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Sample records for eif5a1 involves activation

  1. eIF5A1/RhoGDIα pathway: a novel therapeutic target for treatment of spinal cord injury identified by a proteomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Shang, Fei-Fei; Xu, Yang; Belegu, Visar; Xia, Lei; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Ran; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jin; Li, Chen-Yun; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is frequently accompanied by a degree of spontaneous functional recovery. The underlying mechanisms through which such recovery is generated remain elusive. In this study, we observed a significant spontaneous motor function recovery 14 to 28 days after spinal cord transection (SCT) in rats. Using a comparative proteomics approach, caudal to the injury, we detected difference in 20 proteins. Two of these proteins, are eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A1 (eIF5A1) that is involved in cell survival and proliferation, and Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha (RhoGDIα), a member of Rho GDI family that is involved in cytoskeletal reorganization. After confirming the changes in expression levels of these two proteins following SCT, we showed that in vivo eIF5A1 up-regulation and down-regulation significantly increased and decreased, respectively, motor function recovery. In vitro, eIF5A1 overexpression in primary neurons increased cell survival and elongated neurite length while eIF5A1 knockdown reversed these results. We found that RhoGDIα up-regulation and down-regulation rescues the effect of eIF5A1 down-regulation and up-regulation both in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, we have identified eIF5A1/RhoGDIα pathway as a new therapeutic target for treatment of spinal cord injured patients. PMID:26593060

  2. Cadmium induces cytotoxicity in human bronchial epithelial cells through upregulation of eIF5A1 and NF-kappaB

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, De-Ju; Xu, Yan-Ming; Du, Ji-Ying; Huang, Dong-Yang; Lau, Andy T.Y.

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • Normal human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were dosed with cadmium (Cd). • A low level (2 μM) of Cd treatment for 36 h elicited negligible cytotoxicity. • High levels (20 or 30 μM) of Cd treatment for 36 h induced cell death. • High levels of Cd can upregulate the protein levels of eIF5A1 and NF-κB p65. • We suggest that eIF5A1 level is possibly modulated by NF-κB. - Abstract: Cadmium (Cd) and Cd compounds are widely-distributed in the environment and well-known carcinogens. Here, we report that in CdCl{sub 2}-exposed human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B), the level of p53 is dramatically decreased in a time- and dose-dependent manner, suggesting that the observed Cd-induced cytotoxicity is not likely due to the pro-apoptotic function of p53. Therefore, this prompted us to further study the responsive pro-apoptotic factors by proteomic approaches. Interestingly, we identified that high levels (20 or 30 μM) of Cd can significantly upregulate the protein levels of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A1 (eIF5A1) and redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-κB p65. Moreover, there is an enhanced NF-κB nuclear translocation as well as chromatin-binding in Cd-treated BEAS-2B cells. We also show that small interfering RNA-specific knockdown of eIF5A1 in Cd-exposed cells attenuated the Cd cytotoxicity, indicating the potential role of eIF5A1 in Cd cytotoxicity. As eIF5A1 is reported to be related with cell apoptosis but little is known about its transcriptional control, we hypothesize that NF-κB might likely modulate eIF5A1 gene expression. Notably, by bioinformatic analysis, several potential NF-κB binding sites on the upstream promoter region of eIF5A1 gene can be found. Subsequent chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that indeed there is enhanced NF-κB binding on eIF5A1 promoter region of Cd-treated BEAS-2B cells. Taken together, our findings suggest for the first time a regulatory mechanism for the pro-apoptotic protein eIF5A1 in which its level is possibly modulated by NF-κB in human lung cells.

  3. miR-434-3p and DNA hypomethylation co-regulate eIF5A1 to increase AChRs and to improve plasticity in SCT rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Shang, Fei-Fei; Xia, Qing-Jie; Liu, Wei; Xia, Lei; Qian, Bao-Jiang; You, Ling; He, Mu; Yang, Jin-Liang; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) serve as connections between motor neurons and skeletal muscle and are essential for recovery from spinal cord transection (SCT). Recently, microRNAs have emerged as important potential biotherapeutics for several diseases; however, whether miRNAs operate in the modulation of AChRs remains unknown. We found increased AChRs numbers and function scores in rats with SCT; these increases were reduced following the injection of a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A1 (eIF5A1) shRNA lentivirus into the hindlimb muscle. Then, high-throughput screening for microRNAs targeting eIF5A1 was performed, and miR-434-3p was found to be robustly depleted in SCT rat skeletal muscle. Furthermore, a highly conserved miR-434-3p binding site was identified within the mRNA encoding eIF5A1 through bioinformatics analysis and dual-luciferase assay. Overexpression or knockdown of miR-434-3p in vivo demonstrated it was a negative post-transcriptional regulator of eIF5A1 expression and influenced AChRs expression. The microarray-enriched Gene Ontology (GO) terms regulated by miR-434-3p were muscle development terms. Using a lentivirus, one functional gene (map2k6) was confirmed to have a similar function to that of miR-434-3p in GO terms. Finally, HRM and MeDIP-PCR analyses revealed that DNA demethylation also up-regulated eIF5A1 after SCT. Consequently, miR-434-3p/eIF5A1 in muscle is a promising potential biotherapy for SCI repair. PMID:26964899

  4. miR-434-3p and DNA hypomethylation co-regulate eIF5A1 to increase AChRs and to improve plasticity in SCT rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Fei-Fei; Xia, Qing-Jie; Liu, Wei; Xia, Lei; Qian, Bao-Jiang; You, Ling; He, Mu; Yang, Jin-Liang; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) serve as connections between motor neurons and skeletal muscle and are essential for recovery from spinal cord transection (SCT). Recently, microRNAs have emerged as important potential biotherapeutics for several diseases; however, whether miRNAs operate in the modulation of AChRs remains unknown. We found increased AChRs numbers and function scores in rats with SCT; these increases were reduced following the injection of a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A1 (eIF5A1) shRNA lentivirus into the hindlimb muscle. Then, high-throughput screening for microRNAs targeting eIF5A1 was performed, and miR-434-3p was found to be robustly depleted in SCT rat skeletal muscle. Furthermore, a highly conserved miR-434-3p binding site was identified within the mRNA encoding eIF5A1 through bioinformatics analysis and dual-luciferase assay. Overexpression or knockdown of miR-434-3p in vivo demonstrated it was a negative post-transcriptional regulator of eIF5A1 expression and influenced AChRs expression. The microarray-enriched Gene Ontology (GO) terms regulated by miR-434-3p were muscle development terms. Using a lentivirus, one functional gene (map2k6) was confirmed to have a similar function to that of miR-434-3p in GO terms. Finally, HRM and MeDIP-PCR analyses revealed that DNA demethylation also up-regulated eIF5A1 after SCT. Consequently, miR-434-3p/eIF5A1 in muscle is a promising potential biotherapy for SCI repair. PMID:26964899

  5. Promoting Active Involvement in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg; Bresnahan, Val; Hedin, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a rationale for using active involvement techniques, describes large- and small-group methods based on their documented effectiveness and applicability to K-12 classrooms, and illustrates their use. These approaches include ways of engaging students in large groups (e.g., unison responses, response cards, dry-erase boards,

  6. Promoting Active Involvement in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg; Bresnahan, Val; Hedin, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a rationale for using active involvement techniques, describes large- and small-group methods based on their documented effectiveness and applicability to K-12 classrooms, and illustrates their use. These approaches include ways of engaging students in large groups (e.g., unison responses, response cards, dry-erase boards,…

  7. Involvement. Senior citizens' recreational activities.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, U B

    1992-06-01

    During the last 18 years, senior citizens in Viborg, Denmark, have participated in study circles based on the theory of impression pedagogy and socially relevant activities. They arrange excursions at home and abroad and make films about the trips. They teach schoolchildren, students at folk high schools, and nurses, as well as occupational therapists and physiotherapists. They publish poems and books, write role plays, stage musicals, sing in choirs, and function as tour guides in town. They set up educational color slide programmes on preventing bone fractures, dealing with the problem of reduced hearing, and the importance of healthy food and exercise. They travel abroad and talk about Denmark and the conditions for senior citizens in our country. With the support of the Danish Ministry for Social Affairs, they produce videos about their activities as a source of inspiration to others. The use of drugs by the participants in the study circles has declined, while the level of activities has increased, and none of the participants has ever had to enter residential care. PMID:1638895

  8. Parental Involvement Activities in the School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannes, Holly; Roach, Amy

    This action research project evaluated the impact of strategies to increase parental involvement and improve student interest in academics and school-related activities. Participating were students in an eighth grade social studies class and third through seventh grade learning disabilities classes in a rural school setting. The need for increased…

  9. Promoting Active Involvement in Today's Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conderman, Greg; Bresnahan, Val; Hedin, Laura

    2011-01-01

    In today's diverse classrooms and age of accountability, teachers need to use efficient, research-based instructional approaches that engage all students, promote interest and variety in learning and teaching, and provide immediate and continuous informal assessment data. This article presents a rationale for using active involvement techniques,…

  10. Parent's Interests, Current Involvement and Level of Parental Involvement in School Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gbadamosi, Tara; Lin, Huey-Ling

    This study examined what school activities parents were involved in and the relationship between parents' interests and level of participation. Parents completed self-report questionnaires examining activities they were currently involved in and activities they would like to do in their children's classrooms. Out of 208 surveys distributed, 114…

  11. DESIGN CONSIDERATION INVOLVING ACTIVE SEDIMENT CAPS (PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    When contaminated sediments pose unacceptable risks to human health and the environment, management activities such as removal, treatment, or isolation of contaminated sediments may be required. Various capping designs are being considered for isolating contaminated sediment are...

  12. DESIGN CONSIDERATION INVOLVING ACTIVE SEDIMENT CAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When contaminated sediments pose unacceptable risks to human health and the environment, management activities such as removal, treatment, or isolation of contaminated sediments may be required. Various capping designs are being considered for isolating contaminated sediment are...

  13. Immigrant Youth Involvement in School-Based Extracurricular Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peguero, Anthony A.

    2011-01-01

    Extracurricular activity involvement is generally beneficial toward student progress and success. Little is known, however, about immigrant youth involvement in school-based extracurricular activities. The author examined the patterns of Latino and Asian American youth extracurricular involvement by focusing on the pertinent role of immigrant…

  14. Measuring psychological engagement in youth activity involvement.

    PubMed

    Ramey, Heather L; Rose-Krasnor, Linda; Busseri, Michael A; Gadbois, Shannon; Bowker, Anne; Findlay, Leanne

    2015-12-01

    Although psychological engagement (e.g., enjoyment, concentration) may be critical in fostering positive outcomes of youth activity participation, too few studies have been conducted to establish its role in development. Furthermore, an established measurement tool is lacking. In the current study, we evaluated a brief engagement measure with two Canadian samples of youth (Sample 1, N = 290, mean age = 16.9 years, 62% female; Sample 2, N = 1827, mean age = 13.1 years, 54% female). We conducted a confirmatory factor analysis with structural equation modeling to examine the hypothesized structure of the model. We also assessed the measure's validity by testing relations between engagement and both perceived outcomes and positive features of activity settings. Psychological engagement was best captured by three latent cognitive, affective, and relational/spiritual factors and a second-order latent factor. Also, as anticipated, psychological engagement was associated with features of the activity setting and perceived impact. PMID:26519874

  15. Exploring Extension Involvement in Farm to School Program Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    The study reported here examined Extension professionals' involvement in farm-to-school program activities. Results of an online survey distributed to eight state Extension systems indicate that on average, Extension professionals are involved with one farm to school program activity, with most supporting school or community garden programs.…

  16. Exploring Extension Involvement in Farm to School Program Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    The study reported here examined Extension professionals' involvement in farm-to-school program activities. Results of an online survey distributed to eight state Extension systems indicate that on average, Extension professionals are involved with one farm to school program activity, with most supporting school or community garden programs.

  17. Middle Level Activities To Involve the Invisible Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmer, Sue; Arico, Jim

    Involvement in student activities has many advantages for the middle level student. Such activities promote achievement, citizenship, and service to the community while developing self-esteem, self-confidence, and social cooperation. This book is intended as a tool for middle level schools to motivate, develop, guide, involve, and provide middle…

  18. Empirical Evidence or Intuition? An Activity Involving the Scientific Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overway, Ken

    2007-01-01

    Students need to have basic understanding of scientific method during their introductory science classes and for this purpose an activity was devised which involved a game based on famous Monty Hall game problem. This particular activity allowed students to banish or confirm their intuition based on empirical evidence.

  19. A Profile of Latino School-Based Extracurricular Activity Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peguero, Anthony A.

    2010-01-01

    Participation in school-based extracurricular activities influences educational success. Thus, it is important to depict a profile of school-based extracurricular activity involvement for a Latino student population that is marginalized in schools. This research uses the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 and logistic regression analyses to…

  20. Moon Watch: A Parental-Involvement Homework Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillero, Peter; Gonzalez-Jensen, Margarita; Moy, Tracy

    2000-01-01

    Presents the goals, philosophy, and methods of the SPLASH (Student-Parent Laboratories Achieving Science at Home) program. Describes an at-home, parental-involvement activity called Moon Watch in which students and their parents observe how the phases of the moon and the moon's position in the sky change over a two-week period. (WRM)

  1. Adolescent Involvement in Extracurricular Activities: Influences on Leadership Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Donna; Dyk, Patricia Hyjer; Jones, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Study examined adolescents' participation in sports, school, and community extracurricular activities to assess the influence of different involvement roles and adult support on leadership skills. The study found that males and females who perceived their adult support more positively had more positive perceptions of their leadership skills.

  2. Adolescent Involvement in Extracurricular Activities: Influences on Leadership Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Donna; Dyk, Patricia Hyjer; Jones, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Study examined adolescents' participation in sports, school, and community extracurricular activities to assess the influence of different involvement roles and adult support on leadership skills. The study found that males and females who perceived their adult support more positively had more positive perceptions of their leadership skills.…

  3. Activity Involvement in Aging Women: Career Pattern and Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holahan, Carole Kovalic

    Some research has found that women's retirement from the labor force produces significant changes in their lives and requires further investigation. The effects of career pattern and retirement on activity involvement and life satisfaction for women who had been in the work force was investigated. Subjects were members of the Terman Study of the…

  4. Bringing Person-Centeredness and Active Involvement into Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torenholt, Rikke; Engelund, Gitte; Willaing, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the use and applicability of cultural probes--an explorative participatory method to gain insights into a person's life and thoughts--to achieve person-centeredness and active involvement in self-management education for people with chronic illness. Design/methodology/approach: An education toolkit…

  5. Identifying Associations between Student Achievement and Parental Involvement Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddle, Ann R.

    2011-01-01

    The revision and renewal of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 will likely expand its parental involvement component to engage educators, parents, and community partners in supporting public education for children. This revisions call for best practices, but current literature fails to identify specific activities associated…

  6. Identification of pathways involved in paclitaxel activity in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Wen-Juan; Cheng, Hai-Yan; Li, Chun-Quan; Jin, Hong; Yang, Shan-Shan; Li, Xia; Zhang, Yun-Yan

    2011-01-01

    Paclitaxel is one of the key chemotherapeutic drugs widely used to treat various types of cancer. Many cervical cancer patients exhibit selectivity in response to thereapy, however, which is considered to be correlated with drug-gene-pathways. The aim of this study was to identify pathways involved in paclitaxel activity in cervical cancer. Gene expression data was obtained from the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus and the associations between paclitaxel and genes from DrugBank, MATADOR, TTD, CTD and SuperTarget databases. Differentially expressed genes in cervical cancer were identified using the significance analysis of microarrays (SAM) statistical technique. Pathway analysis was performed according to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database using the software package SubpathwayMiner to predict target genes of paclitaxel in cervical cancer and regulated pathways. We found that paclitaxel, which exhibits anticancer activity in cervical cancer, may interact with these differentially expressed genes and their corresponding signaling pathways. Our study presents the first in-depth, large-scale analysis of pathways involved in paclitaxel activity in cervical cancer. Interestingly, these pathways have not been reported to be involved in other tumors. Thus our findings may contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms underlying paclitaxel resistance in cervical cancer. PMID:21517239

  7. Pontine respiratory activity involved in inspiratory/expiratory phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Mörschel, Michael; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    Control of the timing of the inspiratory/expiratory (IE) phase transition is a hallmark of respiratory pattern formation. In principle, sensory feedback from pulmonary stretch receptors (Breuer–Hering reflex, BHR) is seen as the major controller for the IE phase transition, while pontine-based control of IE phase transition by both the pontine Kölliker–Fuse nucleus (KF) and parabrachial complex is seen as a secondary or backup mechanism. However, previous studies have shown that the BHR can habituate in vivo. Thus, habituation reduces sensory feedback, so the role of the pons, and specifically the KF, for IE phase transition may increase dramatically. Pontine-mediated control of the IE phase transition is not completely understood. In the present review, we discuss existing models for ponto-medullary interaction that may be involved in the control of inspiratory duration and IE transition. We also present intracellular recordings of pontine respiratory units derived from an in situ intra-arterially perfused brainstem preparation of rats. With the absence of lung inflation, this preparation generates a normal respiratory pattern and many of the recorded pontine units demonstrated phasic respiratory-related activity. The analysis of changes in membrane potentials of pontine respiratory neurons has allowed us to propose a number of pontine-medullary interactions not considered before. The involvement of these putative interactions in pontine-mediated control of IE phase transitions is discussed. PMID:19651653

  8. Involving Community Stakeholders to Increase Park Use and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Terry; Mariscal, Mark; Pina-Cortez, Sophia; Cohen, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe implementation of a randomized controlled trial of community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches to increase park use and physical activity across 33 diverse neighborhoods in Los Angeles. Methods Fifty parks were randomly assigned based on park size, facilities and programs, and neighborhood socio-demographic characteristics to: park director (PD, 17 parks); PD and park advisory board of interested community members (PD+PAB, 16 parks); and no-intervention control (17 parks) arms. Between 2007 and 2012, PDs and PABs from the 33 intervention parks participated in community engagement, baseline assessment, marketing training, intervention design and implementation, and follow-up assessment. Results Intervention parks (PD and PD+PAB) invested in new and diversified signage, promotional items, outreach or support for group activities like fitness classes and walking clubs, and various marketing strategies. Scaling up CBPR methods across parks in 33 diverse neighborhoods was challenging. Working with departmental management and established structures for community input (PABs) and park policy (PDs) facilitated implementation and sustainability. Conclusion Scaling up CBPR methods across diverse communities involved tradeoffs. CBPR is useful for tailoring research and enhancing community impact and sustainability, but more work is needed to understand how to conduct multi-site trials across diverse settings using CBPR. PMID:24674853

  9. School Involvement Leave: Providing Leave for Parental Involvement in School Activities. Policy Briefing Series. Issue 18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curlew, Mary; Weber, Julie

    2009-01-01

    One of the most important factors in school performance is parental involvement. However, many parents do not have the flexibility in their work schedules or the leave policies necessary to attend school functions. As a result, legislators are creating policies to address this issue. School involvement leave policies provide parents with…

  10. Cortical areas involved in horizontal OKN in cats: metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Herdman, S J; Tusa, R J; Smith, C B

    1989-04-01

    Cerebral cortex improves optokinetic responses to high target velocities, but the specific cortical areas involved are unknown. Using the 14C-deoxyglucose technique, we compared local rates of cerebral glucose utilization in cats viewing a moving optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) drum (experimental group) with those in cats viewing a stationary OKN drum (control group). In the experimental group, glucose utilization was increased in areas 17 and 18 and in 4 areas in suprasylvian cortex (21a, 21b, PMLS, and VLS). There were no changes in glucose utilization in areas 7, 19, 20a, 20b, ALLS, AMLS, DLS, PLLS, the posterior suprasylvian area, and the splenial visual area. The increases in glucose utilization in areas 17 and 18 were most significant in the granular layers (inner III and IV). In areas 21a, 21b, PMLS, and VLS, the increases in glucose utilization extended from layers II through V. There was also a regional distribution of the increase in glucose utilization within each of these areas in the experimental animals. The increase in glucose utilization did not include the rostral portion of PMLS or the borders between areas PMLS and 21a, and VLS and 21b. In addition, there was a smaller increase in glucose utilization at the borders between areas 17 and 18 than in other portions of these 2 areas. The results indicate that areas 17, 18, 21a, 21b, PMLS, and VLS may be involved in the cortical modulation of horizontal OKN. The laminar distribution of label within the cortical areas corresponds with the distribution of projections from the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus to areas 17 and 18, and from areas 17 and 18 to PMLS. The regional distribution of the metabolic activity within areas 17, 18, and PMLS coincides with that portion of cortex expected to be excited by either the spatial frequency of the stimulus or the retinalslip velocity (drum velocity minus slow phase eye velocity) occurring during the eye movements. PMID:2703871

  11. Head Start Parent Involvement Activities: Measuring the Effect of School Based Parent Involvement Activities on Parent Efficacy in Early Childhood Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quadri, Khadijat O.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this position paper was to examine the impact of school based parent involvement activities on parent efficacy. Methodology: The paper explores research studies into school based activities on long term parent efficacy. Conclusions: Most schools are involving parents in school-based activities in a variety of ways but the…

  12. Organized Activity Involvement among Rural Youth: Gender Differences in Associations between Activity Type and Developmental Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Kaitlyn A.; Oosterhoff, Benjamin; Metzger, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined associations between organized activity involvement, academic achievement, and problem behavior in a sample of youth from a non-agricultural based rural community (M[subscript age] = 15.26, Age range = 11-19 years, N = 456). Analyses examined whether associations varied as a function of adolescent gender and age.

  13. Organized Activity Involvement among Rural Youth: Gender Differences in Associations between Activity Type and Developmental Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Kaitlyn A.; Oosterhoff, Benjamin; Metzger, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined associations between organized activity involvement, academic achievement, and problem behavior in a sample of youth from a non-agricultural based rural community (M[subscript age] = 15.26, Age range = 11-19 years, N = 456). Analyses examined whether associations varied as a function of adolescent gender and age.…

  14. 5 CFR 1215.24 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or... PROCEDURES DEBT MANAGEMENT Claims Collection § 1215.24 Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. (a) A debtor whose indebtedness involves criminal activity such as fraud, embezzlement, theft, or...

  15. 5 CFR 1215.24 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or... PROCEDURES DEBT MANAGEMENT Claims Collection § 1215.24 Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. (a) A debtor whose indebtedness involves criminal activity such as fraud, embezzlement, theft, or...

  16. 45 CFR 1177.4 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct... Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. (a) A debtor whose indebtedness involves criminal activity such as fraud, embezzlement, theft, or misuse of government funds or property is subject...

  17. 45 CFR 1177.4 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct... Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. (a) A debtor whose indebtedness involves criminal activity such as fraud, embezzlement, theft, or misuse of government funds or property is subject...

  18. 45 CFR 1177.4 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct... Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. (a) A debtor whose indebtedness involves criminal activity such as fraud, embezzlement, theft, or misuse of government funds or property is subject...

  19. 5 CFR 1215.24 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or... PROCEDURES DEBT MANAGEMENT Claims Collection § 1215.24 Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. (a) A debtor whose indebtedness involves criminal activity such as fraud, embezzlement, theft, or...

  20. 45 CFR 1177.4 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct... Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. (a) A debtor whose indebtedness involves criminal activity such as fraud, embezzlement, theft, or misuse of government funds or property is subject...

  1. 5 CFR 1215.24 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or... PROCEDURES DEBT MANAGEMENT Claims Collection § 1215.24 Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. (a) A debtor whose indebtedness involves criminal activity such as fraud, embezzlement, theft, or...

  2. 45 CFR 1177.4 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct... Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct. (a) A debtor whose indebtedness involves criminal activity such as fraud, embezzlement, theft, or misuse of government funds or property is subject...

  3. Increasing Parental Involvement through the Use of Motivational Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Sheri; Mindrup, Carol; Wells, Laura

    This action research project evaluated a program for increasing parental involvement for 56 students in targeted first grade classrooms in an elementary school of 311 students. A review of literature showed that lack of parental and community support, undeveloped parent-teacher partnerships, time constraints, and uninviting school climates were

  4. Antithrombin Regulates Matriptase Activity Involved in Plasmin Generation, Syndecan Shedding, and HGF Activation in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Wen; Xu, Zhenghong; Baksh, Adrienne N. H.; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Chen, Chiu-Yuan; Swanson, Richard; Olson, Steve T.; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Johnson, Michael D.; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Matriptase, a membrane-associated serine protease, plays an essential role in epidermal barrier function through activation of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored serine protease prostasin. The matriptase-prostasin proteolytic cascade is tightly regulated by hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI)-1 such that matriptase autoactivation and prostasin activation occur simultaneously and are followed immediately by the inhibition of both enzymes by HAI-1. However, the mechanisms whereby matriptase acts on extracellular substrates remain elusive. Here we report that some active matriptase can escape HAI-1 inhibition by being rapidly shed from the cell surface. In the pericellular environment, shed active matriptase is able to activate hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), accelerate plasminogen activation, and shed syndecan 1. The amount of active matriptase shed is inversely correlated with the amount of antithrombin (AT) bound to the surface of the keratinocytes. Binding of AT to the surface of keratinocytes is dependent on a functional heparin binding site, Lys-125, and that the N-glycosylation site Asn-135 be unglycosylated. This suggests that β-AT, and not α-AT, is responsible for regulation of pericellular matriptase activity in keratinocytes. Keratinocytes appear to rely on AT to regulate the level of pericellular active matriptase much more than breast and prostate epithelial cells in which AT regulation of matriptase activity occurs at much lower levels than keratinocytes. These results suggest that keratinocytes employ two distinct serine protease inhibitors to control the activation and processing of two different sets of matriptase substrates leading to different biological events: 1) HAI-1 for prostasin activation/inhibition, and 2) AT for the pericellular proteolysis involved in HGF activation, accelerating plasminogen activation, and shedding of syndecans. PMID:23675430

  5. Extracurricular Activity Involvement and Adolescent Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kort-Butler, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Structured extracurricular activity participation has been linked to self-esteem and other indicators of positive youth development. This article describes the theoretical basis for this relationship, centering on extracurricular activities as a location for identity development. A summary of the empirical evidence points to the importance of…

  6. Extracurricular Activity Involvement and Adolescent Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kort-Butler, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Structured extracurricular activity participation has been linked to self-esteem and other indicators of positive youth development. This article describes the theoretical basis for this relationship, centering on extracurricular activities as a location for identity development. A summary of the empirical evidence points to the importance of

  7. Artificial masculinization in tilapia involves androgen receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Golan, Matan; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2014-10-01

    Estrogens have a pivotal role in natural female sexual differentiation of tilapia while lack of steroids results in testicular development. Despite the fact that androgens do not participate in natural sex differentiation, synthetic androgens, mainly 17-α-methyltestosterone (MT) are effective in the production of all-male fish in aquaculture. The sex inversion potency of synthetic androgens may arise from their androgenic activity or else as inhibitors of aromatase activity. The current study is an attempt to differentiate between the two alleged activities in order to evaluate their contribution to the sex inversion process and aid the search for novel sex inversion agents. In the present study, MT inhibited aromatase activity, when applied in vitro as did the non-aromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). In comparison, exposure to fadrozole, a specific aromatase inhibitor, was considerably more effective. Androgenic activity of MT was evaluated by exposure of Sciaenochromis fryeri fry to the substance and testing for the appearance of blue color. Flutamide, an androgen antagonist, administered concomitantly with MT, reduced the appearance of the blue color and the sex inversion potency of MT in a dose-dependent manner. In tilapia, administration of MT, fadrozole or DHT resulted in efficient sex inversion while flutamide reduced the sex inversion potency of all three compounds. In the case of MT and DHT the decrease in sex inversion efficiency caused by flutamide is most likely due to the direct blocking of the androgen binding to its cognate receptor. The negative effect of flutamide on the efficiency of the fadrozole treatment may indicate that the masculinizing activity of fadrozole may be attributed to excess, un-aromatized, androgens accumulated in the differentiating gonad. The present study shows that when androgen receptors are blocked, there is a reduction in the efficiency of sex inversion treatments. Our results suggest that in contrast to natural sex differentiation, during sex inversion treatments, androgens, either endogenous or exogenous, participate in inducing testicular differentiation. PMID:24815887

  8. Getting Students Involved: Classroom Activities Which Promote Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, G. Ronald; And Others

    Three essays concerning second language classroom activities that promote learning of communication skills are presented. In "From Manipulation to Communication" (Renate A. Schulz), the importance of establishing minimal communicative objectives for classroom instruction skills is discussed, specifying situations in which students have to…

  9. Involvement of Toso in activation of monocytes, macrophages, and granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Karl S.; Lang, Philipp A.; Meryk, Andreas; Pandyra, Aleksandra A.; Boucher, Louis-Martin; Pozdeev, Vitaly I.; Tusche, Michael W.; Göthert, Joachim R.; Haight, Jillian; Wakeham, Andrew; You-Ten, Annick J.; McIlwain, David R.; Merches, Katja; Khairnar, Vishal; Recher, Mike; Nolan, Garry P.; Hitoshi, Yasumichi; Funkner, Pauline; Navarini, Alexander A.; Verschoor, Admar; Shaabani, Namir; Honke, Nadine; Penn, Linda Z.; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Häussinger, Dieter; Lee, Kyeong-Hee; Mak, Tak W.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid activation of immune responses is necessary for antibacterial defense, but excessive immune activation can result in life-threatening septic shock. Understanding how these processes are balanced may provide novel therapeutic potential in treating inflammatory disease. Fc receptors are crucial for innate immune activation. However, the role of the putative Fc receptor for IgM, known as Toso/Faim3, has to this point been unclear. In this study, we generated Toso-deficient mice and used them to uncover a critical regulatory function of Toso in innate immune activation. Development of innate immune cells was intact in the absence of Toso, but Toso-deficient neutrophils exhibited more reactive oxygen species production and reduced phagocytosis of pathogens compared with controls. Cytokine production was also decreased in Toso−/− mice compared with WT animals, rendering them resistant to septic shock induced by lipopolysaccharide. However, Toso−/− mice also displayed limited cytokine production after infection with the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes that was correlated with elevated presence of Listeria throughout the body. Accordingly, Toso−/− mice succumbed to infections of L. monocytogenes, whereas WT mice successfully eliminated the infection. Taken together, our data reveal Toso to be a unique regulator of innate immune responses during bacterial infection and septic shock. PMID:23359703

  10. Active involvement of catalase during hemolytic crises of favism.

    PubMed

    Gaetani, G F; Rolfo, M; Arena, S; Mangerini, R; Meloni, G F; Ferraris, A M

    1996-08-01

    The endemic occurrence of favism in certain Mediterranean regions provided an investigative opportunity for testing in vivo the validity of claims as to the role of catalase in protecting human erythrocytes against peroxidative injury. Reduced activity of catalase was found in the erythrocytes of six boys who were deficient in erythrocytic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and who were studied while suffering hemolysis after ingesting fava beans. Activity of catalase was further reduced when their red blood cells were incubated with aminotriazole. In contrast, minimal reduction of catalase activity was found, both with and without incubation with aminotriazole, in erythrocytes of a G6PD-deficient boy who had ingested fava beans 7 days earlier and in erythrocytes of seven G6PD-deficient men with a past history of favism. These results confirmed earlier studies in vitro indicating that catalase is a major disposer of hydrogen peroxide in human erythrocytes and, like the glutathione peroxidase/reductase pathway, is dependent on the availability of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). The effect of divicine on purified catalase and on the catalase of intact G6PD-deficient erythrocytes was similar to the previously demonstrated effect on catalase of a known system for generating hydrogen peroxide. This effect of divicine strengthens earlier arguments that divicine is the toxic peroxidative component of fava beans. PMID:8704218

  11. Dopamine is involved in food-anticipatory activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Tian-Ya; Qu, Wei-Min; Hong, Zong-Yuan; Urade, Yoshihiro; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2012-10-01

    When food is available during a restricted and predictable time of the day, mammals exhibit food-anticipatory activity (FAA), an increase in locomotor activity preceding the presentation of food. Although many studies have attempted to locate the food-entrainable circadian oscillator in the central nervous system, the pathways that mediate food entrainment are a matter of controversy. The present study was designed to determine the role of dopaminergic and histaminergic systems on FAA. Mice were given access to food for 2 h (ZT12-ZT14), and FAA was defined as the locomotor activity that occurred 2 h before the availability of food. Dopamine D(1) receptor (R), D(2)R, and histamine H(1)R-specific antagonists were used to clarify the role of dopamine and histamine receptors in FAA induced by food restriction (FR). FAA was monitored by infrared locomotor activity sensors. Mice were sacrificed at ZT12 on the 14th day of FR, and monoamine concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). The results showed that pretreatment with the D(1)R antagonist SCH23390 at 1, 3, or 10 µg/kg significantly reduced FAA by 19% (p < 0.05), 26% (p < 0.05), or 19% (p < 0.01), respectively, and the D(2)R antagonist raclopride at 22, 67, or 200 µg/kg significantly reduced FAA by 16% (p < 0.05), 36% (p < 0.01), or 41% (p < 0.01), respectively, as compared with vehicle control. Moreover, coadministration of SCH23390 (10 µg/kg) and raclopride (200 µg/kg) synergistically inhibited FAA by 57% (p < 0.01) as compared with vehicle control. Consistently, the levels of dopamine and its metabolites in the striatum and midbrain were significantly increased during FAA, even with the pretreatment of D(1)R and D(2)R antagonists. However, pretreatment with pyrilamine at 2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg did not significantly reduce FAA, although it reduced the locomotor activity during the dark period in ad libitum mice. These results strongly indicate that the dopaminergic system plays an essential role in the FAA in mice. PMID:23010662

  12. WRKY Transcription Factors Involved in Activation of SA Biosynthesis Genes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased defense against a variety of pathogens in plants is achieved through activation of a mechanism known as systemic acquired resistance (SAR). The broad-spectrum resistance brought about by SAR is mediated through salicylic acid (SA). An important step in SA biosynthesis in Arabidopsis is the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate through the action of isochorismate synthase, encoded by the ICS1 gene. Also AVRPPHB SUSCEPTIBLE 3 (PBS3) plays an important role in SA metabolism, as pbs3 mutants accumulate drastically reduced levels of SA-glucoside, a putative storage form of SA. Bioinformatics analysis previously performed by us identified WRKY28 and WRKY46 as possible regulators of ICS1 and PBS3. Results Expression studies with ICS1 promoter::β-glucuronidase (GUS) genes in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts cotransfected with 35S::WRKY28 showed that over expression of WRKY28 resulted in a strong increase in GUS expression. Moreover, qRT-PCR analyses indicated that the endogenous ICS1 and PBS3 genes were highly expressed in protoplasts overexpressing WRKY28 or WRKY46, respectively. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays indentified potential WRKY28 binding sites in the ICS1 promoter, positioned -445 and -460 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. Mutation of these sites in protoplast transactivation assays showed that these binding sites are functionally important for activation of the ICS1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with haemagglutinin-epitope-tagged WRKY28 showed that the region of the ICS1 promoter containing the binding sites at -445 and -460 was highly enriched in the immunoprecipitated DNA. Conclusions The results obtained here confirm results from our multiple microarray co-expression analyses indicating that WRKY28 and WRKY46 are transcriptional activators of ICS1 and PBS3, respectively, and support this in silico screening as a powerful tool for identifying new components of stress signaling pathways. PMID:21595875

  13. Antibacterial activity of Thai herbal extracts on acne involved microorganism.

    PubMed

    Niyomkam, P; Kaewbumrung, S; Kaewnpparat, S; Panichayupakaranant, P

    2010-04-01

    Ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of 18 Thai medicinal plants were investigated for their antibacterial activity against Propionibacterium acnes, Stapylococcus aureus, and S. epidermidis. Thirteen plant extracts were capable of inhibiting the growth of P. acnes and S. epidermidis, while 14 plant extracts exhibited an inhibitory effect on S. aureus. Based on the broth dilution method, the ethyl acetate extract of Alpinia galanga (L.) Wild. (Zingiberaceae) rhizome showed the strongest antibacterial effect against P. acnes, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values of 156.0 and 312.0 microg/mL, respectively. On the basis of bioassay-guided purification, the ethyl acetate extract was isolated to afford the antibacterial active compound, which was identified as 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (1'-ACA). 1'-ACA had a strong inhibitory effect on P. acnes with MIC and MBC values of 62.0 and 250.0 microg/mL, respectively. Thus, 1'-ACA was used as an indicative marker for standardization of A. galanga extract using high performance liquid chromatography. These results suggest that A. galanga extract could be an interesting agent for further studies on an alternative treatment of acne. PMID:20645714

  14. Hemolysis-induced lethality involves inflammasome activation by heme

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Fabianno F.; Alves, Letícia S.; Rodrigues, Danielle; Fernandez, Patricia L.; de Oliveira, Rosane B.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Zamboni, Dario S.; Bozza, Marcelo T.

    2014-01-01

    The increase of extracellular heme is a hallmark of hemolysis or extensive cell damage. Heme has prooxidant, cytotoxic, and inflammatory effects, playing a central role in the pathogenesis of malaria, sepsis, and sickle cell disease. However, the mechanisms by which heme is sensed by innate immune cells contributing to these diseases are not fully characterized. We found that heme, but not porphyrins without iron, activated LPS-primed macrophages promoting the processing of IL-1β dependent on nucleotide-binding domain and leucine rich repeat containing family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3). The activation of NLRP3 by heme required spleen tyrosine kinase, NADPH oxidase-2, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and K+ efflux, whereas it was independent of heme internalization, lysosomal damage, ATP release, the purinergic receptor P2X7, and cell death. Importantly, our results indicated the participation of macrophages, NLRP3 inflammasome components, and IL-1R in the lethality caused by sterile hemolysis. Thus, understanding the molecular pathways affected by heme in innate immune cells might prove useful to identify new therapeutic targets for diseases that have heme release. PMID:25225402

  15. Activity of capryloyl collagenic acid against bacteria involved in acne.

    PubMed

    Fourniat, J; Bourlioux, P

    1989-12-01

    Synopsis Capryloyl collagenic acid (Lipacide C8Co) has similar bacteriostatic activity in vitro to that of benzoyl peroxide towards the bacteria found in acne lesions (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes) (MIC between 1 and 4 mg ml(-1) for C8Co, and between 0.5 and 5 mg ml(-1) for benzoyl peroxide). The presence of Emulgine M8 did not affect the bacteriostatic activity of C8Co. A 4% w/v solution of C8Co (incorporating Emulgine M8) fulfilled the criteria for an antiseptic preparation as laid down by the French Pharmacopoeia (10th Edition), and had a spectrum 5 bactericidal activity according to the French Standard AFNOR NF T 72-151. The excellent cutaneous tolerance of capryloyl collagenic acid would indicate that an aqueous solution might be of value for topical treatment of the bacterial component of acne. Rsum Activit antibactrienne de l'acide capryloyl-collagnique vis vis des bactries impliques dans l'etiologie de l'acn L'acide capryloyl-collagnique (Lipacide C8Co) et le peroxyde de benzoyle prsentent une activit bactriostatique in-vitroquivalente vis vis des espces bactriennes retrouves au niveau des lsions acniques (Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis et Propionibacterium acnes) (CMI comprise entre 1 et 4 mg ml(-1) pour le lipoaminoacide, et 0,5 et 5 mg ml(-1) pour le peroxyde de benzoyle). La mise en solution aqueuse de l'acide capryloyl-collagnique en prsence d'Emulgine M8 ne modifie pas son activit bactriostatique. Une telle solution, 4% m/V d'acide capryloyl-collagnique et 5% m/V d'Emulgine M8, satisfait l'essai d'activit des prparations antiseptiques dcrit la Pharmacope Franaise (Xme Ed.) (concentration minimale antiseptique: 10% v/V, pour un temps de contact de 5 min 32 degrees C entre les germes tests et la solution dilue en eau distille), et possde une activit bactricide antiseptique spectre 5 conforme la norme AFNOR NF T 72-151 (concentration minimale bactricide: 40% v/V). Cette activit antiseptique est diminue par l'augmentation du pH, mais demeure significative pH 5,5, pH moyen du revetement cutan. Compte tenu de la bonne tolrance cutane de l'acide capryloyl-collagnique, cette solution pourrait constituer une base intressante pour une preparation dermique destine au traitement local de la composante bactrienne de l'acn. PMID:19456955

  16. 40 CFR 13.5 - Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Claims involving criminal activities or... COLLECTION STANDARDS General § 13.5 Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct. (a) The Administrator will refer cases of suspected criminal activity or misconduct to the EPA Office of Inspector...

  17. 40 CFR 13.5 - Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Claims involving criminal activities or... COLLECTION STANDARDS General § 13.5 Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct. (a) The Administrator will refer cases of suspected criminal activity or misconduct to the EPA Office of Inspector...

  18. 40 CFR 13.5 - Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Claims involving criminal activities or... COLLECTION STANDARDS General § 13.5 Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct. (a) The Administrator will refer cases of suspected criminal activity or misconduct to the EPA Office of Inspector...

  19. Laboratory activities involving transmissible spongiform encephalopathy causing agents

    PubMed Central

    Leunda, Amaya; Van Vaerenbergh, Bernadette; Baldo, Aline; Roels, Stefan; Herman, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Since the appearance in 1986 of epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a new form of neurological disease in cattle which also affected human beings, many diagnostic and research activities have been performed to develop detection and therapeutic tools. A lot of progress was made in better identifying, understanding and controlling the spread of the disease by appropriate monitoring and control programs in European countries. This paper reviews the recent knowledge on pathogenesis, transmission and persistence outside the host of prion, the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) in mammals with a particular focus on risk (re)assessment and management of biosafety measures to be implemented in diagnostic and research laboratories in Belgium. Also, in response to the need of an increasing number of European diagnostic laboratories stopping TSE diagnosis due to a decreasing number of TSE cases reported in the last years, decontamination procedures and a protocol for decommissioning TSE diagnostic laboratories is proposed. PMID:24055928

  20. Impaired enzymatic defensive activity, mitochondrial dysfunction and proteasome activation are involved in RTT cell oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Cervellati, Carlo; Sticozzi, Claudia; Romani, Arianna; Belmonte, Giuseppe; De Rasmo, Domenico; Signorile, Anna; Cervellati, Franco; Milanese, Chiara; Mastroberardino, Pier Giorgio; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Savelli, Vinno; Forman, Henry J; Hayek, Joussef; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    A strong correlation between oxidative stress (OS) and Rett syndrome (RTT), a rare neurodevelopmental disorder affecting females in the 95% of the cases, has been well documented although the source of OS and the effect of a redox imbalance in this pathology has not been yet investigated. Using freshly isolated skin fibroblasts from RTT patients and healthy subjects, we have demonstrated in RTT cells high levels of H2O2 and HNE protein adducts. These findings correlated with the constitutive activation of NADPH-oxidase (NOX) and that was prevented by a NOX inhibitor and iron chelator pre-treatment, showing its direct involvement. In parallel, we demonstrated an increase in mitochondrial oxidant production, altered mitochondrial biogenesis and impaired proteasome activity in RTT samples. Further, we found that the key cellular defensive enzymes: glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and thioredoxin reductases activities were also significantly lower in RTT. Taken all together, our findings suggest that the systemic OS levels in RTT can be a consequence of both: increased endogenous oxidants as well as altered mitochondrial biogenesis with a decreased activity of defensive enzymes that leads to posttranslational oxidant protein modification and a proteasome activity impairment. PMID:26189585

  1. Activation of immunoglobulin mu gene expression involves stepwise demethylation.

    PubMed Central

    Gerondakis, S; Boyd, A; Bernard, O; Webb, E; Adams, J M

    1984-01-01

    In an attempt to identify stages of mu gene activation subsequent to VHDHJH assembly, we investigated two pre-B cell lines (A1 and A8) that have both alleles of the JH locus rearranged but do not make mu polypeptides. The block in A1 reflects incorrect VHDHJH assembly on both alleles. In A8, although an out-of-phase VHDHJH-C mu allele is transcribed, the properly assembled allele is silent, despite having a normal VH promoter and mu enhancer. Thus, transcription can be restricted to a single mu allele. Low level mu transcription in both lines was associated with demethylation of the VHDHJH and enhancer regions but not of the C mu gene. Markedly elevated mu transcription ensued on lipopolysaccharide stimulation or fusion to a plasmacytoma, but only fusion induced C mu demethylation. Hence stepwise demethylation is implicated in mu gene regulation, but enhanced expression can also occur independently of, or prior to, demethylation. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:6098461

  2. Anticancer Activity of Metal Complexes: Involvement of Redox Processes

    PubMed Central

    Jungwirth, Ute; Kowol, Christian R.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Hartinger, Christian G.; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Cells require tight regulation of the intracellular redox balance and consequently of reactive oxygen species for proper redox signaling and maintenance of metal (e.g., of iron and copper) homeostasis. In several diseases, including cancer, this balance is disturbed. Therefore, anticancer drugs targeting the redox systems, for example, glutathione and thioredoxin, have entered focus of interest. Anticancer metal complexes (platinum, gold, arsenic, ruthenium, rhodium, copper, vanadium, cobalt, manganese, gadolinium, and molybdenum) have been shown to strongly interact with or even disturb cellular redox homeostasis. In this context, especially the hypothesis of “activation by reduction” as well as the “hard and soft acids and bases” theory with respect to coordination of metal ions to cellular ligands represent important concepts to understand the molecular modes of action of anticancer metal drugs. The aim of this review is to highlight specific interactions of metal-based anticancer drugs with the cellular redox homeostasis and to explain this behavior by considering chemical properties of the respective anticancer metal complexes currently either in (pre)clinical development or in daily clinical routine in oncology. PMID:21275772

  3. Longitudinal Modeling of Adolescents' Activity Involvement, Problem Peer Associations, and Youth Smoking.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Aaron; Dawes, Nickki; Mermelstein, Robin; Wakschlag, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Longitudinal associations among different types of organized activity involvement, problem peer associations, and cigarette smoking were examined in a sample of 1,040 adolescents (mean age = 15.62 at baseline, 16.89 at 15-month assessment, 17.59 at 24 months) enriched for smoking experimentation (83% had tried smoking). A structural equation model tested longitudinal paths between three categories of involvement (team sports, school clubs and activities, and religious activities, measured at baseline and 15 months), problem peer associations (baseline and 15 months), and cigarette smoking behavior (baseline and 24 months). Multi-group analyses indicated pathways differed by type of activity and adolescent gender. Boys' baseline team sports and religious involvement predicted lower levels of smoking at 24 months via continued activity involvement at 15 months. Girls' involvement in school clubs and activities and religious activities indirectly predicted lower levels of smoking at 24 months via reduced exposure to problem peers at 15 months. PMID:21603061

  4. Longitudinal Modeling of Adolescents' Activity Involvement, Problem Peer Associations, and Youth Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Aaron; Dawes, Nickki; Mermelstein, Robin; Wakschlag, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    Longitudinal associations among different types of organized activity involvement, problem peer associations, and cigarette smoking were examined in a sample of 1,040 adolescents (mean age = 15.62 at baseline, 16.89 at 15-month assessment, 17.59 at 24 months) enriched for smoking experimentation (83% had tried smoking). A structural equation model tested longitudinal paths between three categories of involvement (team sports, school clubs and activities, and religious activities, measured at baseline and 15 months), problem peer associations (baseline and 15 months), and cigarette smoking behavior (baseline and 24 months). Multi-group analyses indicated pathways differed by type of activity and adolescent gender. Boys’ baseline team sports and religious involvement predicted lower levels of smoking at 24 months via continued activity involvement at 15 months. Girls’ involvement in school clubs and activities and religious activities indirectly predicted lower levels of smoking at 24 months via reduced exposure to problem peers at 15 months. PMID:21603061

  5. HIPPARCOS satellite: Aeritalia involvement and system test activities and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strim, B.; Cugno, W.; Morsillo, G.

    In 1989 the European Space Agency is scheduled to launch HIPPARCOS on a 2.5-year mission that will revolutionize the state of astronomy. This is the first satellite to be dedicated to astrometry, a branch of astronomy that deals with the position of celestial objects and their motion in space. With an accuracy impossible to achieve from Earth, HIPPARCOS will make position, trigonometric parallax and proper motion measurements of some 100.000 pre-selected stars. The data will be used to calculate each star's distance and motion, providing astronomers with an unprecedented map of the heavens. In the end, the HIPPARCOS mission is expected to reveal surprisingly new insight into theories of stellar evolution, as well as into the nature of our galaxy and the universe. The program has been awarded to the MESH industrial consortium for definition, development and production. The French firm MATRA (prime contractor) and the AERITALIA SPACE SYSTEMS GROUP (major co-contractor) share program responsibility. AERITALIA is in charge of the spacecraft or "service module". This is the structural platform for the telescope payload and provides all subsystem services including thermal control, data handling, telecommunications, electrical power distribution, power generation, attitude and orbit control, and apogee kick motor. AERITALIA is responsible for the procurement of all spacecraft subsystems for which it directs the activities of a multinational team of subcontractors. In addition, it is in charge of the satellite's final assembly, integration and testing, as well as for the procurement of all ground support equipment for satellite testing. HIPPARCOS stands for HIgh Precision PARallax COllecting Satellite. Its name is also intended to honor the Greek astronomer Hipparchus (190-120 BC) who compiled the first star catalog and who first used trigonometric parallax to calculate the distance to the moon. (Parallax is the apparent shift in a celestial body's position in the sky when observed from two different points, for example, from two different points in the Earth's orbit around the sun. Distance can be calculated using parallax measurements). The satellite payload is a Schmidt reflecting telescope with two openings 58 degrees apart. The design allows stars in two different parts of the sky to be observed at the same time. Internally, the two fields of view are combined and the angular separation between pairs of stars - one star from each field of view - is recorded. Over the 2.5-year life of the HIPPARCOS mission, millions of such measurements between star pairs as faint as magnitude 13 will be made covering the entire celestial sphere. The data will be compiled into the HIPPARCOS catalog. The accuracy of these measurements for most of the stars is expected to be within 0.002 arcsec, an improvement of about a factor of 20 over ground-based observations. A second experiment, called TYCHO, will collect position and photometric data on about 400.000 stars. Although less accurate than the main experiment, TYCHO will provide astronomers with a reference catalog for a large number of stars. Both the HIPPARCOS and TYCHO star catalogs are expected to be available to the worldwide astronomical community by around 1994. The launch weight of HIPPORCOS is 1.140 kg. It will be put into geostationary orbit by an Ariane rocket. Purpose of the present paper is to put the spotlight on the system tests performed on the Satellite Structural Thermal Model STM, the Engineering Model EM and to summarize the main results so far obtained. A description of the System and Spacecraft design to better understand the mission and system requirements is also presented.

  6. Breadth and Intensity: Salient, Separable, and Developmentally Significant Dimensions of Structured Youth Activity Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busseri, Michael A.; Rose-Krasnor, Linda

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, an impressive volume of evidence has accumulated demonstrating that youth involvement in structured, organized activities (e.g. school sports, community clubs) may facilitate positive youth development. We present a theory-based framework for studying structured activity involvement (SAI) as a context for positive youth…

  7. Breadth and Intensity of Youth Activity Involvement as Contexts for Positive Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose-Krasnor, Linda; Busseri, Michael A.; Willoughby, Teena; Chalmers, Heather

    2006-01-01

    Research has linked youth activity involvement to positive development. However, past studies have confounded at least two separable dimensions of involvement: breadth (number of activities) and intensity (participation frequency). Theory and the limited available evidence suggest that these dimensions may make independent contributions to…

  8. Ego Strength Development of Adolescents Involved in Adult-Sponsored Structured Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markstrom, Carol A.; Li, Xaioming; Blackshire, Shana L.; Wilfong, Juanita J.

    2005-01-01

    A psychosocial conception of ego strengths is presented in relation to adolescent involvement in adult-sponsored structured youth activities. Five-hundred and seventeen high school students completed measures on their involvement in structured activities and on 8 ego strengths. Gender, age, and SES were controlled in a MANCOVA procedure and it was…

  9. Involving Low-Income Parents and Parents of Color in College Readiness Activities: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Cheryl Holcomb

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an exploratory and descriptive study that examined the parental involvement beliefs, attitudes, and activities of 22 high school counselors who work in high-poverty and high-minority schools. More specifically, this study examined school counselors' beliefs and activities about involving parents in the college admission…

  10. Capturing Unique Dimensions of Youth Organized Activity Involvement: Theoretical and Methodological Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohnert, Amy; Fredricks, Jennifer; Randall, Edin

    2010-01-01

    Despite increased focus on the effects of organized activities on youth development, there is currently no consensus about the best way to assess various dimensions of involvement. This article explores the complexities of assessing involvement and focuses specifically on the following organized activity dimensions: (a) breadth, (b) intensity, (c)…

  11. Involving Low-Income Parents and Parents of Color in College Readiness Activities: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Cheryl Holcomb

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an exploratory and descriptive study that examined the parental involvement beliefs, attitudes, and activities of 22 high school counselors who work in high-poverty and high-minority schools. More specifically, this study examined school counselors' beliefs and activities about involving parents in the college admission

  12. African American Youths with Internalizing Difficulties: Relation to Social Support and Activity Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolin, Sylvia

    2006-01-01

    Social support and positive activity involvement are considered protective factors that can help offset the risks for youths living in impoverished areas. This study investigated whether insufficient social support and activity involvement are related to internalizing difficulties, such as depression, anxiety, loneliness, and low self-esteem.…

  13. 48 CFR 3452.224-72 - Research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... human subjects covered under 34 CFR part 97: Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011) (a... establish and maintain procedures for the protection of human subjects. The definitions in 34 CFR 97.102... approved by the IRB. (34 CFR 97.103(f).) No covered research involving human subjects shall be...

  14. 48 CFR 3452.224-72 - Research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... human subjects covered under 34 CFR part 97: Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011) (a... establish and maintain procedures for the protection of human subjects. The definitions in 34 CFR 97.102... approved by the IRB. (34 CFR 97.103(f).) No covered research involving human subjects shall be...

  15. 48 CFR 3452.224-72 - Research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... human subjects covered under 34 CFR part 97: Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011) (a... establish and maintain procedures for the protection of human subjects. The definitions in 34 CFR 97.102... approved by the IRB. (34 CFR 97.103(f).) No covered research involving human subjects shall be...

  16. 48 CFR 3452.224-72 - Research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... human subjects covered under 34 CFR part 97: Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011) (a... establish and maintain procedures for the protection of human subjects. The definitions in 34 CFR 97.102... approved by the IRB. (34 CFR 97.103(f).) No covered research involving human subjects shall be...

  17. 40 CFR 13.5 - Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... That office has the responsibility for investigating or referring the matter, where appropriate, to the... activities which should be referred are matters involving fraud, anti-trust violations, embezzlement,...

  18. 40 CFR 13.5 - Claims involving criminal activities or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... That office has the responsibility for investigating or referring the matter, where appropriate, to the... activities which should be referred are matters involving fraud, anti-trust violations, embezzlement,...

  19. Health benefits of serious involvement in leisure activities among older Korean adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhyoung; Yamada, Naoko; Heo, Jinmoo; Han, Areum

    2014-01-01

    The existing literature suggests that serious engagement in leisure activities leads to happiness, life satisfaction, and successful aging among older adults. This qualitative study was used to examine the benefits of serious involvement in leisure activities among older Korean adults who were members of a sports club. Using an analytic data analysis, we identified three main themes associated with the benefits of serious engagement in leisure activities: 1) the experience of psychological benefits, 2) the creation of social support, and 3) the enhancement of physical health. These themes indicate that, through serious involvement in certain physical activities, participants gain various health benefits, which may contribute to successful aging. PMID:25059979

  20. Health benefits of serious involvement in leisure activities among older Korean adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junhyoung; Yamada, Naoko; Heo, Jinmoo; Han, Areum

    2014-01-01

    The existing literature suggests that serious engagement in leisure activities leads to happiness, life satisfaction, and successful aging among older adults. This qualitative study was used to examine the benefits of serious involvement in leisure activities among older Korean adults who were members of a sports club. Using an analytic data analysis, we identified three main themes associated with the benefits of serious engagement in leisure activities: 1) the experience of psychological benefits, 2) the creation of social support, and 3) the enhancement of physical health. These themes indicate that, through serious involvement in certain physical activities, participants gain various health benefits, which may contribute to successful aging. PMID:25059979

  1. Getting Involved: Exploring Latino GBT Volunteerism and Activism in AIDS and LGBT Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Valles, Jesus; Kuhns, Lisa M.; Vázquez, Raquel; Benjamin, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the community involvement (e.g., volunteerism, activism) of Latino gay and bisexual men and transgender persons (GBT) in two areas: AIDS/GLBT and other general causes. Drawing from volunteering and identity theories, we explore: Who is likely to get involved? What factors affect variation in the levels of involvement? Where do Latino GBT participate and what do they do? Data come from a cross-sectional sample (N=643) of Latino GBT in Chicago and San Francisco. We find high levels of involvement, but primarily focused on AIDS/GLBT. Involvement appears to be driven by income, early involvement, role modeling, and childhood stigmatization of gender nonconformity. PMID:26451081

  2. A Longitudinal Study of Breadth and Intensity of Activity Involvement and the Transition to University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busseri, Michael A.; Rose-Krasnor, Linda; Pancer, S. Mark; Pratt, Michael W.; Adams, Gerald R.; Birnie-Lefcovitch, Shelly; Polivy, Janet; Wintre, Maxine Gallander

    2011-01-01

    We examined prospective relations between activity involvement and successful transitioning to university. A sample of 656 students from 6 Canadian universities completed questionnaires before beginning university and at the end of their first year. Breadth (number of different activity domains) and intensity (mean frequency) of activity…

  3. 48 CFR 3452.224-71 - Notice about research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 34 CFR part 97: Notice About Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011) (a) Applicable... to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge.” (34 CFR 97.102(d)). If an activity follows a... the individual, or obtains identifiable private information. (34 CFR 97.102(f)). The definition of...

  4. 48 CFR 3452.224-71 - Notice about research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 34 CFR part 97: Notice About Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011) (a) Applicable... to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge.” (34 CFR 97.102(d)). If an activity follows a... the individual, or obtains identifiable private information. (34 CFR 97.102(f)). The definition of...

  5. A Study of Lipscomb University Students' Internet Use and Involvement in Extracurricular Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Samuel Aarron

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze Lipscomb University students' Internet use and involvement in extracurricular activities. A survey of students at Lipscomb University was conducted. As confirmed by the data the research was able to determine that the type of extracurricular activity a student participates in most often is related to the…

  6. 48 CFR 3452.224-71 - Notice about research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 34 CFR part 97: Notice About Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011) (a) Applicable... to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge.” (34 CFR 97.102(d)). If an activity follows a... the individual, or obtains identifiable private information. (34 CFR 97.102(f)). The definition of...

  7. 48 CFR 3452.224-71 - Notice about research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 34 CFR part 97: Notice About Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011) (a) Applicable... to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge.” (34 CFR 97.102(d)). If an activity follows a... the individual, or obtains identifiable private information. (34 CFR 97.102(f)). The definition of...

  8. Activities involving aeronautical, space science, and technology support for minority institutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Final Report addressed the activities with which the Interracial Council for Business Opportunity (ICBO) was involved over the past 12 months. ICBO was involved in the design and development of a CARES Student Tracking System Software (CARES). Cares is intended to provide an effective means of maintaining relevant current and historical information on NASA-funded students through a range of educational program initiatives. ICBP was extensively involved in the formation of a minority university consortium amd implementation of collaborative research activities by the consortium as part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth/Earth Observing System. ICBO was involved in the formation of an HBCU/MI Consortium to facilitate technology transfer efforts to the small and minority business community in their respective regions.

  9. Addressing Three Common Issues in Research on Youth Activities: An Integrative Approach for Operationalizing and Analyzing Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busseri, Michael A.; Rose-Krasnor, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Youth activity involvement has been operationalized and analyzed using a wide range of approaches. Researchers face the challenges of distinguishing between the effects of involvement versus noninvolvement and intensity of involvement in a particular activity, accounting simultaneously for cumulative effects of involvement, and addressing multiple…

  10. Physiological heart activation by adrenaline involves parallel activation of ATP usage and supply.

    PubMed

    Korzeniewski, Bernard; Deschodt-Arsac, Véronique; Calmettes, Guillaume; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Diolez, Philippe

    2008-07-15

    During low-to-high work transition in adult mammalian heart in vivo the concentrations of free ADP, ATP, PCr (phosphocreatine), P(i) and NADH are essentially constant, in striking contrast with skeletal muscle. The direct activation by calcium ions of ATP usage and feedback activation of ATP production by ADP (and P(i)) alone cannot explain this perfect homoeostasis. A comparison of the response to adrenaline (increase in rate-pressure product and [PCr]) of the intact beating perfused rat heart with the elasticities of the PCr producer and consumer to PCr concentration demonstrated that both the ATP/PCr-producing block and ATP/PCr-consuming block are directly activated to a similar extent during physiological heart activation. Our finding constitutes a direct evidence for the parallel-activation mechanism of the regulation of oxidative phosphorylation in heart postulated previously in a theoretical way. PMID:18377364

  11. Criticality Prevention Specification 224-T Process Cell Characterization Activities Involving Unknown Quantities of Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    DODD, E.N.

    2001-02-27

    The fissionable material addressed in the criticality prevention specification (CPS) is the residual material within the 224-T process cells from previous processing operations. It is anticipated that the majority of the material will be within the process vessels; however, lower levels of contamination external to the vessels is expected and anticipated to include fissionable material. Specifically, this CPS addresses the activities involving unknown quantities of fissionable material and therefore the initial phase of characterization activities.

  12. Increasing Parental Involvement at a Middle School by Involving Parents in Workshops and School Activities Designed To Meet the Needs of Their Adolescent Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amato, John Kenneth

    This practicum was designed to address declining parental participation in school functions and activities at a middle school, along with a low level of parental involvement or interest in their children's education. A year-long parental involvement program was developed that encouraged parents to: (1) interact with their children and their…

  13. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  14. Involving Your Child or Teen with ASD in Integrated Community Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Participating in outside activities and community-based endeavors can be tricky for people with special needs, like Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Families meet more than a few obstacles attempting to integrate their children or teens who have special needs like ASD. Most typical children are highly involved in sports, clubs and camps. If a…

  15. Involving Your Child or Teen with ASD in Integrated Community Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Participating in outside activities and community-based endeavors can be tricky for people with special needs, like Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Families meet more than a few obstacles attempting to integrate their children or teens who have special needs like ASD. Most typical children are highly involved in sports, clubs and camps. If a

  16. A Longitudinal Examination of Breadth and Intensity of Youth Activity Involvement and Successful Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busseri, Michael A.; Rose-Krasnor, Linda; Willoughby, Teena; Chalmers, Heather

    2006-01-01

    Connections between youth activity involvement and indicators of successful development were examined in a longitudinal high school sample. Drawing on theories of expertise skill development (e.g., J. Cote, 1999); the selection, optimization, and compensation framework (P. B. Baltes, 1997); and theories of positive youth development (e.g., R. M.…

  17. Structural Model of Employee Involvement in Skill Development Activity: The Role of Individual Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Todd J.; Lippstreu, Michael; Judge, Timothy A.

    2008-01-01

    We extend prior research on involvement in employee development activity by including prominent individual difference constructs that have been previously ignored in this area of research. These include two important personality characteristics (conscientiousness and openness to experience), mental ability and goal orientation constructs. We…

  18. Idle Hands and Empty Pockets?: Youth Involvement in Extracurricular Activities, Social Capital, and Economic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Amanda M.; Gager, Constance T.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the Survey of Adults and Youth, the authors examine the effect of economic status on youths' involvement in both school- and nonschool-related extracurricular activities. Specifically, they assess the association between four alternative measures of economic status--recipiency of food stamps, Aid to Families with Dependent…

  19. INVOLVEMENT OF MICRORNAS IN EMBRYONIC GENOME ACTIVATION AS SHOWN BY DICER EXPRESSION IN RAINBOW TROUT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most maternal transcripts including many housekeeping genes are degraded at or around embryonic genome activation as evidenced by our initial studies. This degradation appears to be global but highly regulated. MicroRNAs are naturally occurring small (19-24bp) RNAs that are shown to be involved in m...

  20. 78 FR 57818 - Commission Participation and Commission Employee Involvement in Voluntary Standards Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... the development of voluntary standards (43 FR 19216 (May 4, 1978)). Acknowledging the contribution... Commission Employee Involvement in Voluntary Standards Activities. 54 FR 6646 (Feb. 14, 1989). In 2006, the Commission amended several provisions of part 1031. 71 FR 38754 (July 10, 2006). Among other things, the...

  1. Longitudinal Modeling of Adolescents' Activity Involvement, Problem Peer Associations, and Youth Smoking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzger, Aaron; Dawes, Nickki; Mermelstein, Robin; Wakschlag, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Longitudinal associations among different types of organized activity involvement, problem peer associations, and cigarette smoking were examined in a sample of 1040 adolescents (mean age = 15.62 at baseline, 16.89 at 15-month assessment, 17.59 at 24 months) enriched for smoking experimentation (83% had tried smoking). A structural equation model

  2. Beyond the Classroom: Involving Students with Disabilities in Extracurricular Activities at Levy Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Pam; And Others

    Six students in a special education classroom at Levy Middle School (Syracuse, New York) became involved in a variety of after-school activities with nondisabled students. The students participated in the school computer club, cross-country skiing, volleyball, stage crew, intramural basketball, the Spanish Club, and after-school programs at two…

  3. An Emergent Language Program Framework: Actively Involving Learners in Needs Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, William; Storer, Graeme

    1992-01-01

    Relates the experience of the staff of an aquaculture outreach program in Northeast Thailand in implementing an English for special purposes program. By actively involving learners in both the needs analysis and program design, teachers were able to adapt the program content to the requirements of the students. (15 references) (JL)

  4. Increasing Student Involvement in Self-Governance Activities: A Delphi Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Jennifer M.; Miller, Michael T.

    This study used a Delphi survey to examine what undergraduate student government leaders think about increasing student involvement in self-governance activities. Twenty-students from geographically diverse institutions of higher education participated in the three rounds of the Delphi study. They generated a total of 56 different strategies and…

  5. Beyond Participation: The Association between School Extracurricular Activities and Involvement in Violence across Generations of Immigration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Xin; Peterson, Ruth D.

    2012-01-01

    Participation in extracurricular activities is purported to protect the broad spectrum of youth from a host of behavioral risks. Yet, empirical research on the extent to which this assumption holds for involvement in violence by immigrant youth is limited. Thus, using data for 13,236 (51.8% female) adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study

  6. Involving Parents of Young Children in Science, Math and Literacy Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landerholm, Elizabeth; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a collaborative parent-involvement project for inner-city Hispanic primary students sponsored by the Chicago Community Trust. A university professor, two graduate assistants, the principal, and the school community representative designed a summer program featuring hospitality and support activities, free books, and hands-on science and…

  7. Beyond Participation: The Association between School Extracurricular Activities and Involvement in Violence across Generations of Immigration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Xin; Peterson, Ruth D.

