Science.gov

Sample records for eis field investigation

  1. EIS Data on the Chandra Deep Field South Released

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this note is to announce that the ESO Imaging Survey programme has released a full set of optical/infrared data covering the socalled Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) rapidly becoming a favoured target for cosmological studies in the southern hemisphere. The field was originally selected for deep X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM. The former have already been completed producing the deepest high-resolution X-ray image ever taken with a total integration time of one million seconds. The data obtained by EIS include J and Ks infrared observations of an area of 0.1 square degree nearly matching the Chandra image down to JAB ~ 23.4 and KAB ~ 22.6 and UU'BVRI optical observations over 0.25 square degree, matching the XMM field of view, reaching 5 s limiting magnitudes of U'AB = 26.0, UAB = 25.7, BAB = 26.4, VAB = 25.4, RA B = 25.5 and IA B = 24.7 mag, as measured within a 2 ´ FWHM aperture.

  2. The Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) Investigation and the Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Clemmons, J. H.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Jaskulek, S. E.; Schlemm, C. E.; Brown, L. E.; Cooper, S. A.; Craft, J. V.; Fennell, J. F.; Gurnee, R. S.; Hammock, C. M.; Hayes, J. R.; Hill, P. A.; Ho, G. C.; Hutcheson, J. C.; Jacques, A. D.; Kerem, S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nelson, K. S.; Paschalidis, N. P.; Rossano, E.; Stokes, M. R.; Westlake, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    The Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) Investigation is one of 5 fields-and-particles investigations on the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission. MMS comprises 4 spacecraft flying in close formation in highly elliptical, near-Earth-equatorial orbits targeting understanding of the fundamental physics of the important physical process called magnetic reconnection using Earth's magnetosphere as a plasma laboratory. EPD comprises two sensor types, the Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) with one instrument on each of the 4 spacecraft, and the Fly's Eye Energetic Particle Spectrometer (FEEPS) with 2 instruments on each of the 4 spacecraft. EIS measures energetic ion energy, angle and elemental compositional distributions from a required low energy limit of 20 keV for protons and 45 keV for oxygen ions, up to >0.5 MeV (with capabilities to measure up to >1 MeV). FEEPS measures instantaneous all sky images of energetic electrons from 25 keV to >0.5 MeV, and also measures total ion energy distributions from 45 keV to >0.5 MeV to be used in conjunction with EIS to measure all sky ion distributions. In this report we describe the EPD investigation and the details of the EIS sensor. Specifically we describe EPD-level science objectives, the science and measurement requirements, and the challenges that the EPD team had in meeting these requirements. Here we also describe the design and operation of the EIS instruments, their calibrated performances, and the EIS in-flight and ground operations. Blake et al. (The Flys Eye Energetic Particle Spectrometer (FEEPS) contribution to the Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) investigation of the Magnetospheric Magnetoscale (MMS) Mission, this issue) describe the design and operation of the FEEPS instruments, their calibrated performances, and the FEEPS in-flight and ground operations. The MMS spacecraft will launch in early 2015, and over its 2-year mission will provide comprehensive measurements of magnetic reconnection at Earth

  3. The Europa Imaging System (EIS): Investigating Europa's geology, ice shell, and current activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turtle, Elizabeth; Thomas, Nicolas; Fletcher, Leigh; Hayes, Alexander; Ernst, Carolyn; Collins, Geoffrey; Hansen, Candice; Kirk, Randolph L.; Nimmo, Francis; McEwen, Alfred; Hurford, Terry; Barr Mlinar, Amy; Quick, Lynnae; Patterson, Wes; Soderblom, Jason

    2016-07-01

    NASA's Europa Mission, planned for launch in 2022, will perform more than 40 flybys of Europa with altitudes at closest approach as low as 25 km. The instrument payload includes the Europa Imaging System (EIS), a camera suite designed to transform our understanding of Europa through global decameter-scale coverage, topographic and color mapping, and unprecedented sub- meter-scale imaging. EIS combines narrow-angle and wide-angle cameras to address these science goals: • Constrain the formation processes of surface features by characterizing endogenic geologic structures, surface units, global cross-cutting relationships, and relationships to Europa's subsurface structure and potential near-surface water. • Search for evidence of recent or current activity, including potential plumes. • Characterize the ice shell by constraining its thickness and correlating surface features with subsurface structures detected by ice penetrating radar. • Characterize scientifically compelling landing sites and hazards by determining the nature of the surface at scales relevant to a potential lander. EIS Narrow-angle Camera (NAC): The NAC, with a 2.3°° x 1.2°° field of view (FOV) and a 10-μμrad instantaneous FOV (IFOV), achieves 0.5-m pixel scale over a 2-km-wide swath from 50-km altitude. A 2-axis gimbal enables independent targeting, allowing very high-resolution stereo imaging to generate digital topographic models (DTMs) with 4-m spatial scale and 0.5-m vertical precision over the 2-km swath from 50-km altitude. The gimbal also makes near-global (>95%) mapping of Europa possible at ≤50-m pixel scale, as well as regional stereo imaging. The NAC will also perform high-phase-angle observations to search for potential plumes. EIS Wide-angle Camera (WAC): The WAC has a 48°° x 24°° FOV, with a 218-μμrad IFOV, and is designed to acquire pushbroom stereo swaths along flyby ground-tracks. From an altitude of 50 km, the WAC achieves 11-m pixel scale over a 44-km

  4. Ground vortex flow field investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Richard E.; Delfrate, John H.; Eshleman, James E.

    1988-01-01

    Flow field investigations were conducted at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flow Visualization Facility (water tunnel) to investigate the ground effect produced by the impingement of jets from aircraft nozzles on a ground board in a STOL operation. Effects on the overall flow field with both a stationary and a moving ground board were photographed and compared with similar data found in other references. Nozzle jet impingement angles, nozzle and inlet interaction, side-by-side nozzles, nozzles in tandem, and nozzles and inlets mounted on a flat plate model were investigated. Results show that the wall jet that generates the ground effect is unsteady and the boundary between the ground vortex flow field and the free-stream flow is unsteady. Additionally, the forward projection of the ground vortex flow field with a moving ground board is one-third less than that measured over a fixed ground board. Results also showed that inlets did not alter the ground vortex flow field.

  5. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2014-01-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a quantization uncertainty of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05%. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers - multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes - to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  6. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2015-12-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a resolution of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05 %. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers—multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes—to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  7. The Giotto magnetic field investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubauer, F. M.; Musmann, G.; Acuna, M. H.; Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Mariani, F.; Wallis, M.; Ungstrup, E.; Schmidt, H.

    1983-01-01

    The Giotto spacecraft will carry sensors for investigating the interplanetary magnetic field while en route and the interaction between the solar wind magnetoplasma and Halley's Comet neutral gas outflow during close approach. Giotto will carry an outboard biaxial fluxgate system and inboard electronics. The instrumentation draws 1.2 kW and weighs 1.31 kg. Sampling rates will be 28/sec during close encounter, covering selectable ranges from 16 nT to 65,535 nT. In-flight calibration techniques are under development to ensure magnetic cleanliness will be obtained. Measurements are also planned of the inbound bow shock, the magnetosheath and the cometary ionopause. The data will be collected as close as 1000 km from the comet surface.

  8. Field investigation of keyblock stability

    SciTech Connect

    Yow, J.L. Jr.

    1985-04-01

    Discontinuities in a rock mass can intersect an excavation surface to form discrete blocks (keyblocks) which can be unstable. This engineering problem is divided into two parts: block identification, and evaluation of block stability. One stable keyblock and thirteen fallen keyblocks were observed in field investigations at the Nevada Test Site. Nine blocks were measured in detail sufficient to allow back-analysis of their stability. Measurements included block geometry, and discontinuity roughness and compressive strength. Back-analysis correctly predicted stability or failure in all but two cases. These two exceptions involved situations that violated the stress assumptions of the stability calculations. Keyblock faces correlated well with known joint set orientations. The effect of tunnel orientation on keyblock frequency was apparent. Back-analysis of physical models successfully predicted block pullout force for two-dimensional models of unit thickness. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) analytic models for the stability of simple pyramidal keyblocks were examined. Calculated stability is greater for 3D analyses than for 2D analyses. Calculated keyblock stability increases with larger in situ stress magnitudes, larger lateral stress ratios, and larger shear strengths. Discontinuity stiffness controls block displacement more strongly than it does stability itself. Large keyblocks are less stable than small ones, and stability increases as blocks become more slender. Rock mass temperature decreases reduce the confining stress magnitudes and can lead to failure. The pattern of stresses affecting each block face explains conceptually the occurrence of pyramidal keyblocks that are truncated near their apex.

  9. Why does self-reported emotional intelligence predict job performance? A meta-analytic investigation of mixed EI.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Dana L; Jin, Jing; Newman, Daniel A; O'Boyle, Ernest H

    2015-03-01

    Recent empirical reviews have claimed a surprisingly strong relationship between job performance and self-reported emotional intelligence (also commonly called trait EI or mixed EI), suggesting self-reported/mixed EI is one of the best known predictors of job performance (e.g., ρ = .47; Joseph & Newman, 2010b). Results further suggest mixed EI can robustly predict job performance beyond cognitive ability and Big Five personality traits (Joseph & Newman, 2010b; O'Boyle, Humphrey, Pollack, Hawver, & Story, 2011). These criterion-related validity results are problematic, given the paucity of evidence and the questionable construct validity of mixed EI measures themselves. In the current research, we update and reevaluate existing evidence for mixed EI, in light of prior work regarding the content of mixed EI measures. Results of the current meta-analysis demonstrate that (a) the content of mixed EI measures strongly overlaps with a set of well-known psychological constructs (i.e., ability EI, self-efficacy, and self-rated performance, in addition to Conscientiousness, Emotional Stability, Extraversion, and general mental ability; multiple R = .79), (b) an updated estimate of the meta-analytic correlation between mixed EI and supervisor-rated job performance is ρ = .29, and (c) the mixed EI-job performance relationship becomes nil (β = -.02) after controlling for the set of covariates listed above. Findings help to establish the construct validity of mixed EI measures and further support an intuitive theoretical explanation for the uncommonly high association between mixed EI and job performance--mixed EI instruments assess a combination of ability EI and self-perceptions, in addition to personality and cognitive ability. PMID:25243996

  10. The magnetic field investigation on Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balogh, A.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Southwood, D. J.; Musmann, G.; Luhr, H.; Neubauer, F. M.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Riedler, W.; Heyn, M. F.; Acuna, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetic field investigation of the Cluster four-spacecraft mission is designed to provide intercalibrated measurements of the B magnetic field vector. The instrumentation and data processing of the mission are discussed. The instrumentation is identical on the four spacecraft. It consists of two triaxial fluxgate sensors and of a failure tolerant data processing unit. The combined analysis of the four spacecraft data will yield such parameters as the current density vector, wave vectors, and the geometry and structure of discontinuities.

  11. Inlet flow field investigation. Part 1: Transonic flow field survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yetter, J. A.; Salemann, V.; Sussman, M. B.

    1984-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the local inlet flow field characteristics of an advanced tactical supersonic cruise airplane. A data base for the development and validation of analytical codes directed at the analysis of inlet flow fields for advanced supersonic airplanes was established. Testing was conducted at the NASA-Langley 16-foot Transonic Tunnel at freestream Mach numbers of 0.6 to 1.20 and angles of attack from 0.0 to 10.0 degrees. Inlet flow field surveys were made at locations representative of wing (upper and lower surface) and forebody mounted inlet concepts. Results are presented in the form of local inlet flow field angle of attack, sideflow angle, and Mach number contours. Wing surface pressure distributions supplement the flow field data.

  12. Investigation on Preferential Corrosion of Welded Carbon Steel Under Flowing Conditions by EIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawadhi, K.; Aloraier, A. S.; Joshi, S.; Alsarraf, J.; Swilem, S.

    2013-08-01

    Carbon steels are used extensively in construction of oil and gas pipes but they exhibit poor corrosion-resistance properties because of internal corrosion. In this research, a rotating cylinder electrode apparatus was designed so that electrodes machined from the weld metal, heat-affected zone, and parent material of a welded X65 pipeline steel could be tested in high shear stress conditions using electromechanical impedance spectroscopy. The aim was to investigate the cause of the severe localized corrosion that sometimes occurs at welds in carbon steel pipelines carrying hydrocarbons and inhibited brine solutions saturated with carbon dioxide. It was concluded that the surface films play an important role in effective inhibition, and this inhibition is more effective on a clean surface rather than on a precorroded one.

  13. Yucca EIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the disposal of commercial and DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The Notice of Intent for the EIS was placed in the Federal Register on August 7; the period for public comment (the "scoping" period) will end December 5, 1995.

  14. Position-Specific Mass Shift Analysis: A Systematic Method for Investigating the EI-MS Fragmentation Mechanism of epi-Isozizaene.

    PubMed

    Rabe, Patrick; Klapschinski, Tim A; Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2016-07-15

    The EI-MS fragmentation mechanism of the bacterial sesquiterpene epi-isozizaene was investigated through enzymatic conversion of all 15 synthetic ((13) C1 )FPP isotopomers with the epi-isozizaene synthase from Streptomyces albus and GC-MS and GC-QTOF analysis including MS-MS. A systematic method, which we wish to call position-specific mass shift analysis, for the identification of the full set of fragmentation reactions was developed. PMID:27123899

  15. Field investigation of the drift shadow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, G.W.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Ghezzehei, T.A.; Cook, P.J.; Marshall, B.D.

    2006-01-01

    The "Drift Shadow" is defined as the relatively drier region that forms below subsurface cavities or drifts in unsaturated rock. Its existence has been predicted through analytical and numerical models of unsaturated flow. However, these theoretical predictions have not been demonstrated empirically to date. In this project we plan to test the drift shadow concept through field investigations and compare our observations to simulations. Based on modeling studies we have an identified a suitable site to perform the study at an inactive mine in a sandstone formation. Pretest modeling studies and preliminary characterization of the site are being used to develop the field scale tests.

  16. FIELD INVESTIGATIONS OF THE DRIFT SHADOW

    SciTech Connect

    G. W. Su, T. J. Kneafsey, T. A. Ghezzehei, B. D. Marshall, and P. J. Cook

    2006-01-15

    The ''Drift Shadow'' is defined as the relatively drier region that forms below subsurface cavities or drifts in unsaturated rock. Its existence has been predicted through analytical and numerical models of unsaturated flow. However, these theoretical predictions have not been demonstrated empirically to date. In this project they plan to test the drift shadow concept through field investigations and compare our observations to simulations. Based on modeling studies they have an identified suitable site to perform the study at an inactive mine in a sandstone formation. Pretest modeling studies and preliminary characterization of the site are being used to develop the field scale tests.

  17. Polypyrrole nanostructures and their field emission investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpale, Kashmira; More, Mahendra A.; Koinkar, Pankaj M.; Patil, Sandip S.; Sonawane, Kishor M.

    2015-03-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) nanostructures have been synthesized on indium doped tin oxide (ITO) substrates by a facile electrochemical route employing cyclic voltammetry (CV) mode. The morphology of the PPy thin films was observed to be influenced by the monomer concentration. Furthermore, FTIR revealed formation of electrically conducting state of PPy. Field emission investigations of the PPy nanostructures were carried out at base pressure of 1×10-8mbar. The values of turn-on field, corresponding to emission current density of 1 μA/cm2 were observed to be 0.6, 1.0 and 1.2 V/μm for the PPy films characterized with rod-like, cauliflower and granular morphology, respectively. In case of PPy nanorods maximum current density of 1.2 mA/cm2 has been drawn at electric field of 1 V/μm. The low turn on field, extraction of very high emission current density at relatively lower applied field and good emission stability propose the PPy nanorods as a promising material for field emission based devices.

  18. Planar dipolar polymer brush: field theoretical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalik, Jyoti; Kumar, Rajeev; Sumpter, Bobby

    2015-03-01

    Physical properties of polymer brushes bearing monomers with permanent dipole moments and immersed in a polar solvent are investigated using self-consistent field theory (SCFT). It is found that mismatch between the permanent dipole moments of the monomer and the solvent plays a significant role in determining the height of the polymer brush. Sign as well as magnitude of the mismatch determines the extent of collapse of the polymer brush. The mismatch in the dipole moments also affects the force-distance relations and interpenetration of polymers in opposing planar brushes. In particular, an attractive force between the opposing dipolar brushes is predicted for stronger mismatch parameter. Furthermore, effects of added monovalent salt on the structure of dipolar brushes will also be presented. This investigation highlights the significance of dipolar interactions in affecting the physical properties of polymer brushes. Csmd division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA.

  19. Progress with field investigations at Stripa

    SciTech Connect

    Witherspoon, P.A.; Cook, N.G.W.; Gale, J.E.

    1980-02-01

    It is generally agreed that the most practicable method of isolating nuclear wastes from the biosphere is by deep burial in suitable geologic formations. Such burial achieves a high degree of physical isolation but raises questions concerning the rate at which some of these wastes may return to the biosphere through transport by groundwater. Any suitable repository site will be disturbed first by the excavation of the repository and second by the thermal pulse caused by the radioactive decay of the wastes. To assess the effectiveness of geologic isolation it is necessary to develop the capability of predicting the response of a rock mass to such a thermal pulse. Ultimately, this requires field measurements at depths below surface and in media representative of those likely to be encountered at an actual repository. Access to a granitic rock mass adjacent to a defunct iron ore mine at Stripa in Sweden at a depth of about 350 m below surface has provided a unique opportunity to conduct a comprehensive suite of hydrological and thermo-mechanical experiments under such conditions virtually without delay. The results of these field tests have shown the importance of geologic structure and the functional dependence of the thermo-mechanical properties on temperature in developing a valid predictive model. The results have also demonstrated the vital importance of being able to carry out large scale investigations in a field test facility.

  20. Hurricane Ike: Field Investigation Survey (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, L.

    2009-12-01

    Hurricane Ike made landfall at 2:10 a.m. on September 13, 2008, as a Category 2 hurricane. The eye of the hurricane crossed over the eastern end of Galveston Island and a large region of the Texas and Louisiana coast experienced extreme winds, waves and water levels, resulting in large impacts from overtopping, overwash, wind and wave forces and flooding. Major damage stretched from Freeport to the southwest and to Port Arthur to the northeast. The effects of the hurricane force winds were felt well inland in Texas and Louisiana and the storm continued to the interior of the US, causing more damage and loss of life. Through the support of the Coasts, Oceans, Ports and Rivers Institute (COPRI) of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) a team of 14 coastal scientists and engineers inspected the upper Texas coast in early October 2008. The COPRI team surveyed Hurricane Ike’s effects on coastal landforms, structures, marinas, shore protection systems, and other infrastructure. Damages ranges from very minor to complete destruction, depending upon location and elevation. Bolivar Peninsula, to the right of the hurricane path, experienced severe damage and three peninsula communities were completely destroyed. Significant flood and wave damage also was observed in Galveston Island and Brazoria County that were both on the left side of the hurricane path. Beach erosion and prominent overwash fans were observed throughout much of the field investigation area. The post-storm damage survey served to confirm expected performance under extreme conditions, as well as to evaluate recent development trends and conditions unique to each storm. Hurricane Ike confirmed many previously reported observations. One of the main conclusions from the inspection of buildings was that elevation was a key determinant for survival. Elevation is also a major factor in the stability and effectiveness of shore protection. The Galveston Seawall was high enough to provide protection from

  1. The Electron Losses and Fields Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingley, L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Caron, R.; Zarifian, A.; Miller, J.; Gildemeister, A.; Schoen, B.; Tsai, E.; Berger, S.; Zhang, F.; Subramanian, A.; Chung, M.; Runov, A.; Cruce, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Electron Losses and Fields Investigation (ELFIN), is a joint NASA/NSF funded project at the University of California, Los Angeles focusing on eliminating the current deficit in the understanding of the innate physical processes behind geomagnetic storms. Set to launch in 2017, the mission takes advantage of a 3U+ CubeSat design to reduce cost and complexity traditionally associated with a space weather mission of this kind. This mission seeks to quantify the precipitation of relativistic electrons from the radiation belts using a pair of energetic particle detectors (EPDs). The spacecraft will also fly a fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) for determining the pitch angle distribution of the particles, which in conjunction with the EPDs will provide insight to the mechanisms responsible for their loss. Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves are thought to be a significant contributor to the precipitation of electrons trapped in the magnetosphere; however without direct measurement to verify the exact energy range of the particles with high angular resolution, the precise role of these waves is as yet undetermined. ELFIN is unique as it is the first spacecraft that will perform direct pitch angle measurements of the high-energy electrons at the region in the ionosphere where the particles are being lost. Together with correlative measurements from THEMIS, Van Allen Probes and the upcoming ERG mission, ELFIN will provide a unique dataset of magnetospheric wave-particle interactions that will be able to contribute to a marked increase in the fidelity of current space weather models.

  2. The Giotto magnetic-field investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubauer, F. M.; Acuna, M. H.; Burlaga, L. F.; Franke, B.; Gramkow, B.; Mariani, F.; Musmann, G.; Ness, N. F.; Schmidt, H. U.; Terenzi, T.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of the Giotto magnetometer experiment are the investigation of the interaction between Comet Halley and the solar wind 0.9 AU from the Sun, to within 500 km of the cometary nucleus, and the study of the interplanetary magnetic field. The instrumentation consists of a triaxial and a separate biaxial system of fluxgate sensors of the ring-core type, the associated analog electronics and a digital processor. The measuring ranges of + or 1 16 up to + or - 65536 nT are digitized by a 12-bit analog-to-digital converter. Memory modes allow the bridging of gaps in telemetry coverage of up to 10 days. Because of the dust hazard near closest approach, a magnetometer boom could not be included in the spacecraft design. The magnetic contamination problem was attacked by the use of two magnetometers and by a magnetic-cleanliness program. In-flight results show that the instrument is working flawlessly, though magnetic-contamination problems remain.

  3. FIELD INVESTIGATION OF THE DRIFT SHADOW

    SciTech Connect

    G.W. Su; T.J. Kneafsey

    2006-02-01

    A drift shadow is an area immediately beneath an underground void that, in theory, will be relatively drier than the surrounding rock mass. Numerical and analytical models of water flow through unsaturated rock predict the existence of a drift shadow, but field tests confirming the existence of the drift shadow have yet to be performed. Proving the existence of drift shadows and understanding their hydrologic and transport characteristics could provide a better understanding of how contaminants move in the subsurface if released from waste emplacement drifts such as the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We describe the field program that will be used to investigate the existence of a drift shadow--and the corresponding hydrological process at the Hazel-Atlas silica-sand mine located at the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in Antioch, California. The location and configuration of this mine makes it an excellent site to observe and measure drift shadow characteristics. The mine is located in a porous sandstone unit of the Domengine formation, an approximately 230 meter thick series of interbedded Eocene-age shales, coals, and massive-bedded sandstones. The mining method used at the mine required the development of two parallel drifts, one above the other, driven along the strike of the mined sandstone stratum. This configuration provides the opportunity to introduce water into the rock mass in the upper drift and to observe and measure its flow around the underlying drift. The passive and active hydrologic tests to be performed are described. In the passive method, cores will be obtained in a radial pattern around a drift and will be sectioned and analyzed for in-situ water content using a gravimetric technique, as well as analyzed for chemistry. With the active hydrologic test, water will be introduced into the upper drift of the two parallel drifts and the flow of the water will be tracked as it passes near the bottom drift

  4. Field Investigation of the Drift Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, G. W.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Ghezzehei, T. A.; Marshall, B. D.; Cook, P. J.

    2005-12-01

    A drift shadow is an area immediately beneath an underground void that, in theory, will be relatively drier than the surrounding rock mass. Numerical and analytical models of water flow through unsaturated rock predict the existence of a drift shadow, but field tests confirming its existence have yet to be performed. Proving the existence of drift shadows and understanding their hydrologic and transport characteristics could provide a better understanding of how contaminants move in the subsurface if released from waste emplacement drifts such as the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We describe the field program that will be used to investigate the existence of a drift shadow and the corresponding hydrological process at the Hazel-Atlas silica-sand mine located at the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in Antioch, California. The location and configuration of this mine makes it an excellent site to observe and measure drift shadow characteristics. The mine is located in a porous sandstone unit of the Domengine Formation, an approximately 230 meter thick series of interbedded Eocene-age shales, coals, and massive-bedded sandstones. The mining method used at the mine required the development of two parallel drifts, one above the other, driven along the strike of the mined sandstone stratum. This configuration provides the opportunity to introduce water into the rock mass in the upper drift and to observe and measure its flow around the underlying drift. The passive and active hydrologic tests to be performed are described. In the passive method, cores will be obtained in a radial pattern around a drift and will be sectioned and analyzed for in-situ water content and chemical constituents. With the active hydrologic test, water will be introduced into the upper drift of the two parallel drifts and the flow of the water will be tracked as it passes near the bottom drift. Tensiometers, electrical resistance probes, neutron probes, and

  5. Field investigation of the drift shadow

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Grace W.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Marshall, Brian D.; Cook, Paul J.

