, Federico M; Romero, Antonio; Martínez, José L

    2011-06-01

    The wide utilization of biocides poses a concern on the impact of these compounds on natural bacterial populations. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that biocides can select, at least in laboratory experiments, antibiotic resistant bacteria. This situation has raised concerns, not just on scientists and clinicians, but also on regulatory agencies, which are demanding studies on the impact that the utilization of biocides may have on the development on resistance and consequently on the treatment of infectious diseases and on human health. In the present article, we explored the possibility that the widely used biocide triclosan might induce antibiotic resistance using as a model the opportunistic pathogen Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Biochemical, functional and structural studies were performed, focusing on SmeDEF, the most relevant antibiotic- and triclosan-removing multidrug efflux pump of S. maltophilia. Expression of smeDEF is regulated by the repressor SmeT. Triclosan released SmeT from its operator and induces the expression of smeDEF, thus reducing the susceptibility of S. maltophilia to antibiotics in the presence of the biocide. The structure of SmeT bound to triclosan is described. Two molecules of triclosan were found to bind to one subunit of the SmeT homodimer. The binding of the biocide stabilizes the N terminal domain of both subunits in a conformation unable to bind DNA. To our knowledge this is the first crystal structure obtained for a transcriptional regulator bound to triclosan. This work provides the molecular basis for understanding the mechanisms allowing the induction of phenotypic resistance to antibiotics by triclosan. PMID:21738470

  17. Characterization and regulation of the Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-type multidrug efflux pumps MdtABC and MdtUVW from the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of the devastating disease fire blight in rosaceous plants such as apple, pear, quince, raspberry, and cotoneaster. In order to survive and multiply in a host, microbes must be able to circumvent the toxic effects of antimicrobial plant compounds, such as flavonoids and tannins. E. amylovora uses multidrug efflux transporters that recognize and actively export toxic compounds out of the cells. Here, two heterotrimeric resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type multidrug efflux pumps, MdtABC and MdtUVW, from E. amylovora were identified. These RND systems are unusual in that they contain two different RND proteins forming a functional pump. Results To find the substrate specificities of the two efflux systems, we overexpressed the transporters in a hypersensitive mutant lacking the major RND pump AcrB. Both transporters mediated resistance to several flavonoids, fusidic acid and novobiocin. Additionally, MdtABC mediated resistance towards josamycin, bile salts and silver nitrate, and MdtUVW towards clotrimazole. The ability of the mdtABC- and mdtUVW-deficient mutants to multiply in apple rootstock was reduced. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that the expression of the transporter genes was induced during infection of apple rootstock. The polyphenolic plant compound tannin, as well as the heavy metal salt tungstate was found to induce the expression of mdtABC. Finally, the expression of the mdtABC genes was shown to be regulated by BaeR, the response regulator of the two-component system BaeSR, a cell envelope stress response system that controls the adaptive responses to changes in the environment. Conclusions The expression of MdtABC and MdtUVW is induced during growth of E. amylovora in planta. We identified the plant polyphenol tannin as inducer of mdtABC expression. The reduced ability of the mdtABC- and mdtUVW-deficient mutants to multiply in apple rootstock suggests that the

  18. Low-Level Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to Thrombin-Induced Platelet Microbicidal Protein 1 In Vitro Associated with qacA Gene Carriage Is Independent of Multidrug Efflux Pump Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, A. S.; Kupferwasser, L. I.; Brown, M. H.; Skurray, R. A.; Grkovic, S.; Jones, T.; Mukhopadhay, K.; Yeaman, M. R.

    2006-01-01

    Thrombin-induced platelet microbial protein 1 (tPMP-1), a cationic antimicrobial polypeptide released from thrombin-stimulated rabbit platelets, targets the Staphylococcus aureus cytoplasmic membrane to initiate its microbicidal effects. In vitro resistance to tPMP-1 correlates with survival advantages in vivo. In S. aureus, the plasmid-carried qacA gene encodes a multidrug transporter, conferring resistance to organic cations (e.g., ethidium [Et]) via proton motive force (PMF)-energized export. We previously showed that qacA also confers a tPMP-1-resistant (tPMP-1r) phenotype in vitro. The current study evaluated whether (i) transporters encoded by the qacB and qacC multidrug resistance genes also confer tPMP-1r and (ii) tPMP-1r mediated by qacA is dependent on efflux pump activity. In contrast to tPMP-1r qacA-bearing strains, the parental strain and its isogenic qacB- and qacC-containing strains were tPMP-1 susceptible (tPMP-1s). Efflux pump inhibition by cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone abrogated Etr, but not tPMP-1r, in the qacA-bearing strain. In synergy assays, exposure of the qacA-bearing strain to tPMP-1 did not affect the susceptibility of Et (ruling out Et-tPMP-1 cotransport). The following cytoplasmic membrane parameters did not differ significantly between the qacA-bearing and parental strains: contents of the major phospholipids; asymmetric distributions of the positively charged species, lysyl-phosphotidylglycerol; fatty acid composition; and relative surface charge. Of note, the qacA-bearing strain exhibited greater membrane fluidity than that of the parental, qacB-, or qacC-bearing strain. In conclusion, among these families of efflux pumps, only the multidrug transporter encoded by qacA conferred a tPMP-1r phenotype. These data suggest that qacA-encoded tPMP-1r results from the impact of a specific transporter upon membrane structure or function unrelated to PMF-dependent peptide efflux. PMID:16801425

  19. The α-barrel tip region of Escherichia coli TolC homologs of Vibrio vulnificus interacts with the MacA protein to form the functional macrolide-specific efflux pump MacAB-TolC.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minho; Kim, Hyun-Lee; Song, Saemee; Joo, Minju; Lee, Seunghwa; Kim, Daeyoung; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Ha, Nam-Chul; Lee, Kangseok