    2012-01-01

    Participation in extracurricular activities is purported to protect the broad spectrum of youth from a host of behavioral risks. Yet, empirical research on the extent to which this assumption holds for involvement in violence by immigrant youth is limited. Thus, using data for 13,236 (51.8% female) adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study…

  8. Longitudinal Modeling of Adolescents' Activity Involvement, Problem Peer Associations, and Youth Smoking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzger, Aaron; Dawes, Nickki; Mermelstein, Robin; Wakschlag, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Longitudinal associations among different types of organized activity involvement, problem peer associations, and cigarette smoking were examined in a sample of 1040 adolescents (mean age = 15.62 at baseline, 16.89 at 15-month assessment, 17.59 at 24 months) enriched for smoking experimentation (83% had tried smoking). A structural equation model…

  9. Extracurricular Activity and Parental Involvement Predict Positive Outcomes in Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagace-Seguin, Daniel G.; Case, Emily

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to explore if parental involvement and extracurricular activity participation could predict well-being and academic competence in elementary school children. Seventy-two children (mean age = 10.9 years, SD = 0.85) and their parents participated. Results revealed that parental pressure and support, when paired with…

  10. Nitric oxide is involved in abscisic acid-induced antioxidant activities in Stylosanthes guianensis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Biyan; Guo, Zhenfei; Xing, Jinpeng; Huang, Bingru

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies suggest that abscisic acid (ABA) stimulates the activities of antioxidant enzymes under normal and chilling temperature and enhanced chilling resistance in Stylosanthes guianensis. The objective of this study was to test whether nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the ABA-induced activities of the antioxidant enzymes in Stylosanthes guianensis due to its nature as a second messenger in stress responses. Plants were treated with NO donors, ABA, ABA in combination with NO scavengers or the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor and their effects on the activity of antioxidant enzymes and NO production were compared. The results showed that ABA increased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). The effect of ABA on antioxidant enzyme activities was suppressed by the NOS inhibitor, N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), and the NO scavenger, 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl3-oxide (PTIO). NO content increased after 5 h of ABA treatment. The NO-scavenger, PTIO, and the NOS-inhibitor, L-NNA, inhibited the accumulation of NO in ABA-treated Stylosanthes guianensis. NO donor treatment enhanced the activities of SOD, CAT, and APX. The results suggested that NO was involved in the ABA-induced activities of SOD, CAT, and APX in Stylosanthes guianensis. ABA triggered NO production that may lead to the stimulation of antioxidant enzyme activities. PMID:16263901

  11. Involvement of leukocyte (beta 2) integrins (CD18/CD11) in human monocyte tumoricidal activity.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, S; Peri, G; Sironi, M; Mantovani, A

    1991-09-01

    Appropriately activated mononuclear phagocytes mediate contact-dependent tumoricidal activity. Adhesion structures involved in contact-dependent tumor cytotoxicity have not been defined. The present study was aimed at identifying the adhesion structures involved in the tumoricidal activity of activated (IFN-gamma + LPS) human monocytes. Tumor cells of different histological origin were used as targets in a 48-hr cytolysis assay. Anti-CD18 (integrin beta 2 chain) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) substantially (50-80%) inhibited human monocyte cytotoxicity. When the role of different a-chains was studied, anti-alpha L (CD11a, LFA1), anti-alpha M (CD11b, Mac-1) and anti-alpha X (CD11c, p150,95) caused marginal inhibition, but the effect of the 3 combined was comparable to that of anti-CD18. Anti-CD18 MAb did not affect the release of various cytotoxic molecules (e.g. TNF) by activated human monocytes. Activated monocytes showed augmented binding to target cells and anti-CD18 MAb inhibited the binding of resting and activated monocytes to tumor target cells. While IFN-gamma alone augmented expression of leukocyte integrins and LPS had no effect, the 2 activation signals, combined for optimal stimulation of tumoricidal activity, resulted in no appreciable increase in these leukocyte adhesion molecules, as assessed by flow cytometry. Our results suggest that the augmented CD18-dependent binding of activated monocytes on tumor cells depends mainly upon changes in the adhesive properties of these molecules rather than upon increased numbers on the cell surface. Anti-ICAM-1 MAb significantly reduced monocyte cytotoxicity on tumor cells, which is consistent with a role of the CD11/CD18 adhesion pathway. These results implicate "activated" leukocyte (beta 2) integrins (CD11/CD18) as important adhesion molecules in the contact-dependent tumoricidal activity of human monocytes. PMID:1679046

  12. Personal Involvement with Learning Disability Children: Activities Groups Can Do for Personal Involvement with Learning Disability Children thru Movement Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elizabeth I.

    Described are perceptual motor activities in the areas of coordination, agility, strength, balance, and endurance for use with learning disabled children. Provided are a rationale for movement education and definitions of 10 terms such as laterality and endurance. A sequence of activities is provided for the following skills: ball bouncing, rope…

  13. Embedding a Recovery Orientation into Neuroscience Research: Involving People with a Lived Experience in Research Activity.

    PubMed

    Stratford, Anthony; Brophy, Lisa; Castle, David; Harvey, Carol; Robertson, Joanne; Corlett, Philip; Davidson, Larry; Everall, Ian

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the importance and value of involving people with a lived experience of mental ill health and recovery in neuroscience research activity. In this era of recovery oriented service delivery, involving people with the lived experience of mental illness in neuroscience research extends beyond their participation as "subjects". The recovery paradigm reconceptualises people with the lived experience of mental ill health as experts by experience. To support this contribution, local policies and procedures, recovery-oriented training for neuroscience researchers, and dialogue about the practical applications of neuroscience research, are required. PMID:25969424

  14. Mechanism of IL-1? Modulation of Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Involves p38 Kinase and Activating Transcription Factor-2 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sadi, Rana; Guo, Shuhong; Ye, Dongmei; Dokladny, Karol; Alhmoud, Tarik; Ereifej, Lisa; Said, Hamid M.

    2013-01-01

    The defective intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ) barrier has been postulated to be an important pathogenic factor contributing to intestinal inflammation. It has been shown that the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1? causes an increase in intestinal permeability; however, the signaling pathways and the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. The major purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the p38 kinase pathway and the molecular processes involved. In these studies, the in vitro intestinal epithelial model system (Caco-2 monolayers) was used to delineate the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and a complementary in vivo mouse model system (intestinal perfusion) was used to assess the in vivo relevance of the in vitro findings. Our data indicated that the IL-1? increase in Caco-2 TJ permeability correlated with an activation of p38 kinase. The activation of p38 kinase caused phosphorylation and activation of p38 kinase substrate, activating transcription factor (ATF)-2. The activated ATF-2 translocated to the nucleus where it attached to its binding motif on the myosin L chain kinase (MLCK) promoter region, leading to the activation of MLCK promoter activity and gene transcription. Small interfering RNA induced silencing of ATF-2, or mutation of the ATF-2 binding motif prevented the activation of MLCK promoter and MLCK mRNA transcription. Additionally, in vivo intestinal perfusion studies also indicated that the IL-1? increase in mouse intestinal permeability required p38 kinasedependent activation of ATF-2. In conclusion, these studies show that the IL-1?induced increase in intestinal TJ permeability in vitro and in vivo was regulated by p38 kinase activation of ATF-2 and by ATF-2 regulation of MLCK gene activity. PMID:23656735

  15. Barriers to involvement in physical activities of persons with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Shor, Ron; Shalev, Anat

    2016-03-01

    Participating in physical activities could be essential for reducing the multiple risk factors for health problems that persons with severe mental illness (SMI) may suffer. However, people with SMI are significantly less active than the general population. To develop knowledge about factors related to the perceived barriers hindering this population's participation in physical activities and the benefits this participation would have, a study was conducted in Israel with 86 people with mental illness living in community mental health facilities prior to their participation in a health promotion program. A mixed method was implemented and included: a scale designed to measure participants' perceptions of the barriers to and benefits of involvement in physical activities; instruments focusing on bio-psycho-social factors that may affect the level of barriers experienced; and personal interviews. The findings revealed high ranking for accessibility barriers hindering the participation in physical activities. Bio-psycho-social factors stemming from the participants' mental health, such as level of depression, were correlated with higher ranking of accessibility barriers. Bio-psycho-social factors reflecting positive mental health and health, such as positive appraisal of body weight, were correlated with lower ranking of accessibility barriers. Other barriers may include organizational and broader systemic barriers in the mental health facilities where the participants reside. These findings illuminate the need to consider the unique challenges that persons with mental illness may face in any attempt to advance their involvement in physical activity. PMID:25204451

  16. Understanding affluent adolescent adjustment: The interplay of parental perfectionism, perceived parental pressure, and organized activity involvement.

    PubMed

    Randall, Edin T; Bohnert, Amy M; Travers, Lea V

    2015-06-01

    This cross-sectional study examined relations between affluent adolescent adjustment and culturally salient factors within parent-child relationship and extracurricular domain. Bootstrapping techniques evaluated mediated effects among parental perfectionism, perceived parental pressure, intensity of organized activity (OA) involvement, and adolescent adjustment (i.e., depressive and anxiety symptoms, life satisfaction) within a sample of 10th graders and their parents (n = 88 parent-child pairs) from four high schools in affluent communities. Findings indicated that adolescents with more perfectionistic parents perceived more parental pressure and experienced poorer adjustment. Results also demonstrated that affluent adolescents who perceived more parental pressure were more intensely involved in OAs, but that higher OA intensity was linked to better adjustment. Findings highlight the importance of considering parental perfectionism when understanding adolescent behaviors and psychological outcomes, confirm the negative direct effects of parental pressure on adjustment, and corroborate prior research dispelling that highly intense OA involvement is linked to adolescent maladjustment. PMID:25828548

  17. Differential involvement of amygdala and cortical NMDA receptors activation upon encoding in odor fear memory.

    PubMed

    Hegoburu, Chlo; Parrot, Sandrine; Ferreira, Guillaume; Mouly, Anne-Marie

    2014-12-01

    Although the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a crucial role for the acquisition of fear memories, sensory cortices are involved in their long-term storage in rats. However, the time course of their respective involvement has received little investigation. Here we assessed the role of the glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the BLA and olfactory cortex at discrete moments of an odor fear conditioning session. We showed that NMDA receptors in BLA are critically involved in odor fear acquisition during the first association but not during the next ones. In the cortex, NMDA receptor activation at encoding is not necessary for recent odor fear memory while its role in remote memory storage needs further investigation. PMID:25403452

  18. Differential involvement of amygdala and cortical NMDA receptors activation upon encoding in odor fear memory

    PubMed Central

    Hegoburu, Chloé; Parrot, Sandrine; Ferreira, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Although the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a crucial role for the acquisition of fear memories, sensory cortices are involved in their long-term storage in rats. However, the time course of their respective involvement has received little investigation. Here we assessed the role of the glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the BLA and olfactory cortex at discrete moments of an odor fear conditioning session. We showed that NMDA receptors in BLA are critically involved in odor fear acquisition during the first association but not during the next ones. In the cortex, NMDA receptor activation at encoding is not necessary for recent odor fear memory while its role in remote memory storage needs further investigation. PMID:25403452

  19. Involving postgraduate's students in undergraduate small group teaching promotes active learning in both

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Ruchi; Modi, Jyoti Nath; Vyas, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lecture is a common traditional method for teaching, but it may not stimulate higher order thinking and students may also be hesitant to express and interact. The postgraduate (PG) students are less involved with undergraduate (UG) teaching. Team based small group active learning method can contribute to better learning experience. Aim: To-promote active learning skills among the UG students using small group teaching methods involving PG students as facilitators to impart hands-on supervised training in teaching and managerial skills. Methodology: After Institutional approval under faculty supervision 92 UGs and 8 PGs participated in 6 small group sessions utilizing the jigsaw technique. Feedback was collected from both. Observations: Undergraduate Feedback (Percentage of Students Agreed): Learning in small groups was a good experience as it helped in better understanding of the subject (72%), students explored multiple reading resources (79%), they were actively involved in self-learning (88%), students reported initial apprehension of performance (71%), identified their learning gaps (86%), team enhanced their learning process (71%), informal learning in place of lecture was a welcome change (86%), it improved their communication skills (82%), small group learning can be useful for future self-learning (75%). Postgraduate Feedback: Majority performed facilitation for first time, perceived their performance as good (75%), it was helpful in self-learning (100%), felt confident of managing students in small groups (100%), as facilitator they improved their teaching skills, found it more useful and better identified own learning gaps (87.5%). Conclusions: Learning in small groups adopting team based approach involving both UGs and PGs promoted active learning in both and enhanced the teaching skills of the PGs. PMID:26380201

  20. Activity and recovery cycles of National Rugby League matches involving higher and lower ranked teams.

    PubMed

    Gabbett, Tim J

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the influence of ladder position on ball-in-play and recovery periods in elite National Rugby League (NRL) competitive matches. Video recordings of 192 NRL matches and 18 NRL finals matches played over 2 competitive seasons were coded for activity and recovery cycles. Time when the ball was continuously in play was considered activity, whereas any stoppages during the match (e.g., for scrums, penalties, line drop outs, tries, and video referee decisions) were considered recovery. In comparison to matches involving lower standard teams, there was a greater proportion (effect size [ES] = 0.37-0.67) of long duration (>91 seconds) and a smaller proportion (ES = 0.49-0.68) of short duration (<45 seconds) ball-in-play periods when Top 4 teams were competing against other Top 4 teams. No meaningful differences were found between teams of different ladder positions for the proportion of short (ES = 0.04-0.16) and long (ES = 0.06-0.28) recovery periods. In comparison to fixture matches involving the top 4 teams, finals matches had a smaller proportion (ES = 0.56) of long duration activity periods, and a greater proportion (ES = 0.54) of short duration activity periods. Only small differences were found between finals matches and matches involving the Top 4 teams for the proportion of short (ES = 0.42) and long (ES = 0.41) recovery periods. These findings suggest that the competitive advantage of the best NRL teams is closely linked to their ability to maintain a higher playing intensity than less successful teams. Furthermore, long ball-in-play periods in high-standard fixture matches (i.e., involving the top 4 teams) ensure that players are adequately prepared for the ball-in-play demands of finals matches. PMID:23037615

  1. Signalling pathways involved in oocyte growth, acquisition of competence and activation.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Cláudia; Silva, Joana Vieira; Silva, Vladimiro; Torgal, Isabel; Fardilha, Margarida

    2015-06-01

    The oocyte's primary function is to be fertilised by a spermatozoon in order to create a viable embryo. Oocyte growth and development are initiated during embryogenesis and occur in parallel to follicular development. Factors produced by the oocyte bind to receptors on follicular cells, ensuring follicular development. Oocytes begin meiosis during foetal development and are arrested in prophase I by elevated levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases triggers degradation of cAMP, allowing oocyte maturation to proceed. The production of progesterone and prostaglandins during the ovulation process ultimately activates proteases, whose action helps to release the oocyte into the Fallopian tube. Oocyte activation depends on fertilisation and is induced by changes in intracellular calcium levels. Dysregulation of these pathways is involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases including the syndrome of oocyte maturation failure. PMID:25738216

  2. Insulin and dexamethasone stimulation of cardiac lipoprotein lipase activity involves the actin-based cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Ewart, H S; Severson, D L

    1999-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in cultured ventricular cardiomyocytes from adult rat hearts was stimulated by the combination of insulin (100 nM) and dexamethasone (100 nM) during an overnight (16 h) incubation. Wortmannin (100 nM), rapamycin (30 ng/ml) or PD98059 (50 microM) did not prevent this stimulation, suggesting that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, p70 S6 kinase and the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade are not involved in transducing the hormonal signal. In contrast, cytochalasin D (2 microM) completely abolished the stimulatory effect of insulin and dexamethasone on both heparin-releasable LPL and total cellular LPL activities. The potential role of the actin cytoskeleton in the stimulation of LPL activity by insulin and dexamethasone appears to be distal to the initial signalling events since cytochalasin D is still effective in preventing the stimulation when added 2 h after the hormones. PMID:10333493

  3. Involvement of calcium in ACC-oxidase activity from Cicer arietinum seed embryonic axes.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, M; Gómez-Jiménez, M C; Matilla, A

    1999-02-01

    Both in vivo and in vitro ACC-oxidase activities as well as ethylene production from embryonic axes of chickpea seeds were strongly inhibited by EGTA, a selective extracellular Ca2+ ion chelator, indicating that the influx of Ca2+ is important for enzymatic activity. EGTA inhibition was restored by exogenous Ca2+. Treatments of embryonic axes with either Verapamil and LaCl3 (both Ca2+ channel blockers) or TMB-8 (an intracellular Ca2+ antagonist) provoked an inhibition of both ACC-oxidase activity and ethylene production. These results suggest an involvement of calcium fluxes and intracellular calcium levels in the activity of the last step of the ethylene biosynthetic pathway, which is, in turn, intimately correlated with germination of Cicer arietinum seeds. PMID:9933950

  4. Effect of an Activated Platelet Concentrate on Differentiated Cells Involved in Tissue Healing.

    PubMed

    Brini, Anna T; Ceci, Caterina; Taschieri, Silvio; Niada, Stefania; Lolato, Alessandra; Giannasi, Chiara; Mortellaro, Carmen; Del Fabbro, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    Tissue healing is a complex process involving several players such as cells and growth factors released from platelets upon activation. Today, platelet concentrates (PCs) are used in many different medical fields including oral, orthopaedic, and reconstructive surgery since they allow growth factors delivery to the injured site, aiming at enhancing tissue regeneration. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of the acellular plasma of an activated platelet concentrate obtained using a manual protocol, on the proliferation, and biological activity of differentiated cells involved in tissue healing. Human osteoblasts and dermal fibroblasts were grown in serum-free medium supplemented with PC derived from several donors. Human osteoblast and human dermal fibroblast proliferation was assessed by MTT test after 7 days and cells were count up to 12-day incubation. Human osteoblast osteo-differentiation was tested after 7 and 14-day incubation by alkaline phosphatase assay. The addition of PC to the culture medium caused an increased proliferation with respect to cells grown in standard condition. The results of the present study suggest that PC supports the proliferation of terminally differentiated cells involved in wound healing and tissue regeneration, confirming its beneficial clinical application in regenerative therapies. PMID:27054419

  5. Involvement of Endogenous Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Activity.

    PubMed

    Naert, G; Zussy, C; Tran Van Ba, C; Chevallier, N; Tang, Y-P; Maurice, T; Givalois, L

    2015-11-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) appears to be highly involved in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation during adulthood, playing an important role in homeostasis maintenance. The present study aimed to determine the involvement of BDNF in HPA axis activity under basal and stress conditions via partial inhibition of this endogenous neurotrophin. Experiments were conducted in rats and mice with two complementary approaches: (i) BDNF knockdown with stereotaxic delivery of BDNF-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the lateral ventricle of adult male rats and (ii) genetically induced knockdown (KD) of BDNF expression specifically in the central nervous system during the first ontogenesis in mice (KD mice). Delivery of siRNA in the rat brain decreased BDNF levels in the hippocampus (-31%) and hypothalamus (-35%) but not in the amygdala, frontal cortex and pituitary. In addition, siRNA induced no change of the basal HPA axis activity. BDNF siRNA rats exhibited decreased BDNF levels and concomitant altered adrenocortoctrophic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone responses to restraint stress, suggesting the involvement of BDNF in the HPA axis adaptive response to stress. In KD mice, BDNF levels in the hippocampus and hypothalamus were decreased by 20% in heterozygous and by 60% in homozygous animals compared to wild-type littermates. Although, in heterozygous KD mice, no significant change was observed in the basal levels of plasma ACTH and corticosterone, both hormones were significantly increased in homozygous KD mice, demonstrating that robust cerebral BDNF inhibition (60%) is necessary to affect basal HPA axis activity. All of these results in both rats and mice demonstrate the involvement and importance of a robust endogenous pool of BDNF in basal HPA axis regulation and the pivotal function of de novo BDNF synthesis in the establishment of an adapted response to stress. PMID:26388293

  6. Involvement of the CD200 receptor complex in microglia activation in experimental glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Sarah; Calder, Claudia J; Albon, Julie; Erichsen, Jonathan T; Boulton, Micheal E; Morgan, James E

    2011-05-01

    The interaction of the myeloid restricted molecule CD200R with its widely expressed ligand CD200 is involved in the down-regulation of microglia activation. In the present study, we examined the involvement of CD200R in microglia activation in experimental ocular hypertension to determine the role of microglia activation in retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death, the key pathological event in glaucoma. Experimental glaucoma was induced in adult Brown Norway rats by sclerosis of the episcleral veins with the injection of hypertonic saline. Immunohistochemical methods were used to determine the involvement of microglia using GFAP, CD45, OX42 and OX41 and the involvement of CD200 and CD200R in the optic nerve head. Our data demonstrate the increased presence of microglia within the optic nerve head during ocular hypertension, identified by positive staining with OX42 and OX41. The peak of microglia correlates with peak in RGC death at days 20-27 (T3) post OHT induction. In addition, CD200 and CD200R positive cells were increased in ocular hypertensive eyes. Increased expression of CD200 was detected in the early phase (days 1-7; T1) of OHT and decreased over time, whilst the expression of CD200R was detected in the middle phase (days 20-27; T3) of OHT, correlating with the increase in microglia markers. Changes in the expression of CD200R/CD200 occur early in experimental glaucoma and precede the peak in microglia infiltration and RGC death, suggesting that CD200R-positive microglia play an important role in the initiation of RGC death during OHT, indicating a potential area for therapeutic intervention in treating glaucoma. PMID:21296076

  7. Involvement of the CD200 receptor complex in microglia activation in experimental glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sarah; Calder, Claudia J.; Albon, Julie; Erichsen, Jonathan T.; Boulton, Micheal E.; Morgan, James E.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of the myeloid restricted molecule CD200R with its widely expressed ligand CD200 is involved in the down-regulation of microglia activation. In the present study, we examined the involvement of CD200R in microglia activation in experimental ocular hypertension to determine the role of microglia activation in retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death, the key pathological event in glaucoma. Experimental glaucoma was induced in adult Brown Norway rats by sclerosis of the episcleral veins with the injection of hypertonic saline. Immunohistochemical methods were used to determine the involvement of microglia using GFAP, CD45, OX42 and OX41 and the involvement of CD200 and CD200R in the optic nerve head. Our data demonstrate the increased presence of microglia within the optic nerve head during ocular hypertension, identified by positive staining with OX42 and OX41. The peak of microglia correlates with peak in RGC death at days 20–27 (T3) post OHT induction. In addition, CD200 and CD200R positive cells were increased in ocular hypertensive eyes. Increased expression of CD200 was detected in the early phase (days 1–7; T1) of OHT and decreased over time, whilst the expression of CD200R was detected in the middle phase (days 20–27; T3) of OHT, correlating with the increase in microglia markers. Changes in the expression of CD200R/CD200 occur early in experimental glaucoma and precede the peak in microglia infiltration and RGC death, suggesting that CD200R-positive microglia play an important role in the initiation of RGC death during OHT, indicating a potential area for therapeutic intervention in treating glaucoma. PMID:21296076

  8. The spectrum of nasal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus and its association with the disease activity.

    PubMed

    Kusyairi, K A; Gendeh, B S; Sakthiswary, R; Shaharir, S S; Haizlene, A H; Yusof, K H

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum of nasal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its association with the disease activity of SLE based on the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). This was a cross-sectional and observational study involving 73 stable SLE patients. All subjects were evaluated for the SLEDAI scores and had nasal endoscopic examination. The most commonly reported symptom was nasal congestion (31.5%) followed by nasal itchiness (26.0%), runny nose (20.5%) and nasal dryness (19.2%). Almost half (42.9%) of the subjects had nasal mucosal abnormalities, which included mucositis, crusting, ulceration, bifid middle turbinate, septal spur, Jacobson's organ, deviated nasal septum, bilateral inferior turbinate hypertrophy, everted uncinate process, nasopharynx cleft and torus palatinus. The median SLEDAI score for subjects with nasal symptoms was significantly higher than subjects without nasal symptoms (p < 0.05). Similarly, subjects with moderate to high activity (SLEDAI scores of 6-19) had a significantly higher frequency of both nasal symptoms and nasal mucosal abnormalities (p < 0.05) compared to subjects with no to mild activity (SLEDAI scores of 0-5). PMID:26657735

  9. Antinociceptive Activity of Methanol Extract of Muntingia calabura Leaves and the Mechanisms of Action Involved

    PubMed Central

    Sani, M. H. Mohd.; Zakaria, Z. A.; Balan, T.; Teh, L. K.; Salleh, M. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Muntingia calabura L. (family Elaeocarpaceae) has been traditionally used to relieve various pain-related ailments. The present study aimed to determine the antinociceptive activity of methanol extract of M. calabura leaves (MEMC) and to elucidate the possible mechanism of antinociception involved. The in vivo chemicals (acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction and formalin-, capsaicin-, glutamate-, serotonin-induced paw licking test) and thermal (hot plate test) models of nociception were used to evaluate the extract antinociceptive activity. The extract (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg) was administered orally 60 min prior to subjection to the respective test. The results obtained demonstrated that MEMC produced significant (P < 0.05) antinociceptive response in all the chemical- and thermal-induced nociception models, which was reversed after pretreatment with 5 mg/kg naloxone, a non-selective opioid antagonist. Furthermore, pretreatment with L-arginine (a nitric oxide (NO) donor), NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl esters (L-NAME; an inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS)), methylene blue (MB; an inhibitor of cyclic-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway), or their combination also caused significant (P < 0.05) change in the intensity of the MEMC antinociception. In conclusion, the MEMC antinociceptive activity involves activation of the peripheral and central mechanisms, and modulation via, partly, the opioid receptors and NO/cGMP pathway. PMID:22611437

  10. An Initial Investigation of Sexual Minority Youth Involvement in School-Based Extracurricular Activities

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Stephen T.

    2012-01-01

    Sexual minority youth are at risk for negative school-based experiences and poor academic outcomes. Yet, little is known about their experiences in positive school-based contexts. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (1,214 sexual minority and 11,427 heterosexual participants), this study compared participation rates in, predictors of, and outcomes associated with three types of school-based extracurricular activities - sports, arts, and school clubs - by sexual orientation and gender. Findings revealed several significant sexual orientation and gender differences in participation rates in school-based sports, clubs, and arts activities. Further, findings suggested that the outcomes associated with extracurricular activity involvement do not differ by sexual orientation and gender; however, predictors of participation in these domains varied across groups. PMID:24187476

  11. Psychosocial factors associated with youth involvement in community activities promoting heart health.

    PubMed

    Altman, D G; Feighery, E; Robinson, T N; Haydel, K F; Strausberg, L; Lorig, K; Killen, J D

    1998-08-01

    This study examined factors that influence youth participation in heart disease prevention activities among 2,609 ninth graders in six inner-city public high schools. Constructs derived from social cognitive, empowerment, and community development theories informed the conceptual framework employed. Study participants were diverse with respect to gender, ethnicity, parent education, acculturation, and academic achievement. Perceived incentive value, self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, sense of community, and perceived policy control were all significantly associated with participation in community activities promoting heart health. In multivariate analyses, perceived incentive value, defined as the extent to which participants valued a heart-healthy environment, was most strongly associated with community participation, accounting for 11.9% of the total variance. These findings have implications for designing school curricula and after-school and community programs targeting adolescents' involvement in health advocacy activities. PMID:9690106

  12. Oclacitinib (APOQUEL®) is a novel Janus kinase inhibitor with activity against cytokines involved in allergy

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, A J; Bowman, J W; Fici, G J; Zhang, M; Mann, D W; Mitton-Fry, M

    2014-01-01

    Janus kinase (JAK) enzymes are involved in cell signaling pathways activated by various cytokines dysregulated in allergy. The objective of this study was to determine whether the novel JAK inhibitor oclacitinib could reduce the activity of cytokines implicated in canine allergic skin disease. Using isolated enzyme systems and in vitro human or canine cell models, potency and selectivity of oclacitinib was determined against JAK family members and cytokines that trigger JAK activation in cells. Oclacitinib inhibited JAK family members by 50% at concentrations (IC50's) ranging from 10 to 99 nm and did not inhibit a panel of 38 non-JAK kinases (IC50's > 1000 nm). Oclacitinib was most potent at inhibiting JAK1 (IC50 = 10 nm). Oclacitinib also inhibited the function of JAK1-dependent cytokines involved in allergy and inflammation (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-13) as well as pruritus (IL-31) at IC50's ranging from 36 to 249 nm. Oclacitinib had minimal effects on cytokines that did not activate the JAK1 enzyme in cells (erythropoietin, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IL-12, IL-23; IC50's > 1000 nm). These results demonstrate that oclacitinib is a targeted therapy that selectively inhibits JAK1-dependent cytokines involved in allergy, inflammation, and pruritus and suggests these are the mechanisms by which oclacitinib effectively controls clinical signs associated with allergic skin disease in dogs. PMID:24495176

  13. Activated alveolar macrophage and lymphocyte alveolitis in extrathoracic sarcoidosis without radiological mediastinopulmonary involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Wallaert, B.; Ramon, P.; Fournier, E.C.; Prin, L.; Tonnel, A.B.; Voisin, C.

    1986-01-01

    Cellular characteristics of BAL were investigated in 18 patients with proved extrathoracic sarcoidosis (that is, sarcoidosis that affected the skin, eyes, parotid glands, stomach, nose, kidneys, or meninges) without clinical or radiological mediastinopulmonary involvement. Computed tomography of the thorax was performed on five patients: four patients were normal, and one had enlarged lymph nodes (these enlargements were not detectable on the patient's chest roentgenogram). The results of pulmonary function tests were normal in all patients. The total BAL cell count did not differ significantly between controls and patients. Abnormal percentages of alveolar lymphocytes (from 18 to 87%) were noted in 15 out of 18 patients. SACE levels were normal in 15 patients. No pulmonary gallium uptake was detected. The chemiluminescence of AM's, whether spontaneous or PMA induced, was increased in five out of seven patients. The percentages of T3+ lymphocytes in sarcoidosis patients did not significantly differ from those in controls. The T4+:T8+ ratio was normal in four patients and slightly increased in one. Follow-up of patients showed that alveolar lymphocytosis is as lasting as extrathoracic involvement. Our data demonstrate increased percentages of lymphocytes and activated AM's in the BAL of patients with extrathoracic sarcoidosis. This may be due to the initial involvement of the respiratory tract in extrathoracic sarcoidosis or to the diffusion of activated macrophages and lymphocytes from an extrathoracic site into the lung.

  14. Involvement of loops 2 and 3 of α-sarcin on its ribotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Castaño-Rodríguez, Carlos; Olombrada, Miriam; Partida-Hanon, Angélica; Lacadena, Javier; Oñaderra, Mercedes; Gavilanes, José G; García-Ortega, Lucía; Martínez-Del-Pozo, Álvaro

    2015-03-01

    Ribotoxins are a family of fungal ribosome-inactivating proteins displaying highly specific ribonucleolytic activity against the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) of the larger rRNA, with α-sarcin as its best-characterized member. Their toxicity arises from the combination of this activity with their ability to cross cell membranes. The involvement of α-sarcin's loops 2 and 3 in SRL and ribosomal proteins recognition, as well as in the ribotoxin-lipid interactions involving cell penetration, has been suggested some time ago. In the work presented now different mutants have been prepared in order to study the role of these loops in their ribonucleolytic and lipid-interacting properties. The results obtained confirm that loop 3 residues Lys 111, 112, and 114 are key actors of the specific recognition of the SRL. In addition, it is also shown that Lys 114 and Tyr 48 conform a network of interactions which is essential for the catalysis. Lipid-interaction studies show that this Lys-rich region is indeed involved in the phospholipids recognition needed to cross cell membranes. Loop 2 is shown to be responsible for the conformational change which exposes the region establishing hydrophobic interactions with the membrane inner leaflets and eases penetration of ribotoxins target cells. PMID:25598497

  15. Amyloidosis involving the respiratory system: 5-year's experience of a multi-disciplinary group's activity.

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele; Maccari, Uberto; Madioni, Chiara; Venezia, Duccio; La Magra, Lidia Calogera

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis may involve the respiratory system with different clinical-radiological-functional patterns which are not always easy to be recognized. A good level of knowledge of the disease, an active integration of the pulmonologist within a multidisciplinary setting and a high level of clinical suspicion are necessary for an early diagnosis of respiratory amyloidosis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the number and the patterns of amyloidosis involving the respiratory system. We searched the cases of amyloidosis among patients attending the multidisciplinary rare and diffuse lung disease outpatients' clinic of Pulmonology Unit of the Hospital of Arezzo from 2007 to 2012. Among the 298 patients evaluated during the study period, we identified three cases of amyloidosis with involvement of the respiratory system, associated or not with other extra-thoracic localizations, whose diagnosis was histo-pathologically confirmed after the pulmonologist, the radiologist, and the pathologist evaluation. Our experience of a multidisciplinary team confirms that intra-thoracic amyloidosis is an uncommon disorder, representing 1.0% of the cases of rare and diffuse lung diseases referred to our center. The diagnosis of the disease is not always easy and quick as the amyloidosis may involve different parts of the respiratory system (airways, pleura, parenchyma). It is therefore recommended to remind this orphan disease in the differential diagnosis of the wide clinical scenarios the pulmonologist may intercept in clinical practice. PMID:26229565

  16. Amyloidosis involving the respiratory system: 5-year's experience of a multi-disciplinary group's activity

    PubMed Central

    Scala, Raffaele; Maccari, Uberto; Madioni, Chiara; Venezia, Duccio; La Magra, Lidia Calogera

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidosis may involve the respiratory system with different clinical-radiological-functional patterns which are not always easy to be recognized. A good level of knowledge of the disease, an active integration of the pulmonologist within a multidisciplinary setting and a high level of clinical suspicion are necessary for an early diagnosis of respiratory amyloidosis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the number and the patterns of amyloidosis involving the respiratory system. We searched the cases of amyloidosis among patients attending the multidisciplinary rare and diffuse lung disease outpatients' clinic of Pulmonology Unit of the Hospital of Arezzo from 2007 to 2012. Among the 298 patients evaluated during the study period, we identified three cases of amyloidosis with involvement of the respiratory system, associated or not with other extra-thoracic localizations, whose diagnosis was histo-pathologically confirmed after the pulmonologist, the radiologist, and the pathologist evaluation. Our experience of a multidisciplinary team confirms that intra-thoracic amyloidosis is an uncommon disorder, representing 1.0% of the cases of rare and diffuse lung diseases referred to our center. The diagnosis of the disease is not always easy and quick as the amyloidosis may involve different parts of the respiratory system (airways, pleura, parenchyma). It is therefore recommended to remind this orphan disease in the differential diagnosis of the wide clinical scenarios the pulmonologist may intercept in clinical practice. PMID:26229565

  17. Anticancer Activities of Pterostilbene-Isothiocyanate Conjugate in Breast Cancer Cells: Involvement of PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Nikhil, Kumar; Sharan, Shruti; Singh, Abhimanyu K.; Chakraborty, Ajanta; Roy, Partha

    2014-01-01

    Trans-3,5-dimethoxy-4′-hydroxystilbene (PTER), a natural dimethylated analog of resveratrol, preferentially induces certain cancer cells to undergo apoptosis and could thus have a role in cancer chemoprevention. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is a ligand-dependent transcription factor whose activation results in growth arrest and/or apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells. Here we investigated the potential of PTER-isothiocyanate (ITC) conjugate, a novel class of hybrid compound (PTER-ITC) synthesized by appending an ITC moiety to the PTER backbone, to induce apoptotic cell death in hormone-dependent (MCF-7) and -independent (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines and to elucidate PPARγ involvement in PTER-ITC action. Our results showed that when pre-treated with PPARγ antagonists or PPARγ siRNA, both breast cancer cell lines suppressed PTER-ITC-induced apoptosis, as determined by annexin V/propidium iodide staining and cleaved caspase-9 expression. Furthermore, PTER-ITC significantly increased PPARγ mRNA and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner and modulated expression of PPARγ-related genes in both breast cancer cell lines. This increase in PPARγ activity was prevented by a PPARγ-specific inhibitor, in support of our hypothesis that PTER-ITC can act as a PPARγ activator. PTER-ITC-mediated upregulation of PPARγ was counteracted by co-incubation with p38 MAPK or JNK inhibitors, suggesting involvement of these pathways in PTER-ITC action. Molecular docking analysis further suggested that PTER-ITC interacted with 5 polar and 8 non-polar residues within the PPARγ ligand-binding pocket, which are reported to be critical for its activity. Collectively, our observations suggest potential applications for PTER-ITC in breast cancer prevention and treatment through modulation of the PPARγ activation pathway. PMID:25119466

  18. Joint Associations of Residential Density and Neighborhood Involvement With Physical Activity Among a Multiethnic Sample of Urban Adults.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Lawrence, Vicki; Schulz, Amy J; Zenk, Shannon N; Israel, Barbara A; Wineman, Jean; Marans, Robert W; Rowe, Zachary

    2015-08-01

    Regular physical activity is associated with improvements in overall health. Although resident involvement in neighborhood social activities is positively associated with physical activity, neighborhood design features, including residential density, have varied associations with physical activity. Using data from a multiethnic sample of 696 adults in Detroit, Michigan, multilevel models were used to examine joint effects of residential density and resident involvement in neighborhood activities in relation to physical activity. We found a marginally significant negative interaction of higher residential density and resident neighborhood involvement. Higher residential density was negatively associated with physical activity, and resident neighborhood involvement was positively associated with physical activity. Our findings suggest that future work incorporate additional neighborhood and individual-level characteristics to understand the complexity of the association between the neighborhood environment, resident social engagement in the neighborhood, and physical activity. PMID:25626432

  19. Alternative activation of human plasmacytoid DCs in vitro and in melanoma lesions: involvement of LAG-3.

    PubMed

    Camisaschi, Chiara; De Filippo, Annamaria; Beretta, Valeria; Vergani, Barbara; Villa, Antonello; Vergani, Elisabetta; Santinami, Mario; Cabras, Antonello Domenico; Arienti, Flavio; Triebel, Frédéric; Rodolfo, Monica; Rivoltini, Licia; Castelli, Chiara

    2014-07-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) at tumor sites are often tolerogenic. Although pDCs initiate innate and adaptive immunity upon Toll-like receptor (TLR) triggering by pathogens, TLR-independent signals may be responsible for pDC activation and immune suppression in the tumor inflammatory environment. To identify molecules that are potentially involved in alternative pDC activation, we explored the expression and function of lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) in human pDCs. In this report, we showed the expression of LAG-3 on the cell surface of a subset of circulating human pDCs. LAG-3+ pDCs exhibited a partially mature phenotype and were enriched at tumor sites in samples from melanoma patients. We found that LAG-3 interacted with major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) to induce TLR-independent activation of pDCs with limited IFNα and enhanced IL-6 production. This in vitro cytokine profile of LAG-3-activated pDCs paralleled that of tumor-associated pDCs analyzed ex vivo. By confocal microscopy, LAG-3+ pDCs detected in melanoma-invaded lymph nodes (LNs) stained positive for IL-6 and preferentially localized near melanoma cells. These results suggest that LAG-3-mediated activation of pDCs takes place in vivo at tumor sites, and it is in part responsible for directing an immune-suppressive environment. PMID:24441096

  20. Phospholipase A2 is involved in the mechanism of activation of neutrophils by polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed Central

    Tithof, P K; Schiamberg, E; Peters-Golden, M; Ganey, P E

    1996-01-01

    Aroclor 1242, a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), activates neutrophils to produce superoxide anion (O2-) by a mechanism that involves phospholipase C-dependent hydrolysis of membrane phosphoinositides; however, subsequent signal transduction mechanisms are unknown. We undertook this study to determine whether phospholipase A2-dependent release of arachidonic acid is involved in PCB-induced O2- production. We measured O2- production in vitro in glycogen-elicited, rat neutrophils in the presence and absence of the inhibitors of phospholipase A2: quinacrine, 4-bromophenacyl bromide (BPB), and manoalide. All three agents significantly decreased the amount of O2- detected during stimulation of neutrophils with Aroclor 1242. Similar inhibition occurred when neutrophils were activated with the classical stimuli, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) or phorbol myristate acetate. The effects of BPB and manoalide were not a result of cytotoxicity or other nonspecific effects, although data suggest that quinacrine is an O2- scavenger. Significant release of 3H-arachidonic acid preceded O2- production in neutrophils stimulated with Aroclor 1242 or fMLP. Manoalide, at a concentration that abolished O2- production, also inhibited the release of 3H-arachidonate. Aspirin, zileuton, or WEB 2086 did not affect Aroclor 1242-induced O2- production, suggesting that eicosanoids and platelet-activating factor are not needed for neutrophil activation by PCBs. Activation of phospholipase A2 and O2- production do not appear to involve the Ah receptor because a congener with low affinity, but not one with high affinity for this receptor, stimulated the release of arachidonic acid and O2-. These data suggest that Aroclor 1242 stimulates neutrophils to produce O2- by a mechanism that involves phospholipase A2-dependent release of arachidonic acid. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 4. C Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 5. C Figure 6. A Figure 6. B Figure 6. C Figure 6. D PMID:8834862

  1. Involvement of TREK-1 activity in astrocyte function and neuroprotection under simulated ischemia conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Liu, Yang; Chen, Xiaojing; Sun, Qian; Tang, Ronghua; Wang, Wei; Yu, Zhiyuan; Xie, Minjie

    2013-03-01

    Astrocytes play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of ischemic neuronal death. The optimal operation of electrogenic astrocytic transporters and exchangers for some well-defined astrocyte brain homeostatic functions depends on the presence of K(+) channels in the cell membranes and the hyperpolarized membrane potential. Our previous study showed that astrocytes functionally express two-pore domain K(+) channel TREK-1, which helps to set the negative resting membrane potential. However, the roles of TREK-1 on astrocytic function under normal and ischemic conditions remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the expression of TREK-1 protein on cultured astrocytes and the effect of TREK-1 activity on astrocytic glutamate clearance capacity and release of s100β after simulated ischemic insult. TREK-1 immunoreactivity was up-regulated after hypoxia. Suppression of TREK-1 activity inhibited the glutamate clearance capability, enhanced the inflammatory secretion of astrocytes derived s100β and led to increased neuronal apoptosis after ischemic insult. Our results suggest that TREK-1 activity is involved in astrocytic function and neuronal survival. This would provide evidence showing astrocytic TREK-1 involvement in ischemia pathology which may serve as a potential therapeutic target in stroke. PMID:22895843

  2. Salamander limb regeneration involves the activation of a multipotent skeletal muscle satellite cell population

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Jamie I.; Lööf, Sara; He, Pingping; Simon, András

    2006-01-01

    In contrast to mammals, salamanders can regenerate complex structures after injury, including entire limbs. A central question is whether the generation of progenitor cells during limb regeneration and mammalian tissue repair occur via separate or overlapping mechanisms. Limb regeneration depends on the formation of a blastema, from which the new appendage develops. Dedifferentiation of stump tissues, such as skeletal muscle, precedes blastema formation, but it was not known whether dedifferentiation involves stem cell activation. We describe a multipotent Pax7+ satellite cell population located within the skeletal muscle of the salamander limb. We demonstrate that skeletal muscle dedifferentiation involves satellite cell activation and that these cells can contribute to new limb tissues. Activation of salamander satellite cells occurs in an analogous manner to how the mammalian myofiber mobilizes stem cells during skeletal muscle tissue repair. Thus, limb regeneration and mammalian tissue repair share common cellular and molecular programs. Our findings also identify satellite cells as potential targets in promoting mammalian blastema formation. PMID:16449193

  3. Lyssavirus matrix protein induces apoptosis by a TRAIL-dependent mechanism involving caspase-8 activation.

    PubMed

    Kassis, Raïd; Larrous, Florence; Estaquier, Jérôme; Bourhy, Hervé

    2004-06-01

    Lyssaviruses, which are members of the Rhabdoviridae family, induce apoptosis, which plays an important role in the neuropathogenesis of rabies. However, the mechanisms by which these viruses mediate neuronal apoptosis have not been elucidated. Here we demonstrate that the early induction of apoptosis in a model of lyssavirus-infected neuroblastoma cells involves a TRAIL-dependent pathway requiring the activation of caspase-8 but not of caspase-9 or caspase-10. The activation of caspase-8 results in the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-6, as shown by an increase in the cleavage of the specific caspase substrate in lyssavirus-infected cells. However, neither caspase-1 nor caspase-2 activity was detected during the early phase of infection. Lyssavirus-mediated cell death involves an interaction between TRAIL receptors and TRAIL, as demonstrated by experiments using neutralizing antibodies and soluble decoy TRAIL-R1/R2 receptors. We also demonstrated that the decapsidation and replication of lyssavirus are essential for inducing apoptosis, as supported by UV inactivation, cycloheximide treatment, and the use of bafilomycin A1 to inhibit endosomal acidification. Transfection of cells with the matrix protein induced apoptosis using pathways similar to those described in the context of viral infection. Furthermore, our data suggest that the matrix protein of lyssaviruses plays a major role in the early induction of TRAIL-mediated apoptosis by the release of a soluble, active form of TRAIL. In our model, Fas ligand (CD95L) appears to play a limited role in lyssavirus-mediated neuroblastoma cell death. Similarly, tumor necrosis factor alpha does not appear to play an important role. PMID:15163747

  4. Longitudinal relationships between perceived stress, exercise self-regulation and exercise involvement among physically active adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Markus; Lindwall, Magnus; Brand, Serge; Lang, Christin; Elliot, Catherine; Pühse, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Stress exposure may undermine exercisers' capability to self-regulate their exercise behaviour. This longitudinal study examined the interplay between perceived stress, exercise self-regulation (assessment of action and coping planning) and participation in vigorous exercise in vocational students. Moreover, this study examined whether high exercise self-regulation moderates the assumed negative relationship between stress and exercise. A sample of 580 physically active vocational students ([Formula: see text] ± s 17.8 ± 1.3 years, 33.8% girls) was assessed. All participants completed two identical validated questionnaires assessing stress, exercise self-regulation and exercise with a span of 10 months in between survey completion periods. The cross-sectional analyses show that high exercise self-regulation attenuated the assumed negative relationship between stress and exercise. In the longitudinal analyses, however, only a non-significant trend was found. Significant longitudinal relationships existed between exercise self-regulation and exercise involvement. Latent difference score models revealed that a drop in the exercise self-regulation was associated with a concurrent decrease in exercise participation. Cross-lagged panel analyses showed that high exercise self-regulation levels positively predicted exercise behaviour, but an inverse relationship was not supported. The findings suggested that higher exercise self-regulation levels were positively associated with future exercise involvement in currently active adolescents. While partial support was found that exercise self-regulation moderated the influence of stress on exercise, the findings demonstrated that higher exercise self-regulation levels had a positive impact on future exercise involvement in already active individuals. PMID:25098842

  5. Vav3 oncogene activates estrogen receptor and its overexpression may be involved in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kiwon; Liu, Yin; Mo, Jun Qin; Zhang, Jinsong; Dong, Zhongyun; Lu, Shan

    2008-01-01

    Background Our previous study revealed that Vav3 oncogene is overexpressed in human prostate cancer, activates androgen receptor, and stimulates growth in prostate cancer cells. The current study is to determine a potential role of Vav3 oncogene in human breast cancer and impact on estrogen receptor a (ERα)-mediated signaling axis. Methods Immunohistochemistry analysis was performed in 43 breast cancer specimens and western blot analysis was used for human breast cancer cell lines to determine the expression level of Vav3 protein. The impact of Vav3 on breast cancer cell growth was determined by siRNA knockdown of Vav3 expression. The role of Vav3 in ERα activation was examined in luciferase reporter assays. Deletion mutation analysis of Vav3 protein was performed to localize the functional domain involved in ERα activation. Finally, the interaction of Vav3 and ERα was assessed by GST pull-down analysis. Results We found that Vav3 was overexpressed in 81% of human breast cancer specimens, particularly in poorly differentiated lesions. Vav3 activated ERα partially via PI3K-Akt signaling and stimulated growth of breast cancer cells. Vav3 also potentiated EGF activity for cell growth and ERα activation in breast cancer cells. More interestingly, we found that Vav3 complexed with ERα. Consistent with its function for AR, the DH domain of Vav3 was essential for ERα activation. Conclusion Vav3 oncogene is overexpressed in human breast cancer. Vav3 complexes with ERα and enhances ERα activity. These findings suggest that Vav3 overexpression may aberrantly enhance ERα-mediated signaling axis and play a role in breast cancer development and/or progression. PMID:18518979

  6. AMP-activated protein kinase is involved in perfluorohexanesulfonate -induced apoptosis of neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youn Ju; Choi, So-Young; Yang, Jae-Ho

    2016-04-01

    Perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS), one of the major perfluoroalkyl compounds (PFCs), has been used in a variety of industrial and consumer applications and detected in serum in the general population. This raised a concern over its possible detrimental health effects, including neurotoxic effects. We have previously shown that PFHxS induced neuronal apoptosis via the NMDA receptor-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Recently, it has been reported that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) acts as a key signal molecule in neuronal excitotoxicity as well as providing a neuroprotective function. In the present study, we have examined the involvement of AMPK in PFHxS-induced neuronal apoptosis using neuronal differentiated PC12 cells. PFHxS induced significant increases in intracellular [Ca(2+)] via the NMDA receptor and the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (L-VGCC). The inhibition of Ca(2+) loading by the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK801 and the L-VGCC blockers, nifedipine and diltiazem significantly reduced PFHxS-induced apoptosis. PFHxS induced sustained activation of AMPK and the inhibition of AMPK activation by compound C and AMPK siRNA significantly reduced PFHxS-induced caspase-3 activity. These results indicate the pro-apoptotic role of AMPK. The activation of AMPK was attenuated by MK801, nifedipine and diltiazem. However, the activation of AMPK was not affected by the ERK inhibitor, PD98059. Likewise, ERK activation was not affected by compound C but was substantially reduced by MK801, nifedipine or diltiazem. This suggests that the activation of AMPK and ERK is regulated by intracellular Ca(2+) loading in distinct pathways. Taken together, PFHxS-induced neuronal apoptosis is mediated by AMPK and ERK pathways, which are distinctly regulated by increased intracellular Ca(2+) via the NMDA receptor and L-VGCC. PMID:26826296

  7. Shc Proteins Influence the Activities of Enzymes Involved in Fatty Acid Oxidation and Ketogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hagopian, Kevork; Tomilov, Alexey A.; Tomilova, Natalia; Kim, Kyoungmi; Taylor, Sandra L.; Lam, Adam K.; Cortopassi, Gino A.; McDonald, Roger B.; Ramsey, Jon J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective ShcKO mice have low body fat and resist weight gain on a high fat diet, indicating that Shc proteins may influence enzymes involved in β-oxidation. To investigate this idea, the activities of β-oxidation and ketone body metabolism enzymes were measured. Methods The activities of β-oxidation enzymes (acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase and ketoacyl-CoA thiolase) in liver and hindlimb skeletal muscle, ketolytic enzymes (acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase, β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and 3-oxoacid-CoA transferase) in skeletal muscle, and ketogenic enzymes (acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase and β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase) in liver were measured from wild-type and ShcKO mice. Results The activities of β-oxidation enzymes were increased (P < 0.05) in the ShcKO compared to wild-type mice in the fasted but not the fed state. In contrast, no uniform increases in the ketolytic enzyme activities were observed between ShcKO and wild-type mice. In liver, the activities of ketogenic enzymes were increased (P < 0.05) in ShcKO compared to wild-type mice in both the fed and fasted states. Levels of phosphorylated hormone sensitive lipase from adipocytes were also increased (P < 0.05) in fasted ShcKO mice. Conclusions These studies indicate that the low Shc levels in ShcKO mice result in increased liver and muscle β-oxidation enzyme activities in response to fasting and induce chronic increases in the activity of liver ketogenic enzymes. Decreases in the level of Shc proteins should be considered as possible contributors to the increase in activity of fatty acid oxidation enzymes in response to physiological conditions which increase reliance on fatty acids as a source of energy. PMID:22683097

  8. Monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 are involved in the invasion activity of human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hiroto; Takahashi, Mayu; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Nakayama, Yoshifumi; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Wang, Ke-Yong; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki; Nishizawa, Shigeru; Kohno, Kimitoshi

    2011-05-01

    Cancer cells show constitutive upregulation of glycolysis, and the concentration of lactate thus produced correlates with prognosis. Here, we examined whether lactate concentration and lactate transporter expression are related to migration and invasion activity. We found that the expression of the monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4, but not MCT5, in human lung cancer cell lines was significantly correlated with invasiveness. To clarify the effects of MCT1 and MCT4 expression on invasion, we performed migration and invasion assays after transfection with siRNA specific for MCT1 or MCT4. Knockdown of MCT1 or MCT4 did not influence cell migration but reduced invasion; this was also observed for knockdown of the lactate transporter-associated protein basigin. We also demonstrated that both expression and activity of MMP9 and MMP2 were not correlated with invasion activity and not regulated by MCT1, MCT4 and basigin. Furthermore, the addition of lactate did not increase migration and invasion activity, but low concentration of 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS), a general anion channel blocker, as well as other MCT inhibitors quercetin and simvastatin, inhibited cell invasion without influencing migration activity and the cellular expression of MCT1 and MCT4. This is the first report suggesting that lactate transporters are involved in human cancer cell invasiveness. As such, these proteins may be promising targets for the prevention of cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:21306479

  9. Pituitary aminopeptidase activities involved in blood-pressure regulation are modified by dietary cholesterol: sex differences.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Expósito, M J; Mayas, M D; García, M J; Ramírez, M; Martínez-Martos, J M

    2001-12-15

    Given that the existence of a local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in the pituitary and its participation in the regulation of blood pressure and other biological functions are widely accepted, the aim of this work is to analyze the influence of dietary cholesterol on the activity of the enzymes involved in the metabolism of the effector peptides of the renin-angiotensin system (angiotensin II and III) and vasopressin, in the pituitary of male and female mice fed on a cholesterol-enriched diet (1% cholesterol and 0.5% cholic acid). Soluble and membrane-bound pituitary aminopeptidase A (aspartyl- and glutamyl-aminopeptidase), aminopeptidase M (alanyl-aminopeptidase), aminopeptidase B (arginyl-aminopeptidase) and cystinyl-aminopeptidase activities were fluorimetrically measured. In female mice, cholesterol-enriched diet produced a significant increase in soluble aspartyl- and membrane-bound aspartyl- and glutamyl-aminopeptidase activities, and a significant decrease in membrane-bound alanyl-, arginyl- and cystinyl-aminopeptidase activities. In male mice, after feeding the diet, a significant increase in soluble glutamyl- and membrane-bound arginyl-aminopeptidase activities was observed. Our results indicate differential effects of dietary cholesterol on the metabolism of angiotensin II and III and vasopressin in the pituitary of male and female mice. PMID:11730980

  10. Inhibition of Fast Axonal Transport by Pathogenic SOD1 Involves Activation of p38 MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Morfini, Gerardo A.; Bosco, Daryl A.; Brown, Hannah; Gatto, Rodolfo; Kaminska, Agnieszka; Song, Yuyu; Molla, Linda; Baker, Lisa; Marangoni, M. Natalia; Berth, Sarah; Tavassoli, Ehsan; Bagnato, Carolina; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Hayward, Lawrence J.; Pigino, Gustavo F.; Watterson, D. Martin; Huang, Chun-Fang; Banker, Gary; Brown, Robert H.; Brady, Scott T.

    2013-01-01

    Dying-back degeneration of motor neuron axons represents an established feature of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) associated with superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations, but axon-autonomous effects of pathogenic SOD1 remained undefined. Characteristics of motor neurons affected in FALS include abnormal kinase activation, aberrant neurofilament phosphorylation, and fast axonal transport (FAT) deficits, but functional relationships among these pathogenic events were unclear. Experiments in isolated squid axoplasm reveal that FALS-related SOD1 mutant polypeptides inhibit FAT through a mechanism involving a p38 mitogen activated protein kinase pathway. Mutant SOD1 activated neuronal p38 in mouse spinal cord, neuroblastoma cells and squid axoplasm. Active p38 MAP kinase phosphorylated kinesin-1, and this phosphorylation event inhibited kinesin-1. Finally, vesicle motility assays revealed previously unrecognized, isoform-specific effects of p38 on FAT. Axon-autonomous activation of the p38 pathway represents a novel gain of toxic function for FALS-linked SOD1 proteins consistent with the dying-back pattern of neurodegeneration characteristic of ALS. PMID:23776455

  11. BimL involvement in Bax activation during UV irradiation-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Miaojuan; Xing, Da . E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn; Chen, Tongsheng; Zhang, Lan

    2007-06-29

    Bax, a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, localizes largely in the cytoplasm but translocates to mitochondria and undergoes oligomerization to induce the release of apoptogenic factors in response to apoptotic stimuli. However, the molecular mechanism of Bax activation is not fully understood. We show here the role of BimL in Bax activation during UV irradiation-induced apoptosis. In this study, GFP-BimL plasmid was constructed. The dynamic interaction between BimL and Bax during UV irradiation-induced apoptosis was observed using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. Our experimental results showed that BimL translocation to mitochondria occurred before Bax translocation, and that BimL activated Bax indirectly. Moreover, inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation blocked BimL translocation, delayed and attenuated Bax translocation and subsequent apoptosis. These results demonstrate that BimL is involved in UV irradiation-induced apoptosis by indirectly activating Bax.

  12. The benefits of in-group contact through physical activity involvement for health and well-being among Korean immigrants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhyoung; Heo, Jinmoo; Kim, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study is designed to examine the benefits of physical activity involvement with members of the same ethnic group. For this study, Korean immigrants who were members of Korean physical activity clubs such as badminton and tennis were selected as participants. Using a constructive grounded theory methodology, three themes were identified as benefits of physical activity involvement: (1) the experience of psychological well-being, (2) the creation of a unique cultural world, and (3) the facilitation of physical activity involvement. The findings of this study suggest that Korean immigrant participants gained various social, cultural, and psychological benefits by engaging in activities with other Korean immigrants. PMID:24875239

  13. The benefits of in-group contact through physical activity involvement for health and well-being among Korean immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junhyoung; Heo, Jinmoo; Kim, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study is designed to examine the benefits of physical activity involvement with members of the same ethnic group. For this study, Korean immigrants who were members of Korean physical activity clubs such as badminton and tennis were selected as participants. Using a constructive grounded theory methodology, three themes were identified as benefits of physical activity involvement: (1) the experience of psychological well-being, (2) the creation of a unique cultural world, and (3) the facilitation of physical activity involvement. The findings of this study suggest that Korean immigrant participants gained various social, cultural, and psychological benefits by engaging in activities with other Korean immigrants. PMID:24875239

  14. NRF2 activation is involved in ozonated human serum upregulation of HO-1 in endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pecorelli, Alessandra; Bocci, Velio; Acquaviva, Alessandra; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Gardi, Concetta; Virgili, Fabio; Ciccoli, Lucia; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2013-02-15

    During the last decade, it has been shown that the activation of NRF2 and the binding to electrophile-responsive element (EpREs), stimulates the expression of a great number of genes responsible for the synthesis of phase I and phase II proteins, including antioxidants enzymes and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). This critical cell response occurs in cardiovascular, degenerative and chronic infective diseases aggravated by a chronic oxidative stress. In our previous reports we have shown that ozonated plasma is able to up-regulate HO-1 expression in endothelial cells. In the present work we investigated a candidate mechanism involved in this process. After treatment with increasing doses of ozonated serum (20, 40 and 80 μg/mL O{sub 3} per mL of serum), a clear dose dependent activation of NRF2 and the subsequent induction of HO-1 and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1) was observed. This effect was also present when cells were treated with serum and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) or serum and 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE). Moreover, the treatment with ozonated serum was associated with a dose-dependent activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) and p38 MAP kinases (p38), not directly involved in NRF2 activation. These data, provide a new insight on the mechanism responsible for the induction of HO-1 expression by ozonated serum in the endothelium, and have a practical importance as an expedient approach to the treatment of patients with both effective orthodox drugs and ozonated autohemotherapy, targeted to the restoration of redox homeostasis. - Highlights: ► Endothelial HO1 is upregulated by ozonated plasma ► This activation is induced by NRF2 and it is ERK independent. ► 4HNE and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} are the main molecules involved in this process. ► Ozonated plasma induced a hormetic effect ► Combination of orthodox medicine and ozonated plasma can be a useful treatment.

  15. Cissus sicyoides: Pharmacological Mechanisms Involved in the Anti-Inflammatory and Antidiarrheal Activities.

    PubMed

    Beserra, Fernando Pereira; de Cássia Santos, Raquel; Périco, Larissa Lucena; Rodrigues, Vinicius Peixoto; de Almeida Kiguti, Luiz Ricardo; Saldanha, Luiz Leonardo; Pupo, André Sampaio; da Rocha, Lúcia Regina Machado; Dokkedal, Anne Lígia; Vilegas, Wagner; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological mechanisms involved in anti-inflammatory and antidiarrheal actions of hydroalcoholic extract obtained from the leaves of Cissus sicyoides (HECS). The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated by oral administration of HECS against acute model of edema induced by xylene, and the mechanisms of action were analysed by involvement of arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂). The antidiarrheal effect of HECS was observed and we analyzed the motility and accumulation of intestinal fluid. We also analyzed the antidiarrheal mechanisms of action of HECS by evaluating the role of the opioid receptor, α₂ adrenergic receptor, muscarinic receptor, nitric oxide (NO) and PGE₂. The oral administration of HECS inhibited the edema induced by xylene and AA and was also able to significantly decrease the levels of PGE₂. The extract also exhibited significant anti-diarrheal activity by reducing motility and intestinal fluid accumulation. This extract significantly reduced intestinal transit stimulated by muscarinic agonist and intestinal secretion induced by PGE₂. Our data demonstrate that the mechanism of action involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of HECS is related to PGE₂. The antidiarrheal effect of this extract may be mediated by inhibition of contraction by acting on the intestinal smooth muscle and/or intestinal transit. PMID:26805827

  16. Cissus sicyoides: Pharmacological Mechanisms Involved in the Anti-Inflammatory and Antidiarrheal Activities

    PubMed Central

    Beserra, Fernando Pereira; de Cássia Santos, Raquel; Périco, Larissa Lucena; Rodrigues, Vinicius Peixoto; de Almeida Kiguti, Luiz Ricardo; Saldanha, Luiz Leonardo; Pupo, André Sampaio; da Rocha, Lúcia Regina Machado; Dokkedal, Anne Lígia; Vilegas, Wagner; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological mechanisms involved in anti-inflammatory and antidiarrheal actions of hydroalcoholic extract obtained from the leaves of Cissus sicyoides (HECS). The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated by oral administration of HECS against acute model of edema induced by xylene, and the mechanisms of action were analysed by involvement of arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The antidiarrheal effect of HECS was observed and we analyzed the motility and accumulation of intestinal fluid. We also analyzed the antidiarrheal mechanisms of action of HECS by evaluating the role of the opioid receptor, α2 adrenergic receptor, muscarinic receptor, nitric oxide (NO) and PGE2. The oral administration of HECS inhibited the edema induced by xylene and AA and was also able to significantly decrease the levels of PGE2. The extract also exhibited significant anti-diarrheal activity by reducing motility and intestinal fluid accumulation. This extract significantly reduced intestinal transit stimulated by muscarinic agonist and intestinal secretion induced by PGE2. Our data demonstrate that the mechanism of action involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of HECS is related to PGE2. The antidiarrheal effect of this extract may be mediated by inhibition of contraction by acting on the intestinal smooth muscle and/or intestinal transit. PMID:26805827

  17. A review of two recent occurrences at the Advanced Test Reactor involving subcontractor activities

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlke, H.J.; Jensen, N.C.; Vail, J.A.

    1997-11-01

    This report documents the results of a brief, unofficial investigation into two incidents at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility, reported on October 25 and 31, 1997. The first event was an unanticipated breach of confinement. The second involved reactor operation with an inoperable seismic scram subsystem, violating the reactor`s Technical Specifications. These two incidents have been found to be unrelated. A third event that occurred on December 16, 1996, is also discussed because of its similarities to the first event listed above. Both of these incidents were unanticipated breaches of confinement, and both involved the work of construction subcontractor personnel. The cause for the subcontractor related occurrences is a work control process that fails to effectively interface with LMITCO management. ATR Construction Project managers work sufficient close with construction subcontractor personnel to understand planned day-to-day activities. They also have sufficient training and understanding of reactor operations to ensure adherence to applicable administrative requirements. However, they may not be sufficiently involved in the work authorization and control process to bridge an apparent communications gap between subcontractor employees and Facility Operations/functional support personnel for work inside the reactor facility. The cause for the inoperable seismic scram switch (resulting from a disconnected lead) is still under investigation. It does not appear to be subcontractor related.

  18. Pathways Involved in the Synergistic Activation of Macrophages by Lipoteichoic Acid and Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Kathleen H.; Cox, Michelle E.; Woo-Rasberry, Virginia; Hasty, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is a Gram-positive cell surface molecule that is found in both a cell-bound form and cell-free form in the host during an infection. Hemoglobin (Hb) can synergize with LTA, a TLR2 ligand, to potently activate macrophage innate immune responses in a TLR2- and TLR4-dependent way. At low levels of LTA, the presence of Hb can result in a 200-fold increase in the secretion of IL-6 following macrophage activation. Six hours after activation, the macrophage genes that are most highly up-regulated by LTA plus Hb activation compared to LTA alone are cytokines, chemokines, receptors and interferon-regulated genes. Several of these genes exhibit a unique TLR4-dependent increase in mRNA levels that continued to rise more than eight hours after stimulation. This prolonged increase in mRNA levels could be the result of an extended period of NF-κB nuclear localization and the concurrent absence of the NF-κB inhibitor, IκBα, after stimulation with LTA plus Hb. Dynasore inhibition experiments indicate that an endocytosis-dependent pathway is required for the TLR4-dependent up-regulation of IL-6 secretion following activation with LTA plus Hb. In addition, interferon-β mRNA is present after activation with LTA plus Hb, suggesting that the TRIF/TRAM-dependent pathway may be involved. Hb alone can elicit the TLR4-dependent secretion of TNF-α from macrophages, so it may be the TLR4 ligand. Hb also led to secretion of high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), which synergized with LTA to increase secretion of IL-6. The activation of both the TLR2 and TLR4 pathways by LTA plus Hb leads to an enhanced innate immune response. PMID:23071790

  19. Selective involvement of reactive oxygen intermediates in platelet-activating factor-mediated activation of NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Choi, J H; Chung, W J; Han, S J; Lee, H B; Choi, I W; Lee, H K; Jang, K Y; Lee, D G; Han, S S; Park, K H; IM, S Y

    2000-10-01

    Although it has been suggested that some biological activities of platelet-activating factor (PAF) are mediated by, at least in part, reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI), the precise mechanisms underlying the interaction between the two remains to be elucidated. Antioxidants, such as alpha-tocopherol acid succinate, N-acetyl-L-Cysteine, pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate failed to inhibit PAF-induced immediate systemic reactions such as lethality, symptoms of disseminated intravascular coagulation, and histological changes such as pulmonary edema and hemorrhage in renal medullae 10 min following PAF injection. In contrast. antioxidants significantly inhibited both the in vivo and in vitro PAF-induced NF-kappaB activation and NF-kappaB-dependent TNF-alpha expression. The effects of the antioxidants were due to their inhibition of PAF-induced degradation of IkappaBalpha, a protein responsible for keeping NF-kappaB in an inactive form. A protein tyrosine kinase and N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone sensitive serine protease were involved in both PAF- and H2O2-induced NF-kappaB activation. Collectively, these data indicate that the PAF-induced NF-kappaB activation is selectively mediated through the generation of ROI. PMID:10921504

  20. 22 CFR 40.25 - Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution. ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution. 40.25 Section 40.25 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT...