    2005-09-08

    A drift shadow is an area immediately beneath an undergroundvoidthat, in theory, will be relatively drier than the surrounding rockmass. Numerical and analytical models of water flow through unsaturatedrock predict the existence of a drift shadow, but field tests confirmingits existence have yet to be performed. Proving the existence of driftshadows and understanding their hydrologic and transport characteristicscould provide a better understanding of how contaminants move in thesubsurface if released from waste emplacement drifts such as the proposednuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We describe the fieldprogram that will be used to investigate the existence of a drift shadowand the corresponding hydrological process at the Hazel-Atlas silica-sandmine located at the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in Antioch,California. The location and configuration of this mine makes it anexcellent site to observe and measure drift shadow characteristics. Themine is located in a porous sandstone unit of the Domengine Formation, anapproximately 230 meter thick series of interbedded Eocene-age shales,coals, and massive-bedded sandstones. The mining method used at the minerequired the development of two parallel drifts, one above the other,driven along the strike of the mined sandstone stratum. Thisconfiguration provides the opportunity to introduce water into the rockmass in the upper drift and to observe and measure its flow around theunderlying drift. The passive and active hydrologic tests to be performedare described. In the passive method, cores will be obtained in a radialpattern around a drift and will be sectioned and analyzed for in-situwater content and chemical constituents. With the active hydrologic test,water will be introduced into the upper drift of the two parallel driftsand the flow of the water will be tracked as it passes near the bottomdrift. Tensiometers, electrical resistance probes, neutron probes, andground penetrating radar may be

  6. Biochemical and structural analysis of aminoglycoside acetyltransferase Eis from Anabaena variabilis.

    PubMed

    Pricer, Rachel E; Houghton, Jacob L; Green, Keith D; Mayhoub, Abdelrahman S; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2012-10-30

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis enhanced intracellular survival (Eis_Mtb) protein is a clinically important aminoglycoside (AG) multi-acetylating enzyme. Eis homologues are found in a variety of mycobacterial and non-mycobacterial species. Variation of the residues lining the AG-binding pocket and positions of the loops bearing these residues in the Eis homologues dictates the substrate specificity and, thus, Eis homologues are Nature-made tools for elucidating principles of AG recognition by Eis. Here, we demonstrate that the Eis from Anabaena variabilis (Eis_Ava), the first non-mycobacterial Eis homologue reported, is a multi-acetylating AG-acetyltransferase. Eis_Ava, Eis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Eis_Mtb), and Eis from Mycobacterium smegmatis (Eis_Msm) have different structures of their AG-binding pockets. We perform comparative analysis of these differences and investigate how they dictate the substrate and cosubstrate recognition and acetylation of AGs by Eis. PMID:23090428

  7. Field investigation of rooting potential in sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The differential influence of root systems on plant development under field conditions is very difficult. A field experiment was devised using three different row spacings (101,152 and 203 cm ) to screen sorghum germplasm for rooting potential based on the relative ability to explore additional soil...

  8. A novel EIS field effect structures coated with TESUD-PPy-PVC-dibromoaza[7]helicene matrix for potassium ions detection.

    PubMed

    Tounsi, Moncef; Ben Braiek, Mourad; Barhoumi, Houcine; Baraket, Abdoullatif; Lee, Michael; Zine, Nadia; Maaref, Abderrazak; Errachid, Abdelhamid

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we describe the development of new Aza[7]helicene-containing PVC-based membranes for the K(+) ions quantification. Here, silicon nitride-based structures (Si-p/SiO2/Si3N4) were developed and the surface was activated, functionalized with an aldehyde-silane (11-(Triethoxysilyl)undecanal (TESUD)), functionalized with polypyrrole (PPy), and coated with the polyvinylchloride (PVC)-membrane containing the Aza[7]helicene as ionophore. All stages of functionalization process have been thoroughly studied by contact angle measurements (CAMs) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The developed ion-selective electrode (ISE) was then applied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for the detection of potassium ions. A linear range was observed between 1.0 × 10(-8) M to 1.0 × 10(-3) M and a detection limit of 1.0 × 10(-8) M was observed. The EIS results have showed a good sensitivity to potassium ion using this novel technique. The target helicene exhibited good solubility and excellent thermal stability with a high decomposition temperature (Td > 300 °C) and it indicates that helicene may be a promising material as ionophore for ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) elaboration. PMID:26838889

  9. Investigating High Field Gravity using Astrophysical Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, Elliott D.; /SLAC

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of these lectures is to introduce particle physicists to astrophysical techniques. These techniques can help us understand certain phenomena important to particle physics that are currently impossible to address using standard particle physics experimental techniques. As the subject matter is vast, compromises are necessary in order to convey the central ideas to the reader. Many general references are included for those who want to learn more. The paragraphs below elaborate on the structure of these lectures. I hope this discussion will clarify my motivation and make the lectures easier to follow. The lectures begin with a brief review of more theoretical ideas. First, elements of general relativity are reviewed, concentrating on those aspects that are needed to understand compact stellar objects (white dwarf stars, neutron stars, and black holes). I then review the equations of state of these objects, concentrating on the simplest standard models from astrophysics. After these mathematical preliminaries, Sec. 2(c) discusses 'The End State of Stars'. Most of this section also uses the simplest standard models. However, as these lectures are for particle physicists, I also discuss some of the more recent approaches to the equation of state of very dense compact objects. These particle-physics-motivated equations of state can dramatically change how we view the formation of black holes. Section 3 focuses on the properties of the objects that we want to characterize and measure. X-ray binary systems and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are stressed because the lectures center on understanding very dense stellar objects, black hole candidates (BHCs), and their accompanying high gravitational fields. The use of x-ray timing and gamma-ray experiments is also introduced in this section. Sections 4 and 5 review information from x-ray and gamma-ray experiments. These sections also discuss the current state of the art in x-ray and gamma-ray satellite experiments and

  10. 7 CFR 650.20 - Reviewing and commenting on EIS's prepared by other agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... readily available. Field office technical guides, soil surveys, field investigation reports, and other... future use considered in the EIS? (3) Provisions for soil and water conservation management measures on... soil and water practices are to be installed and maintained? (4) The effect of water discharges...

  11. 7 CFR 650.20 - Reviewing and commenting on EIS's prepared by other agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... readily available. Field office technical guides, soil surveys, field investigation reports, and other... future use considered in the EIS? (3) Provisions for soil and water conservation management measures on... soil and water practices are to be installed and maintained? (4) The effect of water discharges...

  12. 7 CFR 650.20 - Reviewing and commenting on EIS's prepared by other agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... readily available. Field office technical guides, soil surveys, field investigation reports, and other... future use considered in the EIS? (3) Provisions for soil and water conservation managment measures on... soil and water practices are to be installed and maintained? (4) The effect of water discharges...

  13. “Playing around” with Field-Effect Sensors on the Basis of EIS Structures, LAPS and ISFETs

    PubMed Central

    Schöning, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Microfabricated semiconductor devices are becoming increasingly relevant, also for the detection of biological and chemical quantities. Especially, the “marriage” of biomolecules and silicon technology often yields successful new sensor concepts. The fabrication techniques of such silicon-based chemical sensors and biosensors, respectively, will have a distinct impact in different fields of application such as medicine, food technology, environment, chemistry and biotechnology as well as information processing. Moreover, scientists and engineers are interested in the analytical benefits of miniaturised and microfabricated sensor devices. This paper gives a survey on different types of semiconductor-based field-effect structures that have been recently developed in our laboratory.

  14. FIELD INVESTIGATION AND EVALUATION OF LAND TREATING TANNERY SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Land treatment of wastewater sludges from tannery processes has been investigated during a five-year field plot study. The experimental design included eight field test plots receiving selected applications of three types of tannery sludges over a three-year period. The five-year...

  15. The first five days: field and laboratory investigations during the early stages of the equine influenza outbreak in Australia, 2007.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, P D; Davis, R J; Wong, D; Ryan, D; Hart, K; Corney, B; Hewitson, G; Cooper, K; Biddle, A; Eastwood, S; Slattery, S; Rayward, D; Evers, M; Wright, T; Halpin, K; Selleck, P; Watson, J

    2011-07-01

    Until August 2007, Australia was one of only three countries internationally recognised to be free of equine influenza (EI). This report documents the diagnosis of the first cases of EI in Australian horses and summarises the investigations that took place over the next 5 days. During that time, a multifocal outbreak was identified across eastern New South Wales and south-eastern Queensland. The use of an influenza type A pan-reactive real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction allowed rapid confirmation of suspect cases of EI. PMID:21711269

  16. EIS and XPS investigations on the corrosion mechanism of ternary Zn-Co-Mo alloy coatings in NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winiarski, J.; Tylus, W.; Szczygieł, B.

    2016-02-01

    The changes in composition of the corrosion products of electrodeposited ternary Zn-Co-Mo alloy coatings on AISI 1015 steel during exposure to 0.5 mol dm-3 NaCl solution were investigated. XPS studies demonstrated that at the initial stage of corrosion on the surface of Zn-Co-Mo coating zinc hydroxide layer is formed. Hydroxyl groups react with chloride and carbonate ions which lead to the formation of zinc hydroxy carbonates and zinc hydroxy chlorides. The share of these compounds in the oxidation products is initially large. However, with time zinc hydroxy compounds slowly changes to zinc oxide, which is more stable corrosion product. It was estimated that after 24 h of exposure to NaCl solution nearly 60% of zinc detected on the surface of Zn-Co-Mo coating was present in the ZnO form, 18% in the form of zinc hydroxy chloride, and more than 21% as zinc hydroxy carbonate. XPS analyses revealed that the amount of zinc hydroxy chloride increases as the exposure time lengthens and it is significantly higher than at the surface of binary Zn-Co coating. The presence of crystalline zinc chloride hydroxide as a stable product of corrosion of ternary Zn-Co-Mo alloy coating in a 0.5 mol dm-3 NaCl solution was confirmed by XRD analysis. According to XRD and FTIR other zinc corrosion products like: ZnO, Zn(OH)2 and Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6 were also present. The results of XPS and EIS measurements allow us to assume that in the presence of Mo in the alloy, on the surface of ternary Zn-Co-Mo alloy (3.4 wt.% Co, 2.7 wt.% Mo) coating more zinc hydroxy chloride is formed, which favors higher corrosion resistance of this coating.

  17. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force's Installation Restoration Program (IRP). As a part of the IRP program, field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions willneed to be carried out at each site. The island's drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites during the 1992 field investigation included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. In addition, geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities.

  18. SITE INVESTIGATIONS/FIELD INVESTIGATIONS OF SUPERFUND HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES: APRIL 1, 2003 - MAY 31, 2004

    EPA Science Inventory

    These projects require developing and implementing Work Plans which include the Project Operations Plan, Field Sampling and Analysis Plan, Quality Assurance Plan and the Health and Safety Plan. In general, these large complex investigations involve: collecting soil, sediment, sur...

  19. Streamlining the EIS Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Julian

    1977-01-01

    A new publication service abstracts, indexes, and prepares microfiche of environmental impact statements (EIS). This new service is designed to streamline the EIS process by reducing the cost and time of preparation, by eliminating redundancy of similar statements, and by working with the government to standardize the preparation process. (MA)

  20. Experiments to investigate particulate materials in reduced gravity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, M.; Eden, H. F.; Felsenthal, P.; Glaser, P. E.; Wechsler, A. E.

    1967-01-01

    Study investigates agglomeration and macroscopic behavior in reduced gravity fields of particles of known properties by measuring and correlating thermal and acoustical properties of particulate materials. Experiment evaluations provide a basis for a particle behavior theory and measure bulk properties of particulate materials in reduced gravity.

  1. Investigating the QED vacuum with ultra-intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, B.; Di Piazza, A.

    2014-05-01

    In view of the increasingly stronger available laser fields it is becoming feasible to employ them to probe the nonlinear dielectric properties of the vacuum as predicted by quantum electrodynamics (QED) and to test QED in the presence of intense laser beams. First, we discuss vacuum-polarization effects that arise in the collision of a high-energy proton beam with a strong laser field. In addition, we investigate the process of light-by-light diffraction mediated by the virtual electron-positrons of the vacuum. A strong laser beam "diffracts" a probe laser field due to vacuum polarization effects, and changes its polarization. This change of the polarization is shown to be in principle measurable. Also, the possibility of generating harmonics by exploiting vacuum-polarization effects in the collision in vacuum of two ultra-strong laser beams is discussed. Moreover, when two strong parallel laser beams collide with a probe electromagnetic field, each photon of the probe may interact through the "polarized" quantum vacuum with the photons of the other two fields. Analogously to "ordinary" double-slit set-ups involving matter, the vacuum-scattered probe photons produce a diffraction pattern, which is the envisaged observable to measure the quantum interaction between the probe and strong field photons. We have shown that the diffraction pattern becomes visible in a few operating hours, if the strong fields have an intensity exceeding 1024W/cm2.

  2. Epidemiologic response to anthrax outbreaks: field investigations, 1950-2001.

    PubMed

    Bales, Michael E; Dannenberg, Andrew L; Brachman, Philip S; Kaufmann, Arnold F; Klatsky, Peter C; Ashford, David A

    2002-10-01

    We used unpublished reports, published manuscripts, and communication with investigators to identify and summarize 49 anthrax-related epidemiologic field investigations conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 1950 to August 2001. Of 41 investigations in which Bacillus anthracis caused human or animal disease, 24 were in agricultural settings, 11 in textile mills, and 6 in other settings. Among the other investigations, two focused on building decontamination, one was a response to bioterrorism threats, and five involved other causes. Knowledge gained in these investigations helped guide the public health response to the October 2001 intentional release of B. anthracis, especially by addressing the management of anthrax threats, prevention of occupational anthrax, use of antibiotic prophylaxis in exposed persons, use of vaccination, spread of B. anthracis spores in aerosols, clinical diagnostic and laboratory confirmation methods, techniques for environmental sampling of exposed surfaces, and methods for decontaminating buildings. PMID:12396934

  3. Investigation on a field description of the chirped laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. Y.; Huang, S. J.; Song, Q.; Wang, P. X.

    2016-02-01

    Starting from a first-order approximate field description function for laser pulses, the method currently used to approximate chirped laser pulse (CLP) substitutes frequency and wave vector related variables with spatiotemporally varying functions. We investigated the error involved by calculating the relative deviation from Maxwell equations. Errors for the electric and magnetic fields are analyzed separately, and behaviors related to parameter changes (that is, in laser width, pulse duration and chirp parameter) were studied. Results show that aberration associated with currently used field-description functions for CLP increases monotonically with chirp parameter, and the deviation introduced by chirping is proportional to the relative frequency span of the laser. Simulations based on these functions will lead to considerable error, especially for laser pulses with large chirping.

  4. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force's Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions will need to be carried out at each site. The island's drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites during the 1992 field investigation included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. In addition, geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities. This report, appendix A, contains the analytical results.

  5. Community fear of nonionizing radiation: a field investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, M.L.; Morton, W.E.; Chartier, V.; Zajac, H.; Benitez, H.

    1985-03-01

    Four children from the same school class developed cancer. Because of concern in the community, a field study designed to document levels of environmental, nonionizing radiation was undertaken. Two school sites were investigated, the one with the cluster of cases and the other without known cases of cancer. The measured values of nonionizing radiation at both sites were not different and were well below existing exposure standards.

  6. Evaluation of corrosion inhibitor film persistency by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.J.

    1996-08-01

    Film persistency of commercially available oilfield corrosion inhibitors has been evaluated in CO{sub 2}-saturated 5% sodium chloride solution using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The effect of inhibitor concentration and contact time on inhibitor film persistency was also investigated. This study demonstrates that EIS is a feasible method for evaluating and ranking inhibitor film persistency and can be used to monitor inhibitor film life. EIS can provide the corrosion rate and characteristics of the inhibited film and generate the parameters related to the specific inhibitor film. It was found that there is an excellent correlation between an EIS parameter, namely the high breakpoint frequency at a 45{degree} phase angle and inhibitor film persistency. The identification of this correlation, for which Chevron has been granted a patent, is significant because there are advantages associated with measuring this parameter. This discovery enables EIS to be used in the field to monitor and optimize corrosion inhibition programs, thus reducing the chemical and operation costs.

  7. Field investigation to assess nutrient emission from paddy field to surface water in river catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogure, Kanami; Aichi, Masaatsu; Zessner, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    In order to maintain good river environment, it is remarkably important to understand and to control nutrient behavior such as Nitrogen and Phosphorus. Our former research dealing with nutrient emission analysis in the Tone River basin area in Japan, in addition to urban and industrial waste water, nutrient emission from agricultural activity is dominant pollution source into the river system. Japanese style agriculture produces large amount of rice and paddy field occupies large areas in Japanese river basin areas. While paddy field can deteriorate river water quality by outflow of fertilizer, it is also suggested that paddy field has water purification function. As we carried out investigation in the Tone River Basin area, data were obtained which dissolved nitrogen concentration is lower in discharging water from paddy field than inflowing water into the field. Regarding to nutrient emission impact from paddy field, sufficient data are required to discuss quantitatively seasonal change of material behavior including flooding season and dry season, difference of climate condition, soil type, and rice species, to evaluate year round comprehensive impact from paddy field to the river system. In this research, field survey in paddy field and data collection relating rice production were carried out as a preliminary investigation to assess how Japanese style paddy field contributes year round on surface water quality. Study sites are three paddy fields located in upper reach of the Tone River basin area. The fields are flooded from June to September. In 2014, field investigations were carried out three times in flooding period and twice in dry period. To understand characteristics of each paddy field and seasonal tendency accompanying weather of agricultural event, short term investigations were conducted and we prepare for further long term investigation. Each study site has irrigation water inflow and outflow. Two sites have tile drainage system under the field and

  8. Investigating options for attenuating methane emission from Indian rice fields.

    PubMed

    Singh, S N; Verma, Amitosh; Tyagi, Larisha

    2003-08-01

    The development of methods and strategies to reduce the emission of methane from paddy fields is a central component of ongoing efforts to protect the Earth's atmosphere and to avert a possible climate change. It appears from this investigation that there can be more than one strategy to contain methane emission from paddy fields, which are thought to be a major source of methane emission in tropical Asia. Promising among the mitigating options may be water management, organic amendments, fertilizer application and selection of rice cultivars. It is always better to adopt multi-pronged strategies to contain CH4 efflux from rice wetlands. Use of fermented manures with low C/N ratio, application of sulfate-containing chemical fertilizers, selection of low CH4 emitting rice cultivars, and implementation of one or two short aeration periods before the heading stage can be effective options to minimize CH4 emission from paddy fields. Among these strategies, water management, which appears to be the best cost-effective and eco-friendly way for methane mitigation, is only possible when excess water is available for reflooding after short soil drying at the right timing and stage. However, in tropical Asia, rice fields are naturally flooded during the monsoonal rainy season and fully controlled drainage is often impossible. In such situation, water deficits during the vegetative and reproductive stage may drastically affect the rice yields. Thus, care must be taken to mitigate methane emission without affecting rice yields. PMID:12742397

  9. Investigation of Magnetic Interference Induced via Gradient Field Coils for Ultra-Low-Field MRI Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, D.; Hatta, J.; Miyamoto, M.; Adachi, Y.; Higuchi, M.; Kawai, J.; Fujihira, J.; Tsuyuguchi, N.; Uehara, G.

    2014-05-01

    We are developing a compact ultra-low-field MRI system that is composed of a SQUID gradiometer and a coil set that generates magnetic fields for capturing MR images. The magnetic interference induced from a power amplifier potentially disturbs MRI measurements. We investigated the path of the interference by experimental measurements and calculation of the magnetic field generated by the coil set. We found that the magnetic field generated from a particular gradient coil affected the SQUID gradiometer and that the level of the interference was strongly dependent on the shape of the gradient coils. When the coils' shapes are designed, minimizing the noise introduced from the power amplifier is crucial, in addition to consideration of the homogeneities of the magnetic field.

  10. Interpretation and communication of the results of medical field investigations.

    PubMed

    Schulte, P A; Singal, M

    1989-07-01

    Since the controversy over cytogenetic test results at the Love Canal in New York State, there has been increasing concern about the communication of medical test results to participants in field studies. To identify the range of issues that arise and to present examples of practices that might be useful for consideration, we have drawn from 15 years of experience in interpreting and communicating the results of medical field investigations by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The investigations were qualitatively characterized according to study type and design, substances involved, language used in the notification of results, and the nature of the efforts to put results in perspective. Based on this evaluation, the following recommendations are made: (1) provide a comprehensible consent form, (2) interpret results for study participants, (3) use clear language, (4) be explicit about uncertainty of findings, (5) where appropriate, indicate the need for medical follow-up, (6) provide results promptly, (7) provide overall study results, (8) evaluate the impact of the notification, (9) train investigators in the practice of communicating results. PMID:2769455

  11. The Cluster magnetic field investigation: Scientific objectives and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balogh, A.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Dunlop, M. W.; Southwood, D. J.; Thomlinson, J. G.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Musmann, G.; Luehr, H.; Acuna, M. H.; Fairfield, D. H.

    1993-01-01

    The Cluster magnetic field investigation is presented. Cluster represents a qualitatively new type of space mission which will provide, for the first time, a three dimensional view of small scale plasma processes and structures in the different regions in and around the Earth's magnetosphere. Concepts of data analysis needed to interpret the four spacecraft magnetic field data in terms of magnetospheric processes and structures are outlined. The instrument itself, a vital component of the scientific payload, follows a long tradition of fluxgate magnetometers on space missions, yet represents an evolution in terms of built in functions and reliability. A detailed description of the instrument is given with emphasis on those aspects that are unique to the mission.

  12. Effective field investigation in arrays of polycrystalline ferromagnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Eduardo Padrón; Rezende, S. M.; Azevedo, A.

    2008-04-01

    Nanowire arrays have been used as prototypes to investigate basic issues such as size effect, shape anisotropy, and dipolar interaction on the magnetic properties. Under ideal conditions, the nanowires are approximated as perfect long cylinders. Here, coherent rotation as the magnetization reversal mode cannot completely interpret the experimental data. The internal magnetic field value, in nanowire arrays, decreases due to the wire inhomogeneities and the dipolar interaction between the wires. Realistic models must account for the imperfections due to the fabrication process. Instead of it, in this work, a modified ellipsoid-chain array model is proposed to describe magnetization reversal in nanowire arrays. From the angular dependence of the ferromagnetic resonance field presented previously in the literature and from our proper results here, we present experimental confirmations to the model.

  13. SITE INVESTIGATIONS (SI) AND FIELD INVESTIGATIONS (FI) OF REGION 4 SUPERFUND HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES: OCTOBER 2006 – JULY 2007

    EPA Science Inventory

    Site Investigations (SIs) and Field Investigations (FIs) conducted by the Region 4 Science and Ecosystem Support Division (SESD) require developing and implementing work plans which include a Project Operations Plan, Field Sampling and Analysis Plan, Quality Assurance Project Pla...

  14. Investigation of a supersonic cruise fighter model flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reubush, D. E.; Bare, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to survey the flow field around a model of a supersonic cruise fighter configuration. Local values of angle of attack, side flow, Mach number, and total pressure ratio were measured with a single multi-holed probe in three survey areas on a model previously used for nacelle/nozzle integration investigations. The investigation was conducted at Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2, and at angles of attack from 0 deg to 10 deg. The purpose of the investigation was to provide a base of experimental data with which theoretically determined data can be compared. To that end the data are presented in tables as well as graphically, and a complete description of the model geometry is included as fuselage cross sections and wing span stations. Measured local angles of attack were generally greater than free stream angle of attack above the wing and generally smaller below. There were large spanwise local angle-of-attack and side flow gradients above the wing at the higher free stream angles of attack.

  15. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force's Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions will need to be carried out at each site. The island's drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. In addition, geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal, to be avoided during drilling activities. This report contains appendices E and F with information on the following: soil boring logs, and data validation of samples analyzed.

  16. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force's Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions will need to be carried out at each site. The island's drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. Geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities. This report, appendices B, C, and D contains information on the following: geophysical contour maps and profile plots; human health risk assessment; and ecological risk assessment.

  17. Investigation of the arcjet plume near field using electrostatic probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankovic, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The near field plum of a 1 kW class arcjet thruster was investigated using electrostatic probes of various geometries. The electron number densities and temperatures were determined in a simulated hydrazine plume at axial distances between 3 cm (1.2 in) and 15 cm (5.9 in) and radial distances extending to 10 cm (3.9 in) off centerline. Values of electron number densities obtained using cylindrical and spherical probes of different geometries agreed very well. The electron density on centerline followed a source flow approximation for axial distances as near as 3 cm (1.2 in) from the nozzle exit plane. The model agreed well with previously obtained data in the far field. The effects of propellant mass flow rate and input power level were also studied. Cylindrical probes were used to obtain ion streamlines by changing the probe orientation with respect to the flow. The effects of electrical configuration on the plasma characteristics of the plume were also investigated by using a segmented anode/nozzle thruster. The results showed that the electrical configuration in the nozzle affected the distribution of electrons in the plume.

  18. Investigation of the Arcjet near Field Plume Using Electrostatic Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankovic, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The near field plume of a 1 kW class arcjet thruster was investigated using electrostatic probes of various geometries. The electron number densities and temperatures were determined in a simulated hydrazine plume at axial distances between 3 cm (1.2 in.) and 15 cm (5.9 in.) and radial distances extending to 10 cm (3.9 in.) off centerline. Values of electron number densities obtained using cylindrical and spherical probes of different geometries agreed very well. The electron density on centerline followed a source flow approximation for axial distances as near as 3 cm (1.2 in.) from the nozzle exit plane. The model agreed well with previously obtained data in the far field. The effects of propellant mass flow rate and input power level were also studied. Cylindrical probes were used to obtain ion streamlines by changing the probe orientation with respect to the flow. The effects of electrical configuration on the plasma characteristics of the plume were also investigated by using a segmented anode/nozzle thruster. The results showed that the electrical configuration in the nozzle affected the distribution of electrons in the plume.