    2013-04-01

    TolC and its homologous family of proteins are outer membrane factors that are essential for exporting small molecules and toxins across the outer membrane in Gram-negative bacteria. Two open reading frames in the Vibrio vulnificus genome that encode proteins homologous to Escherichia coli TolC, designated TolCV1 and TolCV2, have 51.3% and 29.6% amino acid identity to TolC, respectively. In this study, we show that TolCV1 and TolCV2 functionally and physically interacted with the membrane fusion protein, MacA, a component of the macrolide-specific MacAB-TolC pump of E. coli. We further show that the conserved residues located at the aperture tip region of the α-hairpin of TolCV1 and TolCV2 played an essential role in the formation of the functional MacAB-TolC pump using site-directed mutational analyses. Our findings suggest that these outer membrane factors have conserved tip-to-tip interaction with the MacA membrane fusion protein for action of the drug efflux pump in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:23625214

  20. Expression of the AcrAB Components of the AcrAB-TolC Multidrug Efflux Pump of Yersinia enterocolitica Is Subject to Dual Regulation by OmpR

    PubMed Central

    Raczkowska, Adrianna; Trzos, Joanna; Lewandowska, Olga; Nieckarz, Marta; Brzostek, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    OmpR is a transcriptional regulator implicated in the control of various cellular processes and functions in Enterobacteriaceae. This study was undertaken to identify genes comprising the OmpR regulon in the human gastrointestinal pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica. Derivatives of an ompR-negative strain with random transposon insertions creating transcriptional fusions with the reporter gene lacZ were isolated. These were supplied with the wild-type ompR allele in trans and then screened for OmpR-dependent changes in β-galactosidase activity. Using this strategy, five insertions in genes/operons positively regulated by OmpR and two insertions in genes negatively regulated by this protein were identified. Genetic analysis of one of these fusion strains revealed that the gene acrR, encoding transcriptional repressor AcrR is negatively regulated by OmpR. Differential analysis of membrane proteins by SDS-PAGE followed by mass spectrometry identified the protein AcrB, a component of the AcrAB-TolC multidrug efflux pump, as being positively regulated by OmpR. Analysis of the activity of the acrR and acrAB promoters using gfp fusions confirmed their OmpR-dependent repression and activation, respectively. The identification of putative OmpR-binding sites and electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that this regulator binds specifically to both promoter regions with different affinity. Examination of the activity of the acrR and acrAB promoters after the exposure of cells to different chemicals showed that bile salts can act as an OmpR-independent inducer. Taken together, our findings suggest that OmpR positively controls the expression of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump involved in the adaptive response of Y. enterocolitica O:9 to different chemical stressors, thus conferring an advantage in particular ecological niches. PMID:25893523

  1. Rifaximin resistance in Escherichia coli associated with inflammatory bowel disease correlates with prior rifaximin use, mutations in rpoB, and activity of Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide-inhibitable efflux pumps.

    PubMed

    Kothary, Vishesh; Scherl, Ellen J; Bosworth, Brian; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Dupont, Herbert L; Harel, Josee; Simpson, Kenneth W; Dogan, Belgin

    2013-02-01

    Escherichia coli is implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Rifaximin, a nonabsorbable derivative of rifampin effective against E. coli, improves symptoms in mild-to-moderate IBD. However, rifaximin resistance can develop in a single step in vitro. We examined the prevalence and mechanisms of rifaximin resistance in 62 strains of E. coli isolated from the ileal mucosa of 50 patients (19 with ileal Crohn's disease [L1+L3], 6 with colonic Crohn's disease [L2], 13 with ulcerative colitis [UC], 4 with symptomatic non-IBD diagnoses [NI], and 8 healthy [H]). Resistance (MIC > 1,024 mg/liter) was present in 12/48 IBD-associated ileal E. coli strains. Resistance correlated with prior rifaximin treatment (P < 0.00000001) but not with the presence of ileal inflammation (P = 0.73) or E. coli phylogroup. Mutations in a 1,057-bp region of rpoB, which encodes the bacterial target of rifaximin, were identified in 10/12 resistant strains versus 0/50 sensitive strains (P < 0.000000001) and consisted of seven amino acid substitutions. The efflux pump inhibitor Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide (PAβN) lowered the MIC of 9/12 resistant strains 8- to 128-fold. Resistance was stable in the absence of rifaximin in 10/12 resistant strains after 30 passages. We conclude that IBD-associated ileal E. coli frequently manifest resistance to rifaximin that correlates with prior rifaximin use, amino acid substitutions in rpoB, and activity of PAβN-inhibitable efflux pumps, but not with the presence of ileal inflammation or E. coli phylogroup. These findings have significant implications for treatment trials targeting IBD-associated E. coli. PMID:23183443

  2. Rifaximin Resistance in Escherichia coli Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Correlates with Prior Rifaximin Use, Mutations in rpoB, and Activity of Phe-Arg-β-Naphthylamide-Inhibitable Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Kothary, Vishesh; Scherl, Ellen J.; Bosworth, Brian; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; DuPont, Herbert L.; Harel, Josee

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli is implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Rifaximin, a nonabsorbable derivative of rifampin effective against E. coli, improves symptoms in mild-to-moderate IBD. However, rifaximin resistance can develop in a single step in vitro. We examined the prevalence and mechanisms of rifaximin resistance in 62 strains of E. coli isolated from the ileal mucosa of 50 patients (19 with ileal Crohn's disease [L1+L3], 6 with colonic Crohn's disease [L2], 13 with ulcerative colitis [UC], 4 with symptomatic non-IBD diagnoses [NI], and 8 healthy [H]). Resistance (MIC > 1,024 mg/liter) was present in 12/48 IBD-associated ileal E. coli strains. Resistance correlated with prior rifaximin treatment (P < 0.00000001) but not with the presence of ileal inflammation (P = 0.73) or E. coli phylogroup. Mutations in a 1,057-bp region of rpoB, which encodes the bacterial target of rifaximin, were identified in 10/12 resistant strains versus 0/50 sensitive strains (P < 0.000000001) and consisted of seven amino acid substitutions. The efflux pump inhibitor Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide (PAβN) lowered the MIC of 9/12 resistant strains 8- to 128-fold. Resistance was stable in the absence of rifaximin in 10/12 resistant strains after 30 passages. We conclude that IBD-associated ileal E. coli frequently manifest resistance to rifaximin that correlates with prior rifaximin use, amino acid substitutions in rpoB, and activity of PAβN-inhibitable efflux pumps, but not with the presence of ileal inflammation or E. coli phylogroup. These findings have significant implications for treatment trials targeting IBD-associated E. coli. PMID:23183443

  3. Expression of the AcrAB Components of the AcrAB-TolC Multidrug Efflux Pump of Yersinia enterocolitica Is Subject to Dual Regulation by OmpR.