  1. 22 CFR 40.25 - Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution. ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution. 40.25 Section 40.25 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT...

  2. 22 CFR 40.25 - Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution. ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution. 40.25 Section 40.25 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT...

  3. 22 CFR 40.25 - Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution. ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution. 40.25 Section 40.25 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT...

  4. 22 CFR 40.25 - Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution. ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Certain aliens involved in serious criminal activity who have asserted immunity from prosecution. 40.25 Section 40.25 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT...

  5. Multidimensional Self-Concept: Age and Gender Differences in Australian High School Students Involved in Delinquent Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Annemaree; Houghton, Stephen; Wood, Robert; Perkins, Catherine; Bower, Julie

    2007-01-01

    The present research examined the relationship between self-concept and level of involvement in delinquent activities of 1327 (612 males, 715 females) years 8-12 high school students. Through cluster analysis, participants were identified as having either high or low involvement in delinquent activities from scores on a self-report measure of…

  6. 12 CFR 408.4 - Early involvement in foreign activities for which Eximbank financing may be requested.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... THE UNITED STATES PROCEDURES FOR COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Eximbank Implementing Procedures § 408.4 Early involvement in foreign activities for which Eximbank financing may be... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Early involvement in foreign activities...

  7. 12 CFR 408.4 - Early involvement in foreign activities for which Eximbank financing may be requested.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Early involvement in foreign activities for which Eximbank financing may be requested. 408.4 Section 408.4 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF... Implementing Procedures § 408.4 Early involvement in foreign activities for which Eximbank financing may...

  8. 12 CFR 408.4 - Early involvement in foreign activities for which Eximbank financing may be requested.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Early involvement in foreign activities for which Eximbank financing may be requested. 408.4 Section 408.4 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF... Implementing Procedures § 408.4 Early involvement in foreign activities for which Eximbank financing may...

  9. 12 CFR 408.4 - Early involvement in foreign activities for which Eximbank financing may be requested.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Early involvement in foreign activities for which Eximbank financing may be requested. 408.4 Section 408.4 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF... Implementing Procedures § 408.4 Early involvement in foreign activities for which Eximbank financing may...

  10. 12 CFR 408.4 - Early involvement in foreign activities for which Eximbank financing may be requested.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Early involvement in foreign activities for which Eximbank financing may be requested. 408.4 Section 408.4 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF... Implementing Procedures § 408.4 Early involvement in foreign activities for which Eximbank financing may...

  11. Arabidopsis MKKK20 is involved in osmotic stress response via regulation of MPK6 activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Min; Woo, Dong-Hyuk; Kim, Sun-Ho; Lee, Sun-Young; Park, Hee-Yeon; Seok, Hye-Yeon; Chung, Woo Sik; Moon, Yong-Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Plants have developed various regulatory pathways to adapt to environmental stresses. In this study, we identified Arabidopsis MKKK20 as a regulator in the response to osmotic stress. mkkk20 mutants were found to be sensitive to high concentration of salt and showed higher water loss rates than wild-type (WT) plants under dehydration conditions. In addition, mkkk20 mutants showed higher accumulation of superoxide, a reactive oxygen species (ROS), compared to WT plants under high salt condition. In contrast, transgenic plants overexpressing MKKK20 displayed tolerance to salt stress. MKKK20 transcripts were increased by the treatments with NaCl, mannitol, MV, sorbitol, and cold, suggesting that MKKK20 is involved in the response to osmotic, ROS, and cold stresses. In-gel kinase assay showed that MKKK20 regulates the activity of MPK6 under NaCl, cold, and H(2)O(2) treatments. Taken together, our results suggest that MKKK20 might be involved in the response to various abiotic stresses, especially osmotic stress, through its regulation of MPK6 activity. PMID:21969089

  12. Who's who in the crew? Exploring participant involvement in the Active Living Coalition.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Priscilla A; Schaefer, Samantha; Middlestadt, Susan; Knoblock, Heidi

    2015-06-01

    Health coalitions serve as an important "vehicle" to strengthen horizontal and vertical ties between organizations, community groups, and individuals whose intent and purpose is to improve wellness. Having a strong and diverse group of participants is essential for highly effective coalitions to carry out their mission in an organized and participatory manner. However, the extent that individuals become involved in coalition operations and activities remains ambiguous. A grounded theory approach was used to explore expressions of participant involvement of a local health coalition known as the Active Living Coalition (ALC). Open, axial, as well as domain and taxonomic coding were used to analyze transcripts from four focus groups (n = 37 participants) in order to develop a participant continuum that captured six network aggregates within the coalition. Findings suggest that participation, for the most part, was heterogeneous and ever-changing given the expectations of the level of partnership that best individuals' personal and professional interests. Differentiating the type of participants in health coalitions can help coalition leaders more successfully "manage" new and existing relationships. Findings imply that health coalitions can maximize coalition capacity by drawing upon the full range of potential human and material resources by further understanding the types of individuals that make up their network. PMID:25812479

  13. Developmental changes in brain activation involved in the production of novel speech sounds in children.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Thyreau, Benjamin; Asano, Michiko; Asano, Kohei; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Jeong, Hyeonjeong; Sugiura, Motoaki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-08-01

    Older children are more successful at producing unfamiliar, non-native speech sounds than younger children during the initial stages of learning. To reveal the neuronal underpinning of the age-related increase in the accuracy of non-native speech production, we examined the developmental changes in activation involved in the production of novel speech sounds using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Healthy right-handed children (aged 6-18 years) were scanned while performing an overt repetition task and a perceptual task involving aurally presented non-native and native syllables. Productions of non-native speech sounds were recorded and evaluated by native speakers. The mouth regions in the bilateral primary sensorimotor areas were activated more significantly during the repetition task relative to the perceptual task. The hemodynamic response in the left inferior frontal gyrus pars opercularis (IFG pOp) specific to non-native speech sound production (defined by prior hypothesis) increased with age. Additionally, the accuracy of non-native speech sound production increased with age. These results provide the first evidence of developmental changes in the neural processes underlying the production of novel speech sounds. Our data further suggest that the recruitment of the left IFG pOp during the production of novel speech sounds was possibly enhanced due to the maturation of the neuronal circuits needed for speech motor planning. This, in turn, would lead to improvement in the ability to immediately imitate non-native speech. PMID:24585739

  14. Involvement of a phospholipase C in the hemolytic activity of a clinical strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Gaelle; Merieau, Annabelle; Guerillon, Josette; Veron, Wilfried; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Feuilloley, Marc GJ; Orange, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas fluorescens is a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium frequently encountered in hospitals as a contaminant of injectable material and surfaces. This psychrotrophic bacterium, commonly described as unable to grow at temperatures above 32°C, is now considered non pathogenic. We studied a recently identified clinical strain of P. fluorescens biovar I, MFN1032, which is considered to cause human lung infection and can grow at 37°C in laboratory conditions. Results We found that MFN1032 secreted extracellular factors with a lytic potential at least as high as that of MF37, a psychrotrophic strain of P. fluorescens or the mesophilic opportunistic pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. We demonstrated the direct, and indirect – through increases in biosurfactant release – involvement of a phospholipase C in the hemolytic activity of this bacterium. Sequence analysis assigned this phospholipase C to a new group of phospholipases C different from those produced by P. aeruginosa. We show that changes in PlcC production have pleiotropic effects and that plcC overexpression and plcC extinction increase MFN1032 toxicity and colonization, respectively. Conclusion This study provides the first demonstration that a PLC is involved in the secreted hemolytic activity of a clinical strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens. Moreover, this phospholipase C seems to belong to a complex biological network associated with the biosurfactant production. PMID:18973676

  15. Sacroiliac joint involvement in activation of the porcine spinal and gluteal musculature.

    PubMed

    Indahl, A; Kaigle, A; Reikerås, O; Holm, S

    1999-08-01

    In the search for causes of low back pain, the sacroiliac joint has gained renewed interest as a possible pain generator. There is reason to believe that the sacroiliac joint plays a regulatory role involving reflex muscle activation, which controls trunk mobility and stability, as well as locomotion. The aim of this experimental study was to determine whether stimulation of nerves in the sacroiliac joint and joint capsule could elicit contractions in porcine gluteal or lumbar spinal muscles. Via a lateral retroperitoneal approach and using hypodermic needles, bipolar stimulating wire electrodes were inserted into the ventral area of the sacroiliac joint and directly under the surface of the capsular membrane, in 10 adolescent pigs (45 kg). This procedure was performed bilaterally, thus establishing two bilateral stimulation sites in the joints. Six electromyographic electrodes were unilaterally inserted into the following muscles: multifidus, gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, and quadratus lumborum. On stimulation within the ventral area of the joint, predominant responses occurred in both the gluteus maximus and quadratus lumborum muscles. However, when stimulating the capsule, the greatest muscular responses were detected in the multifidus muscles. This study addressed the possible regulatory function of the sacroiliac joint, namely, its involvement in activation of the spinal and gluteal muscles, which help control locomotion and body posture, as well as provide stability on the segmental level in the lumbar spine. PMID:10451049

  16. CIPK23 is involved in iron acquisition of Arabidopsis by affecting ferric chelate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qiuying; Zhang, Xinxin; Yang, An; Wang, Tianzuo; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2016-05-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the major limiting factors affecting quality and production of crops in calcareous soils. Numerous signaling molecules and transcription factors have been demonstrated to play a regulatory role in adaptation of plants to iron deficiency. However, the mechanisms underlying the iron deficiency-induced physiological processes remain to be fully dissected. Here, we demonstrated that the protein kinase CIPK23 was involved in iron acquisition. Lesion of CIPK23 rendered Arabidopsis mutants hypersensitive to iron deficiency, as evidenced by stronger chlorosis in young leaves and lower iron concentration than wild-type plants under iron-deficient conditions by down-regulating ferric chelate reductase activity. We found that iron deficiency evoked an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and the elevated Ca(2+) would bind to CBL1/CBL9, leading to activation of CIPK23. These novel findings highlight the involvement of calcium-dependent CBL-CIPK23 complexes in the regulation of iron acquisition. Moreover, mutation of CIPK23 led to changes in contents of mineral elements, suggesting that CBL-CIPK23 complexes could be as "nutritional sensors" to sense and regulate the mineral homeostasis in Arabisopsis. PMID:26993237

  17. An update on renal involvement in hemophagocytic syndrome (macrophage activation syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Esmaili, Haydarali; Mostafidi, Elmira; Mehramuz, Bahareh; Ardalan, Mohammadreza; Mohajel-Shoja, Mohammadali

    2016-01-01

    Context: Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) is mainly characterized by massive infiltration of bone marrow by activated macrophages and often presents with pancytopenia. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is also present with thrombocytopenia and renal involvement. Both conditions could coexist with each other and complicate the condition. Evidence Acquisition: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), EMBASE, Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO, and Web of Science with keywords relevant to; Hemophagocytic syndrome, macrophage activation syndrome, interferon-gamma and thrombotic microangiopathy, have been searched. Results: Viral infection, rheumatologic disease and malignancies are the main underlying causes for secondary HPS. calcineurin inhibitors and viral infections are also the main underlying causes of TMA in transplant recipients. In this review, we discussed a 39-year-old male who presented with pancytopenia and renal allograft dysfunction. With the diagnosis of HPS induced TMA his renal condition and pancytopenia improved after receiving intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and plasmapheresis therapy. Conclusions: HPS is an increasingly recognized disorder in the realm of different medical specialties. Renal involvement complicates the clinical picture of the disease, and this condition even is more complex in renal transplant recipients. We should consider the possibility of HPS in any renal transplant recipient with pancytopenia and allograft dysfunction. The combination of HPS with TMA future increases the complexity of the situation.

  18. Effects of negative air ions on activity of neural substrates involved in autonomic regulation in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Satoko; Yanagita, Shinya; Amemiya, Seiichiro; Kato, Yumi; Kubota, Natsuko; Ryushi, Tomoo; Kita, Ichiro

    2008-07-01

    The neural mechanism by which negative air ions (NAI) mediate the regulation of autonomic nervous system activity is still unknown. We examined the effects of NAI on physiological responses, such as blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV) as well as neuronal activity, in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), locus coeruleus (LC), nucleus ambiguus (NA), and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) with c-Fos immunohistochemistry in anesthetized, spontaneously breathing rats. In addition, we performed cervical vagotomy to reveal the afferent pathway involved in mediating the effects of NAI on autonomic regulation. NAI significantly decreased BP and HR, and increased HF power of the HRV spectrum. Significant decreases in c-Fos positive nuclei in the PVN and LC, and enhancement of c-Fos expression in the NA and NTS were induced by NAI. After vagotomy, these physiological and neuronal responses to NAI were not observed. These findings suggest that NAI can modulate autonomic regulation through inhibition of neuronal activity in PVN and LC as well as activation of NA neurons, and that these effects of NAI might be mediated via the vagus nerves.

  19. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Is Involved in the Toxic Activity of Boric Acid against Saprolegnia

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shimaa E.; Thoen, Even; Evensen, Øystein; Wiik-Nielsen, Jannicke; Gamil, Amr A. A.; Skaar, Ida

    2014-01-01

    There has been a significant increase in the incidence of Saprolegnia infections over the past decades, especially after the banning of malachite green. Very often these infections are associated with high economic losses in salmonid farms and hatcheries. The use of boric acid to control the disease has been investigated recently both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, however its possible mode of action against fish pathogenic Saprolegnia is not known. In this study, we have explored the transformation in Saprolegnia spores/hyphae after exposure to boric acid (1 g/L) over a period 4–24 h post treatment. Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), early changes in Saprolegnia spores were detected. Mitochondrial degeneration was the most obvious sign observed following 4 h treatment in about 20% of randomly selected spores. We also investigated the effect of the treatment on nuclear division, mitochondrial activity and function using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence microscopy was also used to test the effect of treatment on mitochondrial membrane potential and formation of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, the viability and proliferation of treated spores that correlated to mitochondrial enzymatic activity were tested using an MTS assay. All obtained data pointed towards changes in the mitochondrial structure, membrane potential and enzymatic activity following treatment. We have found that boric acid has no effect on the integrity of membranes of Saprolegnia spores at concentrations tested. It is therefore likely that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the toxic activity of boric acid against Saprolegnia spp. PMID:25354209

  20. Joint Associations of Residential Density and Neighborhood Involvement with Physical Activity among a Multiethnic Sample of Urban Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Lawrence, Vicki; Schulz, Amy J.; Zenk, Shannon N.; Israel, Barbara A.; Wineman, Jean; Marans, Robert W.; Rowe, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity is associated with improvements in overall health. Although resident involvement in neighborhood social activities is positively associated with physical activity, neighborhood design features, including residential density, have varied associations with physical activity. Using data from a multiethnic sample of 696…

  1. Purinergic receptors are involved in tooth-pulp evoked nocifensive behavior and brainstem neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To evaluate whether P2X receptors are involved in responses to noxious pulp stimulation, the P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptor agonist α,β-methyleneATP (α,β-meATP) was applied to the molar tooth pulp and nocifensive behavior and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis (Vc), trigeminal spinal subnucleus interpolaris (Vi), upper cervical spinal cord (C1/C2) and paratrigeminal nucleus (Pa5) neurons were analyzed in rats. Results Genioglossus (GG) muscle activity was evoked by pulpal application of 100 mM α,β-meATP and was significantly larger than GG activity following vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline PBS) application (p < 0.01). The enhanced GG muscle activity following 100 mM α,β-meATP was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) by co-application of 1 mM TNP-ATP (P2X1, P2X3 and, P2X2/3 antagonist). A large number of pERK-LI cells were expressed in the Vc, Vi/Vc, C1/C2 and Pa5 at 5 min following pulpal application of 100 mM α,β-meATP compared to PBS application to the pulp (p < 0.05). The pERK-LI cell expression and GG muscle activity induced by 100 mM α,β-meATP pulpal application were significantly reduced after intrathecal injection of the MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD 98059 and by pulpal co-application of 1 mM TNP-ATP (p < 0.05). Conclusions The present findings suggest that activation of P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptors in the tooth pulp is sufficient to elicit nociceptive behavioral responses and trigeminal brainstem neuronal activity. PMID:20860800

  2. Nerolidol exhibits antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity: involvement of the GABAergic system and proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Fonsêca, Diogo V; Salgado, Paula R R; de Carvalho, Fabíola L; Salvadori, Mirian Graciela S S; Penha, Antônia Rosângela S; Leite, Fagner C; Borges, Clóvis José S; Piuvezam, Marcia R; Pordeus, Liana Clébia de Morais; Sousa, Damião P; Almeida, Reinaldo N

    2016-02-01

    Nerolidol, an acyclic sesquiterpene found as a major constituent of several essential oils, has several pharmacological activities, but its action in pain processes has never been studied. The purpose of our research was to evaluate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of nerolidol, as well as possible mechanisms of action, in experimental mouse models of pain. Antinociceptive activity was evaluated using the acetic acid-induced writhing test, the formalin test, and the hot-plate test. The nerolidol-treated group showed lesser acetic acid-induced abdominal contractions than the control group in all of the three doses tested (200, 300, and 400 mg/kg, p.o.). The formalin test doses of 300 and 400 mg/kg p.o. inhibited licking time, in both the first phase and the second phase. In the hot-plate test, nerolidol did not alter latency at any of the observed time points. Motor coordination, evaluated through the rotarod test, was not hindered in animals treated with nerolidol. Regarding the mechanism of action, the antinociceptive activity of nerolidol is related to the GABAergic system, and not to the opioidergic or ATP-sensitive K(+) channels. Treatment with nerolidol reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema. In the model of carrageenan-induced peritonitis, nerolidol decreased the influx of polymorphonuclear cells and also reduced levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) in peritoneal lavage. Nerolidol reduced production of interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) in LPS-stimulated, peritoneal macrophages. Thus, these results showed that nerolidol has antinociceptive activity with possible involvement of the GABAergic system, and anti-inflammatory activity, attributed to the suppression of TNF-α and IL-1β proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:26791997

  3. Bakuchiol Is a Phenolic Isoprenoid with Novel Enantiomer-selective Anti-influenza A Virus Activity Involving Nrf2 Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Masaki; Arakaki, Yumie; Esumi, Tomoyuki; Kohnomi, Shuntaro; Yamamoto, Chihiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Takahashi, Etsuhisa; Konishi, Shiro; Kido, Hiroshi; Kuzuhara, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Influenza represents a substantial threat to human health and requires novel therapeutic approaches. Bakuchiol is a phenolic isoprenoid compound present in Babchi (Psoralea corylifolia L.) seeds. We examined the anti-influenza viral activity of synthetic bakuchiol using Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. We found that the naturally occurring form, (+)-(S)-bakuchiol, and its enantiomer, (−)-(R)-bakuchiol, inhibited influenza A viral infection and growth and reduced the expression of viral mRNAs and proteins in these cells. Furthermore, these compounds markedly reduced the mRNA expression of the host cell influenza A virus-induced immune response genes, interferon-β and myxovirus-resistant protein 1. Interestingly, (+)-(S)-bakuchiol had greater efficacy than (−)-(R)-bakuchiol, indicating that chirality influenced anti-influenza virus activity. In vitro studies indicated that bakuchiol did not strongly inhibit the activities of influenza surface proteins or the M2 ion channel, expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Analysis of luciferase reporter assay data unexpectedly indicated that bakuchiol may induce some host cell factor(s) that inhibited firefly and Renilla luciferases. Next generation sequencing and KeyMolnet analysis of influenza A virus-infected and non-infected cells exposed to bakuchiol revealed activation of transcriptional regulation by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf), and an Nrf2 reporter assay showed that (+)-(S)-bakuchiol activated Nrf2. Additionally, (+)-(S)-bakuchiol up-regulated the mRNA levels of two Nrf2-induced genes, NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 and glutathione S-transferase A3. These findings demonstrated that bakuchiol had enantiomer-selective anti-influenza viral activity involving a novel effect on the host cell oxidative stress response. PMID:26446794

  4. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, Michael

    2011-06-23

    Plants utilize light as a source of information via families of photoreceptors such as the red/far-red absorbing phytochromes (PHY) and the blue/UVA absorbing cryptochromes (CRY). The main goal of the Neff lab is to use molecular-genetic mutant screens to elucidate signaling components downstream of these photoreceptors. Activation-tagging mutagenesis led to the identification of two putative transcription factors that may be involved in both photomorphogenesis and hormone signaling pathways. sob1-D (suppressor of phyB-dominant) mutant phenotypes are caused by the over-expression of a Dof transcription factor previously named OBP3. Our previous studies indicate that OBP3 is a negative regulator of light-mediated cotyledon expansion and may be involved in modulating responsiveness to the growth-regulating hormone auxin. The sob2-D mutant uncovers a role for LEP, a putative AP2/EREBP-like transcription factor, in seed germination, hypocotyl elongation and responsiveness to the hormone abscisic acid. Based on photobiological and genetic analysis of OBP3-knockdown and LEP-null mutations, we hypothesize that these transcription factors are involved in both light-mediated seedling development and hormone signaling. To examine the role that these genes play in photomorphogenesis we will: 1) Further explore the genetic role of OBP3 in cotyledon/leaf expansion and other photomorphogenic processes as well as examine potential physical interactions between OBP3 and CRY1 or other signaling components that genetically interact with this transcription factor 2) Test the hypothesis that OBP3 is genetically involved in auxin signaling and root development as well as examine the affects of this hormone and light on OBP3 protein accumulation. 3) Test the hypothesis that LEP is involved in seed germination, seedling photomorphogenesis and hormone signaling. Together these experiments will lead to a greater understanding of the complexity of interactions between photoreceptors and DNA-interacting proteins during photomorphogenesis. These studies also address the roles OBP3 and LEP may play as points of intersection between hormone signaling and photomorphogenesis. In the future, phenotypes caused by altered expression of these genes may generate useful traits for improving crop yield.

  5. atRA-induced apoptosis of mouse embryonic palate mesenchymal cells involves activation of MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Zengli . E-mail: yuzengli@263.net; Xing Ying . E-mail: xingy@zzu.edu.cn

    2006-08-15

    Our previous studies have shown that atRA treatment resulted in cell-cycle block and growth inhibition in mouse embryonic palatal mesenchymal (MEPM). In the current study, gestation day (GD) 13 MEPM cells were used to test the hypothesis that the growth inhibition by atRA is due to apoptosis. The effects of atRA on apoptosis were assessed by performing MTT assay, Cell Death Detection ELISA and flow cytometry, respectively. Data analysis confirmed that atRA treatment induced apoptosis-like cell death, as shown by decreased cell viability and increased fragmented DNA and sub-G1 fraction. atRA-induced apoptosis was associated with upregulation of bcl-2, translocation of bax protein to the mitochondria from the cytosol, activation of caspase-3 and cytochrome c release into cytosol. atRA-induced apoptosis was abrogated by z-DEVD-fmk, a caspase-3 specific inhibitor, and z-VAD-fmk, a general caspase inhibitor, suggesting that the atRA-induced cell death of MEPM cells occurs through the cytochrome c- and caspase-3-dependent pathways. In addition, atRA treatment caused a strong and sustained activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase (p38), as well as an early but transient activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Importantly, atRA-induced DNA fragmentation and capase-3 activation were prevented by pretreatment with the JNK inhibitor (SP600125) and the p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB202190), but not by pretreatment with MEK inhibitor (U0126). From these results, we suggest that mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathways is involved in the atRA-induced apoptosis of MEPM cells.

  6. Influenza A Virus Panhandle Structure Is Directly Involved in RIG-I Activation and Interferon Induction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, GuanQun; Park, Hong-Su; Pyo, Hyun-Mi; Liu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) is an important innate immune sensor that recognizes viral RNA in the cytoplasm. Its nonself recognition largely depends on the unique RNA structures imposed by viral RNA. The panhandle structure residing in the influenza A virus (IAV) genome, whose primary function is to serve as the viral promoter for transcription and replication, has been proposed to be a RIG-I agonist. However, this has never been proved experimentally. Here, we employed multiple approaches to determine if the IAV panhandle structure is directly involved in RIG-I activation and type I interferon (IFN) induction. First, in porcine alveolar macrophages, we demonstrated that the viral genomic coding region is dispensable for RIG-I-dependent IFN induction. Second, using in vitro-synthesized hairpin RNA, we showed that the IAV panhandle structure could directly bind to RIG-I and stimulate IFN production. Furthermore, we investigated the contributions of the wobble base pairs, mismatch, and unpaired nucleotides within the wild-type panhandle structure to RIG-I activation. Elimination of these destabilizing elements within the panhandle structure promoted RIG-I activation and IFN induction. Given the function of the panhandle structure as the viral promoter, we further monitored the promoter activity of these panhandle variants and found that viral replication was moderately affected, whereas viral transcription was impaired dramatically. In all, our results indicate that the IAV panhandle promoter region adopts a nucleotide composition that is optimal for balanced viral RNA synthesis and suboptimal for RIG-I activation. IMPORTANCE The IAV genomic panhandle structure has been proposed to be an RIG-I agonist due to its partial complementarity; however, this has not been experimentally confirmed. Here, we provide direct evidence that the IAV panhandle structure is competent in, and sufficient for, RIG-I activation and IFN induction. By constructing panhandle variants with increased complementarity, we demonstrated that the wild-type panhandle structure could be modified to enhance RIG-I activation and IFN induction. These panhandle variants posed moderate influence on viral replication but dramatic impairment of viral transcription. These results indicate that the IAV panhandle promoter region adopts a nucleotide composition to achieve optimal balance of viral RNA synthesis and suboptimal RIG-I activation. Our results highlight the multifunctional role of the IAV panhandle promoter region in the virus life cycle and offer novel insights into the development of antiviral agents aiming to boost RIG-I signaling or virus attenuation by manipulating this conserved region. PMID:25810557

  7. Regulation of retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux involves liver X receptor activation in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Manna, Pulak R; Sennoune, Souad R; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul; Slominski, Andrzej T; Pruitt, Kevin

    2015-08-14

    Removal of cholesterol from macrophage-derived foam cells is a critical step to the prevention of atherosclerotic lesions. We have recently demonstrated the functional importance of retinoids in the regulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein that predominantly mediates the intramitochondrial transport of cholesterol in target tissues. In the present study, treatment of mouse macrophages with retinoids, particularly all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) and 9-cis RA, resulted in increases in cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein AI (Apo-A1). Activation of the PKA pathway by a cAMP analog, (Bu)2cAMP, markedly augmented retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux. Macrophages overexpressing hormone-sensitive lipase increased the hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters and concomitantly enhanced the efficacy of retinoic acid receptor and liver X receptor (LXR) ligands on StAR and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) protein levels. RAs elevated StAR promoter activity in macrophages, and an increase in StAR levels augmented cholesterol efflux to Apo-A1, suggesting retinoid-mediated efflux of cholesterol involves enhanced oxysterol production. Further studies revealed that retinoids activate the LXR regulated genes, sterol receptor-element binding protein-1c and ABCA1. These findings provide insights into the regulatory events in which retinoid signaling effectively enhances macrophage cholesterol efflux and indicate that retinoid therapy may have important implications in limiting and/or regressing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:26119689

  8. TRAIL induces necroptosis involving RIPK1/RIPK3-dependent PARP-1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Jouan-Lanhouet, S; Arshad, M I; Piquet-Pellorce, C; Martin-Chouly, C; Le Moigne-Muller, G; Van Herreweghe, F; Takahashi, N; Sergent, O; Lagadic-Gossmann, D; Vandenabeele, P; Samson, M; Dimanche-Boitrel, M-T

    2012-01-01

    Although TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis inducing ligand) is a well-known apoptosis inducer, we have previously demonstrated that acidic extracellular pH (pHe) switches TRAIL-induced apoptosis to regulated necrosis (or necroptosis) in human HT29 colon and HepG2 liver cancer cells. Here, we investigated the role of RIPK1 (receptor interacting protein kinase 1), RIPK3 and PARP-1 (poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1) in TRAIL-induced necroptosis in vitro and in concanavalin A (Con A)-induced murine hepatitis. Pretreatment of HT29 or HepG2 with pharmacological inhibitors of RIPK1 or PARP-1 (Nec-1 or PJ-34, respectively), or transient transfection with siRNAs against RIPK1 or RIPK3, inhibited both TRAIL-induced necroptosis and PARP-1-dependent intracellular ATP depletion demonstrating that RIPK1 and RIPK3 were involved upstream of PARP-1 activation and ATP depletion. In the mouse model of Con A-induced hepatitis, where death of mouse hepatocytes is dependent on TRAIL and NKT (Natural Killer T) cells, PARP-1 activity was positively correlated with liver injury and hepatitis was prevented both by Nec-1 or PJ-34. These data provide new insights into TRAIL-induced necroptosis with PARP-1 being active effector downstream of RIPK1/RIPK3 initiators and suggest that pharmacological inhibitors of RIPKs and PARP-1 could be new treatment options for immune-mediated hepatitis. PMID:22814620

  9. Flagellin-induced NADPH oxidase 4 activation is involved in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinoh; Seo, Misun; Kim, Su Kyung; Bae, Yun Soo

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that bacterial infection-mediated inflammation facilitates development of atherosclerosis by activating toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling system. We reasoned that NADPH oxidases (Nox), required for TLR-mediated inflammatory response, are involved in atherogenesis. Here, we show that the activation of Nox4 through TLR5 regulates the inflammation of the endothelium and in atherogenesis. Flagellin-induced interaction between the COOH region of Nox4 and the TIR domain of TLR5 led to H2O2 generation, which in turn promoted the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-8, as well as the expression of ICAM-1 in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Knockdown of the Nox4 in HAECs resulted in attenuated expressions of IL-8 and ICAM-1 leading to a reduction in the adhesion and trans-endothelial migration of monocytes. Challenge of recombinant FliC (rFliC) to the ApoE KO mice with high-fat diet (HFD) resulted in significantly increased atherosclerotic plaque sizes compared to the saline-injected mice. However, an injection of rFliC into the Nox4ApoE DKO mice with HFDs failed to generate atherosclerotic plaque, suggesting that Nox4 deficiency resulted in significant protections against rFliC-mediated atherogenesis. We conclude that TLR5-dependent Nox4 activation and subsequent H2O2 generation play critical roles for the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:27146088

  10. Transmembrane myosin chitin synthase involved in mollusc shell formation produced in Dictyostelium is active

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenitzer, Veronika; Universitaet Regensburg, Biochemie I, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg ; Eichner, Norbert; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Weiss, Ingrid M.

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dictyostelium produces the 264 kDa myosin chitin synthase of bivalve mollusc Atrina. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitin synthase activity releases chitin, partly associated with the cell surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Membrane extracts of transgenic slime molds produce radiolabeled chitin in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chitin producing Dictyostelium cells can be characterized by atomic force microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This model system enables us to study initial processes of chitin biomineralization. -- Abstract: Several mollusc shells contain chitin, which is formed by a transmembrane myosin motor enzyme. This protein could be involved in sensing mechanical and structural changes of the forming, mineralizing extracellular matrix. Here we report the heterologous expression of the transmembrane myosin chitin synthase Ar-CS1 of the bivalve mollusc Atrina rigida (2286 amino acid residues, M.W. 264 kDa/monomer) in Dictyostelium discoideum, a model organism for myosin motor proteins. Confocal laser scanning immunofluorescence microscopy (CLSM), chitin binding GFP detection of chitin on cells and released to the cell culture medium, and a radiochemical activity assay of membrane extracts revealed expression and enzymatic activity of the mollusc chitin synthase in transgenic slime mold cells. First high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of Ar-CS1 transformed cellulose synthase deficient D. discoideumdcsA{sup -} cell lines are shown.

  11. Cell-matrix interactions modulate interstitial collagenase expression by human keratinocytes actively involved in wound healing.

    PubMed Central

    Saarialho-Kere, U K; Kovacs, S O; Pentland, A P; Olerud, J E; Welgus, H G; Parks, W C

    1993-01-01

    We reported that interstitial collagenase is produced by keratinocytes at the edge of ulcers in pyogenic granuloma, and in this report, we assessed if production of this metalloproteinase is a common feature of the epidermal response in a variety of wounds. In all samples of chronic ulcers, regardless of etiology, and in incision wounds, collagenase mRNA, localized by in situ hybridization, was prominently expressed by basal keratinocytes bordering the sites of active re-epithelialization indicating that collagenolytic activity is a characteristic response of the epidermis to wounding. No expression of mRNAs for 72- and 92-kD gelatinases or matrilysin was seen in keratinocytes, and no signal for any metalloproteinase was detected in normal epidermis. Immunostaining for type IV collagen showed that collagenase-positive keratinocytes were not in contact with an intact basement membrane and, unlike normal keratinocytes, expressed alpha 5 beta 1 receptors. These observations suggest that cell-matrix interactions influence collagenase expression by epidermal cells. Indeed, as determined by ELISA, primary cultures of human keratinocytes grown on basement membrane proteins (Matrigel; Collaborative Research Inc., Bedford, MA) did not express significant levels of collagenase, whereas cells grown on type I collagen produced markedly increased levels. These results suggest that migrating keratinocytes actively involved in re-epithelialization acquire a collagenolytic phenotype upon contact with the dermal matrix. Images PMID:8254040

  12. 1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium induces synaptic dysfunction through a pathway involving caspase and PKCdelta enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Serulle, Yafell; Morfini, Gerardo; Pigino, Gustavo; Moreira, Jorge E; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Brady, Scott T; Llinás, Rodolfo R

    2007-02-13

    1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine administration has been used, in various mammalian species, as an experimental model of Parkinson's disease. The pathogenesis for such pharmacologically induced Parkinson's disease involves 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), the active metabolite of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. This metabolite produces rapid degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons, which causes the parkinsonian syndrome. In this work, we show that injection of MPP+ into the presynaptic terminal of the squid giant synapse blocks synaptic transmission without affecting the presynaptic action potential or the presynaptic calcium currents. These effects of MPP+ were mimicked by the injection of an active form of caspase-3 and prevented by inhibitors of caspase-3 and protein kinase C delta. Ultrastructurally, MPP+-injected synapses showed a dramatic reduction in the number of neurotransmitter vesicles at the presynaptic active zone, as compared with control synapses. Otherwise, normal docking and clathrin-coated vesicles were observed, albeit at much reduced numbers. These results indicate that MPP+ acutely reduces presynaptic vesicular availability, not release, and that MPP+-induced pathogenesis results from presynaptic dysfunction that leads, secondarily, to dying-back neuropathy in affected neurons. PMID:17287339

  13. Activation of PPAR{gamma} is not involved in butyrate-induced epithelial cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, S.; Waechtershaeuser, A.; Loitsch, S.; Knethen, A. von; Bruene, B.; Stein, J. . E-mail: j.stein@em.uni-frankfurt.de

    2005-10-15

    Histone deacetylase-inhibitors affect growth and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells by inducing expression of several transcription factors, e.g. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) or vitamin D receptor (VDR). While activation of VDR by butyrate mainly seems to be responsible for cellular differentiation, the activation of PPAR{gamma} in intestinal cells remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the role of PPAR{gamma} in butyrate-induced cell growth inhibition and differentiation induction in Caco-2 cells. Treatment with PPAR{gamma} ligands ciglitazone and BADGE (bisphenol A diglycidyl) enhanced butyrate-induced cell growth inhibition in a dose- and time-dependent manner, whereas cell differentiation was unaffected after treatment with PPAR{gamma} ligands rosiglitazone and MCC-555. Experiments were further performed in dominant-negative PPAR{gamma} mutant cells leading to an increase in cell growth whereas butyrate-induced cell differentiation was again unaffected. The present study clearly demonstrated that PPAR{gamma} is involved in butyrate-induced inhibition of cell growth, but seems not to play an essential role in butyrate-induced cell differentiation.

  14. Flagellin-induced NADPH oxidase 4 activation is involved in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinoh; Seo, Misun; Kim, Su Kyung; Bae, Yun Soo

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that bacterial infection-mediated inflammation facilitates development of atherosclerosis by activating toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling system. We reasoned that NADPH oxidases (Nox), required for TLR-mediated inflammatory response, are involved in atherogenesis. Here, we show that the activation of Nox4 through TLR5 regulates the inflammation of the endothelium and in atherogenesis. Flagellin-induced interaction between the COOH region of Nox4 and the TIR domain of TLR5 led to H2O2 generation, which in turn promoted the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-8, as well as the expression of ICAM-1 in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Knockdown of the Nox4 in HAECs resulted in attenuated expressions of IL-8 and ICAM-1 leading to a reduction in the adhesion and trans-endothelial migration of monocytes. Challenge of recombinant FliC (rFliC) to the ApoE KO mice with high-fat diet (HFD) resulted in significantly increased atherosclerotic plaque sizes compared to the saline-injected mice. However, an injection of rFliC into the Nox4ApoE DKO mice with HFDs failed to generate atherosclerotic plaque, suggesting that Nox4 deficiency resulted in significant protections against rFliC-mediated atherogenesis. We conclude that TLR5-dependent Nox4 activation and subsequent H2O2 generation play critical roles for the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:27146088

  15. (-)-Linalool inhibits in vitro NO formation: Probable involvement in the antinociceptive activity of this monoterpene compound.

    PubMed

    Peana, Alessandra T; Marzocco, Stefania; Popolo, Ada; Pinto, Aldo

    2006-01-11

    Recent studies performed in our laboratory have shown that (-)-linalool, the natural occurring enantiomer in essential oils, possesses anti-inflammatory, antihyperalgesic and antinociceptive effects in different animal models. The antinociceptive and antihyperalgesic effect of (-)-linalool has been ascribed to the stimulation of the cholinergic, opioidergic and dopaminergic systems, to its local anaesthetic activity and to the blockade of N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDA). Since nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) play an important role in oedema formation and hyperalgesia and nociception development, to investigate the mechanism of these actions of the (-)-linalool, we examined the effects of this compound on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced responses in macrophage cell line J774.A1. Exposure of LPS-stimulated cells to (-)-linalool significantly inhibited nitrite accumulation in the culture medium without inhibiting the LPS-stimulated increase of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, suggesting that the inhibitory activity of (-)-linalool is mainly due to the iNOS enzyme activity. In contrast, exposure of LPS-stimulated cells to (-)-linalool failed, if not at the highest concentration, both in inhibiting PGE(2) release and in inhibiting increase of inducible cyclooxygenase-2 (COX(2)) expression in the culture medium. Collectively, these results indicate that the reduction of NO production/release is responsible, at least partially, for the molecular mechanisms of (-)-linalool antinociceptive effect, probably through mechanisms where cholinergic and glutamatergic systems are involved. PMID:16137709

  16. Astragaloside IV enhances diabetic wound healing involving upregulation of alternatively activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaochun; Huang, Ping; Yuan, Baohong; Liu, Tao; Lan, Fang; Lu, Xiaoyan; Dai, Liangcheng; Liu, Yunjun; Yin, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Astragaloside IV (AS-IV), one of the major active compounds extracted from Astragali Radix, has been used experimentally for its potent antiinflammatory and immunoregulatory activities. In this study, we further investigate the potential efficacy of AS-IV on impaired wound healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. A full-thickness skin wound was produced on the back of diabetic mice and treated with AS-IV or vehicle topically. Our results showed that AS-IV application promoted diabetic wound repair with wounds gaping narrower and exhibiting augmented reepithelialization. AS-IV enhanced the collagen deposition and the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM)-related genes such as fibronectin and collagen IIIa, which implies a direct effect of AS-IV on matrix synthesis. AS-IV also improved the new blood vessel formation in wound tissue with increased numbers of endothelial cells and enhanced expression of VEGF and vWF. Moreover, the beneficial effect of AS-IV was related to the development of polarized alternatively activated macrophages, which involved in resolution of inflammation and facilitation of wound repair. All together, these findings suggest that AS-IV may play a potential effect on maintenance of cutaneous homeostasis and acceleration of diabetic wound healing. PMID:27016716

  17. Implicit trustworthiness ratings of self-resembling faces activate brain centers involved in reward.

    PubMed

    Platek, Steven M; Krill, Austen L; Wilson, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of Hamilton's (Hamilton, W. D. (1964). The genetical evolution of social behavior I, II. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 7, 17-52) theory of inclusive fitness, self-facial resemblance is hypothesized as a mechanism for self-referent phenotypic matching by which humans can detect kin. To understand the mechanisms underlying pro-sociality toward self-resembling faces, we investigated the neural correlates of implicit trustworthiness ratings for self-resembling faces. Here we show that idiosyncratic trustworthiness ratings of self-resembling faces predict brain activation in the ventral inferior, middle and medial frontal gyri, substrates involved in reward processing. These findings demonstrate that neural reward centers are implicated in evaluating implicit pro-social behaviors toward self-resembling faces. These findings suggest that humans have evolved to use neurocomputational architecture dedicated to face processing and reward evaluation for the differentiation of kin, which drives implicit idiosyncratic affectively regulated social interactions. PMID:18761362

  18. A novel carotenoid cleavage activity involved in the biosynthesis of Citrus fruit-specific apocarotenoid pigments.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, María J; Alquézar, Berta; Alós, Enriqueta; Medina, Víctor; Carmona, Lourdes; Bruno, Mark; Al-Babili, Salim; Zacarías, Lorenzo

    2013-11-01

    Citrus is the first tree crop in terms of fruit production. The colour of Citrus fruit is one of the main quality attributes, caused by the accumulation of carotenoids and their derivative C30 apocarotenoids, mainly β-citraurin (3-hydroxy-β-apo-8'-carotenal), which provide an attractive orange-reddish tint to the peel of oranges and Mandarins. Though carotenoid biosynthesis and its regulation have been extensively studied in Citrus fruits, little is known about the formation of C30 apocarotenoids. The aim of this study was to the identify carotenoid cleavage enzyme(s) [CCD(s)] involved in the peel-specific C30 apocarotenoids. In silico data mining revealed a new family of five CCD4-type genes in Citrus. One gene of this family, CCD4b1, was expressed in reproductive and vegetative tissues of different Citrus species in a pattern correlating with the accumulation of C30 apocarotenoids. Moreover, developmental processes and treatments which alter Citrus fruit peel pigmentation led to changes of β-citraurin content and CCD4b1 transcript levels. These results point to the involvement of CCD4b1 in β-citraurin formation and indicate that the accumulation of this compound is determined by the availability of the presumed precursors zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin. Functional analysis of CCD4b1 by in vitro assays unequivocally demonstrated the asymmetric cleavage activity at the 7',8' double bond in zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin, confirming its role in C30 apocarotenoid biosynthesis. Thus, a novel plant carotenoid cleavage activity targeting the 7',8' double bond of cyclic C40 carotenoids has been identified. These results suggest that the presented enzyme is responsible for the biosynthesis of C30 apocarotenoids in Citrus which are key pigments in fruit coloration. PMID:24006419

  19. A novel carotenoid cleavage activity involved in the biosynthesis of Citrus fruit-specific apocarotenoid pigments

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, María J.; Alquézar, Berta; Al-Babili, Salim

    2013-01-01

    Citrus is the first tree crop in terms of fruit production. The colour of Citrus fruit is one of the main quality attributes, caused by the accumulation of carotenoids and their derivative C30 apocarotenoids, mainly β-citraurin (3-hydroxy-β-apo-8′-carotenal), which provide an attractive orange-reddish tint to the peel of oranges and mandarins. Though carotenoid biosynthesis and its regulation have been extensively studied in Citrus fruits, little is known about the formation of C30 apocarotenoids. The aim of this study was to the identify carotenoid cleavage enzyme(s) [CCD(s)] involved in the peel-specific C30 apocarotenoids. In silico data mining revealed a new family of five CCD4-type genes in Citrus. One gene of this family, CCD4b1, was expressed in reproductive and vegetative tissues of different Citrus species in a pattern correlating with the accumulation of C30 apocarotenoids. Moreover, developmental processes and treatments which alter Citrus fruit peel pigmentation led to changes of β-citraurin content and CCD4b1 transcript levels. These results point to the involvement of CCD4b1 in β-citraurin formation and indicate that the accumulation of this compound is determined by the availability of the presumed precursors zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin. Functional analysis of CCD4b1 by in vitro assays unequivocally demonstrated the asymmetric cleavage activity at the 7′,8′ double bond in zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin, confirming its role in C30 apocarotenoid biosynthesis. Thus, a novel plant carotenoid cleavage activity targeting the 7′,8′ double bond of cyclic C40 carotenoids has been identified. These results suggest that the presented enzyme is responsible for the biosynthesis of C30 apocarotenoids in Citrus which are key pigments in fruit coloration. PMID:24006419

  20. Decreased activity of neutrophils in the presence of diferuloylmethane (curcumin) involves protein kinase C inhibition.

    PubMed

    Jancinová, Viera; Perecko, Tomás; Nosál, Radomír; Kostálová, Daniela; Bauerová, Katarína; Drábiková, Katarína

    2009-06-10

    Diferuloylmethane (curcumin) has been shown to act beneficially in arthritis, particularly through downregulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines and collagenase as well as through the modulated activities of T lymphocytes and macrophages. In this study its impact on activated neutrophils was investigated both in vitro and in experimental arthritis. Formation of reactive oxygen species in neutrophils was recorded on the basis of luminol- or isoluminol-enhanced chemiluminescence. Phosphorylation of neutrophil protein kinases C alpha and beta II was assessed by Western blotting, using phosphospecific antibodies. Adjuvant arthritis was induced in Lewis rats by heat-killed Mycobacterium butyricum. Diferuloylmethane or methotrexate was administered over a period of 28 days after arthritis induction. Under in vitro conditions, diferuloylmethane (1-100 microM) reduced dose-dependently oxidant formation both at extra- and intracellular level and it effectively reduced protein kinase C activation. Adjuvant arthritis was accompanied by an increased number of neutrophils in blood and by a more pronounced spontaneous as well as PMA (phorbol myristate acetate) stimulated chemiluminescence. Whereas the arthritis-related alterations in neutrophil count and in spontaneous chemiluminescence were not modified by diferuloylmethane, the increased reactivity of neutrophils to PMA was less evident in diferuloylmethane-treated animals. The effects of diferuloylmethane were comparable with those of methotrexate. Diferuloylmethane was found to be a potent inhibitor of neutrophil functions both in vitro and in experimental arthritis. As neutrophils are considered to be cells with the greatest capacity to inflict damage within diseased joints, the observed effects could represent a further mechanism involved in the antirheumatic activity of diferuloylmethane. PMID:19371737

  1. Vascular neurobehcet disease: correlation with current disease activity forum and systemic vascular involvement.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Reem H A; Nasef, Amr; Kewan, Hanady H; Al Shaar, Mohammed

    2012-07-01

    Behcet's syndrome (BS) is a chronic relapsing vascular inflammatory disease of unknown etiology with high morbidity and mortality. This research aims to study the clinical patterns of CNS disease in a group of patients with BS as well as the frequency and type of the associated radiographic findings suggestive of structural cerebral vascular disease. The findings were studied in relation to disease activity and features of systemic vascular involvement. Forty patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of the International Study Group for Behcet's Disease, mean age of 33.56 9.7 years, were enrolled. Patients were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging with conjugate survey of cerebral blood vessels' flow pattern abnormalities by transcranial Doppler study. Thirty healthy controls were included. Behcet's Disease Current Activity Form Score was used. Neuro-Behcet's syndrome (NBS) was diagnosed in 37.5% with headache being the most common (86.6% of cases), pyramidal affection (signs of upper motor neuron lesions/hemiplegia) was reported in 33.3%, attacks of disturbed conscious level in 26.6%, and cranial nerve affection in 6.5%. Of the patients, 66.6% with clinical features of NBS had statistically significant radiographic evidences of cerebrovascular disease (p = 0.01). Patients with NBS had significantly higher disease activity index score (r = 0.69, p = 0.0001). Radiographic findings and flow abnormalities were significantly less in patients on immune suppressants and antiplatelet drugs (p = 0.003, 0.04). BS patients with clinical neurologic disease were found to have radiographic findings suggestive of cerebral vascular disease with high disease activity index score. Drugs like immunosuppressants and oral antiplatelets might retard cerebral vascular disease progression and flow abnormalities, respectively. PMID:22415466

  2. Bromelain treatment alters leukocyte expression of cell surface molecules involved in cellular adhesion and activation.

    PubMed

    Hale, Laura P; Greer, Paula K; Sempowski, Gregory D

    2002-08-01

    Bromelain is a natural proteinase preparation derived from pineapple stem that is marketed for oral use as a digestive aid and as an antiinflammatory agent. Bromelain treatment in vitro has been previously shown to selectively remove certain cell surface molecules that may affect lymphocyte migration and activation. This study reports the effects of bromelain on a broad range of cell surface molecules and on lymphocytes, monocytes, and granulocytes under physiologically relevant conditions. In vitro bromelain treatment of leukocytes in whole blood proteolytically altered 14 of 59 leukocyte markers studied. Constitutively expressed bromelain-sensitive molecules included CD7, CD8alpha, CD14, CD16, CD21, CD41, CD42a, CD44, CD45RA, CD48, CD57, CD62L, CD128a, and CD128b. The proteolytic effect of bromelain increased as the concentration of plasma decreased, with EC50 ranging from >1000 microg/ml for 100% plasma to approximately 1 microg/ml in the absence of plasma, indicating the presence of an inhibitor of bromelain in plasma. alpha2-macroglobulin purified from plasma mimicked the inhibitory effect of whole plasma on bromelain activity. If proteolysis is required for the antiinflammatory actions of oral bromelain, these data suggest that the required concentrations are more likely to be achieved locally in the gastrointestinal tract or in other tissue sites where the plasma concentration is low, rather than in the bloodstream. The cell surface molecules altered by bromelain are involved in leukocyte homing and cellular adhesion and activation. Thus bromelain could potentially exert an antiinflammatory effect by multiple mechanisms, including alterations in leukocyte migration and activation. PMID:12165279

  3. Involvement of ER stress and activation of apoptotic pathways in fisetin induced cytotoxicity in human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Syed, Deeba N; Lall, Rahul K; Chamcheu, Jean Christopher; Haidar, Omar; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2014-12-01

    The prognosis of malignant melanoma remains poor in spite of recent advances in therapeutic strategies for the deadly disease. Fisetin, a dietary flavonoid is currently being investigated for its growth inhibitory properties in various cancer models. We previously showed that fisetin inhibited melanoma growth in vitro and in vivo. Here, we evaluated the molecular basis of fisetin induced cytotoxicity in metastatic human melanoma cells. Fisetin treatment induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in highly aggressive A375 and 451Lu human melanoma cells, as revealed by up-regulation of ER stress markers including IRE1α, XBP1s, ATF4 and GRP78. Time course analysis indicated that the ER stress was associated with activation of the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. Fisetin treated 2-D melanoma cultures displayed autophagic response concomitant with induction of apoptosis. Prolonged treatment (16days) with fisetin in a 3-D reconstituted melanoma model resulted in inhibition of melanoma progression with significant apoptosis, as evidenced by increased staining of cleaved Caspase-3 in the treated constructs. However, no difference in the expression of autophagic marker LC-3 was noted between treated and control groups. Fisetin treatment to 2-D melanoma cultures resulted in phosphorylation and activation of the multifunctional AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including autophagy and apoptosis. Silencing of AMPK failed to prevent cell death indicating that fisetin induced cytotoxicity is mediated through both AMPK-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Taken together, our studies confirm apoptosis as the primary mechanism through which fisetin inhibits melanoma cell growth and that activation of both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways contributes to fisetin induced cytotoxicity. PMID:25016296

  4. Dark-induced senescence of barley leaves involves activation of plastid transglutaminases.

    PubMed

    Sobieszczuk-Nowicka, E; Zmienko, A; Samelak-Czajka, A; ?uczak, M; Pietrowska-Borek, M; Iorio, R; Del Duca, S; Figlerowicz, M; Legocka, J

    2015-04-01

    Transglutaminases (E.C. 2.3.2.13) catalyze the post-translational modification of proteins by establishing ?-(?-glutamyl) lysine isopeptide bonds and by the covalent conjugation of polyamines to endo-glutamyl residues of proteins. In light of the confirmed role of transglutaminases in animal cell apoptosis and only limited information on the role of these enzymes in plant senescence, we decided to investigate the activity of chloroplast transglutaminases (ChlTGases) and the fate of chloroplast-associated polyamines in Hordeum vulgare L. 'Nagrad' leaves, where the senescence process was induced by darkness (day 0) and continued until chloroplast degradation (day 12). Using an anti-TGase antibody, we detected on a subcellular level, the ChlTGases that were associated with destacked/degraded thylakoid membranes, and beginning on day 5, were also found in the stroma. Colorimetric and radiometric assays revealed during senescence an increase in ChlTGases enzymatic activity. The MS/MS identification of plastid proteins conjugated with exogenous polyamines had shown that the ChlTGases are engaged in the post-translational modification of proteins involved in photosystem organization, stress response, and oxidation processes. We also computationally identified the cDNA of Hv-Png1-like, a barley homologue of the Arabidopsis AtPng1 gene. Its mRNA level was raised from days 3 to 10, indicating that transcriptional regulation controls the activity of barley ChlTGases. Together, the presented results deepen our knowledge of the mechanisms of the events happened in dark-induced senescence of barley leaves that might be activation of plastid transglutaminases. PMID:25583605

  5. Calcitonin promotes mouse pre-implantation development: involvement of calcium mobilization and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, F-w; Zhang, Y-m; Wang, Z; Liu, S-m; Wang, L-y; Zhang, X-l; Jia, D-y; Hao, A-j; Wu, Y-l

    2013-06-01

    The study was designed to examine the effects of calcitonin (CT) on the development of murine pre-implantation embryos and possible molecular mechanisms involved in the process. In the present study, the 2-cell embryos were treated with different concentration of CT in vitro for the indicated time and the results demonstrated that CT promoted the development of the pre-implantation embryos in a dosage-dependent manner by increasing the intracellular Ca(2+) level. Furthermore, the present study showed that CT significantly increased the expression of phospho-P38MAPK (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase) of the pre-implantation embryos by Western blots and pre-treatment of specific P38MAPK inhibitor significantly reduced the promotion effects of CT on the embryonic development in vitro culture. Moreover, the results of intrauterine horn injection showed that the average number of embryos implanted in CT-antibody or specific P38 MAPK inhibitor-treated uterus was significantly lower than that of the corresponding control, respectively. And the observation of tissue specimen suggested that some embryos were degenerated in CT-antibody or specific P38 MAPK inhibitor-treated uterus, and adipose vacuoles were present in the decidual cells. In conclusion, CT promoted the development of pre-implantation embryos and the intracellular Ca(2+) -dependent P38MAPK signal molecule was involved in the process. PMID:23651148

  6. CaMKKβ is involved in AMP-activated protein kinase activation by baicalin in LKB1 deficient cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Yang, Fuzhen; Wang, Ying; Du, Zhiyan; Liu, Daihua; Guo, Hongxia; Shen, Jingkang; Peng, Hongli

    2012-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays an important role in mediating energy metabolism and is controlled mainly by two upstream kinases, LKB1 or Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β (CaMKKβ). Previously, we found that baicalin, one of the major flavonoids in a traditional Chinese herb medicine, Scutellaria baicalensis, protects against the development of hepatic steatosis in rats feeding with a high-fat diet by the activation of AMPK, but, the underlying mechanism for AMPK activation is unknown. Here we show that in two LKB1-deficient cells, HeLa and A549 cells, baicalin activates AMPK by α Thr-172 phosphorylation and subsequent phosphorylation of its downstream target, acetyl CoA carboxylase, at Ser-79, to a similar degree as does in HepG2 cells (that express LKB1). Pharmacologic inhibition of CaMKKβ by its selective inhibitor STO-609 markedly inhibits baicalin-induced AMPK activation in both HeLa and HepG2 cells, indicating that CaMKKβ is the responsible AMPK kinase. We also show that treatment of baicalin causes a larger increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)), although the maximal level of [Ca(2+)](i) is lower in HepG2 cells compared to HeLa cells. Chelation of intracellular free Ca(2+) by EDTA and EGTA, or depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores by the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin abrogates baicalin-induced activation of AMPK in HeLa cells. Neither cellular ATP nor the production of reactive oxygen species is altered by baicalin. Finally, in HeLa cells, baicalin treatment no longer decreases intracellular lipid accumulation caused by oleic acid after inhibition of CaMKKβ by STO-609. These results demonstrate that a potential Ca(2+)/CaMKKβ dependent pathway is involved in the activation of AMPK by baicalin and suggest that CaMKKβ likely acts as an upstream kinase of AMPK in response to baicalin. PMID:23110126

  7. AF2 interaction with Ascaris suum body wall muscle membranes involves G-protein activation.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Teresa M; Larsen, Martha J; Davis, John P; Zantello, Marjorie R; Bowman, Jerry W

    2003-02-01

    KHEYLRF-NH(2) (AF2) is the most abundant FMRFamide-related peptide (FaRP) in Ascaris suum and also in many other parasitic and free-living nematodes. The AF2 abundance in the highly diverse nematodes and its potent and profound effects on the neuromuscular systems make AF2 and its receptor(s) very attractive targets for the discovery of novel broad-spectrum anthelmintics. Although FaRP receptors are believed to belong to the large family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), to date no AF2 receptor(s) have been cloned so there is no final proof to show that they are indeed G-protein coupled. In this study, using A. suum body wall muscle membranes, we showed that: (1) AF2 effectively (EC(50) 57 nM) induced a dose-dependent stimulation of [35S]GTP gamma S binding to the membranes, which is a hallmark of G-protein activation; (2) the high affinity binding of [125I-Tyr(4)]AF2 was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by GTP with a K(i) of 10.5 nM (so-called guanine nucleotide effect, characteristic for GPCRs). Collectively, our results provide direct evidence for G-protein involvement in AF2-triggered receptor activation and thus confirm that the receptor for AF2 in A. suum is a GPCR. PMID:12565883

  8. Monitoring methods and dose assessment for internal exposures involving mixed fission and activation products containing actinides.

    PubMed

    Thind, K S

    2001-01-01

    Internal dose assessment for intakes of radionuclide mixtures is a difficult task. When the radionuclide mixture contains both the easy to detect gamma emitters, e.g., 60Co and 95Zr, and difficult to detect alpha emitters such as 239Pu and 241Am, a single monitoring method, such as in-vivo counting, is inadequate for detection and dose assessment. Recent experience with task related monitoring for such radionuclide mixtures at Ontario Power Generation CANDU nuclear power plants has offered an opportunity to review this topic and suggest a strategy for monitoring that involves a combination of in-vivo and in-vitro methods. Using the radionuclide composition data in a mixture from an actual case as an example, this paper describes a monitoring strategy for mixed fission and activation products, including the advantages and pitfalls of reliance on surrogate radionuclides for signaling the presence of actinides in the mixture. The described monitoring strategy is consistent with the recommendations of ICRP Publication 78, which advocates a "combination of techniques so as to make the best possible evaluation of an unusual situation, for example, a programme of both body activity and excreta measurements." The use of experience and professional judgement for interpreting the combined in-vivo and in-vitro data for interim and ultimate intake and dose assessment is discussed and emphasized. PMID:11204117

  9. Mechanisms involved in Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens removal during activated sludge wastewater treatment

    PubMed Central

    Orruño, Maite; Garaizabal, Idoia; Bravo, Zaloa; Parada, Claudia; Barcina, Isabel; Arana, Inés

    2014-01-01

    Wastewater treatment reduces environmental contamination by removing gross solids and mitigating the effects of pollution. Treatment also reduces the number of indicator organisms and pathogens. In this work, the fates of two coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens, were analyzed in an activated sludge process to determine the main mechanisms involved in the reduction of pathogenic microorganisms during wastewater treatment. These bacteria, modified to express green fluorescent protein, were inoculated in an activated sludge unit and in batch systems containing wastewater. The results suggested that, among the different biological factors implied in bacterial removal, bacterivorous protozoa play a key role. Moreover, a representative number of bacteria persisted in the system as free-living or embedded cells, but their distribution into liquid or solid fractions varied depending on the bacterium tested, questioning the real value of bacterial indicators for the control of wastewater treatment process. Additionally, viable but nonculturable cells constituted an important part of the bacterial population adhered to solid fractions, what can be derived from the competition relationships with native bacteria, present in high densities in this environment. These facts, taken together, emphasize the need for reliable quantitative and qualitative analysis tools for the evaluation of pathogenic microbial composition in sludge, which could represent an undefined risk to public health and ecosystem functions when considering its recycling. PMID:25044599

  10. Are serotonergic neurons involved in the control of anxiety and in the anxiolytic activity of benzodiazepines?

    PubMed

    Thiebot, M H

    1986-05-01

    Several studies have shown that, like benzodiazepines (BZP), treatments able to reduce or block the activity of CNS serotonergic (5-HT) neurons released punished behavior. Therefore, 5-HT mechanisms have been tentatively implicated in the anti-punishment (anxiolytic?) activity of BZP. Numerous data, however, are not in keeping with this hypothesis. Since not responding enables the animals to avoid punishment but also delays the receipt of food-reward, one of these factors could be an alteration of waiting capacities. Indeed, we have shown that diazepam released behavioral suppression in conflict schedules only when the duration of the punished periods exceeded 1 minute. Moreover, in rats allowed to choose in a T-maze between immediate-but-small vs. delayed-but-large reward, BZP significantly decreased the frequency with which the delayed reward was chosen, with 5-HT uptake blockers producing opposite effects. Therefore, one can hypothesize that BZP render the animals less prone than controls to tolerate delay of reward and that 5-HT mechanisms may be involved in this phenomenon. An altered tolerance to delay of reward should be taken into account when interpreting the BZP-induced release of behavioral inhibition in classical conflict procedures. PMID:2873593

  11. Involvement of JNK and Caspase Activation in Hoiamide A-Induced Neurotoxicity in Neocortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengyu; Li, Xichun; Zou, Xiaohan; Greenwood, Michael; Gerwick, William H.; Murray, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    The frequent occurrence of Moorea producens (formerly Lyngbya majuscula) blooms has been associated with adverse effects on human health. Hoiamide A is a structurally unique cyclic depsipeptide isolated from an assemblage of the marine cyanobacteria M. producens and Phormidium gracile. We examined the influence of hoiamide A on neurite outgrowth in neocortical neurons and found that it suppressed neurite outgrowth with an IC50 value of 4.89 nM. Further study demonstrated that hoiamide A stimulated lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH) efflux, nuclear condensation and caspase-3 activity with EC50 values of 3.66, 2.55 and 4.33 nM, respectively. These data indicated that hoiamide A triggered a unique neuronal death profile that involves both necrotic and apoptotic mechanisms. The similar potencies and similar time-response relationships between LDH efflux and caspase-3 activation/nuclear condensation suggested that both necrosis and apoptosis may derive from interaction with a common molecular target. The broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK completely inhibited hoiamide A-induced neurotoxicity. Additionally, hoiamide A stimulated JNK phosphorylation, and a JNK inhibitor attenuated hoiamide A-induced neurotoxicity. Collectively, these data demonstrate that hoiamide A-induced neuronal death requires both JNK and caspase signaling pathways. The potent neurotoxicity and unique neuronal cell death profile of hoiamide A represents a novel neurotoxic chemotype from marine cyanobacteria. PMID:25675001

  12. Mechanisms involved in Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens removal during activated sludge wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Orruño, Maite; Garaizabal, Idoia; Bravo, Zaloa; Parada, Claudia; Barcina, Isabel; Arana, Inés

    2014-10-01

    Wastewater treatment reduces environmental contamination by removing gross solids and mitigating the effects of pollution. Treatment also reduces the number of indicator organisms and pathogens. In this work, the fates of two coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens, were analyzed in an activated sludge process to determine the main mechanisms involved in the reduction of pathogenic microorganisms during wastewater treatment. These bacteria, modified to express green fluorescent protein, were inoculated in an activated sludge unit and in batch systems containing wastewater. The results suggested that, among the different biological factors implied in bacterial removal, bacterivorous protozoa play a key role. Moreover, a representative number of bacteria persisted in the system as free-living or embedded cells, but their distribution into liquid or solid fractions varied depending on the bacterium tested, questioning the real value of bacterial indicators for the control of wastewater treatment process. Additionally, viable but nonculturable cells constituted an important part of the bacterial population adhered to solid fractions, what can be derived from the competition relationships with native bacteria, present in high densities in this environment. These facts, taken together, emphasize the need for reliable quantitative and qualitative analysis tools for the evaluation of pathogenic microbial composition in sludge, which could represent an undefined risk to public health and ecosystem functions when considering its recycling. PMID:25044599

  13. HSP27 Alleviates Cardiac Aging in Mice via a Mechanism Involving Antioxidation and Mitophagy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shenglan; Wang, Yana; Zhang, Xiaojin; Kong, Qiuyue; Li, Chuanfu; Li, Yuehua; Ding, Zhengnian

    2016-01-01

    Aging-induced cardiac dysfunction is a prominent feature of cardiac aging. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) protects cardiac function against ischemia or chemical challenge. We hypothesized that HSP27 attenuates cardiac aging. Transgenic (Tg) mice with cardiac-specific expression of the HSP27 gene and wild-type (WT) littermates were employed in the experiments. Echocardiography revealed a significant decline in the cardiac function of old WT mice compared with young WT mice. In striking contrast, the aging-induced impairment of cardiac function was attenuated in old Tg mice compared with old WT mice. Levels of cardiac aging markers were lower in old Tg mouse hearts than in old WT mouse hearts. Less interstitial fibrosis and lower contents of reactive oxygen species and ubiquitin-conjugated proteins were detected in old Tg hearts than in old WT hearts. Furthermore, old Tg hearts demonstrated lower accumulation of LC3-II and p62 than old WT hearts. Levels of Atg13, Vps34, and Rab7 were also higher in old Tg hearts than in old WT hearts. Additionally, old Tg hearts had higher levels of PINK1 and Parkin than old WT hearts, suggesting that mitophagy was activated in old Tg hearts. Taken together, HSP27 alleviated cardiac aging and this action involved antioxidation and mitophagy activation. PMID:27110324

  14. Involvement of BimL activation in apoptosis induced by lysosomal photodamage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Wang, Xianwang; Li, Hui

    2008-12-01

    Lysosomal photosensitizers have been used in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Combination of such photosensitizers and light causes lysosomal photodamage, inducing cell death. The lysosomal disruption can lead to apoptosis but its signaling pathways remain to be elucidated. In this study, we selected N-aspartyl chlorin e6 (NPe6), an effective photosensitizer which preferentially accumulates in lysosomes, to study the mechanism of apoptosis caused by lysosomal photodamage. Apoptosis in living human lung adenocarcinoma cells treated by NPe6-PDT was studied using real-time single-cell analysis. Confocal imaging of cells transfected with BimL-GFP demonstrated that BimL translocated to mitochondria after NPe6-PDT treatment for about 150 min, and then sequestered into clusters associated with the mitochondira within 30 min. The activation of BimL proved to be an important event in the apoptotic machinery, as demonstrated by the significant protection of cell death in samples suppressed the expression level of endogenous BimL. This study demonstrates that BimL activation was involved in the cell death induced by PDT with lysosomal photosensitizer.