  19. FINESSE: Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldmann, Jennifer; Lim, Darlene; Colaprete, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) team is focused on a science and exploration field-based research program aimed at generating strategic knowledge in preparation for the human and robotic exploration of the Moon, near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) and Phobos and Deimos. We follow the philosophy that "science enables exploration and exploration enables science." 1) FINESSE Science: Understand the effects of volcanism and impacts as dominant planetary processes on the Moon, NEAs, and Phobos & Deimos. 2) FINESSE Exploration: Understand which exploration concepts of operations (ConOps) and capabilities enable and enhance scientific return. To accomplish these objectives, we are conducting an integrated research program focused on scientifically-driven field exploration at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve in Idaho and at the West Clearwater Lake Impact Structure in northern Canada. Field deployments aimed at reconnaissance geology and data acquisition were conducted in 2014 at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve. Targets for data acquisition included selected sites at Kings Bowl eruptive fissure, lava field and blowout crater, Inferno Chasm vent and outflow channel, North Crater lava flow and Highway lava flow. Field investigation included (1) differential GPS (dGPS) measurements of lava flows, channels (and ejecta block at Kings Bowl); (2) LiDAR imaging of lava flow margins, surfaces and other selected features; (3) digital photographic documentation; (4) sampling for geochemical and petrographic analysis; (5) UAV aerial imagery of Kings Bowl and Inferno Chasm features; and (6) geologic assessment of targets and potential new targets. Over the course of the 5-week field FINESSE campaign to the West Clearwater Impact Structure (WCIS) in 2014, the team focused on several WCIS research topics, including impactites, central uplift formation, the impact-generated hydrothermal system, multichronometer

  20. Investigations on the Incompletely Developed Plane Diagonal-Tension Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Paul

    1940-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation on the incompletely developed diagonal-tension field. Actual diagonal-tension beams work in an intermediate stage between pure shear and pure diagonal tension; the theory developed by wagner for diagonal tension is not directly applicable. The first part of the paper reviews the most essential items of the theory of pure diagonal tension as well as previous attempts to formulate a theory of incomplete diagonal tension. The second part of the paper describes strain measurement made by the N. A. C. A. to obtain the necessary coefficients for the proposed theory. The third part of the paper discusses the stress analysis of diagonal-tension beams by means of the proposed theory.

  1. Investigation of Polarization Phase Difference Related to Forest Fields Characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, M.; Maghsoudi, Y.

    2013-09-01

    The information content of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data significantly included in the radiometric polarization channels, hence polarimetric SAR data should be analyzed in relation with target structure. The importance of the phase difference between two co-polarized scattered signals due to the possible association between the biophysical parameters and the measured Polarization Phase Difference (PPD) statistics of the backscattered signal recorded components has been recognized in geophysical remote sensing. This paper examines two Radarsat-2 images statistics of the phase difference to describe the feasibility of relationship with the physical properties of scattering targets and tries to understand relevance of PPD statistics with various types of forest fields. As well as variation of incidence angle due to affecting on PPD statistics is investigated. The experimental forest pieces that are used in this research are characterized white pine (Pinus strobus L.), red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.), jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.), white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench Voss), black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill) B.S.P.), poplar (Populus L.), red oak (Quercus rubra L.) , aspen and ground vegetation. The experimental results show that despite of biophysical parameters have a wide diversity, PPD statistics are almost the same. Forest fields distributions as distributed targets have close to zero means regardless of the incidence angle. Also, The PPD distribution are function of both target and sensor parameters, but for more appropriate examination related to PPD statistics the observations should made in the leaf-off season or in bands with lower frequencies.

  2. Continuous field investigation assessing nitrogen and phosphorus emission from irrigated paddy field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogure, Kanami; Aichi, Masaatsu; Zessner, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    In order to maintain good river environment, it is very important to understand and to control nutrient behavior such as Nitrogen and Phosphorus. Other than urban and industrial waste water, nutrient emission from agricultural activity is dominant pollution source into the river system. Rice is one of the staple products of Asia and paddy field occupies large areas in Asian countries. Rice is also widely cultivated in Japan. Paddy field occupies large areas in Japanese river basin areas. While paddy field can deteriorate river water quality by discharging fertilizer, it is also suggested that paddy field has water purification function. Regarding to nutrient emission from paddy field, existing monitored data are insufficient so as to discuss quantitatively seasonal change of material behavior including flooding season and dry season and to evaluate year round comprehensive impact from paddy field to the river system. These are not sufficient data for discussion of material flow and emission impact quantitatively as well as qualitatively. We have carried out field investigation in paddy fields in middle reach of the Tone River Basin. The aim of the survey is understanding of water and nutrient balance in paddy field. In order to understand emission impact from paddy field to river system, all input and output flow are measured to calculate nutrient balance in paddy field. Therefore we observed quantity of water flow into/from paddy field, water quality change of inflow and outflow during flooding season. We set focus on a monitoring paddy field IM, and monitored continuously water and nutrient behavior. By measuring water quality and flow rate of inflow, outflow, infiltrating water, ground water and depth of flooding water, we tried to quantitatively understand N and P cycle around paddy field including seasonal tendency, change accompanying with rainy events and occurred according to agricultural events like fertilization. At the beginning of flooding season, we

  3. Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Remedial investigation results

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, C. R.; Martino, L. E.; Biang, R. P.; Chang, Y. S.; Dolak, D.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R. A.; Patton, T. L.; Prasad, S.; Quinn, J.; Rosenblatt, D. H.; Vercellone, J.; Wang, Y. Y.

    2000-03-14

    This report presents the results of the remedial investigation (RI) conducted at J-Field in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), a U.S. Army installation located in Harford County, Maryland. Since 1917, activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, and testing of chemical agents and munitions and the subsequent destruction of these materials at J-Field by open burning and open detonation. These activities have raised concerns about environmental contamination at J-Field. This RI was conducted by the Environmental Conservation and Restoration Division, Directorate of Safety, Health and Environmental Division of APG, pursuant to requirements outlined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA). The RI was accomplished according to the procedures developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988). The RI provides a comprehensive evaluation of the site conditions, nature of contaminants present, extent of contamination, potential release mechanisms and migration pathways, affected populations, and risks to human health and the environment. This information will be used as the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions to be performed during the remedial action phase, which will follow the feasibility study (FS) for J-Field.

  4. A field investigation and numerical simulation of coastal fog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, E. J.; Eadie, W. J.; Rogers, C. W.; Kocmond, W. C.; Pilie, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    A field investigation of the microphysical and micrometeorological features of fogs occurring near Los Angeles and Vandenberg, California was conducted. Observations of wind speed and direction, temperature, dew point, vertical wind velocity, dew deposition, drop-size distribution, liquid water content, and haze and cloud nucleus concentration were obtained. These observations were initiated in late evening prior to fog formation and continued until the time of dissipation in both advection and radiation fogs. Data were also acquired in one valley fog and several dense haze situations. The behavior of these parameters prior to and during fog are discussed in detail. A two-dimensional numerical model was developed to investigate the formation and dissipation of advection fogs under the influence of horizontal variations in surface temperature. The model predicts the evolution of potential temperature, water vapor content, and liquid water content in a vertical plane as determined by vertical turbulent transfer and horizontal advection. Results are discussed from preliminary numerical experiments on the formation of warm-air advection fog and dissipation by natural and artificial heating from the surface.

  5. Field site investigation: Effect of mine seismicity on groundwater hydrology

    SciTech Connect

    Ofoegbu, G.I.; Hsiung, S.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Philip, J.

    1995-04-01

    The results of a field investigation on the groundwater-hydrologic effect of mining-induced earthquakes are presented in this report. The investigation was conducted at the Lucky Friday Mine, a silver-lead-zinc mine in the Coeur d`Alene Mining District of Idaho. The groundwater pressure in sections of three fracture zones beneath the water table was monitored over a 24-mo period. The fracture zones were accessed through a 360-m-long inclined borehole, drilled from the 5,700 level station of the mine. The magnitude, source location, and associated ground motions of mining-induced seismic events were also monitored during the same period, using an existing seismic instrumentation network for the mine, augmented with additional instruments installed specifically for the project by the center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). More than 50 seismic events of Richter magnitude 1.0 or larger occurred during the monitoring period. Several of these events caused the groundwater pressure to increase, whereas a few caused it to decrease. Generally, the groundwater pressure increased as the magnitude of seismic event increased; for an event of a given magnitude, the groundwater pressure increased by a smaller amount as the distance of the observation point from the source of the event increased. The data was examined using regression analysis. Based on these results, it is suggested that the effect of earthquakes on groundwater flow may be better understood through mechanistic modeling. The mechanical processes and material behavior that would need to be incorporated in such a model are examined. They include a description of the effect of stress change on the permeability and water storage capacity of a fracture rock mass; transient fluid flow; and the generation and transmission of seismic waves through the rock mass.

  6. First results of the MAVEN magnetic field investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Gruesbeck, J. R.; Oliversen, R. J.; Mitchell, D. L.; Halekas, J.; Mazelle, C.; Brain, D.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-11-01

    Two Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN magnetic field sensors sample the ambient magnetic field at the outer edge of each solar array. We characterized relatively minor spacecraft-generated magnetic fields using in-flight subsystem tests and spacecraft maneuvers. Dynamic spacecraft fields associated with the power subsystem (≤1 nT) are compensated for using spacecraft engineering telemetry to identify active solar array circuits and monitor their electrical current production. Static spacecraft magnetic fields are monitored using spacecraft roll maneuvers. Accuracy of measurement of the environmental magnetic field is demonstrated by comparison with field directions deduced from the symmetry properties of the electron distribution function measured by the Solar Wind Electron Analyzer. We map the bow shock, magnetic pileup boundary, the V × B convection electric field and ubiquitous proton cyclotron, and 1 Hz waves in the ion foreshock region.

  7. The investigation of fetal doses in mantle field irradiation.

    PubMed

    Karaçam, Songül Cavdar; Güralp, Onur Sahin; Oksüz, Didem Colpan; Koca, Ayse; Cepni, Ismail; Cepni, Kimia; Bese, Nuran

    2009-02-01

    To determine clinically the fetal dose from irradiation of Hodgkin's disease during pregnancy and to quantify the components of fetal dose using phantom measurements. The fetal dose was measured with phantom measurements using thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). Phantom measurements were performed by simulating the treatment conditions on an anthropomorphic phantom. TLDs were placed on the phantom 41, 44, 46.5 and 49.5 cm from the centre of the treatment field. Two TLDs were placed on the surface of the phantom. The estimated total dose to all the TLDs ranged from 8.8 to 13.2 cGy for treatment with (60)Co and from 8.2 to 11.8 cGy for 4 MV photons. It was concluded that the doses in different sections were evaluated to investigate dose changes in different points and depths of fetal tissues in phantom. Precise planning and the use of supplemental fetal shielding may help reduce fetal exposure. PMID:19299479

  8. Results of investigations at the Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, B.; Goff, F.; Van Eeckhout, E.; Hanold, B.

    1990-04-01

    Well logging operations were performed in eight of the geothermal wells at Ahuachapan. High-temperature downhole instruments, including a temperature/rabbit, caliper, fluid velocity spinner/temperature/pressure (STP), and fluid sampler, were deployed in each well. The caliper tool was used primarily to determine if chemical deposits were present in well casings or liners and to investigate a suspected break in the casing in one well. STP logs were obtained from six of the eight wells at various flow rates ranging from 30 to 80 kg/s. A static STP log was also run with the wells shut-in to provide data to be used in the thermodynamic analysis of several production wells. The geochemical data obtained show a system configuration like that proposed by C. Laky and associates in 1989. Our data indicate recharge to the system from the volcanic highlands south of the field. Additionally, our data indicate encroachment of dilute fluids into deeper production zones because of overproduction. 17 refs., 50 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. Limited field investigation for the 200-UP-1 operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit is located in the southern portion of the 200 West Area on the Hanford Site in Washington State. The operable unit is located adjacent to the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit and underlies a significant part of seven source operable units: 200-RO-1, 200-RO-2, 200-RO-3, 200-RO-4, 200-SS-2, 200-UP-2, and 200-UP-3. Remedial efforts in the 100-ZP-1 Operable Unit focus on addressing volatile organic contamination in the aquifer. The focus of the 200-UP-1 limited field investigation (LFI) is on contaminated aquifer soils and groundwater within its boundary, with the exception of uranium and technetium-99 plumes, which are addressed by an existing 200-UP-1 interim remedial measure (IRM). The LFI approach is driven by general and specific data needs required to refine the site conceptual model and conduct a risk assessment. Activities supporting the LFI include drilling, well construction, sampling and analysis, data validation, geologic and geophysical logging, aquifer testing, measuring depth to water, and evaluating geodetic survey and existing analytical data.

  10. Near-field scanning optical microscopy investigations of conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dearo, Jessie Ann

    The Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM) studies of novel, optically active, conjugated polymers are presented. NSOM is a relatively new technique which produces super resolution (˜50--100 nm) optical images simultaneously with topography. The conjugated polymer poly(p-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) and derivatives of PPV are organic semiconductor-like materials with interesting and unique optical properties. Derivatives of PPV have been used in LEDs and have potential in other optoelectronic devices. NSOM provides a tool for investigation of the photoluminescence, absorption/reflection, photo-dynamics and photoconductivity of films of PPV and PPV derivatives on the length scale that these properties are fundamentally defined. The NSOM experiments have revealed mesoscale domains (˜100 nm) of varying photoluminescence emission and average molecular order in drop cast films of PPV. NSOM of stretch-oriented PPV have shown domains of perpendicular molecular orientation with low photoluminescence emission. Near-field photoconductivity experiments of stretch-oriented PPV have correlated the mesoscale topography with the photoconductivity properties of the polymer. NSOM experiments of films of poly(2-methoxy, 5-(2'-(ethyl(hexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene) (MEH-PPV) have shown that there is mesoscale spatial inhomogeneity in the photo-oxidation process which reduces photoluminescence emission. NSOM has also been used to create nanoscale photo-patterning in MEH-PPV films. The NSOM experiments of blended films of MEH-PPV in polystyrene have shown mesoscale phase separation directly correlated to variations in the optical properties of the film. Derivatives of PPV, stretch-oriented in polyethylene, show photoluminescence intensity variations perpendicular and parallel to the stretch-direction correlated to topography features. As a complement to the NSOM studies of conjugated polymers, single polymer molecule experiments of MEH-PPV are also presented. The

  11. Field and Laboratory Investigations of Organic Photochemistry on Urban Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styler, S. A.; Baergen, A.; van Pinxteren, D.; Donaldson, D. J.; Herrmann, H.

    2014-12-01

    In polluted urban environments, windows and building surfaces rapidly become coated with a complex film of chemicals, which enhances the dry deposition of particles and the partitioning of semi-volatile organic species to the surface. Despite its high surface-to-volume ratio and direct exposure to sunlight, few studies have directly investigated the role that this "urban film" may play in promoting the photooxidative processing of semi-volatile organics contained within it. The present study represents a comprehensive field- and laboratory-based investigation of the film-phase photochemistry of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), here used as proxies for light-absorbing semi-volatile organics present within the film. Urban film sampling was conducted using a custom-built three-stage sampler housing, which was deployed in a central, high-traffic area in Leipzig, Germany. The sampler itself employs small glass beads as surrogate window surfaces and is designed such that only its uppermost stage is exposed to sunlight. Each stage is subdivided into 16 compartments, which allows for the study of film formation and evolution. In the first phase of the study, the role of urban film as a photochemical sink for reactive organic species was determined by measuring total film PAH content and PAH abundance ratios as a function of atmospheric exposure time under both light and dark conditions. In the second, more general, phase of the study, the organic and inorganic composition of collected film samples was compared to that of co-located PM10 samples, and differences between the two sample types were used to gain insight into the relative importance of heterogeneous photochemical oxidation within the particle and film phases. In the third phase of the study, film samples grown under dark conditions were exposed to gas-phase ozone in an atmospheric-pressure flat-bed reactor, and the kinetics of ozone-induced PAH loss were studied under both dark and illuminated conditions

  12. Regional Ecorisk Field investigation, upper Clark Fork River Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Pastorok, R.; LaTier, A.; Ginn, T.

    1995-12-31

    The Regional Ecorisk Field Investigation was conducted at the Clark Fork River Superfund Site (Montana) to evaluate the relationships between plant communities and tailings deposits in riparian habitats and to evaluate food-chain transfer of trace elements to selected wildlife species. Stations were selected to represent a range of vegetation biomass (or cover) values and apparent impact of trace elements, with some areas of lush vegetation, some areas of mostly unvegetated soil (e.g., < 30 percent plant cover), and a gradient in between. For the evaluation of risk to wildlife, bioaccumulation of metals was evaluated in native or naturalized plants, terrestrial invertebrates, and the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus). Potential reproductive effects in the deer mouse were evaluated by direct measurements. For other wildlife species, bioaccumulation data were interpreted in the context of food web exposure models. Total biomass and species richness of riparian plant communities are related to tailings content of soil as indicated by pH and metals concentrations. Risk to populations of omnivorous small mammals such as the deer mouse was not significant. Relative abundance and reproductive condition of the deer mouse were normal, even in areas of high metals enrichment. Based on exposure models and site-specific tissue residue data for dietary species, risk to local populations of predators such as red fox and American kestrel that feed on deer mice and terrestrial invertebrates is not significant. Risk to herbivores related to metals bioaccumulation in plant tissues is not significant. Population level effects in deer and other large wildlife are not expected because of the large home ranges of such species and compensatory demographic factors.

  13. First Results of the MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Gruesbeck, J.; Mitchell, D. L.; Halekas, J. S.; Mazelle, C. X.; Brain, D.; Jakosky, B. M.; Oliversen, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    The MAVEN spacecraft approaches the end of its first year in orbit, systematically mapping the interaction region about Mars with a focus on atmospheric escape. The comprehensive instrument suite aboard MAVEN has busied itself in mapping the magnetosphere, magnetosheath, magnetotail, and extended atmospheric corona in near-Mars space. MAVEN carries two magnetic field sensors (fluxgate magnetometers) as part of the particles and fields package (PFP); they sample the ambient magnetic field from a vantage point on at the outer edge of each solar array. We characterized relatively minor spacecraft-generated magnetic fields using a series of in-flight subsystem tests and spacecraft maneuvers. Dynamic spacecraft fields (≤ 1 nT) associated with the operation of specific solar array circuits are compensated for using spacecraft engineering telemetry to identify active circuits and monitor their electrical current production. Static spacecraft magnetic fields are monitored using spacecraft roll maneuvers. Accuracy of measurement of the environmental magnetic field is demonstrated by comparison with field directions deduced from the symmetry properties of the electron distribution function measured by the Solar Wind Electron Analyzer (SWEA). We compile magnetometer observations to characterize intense crustal magnetic fields, the solar wind interaction with Mars, and ubiquitous proton cyclotron and 1-Hz waves in the upstream solar wind (ion foreshock region). The figure below compiles observations of magnetic fluctuations obtained by MAVEN in near-Mars space. The map of magnetic fluctuations reveals the statistical extent of the magnetosheath, confined between the bow shock and the magnetic pile-up region.

  14. FIELD INVESTIGATION OF BIOLOGICAL TOILET SYSTEMS AND GREY WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the field program was to determine the operational characteristics and overall acceptability of popular models of biological toilets and a few select grey water systems. A field observation scheme was devised to take advantage of in-use sites throughout the State...

  15. Laboratory and field investigations of marsh edge erosion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter presents the laboratory experiments and field observations of marsh edge erosion. The marsh retreat rate in a field study site in Terrebonne Bay, Louisiana, was measured using GPS systems and aerial photographs. The wave environment was also measured in order to correlate the marsh edge...

  16. OpenEIS Algorithms

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-07-29

    The OpenEIS Algorithm package seeks to provide a low-risk path for building owners, service providers and managers to explore analytical methods for improving building control and operational efficiency. Users of this software can analyze building data, and learn how commercial implementations would provide long-term value. The code also serves as a reference implementation for developers who wish to adapt the algorithms for use in commercial tools or service offerings.

  17. Investigation of Spherical-Wave-Initiated Flow Fields Around Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Donald R.

    1959-01-01

    Measurements of the velocity flow fields and vortex movements have been made about various simple blunt models undergoing spherical blast waves with a positive overpressure of 4 pounds per square inch. A bullet-optical method was used to determine flow velocities and is applied to velocity fields in which the gradients are largely normal to the free-stream direction. The velocity flow fields are shown at various flow times following passage of the blast front for different models. Vortex movements with time are compared for square-bar models of various aspect ratios. Corner sharpness had no discernible effect on the overall disturbed velocity fields or vortex movements for the square-box models used.

  18. Policy Forum: Studying Eyewitness Investigations in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, Robyn; Jacoby, Larry L.; Kahneman, Daniel; Lempert, Richard; Roediger, Henry L.; Rosenthal, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This article considers methodological issues arising from recent efforts to provide field tests of eyewitness identification procedures. We focus in particular on a field study (Mecklenburg 2006) that examined the “double blind, sequential” technique, and consider the implications of an acknowledged methodological confound in the study. We explain why the confound has severe consequences for assessing the real-world implications of this study. PMID:17610149

  19. Theoretical investigation of hyperfine field parameters through mossbauer gamma ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Sikander; Hashim, Mohd

    2012-06-05

    When a Mossbauer gamma-ray emitting or absorbing nucleus is placed in a crystalline environment, the quadrupole moment of the nucleus interacts with the electric field gradient set up by the ligands around it. In the transition |7/2>{yields}|5/2> twelve lines are obtained. Applying the multipole radiation field theory and density matrix formalism, the determinant of coherency matrix, intensity and degree of polarization have been calculated for each line.

  20. Investigation of the light field of a semiconductor diode laser.

    PubMed

    Ankudinov, A V; Yanul, M L; Slipchenko, S O; Shelaev, A V; Dorozhkin, P S; Podoskin, A A; Tarasov, I S

    2014-10-20

    Scanning near-field optical microscopy was applied to study, with sub-wavelength spatial resolution, the near- and the far-field distributions of propagating modes from a high-power laser diode. Simple modeling was also performed and compared with experimental results. The simulated distributions were consistent with the experiment and permitted clarification of the configuration of the transverse modes of the laser. PMID:25401675

  1. Investigation of Reddening in Fields of the SMASH Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juelfs, Elizabeth A.; Olsen, Knut A.; SMASH Team

    2016-01-01

    We present dust extinction maps derived from eight fields in the Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH), a survey that is imaging 480 deg^2 of the southern sky in DES-ugriz with the CTIO 4-m Blanco telescope and the Dark Energy Camera (DECam). We derive the extinction due to dust using fits to the stellar locus of stars brighter than g=21 in color-color diagrams, and explore the spatial distribution of the extinction within each of the fields. We compare our results to the extinction map of Schlegel, Finkbeiner, & Davis (1998), and find generally good agreement. We describe plans to measure the three-dimensional distribution of extinction in these fields using fainter stars and background galaxies as tracers. Juelfs was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  2. Extending methods: using Bourdieu's field analysis to further investigate taste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindel Dimick, Alexandra

    2015-06-01

    In this commentary on Per Anderhag, Per-Olof Wickman and Karim Hamza's article Signs of taste for science, I consider how their study is situated within the concern for the role of science education in the social and cultural production of inequality. Their article provides a finely detailed methodology for analyzing the constitution of taste within science education classrooms. Nevertheless, because the authors' socially situated methodology draws upon Bourdieu's theories, it seems equally important to extend these methods to consider how and why students make particular distinctions within a relational context—a key aspect of Bourdieu's theory of cultural production. By situating the constitution of taste within Bourdieu's field analysis, researchers can explore the ways in which students' tastes and social positionings are established and transformed through time, space, place, and their ability to navigate the field. I describe the process of field analysis in relation to the authors' paper and suggest that combining the authors' methods with a field analysis can provide a strong methodological and analytical framework in which theory and methods combine to create a detailed understanding of students' interest in relation to their context.

  3. Structural investigations of Great Basin geothermal fields: Applications and implications

    SciTech Connect

    Faulds, James E; Hinz, Nicholas H.; Coolbaugh, Mark F

    2010-11-01

    Because fractures and faults are commonly the primary pathway for deeply circulating hydrothermal fluids, structural studies are critical to assessing geothermal systems and selecting drilling targets for geothermal wells. Important tools for structural analysis include detailed geologic mapping, kinematic analysis of faults, and estimations of stress orientations. Structural assessments are especially useful for evaluating geothermal fields in the Great Basin of the western USA, where regional extension and transtension combine with high heat flow to generate abundant geothermal activity in regions having little recent volcanic activity. The northwestern Great Basin is one of the most geothermally active areas in the USA. The prolific geothermal activity is probably due to enhanced dilation on N- to NNE-striking normal faults induced by a transfer of NW-directed dextral shear from the Walker Lane to NW-directed extension. Analysis of several geothermal fields suggests that most systems occupy discrete steps in normal fault zones or lie in belts of intersecting, overlapping, and/or terminating faults. Most fields are associated with steeply dipping faults and, in many cases, with Quaternary faults. The structural settings favoring geothermal activity are characterized by subvertical conduits of highly fractured rock along fault zones oriented approximately perpendicular to the WNW-trending least principal stress. Features indicative of these settings that may be helpful in guiding exploration for geothermal resources include major steps in normal faults, interbasinal highs, groups of relatively low discontinuous ridges, and lateral jogs or terminations of mountain ranges.

  4. Investigation of back surface fields effect on bifacial solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepeai, Suhaila; Sulaiman, M. Y.; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    2012-11-01

    A bifacial solar cell, in contrast with a conventional monofacial solar cell, produces photo-generated current from both front and back sides. Bifacial solar cell is an attractive candidate for enhancing photovoltaic (PV) market competitiveness as well as supporting the current efforts to increase efficiency and lower material costs. This paper reports on the fabrication of bifacial solar cells using phosphorus-oxytrichloride (POCl3) emitter formation on p-type, nanotextured silicon (Si) wafer. Backside surface field was formed through Al-diffusion using conventional screen-printing process. Bifacial solar cells with a structure of n+pp+ with and without back surface field (BSF) were fabricated in which silicon nitride (SiN) anti reflection and passivation films were coated on both sides, followed by screen printing of Argentum (Ag) and Argentum/Aluminum (Ag/Al) on front and back contacts, respectively. Bifacial solar cells without BSF exhibited open circuit voltage (VOC) of 535 mV for front and 480 mV for back surface. With Al-alloyed BSF bifacial solar cells, the VOC improved to 580 mV for the front surface and 560 mV for the back surface. Simulation of bifacial solar cells using PC1D and AFORS software demonstrated good agreement with experimental results. Simulations showed that best bifacial solar cells are achieved through a combination of high lifetime wafer, low recombination back surface field, reduced contact resistance, and superior surface passivation.