    PubMed

    Raczkowska, Adrianna; Trzos, Joanna; Lewandowska, Olga; Nieckarz, Marta; Brzostek, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    OmpR is a transcriptional regulator implicated in the control of various cellular processes and functions in Enterobacteriaceae. This study was undertaken to identify genes comprising the OmpR regulon in the human gastrointestinal pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica. Derivatives of an ompR-negative strain with random transposon insertions creating transcriptional fusions with the reporter gene lacZ were isolated. These were supplied with the wild-type ompR allele in trans and then screened for OmpR-dependent changes in β-galactosidase activity. Using this strategy, five insertions in genes/operons positively regulated by OmpR and two insertions in genes negatively regulated by this protein were identified. Genetic analysis of one of these fusion strains revealed that the gene acrR, encoding transcriptional repressor AcrR is negatively regulated by OmpR. Differential analysis of membrane proteins by SDS-PAGE followed by mass spectrometry identified the protein AcrB, a component of the AcrAB-TolC multidrug efflux pump, as being positively regulated by OmpR. Analysis of the activity of the acrR and acrAB promoters using gfp fusions confirmed their OmpR-dependent repression and activation, respectively. The identification of putative OmpR-binding sites and electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that this regulator binds specifically to both promoter regions with different affinity. Examination of the activity of the acrR and acrAB promoters after the exposure of cells to different chemicals showed that bile salts can act as an OmpR-independent inducer. Taken together, our findings suggest that OmpR positively controls the expression of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump involved in the adaptive response of Y. enterocolitica O:9 to different chemical stressors, thus conferring an advantage in particular ecological niches. PMID:25893523

  4. AcrS/EnvR Represses Expression of the acrAB Multidrug Efflux Genes in Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Hidetada; Takumi-Kobayashi, Asuka; Theisen, Ulrike; Hirata, Takahiro; Nishino, Kunihiko; Yamaguchi, Akihito

    2008-01-01

    The acrS regulatory gene is located upstream of the acrEF multidrug efflux system genes. However, the roles of AcrS in regulation of drug efflux pumps have not been clearly understood. Here we show that AcrS represses other multidrug efflux genes, acrAB, which encode a major efflux system in Escherichia coli. PMID:18567659

  5. Bacterial multi-drug efflux transporters

    PubMed Central

    Delmar, Jared A.; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W.

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by bacteria remain a leading cause of death worldwide. While antibiotics remain a key clinical therapy, their effectiveness has been severely compromised by the development of drug resistance in these pathogens. A common and powerful resistance mechanism, multi-drug efflux transporters are capable of extruding a number of structurally unrelated antimicrobials from the bacterial cell, including antibiotics and toxic heavy metal ions, facilitating their survival in noxious environments. Those transporters belonging to the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) superfamily typically assemble as tripartite efflux complexes, spanning the inner and outer membranes of the cell envelope. In Escherichia coli, the CusCFBA complex, which mediates resistance to copper(I) and silver(I) ions, is the only known RND transporter with a specificity for heavy metals. Herein, we describe the current knowledge of individual pump components of the Cus system, a paradigm for efflux machinery, and speculate on how RND pumps assemble to fight diverse antimicrobials. PMID:24702006

  6. Multidrug Efflux Systems in Microaerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zeling; Yan, Aixin

    2015-01-01

    Active drug efflux constitutes an important mechanism of antibiotic and multidrug resistance in bacteria. Understanding the distribution, expression, and physiological functions of multidrug efflux pumps, especially under physiologically and clinically relevant conditions of the pathogens, is the key to combat drug resistance. In animal hosts, most wounded, infected and inflamed tissues display low oxygen tensions. In this article, we summarize research development on multidrug efflux pumps in the medicinally relevant microaerobic and anaerobic pathogens and their implications in the effort to combat drug-resistant infections. PMID:27025630

  7. Pathways of Arsenic Uptake and Efflux

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hung-Chi; Fu, Hsueh-Liang; Lin, Yung-Feng; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic substance and ranks first on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Superfund List. Arsenic is a carcinogen and a causative agent of numerous human diseases. Paradoxically arsenic is used as a chemotherapeutic agent for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Inorganic arsenic has two biological important oxidation states: As(V) (arsenate) and As(III) (arsenite). Arsenic uptake is adventitious because the arsenate and arsenite are chemically similar to required nutrients. Arsenate resembles phosphate and is a competitive inhibitor of many phosphate-utilizing enzymes. Arsenate is taken up by phosphate transport systems. In contrast, at physiological pH, the form of arsenite is As(OH)3, which resembles organic molecules such as glycerol. Consequently, arsenite is taken into cells by aquaglyceroporin channels. Arsenic efflux systems are found in nearly every organism and evolved to rid cells of this toxic metalloid. These efflux systems include members of the multidrug resistance protein family and the bacterial exchangers Acr3 and ArsB. ArsB can also be a subunit of the ArsAB As(III)-translocating ATPase, an ATP-driven efflux pump. The ArsD metallochaperone binds cytosolic As(III) and transfers it to the ArsA subunit of the efflux pump. Knowledge of the pathways and transporters for arsenic uptake and efflux is essential for understanding its toxicity and carcinogenicity and for rational design of cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:23046656

  8. PUMPS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1959-03-24

    A pump is described for conveving liquids, particure it is not advisable he apparatus. The to be submerged in the liquid to be pumped, a conduit extending from the high-velocity nozzle of the injector,and means for applying a pulsating prcesure to the surface of the liquid in the conduit, whereby the surface oscillates between positions in the conduit. During the positive half- cycle of an applied pulse liquid is forced through the high velocity nozzle or jet of the injector and operates in the manner of the well known water injector and pumps liquid from the main intake to the outlet of the injector. During the negative half-cycle of the pulse liquid flows in reverse through the jet but no reverse pumping action takes place.