  15. Intrinsic plasma fibrinolysis: involvement of urokinase-related activity in the factor XII-independent plasminogen proactivator pathway.

    PubMed

    Kluft, C; Wijngaards, G; Jie, A F

    1984-03-01

    A portion of human blood fibrinolytic activity can be quenched by antibodies to urokinase. We attempted to identify this portion and its position in the three pathways (extrinsic, intrinsic factor XII dependent, and intrinsic factor XII independent) of plasminogen activator activity that have been defined in the DEFs of plasma. Activity quenching in various plasmas (including plasma adsorbed by agarose-bound AUK) demonstrated the involvement of a discrete activator activity of 40 to 50 BAU/ml with little variation among individuals (43 +/- 6 (SD) BAU/ml, n = 13). The quenching did not involve, quantitatively or qualitatively, the extrinsic (tissue-type) plasminogen activator activity varying between 1 and 146 BAU/ml in baseline plasma and in plasma obtained after stimulation by venous occlusion, exercise, or DDAVP administration. In confirmation, extrinsic activator activity was recovered in plasma adsorbed by agarose-bound AUK. The quenching also did not involve the factor XII-dependent activities; it was quantitatively normal in plasma with Hageman (n = 3) and Fletcher (n = 2) traits, and AUK did not interfere with the generation of factor XII-dependent fibrinolytic activity by addition of purified activated factor XII in plasma with Hageman trait. There was no effect of AUK on kallikrein generation, kallikrein activities, or the APPT, nor were these aspects altered in depleted plasma. In conclusion, the quenching involved the factor XII-independent system of intrinsic fibrinolysis. Addition of purified urinary urokinase did not result in restoration of missing activity in plasma adsorbed by AUK-agarose. The quenching, therefore, probably involved an apparent urokinase-related activator component in plasma. PMID:6199446

  16. Modulation of NCC activity by low and high K+ intake: insights into the signaling pathways involved

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda-Bueno, María; Cervantes-Perez, Luz Graciela; Rojas-Vega, Lorena; Arroyo-Garza, Isidora; Vázquez, Norma; Moreno, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of Na+-Cl− cotransporter (NCC) activity is essential to adjust K+ excretion in the face of changes in dietary K+ intake. We used previously characterized genetic mouse models to assess the role of Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) and with-no-lysine kinase (WNK)4 in the modulation of NCC by K+ diets. SPAK knockin and WNK4 knockout mice were placed on normal-, low-, or high-K+-citrate diets for 4 days. The low-K+ diet decreased and high-K+ diet increased plasma aldosterone levels, but both diets were associated with increased phosphorylation of NCC (phospho-NCC, Thr44/Thr48/Thr53) and phosphorylation of SPAK/oxidative stress responsive kinase 1 (phospho-SPAK/OSR1, Ser383/Ser325). The effect of the low-K+ diet on SPAK phosphorylation persisted in WNK4 knockout and SPAK knockin mice, whereas the effects of ANG II on NCC and SPAK were lost in both mouse colonies. This suggests that for NCC activation by ANG II, integrity of the WNK4/SPAK pathway is required, whereas for the low-K+ diet, SPAK phosphorylation occurred despite the absence of WNK4, suggesting the involvement of another WNK (WNK1 or WNK3). Additionally, because NCC activation also occurred in SPAK knockin mice, it is possible that loss of SPAK was compensated by OSR1. The positive effect of the high-K+ diet was observed when the accompanying anion was citrate, whereas the high-KCl diet reduced NCC phosphorylation. However, the effect of the high-K+-citrate diet was aldosterone dependent, and neither metabolic alkalosis induced by bicarbonate, nor citrate administration in the absence of K+ increased NCC phosphorylation, suggesting that it was not due to citrate-induced metabolic alkalosis. Thus, the accompanying anion might modulate the NCC response to the high-K+ diet. PMID:24761002

  17. Involvement of IL-1 in the Maintenance of Masseter Muscle Activity and Glucose Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Ko; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Koide, Masashi; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Keiichi; Hattori, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Makoto; Sugawara, Shunji; Kanzaki, Makoto; Endo, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise reportedly stimulates IL-1 production within working skeletal muscles, but its physiological significance remains unknown due to the existence of two distinct IL-1 isoforms, IL-1? and IL-1?. The regulatory complexities of these two isoforms, in terms of which cells in muscles produce them and their distinct/redundant biological actions, have yet to be elucidated. Taking advantage of our masticatory behavior (Restrained/Gnawing) model, we herein show that IL-1?/1?-double-knockout (IL-1-KO) mice exhibit compromised masseter muscle (MM) activity which is at least partially attributable to abnormalities of glucose handling (rapid glycogen depletion along with impaired glucose uptake) and dysfunction of IL-6 upregulation in working MMs. In wild-type mice, masticatory behavior clearly increased IL-1? mRNA expression but no incremental protein abundance was detectable in whole MM homogenates, whereas immunohistochemical staining analysis revealed that both IL-1?- and IL-1?-immunopositive cells were recruited around blood vessels in the perimysium of MMs after masticatory behavior. In addition to the aforementioned phenotype of IL-1-KO mice, we found the IL-6 mRNA and protein levels in MMs after masticatory behavior to be significantly lower in IL-1-KO than in WT. Thus, our findings confirm that the locally-increased IL-1 elicited by masticatory behavior, although present small in amounts, contributes to supporting MM activity by maintaining normal glucose homeostasis in these muscles. Our data also underscore the importance of IL-1-mediated local interplay between autocrine myokines including IL-6 and paracrine cytokines in active skeletal muscles. This interplay is directly involved in MM performance and fatigability, perhaps mediated through maintaining muscular glucose homeostasis. PMID:26599867

  18. Involvement of IL-1 in the Maintenance of Masseter Muscle Activity and Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Ko; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Koide, Masashi; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Keiichi; Hattori, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Makoto; Sugawara, Shunji; Kanzaki, Makoto; Endo, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise reportedly stimulates IL-1 production within working skeletal muscles, but its physiological significance remains unknown due to the existence of two distinct IL-1 isoforms, IL-1α and IL-1β. The regulatory complexities of these two isoforms, in terms of which cells in muscles produce them and their distinct/redundant biological actions, have yet to be elucidated. Taking advantage of our masticatory behavior (Restrained/Gnawing) model, we herein show that IL-1α/1β-double-knockout (IL-1-KO) mice exhibit compromised masseter muscle (MM) activity which is at least partially attributable to abnormalities of glucose handling (rapid glycogen depletion along with impaired glucose uptake) and dysfunction of IL-6 upregulation in working MMs. In wild-type mice, masticatory behavior clearly increased IL-1β mRNA expression but no incremental protein abundance was detectable in whole MM homogenates, whereas immunohistochemical staining analysis revealed that both IL-1α- and IL-1β-immunopositive cells were recruited around blood vessels in the perimysium of MMs after masticatory behavior. In addition to the aforementioned phenotype of IL-1-KO mice, we found the IL-6 mRNA and protein levels in MMs after masticatory behavior to be significantly lower in IL-1-KO than in WT. Thus, our findings confirm that the locally-increased IL-1 elicited by masticatory behavior, although present small in amounts, contributes to supporting MM activity by maintaining normal glucose homeostasis in these muscles. Our data also underscore the importance of IL-1-mediated local interplay between autocrine myokines including IL-6 and paracrine cytokines in active skeletal muscles. This interplay is directly involved in MM performance and fatigability, perhaps mediated through maintaining muscular glucose homeostasis. PMID:26599867

  19. Nelfinavir and other protease inhibitors in cancer: mechanisms involved in anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Koltai, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To review the mechanisms of anti-cancer activity of nelfinavir and other protease inhibitors (PIs) based on evidences reported in the published literature. Methods: We extensively reviewed the literature concerning nelfinavir (NFV) as an off target anti-cancer drug and other PIs. A classification of PIs based on anti-cancer mode of action was proposed. Controversies regarding nelfinavir mode of action were also addressed. Conclusions: The two main mechanisms involved in anti-cancer activity are endoplasmic reticulum stress-unfolded protein response pathway and Akt inhibition. However there are many other effects, partially dependent and independent of those mentioned, that may be useful in cancer treatment, including MMP-9 and MMP-2 inhibition, down-regulation of CDK-2, VEGF, bFGF, NF-kB, STAT-3, HIF-1 alfa, IGF, EGFR, survivin, BCRP, androgen receptor, proteasome, fatty acid synthase (FAS), decrease in cellular ATP concentration and upregulation of TRAIL receptor DR5, Bax, increased radiosensitivity, and autophagy. The end result of all these effects is slower growth, decreased angiogenesis, decreased invasion and increased apoptosis, which means reduced proliferation and increased cancer cells death. PIs may be classified according to their anticancer activity at clinically achievable doses, in AKT inhibitors, ER stressors and Akt inhibitors/ER stressors. Beyond the phase I trials that have been recently completed, adequately powered and well-designed clinical trials are needed in the various cancer type settings, and specific trials where NFV is tested in association with other known anti-cancer pharmaceuticals should be sought, in order to find an appropriate place for NFV in cancer treatment. The analysis of controversies on the molecular mechanisms of NFV hints to the possibility that NFV works in a different way in tumor cells and in hepatocytes and adipocytes. PMID:26097685

  20. Autophagy activation by interferon-γ via the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathway is involved in macrophage bactericidal activity

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzawa, Takeshi; Fujiwara, Eri; Washi, Yui

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are involved in many essential immune functions. Their role in cell-autonomous innate immunity is reinforced by interferon-γ (IFN-γ), which is mainly secreted by proliferating type 1 T helper cells and natural killer cells. Previously, we showed that IFN-γ activates autophagy via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), but the biological importance of this signalling pathway has not been clear. Here, we found that macrophage bactericidal activity increased by 4 hr after IFN-γ stimulation. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) is a major downstream effector of the Janus kinase–signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 signalling pathway that contributes to macrophage bactericidal activity via nitric oxide (NO) generation. However, no NO generation was observed after 4 hr of IFN-γ stimulation, and macrophage bactericidal activity at early stages after IFN-γ stimulation was not affected by the NOS inhibitors, NG-methyl-l-arginine acetate salt and diphenyleneiodonium chloride. These results suggest that an NOS2-independent signalling pathway is involved in IFN-γ-mediated bactericidal activity. We also found that this macrophage activity was attenuated by the addition of the p38 MAPK inhibitors, PD 169316, SB 202190, and SB 203580, or by the expression of short hairpin RNA against p38α or the essential factors for autophagy, Atg5 and Atg7. Collectively, our results suggest that the IFN-γ-mediated autophagy via p38 MAPK, without the involvement of NOS2, also contributes to the ability of macrophages to kill intracellular bacteria. These observations provide direct evidence that p38 MAPK-mediated autophagy can support IFN-γ-mediated cell-autonomous innate immunity. PMID:24032631

  1. GSE Is a Maternal Factor Involved in Active DNA Demethylation in Zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Hatanaka, Yuki; Shimizu, Natsumi; Nishikawa, Satoshi; Tokoro, Mikiko; Shin, Seung-Wook; Nishihara, Takuji; Amano, Tomoko; Anzai, Masayuki; Kato, Hiromi; Mitani, Tasuku; Hosoi, Yoshihiko; Kishigami, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Kazuya

    2013-01-01

    After fertilization, the sperm and oocyte genomes undergo extensive epigenetic reprogramming to form a totipotent zygote. The dynamic epigenetic changes during early embryo development primarily involve DNA methylation and demethylation. We have previously identified Gse (gonad-specific expression gene) to be expressed specifically in germ cells and early embryos. Its encoded protein GSE is predominantly localized in the nuclei of cells from the zygote to blastocyst stages, suggesting possible roles in the epigenetic changes occurring during early embryo development. Here, we report the involvement of GSE in epigenetic reprogramming of the paternal genome during mouse zygote development. Preferential binding of GSE to the paternal chromatin was observed from pronuclear stage 2 (PN2) onward. A knockdown of GSE by antisense RNA in oocytes produced no apparent effect on the first and second cell cycles in preimplantation embryos, but caused a significant reduction in the loss of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and the accumulation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) in the paternal pronucleus. Furthermore, DNA methylation levels in CpG sites of LINE1 transposable elements, Lemd1, Nanog and the upstream regulatory region of the Oct4 (also known as Pou5f1) gene were clearly increased in GSE-knockdown zygotes at mid-pronuclear stages (PN3-4), but the imprinted H19-differential methylated region was not affected. Importantly, DNA immunoprecipitation of 5mC and 5hmC also indicates that knockdown of GSE in zygotes resulted in a significant reduction of the conversion of 5mC to 5hmC on LINE1. Therefore, our results suggest an important role of maternal GSE for mediating active DNA demethylation in the zygote. PMID:23560077

  2. Mothers' and Fathers' Involvement in Home Activities with Their Children: Psychosocial Factors and the Role of Parental Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giallo, Rebecca; Treyvaud, Karli; Cooklin, Amanda; Wade, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Parent involvement in play, learning, and everyday home activities is important for promoting children's cognitive and language development. The aims of the study were to (a) examine differences between mothers' and fathers' self-reported involvement with their children, (b) explore the relationship between child, parent and family factors, and…

  3. Summary of Epidemiology Studies or Activities Involving Workers at the Savannah River Site or the Surrounding Public: An Update

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.T.

    2002-10-18

    There have been numerous health studies or related activities over time that have involved workers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) or the surrounding public. While most of these epidemiology studies or activities have been performed by external agencies, it has proved useful to provide interested parties an overall summary of such activities. The first such summary was provided in an October 1998 report. The 1998 summary was updated in a February 2000 report. This report provides an update on the status or findings of epidemiology studies or activities involving SRS workers or the surrounding public, as an update to the previous summaries.

  4. Cocaine-mediated microglial activation involves the ER stress-autophagy axis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ming-Lei; Liao, Ke; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Yang, Lu; Cai, Yu; Callen, Shannon E; Buch, Shilpa

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine abuse leads to neuroinflammation, which, in turn, contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration associated with advanced HIV-1 infection. Autophagy plays important roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. However, the possible functional link between cocaine and autophagy has not been explored before. Herein, we demonstrate that cocaine exposure induced autophagy in both BV-2 and primary rat microglial cells as demonstrated by a dose- and time-dependent induction of autophagy-signature proteins such as BECN1/Beclin 1, ATG5, and MAP1LC3B. These findings were validated wherein cocaine treatment of BV-2 cells resulted in increased formation of puncta in cells expressing either endogenous MAP1LC3B or overexpressing GFP-MAP1LC3B. Specificity of cocaine-induced autophagy was confirmed by treating cells with inhibitors of autophagy (3-MA and wortmannin). Intriguingly, cocaine-mediated induction of autophagy involved upstream activation of 2 ER stress pathways (EIF2AK3- and ERN1-dependent), as evidenced by the ability of the ER stress inhibitor salubrinal to ameliorate cocaine-induced autophagy. In vivo validation of these findings demonstrated increased expression of BECN1, ATG5, and MAP1LC3B-II proteins in cocaine-treated mouse brains compared to untreated animals. Increased autophagy contributes to cocaine-mediated activation of microglia since pretreatment of cells with wortmannin resulted in decreased expression and release of inflammatory factors (TNF, IL1B, IL6, and CCL2) in microglial cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that cocaine exposure results in induction of autophagy that is closely linked with neuroinflammation. Targeting autophagic proteins could thus be considered as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cocaine-related neuroinflammation diseases. PMID:26043790

  5. Evidence for the Involvement of p38 MAPK Activation in Barnacle Larval Settlement

    PubMed Central

    He, Li-Sheng; Xu, Ying; Matsumura, Kiyotaka; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Gen; Qi, Shu-Hua; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The barnacle Balanus ( = Amphibalanus) amphitrite is a major marine fouling animal. Understanding the molecular mechanism of larval settlement in this species is critical for anti-fouling research. In this study, we cloned one isoform of p38 MAPK (Bar-p38 MAPK) from this species, which shares the significant characteristic of containing a TGY motif with other species such as yeast, Drosophila and humans. The activation of p38 MAPK was detected by an antibody that recognizes the conserved dual phosphorylation sites of TGY. The results showed that phospho-p38 MAPK (pp38 MAPK) was more highly expressed at the cyprid stage, particularly in aged cyprids, in comparison to other stages, including the nauplius and juvenile stages. Immunostaining showed that Bar-p38 MAPK and pp38 MAPK were mainly located at the cyprid antennules, and especially the third and fourth segments, which are responsible for substratum exploration during settlement. The expression and localization patterns of Bar-p38 MAPK suggest its involvement in larval settlement. This postulation was also supported by the larval settlement bioassay with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. Behavioral analysis by live imaging revealed that the larvae were still capable of exploring the surface of the substratum after SB203580 treatment. This shows that the effect of p38 MAPK on larval settlement might be by regulating the secretion of permanent proteinaceous substances. Furthermore, the level of pp38 MAPK dramatically decreased after full settlement, suggesting that Bar-p38 MAPK maybe plays a role in larval settlement rather than metamorphosis. Finally, we found that Bar-p38 MAPK was highly activated when larvae confronted extracts of adult barnacle containing settlement cues, whereas larvae pre-treated with SB203580 failed to respond to the crude adult extracts. PMID:23115639

  6. Evidence for the involvement of p38 MAPK activation in barnacle larval settlement.

    PubMed

    He, Li-Sheng; Xu, Ying; Matsumura, Kiyotaka; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Gen; Qi, Shu-Hua; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The barnacle Balanus ( = Amphibalanus) amphitrite is a major marine fouling animal. Understanding the molecular mechanism of larval settlement in this species is critical for anti-fouling research. In this study, we cloned one isoform of p38 MAPK (Bar-p38 MAPK) from this species, which shares the significant characteristic of containing a TGY motif with other species such as yeast, Drosophila and humans. The activation of p38 MAPK was detected by an antibody that recognizes the conserved dual phosphorylation sites of TGY. The results showed that phospho-p38 MAPK (pp38 MAPK) was more highly expressed at the cyprid stage, particularly in aged cyprids, in comparison to other stages, including the nauplius and juvenile stages. Immunostaining showed that Bar-p38 MAPK and pp38 MAPK were mainly located at the cyprid antennules, and especially the third and fourth segments, which are responsible for substratum exploration during settlement. The expression and localization patterns of Bar-p38 MAPK suggest its involvement in larval settlement. This postulation was also supported by the larval settlement bioassay with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. Behavioral analysis by live imaging revealed that the larvae were still capable of exploring the surface of the substratum after SB203580 treatment. This shows that the effect of p38 MAPK on larval settlement might be by regulating the secretion of permanent proteinaceous substances. Furthermore, the level of pp38 MAPK dramatically decreased after full settlement, suggesting that Bar-p38 MAPK maybe plays a role in larval settlement rather than metamorphosis. Finally, we found that Bar-p38 MAPK was highly activated when larvae confronted extracts of adult barnacle containing settlement cues, whereas larvae pre-treated with SB203580 failed to respond to the crude adult extracts. PMID:23115639

  7. Lack of Involvement of CEP Adducts in TLR Activation and in Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gounarides, John; Cobb, Jennifer S.; Zhou, Jing; Cook, Frank; Yang, Xuemei; Yin, Hong; Meredith, Erik; Rao, Chang; Huang, Qian; Xu, YongYao; Anderson, Karen; De Erkenez, Andrea; Liao, Sha-Mei; Crowley, Maura; Buchanan, Natasha; Poor, Stephen; Qiu, Yubin; Fassbender, Elizabeth; Shen, Siyuan; Woolfenden, Amber; Jensen, Amy; Cepeda, Rosemarie; Etemad-Gilbertson, Bijan; Giza, Shelby; Mogi, Muneto; Jaffee, Bruce; Azarian, Sassan

    2014-01-01

    Proteins that are post-translationally adducted with 2-(ω-carboxyethyl)pyrrole (CEP) have been proposed to play a pathogenic role in age-related macular degeneration, by inducing angiogenesis in a Toll Like Receptor 2 (TLR2)-dependent manner. We have investigated the involvement of CEP adducts in angiogenesis and TLR activation, to assess the therapeutic potential of inhibiting CEP adducts and TLR2 for ocular angiogenesis. As tool reagents, several CEP-adducted proteins and peptides were synthetically generated by published methodology and adduction was confirmed by NMR and LC-MS/MS analyses. Structural studies showed significant changes in secondary structure in CEP-adducted proteins but not the untreated proteins. Similar structural changes were also observed in the treated unadducted proteins, which were treated by the same adduction method except for one critical step required to form the CEP group. Thus some structural changes were unrelated to CEP groups and were artificially induced by the synthesis method. In biological studies, the CEP-adducted proteins and peptides failed to activate TLR2 in cell-based assays and in an in vivo TLR2-mediated retinal leukocyte infiltration model. Neither CEP adducts nor TLR agonists were able to induce angiogenesis in a tube formation assay. In vivo, treatment of animals with CEP-adducted protein had no effect on laser-induced choroidal neovascularization. Furthermore, in vivo inactivation of TLR2 by deficiency in Myeloid Differentiation factor 88 (Myd88) had no effect on abrasion-induced corneal neovascularization. Thus the CEP-TLR2 axis, which is implicated in other wound angiogenesis models, does not appear to play a pathological role in a corneal wound angiogenesis model. Collectively, our data do not support the mechanism of action of CEP adducts in TLR2-mediated angiogenesis proposed by others. PMID:25343517

  8. Utilization of iron-catecholamine complexes involving ferric reductase activity in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Coulanges, V; Andre, P; Ziegler, O; Buchheit, L; Vidon, D J

    1997-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous potentially pathogenic organism requiring iron for growth and virulence. Although it does not produce siderophores, L. monocytogenes is able to obtain iron by using either exogenous siderophores produced by various microorganisms or natural catechol compounds widespread in the environment. In the presence of tropolone, an iron-chelating agent, growth of L. monocytogenes is completely inhibited. However, the growth inhibition can be relieved by the addition of dopamine or norepinephrine under their different isomeric forms, while the catecholamine derivatives 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol and normetanephrine did not relieve the inhibitory effect of tropolone. Preincubation of L. monocytogenes with chlorpromazine and yohimbine did not antagonize the growth-promoting effect of catecholamines in iron-complexed medium. In addition, norepinephrine stimulated the growth-promoting effect induced by human transferrin in iron-limited medium. Furthermore, dopamine and norepinephrine allowed 55Fe uptake by iron-deprived bacterial cells. The uptake of iron was energy dependent, as indicated by inhibition of 55Fe uptake at 0 degrees C as well as by preincubating the bacteria with KCN. Inhibition of 55Fe uptake by L. monocytogenes was also observed in the presence of Pt(II). Moreover, when assessed by a whole-cell ferric reductase assay, reductase activity of L. monocytogenes was inhibited by Pt(II). These data demonstrate that dopamine and norepinephrine can function as siderophore-like compounds in L. monocytogenes owing to their ortho-diphenol function and that catecholamine-mediated iron acquisition does not involve specific catecholamine receptors but acts through a cell-bound ferrireductase activity. PMID:9199450

  9. Involvement of plant endogenous ABA in Bacillus megaterium PGPR activity in tomato plants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are naturally occurring soil bacteria which benefit plants by improving plant productivity and immunity. The mechanisms involved in these processes include the regulation of plant hormone levels such as ethylene and abscisic acid (ABA). The aim of the present study was to determine whether the activity of Bacillus megaterium PGPR is affected by the endogenous ABA content of the host plant. The ABA-deficient tomato mutants flacca and sitiens and their near-isogenic wild-type parental lines were used. Growth, stomatal conductance, shoot hormone concentration, competition assay for colonization of tomato root tips, and root expression of plant genes expected to be modulated by ABA and PGPR were examined. Results Contrary to the wild-type plants in which PGPR stimulated growth rates, PGPR caused growth inhibition in ABA-deficient mutant plants. PGPR also triggered an over accumulation of ethylene in ABA-deficient plants which correlated with a higher expression of the pathogenesis-related gene Sl-PR1b. Conclusions Positive correlation between over-accumulation of ethylene and a higher expression of Sl-PR1b in ABA-deficient mutant plants could indicate that maintenance of normal plant endogenous ABA content may be essential for the growth promoting action of B. megaterium by keeping low levels of ethylene production. PMID:24460926

  10. Current Practice of Public Involvement Activities in Biomedical Research and Innovation: A Systematic Qualitative Review

    PubMed Central

    Lander, Jonas; Hainz, Tobias; Hirschberg, Irene; Strech, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background A recent report from the British Nuffield Council on Bioethics associated ‘emerging biotechnologies’ with a threefold challenge: 1) uncertainty about outcomes, 2) diverse public views on the values and implications attached to biotechnologies and 3) the possibility of creating radical changes regarding societal relations and practices. To address these challenges, leading international institutions stress the need for public involvement activities (PIAs). The objective of this study was to assess the state of PIA reports in the field of biomedical research. Methods PIA reports were identified via a systematic literature search. Thematic text analysis was employed for data extraction. Results After filtering, 35 public consultation and 11 public participation studies were included in this review. Analysis and synthesis of all 46 PIA studies resulted in 6 distinguishable PIA objectives and 37 corresponding PIA methods. Reports of outcome translation and PIA evaluation were found in 9 and 10 studies respectively (20% and 22%). The paper presents qualitative details. Discussion The state of PIAs on biomedical research and innovation is characterized by a broad range of methods and awkward variation in the wording of objectives. Better comparability of PIAs might improve the translation of PIA findings into further policy development. PIA-specific reporting guidelines would help in this regard. The modest level of translation efforts is another pointer to the “deliberation to policy gap”. The results of this review could inform the design of new PIAs and future efforts to improve PIA comparability and outcome translation. PMID:25469705

  11. Nanometer Scale Titanium Surface Texturing Are Detected by Signaling Pathways Involving Transient FAK and Src Activations

    PubMed Central

    Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Bonfante, Estevam A.; Jimbo, Ryo; Hayashi, Mariko; Andersson, Martin; Alves, Gutemberg; Takamori, Esther R.; Beltrão, Paulo J.; Coelho, Paulo G.; Granjeiro, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is known that physico/chemical alterations on biomaterial surfaces have the capability to modulate cellular behavior, affecting early tissue repair. Such surface modifications are aimed to improve early healing response and, clinically, offer the possibility to shorten the time from implant placement to functional loading. Since FAK and Src are intracellular proteins able to predict the quality of osteoblast adhesion, this study evaluated the osteoblast behavior in response to nanometer scale titanium surface texturing by monitoring FAK and Src phosphorylations. Methodology Four engineered titanium surfaces were used for the study: machined (M), dual acid-etched (DAA), resorbable media microblasted and acid-etched (MBAA), and acid-etch microblasted (AAMB). Surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thereafter, those 4 samples were used to evaluate their cytotoxicity and interference on FAK and Src phosphorylations. Both Src and FAK were investigated by using specific antibody against specific phosphorylation sites. Principal Findings The results showed that both FAK and Src activations were differently modulated as a function of titanium surfaces physico/chemical configuration and protein adsorption. Conclusions It can be suggested that signaling pathways involving both FAK and Src could provide biomarkers to predict osteoblast adhesion onto different surfaces. PMID:24999733

  12. Water-soluble chlorophyll protein is involved in herbivore resistance activation during greening of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Reinbothe, Steffen; Reinbothe, Christiane

    2015-06-01

    Water-soluble chlorophyll proteins (WSCPs) constitute a small family of unusual chlorophyll (Chl)-binding proteins that possess a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor domain. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a WSCP has been identified, named AtWSCP, that forms complexes with Chl and the Chl precursor chlorophyllide (Chlide) in vitro. AtWSCP exhibits a quite unexpected expression pattern for a Chl binding protein and accumulated to high levels in the apical hook of etiolated plants. AtWSCP expression was negatively light-regulated. Transgenic expression of AtWSCP fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) revealed that AtWSCP is localized to cell walls/apoplastic spaces. Biochemical assays identified AtWSCP as interacting with RD21 (responsive to desiccation 21), a granulin domain-containing cysteine protease implicated in stress responses and defense. Reconstitution experiments showed tight interactions between RD21 and WSCP that were relieved upon Chlide binding. Laboratory feeding experiments with two herbivorous isopod crustaceans, Porcellio scaber (woodlouse) and Armadillidium vulgare (pillbug), identified the apical hook as Achilles' heel of etiolated plants and that this was protected by RD21 during greening. Because Chlide is formed in the apical hook during seedling emergence from the soil, our data suggest an unprecedented mechanism of herbivore resistance activation that is triggered by light and involves AtWSCP. PMID:26016527

  13. Whole genome sequencing of glioblastoma multiforme identifies multiple structural variations involved in EGFR activation

    PubMed Central

    Furgason, John M.; Li, Wenge; Milholland, Brandon; Cross, Emily; Li, Yaqin; McPherson, Christopher M.; Warnick, Ronald E.; Rixe, Olivier; Stambrook, Peter J.; Vijg, Jan; Bahassi, El Mustapha

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing has become a powerful tool in dissecting and identifying mutations and genomic structural variants that accompany tumourigenesis. Sequence analysis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) illustrates the ability to rapidly identify mutations that may affect phenotype. Approximately 50% of human GBMs overexpress epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) which renders the EGFR protein a compelling therapeutic target. In brain tumours, attempts to target EGFR as a cancer therapeutic, however, have achieved little or no benefit. The mechanisms that drive therapeutic resistance to EGFR inhibitors in brain tumours are not well defined, and drug resistance contributes to the deadly and aggressive nature of the disease. Whole genome sequencing of four primary GBMs revealed multiple pathways by which EGFR protein abundance becomes deregulated in these tumours and will guide the development of new strategies for treating EGFR overexpressing tumours. Each of the four tumours displayed a different mechanism leading to increased EGFR protein levels. One mechanism is mediated by gene amplification and tandem duplication of the kinase domain. A second involves an intragenic deletion that generates a constitutively active form of the protein. A third combines the loss of a gene which encodes a protein that regulates EGFR abundance as well as an miRNA that modulates EGFR expression. A fourth mechanism entails loss of an ubiquitin ligase docking site in the C-terminal part of the protein whose absence inhibits turnover of the receptor. PMID:25103728

  14. Whole genome sequencing of glioblastoma multiforme identifies multiple structural variations involved in EGFR activation.

    PubMed

    Furgason, John M; Li, Wenge; Milholland, Brandon; Cross, Emily; Li, Yaqin; McPherson, Christopher M; Warnick, Ronald E; Rixe, Olivier; Stambrook, Peter J; Vijg, Jan; Bahassi, El Mustapha

    2014-09-01

    Next generation sequencing has become a powerful tool in dissecting and identifying mutations and genomic structural variants that accompany tumourigenesis. Sequence analysis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) illustrates the ability to rapidly identify mutations that may affect phenotype. Approximately 50% of human GBMs overexpress epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) which renders the EGFR protein a compelling therapeutic target. In brain tumours, attempts to target EGFR as a cancer therapeutic, however, have achieved little or no benefit. The mechanisms that drive therapeutic resistance to EGFR inhibitors in brain tumours are not well defined, and drug resistance contributes to the deadly and aggressive nature of the disease. Whole genome sequencing of four primary GBMs revealed multiple pathways by which EGFR protein abundance becomes deregulated in these tumours and will guide the development of new strategies for treating EGFR overexpressing tumours. Each of the four tumours displayed a different mechanism leading to increased EGFR protein levels. One mechanism is mediated by gene amplification and tandem duplication of the kinase domain. A second involves an intragenic deletion that generates a constitutively active form of the protein. A third combines the loss of a gene which encodes a protein that regulates EGFR abundance as well as an miRNA that modulates EGFR expression. A fourth mechanism entails loss of an ubiquitin ligase docking site in the C-terminal part of the protein whose absence inhibits turnover of the receptor. PMID:25103728

  15. Reduced nucleic ZHX2 involves in oncogenic activation of glypican 3 in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Luan, Fang; Liu, Peng; Ma, Hongxin; Yue, Xuetian; Liu, Jun; Gao, Lifen; Liang, Xiaohong; Ma, Chunhong

    2014-10-01

    Glypican 3 (GPC3) has been paid particular attention owing to its potential as diagnosis marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Identifying the mechanisms regulating the reactivation of GPC3 in HCC appears to be clinically meaningful. Previous study identified zinc-fingers and homeoboxes 2 (ZHX2) as transcriptional factor responsible for postnatal repression of GPC3 in mice. Here, in this study, we provided the first evidence that down regulated ZHX2 is responsible for GPC3 reactivation in HCC. First, inverse correlation of ZHX2 with GPC3 expression was shown in cultured liver cell lines. Second, ZHX2 overexpression significantly decreased GPC3 expression, while ZHX2 knockdown effectively increased GPC3 level in different HCC cell lines. Consistently, dual luciferase and ChIP assay showed that ZHX2 dose-dependently suppressed GPC3 promoter activity by binding with the core promoter. More importantly, immunohistochemical staining demonstrated the inverse correlation between nuclear ZHX2 with GPC3 expression in HCC tissues. Further in vitro analysis showed that nuclear translocation was crucial for ZHX2 mediated repression on GPC3 transcription. Taken together, our results prove that ZHX2 suppresses GPC3 transcription by binding with its core promoter and reduced nucleic ZHX2 expression may be involved in GPC3 reactivation in HCC. PMID:25195714

  16. Involvement of Trichoderma Trichothecenes in the Biocontrol Activity and Induction of Plant Defense-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Malmierca, M. G.; Cardoza, R. E.; Alexander, N. J.; McCormick, S. P.; Hermosa, R.; Monte, E.

    2012-01-01

    Trichoderma species produce trichothecenes, most notably trichodermin and harzianum A (HA), by a biosynthetic pathway in which several of the involved proteins have significant differences in functionality compared to their Fusarium orthologues. In addition, the genes encoding these proteins show a genomic organization differing from that of the Fusarium tri clusters. Here we describe the isolation of Trichoderma arundinaceum IBT 40837 transformants which have a disrupted or silenced tri4 gene, a gene encoding a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase that oxygenates trichodiene to give rise to isotrichodiol, and the effect of tri4 gene disruption and silencing on the expression of other tri genes. Our results indicate that the tri4 gene disruption resulted in a reduced antifungal activity against Botrytis cinerea and Rhizoctonia solani and also in a reduced ability to induce the expression of tomato plant defense-related genes belonging to the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonate (JA) pathways against B. cinerea, in comparison to the wild-type strain, indicating that HA plays an important function in the sensitization of Trichoderma-pretreated plants against this fungal pathogen. Additionally, the effect of the interaction of T. arundinaceum with B. cinerea or R. solani and with tomato seedlings on the expressions of the tri genes was studied. PMID:22562989

  17. High hydrostatic pressure activates transcription factors involved in Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bravim, Fernanda; da Silva, Lucas F.; Souza, Diego T.; Lippman, Soyeon I.; Broach, James R.; Fernandes, A. Alberto R.; Fernandes, Patricia M, B.

    2016-01-01

    A number of transcriptional control elements are activated when Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells are submitted to various stress conditions, including high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). Exposure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to HHP results in global transcriptional reprogramming, similar to that observed under other industrial stresses, such as temperature, ethanol and oxidative stresses. Moreover, treatment with a mild hydrostatic pressure renders yeast cells multi-stress tolerant. In order to identify transcriptional factors involved in coordinating response to high hydrostatic pressure, we performed a time series microarray expression analysis on a wild S. cerevisiae strain exposed to 50 MPa for 30 min followed by recovery at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa) for 5, 10 and 15 min. We identified transcription factors and corresponding DNA and RNA motifs targeted in response to hydrostatic pressure. Moreover, we observed that different motif elements are present in the promoters of induced or repressed genes during HHP treatment. Overall, as we have already published, mild HHP treatment to wild yeast cells provides multiple protection mechanisms, and this study suggests that the TFs and motifs identified as responding to HHP may be informative for a wide range of other biotechnological and industrial applications, such as fermentation, that may utilize HHP treatment. PMID:23072392

  18. Hepatitis C Virus Infection Activates a Novel Innate Pathway Involving IKKα in Lipogenesis and Viral Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qisheng; Pène, Véronique; Krishnamurthy, Siddharth; Cha, Helen; Liang, T. Jake

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus interacts extensively with host factors not only to establish productive infection but also to trigger unique pathological processes. Our recent genome-wide siRNA screen demonstrated that IKKα is a critical host factor for HCV. Here we describe a novel NF-κB-independent and kinase-mediated nuclear function of IKKα in HCV assembly. HCV infection, through its 3’-untranslated region, interacts with DDX3X to activate IKKα, which translocates to the nucleus and induces a CBP/p300-mediated transcriptional program involving SREBPs. This novel innate pathway induces lipogenic genes and enhances core-associated lipid droplet formation to facilitate viral assembly. Chemical inhibitors of IKKα suppress HCV infection and IKKα-induced lipogenesis, offering a proof-of-concept approach for novel HCV therapeutic development. Our results show that HCV commands a novel mechanism to its advantage by exploiting intrinsic innate response and hijacking lipid metabolism, which likely contributes to a high chronicity rate and the pathological hallmark of steatosis in HCV infection. PMID:23708292

  19. Anionic phospholipids are involved in membrane association of FtsY and stimulate its GTPase activity

    PubMed Central

    de Leeuw, E.; te Kaat, K.; Moser, C.; Menestrina, G.; Demel, R.; de Kruijff, B.; Oudega, B.; Luirink, J.; Sinning, I.

    2000-01-01

    FtsY, the Escherichia coli homologue of the eukaryotic signal recognition particle (SRP) receptor α-subunit, is located in both the cytoplasm and inner membrane. It has been proposed that FtsY has a direct targeting function, but the mechanism of its association with the membrane is unclear. FtsY is composed of two hydrophilic domains: a highly charged N–terminal domain (the A–domain) and a C–terminal GTP-binding domain (the NG–domain). FtsY does not contain any hydrophobic sequence that might explain its affinity for the inner membrane, and a membrane-anchoring protein has not been detected. In this study, we provide evidence that FtsY interacts directly with E.coli phospholipids, with a preference for anionic phospholipids. The interaction involves at least two lipid-binding sites, one of which is present in the NG–domain. Lipid association induced a conformational change in FtsY and greatly enhanced its GTPase activity. We propose that lipid binding of FtsY is important for the regulation of SRP-mediated protein targeting. PMID:10675322

  20. Riboswitches that Sense S-adenosylhomocysteine and Activate Genes Involved in Coenzyme Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joy Xin; Lee, Elaine R.; Morales, Dianali Rivera; Lim, Jinsoo; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We have identified a highly conserved RNA motif that occurs upstream of genes involved in S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) recycling in many Gram-positive and Gram-negative species of bacteria. The phylogenetic distribution and the conserved structural features of representatives of this motif are indicative of riboswitch function. Riboswitches are widespread metabolite-sensing gene control elements that are typically found in the 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs) of bacterial mRNAs. We experimentally verified that examples of this RNA motif specifically recognize S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) in protein-free in vitro assays, and confirmed that these RNAs strongly discriminate against SAM and other closely related analogs. A representative SAH motif was found to activate expression of a downstream gene in vivo when the metabolite is bound. These observations confirm that SAH motif RNAs are distinct ligand-binding aptamers for a riboswitch class that selectively binds SAH and controls genes essential for recycling expended SAM coenzymes. PMID:18374645

  1. Water-soluble chlorophyll protein is involved in herbivore resistance activation during greening of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Reinbothe, Steffen; Reinbothe, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Water-soluble chlorophyll proteins (WSCPs) constitute a small family of unusual chlorophyll (Chl)-binding proteins that possess a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor domain. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a WSCP has been identified, named AtWSCP, that forms complexes with Chl and the Chl precursor chlorophyllide (Chlide) in vitro. AtWSCP exhibits a quite unexpected expression pattern for a Chl binding protein and accumulated to high levels in the apical hook of etiolated plants. AtWSCP expression was negatively light-regulated. Transgenic expression of AtWSCP fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) revealed that AtWSCP is localized to cell walls/apoplastic spaces. Biochemical assays identified AtWSCP as interacting with RD21 (RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION 21), a granulin domain-containing cysteine protease implicated in stress responses and defense. Reconstitution experiments showed tight interactions between RD21 and WSCP that were relieved upon Chlide binding. Laboratory feeding experiments with two herbivorous isopod crustaceans, Porcellio scaber (woodlouse) and Armadillidium vulgare (pillbug), identified the apical hook as Achilles’ heel of etiolated plants and that this was protected by RD21 during greening. Because Chlide is formed in the apical hook during seedling emergence from the soil, our data suggest an unprecedented mechanism of herbivore resistance activation that is triggered by light and involves AtWSCP. PMID:26016527

  2. Study of the possible mechanisms involved in the mucosal immune system activation by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Perdigón, G; Vintiñi, E; Alvarez, S; Medina, M; Medici, M

    1999-06-01

    The induction of a mucosal immune response is not easy due to the development of oral tolerance, but under some conditions, bacteria can activate this immune system. Antigens administered orally can interact with M cells of Peyer's patches or bind to the epithelial cells. We have demonstrated that certain lactic acid bacteria are able to induce specific secretory immunity, and others will enhance the gut inflammatory immune response. The aim of this work was to establish the reason for these different behaviors and to define possible mechanisms involved in the interaction of lactic acid bacteria at the intestinal level. We studied IgA+ and IgM+ B cells comparatively in bronchus and intestine and CD4+ T cells and IgA anti-lactic acid bacteria antibodies in the intestinal fluid, induced by oral administration of Lactobacillus casei, Lb. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, Lb. acidophilus, Lb. plantarum, Lb. rhamnosus, Lactococcus lactis, and Streptococcus salivarius ssp. thermophilus. The increase in the IgA+ B cells in the bronchus means that these lactic acid bacteria were able to induce the IgA cycle by interaction with M cells from Peyer's patches or intestinal epithelial cells. The IgM+ cells increased when the stimulus did not induce the switch from IgM+ to IgA+. The increase in the CD4+ cells suggests interaction of Peyer's patches and enhancement of the B- and T-cell migration. The anti-lactic acid bacteria antibody is related to the processing and presentation of the microorganisms to the immune cells. We demonstrated that Lb. casei and Lb. plantarum were able to interact with Peyer's patch cells and showed an increase in IgA-, CD4+ cells, and antibodies specific for the stimulating strain. Lactobacillus acidophilus induced gut mucosal activation by interaction with the epithelial cells without increase in the immune cells associated with the bronchus. Although Lb. rhamnosus and Strep. salivarius ssp. thermophilus interact with epithelial cells, they also induced an immune response against their epitopes. Lactococcus lactis and Lb. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus induced an increase of IgA+ cells entering the IgA cycle but not CD4+ cells; thus, these bacteria would have been bound to epithelial cells that activated B lymphocytes without processing and presenting of their epitopes. We did not determine specific antibodies against Lc. lactis or Lb. bulgaricus. PMID:10386296

  3. Understanding the Meaning African-American Men Give to Their Student Leadership Involvement and Engagement Activities in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Karl A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, phenomenological study was to explore and gain a deeper understanding of the lived experiences and perceptions of African-American (A-A) men who are persisting in college and who demonstrate participation in co-curricular activities defined as student leadership involvement and engagement activities (SLIEA). The

  4. Understanding the Meaning African-American Men Give to Their Student Leadership Involvement and Engagement Activities in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Karl A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, phenomenological study was to explore and gain a deeper understanding of the lived experiences and perceptions of African-American (A-A) men who are persisting in college and who demonstrate participation in co-curricular activities defined as student leadership involvement and engagement activities (SLIEA). The…

  5. 77 FR 31045 - Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities; In the Matter of Jaime Sánchez

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... under 10 CFR 2.315(c), must be filed in accordance with NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139, August 28, 2007... COMMISSION Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities; In the Matter of Jaime S nchez I Jaime S... limited to, those activities of Agreement State licensees conducted pursuant to the authority granted...

  6. The developmental and acute phases of insulin-induced laminitis involve minimal metalloproteinase activity.

    PubMed

    de Laat, M A; Kyaw-Tanner, M T; Nourian, A R; McGowan, C M; Sillence, M N; Pollitt, C C

    2011-04-15

    Metalloproteinases have been implicated in the pathogenesis of equine laminitis and other inflammatory conditions, through their role in the degradation and remodelling of the extracellular matrix environment. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors are present in normal equine lamellae, with increased secretion and activation of some metalloproteinases reported in horses with laminitis associated with systemic inflammation. It is unknown whether these enzymes are involved in insulin-induced laminitis, which occurs without overt systemic inflammation. In this study, gene expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, MT1-MMP, ADAMTS-4 and TIMP-3 was determined in the lamellar tissue of normal control horses (n=4) and horses that developed laminitis after 48 h of induced hyperinsulinaemia (n=4), using quantitative Real Time-Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR). Protein concentrations of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were also examined using gelatin zymography in horses subject to prolonged hyperinsulinaemia for 6h (n=4), 12h (n=4), 24h (n=4) and 48 h (n=4), and in normal control horses (n=4). The only change in gene expression observed was an upregulation of MMP-9 (p<0.05) in horses that developed insulin-induced laminitis (48 h). Zymographical analysis showed an increase (p<0.05) in pro MMP-9 during the acute phase of laminitis (48 h), whereas pro MMP-2 was present in similar concentration in the tissue of all horses. Thus, MMP-2, MT1-MMP, TIMP-3 and ADAMTS-4 do not appear to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of insulin-induced laminitis. The increased expression of MMP-9 may be associated with the infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes, or may be a direct result of hyperinsulinaemia. The exact role of MMP-9 in basement membrane degradation in laminitis is uncertain as it appears to be present largely in the inactive form. PMID:21333362

  7. Active involvement of people with intellectual disabilities in health research - A structured literature review.

    PubMed

    Frankena, Tessa Kim; Naaldenberg, Jenneken; Cardol, Mieke; Linehan, Christine; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny

    2015-01-01

    Actively involving people with intellectual disabilities (ID) in health research, also known as inclusive health research, is increasingly popular. Currently, insight into experiences of this type of research is scarce. To gain insight into this topic, a structured literature review was conducted focussing on (1) existing theories, (2) inclusive methods, (3) added value and (4) barriers and facilitators. Literature published between January 2000 and January 2014 was included covering keywords related to ID and inclusive health research. Searches were performed in Pubmed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE and MEDLINE databases, resulting in 26 included papers. Papers were quality assessed and analysed using qualitative data analysis software. Four theories were often simultaneously addressed: participatory research, emancipatory research, inclusive research and Arnstein's ladder. Barriers and facilitators could be divided into preparing, undertaking and finalising phases of research. Authors indicated that their motivation to conduct inclusive health research was based on demands by policy and funding bodies or was based on ethical considerations (i.e., ethical notions and giving people with ID a voice). Upon completion, authors perceived increased quality and validity of their research and several benefits for stakeholders (i.e., people with ID, researchers and healthcare professionals). Overall, there was consistency in their perception of the most important aspects of inclusive health research. Based on the analysis of included papers, four recommendations of inclusive health research with people with ID were found. Inclusive health research should be: (1) tailoring to the specific study; (2) anticipating all stakeholders; (3) considering its added value; and (4) providing insight into its process. PMID:26280692

  8. Involvement of the PPPGHR motif in T cell activation via CD2.

    PubMed

    Chang, H C; Moingeon, P; Pedersen, R; Lucich, J; Stebbins, C; Reinherz, E L

    1990-07-01

    Prior studies identified a segment of the CD2 cytoplasmic domain between amino acid (aa) residues 253 and 287 as important in T lymphocyte signal transduction. This region contains two repeats of the sequence motif PPPGHR, thought to form a "cage" structure involved in CD2-mediated signaling. To evaluate this segment, a series of mutant human CD2 molecules were produced by oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis and inserted into the ovalbumin-specific, I-Ad-restricted murine T-T hybridoma 3DO54.8 using the DOL retroviral system. CD2 M1 (271-272), CD2 M2 (278-279), and CD2 M4 (264-265) mutants replaced the positively charged adjacent aa histidine and arginine (HR) in the wild-type CD2 sequence with aspartic and glutamic acid (DE) at positions 271-272, 278-279, and 264-265, respectively. In addition, a truncation mutant, CD2 M3 (268), containing only 57 of the 117 cytoplasmic aa and terminating before the second PPPGHR sequence, was generated. Stimulation of transfectants CD2 FL, CD2 M1 (271-272), and CD2 M2 (278-279) with anti-T11(2) + anti-T11(3) antibodies resulted in a rise in cytosolic-free calcium [( Ca2+]i) and subsequent interleukin 2 (IL-2) secretion. In contrast, CD2 M4 (264-265) transfectants could not be activated in either assay. Thus, alteration of histidine 264 and/or arginine 265 within the first PPPGHR motif affects the process of signal transduction via CD2, whereas identical mutations in residues at 271-272 or 278-279 were individually without effect. Consistent with these data, CD2 M3 (268) transfectants were able to generate a detectable amount of IL-2 via CD2 triggering. These data support the notion that the PPPGHR motif at aa 260-265 is important for activation of T lymphocytes via the CD2 molecule. PMID:1972730

  9. Family involvement in music impacts participation of children with cochlear implants in music education and music activities

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Virginia; Gfeller, Kate; Tan, Xueli; See, Rachel L.; Cheng, Hsin-Yi; Kanemitsu, Mikiko

    2014-01-01

    Objective Children with cochlear implants (CIs) participate in musical activities in school and daily lives. Considerable variability exists regarding the amount of music involvement and enjoyment. Using the Music Engagement Questionnaire-Preschool/Elementary (MEQ-P/E), we wanted to determine patterns of musical participation and the impact of familial factors on engagement. Methods Parents of 32 children with CIs (16 preschool, 16 elementary) completed a questionnaire regarding the musical involvement of their child with an implant and a normal-hearing (NH) sibling (if one existed). We compared CI children's involvement to that of their NH siblings as well as across groups of children with and without CIs. Correlations between parent ratings of music importance, demographic factors, and involvement of CI and NH children were conducted within and across groups. Results No significant differences were found between children with CIs and NH siblings, meaning children from the same family showed similar levels of musical involvement. When compared at the same developmental stage, no significant differences were found between preschool children with and without CIs. Parents who rated the importance of music as “low” or “middle” had children (NH and CI) who were less involved in music activities. Children whose parents rated music importance as “high” were involved in monthly to weekly music activities with 81.25% reporting daily music listening. Conclusion Despite a less-than-ideal auditory signal for music, preschool and school-aged CI children enjoy and are involved in musical experiences. Families who enjoy and spend a greater amount of time involved in music tend to have children who also engage more actively in music. PMID:25431978

  10. Family involvement in music impacts participation of children with cochlear implants in music education and music activities.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Virginia; Gfeller, Kate; Tan, Xueli; See, Rachel L; Cheng, Hsin-Yi; Kanemitsu, Mikiko

    2015-05-01

    Objective Children with cochlear implants (CIs) participate in musical activities in school and daily lives. Considerable variability exists regarding the amount of music involvement and enjoyment. Using the Music Engagement Questionnaire-Preschool/Elementary (MEQ-P/E), we wanted to determine patterns of musical participation and the impact of familial factors on engagement. Methods Parents of 32 children with CIs (16 preschool and 16 elementary) completed a questionnaire regarding the musical involvement of their child with an implant and a normal-hearing (NH) sibling (if one existed). We compared CI children's involvement to that of their NH siblings as well as across groups of children with and without CIs. Correlations between parent ratings of music importance, demographic factors, and involvement of CI and NH children were conducted within and across groups. Results No significant differences were found between children with CIs and NH siblings, meaning children from the same family showed similar levels of musical involvement. When compared at the same developmental stage, no significant differences were found between preschool children with and without CIs. Parents who rated the importance of music as 'low' or 'middle' had children (NH and CI) who were less involved in music activities. Children whose parents rated music importance as 'high' were involved in monthly to weekly music activities with 81.25% reporting daily music listening. Conclusion Despite a less-than-ideal auditory signal for music, preschool and school-aged CI children enjoy and are involved in musical experiences. Families who enjoy and spend a greater amount of time involved in music tend to have children who also engage more actively in music. PMID:25431978

  11. Differential Involvement of Amygdala and Cortical NMDA Receptors Activation upon Encoding in Odor Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegoburu, Chlo; Parrot, Sandrine; Ferreira, Guilaume; Mouly, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Although the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a crucial role for the acquisition of fear memories, sensory cortices are involved in their long-term storage in rats. However, the time course of their respective involvement has received little investigation. Here we assessed the role of the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the

  12. Differential Involvement of Amygdala and Cortical NMDA Receptors Activation upon Encoding in Odor Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegoburu, Chloé; Parrot, Sandrine; Ferreira, Guilaume; Mouly, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Although the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a crucial role for the acquisition of fear memories, sensory cortices are involved in their long-term storage in rats. However, the time course of their respective involvement has received little investigation. Here we assessed the role of the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the…

  13. Combining active farmer involvement with detailed farm data in Denmark: a promising method for achieving water framework directive targets?

    PubMed

    Wright, Stuart A L; Jacobsen, Brian H

    2010-01-01

    The Water Framework Directive (WFD) encourages active involvement during its implementation, although no specific participatory methods are suggested, whilst implementing the target-oriented Directive will require detailed agri-environmental data at catchment and farm level. The paper is a case study of the Danish AGWAplan project, which actively involved farmers in the selection of measures to reduce diffuse nutrient pollution at farm and catchment level, thereby providing an example of how active involvement might be operationalised. Active involvement has been identified as being of central importance to the success of the WFD. The project also entailed the accumulation of extensive agri-environmental data. The aim of the paper is to evaluate AGWAplan to establish the extent to which its expected objectives have been achieved and how, and to determine whether the project approach might facilitate WFD goals if implemented in forthcoming river basin management plans (RBMPs). AGWAplan resulted in advantageous outcomes, including win-win solutions to reduce nutrient leaching and greater acceptance of policy, although the original reduction targets where not fully reached. The paper concludes that actively involving farmers in a similar manner in RBMPs may make an important contribution to the implementation of the WFD, although caveats regarding its potential for transfer to other areas are identified. PMID:20453337

  14. Identification and Functions of Amino Acid Residues in PotB and PotC Involved in Spermidine Uptake Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Kyohei; Sakamaki, Yoshiharu; Herai, Emiko; Demizu, Risa; Uemura, Takeshi; Saroj, Sunil D.; Zenda, Risa; Terui, Yusuke; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Toida, Toshihiko; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2010-01-01

    Amino acid residues on PotB and PotC involved in spermidine uptake were identified by random and site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that Trp8, Tyr43, Trp100, Leu110, and Tyr261 in PotB and Trp46, Asp108, Glu169, Ser196, Asp198, and Asp199 in PotC were strongly involved in spermidine uptake and that Tyr160, Glu172, and Leu274 in PotB and Tyr19, Tyr88, Tyr148, Glu160, Leu195, and Tyr211 in PotC were moderately involved in spermidine uptake. Among 11 amino acid residues that were strongly involved in spermidine uptake, Trp8 in PotB was important for insertion of PotB and PotC into membranes. Tyr43, Trp100, and Leu110 in PotB and Trp46, Asp108, Ser196, and Asp198 in PotC were found to be involved in the interaction with PotD. Leu110 and Tyr261 in PotB and Asp108, Asp198, and Asp199 in PotC were involved in the recognition of spermidine, and Trp100 and Tyr261 in PotB and Asp108, Glu169, and Asp198 in PotC were involved in ATPase activity of PotA. Accordingly, Trp100 in PotB was involved in both PotD recognition and ATPase activity, Leu110 in PotB was involved in both PotD and spermidine recognition, and Tyr261 in PotB was involved in both spermidine recognition and ATPase activity. Asp108 and Asp198 in PotC were involved in PotD and spermidine recognition as well as ATPase activity. These results suggest that spermidine passage from PotD to the cytoplasm is coupled to the ATPase activity of PotA through a structural change of PotA by its ATPase activity. PMID:20937813

  15. Personal involvement is related to increased search motivation and associated with activity in left BA44-a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Michael; Rumpel, Franziska; Sadrieh, Abdolkarim; Reimann, Martin; Denke, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies explore consumer perception of brands in a more or less passive way. This may still be representative for many situations or decisions we make each day. Nevertheless, sometimes we often actively search for and use information to make informed and reasoned choices, thus implying a rational and thinking consumer. Researchers suggested describing this distinction as low relative to high involvement consumer behavior. Although the involvement concept has been widely used to explain consumer behavior, behavioral and neural correlates of this concept are poorly understood. The current study aims to describe a behavioral measure that is associated with high involvement, the length of search behavior. A second aim of this study was to explore brain activations associated with involvement by employing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We presented participants information cues for different products and told them that they had to answer questions with respect to these products at the end of the experiment. Participants were free to stop the information search if they think they gathered enough information or to continue with collecting information. Behavioral results confirmed our hypothesis of a relationship between searching behavior and personal involvement by demonstrating that the length of search correlated significantly with the degree of personal involvement of the participants. fMRI data revealed that personal involvement was associated with activation in BA44. Since this brain region is known to be involved in semantic memory, the results of this pilot study suggest that high involvement consumer behavior may be linked to cognitive load and attention towards a product. PMID:25859200

  16. 5 CFR 1215.24 - Claims involving criminal activity or misconduct.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... civil claim by the United States for compensation for the misappropriated funds. The MSPB will refer these cases to the appropriate law enforcement agency for prosecution. (b) Debts involving fraud,...

  17. Caffeine in hot drinks elicits cephalic phase responses involving cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Michael K; Whitehouse, Julie M; Shine, Gillian; Whitton, Peter A; Towell, Anthony

    2012-09-01

    Caffeine stimulates both oropharyngeal and gut bitter taste receptors (hTAS2Rs) and so has the potential to elicit reflex autonomic responses. Coffee containing 130 mg caffeine has been reported to increase heart rate for 30 min post-ingestion. Whereas added-caffeine, in doses of 25 to 200 mg, ingested with decaffeinated coffee/tea decreases heart rate 10 to 30 min post-ingestion. This study aimed to clarify caffeine's chemosensory impact. Double-espresso coffees were compared to a placebo-control capsule in a double-blind between-measures design. Coffees tested were regular coffee (130 mg caffeine) and decaffeinated coffee with added-caffeine (0, 67 and 134 mg). Cardiovascular measures from three post-ingestion phases: 1) 0 to 5; 2) 10 to 15; and 3) 25 to 30 min; were compared to pre-ingestion measures. Participants comprised 11 women in the control group and 10 women in the test group. Decaffeinated coffee elicited no changes. Decaffeinated coffee with 67 mg caffeine: decreased dp/dt in Phase 1. Decaffeinated coffee with 134 mg caffeine: increased heart rate in Phases 1 and 2; decreased spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity in Phase 1; and increased diastolic pressure in Phases 2 and 3. Regular coffee: increased heart rate in Phases 1 and 2; decreased dp/dt in all phases; and decreased systolic pressure in Phase 1. Caffeine is the substance in regular coffee which elicits chemosensory autonomic reflex responses, which involves heart activity and the baroreflex. Compared to the caffeine in regular coffee, added-caffeine elicits somewhat different chemosensory responses including a more pronounced pressor effect and resetting of the baroreflex. Caffeine in commonly consumed amounts, as well as modulating body processes by blocking adenosine receptors, can elicit reflex autonomic responses during the ingestion of caffeinated drinks. It is plausible that caffeine stimulates hTAS2Rs, during the ingestion of coffee, eliciting cephalic phase responses. These cephalic phase responses likely result from vagal withdrawal and it is uncertain whether they enhance digestion or not. PMID:22614720

  18. The death effector domain of PEA-15 is involved in its regulation of integrin activation.

    PubMed

    Ramos, J W; Kojima, T K; Hughes, P E; Fenczik, C A; Ginsberg, M H

    1998-12-18

    Increased integrin ligand binding affinity (activation) is triggered by intracellular signaling events. A Ras-initiated mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway suppresses integrin activation in fibroblasts. We used expression cloning to isolate cDNAs that prevent Ras suppression of integrin activation. Here, we report that PEA-15, a small death effector domain (DED)-containing protein, blocks Ras suppression. PEA-15 does not block the capacity of Ras to activate the ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Instead, it inhibits suppression via a pathway blocked by a dominant-negative form of the distinct small GTPase, R-Ras. Heretofore, all known DEDs functioned in the regulation of apoptosis. In contrast, the DED of PEA-15 is essential for its capacity to reverse suppression of integrin activation. Thus, certain DED-containing proteins can regulate integrin activation as opposed to apoptotic protease cascades. PMID:9852038

  19. The Student Activities Interest Questionnaire: Relating Holland's Vocational Theory to Student Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Joseph L.; Hall, Page M.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the reliability and validity of the Student Activities Interest Questionnaire, developed to relate student interests to available campus activities using Holland's (1997) vocational interest categories. Found the instrument to be sufficiently reliable and valid for use as an informal means of prioritizing campus activities. (EV)

  20. Parental Involvement in Active Transport to School Initiatives: A Multi-Site Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyler, Amy; Baldwin, Julie; Carnoske, Cheryl; Nickelson, Jan; Troped, Philip; Steinman, Lesley; Pluto, Delores; Litt, Jill; Evenson, Kelly; Terpstra, Jennifer; Brownson, Ross; Schmid, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background: Increasing physical activity in youth is a recommended approach to curbing the childhood obesity epidemic. One way to help increase children's daily activity is to promote active transportation to and from school (ATS). Purpose: The purpose of this case study was to explore parental perception of, and participation in, ATS initiatives.…

  1. AMPK is Involved in Mediation of Erythropoietin Influence on Metabolic Activity and Reactive Oxygen Species Production in White Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Di, Lijun; Noguchi, Constance Tom

    2014-01-01

    Erythropoietin, discovered for its indispensable role during erythropoiesis, has been used in the therapy for selected red blood cell disorders in erythropoietin-deficient patients. The biological activities of erythropoietin have been found to extend to non-erythroid tissues due to the expression of erythropoietin receptor. We previously demonstrated that erythropoietin promotes metabolic activity and white adipocytes browning to increase mitochondrial function and energy expenditure via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and Sirtuin1. Here we report that AMP-activated protein kinase was activated by erythropoietin possibly via Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase in adipocytes as well as in white adipose tissue from diet induced obese mice. Erythropoietin increased cellular Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide via increased AMP-activated protein kinase activity, possibly leading to Sirtuin1 activation. AMP-activated protein kinase knock down reduced erythropoietin mediated increase in cellular oxidative function including the increased oxygen consumption rate, fatty acid utilization and induction of key metabolic genes. Under hypoxia, adipocytes were found to generate more reactive oxygen species, and erythropoietin reduced the reactive oxygen species and increased antioxidant gene expression, suggesting that erythropoietin may provide protection from oxidative stress in adipocytes. Erythropoietin also reversed increased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by hypoxia via increased AMP-activated protein kinase. Additionally, AMP-activated protein kinase is found to be involved in erythropoietin stimulated increase in oxygen consumption rate, fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial gene expression. AMP-activated protein kinase knock down impaired erythropoietin stimulated increases in antioxidant gene expression. Collectively, our findings identify the AMP-activated protein kinase involvement in erythropoietin signaling in regulating adipocyte cellular redox status and metabolic activity. PMID:24953559

  2. Unique Residues Involved in Activation of the Multitasking Protease/Chaperone HtrA from Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Wilhelmina M.; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; Lott, William B.; Stansfield, Scott H.; Timms, Peter

    2011-01-01

    DegP, a member of the HtrA family of proteins, conducts critical bacterial protein quality control by both chaperone and proteolysis activities. The regulatory mechanisms controlling these two distinct activities, however, are unknown. DegP activation is known to involve a unique mechanism of allosteric binding, conformational changes and oligomer formation. We have uncovered a novel role for the residues at the PDZ1:protease interface in oligomer formation specifically for chaperone substrates of Chlamydia trachomatis HtrA (DegP homolog). We have demonstrated that CtHtrA proteolysis could be activated by allosteric binding and oligomer formation. The PDZ1 activator cleft was required for the activation and oligomer formation. However, unique to CtHtrA was the critical role for residues at the PDZ1:protease interface in oligomer formation when the activator was an in vitro chaperone substrate. Furthermore, a potential in vivo chaperone substrate, the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) from Chlamydia, was able to activate CtHtrA and induce oligomer formation. Therefore, we have revealed novel residues involved in the activation of CtHtrA which are likely to have important in vivo implications for outer membrane protein assembly. PMID:21931748

  3. Undergraduate Involvement in Extracurricular Activities and Leadership Development in College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Elizabeth A.; Retallick, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe experiences of undergraduate extracurricular involvement that result in increased leadership development. Senior students in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Iowa State University completed an online questionnaire about their extracurricular experiences. Leadership development

  4. Undergraduate Involvement in Extracurricular Activities and Leadership Development in College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Elizabeth A.; Retallick, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe experiences of undergraduate extracurricular involvement that result in increased leadership development. Senior students in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Iowa State University completed an online questionnaire about their extracurricular experiences. Leadership development…

  5. Strategies for Effective Faculty Involvement in Online Activities Aimed at Promoting Critical Thinking and Deep Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul Razzak, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Highly-traditional education systems that mainly offer what is known as "direct instruction" usually result in graduates with a surface approach to learning rather than a deep one. What is meant by deep-learning is learning that involves critical analysis, the linking of ideas and concepts, creative problem solving, and application…

  6. Involving Children in Health and Social Research: "Human Becomings" or "Active Beings"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balen, Rachel; Blyth, Eric; Calabretto, Helen; Fraser, Claire; Horrocks, Christine; Manby, Martin

    2006-01-01

    This article draws on the authors' experiences of undertaking health and social research involving children in Australia and England and focuses on securing the informed consent of children to participate in such research. A clear trend within literature, service provision, legislation and international conventions recognizes children as "active…

  7. Examining Parent Involvement Activities in Two Immigrant-Impacted Schools: A Comparative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquez, Amalia

    2012-01-01

    K-12 schools with large immigrant populations face a myriad of challenges, including low academic achievement and high dropout rates of Latino students. Parental involvement is a practical strategy in positively influencing student outcomes along the K-12 continuum. To this end, it is essential that immigrant impacted schools work together with…

  8. Csk suppression of Src involves movement of Csk to sites of Src activity.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, B W; Cooper, J A

    1994-01-01

    Csk phosphorylates Src family members at a key regulatory tyrosine in the C-terminal tail and suppresses their activities. It is not known whether Csk activity is regulated. To examine the features of Csk required for Src suppression, we expressed Csk mutants in a cell line with a disrupted csk gene. Expression of wild-type Csk suppressed Src, but Csk with mutations in the SH2, SH3, and catalytic domains did not suppress Src. An SH3 deletion mutant of Csk was fully active against in vitro substrates, but two SH2 domain mutants were essentially inactive. Whereas Src repressed by Csk was predominantly perinuclear, the activated Src in cells lacking Csk was localized to structures resembling podosomes. Activated mutant Src was also in podosomes, even in the presence of Csk. When Src was not active, Csk was diffusely located in the cytosol, but when Src was active, Csk colocalized with activated Src to podosomes. Csk also localizes to podosomes of cells transformed by an activated Src that lacks the major tyrosine autophosphorylation site, suggesting that the relocalization of Csk is not a consequence of the binding of the Csk SH2 domain to phosphorylated Src. A catalytically inactive Csk mutant also localized with Src to podosomes, but SH3 and SH2 domain mutants did not, suggesting that the SH3 and SH2 domains are both necessary to target Csk to places where Src is active. The failure of the catalytically active SH3 mutant of Csk to regulate Src may be due to its inability to colocalize with active Src. Images PMID:7518562

  9. Activity-Dependent Dendritic Spine Shrinkage and Growth Involve Downregulation of Cofilin via Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Barbara; Saffin, Jean-Michel; Halpain, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    A current model posits that cofilin-dependent actin severing negatively impacts dendritic spine volume. Studies suggested that increased cofilin activity underlies activity-dependent spine shrinkage, and that reduced cofilin activity induces activity-dependent spine growth. We suggest instead that both types of structural plasticity correlate with decreased cofilin activity. However, the mechanism of inhibition determines the outcome for spine morphology. RNAi in rat hippocampal cultures demonstrates that cofilin is essential for normal spine maintenance. Cofilin-F-actin binding and filament barbed-end production decrease during the early phase of activity-dependent spine shrinkage; cofilin concentration also decreases. Inhibition of the cathepsin B/L family of proteases prevents both cofilin loss and spine shrinkage. Conversely, during activity-dependent spine growth, LIM kinase stimulates cofilin phosphorylation, which activates phospholipase D-1 to promote actin polymerization. These results implicate novel molecular mechanisms and prompt a revision of the current model for how cofilin functions in activity-dependent structural plasticity. PMID:24740405

  10. Activity-dependent dendritic spine shrinkage and growth involve downregulation of cofilin via distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Barbara; Saffin, Jean-Michel; Halpain, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    A current model posits that cofilin-dependent actin severing negatively impacts dendritic spine volume. Studies suggested that increased cofilin activity underlies activity-dependent spine shrinkage, and that reduced cofilin activity induces activity-dependent spine growth. We suggest instead that both types of structural plasticity correlate with decreased cofilin activity. However, the mechanism of inhibition determines the outcome for spine morphology. RNAi in rat hippocampal cultures demonstrates that cofilin is essential for normal spine maintenance. Cofilin-F-actin binding and filament barbed-end production decrease during the early phase of activity-dependent spine shrinkage; cofilin concentration also decreases. Inhibition of the cathepsin B/L family of proteases prevents both cofilin loss and spine shrinkage. Conversely, during activity-dependent spine growth, LIM kinase stimulates cofilin phosphorylation, which activates phospholipase D-1 to promote actin polymerization. These results implicate novel molecular mechanisms and prompt a revision of the current model for how cofilin functions in activity-dependent structural plasticity. PMID:24740405

  11. Activated spinal astrocytes are involved in the maintenance of chronic widespread mechanical hyperalgesia after cast immobilization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the present study, we examined spinal glial cell activation as a central nervous system mechanism of widespread mechanical hyperalgesia in rats that experienced chronic post-cast pain (CPCP) 2 weeks after cast immobilization. Activated spinal microglia and astrocytes were investigated immunohistologically in lumbar and coccygeal spinal cord segments 1 day, 5 weeks, and 13 weeks following cast removal. Results In the lumbar cord, astrocytes were activated after microglia. Astrocytes also were activated after microglia in the coccygeal cord, but with a delay that was longer than that observed in the lumbar cord. This activation pattern paralleled the observation that mechanical hyperalgesia occurred in the hindleg or the hindpaw before the tail. The activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) immune response in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) on the last day of cast immobilization suggested that nerve damage might not occur in CPCP rats. The neural activation assessed by the phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) immune response in DRG arose 1 day after cast removal. In addition, L-α-aminoadipate (L-α-AA), an inhibitor of astrocyte activation administered intrathecally 5 weeks after cast removal, inhibited mechanical hyperalgesia in several body parts including the lower leg skin and muscles bilaterally, hindpaws, and tail. Conclusions These findings suggest that activation of lumbar cord astrocytes is an important factor in widespread mechanical hyperalgesia in CPCP. PMID:24456903

  12. Melanosis in Penaeus monodon: Involvement of the Laccase-like Activity of Hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Bris, Cédric Le; Cudennec, Benoit; Dhulster, Pascal; Drider, Djamel; Duflos, Guillaume; Grard, Thierry

    2016-01-27

    In shrimp, the development of postmortem melanosis resulting from phenoloxidase activities leads to important economic losses. Phenoloxidase enzymes include catechol oxidases, laccases, and tyrosinases, but hemocyanin is also capable of phenoloxidase activities. These activities have been explored in Penaeus monodon, using different substrates. Results highlighted that tyrosinase-specific substrates were little oxidized, whereas hydroquinone (laccase-specific substrate) was more highly oxidized than l-DOPA (nonspecific substrate) in the pereopods and pleopods. Global phenoloxidase activity, assayed with l-DOPA, did not appear thermally stable over time and probably resulted from phenoloxidase enzymes. Conversely, the laccase-like activity assayed with hydroquinone was thermally stable over time, reflecting the thermal stability of hemocyanin. Independently of the anatomical compartment, the temperature, or the substrate, the highest activities were assayed in the cuticular compartments. This study demonstrates the complexity of phenoloxidase activities in P. monodon, and the importance of considering all the activities, including laccase-like activities such as that of hemocyanin. PMID:26671070

  13. Predicting Adolescents' Organized Activity Involvement: The Role of Maternal Depression History, Family Relationship Quality, and Adolescent Cognitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohnert, Amy M.; Martin, Nina C.; Garber, Judy

    2007-01-01

    Although the potential benefits of organized activity involvement during high school have been documented, little is known about what familial and individual characteristics are associated with higher levels of participation. Using structural equation modeling, this longitudinal study examined the extent to which maternal depression history (i.e.,…

  14. Children's Well-Being and Involvement in Physically Active Outdoors Play in a Norwegian Kindergarten: Playful Sharing of Physical Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjørgen, Kathrine

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the conditions of children's level of well-being and their involvement in physically active play during kindergarten outdoors time. Observations of three to five year olds from one kindergarten in central Norway were conducted. The researcher followed the children around the kindergarten's outdoors playground and…

  15. Expectations of Rock Music Consumption for Entertainment and Information Relative to the Active Involvement of the User.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouner, Donna; Noyes, Amy

    Before examining potentially negative effects of rock music on adolescents, it is necessary to demonstrate links between adolescent motivations for consuming rock music and active involvement relative to that use and also to consider how much rock listeners rely on rock music as a source for information about values, beliefs, and social

  16. 41 CFR 102-74.495 - If a permit involves demonstrations or activities that may lead to civil disturbances, what...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false If a permit involves demonstrations or activities that may lead to civil disturbances, what action must a Federal agency take before approving such a permit application? 102-74.495 Section 102-74.495 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property...