  5. A Field Course Investigation of a Pembrokeshire River.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, R. G.

    1978-01-01

    The river was investigated at six stations from source to estuary. Modifications of water quality and aquatic communities are related to man's activities in the river basin. The organization of the exercise and the method employed are described. (Author/BB)

  6. FIELD INVESTIGATION OF SULFITE FLUXES TO A DECIDUOUS FOREST

    EPA Science Inventory

    An intensive investigation of particulate sulfur fluxes to a deciduous forest was conducted at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during May 1983. ddy correlation methods were used to measure fluxes of submicron particulate sulfur, of submicron particles in three different size ranges, and of...

  7. Integrating Field and Laboratory Investigations of Televised Violence and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eron, Leonard D.; Huesmann, L. Rowell

    Longitudinal and intervention laboratory studies were conducted to investigate the effects of viewing televised violence on the aggressive behavior of elementary school children. In the longitudinal study 505 children were studied over a 3-year period. The measures used included peer nominated aggression, aggression anxiety and popularity,…

  8. Spectral investigation of nonlinear local field effects in Ag nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Rodrigo Takeda, Yoshihiko; Ohnuma, Masato; Oyoshi, Keiji

    2015-03-21

    The capability of Ag nanoparticles to modulate their optical resonance condition, by optical nonlinearity, without an external feedback system was experimentally demonstrated. These optical nonlinearities were studied in the vicinity of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), using femtosecond pump-and-probe spectroscopy with a white-light continuum probe. Transient transmission changes ΔT/T exhibited strong photon energy and particle size dependence and showed a complex and non-monotonic change with increasing pump light intensity. Peak position and change of sign redshift with increasing pump light intensity demonstrate the modulation of the LSPR. These features are discussed in terms of the intrinsic feedback via local field enhancement.

  9. ASTEROSEISMIC INVESTIGATION OF KNOWN PLANET HOSTS IN THE KEPLER FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Kjeldsen, H.; Arentoft, T.; Frandsen, S.; Quirion, P.-O.; Brown, T. M.; Gilliland, R. L.; Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D.; Jenkins, J. M.

    2010-04-20

    In addition to its great potential for characterizing extra-solar planetary systems, the Kepler Mission is providing unique data on stellar oscillations. A key aspect of Kepler asteroseismology is the application to solar-like oscillations of main-sequence stars. As an example, we here consider an initial analysis of data for three stars in the Kepler field for which planetary transits were known from ground-based observations. For one of these, HAT-P-7, we obtain a detailed frequency spectrum and hence strong constraints on the stellar properties. The remaining two stars show definite evidence for solar-like oscillations, yielding a preliminary estimate of their mean densities.

  10. Echoes from the Field: An Ethnographic Investigation of Outdoor Science Field Trips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boxerman, Jonathan Zvi

    2013-01-01

    As popular as field trips are, one might think they have been well-studied. Nonetheless, field trips have not been heavily studied, and little research has mapped what actually transpires during field trips. Accordingly, to address this research gap, I asked two related research questions. The first question is a descriptive one: What happens on…

  11. Investigation of the temperature field in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, Clayton; Hultmark, Marcus

    2015-11-01

    The scaling and evolution of a developing turbulent thermal boundary layer is investigated. By allowing the temperature differences in the fluid to remain small enough to treat temperature as a passive scalar, the analysis can be extended to any turbulent convection/diffusion problem. Mean temperature scaling is developed and analyzed by utilizing the ``Asymptotic Invariance Principle'' developed by George and Castillo (1997). Possible effects of the Reynolds and Prandtl number are discussed. The derived power law solution for the inner and outer scaling is then used to develop a ``heat transfer law'' for the wall heat flux, qw. Data collection is performed with a newly developed MEMS sensor, allowing improved performance and reduced spatial and temporal filtering of the signal. Integration with a PIV system will allow direct measurements of the turbulent heat flux - θv to investigate the extent of the overlap layer and validity of the proposed scaling laws. Temperature variance 1/2 θ2 will also be investigated, with a possible scaling proposed.

  12. Field Investigations of Evaporation from a Bare Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evett, Steven Roy

    Selected components of the water and energy balances at the surface of a bare clay loam were measured at 57 locations in a 1 ha field. Spatial and temporal variability of these components were also studied. Components included evaporation, irrigation, moisture storage, sensible heat flux and long wave radiation. Sub-studies were conducted on irrigation uniformity under low pressure sprinklers; and, on steel versus plastic microlysimeters (ML) of various lengths. An energy balance model of evaporation, requiring minimal inputs, was developed and validated giving an r ^2 value of 0.78. Model improvements included an easy method of accurately estimating soil surface temperature at many points in a field, and an empirically fitted transfer coefficient function for the sensible heat flux from the reference dry soil. The omission of soil heat flux and reflected shortwave radiation terms was shown to reduce model accuracy. Steel ML underestimated cumulative evaporation compared to plastic ML at 20 and 30 cm lengths. Cumulative evaporation increased with ML length. The 10 and 20 cm ML were too short for use over multiple days but 30 cm ML may not be long enough for extended periods. Daily net soil heat flux for steel ML averaged 44% higher than that for both plastic ML and undisturbed field soil. Christiansen's uniformity coefficient (UCC) was close to 0.83 for each of 3 irrigations when measured by both catch cans and by profile water contents. But UCC for the change in storage due to irrigation averaged only 0.43 indicating than the high uniformity of profile water contents was more due to surface and subsurface redistribution than to the uniformity of application. Profile water contents and catch can depths were time invariant across at least 3 irrigations. Midday soil surface temperatures and daily evaporation were somewhat less time invariant. Variogram plots for evaporation and surface temperature showed mostly random behavior. Relative variograms represented well

  13. Complex Investigation of SBS Galaxies in Seven Selected Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakopian, Susanna

    2014-07-01

    It is known that the main criterion for the selection of active objects in the First Byurakan, otherwise Markarian survey was the presence of signs of UV-excess in their low-dispersion spectra. Using the presence of emission lines as the second criteria became real during the Second Byurakan survey because of its improved technique. Extended (not stellated) objects, selected with the use of this criterion, made the main part of the separate sample of SBS galaxies. Originally, this sample included 1286 objects, selected in 65 fields of the survey (16 square degree each), to which, with the help of other sources than the survey, there were later added some objects. We studied a subsample of SBS galaxies in seven selected fields (the deepest according to the V/Vmax criterion), including about the third of the whole sample. The first, already completed phase of this program was started with carrying out a follow-up slit spectroscopy of all, about 500 objects, based on observations with long-slit spectrographs with 6m telescope of SAO Russia and 2.6.m telescope of Byurakan. As a result redshifts were determined, as well as spectral classification was made for all of objects, using the scheme adapted to the spectral material. Besides other, obtained data allowed us to estimate the efficiency of used criteria for the selection of galaxies of different classes of starformation and nuclear activity along the full scale of the apparent magnitudes, including close to the limit values (18.5 < m pg < 19.5), etc. The fact that the total area of seven fields as the total number of objects in them comparable with these values for the survey as a whole, allows us to extrapolate the results to the whole sample of galaxies as an upper estimate. The second stage is to conduct detailed studies of individual galaxies in the first place, the most interesting in terms of morphology. They are based on panoramic spectroscopy obtained from observations at 6 m telescope of Russia and 2.6m

  14. Echoes from the Field: An Ethnographic Investigation of Outdoor Science Field Trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxerman, Jonathan Zvi

    As popular as field trips are, one might think they have been well-studied. Nonetheless, field trips have not been heavily studied, and little research has mapped what actually transpires during field trips. Accordingly, to address this research gap, I asked two related research questions. The first question is a descriptive one: What happens on field trips? The second question is explanatory: What field trip events are memorable and why? I employed design research and ethnographic methodologies to study learning in naturally occurring contexts. I collaborated with middle-school science teachers to design and implement more than a dozen field trips. The field trips were nested in particular biology and earth sciences focal units. Students were tasked with making scientific observations in the field and then analyzing this data during classroom activities. Audio and video recording devices captured what happened during the field trips, classroom activities and discussions, and the interviews. I conducted comparative microanalysis of videotaped interactions. I observed dozens of events during the field trips that reverberated across time and place. I characterize the features of these events and the objects that drew interest. Then, I trace the residue across contexts. This study suggests that field trips could be more than one-off experiences and have the potential to be resources to seed and enrich learning and to augment interest in the practice of science.

  15. First Investigation on the Radiation Field of the Spherical Hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Wen Yi; Li, Zhichao; Chen, Yao-Hua; Xie, Xuefei; Lan, Ke; Liu, Jie; Ren, Guoli; Li, Yongsheng; Liu, Yonggang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei; Guo, Liang; Zhang, Huan; Hou, Lifei; Du, Huabing; Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Li, Chaoguang; Zhan, Xiayu; Yuan, Guanghui; Zhang, Haijun; Jiang, Baibin; Huang, Lizhen; Du, Kai; Zhao, Runchang; Li, Ping; Wang, Wei; Su, Jingqin; Ding, Yongkun; He, Xian-Tu; Zhang, Weiyan

    2016-07-01

    The first spherical hohlraum energetics experiment is accomplished on the SGIII-prototype laser facility. In the experiment, the radiation temperature is measured by using an array of flat-response x-ray detectors (FXRDs) through a laser entrance hole at four different angles. The radiation temperature and M -band fraction inside the hohlraum are determined by the shock wave technique. The experimental observations indicate that the radiation temperatures measured by the FXRDs depend on the observation angles and are related to the view field. According to the experimental results, the conversion efficiency of the vacuum spherical hohlraum is in the range from 60% to 80%. Although this conversion efficiency is less than the conversion efficiency of the near vacuum hohlraum on the National Ignition Facility, it is consistent with that of the cylindrical hohlraums used on the NOVA and the SGIII-prototype at the same energy scale.

  16. Results of investigation at the Ahuachapan Geothermal Field, El Salvador

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.B. )

    1990-04-01

    The Ahuachapan Geothermal Field (AGF) is a 95 megawatt geothemal-sourced power-plant operated by the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) of El Salvador. During the past decade, as part of an effort to increase in situ thermal reserves in order to realize the full generation capacity of the AGF, extensive surface geophysical coverage has been obtained over the AGF and the prospective Chipilapa area to the east. The geophysical surveys were performed to determine physical property characteristics of the known reservoir and then to search for similar characteristics in the Chipilapa area. A secondary objective was to evaluate the surface recharge area in the highlands to the south of the AGF. The principal surface electrical geophysical methods used during this period were DC resistivity and magnetotellurics. Three available data sets have been reinterpreted using drillhole control to help form geophysical models of the area. The geophysical models are compared with the geologic interpretations.

  17. Field investigation of FGD system chemistry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Litherland, S.T.; Colley, J.D.; Glover, R.L.; Maller, G.; Behrens, G.P.

    1984-12-01

    Three full-scale wet limestone FGD systems were investigated to gain a better understanding of FGD system operation and chemistry. The three plants which participated in the program were South Mississippi Electric Power Association's R. D. Morrow Station, Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Craig Station, and Central Illinois Light Company's Duck Creek Station. Each FGD system was characterized with respect to SO/sub 2/ removal, liquid and solid phase chemistry, and calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate relative saturation. Mist eliminator chemistry and performance were documented at Morrow and Duck Creek. Solutions to severe mist eliminator scaling and pluggage were demonstrated at Duck Creek. A technical and econ

  18. Development of Point Doppler Velocimetry for Flow Field Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavone, Angelo A.; Meyers, James F.; Lee, Joseph W.

    2006-01-01

    A Point Doppler Velocimeter (pDv) has been developed using a vapor-limited iodine cell as the sensing medium. The iodine cell is utilized to directly measure the Doppler shift frequency of laser light scattered from submicron particles suspended within a fluid flow. The measured Doppler shift can then be used to compute the velocity of the particles, and hence the fluid. Since this approach does not require resolution of scattered light from individual particles, the potential exists to obtain temporally continuous signals that could be uniformly sampled in the manner as a hot wire anemometer. This leads to the possibility of obtaining flow turbulence power spectra without the limitations of fringe-type laser velocimetry. The development program consisted of a methodical investigation of the technology coupled with the solution of practical engineering problems to produce a usable measurement system. The paper outlines this development along with the evaluation of the resulting system as compared to primary standards and other measurement technologies.

  19. Incorporating a hybrid urease-carbon nanotubes sensitive nanofilm on capacitive field-effect sensors for urea detection.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José R; Molinnus, Denise; Beging, Stefan; Schöning, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    The ideal combination among biomolecules and nanomaterials is the key for reaching biosensing units with high sensitivity. The challenge, however, is to find out a stable and sensitive film architecture that can be incorporated on the sensor's surface. In this paper, we report on the benefits of incorporating a layer-by-layer (LbL) nanofilm of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on capacitive electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) field-effect sensors for detecting urea. Three sensor arrangements were studied in order to investigate the adequate film architecture, involving the LbL film with the enzyme urease: (i) urease immobilized directly onto a bare EIS [EIS-urease] sensor; (ii) urease atop the LbL film over the EIS [EIS-(PAMAM/CNT)-urease] sensor; and (iii) urease sandwiched between the LbL film and another CNT layer [EIS-(PAMAM/CNT)-urease-CNT]. The surface morphology of all three urea-based EIS biosensors was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), while the biosensing abilities were studied by means of capacitance-voltage (C/V) and dynamic constant-capacitance (ConCap) measureaments at urea concentrations ranging from 0.1 mM to 100 mM. The EIS-urease and EIS-(PAMAM/CNT)-urease sensors showed similar sensitivity (~18 mV/decade) and a nonregular signal behavior as the urea concentration increased. On the other hand, the EIS-(PAMAM/CNT)-urease-CNT sensor exhibited a superior output signal performance and higher sensitivity of about 33 mV/decade. The presence of the additional CNT layer was decisive to achieve a urea based EIS sensor with enhanced properties. Such sensitive architecture demonstrates that the incorporation of an adequate hybrid enzyme-nanofilm as sensing unit opens new prospects for biosensing applications using the field-effect sensor platform. PMID:24814256

  20. OpenEIS. Users Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woohyun; Lutes, Robert G.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Haack, Jereme N.; Carpenter, Brandon J.; Akyol, Bora A.; Monson, Kyle E.; Allwardt, Craig H.; Kang, Timothy; Sharma, Poorva

    2015-02-28

    This document is a users guide for OpenEIS, a software code designed to provide standard methods for authoring, sharing, testing, using and improving algorithms for operational building energy efficiency.

  1. A Comparative Model of Field Investigations: Aligning School Science Inquiry with the Practices of Contemporary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windschitl, Mark; Dvornich, Karen; Ryken, Amy E.; Tudor, Margaret; Koehler, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Field investigations are not characterized by randomized and manipulated control group experiments; however, most school science and high-stakes tests recognize only this paradigm of investigation. Scientists in astronomy, genetics, field biology, oceanography, geology, and meteorology routinely select naturally occurring events and conditions and…

  2. Invited Reaction: Developing Emotional Intelligence (EI) Abilities through Team-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leimbach, Michael P.; Maringka, Jane

    2010-01-01

    The preceding article (Clarke, 2010) examines an important and interesting question; that is, under what conditions can learning contribute to the development of emotional intelligence (EI)? Despite the controversy surrounding the definition and construct of EI, its prevalence for the human resources development (HRD) field and its implications…

  3. Remedial investigation sampling and analysis plan for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 1: Field Sampling Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Benioff, P.; Biang, R.; Dolak, D.; Dunn, C.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.; Wang, Y.; Yuen, C.

    1995-03-01

    The Environmental Management Division (EMD) of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. J-Field is within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland (Figure 1. 1). Since World War II activities in the Edgewood Area have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning and open detonation (OB/OD). Considerable archival information about J-Field exists as a result of efforts by APG staff to characterize the hazards associated with the site. Contamination of J-Field was first detected during an environmental survey of the Edgewood Area conducted in 1977 and 1978 by the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA) (predecessor to the US Army Environmental Center [AEC]). As part of a subsequent USATHAMA -environmental survey, 11 wells were installed and sampled at J-Field. Contamination at J-Field was also detected during a munitions disposal survey conducted by Princeton Aqua Science in 1983. The Princeton Aqua Science investigation involved the installation and sampling of nine wells and the collection and analysis of surficial and deep composite soil samples. In 1986, a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit (MD3-21-002-1355) requiring a basewide RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) and a hydrogeologic assessment of J-Field was issued by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In 1987, the US Geological Survey (USGS) began a two-phased hydrogeologic assessment in data were collected to model, groundwater flow at J-Field. Soil gas investigations were conducted, several well clusters were installed, a groundwater flow model was developed, and groundwater and surface water monitoring programs were established that continue today.

  4. GRACE gravity field modeling with an investigation on correlation between nuisance parameters and gravity field coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Hu, Zhigang; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan; Cai, Hua; Liu, Xianglin

    2011-05-01

    The GRACE (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment) monthly gravity models have been independently produced and published by several research institutions, such as Center for Space Research (CSR), GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and Delft Institute of Earth Observation and Space Systems (DEOS). According to their processing standards, above institutions use the traditional variational approach except that the DEOS exploits the acceleration approach. The background force models employed are rather similar. The produced gravity field models generally agree with one another in the spatial pattern. However, there are some discrepancies in the gravity signal amplitude between solutions produced by different institutions. In particular, 10%-30% signal amplitude differences in some river basins can be observed. In this paper, we implemented a variant of the traditional variational approach and computed two sets of monthly gravity field solutions using the data from January 2005 to December 2006. The input data are K-band range-rates (KBRR) and kinematic orbits of GRACE satellites. The main difference in the production of our two types of models is how to deal with nuisance parameters. This type of parameters is necessary to absorb low-frequency errors in the data, which are mainly the aliasing and instrument errors. One way is to remove the nuisance parameters before estimating the geopotential coefficients, called NPARB approach in the paper. The other way is to estimate the nuisance parameters and geopotential coefficients simultaneously, called NPESS approach. These two types of solutions mainly differ in geopotential coefficients from degree 2 to 5. This can be explained by the fact that the nuisance parameters and the gravity field coefficients are highly correlated, particularly at low degrees. We compare these solutions with the official and published ones by means of spectral analysis. It is

  5. RAPID ARSENITE OXIDATION BY THERMUS AQUATICUS AND THERMUS THERMOPHILUS: FIELD AND LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS. (R826189)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermus aquaticus and Thermus thermophilus, common inhabitants of terrestrial hot springs and thermally polluted domestic and industrial waters, have been found to rapidly oxidize arsenite to arsenate. Field investigations at a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park revealed ...

  6. FIELD INVESTIGATIONS OF CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS (CAFOs): AUGUST 2007 – SEPTEMBER 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field investigations of CAFO sites conducted by the Region 4 Science and Ecosystem Support Division involve identifying, sampling, and characterizing the level of microbiological and chemical contamination in surface water, groundwater, and sediment in areas surrounding the CAFO ...

  7. FIELD INVESTIGATIONS OF CONFINED ANIMAL FEED LOT OPERATIONS (CAFO): OCTOBER 2005 – SEPTEMBER 2006

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field investigations include identifying, sampling, and characterizing the level of microbiological and chemical contamination in surface water, groundwater, and sediment in areas surrounding CAFO sites. Study sites for this reporting period included the Turner Road Site in Cleve...

  8. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 5, Field Investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    An environmental investigation of ground water conditions has been undertaken at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), Ohio to obtain data to assist in the evaluation of a potential removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, migration of the contaminated ground water across Base boundaries. Field investigations were limited to the central section of the southwestern boundary of Area C and the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B. Further, the study was limited to a maximum depth of 150 feet below grade. Three primary activities of the field investigation were: (1) installation of 22 monitoring wells, (2) collection and analysis of ground water from 71 locations, (3) measurement of ground water elevations at 69 locations. Volatile organic compounds including trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, and/or vinyl chloride were detected in concentrations exceeding Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) at three locations within the Area C investigation area. Ground water at the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B occurs in two primary units, separated by a thicker-than-expected clay layers. One well within Area B was determined to exceed the MCL for trichloroethylene.

  9. Deuterium NMR investigations of field-induced director alignment in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Sugimura, Akihiko; Luckhurst, Geoffrey R

    2016-05-01

    There have been many investigations of the alignment of nematic liquid crystals by either a magnetic and/or an electric field. The basic features of the important hydrodynamic processes for low molar mass nematics have been characterized for the systems in their equilibrium and non-equilibrium states. These have been created using electric and magnetic fields to align the director and deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ((2)H NMR) spectroscopy has been used to explore this alignment. Theoretical models based on continuum theory have been developed to complement the experiments and found to describe successfully the static and the dynamic phenomena observed. Such macroscopic behaviour has been investigated with (2)H NMR spectroscopy, in which an electric field in addition to the magnetic field of the spectrometer is used to rotate the director and produce a non-equilibrium state. This powerful technique has proved to be especially valuable for the investigation of nematic liquid crystals. Since the quadrupolar splitting for deuterons observed in the liquid crystal phase is determined by the angle between the director and the magnetic field, time-resolved and time-averaged (2)H NMR spectroscopies can be employed to investigate the dynamic director alignment process in a thin nematic film following the application or removal of an electric field. In this article, we describe some seminal studies to illustrate the field-induced static and dynamic director alignment for low molar mass nematics. PMID:27247284

  10. 32 CFR 989.19 - Draft EIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... proponent in preparation of a preliminary draft EIS (PDEIS) (40 CFR 1502.9) based on the scope of issues... recommended in the CEQ regulations (40 CFR 1502.10 and 1502.11). The CEQ regulations indicate that EISs... review of draft EIS (40 CFR 1502.19 and 1506.6): (1) The public comment period for the draft EIS is...

  11. 32 CFR 989.19 - Draft EIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... proponent in preparation of a preliminary draft EIS (PDEIS) (40 CFR 1502.9) based on the scope of issues... recommended in the CEQ regulations (40 CFR 1502.10 and 1502.11). The CEQ regulations indicate that EISs... review of draft EIS (40 CFR 1502.19 and 1506.6): (1) The public comment period for the draft EIS is...

  12. 32 CFR 989.19 - Draft EIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... proponent in preparation of a preliminary draft EIS (PDEIS) (40 CFR 1502.9) based on the scope of issues... recommended in the CEQ regulations (40 CFR 1502.10 and 1502.11). The CEQ regulations indicate that EISs... review of draft EIS (40 CFR 1502.19 and 1506.6): (1) The public comment period for the draft EIS is...

  13. 32 CFR 989.19 - Draft EIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... proponent in preparation of a preliminary draft EIS (PDEIS) (40 CFR 1502.9) based on the scope of issues... recommended in the CEQ regulations (40 CFR 1502.10 and 1502.11). The CEQ regulations indicate that EISs... review of draft EIS (40 CFR 1502.19 and 1506.6): (1) The public comment period for the draft EIS is...

  14. 32 CFR 989.19 - Draft EIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... proponent in preparation of a preliminary draft EIS (PDEIS) (40 CFR 1502.9) based on the scope of issues... recommended in the CEQ regulations (40 CFR 1502.10 and 1502.11). The CEQ regulations indicate that EISs... review of draft EIS (40 CFR 1502.19 and 1506.6): (1) The public comment period for the draft EIS is...

  15. Technology transfer opportunities: new development: computerized field manual provides valuable resource for hydrologic investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapel, Paul

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is known throughout the world for conducting quality scientific investigation is hydrologic environments. Proper and consistent field techniques have been an integral part of this good research. Over the past few decades, the USGS has developed and published detailed, standard protocols for conducting studies in most aspects of the hydrologic environment. These protocols have been published in a number of diverse documents. The wealth of information contained in these diverse documents can benefit other scientists in industry, government, and academia that are involved in conducting hydrologic studies. Scientists at the USGS have brought together many of the most important of the field protocols in a user-friendly, graphical-interfaced field manual that will be useful in both the field and in the office. This electronic field manual can assist hydrologists and other scientists in conducting and documenting their field activities in a manner that is recognized standard throughout the hydrologic community.

  16. Investigation of electric field distribution on FAC-IR-300 ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, S. M.; Tavakoli-Anbaran, H.; Zeinali, H. Z.

    2016-07-01

    One of the important parameters for establishing charge particle equilibrium (CPE) conditions of free-air ionization chamber is an electric field distribution. In this paper, electric field distribution inside the ionization chamber was investigated by finite element method. For this purpose, the effects of adding guard plate and guard strips on the electric field distribution in the ionization chamber were studied. it is necessary to apply a lead box around the ionization chamber body to avoid of scattered radiation effects on the ionization chamber operation, but the lead box changes the electric field distribution. In the following, the effect of lead box on the electric field distribution was studied. Finally, electric field distribution factor (kfield) was calculated by the simulation. The results of the simulation showed that presence of the guard plate and guard strips, and applying a suitable potential to lead box, a convergence of kfield to 1 was achieved.