  9. Involvement of Antibiotic Efflux Machinery in Glutathione-Mediated Decreased Ciprofloxacin Activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Manish; Subramanian, Mahesh; Kumar, Ranjeet; Jass, Jana; Jawali, Narendra

    2016-07-01

    We have analyzed the contribution of different efflux components to glutathione-mediated abrogation of ciprofloxacin's activity in Escherichia coli and the underlying potential mechanism(s) behind this phenomenon. The results indicated that glutathione increased the total active efflux, thereby partially contributing to glutathione-mediated neutralization of ciprofloxacin's antibacterial action in E. coli However, the role of glutathione-mediated increased efflux becomes evident in the absence of a functional TolC-AcrAB efflux pump. PMID:27139480

  10. Expression of the RND-type efflux pump AdeABC in Acinetobacter baumannii is regulated by the AdeRS two-component system.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Isabelle; Damier-Piolle, Laurence; Courvalin, Patrice; Lambert, Thierry

    2004-09-01

    The AdeABC pump of Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454, which confers resistance to various antibiotic classes including aminoglycosides, is composed of the AdeA, AdeB, and AdeC proteins; AdeB is a member of the RND superfamily. The adeA, adeB, and adeC genes are contiguous and adjacent to adeS and adeR, which are transcribed in the opposite direction and which specify proteins homologous to sensors and regulators of two-component systems, respectively (S. Magnet, P. Courvalin, and T. Lambert, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 45:3375-3380, 2001). Analysis by Northern hybridization indicated that the three genes were cotranscribed, although mRNAs corresponding to adeAB and adeC were also present. Cotranscription of the two regulatory genes was demonstrated by reverse transcription-PCR. Inactivation of adeS led to aminoglycoside susceptibility. Transcripts corresponding to adeAB were not detected in susceptible A. baumannii CIP 70-10 but were present in spontaneous gentamicin-resistant mutants obtained in vitro. Analysis of these mutants revealed the substitutions Thr153-->Met in AdeS downstream from the putative His-149 site of autophosphorylation, which is presumably responsible for the loss of phosphorylase activity by the sensor, and Pro116-->Leu in AdeR at the first residue of the alpha(5) helix of the receiver domain, which is involved in interactions that control the output domain of response regulators. These mutations led to constitutive expression of the pump and, thus, to antibiotic resistance. These data indicate that the AdeABC pump is cryptic in wild A. baumannii due to stringent control by the AdeRS two-component system. PMID:15328088

  11. Expression of the RND-Type Efflux Pump AdeABC in Acinetobacter baumannii Is Regulated by the AdeRS Two-Component System

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Isabelle; Damier-Piolle, Laurence; Courvalin, Patrice; Lambert, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    The AdeABC pump of Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454, which confers resistance to various antibiotic classes including aminoglycosides, is composed of the AdeA, AdeB, and AdeC proteins; AdeB is a member of the RND superfamily. The adeA, adeB, and adeC genes are contiguous and adjacent to adeS and adeR, which are transcribed in the opposite direction and which specify proteins homologous to sensors and regulators of two-component systems, respectively (S. Magnet, P. Courvalin, and T. Lambert, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 45:3375-3380, 2001). Analysis by Northern hybridization indicated that the three genes were cotranscribed, although mRNAs corresponding to adeAB and adeC were also present. Cotranscription of the two regulatory genes was demonstrated by reverse transcription-PCR. Inactivation of adeS led to aminoglycoside susceptibility. Transcripts corresponding to adeAB were not detected in susceptible A. baumannii CIP 70-10 but were present in spontaneous gentamicin-resistant mutants obtained in vitro. Analysis of these mutants revealed the substitutions Thr153→Met in AdeS downstream from the putative His-149 site of autophosphorylation, which is presumably responsible for the loss of phosphorylase activity by the sensor, and Pro116→Leu in AdeR at the first residue of the α5 helix of the receiver domain, which is involved in interactions that control the output domain of response regulators. These mutations led to constitutive expression of the pump and, thus, to antibiotic resistance. These data indicate that the AdeABC pump is cryptic in wild A. baumannii due to stringent control by the AdeRS two-component system. PMID:15328088

  12. In vitro activity of levofloxacin against planktonic and biofilm Stenotrophomonas maltophilia lifestyles under conditions relevant to pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis, and relationship with SmeDEF multidrug efflux pump expression.

    PubMed

    Pompilio, Arianna; Crocetta, Valentina; Verginelli, Fabio; Bonaventura, Giovanni Di

    2016-07-01

    The activity of levofloxacin against planktonic and biofilm Stenotrophomonas maltophilia cells and the role played by the multidrug efflux pump SmeDEF were evaluated under conditions relevant to the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. MIC, MBC and MBEC of levofloxacin were assessed, against five CF strains, under 'standard' (CLSI-recommended) and 'CF-like' (pH 6.8, 5% CO2, in a synthetic CF sputum) conditions. Levofloxacin was tested against biofilms at concentrations (10, 50 and 100 μg mL(-1)) corresponding to achievable serum levels and sputum levels by aerosolisation. smeD expression was evaluated, under both conditions, in planktonic and biofilm cells by RT-PCR. The bactericidal effect of levofloxacin was decreased, in three out of five strains tested, under 'CF-like' conditions (MBC: 2-4 vs 8-16 μg mL(-1), under 'standard' and 'CF-like' conditions, respectively). Biofilm was intrinsically resistant to levofloxacin, regardless of conditions tested (MBECs ≥ 100 μg mL(-1) for all strains). Only under 'CF-like' conditions, smeD expression increased during planktonic-to-biofilm transition, and in biofilm cells compared to stationary planktonic cells. Our findings confirmed that S. maltophilia biofilm is intrinsically resistant to therapeutic concentrations of levofloxacin. Under conditions relevant to CF, smeD overexpression could contribute to levofloxacin resistance. Further studies are warranted to define the clinical relevance of our findings. PMID:27242375

  13. Pseudoatomic Structure of the Tripartite Multidrug Efflux Pump AcrAB-TolC Reveals the Intermeshing Cogwheel-like Interaction between AcrA and TolC.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeongseop; Kim, Jin-Sik; Song, Saemee; Shigematsu, Hideki; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Hyun, Jaekyung; Ha, Nam-Chul