  17. 41 CFR 102-74.495 - If a permit involves demonstrations or activities that may lead to civil disturbances, what...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false If a permit involves demonstrations or activities that may lead to civil disturbances, what action must a Federal agency take before approving such a permit application? 102-74.495 Section 102-74.495 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property...

  18. 41 CFR 102-74.495 - If a permit involves demonstrations or activities that may lead to civil disturbances, what...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false If a permit involves demonstrations or activities that may lead to civil disturbances, what action must a Federal agency take before approving such a permit application? 102-74.495 Section 102-74.495 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property...

  19. 41 CFR 51-7.2 - Early involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval. (a) 40 CFR 1501.2(d) requires... of 40 CFR 1501.2(d) with respect to these actions, the Committee staff shall consult as required with... requires an environmental assessment as set forth in 40 CFR 1501.4. (c) To facilitate compliance with...

  20. Cross-Age Tutorial Program To Increase Reading Comprehension through the Use of High Interest Activities Involving Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leatherwood, Prudence Lee

    A practicum used a program of high interest activities involving reading to address the problem of low reading comprehension grades and test scores of eight students in the second through fourth grades, who were an average of 1 year behind the norm in reading. The program's six units included a listening unit, computer technology unit, daily…

  1. 15 CFR 764.7 - Activities involving items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Arrangement's Web site (www.wassenaar.org) at the Control Lists web page. Note 1 to paragraph (b)(1)(i): An... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Activities involving items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. 764.7 Section 764.7 Commerce and Foreign...

  2. 15 CFR 764.7 - Activities involving items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Arrangement's Web site (www.wassenaar.org) at the Control Lists web page. Note 1 to paragraph (b)(1)(i): An... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Activities involving items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. 764.7 Section 764.7 Commerce and Foreign...

  3. 15 CFR 764.7 - Activities involving items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Arrangement's Web site (www.wassenaar.org) at the Control Lists web page. Note 1 to paragraph (b)(1)(i): An... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Activities involving items that may have been illegally exported or reexported to Libya. 764.7 Section 764.7 Commerce and Foreign...

  4. 41 CFR 51-7.2 - Early involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval. (a) 40 CFR 1501.2(d) requires... of 40 CFR 1501.2(d) with respect to these actions, the Committee staff shall consult as required with... requires an environmental assessment as set forth in 40 CFR 1501.4. (c) To facilitate compliance with...

  5. 41 CFR 51-7.2 - Early involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval. (a) 40 CFR 1501.2(d) requires... of 40 CFR 1501.2(d) with respect to these actions, the Committee staff shall consult as required with... requires an environmental assessment as set forth in 40 CFR 1501.4. (c) To facilitate compliance with...

  6. 41 CFR 51-7.2 - Early involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval. (a) 40 CFR 1501.2(d) requires... of 40 CFR 1501.2(d) with respect to these actions, the Committee staff shall consult as required with... requires an environmental assessment as set forth in 40 CFR 1501.4. (c) To facilitate compliance with...

  7. Ideas Exchange: Should Students Be Granted a Waiver from Physical Education if They Are Involved in Other Activities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sipe, Roberta; Belka, David; Kamla, Jim; Christenson, Robert S.; Magnotta, John; Lorenzi, David G.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the opinions/ideas of professionals who were asked this question: "Should students be granted a waiver from physical education if they are involved in other activities?" These professionals share the pros and cons of the waiver question.

  8. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Round to zero rule that applies to... CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to zero.... 1 to this part) as unavoidable by-products or impurities may round to zero and are not subject...

  9. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Round to zero rule that applies to... CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to zero.... 1 to this part) as unavoidable by-products or impurities may round to zero and are not subject...

  10. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Round to zero rule that applies to... CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to zero.... 1 to this part) as unavoidable by-products or impurities may round to zero and are not subject...

  11. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Round to zero rule that applies to... CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to zero.... 1 to this part) as unavoidable by-products or impurities may round to zero and are not subject...

  12. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Round to zero rule that applies to... CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to zero.... 1 to this part) as unavoidable by-products or impurities may round to zero and are not subject...

  13. Parental Involvement in School Activities and Reading Literacy: Findings and Implications from PIRLS 2011 Data. Policy Brief No. 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirazchiyski, Plamen; Klemencic, Eva

    2014-01-01

    This policy brief presents evidence demonstrating a positive association between parental involvement in school activities and student performance in the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) 2011. This association, which was evident in most of the 54 education systems analyzed, indicates that students enrolled in schools with…

  14. 77 FR 49835 - Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities; In the Matter of Mr. Joseph Quintanilla

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... rule (72 FR 49139; August 28, 2007). The E-Filing process requires participants to submit and serve all... COMMISSION Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities; In the Matter of Mr. Joseph Quintanilla.... Quintanilla indicated that he was aware the camera was outside of the dark room and did not contest...

  15. 77 FR 39270 - In the Matter of Mr. Timothy Goold; Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... under 10 CFR 2.315(c), must be filed in accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139; August 28... COMMISSION In the Matter of Mr. Timothy Goold; Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities I Mr... NRC in an attempt to resolve issues associated with this matter. Mr. Goold provided a written...

  16. 77 FR 3010 - In the Matter of Mr. Francis Guilbeau; Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... under 10 CFR 2.315(c), must be filed in accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139, August 28... COMMISSION In the Matter of Mr. Francis Guilbeau; Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities I...) with the NRC in an attempt to resolve issues associated with this matter. In response, Mr....

  17. 41 CFR 51-7.2 - Early involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... involvement in private, State, and local activities requiring Federal approval. (a) 40 CFR 1501.2(d) requires... of 40 CFR 1501.2(d) with respect to these actions, the Committee staff shall consult as required with... requires an environmental assessment as set forth in 40 CFR 1501.4. (c) To facilitate compliance with...

  18. Involvement of Macromolecule Biosynthesis in Auxin and Fusicoccin Enhancement of β-Glucan Synthase Activity in Pea 1

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Peter M.

    1987-01-01

    In pea stem segments whose cuticle has been made permeable by abrading it, actinomycin D (ActD) and 80S ribosomal protein synthesis inhibitors such as cycloheximide (CHI) inhibit enhancement by indole 3-acetic acid (IAA) of the activity of the cell wall biosynthetic enzyme, glucan synthase I (GS). This supersedes earlier, negative results with inhibitors, obtained with segments having an intact cuticle, which prevents adequate inhibitor uptake. Since these inhibitors also block IAA-stimulated H+ extrusion, which according to earlier results is involved in the GS response, the significance of these inhibitions would be ambiguous without additional evidence. ActD does not inhibit fusicoccin (FC) enhancement of GS activity, which indicates existence of a post-transcriptional control mechanism for GS, but does not preclude involvement of transcription in the GS response to IAA. Although protein synthesis inhibitors such as CHI do not block FC-stimulated H+ extrusion, they do inhibit FC enhancement of GS activity, indicating an involvement of protein synthesis in the GS response to FC, and presumably also to IAA. However, protein synthesis inhibitors (but not ActD) by themselves paradoxically elevate GS activity, less strongly than IAA does but resembling the IAA enhancement in several characteristics. These results suggest that IAA may enhance GS activity at least in part by inhibiting the synthesis or action of a labile repressor of the transcription of, or a labile destabilizer of, mRNA for GS or some polypeptide that enhances GS activity. However, resemblances between the IAA and FC effects on GS suggest that IAA also has a posttranscriptional GS-enhancing action like that of FC. Lipid biosynthesis may be involved in this aspect of the response since both IAA and FC enhancements of GS activity are inhibited by cerulenin. PMID:16665730

  19. Amino-acid residues involved in the expression of the activity of Escherichia coli TolC.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Hiroyasu; Morisada, Naoyuki; Miyano, Masaya; Tsuge, Hideaki; Shinoda, Sumio; Takahashi, Eizo; Okamoto, Keinosuke

    2004-01-01

    The Escherichia coli TolC, composed of 471 amino-acid residues, functions as a channel tunnel in the transport of various molecules across the outer membrane. We found previously that Leu-412, the 60th amino-acid residue from the carboxy terminal end, was crucial to the transport activity of TolC. Leu-412 is located in a domain which protrudes from the main body of TolC into the periplasm. Subsequent study indicated that the hydrophobicity generated by Leu-412 played an important role in the activity of TolC (H. Yamanaka, T. Nomura, N. Morisada, S. Shinoda, and K. Okamoto, Microb. Pathog. 33: 81-89, 2002). We predicted that other hydrophobic amino-acid residues around Leu-412 were also involved in the expression of the activity of TolC. To test this possibility, we substituted several hydrophobic residues around Leu-412, (Leu-3, Val-6, Leu-212, Leu-213, Leu-223, and Leu-224), with serine and examined the activity of these mutant TolCs. The result showed that Leu-3 is involved in the activity of TolC, but the other residues are not. The involvement of Leu-3 was confirmed by the residue deletion experiment. A subsequent point-mutational analysis of the residue showed that a hydrophobic side chain is required at position 3 for TolC to express its activity. As the distance between the alpha-carbons of Leu-3 and Leu-412 is just 7.45 angstroms, hydrophobic interaction between the two leucine residues might be involved in the activity of TolC. PMID:15502403

  20. INVOLVEMENT OF PEPTIDOGLYCAN RECOGNITION PROTEIN L6 IN ACTIVATION OF IMMUNE DEFICIENCY PATHWAY IN THE IMMUNE RESPONSIVE SILKWORM CELLS.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiromitsu; Sagisaka, Aki

    2016-06-01

    The immune deficiency (Imd) signaling pathway is activated by Gram-negative bacteria for producing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In Drosophila melanogaster, the activation of this pathway is initiated by the recognition of Gram-negative bacteria by peptidoglycan (PGN) recognition proteins (PGRPs), PGRP-LC and PGRP-LE. In this study, we found that the Imd pathway is involved in enhancing the promoter activity of AMP gene in response to Gram-negative bacteria or diaminopimelic (DAP) type PGNs derived from Gram-negative bacteria in an immune responsive silkworm cell line, Bm-NIAS-aff3. Using gene knockdown experiments, we further demonstrated that silkworm PGRP L6 (BmPGRP-L6) is involved in the activation of E. coli or E. coli-PGN mediated AMP promoter activation. Domain analysis revealed that BmPGRP-L6 contained a conserved PGRP domain, transmembrane domain, and RIP homotypic interaction motif like motif but lacked signal peptide sequences. BmPGRP-L6 overexpression enhances AMP promoter activity through the Imd pathway. BmPGRP-L6 binds to DAP-type PGNs, although it also binds to lysine-type PGNs that activate another immune signal pathway, the Toll pathway in Drosophila. These results indicate that BmPGRP-L6 is a key PGRP for activating the Imd pathway in immune responsive silkworm cells. PMID:26991439

  1. A qualitative study of the activities performed by people involved in clinical decision support: recommended practices for success

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Ash, Joan S; Erickson, Jessica L; Wasserman, Joe; Bunce, Arwen; Stanescu, Ana; St Hilaire, Daniel; Panzenhagen, Morgan; Gebhardt, Eric; McMullen, Carmit; Middleton, Blackford; Sittig, Dean F

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the activities performed by people involved in clinical decision support (CDS) at leading sites. Materials and methods We conducted ethnographic observations at seven diverse sites with a history of excellence in CDS using the Rapid Assessment Process and analyzed the data using a series of card sorts, informed by Linstone's Multiple Perspectives Model. Results We identified 18 activities and grouped them into four areas. Area 1: Fostering relationships across the organization, with activities (a) training and support, (b) visibility/presence on the floor, (c) liaising between people, (d) administration and leadership, (e) project management, (f) cheerleading/buy-in/sponsorship, (g) preparing for CDS implementation. Area 2: Assembling the system with activities (a) providing technical support, (b) CDS content development, (c) purchasing products from vendors (d) knowledge management, (e) system integration. Area 3: Using CDS to achieve the organization's goals with activities (a) reporting, (b) requirements-gathering/specifications, (c) monitoring CDS, (d) linking CDS to goals, (e) managing data. Area 4: Participation in external policy and standards activities (this area consists of only a single activity). We also identified a set of recommendations associated with these 18 activities. Discussion All 18 activities we identified were performed at all sites, although the way they were organized into roles differed substantially. We consider these activities critical to the success of a CDS program. Conclusions A series of activities are performed by sites strong in CDS, and sites adopting CDS should ensure they incorporate these activities into their efforts. PMID:23999670

  2. Discovering the Thermodynamics of Simultaneous Equilibria: An Entropy Analysis Activity Involving Consecutive Equilibria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2007-01-01

    An activity is presented in which the thermodynamics of simultaneous, consecutive equilibria are explored. The activity is appropriate for second-year high school or AP chemistry. Students discover that a reactant-favored (entropy-diminishing or endergonic) reaction can be caused to happen if it is coupled with a product-favored reaction of

  3. Optical Topography of Evoked Brain Activity during Mental Tasks Involving Whole Number Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Students start to memorize arithmetic facts from early elementary school mathematics activities. Their fluency or lack of fluency with these facts could affect their efforts as they carry out mental calculations as adults. This study investigated participants' levels of brain activation and possible reasons for these levels as they solved…

  4. Developmental Benefits of Extracurricular Involvement: Do Peer Characteristics Mediate the Link between Activities and Youth Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredricks, Jennifer A.; Eccles, Jacquelynn S.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, we test: (a) the relation between school-based extracurricular participation and indicators of positive and negative development across a range of activity contexts, and (b) a mediation model linking activity participation, prosocial peers, and development. Extensive survey information was collected from a predominately White…

  5. Involvement of Cot activity in the proliferation of ALCL lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Margarita; Manso, Rebeca; Bernaldez, Flavia; Lopez, Pilar; Martin-Duce, Antonio; Alemany, Susana

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} We show here that ALCL lymphoma cell lines present high levels of Cot (MAP3K8). {yields} We show that Cot mediates the constitutive Erk1/2 activation in SUDHL-1 cells. {yields} Inhibition of Cot activity reduces the number of cell divisions in SUDHL-1 cells. {yields} Cot controls the activation state of p70 S6K and JunB expression in SUDHL-1 cells. -- Abstract: Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) cells overexpress CD30 on their cell surface, show increased levels of activated Erk1/2 and of JunB; participating JunB in the proliferative capacity of these lymphomas. Here, we show that ALCL lymphoma cells also present high expression levels of the proto-oncogenic Cot (MAP3K8). Using pharmacological drugs as well as the RNA interference technique we show that Cot protein is responsible for the constitutive Erk1/2 activation in the ALCL lymphoma cells, SUDHL-1. Besides, inhibition of Cot activity reduces the number of cell divisions which is achieved, at least in part, by the control that Cot exercises on the activation state of p70 S6K and on the expression levels of JunB. Since Cot represents an alternative mode, independently of RAF, to activate Erk1/2, all these data strongly suggest that molecular targeting of Cot may be a potential new specific strategy for ALCL lymphomas therapy, without the fully disturbance of the Erk1/2 function.

  6. Discovering the Thermodynamics of Simultaneous Equilibria: An Entropy Analysis Activity Involving Consecutive Equilibria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2007-01-01

    An activity is presented in which the thermodynamics of simultaneous, consecutive equilibria are explored. The activity is appropriate for second-year high school or AP chemistry. Students discover that a reactant-favored (entropy-diminishing or endergonic) reaction can be caused to happen if it is coupled with a product-favored reaction of…

  7. "Apathetic, Active, or Antagonistic": A History of the American Sociological Association's Involvement in High School Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCesare, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The role that the American Sociological Association (ASA) has historically played in reforming high school sociology courses has been alternately apathetic, active, or antagonistic. Apathy marked the time period between 1905 and about 1960, and again during most of the 1970s and 1980s. The Association played a much more active role during the New…

  8. Optical Topography of Evoked Brain Activity during Mental Tasks Involving Whole Number Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Students start to memorize arithmetic facts from early elementary school mathematics activities. Their fluency or lack of fluency with these facts could affect their efforts as they carry out mental calculations as adults. This study investigated participants' levels of brain activation and possible reasons for these levels as they solved

  9. Family and Community Involvement in the Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipriani, Kristin; Richardson, Cheryl; Roberts, Georgi

    2012-01-01

    Engaging families and communities in physical activities for the benefit of children is an extension of the role of a physical education instructor. Although it is possible for a physical educator to generate ideas that encourage families and communities to move, a certified director of physical activity (C-DPA) would be better trained to…

  10. Control of 5-aminolaevulinate synthetase activity in Rhodopseudomonas spheroides. The involvement of sulphur metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Neuberger, Albert; Sandy, John D.; Tait, George H.

    1973-01-01

    1. The `initial' 5-aminolaevulinate synthetase activity, that is the activity observed immediately after cell disruption, in extracts prepared from unharvested semianaerobically grown Rhodopseudomonas spheroides, was twice that observed under the same assay conditions in extracts prepared from harvested cells. 2. The effect of oxygenation of a culture on the `maximum' aminolaevulinate synthetase activity, that is the activity observed 1h after disruption of harvested cells, is markedly influenced by the contents of the growth medium. Oxygenation of organisms for 1h in the medium in which they have grown produces an 80–90% decrease in maximum activity, whereas similar treatment of organisms resuspended in fresh medium produces less than a 40% decrease. 3. This protective effect of fresh medium is absolutely dependent on the presence of sulphate. When cells are suspended in sulphate-deficient fresh medium, the maximum activity falls by 65–75% even without oxygenation. A high maximum activity is regenerated when sulphate is resupplied. 4. When organisms are oxygenated in the medium in which they have grown, the cellular contents of GSH+GSSG and cysteine+cystine fall very markedly and homolanthionine is formed. Both the fall in aminolaevulinate synthetase activity and the changes in sulphur metabolism are largely prevented by the addition of compounds which stimulate synthesis of cysteine de novo or inhibit the conversion of cysteine S into homocysteine S. 5. The maximum aminolaevulinate synthetase activity was directly proportional to the GSH+GSSG content of all cell preparations. In glutathione-depleted extracts the `low'-activity enzyme could be re-activated in vitro by the addition of GSH, GSSG, cysteine or cystine, whereas in extracts with a high glutathione content the `high'-activity enzyme was unaffected by these sulphur compounds. 6. The activation of low-activity enzyme with exogenous sulphur compounds was prevented by excluding air or by adding NADH. Studies with purified enzyme indicate that sulphur compounds do not interact directly with the enzyme, but that their effect is mediated by a number of other endogenous factors. PMID:4544404

  11. Codeine induces human mast cell chemokine and cytokine production: involvement of G-protein activation

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, C. H.; Schleimer, R. P.; Kulka, M.

    2007-01-01

    Background Activation of mast cells and the systemic release of histamine are common side effects of opiates such as codeine and morphine. In some individuals, codeine not only elicits a sizable early response due to mast cell degranulation, but can also lead to late cutaneous allergic inflammation possibly through the production of chemokines. However, individuals who exhibit a late phase reaction to codeine often do not react to its synthetic analog, meperidine. The goal of this study was to test whether codeine and meperidine induce secretion of inflammatory mediators in human mast cells. Methods To characterize opiate activation of human mast cells, we stimulated cultured human (LAD2 cell line and CD34+-derived) mast cells with codeine and meperidine and measured degranulation and chemokine production. Results Codeine, but not meperidine, activated human mast cell degranulation within 30 min in a dose-dependent manner. Degranulation was blocked by the phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, wortmannin, and pertussis toxin but not by Ro-31-8220, a PKC inhibitor or forskolin, a cyclic adenylyl cyclase activator. After 3 and 8 h of stimulation, codeine, but not meperidine, activated human mast cells to release monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (CCL2), regulated on activation, normal T expressed and secreted (RANTES, CCL5) and interleukin-8 (CXCL 8) but not inducible protein-10 (CXCL10). Conclusions Codeine activates human mast cell degranulation and chemokine production by activating protein kinase A and PI3 kinase, possibly leading to NF-κB activation. Therefore, opiates may regulate late phase allergic inflammation by activating chemokine production by human mast cells. PMID:17441793

  12. ACTIVATION OF STIM1-ORAI1 INVOLVES AN INTRAMOLECULAR SWITCHING MECHANISM*

    PubMed Central

    Korzeniowski, Marek K.; Manjarrés, Isabel Martín; Varnai, Peter; Balla, Tamas

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The stromal interaction molecule, STIM1 regulates Ca2+ entry via Orai1 channels in response to decreased concentration of ER luminal Ca2+. In search of a mechanism that switches the cytoplasmic aspect of STIM1 from an inactive to an active state, we identified an acidic motif within the STIM1 coiled-coil region that keeps the Ca2+ activation domain (CAD/SOAR) inactive. The STIM1 acidic motif shows significant homology to the C-terminal coiled-coil segment of Orai1, the postulated site of interaction with STIM1. Mutations within the acidic region make STIM1 constitutively active while those within a short basic segment of CAD/SOAR prevent Orai1 activation. We propose that during STIM1 activation, the CAD/SOAR domain is released from an intramolecular clamp allowing the basic segment to activate Orai1 channels. This evolutionary conserved activation mechanism of STIM1 resembles the regulation of protein kinases by intramolecular silencing with pseudosubstrate binding. PMID:21081754

  13. Involvement of antioxidant activity of Lactobacillus plantarum on functional properties of olive phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Kachouri, Faten; Ksontini, Hamida; Kraiem, Manel; Setti, Khaoula; Mechmeche, Manel; Hamdi, Moktar

    2015-12-01

    Eight lactic acid bacteria strains isolated from traditional fermented foods were investigated for their antioxidant activity against DPPH free radicals, β-carotene bleaching assay and linoleic acid test. L. plantarum LAB 1 at a dose of 8.2 10(9) CFU/ml showed the highest DPPH scavenging activity, with inhibition rate of 57.07 ± 0.57 % and an antioxidant activity (TAA = 43.47 ± 0.663 % and AAC = 172.65 ± 5.57), which increase with cell concentrations. When L. plantarum LAB 1 was administered to oxidative enzymes, residual activities decreased significantly with cell concentrations. The use of L. plantarum LAB 1 on olives process, favours the increase of the antioxidant activity (24 %). HPLC results showed a significant increase of orthodiphenols (74 %). Viable cells of strain were implicated directly on minimum media growth with 500 mg/l of olive phenolic compounds. Results showed an increase in their antioxidant activity. CG-SM analysis, identify the presence of compounds with higher antioxidant activity as vinyl phenol and hydroxytyrosol. PMID:26604364

  14. Involvement of the Lectin Pathway of Complement Activation in Antimicrobial Immune Defense during Experimental Septic Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Windbichler, Michaela; Echtenacher, Bernd; Hehlgans, Thomas; Jensenius, Jens C.; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; Männel, Daniela N.

    2004-01-01

    A critical first line of defense against infection is constituted by the binding of natural antibodies to microbial surfaces, activating the complement system via the classical complement activation pathway. In this function, the classical activation pathway is supported and amplified by two antibody-independent complement activation routes, i.e., the lectin pathway and the alternative pathway. We studied the contribution of the different complement activation pathways in the host defense against experimental polymicrobial peritonitis induced by cecal ligation and puncture by using mice deficient in either C1q or factors B and C2. The C1q-deficient mice lack the classical complement activation pathway. While infection-induced mortality of wild-type mice was 27%, mortality of C1q-deficient mice was increased to 60%. Mice with a deficiency of both factors B and C2 lack complement activation via the classical, the alternative, and the lectin pathways and exhibit a mortality of 92%, indicating a significant contribution of the lectin and alternative pathways of complement activation to survival. For 14 days after infection, mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-dependent activation of C4 was compromised. Serum MBL-A and MBL-C levels were significantly reduced for 1 week, possibly due to consumption. mRNA expression profiles did not lend support for either of the two MBL genes to respond as typical acute-phase genes. Our results demonstrate a long-lasting depletion of MBL-A and MBL-C from serum during microbial infection and underline the importance of both the lectin and the alternative pathways for antimicrobial immune defense. PMID:15322019

  15. Molecular mechanisms involved in the enhancement of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity by calcitriol in chick intestine.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Adriana; Centeno, Viviana A; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori G

    2010-12-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) from the intestine is the NAD-linked oxidoreductase of the tricarboxylic acid cycle with the highest activity and response to vitamin D treatment in vitamin D-deficient chicks (-D). The aim of this study was to elucidate potential molecular mechanisms by which cholecalciferol or calcitriol enhances the activity of this enzyme. One group of animals used was composed of -D and -D treated with cholecalciferol or with calcitriol. A second group consisted of -D and -D supplemented with high Ca(2+) diet. A third group included chicks receiving either a normal or a low Ca(2+) diet. In some experiments, animals were injected with cycloheximide. Data showed that either vitamin D (cholecalciferol or calcitriol) or a low Ca(2+) diet increases mMDH activity. High Ca(2+) diet did not modify the intestinal mMDH activity from -D. The mMDH activity from -D remained unaltered when duodenal cells were exposed to 10(-8) mol/L calcitriol for 15 min. The enhancement of mMDH activity by calcitriol was completely abolished by simultaneous cycloheximide injection to -D. mMDH mRNA levels, detected by RT-PCR, indicate that calcitriol did not affect gene expression. In contrast, Western blots show that calcitriol enhanced the protein expression. In conclusion, calcitriol stimulates intestinal mMDH activity by increasing protein synthesis. No response of mMDH activity by rapid effects of calcitriol or activation through increment of serum Ca(2+) was demonstrated. Consequently, ATP production would be increased, facilitating the Ca(2+) exit from the enterocytes via the Ca(2+)-ATPase and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, which participate in the intestinal Ca(2+) absorption. PMID:20149622

  16. B cell activation involves nanoscale receptor reorganizations and inside-out signaling by Syk

    PubMed Central

    Kläsener, Kathrin; Maity, Palash C; Hobeika, Elias; Yang, Jianying; Reth, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Binding of antigen to the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) initiates a multitude of events resulting in B cell activation. How the BCR becomes signaling-competent upon antigen binding is still a matter of controversy. Using a high-resolution proximity ligation assay (PLA) to monitor the conformation of the BCR and its interactions with co-receptors at a 10–20 nm resolution, we provide direct evidence for the opening of BCR dimers during B cell activation. We also show that upon binding Syk opens the receptor by an inside-out signaling mechanism that amplifies BCR signaling. Furthermore, we found that on resting B cells, the coreceptor CD19 is in close proximity with the IgD-BCR and on activated B cells with the IgM-BCR, indicating nanoscale reorganization of receptor clusters during B cell activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02069.001 PMID:24963139

  17. Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted form DOE F 1300.2, Record of Non-Government Standards Activity. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies.

  18. Activation of eNOS in endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation involves components of the DNA damage response pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Sakai, Yuri; Yamamori, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi; Hattori, Yuichi; Kondo, Takashi; Inanami, Osamu

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • eNOS activity is increased in BAECs exposed to X-rays. • ATM is involved in this increased eNOS activity. • HSP90 modulates the radiation-induced activation of ATM and eNOS. - Abstract: In this study, the involvement of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was investigated in X-irradiated bovine aortic endothelial cells. The activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the phosphorylation of serine 1179 of eNOS (eNOS-Ser1179) were significantly increased in irradiated cells. The radiation-induced increases in NOS activity and eNOS-Ser1179 phosphorylation levels were significantly reduced by treatment with either an ATM inhibitor (Ku-60019) or an HSP90 inhibitor (geldanamycin). Geldanamycin was furthermore found to suppress the radiation-induced phosphorylation of ATM-Ser1181. Our results indicate that the radiation-induced eNOS activation in bovine aortic endothelial cells is regulated by ATM and HSP90.

  19. Aesthetic activities and aesthetic attitudes: influences of education, background and personality on interest and involvement in the arts.

    PubMed

    McManus, I C; Furnham, A

    2006-11-01

    There have been few studies of why some people are frequently involved in aesthetic activities such as going to the theatre, reading or playing musical instruments, whereas others are less involved. This study assesses the broad roles of education, personality and demographic factors such as social class, age and sex. More aesthetic activity was associated with music and art education, whereas science education had a substantial negative relationship with aesthetic activity, both directly and also indirectly via reduced art education. More aesthetic activity was particularly related to higher scores on the personality factor of openness, and also to lower scores on agreeableness and conscientiousness. Higher parental social class was also associated with more aesthetic activity, as also was lower age. Sex had no relationship to aesthetic activity, as neither did masculinity-femininity. Positive aesthetic attitudes were also related moderately to aesthetic activity, but were particularly strongly related to openness to experience, and somewhat less to extraversion. Class, age and sex had no direct relationship to aesthetic attitudes. PMID:17018189

  20. Cdc42-Dependent Activation of NADPH Oxidase Is Involved in Ethanol-Induced Neuronal Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Ke, Zunji; Chen, Gang; Xu, Mei; Bower, Kimberly A.; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress play an important role in ethanol-induced damage to both the developing and mature central nervous system (CNS). The mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced neuronal ROS, however, remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of NADPH oxidase (NOX) in ethanol-induced ROS generation. We demonstrated that ethanol activated NOX and inhibition of NOX reduced ethanol-promoted ROS generation. Ethanol significantly increased the expression of p47phox and p67phox, the essential subunits for NOX activation in cultured neuronal cells and the cerebral cortex of infant mice. Ethanol caused serine phosphorylation and membrane translocation of p47phox and p67phox, which were prerequisites for NOX assembly and activation. Knocking down p47phox with the small interfering RNA was sufficient to attenuate ethanol-induced ROS production and ameliorate ethanol-mediated oxidative damage, which is indicated by a decrease in protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation. Ethanol activated cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42) and overexpression of a dominant negative (DN) Cdc42 abrogate ethanol-induced NOX activation and ROS generation. These results suggest that Cdc42-dependent NOX activation mediates ethanol-induced oxidative damages to neurons. PMID:22662267

  1. In vitro stabilization and minimum active component of polygalacturonic acid synthase involved in pectin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Takao; Ishimizu, Takeshi; Akita, Kazumasa; Hase, Sumihiro

    2007-09-01

    Polygalacturonic acid (PGA) synthase successively transfers galacturonic acid to oligogalacturonic acid by an alpha1,4-linkage to synthesize PGA, the backbone of plant pectic homogalacturonan. PGA synthase has not been purified to date due to its instability in vitro. In this study, we found stable conditions in vitro and separated a minimum active component of the enzymes from pea and azuki bean epicotyls. The PGA synthase lost its activity in 500 mM of sodium chloride or potassium chloride, while it was relatively stable at low salt concentrations. Under low salt concentrations, three peaks bearing PGA synthase activity were separated, by gel filtration and sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The molecular masses of these enzymes solubilized with 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethyl-ammonio]propanesulfonic acid were estimated to be 21,000, 5,000, and 590 kDa. The two higher molecular mass PGA synthases converted to smaller PGA synthase proteins when treated with high salt concentrations, while retaining their activity, indicating that PGA synthase has a minimum active component for its activity. PMID:17827695

  2. Inhibitory effect of caffeic acid on ADP-induced thrombus formation and platelet activation involves mitogen-activated protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yu; Li, Quan; Liu, Yu-Ying; Sun, Kai; Fan, Jing-Yu; Wang, Chuan-She; Han, Jing-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA), one of the active constituents of Radix Salvia miltiorrhizae, exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, few studies have assessed the ability of CA to inhibit platelet mediated thrombus generation in vivo. In this study, we investigated the antithrombotic effect of CA in mouse cerebral arterioles and venules using intravital microscopy. The antiplatelet activity of CA in ADP stimulated mouse platelets in vitro was also examined in attempt to explore the underlying mechanism. Our results demonstrated that CA (1.25–5 mg/kg) significantly inhibited thrombus formation in vivo. In vitro, CA (25–100 μM) inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation, P-selectin expression, ATP release, Ca2+ mobilization, and integrin αIIbβ3 activation. Additionally, CA attenuated p38, ERK, and JNK activation, and enhanced cAMP levels. Taken together, these data provide evidence for the inhibition of CA on platelet-mediated thrombosis in vivo, which is, at least partly, mediated by interference in phosphorylation of ERK, p38, and JNK leading to elevation of cAMP and down-regulation of P-selectin expression and αIIbβ3 activation. These results suggest that CA may have potential for the treatment of aberrant platelet activation-related diseases. PMID:26345207

  3. Anticonvulsant activity of Citrus aurantium blossom essential oil (neroli): involvment of the GABAergic system.

    PubMed

    Azanchi, Taravat; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Asgarpanah, Jinous

    2014-11-01

    Citrus aurantium L. blossoms are an important medicinal plant part in Iran and some other countries. It is used in traditional medicine as an antiseizure and anticonvulsant natural agent. Early in vitro research of the anticonvulsant activity of the blossom extracts were done but there has been no investigation focused on the blossom essential oil and its anticonvulsant activity. The anticonvulsant activity of the essential oil of C. aurantium blossoms (neroli) was investigated. The anticonvulsant activity of neroli was assessed in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsion by i.v. and i.p. methods and maximal electroshock (MES) in mice, with diazepam as the standard drug. While mechanistic studies were conducted using flumazenil, a GABA A-benzodiazepine receptor complex site antagonist. Neroli produced protection against clonic by i.v adminiatration of PTZ at 20 and 40 mg/kg, compared with protection with benzodiazepine. The mean onset and percentage protection against convulsion in neroli-treated mice were reduced by flumazenil. Intraperitonaeal PTZ also decreased the latency of clonic seizure in the neroli (40 mg/kg) treated group. We also showed that neroli (20 and 40 mg/kg), exhibited inhibition of the tonic convulsion induced by MES and decreased the mortality rate. Neroli was analyzed by GC and GC-MS and twenty three constituents, representing 91.0 % of the chromatographical oil were identified. The major components of neroli were characterized as linalool (28.5%), linalyl acetate (19.6%), nerolidol (9.1%) E,E-farnesol (9.1%), α-terpineol (4.9%) and limonene (4.6%) which might be responsible for the anticonvulsant activity. The results suggest that neroli possesses biologically active constituent(s) that have anticonvulsant activity which supports the ethnomedicinal claims of the use of the plant in the management of seizure. PMID:25532295

  4. Possible dopaminergic stimulation of locus coeruleus alpha1-adrenoceptors involved in behavioral activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Quartermain, David; Dunn, Adrian J; Weinshenker, David; Stone, Eric A

    2008-07-01

    alpha(1)-Adrenoceptors of the locus coeruleus (LC) have been implicated in behavioral activation in novel surroundings, but the endogenous agonist that activates these receptors has not been established. In addition to the canonical activation of alpha(1)-receptors by norepinephrine (NE), there is evidence that dopamine (DA) may also activate certain brain alpha(1)-receptors. This study examined the contribution of DA to exploratory activity in a novel cage by determining the effect of infusion of various dopaminergic and adrenergic drugs into the mouse LC. It was found that the D2/D3 agonist, quinpirole, which selectively blocks the release of CNS DA, produced a dose-dependent and virtually complete abolition of exploration and all movement in the novel cage test. The quinpirole-induced inactivity was significantly attenuated by coinfusion of DA but not by the D1 agonist, SKF38390. Furthermore, the DA attenuation of quinpirole inactivity was blocked by coinfusion of the alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, terazosin, but not by the D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390. LC infusions of either quinpirole or terazosin also produced profound inactivity in DA-beta-hydroxylase knockout (Dbh -/-) mice that lack NE, indicating that their behavioral effects were not due to an alteration of the release or action of LC NE. Measurement of endogenous DA, NE, and 5HT and their metabolites in the LC during exposure to the novel cage indicated an increase in the turnover of DA and NE but not 5HT. These results indicate that DA is a candidate as an endogenous agonist for behaviorally activating LC alpha(1)-receptors and may play a role in the activation of this nucleus by novel surroundings. PMID:18435418

  5. Premature senescence involving p53 and p16 is activated in response to constitutive MEK/MAPK mitogenic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Athena W.; Barradas, Marta; Stone, James C.; van Aelst, Linda; Serrano, Manuel; Lowe, Scott W.

    1998-01-01

    Oncogenic Ras transforms immortal rodent cells to a tumorigenic state, in part, by constitutively transmitting mitogenic signals through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. In primary cells, Ras is initially mitogenic but eventually induces premature senescence involving the p53 and p16INK4a tumor suppressors. Constitutive activation of MEK (a component of the MAPK cascade) induces both p53 and p16, and is required for Ras-induced senescence of normal human fibroblasts. Furthermore, activated MEK permanently arrests primary murine fibroblasts but forces uncontrolled mitogenesis and transformation in cells lacking either p53 or INK4a. The precisely opposite response of normal and immortalized cells to constitutive activation of the MAPK cascade implies that premature senescence acts as a fail-safe mechanism to limit the transforming potential of excessive Ras mitogenic signaling. Consequently, constitutive MAPK signaling activates p53 and p16 as tumor suppressors. PMID:9765203

  6. The relationship between active ghrelin levels and human obesity involves alterations in resting energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Marzullo, Paolo; Verti, Barbara; Savia, Giulio; Walker, Gillian E; Guzzaloni, Gabriele; Tagliaferri, Mariantonella; Di Blasio, Annamaria; Liuzzi, Antonio

    2004-02-01

    Ghrelin is a gastric hormone that exerts a stimulatory effect on appetite and fat accumulation. Ser(3) octanoylation is regarded as a prerequisite for ghrelin biological activity, although des-octanoylated forms may retain biological functions in vitro. Circulating ghrelin levels are usually low in obesity and in states of positive energy balance. Hence, the aim of our study was to analyze plasma active and serum total ghrelin levels in 20 obese (ages, 22-42 yr; body mass index, 41.3 +/- 1.1 kg/m(2)) and 20 lean subjects (ages, 22-43 yr; body mass index, 22.4 +/- 0.6 kg/m(2)) as well as their relationship to measures of glucose homeostasis, body fat, and resting energy expenditure (REE). The measured/predicted REE percentage ratio was calculated to subdivide groups into those with positive (> or = 100% ) and negative (<100%) ratio values. In obese patients, plasma active (180 +/- 18 vs. 411 +/- 57 pg/ml; P < 0.001) and serum total ghrelin levels (3650 +/- 408 vs. 5263 +/- 643 pg/ml; P < 0.05) were significantly lower when compared with lean subjects. Hence, ghrelin activity, defined as the proportion of active over total ghrelin levels, was similarly reduced in the obese state (6.1 +/- 0.9% vs. 8.4 +/- 1%; P < 0.05). There was a significant correlation between active and total ghrelin (r = 0.62; P < 0.001), and between total ghrelin and insulin (r = -0.53; P < 0.001) or insulin resistance using the homeostatis model of assessment-insulin resistance (r = -0.49; P < 0.001) approach. Significantly higher active ghrelin levels (214 +/- 22 vs. 159 +/- 30 pg/ml; P < 0.05) and ghrelin activity (8 +/- 1.7% vs. 4.9 +/- 0.9%; P < 0.05) were observed in patients with positive compared with negative measured/predicted REE ratio values. Our study shows that obesity is associated with an impairment of the entire ghrelin system. The observation that ghrelin is further decreased in cases of abnormal energy profit adds new evidence to the relationship between ghrelin activity and energy balance in obesity. PMID:14764817

  7. Activity of hypothalamic dopaminergic neurones during the day of oestrus: involvement in prolactin secretion.

    PubMed

    Leite, C M; Ribeiro, A B; Szawka, R E; Anselmo-Franci, J A

    2010-10-01

    A secretory surge of prolactin occurs on the afternoon of oestrus in cycling rats. Pituitary prolactin is inhibited by dopamine. We evaluated the activity of the neuroendocrine dopaminergic neurones during oestrus and dioestrus, as determined by dopaminergic activity in the median eminence and neurointermediate lobe of the pituitary, as well as Fos-related antigen expression in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive (ir) neurones of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and periventricular nucleus (Pe). During oestrus, the 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid/dopamine ratio in the median eminence decreased at 16.00 h, coinciding with the increase in plasma prolactin levels. Similarly, the expression of Fos-related antigen in TH-ir neurones of Pe and rostral-, dorsomedial- and caudal-ARC also decreased at 16.00 h. On dioestrus, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid/dopamine ratio in the median eminence and Fos-related antigen expression in TH-ir neurones of Pe and rostral-ARC decreased at 18.00 h, whereas prolactin levels were unaltered. No variation in dopaminergic activity was found in the neurointermediate lobe of the pituitary on either oestrus or dioestrus. The number of TH-ir neurones in the ARC and parameters of dopaminergic activity were found to be generally lower on oestrus compared to dioestrus. The transitory decrease in the activity of neuroendocrine dopaminergic neurones temporally associated with the prolactin surge on the afternoon of oestrus suggests a role for dopamine in the generation of the oestrous prolactin surge. PMID:20722974

  8. Tumor cell alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity and its involvement in GcMAF-related macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Saharuddin B; Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi

    2002-05-01

    Alpha-N-acetyl galactosaminidase (alpha-NaGalase) has been reported to accumulate in serum of cancer patients and be responsible for deglycosylation of Gc protein, which is a precursor of GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade, finally leading to immunosuppression in advanced cancer patients. We studied the biochemical characterization of alpha-NaGalase from several human tumor cell lines. We also examined its effect on the potency of GcMAF to activate mouse peritoneal macrophage to produce superoxide in GcMAF-mediated macrophage activation cascade. The specific activity of alpha-NaGalases from human colon tumor cell line HCT116, human hepatoma cell line HepG2, and normal human liver cells (Chang liver cell line) were evaluated using two types of substrates; GalNAc-alpha-PNP (exo-type substrate) and Gal-beta-GalNAc-alpha-PNP (endo-type substrate). Tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase having higher activity than normal alpha-NaGalase, had higher substrate specificity to the exo-type substrate than to the endo-type substrate, and still maintained its activity at pH 7. GcMAF enhance superoxide production in mouse macrophage, and pre-treatment of GcMAF with tumor cell lysate reduce the activity. We conclude that tumor-derived alpha-NaGalase is different in biochemical characterization compared to normal alpha-NaGalase from normal Chang liver cells. In addition, tumor cell-derived alpha-NaGalase decreases the potency of GcMAF on macrophage activation. PMID:12062184

  9. The upstream activator CTF/NF1 and RNA polymerase II share a common element involved in transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, H; Lis, J T; Xiao, H; Greenblatt, J; Friesen, J D

    1994-01-01

    The carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II consists of tandem repeats of a heptapeptide with the consensus YSPTSPS. It has been shown that the heptapeptide repeat interacts directly with the general transcription factor TFIID. We report here that the CTD activates transcription when fused to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. More importantly, we find that the proline-rich transcriptional activation domain of the CCAAT-box-binding factor CTF/NF1 contains a sequence with striking similarity to the heptapeptide repeats of the CTD. We show that this CTD-like motif is essential for the transcriptional activator function of the proline-rich domain of CTF/NF1. Deletion of and point mutations in this CTD-like motif abolish the transcriptional activator function of the proline-rich domain, while natural CTD repeats from RNA polymerase II are fully functional in place of the CTD-like motif. We further show that the proline-rich activation domain of CTF/NF1 interacts directly with the TATA-box-binding protein (TBP), and that a mutation in the CTD-like motif that abolishes transcriptional activation reduces the affinity of the proline-rich domain for TBP. These results demonstrate that a class of proline-rich activator proteins and RNA polymerase II possess a common structural and functional component which can interact with the same target in the general transcription machinery. We discuss the implications of these results for the mechanisms of transcriptional activation in eucaryotes. Images PMID:8029001

  10. Involvement of Activating NK Cell Receptors and Their Modulation in Pathogen Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Marras, Francesco; Bozzano, Federica; De Maria, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are endowed with cell-structure-sensing receptors providing inhibitory protection from self-destruction (inhibitory NK receptors, iNKRs, including killer inhibitory receptors and other molecules) and rapid triggering potential leading to functional cell activation by Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokine receptors, and activating NK cell receptors including natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs, i.e., NKp46, NKp46, and NKp44). NCR and NKG2D recognize ligands on infected cells which may be endogenous or may directly bind to some structures derived from invading pathogens. In this paper, we address the known direct or indirect interactions between activating receptors and pathogens and their expression during chronic HIV and HCV infections. PMID:21860586

  11. NIK is involved in constitutive activation of the alternative NF-{kappa}B pathway and proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nishina, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 513 Wasedatsurumaki-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0041 ; Gohda, Jin; Semba, Kentaro; Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-science, Waseda University, 2-2 Wakamatsu-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 ; Inoue, Jun-ichiro

    2009-10-09

    Pancreatic cancer has one of the poorest prognoses among human neoplasms. Constitutive activation of NF-{kappa}B is frequently observed in pancreatic cancer cells and is involved in their malignancy. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of this constitutive NF-{kappa}B activation. Here, we show that the alternative pathway is constitutively activated and NF-{kappa}B-inducing kinase (NIK), a mediator of the alternative pathway, is significantly expressed in pancreatic cancer cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of NIK expression followed by subcellular fractionation revealed that NIK is constitutively involved in the processing of p100 and nuclear transport of p52 and RelB in pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, NIK silencing significantly suppressed proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. These results clearly indicate that NIK is involved in the constitutive activation of the alternative pathway and controls cell proliferation in pancreatic cancer cells. Therefore, NIK might be a novel target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  12. Activation of the oxidative burst by yeast elicitor in Catharanthus roseus cells occurs independently of the activation of genes involved in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pauw, Bea; van Duijn, Bert; Kijne, Jan W; Memelink, Johan

    2004-08-01

    In Catharanthus roseus cell suspensions, expression of several terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) biosynthetic genes, including those encoding strictosidine synthase and tryptophan decarboxylase, is coordinately induced by fungal elicitors such as yeast extract (YE). This induction is mediated by several signaling steps including the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid, and the activation of the jasmonic acid-responsive ORCA transcription factors. We investigated a possible role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a second messenger in this system. YE was shown to activate the production of ROS, which was dependent on protein phosphorylation and calcium influx. However, ROS generation was neither necessary for the induction of genes involved in TIA biosynthesis by YE nor by itself sufficient to induce these genes. Therefore, we conclude that activation of the oxidative burst by YE occurs independently of the activation of genes involved in TIA biosynthesis. PMID:15604717

  13. ACEII, a novel transcriptional activator involved in regulation of cellulase and xylanase genes of Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Aro, N; Saloheimo, A; Ilmén, M; Penttilä, M

    2001-06-29

    A novel yeast-based method to isolate transcriptional activators was applied to clone regulators binding to the cellulase promoter cbh1 of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina). This led to the isolation of the cellulase activator ace2 encoding for a protein belonging to the class of zinc binuclear cluster proteins found exclusively in fungi. The DNA-binding domain of ACEII was expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein in Escherichia coli, and ACEII was shown to bind in vitro to the 5'-GGCTAATAA site present in the cbh1 promoter. This site also contains the proposed binding sequence of the xylanase activator XlnR of Aspergillus niger. Mutation of the GGC triplet abolished ACEII binding. The function of ACEII was studied by analyzing the effects of ace2 deletion in the hypercellulolytic T. reesei strain ALKO2221. Deletion of the ace2 gene led to lowered induction kinetics of mRNAs encoding the major cellulases cellobiohydrolases I and II and endoglucanases I and II and to 30-70% reduced cellulase activity when the fungus was grown on medium containing Solka floc cellulose. The expression level of the gene encoding xylanase was also affected. ace2 deletion led to lowered xyn2 expression in cellulose-induced cultivation. Cellulase induction by sophorose was not affected by ace2 deletion. PMID:11304525

  14. Stimulus-driven incidental episodic retrieval involves activation of the left posterior parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    LaMontagne, Pamela J; Habib, Reza

    2010-09-01

    Recent reviews have highlighted the important role that the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) serves during episodic memory retrieval. A handful of studies have also noted that the PPC is active when old information is present on tasks that do not require overt episodic retrieval. Based on this observation, we examined whether incidental study-phase retrieval, cued by the repeated presence of stimuli, was sufficient to activate the PPC and whether this activation would be modulated by the lag between the initial and repeated presentation of those stimuli. Blood flow was measured with positron emission tomography (PET) while subjects classified pictures that were either new, repeated following a short lag, or repeated following a long lag. Activity in the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL, BA 40), amongst other regions, was greater for repeated than new pictures, and was greater following a long lag than a short lag, even though intentional retrieval was not required. These results suggest that the presence of repeated stimuli is sufficient to initiate left PPC mediated episodic retrieval. PMID:20638394

  15. The Effect of the New Copyright Law on the Interlibrary Loan Activity Involving Periodicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steuben, John

    Since 1954 when Congress authorized the Copyright Office to prepare a series of studies to serve as background for revision hearings, copyright has been one of the major issues in librarianship. Although the impact that the New Copyright Law will have on interlibrary loan activity is yet to be determined, there is a need to know whether present

  16. Fantasy Activity and the Televiewing Event: Considerations for an Information Processing Construct of Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindlof, Thomas R.

    The similarities between television viewing and fantasy activity (daydreaming, reverie, mind-wandering, internal dialogue) more than warrant the building of a theoretical construct, especially in the context of recent empirical research on television viewing consequences. A construct of the television viewing process, based on cognitive theories…

  17. Marketing Informal Education Institutions in Israel: The Centrality of Customers' Active Involvement in Service Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oplatka, Izhar

    2004-01-01

    The current paper outlines a unique marketing perspective that prevails in some informal education institutions in Israel parallel with "traditional modes of marketing", such as promotion, public relations and the like. Based on a case study research in five community centres, a service development based on active participation of the potential

  18. How Curriculum Leaders Can Involve the Right Brain in Active Reading and Writing Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinatra, Richard; Stahl-Gemake, Josephine

    Curriculum leaders, program specialists, and teachers can intentionally arouse the activation of one hemisphere of the brain over the other through the use of right brain strategies in language learning. While most functions of the left hemisphere are concerned with convergent production (getting the right answer), functions of the right…

  19. Capsaicin-induced neurotoxicity in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons: involvement of calcium-activated proteases.

    PubMed

    Chard, P S; Bleakman, D; Savidge, J R; Miller, R J

    1995-04-01

    We examined the mechanism by which capsaicin produces its toxic effects on cultures of rat sensory neurons. Capsaicin caused a robust increase in [Ca2+]i in a subpopulation of cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. Similarly, a brief exposure to capsaicin resulted in delayed degeneration of a subpopulation of the cells. This subpopulation (about 35% of the cells present) was characterized by a capsaicin-induced uptake of Co2+, which could be detected cytochemically. Both capsaicin-induced Co2+ uptake and capsaicin-induced cell death were blocked by the capsaicin antagonist Ruthenium Red. Cell death was also prevented by removal of external calcium or by inhibiting calcium-activated proteases such as calpain. Evidence that calpain activity was increased was provided by examining the amount of degradation of the preferred calpain substrate alpha-spectrin. Capsaicin treatment produced a significant increase in the levels of the 150,000 molecular weight spectrin breakdown product. Furthermore, applying the protease inhibitors E64 or MDL 28,170 reduced capsaicin-mediated cell death. It is concluded that capsaicin kills a subpopulation of sensory neurons by activating a receptor-operated channel. The consequent Ca2+ ion influx causes large increases in [Ca2+]i and subsequent activation of Ca(2+)-sensitive proteases. This model provides support for the role of [Ca2+]i as the orchestrator of delayed neuronal degeneration. PMID:7617165

  20. Regrouping: Organized Activity Involvement and Social Adjustment across the Transition to High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohnert, Amy M.; Aikins, Julie Wargo; Arola, Nicole T.

    2013-01-01

    Although organized activities (OAs) have been established as important contexts of development, limited work has examined the role of OAs across the high school transition in buffering adolescents' social adjustment by providing opportunities for visibility and peer affiliation. The transition to high school is characterized by numerous…

  1. Carboxy-Terminal Region Involved in Activity of Escherichia coli TolC

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Hiroyasu; Izawa, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Keinosuke

    2001-01-01

    The Escherichia coli TolC acts as a channel tunnel in the transport of various molecules across the outer membrane. Partial-deletion studies of tolC revealed that the region extending from the 50th to the 60th amino acid residue from the carboxy terminus plays an important role in this transport activity of TolC. PMID:11698388

  2. Carboxy-terminal region involved in activity of Escherichia coli TolC.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, H; Izawa, H; Okamoto, K

    2001-12-01

    The Escherichia coli TolC acts as a channel tunnel in the transport of various molecules across the outer membrane. Partial-deletion studies of tolC revealed that the region extending from the 50th to the 60th amino acid residue from the carboxy terminus plays an important role in this transport activity of TolC. PMID:11698388

  3. Families and School Personnel Involved in a Literacy and Physical Activity Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, James A.; Richardson, Maurine V.; Sacks, Mary Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    A traditional part of American education has been to include the families in the educational process of their children. The needs and complexities of today's families and classrooms have never been greater. Programs and activities used with families, and school interactions 10 to 15 years ago are not effective for today's complex families and…

  4. School-Based Extracurricular Activity Involvement and Adolescent Self-Esteem: A Growth-Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kort-Butler, Lisa A.; Hagewen, Kellie J.

    2011-01-01

    Research on adolescent self-esteem indicates that adolescence is a time in which individuals experience important changes in their physical, cognitive, and social identities. Prior research suggests that there is a positive relationship between an adolescent's participation in structured extracurricular activities and well-being in a variety of…

  5. Cultural Variation in Young Children's Opportunities for Involvement in Adult Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morelli, Gilda A.; And Others

    This study gathered information on the extent to which children participate in the mature routines of their community, and the extent to which elders participate in child-centered activities. Subjects were children ranging in age from 30 to 45 months from the four societies of: (1) Mayan Indians living in a rural Guatemalan town; (2) the Efe…

  6. Basolateral K+ channel involvement in forskolin-activated chloride secretion in human colon.

    PubMed

    McNamara, B; Winter, D C; Cuffe, J E; O'Sullivan, G C; Harvey, B J

    1999-08-15

    1. In this study we investigated the role of basolateral potassium transport in maintaining cAMP-activated chloride secretion in human colonic epithelium. 2. Ion transport was quantified in isolated human colonic epithelium using the short-circuit current technique. Basolateral potassium transport was studied using nystatin permeabilization. Intracellular calcium measurements were obtained from isolated human colonic crypts using fura-2 spectrofluorescence imaging. 3. In intact isolated colonic strips, forskolin and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) activated an inward transmembrane current (ISC) consistent with anion secretion (for forskolin DeltaISC = 63.8+/-6.2 microA cm(-2), n = 6; for PGE2 DeltaISC = 34.3+/-5.2 microA cm(-2), n = 6). This current was inhibited in chloride-free Krebs solution or by inhibiting basolateral chloride uptake with bumetanide and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid DIDS). 4. The forskolin- and PGE2-induced chloride secretion was inhibited by basolateral exposure to barium (5 mM), tetrapentylammonium (10 microM) and tetraethylammonium (10 mM). 5. The transepithelial current produced under an apical to serosal K+ gradient in nystatin-perforated colon is generated at the basolateral membrane by K+ transport. Forskolin failed to activate this current under conditions of high or low calcium and failed to increase the levels of intracellular calcium in isolated crypts 6. In conclusion, we propose that potassium recycling through basolateral K+ channels is essential for cAMP-activated chloride secretion. PMID:10432355

  7. Activity Involvement among Suicidal and Nonsuicidal High-Risk and Typical Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazza, James J.; Eggert, Leona L.

    2001-01-01

    Compared weekly activities among four groups of high risk and typical high school students: potential dropouts at suicide risk; typical youth at suicide risk; potential dropouts not at suicide risk; and typical youth not at suicide risk. Of the 1,286 participants, 39.4% of high risk and 30.1% of typical high school students screened in at suicide

  8. Marketing Informal Education Institutions in Israel: The Centrality of Customers' Active Involvement in Service Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oplatka, Izhar

    2004-01-01

    The current paper outlines a unique marketing perspective that prevails in some informal education institutions in Israel parallel with "traditional modes of marketing", such as promotion, public relations and the like. Based on a case study research in five community centres, a service development based on active participation of the potential…

  9. Involvement of sensor kinase gene (skrp 1122) for biocontrol activity by Pseudomonas synxantha BG33R

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research identified Pseudomonas synxantha BG33R as potential carrier for a nematode egg-kill factor. Further research indicated that BG33R exhibits a broad-spectrum of antagonistic activity against oomycetes, fungi, nematodes and insects. Earlier screening for negative egg-kill factor indi...

  10. Activity Involvement among Suicidal and Nonsuicidal High-Risk and Typical Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazza, James J.; Eggert, Leona L.

    2001-01-01

    Compared weekly activities among four groups of high risk and typical high school students: potential dropouts at suicide risk; typical youth at suicide risk; potential dropouts not at suicide risk; and typical youth not at suicide risk. Of the 1,286 participants, 39.4% of high risk and 30.1% of typical high school students screened in at suicide…

  11. The Development of Spatial Skills through Interventions Involving Block Building Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Beth M.; Andrews, Nicole; Schindler, Holly; Kersh, Joanne E.; Samper, Alexandra; Copley, Juanita

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the use of block-building interventions to develop spatial-reasoning skills in kindergartners. Two intervention conditions and a control condition were included to determine, first, whether the block building activities themselves benefited children's spatial skills, and secondly, whether a story context further improved…

  12. Improving image quality in reflection confocal microscopy involving gold nanoparticles and osmotically active immersion liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, B. A.; Lemelle, A.; Kozhevnikov, I. S.; Akchurin, G. G.; Meglinski, I. V.

    2011-03-01

    We consider the possibility of using gold nanoparticles to improve the image contrast of biotissue structures in reflection confocal laser microscopy. We present the results of experimental studies using gold nanospheres with a diameter of 60 nm compared to osmotically active immersion contrast agents based on glycerol.