  17. Numerical Investigation of Near-Field Plasma Flows in Magnetic Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, Kamesh; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2009-01-01

    The development and application of a multidimensional numerical simulation code for investigating near-field plasma processes in magnetic nozzles are presented. The code calculates the time-dependent evolution of all three spatial components of both the magnetic field and velocity in a plasma flow, and includes physical models of relevant transport phenomena. It has been applied to an investigation of the behavior of plasma flows found in high-power thrusters, employing a realistic magnetic nozzle configuration. Simulation of a channel-flow case where the flow was super-Alfvenic has demonstrated that such a flow produces adequate back-emf to significantly alter the shape of the total magnetic field, preventing the flow from curving back to the magnetic field coil in the near-field region. Results from this simulation can be insightful in predicting far-field behavior and can be used as a set of self-consistent boundary conditions for far-field simulations. Future investigations will focus on cases where the inlet flow is sub-Alfvenic and where the flow is allowed to freely expand in the radial direction once it is downstream of the coil.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Effectiveness of Magnetic Field on Food Freezing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toru; Takeuchi, Yuri; Masuda, Kazunori; Watanabe, Manabu; Shirakashi, Ryo; Fukuda, Yutaka; Tsuruta, Takaharu; Yamamoto, Kazutaka; Koga, Nobumitsu; Hiruma, Naoya; Ichioka, Jun; Takai, Kiyoshi

    Recently, several food refrigeration equipments that utilize magnetic field have attracted much attention from food production companies, consumers and mass media. However, the effectiveness of the freezers is not scientifically examined. Therefore, the effectiveness should be clarified by experiments or theoretical considerations. In this study, the effect of weak magnetic field (about 0.0005 T) on freezing process of several kinds of foods was investigated by using a specially designed freezer facilitated with magnetic field generator. The investigation included the comparison of freezing curves, drip amount, physicochemical evaluations on color and texture, observation of microstructure, and sensory evaluation. From the results of the control experiments, it can be concluded that weak magnetic field around 0.0005 T provided no significant difference on temperature history during freezing and on the qualities of frozen foods, within our experimental conditions.

  19. Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 3: Ecological risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.; Kuperman, R.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2000-02-25

    The Environmental Management Division of the U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) of the J-Field area at APG, pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of that activity, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted an ecological risk assessment (ERA) of the J-Field site. This report presents the results of that assessment.

  20. Guided resonances on lithium niobate for extremely small electric field detection investigated by accurate sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wentao; Ndao, Abdoulaye; Lu, Huihui; Bernal, Maria-Pilar; Baida, Fadi Issam

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical study of guided resonances (GR) on a thin film lithium niobate rectangular lattice photonic crystal by band diagram calculations and 3D Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) transmission investigations which cover a broad range of parameters. A photonic crystal with an active zone as small as 13μm×13μm×0.7μm can be easily designed to obtain a resonance Q value in the order of 1000. These resonances are then employed in electric field (E-field) sensing applications exploiting the electro optic (EO) effect of lithium niobate. A local field factor that is calculated locally for each FDTD cell is proposed to accurately estimate the sensitivity of GR based E-field sensor. The local field factor allows well agreement between simulations and reported experimental data therefore providing a valuable method in optimizing the GR structure to obtain high sensitivities. When these resonances are associated with sub-picometer optical spectrum analyzer and high field enhancement antenna design, an E-field probe with a sensitivity of 50 μV/m could be achieved. The results of our simulations could be also exploited in other EO based applications such as EEG (Electroencephalography) or ECG (Electrocardiography) probe and E-field frequency detector with an 'invisible' probe to the field being detected etc. PMID:27607627

  1. SITE IVESTIGATIONS (SI) AND FIELD INVESTIGATIONS (FI) OF REGION 4 SUPERFUND HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES: OCTOBER 2005 – SEPTEMBER 2006

    EPA Science Inventory

    Site Investigations (SIs) and expanded Field Investigations (FIs) conducted by the Region 4 Science and Ecosystem Support Division (SESD) require developing and implementing work plans which include a Project Operations Plan, Field Sampling and Analysis Plan, Quality Assurance Pl...

  2. SITE IVESTIGATIONS (SI) AND FIELD INVESTIGATIONS (FI) OF REGION 4 SUPERFUND HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES: AUGUST 2007 – SEPTEMBER 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    Site Investigations (SIs) and Field Investigations (FIs) conducted by the Region 4 Science and Ecosystem Support Division (SESD) require developing and implementing work plans which include a Project Operations Plan, Field Sampling and Analysis Plan, Quality Assurance Project Pla...

  3. Investigation of Electric and Self-Generated Magnetic Fields in Implosion Experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Nilson, P. M.; Goncharov, V. N.; Li, C. K.; Zylstra, A. B.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2013-10-01

    Electric and self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments on the OMEGA laser were investigated using proton radiography. The experiments use plastic-shell targets with various surface defects (glue spot, wire, and stalk mount) to seed perturbations and generate localized electromagnetic fields at the ablation surface and in the plasma corona surrounding the targets. Proton radiographs show features from these perturbations and quasi-spherical multiple shell structures around the capsules at earlier times of implosions (up to ~700 ps for a 1-ns laser pulse) indicating the development of the fields. Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of these experiments predict the growth of magnetic fields up to several MG. The simulated distributions of electromagnetic fields were used to produce proton images, which show good agreement with experimental radiographs. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  4. Geometric optical investigation of the underwater visual field of aerial animals.

    PubMed

    Horváth, G; Varjú, D

    1990-11-01

    The underwater visual field distorted by refraction for aerial animals living near the water surface is investigated by means of geometric optics. The imaging of underwater objects by one and two aerial eyes is studied. The underwater binocular image field is determined for pairs of aerial eyes placed in horizontal and vertical planes. Some possible biooptical consequences of the visual detection of underwater prey and predator by aerial animals are discussed on the basis of the structure of their distorted visual field. PMID:2134486

  5. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, C.

    2000-01-01

    The research carried out in the Heat Transfer Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins University was motivated by previous studies indicating that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50 when compared to values obtained for the same system without electric fields. Imposing an external electric field holds the promise to improve pool boiling heat transfer in low gravity, since a phase separation force other than gravity is introduced. The influence of electric fields on bubble formation has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically.

  6. Investigation of different magnetic field configurations using an electrical, modular Zeeman slower

    SciTech Connect

    Ohayon, Ben; Ron, Guy

    2015-10-15

    We present a method of constructing an automatically reconfigurable, modular, electronic Zeeman slower, which is remotely controlled. This setup is used to investigate the ability of different magnetic field profiles to slow thermal atoms to the capture velocity of a magneto-optical-trap. We show that a simple numerical optimization process yields better results than the commonly used approach for deciding on the appropriate field and comes close to the optimum field, found by utilizing a fast feedback loop which uses a genetic algorithm. Our new numerical method is easily adaptable to a variety of existing slower designs and may be beneficial where feedback is unavailable.

  7. Theoretical investigation of boundary contours of ground-state atoms in uniform electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hua; Zhao, Dong-Xia; Yang, Zhong-Zhi

    2015-12-01

    The boundary contours were investigated for first 54 ground-state atoms of the periodic table when they are in uniform electric fields of strengths 106, 107 and 108 V/m. The atomic characteristic boundary model in combination with an ab-initio method was employed. Some regularities of the deformation of atoms, ΔR, in above electric fields are revealed. Furthermore, atomic polarisabilities of the first 54 elements of the periodic table are shown to correlate strongly with the mean variation rate of atomic radial size divided by the strength of the electric field F, ?, which provides a predictive method of calculating atomic polarisabilities of 54 atoms.

  8. Optical investigation of effective permeability of dilute magnetic dielectrics with magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Ananya; Sarkar, A.

    2016-05-01

    The prime objective of this paper is to investigate the magnetic nature of dilute magnetic dielectrics (DMD) under variation of external magnetic field. The said variation is studied over developed nano-sized Gadolinium Oxide as a DMD system. The observed experimental field variation of the effective magnetic permeability is analyzed results of optical experiment. The experiment records the variation of Brewster angle of incident polarized LASER beam from the surface of developed DMD specimen with applied out of plane external magnetic field. The effective refractive index and hence relative magnetic permeability were estimated following electro-magnetic theory. The overall results obtained and agreement between theory and experiment are good.

  9. Investigations of cosmic ray anisotropies and their relationship to concurrent magnetic field data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allum, F. R.

    1974-01-01

    Investigations of cosmic ray anisotropies and their relationship to concurrent magnetic field data are reported. These investigations range in scope from the examination of data very late in the decay phase of a solar particle event where long term (approximately 6 hour) averages are used and definite interplanetary effects sought after to an examination of the change in low energy particle anisotropy as the satellite approaches the bow shock and the magnetopause.

  10. MO-G-BRF-09: Investigating Magnetic Field Dose Effects in Mice: A Monte Carlo Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A; Guindani, M; Followill, D; Melancon, A; Hazle, J; Court, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In MRI-linac treatments, radiation dose distributions are affected by magnetic fields, especially at high-density/low-density interfaces. Radiobiological consequences of magnetic field dose effects are presently unknown; therefore, preclinical studies are needed to ensure the safe clinical use of MRI-linacs. This study investigates the optimal combination of beam energy and magnetic field strength needed for preclinical murine studies. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNP6 was used to simulate the effects of a magnetic field when irradiating a mouse-sized lung phantom with a 1.0cmx1.0cm photon beam. Magnetic field effects were examined using various beam energies (225kVp, 662keV[Cs-137], and 1.25MeV[Co-60]) and magnetic field strengths (0.75T, 1.5T, and 3T). The resulting dose distributions were compared to Monte Carlo results for humans with various field sizes and patient geometries using a 6MV/1.5T MRI-linac. Results: In human simulations, the addition of a 1.5T magnetic field caused an average dose increase of 49% (range:36%–60%) to lung at the soft tissue-to-lung interface and an average dose decrease of 30% (range:25%–36%) at the lung-to-soft tissue interface. In mouse simulations, the magnetic fields had no effect on the 225kVp dose distribution. The dose increases for the Cs-137 beam were 12%, 33%, and 49% for 0.75T, 1.5T, and 3.0T magnetic fields, respectively while the dose decreases were 7%, 23%, and 33%. For the Co-60 beam, the dose increases were 14%, 45%, and 41%, and the dose decreases were 18%, 35%, and 35%. Conclusion: The magnetic field dose effects observed in mouse phantoms using a Co-60 beam with 1.5T or 3T fields and a Cs-137 beam with a 3T field compare well with those seen in simulated human treatments with an MRI-linac. These irradiator/magnet combinations are suitable for preclinical studies investigating potential biological effects of delivering radiation therapy in the presence of a magnetic field. Partially funded by Elekta.

  11. Investigations of diffuse sound fields using systematic changes in surface scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herder, John

    Systematically varying the surface scattering in an enclosure provides insight towards the impact of field diffusion on acoustic phenomena. Two independent studies are presented, each utilizing three distinct cases of field diffusion created through the introduction of boundary irregularities. First, dodecaspherical loudspeakers used in acoustic measurement exhibit non-uniform radiation. Also, the interaction of the source sound with room boundaries impacts the degree of energy interference and decay over time. As such, the amount of variation in sound pressure level and clarity over a grid of receivers is investigated with respect to stand-alone cases as well as the promotion of field diffusion. By sequentially expanding the extent of energy mixing in a volume, it is expected that variations in the acoustic parameters over an area will be reduced. Developing a consistent aural experience over a listening area is an important topic in room acoustics, so exploring the physical impact of field diffusion on sound field variance advances this aim. The second experiment reinforces a method for understanding the time arrival of diffuse sound fields in a volume. By systematically promoting greater diffusion, it is expected that the corresponding diffuse sound field will arrive earlier. The turning point property of experimental double sloped energy decays is investigated against a diffusion equation model, relating the valid range of the numerical model to the time onset of the diffuse sound field. In this way, the time arrival of the diffuse sound field is calculated in terms of the change in mean free time between cases. The effect of overall absorption is also discussed, reinforcing the validity of the outcome.

  12. Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis Framework in the Selection of an Enterprise Integration (EI) Approach That Best Satisfies Organizational Requirements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngeru, James

    2012-01-01

    In the past few decades, adoption of Enterprise Integration (EI) through initiatives such as Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) and Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) has consistently dominated most of organizations' top strategic priorities. Additionally, the field of EI has generated a vast amount…

  13. 77 FR 64097 - Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the 2011 Final EIS for the Leasing and Underground...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ...The Manti-La Sal and Fishlake National Forests along with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Price Field Office as joint lead agencies announce their intent to prepare a supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision to the 2011 Final EIS For the Leasing and Undeground Mining of the Greens Hollow Federal Coal Lease Tract UTU-84102. Supplemental analyses are required......

  14. An X-ray Investigation of the NGC 346 Field in the SMC (2): The Field Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naze, Y.; Hartwell, J. M.; Stevens, I. R.; Manfroid, J.; Marchenko. S.; Corcoran, M. F.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Skalkowski, G.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present results from a Chandra observation of the NGC 346 cluster, the ionizing source of N66, the most luminous H II region and the largest star formation region in the SMC. In the first part of this investigation, we have analysed the X-ray properties of the cluster itself and the remarkable star HD 5980. But the field contains additional objects of interest. In total, 79 X-ray point sources were detected in the Chandra observation and we investigate here their characteristics in details. The sources possess rather high HRs, and their cumulative luminosity function is steeper than the SMC's trend. Their absorption columns suggest that most of the sources belong to NGC 346. Using new UBVRI imaging with the ESO 2.2m telescope, we also discovered possible counterparts for 36 of these X-ray sources. Finally, some objects show X-ray and/or optical variability, and thus need further monitoring.

  15. Distinguishing among Declarative, Descriptive and Causal Questions to Guide Field Investigations and Student Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Arthur Louis; Bell, Clare V.

    2011-01-01

    Teachers as well as students often have difficulty formulating good research questions because not all questions lend themselves to scientific investigation. The following is a guide for high-school and college life-science teachers to help students define question types central to biological field studies. The mayfly nymph was selected as the…

  16. Field Investigations of Lactate-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H

    SciTech Connect

    T. C. Hazen; B. Faybishenko; D. Joyner; S. Borglin; E. Brodie; S. Hubbard; K. Williams; J. Peterson; J. Wan; T. Tokunaga; M. Firestone; P. E. Long; Resch, C.T.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A. C. T. Resch, and D. Newcomer , S. Koenigsberg and A. Willet Field Investigations of Lactate-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr at Hanford 100H

    2005-04-20

    The overall objective of this paper is to carry out field investigations to assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford 100H site.

  17. 77 FR 16852 - Notice of Reclassification of Five Regional Offices to Investigative Field Offices: Seattle, WA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... Central Islip, New York, sub-field office of investigations. SUMMARY: This notice advises the public that.... (d) Space alteration costs (de minimus). Some offices may require space alterations and telephone changes to accommodate any future changes of assigned staff. However, HUD/OIG estimates that any...

  18. Coronal Loops: New Insights from EIS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, G.; Bradshaw, S. J.

    2009-12-01

    Multi-instrument observations of coronal loops of different active regions have been studied. The general features discussed in Del Zanna (2003) and Del Zanna and Mason (2003) based on SOHO/CDS are confirmed. Hinode/EIS high-cadence observations clearly show how dynamic loops are at all temperatures. This clearly reflects the fast changes in the photospheric magnetic fields measured by SOT over a minute timescale. Despite that, persistent patterns are present. In particular, the pattern of Doppler shifts and non-thermal widths, found for the first time in NOAA 10926 (cf. Del Zanna 2007, 2008), is actually a common feature in all active regions. It is likely that the majority of cool (0.5--1 MK) loops are observed during their radiatively cooling phase.

  19. An experimental investigation of the flow field of a rectangular wall jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, C.; Karamcheti, K.

    1979-01-01

    The structure of a laminar, rectangular wall jet developing from an initially parabolic velocity profile was investigated with measurements of the mean and fluctuating velocity field, and with Schlieren flow visualization. The effects on mean and fluctuating velocity fields of changes in the jet Reynolds number over the range of from 0 to 4800, and of various wall lengths ranging from 0 to 312 jet widths were studied. For a given wall length and Reynolds number, disturbances in the flow field were regular and periodic, and of a constant frequency in a large region of the flow field. Small, self-excited disturbances at the nozzle exit were observed to grow exponentially with downstream distance, and roll up to form a convecting array of discrete vortices. For certain values of wall length and jet speed, discrete audible tones were detected, and appeared to be associated with an enhancement of the regularity and stability of the vortex array.

  20. Investigation of flow and solute transport at the field scale through heterogeneous deformable porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ching-Min; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2016-09-01

    This work describes an investigation of the spatial statistical structure of specific discharge field and solute transport process of a nonreactive solute at the field scale through a heterogeneous deformable porous medium. The flow field is driven by a vertical gradient in the excess pore water pressure induced by a step increase in load applied on the upper part of a finite-thickness aquifer. The non-stationary spectral representation is adopted to characterize the spatial covariance of the specific discharge field necessary for the development of the solute particle trajectory statistics using the Lagrangian formalism. We show that the statistics of the specific discharge and particle trajectory derived herein are non-stationary and functions of the coefficient of soil compressibility, μ. The effect of μ on the relative variation of specific discharge and the solute particle trajectory statistics are analyzed upon evaluating our expressions.

  1. Investigation of the pressure and velocity fields in a turbulent separated flow using the LES technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, M.; Friedrich, R.

    1991-01-01

    The large eddy simulation (LES) technique is utilized to investigate the turbulent separating and reattaching flow over a rearward-facing step. Simulations on a series of successively refined grids were performed (maximum resolution: 320 x 64 x 48). Statistical results are compared with experimental data and show good agreement. An examination of the simulated flow fields reveals the instantaneous structure of the separating shear layer, the reattachment zone and the recirculation region. Large departures from the mean in both the velocity and pressure fields are found to occur in all three regions. The shape and size of structures in the velocity and pressure fields varies with the proximity of solid walls and the region of the flow domain. Awareness of the instantaneous flow field structure is shown to be instrumental to having a complete understanding of the unsteady turbulent flow.

  2. Electric-field induced mutation of DNA: a theoretical investigation of the GC base pair.

    PubMed

    Cerón-Carrasco, José P; Jacquemin, Denis

    2013-04-01

    It is known that intense external electric fields affect the proton transfer (PT) reactions in simple chemical systems, such as hydrated chlorhydric acid or formic acid dimer. Accordingly, electric fields might be used to modulate the PT reactions responsible for the spontaneous mutation mechanism in DNA. In this contribution, we investigate the effect of these fields on the tautomeric equilibria of the guanine-cytosine (GC) base pair in order to gain further insight into this hypothesis. This task is performed with both density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) approaches. Our results demonstrate that electric fields not only drastically alter the rate constants of PT but also tune the mechanism of the PT reactions in the GC base pair. PMID:23338206

  3. An X-ray Investigation of the NGC 346 Field in the SMC (2): The Field Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naze, Y.; Hartwell, J. M.; Stevens, I. R.; Manfroid, J.; Marchenko, S.; Corcoran, M. F.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Skalkowski, G.

    2003-01-01

    We present results from a Chandra observation of the NGC 346 cluster, which is the ionizing source of N66, the most luminous HII region and the largest star formation region in the SMC. In the first part of this investigation, we have analysed the X-ray properties of the cluster itself and the remarkable star HD 5980. But the field contains additional objects of interest. In total, 79 X-ray point sources were detected in the Chandra observation: this is more than five times the number of sources detected by previous X-ray surveys. We investigate here their characteristics in detail. The sources possess rather high hardness ratios, and their cumulative luminosity function is steeper than that for the rest of the SMC at higher .luminosities. Their absorption columns suggest that most of the sources belong to NGC346. Using new UBV RI imaging with the ESO 2.2m telescope, we also discovered possible counterparts for 36 of these X-ray sources and estimated a B spectral type for a large number of these counterparts. This tends to suggest that most of the X-ray sources in the field are in fact X-ray binaries. Finally, some objects show X-ray and/or optical variability, with a need for further monitoring.

  4. An investigation into the induced electric fields from transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadimani, Ravi; Lee, Erik; Duffy, Walter; Waris, Mohammed; Siddiqui, Waquar; Islam, Faisal; Rajamani, Mahesh; Nathan, Ryan; Jiles, David; David C Jiles Team; Walter Duffy Collaboration

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a promising tool for noninvasive brain stimulation that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of major depressive disorder. To stimulate the brain, TMS uses large, transient pulses of magnetic field to induce an electric field in the head. This transient magnetic field is large enough to cause the depolarization of cortical neurons and initiate a synaptic signal transmission. For this study, 50 unique head models were created from MRI images. Previous simulation studies have primarily used a single head model, and thus give a limited image of the induced electric field from TMS. This study uses finite element analysis simulations on 50 unique, heterogeneous head models to better investigate the relationship between TMS and the electric field induced in brain tissues. Results showed a significant variation in the strength of the induced electric field in the brain, which can be reasonably predicted by the distance from the TMS coil to the stimulated brain. Further, it was seen that some models had high electric field intensities in over five times as much brain volume as other models.

  5. Field investigation source area ST58 old Quartermaster service station, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Liikala, T.L.; Evans, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Source area ST58 is the site of the old Quartermaster service station at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The source area is one of several Source Evaluation Report sites being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Air Force as candidates for no further remedial action, interim removal action, or a remedial investigation/feasibility study under a Federal Facilities Agreement. The purpose of this work was to characterize source area ST58 and excavate the most contaminated soils for use in composting treatability studies. A field investigation was conducted to determine the nature and extent of soil contamination. The field investigation entailed a records search; grid node location, surface geophysical, and soil gas surveys; and test pit soil sampling. Soil excavation followed based on the results of the field investigation. The site was backfilled with clean soil. Results from this work indicate close spatial correlation between screening instruments, used during the field investigation and soil excavation, and laboratory analyses. Gasoline was identified as the main subsurface contaminant based on the soil gas surveys and test pit soil sampling. A center of contamination was located near the northcentral portion of the source area, and a center was located in the northwestern comer. The contamination typically occurred near or below a former soil horizon probably as a result of surface spills and leaks from discontinuities and/or breaks in the underground piping. Piping locations were delineated during the surface geophysical surveys and corresponded very well to unscaled drawings of the site. The high subsurface concentrations of gasoline detected in the northwestern comer of the source area probably reflect ground-water contamination and/or possibly floating product.

  6. Low-temperature scanning system for near- and far-field optical investigations.

    PubMed

    Kazantsev, D V; Dal Savio, C; Pierz, K; Güttler, B; Danzebrink, H-U

    2003-03-01

    A combined system for far- and near-field optical spectroscopy consisting of a compact scanning near-field optical microscope and a dedicated spectrometer was realized. The set-up allows the optical investigation of samples at temperatures from 10 to 300 K. The sample positioning range is as large as 5 x 5 x 5 mm3 and the spatial resolution is in the range of 1.5 micro m in the far-field optical microscopy mode at low temperatures. In the scanning near-field optical microscope mode the resolution is defined by the microfabricated cantilever probe, which is placed in the focus of a double-mirror objective. The tip-to-sample distance in the scanning near-field optical microscope is controlled by a beam deflection system in dynamic scanning force microscopy mode. After a description of the apparatus, scanning force topography images of self-assembled InAs quantum dots on a GaAs substrate with a density of less than one dot per square micrometre are shown, followed by the first spectroscopic investigations of such a sample. The presented results demonstrate the potential of the system. PMID:12641762

  7. The magnetic field investigation on the Ulysses mission - Instrumentation and preliminary scientific results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balogh, A.; Beek, T. J.; Forsyth, R. J.; Hedgecock, P. C.; Marquedant, R. J.; Smith, E. J.; Southwood, D. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental feature of the heliosphere is the three-dimensional structure of the interplanetary magnetic field. The magnetic field investigation on Ulysses, the first space probe to explore the out-of-ecliptic and polar heliosphere, aims at determining the large-scale features and gradients of the field, as well as the heliolatitude dependence of interplanetary phenomena so far only observed near the ecliptic plane. The Ulysses magnetometer uses two sensors, one a Vector Helium Magnetometer, the other a Fluxgate Magnetometer. Onboard data processing yields measurements of the magnetic field vector with a time resolution up to 2 vectors/second and a sensitivity of about 10 pT. Since the switch-on of the instrument in flight on 25 October 1990, a steady stream of observations has been made, indicating that at this phase of the solar cycle the field is generally disturbed: several shock waves and a large number of discontinuities have been observed, as well as several periods with apparently intense wave activity. The paper gives a brief summary of the scientific objectives of the investigation, followed by a detailed description of the instrument and its characteristics. Examples of wave bursts, interplanetary shocks and crossings of the heliospheric current sheet are given to illustrate the observations made with the instrument.

  8. The erosion of carbonate stone by acid rain: Laboratory and field investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Baedecker, P.A. ); Reddy, M.M. )

    1993-02-01

    This paper describes a laboratory experiment on the effects of acidic deposition on carbonate stone erosion. It can serve as the basis for an undergraduate (or pre college) experiment in environmental chemistry. Recent field investigations are described that provide measurements of carbonate stone dissolution and mechanical erosion under weathering conditions that are prevalent in the eastern US. The purpose of the laboratory work is to answer questions concerning the effects of hydrogen ion deposition on stone erosion processes that were difficult to resolve on the basis of field experiments alone.

  9. Investigation of turbulence in reversed field pinch plasma by using microwave imaging reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Z. B.; Nagayama, Y.; Hamada, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Michael, C. A.; Yambe, K.

    2011-10-15

    Turbulence in the reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma has been investigated by using the microwave imaging reflectometry in the toroidal pinch experiment RX (TPE-RX). In conventional RFP plasma, the fluctuations are dominated by the intermittent blob-like structures. These structures are accompanied with the generation of magnetic field, the strong turbulence, and high nonlinear coupling among the high and low k modes. The pulsed poloidal current drive operation, which improves the plasma confinement significantly, suppresses the dynamo, the turbulence, and the blob-like structures.