    2016-02-01

    The resistance-nodulation-division type tripartite pump AcrAB-TolC and its homologs are responsible for multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria by expelling a wide variety of toxic substrates. The three essential components, AcrA, AcrB, and TolC, must function in concert with each respective binding partner within the complex. In this study, we report an 8.2-Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) 3D reconstruction of the complex that consists of an AcrAB fusion protein and a chimeric TolC protein. The pseudoatomic structure derived from the cryo-EM reconstruction clearly demonstrates a model only compatible with the adaptor bridging mechanism, wherein the funnel-like AcrA hexamer forms an intermeshing cogwheel-like interaction with the α-barrel tip region of TolC. These observations provide a structural milestone for understanding multidrug resistance in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, and may also lead to the design of new antibacterial drugs. PMID:26777412

  14. Isolation of Escherichia coli Strains with AcrAB–TolC Efflux Pump-Associated Intermediate Interpretation or Resistance to Fluoroquinolone, Chloramphenicol and Aminopenicillin from Dogs Admitted to a University Veterinary Hospital

    PubMed Central

    SATO, Toyotaka; YOKOTA, Shin-ichi; ICHIHASHI, Risa; MIYAUCHI, Tomoka; OKUBO, Torahiko; USUI, Masaru; FUJII, Nobuhiro; TAMURA, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistance and the relationship between emergence of resistant bacteria and clinical treatment can facilitate design of effective treatment strategies. We here examined antimicrobial susceptibilities of Escherichia coli isolated from dogs admitted to a university hospital (University hospital) and companion animal clinics (Community clinics) in the same city and investigated underlying multidrug-resistance mechanisms. The prevalence of E. coli with intermediate and resistant interpretations to ampicillin (AMP), enrofloxacin (ENR) and chloramphenicol (CHL) was higher in the University hospital than in the Community clinics cases. Use of antimicrobials, including fluoroquinolone, was also significantly higher in the University hospital than in the Community clinics cases. Upon isolation using ENR-supplemented agar plates, all ENR-resistant isolates had 3–4 nucleotide mutations that accompanied by amino acid substitutions in the quinolone-resistance-determining regions of gyrA, parC and parE, and 94.7% of all isolates derived from the University hospital showed AMP and/or CHL resistance and possessed blaTEM and/or catA1. The average mRNA expression levels of acrA, acrB and tolC and the prevalence of organic solvent tolerance, in isolates derived from ENR-supplemented agar plates were significantly higher in the University hospital than in the Community clinics isolates. Thus, E. coli derived from the University hospital cases more often showed concomitant decreased susceptibilities to aminopenicillins, fluoroquinolones and CHL than did those derived from the Community clinics; this was related to an active AcrAB–TolC efflux pump, in addition to acquisition of specific resistance genes and genetic mutations. PMID:24646457

  15. Cross-Resistance between Triclosan and Antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Mediated by Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Exposure of a Susceptible Mutant Strain to Triclosan Selects nfxB Mutants Overexpressing MexCD-OprJ

    PubMed Central

    Chuanchuen, Rungtip; Beinlich, Kerry; Hoang, Tung T.; Becher, Anna; Karkhoff-Schweizer, RoxAnn R.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2001-01-01

    Triclosan is an antiseptic frequently added to items as diverse as soaps, lotions, toothpaste, and many commonly used household fabrics and plastics. Although wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa expresses the triclosan target enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase, it is triclosan resistant due to expression of the MexAB-OprM efflux system. Exposure of a susceptible Δ(mexAB-oprM) strain to triclosan selected multidrug-resistant bacteria at high frequencies. These bacteria hyperexpressed the MexCD-OprJ efflux system due to mutations in its regulatory gene, nfxB. The MICs of several drugs for these mutants were increased up to 500-fold, including the MIC of ciprofloxacin, which was increased 94-fold. Whereas the MexEF-OprN efflux system also participated in triclosan efflux, this antimicrobial was not a substrate for MexXY-OprM. PMID:11158736

  16. Cross-resistance between triclosan and antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is mediated by multidrug efflux pumps: exposure of a susceptible mutant strain to triclosan selects nfxB mutants overexpressing MexCD-OprJ.

    PubMed

    Chuanchuen, R; Beinlich, K; Hoang, T T; Becher, A; Karkhoff-Schweizer, R R; Schweizer, H P

    2001-02-01

    Triclosan is an antiseptic frequently added to items as diverse as soaps, lotions, toothpaste, and many commonly used household fabrics and plastics. Although wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa expresses the triclosan target enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase, it is triclosan resistant due to expression of the MexAB-OprM efflux system. Exposure of a susceptible Delta(mexAB-oprM) strain to triclosan selected multidrug-resistant bacteria at high frequencies. These bacteria hyperexpressed the MexCD-OprJ efflux system due to mutations in its regulatory gene, nfxB. The MICs of several drugs for these mutants were increased up to 500-fold, including the MIC of ciprofloxacin, which was increased 94-fold. Whereas the MexEF-OprN efflux system also participated in triclosan efflux, this antimicrobial was not a substrate for MexXY-OprM. PMID:11158736

  17. Efflux systems in bacterial pathogens: an opportunity for therapeutic intervention? An industry view.

    PubMed

    Lynch, A Simon

    2006-03-30

    The efflux systems of bacteria protect cells from antibiotics and biocides by actively transporting compounds out of the cytoplasm and/or periplasm and thereby limit their steady-state accumulation at their site(s) of action. The impact of efflux systems on the efficacy of antibiotics used in human medicine and animal husbandry is becoming increasingly apparent from the characterization of drug-resistant strains with altered drug efflux properties. In most instances, efflux-mediated antibiotic resistance arises from mutational events that result in their elevated expression and, in the case of efflux pumps with broad substrate specificity, can confer multi-drug resistance (MDR) to structurally unrelated antibiotics. Knowledge of the role of efflux systems in conferring antibiotic resistance has now been successfully exploited in the pharmaceutical industry and contributed, in part, to the development of new members of the macrolide and tetracycline classes of antibiotics that circumvent the efflux-based resistance mechanisms that have limited the clinical utility of their progenitors. The therapeutic utility of compounds that inhibit bacterial drug efflux pumps and therein potentiate the activity of a co-administered antibiotic agent remains to be validated in the clinical setting, but the approach holds promise for the future in improving the efficacy and/or extending the clinical utility of existing antibiotics. This review discusses the potential of further exploiting the knowledge of efflux-mediated antibiotic resistance in bacteria toward the discovery and development of new chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:16290174