  13. GBA2-Encoded β-Glucosidase Activity Is Involved in the Inflammatory Response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lampronti, Ilaria; Marchetti, Nicola; Aureli, Massimo; Bassi, Rosaria; Giri, Maria Grazia; Bezzerri, Valentino; Lovato, Valentina; Cantù, Cinzia; Munari, Silvia; Cheng, Seng H.; Cavazzini, Alberto; Gambari, Roberto; Sonnino, Sandro; Cabrini, Giulio; Dechecchi, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Current anti-inflammatory strategies for the treatment of pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) are limited; thus, there is continued interest in identifying additional molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. Given the emerging role of sphingolipids (SLs) in various respiratory disorders, including CF, drugs that selectively target the enzymes associated with SL metabolism are under development. Miglustat, a well-characterized iminosugar-based inhibitor of β-glucosidase 2 (GBA2), has shown promise in CF treatment because it reduces the inflammatory response to infection by P. aeruginosa and restores F508del-CFTR chloride channel activity. This study aimed to probe the molecular basis for the anti-inflammatory activity of miglustat by examining specifically the role of GBA2 following the infection of CF bronchial epithelial cells by P. aeruginosa. We also report the anti-inflammatory activity of another potent inhibitor of GBA2 activity, namely N-(5-adamantane-1-yl-methoxy)pentyl)-deoxynojirimycin (Genz-529648). In CF bronchial cells, inhibition of GBA2 by miglustat or Genz-529648 significantly reduced the induction of IL-8 mRNA levels and protein release following infection by P. aeruginosa. Hence, the present data demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of miglustat and Genz-529648 are likely exerted through inhibition of GBA2. PMID:25141135

  14. The Effect of the New Copyright Law on the Interlibrary Loan Activity Involving Periodicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steuben, John

    Since 1954 when Congress authorized the Copyright Office to prepare a series of studies to serve as background for revision hearings, copyright has been one of the major issues in librarianship. Although the impact that the New Copyright Law will have on interlibrary loan activity is yet to be determined, there is a need to know whether present…

  15. Anti-inflammatory Activity of Saxifragin via Inhibition of NF-κB Involves Caspase-1 Activation.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Se-Yun; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Jeon, Eunjin; Nugroho, Agung; Park, Hee-Jun; An, Hyo-Jin

    2015-07-24

    Saxifragin, the 5-glucoside of the flavonoid quercetin, is found in plants and insects. It has been reported that saxifragin has peroxynitrite-scavenging effects. However, the mechanism of anti-inflammatory effects of saxifragin has not yet been clearly identified. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of saxifragin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages and animal models of inflammation. We found that saxifragin suppressed the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages by suppressing the level of protein and mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), respectively. Furthermore, saxifragin inhibited mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-1β. We studied the inhibitory effects of saxifragin on the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, activation of caspase-1, and phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Furthermore, pretreatment with saxifragin increased the survival rate of mice with LPS-induced septic death. Collectively, these findings suggest that saxifragin exerts anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting NF-κB, caspase-1, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. PMID:26171782

  16. Involvement of mitochondrial activity in mediating ELF-EMF stimulatory effect on human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Roberto; Delle Monache, Simona; Bennato, Francesca; Di Bartolomeo, Claudia; Scrimaglio, Renato; Cinque, Benedetta; Colonna, Rosella Cardigno

    2011-01-01

    It has recently been reported that the exposure of human spermatozoa to an extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic field (EMF) with a square waveform of 5 mT amplitude and frequency of 50 Hz improves sperm motility. The functional relationship between the energy metabolism and the enhancement of human sperm motility induced by ELF-EMF was investigated. Sperm exposure to ELF-EMF resulted in a progressive and significant increase of mitochondrial membrane potential and levels of ATP, ADP and NAD(+) that was associated with a progressive and significant increase in the sperm kinematic parameters. No significant effects were detected on other parameters such as ATP/ADP ratio and energy charge. When carbamoyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CICCP) was applied to inhibit the oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria, the values of energy parameters and motility in the sperm incubated in the presence of glucose and exposed to ELF-EMF did not change, thus indicating that the glycolysis was not involved in mediating ELF-EMF stimulatory effect on motility. By contrast, when pyruvate and lactate were provided instead of glucose, the energy status and motility increased significantly in ELF-EMF-treated sperm. Under these culture conditions, the inhibition of glycolitic metabolism by 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DOG) again resulted in increased values of energy and kinematic parameters, indicating that gluconeogenesis was not involved in producing glucose for use in glycolysis. We concluded that the key role in mediating the stimulatory effects exerted by ELF-EMF on human sperm motility is played by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation rather than glycolysis. PMID:20690107

  17. Designing active flutter suppression for high-dimensional aeroelastic systems involving a control delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rui; Hu, Haiyan; Zhao, Yonghui

    2012-10-01

    Many linear control laws, such as optimal controllers and classical controllers, have seen their applications to suppressing the aeroelastic vibrations of the high-dimensional aeroelastic system. However, those conventional control laws may not work effectively if the high-dimensional aeroelastic system involves a control delay. The paper reveals the effect of input time delay on the stability of a controlled high-dimensional aeroelastic system in an incompressible flow field and presents a new optimal control law to suppress the flutter of the high-dimensional aeroelastic system with an input time delay in the control loop. The procedure of designing the proposed control law includes three steps as follows. The first step is to convert the system described by a set of differential equations with a time delay into a set of difference equations involving discrete delay terms by using zero-order holder. The second step, exhibiting the novelty of the study, is to transform the difference equations with delay terms into a set of delay-free difference equations via a state transformation. The third step is to use the theory of linear control, say, the theory of Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG), to complete the design of controller by solving an equivalent Riccati equation. The paper demonstrates the efficacy of proposed method in designing the flutter suppression controller for a wind-tunnel model of Multiple-Actuated Wing. The new method works much better than classical feedback and conventional LQG controllers, both of which do not take the input time delay into account and may induce instability, when the input time delay becomes significant.

  18. Factors Involved in Iranian Women Heads of Household’s Health Promotion Activities: A Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Forough; Seyedfatemi, Naima; Rezaei, Mahboubeh

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to explore and describe the factors involved in Iranian women heads of household’s health promotion activities. Grounded theory was used as the method. Sixteen women heads of household were recruited. Data were generated by semi structured interviews. Our findings indicated that remainder of resources (money, time and energy) alongside perceived severity of health risk were two main factors whereas women’s personal and socio-economic characteristics were two contextual factors involved in these women's health promotion activities. To help these women improve their health status, we recommended that the government, non-governmental organizations and health care professionals provide them with required resources and increase their knowledge by holding training sessions. PMID:24039645

  19. Functional dissection of Escherichia coli phosphotransacetylase structural domains and analysis of key compounds involved in activity regulation.

    PubMed

    Campos-Bermudez, Valeria Alina; Bologna, Federico Pablo; Andreo, Carlos Santiago; Drincovich, María Fabiana

    2010-04-01

    Escherichia coli phosphotransacetylase (Pta) catalyzes the reversible interconversion of acetyl-CoA and acetyl phosphate. Both compounds are critical in E. coli metabolism, and acetyl phosphate is also involved in the regulation of certain signal transduction pathways. Along with acetate kinase, Pta plays an important role in acetate production when E. coli grows on rich medium; alternatively, it is involved in acetate utilization at high acetate concentrations. E. coli Pta is composed of three different domains, but only the C-terminal one, called PTA_PTB, is specific for all Ptas. In the present work, the characterization of E. coli Pta and deletions from the N-terminal region were performed. E. coli Pta acetyl phosphate-forming and acetyl phosphate-consuming reactions display different maximum activities, and are differentially regulated by pyruvate and phosphoenolpyruvate. These compounds activate acetyl phosphate production, but inhibit acetyl-CoA production, thus playing a critical role in defining the rates of the two Pta reactions. The characterization of three truncated Ptas, which all display Pta activity, indicates that the substrate-binding site is located at the C-terminal PTA_PTB domain. However, the N-terminal P-loop NTPase domain is involved in expression of the maximal catalytic activity, stabilization of the hexameric native state, and Pta activity regulation by NADH, ATP, phosphoenolpyruvate, and pyruvate. The truncated protein Pta-F3 was able to complement the growth on acetate of an E. coli mutant defective in acetyl-CoA synthetase and Pta, indicating that, although not regulated by metabolites, the Pta C-terminal domain is active in vivo. PMID:20236319

  20. Involvement of ASK1 activation in apoptosis induced by NPe6-PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Zhang, Zhen-zhen; Zhang, Zhigang

    2010-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employing photosensiter N-aspartyl chlorin e6 (NPe6) can induce lysosome disruption and initiate apoptotic pathway. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase (ASK1) is an important regulator of apoptosis in response to various stresses, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and calcium influx. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis induced by NPe6-PDT in ASTC-a-1 cells. The results showed that the activities of ASK1 increased in response to NPe6-PDT. Over-expression of wild-type or activated mutant of ASK1 could obviously decrease cell viability and increase cell death; while inhibition of ASK1 significantly decreased cell apoptosis. These results suggested that ASK1 plays an important role in apoptosis induced by NPe6-PDT.

  1. Killing of Staphylococci by θ-Defensins Involves Membrane Impairment and Activation of Autolytic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wilmes, Miriam; Stockem, Marina; Bierbaum, Gabriele; Schlag, Martin; Götz, Friedrich; Tran, Dat Q.; Schaal, Justin B.; Ouellette, André J.; Selsted, Michael E.; Sahl, Hans-Georg

    2014-01-01

    θ-Defensins are cyclic antimicrobial peptides expressed in leukocytes of Old world monkeys. To get insight into their antibacterial mode of action, we studied the activity of RTDs (rhesus macaque θ-defensins) against staphylococci. We found that in contrast to other defensins, RTDs do not interfere with peptidoglycan biosynthesis, but rather induce bacterial lysis in staphylococci by interaction with the bacterial membrane and/or release of cell wall lytic enzymes. Potassium efflux experiments and membrane potential measurements revealed that the membrane impairment by RTDs strongly depends on the energization of the membrane. In addition, RTD treatment caused the release of Atl-derived cell wall lytic enzymes probably by interaction with membrane-bound lipoteichoic acid. Thus, the premature and uncontrolled activity of these enzymes contributes strongly to the overall killing by θ-defensins. Interestingly, a similar mode of action has been described for Pep5, an antimicrobial peptide of bacterial origin. PMID:25632351

  2. Transthyretin is involved in depression-like behaviour and exploratory activity.

    PubMed

    Sousa, João Carlos; Grandela, Catarina; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; de Miguel, Rosário; de Sousa, Liliana; Magalhães, Ana Isabel; Saraiva, Maria João; Sousa, Nuno; Palha, Joana Almeida

    2004-03-01

    Transthyretin (TTR), the major transporter of thyroid hormones and vitamin A in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), binds the Alzheimer beta-peptide and thus might confer protection against neurodegeneration. In addition, altered TTR levels have been described in the CSF of patients with psychiatric disorders, yet its function in the CNS is far from understood. To determine the role of TTR in behaviour we evaluated the performance of TTR-null mice in standardized tasks described to assess depression, exploratory activity and anxiety. We show that the absence of TTR is associated with increased exploratory activity and reduced signs of depressive-like behaviour. In order to investigate the mechanism underlying these alterations, we measured the levels of catecholamines. We found that the levels of noradrenaline were significantly increased in the limbic forebrain of TTR-null mice. This report represents the first clear indication that TTR plays a role in behaviour, probably by modulation of the noradrenergic system. PMID:15009661

  3. Protease-activated receptor 1-dependent neuronal damage involves NMDA receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Hamill, Cecily E.; Mannaioni, Guido; Lyuboslavsky, Polina; Sastre, Aristide A.; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is a G-protein coupled receptor that is expressed throughout the central nervous system. PAR1 activation by brain-derived as well as blood-derived proteases has been shown to have variable and complex effects in a variety of animal models of neuronal injury and inflammation. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of PAR1 on lesion volume in wild-type or PAR1−/− C57Bl/6 mice subjected to transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery or injected with NMDA in the striatum. We found that removal of PAR1 reduced infarct volume following transient focal ischemia to 57% of control. Removal of PAR1 or application of a PAR1 antagonist also reduced the neuronal injury associated with intrastriatal injection of NMDA to 60% of control. To explore whether NMDA receptor potentiation by PAR1 activation contributes to the harmful effects of PAR1, we investigated the effect of NMDA receptor antagonists on the neuroprotective phenotype of PAR1−/− mice. We found that MK801 reduced penumbral but not core neuronal injury in mice subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion or intrastriatal NMDA injection. Lesion volumes in both models were not significantly different between PAR1−/− mice treated with and without MK801. Use of the NMDA receptor antagonist and dissociative anesthetic ketamine also renders NMDA-induced lesion volumes identical in PAR1−/− mice and wild-type mice. These data suggest that the ability of PAR1 activation to potentiate NMDA receptor function may underlie its harmful actions during injury. PMID:19416668

  4. Intracellular cysteine 346 is essentially involved in regulating Panx1 channel activity.

    PubMed

    Bunse, Stefanie; Schmidt, Matthias; Prochnow, Nora; Zoidl, Georg; Dermietzel, Rolf

    2010-12-01

    Pannexins constitute a family of proteins exhibiting predominantly hemichannel activity. Pannexin channels have been suggested to participate in a wide spectrum of biological functions such as propagation of calcium waves, release of IL-1β, and responses to ischemic conditions. At present, the molecular mechanisms regulating pannexin hemichannel activity are essentially unknown. Because cysteines have been shown to constitute key elements in regulating hemichannel properties of the connexin-type we performed site-directed mutagenesis of intracellular cysteine residues of Panx1. Cysteine to serine exchange (Cys → Ser) at the C-terminal position amino acid 346 led to a constitutively leaky hemichannel and subsequently to cell death. Increased channel activity was demonstrated by dye uptake and electrophysiological profiling in injected Xenopus laevis oocytes and transfected N2A cells. Mutations of the remaining intracellular cysteines did not result in major changes of Panx1 channel properties. From these data we conclude that the Cys-346 residue is important for proper functioning of the Panx1 channel. PMID:20829356

  5. Estrogen receptor-mediated transcription involves the activation of multiple kinase pathways in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sara; Rainville, Jennifer; Zhao, Xing; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Pfaff, Donald; Vasudevan, Nandini

    2014-01-01

    While many physiological effects of estrogens (E) are due to regulation of gene transcription by liganded estrogen receptors (ERs), several effects are also mediated, at least in part, by rapid non-genomic actions of E. Though the relative importance of rapid versus genomic effects in the central nervous system is controversial, we showed previously that membrane-limited effects of E, initiated by an estradiol bovine serum albumin conjugate (E2-BSA), could potentiate transcriptional effects of 17β-estradiol from an estrogen response element (ERE)-reporter in neuroblastoma cells. Here, using specific inhibitors and activators in a pharmacological approach, we show that activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate kinase (PI3K) and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, dependent on a Gαq coupled receptor signaling are important in this transcriptional potentiation. We further demonstrate, using ERα phospho-deficient mutants, that E2-BSA mediated phosphorylation of ERα is one mechanism to potentiate transcription from an ERE reporter construct. This study provides a possible mechanism by which signaling from the membrane is coupled to transcription in the nucleus, providing an integrated view of hormone signaling in the brain. PMID:24121066

  6. Involvement of Fungal Pectin Methylesterase Activity in the Interaction Between Fusarium graminearum and Wheat.

    PubMed

    Sella, Luca; Castiglioni, Carla; Paccanaro, Maria Chiara; Janni, Michela; Schäfer, Wilhelm; D'Ovidio, Renato; Favaron, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The genome of Fusarium graminearum, the causal agent of Fusarium head blight of wheat, contains two putative pectin methylesterase (PME)-encoding genes. However, when grown in liquid culture containing pectin, F. graminearum produces only a single PME, which was purified and identified. Its encoding gene, expressed during wheat spike infection, was disrupted by targeted homologous recombination. Two Δpme mutant strains lacked PME activity but were still able to grow on highly methyl-esterified pectin even though their polygalacturonase (PG) activity showed a reduced capacity to depolymerize this substrate. The enzymatic assays performed with purified F. graminearum PG and PME demonstrated an increase in PG activity in the presence of PME on highly methyl-esterified pectin. The virulence of the mutant strains was tested on Triticum aestivum and Triticum durum spikes, and a significant reduction in the percentage of symptomatic spikelets was observed between 7 and 12 days postinfection compared with wild type, demonstrating that the F. graminearum PME contributes to fungal virulence on wheat by promoting spike colonization in the initial and middle stages of infection. In contrast, transgenic wheat plants with increased levels of pectin methyl esterification did not show any increase in resistance to the Δpme mutant, indicating that the infectivity of the fungus relies only to a certain degree on pectin degradation. PMID:26713352

  7. Impaired cortical activation in autistic children: is the mirror neuron system involved?

    PubMed

    Martineau, Jolle; Cochin, Stphanie; Magne, Rmy; Barthelemy, Catherine

    2008-04-01

    The inability to imitate becomes obvious early in autistic children and seems to contribute to learning delay and to disorders of communication and contact. Posture, motility and imitation disorders in autistic syndrome might be the consequence of an abnormality of sensori-motor integration, related to the visual perception of movement, and could reflect impairment of the mirror neuron system (MNS). We compared EEG activity during the observation of videos showing actions or still scenes in 14 right-handed autistic children and 14 right-handed, age- and gender-matched control children (3 girls and 11 boys, aged 5 years 3 months-7 years 11 months). We showed desynchronisation of the EEG in the motor cerebral cortex and the frontal and temporal areas during observation of human actions in the group of healthy children. No such desynchronisation was found in autistic children. Moreover, inversion of the pattern of hemispheric activation was found in autistic children, with increased cortical activity in the right hemisphere in the posterior region, including the centro-parietal and temporo-occipital sites. These results are in agreement with the hypothesis of impairment of the mirror neuron system in autistic disorder. PMID:18313160

  8. Distinguishable promoter elements are involved in transcriptional activation by E1a and cyclic AMP.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K A; Fink, J S; Goodman, R H; Green, M R

    1989-01-01

    The sequence motif CGTCA is critical for binding of a group of cellular transcription factors (ATF, CREB, E4F, and EivF) and for activation of certain E1a-inducible and cyclic AMP (cAMP)-inducible promoters. We have tested different promoter elements containing the CGTCA motif (referred to here as ATF-binding sites) for the ability to function as E1a or cAMP response elements. The adenovirus E4 promoter and the cellular vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) promoter responded differently to E1a and cAMP, demonstrating that the activating potential of ATF-binding sites within these promoters is not equivalent. While particular ATF-binding sites were sufficient for the activity of both the E4 (E1a inducibility) and VIP (cAMP inducibility) enhancers, these two enhancers had contrasting effects on E1a- and cAMP-inducible transcription. Thus, the relationship between E1a- and cAMP-inducible transcription is not simply explained by the action of these two inducers through the same promoter elements. Images PMID:2555692

  9. GABAergic Neural Activity Involved in Salicylate-Induced Auditory Cortex Gain Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianzhong; Lobarinas, Edward; Deng, Anchun; Goodey, Ronald; Stolzberg, Daniel; Salvi, Richard J.; Sun, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Although high doses of sodium salicylate impair cochlear function, it paradoxically enhances sound-evoked activity in the auditory cortex (AC) and augments acoustic startle reflex responses, neural and behavioral metrics associated with hyperexcitability and hyperacusis. To explore the neural mechanisms underlying salicylate-induced hyperexcitability and “increased central gain”, we examined the effects of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor agonists and antagonists on salicylate-induced hyperexcitability in the AC and startle reflex responses. Consistent with our previous findings, local or systemic application of salicylate significantly increased the amplitude of sound-evoked AC neural activity, but generally reduced spontaneous activity in the AC. Systemic injection of salicylate also significantly increased the acoustic startle reflex. S-baclofen or R-baclofen, GABA-B agonists, which suppressed sound-evoked AC neural firing rate and local field potentials, also suppressed the salicylate-induced enhancement of the AC field potential and the acoustic startle reflex. Local application of vigabatrin, which enhances GABA concentration in the brain, suppressed the salicylate-induced enhancement of AC firing rate. Systemic injection of vigabatrin also reduced the salicylate-induced enhancement of acoustic startle reflex. Collectively, these results suggest that the sound-evoked behavioral and neural hyperactivity induced by salicylate may arise from a salicylate-induced suppression GABAergic inhibition in the AC. PMID:21664433

  10. Kindergarten Practitioners' Experience of Promoting Children's Involvement in and Enjoyment of Physically Active Play: Does the Contagion of Physical Energy Affect Physically Active Play?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjørgen, Kathrine; Svendsen, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    This research is based on interviews that explore the reflections of 10 Norwegian kindergarten practitioners with regard to the importance of their involvement in children's physically active outdoor playtime. The data were analysed from a qualitative phenomenological perspective and resulted in basic themes that describe the practitioners'…

  11. Activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress is involved in the activity of icariin against human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Di, Shouyin; Fan, Chongxi; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Shuai; Liang, Miaomiao; Wu, Guiling; Wang, Bodong; Xin, Zhenlong; Hu, Wei; Zhu, Yifang; Li, Weimiao; Zhou, Yongan; Li, Xiaofei; Yan, Xiaolong

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the anticancer activity of icariin (ICA) against human lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo and explored the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress (ERS) signaling in this process. ICA treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent decrease in the viability of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Additionally, ICA exhibited potent anticancer activity, as evidenced by reductions in A549 cell adhesion, migration and intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels and increases in the apoptotic index, Caspase 3 activity, and reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, ICA treatment increased the expression of ERS-related molecules (p-PERK, ATF6, GRP78, p-eIF2?, and CHOP), up-regulated the apoptosis-related protein PUMA and down-regulated the anti-apoptosis-related protein Bcl2. The down-regulation of ERS signaling using PERK siRNA desensitized lung adenocarcinoma cells to ICA treatment, whereas the up-regulation of ERS signaling using thapsigargin (THA) sensitized lung adenocarcinoma cells to ICA treatment. Additionally, ICA inhibited the growth of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell xenografts by increasing the expression of ERS-related molecules (p-PERK and CHOP), up-regulating PUMA, and down-regulating Bcl2. These data indicate that ICA is a potential inhibitor of lung adenocarcinoma cell growth by targeting ERS signaling and suggest that the activation of ERS signaling may represent a novel therapeutic intervention for lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26049256

  12. Activism and Leadership Development: Examining the Relationship between College Student Activism Involvement and Socially Responsible Leadership Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Jeremy Dale

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between participation in student activism and leadership development among college students. This study applied the social change model of leadership development (SCM) as the theoretical model used to measure socially responsible leadership capacity in students. The study utilized data…

  13. Belinostat-induced apoptosis and growth inhibition in pancreatic cancer cells involve activation of TAK1-AMPK signaling axis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bing Wang, Xin-bao; Chen, Li-yu; Huang, Ling; Dong, Rui-zen

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Belinostat activates AMPK in cultured pancreatic cancer cells. •Activation of AMPK is important for belinostat-induced cytotoxic effects. •ROS and TAK1 are involved in belinostat-induced AMPK activation. •AMPK activation mediates mTOR inhibition by belinostat. -- Abstract: Pancreatic cancer accounts for more than 250,000 deaths worldwide each year. Recent studies have shown that belinostat, a novel pan histone deacetylases inhibitor (HDACi) induces apoptosis and growth inhibition in pancreatic cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In the current study, we found that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation was required for belinostat-induced apoptosis and anti-proliferation in PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells. A significant AMPK activation was induced by belinostat in PANC-1 cells. Inhibition of AMPK by RNAi knockdown or dominant negative (DN) mutation significantly inhibited belinostat-induced apoptosis in PANC-1 cells. Reversely, AMPK activator AICAR and A-769662 exerted strong cytotoxicity in PANC-1 cells. Belinostat promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in PANC-1 cells, increased ROS induced transforming growth factor-β-activating kinase 1 (TAK1)/AMPK association to activate AMPK. Meanwhile, anti-oxidants N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC) and MnTBAP as well as TAK1 shRNA knockdown suppressed belinostat-induced AMPK activation and PANC-1 cell apoptosis. In conclusion, we propose that belinostat-induced apoptosis and growth inhibition require the activation of ROS-TAK1-AMPK signaling axis in cultured pancreatic cancer cells.

  14. Regulation of human CYP2C9 expression by electrophilic stress involves activator protein 1 activation and DNA looping.

    PubMed

    Makia, Ngome L; Surapureddi, Sailesh; Monostory, Katalin; Prough, Russell A; Goldstein, Joyce A

    2014-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP)2C9 and CYP2C19 are important human enzymes that metabolize therapeutic drugs, environmental chemicals, and physiologically important endogenous compounds. Initial studies using primary human hepatocytes showed induction of both the CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 genes by tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ). As a pro-oxidant, tBHQ regulates the expression of cytoprotective genes by activation of redox-sensing transcription factors, such as the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and members of the activator protein 1 (AP-1) family of proteins. The promoter region of CYP2C9 contains two putative AP-1 sites (TGAGTCA) at positions -2201 and -1930, which are also highly conserved in CYP2C19. The CYP2C9 promoter is activated by ectopic expression of cFos and JunD, whereas Nrf2 had no effect. Using specific kinase inhibitors for mitogen-activated protein kinase, we showed that extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Jun N-terminal kinase are essential for tBHQ-induced expression of CYP2C9. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrate that cFos distinctly interacts with the distal AP-1 site and JunD with the proximal site. Because cFos regulates target genes as heterodimers with Jun proteins, we hypothesized that DNA looping might be required to bring the distal and proximal AP-1 sites together to activate the CYP2C9 promoter. Chromosome conformation capture analyses confirmed the formation of a DNA loop in the CYP2C9 promoter, possibly allowing interaction between cFos at the distal site and JunD at the proximal site to activate CYP2C9 transcription in response to electrophiles. These results indicate that oxidative stress generated by exposure to electrophilic xenobiotics and metabolites induces the expression of CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 in human hepatocytes. PMID:24830941

  15. Phage Orf Family Recombinases: Conservation of Activities and Involvement of the Central Channel in DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Fiona A.; Malay, Ali D.; Trotter, Alexander J.; Wilson, Lindsay A.; Barradell-Black, Michael M. H.; Bowers, Laura Y.; Reed, Patricia; Hillyar, Christopher R. T.; Yeo, Robert P.; Sanderson, John M.; Heddle, Jonathan G.; Sharples, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical evidence suggests that λ Orf is a recombination mediator, promoting nucleation of either bacterial RecA or phage Redβ recombinases onto single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) bound by SSB protein. We have identified a diverse family of Orf proteins that includes representatives implicated in DNA base flipping and those fused to an HNH endonuclease domain. To confirm a functional relationship with the Orf family, a distantly-related homolog, YbcN, from Escherichia coli cryptic prophage DLP12 was purified and characterized. As with its λ relative, YbcN showed a preference for binding ssDNA over duplex. Neither Orf nor YbcN displayed a significant preference for duplex DNA containing mismatches or 1-3 nucleotide bulges. YbcN also bound E. coli SSB, although unlike Orf, it failed to associate with an SSB mutant lacking the flexible C-terminal tail involved in coordinating heterologous protein-protein interactions. Residues conserved in the Orf family that flank the central cavity in the λ Orf crystal structure were targeted for mutagenesis to help determine the mode of DNA binding. Several of these mutant proteins showed significant defects in DNA binding consistent with the central aperture being important for substrate recognition. The widespread conservation of Orf-like proteins highlights the importance of targeting SSB coated ssDNA during lambdoid phage recombination. PMID:25083707

  16. Involvement of PRMT1 in hnRNPQ activation and internalization of insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Hiroaki

    2008-07-25

    Insulin signaling in skeletal L6 myotubes is known to be affected by arginine methylation catalyzed by protein N-arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1), however, the mechanism by which this occurs has not yet been defined. This study aimed to determine the exact substrate involved in the methylation and regulating insulin signaling in cells. Insulin enhanced arginine methylation of a 66-kDa protein (p66) concomitant with translocation of PRMT1 to the membrane fraction. Peptide mass fingerprinting identified p66 as a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, hnRNPQ that was bound to and methylated by PRMT1. Pharmacological inhibition of methylation (MTA) and small interfering RNA against PRMT1 (PRMT1-siRNA) attenuated insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of hnRNPQ and insulin receptor (IR), and the interaction between hnRNPQ and IR. MTA, PRMT1-siRNA, and hnRNPQ-siRNA inhibited internalization of IR in the same manner. These data suggest that the PRMT1-mediated methylation of hnRNPQ is implicated in IR trafficking and insulin signaling in skeletal L6 myotubes.

  17. Two-step mechanism involving active-site conformational changes regulates human telomerase DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Christopher G; Moye, Aaron L; Holien, Jessica K; Parker, Michael W; Cohen, Scott B; Bryan, Tracy M

    2015-01-15

    The ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase maintains telomeres and is essential for cellular immortality in most cancers. Insight into the telomerase mechanism can be gained from syndromes such as dyskeratosis congenita, in which mutation of telomerase components manifests in telomere dysfunction. We carried out detailed kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of wild-type telomerase and two disease-associated mutations in the reverse transcriptase domain. Differences in dissociation rates between primers with different 3' ends were independent of DNA affinities, revealing that initial binding of telomerase to telomeric DNA occurs through a previously undescribed two-step mechanism involving enzyme conformational changes. Both mutations affected DNA binding, but through different mechanisms: P704S specifically affected protein conformational changes during DNA binding, whereas R865H showed defects in binding to the 3' region of the DNA. To gain further insight at the structural level, we generated the first homology model of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase domain; the positions of P704S and R865H corroborate their observed mechanistic defects, providing validation for the structural model. Our data reveal the importance of protein interactions with the 3' end of telomeric DNA and the role of protein conformational change in telomerase DNA binding, and highlight naturally occurring disease mutations as a rich source of mechanistic insight. PMID:25365545

  18. Ovarian-steroid modulation of locus coeruleus activity in female rats: involvement in luteinising hormone regulation.

    PubMed

    Szawka, R E; Rodovalho, G V; Monteiro, P M; Carrer, H F; Anselmo-Franci, J A

    2009-07-01

    The noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) has been reported to regulate luteinising hormone (LH) secretion in female rats. Both oestrogen and progestin receptors have been demonstrated in LC neurones, suggesting that these cells are possibly responsive to variations in circulating levels of ovarian steroids. We therefore evaluated changes in the activity of LC neurones during the oestrous cycle and after ovarian-steroid treatment in ovariectomised (OVX) rats, as determined by immunoreactivity to Fos-related antigens (FRA), which comprises all of the known members of the Fos family. Effects of ovarian steroids on the firing rate of LC neurones were also determined in a slice preparation. The number of FRA/tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive (ir) neurones in the LC increased from 14.00-16.00 h on pro-oestrus, coinciding with the onset of the LH surge and rise in plasma progesterone. FRA immunoreactivity was unaltered during dioestrus. Oestradiol-treated OVX rats (OVX+E) displayed marked reduction in FRA/TH-ir neurones in LC compared to oil-treated OVX rats. Accordingly, oestradiol superfusion significantly reduced the spontaneous firing rate of LC neurones in slices from OVX rats. Compared to OVX+E, oestradiol-treated rats injected with progesterone at 08.00 h (OVX+EP) exhibited higher number of FRA/TH-ir neurones in the LC at 10.00 h and 16.00 h, and great amplification of the LH surge. Bath application of progesterone significantly increased the spontaneous firing rate of OVX+E LC neurones. Our data suggest that ovarian steroids may physiologically modulate the activity of LC neurones in females, with possible implications for LH secretion. Moreover, oestradiol and progesterone appear to exert opposite and complementary effects (i.e. whereas oestradiol inhibits, progesterone, after oestradiol priming, stimulates LC activity). PMID:19490365

  19. The Gastroprotective Effect of Menthol: Involvement of Anti-Apoptotic, Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Rozza, Ariane Leite; Meira de Faria, Felipe; Souza Brito, Alba Regina; Pellizzon, Cláudia Helena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the anti-apoptotic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of menthol against ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in rats. Wistar rats were orally treated with vehicle, carbenoxolone (100 mg/kg) or menthol (50 mg/kg) and then treated with ethanol to induce gastric ulcers. After euthanasia, stomach samples were prepared for histological slides and biochemical analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses of the cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic heat-shock protein-70 (HSP-70) and the apoptotic Bax protein were performed. The neutrophils were manually counted. The activity of the myeloperoxidase (MPO) was measured. To determine the level of antioxidant functions, the levels of glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GR) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured using ELISA. The levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) were assessed using ELISA kits. The menthol treated group presented 92% gastroprotection compared to the vehicle-treated group. An increased immunolabeled area was observed for HSP-70, and a decreased immunolabeled area was observed for the Bax protein in the menthol treated group. Menthol treatment induced a decrease in the activity of MPO and SOD, and the protein levels of GSH, GSH-Px and GR were increased. There was also a decrease in the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and an increase in the level of IL-10. In conclusion, oral treatment with menthol displayed a gastroprotective activity through anti-apoptotic, antixidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:24466200

  20. Heme modulates intestinal epithelial cell activation: involvement of NADPHox-derived ROS signaling.

    PubMed

    Barcellos-de-Souza, Pedro; Moraes, João Alfredo; de-Freitas-Junior, Julio Cesar Madureira; Morgado-Díaz, José Andrés; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina; Arruda, Maria Augusta

    2013-01-15

    In many gut chronic inflammatory conditions, intestinal epithelium (IE) is deprived of the protection of the mucus secreted by IE-specialized cells. In these events, bleeding and subsequent lysis of erythrocytes are common. This may lead to the release of high amounts of heme in the intestinal lumen, which interacts with IE. Previous works from our group have shown that heme itself is a proinflammatory molecule, activating a number of phlogistic signaling events in a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPHox)-dependent manner. In this study, we aim to evaluate the effects of heme upon a well-established nontransformed small intestine epithelial cell lineage (IEC 6). Our results show that free heme evokes intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by IEC 6 cells, which is inhibited both by pharmacological inhibition with diphenyleneiodonium (10 μM), a NADPHox inhibitor, and small interfering RNA-mediated suppression of NOX1, a constitutive NADPHox isoform present in intestinal epithelial cells. Focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation and actin cytoskeleton polymerization are also induced by heme in a NADPHox-dependent manner. Heme increases monolayer permeability and redistributes key modulators of cell-cell adhesion as zona occludens-1 and E-cadherin proteins via NADPHox signaling. Heme promotes IEC 6 cell migration and proliferation, phenomena also regulated by NADPHox-derived ROS. Heme, in NADPHox-activating concentrations, is able to induce mRNA expression of IL-6, a cytokine implicated in inflammatory and tumorigenic responses. These data indicate a prominent role for heme-derived signaling in the pathophysiology of intestinal mucosa dysfunction and address an important role of NADPHox activity on the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammatory conditions. PMID:23114967

  1. Regulation of ERK1/2 activity by ghrelin-activated growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1A involves a PLC/PKCɛ pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mousseaux, Delphine; Le Gallic, Lionel; Ryan, Joanne; Oiry, Catherine; Gagne, Didier; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Galleyrand, Jean-Claude; Martinez, Jean

    2006-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR-1a) is a G-protein coupled receptor, involved in the biological actions of ghrelin by triggering inositol phosphates and calcium intracellular second messengers. It has also been reported that ghrelin could activate the 44- and 42-kDa extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK1/2) in different cell lines, but it is not clear whether this regulation is GHSR-1a dependent or not. To provide direct evidence for the coupling of GHSR-1a to ERK1/2 activation, this pathway has been studied in a heterologous expression system. Thus, in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells we showed that ghrelin induced, via the human GHSR-1a, a transient and dose-dep endent activation of ERK1/2 leading to activation of the transcriptional factor Elk1. We then investigated the precise mechanisms involved in GHSR-1a-mediated ERK1/2 activation using various specific inhibitors and dominant-negative mutants and found that internalization of GHSR-1a was not necessary. Our results also indicate that phospholipase C (PLC) was involved in GHSR-1a-mediated ERK1/2 activation, however, pathways like tyrosine kinases, including Src, and phosphoinositide 3-kinases were not found to be involved. GHSR-1a-mediated ERK1/2 activation was abolished both by a general protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, Gö6983, and by PKC depletion using overnight pretreatment with phorbol ester. Moreover, the calcium chelator, BAPTA-AM, and the inhibitor of conventional PKCs, Gö6976, had no effect on the GHSR-1a-mediated ERK1/2 activation, suggesting the involvement of novel PKC isoforms (ɛ, δ), but not conventional or atypical PKCs. Further analyses suggest that PKCɛ is required for the activation of ERK1/2. Taken together, these data suggest that ghrelin, through GHSR-1a, activates the Elk1 transcriptional factor and ERK1/2 by a PLC- and PKCɛ-dependent pathway. PMID:16582936

  2. Medial Parietal Cortex Activation Related to Attention Control Involving Alcohol Cues

    PubMed Central

    Gladwin, Thomas E.; ter Mors-Schulte, Mieke H. J.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Wiers, Reinout W.

    2013-01-01

    Automatic attentional engagement toward and disengagement from alcohol cues play a role in alcohol use and dependence. In the current study, social drinkers performed a spatial cueing task designed to evoke conflict between such automatic processes and task instructions, a potentially important task feature from the perspective of recent dual-process models of addiction. Subjects received instructions either to direct their attention toward pictures of alcoholic beverages, and away from non-alcohol beverages; or to direct their attention toward pictures of non-alcoholic beverages, and away from alcohol beverages. Instructions were varied per block. Activation in medial parietal cortex was found during “approach alcohol” versus “avoid-alcohol” blocks. This region is associated with the, possibly automatic, shifting of attention between stimulus features. Subjects thus appeared to shift attention away from certain features of alcoholic cues when attention had to be directed toward their location. Further, activation in voxels located close to this region was negatively correlated with riskier drinking behavior. A tentative interpretation of the results is that risky drinking may be associated with a reduced automatic tendency to shift attention away from potentially distracting task-irrelevant alcohol cues. Future study is needed to test this interpretation, and to further determine the role of medial posterior regions in automatic alcohol-related attentional processes in general. PMID:24391604

  3. Activation of phospholipase A(2) by long chain fatty acyl groups involves a novel unstable linkage.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, T; Kelly, S M; Price, N C; Lawrence, A J

    2000-05-01

    The acidic isoform of phospholipase A(2) from Naja mossambica mossambica was activated by treatment with a molar equivalent of oleoyl imidazolide. Modification of the protein was accompanied by 50% quenching of tryptophan fluorescence and a significant red shift. The (3)H(9,10) labeled oleoyl residue was co-eluted with the enzyme during gel filtration in the presence of 20% 1-propanol or excess albumin, both of which remove free oleic acid from the enzyme. In contrast, the adduct was labile as to electrophoresis on SDS-PAGE and acid or alkali urea PAGE. The formation of a covalently linked adduct was demonstrated by electrospray mass spectrometry in the presence of 2% formic acid. No such adduct was formed by the phospholipase A(2) isoform from Naja naja atra, which differs in sequence from the N. mossambica mossambica isoform by seven residues including 2 histidine residues and 1 lysine residue. We conclude that oleoyl imidazolide activates the N. mossambica mossambica enzyme by forming an acyl adduct which is unstable as to protein denaturation. The magnitude of tryptophan fluorescence quenching indicates that the site of acylation lies in the sequence WWHF. PMID:10788797

  4. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of triethyleneglycol-dimethacrylate in macrophages involved in DNA damage and caspases activation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Mei; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Shiuan-Shinn; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2015-05-01

    Triethyleneglycol-dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) is a monomer and widely used in dental composite resins. TEGDMA has been found to exhibit cytotoxicity and genotoxicity on many cells. However, little is known about the potential toxicological implications of TEGDMA on murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7. In this study, TEGDMA demonstrated a cytotoxic effect to RAW264.7 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (p < 0.05). TEGDMA was found to induce two modes of cell death in a concentration-dependent manner (p < 0.05). TEGDMA-induced cell apoptosis was demonstrated by the increase in the portion of sub-G0/G1 phase and DNA ladder formation. In addition, TEGDMA exhibited genotoxicity via a dose-related increase in the numbers of micronucleus and DNA strand breaks (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the activation of caspase-3, -8, and -9 were generated by TEGDMA in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). These results indicated that cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by TEGDMA in macrophages may be via DNA damage and caspase activation. PMID:24307521

  5. Involvement of p38 MAPK in the Anticancer Activity of Cultivated Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shang-Min; Lai, Wan-Jung; Hong, Tzuwen; Tsai, Sheng-Hong; Chen, Yen-Hsun; Kao, Cheng-Hsiang; Chu, Richard; Shen, Tang-Long; Li, Tsai-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris is a traditional Chinese medicine frequently used for tonic and therapeutic purposes. Reports from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that extracts of the cultivated fruiting bodies of C. militaris (CM) exhibit a potent cytotoxic effect against many cancer cell lines, especially human leukemia cells. Here, we further investigated the underlying mechanism through which CM is cytotoxic to cancer cells. The CM-mediated induction of PARP cleavage and its related DNA damage signal (?H2AX) was diminished by caspase inhibitor I. In contrast, a ROS scavenger failed to prevent CM-mediated leukemia cell death. Moreover, two signaling molecules, AKT and p38 MAPK, were activated during the course of apoptosis induction. Employing MTT analysis, we found that a p38 MAPK inhibitor but not an AKT inhibitor could rescue cells from CM-mediated cell death, as well as inhibit the cleavage of PARP, formation of apoptotic bodies and up-regulation of the ?H2AX signal. These results suggest that CM-mediated leukemia cell death occurs through the activation of the p38 MAPK pathway, indicating its potential therapeutic effects against human leukemia. PMID:26205966

  6. Involvement of an Active Efflux System in the Natural Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to Aminoglycosides

    PubMed Central

    Aires, Julio Ramos; Köhler, Thilo; Nikaido, Hiroshi; Plésiat, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    A mutant, named 11B, hypersusceptible to aminoglycosides, tetracycline, and erythromycin was isolated after Tn501 insertion mutagenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. Cloning and sequencing experiments showed that 11B was deficient in an, at that time, unknown active efflux system that contains homologs of MexAB. This locus also contained a putative regulatory gene, mexZ, transcribed divergently from the efflux operon. Introduction of a recombinant plasmid that carries the genes of the efflux system restored the resistance of 11B to parental levels, whereas overexpression of these genes strongly increased the MICs of substrate antibiotics for the PAO1 host. Antibiotic accumulation studies confirmed that this new system is an energy-dependent active efflux system that pumps out aminoglycosides. Furthermore, this system appeared to function with an outer membrane protein, OprM. While the present paper was being written and reviewed, genes with a sequence identical to our pump genes, mexXY of P. aeruginosa, have been reported to increase resistance to erythromycin, fluoroquinolones, and organic cations in Escherichia coli hosts, although efflux of aminoglycosides was not examined (Mine et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 43:415–417, 1999). Our study thus shows that the MexXY system plays an important role in the intrinsic resistance of P. aeruginosa to aminoglycosides. Although overexpression of MexXY increased the level of resistance to fluoroquinolones, disruption of the mexXY operon in P. aeruginosa had no detectable effect on susceptibility to these agents. PMID:10543738

  7. Using Long-Distance Scientist Involvement to Enhance NASA Volunteer Network Educational Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, K.

    2012-12-01

    Since 1999, the NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassadors (SSA) and Solar System Educators (SSEP) programs have used specially-trained volunteers to expand education and public outreach beyond the immediate NASA center regions. Integrating nationwide volunteers in these highly effective programs has helped optimize agency funding set aside for education. Since these volunteers were trained by NASA scientists and engineers, they acted as "stand-ins" for the mission team members in communities across the country. Through the efforts of these enthusiastic volunteers, students gained an increased awareness of NASA's space exploration missions through Solar System Ambassador classroom visits, and teachers across the country became familiarized with NASA's STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) educational materials through Solar System Educator workshops; however the scientist was still distant. In 2003, NASA started the Digital Learning Network (DLN) to bring scientists into the classroom via videoconferencing. The first equipment was expensive and only schools that could afford the expenditure were able to benefit; however, recent advancements in software allow classrooms to connect to the DLN via personal computers and an internet connection. Through collaboration with the DLN at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Goddard Spaceflight Center, Solar System Ambassadors and Solar System Educators in remote parts of the country are able to bring scientists into their classroom visits or workshops as guest speakers. The goals of this collaboration are to provide special elements to the volunteers' event, allow scientists opportunities for education involvement with minimal effort, acquaint teachers with DLN services and enrich student's classroom learning experience.;

  8. Different structures involved during ictal and interictal epileptic activity in malformations of cortical development: an EEG-fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Tyvaert, L.; Hawco, C.; Kobayashi, E.; LeVan, P.; Dubeau, F.; Gotman, J.

    2013-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCDs) are commonly complicated by intractable focal epilepsy. Epileptogenesis in these disorders is not well understood and may depend on the type of MCD. The cellular mechanisms involved in interictal and ictal events are notably different, and could be influenced independently by the type of pathology. We evaluated the relationship between interictal and ictal zones in eight patients with different types of MCD in order to better understand the generation of these activities: four had nodular heterotopia, two focal cortical dysplasia and two subcortical band heterotopia (double-cortex). We used the non-invasive EEG-fMRI technique to record simultaneously all cerebral structures with a high spatio-temporal resolution. We recorded interictal and ictal events during the same session. Ictal events were either electrical only or clinical with minimal motion. BOLD changes were found in the focal cortical dysplasia during interictal and ictal epileptiform events in the two patients with this disorder. Heterotopic and normal cortices were involved in BOLD changes during interictal and ictal events in the two patients with double cortex, but the maximum BOLD response was in the heterotopic band in both patients. Only two of the four patients with nodular heterotopia showed involvement of a nodule during interictal activity. During seizures, although BOLD changes affected the lesion in two patients, the maximum was always in the overlying cortex and never in the heterotopia. For two patients intracranial recordings were available and confirm our findings. The dysplastic cortex and the heterotopic cortex of band heterotopia were involved in interictal and seizure processes. Even if the nodular gray matter heterotopia may have the cellular substrate to produce interictal events, the often abnormal overlying cortex is more likely to be involved during the seizures. The non-invasive BOLD study of interictal and ictal events in MCD patients may help to understand the role of the lesion in epileptogenesis and also determine the potential surgical target. PMID:18669486

  9. Involvement of spinal recurrent inhibition in spasticity. Further insight into the regulation of Renshaw cell activity.

    PubMed

    Mazzocchio, R; Rossi, A

    1997-06-01

    Changes in the excitability of the soleus H-reflex are were studied after oral administration of L-acetylcarnitine, a cholinomimetic substance, in eight healthy control subjects and 23 spastic patients presenting with slowly progressive paraparesis (n = 10), a cord lesion (n = 9) and a cerebral lesion (n = 4). Changes in the amount of recurrent inhibition of soleus motor neurons at rest were also estimated in order to assess the level of activity of Renshaw cells before and after L-acetylcarnitine administration. Recurrent inhibition elicited by a conditioning reflex discharge (H1) was assessed by a subsequent test reflex (H'). Four patients lacked an H' reflex. In approximately 50% of the remaining patients, recurrent inhibition was normal, while in the other half there was evidence of reduced or absent inhibitory activity at rest. Pooling the data relative to the effect of L-acetylcarnitine on the H-reflex in relation to the strength of recurrent inhibition disclosed that the ratio of peak-to-peak amplitude values of the maximum H reflex to maximum M wave responses (Hmax:Mmax) was reduced in all the cases in which the recurrent inhibition at rest was normal, while such a reduction was never observed in the patients in whom recurrent inhibition was found to be decreased at rest. In the former cases, the size of the H' reflex evoked by the same conditioning H1 discharge was further depressed after L-acetylcarnitine, pointing to a potentiating effect of the drug on Renshaw cells; in the latter cases no such effect was seen. A significant decrease in the mean Hmax:Mmax ratio after L-acetylcarnitine intake was also seen in the healthy control subjects. Possible changes in the amount of presynaptic inhibition on Ia terminals on soleus motor neurons after L-acetylcarnitine were ruled out. It is proposed that the differential effect of the drug on the H-reflex excitability is directly related to the level of Renshaw cell activity, a reduction of which probably follows a lesion interrupting reticulo-spinal pathways with tonic facilitatory influences on Renshaw cells. These findings support the hypothesis that Renshaw cell excitability is set via cortico-reticulo-spinal systems. PMID:9217683

  10. Characterization of streptococcal platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase variants that are involved in innate immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanghui; Liu, Mengyao; Xie, Gang; Lei, Benfang

    2013-09-01

    Human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS) has developed mechanisms to subvert innate immunity. We recently reported that the secreted esterase produced by serotype M1 GAS (SsE(M1)) reduces neutrophil recruitment by targeting platelet-activating factor (PAF). SsE(M1) and SsE produced by serotype M28 GAS (SsE(M28)) have a 37% sequence difference. This study aims at determining whether SsE(M28) is also a PAF acetylhydrolase and participates in innate immune evasion. We also examined whether SsE evolved to target PAF by characterizing the PAF acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) activity and substrate specificity of SsE(M1), SsE(M28), SeE, the SsE homologue in Streptococcus equi, and human plasma PAF-AH (hpPAF-AH). PAF incubated with SsE(M28) or SeE was converted into lyso-PAF. SsE(M1) and SsE(M28) had kcat values of 373 s(-1) and 467 s(-1), respectively, that were ≥ 30-fold greater than that of hpPAF-AH (12 s(-1)). The comparison of SsE(M1), SsE(M28), and hpPAF-AH in kcat and Km in hydrolyzing triglycerides, acetyl esters, and PAF indicates that the SsE proteins are more potent hydrolases against PAF and have high affinity for PAF. SsE(M28) possesses much lower esterase activities against triglycerides and other esters than SsE(M1) but have similar potency with SsE(M1) in PAF hydrolysis. Deletion of sse(M28) in a covS deletion mutant of GAS increased neutrophil recruitment and reduced skin infection, whereas in trans expression of SsE(M28) in GAS reduced neutrophil infiltration and increased skin invasion in subcutaneous infection of mice. These results suggest that the SsE proteins evolved to target PAF for enhancing innate immune evasion and skin invasion. PMID:23774595

  11. Opioid Modulation of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Protein Kinase Activity Is Ras-Dependent and Involves Gβγ Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Belcheva, Mariana M.; Vogel, Zvi; Ignatova, Elena; Avidor-Reiss, Tomer; Zippel, Renata; Levy, Rivka; Young, Eric C.; Barg, Jacob; Coscia, Carmine J.

    2008-01-01

    Although it is well-established that G protein-coupled receptor signaling systems can network with those of tyrosine kinase receptors by several mechanisms, the point(s) of convergence of the two pathways remains largely undelineated, particularly for opioids. Here we demonstrate that opioid agonists modulate the activity of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) in African green monkey kidney COS-7 cells transiently cotransfected with μ-, δ-, or κ-opioid receptors and ERK1- or ERK2-containing plasmids. Recombinant proteins in transfected cells were characterized by binding assay or immunoblotting. On treatment with corresponding μ- ([d-Ala2,Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5]enkephalin)-, δ-([d-Pen2,d-Pen5]enkephalin)-, or κ- (U69593)-selective opioid agonists, a dose-dependent, rapid stimulation of ERK1 and ERK2 activity was observed. This activation was inhibited by specific antagonists, suggesting the involvement of opioid receptors. Pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin abolished ERK1 and ERK2 activation by agonists. Cotransfection of cells with dominant negative mutant N17-Ras or with a βγ scavenger, CD8-β-adrenergic receptor kinase-C, suppressed opioid stimulation of ERK1 and ERK2. When epidermal growth factor was used to activate ERK1, chronic (>2-h) opioid agonist treatment resulted in attenuation of the stimulation by the growth factor. This inhibition was blocked by the corresponding antagonists and CD8-β-adrenergic receptor kinase-C cotransfection. These results suggest a mechanism involving Ras and βγ subunits of Gi/o proteins in opioid agonist activation of ERK1 and ERK2, as well as opioid modulation of epidermal growth factor-induced ERK activity. PMID:9453557

  12. Extracurricular activities in young applicants' résumés: what are the motives behind their involvement?

    PubMed

    Roulin, Nicolas; Bangerter, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Applicants use résumés to demonstrate their knowledge, skills, abilities, and other personal characteristics (KSAOs) to recruiters, through education and job-related or non-job-related experiences. But research suggests that the situation for young applicants is especially competitive, since they increasingly enter the labour market with similar educational credentials and limited job-related experience. They may thus use non-job-related experiences, such as participation in extracurricular activities (ECAs) during their studies, to demonstrate KSAOs to recruiters, but also to add distinction and value to their credentials. ECAs may therefore become more important in the selection of young applicants. Yet few studies have undertaken a comprehensive and systematic analysis of the relationships students have with these activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent students' involvement in ECAs is due to internal (e.g., passion) or external (e.g., résumé-building) motives, and what factors influence these motives. Results from a study with 197 students suggest that students engage in ECAs mainly out of internal motives. But external motives are stronger for activities started closer to entering the labour market, for students active in associative or volunteering activities (as compared to sports or artistic activities), and for students holding leadership positions in their activities. Our results suggest that labour market pressure may be a key component of applicants' involvement in ECAs. Also, organizations and recruiters may want to consider that students tend not to engage in ECAs purely out of internal motives, but also to add value to their credentials and match employers' expectations. The authors thank Anna Ambrosetti for her help with the data collection. PMID:22823060

  13. Laboratory activities involving transmissible spongiform encephalopathy causing agents: risk assessment and biosafety recommendations in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Leunda, Amaya; Van Vaerenbergh, Bernadette; Baldo, Aline; Roels, Stefan; Herman, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Since the appearance in 1986 of epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a new form of neurological disease in cattle which also affected human beings, many diagnostic and research activities have been performed to develop detection and therapeutic tools. A lot of progress was made in better identifying, understanding and controlling the spread of the disease by appropriate monitoring and control programs in European countries. This paper reviews the recent knowledge on pathogenesis, transmission and persistence outside the host of prion, the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) in mammals with a particular focus on risk (re)assessment and management of biosafety measures to be implemented in diagnostic and research laboratories in Belgium. Also, in response to the need of an increasing number of European diagnostic laboratories stopping TSE diagnosis due to a decreasing number of TSE cases reported in the last years, decontamination procedures and a protocol for decommissioning TSE diagnostic laboratories is proposed. PMID:24055928

  14. Interionic and intermolecular interactions in ion-exchange and sorption systems involving physiologically active substances

    SciTech Connect

    Selemenev, V.F.; Chikin, G.A.; Khokhlov, V.J.

    1999-07-01

    This paper reviews the results obtained by studying the sorption of physiologically active substances (PAS) of different types such as, amino acids, nucleotides and melanoidins on ion exchangers and non-ionogenic sorbents. The review is mainly focused upon the mechanisms of interaction of PAS molecules in the sorbent phase. The contribution of ion-ionic, ion-molecular and intermolecular interactions to the overall sorption effect is discussed. The results of studying ion-exchange isothermal supersaturation of amino acid solutions on anion exchangers are reported and discussed. The mechanisms of aging of ion-exchange materials in the course of recovery of PAS from fermentation broths and hydrolysates are proposed. 48 refs.

  15. In vitro activity of secnidazole against Atopobium vaginae, an anaerobic pathogen involved in bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    De Backer, E; Dubreuil, L; Brauman, M; Acar, J; Vaneechoutte, M

    2010-05-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a polymicrobial syndrome. The most important marker for bacterial vaginosis is the presence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae. In this study, the in vitro susceptibilities to metronidazole and secnidazole of 16 strains of A. vaginae were tested with the agar dilution method. We observed an MIC range for metronidazole of 4-64 mg/L (MIC(50), 8 mg/L; MIC(90), 32 mg/L) and an MIC range for secnidazole of 4-128 mg/L (MIC(50), 16 mg/L; MIC(90), 64 mg/L). According to these findings, we can conclude that the activity of secnidazole is similar to that of metronidazole. PMID:19548924

  16. Neuroprotective activity of stiripentol with a possible involvement of voltage-dependent calcium and sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Verleye, Marc; Buttigieg, Dorothée; Steinschneider, Rémy

    2016-02-01

    A growing body of data has shown that recurrent epileptic seizures may be caused by an excessive release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in the brain. Glutamatergic overstimulation results in massive neuronal influxes of calcium and sodium through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, and kainic acid glutamate subtype receptors and also through voltage-gated calcium and sodium channels. These persistent and abnormal sodium and calcium entry points have deleterious consequences (neurotoxicity) for neuronal function. The therapeutic value of an antiepileptic drug would include not only control of seizure activity but also protection of neuronal tissue. The present study examines the in vitro neuroprotective effects of stiripentol, an antiepileptic compound with γ-aminobutyric acidergic properties, on neuronal-astroglial cultures from rat cerebral cortex exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) or to glutamate (40 µM for 20 min), two in vitro models of brain injury. In addition, the affinity of stiripentol for the different glutamate receptor subtypes and the interaction with the cell influx of Na(+) and of Ca(2+) enhanced by veratridine and NMDA, respectively, are assessed. Stiripentol (10-100 µM) included in the culture medium during OGD or with glutamate significantly increased the number of surviving neurons relative to controls. Stiripentol displayed no binding affinity for different subtypes of glutamate receptors (IC50  >100 µM) but significantly blocked the entry of Na(+) and Ca(2+) activated by veratridine and NMDA, respectively. These results suggest that Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels could contribute to the neuroprotective properties of sitiripentol. PMID:26511438

  17. The role of intentional self regulation, lower neighborhood ecological assets, and activity involvement in youth developmental outcomes.

    PubMed

    Urban, Jennifer Brown; Lewin-Bizan, Selva; Lerner, Richard M

    2010-07-01

    Extracurricular activities provide a key context for youth development, and participation has been linked with positive developmental outcomes. Using data from the 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development (PYD), this study explored how the intentional self regulation ability of youth interacted with participation in extracurricular activities to affect PYD among adolescents living in neighborhoods with relatively low ecological assets. In total, 545 youth were included in the study (50.3% female). Most of the youth were European American (41%) or Latino (37%; African American, 10%; Asian American, 7%; Native American, 4%; and other, 1%). In general, youth with the greatest capacity to self regulate benefitted the most, as compared to their peers with less capacity to self regulate, from involvement in extracurricular activities. Consistent with a developmental systems perspective, and specifically with bioecological theory, the findings from this study confirmed that, within lower asset settings, children with the most positive person-level factors (intentional self regulation) benefit the most from proximal processes such as extracurricular activity involvement. PMID:20495856

  18. Aldosterone regulation of intestinal Na absorption involves SGK-mediated changes in NHE3 and Na+ pump activity

    PubMed Central

    Musch, Mark W.; Lucioni, Alvaro; Chang, Eugene B.

    2008-01-01

    Aldosterone-induced intestinal Na+ absorption is mediated by increased activities of apical membrane Na+/H+ exchange (aNHE3) and basolateral membrane Na+-K+-ATPase (BLM-Na+-K+-ATPase) activities. Because the processes coordinating these events were not well understood, we investigated human intestinal Caco-2BBE cells where aldosterone increases within 2–4 h of aNHE3 and α-subunit of BLM-Na+-K+-ATPase, but not total abundance of these proteins. Although aldosterone activated Akt2 and serum glucorticoid kinase-1 (SGK-1), the latter through stimulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), only the SGK-1 pathway mediated its effects on Na+-K+-ATPase. Ouabain inhibition of the early increase in aldosterone-induced Na+-K+-ATPase activation blocked most of the apical NHE3 insertion, possibly by inhibiting Na+-K+-ATPase-induced changes in intracellular sodium concentration ([Na]i). Over the next 6–48 h, further increases in aNHE3 and BLM-Na+-K+-ATPase activity and total protein expression were observed to be largely mediated by aldosterone-activated SGK-1 pathway. Aldosterone-induced increases in NHE3 mRNA, for instance, could be inhibited by RNA silencing of SGK-1, but not Akt2. Additionally, aldosterone-induced increases in NHE3 promoter activity were blocked by silencing SGK-1 as well as pharmacological inhibition of PI3K. In conclusion, aldosterone-stimulated intestinal Na+ absorption involves two phases. The first phase involves stimulation of PI3K, which increases SGK-dependent insertion and function of BLM-Na+-K+-ATPase and subsequent increased membrane insertion of aNHE3. The latter may be caused by Na+-K+-ATPase-induced changes in [Na] or transcellular Na flux. The second phase involves SGK-dependent increases in total NHE3 and Na+-K+-ATPase protein expression and activities. The coordination of apical and BLM transporters after aldosterone stimulation is therefore a complex process that requires multiple time- and interdependent cellular processes. PMID:18801914

  19. Peroxidase Activity and Involvement in the Oxidative Stress Response of Roseobacter denitrificans Truncated Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaya; Barbeau, Xavier; Bilimoria, Astha; Lagüe, Patrick; Couture, Manon; Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Roseobacter denitrificans is a member of the widespread marine Roseobacter genus. We report the first characterization of a truncated hemoglobin from R. denitrificans (Rd. trHb) that was purified in the heme-bound form from heterologous expression of the protein in Escherichia coli. Rd. trHb exhibits predominantly alpha-helical secondary structure and absorbs light at 412, 538 and 572 nm. The phylogenetic classification suggests that Rd. trHb falls into group II trHbs, whereas sequence alignments indicate that it shares certain important heme pocket residues with group I trHbs in addition to those of group II trHbs. The resonance Raman spectra indicate that the isolated Rd. trHb contains a ferric heme that is mostly 6-coordinate low-spin and that the heme of the ferrous form displays a mixture of 5- and 6-coordinate states. Two Fe-His stretching modes were detected, notably one at 248 cm-1, which has been reported in peroxidases and some flavohemoglobins that contain an Fe-His-Asp (or Glu) catalytic triad, but was never reported before in a trHb. We show that Rd. trHb exhibits a significant peroxidase activity with a (kcat/Km) value three orders of magnitude higher than that of bovine Hb and only one order lower than that of horseradish peroxidase. This enzymatic activity is pH-dependent with a pKa value ~6.8. Homology modeling suggests that residues known to be important for interactions with heme-bound ligands in group II trHbs from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Bacillus subtilis are pointing toward to heme in Rd. trHb. Genomic organization and gene expression profiles imply possible functions for detoxification of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in vivo. Altogether, Rd. trHb exhibits some distinctive features and appears equipped to help the bacterium to cope with reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and/or to operate redox biochemistry. PMID:25658318

  20. Phytochemicals from Ruta graveolens Activate TAS2R Bitter Taste Receptors and TRP Channels Involved in Gustation and Nociception.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Giuseppe; Borgonovo, Gigliola; Scaglioni, Leonardo; Bassoli, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Ruta graveolens (rue) is a spontaneous plant in the Mediterranean area with a strong aroma and a very intense bitter taste, used in gastronomy and in folk medicine. From the leaves, stems and fruits of rue, we isolated rutin, rutamarin, three furanocoumarins, two quinolinic alkaloids, a dicoumarin and two long chain ketones. Bitter taste and chemesthetic properties have been evaluated by in vitro assays with twenty receptors of the TAS2R family and four TRP ion channels involved in gustation and nociception. Among the alkaloids, skimmianine was active as a specific agonist of T2R14, whereas kokusaginin did not activate any of the tested receptors. The furanocoumarins activates TAS2R10, 14, and 49 with different degrees of selectivity, as well as the TRPA1 somatosensory ion channel. Rutamarin is an agonist of TRPM5 and TRPV1 and a strong antagonist of TRPM8 ion channels. PMID:26501253

  1. DOE Technical Standards List. Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    This is a periodic report on the level of agency participation in non-Government standards activities. This technical standards list is intended to assist US Department of Energy (DOE) management and other personnel involved in the DOE technical Standards Program by identifying those participating individuals. The body of this document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted a Record of Non-Government Standards Activity. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies. Appendices to this document are provided to list the information by parent employment organization, by non-Government standards activity, and by the proper names of the non-Government standards organizations and committees.

  2. Involvement of the extrinsic pathway in the activities of low molecular weight heparins.

    PubMed

    Norrheim, L; Abildgaard, U; Larsen, M L; Lindahl, A K

    1991-01-01

    Anticoagulant effects of the three LMW heparins (LMWHs) Enoxaparine, Fragmin, Logiparin and of unfractionated heparin (UFH) were compared. The heparins were added to plasma to nominal concentration of 0.2 and 0.5 anti XaU/ml plasma. Dilute tissue thromboplastin (TTP) and CaCl2 were added to platelet poor plasma (PPP), platelet rich plasma (PRP) and citrated blood. Thrombin activity was recorded with chromogenic substrate. In PPP, UFH was definitely more inhibitory than LMWH. In PRP, 0.2 U/ml of LMWHs were about as effective as UFH. At 0.5 U/ml PRP, UFH and Logiparin were more effective than Enoxaparine and Fragmin. Factor XII deficient plasma was very sensitive to heparin, and UFH and Logiparin were again more inhibitory. In whole blood, fibrinopeptide A determinations showed that UFH was more inhibitory than LMWH. We conclude that the net anticoagulant effects of these heparins result from interactions with platelets in addition to accelerated inactivation of clotting factors. The in vivo anticoagulant effect of these drugs can therefore not be predicted from their nominal anti Xa and anti IIa effects alone. PMID:1658967

  3. Collaborative modelling for active involvement of stakeholders in urban flood risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evers, M.; Jonoski, A.; Maksimovič, Č.; Lange, L.; Ochoa Rodriguez, S.; Teklesadik, A.; Cortes Arevalo, J.; Almoradie, A.; Simões, N. Eduardo; Wang, L.; Makropoulos, C.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents an approach to enhance the role of local stakeholders in dealing with urban floods. The concept is based on the DIANE-CM project (Decentralised Integrated Analysis and Enhancement of Awareness through Collaborative Modelling and Management of Flood Risk) of the 2nd ERANET CRUE funding initiative. The main objective of the project was to develop and test an advanced methodology for enhancing the resilience of local communities to flooding. Through collaborative modelling, a social learning process was initiated that enhances the social capacity of the stakeholders due to the interaction process. The other aim of the project was to better understand how data from hazard and vulnerability analyses and improved maps, as well as from the near real-time flood prediction, can be used to initiate a public dialogue (i.e. collaborative mapping and planning activities) in order to carry out more informed and shared decision-making processes and to enhance flood risk awareness. The concept of collaborative modelling was applied in two case studies: (1) the Cranbrook catchment in the UK, with focus on pluvial flooding; and (2) the Alster catchment in Germany, with focus on fluvial flooding. As a result of the interactive and social learning process, supported by sociotechnical instruments, an understanding of flood risk was developed amongst the stakeholders and alternatives for flood risk management for the respective case study area were jointly developed and ranked as a basis for further planning and management.

  4. Calmodulin Involvement in Stress-Activated Nuclear Localization of Albumin in JB6 Epithelial Cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Thomas J.; Negash, Sewite; Smallwood, Heather S.; Ramos, Kenneth S.; Thrall, Brian D.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2004-06-15

    We report that in response to oxidative stress, albumin is translocated to the nucleus where it binds in concert with known transcription factors to an antioxidant response element (ARE), which controls the expression of glutathione-S-transferase and other antioxidant enzymes, functioning to mediate adaptive cellular responses. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this adaptive cell response, we have identified linkages between calcium signaling and the nuclear translocation of albumin in JB6 epithelial cells. Under resting conditions, albumin and the calcium regulatory protein, calmodulin (CaM), co-immunoprecipitate using antibodies against either protein, indicating a tight association. Calcium activation of CaM disrupts the association between CaM and albumin, suggesting that transient increases in cytosolic calcium levels function to mobilize intracellular albumin to facilitate its translocation into the nucleus. Likewise, nuclear translocation of albumin is induced by exposure of cells to hydrogen peroxide or a phorbol ester, indicating a functional linkage between reactive oxygen species, calcium, and PKC-signaling pathways. Inclusion of an antioxidant enzyme (i.e., superoxide dismutase) blocks nuclear translocation, suggesting that the oxidation of sensitive proteins functions to coordinate the adaptive cellular response. These results suggest that elevated calcium transients, and associated increases in reactive oxygen species, contribute to adaptive cellular responses through the mobilization and nuclear translocation of cellular albumin to mediate the transcriptional regulation of antioxidant responsive elements.