  10. Investigation of mechanosensation in C. elegans using light field calcium imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Michael; Elmi, Muna; Pawar, Vijay; Srinivasan, Mandayam A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new experimental approach to investigate touch sensation in the model organism C. elegans using light field deconvolution microscopy. By combining fast volumetric image acquisition with controlled indentation of the organism using a high sensitivity force transducer, we are able to simultaneously measure activity in multiple touch receptor neurons expressing the calcium ion indicator GCaMP6s. By varying the applied mechanical stimulus we show how this method can be used to quantify touch sensitivity in C. elegans. We describe some of the challenges of performing light field calcium imaging in moving samples and demonstrate that they can be overcome by simple data processing. PMID:27446713

  11. Investigation of mechanosensation in C. elegans using light field calcium imaging.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Michael; Elmi, Muna; Pawar, Vijay; Srinivasan, Mandayam A

    2016-07-01

    We describe a new experimental approach to investigate touch sensation in the model organism C. elegans using light field deconvolution microscopy. By combining fast volumetric image acquisition with controlled indentation of the organism using a high sensitivity force transducer, we are able to simultaneously measure activity in multiple touch receptor neurons expressing the calcium ion indicator GCaMP6s. By varying the applied mechanical stimulus we show how this method can be used to quantify touch sensitivity in C. elegans. We describe some of the challenges of performing light field calcium imaging in moving samples and demonstrate that they can be overcome by simple data processing. PMID:27446713

  12. Mars' "Magnetospheric" Response to Interplanetary Field Orientation: Inferences from Models for MAVEN Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Dong, C.; Ma, Y.-J.; Curry, S. M.; Alvarez, K.; Hara, T.; Halekas, J.; Brain, D. A.; Bougher, S.; Espley, J.

    2015-10-01

    Planetary space weather at Mars has attracted much interest, but the focus is usually on the response to solar activity and its related disturbances in the solar wind. While this aspect is important and may be key to understanding Mars' atmosphere evolution, an additional consideration is based on the sensitivity of Earth's magnetospheric solar wind interaction to southward interplanetary magnetic fields. The study described here investigates whether Mars has its own specific interplanetary field orientation sensitivities that might be identified in the MAVEN data analyses.

  13. The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: field investigations and reconstruction effort

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Wallace R.; Eckel, Edwin B.; Schaem, William E.; Lyle, Robert E.; George, Warren; Chance, Genie

    1966-01-01

    One of the greatest geotectonic events of our time occurred in southern Alaska late in the afternoon of March 27, 1964. Beneath a leaden sky, the chill of evening was just settling over the Alaskan countryside. Light snow was falling on some communities. It was Good Friday, schools were closed, and the business day was ending. Suddenly without warning half of Alaska was rocked and jarred by the most violent earthquake to occur in North America this century. The descriptive summary that follows is based on the work of many investigators. A large and still-growing scientific literature has accumulated since the earthquake, and this literature has been freely drawn upon here. In particular, the writers have relied upon the findings of their colleagues in the Geological Survey. Some of these findings have been published, but some are still being prepared for publication. Moreover, some field investigations are still in progress. This is the first in a series of six reports that the U.S. Geological Survey published on the results of a comprehensive geologic study that began, as a reconnaissance survey, within 24 hours after the March 27, 1964, Magnitude 9.2 Great Alaska Earthquake and extended, as detailed investigations, through several field seasons. The 1964 Great Alaska earthquake was the largest earthquake in the U.S. since 1700. Professional Paper 541, in 1 part, describes Field Investigations and Reconstruction Effort.

  14. Laboratory experiments investigating magnetic field production via the Weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, Channing; Fiuza, Frederico; Ross, James Steven; Zylstra, Alex; Pollock, Brad; Drake, R. Paul; Froula, Dustin; Gregori, Gianluca; Kugland, Nathan; Kuranz, Carolyn; Levy, Matthew; Li, Chikang; Meinecke, Jena; Petrasso, Richard; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; Sakawa, Youichi; Spitkovsky, Anatoly; Takabe, Hideke; Turnbull, David; Park, Hye-Sook

    2015-08-01

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are often associated with the presence of strong magnetic fields in a plasma flow. The magnetic fields required for shock formation may either be initially present, for example in supernova remnants or young galaxies, or they may be self-generated in systems such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In the case of GRB outflows, the intense magnetic fields are greater than those seeded by the GRB progenitor or produced by misaligned density and temperature gradients in the plasma flow (the Biermann-battery effect). The Weibel instability is one candidate mechanism for the generation of sufficiently strong fields to create a collisionless shock. Despite their crucial role in astrophysical systems, observation of the magnetic fields produced by Weibel instabilities in experiments has been challenging. Using a proton probe to directly image electromagnetic fields, we present evidence of Weibel-generated magnetic fields that grow in opposing, initially unmagnetized plasma flows from laser-driven laboratory experiments. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that the instability efficiently extracts energy from the plasma flows, and that the self-generated magnetic energy reaches a few percent of the total energy in the system. This result demonstrates an experimental platform suitable for the investigation of a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, including collisionless shock formation in supernova remnants, large-scale magnetic field amplification, and the radiation signature from gamma-ray bursts.This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Numerical Simulations and Accompanying Experimental Investigations of Magnetoplasmadynamic Thrusters with Coaxial Applied Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Daniel; Auweter-Kurtz, Monika; Fertig, Markus; Herdrich, Georg

    An overview is given on a numerical simulation program for applied field magnetoplasmadynamic (AF-MPD) thrusters, which is currently under development at the Institute of Space Systems (IRS). The program allows the simulation of argon plasma flows in thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. The code is based on an axisymmetric finite volume method on unstructured, adaptive meshes. An externally applied magnetic field can be taken into account employing the vector potential formulation. Azimuthal velocity and magnetic field are handled by a quasi three-dimensional approach with vanishing azimuthal derivatives. Additionally, a laboratory AF-MPD thruster for the power range of 10-20 kW has been built up at IRS. The goal of the experimental investigations is the characterization of the operation and performance parameters of the thruster.

  16. Experimental and computational investigation of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, M. D.; Chriss, R. M.; Wood, J. R.; Strazisar, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor (LSCC) flow field has been conducted using laser anemometry and Dawes' 3D viscous code. The experimental configuration consists of a backswept impeller followed by a vaneless diffuser. Measurements of the three-dimensional velocity field were acquired at several measurement planes through the compressor. The measurements describe both the throughflow and secondary velocity field along each measurement plane. In several cases the measurements provide details of the flow within the blade boundary layers. Insight into the complex flow physics within centrifugal compressors is provided by the computational analysis, and assessment of the CFD predictions is provided by comparison with the measurements. Five-hole probe and hot-wire surveys at the inlet and exit to the rotor as well as surface flow visualization along the impeller blade surfaces provide independent confirmation of the laser measurement technique.

  17. Strain in Hydrogen-Implanted Si Investigated Using Dark-Field Electron Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkashin, Nikolay; Reboh, Shay; Lubk, Axel; Hÿtch, Martin J.; Claverie, Alain

    2013-09-01

    The microstructure of ion-implanted crystals is profoundly dictated by mechanical strain developing in interplay with structural defects. Understanding the origin of strain during the early stages of development is challenging and requires accurate measurements and modeling. Here, we investigate the mechanical strain in H-implanted Si. X-ray diffraction analysis is performed to measure the mesoscopic out-of-plane strain and dark-field electron holography to map strain in two-dimensions (2D) with nanometer spatial resolution. Supported by finite element method modeling, we propose that the mean strain field is explained by overlapping and averaging discrete strain fields generated by sub-nanoscopic defects that are intimately related to the H depth concentration.

  18. Investigation of defect copper substructure disrupted in creep condition under the action of magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, S. V.; Yaropolova, N. G.; Zaguyliaev1, D. V.; Gromov, V. E.; Ivanov, Yu F.; Komissarova, I. A.

    2015-09-01

    The defect substructure of M00b copper samples loaded up to disruption in creep condition both under and without the action of 0.35 T magnetic field is investigated in the paper. Material near the disrupted surface and at certain distances from it received the serious study. It has been ascertained that when copper disrupting without magnetic action on creep process the main type of dislocation substructure is the cellular one irrespectively of the distance to disruption surface. As the result of magnetic field influence on creep process the main type of dislocation substructure is replaced by the stripe-like one. The distinctive quantitative characteristics of dislocation substructures are observed. Moreover, a gradient behavior of the number of stress raisers has been revealed when moving away from disruption surface both in deformation conditions with and without a magnetic field.

  19. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report. Volume 1: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force`s Installation Restoration Program (IRP). As a part of the IRP program, field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions willneed to be carried out at each site. The island`s drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites during the 1992 field investigation included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. In addition, geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities.

  20. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report. Volume 2, Appendix A: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force`s Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions will need to be carried out at each site. The island`s drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites during the 1992 field investigation included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. In addition, geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities. This report, appendix A, contains the analytical results.

  1. Investigation of Electromagnetic Field Threat to Fuel Tank Wiring of a Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Scearce, Stephen A.; Beck, Fred B.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Cockrell, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    National Transportation Safety Board investigators have questioned whether an electrical discharge in the Fuel Quantity Indication System (FQIS) may have initiated the TWA-800 center wing tank explosion. Because the FQIS was designed to be incapable of producing such a discharge on its own, attention has been directed to mechanisms of outside electromagnetic influence. To support the investigation, the NASA Langley Research Center was tasked to study the potential for radiated electromagnetic fields from external radio frequency (RF) transmitters and passenger carried portable electronic devices (PEDs) to excite the FQIS enough to cause arcing, sparking or excessive heating within the fuel tank.

  2. Investigation of ginkgo biloba leave extracts as corrosion and Oil field microorganism inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Jingrui; Zhou, Rui; Meng, Zuchao; Zhang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba (Ginkgoaceae), originating from China, now distributes all over the world. Wide application of Ginkgo biloba extracts is determined by the main active substances, flavonoids and terpenoids, which indicates its extracts suitable to be used as an effective corrosion inhibitor. The extracts of Ginkgo biloba leave have been investigated on the corrosion inhibition of Q235A steel with weight loss and potentiodynamic polarisation techniques. The inhibition efficiency of the extracts varies with extract concentration. The extracts inhibit corrosion mainly by adsorption mechanism. Potentiodynamic polarisation studies show that extracts are mixed type inhibitors. The antibacterial activity of the extracts against oil field microorganism (SRB, IB and TGB) was also investigated. PMID:23651921

  3. Initial Results from the Vector Electric Field Investigation on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Acuna, M.; Le, G.; Farrell, W.; Holzworth, R.; Wilson, G.; Burke, W.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Liebrecht, C.; Martin, S.; Kujawski, J.; Uribe, P.; Fourre, R.; McCarthy, M.; Maynard, N.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Steigies, C.

    2009-01-01

    Initial results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. The DC electric field detector has revealed zonal and meridional electric fields that undergo a diurnal variation, typically displaying eastward and outward-directed fields during the day and westward and downward-directed fields at night. In general, the measured DC electric field amplitudes are in the 0.5-2 mV/m range, corresponding to I3 x B drifts of the order of 30-150 m/s. What is surprising is the high degree of large-scale (10's to 100's of km) structure in the DC electric field, particularly at night, regardless of whether well-defined spread-F plasma density depletions are present. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. On some occasions, localized regions of low frequency (< 8 Hz) magnetic field broadband irregularities have been detected, suggestive of filamentary currents, although there is no one-to-one correspondence of these waves with the observed plasma density depletions, at least within the data examined thus far. Finally, the data set includes a wide range of ELF/VLF/HF waves corresponding to a variety of plasma waves, in particular banded ELF hiss, whistlers, and lower hybrid wave turbulence

  4. Effect of synthesis parameters on morphology of polyaniline (PANI) and field emission investigation of PANI nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bankar, Prashant K.; More, Mahendra A.; Patil, Sandip S.

    2015-06-24

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanostructures have been synthesized by simple chemical oxidation route at different monomer concentration along with variation in synthesis temperature. The effect of variation of synthesis parameters has been revealed using different characterization techniques. The structural and morphological characterization of the synthesized PANI nanostructures was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), whereas Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been used to reveal the chemical properties. With the variation in the synthesis temperature and monomer concentration, various morphologies characterized by formation of PANI nanoparticles, nanofibres, nanotubes and nanospheres, are revealed from the SEM analysis. The FTIR analysis reveals the formation of conducting state of PANI under prevailing experimental conditions. The field emission investigation of the conducting PANI nanotubes was performed in all metal UHV system at base pressure of 1x10{sup −8} mbar. The turn on field required to draw emission of 1 nA current was observed to be ∼ 2.2 V/μm and threshold field (corresponding to emission current density of 1 µA/cm2) was found to be 3.2 V/μm. The emission current was observed to be stable for more than three hours at a preset value 1 µA. The simple synthesis route and good field emission characteristics indicate potential of PANI nanofibres as a promising emitter for field emission based micro/nano devices.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Porous-floor Effects on Cavity Flow Fields at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a passive-venting system to modify the flow field characteristics of a rectangular-box cavity at supersonic speeds. The passive-venting system consists of a porous floor with a vent chamber beneath the floor. For certain cavity length-to-height ratios, this configuration allowed high-pressure air at the rear of the cavity to vent to the forward part of the cavity, thereby modifying the cavity flow field. The wind-tunnel model consisted of a flat plate that housed a cavity mounted on a balance such that only the cavity drag was measured. The cavity height remained constant, and the length varied with rectangular-block inserts. Both solid-and porous-floor cavities were tested for comparison at Mach numbers of 1.60, 1.90, 2.16, and 2.86. These results showed that the passive-venting system did modify the cavity flow field. In order to determine the type flow field which existed for the porous-floor configuration, pressures were measured inside the cavity at the same conditions and for the same configurations as those used in the drag tests. Pressure data were also obtained with stores mounted in the cavity. These results, along with Schlieren photographs and the tabulated data, are presented to document the porous-floor cavity flow field.

  6. Results of investigations at the Zunil geothermal field, Guatemala: Well logging and brine geochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, A.; Dennis, B.; Van Eeckhout, E.; Goff, F.; Lawton, R.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Archuleta, J. ); Medina, V. . Unidad de Desarollo Geotermico)

    1991-07-01

    The well logging team from Los Alamos and its counterpart from Central America were tasked to investigate the condition of four producing geothermal wells in the Zunil Geothermal Field. The information obtained would be used to help evaluate the Zunil geothermal reservoir in terms of possible additional drilling and future power plant design. The field activities focused on downhole measurements in four production wells (ZCQ-3, ZCQ-4, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6). The teams took measurements of the wells in both static (shut-in) and flowing conditions, using the high-temperature well logging tools developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two well logging missions were conducted in the Zunil field. In October 1988 measurements were made in well ZCQ-3, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6. In December 1989 the second field operation logged ZCQ-4 and repeated logs in ZCQ-3. Both field operations included not only well logging but the collecting of numerous fluid samples from both thermal and nonthermal waters. 18 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Investigation of Particle Sampling Bias in the Shear Flow Field Downstream of a Backward Facing Step

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.; Kjelgaard, Scott O.; Hepner, Timothy E.

    1990-01-01

    The flow field about a backward facing step was investigated to determine the characteristics of particle sampling bias in the various flow phenomena. The investigation used the calculation of the velocity:data rate correlation coefficient as a measure of statistical dependence and thus the degree of velocity bias. While the investigation found negligible dependence within the free stream region, increased dependence was found within the boundary and shear layers. Full classic correction techniques over-compensated the data since the dependence was weak, even in the boundary layer and shear regions. The paper emphasizes the necessity to determine the degree of particle sampling bias for each measurement ensemble and not use generalized assumptions to correct the data. Further, it recommends the calculation of the velocity:data rate correlation coefficient become a standard statistical calculation in the analysis of all laser velocimeter data.

  8. Development of Emergency Intravehicular Spacesuit (EIS) assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A program was undertaken to develop and test two prototype pressure suits to operate at pressures up to 413 mm Hg (8.0 PSIG). The units were designated Emergency Intravehicular Spacesuits (EIS). Performance requirements, design evolution, testing performed, problems encountered, and final EIS configuration are reported.

  9. Original Size of the Sudbury Structure: Evidence from Field Investigations and Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowmman, Paul D., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes results of continuing studies of the original size of the Sudbury impact structure, including imaging radar and field investigations of supposed "Sudbury breccia" north of the Sudbury Igneous Comples (SIC). Imaging radar acquired from Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) aircraft, European Space Agency Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1), and RADARSAT shows no evidence of outer rings concentric with the North Range. Illumination directions are such that these rings, presumably extension fractures, would be conspicuous by look azimuth highlighting if they existed. Field mapping supports this interpretation, showing that supposed ring fractures occupied by Huronian sediments are essentially synclines older than the 1850 Ma impact and are not related to the impact. Field investigations of "Sudbury breccia" north of the SIC shows that most if not all of it is inside or along contacts with diabase dykes of the Sudbury Swarm (ca. 1238 Ma), and hence is far too young to be related to the impact. A recently-discovered occurrence of "Sudbury breccia" south of the SIC, near Creighton, is similarly associated with a NW-trending diabase dyke cutting the SIC, supporting the post-impact age of the breccia. It is concluded that the original north rim of the Sudbury crater was not more than 5 to 10 km north of the present North Range SIC contact, and that published estimates of the crater size (ca 200 km diameter) are incorrect.

  10. Investigation of the three-dimensional flow field within a transonic fan rotor: experiment and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pierzga, M.J.; Wood, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the three-dimensional flow field through a low aspect ratio, transonic, axial-flow fan rotor has been conducted using an advanced laser anemometer (LA) system. Laser velocimeter measurements of the rotor flow field at the design operating speed and over a range of through-flow conditions are compared to analytical solutions. The numerical technique used yields the solution to the full, three-dimensional, unsteady Euler equations using an explicit time-marching, finite volume approach. The numerical analysis, when coupled with a simplified boundary layer calculation, generally yields good agreement with the experimental data. The test rotor has an aspect ratio of 1.56, a design total pressure ratio of 1.629 and a tip relative Mach number of 1.38. The high spatial resolution of the LA data matrix (9 radial by 30 axial by 50 blade-to-blade) permits details of the transonic flow field such as shock location, turning distribution and blade loading levels to be investigated and compared to analytical results.

  11. Pulsed magnetic field measurement system based on colossal magnetoresistance-B-scalar sensors for railgun investigation.

    PubMed

    Stankevič, T; Medišauskas, L; Stankevič, V; Balevičius, S; Żurauskienė, N; Liebfried, O; Schneider, M

    2014-04-01

    A high pulsed magnetic field measurement system based on the use of CMR-B-scalar sensors was developed for the investigations of the electrodynamic processes in electromagnetic launchers. The system consists of four independent modules (channels) which are controlled by a personal computer. Each channel is equipped with a CMR-B-scalar sensor connected to the measurement device-B-scalar meter. The system is able to measure the magnitude of pulsed magnetic fields from 0.3 T to 20 T in the range from DC up to 20 kHz independently of the magnetic field direction. The measurement equipment circuit is electrically separated from the ground and shielded against low and high frequency electromagnetic noise. The B-scalar meters can be operated in the presence of ambient pulsed magnetic fields with amplitudes up to 0.2 T and frequencies higher than 1 kHz. The recorded signals can be transmitted to a personal computer in a distance of 25 m by means of a fiber optic link. The system was tested using the electromagnetic railgun RAFIRA installed at the French-German Research Institute of Saint-Louis, France. PMID:24784635

  12. Field investigation of a wake structure downwind of a VAWT in a windfarm array

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.T.; Buck, J.W.; Germain, A.C.; Hinchee, M.E.; Solt, T.S.; LeRoy, G.M.; Srnsky, R.A.

    1987-10-01

    The effects of upwind turbine wakes on the performance of a FloWind 17-m VAWT were investigated through a series of field experiments conducted at the FloWind windfarm on Cameron Ridge, Tehachapi, California. The field experiment was conducted within a VAWT array consisting of more than nine VAWTs with separations 3D crosswised by 8D downwind (where D is the turbine diameter) in a staggered configuration. The array is the upwind three rows of VAWTS in a total of six rows that are on top of the Cameron Ridge plateau. The terrain features in the vicinity are reasonably regular, with an upslope of 7 deg on the average; however, several local irregularities are present. The annual hourly averaged wind speed exceeds 8 m/s at the site. The wind field and the power-outputs of nine turbines within the array were measured with wind sensors and power transducers. Nine Gill propeller and 18 Maximum cup anemometers and one direction sensor were mounted on portable and stack-up towers installed upwind and within the turbine array. From the field measurements, the velocity and power/energy deficits were derived under various turbine on/off configurations. Much information was provided to characterize the structure of VAWT wakes and to assess their effects on the performance of downwind turbines. Recommendations are made for optimizing windfarm design and operations as well as for wind energy management.

  13. Experimental investigation of electron transport across a magnetic field barrier in electropositive and electronegative plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. B.; Rafalskyi, D.; Lafleur, T.; Aanesland, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we experimentally investigate the \\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} drift of electrons in low temperature plasmas containing a magnetic field barrier; a plasma configuration commonly used in gridded negative ion sources. A planar Langmuir probe array is developed to quantify the \\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} drift of electrons over the cross-section of the ion-extraction region of an ion–ion plasma source. The drift is studied as a function of pressure using both electropositive plasmas (Ar), as well electronegative plasmas (Ar and SF6 mixtures), and is demonstrated to result from an interaction of the applied magnetic field and the electric fields in the sheath and pre-sheath near the transverse boundaries. The drift enhances electron transport across the magnetic field by more than two orders of magnitude compared with simple collisional transport, and is found to be strongly dependant on pressure. The lowest pressure resulted in the highest influence of the drift across the extraction area and is found to be 30%.

  14. Investigating the active hydrothermal field of Kolumbo Volcano using CTD profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleni Christopoulou, Maria; Mertzimekis, Theo; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Carey, Steve

    2014-05-01

    The submarine Kolumbo volcano NE of Santorini Island and the unique active hydrothermal vent field on its crater field (depth ~ 500 m) have been recently explored in multiple cruises aboard E/V Nautilus. ROV explorations showed the existence of extensive vent activity and almost completely absence of vent-specific macrofauna. Gas discharges have been found to be 99%-rich in CO2, which is sequestered at the bottom of the crater due to a special combination of physicochemical and geomorphological factors. The dynamic conditions existing along the water column in the crater have been studied in detail by means of temperature, salinity and conductivity depth profiles for the first time. CTD sensors aboard the ROV Hercules were employed to record anomalies in those parameters in an attempt to investigate several active and inactive vent locations. Temporal CTD monitoring inside and outside of the crater was carried out over a period of two years. Direct comparison between the vent field and locations outside the main cone, where no hydrothermal activity is known to exist, showed completely different characteristics. CTD profiles above the active vent field (NNE side) are correlated to Kolumbo's cone morphology. The profiles suggest the existence of four distinct zones of physicochemical properties in the water column. The layer directly above the chimneys exhibit gas discharges highly enriched in CO2. Continuous gas motoring is essential to identify the onset of geological hazards in the region.

  15. Stud arc welding in a magnetic field - Investigation of the influences on the arc motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartz-Behrend, K.; Marqués, J. L.; Forster, G.; Jenicek, A.; Müller, M.; Cramer, H.; Jilg, A.; Soyer, H.; Schein, J.

    2014-11-01

    Stud arc welding is widely used in the construction industry. For welding of studs with a diameter larger than 14 mm a ceramic ferrule is usually necessary in order to protect the weld pool. Disadvantages of using such a ferrule are that more metal is molten than necessary for a high quality welded joint and that the ferrule is a consumable generally thrown away after the welding operation. Investigations show that the ferrule can be omitted when the welding is carried out in a radially symmetric magnetic field within a shielding gas atmosphere. Due to the Lorentz force the arc is laterally shifted so that a very uniform and controlled melting of the stud contact surface as well as of the work piece can be achieved. In this paper a simplified physical model is presented describing how the parameters welding current, flux density of the magnetic field, radius of the arc and mass density of the shielding gas influence the velocity of the arc motion. The resulting equation is subsequently verified by comparing it to optical measurements of the arc motion. The proposed model can be used to optimize the required field distribution for the magnetic field stud welding process.

  16. Investigating Non-Equilibrium Fluctuations of Nanocolloids in a Magnetic Field Using Direct Imaging Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Ashley; Oprisan, Ana; Oprisan, Sorinel; Rice-Oprisan College of Charleston Team

    Nanoparticles of iron oxide have a high surface area and can be controlled by an external magnetic field. Since they have a fast response to the applied magnetic field, these systems have been used for numerous in vivo applications, such as MRI contrast enhancement, tissue repair, immunoassay, detoxification of biological fluids, hyperthermia, drug delivery, and cell separation. We performed three direct imaging experiments in order to investigate the concentration-driven fluctuations using magnetic nanoparticles in the absence and in the presence of magnetic field. Our direct imaging experimental setup involved a glass cell filled with magnetic nanocolloidal suspension and water with the concentration gradient oriented against the gravitational field and a superluminescent diode (SLD) as the light source. Nonequilibrium concentration-driven fluctuations were recorded using a direct imaging technique. We used a dynamic structure factor algorithm for image processing in order to compute the structure factor and to find the power law exponents. We saw evidence of large concentration fluctuations and permanent magnetism. Further research will use the correlation time to approximate the diffusion coefficient for the free diffusion experiment. Funded by College of Charleston Department of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities SURF grant.