  18. Enhancement of antibiotic activity by efflux inhibitors against multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Tatiane; Machado, Diana; Couto, Isabel; Maschmann, Raquel; Ramos, Daniela; von Groll, Andrea; Rossetti, Maria L.; Silva, Pedro A.; Viveiros, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis continues to increase and new approaches for its treatment are necessary. The identification of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates presenting efflux as part of their resistant phenotype has a major impact in tuberculosis treatment. In this work, we used a checkerboard procedure combined with the tetrazolium microplate-based assay (TEMA) to study single combinations between antituberculosis drugs and efflux inhibitors (EIs) against multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis clinical isolates using the fully susceptible strain H37Rv as reference. Efflux activity was studied on a real-time basis by a fluorometric method that uses ethidium bromide as efflux substrate. Quantification of efflux pump genes mRNA transcriptional levels were performed by RT-qPCR. The fractional inhibitory concentrations (FIC) indicated synergistic activity for the interactions between isoniazid, rifampicin, amikacin, ofloxacin, and ethidium bromide plus the EIs verapamil, thioridazine and chlorpromazine. The FICs ranged from 0.25, indicating a four-fold reduction on the MICs, to 0.015, 64-fold reduction. The detection of active efflux by real-time fluorometry showed that all strains presented intrinsic efflux activity that contributes to the overall resistance which can be inhibited in the presence of the EIs. The quantification of the mRNA levels of the most important efflux pump genes on these strains shows that they are intrinsically predisposed to expel toxic compounds as the exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics were not necessary to increase the pump mRNA levels when compared with the non-exposed counterpart. The results obtained in this study confirm that the intrinsic efflux activity contributes to the overall resistance in multidrug resistant clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis and that the inhibition of efflux pumps by the EIs can enhance the clinical effect of antibiotics that are their substrates. PMID:25972842

  19. The Challenge of Efflux-Mediated Antibiotic Resistance in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Plésiat, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The global emergence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria is a growing threat to antibiotic therapy. The chromosomally encoded drug efflux mechanisms that are ubiquitous in these bacteria greatly contribute to antibiotic resistance and present a major challenge for antibiotic development. Multidrug pumps, particularly those represented by the clinically relevant AcrAB-TolC and Mex pumps of the resistance-nodulation-division (RND) superfamily, not only mediate intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) but also are involved in other functions, including the bacterial stress response and pathogenicity. Additionally, efflux pumps interact synergistically with other resistance mechanisms (e.g., with the outer membrane permeability barrier) to increase resistance levels. Since the discovery of RND pumps in the early 1990s, remarkable scientific and technological advances have allowed for an in-depth understanding of the structural and biochemical basis, substrate profiles, molecular regulation, and inhibition of MDR pumps. However, the development of clinically useful efflux pump inhibitors and/or new antibiotics that can bypass pump effects continues to be a challenge. Plasmid-borne efflux pump genes (including those for RND pumps) have increasingly been identified. This article highlights the recent progress obtained for organisms of clinical significance, together with methodological considerations for the characterization of MDR pumps. PMID:25788514

  20. Candida Efflux ATPases and Antiporters in Clinical Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Shah, Abdul Haseeb

    2016-01-01

    An enhanced expression of genes encoding ATP binding cassette (ABC) and major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transport proteins are known to contribute to the development of tolerance to antifungals in pathogenic yeasts. For example, the azole resistant (AR) clinical isolates of the opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida albicans show an overexpression of CDR1 and/or CaMDR1 belonging to ABC and MFS, superfamilies, respectively. The reduced accumulation (due to rapid efflux) of drugs in AR isolates confirms the role of efflux pump proteins in the development of drug tolerance. Considering the importance of major multidrug transporters, the focus of recent research has been to understand the structure and function of these proteins which could help to design inhibitors/modulators of these pump proteins. This chapter focuses on some aspects of the structure and function of yeast transporter proteins particularly in relation to MDR in Candida. PMID:26721282

  1. Fluid transport by the cornea endothelium is dependent on buffering lactic acid efflux.

    PubMed

    Li, Shimin; Kim, Edward; Bonanno, Joseph A

    2016-07-01

    Maintenance of corneal hydration is dependent on the active transport properties of the corneal endothelium. We tested the hypothesis that lactic acid efflux, facilitated by buffering, is a component of the endothelial fluid pump. Rabbit corneas were perfused with bicarbonate-rich (BR) or bicarbonate-free (BF) Ringer of varying buffering power, while corneal thickness was measured. Perfusate was collected and analyzed for lactate efflux. In BF with no added HEPES, the maximal corneal swelling rate was 30.0 ± 4.1 μm/h compared with 5.2 ± 0.9 μm/h in BR. Corneal swelling decreased directly with [HEPES], such that with 60 mM HEPES corneas swelled at 7.5 ± 1.6 μm/h. Perfusate [lactate] increased directly with [HEPES]. Similarly, reducing the [HCO3 (-)] increased corneal swelling and decreased lactate efflux. Corneal swelling was inversely related to Ringer buffering power (β), whereas lactate efflux was directly related to β. Ouabain (100 μM) produced maximal swelling and reduction in lactate efflux, whereas carbonic anhydrase inhibition and an monocarboxylic acid transporter 1 inhibitor produced intermediate swelling and decreases in lactate efflux. Conversely, 10 μM adenosine reduced the swelling rate to 4.2 ± 0.8 μm/h and increased lactate efflux by 25%. We found a strong inverse relation between corneal swelling and lactate efflux (r = 0.98, P < 0.0001). Introducing lactate in the Ringer transiently increased corneal thickness, reaching a steady state (0 ± 0.6 μm/h) within 90 min. We conclude that corneal endothelial function does not have an absolute requirement for bicarbonate; rather it requires a perfusing solution with high buffering power. This facilitates lactic acid efflux, which is directly linked to water efflux, indicating that lactate flux is a component of the corneal endothelial pump. PMID:27225657