  5. N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase activity involved in O-glycosylation of herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Serafini-Cessi, F; Dall'Olio, F; Scannavini, M; Costanzo, F; Campadelli-Fiume, G

    1983-01-01

    We report on N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (UDPacetylgalactosamine--protein acetylgalactosaminyltransferase; EC 2.4.1.41) activity in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-infected BHK and RicR14 cells, a line of ricin-resistant BHK cells defective in N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I. The enzyme catalyzed the transfer of [14C]N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) from UDP-[14C]GalNAc into HSV glycoproteins, as identified by immunoprecipitation. The sugar was selectively incorporated into the immature forms of herpesvirus glycoproteins pgC, pgD, and gA-pgB, which are known to contain N-linked glycans of the high-mannose type. The high incorporation of [14C]GalNAc into endogenous acceptors of HSV-1-infected RicR14 cells was consistent with the accumulation of immature forms of HSV glycoproteins which occurs in these cells. Mild alkaline borohydride treatment of glycoproteins labeled via GalNAc transferase showed that the transferred GalNAc was O-linked and represented the first sugar added to the peptide backbone. Images PMID:6310156

  6. Growth hormone activity in mitochondria depends on GH receptor Box 1 and involves caveolar pathway targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Perret-Vivancos, Cecile; Abbate, Aude; Ardail, Dominique; Raccurt, Mireille; Usson, Yves; Lobie, Peter E.; Morel, Gerard . E-mail: gerard.morel@univ-lyon1.fr

    2006-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) binding to its receptor (GHR) initiates GH-dependent signal transduction and internalization pathways to generate the biological effects. The precise role and way of action of GH on mitochondrial function are not yet fully understood. We show here that GH can stimulate cellular oxygen consumption in CHO cells transfected with cDNA coding for the full-length GHR. By using different GHR cDNA constructs, we succeeded in determining the different parts of the GHR implicated in the mitochondrial response to GH. Polarography and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy analysis showed that the Box 1 of the GHR intracellular domain was required for an activation of the mitochondrial respiration in response to a GH exposure. However, confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that cells lacking the GHR Box 1 could efficiently internalize the hormone. We demonstrated that internalization mediated either by clathrin-coated pits or by caveolae was able to regulate GH mitochondrial effect: these two pathways are both essential to obtain the GH stimulatory action on mitochondrial function. Moreover, electron microscopic and biochemical approaches allowed us to identify the caveolar pathway as essential for targeting GH and GHR to mitochondria.

  7. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng -han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan -Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.; Dustin, Michael L.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T.

    2015-08-19

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell–cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest that the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role.

  8. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng -han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan -Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; et al

    2015-08-19

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell–cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest thatmore » the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role.« less

  9. Attributes of Dental Trauma in a School Population with Active Sports Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Anand; Rao, Arun Prasad; Govindarajan, Mohan; Reddy, Venugopal; Krishnakumar, Ramalingam; Kaliyamoorthy, Sugumaran

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Dental trauma has become an important aspect of dental public health. The primary requisite before actively dealing with such problems is to describe the extent, distribution, and variables associated with the specific condition. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and role of socioeconomic status and anatomic risk factors in traumatic dental injuries (TDI) to permanent anterior teeth in 10 to 16 year old Sainik (Army) school, children in India. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted. Data was collected through a survey form and clinical examination. The permanent anterior teeth of four hundred and forty six male school children were examined for TDI. The socio-economic status, lip coverage and overjet were recorded. Statistical significance for the association between occurrence of TDI and the various risk factors was carried out. Results The prevalence of TDI to permanent anterior teeth was 23.8%. A large number of injuries occurred during participation in sports. Inadequate lip coverage and a large maxillary overjet were identified as important predictors for dental trauma. Conclusion A high prevalence of dental trauma was observed in the study population suggestive of low awareness regarding the cause, effects and prevention of the condition. PMID:24427477

  10. Involvement of activation-induced cytidine deaminase in skin cancer development.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Taichiro; Toda, Yoshinobu; Hiai, Hiroshi; Uemura, Munehiro; Nakamura, Motonobu; Yamamoto, Norio; Asato, Ryo; Hattori, Yukari; Bessho, Kazuhisa; Minato, Nagahiro; Kinoshita, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    Most skin cancers develop as the result of UV light-induced DNA damage; however, a substantial number of cases appear to occur independently of UV damage. A causal link between UV-independent skin cancers and chronic inflammation has been suspected, although the precise mechanism underlying this association is unclear. Here, we have proposed that activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, encoded by AICDA) links chronic inflammation and skin cancer. We demonstrated that Tg mice expressing AID in the skin spontaneously developed skin squamous cell carcinoma with Hras and Trp53 mutations. Furthermore, genetic deletion of Aicda reduced tumor incidence in a murine model of chemical-induced skin carcinogenesis. AID was expressed in human primary keratinocytes in an inflammatory stimulus-dependent manner and was detectable in human skin cancers. Together, the results of this study indicate that inflammation-induced AID expression promotes skin cancer development independently of UV damage and suggest AID as a potential target for skin cancer therapeutics. PMID:26974156

  11. Biodegradation of ivory (natural apatite): possible involvement of fungal activity in biodeterioration of the Lewis Chessmen.

    PubMed

    Pinzari, Flavia; Tate, James; Bicchieri, Marina; Rhee, Young Joon; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael

    2013-04-01

    Fungal biodeterioration of ivory was investigated with in vitro inoculation of samples obtained from boar and walrus tusks with the fungi Aspergillus niger and Serpula himantioides, species of known geoactive abilities. A combination of light and scanning electron microscopy together with associated analytical techniques was used to characterize fungal interactions with the ivory, including changes in ivory composition, dissolution and tunnelling, and the formation of new biominerals. The research was aimed at providing further understanding of the potential roles of fungi in the colonization and deterioration of ivory in terrestrial environments, but also contributes to our knowledge regarding the possible origins of the surface damage observed on early medieval sculptures made largely from walrus tusks, referred to as 'the Lewis hoard of gaming pieces', that were presumably produced for playing chess. The experiments have shown that the possibility of damage to ivory being caused by fungi is realistic. Scanning electron microscopy revealed penetration of fungal hyphae within cracks in the walrus tusk that showed also widespread tunnelling by fungal hyphae as well as 'fungal footprints' where the surface was etched as a consequence of mycelial colonization. Similar phenomena were observed with boar tusk ivory, while production of metabolites could lead to complete dissolution of the sample. Colonization of ivory and/or exposure to fungal activity lead to extensive secondary biomineral formation, and this was identified as calcium oxalate, mainly as the monohydrate, whewellite. PMID:23157656

  12. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng-han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan-Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.; Dustin, Michael L.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell−cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin (E-cad-ECD) in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest that the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role. PMID:26290581

  13. Cytotoxic cell involvement in human cutaneous leishmaniasis: assessments in active disease, under therapy and after clinical cure.

    PubMed

    Cunha, C F; Ferraz, R; Pimentel, M I F; Lyra, M R; Schubach, A O; Da-Cruz, A M; Bertho, A L

    2016-04-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is an important public health issue worldwide. The control of Leishmania infection depends on cellular immune mechanisms, and the inflammatory response may contribute to pathogenesis. A beneficial role of CD8(+) T lymphocytes has been proposed; nevertheless, other studies suggest a cytotoxic role of CD8(+) T lymphocytes involved in tissue damage, showing controversial role of these cells. The goal of the current study was to understand the immunopathology of CL and determine the profile of cytotoxic cells - such as CD4(+) T, natural killer and natural killer T cells - that might be involved in triggering immunological mechanisms, and may lead to cure or disease progression. The frequencies of cytotoxic cell populations in peripheral blood, obtained from patients with active disease, during treatment and after clinical healing, were assessed by flow cytometry. Cytotoxicity could not be related to a deleterious role in Leishmania braziliensis infection, as patients with active CL showed similar percentages of degranulation to healthy individuals (HI). Cured patients exhibited a lower percentage of degranulating cells, which may be due to a downregulation of the immune response. The understanding of the immunopathological mechanisms involved in CL and the commitment of cytotoxic cells enables improvements in therapeutic strategies. PMID:26928901

  14. The Thiol Reductase Activity of YUCCA6 Mediates Delayed Leaf Senescence by Regulating Genes Involved in Auxin Redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Mi R.; Jung, In J.; Kang, Sun B.; Park, Hee J.; Kim, Min G.; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Auxin, a phytohormone that affects almost every aspect of plant growth and development, is biosynthesized from tryptophan via the tryptamine, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-pyruvic acid, and indole-3-acetaldoxime pathways. YUCCAs (YUCs), flavin monooxygenase enzymes, catalyze the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) to the auxin (indole acetic acid). Arabidopsis thaliana YUC6 also exhibits thiol-reductase and chaperone activity in vitro; these activities require the highly conserved Cys-85 and are essential for scavenging of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the drought tolerance response. Here, we examined whether the YUC6 thiol reductase activity also participates in the delay in senescence observed in YUC6-overexpressing (YUC6-OX) plants. YUC6 overexpression delays leaf senescence in natural and dark-induced senescence conditions by reducing the expression of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE 12 (SAG12). ROS accumulation normally occurs during senescence, but was not observed in the leaves of YUC6-OX plants; however, ROS accumulation was observed in YUC6-OXC85S plants, which overexpress a mutant YUC6 that lacks thiol reductase activity. We also found that YUC6-OX plants, but not YUC6-OXC85S plants, show upregulation of three genes encoding NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRA, NTRB, and NTRC), and GAMMA-GLUTAMYLCYSTEINE SYNTHETASE 1 (GSH1), encoding an enzyme involved in redox signaling. We further determined that excess ROS accumulation caused by methyl viologen treatment or decreased glutathione levels caused by buthionine sulfoximine treatment can decrease the levels of auxin efflux proteins such as PIN2-4. The expression of PINs is also reduced in YUC6-OX plants. These findings suggest that the thiol reductase activity of YUC6 may play an essential role in delaying senescence via the activation of genes involved in redox signaling and auxin availability.

  15. Involvement of spinal cord nuclear factor kappaB activation in rat models of proinflammatory cytokine-mediated pain facilitation.

    PubMed

    Ledeboer, Annemarie; Gamanos, Michael; Lai, Wenmin; Martin, David; Maier, Steven F; Watkins, Linda R; Quan, Ning

    2005-10-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1beta and tumour necrosis factor-alpha, are released by activated glial cells in the spinal cord and play a major role in pain facilitation. These cytokines exert their actions, at least partially, through the activation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB). In turn, NF-kappaB regulates the transcription of many inflammatory mediators, including cytokines. We have previously shown that intrathecal injection of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein, gp120, induces mechanical allodynia via the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we investigated whether NF-kappaB is involved in gp120-induced pain behaviour in Sprague-Dawley rats. Intrathecal administration of NF-kappaB inhibitors, pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC) and SN50, prior to gp120 partially attenuated gp120-induced allodynia. In addition, PDTC delayed and reversed allodynia in a model of neuropathic pain induced by sciatic nerve inflammation. These observations suggest that intrathecal gp120 may lead to activation of NF-kappaB within the spinal cord. To reveal NF-kappaB activation, we assessed inhibitory factor kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) mRNA expression by in situ hybridization, as NF-kappaB activation up-regulates IkappaBalpha gene expression as part of an autoregulatory feedback loop. No or low levels of IkappaBalpha mRNA were detected in the lumbar spinal cord of vehicle-injected rats, whereas IkappaBalpha mRNA expression was markedly induced in the spinal cord following intrathecal gp120 in predominantly astrocytes and endothelial cells. Moreover, IkappaBalpha mRNA expression positively correlated with proinflammatory cytokine protein levels in lumbosacral cerebrospinal fluid. Together, these results demonstrate that spinal cord NF-kappaB activation is involved, at least in part, in exaggerated pain states. PMID:16262636

  16. Correlation of plasma interleukin-18 concentration and severity of renal involvement and disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Jafari-Nakhjavani, Mohammad Reza; Abedi-Azar, Sima; Nejati, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by activation of T and polyclonal B lymphocytes. IL-18 was originally identified as a factor which enhances IFN-γ production and is a potent inducer of the inflammatory mediators by T cells, causing severe inflammatory disorders in SLE. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the association of plasma interlukine-18 (IL-18) concentration and severity of lupus nephritis (LN) and disease activity in SLE patients. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 113 patients with SLE and 50 healthy individuals were examined. Serum level of IL-18 was measured. The severity and activity of the disease was determined by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score. The severity of kidney involvement was studied by renal biopsy, serum creatinine and 24 hours urine protein level. Results: The mean level of serum IL-18 was significantly higher in the patients than controls (577.67 ± 649.95 versus 60.48 ± 19.53 pg/ml; P < 0.001). In SLE patients with active disease level of serum IL-18 was significantly higher than chronic disease (622.77 ± 716.54 versus 182 ± 184.37 pg/ml; P < 0.001). The serum level of IL-18 was significantly higher in stage IV (P < 0.001) and V (P < 0.001) of patients with LN, than other stages. Conclusions: The current study showed that the serum IL-18 is significantly higher in the patients than controls and it significantly correlated with sever renal involvement and disease activity in SLE patients. PMID:27047807

  17. Impairment of the Intestinal Barrier by Ethanol Involves Enteric Microflora and Mast Cell Activation in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier, Laurent; Bérard, Florian; Debrauwer, Laurent; Chabo, Chantal; Langella, Philippe; Buéno, Lionel; Fioramonti, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol hepatic toxicity in heavy drinkers is associated with high endotoxin blood levels and increased intestinal permeability. Because endotoxins can cross damaged mucosa, we investigated the mechanisms through which ethanol impairs the colonic epithelium of rats submitted to acute alcohol intake. Colonic permeability to 51Cr-ethylenediamintetraacetic acid was increased 24 hours after 3.0 g/kg ethanol intake (3.2 ± 0.2% versus 2.2 ± 0.2%) and was associated with significant endotoxemia. Antibiotics and doxantrazole (a mast cell membrane stabilizer) significantly inhibited the effect of ethanol. Two hours after intake, plasma concentrations of ethanol were twofold higher in antibiotic-treated rats than in controls (155.8 ± 9.3 mg/dl versus 75.7 ± 7.6 mg/dl, P < 0.001). Lumenal concentrations of acetaldehyde were markedly increased after ethanol intake (132.6 ± 31.6 μmol/L versus 20.8 ± 1.4 μmol/L, P < 0.05) and antibiotics diminished this increase (86.2 ± 10.9 μmol/L). In colonic samples mounted in Ussing chambers, acetaldehyde but not ethanol increased dextran flux across the mucosa by 54%. Doxantrazole inhibited the effect of acetaldehyde. This study demonstrates that an acute and moderate ethanol intake alters the epithelial barrier through ethanol oxidation into acetaldehyde by the colonic microflora and downstream mast cell activation. Such alterations that remain for longer periods could result in excessive endotoxin passage, which could explain the subsequent endotoxemia frequently observed in patients with alcoholic liver disease. PMID:16565490

  18. A pathogenic mechanism in Huntington's disease involves small CAG-repeated RNAs with neurotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Bañez-Coronel, Mónica; Porta, Silvia; Kagerbauer, Birgit; Mateu-Huertas, Elisabet; Pantano, Lorena; Ferrer, Isidre; Guzmán, Manuel; Estivill, Xavier; Martí, Eulàlia

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder caused by the expansion of CAG repeats in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. The abnormally extended polyglutamine in the HTT protein encoded by the CAG repeats has toxic effects. Here, we provide evidence to support that the mutant HTT CAG repeats interfere with cell viability at the RNA level. In human neuronal cells, expanded HTT exon-1 mRNA with CAG repeat lengths above the threshold for complete penetrance (40 or greater) induced cell death and increased levels of small CAG-repeated RNAs (sCAGs), of ≈21 nucleotides in a Dicer-dependent manner. The severity of the toxic effect of HTT mRNA and sCAG generation correlated with CAG expansion length. Small RNAs obtained from cells expressing mutant HTT and from HD human brains significantly decreased neuronal viability, in an Ago2-dependent mechanism. In both cases, the use of anti-miRs specific for sCAGs efficiently blocked the toxic effect, supporting a key role of sCAGs in HTT-mediated toxicity. Luciferase-reporter assays showed that expanded HTT silences the expression of CTG-containing genes that are down-regulated in HD. These results suggest a possible link between HD and sCAG expression with an aberrant activation of the siRNA/miRNA gene silencing machinery, which may trigger a detrimental response. The identification of the specific cellular processes affected by sCAGs may provide insights into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying HD, offering opportunities to develop new therapeutic approaches. PMID:22383888

  19. Mos is required for MAP kinase activation and is involved in microtubule organization during meiotic maturation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Verlhac, M H; Kubiak, J Z; Weber, M; Géraud, G; Colledge, W H; Evans, M J; Maro, B

    1996-03-01

    Mos is normally expressed during oocyte meiotic maturation in vertebrates. However, apart from its cytostatic factor (CSF) activity, its precise role during mouse meiosis is still unknown. First, we analyzed its role as a MAP kinase kinase kinase. Mos is synthesized concomitantly with the activation of MAP kinase in mouse oocytes. Moreover, MAP kinase is not activated during meiosis in oocytes from mos -/- mice. This result implies that Mos is necessary for MAP kinase activation in mouse oocytes. Raf-1, another MAP kinase kinase kinase, is already present in immature oocytes, but does not seem to be active when MAP kinase is activated. Moreover, the absence of MAP kinase activation in mos -/- oocytes demonstrates that Raf-1 cannot compensate for the lack of Mos. These results suggest that Raf-1 is not involved in MAP kinase activation. Second, we analyzed the organization of the microtubules and chromosomes in oocytes from mos -/- mice. We observed that during the transition between two meiotic M-phases, the microtubules and chromosomes evolve towards an interphase-like state in mos -/- oocytes, while in the control mos +/- oocytes they remain in an M-phase configuration, as in the wild type. Moreover, after spontaneous activation, the majority of mos -/- oocytes are arrested for at least 10 hours in a third meiotic M-phase where they exhibit monopolar half-spindles. These observations present the first evidence, in intact oocytes, of a role for the Mos/.../MAP kinase cascade in the control of microtubule and chromatin organization during meiosis. PMID:8631259

  20. A spectroscopic method to determine the activity of the restriction endonuclease EcoRV that involves a single reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing; Quiñones, Edwin

    2016-03-15

    A one-step protocol is presented to determine the activity of EcoRV as a model of restriction enzymes. The protocol involved a molecular beacon as DNA substrate, with the target sequence recognized by EcoRV in the stem. EcoRV cleaved the stem forming two fragments, one of which contained the fluorophore and quencher, initially bound by 3bp. This shorter fragment rapidly dissociated at 37°C, causing an increase of fluorescence intensity that was used to gauge the reaction kinetics. The reaction can be described using the Michaelis-Menten mechanism, and the kinetic parameters obtained were compared with literature values involving other protocols. PMID:18489897

  1. Parental Involvment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Jeanne; And Others

    This document presents one module in a set of training resources for trainers to use with parents and/or professionals serving children with disabilities; focus is on parental involvement. The modules stress content and activities that build skills and offer resources to promote parent-professional collaboration. Each module takes about 2 hours to…

  2. Differential Pro-Inflammatory Responses of Astrocytes and Microglia Involve STAT3 Activation in Response to 1800 MHz Radiofrequency Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yonghui; He, Mindi; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Shangcheng; Zhang, Lei; He, Yue; Chen, Chunhai; Liu, Chuan; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Microglia and astrocytes play important role in maintaining the homeostasis of central nervous system (CNS). Several CNS impacts have been postulated to be associated with radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields exposure. Given the important role of inflammation in neural physiopathologic processes, we investigated the pro-inflammatory responses of microglia and astrocytes and the involved mechanism in response to RF fields. Microglial N9 and astroglial C8-D1A cells were exposed to 1800 MHz RF for different time with or without pretreatment with STAT3 inhibitor. Microglia and astrocytes were activated by RF exposure indicated by up-regulated CD11b and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). However, RF exposure induced differential pro-inflammatory responses in astrocytes and microglia, characterized by different expression and release profiles of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, PGE2, nitric oxide (NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2). Moreover, the RF exposure activated STAT3 in microglia but not in astrocytes. Furthermore, the STAT3 inhibitor Stattic ameliorated the RF-induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in microglia but not in astrocytes. Our results demonstrated that RF exposure differentially induced pro-inflammatory responses in microglia and astrocytes, which involved differential activation of STAT3 in microglia and astrocytes. Our data provide novel insights into the potential mechanisms of the reported CNS impacts associated with mobile phone use and present STAT3 as a promising target to protect humans against increasing RF exposure. PMID:25275372

  3. The transcriptional activation pattern of lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) involving transcription factors AP-1 and C/EBP beta.

    PubMed

    Kirschning, C J; Unbehaun, A; Fiedler, G; Hallatschek, W; Lamping, N; Pfeil, D; Schumann, R R

    1997-12-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Binding Protein (LBP) is an acute phase protein with the ability to recognize bacterial LPS and transport it to the CD14 molecule or into HDL particles. It is synthesized in hepatocytes and secreted into the blood stream. LBP levels significantly rise during the acute phase response and levels of LBP may be important for an appropriate host reaction to bacterial challenge and for developing the sepsis syndrome. In order to elucidate the mechanisms of LBP regulation we investigated its transcription pattern and performed promoter studies under experimental conditions mimicking an acute phase scenario. In human hepatoma cell lines stimulation with IL-1 beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha and dexamethasone leads to strong transcriptional activation of the LBP gene in a dose- and time-dependent manner. IL-6 alone induces LBP significantly, whereas IL-1 beta mainly increases the IL-6 effect when applied in combination. Our results furthermore show that AP-1 and C/EBP beta are transcription factors involved in the activation of the LBP gene, as revealed by Luciferase reporter gene analysis and electromobility shift assays. Elucidating the mechanism of transcriptional activation of LBP potentially may help in understanding host-pathogen response patterns and mechanisms involved in the acute phase reaction and in the pathophysiology of sepsis. PMID:9442384

  4. Involvement of mast cells and proteinase-activated receptor 2 in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ayumi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin induces neuropathic pain, a dose-limiting side effect, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we show the potential involvement of cutaneous mast cells in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection. Oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was almost completely prevented by congenital mast cell deficiency. The numbers of total and degranulated mast cells was significantly increased in the skin after oxaliplatin administration. Repetitive topical application of the mast cell stabilizer azelastine hydrochloride inhibited mechanical allodynia and the degranulation of mast cells without affecting the number of mast cells in oxaliplatin-treated mice. The serine protease inhibitor camostat mesilate and the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) antagonist FSLLRY-NH2 significantly inhibited oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. However, it was not inhibited by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. Single oxaliplatin administration increased the activity of cutaneous serine proteases, which was attenuated by camostat and mast cell deficiency. Depletion of the capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents by neonatal capsaicin treatment almost completely prevented oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, the increase in the number of mast cells, and the activity of cutaneous serine proteases. These results suggest that serine protease(s) released from mast cells and PAR2 are involved in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Therefore, oxaliplatin may indirectly affect the functions of mast cells through its action on capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents. PMID:26804251

  5. Unbalanced Activation of Glutathione Metabolic Pathways Suggests Potential Involvement in Plant Defense against the Gall Midge Mayetiola destructor in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuming; Zhang, Shize; Whitworth, R. Jeff; Stuart, Jeffrey J.; Chen, Ming-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione, γ-glutamylcysteinylglycine, exists abundantly in nearly all organisms. Glutathione participates in various physiological processes involved in redox reactions by serving as an electron donor/acceptor. We found that the abundance of total glutathione increased up to 60% in resistant wheat plants within 72 hours following attack by the gall midge Mayetiola destructor, the Hessian fly. The increase in total glutathione abundance, however, is coupled with an unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways. The activity and transcript abundance of glutathione peroxidases, which convert reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione (GSSG), increased in infested resistant plants. However, the enzymatic activity and transcript abundance of glutathione reductases, which convert GSSG back to GSH, did not change. This unbalanced regulation of the glutathione oxidation/reduction cycle indicates the existence of an alternative pathway to regenerate GSH from GSSG to maintain a stable GSSG/GSH ratio. Our data suggest the possibility that GSSG is transported from cytosol to apoplast to serve as an oxidant for class III peroxidases to generate reactive oxygen species for plant defense against Hessian fly larvae. Our results provide a foundation for elucidating the molecular processes involved in glutathione-mediated plant resistance to Hessian fly and potentially other pests as well. PMID:25627558

  6. Unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways suggests potential involvement in plant defense against the gall midge Mayetiola destructor in wheat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuming; Zhang, Shize; Whitworth, R Jeff; Stuart, Jeffrey J; Chen, Ming-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione, γ-glutamylcysteinylglycine, exists abundantly in nearly all organisms. Glutathione participates in various physiological processes involved in redox reactions by serving as an electron donor/acceptor. We found that the abundance of total glutathione increased up to 60% in resistant wheat plants within 72 hours following attack by the gall midge Mayetiola destructor, the Hessian fly. The increase in total glutathione abundance, however, is coupled with an unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways. The activity and transcript abundance of glutathione peroxidases, which convert reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione (GSSG), increased in infested resistant plants. However, the enzymatic activity and transcript abundance of glutathione reductases, which convert GSSG back to GSH, did not change. This unbalanced regulation of the glutathione oxidation/reduction cycle indicates the existence of an alternative pathway to regenerate GSH from GSSG to maintain a stable GSSG/GSH ratio. Our data suggest the possibility that GSSG is transported from cytosol to apoplast to serve as an oxidant for class III peroxidases to generate reactive oxygen species for plant defense against Hessian fly larvae. Our results provide a foundation for elucidating the molecular processes involved in glutathione-mediated plant resistance to Hessian fly and potentially other pests as well. PMID:25627558

  7. Modulation of pineal melatonin synthesis by glutamate involves paracrine interactions between pinealocytes and astrocytes through NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Villela, Darine; Atherino, Victoria Fairbanks; Lima, Larissa de Sá; Moutinho, Anderson Augusto; do Amaral, Fernanda Gaspar; Peres, Rafael; Martins de Lima, Thais; Torrão, Andréa da Silva; Cipolla-Neto, José; Scavone, Cristóforo; Afeche, Solange Castro

    2013-01-01

    The glutamatergic modulation of melatonin synthesis is well known, along with the importance of astrocytes in mediating glutamatergic signaling in the central nervous system. Pinealocytes and astrocytes are the main cell types in the pineal gland. The objective of this work was to investigate the interactions between astrocytes and pinealocytes as a part of the glutamate inhibitory effect on melatonin synthesis. Rat pinealocytes isolated or in coculture with astrocytes were incubated with glutamate in the presence of norepinephrine, and the melatonin content, was quantified. The expression of glutamate receptors, the intracellular calcium content and the NF- κ B activation were analyzed in astrocytes and pinealocytes. TNF- α 's possible mediation of the effect of glutamate was also investigated. The results showed that glutamate's inhibitory effect on melatonin synthesis involves interactions between astrocytes and pinealocytes, possibly through the release of TNF- α . Moreover, the activation of the astrocytic NF- κ B seems to be a necessary step. In astrocytes and pinealocytes, AMPA, NMDA, and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors were observed, as well as the intracellular calcium elevation. In conclusion, there is evidence that the modulation of melatonin synthesis by glutamate involves paracrine interactions between pinealocytes and astrocytes through the activation of the astrocytic NF- κ B transcription factor and possibly by subsequent TNF- α release. PMID:23984387

  8. Modulation of Pineal Melatonin Synthesis by Glutamate Involves Paracrine Interactions between Pinealocytes and Astrocytes through NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Atherino, Victoria Fairbanks; Lima, Larissa de Sá; Moutinho, Anderson Augusto; do Amaral, Fernanda Gaspar; Peres, Rafael; Martins de Lima, Thais; Torrão, Andréa da Silva; Cipolla-Neto, José; Scavone, Cristóforo; Afeche, Solange Castro

    2013-01-01

    The glutamatergic modulation of melatonin synthesis is well known, along with the importance of astrocytes in mediating glutamatergic signaling in the central nervous system. Pinealocytes and astrocytes are the main cell types in the pineal gland. The objective of this work was to investigate the interactions between astrocytes and pinealocytes as a part of the glutamate inhibitory effect on melatonin synthesis. Rat pinealocytes isolated or in coculture with astrocytes were incubated with glutamate in the presence of norepinephrine, and the melatonin content, was quantified. The expression of glutamate receptors, the intracellular calcium content and the NF-κB activation were analyzed in astrocytes and pinealocytes. TNF-α's possible mediation of the effect of glutamate was also investigated. The results showed that glutamate's inhibitory effect on melatonin synthesis involves interactions between astrocytes and pinealocytes, possibly through the release of TNF-α. Moreover, the activation of the astrocytic NF-κB seems to be a necessary step. In astrocytes and pinealocytes, AMPA, NMDA, and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors were observed, as well as the intracellular calcium elevation. In conclusion, there is evidence that the modulation of melatonin synthesis by glutamate involves paracrine interactions between pinealocytes and astrocytes through the activation of the astrocytic NF-κB transcription factor and possibly by subsequent TNF-α release. PMID:23984387

  9. De Novo Sequencing of Hypericum perforatum Transcriptome to Identify Potential Genes Involved in the Biosynthesis of Active Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    He, Miao; Wang, Ying; Hua, Wenping; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Zhezhi

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypericum perforatum L. (St. John’s wort) is a medicinal plant with pharmacological properties that are antidepressant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, anti-cancer, and antibacterial. Its major active metabolites are hypericins, hyperforins, and melatonin. However, little genetic information is available for this species, especially that concerning the biosynthetic pathways for active ingredients. Methodology/Principal Findings Using de novo transcriptome analysis, we obtained 59,184 unigenes covering the entire life cycle of these plants. In all, 40,813 unigenes (68.86%) were annotated and 2,359 were assigned to secondary metabolic pathways. Among them, 260 unigenes are involved in the production of hypericin, hyperforin, and melatonin. Another 2,291 unigenes are classified as potential Type III polyketide synthase. Our BlastX search against the AGRIS database reveals 1,772 unigenes that are homologous to 47 known Arabidopsis transcription factor families. Further analysis shows that 10.61% (6,277) of these unigenes contain 7,643 SSRs. Conclusion We have identified a set of putative genes involved in several secondary metabolism pathways, especially those related to the synthesis of its active ingredients. Our results will serve as an important platform for public information about gene expression, genomics, and functional genomics in H. perforatum. PMID:22860059

  10. Public involvement in the priority setting activities of a wait time management initiative: a qualitative case study

    PubMed Central

    Bruni, Rebecca A; Laupacis, Andreas; Levinson, Wendy; Martin, Douglas K

    2007-01-01

    Background As no health system can afford to provide all possible services and treatments for the people it serves, each system must set priorities. Priority setting decision makers are increasingly involving the public in policy making. This study focuses on public engagement in a key priority setting context that plagues every health system around the world: wait list management. The purpose of this study is to describe and evaluate priority setting for the Ontario Wait Time Strategy, with special attention to public engagement. Methods This study was conducted at the Ontario Wait Time Strategy in Ontario, Canada which is part of a Federal-Territorial-Provincial initiative to improve access and reduce wait times in five areas: cancer, cardiac, sight restoration, joint replacements, and diagnostic imaging. There were two sources of data: (1) over 25 documents (e.g. strategic planning reports, public updates), and (2) 28 one-on-one interviews with informants (e.g. OWTS participants, MOHLTC representatives, clinicians, patient advocates). Analysis used a modified thematic technique in three phases: open coding, axial coding, and evaluation. Results The Ontario Wait Time Strategy partially meets the four conditions of 'accountability for reasonableness'. The public was not directly involved in the priority setting activities of the Ontario Wait Time Strategy. Study participants identified both benefits (supporting the initiative, experts of the lived experience, a publicly funded system and sustainability of the healthcare system) and concerns (personal biases, lack of interest to be involved, time constraints, and level of technicality) for public involvement in the Ontario Wait Time Strategy. Additionally, the participants identified concern for the consequences (sustainability, cannibalism, and a class system) resulting from the Ontario Wait Times Strategy. Conclusion We described and evaluated a wait time management initiative (the Ontario Wait Time Strategy) with special attention to public engagement, and provided a concrete plan to operationalize a strategy for improving public involvement in this, and other, wait time initiatives. PMID:18021393

  11. Organizational Member Involvement in Physical Activity Coalitions across the United States: Development and Testing of a Novel Survey Instrument for Assessing Coalition Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Daniel B.; Pate, Russell R.; Beets, Michael W.; Saunders, Ruth P.; Blair, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Coalitions are often composed of member organizations. Member involvement is thought to be associated with coalition success. No instrument currently exists for evaluating organizational member involvement in physical activity coalitions. This study aimed to develop a survey instrument for evaluating organizational member involvement

  12. Activation of Nrf2/HO-1signaling pathway involves the anti-inflammatory activity of magnolol in Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sheng-Hua; Hsu, Wen-Lin; Chen, Tso-Hsiao; Chou, Tz-Chong

    2015-12-01

    Magnolol isolated from Magnolia officinalis, a Chinese medical herb, exhibits an anti-inflammatory activity and a protective effect against periodontitis. The inflammation caused by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) has been considered a key inducer in the development of periodontitis. In this study, we investigated whether magnolol inhibits P. gingivalis LPS-evoked inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 macrophages and the involvement of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Magnolol significantly activated p38 MAPK, Nrf-2/HO-1 cascade and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Notably, the Nrf-2 activation and HO-1 induction by magnolol were greatly diminished by blocking p38 MAPK activity and ROS production. Furthermore, in P. gingivalis LPS-stimulated macrophages, magnolol treatment remarkably inhibited the inflammatory responses evidenced by suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine, prostaglandin E2, nitrite formation, and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, as well as NF-κB activation accompanied by a significant elevation of Nrf-2 nuclear translocation and HO-1 expression/activity. However, inhibiting HO-1 activity with tin protoporphyrin IX markedly reversed the anti-inflammatory effects of magnolol. Collectively, these findings provide a novel mechanism by which magnolol inhibits P. gingivalis LPS-induced inflammation in macrophages is at least partly mediated by HO-1 activation, and thereby promoting its clinical use in periodontitis. PMID:26388191

  13. Involvement of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its receptors in the mechanism of antidepressant action.

    PubMed

    Reichenstein, Michal; Rehavi, Moshe; Pinhasov, Albert

    2008-11-01

    Recent studies have suggested antidepressant involvement in synaptic plasticity, possibly mediated by neurotrophins and neuropeptides. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neuropeptide and neuromodulator. Since its discovery, PACAP has been extensively investigated with regard to its neurotrophic properties including regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression, a neurotrophin postulated to be involved in the mechanism of antidepressant action and etiology of affective disorders. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, we demonstrate in this paper a robust upregulation of BDNF messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in rat primary cortical neurons following a 6-hour incubation with PACAP, and subsequently elevated BDNF expression after prolonged treatment. Additional experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of antidepressants on the expression of PACAP, its receptors and BDNF. In rat hippocampal neurons, prolonged (72-hour) treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors paroxetine and citalopram significantly up-regulated BDNF and PACAP expression and down-regulated PACAP receptor (PAC1 and VPAC2) expression; the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine had an opposite effect. These alterations in BDNF expression correlated negatively with PAC1 and VPAC2 expression, and positively with PACAP mRNA levels. Thus, our findings suggest the possible involvement of PACAP signaling in the neuronal plasticity induced by antidepressant treatment. PMID:18592413

  14. Ginseng Gintonin Activates the Human Cardiac Delayed Rectifier K+ Channel: Involvement of Ca2+/Calmodulin Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun-Hye; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Jung, Seok-Won; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Shin, Ho-Chul; Lee, Jun-Hee; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Rhim, Hyewhon; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Ha, Tal soo; Kim, Hyun-Ji; Cho, Hana; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2014-01-01

    Gintonin, a novel, ginseng-derived G protein-coupled lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor ligand, elicits [Ca2+]i transients in neuronal and non-neuronal cells via pertussis toxin-sensitive and pertussis toxin-insensitive G proteins. The slowly activating delayed rectifier K+ (IKs) channel is a cardiac K+ channel composed of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 subunits. The C terminus of the KCNQ1 channel protein has two calmodulin-binding sites that are involved in regulating IKs channels. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of gintonin-mediated activation of human IKs channel activity by expressing human IKs channels in Xenopus oocytes. We found that gintonin enhances IKs channel currents in concentration- and voltage-dependent manners. The EC50 for the IKs channel was 0.05 ± 0.01 μg/ml. Gintonin-mediated activation of the IKs channels was blocked by an LPA1/3 receptor antagonist, an active phospholipase C inhibitor, an IP3 receptor antagonist, and the calcium chelator BAPTA. Gintonin-mediated activation of both the IKs channel was also blocked by the calmodulin (CaM) blocker calmidazolium. Mutations in the KCNQ1 [Ca2+]i/CaM-binding IQ motif sites (S373P, W392R, or R539W)blocked the action of gintonin on IKs channel. However, gintonin had no effect on hERG K+ channel activity. These results show that gintonin-mediated enhancement of IKs channel currents is achieved through binding of the [Ca2+]i/CaM complex to the C terminus of KCNQ1 subunit. PMID:25234465

  15. Ginseng gintonin activates the human cardiac delayed rectifier K+ channel: involvement of Ca2+/calmodulin binding sites.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun-Hye; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Jung, Seok-Won; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Shin, Ho-Chul; Lee, Jun-Hee; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Rhim, Hyewhon; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Ha, Tal Soo; Kim, Hyun-Ji; Cho, Hana; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2014-09-01

    Gintonin, a novel, ginseng-derived G protein-coupled lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor ligand, elicits [Ca(2+)]i transients in neuronal and non-neuronal cells via pertussis toxin-sensitive and pertussis toxin-insensitive G proteins. The slowly activating delayed rectifier K(+) (I(Ks)) channel is a cardiac K(+) channel composed of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 subunits. The C terminus of the KCNQ1 channel protein has two calmodulin-binding sites that are involved in regulating I(Ks) channels. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of gintonin-mediated activation of human I(Ks) channel activity by expressing human I(Ks) channels in Xenopus oocytes. We found that gintonin enhances IKs channel currents in concentration- and voltage-dependent manners. The EC50 for the I(Ks) channel was 0.05 ± 0.01 μg/ml. Gintonin-mediated activation of the I(Ks) channels was blocked by an LPA1/3 receptor antagonist, an active phospholipase C inhibitor, an IP3 receptor antagonist, and the calcium chelator BAPTA. Gintonin-mediated activation of both the I(Ks) channel was also blocked by the calmodulin (CaM) blocker calmidazolium. Mutations in the KCNQ1 [Ca(2+)]i/CaM-binding IQ motif sites (S373P, W392R, or R539W)blocked the action of gintonin on I(Ks) channel. However, gintonin had no effect on hERG K(+) channel activity. These results show that gintonin-mediated enhancement of I(Ks) channel currents is achieved through binding of the [Ca(2+)]i/CaM complex to the C terminus of KCNQ1 subunit. PMID:25234465

  16. [Active involvement of pharmacists in initial treatments for acute poisoning and overdosed patients in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Ihara, Kumiko; Unei, Hiroko; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Yashiki, Mikio; Tanigawa, Koichi; Kihira, Kenji; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2003-10-01

    We have developed guidelines of pharmaceutical activity which describes how pharmacists are actively involved in supporting the initial treatment of poisoning and overdosed patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). These guidelines are derived from the original procedural manual that consisted of protocol charts. The charts provide the pharmacist including ICU staff members with directions for the collection of clinical information and the forms to use for documentation. We focused on appropriate collection and proper preservation of collected samples in order to perform diagnostic analysis when needed. The original Information Record Form, completed by the participating pharmacist, documents all information regarding the patient's care. This record provides for integration of the diverse and complicated clinical information of the patient so that the physician can gain a comprehensive picture of the patient. The guidelines, manual book, materials for sample collection and the Information Record Form are stored in a container called the "Poisoning Aid Set", which will be available in the ICU. The guidelines are activated once an emergency call from paramedics is received regarding a suspected poisoning patient. According to the guidelines, the emergency room (ER) physician immediately contacts the pharmacist who will provide his professional services as a member of the treatment team. We have applied these guidelines to 29 poisoning patients and have critically evaluated for effectiveness. Early participation by pharmacists, by reviewing timely, accurate and competent clinical information enabled the pharmacist to identify the suspected drug from the biological samples obtained. From our experiences, we conclude that this active involvement of pharmacist in the initial treatment of poisoning and overdosed patients in the ICU was both supportive and beneficial to the patient. In addition, the participation of pharmacist as a member of a treatment team provided an excellent opportunity to collaborate with the entire ICU staff members. PMID:14740565

  17. Metatranscriptome of an Anaerobic Benzene-Degrading, Nitrate-Reducing Enrichment Culture Reveals Involvement of Carboxylation in Benzene Ring Activation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Fei; Gitiafroz, Roya; Devine, Cheryl E.; Gong, Yunchen; Hug, Laura A.; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2014-01-01

    The enzymes involved in the initial steps of anaerobic benzene catabolism are not known. To try to elucidate this critical step, a metatranscriptomic analysis was conducted to compare the genes transcribed during the metabolism of benzene and benzoate by an anaerobic benzene-degrading, nitrate-reducing enrichment culture. RNA was extracted from the mixed culture and sequenced without prior mRNA enrichment, allowing simultaneous examination of the active community composition and the differential gene expression between the two treatments. Ribosomal and mRNA sequences attributed to a member of the family Peptococcaceae from the order Clostridiales were essentially only detected in the benzene-amended culture samples, implicating this group in the initial catabolism of benzene. Genes similar to each of two subunits of a proposed benzene-carboxylating enzyme were transcribed when the culture was amended with benzene. Anaerobic benzoate degradation genes from strict anaerobes were transcribed only when the culture was amended with benzene. Genes for other benzoate catabolic enzymes and for nitrate respiration were transcribed in both samples, with those attributed to an Azoarcus species being most abundant. These findings indicate that the mineralization of benzene starts with its activation by a strict anaerobe belonging to the Peptococcaceae, involving a carboxylation step to form benzoate. These data confirm the previously hypothesized syntrophic association between a benzene-degrading Peptococcaceae strain and a benzoate-degrading denitrifying Azoarcus strain for the complete catabolism of benzene with nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor. PMID:24795366

  18. GABA/sub B/ receptor activation inhibits Ca/sup 2 +/-activated potassium channels in synaptosomes: involvement of G-proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ticku, M.K.; Delgado, A.

    1989-01-01

    /sup 86/Rb-efflux assay from preloaded synaptosomes of rat cerebral cortex was developed to study the effect of GABA/sub B/ receptor agonist baclofen on Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. Depolarization of /sup 86/Rb-loaded synaptosomes in physiological buffer increased Ca/sup 2 +/-activated /sup 86/Rb-efflux by 400%. The /sup 86/Rb-efflux was blocked by quinine sulfate, tetraethylammonium, and La/sup 3 +/ indicating the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. (-)Baclofen inhibited Ca/sup 2 +/-activated /sup 86/Rb-efflux in a stereospecific manner. The inhibitory effect of (-)baclofen was mediated by GABA/sub B/ receptor activation, since it was blocked by GABA/sub B/ antagonist phaclofen, but not by bicuculline. Further, pertussis toxin also blocked the ability of baclofen or depolarizing action to affect Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. These results suggest that baclofen inhibits Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels in synaptosomes and these channels are regulated by G-proteins. This assay may provide an ideal in vitro model to study GABA/sub B/ receptor pharmacology.

  19. Constitutive active/androstane receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, and cytotoxicity are involved in oxadiazon-induced liver tumor development in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Kazunori; Inoue, Kaoru; Ichimura, Ryohei; Takahashi, Miwa; Kodama, Yukio; Yoshida, Midori

    2016-02-01

    Oxadiazon (OX) is a protoporphyrinogen oxidase-inhibiting herbicide that induces porphyria and liver tumors in rodents. Although porphyria is generally considered to be a risk factor for liver tumor development, the mechanisms through which OX mediates tumor development are unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the mechanisms of tumor development by focusing on constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR), which is essential for the development of tumors in response to several chemicals. After 1, 4, or 13 weeks of dietary treatment with 1000 ppm OX, hepatic Cyp2b10 expression was induced in wild-type (WT) mice. However, this effect was blocked in CAR-knockout (CARKO) mice. Hepatic Cyp4a10 expression, indicative of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) activation, and cytotoxic changes in hepatocytes were also observed in both groups of mice. After initiation by diethylnitrosamine, 26-week treatment with OX resulted in an increase in proliferative lesions, including foci and adenomas, in both genotypes, and the incidence and multiplicity of proliferative lesions in CARKO mice were higher than those in control mice but lower than those in WT mice. These results suggested that CAR, PPARα activation, and cytotoxicity were involved in the development of liver tumors. Moreover, porphyrin was not apparently involved in OX-induced tumor development. PMID:26710982

  20. Direct evidence for the involvement of capsular polysaccharide in the immunoprotective activity of Klebsiella pneumoniae ribosomal preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Riottot, M M; Fournier, J M; Jouin, H

    1981-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the capsular serotypic specificity of the protection conferred on mice by Klebsiella pneumoniae ribosomal preparations. The data in these studies support the hypothesis that capsular polysaccharide plays at least some role in the specificity of the protection conferred by ribosomal preparations. In this investigation, the presence of capsular polysaccharide and lipopolysaccharide in K. pneumoniae ribosomal preparations was demonstrated by using immunodiffusion tests. Lipopolysaccharide content was determined for mice treated with actinomycin D. The serotype of O antigen did not play a role in the orientation of the specificity of the protection. The possibility that lipopolysaccharide might act as an adjuvant was not unlikely since the ribosomal preparations which contained the greatest amounts of lipopolysaccharide appeared to be the most immunoprotective preparations. Ribosomal preparations extracted from a noncapsulated mutant of K. pneumoniae did not protect mice. This finding suggested that capsular polysaccharide might play a role in the immunoprotective activity of ribosomes. This hypothesis was tested by using K. pneumoniae K2 bacteriophage-associated-glycanase, which specifically hydrolyzed K. pneumoniae K2 capsular polysaccharide and thereby suppressed the immunoprotective activity of K. pneumoniae K2 ribosomal preparations. In contrast, the K2 bacteriophage-associated glycanase did not interfere with the immunoprotective activity of K. pneumoniae K1 ribosomal preparations. These results clearly demonstrate that capsular polysaccharide, which is an extraribosomal antigen, is involved in the immunoprotective activity of K. pneumoniae ribosomal preparations. Images PMID:7012008

  1. The reinforcing effects of ethanol within the nucleus accumbens shell involve activation of local GABA and serotonin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zheng-Ming; Ingraham, Cynthia M.; Rodd, Zachary A.; McBride, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is reinforcing within the nucleus accumbens shell (NACsh), but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Ethanol can potentiate the function of the GABAA, GABAB, and 5-HT3 receptors. Therefore, the current study tested the hypothesis that activation of these receptors would be involved in the reinforcing effects of ethanol in the NACsh. An intracranial self-administration (ICSA) procedure was used to assess the reinforcing effects of ethanol in the NACsh of alcohol preferring (P) rats. The ICSA consisted of 7 sessions: 4 sessions to establish 150 mg% ethanol self-infusion into the NACsh; sessions 5 and 6 with co-infusion of ethanol plus one concentration of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (10 or 100 M), the GABAB antagonist SCH 50911 (50, 75 or 100 M), or the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist zacopride (10 or 100 M); and session 7 with 150 mg% ethanol alone. All groups self-infused ethanol into the NACsh and readily discriminated the active from inactive lever during the acquisition sessions. Co-infusion of 100 M, but not 10 M, bicuculline or zacopride significantly decreased active responses during sessions 5 and 6. Co-infusion of 75 M, but not 50 or 100 M, SCH 50911 significantly attenuated responses for ethanol. Overall, the results suggest that the reinforcing effects of ethanol in the NACsh may be modulated by activation of local GABAA, GABAB and 5-HT3 receptors. PMID:25922425

  2. Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease Involves a Cysteinyl Leukotriene-Driven IL-33-Mediated Mast Cell Activation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Kanaoka, Yoshihide; Barrett, Nora A; Feng, Chunli; Garofalo, Denise; Lai, Juying; Buchheit, Kathleen; Bhattacharya, Neil; Laidlaw, Tanya M; Katz, Howard R; Boyce, Joshua A

    2015-10-15

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), a severe eosinophilic inflammatory disorder of the airways, involves overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs), activation of airway mast cells (MCs), and bronchoconstriction in response to nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibitors that deplete homeostatic PGE2. The mechanistic basis for MC activation in this disorder is unknown. We now demonstrate that patients with AERD have markedly increased epithelial expression of the alarmin-like cytokine IL-33 in nasal polyps, as compared with polyps from aspirin-tolerant control subjects. The murine model of AERD, generated by dust mite priming of mice lacking microsomal PGE2 synthase (ptges(-/-) mice), shows a similar upregulation of IL-33 protein in the airway epithelium, along with marked eosinophilic bronchovascular inflammation. Deletion of leukotriene C4 synthase, the terminal enzyme needed to generate cysLTs, eliminates the increased IL-33 content of the ptges(-/-) lungs and sharply reduces pulmonary eosinophilia and basal secretion of MC products. Challenges of dust mite-primed ptges(-/-) mice with lysine aspirin induce IL-33-dependent MC activation and bronchoconstriction. Thus, IL-33 is a component of a cysLT-driven innate type 2 immune response that drives pathogenic MC activation and contributes substantially to AERD pathogenesis. PMID:26342029

  3. The reinforcing effects of ethanol within the nucleus accumbens shell involve activation of local GABA and serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zheng-Ming; Ingraham, Cynthia M; Rodd, Zachary A; McBride, William J

    2015-06-01

    Ethanol is reinforcing within the nucleus accumbens shell (NACsh), but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Ethanol can potentiate the function of the GABAA, GABAB, and serotonin-3 (5-HT3) receptors. Therefore, the current study tested the hypothesis that activation of these receptors would be involved in the reinforcing effects of ethanol in the NACsh. An intracranial self-administration (ICSA) procedure was used to assess the reinforcing effects of ethanol in the NACsh of alcohol preferring (P) rats. The ICSA consisted of seven sessions: four sessions to establish 150 mg% ethanol self-infusion into the NACsh; sessions 5 and 6 with co-infusion of ethanol plus one concentration of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (10 or 100 M), the GABAB antagonist SCH 50911 (50, 75 or 100 M), or the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist zacopride (10 or 100 M); and session 7 with 150 mg% ethanol alone. All groups self-infused ethanol into the NACsh and readily discriminated the active from inactive lever during the acquisition sessions. Co-infusion of 100 M, but not 10 M, bicuculline or zacopride significantly decreased active responses during sessions 5 and 6. Co-infusion of 75 M, but not 50 or 100 M, SCH 50911 significantly attenuated responses for ethanol. Overall, the results suggest that the reinforcing effects of ethanol in the NACsh may be modulated by activation of local GABAA, GABAB and 5-HT3 receptors. PMID:25922425

  4. Structures of Rhodopsin Kinase in Different Ligand States Reveal Key Elements Involved in G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Puja; Wang, Benlian; Maeda, Tadao; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2008-10-08

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated heptahelical receptors, leading to their uncoupling from G proteins. Here we report six crystal structures of rhodopsin kinase (GRK1), revealing not only three distinct nucleotide-binding states of a GRK but also two key structural elements believed to be involved in the recognition of activated GPCRs. The first is the C-terminal extension of the kinase domain, which was observed in all nucleotide-bound GRK1 structures. The second is residues 5-30 of the N terminus, observed in one of the GRK1{center_dot}(Mg{sup 2+}){sub 2} {center_dot}ATP structures. The N terminus was also clearly phosphorylated, leading to the identification of two novel phosphorylation sites by mass spectral analysis. Co-localization of the N terminus and the C-terminal extension near the hinge of the kinase domain suggests that activated GPCRs stimulate kinase activity by binding to this region to facilitate full closure of the kinase domain.

  5. S-Nitrosylation of proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 involves its activation induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xian-Liang; Liu, Dong-Hai; Zhang, Gong-Liang; Hu, Shu-Qun; Chen, Yu-Guo; Xu, Tie

    2015-06-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that activation of proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK2) in cerebral ischemia is involved in the modulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate-type (NMDA) glutamate receptor activity and Ca(2+) dynamics, resulting in ischemic neuron death ultimately. A number of reports indicate that PYK2 is a redox sensitive kinase that must be activated by an estrogen-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanism of PYK2 activation remains incompletely illustrated. Accumulating attention is focused on nitric oxide (NO, a free radical) which plays a critical role in cellular signal transduction through stimulus-coupled S-nitrosylation of cysteine residues. Here we reported that PYK2 over-expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells was S-nitrosylated (forming SNO-PYK2) by reacting with GSNO, an exogenous NO donor, at one critical cysteine residue (Cys534) with a biotin switch assay. Moreover, our results showed that S-nitrosylation and phosphorylation of PYK2 over-expressed in SH-SY5Y cells was significantly increased after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). We further investigated whether the activation (phosphorylation) of PYK2 was associated with S-nitrosylation following SH-SY5Y cells OGD. Our results showed that the cysteine534 residue (site of S-nitrosylation) mutant PYK2 over-expressed in SH-SY5Y cells diminished S-nitrosylation of PYK2 and inhibited its phosphorylation induced by OGD. In addition, overexpression of the mutant PYK2 protein could prevent nuclear accumulation and abrogate neuronal cell death compared to wild type PYK2 in SH-SY5Y cells induced by OGD. These data suggest that the activation of PYK2 following OGD may be modulated by S-nitrosylation, which provides a new avenue for stroke therapy by targeting the post-translational modification machinery. PMID:25929187

  6. Endothelial cell permeability during hantavirus infection involves factor XII-dependent increased activation of the kallikrein-kinin system.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Shannon L; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Copeland, Anna Maria; Jahrling, Peter B; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) are diseases caused by hantavirus infections and are characterized by vascular leakage due to alterations of the endothelial barrier. Hantavirus-infected endothelial cells (EC) display no overt cytopathology; consequently, pathogenesis models have focused either on the influx of immune cells and release of cytokines or on increased degradation of the adherens junction protein, vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, due to hantavirus-mediated hypersensitization of EC to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). To examine endothelial leakage in a relevant in vitro system, we co-cultured endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) to generate capillary blood vessel-like structures. In contrast to results obtained in monolayers of cultured EC, we found that despite viral replication in both cell types as well as the presence of VEGF, infected in vitro vessels neither lost integrity nor displayed evidence of VE-cadherin degradation. Here, we present evidence for a novel mechanism of hantavirus-induced vascular leakage involving activation of the plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS). We show that incubation of factor XII (FXII), prekallikrein (PK), and high molecular weight kininogen (HK) plasma proteins with hantavirus-infected EC results in increased cleavage of HK, higher enzymatic activities of FXIIa/kallikrein (KAL) and increased liberation of bradykinin (BK). Measuring cell permeability in real-time using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS), we identified dramatic increases in endothelial cell permeability after KKS activation and liberation of BK. Furthermore, the alterations in permeability could be prevented using inhibitors that directly block BK binding, the activity of FXIIa, or the activity of KAL. Lastly, FXII binding and autoactivation is increased on the surface of hantavirus-infected EC. These data are the first to demonstrate KKS activation during hantavirus infection and could have profound implications for treatment of hantavirus infections. PMID:23874198

  7. Involvement of nitric oxide in bone marrow-derived natural suppressor activity. Its dependence on IFN-gamma.

    PubMed

    Angulo, I; Rodríguez, R; García, B; Medina, M; Navarro, J; Subiza, J L

    1995-07-01

    Bone marrow (BM)-derived natural suppressor (NS) cells are strong inhibitors of lymphoproliferative responses. In this study we have assessed the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in BM-derived NS activity, as detected in cocultures of BM and spleen cells stimulated with B cell (LPS) or T cell (Con A) mitogens. The results indicate that NS activity is readily inhibited by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, a competitive inhibitor of NO synthase, or N-acetylcysteine, a free radical-scavenging thiol compound. High amounts of nitrite, a stable end product of NO, are detected only in supernatants of Con A- or LPS-stimulated spleen cells cocultured with BM cells enriched in NS activity (Fr3 cells). These amounts (15 to 55 microM) are strongly antiproliferative for both Con A and LPS responses, as was established with a nitrite curve made with a NO donor (sodium nitroprusside). Fr3 cells cultured alone release large quantities of NO and express inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA upon LPS stimulation, but require spleen cells in cultures stimulated with Con A. Anti-IFN-gamma-neutralizing Abs blocked both NO production and NS activity, irrespective of the mitogen used; yet, only exogenous IFN-gamma is unable to promote successful NO production by Fr3 cells, but does induce detectable iNOS mRNA expression in these cells. Taken together the results indicate that: 1) NO is the major mediator of BM-derived NS activity; 2) BM cells enriched in NS activity produce large amounts of NO through an IFN-gamma-dependent iNOS induction. PMID:7541413

  8. Endothelial Cell Permeability during Hantavirus Infection Involves Factor XII-Dependent Increased Activation of the Kallikrein-Kinin System

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Shannon L.; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Copeland, Anna Maria; Jahrling, Peter B.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) are diseases caused by hantavirus infections and are characterized by vascular leakage due to alterations of the endothelial barrier. Hantavirus-infected endothelial cells (EC) display no overt cytopathology; consequently, pathogenesis models have focused either on the influx of immune cells and release of cytokines or on increased degradation of the adherens junction protein, vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, due to hantavirus-mediated hypersensitization of EC to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). To examine endothelial leakage in a relevant in vitro system, we co-cultured endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) to generate capillary blood vessel-like structures. In contrast to results obtained in monolayers of cultured EC, we found that despite viral replication in both cell types as well as the presence of VEGF, infected in vitro vessels neither lost integrity nor displayed evidence of VE-cadherin degradation. Here, we present evidence for a novel mechanism of hantavirus-induced vascular leakage involving activation of the plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS). We show that incubation of factor XII (FXII), prekallikrein (PK), and high molecular weight kininogen (HK) plasma proteins with hantavirus-infected EC results in increased cleavage of HK, higher enzymatic activities of FXIIa/kallikrein (KAL) and increased liberation of bradykinin (BK). Measuring cell permeability in real-time using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS), we identified dramatic increases in endothelial cell permeability after KKS activation and liberation of BK. Furthermore, the alterations in permeability could be prevented using inhibitors that directly block BK binding, the activity of FXIIa, or the activity of KAL. Lastly, FXII binding and autoactivation is increased on the surface of hantavirus-infected EC. These data are the first to demonstrate KKS activation during hantavirus infection and could have profound implications for treatment of hantavirus infections. PMID:23874198

  9. The Orosomucoid 1 protein is involved in the vitamin D – mediated macrophage de-activation process

    SciTech Connect

    Gemelli, Claudia; Martello, Andrea; Montanari, Monica; Zanocco Marani, Tommaso; Salsi, Valentina; Zappavigna, Vincenzo; Parenti, Sandra; Vignudelli, Tatiana; Selmi, Tommaso; Ferrari, Sergio; Grande, Alexis

    2013-12-10

    Orosomucoid 1 (ORM1), also named Alpha 1 acid glycoprotein A (AGP-A), is an abundant plasma protein characterized by anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties. The present study was designed to identify a possible correlation between ORM1 and Vitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), a hormone exerting a widespread effect on cell proliferation, differentiation and regulation of the immune system. In particular, the data described here indicated that ORM1 is a 1,25(OH)2D3 primary response gene, characterized by the presence of a VDRE element inside the 1 kb sequence of its proximal promoter region. This finding was demonstrated with gene expression studies, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and luciferase transactivation experiments and confirmed by VDR full length and dominant negative over-expression. In addition, several experiments carried out in human normal monocytes demonstrated that the 1,25(OH)2D3 – VDR – ORM1 pathway plays a functional role inside the macrophage de-activation process and that ORM1 may be considered as a signaling molecule involved in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling. - Highlights: • ORM1 is a Vitamin D primary response gene. • VD and its receptor VDR are involved in the de-activation process mediated by human resident macrophages. • The signaling pathway VD-VDR-ORM1 plays an important role in the control of macrophage de-activation process. • ORM1 may be defined as a signaling molecule implicated in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling.

  10. Paradoxical effects of VEGF on synaptic activity partially involved in notch1 signaling in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiajia; Yang, Chunxiao; Liu, Chunhua; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Zhuo

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that the neuronal effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) include modulating learning and memory, plasticity of mature neurons, and synaptic transmission in addition to neurogenesis. However, there is conflicting evidence particularly of its role in the regulation of excitatory synaptic activity. In this study, application of the patch-clamp technique revealed that lower doses (10 and 50 ng/mL) of VEGF enhanced excitatory neurotransmission in hippocampal slices of mice through both presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. However, the effects were reversed by higher doses of VEGF (>100 ng/mL), which inhibited excitatory neurotransmission via a presynaptic mechanism. These competing, concentration-dependent effects of VEGF suggested that different pathways were involved. The involvement of the Notch1 receptor was tested in the modulation of VEGF on synaptic activity by using heterozygous Notch1(+/-) mice. Notch1 knockdown did not influence the inhibitory effect of high VEGF doses (200 ng/mL) but reduced the enhancement effects of low concentration of VEGF (50 ng/mL) at the postsynaptic level, which might be due to the decreased level of VEGF receptor. The results indicate that the Notch1 receptor plays a role in VEGF-induced modulation of synaptic activity, which provides new insights into a complex VEGF/Notch signaling cross-talk. These findings set the groundwork for understanding new mechanisms of Notch signaling and the neurotrophic effects of VEGF, which is beneficial to develop new therapeutic targets to the VEGF/Notch axis and improve current treatments for neural diseases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26482652

  11. Integrated signaling network involving calcium, nitric oxide, and active oxygen species but not mitogen-activated protein kinases in BcPG1-elicited grapevine defenses.

    PubMed

    Vandelle, Elodie; Poinssot, Benoît; Wendehenne, David; Bentéjac, Marc; Alain, Pugin

    2006-04-01

    We have already reported the identification of the endopolygalacturonase 1 (BcPG1) from Botrytis cinerea as a potent elicitor of defense responses in grapevine, independently of its enzymatic activity. The aim of the present study is the analysis of the signaling pathways triggered by BcPG1 in grapevine cells. Our data indicate that BcPG1 induces a Ca2+ entry from the apoplasm, which triggers a phosphorylation-dependent nitric oxide (NO) production via an enzyme probably related to a NO synthase. Then NO is involved in (i) cytosolic calcium homeostasis, by activating Ca2+ release from internal stores and regulating Ca2+ fluxes across the plasma membrane, (ii) plasma membrane potential variation, (iii) the activation of active oxygen species (AOS) production, and (iv) defense gene expression, including phenylalanine ammonia lyase and stilbene synthase, which encode enzymes responsible for phytoalexin biosynthesis. Interestingly enough, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation is independent of this regulation pathway that closely connects Ca2+, NO, and AOS. PMID:16610746

  12. Abscisic acid activates a Ca2+-calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase involved in antioxidant defense in maize leaves.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shucheng

    2010-09-01

    The role of a calcium-dependent and calmodulin (CaM)-stimulated protein kinase in abscisic acid (ABA)-induced antioxidant defense was determined in leaves of maize (Zea mays). In-gel kinase assays showed that treatments with ABA or H(2)O(2) induced the activation of a 49-kDa protein kinase and a 52-kDa protein kinase significantly. Furthermore, we showed that the 52-kDa protein kinase has the characteristics of CaM-stimulating activity and is sensitive to calcium-CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II) inhibitor KN-93 or CaM antagonist W-7. Treatments with ABA or H(2)O(2) not only induced the activation of the 52-kDa protein kinase, but also enhanced the total activities of the antioxidant enzymes, including catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and superoxide dismutase. Such enhancements were blocked by pretreatment with a CaMK inhibitor and a reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor or scavenger. Pretreatment with the CaMK inhibitor also substantially arrested the ABA-induced H(2)O(2) production. Kinase activity enhancements induced by ABA were attenuated by pretreatment with an ROS inhibitor or scavenger. These results suggest that the 52-kDa CaMK is involved in ABA-induced antioxidant defense and that cross-talk between CaMK and H(2)O(2) plays a pivotal role in ABA signaling. We infer that CaMK acts both upstream and downstream of H(2)O(2), but mainly acts between ABA and H(2)O(2) in ABA-induced antioxidant-defensive signaling. PMID:20702465

  13. Activation of STAT3 is involved in neuroprotection by electroacupuncture pretreatment via cannabinoid CB1 receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Heng; Zhang, Zhi; Wei, Haidong; Wang, Feng; Guo, Fan; Gao, Zijun; Marsicano, Giovanni; Wang, Qiang; Xiong, Lize

    2013-09-01

    Pretreatment with electroacupuncture (EA) attenuates cerebral ischemic injury through the endocannabinoid system, although the molecular mechanisms mediate this neuroprotection are unknown. It is well-known that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays an essential role in cell survival and proliferation. Therefore, we investigated whether STAT3 is involved in EA pretreatment-induced neuroprotection via cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1R) after transient focal cerebral ischemia in rats. Two hours after EA pretreatment, focal cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MACO) for 120 min. The expression of pSTAT3(Ser727), which is necessary for STAT3 activation, was examined in the ipsilateral ischemic penumbra. Infarct volumes and neurological scores were evaluated at 72 h after MACO in the presence or absence of the STAT3 inhibitor peptide (PpYLKTK). Neuronal apoptosis and the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio were also evaluated 24h after reperfusion. Our results showed that EA pretreatment significantly enhanced neuronal expression of pSTAT3(Ser727) in the ischemic penumbra 6h after reperfusion. Moreover, EA pretreatment reduced infarct volume, improved neurological outcome, inhibited neuronal apoptosis and decreased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio following reperfusion. The beneficial effects of EA were attenuated by PpYLKTK administered 30 min before MACO, and PpYLKTK effectively reversed the increase in pSTAT3(Ser727) expression. Furthermore, CB1R antagonist or CB1R knockdown with siRNA blocked the elevation of pSTAT3(Ser727) expression by EA pretreatment, whereas the two CB1R agonists increased STAT3 activation. In conclusion, EA pretreatment enhances STAT3 activation via CB1R to protect against cerebral ischemia, suggesting that STAT3 activation may be a novel target for stroke intervention. PMID:23880371

  14. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor-1 is involved in cardiac noradrenergic activity observed during naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Laorden, Elena; García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Romecín, Paola; Atucha, Noemí M; Milanés, María-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The negative affective states of withdrawal involve the recruitment of brain and peripheral stress circuitry [noradrenergic activity, induction of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenocortical (HPA) axis and activation of heat shock proteins (Hsps)]. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) pathways are important mediators in the negative symptoms of opioid withdrawal. We performed a series of experiments to characterize the role of the CRF1 receptor in the response of stress systems to morphine withdrawal and its effect in the heart using genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1 receptors. Experimental Approach Wild-type and CRF1 receptor-knockout mice were treated with increasing doses of morphine. Precipitated withdrawal was induced by naloxone. Plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone levels, the expression of myocardial Hsp27, Hsp27 phosphorylated at Ser82, membrane (MB)- COMT, soluble (S)-COMT protein and NA turnover were evaluated by RIA, immunoblotting and HPLC. Key Results During morphine withdrawal we observed an enhancement of NA turnover in parallel with an increase in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) in wild-type mice. In addition, naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal induced an activation of HPA axis and Hsp27. The principal finding of the present study was that plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels, MB-COMT, S-COMT, NA turnover, and Hsp27 expression and activation observed during morphine withdrawal were significantly inhibited in the CRF1 receptor-knockout mice. Conclusion and Implications Our results demonstrate that CRF/CRF1 receptor activation may contribute to stress-induced cardiovascular dysfunction after naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal and suggest that CRF/CRF1 receptor pathways could contribute to cardiovascular disease associated with opioid addiction. PMID:24490859

  15. Antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils against bacterial and fungal species involved in food poisoning and/or food decay.