  17. Numerical investigation of the contraction of neutral-charged diblock copolymer brushes in electric fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuwei; Li, Haiming; Zhu, Yuejin; Tong, Chaohui

    2016-03-31

    Using self-consistent field theory (SCFT), the contraction of neutral-charged A-B diblock copolymer brushes in electric fields generated by opposite surface charges on two parallel electrodes has been numerically investigated. The diblock copolymer chains were grafted with the free end of the neutral block to one electrode and immersed in a salt-free solution sandwiched between the two electrodes. The numerical results reveal that the charged monomers, A-B joint segment and the tail exhibit bimodal distributions under external electric fields, which are absent for homopolymer polyelectrolyte brushes. The dependences of the relative populations and peak positions of the two modes on various parameters such as block ratio, grafting density, chain length and strength of the applied electric field were systematically examined and the underlining mechanisms were elucidated. It was found in this study that, if the total amount of surface charges on the grafting electrode is no more than that of the counter-ions in the system, overall charge neutrality is generally maintained inside the brushes when including the contribution of surface charges on the grafting electrode. In such a case, the counter-ions expelled from the brushes are highly enriched in the immediate vicinity of the second electrode and an approximate charge balance between these expelled counter-ions and the opposite surface charges on the second electrode is achieved. PMID:26912335

  18. Experimental investigation of a simulated LOX injector flow field and other nonintrusive measurement efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.

    1992-12-01

    Efforts to improve the characteristics of fuel-oxidizer mixing in liquid rocket combustors have lead to a swirl element design for a liquid oxygen injector which is being considered for use on the STME. For the design which is the subject of this investigation, the oxygen enters the injector element perpendicular to the injector axis and nearly tangent to the circular injector wall. This swirl element is at one end of a tube and the injector exit is at the other. This geometric configuration creates a plume in the shape of a conical sheet. This sheet is either primarily contiguous liquid or droplets depending on the pressure drop in the injector and the distance from the injector exit. Probe-based devices such as two-dimensional grid patternators have been used to investigate simulated LOX injector flow fields (Hulka). The primary work described herein is an effort to use optical techniques to investigate the plume of a swirl injector element. For this investigation, a high pressure (500 psig) cold flow test facility was constructed. Water was used as the LOX simulate and air pressure was used to drive the injector flow field. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) from dye seeded into the water was used to obtain quantitative measurements of the time-averaged water concentration distribution in the plume. Scattered laser light and LIF were used for time averaged plume visualization and scattered light from a strobe with a 1 microsecond pulse was used for time-resolved plume visualization. During the Summer Faculty Fellowship for which this report was developed, an additional effort, unrelated to the swirl injector investigation, was made to resolve fluctuations in the combustion product composition in the exhaust of a hybrid rocket motor. A brief description of this effort is included herein.

  19. Investigating the impact of electromagnetic fields on human cells: A thermodynamic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, Umberto; Ponzetto, Antonio; Deisboeck, Thomas S.

    2016-02-01

    The consequences of the interactions of electromagnetic waves, as used in conventional MRI technology, with human cells are not fully understood. To analyze these interactions, a novel thermodynamic approach is presented that is based on the relationship between electromagnetic and thermodynamic quantities. The theoretical results indicate that the waves' impact is largest at high magnetic field strengths and at low frequencies. This is the first step towards a clinically useful framework to quantitatively assess MRI impact including a potential trade-off between the desired increase in spatial resolution that higher magnetic field strengths yield for diagnostic purposes and the danger this may pose for cell membranes, and by extension, for the tissues investigated.

  20. Investigation of 2D-Trace Gas Field Reconstruction Techniques From Tomographic AMAX-DOAS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laepple, T.; Heue, K.; Friedeburg, C. V.; Wang, P.; Knab, V.; Pundt, I.

    2002-12-01

    Tomographic-Differential-Optical-Absorption-Spectroscopy (Tom-DOAS) is a new application of the DOAS method designed to measure 2-3-dimensional concentration fields of different trace gases (e.g. NO2, HCHO, Ozone) in the troposphere. Numerical reconstruction techniques are used to obtain spatially resolved data from the slant column densities provided by DOAS instruments. We discuss the detection of emission plumes by AMAX (Airborne Multi AXis) DOAS Systems which measure sunlight by telescopes pointing in different directions. 2D distributions are reconstructed from slant columns by using airmass factor matrices and inversion techniques. We discuss possibilities and limitations of this technique gained with the use of simulated test fields. Therefore the effect of the parameter choice (e.g. flight track, algorithm changes) and measurement errors is investigated. Further, first results from the Partenavia aircraft measurements over Milano (Italy) during the European FORMAT campaign will be presented.

  1. Qualitative investigation of cryogenic fluid injection into a supersonic flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Boldman, D. R.; Neumann, H. E.; Vlcek, B. L.

    1990-01-01

    The behavior of liquid nitrogen injected into a supersonic nitrogen flow field was investigated using an experimental apparatus in which a Mach 2.7 2D gas nitrogen tunnel is coupled with a high-pressure cryogenic source. Observations were monitored and recorded via a video camera and a motion picture camera. It was found that the penetration of a supersonic flow field by injection of liquid nitrogen is strongly dependent on the flow Mach number, the cryogen injection pressure (Pi/Pc), the injector configuration, and the cryogen temperature. For a 2D gaseous N2, Mach 2.7 tunnel, with cryogen injection Pi/Pc approaching 2, the injected fluid penetration for the 1/8-in. injection port approached one half of the tunnel width at 90-deg injection, and one fourth of the tunnel width at 20-deg injection.

  2. Use of percolation theory and Latin hypercube sampling in field-scale solute transport investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Luxmoore, R.J.; Jardine, P.M.; Gardner, R.H. ); Wilson, G.V. . Dept. of Plant and Soil Science)

    1990-01-01

    Investigations of rain-fed solute transport have been conducted at a forested hillslope site by using an in situ soil pedon and a subsurface hydrologic monitoring facility. Complementary solute transport studies on undisturbed soil columns taken from the field site have not provided data that can be directly applied to the field situation. Scaling up from columns to pedons and from pedons to hillslopes is being evaluated with percolation theory and Latin hypercube sampling methods. Percolation theory provides a means of identifying mobile zones and stagnant zones for given soil structural attributes which can be compared with column dye tracing results. The generation of frequency distributions of backwater and backbone porosities for a range of total soil porosities and pore arrangements may provide a stochastic representation of soil systems suitable for scaling up from the column scale to the pedon using the Latin hypercube sampling method. 9 refs.

  3. Experimental investigation of the temperature field in the gas-liquid two-layer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatapova, E. Ya.; Filipenko, R. A.; Lyulin, Yu. V.; Graur, I. A.; Marchuk, I. V.; Kabov, O. A.

    2015-11-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the temperature field across the liquid-gas two-layer system are presented. The liquid layer is locally heated from the bottom substrate, and the intensive liquid evaporation is observed. A technique for measuring the temperature profile across the liquid and gas layers (including their interface) is developed. To do these measurements, the microthermocouple is moved across the layers with the help of precision micropositioner with a step of 1 μm. The temperature jump at the liquid-gas interface is measured, and its value increases with the temperature increase. Detailed information on the temperature field near the interface is obtained by using the precise thermocouple displacement with a small step.

  4. Gating capacitive field-effect sensors by the charge of nanoparticle/molecule hybrids.

    PubMed

    Poghossian, Arshak; Bäcker, Matthias; Mayer, Dirk; Schöning, Michael J

    2015-01-21

    The semiconductor field-effect platform is a powerful tool for chemical and biological sensing with direct electrical readout. In this work, the field-effect capacitive electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) structure - the simplest field-effect (bio-)chemical sensor - modified with citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been applied for a label-free electrostatic detection of charged molecules by their intrinsic molecular charge. The EIS sensor detects the charge changes in AuNP/molecule inorganic/organic hybrids induced by the molecular adsorption or binding events. The feasibility of the proposed detection scheme has been exemplarily demonstrated by realizing capacitive EIS sensors consisting of an Al-p-Si-SiO2-silane-AuNP structure for the label-free detection of positively charged cytochrome c and poly-d-lysine molecules as well as for monitoring the layer-by-layer formation of polyelectrolyte multilayers of poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(sodium 4-styrene sulfonate), representing typical model examples of detecting small proteins and macromolecules and the consecutive adsorption of positively/negatively charged polyelectrolytes, respectively. For comparison, EIS sensors without AuNPs have been investigated, too. The adsorption of molecules on the surface of AuNPs has been verified via the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy method. In addition, a theoretical model of the functioning of the capacitive field-effect EIS sensor functionalized with AuNP/charged-molecule hybrids has been discussed. PMID:25470772

  5. Limited field investigation report for the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-DR-1 Source Operable Unite LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land use scenarios. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit is one of four operable units associated with the 100 D/DR Area at the Hanford Site. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit encompasses approximately 1.5 km{sup 2} (0.59 mi{sup 2}) and is located immediately adjacent to the Columbia River shoreline. In general, it contains waste facilities associated with the original plant facilities constructed to support D Reactor facilities, as well as cooling water retention basin systems for both D and DR Reactors. The 100-DR-1 LFI began the investigative phase of the remedial investigation for a select number of high-priority sites. The LFI was performed to provide additional data needed to support selection, design and implementation of IRM, if needed. The LFI included data compilation, nonintrusive investigations, intrusive investigations, summarization of 100 Area aggregate studies, and data evaluation.

  6. Experimental and Computational Investigation of a Plasma Ion Accelerator with Multiple Magnetic Field Cusps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher; Cappelli, Mark

    2011-10-01

    A cusped-field discharge produces efficient ionization by trapping electrons from an external cathode through magnetic mirroring between adjacent magnetic cusps. These discharges have applications in space propulsion, particularly at low power (under 200W). However, the underlying physics driving electron transport and ionization in these devices is still poorly understood. In the current study, the plasma potential of a 40-250 W cylindrical cusped-field discharge is characterized using a floating emissive probe. The potential exhibits a spatial structure that mimics visible light emission; elevated potential is observed in a surrounding conical region downstream of the discharge channel, concomitant with ion emission. The experimentally measured plasma potential is used in single-electron particle simulations to investigate transport processes associated with electron migration from the external cathode to the anode at the base of the discharge channel. A cusped-field discharge produces efficient ionization by trapping electrons from an external cathode through magnetic mirroring between adjacent magnetic cusps. These discharges have applications in space propulsion, particularly at low power (under 200W). However, the underlying physics driving electron transport and ionization in these devices is still poorly understood. In the current study, the plasma potential of a 40-250 W cylindrical cusped-field discharge is characterized using a floating emissive probe. The potential exhibits a spatial structure that mimics visible light emission; elevated potential is observed in a surrounding conical region downstream of the discharge channel, concomitant with ion emission. The experimentally measured plasma potential is used in single-electron particle simulations to investigate transport processes associated with electron migration from the external cathode to the anode at the base of the discharge channel. The authors acknowledge support from the Air Force Office of

  7. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 5, Appendix A, Part 2, Field Investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report contains information related to the sampling and chemical analysis of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of a field investigation of ground water contamination.

  8. Investigations of the Sheath Effect on the Resultant Magnetic Field of a Cylindrical Monopole Plasma Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, E. Emetere

    2015-02-01

    The functionality of the plasma antenna has been narrowed to types and brand names only. The physics of its operation has been neglected and has stagnated technological innovations. The magnetic field in the sheath and plasma were investigated. Notable specifications were worked out in the proposed improved cylindrical monopole plasma antenna. The occurrence of femto spin demagnetization was discovered between the duration of switch on and switch off of the antenna. This phenomenon seems transient because magnetization is highest at the switch on/off point.

  9. In vitro investigation of eddy current effect on pacemaker operation generated by low frequency magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Babouri, A; Hedjeidj, A

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents in vitro investigation of the eddy current induction effects to the cardiac pacemaker exposed to low frequency magnetic fields. The method used in this study is based to the interaction by inductive coupling through the loop formed by the pacemaker and its leads and the surrounding medium. This interaction results in an induced electromotive force between the terminals of the pacemaker which can potentially disturb the operation of this last. In this article we present experimental results, analytical calculations and numerical simulations using the finite element method. PMID:18003302

  10. Investigation of defect-induced abnormal body current in fin field-effect-transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kuan-Ju; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Liu, Xi-Wen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Ching-En; Yang, Ren-Ya; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung

    2015-08-24

    This letter investigates the mechanism of abnormal body current at the linear region in n-channel high-k/metal gate stack fin field effect transistors. Unlike body current, which is generated by impact ionization at high drain voltages, abnormal body current was found to increase with decreasing drain voltages. Notably, the unusual body leakage only occurs in three-dimensional structure devices. Based on measurements under different operation conditions, the abnormal body current can be attributed to fin surface defect-induced leakage current, and the mechanism is electron tunneling to the fin via the defects, resulting in holes left at the body terminal.

  11. Investigation of Molecular Exchange Using DEXSY with Ultra-High Pulsed Field Gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Gratz, Marcel; Galvosas, Petrik

    2008-12-05

    Diffusion exchange spectroscopy has been employed for the investigation of water exchange between different regions of a cosmetic lotion as well as for the exchange of n-pentane between the inter- and intra-crystalline space in zeolite NaX. We successfully combined this two-dimensional (2D) NMR experiment with methods for the application of ultra-high pulsed field gradients of up to 35 T/m, resulting in observation times and mixing times as short as 2 ms and 2.8 ms, respectively.

  12. Investigation of Molecular Exchange Using DEXSY with Ultra-High Pulsed Field Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratz, Marcel; Galvosas, Petrik

    2008-12-01

    Diffusion exchange spectroscopy has been employed for the investigation of water exchange between different regions of a cosmetic lotion as well as for the exchange of n-pentane between the inter- and intra-crystalline space in zeolite NaX. We successfully combined this two-dimensional (2D) NMR experiment with methods for the application of ultra-high pulsed field gradients of up to 35 T/m, resulting in observation times and mixing times as short as 2 ms and 2.8 ms, respectively.

  13. Field Investigation Plan for 1301-N and 1325-N FacilitiesSampling to Support Remedial Design

    SciTech Connect

    S. G. Weiss.

    1998-12-04

    This field investigation plan (FIP) provides for the sampling and analysis activities supporting the remedial design planning for the planned removal action for the 1301-N and 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities (LWDFs), which are treatment, storage,and disposal (TSD) units (cribs/trenches). The planned removalaction involves excavation, transportation, and disposal of contaminated material at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF).An engineering study (BHI 1997) was performed to develop and evaluate various options that are predominately influenced by the volume of high- and low-activity contaminated soil requiring removal. The study recommended that additional sampling be performed to supplement historical data for use in the remedial design.

  14. An investigation of magnetic field effects on plume density and temperature profiles of an applied-field MPD thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, S. Ray; Myers, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    Applied-field magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster performance is below levels required for primary propulsion missions. While MPD thruster performance has been found to increase with the magnitude of the applied-field strength, there is currently little understanding of the impact of applied-field shape on thruster performance. The results of a study in which a single applied-field thruster was operated using three solenoidal magnets with diameters of 12.7, 15.2, and 30.4-cm are presented. Thruster voltage and anode power deposition were measured for each applied field shape over a range of field strengths. Plume electron number density and temperature distributions were measured using a Langmuir probe in an effort to determine the effect of field shape on plume confinement by the diverging magnetic-field for each of the three magnetic field shapes. Results show that the dependence of the measured thruster characteristics on field shape were non-monotonic and that the field shape had a significant effect on the plume density and temperature profiles.

  15. Investigation of Fully Three-Dimensional Helical RF Field Effects on TWT Beam/Circuit Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    2000-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional (3D), time-dependent, helical traveling wave-tube (TWT) interaction model has been developed using the electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code MAFIA. The model includes a short section of helical slow-wave circuit with excitation fed by RF input/output couplers, and electron beam contained by periodic permanent magnet (PPM) focusing. All components of the model are simulated in three dimensions allowing the effects of the fully 3D helical fields on RF circuit/beam interaction to be investigated for the first time. The development of the interaction model is presented, and predicted TWT performance using 2.5D and 3D models is compared to investigate the effect of conventional approximations used in TWT analyses.

  16. Investigation of implosion dynamics and magnetic fields in 1-MA wire arrays by optical probing diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laca, P. J.; Sarkisov, G. S.

    2005-10-01

    Multiframe optical probing diagnostics were applied for the investigation of implosion dynamics and magnetic fields in z-pinch plasma of wire arrays and x-pinches at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF). Five shadow frames per shot, with a long 34-ns or short 9-ns pulse train, presents fine details of plasma evolution in the wire array. A Faraday rotation diagnostic consists of identical shadow and Faraday channels, shearing air-wedge interferometer, and schlieren channel. Evolution of the wire array z-pinch in different regimes of implosion was investigated. Fast dynamics of bubbles in plasma streams were studied in detail. A current in the plasma column of Al wire arrays and magnetic bubbles were found by the Faraday rotation diagnostic.

  17. Potent Inhibitors of Acetyltransferase Eis Overcome Kanamycin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Willby, Melisa J; Green, Keith D; Gajadeera, Chathurada S; Hou, Caixia; Tsodikov, Oleg V; Posey, James E; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2016-06-17

    A major cause of tuberculosis (TB) resistance to the aminoglycoside kanamycin (KAN) is the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) acetyltransferase Eis. Upregulation of this enzyme is responsible for inactivation of KAN through acetylation of its amino groups. A 123 000-compound high-throughput screen (HTS) yielded several small-molecule Eis inhibitors that share an isothiazole S,S-dioxide heterocyclic core. These were investigated for their structure-activity relationships. Crystal structures of Eis in complex with two potent inhibitors show that these molecules are bound in the conformationally adaptable aminoglycoside binding site of the enzyme, thereby obstructing binding of KAN for acetylation. Importantly, we demonstrate that several Eis inhibitors, when used in combination with KAN against resistant Mtb, efficiently overcome KAN resistance. This approach paves the way toward development of novel combination therapies against aminoglycoside-resistant TB. PMID:27010218

  18. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila

    1996-01-01

    compared to values obtained for the same system without electric fields. Imposing an external electric field holds the promise to improve pool boiling heat transfer in low gravity, since a phase separation force other than gravity is introduced. The goal of our research is to experimentally investigate the potential of EHD and the mechanisms responsible for EHD heat transfer enhancement in boiling in low gravity conditions.

  19. Polarization and molecular-orbital dependence of strong-field enhanced ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wei; Guo, Chunlei

    2016-04-01

    In this work we perform a polarization dependence study of enhanced ionization (EI) in diatomic molecules. We find that EI exists when the field polarization is parallel to the molecular axis but disappears when polarization is perpendicular. We further study EI with circular polarization and find that EI exists with circular polarization indicating that rescattering does not play a significant role for EI. Furthermore, we study molecular orbital effect on EI. We find that EI exists in σ type but not π type outmost molecular orbitals.

  20. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report. Volume 4, Appendixes E and F: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force`s Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions will need to be carried out at each site. The island`s drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. In addition, geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal, to be avoided during drilling activities. This report contains appendices E and F with information on the following: soil boring logs, and data validation of samples analyzed.

  1. OpenEIS. Developer Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Lutes, Robert G.; Neubauer, Casey C.; Haack, Jereme N.; Carpenter, Brandon J.; Monson, Kyle E.; Allwardt, Craig H.; Sharma, Poorva; Akyol, Bora A.

    2015-03-31

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) is supporting the development of an open-source software tool for analyzing building energy and operational data: OpenEIS (open energy information system). This tool addresses the problems of both owners of building data and developers of tools to analyze this data. Building owners and managers have data but lack the tools to analyze it while tool developers lack data in a common format to ease development of reusable data analysis tools. This document is intended for developers of applications and explains the mechanisms for building analysis applications, accessing data, and displaying data using a visualization from the included library. A brief introduction to the visualizations can be used as a jumping off point for developers familiar with JavaScript to produce their own. Several example applications are included which can be used along with this document to implement algorithms for performing energy data analysis.

  2. Experimental and computational investigation of the patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm pressure field.

    PubMed

    Antón, R; Chen, C-Y; Hung, M-Y; Finol, E A; Pekkan, K

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the present manuscript is three-fold: (i) to study the detailed pressure field inside a patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) model experimentally and numerically and discuss its clinical relevance, (ii) to validate a number of possible numerical model options and their ability to predict the experimental pressure field and (iii) to compare the spatial pressure drop in the AAA before and after the formation of intraluminal thrombus (ILT) for a late disease development timeline. A finite volume method was used to solve the governing equations of fluid flow to simulate the flow dynamics in a numerical model of the AAA. Following our patient-specific anatomical rapid prototyping technique, physical models of the aneurysm were created with seven ports for pressure measurement along the blood flow path. A flow loop operating with a blood analogue fluid was used to replicate the patient-specific flow conditions, acquired with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging, and measure pressure in the flow model. The Navier-Stokes equations and two turbulent models were implemented numerically to compare the pressure estimations with experimental measurements. The relative pressure difference from experiments obtained with the best performing model (unsteady laminar simulation) was ∼1.1% for the AAA model without ILT and ∼15.4% for the AAA model with ILT (using Reynolds Stress Model). Future investigations should include validation of the 3D velocity field and wall shear stresses within the AAA sac predicted by the three numerical models. PMID:24460046

  3. Investigating the impact of visuohaptic simulations for the conceptual understanding of electric field for distributed charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Uzma Abdul Sattar

    The present study assessed the benefits of a multisensory intervention on the conceptual understanding of electric field for distributed charges in engineering and technology undergraduate students. A novel visuohaptic intervention was proposed, which focused on exploring the forces around the different electric field configurations for distributed charges namely point, infinitely long line and uniformly charged ring. The before and after effects of the visuohaptic intervention are compared, wherein the intervention includes instructional scaffolding. Three single-group studies were conducted to investigate the effect among three different populations: (a) Undergraduate engineering students, (b) Undergraduate technology students and (c) Undergraduate engineering technology students from a different demographic setting. The findings from the three studies suggests that the haptic modality intervention provides beneficial effects by allowing students to improve their conceptual understanding of electric field for distributed charges, although students from groups (b) and (c) showed a statistically significant increase in the conceptual understanding. The findings also indicate a positive learning perception among all the three groups.

  4. Experimental and computational investigation of the NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.; Chriss, Randall M.; Wood, Jerry R.; Strazisar, Anthony J.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the NASA Lewis Research Center's low-speed centrifugal compressor (LSCC) flow field was conducted using laser anemometry and Dawes' three-dimensional viscous code. The experimental configuration consisted of a backswept impeller followed by a vaneless diffuser. Measurements of the three-dimensional velocity field were acquired at several measurement planes through the compressor. The measurements describe both the throughflow and secondary velocity field along each measurement plane. In several cases the measurements provide details of the flow within the blade boundary layers. Insight into the complex flow physics within centrifugal compressors is provided by the computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD), and assessment of the CFD predictions is provided by comparison with the measurements. Five-hole probe and hot-wire surveys at the inlet and exit to the impeller as well as surface flow visualization along the impeller blade surfaces provided independent confirmation of the laser measurement technique. The results clearly document the development of the throughflow velocity wake that is characteristic of unshrouded centrifugal compressors.

  5. Experimental Investigation on Liquid Metal Flow Distribution in Insulating Manifold under Uniform Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Masato; Ueki, Yoshitaka; Yokomine, Takehiko; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2012-11-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) problem which is caused by interaction between electrical conducting fluid flow and the magnetic field is one of the biggest problem in the liquid metal blanket of the fusion reactor. In the liquid metal blanket concept, it is necessary to distribute liquid metal flows uniformly in the manifold because imbalance of flow rates should affect the heat transfer performance directly, which leads to safety problem. While the manifold is insulated electrically as well as the flow duct, the 3D-MHD effect on the flowing liquid metal in the manifold is more apparent than that in straight duct. With reference to the flow distribution in this concept, the liquid metal flow in the electrical insulating manifold under the uniform transverse magnetic field is investigated experimentally. In this study, GaInSn is selected as working fluid. The experimental system includes the electrical magnet and the manifold test section which is made of acrylic resin for perfectly electrical insulation. The liquid metal flows in a non-symmetric 180°-turn with manifold, which consists of one upward channel and two downward channels. The flow rates in each channel are measured by electromagnetic flow meters for several combinations Reynolds number and Hartman number. The effects of magnetic field on the uniformity of flow distribution are cleared.

  6. Radioactive waste storage in mined caverns in crystalline rock: results of field investigations at Stripa, Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    1980-10-01

    It is generally agreed that the most practicable method of isolating nuclear wastes from the biosphere is by deep burial in suitable geologic formations. Such burial achieves a high degree of physical isolation but raises questions concerning the rate at which some of these wastes may return to the biosphere through transport by groundwater. Any suitable repository site will be disturbed first by excavation and second by the thermal pulse caused by the radioactive decay of the wastes. To assess the effectiveness of geologic isolation it is necessary to develop the capability of predicting the response of a rock mass to such a thermal pulse. Ultimately, this requires field measurements below the surface in media representative of those likely to be encountered at an actual repository. Access to a granitic rock mass adjacent to a defunct iron ore mine at Stripa, Sweden, at a depth of about 350 m below surface has provided a unique opportunity to conduct a comprehensive suite of hydrological and thermo-mechanical experiments under such conditions. The results of these field tests have shown the importance of geologic structure and the functional dependence of the thermo-mechanical properties on temperature in developing a valid predictive model. The results have also demonstrated the vital importance of carrying out large-scale investigations in a field test facility.

  7. Investigating Jeffery-Hamel flow with high magnetic field and nanoparticle by HPM and AGM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, A.; Akbari, M.; Ganji, D.; Heydari, S.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the effects of magnetic field and nanoparticle on the Jeffery-Hamel flow are studied using two powerful analytical methods, Homotopy Perturbation Method (HPM) and a simple and innovative approach which we have named it Akbari-Ganji's Method(AGM). Comparisons have been made between HPM, AGM and Numerical Method and the acquired results show that these methods have high accuracy for different values of α, Hartmann numbers, and Reynolds numbers. The flow field inside the divergent channel is studied for various values of Hartmann number and angle of channel. The effect of nanoparticle volume fraction in the absence of magnetic field is investigated. It is necessary to represent some of the advantages of choosing the new method, AGM, for solving nonlinear differential equations as follows: AGM is a very suitable computational process and is applicable for solving various nonlinear differential equations. Moreover, in AGM by solving a set of algebraic equations, complicated nonlinear equations can easily be solved and without any mathematical operations such as integration, the solution of the problem can be obtained very simply and easily. It is notable that this solution procedure, AGM, can help students with intermediate mathematical knowledge to solve a broad range of complicated nonlinear differential equations.