  2. Synthesis of α,β-Unsaturated Carbonyl-Based Compounds, Oxime and Oxime Ether Analogs as Potential Anticancer Agents for Overcoming Cancer Multidrug Resistance by Modulation of Efflux Pumps in Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hua-Li; Leng, Jing; Zhang, Cheng-Pan; Jantan, Ibrahim; Amjad, Muhammad Wahab; Sher, Muhammad; Naeem-Ul-Hassan, Muhammad; Hussain, Muhammad Ajaz; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas

    2016-04-14

    Sixty-nine novel α,β-unsaturated carbonyl based compounds, including cyclohexanone, tetralone, oxime, and oxime ether analogs, were synthesized. The antiproliferative activity determined by using seven different human cancer cell lines provided a structure-activity relationship. Compound 8ag exhibited high antiproliferative activity against Panc-1, PaCa-2, A-549, and PC-3 cell lines, with IC50 value of 0.02 μM, comparable to the positive control Erlotinib. The ten most active antiproliferative compounds were assessed for mechanistic effects on BRAF(V600E), EGFR TK kinases, and tubulin polymerization, and were investigated in vitro to reverse efflux-mediated resistance developed by cancer cells. Compound 8af exhibited the most potent BRAF(V600E) inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.9 μM. Oxime analog 7o displayed the most potent EGFR TK inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 0.07 μM, which was analogous to the positive control. Some analogs including 7f, 8af, and 8ag showed a dual role as anticancer and MDR reversal agents. PMID:27010345

  3. The Heterodimeric ABC Transporter EfrCD Mediates Multidrug Efflux in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Hürlimann, Lea M.; Corradi, Valentina; Hohl, Michael; Bloemberg, Guido V.; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial infections with Enterococcus faecalis are an emerging health problem. However, drug efflux pumps contributing to intrinsic drug resistance are poorly studied in this Gram-positive pathogen. In this study, we functionally investigated seven heterodimeric ABC transporters of E. faecalis that are annotated as drug efflux pumps. Deletion of ef0789-ef0790 on the chromosome of E. faecalis resulted in increased susceptibility to daunorubicin, doxorubicin, ethidium, and Hoechst 33342, and the corresponding transporter was named EfrCD. Unexpectedly, the previously described heterodimeric multidrug ABC transporter EfrAB contributes marginally to drug efflux in the endogenous context of E. faecalis. In contrast, heterologous expression in Lactococcus lactis revealed that EfrAB, EfrCD, and the product of ef2226-ef2227 (EfrEF) mediate the efflux of fluorescent substrates and confer resistance to multiple dyes and drugs, including fluoroquinolones. Four of seven transporters failed to exhibit drug efflux activity for the set of drugs and dyes tested, even upon overexpression in L. lactis. Since all seven transporters were purified as heterodimers after overexpression in L. lactis, a lack of drug efflux activity is not attributed to poor expression or protein aggregation. Reconstitution of the purified multidrug transporters EfrAB, EfrCD, and EfrEF in proteoliposomes revealed functional coupling between ATP hydrolysis and drug binding. Our analysis creates an experimental basis for the accurate prediction of drug efflux transporters and indicates that many annotated multidrug efflux pumps might be incapable of drug transport and thus might fulfill other physiological functions in the cell. PMID:27381387

  4. The Heterodimeric ABC Transporter EfrCD Mediates Multidrug Efflux in Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Hürlimann, Lea M; Corradi, Valentina; Hohl, Michael; Bloemberg, Guido V; Tieleman, D Peter; Seeger, Markus A

    2016-09-01

    Nosocomial infections with Enterococcus faecalis are an emerging health problem. However, drug efflux pumps contributing to intrinsic drug resistance are poorly studied in this Gram-positive pathogen. In this study, we functionally investigated seven heterodimeric ABC transporters of E. faecalis that are annotated as drug efflux pumps. Deletion of ef0789-ef0790 on the chromosome of E. faecalis resulted in increased susceptibility to daunorubicin, doxorubicin, ethidium, and Hoechst 33342, and the corresponding transporter was named EfrCD. Unexpectedly, the previously described heterodimeric multidrug ABC transporter EfrAB contributes marginally to drug efflux in the endogenous context of E. faecalis In contrast, heterologous expression in Lactococcus lactis revealed that EfrAB, EfrCD, and the product of ef2226-ef2227 (EfrEF) mediate the efflux of fluorescent substrates and confer resistance to multiple dyes and drugs, including fluoroquinolones. Four of seven transporters failed to exhibit drug efflux activity for the set of drugs and dyes tested, even upon overexpression in L. lactis Since all seven transporters were purified as heterodimers after overexpression in L. lactis, a lack of drug efflux activity is not attributed to poor expression or protein aggregation. Reconstitution of the purified multidrug transporters EfrAB, EfrCD, and EfrEF in proteoliposomes revealed functional coupling between ATP hydrolysis and drug binding. Our analysis creates an experimental basis for the accurate prediction of drug efflux transporters and indicates that many annotated multidrug efflux pumps might be incapable of drug transport and thus might fulfill other physiological functions in the cell. PMID:27381387

  5. Efflux transporter engineering markedly improves amorphadiene production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Congqiang; Chen, Xixian; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Too, Heng-Phon

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic engineering aims at altering cellular metabolism to produce valuable products at high yields and titers. Achieving high titers and productivity can be challenging if final products are largely accumulated intracellularly. A potential solution to this problem is to facilitate the export of these substances from cells by membrane transporters. Amorphadiene, the precursor of antimalarial drug artemisinin, is known to be secreted from Escherichia coli overexpressing the biosynthetic pathway. In order to assess the involvement of various endogenous efflux pumps in amorphadiene transport, the effects of single gene deletion of 16 known multidrug-resistant membrane efflux transporters were examined. The outer membrane protein TolC was found to be intimately involved in amorphadiene efflux. The overexpression of tolC together with ABC family transporters (macAB) or MFS family transporters (emrAB or emrKY) enhanced amorphadiene titer by more than threefold. In addition, the overexpression of transporters in the lipopolysaccharide transport system (msbA, lptD, lptCABFG) was found to improve amorphadiene production. As efflux transporters often have a wide range of substrate specificity, the multiple families of transporters were co-expressed and synergistic benefits were observed in amorphadiene production. This strategy of screening and then rationally engineering transporters can be used to improve the production of other valuable compounds in E. coli. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1755-1763. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26804325