    PubMed

    Lixandru, Brndu?a-Elena; Dr?cea, Nicoleta Olgu?a; Dragomirescu, Cristiana Cerasella; Dr?gulescu, Elena Carmina; Coldea, Ileana Lumini?a; Anton, Liliana; Dobre, Elena; Rovinaru, Camelia; Codi??, Irina

    2010-01-01

    The currative properties of aromatic and medicinal plants have been recognized since ancient times and, more recently, the antimicrobial activity of plant essential oils has been used in several applications, including food preservation. The purpose of this study was to create directly comparable, quantitative data on the antimicrobial activity of some plant essential oils prepared in the National Institute of Research-Development for Chemistry and Petrochemistry, Bucharest to be used for the further development of food packaging technology, based on their antibacterial and antifungal activity. The essential oils extracted from thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.), basil (Ocimum basilicum L.), coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.), sage (Salvia officinalis L.), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare L.), spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) and carraway (Carum carvi L.) were investigated for their antimicrobial activity against eleven different bacterial and three fungal strains belonging to species reported to be involved in food poisoning and/or food decay: S. aureus ATCC 25923, S. aureus ATCC 6538, S. aureus ATCC 25913, E. coli ATCC 25922, E. coli ATCC 35218, Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Cantacuzino Institute Culture Collection (CICC) 10878, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19112, Bacillus cereus CIP 5127, Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778, Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404, Penicillium spp. CICC 251 and two E. coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis clinical isolates. The majority of the tested essential oils exibited considerable inhibitory capacity against all the organisms tested, as supported by growth inhibition zone diameters, MICs and MBC's. Thyme, coriander and basil oils proved the best antibacterial activity, while thyme and spearmint oils better inhibited the fungal species. PMID:21462837

  16. Quercetin Inhibits Fibroblast Activation and Kidney Fibrosis Involving the Suppression of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin and β-catenin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiafa; Li, Jianzhong; Liu, Xin; Feng, Ye; Gui, Yuan; Yang, Junwei; He, Weichun; Dai, Chunsun

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid found in a wide variety of plants and presented in human diet, displays promising potential in preventing kidney fibroblast activation. However, whether quercetin can ameliorate kidney fibrosis in mice with obstructive nephropathy and the underlying mechanisms remain to be further elucidated. In this study, we found that administration of quercetin could largely ameliorate kidney interstitial fibrosis and macrophage accumulation in the kidneys with obstructive nephropathy. MTORC1, mTORC2, β-catenin as well as Smad signaling were activated in the obstructive kidneys, whereas quercetin could markedly reduce their abundance except Smad3 phosphorylation. In cultured NRK-49F cells, quercetin could inhibit α-SMA and fibronectin (FN) expression induced by TGFβ1 treatment. MTORC1, mTORC2, β-catenin and Smad signaling pathways were stimulated by TGFβ1 at a time dependent manner. Similar to those findings in the obstructive kidneys, mTORC1, mTORC2 and β-catenin, but not Smad signaling pathways were remarkably blocked by quercetin treatment. Together, these results suggest that quercetin inhibits fibroblast activation and kidney fibrosis involving a combined inhibition of mTOR and β-catenin signaling transduction, which may act as a therapeutic candidate for patients with chronic kidney diseases. PMID:27052477

  17. Possible involvement of TLRs and hemichannels in stress-induced CNS dysfunction via mastocytes, and glia activation.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Adam; Maturana, Carola J; Harcha, Paloma A; Sáez, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), mastocytes and glial cells (microglia, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) function as sensors of neuroinflammatory conditions, responding to stress triggers or becoming sensitized to subsequent proinflammatory challenges. The corticotropin-releasing hormone and glucocorticoids are critical players in stress-induced mastocyte degranulation and potentiation of glial inflammatory responses, respectively. Mastocytes and glial cells express different toll-like receptor (TLR) family members, and their activation via proinflammatory molecules can increase the expression of connexin hemichannels and pannexin channels in glial cells. These membrane pores are oligohexamers of the corresponding protein subunits located in the cell surface. They allow ATP release and Ca(2+) influx, which are two important elements of inflammation. Consequently, activated microglia and astrocytes release ATP and glutamate, affecting myelinization, neuronal development, and survival. Binding of ligands to TLRs induces a cascade of intracellular events leading to activation of several transcription factors that regulate the expression of many genes involved in inflammation. During pregnancy, the previous responses promoted by viral infections and other proinflammatory conditions are common and might predispose the offspring to develop psychiatric disorders and neurological diseases. Such disorders could eventually be potentiated by stress and might be part of the etiopathogenesis of CNS dysfunctions including autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. PMID:23935250

  18. Possible Involvement of TLRs and Hemichannels in Stress-Induced CNS Dysfunction via Mastocytes, and Glia Activation

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Adam; Maturana, Carola J.; Harcha, Paloma A.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), mastocytes and glial cells (microglia, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) function as sensors of neuroinflammatory conditions, responding to stress triggers or becoming sensitized to subsequent proinflammatory challenges. The corticotropin-releasing hormone and glucocorticoids are critical players in stress-induced mastocyte degranulation and potentiation of glial inflammatory responses, respectively. Mastocytes and glial cells express different toll-like receptor (TLR) family members, and their activation via proinflammatory molecules can increase the expression of connexin hemichannels and pannexin channels in glial cells. These membrane pores are oligohexamers of the corresponding protein subunits located in the cell surface. They allow ATP release and Ca2+ influx, which are two important elements of inflammation. Consequently, activated microglia and astrocytes release ATP and glutamate, affecting myelinization, neuronal development, and survival. Binding of ligands to TLRs induces a cascade of intracellular events leading to activation of several transcription factors that regulate the expression of many genes involved in inflammation. During pregnancy, the previous responses promoted by viral infections and other proinflammatory conditions are common and might predispose the offspring to develop psychiatric disorders and neurological diseases. Such disorders could eventually be potentiated by stress and might be part of the etiopathogenesis of CNS dysfunctions including autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. PMID:23935250

  19. Receptor-mediated activation of a plant Ca2+-permeable ion channel involved in pathogen defense

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Sabine; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Frachisse, Jean-Marie; Wirtz, Wolfgang; Guern, Jean; Hedrich, Rainer; Scheel, Dierk

    1997-01-01

    Pathogen recognition at the plant cell surface typically results in the initiation of a multicomponent defense response. Transient influx of Ca2+ across the plasma membrane is postulated to be part of the signaling chain leading to pathogen resistance. Patch-clamp analysis of parsley protoplasts revealed a novel Ca2+-permeable, La3+-sensitive plasma membrane ion channel of large conductance (309 pS in 240 mM CaCl2). At an extracellular Ca2+ concentration of 1 mM, which is representative of the plant cell apoplast, unitary channel conductance was determined to be 80 pS. This ion channel (LEAC, for large conductance elicitor-activated ion channel) is reversibly activated upon treatment of parsley protoplasts with an oligopeptide elicitor derived from a cell wall protein of Phytophthora sojae. Structural features of the elicitor found previously to be essential for receptor binding, induction of defense-related gene expression, and phytoalexin formation are identical to those required for activation of LEAC. Thus, receptor-mediated stimulation of this channel appears to be causally involved in the signaling cascade triggering pathogen defense in parsley. PMID:11038609

  20. Tissue transglutaminase activity is involved in the differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells into myelin-forming oligodendrocytes during CNS remyelination.

    PubMed

    Van Strien, Miriam E; Baron, Wia; Bakker, Erik N T P; Bauer, Jan; Bol, John G J M; Brev, John J P; Binnekade, Rob; Van Der Laarse, Willem J; Drukarch, Benjamin; Van Dam, Anne-Marie

    2011-11-01

    During normal brain development, axons are myelinated by mature oligodendrocytes (OLGs). Under pathological, demyelinating conditions within the central nervous system (CNS), axonal remyelination is only partially successful because oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) largely remain in an undifferentiated state resulting in a failure to generate myelinating OLGs. Tissue Transglutaminase (TG2) is a multifunctional enzyme, which amongst other functions, is involved in cell differentiation. Therefore, we hypothesized that TG2 contributes to differentiation of OPCs into OLGs and thereby stimulates remyelination. In vivo studies, using the cuprizone model for de- and remyelination in TG2(-/-) and wild-type mice, showed that during remyelination expression of proteolipid protein mRNA, as a marker for remyelination, in the corpus callosum lags behind in TG2(-/-) mice resulting in less myelin formation and, moreover, impaired recovery of motor behavior. Subsequent in vitro studies showed that rat OPCs express TG2 protein and activity which reduces when the cells have matured into OLGs. Furthermore, when TG2 activity is pharmacologically inhibited, the differentiation of OPCs into myelin-forming OLGs is dramatically reduced. We conclude that TG2 plays a prominent role in remyelination of the CNS, probably through stimulating OPC differentiation into myelin-forming OLGs. Therefore, manipulating TG2 activity may represent an interesting new target for remyelination in demyelinating diseases. PMID:21818782

  1. Quercetin Inhibits Fibroblast Activation and Kidney Fibrosis Involving the Suppression of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin and β-catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jiafa; Li, Jianzhong; Liu, Xin; Feng, Ye; Gui, Yuan; Yang, Junwei; He, Weichun; Dai, Chunsun

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid found in a wide variety of plants and presented in human diet, displays promising potential in preventing kidney fibroblast activation. However, whether quercetin can ameliorate kidney fibrosis in mice with obstructive nephropathy and the underlying mechanisms remain to be further elucidated. In this study, we found that administration of quercetin could largely ameliorate kidney interstitial fibrosis and macrophage accumulation in the kidneys with obstructive nephropathy. MTORC1, mTORC2, β-catenin as well as Smad signaling were activated in the obstructive kidneys, whereas quercetin could markedly reduce their abundance except Smad3 phosphorylation. In cultured NRK-49F cells, quercetin could inhibit α-SMA and fibronectin (FN) expression induced by TGFβ1 treatment. MTORC1, mTORC2, β-catenin and Smad signaling pathways were stimulated by TGFβ1 at a time dependent manner. Similar to those findings in the obstructive kidneys, mTORC1, mTORC2 and β-catenin, but not Smad signaling pathways were remarkably blocked by quercetin treatment. Together, these results suggest that quercetin inhibits fibroblast activation and kidney fibrosis involving a combined inhibition of mTOR and β-catenin signaling transduction, which may act as a therapeutic candidate for patients with chronic kidney diseases. PMID:27052477

  2. Induction of the Gene Encoding Macrophage Chemoattractant Protein 1 by Orientia tsutsugamushi in Human Endothelial Cells Involves Activation of Transcription Factor Activator Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Seong, Seung-Yong; Huh, Myung-Sook; Kim, Na-Hyun; Choi, Myung-sik; Kim, Ik-sang

    2002-01-01

    Human macrophage chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is a potent mediator of macrophage migration and therefore plays an essential role in early events of inflammation. In endothelial cells, at least three independent pathways regulate MCP-1 expression by NF-?B and AP-1. Orientia tsutsugamushi causes vasculitis in humans by replicating inside macrophages and endothelial cells. In the present study, we investigated the cis-acting and trans-acting elements involved in O. tsutsugamushi-induced MCP-1 gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Although NF-?B activation was observed in HUVEC infected with O. tsutsugamushi, inhibition of NF-?B activation did not affect the MCP-1 expression. However, treatment of HUVEC with extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase inhibitor or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor suppressed expression of MCP-1 mRNA concomitant with downregulation of activator protein 1 (AP-1) activation. Deletion of triphorbol acetate response elements (TRE) at position ?69 to ?63 of MCP-1 gene abolished inducible promoter activity. Deletion of TRE at position ?69 to ?63?96 to ?90 or deletion of NF-?B-binding site at position ?69 to ?63?88 to ?79 did not affect the inducibility of promoter. Site-directed mutagenesis of the NF-?B binding sites at positions ?2640 to ?2632, ?2612 to ?2603 in the enhancer region, or the AP-1 biding site at position ?2276 to ?2270 decreased the inducible activity of the promoter. Taken together, AP-1 activation by both the ERK pathway and the p38 MAPK pathway as well as their binding to TRE at position ?69 to ?63 in proximal promoter and TRE at position ?2276 to ?2270 in enhancer region is altogether essential in induction of MCP-1 mRNA in HUVEC infected with O. tsutsugamushi. Although NF-?B activation is not essential per se, the ?B site in the enhancer region is important in MCP-1 induction of HUVEC. This discrepancy in the involvement of the NF-?B may be due to the function of chromatin structures and other transcription cofactors in the regulation of MCP-1 gene expression in response to O. tsutsugamushi infectioin. PMID:12183528

  3. The activation of protein degradation in muscle by Ca2+ or muscle injury does not involve a lysosomal mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Furuno, K; Goldberg, A L

    1986-01-01

    By use of different inhibitors, we distinguished three proteolytic processes in rat skeletal muscle. When soleus muscles maintained under tension were exposed to the calcium ionophore A23187 or were incubated under no tension in the presence of Ca2+, net protein breakdown increased by 50-80%. Although leupeptin and E-64 inhibit this acceleration of protein breakdown almost completely, other agents that prevent lysosomal function, such as methylamine or leucine methyl ester, did not inhibit this effect. A similar increase in net proteolysis occurred in muscle fibres injured by cutting, and this response was also inhibited by leupeptin, but not by methylamine. In contrast, all these inhibitors markedly decreased the 2-fold increase in protein breakdown induced by incubating muscles without insulin and leucine, isoleucine and valine. In addition, the low rate of proteolysis seen in muscles under passive tension in complete medium was not affected by any of these inhibitors. Thus the basal degradative process in muscle does not involve lysosomes or thiol proteinases, and muscle can enhance protein breakdown by two mechanisms: lack of insulin and nutrients enhances a lysosomal process in muscle, as in other cells, whereas Ca2+ and muscle injury activate a distinct pathway involving cytosolic thiol proteinase(s). PMID:3099758

  4. Involvement of p53 in the cytotoxic activity of the NAMPT inhibitor FK866 in myeloid leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Basant Kumar; Dittrich, Tino; Chandra, Prakash; Becker, Annette; Kuehnau, Wolfgang; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Reinhardt, Dirk; Welte, Karl

    2013-02-15

    FK866 is a specific inhibitor of NAMPT and induces apoptosis of leukemic cells by depletion of intracellular NAD(+). Since up-regulation of NAMPT is associated with several cases of cancers, including leukemias, we asked whether in leukemic cells inhibition of NAMPT involves p53 pathway. We observed that FK866 induced apoptosis and reduced cell proliferation in NB-4, OCI-AML3 and MOLM-13 cell lines. In contrast, the leukemia cell lines, K-562 and Kasumi, containing nonfunctional p53 were relatively unaffected by FK866 treatment. Importantly, direct inhibition of sirtuins significantly reduced the viability of NB-4, OCI-AML3 and MOLM-13 cell lines. Activation of p53 by FK866 involved increased acetylation of p53 at lysine 382 with subsequent increase in the expression of p21 and BAX. Further, knockdown of p53 attenuated the effects of FK866 on apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, which was partly associated with decreased expression of p21 and BAX. Our results suggest the role of p53 acetylation pathway in the anti-leukemic effect of FK866. PMID:22815158

  5. The medial amygdaloid nucleus is involved in the cardiovascular pathway activated by noradrenaline into the lateral septal area of rats.

    PubMed

    Scopinho, América A; Fortaleza, Eduardo A T; Corrêa, Fernando M A

    2012-10-01

    We have previously reported that noradrenaline (NA) microinjected into the lateral septal area (LSA) caused pressor and bradicardic responses that were mediated by vasopressin release into the circulation through the paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVN). Although PVN is the final structure involved in the cardiovascular responses caused by NA in the LSA, there is no evidence of direct connections between these areas, suggesting that some structures could be links in this pathway. In the present study, we verified the effect of reversible synaptic inactivation of the medial amygdaloid nucleus (MeA), bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST) or diagonal band of Broca (DBB) with Cobalt Chloride (CoCl(2) ) on the cardiovascular response to NA microinjection into the LSA of unanesthetized rats. Male Wistar rats had guide cannulae implanted into the LSA and the MeA, BNST or DBB for drug administration, and a femoral catheter for blood pressure and heart rate recordings. Local microinjection of CoCl(2) (1 mm in 100 nL) into the MeA significantly reduced the pressor and bradycardic responses caused by NA microinjection (21 nmol in 200 nL) into the LSA. In contrast, microinjection of CoCl(2) into the BNST or DBB did not change the cardiovascular responses to NA into the LSA. The results indicate that synapses within the MeA, but not in BNST or DBB, are involved in the cardiovascular pathway activated by NA microinjection into the LSA. PMID:22805235

  6. Isolation and DNA-binding characteristics of a protein involved in transcription activation of two divergently transcribed, essential yeast genes.

    PubMed Central

    Halfter, H; Müller, U; Winnacker, E L; Gallwitz, D

    1989-01-01

    We have identified a protein, BAF1, which has two oppositely oriented, partially overlapping binding sites within a symmetrical sequence located midway between and upstream of the divergently transcribed YPT1 and TUB2 genes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The 120 kd BAF1 protein was purified to near homogeneity and used to delineate the two binding sites and to identify apparent protein contact sites by the missing contact technique, methylation interference and by site-directed mutagenesis. The BAF1-recognition sequence contains a conserved TCN7ACG element recently identified at autonomously replicating sequences (ARS) and in the 5' and 3' flanking region of other yeast genes. The symmetrical sequence of the YPT1/TUB2 intergene region seems not to be involved in DNA replication but activates transcription in an orientation-independent fashion. Images PMID:2684633

  7. A soluble and active form of Wnt-3a protein is involved in myogenic differentiation after cholesterol depletion.

    PubMed

    Portilho, Débora M; Martins, Eliane R; Costa, Manoel L; Mermelstein, Cláudia S

    2007-12-22

    Cholesterol is one of the major lipids of plasma membranes. Recently, we have shown that cholesterol depletion by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (M beta CD) induces the activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway and enhances myogenic differentiation. Here, we show that M beta CD-conditioned media accelerates myogenesis in a similar way as M beta CD does, suggesting that the effects induced by M beta CD could be caused by soluble factors present in the culture medium. Soluble Wnt-3 protein is significantly enhanced in M beta CD-conditioned medium. Wnt-3a-enriched media induces myogenesis as much as M beta CD does, whereas Wnt-5a-enriched media inhibits. We suggest that Wnt-3a is involved in the myogenic induction observed after cholesterol depletion. PMID:18037380

  8. Characterization of Enzymatic Activity of MlrB and MlrC Proteins Involved in Bacterial Degradation of Cyanotoxins Microcystins

    PubMed Central

    Dziga, Dariusz; Zielinska, Gabriela; Wladyka, Benedykt; Bochenska, Oliwia; Maksylewicz, Anna; Strzalka, Wojciech; Meriluoto, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial degradation of toxic microcystins produced by cyanobacteria is a common phenomenon. However, our understanding of the mechanisms of these processes is rudimentary. In this paper several novel discoveries regarding the action of the enzymes of the mlr cluster responsible for microcystin biodegradation are presented using recombinant proteins. In particular, the predicted active sites of the recombinant MlrB and MlrC were analyzed using functional enzymes and their inactive muteins. A new degradation intermediate, a hexapeptide derived from linearized microcystins by MlrC, was discovered. Furthermore, the involvement of MlrA and MlrB in further degradation of the hexapeptides was confirmed and a corrected biochemical pathway of microcystin biodegradation has been proposed. PMID:26999203

  9. Characterization of Enzymatic Activity of MlrB and MlrC Proteins Involved in Bacterial Degradation of Cyanotoxins Microcystins.

    PubMed

    Dziga, Dariusz; Zielinska, Gabriela; Wladyka, Benedykt; Bochenska, Oliwia; Maksylewicz, Anna; Strzalka, Wojciech; Meriluoto, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial degradation of toxic microcystins produced by cyanobacteria is a common phenomenon. However, our understanding of the mechanisms of these processes is rudimentary. In this paper several novel discoveries regarding the action of the enzymes of the mlr cluster responsible for microcystin biodegradation are presented using recombinant proteins. In particular, the predicted active sites of the recombinant MlrB and MlrC were analyzed using functional enzymes and their inactive muteins. A new degradation intermediate, a hexapeptide derived from linearized microcystins by MlrC, was discovered. Furthermore, the involvement of MlrA and MlrB in further degradation of the hexapeptides was confirmed and a corrected biochemical pathway of microcystin biodegradation has been proposed. PMID:26999203

  10. Enhancement of Ca(2+)-dependent endonuclease activity in L1210 cells during apoptosis induced by 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine: possible involvement of activating factor(s).

    PubMed

    Takauji, R; Yoshida, A; Iwasaki, H; Tohyama, K; Ueda, T; Nakamura, T

    1995-07-01

    Internucleosomal DNA fragmentation and morphological changes in nuclei typical of apoptosis were observed in L1210 cells incubated with 1.0 micrograms/ml of 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C). To investigate the mechanisms involved, we examined the activities of endogenous endonucleases in nuclei and cytoplasm. Both fractions of control cells contained Ca(2+)-dependent endonuclease which was capable of mediating internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. The assay system using two kinds of target substrates, i.e., nuclear chromatin of CCRF-CEM cells and naked DNA purified from the same cells, revealed that the activity of Ca(2+)-dependent endonuclease was enhanced in the crude nuclear extracts of cells treated with 1.0 microgram/ml of ara-C for 24 h or 48 h. The activity was extracted more easily from ara-C-treated cells than control cells without sonication of the nuclear fraction. On the other hand, in the cytoplasmic fraction of the cells, the activity towards naked DNA was unchanged, whereas that towards nuclear chromatin was clearly enhanced. These results suggest that internucleosomal DNA fragmentation induced by ara-C treatment is associated with enhancement and activation of constitutively expressed Ca(2+)-dependent endonuclease in L1210 cells. PMID:7559086

  11. A potential Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor involves in kinetics of protease inhibition and bacteriostatic activity.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Harikrishnan, Ramaswamy; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2015-02-01

    Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor (KSPI) is a pancreatic secretary trypsin inhibitor which involves in various cellular component regulations including development and defense process. In this study, we have characterized a KSPI cDNA sequence of freshwater striped murrel fish Channa striatus (Cs) at molecular level. Cellular location analysis predicted that the CsKSPI was an extracellular protein. The domain analysis showed that the CsKSPI contains a Kazal domain at 47-103 along with its family signature between 61 and 83. Phylogenetically, CsKSPI is closely related to KSPI from Maylandia zebra and formed a sister group with mammals. The 2D structure of CsKSPI showed three α-helical regions which are connected with random coils, one helix at signal sequence and two at the Kazal domain region. The relative gene expression showed that the CsKSPI was highly expressed in gills and its expression was induced upon fungus (Aphanomyces invadans), bacteria (Aeromonas hydrophila) and poly I:C (a viral analogue) challenge. The CsKSPI recombinant protein was produced to characterize and study the CsKSPI gene specific functions. The recombinant CsKSPI strongly inhibited trypsin compared to other tested proteases. The results of the kinetic activity of CsKSPI against trypsin was V(max)s = 1.62 nmol/min, K(M)s = 0.21 mM and K(i)s = 15.37 nM. Moreover, the recombinant CsKSPI inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria A. hydrophila at 20 μM and Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis at the MIC50 of 15 μM. Overall, the study indicated that the CsKSPI was a potential trypsin inhibitor which involves in antimicrobial activity. PMID:25433138

  12. SELENOGLYCOPROTEINS ATTENUATE ADHESION OF TUMOR CELLS TO THE BRAIN MICROVASCULAR ENDOTHELIUM VIA A PROCESS INVOLVING NF-κB ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Jagoda K.; Choi, Jeong June; Xiao, Rijin; Eum, Sung Yong; Kwiatkowski, Stefan; Wolff, Gretchen; Spangler, Leya; Power, Ronan F.; Toborek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Selenium-containing compounds and selenized yeast have anti-cancer properties. In order to address possible mechanisms involved in these effects, selenoglycoproteins (SGP) were extracted from selenium-enriched yeast at pH 4.0 and 6.5 (the fractions are called SGP40 and SGP65, respectively), followed by evaluation of their impact on the interactions of lung and breast tumor cells with human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). Extracted SGPs, especially SGP40, significantly inhibited adhesion of tumor cells to HBMEC and their transendothelial migration. Because the active component(s) of SGPs are unknown, small selenium-containing compounds (leucyl-valyl-selenomethionyl-arginine [LVSe-MR] and methylseleno adenosine [M-Se-A]), which are normally present in selenized yeast, were introduced as additional treatment groups. Treatment of HBMEC with SGP40, LVSe-MR, and M-Se-A induced changes in gene signatures, which suggested a central involvement of NF-κB-dependent pathway. These observations were confirmed in the subsequent analysis of NF-κB DNA binding activity, quantitative measurements of the expression of selected genes and proteins, and tumor cell adhesion assay with a specific NF-κB inhibitor as the additional treatment factor. These findings indicate that specific organic selenium-containing compounds have the ability to inhibit tumor cell adhesion to brain endothelial cells via downregulation of NF-κB. SGPs appear to be more effective than small selenium-containing compounds, suggesting the role of not only selenium but also the glycoprotein component in the observed protective impact. PMID:25465156

  13. The neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor knockdown modulates activator protein 1-involved feeding behavior in amphetamine-treated rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and two immediate early genes, c-fos and c-jun, have been found to be involved in regulating the appetite-suppressing effect of amphetamine (AMPH). The present study investigated whether cerebral catecholamine (CA) might regulate NPY and POMC expression and whether NPY Y1 receptor (Y1R) participated in activator protein-1 (AP-1)–mediated feeding. Methods Rats were given AMPH daily for 4 days. Changes in the expression of NPY, Y1R, c-Fos, c-Jun, and AP-1 were assessed and compared. Results Decreased CA could modulate NPY and melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) expressions. NPY and food intake decreased the most on Day 2, but Y1R, c-Fos, and c-Jun increased by approximately 350%, 280%, and 300%, respectively, on Day 2. Similarly, AP-1/DNA binding activity was increased by about 180% on Day 2. The expression patterns in Y1R, c-Fos, c-Jun, and AP-1/DNA binding were opposite to those in NPY during AMPH treatment. Y1R knockdown was found to modulate the opposite regulation between NPY and AP-1, revealing an involvement of Y1R in regulating NPY/AP-1–mediated feeding. Conclusions These results point to a molecular mechanism of CA/NPY/Y1R/AP-1 signaling in the control of AMPH-mediated anorexia and may advance the medical research of anorectic and anti-obesity drugs. PMID:24225225

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? and thymic stromal lymphopoietin are involved in the pathophysiology of childhood coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Sziksz, Erna; Molnr, Kriszta; Lippai, Rita; Pap, Domonkos; Onody, Anna; Veres-Szkely, Apor; Vrs, Pter; Szab, Dolresz; Gy?rffy, Hajnalka; Veres, Gbor; Tulassay, Tivadar; Vannay, Adm; Arat, Andrs

    2014-10-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic autoimmune enteropathy caused by exposure to dietary gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR?) was shown to exert protective effects in several immune-mediated disorders. Activation of PPAR? suppressed the expression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), an inducer of proinflammatory cytokines. Since the role of TSLP in gluten-sensitive enteropathy is completely unknown, we investigated the involvement of TSLP and its regulator PPAR? in childhood CD. We collected duodenal biopsy specimens from 19 children with newly diagnosed CD, 6 children with treated CD (gluten-free diet, GFD), and 10 controls. Expression of mRNA and protein levels of PPAR?, TSLP, and TSLP receptor were determined by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Duodenal localization of PPAR? and TSLP was studied by immunohistochemistry. In duodenal mucosa of children with CD, the amount of PPAR? was significantly lower and simultaneously that of TSLP significantly higher compared to controls (p?involved in the pathophysiology of CD. We hypothesize that PPAR? may be an inhibitory regulator of TSLP-stimulated inflammatory processes in CD. PMID:25187315

  15. Chromate alters root system architecture and activates expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis and signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Trujillo, Miguel; Méndez-Bravo, Alfonso; Ortiz-Castro, Randy; Hernández-Madrigal, Fátima; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Ruiz-Herrera, León Francisco; Long, Terri A; Cervantes, Carlos; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; López-Bucio, José

    2014-09-01

    Soil contamination by hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI) or chromate] due to anthropogenic activities has become an increasingly important environmental problem. To date few studies have been performed to elucidate the signaling networks involved on adaptive responses to (CrVI) toxicity in plants. In this work, we report that depending upon its concentration, Cr(VI) alters in different ways the architecture of the root system in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Low concentrations of Cr (20-40 µM) promoted primary root growth, while concentrations higher than 60 µM Cr repressed growth and increased formation of root hairs, lateral root primordia and adventitious roots. We analyzed global gene expression changes in seedlings grown in media supplied with 20 or 140 µM Cr. The level of 731 transcripts was significantly modified in response to Cr treatment with only five genes common to both Cr concentrations. Interestingly, 23 genes related to iron (Fe) acquisition were up-regulated including IRT1, YSL2, FRO5, BHLH100, BHLH101 and BHLH039 and the master controllers of Fe deficiency responses PYE and BTS were specifically activated in pericycle cells. It was also found that increasing concentration of Cr in the plant correlated with a decrease in Fe content, but increased both acidification of the rhizosphere and activity of the ferric chelate reductase. Supply of Fe to Cr-treated Arabidopsis allowed primary root to resume growth and alleviated toxicity symptoms, indicating that Fe nutrition is a major target of Cr stress in plants. Our results show that low Cr levels are beneficial to plants and that toxic Cr concentrations activate a low-Fe rescue system. PMID:24928490

  16. Domains with transcriptional regulatory activity within the ALL1 and AF4 proteins involved in acute leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, R; Yano, T; Sorio, C; Nakamura, T; Rallapalli, R; Gu, Y; Leshkowitz, D; Croce, C M; Canaani, E

    1995-01-01

    The ALLI gene, located at chromosome band 11q23, is involved in acute leukemia through a series of chromosome translocations and fusion to a variety of genes, most frequently to A4 and AF9. The fused genes encode chimeric proteins proteins. Because the Drosophila homologue of ALL1, trithorax, is a positive regulator of homeotic genes and acts at the level of transcription, it is conceivable that alterations in ALL1 transcriptional activity may underlie its action in malignant transformation. To begin studying this, we examined the All1, AF4, AF9, and AF17 proteins for the presence of potential transcriptional regulatory domains. This was done by fusing regions of the proteins to the yeast GAL4 DNA binding domain and assaying their effect on transcription of a reporter gene. A domain of 55 residues positioned at amino acids 2829-2883 of ALL1 was identified as a very strong activator. Further analysis of this domain by in vitro mutagenesis pointed to a core of hydrophobic and acidic residues as critical for the activity. An ALL1 domain that repressed transcription of the reporter gene coincided with the sequence homologous to a segment of DNA methyltransferase. An AF4 polypeptide containing residues 480-560 showed strong activation potential. The C-terminal segment of AF9 spanning amino acids 478-568 transactivated transcription of the reporter gene in HeLa but not in NIH 3T3 cells. These results suggest that ALL1, AF4, and probably AF9 interact with the transcriptional machinery of the cell. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8618864

  17. Identification of a Bidirectional Splicing Enhancer: Differential Involvement of SR Proteins in 5? or 3? Splice Site Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois, Cyril F.; Popielarz, Michel; Hildwein, Georges; Stevenin, James

    1999-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A pre-mRNA undergoes alternative splicing whose modulation occurs during infection, through the use of three different 5? splice sites and of one major or one minor 3? splice site. Although this pre-mRNA has been extensively used as a model to compare the transactivation properties of SR proteins, no cis-acting element has been identified in the transcript sequence. Here we describe the identification and the characterization of a purine-rich splicing enhancer, located just upstream of the 12S 5? splice site, which is formed from two contiguous 9-nucleotide (nt) purine motifs (Pu1 and Pu2). We demonstrate that this sequence is a bidirectional splicing enhancer (BSE) in vivo and in vitro, because it activates both the downstream 12S 5? splice site through the Pu1 motif and the upstream 216-nt intervening sequence (IVS) 3? splice site through both motifs. UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that the BSE interacts with several SR proteins specifically, among them 9G8 and ASF/SF2, which bind preferentially to the Pu1 and Pu2 motifs, respectively. Interestingly, we show by in vitro complementation assays that SR proteins have distinct transactivatory properties. In particular, 9G8, but not ASF/SF2 or SC35, is able to strongly activate the recognition of the 12S 5? splice site in a BSE-dependent manner in wild-type E1A or in a heterologous context, whereas ASF/SF2 or SC35, but not 9G8, activates the upstream 216-nt IVS splicing. Thus, our results identify a novel exonic BSE and the SR proteins which are involved in its differential activity. PMID:10523623

  18. GA3, a new gambogic acid derivative, exhibits potent antitumor activities in vitro via apoptosis-involved mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hua; Qin, Yu-xin; Zhou, Yun-long; Tong, Lin-jiang; Lin, Li-ping; Geng, Mei-yu; Duan, Wen-hu; Ding, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Gambogic acid (GA) is the major active ingredient of gamboge, which is secreted from a Chinese traditional medicine, Garcinia hanburyi, which possesses potent antitumor activity. GA3, a new GA derivative, has been shown to possess better water solubility than GA. The aim of the present study was to examine the antitumor activity of GA3 and the mechanism underlying it. Methods: The growth inhibition of cancer cell lines induced by GA3 was assessed using the SRB assay. DAPI staining, flow cytometry, a DNA fragment assay, and Western blot analysis were used to study the apoptotic mechanisms of GA3. Results: GA3 displayed wide cytotoxicity in diversified human cancer cell lines with a mean IC50 value of 2.15 μmol/L. GA3 was also effective against multidrug resistant cells, with an average resistance factor (RF) that was much lower than that of the reference drug, doxorubicin. Mechanistic studies revealed that GA3-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells proceeded via both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways, with caspase-8 functioning upstream of caspase-9. In addition, GA3-driven apoptotic events were associated with up-regulation of Bax, down-regulation of Bcl-2 and cleavage of Bid. Moreover, GA3 triggered cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, in particular bypassing the involvement of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Conclusion: Better solubility and a potential anti-MDR activity, combined with a comparable antitumor efficacy, make GA3 a potential drug candidate in cancer therapy that deserves further investigation. PMID:19262558

  19. Involvement of calmodulin in Ca(2+)-activated K+ efflux in human colonic cell line, HT29-19A.

    PubMed

    Fogg, K E; Higgs, N B; Warhurst, G

    1994-03-31

    The receptor-mediated agonist, neurotensin (NT) stimulated Ba(2+)- and charybdotoxin-sensitive 86Rb (K+) efflux in the HT29-19A colonic cell line. Efflux was also stimulated by ionomycin and thapsigargin and could be abolished by incubation with the intracellular Ca2+ chelator, BAPTA. Together, these data suggest a rise in [Ca2+]i is prerequisite for activation of K+ efflux in these cells. Comparison of the temporal profiles for NT-induced increases in [Ca2+]i and 86Rb efflux, however, failed to show a direct relationship between these parameters. The NT-stimulated increase in [Ca2+]i was transient, returning to baseline within 4-5 min, while efflux was sustained over a much longer period (> 12 min). Ca(2+)-activated 86Rb efflux was inhibited by pretreatment with calmodulin (CaM) antagonist, W7. W7 had no effect on basal efflux, but reduced both NT- and IM-activated efflux up to 80%, with a Ki of 38 microM. Other CaM antagonist inhibited efflux with an order of potency (TFP approximately W8 > W7 > W5) consistent with inhibition of a CaM-dependent process. Inhibition by W7 was not abolished by ouabain or bumetanide, indicating its effects are not mediated by action upon K+ uptake processes. W7 did not inhibit NT-stimulated 125I efflux but significantly reduced efflux stimulated by the Ca2+ ionophore, ionomycin. NT-stimulated 86Rb+ efflux was localized to the basolateral membrane of HT29-19A monolayers grown on permeable supports. These data are consistent with the involvement of CaM in mediating Ca(2+)-dependent activation of K+ conductance in HT29-19A colonocytes. PMID:8148397

  20. Analysis of Cathepsin and Furin Proteolytic Enzymes Involved in Viral Fusion Protein Activation in Cells of the Bat Reservoir Host

    PubMed Central

    El Najjar, Farah; Lampe, Levi; Baker, Michelle L.; Wang, Lin-Fa; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2015-01-01

    Bats of different species play a major role in the emergence and transmission of highly pathogenic viruses including Ebola virus, SARS-like coronavirus and the henipaviruses. These viruses require proteolytic activation of surface envelope glycoproteins needed for entry, and cellular cathepsins have been shown to be involved in proteolysis of glycoproteins from these distinct virus families. Very little is currently known about the available proteases in bats. To determine whether the utilization of cathepsins by bat-borne viruses is related to the nature of proteases in their natural hosts, we examined proteolytic processing of several viral fusion proteins in cells derived from two fruit bat species, Pteropus alecto and Rousettus aegyptiacus. Our work shows that fruit bat cells have homologs of cathepsin and furin proteases capable of cleaving and activating both the cathepsin-dependent Hendra virus F and the furin-dependent parainfluenza virus 5 F proteins. Sequence analysis comparing Pteropus alecto furin and cathepsin L to proteases from other mammalian species showed a high degree of conservation; however significant amino acid variation occurs at the C-terminus of Pteropus alecto furin. Further analysis of furin-like proteases from fruit bats revealed that these proteases are catalytically active and resemble other mammalian furins in their response to a potent furin inhibitor. However, kinetic analysis suggests that differences may exist in the cellular localization of furin between different species. Collectively, these results indicate that the unusual role of cathepsin proteases in the life cycle of bat-borne viruses is not due to the lack of active furin-like proteases in these natural reservoir species; however, differences may exist between furin proteases present in fruit bats compared to furins in other mammalian species, and these differences may impact protease usage for viral glycoprotein processing. PMID:25706132

  1. Critical residues of Semliki Forest virus RNA capping enzyme involved in methyltransferase and guanylyltransferase-like activities.

    PubMed

    Ahola, T; Laakkonen, P; Vihinen, H; Kääriäinen, L

    1997-01-01

    The Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicase protein nsP1 has methyltransferase (MT) and guanylyltransferase-like (GT) activities, which are involved in the capping of viral mRNAs. MT catalyzes the transfer of the methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to position 7 of GTP, and this reaction is followed by GT-catalyzed formation of the covalent complex m7GMP-nsP1. These reactions are virus specific and thus potential targets for inhibitors of virus replication. We have mutated residues of SFV nsP1, which are conserved in related proteins of the large alphavirus-like superfamily. Mutations of D64, D90, R93, C135, C142, and Y249 to alanine destroyed or greatly reduced the MT activity of nsP1. All MT-negative mutants lost also the GT activity, confirming that methylation of GTP is an essential prerequisite for the synthesis of the covalent guanylate complex. Mutation of H38 prevented the GT reaction without destroying MT activity. Conservation of residues essential for both reactions in the alphavirus-like superfamily implies that they use a capping mechanism similar to that for the alphaviruses. Residues D64 and D90 were necessary for AdoMet binding, as measured by UV cross-linking. Secondary structure predictions of nsP1 and other proteins of the superfamily place these residues in positions corresponding to AdoMet-binding sites of cellular methyltransferases, suggesting that they all may be structurally related. PMID:8985362

  2. VEGF increases the fibrinolytic activity of endothelial cells within fibrin matrices: involvement of VEGFR-2, tissue type plasminogen activator and matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Ratel, David; Mihoubi, Samira; Beaulieu, Edith; Durocher, Yves; Rivard, Georges-Etienne; Gingras, Denis; Béliveau, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Proteolysis of fibrin matrices by endothelial cells plays essential roles in the migratory and morphogenic differentiation processes underlying angiogenesis. Using an in vitro fibrinolysis model consisting of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) embedded in a three dimensional fibrin matrix, we show that VEGF, an angiogenic cytokine that plays a crucial role in the onset of angiogenesis, is a potent activator of HUVEC-mediated fibrinolysis. This VEGF-dependent fibrin degradation was completely abrogated by inhibitors of either the plasminogen activator/plasmin or matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) proteolytic systems, suggesting the involvement of both classes of proteases in fibrin degradation. Accordingly, VEGF-induced fibrinolysis correlated with an increase in the expression of tPA and of some MMPs, such as MT2-MMP and was completely blocked by a neutralizing antibody against tPA. Overall, these results indicate that efficient proteolysis of three dimensional fibrin matrices during VEGF-mediated angiogenesis involves a complex interplay between the MMP and plasmin-mediated proteolytic systems. PMID:17512973

  3. IeCPS2 is potentially involved in the biosynthesis of pharmacologically active Isodon diterpenoids rather than gibberellin.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Ling; Chen, Qian-Qian; Jin, Qiu-Ping; Gao, Juan; Zhao, Pei-Ji; Lu, Shan; Zeng, Ying

    2012-04-01

    The traditional Chinese medicinal plant, Isodon L., is remarkably rich in pharmacologically active ent-kaurane diterpenoids of diverse carbon skeletons. In an effort to create a resource for gene discovery and elucidate the biosynthesis of Isodonent-kaurane diterpenoids, three cDNAs (named IeCPS1, IeCPS2 and IeCPS2a) were isolated putatively encoding copalyl diphosphate synthases from Isodoneriocalyx leaves. Recombinant proteins of IeCPS1 and IeCPS2 were expressed, respectively, in Escherichia coli, and were shown to specifically convert geranylgeranyl diphosphate to copalyl diphosphate as demonstrated by GC-MS analyses. Based on tissue-specific expression and metabolic localization studies, the IeCPS2 transcripts were detected in young and mature leaves where the dominant ent-kaurane diterpenoid maoecrystal B accumulates, whereas no detectable expression of IeCPS2 was observed in germinating seeds where the gibberellin biosynthetic pathway is usually active. In addition, no evidence for maoecrystal B was found in germinating seeds. On the other hand, IeCPS1 transcripts significantly accumulated in germinating seeds as well as in leaves. The biochemical and molecular genetic evidence thus indicated that IeCPS2 is a copalyl diphosphate synthase potentially involved in the biosynthesis of Isodon diterpenoids in leaves, while IeCPS1 is more probably relevant to gibberellin formation and may, in addition, participate in Isodonent-kaurane diterpenoid production. PMID:22284743

  4. The practice of effective involvment of Master and Graduate students to research activity for space science and technology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyi, Lev; Alferov, A.; Zeleniy, Lev; Veselov, M.; Rodin, V.

    One of serious problems both for fundamental space research and various applied fields of space exploration is an effective involvement of graduates to real scientific or engineering work. The basic education even of high quality does not prepare a graduate well enough to start productive work in such specific fields as space science and engineering. An idea to organize the thematic educational training with elements of participation in real projects based on a profile research of Academic and industry organizations already at Master's degree program level was successfully implemented in Russian Academy in cooperation with Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology. However at present, under severe competition with commercial companies, we need to search for new additional ways to intensify young talented people inflow to the field of space science and applications. Various activities aimed to resolve this problem are now conducted by Russian Space Science Council and Russian Academy of Sciences, such as educational discourses for high-schools and students of junior level. We discuss the first results of this practice. Very important part of this activity is development of effective integration into international educational and outreach programs. The report is prepared in a frame of "Young Scientists Support Program" of Russian Academy of Sciences.

  5. AMPA-receptor activation is involved in the antiamnesic effect of DM 232 (unifiram) and DM 235 (sunifiram).

    PubMed

    Galeotti, N; Ghelardini, C; Pittaluga, A; Pugliese, A M; Bartolini, A; Manetti, D; Romanelli, M N; Gualtieri, F

    2003-12-01

    DM 232 and DM 235 are novel antiamnesic compounds structurally related to ampakines. The involvement of AMPA receptors in the mechanism of action of DM 232 and DM 235 was, therefore, investigated in vivo and in vitro. Both compounds (0.1 mg/kg(-1) i.p.) were able to reverse the amnesia induced by the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (30 mg/kg(-1) i.p.) in the mouse passive avoidance test. At the effective doses, the investigated compounds did not impair motor coordination, as revealed by the rota rod test, nor modify spontaneous motility and inspection activity, as revealed by the hole board test. DM 232 and DM 235 reversed the antagonism induced by kynurenic acid of the NMDA-mediated release of [(3)H]NA in the kynurenate test performed in rat hippocampal slices. This effect was abolished by NBQX. DM 232 increases, in a concentration dependent manner, excitatory synaptic transmission in the rat hippocampus in vitro. These results suggest that DM 232 and DM 235 act as cognition enhancers through the activation of the AMPA-mediated neurotransmission system. PMID:14600801

  6. JAB1 is Involved in Neuropathic Pain by Regulating JNK and NF-κB Activation After Chronic Constriction Injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Chen, Xiangdong; Yu, Jiang; Xu, Xingguo; Wei, Xiaojia; Gu, Xiaoling; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Dongmei; Xu, Zhongling

    2016-05-01

    Neuropathic pain, caused by a lesion or dysfunction of the somatosensory nervous system, is a severe debilitating condition with which clinical treatment remains challenging. Jun activation domain-binding protein (JAB1) is a multifunctional protein that participates in several signaling pathways, controlling cell proliferation and apoptosis. However, the expression and possible function of JAB1 in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain has not been elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the possible involvement of JAB1. Here, employing a neuropathic pain model induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) on rats, we reported the role of JAB1 in the maintenance of neuropathic pain. By western blot, we found that CCI markedly up-regulated JAB1 expression in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord. Immunofluorescent assay demonstrated that JAB1 was extensively localized in IB4-, CGRP- and NF200-positive neurons in the injured L5 DRG, and mainly co-localized with NeuN in spinal cord. In addition, we showed that CCI induced phosphorylation of p65 and JNK in vivo. Intrathecal injection of JAB1 siRNA significantly attenuated the CCI-induced JNK and p65 phosphorylation and alleviated both mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia in rats. Taken together, these results suggested that JAB1 promotes neuropathic pain via positively regulating JNK and NF-κB activation. PMID:26700435

  7. Crl Activates Transcription Initiation of RpoS-Regulated Genes Involved in the Multicellular Behavior of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Robbe-Saule, Véronique; Jaumouillé, Valentin; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Guadagnini, Stéphanie; Talhouarne, Christelle; Mathout, Hayette; Kolb, Annie; Norel, Françoise

    2006-01-01

    In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, the stationary-phase sigma factor σS (RpoS) is required for virulence, stress resistance, biofilm formation, and development of the rdar morphotype. This morphotype is a multicellular behavior characterized by expression of the adhesive extracellular matrix components cellulose and curli fimbriae. The Crl protein of Escherichia coli interacts with σS and activates expression of σS-regulated genes, such as the csgBAC operon encoding the subunit of the curli proteins, by an unknown mechanism. Here, we showed using in vivo and in vitro experiments that the Crl protein of Salmonella serovar Typhimurium is required for development of a typical rdar morphotype and for maximal expression of the csgD, csgB, adrA, and bcsA genes, which are involved in curli and cellulose biosynthesis. In vitro transcription assays and potassium permanganate reactivity experiments with purified His6-Crl showed that Crl directly activated σS-dependent transcription initiation at the csgD and adrA promoters. We observed no effect of Crl on σ70-dependent transcription. Crl protein levels increased during the late exponential and stationary growth phases in Luria-Beratani medium without NaCl at 28°C. We obtained complementation of the crl mutation by increasing σS levels. This suggests that Crl has a major physiological impact at low concentrations of σS. PMID:16707690

  8. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles stimulate sea urchin immune cell phagocytic activity involving TLR/p38 MAPK-mediated signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Pinsino, Annalisa; Russo, Roberta; Bonaventura, Rosa; Brunelli, Andrea; Marcomini, Antonio; Matranga, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) are one of the most widespread-engineered particles in use for drug delivery, cosmetics, and electronics. However, TiO2NP safety is still an open issue, even for ethical reasons. In this work, we investigated the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus immune cell model as a proxy to humans, to elucidate a potential pathway that can be involved in the persistent TiO2NP-immune cell interaction in vivo. Morphology, phagocytic ability, changes in activation/inactivation of a few mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK, ERK), variations of other key proteins triggering immune response (Toll-like receptor 4-like, Heat shock protein 70, Interleukin-6) and modifications in the expression of related immune response genes were investigated. Our findings indicate that TiO2NPs influence the signal transduction downstream targets of p38 MAPK without eliciting an inflammatory response or other harmful effects on biological functions. We strongly recommend sea urchin immune cells as a new powerful model for nano-safety/nano-toxicity investigations without the ethical normative issue. PMID:26412401

  9. Activation of Manganese Oxidants with Bisulfite for Enhanced Oxidation of Organic Contaminants: The Involvement of Mn(III).

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Guan, Xiaohong; Fang, Jingyun; Tratnyek, Paul G

    2015-10-20

    MnO4(-) was activated by HSO3(-), resulting in a process that oxidizes organic contaminants at extraordinarily high rates. The permanganate/bisulfite (PM/BS) process oxidized phenol, ciprofloxacin, and methyl blue at pHini 5.0 with rates (kobs ≈ 60-150 s(-1)) that were 5-6 orders of magnitude faster than those measured for permanganate alone, and ∼5 to 7 orders of magnitude faster than conventional advanced oxidation processes for water treatment. Oxidation of phenol was fastest at pH 4.0, but still effective at pH 7.0, and only slightly slower when performed in tap water. A smaller, but still considerable (∼3 orders of magnitude) increase in oxidation rates of methyl blue was observed with MnO2 activated by HSO3(-) (MO/BS). The above results, time-resolved spectroscopy of manganese species under various conditions, stoichiometric analysis of pH changes, and the effect of pyrophosphate on UV absorbance spectra suggest that the reactive intermediate(s) responsible for the extremely rapid oxidation of organic contaminants in the PM/BS process involve manganese(III) species with minimal stabilization by complexation. The PM/BS process may lead to a new category of advanced oxidation technologies based on contaminant oxidation by reactive manganese(III) species, rather than hydroxyl and sulfate radicals. PMID:26421879

  10. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β activation mediates rotenone-induced cytotoxicity with the involvement of microtubule destabilization.

    PubMed

    Hongo, Haruyuki; Kihara, Takeshi; Kume, Toshiaki; Izumi, Yasuhiko; Niidome, Tetsuhiro; Sugimoto, Hachiro; Akaike, Akinori

    2012-09-14

    Rotenone, a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, has been used to generate animal and cell culture models of Parkinson's disease. Recent studies suggest that microtubule destabilization causes selective dopaminergic neuronal loss. In this study, we investigated glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) involvement in rotenone-induced microtubule destabilization. Rotenone-induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells was attenuated by the GSK3β inhibitor SB216763. Tau, a microtubule-associated protein and substrate for GSK3β, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease. Rotenone induced an increase in phosphorylated tau, the effect of which was attenuated by concomitant treatment with SB216763. Rotenone treatment also decreased tau expression in the microtubule fraction and increased tau expression in the cytosol fraction. These effects were suppressed by SB216763, which suggests that rotenone reduces the capacity of tau to bind microtubules. Rotenone treatment increased the amount of free tubulin and reduced the amount of polymerized tubulin, indicating that rotenone destabilizes microtubules. Rotenone-induced microtubule destabilization was suppressed by SB216763 and taxol, a microtubule stabilizer. Taxol prevented rotenone-induced cytotoxicity and morphological changes. Taken together, these results suggest that rotenone-induced cytotoxicity is mediated by microtubule destabilization via GSK3β activation, and that microtubule destabilization is caused by reduction in the binding capacity of tau to microtubules, which is a result of tau phosphorylation via GSK3β activation. PMID:22922102

  11. Transient accumulation of 5-carboxylcytosine indicates involvement of active demethylation in lineage specification of neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wheldon, Lee M; Abakir, Abdulkadir; Ferjentsik, Zoltan; Dudnakova, Tatiana; Strohbuecker, Stephanie; Christie, Denise; Dai, Nan; Guan, Shengxi; Foster, Jeremy M; Corra, Ivan R; Loose, Matthew; Dixon, James E; Sottile, Virginie; Johnson, Andrew D; Ruzov, Alexey

    2014-06-12

    5-Methylcytosine (5mC) is an epigenetic modificationinvolved in regulation of gene activity during differentiation. Tet dioxygenases oxidize 5mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC). Both 5fC and 5caC can be excised from DNA by thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) followed by regeneration of unmodified cytosine via the base excision repair pathway. Despite evidence that this mechanism is operative in embryonic stem cells, the role of TDG-dependent demethylation in differentiation and development is currently unclear. Here, we demonstrate that widespread oxidation of 5hmC to 5caC occurs in postimplantation mouse embryos. We show that 5fC and 5caC are transiently accumulated during lineage specification of neural stem cells (NSCs) in culture and invivo. Moreover, 5caC is enriched at the cell-type-specific promoters during differentiation of NSCs, and TDG knockdown leads to increased 5fC/5caC levels in differentiating NSCs. Our data suggest that active demethylation contributes to epigenetic reprogramming determining lineage specification in embryonic brain. PMID:24882006

  12. Microarray Analysis of Genes Involved with Shell Strength in Layer Shell Gland at the Early Stage of Active Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhangguo; Zheng, Qi; Zhang, Xueyu; Lu, Lizhi

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to get a comprehensive understanding of how genes in chicken shell gland modulate eggshell strength at the early stage of active calcification. Four 32-week old of purebred Xianju hens with consistent high or low shell breakage strength were grouped into two pairs. Using Affymetrix Chicken Array, a whole-transcriptome analysis was performed on hen’s shell gland at 9 h post oviposition. Gene ontology enrichment analysis for differentially expressed (DE) transcripts was performed using the web-based GOEAST, and the validation of DE-transcripts was tested by qRT-PCR. 1,195 DE-transcripts, corresponding to 941 unique genes were identified in hens with strong eggshell compared to weak shell hens. According to gene ontology annotations, there are 77 DE-transcripts encoding ion transporters and secreted extracellular matrix proteins, and at least 26 DE-transcripts related to carbohydrate metabolism or post-translation glycosylation modification; furthermore, there are 88 signaling DE-transcripts. GO term enrichment analysis suggests that some DE-transcripts mediate reproductive hormones or neurotransmitters to affect eggshell quality through a complex suite of biophysical processes. These results reveal some candidate genes involved with eggshell strength at the early stage of active calcification which may facilitate our understanding of regulating mechanisms of eggshell quality. PMID:25049830

  13. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles stimulate sea urchin immune cell phagocytic activity involving TLR/p38 MAPK-mediated signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pinsino, Annalisa; Russo, Roberta; Bonaventura, Rosa; Brunelli, Andrea; Marcomini, Antonio; Matranga, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) are one of the most widespread-engineered particles in use for drug delivery, cosmetics, and electronics. However, TiO2NP safety is still an open issue, even for ethical reasons. In this work, we investigated the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus immune cell model as a proxy to humans, to elucidate a potential pathway that can be involved in the persistent TiO2NP-immune cell interaction in vivo. Morphology, phagocytic ability, changes in activation/inactivation of a few mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK, ERK), variations of other key proteins triggering immune response (Toll-like receptor 4-like, Heat shock protein 70, Interleukin-6) and modifications in the expression of related immune response genes were investigated. Our findings indicate that TiO2NPs influence the signal transduction downstream targets of p38 MAPK without eliciting an inflammatory response or other harmful effects on biological functions. We strongly recommend sea urchin immune cells as a new powerful model for nano-safety/nano-toxicity investigations without the ethical normative issue. PMID:26412401

  14. Cdk3-promoted epithelial-mesenchymal transition through activating AP-1 is involved in colorectal cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Na; Li, Yuejin; Peng, Zhengke; Lu, Chengrong; Dong, Zigang; Tang, Faqing

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinase-3 (Cdk3) is a positive regulator of the G1 mammalian cell cycle phase. Cdk3 is involved in cancer progression, but very little is known about its mechanism in cancer development and progression. Herein, we found that Cdk3 increased colorectal cancer metastasis through promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) shift. Cdk3 was found to highly express in metastatic cancer and induce cell motility and invasion. Cdk3 was shown to phosphorylate c-Jun at Ser 63 and Ser 73 in vitro and ex vivo. Cdk3-phosphorylated c-Jun at Ser 63 and Ser 73 resulted in an increased AP-1 activity. Ectopic expression of Cdk3 promoted colorectal cancer from epithelial to mesenchymal transition conjugating AP-1 activation, while AP-1 inhibition dramatically decreased Cdk3-increased EMT shift. These results showed that the Cdk3/c-Jun signaling axis mediating epithelial-mesenchymal transition plays an important role in colorectal cancer metastasis. PMID:26755651

  15. Increased origin activity in transformed versus normal cells: identification of novel protein players involved in DNA replication and cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Di Paola, Domenic; Rampakakis, Emmanouil; Chan, Man Kid; Arvanitis, Dina N.; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Using libraries of replication origins generated previously, we identified three clones that supported the autonomous replication of their respective plasmids in transformed, but not in normal cells. Assessment of their in vivo replication activity by in situ chromosomal DNA replication assays revealed that the chromosomal loci corresponding to these clones coincided with chromosomal replication origins in all cell lines, which were more active by 2–3-fold in the transformed by comparison to the normal cells. Evaluation of pre-replication complex (pre-RC) protein abundance at these origins in transformed and normal cells by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, using anti-ORC2, -cdc6 and -cdt1 antibodies, showed that they were bound by these pre-RC proteins in all cell lines, but a 2–3-fold higher abundance was observed in the transformed by comparison to the normal cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) performed on the most efficiently replicating clone, using nuclear extracts from the transformed and normal cells, revealed the presence of a DNA replication complex in transformed cells, which was barely detectable in normal cells. Subsequent supershift EMSAs suggested the presence of transformation-specific complexes. Mass spectrometric analysis of these complexes revealed potential new protein players involved in DNA replication that appear to correlate with cellular transformation. PMID:20064876

  16. P21-activated protein kinase is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma and enhances cancer metastasis involving c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation and paxillin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ching, Yick-Pang; Leong, Veronica Y L; Lee, Man-Fong; Xu, Hai-Tao; Jin, Dong-Yan; Ng, Irene Oi-Lin

    2007-04-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major malignancies in the world. The prognosis of HCC is poor, due to frequent intrahepatic metastasis and tumor recurrence. P21-activated protein kinase (Pak1), a main downstream effector of small Rho GTPases, Rac1 and Cdc42, plays an important role in the regulation of cell morphogenesis, motility, mitosis, and angiogenesis. Here, we show that Pak1 gene was overexpressed in human HCCs. Overexpression of Pak1 in human HCCs was associated with more aggressive tumor behavior in terms of more metastatic phenotype and more advanced tumor stages. In addition, HCC cell line stably expressing Pak1 displayed increased cell motility rates and, conversely, knockdown of endogenous Pak1 expression by small interfering RNA reduced the migration rates of HCC cells. In an established metastatic HCC cell line, we found that Pak1 was overexpressed compared with its primary HCC cell line and this overexpression was associated with higher cell motility. Importantly, we found that c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) was activated in HCC cell lines overexpressing Pak1. Inhibition of the JNK activity by chemical inhibitor significantly reduced the migration rates of HCC cells via attenuation of paxillin phosphorylation at Ser(178). In conclusion, our results document that Pak1 is overexpressed in HCCs and plays an important role in the metastasis of HCC. The mechanism by which Pak1 induces cancer metastasis may involve activation of JNK and phosphorylation of paxillin. PMID:17440071

  17. Antimanic-like activity of candesartan in mice: Possible involvement of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    de Souza Gomes, Júlia Ariana; de Souza, Greicy Coelho; Berk, Michael; Cavalcante, Lígia Menezes; de Sousa, Francisca Cléa F; Budni, Josiane; de Lucena, David Freitas; Quevedo, João; Carvalho, André F; Macêdo, Danielle

    2015-11-01

    Activation of the brain angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) triggers pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory mechanisms which are involved in the neurobiology of bipolar disorder (BD). Candesartan (CDS) is an AT1 receptor antagonist with potential neuroprotective properties. Herein we investigated CDS effects against oxidative, neurotrophic inflammatory and cognitive effects of amphetamine (AMPH)-induced mania. In the reversal protocol adult mice were given AMPH 2 mg/kg i.p. or saline and between days 8 and 14 received CDS 0.1, 0.3 or 1 mg/kg orally, lithium (Li) 47.5 mg/kg i.p., or saline. In the prevention treatment, mice were pretreated with CDS, Li or saline prior to AMPH. Locomotor activity and working memory performance were assessed. Glutathione (GSH), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) and TNF-α levels were evaluated in the hippocampus (HC) and cerebellar vermis (CV). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta (GSK-3beta) levels were measured in the HC. CDS and Li prevented and reversed the AMPH-induced increases in locomotor activity. Only CDS prevented and reversed AMPH-induced working memory deficits. CDS prevented AMPH-induced alterations in GSH (HC and CV), TBARS (HC and CV), TNF-α (HC and CV) and BDNF (HC) levels. Li prevented alterations in BDNF and phospho-Ser9-GSK3beta. CDS reversed AMPH-induced alterations in GSH (HC and CV), TBARS (HC), TNF-α (CV) and BDNF levels. Li reversed AMPH-induced alterations in TNF-α (HC and CV) and BDNF (HC) levels. CDS is effective in reversing and preventing AMPH-induced behavioral and biochemical alterations, providing a rationale for the design of clinical trials investigating CDS׳s possible therapeutic effects. PMID:26321203

  18. Daxx from Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei is involved in activation of NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Muting; Tang, Junliang; Liang, Qianhui; Zhu, Guohua; Li, Haoyang; Li, Chaozheng; Weng, Shaoping; He, Jianguo; Xu, Xiaopeng

    2015-08-01

    Death domain-associated factor 6 (Daxx) is a Fas-binding protein that mediates the activation of Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway and Fas-induced apoptosis. In this study, a crustacean Daxx (LvDaxx) was firstly cloned and identified from Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. The LvDaxx cDNA was 2644 bp in length with an Open Reading Frame (ORF) of 2217 bp. Sequence analysis indicated that LvDaxx contained a single Daxx domain and two nuclear localization signals (NLSs) and shared a similarity with Drosophila melanogaster Daxx. LvDaxx was a nuclear-localized protein that was expressed highest in hemocytes and could be up-regulated in pathogen- and stimulant-challenge shrimps. LvDaxx could activate the artificial promoter containing an NF-κB binding site and the promoters of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) ie1 gene and arthropod antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), suggesting LvDaxx could be involved in the activation of the NF-κB pathway. Knock-down of LvDaxx in vivo resulted in down-regulation of shrimp AMPs and reduction of WSSV copies in tissues. Furthermore, suppression of LvDaxx significantly decreased the mortality of WSSV-infected shrimps, but increased the mortality of Vibrio Parahaemolyticus-infected shrimps. Thus, these suggested that LvDaxx could play a role in the innate immunity against Vibrio parahaemolyticus in L. vannamei, while in the antiviral response, LvDaxx may be hijacked by WSSV and play a complex role in WSSV pathogenesis. PMID:25917972

  19. Trypanosome U-deletional RNA editing involves guide RNA-directed endonuclease cleavage, terminal U exonuclease, and RNA ligase activities.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Reyes, J; Sollner-Webb, B

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the mechanism of accurate in vitro RNA editing of Trypanosoma brucei ATPase 6 mRNA, using four mRNA-guide RNA (gRNA) pairs that specify deletion of 2, 3, or 4 U residues at editing site 1 and mitochondrial extract. This extract not only catalyzes deletion of the specified number of U residues but also exhibits a novel endonuclease activity that cleaves the input pre-mRNA in a gRNA-directed manner, precisely at the phosphodiester bond predicted in a simple enzymatic model of RNA editing. This cleavage site is inconsistent with a chimera-based editing mechanism. The U residues to be deleted, present at the 3' end of the upstream cleavage product, are then removed evidently by a 3' U-specific exonuclease and not by a reverse reaction of terminal U transferase. RNA ligase can then join the mRNA halves through their newly formed 5' P and 3' OH termini, generating mRNA faithfully edited at the first editing site. This resultant, partially edited mRNA can then undergo accurate, gRNA-directed cleavage at editing site 2, again precisely as predicted by the enzymatic editing model. All of these enzymatic activities cofractionate with the U-deletion activity and may reside in a single complex. The data imply that each round of editing is a four-step process, involving (i) gRNA-directed cleavage of the pre-mRNA at the bond immediately 5' of the region base paired to the gRNA, (ii) U deletion from or U addition to the 3' OH of the upstream mRNA half, (iii) ligation of the mRNA halves, and (iv) formation of additional base pairing between the correctly edited site and the gRNA that directs subsequent nuclease cleavage at the next editing site. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8799125

  20. Transcriptional Activation of Multiple Operons Involved in para-Nitrophenol Degradation by Pseudomonas sp. Strain WBC-3

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Mao; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Jiang, Xuan; Chao, Hongjun

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain WBC-3 utilizes para-nitrophenol (PNP) as a sole carbon and energy source. The genes involved in PNP degradation are organized in the following three operons: pnpA, pnpB, and pnpCDEFG. How the expression of the genes is regulated is unknown. In this study, an LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) is identified to activate the expression of the genes in response to the specific inducer PNP. While the LTTR coding gene pnpR was found to be not physically linked to any of the three catabolic operons, it was shown to be essential for the growth of strain WBC-3 on PNP. Furthermore, PnpR positively regulated its own expression, which is different from the function of classical LTTRs. A regulatory binding site (RBS) with a 17-bp imperfect palindromic sequence (GTT-N11-AAC) was identified in all pnpA, pnpB, pnpC, and pnpR promoters. Through electrophoretic mobility shift assays and mutagenic analyses, this motif was proven to be necessary for PnpR binding. This consensus motif is centered at positions approximately −55 bp relative to the four transcriptional start sites (TSSs). RBS integrity was required for both high-affinity PnpR binding and transcriptional activation of pnpA, pnpB, and pnpR. However, this integrity was essential only for high-affinity PnpR binding to the promoter of pnpCDEFG and not for its activation. Intriguingly, unlike other LTTRs studied, no changes in lengths of the PnpR binding regions of the pnpA and pnpB promoters were observed after the addition of the inducer PNP in DNase I footprinting. PMID:25326309