  6. Tigecycline Efflux as a Mechanism for Nonsusceptibility in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Anton Y; Adams, Jennifer; Paterson, David L

    2007-06-01

    Tigecycline has an extended spectrum of in vitro antimicrobial activities, including that against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter. After identifying bloodstream isolates of Acinetobacter with reduced susceptibilities to tigecycline, we performed a study to assess tigecycline efflux mediated by the resistance-nodulation-division-type transporter AdeABC. After exposure of two tigecycline-nonsusceptible isolates to the efflux pump inhibitor phenyl-arginine-beta-naphthylamide (PABN), a fourfold reduction in the tigecycline MIC was observed. Both tigecycline-susceptible and -nonsusceptible isolates were found to carry the gene coding for the transmembrane component of the AdeABC pump, adeB, and the two-component regulatory system comprising adeS and adeR. Previously unreported point mutations were identified in the regulatory system in tigecycline-nonsusceptible isolates. Real-time PCR identified 40-fold and 54-fold increases in adeB expression in the two tigecycline-nonsusceptible isolates compared to that in a tigecycline-susceptible isolate. In vitro exposure of a tigecycline-susceptible clinical strain to tigecycline caused a rapid rise in the MIC of tigecycline from 2 microg/ml to 24 microg/ml, which was reversible with PABN. A 25-fold increase in adeB expression was observed in a comparison between this tigecycline-susceptible isolate and its isogenic tigecycline-nonsusceptible mutant. These results indicate that an efflux-based mechanism plays a role in reduced tigecycline susceptibility in Acinetobacter. PMID:17420217

  7. Tigecycline Efflux as a Mechanism for Nonsusceptibility in Acinetobacter baumannii▿

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, Anton Y.; Adams, Jennifer; Paterson, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Tigecycline has an extended spectrum of in vitro antimicrobial activities, including that against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter. After identifying bloodstream isolates of Acinetobacter with reduced susceptibilities to tigecycline, we performed a study to assess tigecycline efflux mediated by the resistance-nodulation-division-type transporter AdeABC. After exposure of two tigecycline-nonsusceptible isolates to the efflux pump inhibitor phenyl-arginine-β-naphthylamide (PABN), a fourfold reduction in the tigecycline MIC was observed. Both tigecycline-susceptible and -nonsusceptible isolates were found to carry the gene coding for the transmembrane component of the AdeABC pump, adeB, and the two-component regulatory system comprising adeS and adeR. Previously unreported point mutations were identified in the regulatory system in tigecycline-nonsusceptible isolates. Real-time PCR identified 40-fold and 54-fold increases in adeB expression in the two tigecycline-nonsusceptible isolates compared to that in a tigecycline-susceptible isolate. In vitro exposure of a tigecycline-susceptible clinical strain to tigecycline caused a rapid rise in the MIC of tigecycline from 2 μg/ml to 24 μg/ml, which was reversible with PABN. A 25-fold increase in adeB expression was observed in a comparison between this tigecycline-susceptible isolate and its isogenic tigecycline-nonsusceptible mutant. These results indicate that an efflux-based mechanism plays a role in reduced tigecycline susceptibility in Acinetobacter. PMID:17420217

  8. Heavy metal transport by the CusCFBA efflux system.

    PubMed

    Delmar, Jared A; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W

    2015-11-01

    It is widely accepted that the increased use of antibiotics has resulted in bacteria with developed resistance to such treatments. These organisms are capable of forming multi-protein structures that bridge both the inner and outer membrane to expel diverse toxic compounds directly from the cell. Proteins of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND) superfamily typically assemble as tripartite efflux pumps, composed of an inner membrane transporter, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, and an outer membrane factor channel protein. These machines are the most powerful antimicrobial efflux machinery available to bacteria. In Escherichia coli, the CusCFBA complex is the only known RND transporter with a specificity for heavy metals, detoxifying both Cu(+) and Ag(+) ions. In this review, we discuss the known structural information for the CusCFBA proteins, with an emphasis on their assembly, interaction, and the relationship between structure and function. PMID:26258953

  9. Peptide mediators of cholesterol efflux

    DOEpatents

    Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan

    2013-04-09

    The present invention provides a family of non-naturally occurring polypeptides having cholesterol efflux activity that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins (e.g., Apo AI and Apo E), and having high selectivity for ABAC1 that parallels that of full-length apolipoproteins. The invention also provides compositions comprising such polypeptides, methods of identifying, screening and synthesizing such polypeptides, and methods of treating, preventing or diagnosing diseases and disorders associated with dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia and inflammation.

  10. Distribution and expression of the Ade multidrug efflux systems in Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Pagdepanichkit, Sirawit; Tribuddharat, Chanwit; Chuanchuen, Rungtip

    2016-09-01

    One hundred Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates were examined for inhibitory effect of reserpine and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) on the antimicrobial susceptibility and expression of 4 resistant-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type multidrug efflux systems, including AdeABC, AdeDE, AdeIJK, and AdeFGH, using RT-PCR. Ten A. baumannii isolates expressing AdeABC, AdeIJK, or AdeFGH were randomly selected for determination of transcription level and regulatory mutations. While all the isolates were resistant to multiple drugs, the reserpine and CCCP experiment showed that the multidrug resistance phenotype in most A. baumannii isolates was associated with efflux pumps. Most isolates expressed at least one of the RND-type efflux pumps tested (97%). AdeIJK expression was most common (97%), but none of the isolates produced AdeDE. Fifty-two percent of the A. baumannii isolates simultaneously produced up to 3 RND-type efflux systems (i.e., AdeABC, AdeFGH, and AdeIJK). No good correlation between the expression of RND-type efflux pumps and the type of antimicrobial resistance was observed. Overexpression of AdeABC, AdeIJK, and AdeFGH was not always related to the presence of mutations in their corresponding regulatory genes. This study highlights (i) the universal presence of the RND-type efflux pumps with variable levels of expression level among the A. baumannii in this collection and (ii) the complexity of their regulation of expression. PMID:27332787