  8. Investigation of the flow field inside flat-plate collector tube using PIV technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sookdeo, Steven; Siddiqui, Kamran

    2010-06-15

    The thermofluid process inside the tube of flat-plate collectors is complex because the non-uniform heating of the tube results in the formation of stably and unstably stratified layers of fluid that interact with each other. The measurement and investigation of the flow behaviour inside the collector tube is very challenging. We report on a novel application of the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique to remotely measure the velocity field inside the collector tube. The two-dimensional velocity fields were measured in the midplane of a collector tube for the Reynolds number range of 150-900 at unheated and four different heating conditions. We have presented and discussed in detail the technique implementation and the associated challenges. The results have shown that the collector heating significantly alters the structure and magnitude of the mean velocity field and influences the heat transfer to the fluid. It is observed that the collector heating causes a significant asymmetry in the mean velocity profiles over the given range of Reynolds numbers and heating conditions. (author)

  9. Insights into reductive dechlorination of triclocarban in river sediments: Field measurements and in vitro mechanism investigations.

    PubMed

    Souchier, Marine; Casellas, Claude; Ingrand, Valérie; Chiron, Serge

    2016-02-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) reductive dechlorination was investigated using a combination of field and laboratory experiments. Field monitoring revealed that TCC reductive dechlorination in river sediments leads to formation of two isomers of its lesser chlorinated congener namely 3,4'-dichlorocarbanilide and 4,4'-dichlorocarbanilide. Monochlorocarbanilide was not detected in sediments supporting that transformation of dichlorocarbanilide into monochlorocarbanilide is the rate limiting step of TCC dechlorination. In vitro experiments were conducted to study TCC potential reductive dechlorination mechanisms. These experiments demonstrated that 4,4'-dichlorocarbanilide was specifically formed upon a nucleophilic addition reaction under anaerobic conditions. The 3,4'-diclorocarbanilide was formed upon a two steps radical mechanism under aerobic conditions which includes TCC activation by one electron oxidation followed by a nucleophilic substitution reaction with glutathione. In vitro results suggested that strict anaerobic conditions might not be required for TCC reductive dechlorination in the environment. Moreover, in vitro reactions were performed using biomimetic or enzymatic systems supposing that TCC dechlorination might occur through microbial action in situ. Measured dichlorocarbanilide isomers/triclocarban ratios were used to evaluate the relative significance of both dechlorination pathways and the pathway leading to 3,4'-dichlorocarbanilide was found significant in all investigated river sediment samples. PMID:26386432

  10. Investigation of Efficiency in Applied Field MagnetoPlasmaDynamic Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Dan

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the scaling of thrust efficiency with the operational parameters (J,B,m˙) of applied-field magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters (AF-MPDTs) is carried out to provide guidelines for scaling and controlling AF-MDPT performance. This investigation is based on characterization of the various power dissipation mechanisms in AF-MPDTs with a focus on the acceleration and anode sheath power components. A semi-empirical model is derived for the anode sheath voltage fall in AF-MPDTs and verified by comparison to experimental data on a 30~kW lithium-fed steady-state AF-MPDT obtained using a hot langmuir probe. It is found that the anode sheath voltage fall increases approximately linearly with current and applied magnetic field and is inversely proportional to mass flow rate. It is shown that, although the electrons in the anode sheath are unmagnetized the voltage fall is attributed to plasma density reduction at the sheath edge, which is a result of increased plasma pinching at higher applied magnetic field values. It is also concluded that increased thermionic emission from the anode surface leads to an increase in the anode sheath voltage fall; therefore anode material with a high work function is preferred. A thrust efficiency model is formulated by employing a thrust formula previously derived and verified for the same thruster, and composing expressions for the different voltage components in AF-MPDTs. It is demonstrated that the efficiency increases with applied magnetic field for all current and mass flow rate values, and the enhancement of the efficiency by the applied magnetic field is greater when the mass flow rate is reduced. It is shown that the efficiency-current curves have a decreasing-increasing behavior due to an interchange between the different thrust components, each of which dominates in a different current regime and thus affects the scalability of the acceleration power component with current. It is

  11. Theoretical investigation of hyperfine fields in fluoromethanes and transition metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Gowri

    Ab-initio Hartree-Fock Cluster procedure has been used to study Nuclear Quadrupole Interaction effects in molecular solid systems and Magnetic Hyperfine properties in antiferromagnetic transition metal oxides. Using the molecular orbital wave functions obtained from the Hartree-Fock calculations, the nuclear quadrupole interaction parameters, namely, the asymmetry parameter and quadrupole coupling constants are calculated at the fluorine site in CHsb{4-n}Fsb{n} (n = 1,2,3) and CHClFsb2 molecules. In addition to these molecules, the possibility of complexing of HF* molecule to these host molecules is also investigated. This complex formation is found to give rise to a second frequency at the fluorine site arising from the fluorine atom of the HF* hydrogen bonded to the host molecule. All of these results agree well with those from Time Dependent Perturbed Angular Distribution measurements of quadrupole interactions at the fluorine site in these systems. Theoretical investigations have also been carried out for the transition metal oxides NiO and MnO in antiferromagnetic state. The location of the muon in the two oxides and the associated electronic structure and muon hyperfine properties have been investigated. Eight equilibrium positions for the muon are found around each oxygen ion in the crystal, of which two are found to have substantially stronger stability than the other six. Direct and exchange contributions to the contact and dipolar hyperfine fields from within the cluster and dipolar fields from outside, are evaluated for each of the equilibrium locations of the muon and are shown to lead to three sets of hyperfine fields. The nature of the potential experienced by the muon as it travels between the equilibrium sites is studied to understand its dynamics inside the solid. The rates of hopping between each of the two equivalent most stable sites, where the muon most strongly trapped, and the other six sites are studied. In each case, the combination of

  12. An investigation into field effects of consciousness from the perspectives of Maharishi's Vedic Science and physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinschnitz, Kurt Warren

    1997-05-01

    A long-range field effect of consciousness has been reported repeatedly in the scientific literature over the past twenty years. This phenomenon is called the Maharishi Effect, after Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, the first to predict it. The Maharishi Effect is the phenomenon of improved societal trends resulting from the practice of the Transcendental Meditationoler program or group practice of the TM-Sidhioler program by a small fraction of a population. The Maharishi Effect is fundamentally a phenomenon of radiation of evolutionary influence arising from the enlivenment of pure consciousness, the unified field of natural law, in the perspective of Maharishi's Vedic Science. This perspective is corroborated by forty-three published or presented papers reporting on results of Maharishi Effect interventions world-wide at city, national, international, and global scales. Present day standard- model physics and physiology do not account for the outcomes of the research on the Maharishi Effect. Because the observed societal impact of the Maharishi Effect influence must be based in an impact on the individual, and investigators report detection of the effect in individual physiological measurements, a simple robust indicator for the effect might aid physiologists and physicists in the effort to extend their sciences to include such field effects of consciousness. Thus, this dissertation reports on two experiments investigating simple, robust, objective indicators for the effect. The dissertation concludes on a practical note with a description of the promise, available through concerted utilization of the knowledge and technologies of consciousness in Maharishi's Vedic Science, for enhanced national and global security in the face of unprecedented nuclear, biological, and genetic threats for which the modern sciences offer few sensible solutions. ftnolerTranscendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi are service marks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office

  13. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila

    1999-01-01

    In boiling high heat fluxes are possible driven by relatively small temperature differences, which make its use increasingly attractive in aerospace applications. The objective of the research is to develop ways to overcome specific problems associated with boiling in the low gravity environment by substituting the buoyancy force with the electric force to enhance bubble removal from the heated surface. Previous studies indicate that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50, as compared to values obtained for the same system without electric fields. The goal of our research is to experimentally explore the mechanisms responsible for EHD heat transfer enhancement in boiling in low gravity conditions, by visualizing the temperature distributions in the vicinity of the heated surface and around the bubble during boiling using real-time holographic interferometry (HI) combined with high-speed cinematography. In the first phase of the project the influence of the electric field on a single bubble is investigated. Pool boiling is simulated by injecting a single bubble through a nozzle into the subcooled liquid or into the thermal boundary layer developed along the flat heater surface. Since the exact location of bubble formation is known, the optical equipment can be aligned and focused accurately, which is an essential requirement for precision measurements of bubble shape, size and deformation, as well as the visualization of temperature fields by HI. The size of the bubble and the frequency of bubble departure can be controlled by suitable selection of nozzle diameter and mass flow rate of vapor. In this approach effects due to the presence of the electric field can be separated from effects caused by the temperature gradients in the thermal boundary layer. The influence of the thermal boundary layer can be investigated after activating the heater at a later stage of the research. For the visualization experiments a

  14. Experimental investigation of mechanisms of mid-latitude ionosphere and geophysical fields perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, Boris; Zetzer, Julius; Egorov, Dmitry

    The investigations are carried out to study mechanisms and channels of the mid-latitude ionosphere, near-Earth electric field and current perturbations, and their connection to high-latitude and magnetospheric events. The basis of these investigations is a measurement of the geophysical fields in the Geophysical Observatory Mikhnevo (54.9 N, 37,8 E) of the Institute of Geospheres Dynamics RAS situated at 80 km to the south from Moscow. The observatory includes a set of measuring complexes for radiophysics, magnetic, electrical, optic, infrasound, seismic, and other investigations. All of them are controlled by the united computer centre in the common scale of time. Our approach bases on well known conception that the main reasons of the mid-latitude perturbations are the processes in the auroral regions. But auroral phenomena impact on mid-latitudes by means of different physical mechanisms and agents of disturbances. Fortunately, they differ from each other in the time of their generation and velocities of their propagation. For example, the typical velocity of propagation of thermosphere winds is about 100 m/s, the acoustic gravity wave propagate with a velocity of about 400 m/s, and a prompt penetration of the magnetospheric electric field affects the mid-latitude practically instantly. If we can determine a time lag between the action of the perturbation source and mid-latitude ionosphere response, we can determine the velocity of perturbation propagation and recognize the dominating mechanisms and channels of disturbances. The important requirements for the organization of such investigation is a positioning of different measuring facilities in one place and organization of coordinated and synchronous registration of the ionosphere parameters and geophysical fields variations with high temporal resolution. The Mikhnevo observatory gives us such ability. As an indicator and marker of high latitude events (magnetic storms and substorms) we use AE-index. The

  15. Field Demonstration of Slim-hole Borehole Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Logging Tool for Groundwater Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, D.; Turner, P.; Frid, I.; Shelby, R.; Grunewald, E. D.; Magnuson, E.; Butler, J. J.; Johnson, C. D.; Cannia, J. C.; Woodward, D. A.; Williams, K. H.; Lane, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods provide estimates of free and bound water content and hydraulic conductivity, which are critically important for groundwater investigations. Borehole NMR tools have been available and widely used in the oil industry for decades, but only recently have been designed for small diameter boreholes typical of groundwater investigations. Field tests of an 89-mm-diameter borehole NMR logging tool are presented. This borehole NMR logging tool was developed for economical NMR logging of 100- to 200-mm-diameter boreholes, and specifically for characterizing hydraulic properties in the top 200 m of the subsurface. The tool has a vertical resolution of 0.5 m, a minimum echo spacing of 2.0 ms, and a radial depth of investigation of 178 to 203 mm, which typically is beyond the annulus of observation wells. It takes about 15 minutes to collect a data sample for each 0.5-m interval. The borehole NMR logging tool was field tested during spring 2010, in PVC-cased wells at sites in East Haddam and Storrs, Connecticut; Cape Cod, Massachusetts; Lexington, Nebraska; Lawrence, Kansas; and Rifle, Colorado. NMR logging yielded estimates of bound water, free water, and total-water content, as well as continuous distributions of water content versus transverse relaxation time (T2) at all depth levels. The derived water-content data were compared to the available ground-truth hydrogeologic data from each well, including drilling logs, neutron and other geophysical logs, and direct measurements of hydraulic conductivity. The results indicate that the borehole NMR logging tool provides information on porosity, pore-size distribution, and estimated hydraulic conductivity that cannot be duplicated by any other single geophysical logging tool.

  16. Hydraulic characterization of rocky subsurface using field infiltrometer measurements coupled with hydrogeophysical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, M. C.; de Carlo, L.; de Benedictis, F.; Vurro, M.

    2009-04-01

    The shallow and/or karstic and fractured aquifers are among the most important water resources. At the same time, they are particularly vulnerable to contamination. A detailed scientific knowledge of the behavior of these aquifers is essential for the development of sustainable groundwater management. Different investigation methods have been developed with the aim to characterize the subsurface and to monitor the flow and solute transport in these hydrogeology systems. This study presents the results of an investigation method, that combine large infiltrometer measurements with elettrical resistivity profiles, carried out in two different experimental sites characterized by different hydrogeology systems. One site, close to Altamura a city in the South of Italy, is represented from karstic and fractured limestone that overlays the deep aquifer. This area has been affected by sludge waste deposits derived from municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants. The second site, close to San Pancrazio Salentino town in Southern Italy also, is represented from a quarry of calcarenite that has been used as a dump of sludge of mycelium producted from pharmaceutical industry. In both these cases the waste disposal have caused soil-subsoil contamination. Knowledge of the flow rate of the unsaturated zone percolation is needed to investigate the vertical migration of pollutants and the vulnerability of the aquifers. In this study, subsurface electrical resistivity measurements were used to visualize the infiltration of water in the subsoil due to unsaturated water flow. Simultaneously, the vertical flow was investigated by measuring water levels during infiltrometer tests carried out using a large adjustable ring infiltrometer, designed to be installed in the field directly on the outcrop of rock. In addition electrical resistivity azimuthal surveys have been conducted to detect principal fractures strike directions that cause preferential flow. The results obtained

  17. Source evaluation report phase 2 investigation: Limited field investigation. Final report: United States Air Force Environmental Restoration Program, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the limited field investigation work done to address issues and answer unresolved questions regarding a collection of potential contaminant sources at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), near Fairbanks, Alaska. These sources were listed in the Eielson AFB Federal Facility Agreement supporting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of the base. The limited field investigation began in 1993 to resolve all remaining technical issues and provide the data and analysis required to evaluate the environmental hazard associated with these sites. The objective of the limited field investigation was to allow the remedial project managers to sort each site into one of three categories: requiring remedial investigation/feasibility study, requiring interim removal action, or requiring no further remedial action.

  18. 100-FR-3 groundwater/soil gas supplemental limited field investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    In 1993, a Limited Field Investigation (LFI) was conducted for the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit which identified trichloroethylene (TCE) as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) (DOE-RL 1994). In groundwater samples collected for the LFI, TCE was detected in well 199-177-1 at a concentration exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (5 {mu}g/L) and Washington State groundwater criteria (3 {mu}g/L). With the concurrence of the EPA and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), a supplemental LFI was conducted to determine the extent and potential source of TCE groundwater contamination associated with the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. This report summarizes the activities and results of the groundwater/soil gas supplemental LFI for the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. The primary objective of this investigation was to assess the lateral distribution of TCE in shallow (3 to 5 ft below the water table) groundwater associated with the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. The second objective was to assess soil gas (3 to 5 concentrations in the study area in an attempt to identify potential sources of TCE and develop a correlation between soil gas and groundwater concentrations). Finally, the third objective of the investigation was to refine the site conceptual model.

  19. The Impact of Engineering Integrated Science (EIS) Curricula on First-Year Technical High School Students' Attitudes toward Science and Perceptions of Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nam, Younkyeong; Lee, Sun-Ju; Paik, Seoung-Hey

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated how engineering integrated science (EIS) curricula affect first-year technical high school students' attitudes toward science and perceptions of engineering. The effect of the EIS participation period on students' attitudes toward science was also investigated via experimental study design. Two engineering integrated…

  20. Investigation into the Horizontal Spatial Variability of Dew at Field-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowlandson, T. L.; Hornbuckle, B. K.; Patton, J.; Russell, E.; Seier, K.; Spoth, K.

    2009-12-01

    The occurrence of free moisture on a crop canopy, whether in the form of intercepted precipitation or dew, has implications for both plant disease development and sensing of soil moisture by microwave remote sensing. In agriculture, the duration of leaf wetness can impact disease development, and with microwave remote sensing, free water on the canopy can influence the detection of soil moisture by increasing or decreasing the measured brightness temperature, depending on the canopy being investigated. Research has been conducted on the variability of dew vertically within a crop canopy; however the horizontal spatial variability of dew at the field scale had not yet been examined. We conducted a study in a maize field during the growing season of 2009 to investigate variations in dew duration and amount at 4 locations in a 1km2 with varying topography and soil characteristics. At each of the four sites, two leaf wetness sensors were installed at both 1/3- and 2/3-canopy height, providing insight into variations in dew duration between the four locations. Above canopy temperature and relative humidity were measured, in addition to in-canopy temperature and relative humidity, measured at half-canopy height. Soil moisture was measured continuously at each of the four locations. Physical samples were taken 11 times during the months of July and August, 2009. Sampling began at sunrise, and was conducted 3 times at each measurement location at both 1/3- and 2/3-canopy height. In addition to samples taken at sunrise, on three occasions, samples were taken at sunset, 11pm and 3am in order to monitor the progression of dew development. A sample at three of the locations occurred at the end of August to determine how dew varies at each location by taking simultaneous measurements. Leaf area index (LAI) was measured throughout the growing season at 1/3- and 2/3-canopy height at each measurement location. This information was utilized to investigate how dew measurements taken

  1. A phase-field investigation of domain structures in ferroelectric bismuth ferrite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, Benjamin

    The ferroelectric domain structure of multiferroic BiFeO3 thin films are strongly affected by the electrical boundary conditions. We employ a Ginzburg-Landau- Devonshire phase-field model to investigate the effects of the electrical boundary conditions on domain structure in BiFeO3 thin films. We examine the domain structure under short-circuit and under open-circuit boundary conditions with varying levels of compensation. As the degree of compensation changes, we find a smooth transition between the two types of domain structure. In the open-circuit case, we note small triangular nanodomains at the surface/wall interfaces that may be useful in nanoelectronic applications. The ferroelectric domain structures of epitaxial BiFeO3 thin films on miscut substrates were studied using a phase-field model. The effects of substrate vicinality towards are considered by assuming charge-compensated surface and film/substrate interface. The predicted domain structures show remarkable agreement with existing experimental observations, including domain wall orientations and local topological domain configurations. The roles of elastic, electric, and gradient energies on the domain structures were analyzed. It is shown that the substrate strain anisotropy due to the miscut largely determines the domain variant selection and domain configurations. We employ phase-field modeling to explore the elastic properties of artificiallycreated 1-D domain walls in (001)p-oriented BiFeO3 thin films. The walls are composed of a junction of the four polarization variants, all with the same out-of-plane polarization: a "vortex" is comprised of polarization variants rotating around the junction, and an "anti-vortex" is comprised of two polarization variants pointing towards the junction and two pointing away. It was found that these junctions exhibit peculiarly high electroelastic fields induced by the neighboring ferroelastic/ferroelectric domains. These fields may contribute to the segregation

  2. Development and application of color schlieren technique for investigation of three-dimensional concentration field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Atul

    2013-11-01

    The present work describes the development and application of rainbow schlieren deflectometry technique for the investigation of the three-dimensional concentration field around a crystal growing from its aqueous solution. The imaging technique employs a diverging beam of light to record the projection data of the concentration field. In contrast to the conventional schlieren methods, the present system makes use of a microscopic objective lens to act as the de-collimating lens for focusing the light beam onto the color filter to get the desired schlieren effect. In order to record the projection data of the concentration field from different view angles for tomographic reconstruction, the experiments are conducted in an octagonal growth cell. Detailed quantitative analysis of the schlieren images has then been carried out for each view angle to determine the path-integrated concentration distribution. Principles of tomography have been employed for the reconstruction of concentration field at select horizontal planes above the growing crystal. Results have been presented in the form of rainbow schlieren images of the convective field, path-averaged solute concentration distribution around the growing for each view angle and local concentration distribution at select horizontal planes above the crystal top surface. Recorded color schlieren images have been compared with those of the conventional monochrome schlieren and interferometric techniques for the same experimental conditions. The extent of color re-distribution as seen from the recorded rainbow schlieren images correlate well with the bright intensity regions of monochrome schlieren images and the extent of fringe deformation in the interferometric images. The comparison has been performed for a small as well as a comparatively larger-sized crystal. For small sized-crystal, the observed color redistribution is seen to be weak and restricted to the crystal vicinity only whereas the color changes are more

  3. Multithermal Analysis of EIS Coronal Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Brian T.; Schmelz, J. T.; Pathak, S.

    2012-05-01

    Four separate active regions containing multiple coronal loops were selected for Differential Emission Measure (DEM) analysis from Hinode Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) data. Each loop was chosen based on its location and our ability to find a clean nearby area for background subtraction. Our analysis uses iron lines with ionization stages from Fe VIII to Fe XVI in the wavelength ranges 170 - 210 and 250 - 290 A. The twelve selected loops were then analyzed to determine if their cross-field temperature was isothermal or multithermal. This was accomplished by averaging the intensities of ten individual pixels along the length of each loop and subtracting the average intensity of ten nearby background pixels. We then used these background-subtracted values, the density from a density-sensitive line ratio, and the atomic data from the CHIANTI database to create a DEM curve for each loop. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NSF ATM-0402729 as well as a Hinode subcontract from NASA/SAO.

  4. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Benioff, P.; Biang, R.; Dolak, D.; Dunn, C.; Haffenden, R.; Martino, L.; Patton, T.; Wang, Y.; Yuen, C.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of an RI/FS is to characterize the nature and extent of the risks posed by contaminants present at a site and to develop and evaluate options for remedial actions. The overall objective of the RI is to provide a comprehensive evaluation of site conditions, types and quantities of contaminants present, release mechanisms and migration pathways, target populations, and risks to human health and the environment. The information developed during the RI provides the basis for the design and implementation of remedial actions during the FS. The purpose of this RI Work Plan is to define the tasks that will direct the remedial investigation of the J-Field site at APG.

  5. Investigation of an Optimum Detection Scheme for a Star-Field Mapping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldridge, M. D.; Credeur, L.

    1970-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine the optimum detection scheme for a star-field mapping system that uses coded detection resulting from starlight shining through specially arranged multiple slits of a reticle. The computer solution of equations derived from a theoretical model showed that the greatest probability of detection for a given star and background intensity occurred with the use of a single transparent slit. However, use of multiple slits improved the system's ability to reject the detection of undesirable lower intensity stars, but only by decreasing the probability of detection for lower intensity stars to be mapped. Also, it was found that the coding arrangement affected the root-mean-square star-position error and that detection is possible with error in the system's detected spin rate, though at a reduced probability.

  6. Investigation of pulsed field deletions at the chromosome 16 TSC2 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Brook-Carter, P.T.; Thompson, P.; Nellist, M.

    1994-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis loci map at 9q34 near to the Abelson oncogene, and at 16p13.3 in the candidate region for type 1 adult polycystic kidney disease (PKD1). Five TSC-associated pulsed field deletions were found in the gene-rich PKD1 candidate region at 16p13.3, leading to the cloning and characterization of the TSC2 gene. One deletion detected in a TSC patient with polycystic kidneys (WS-53) also involved a gene proximal and adjacent to the TSC2 gene. This gene has now been shown to be the causative gene in type 1 adult polycystic kidney disease. Polycystic reneal disease is well recognized in association with TSC. We are therefore investigating other TSC patients with this complication to determine whether mutations affecting both the TSC2 and PKD1 genes account for this phenotypic variant of TSC.

  7. Small estuarine fishes feed on large trematode cercariae: Lab and field investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaplan, A.T.; Rebhal, S.; Lafferty, K.D.; Kuris, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, dense populations of snails can shed millions of digenean trematode cercariae every day. These short-lived, free-living larvae are rich in energy and present a potential resource for consumers. We investigated whether estuarine fishes eat cercariae shed by trematodes of the estuarine snail Cerithidea californica. In aquaria we presented cercariae from 10 native trematode species to 6 species of native estuarine fishes. Many of these fishes readily engorged on cercariae. To determine if fishes ate cercariae in the field, we collected the most common fish species, Fundulus parvipinnis (California killifish), from shallow water on rising tides when snails shed cercariae. Of 61 killifish, 3 had recognizable cercariae in their gut. Because cercariae are common in this estuary, they could be frequent sources of energy for small fishes. In turn, predation on cercariae by fishes (and other predators) could also reduce the transmission success of trematodes. ?? 2009 American Society of Parasitologists.

  8. Theoretical Investigation of Graphene Nanoribbon Field-Effect Transistors Designed for Digital Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Naoki; Sato, Shintaro; Yokoyama, Naoki

    2013-09-01

    Nanometer-scale, single-gate graphene nanoribbon Schottky barrier field-effect transistors (FETs) were theoretically investigated using self-consistent atomistic simulation. The device geometry was determined by referring to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. The target performance levels were the requirements specified in the roadmap for 2024, particularly a maximum leakage current of 0.1 A/m, an on-current of 2017 A/m, and a delay time of 0.13 ps. The device conditions needed to meet these requirements were found to be a bandgap larger than 1.1 eV, a supply voltage of 0.6 V, and a gate length of 7 nm.

  9. Investigation of drift effect on silicon nanowire field effect transistor based pH sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sihyun; Kwon, Dae Woong; Lee, Ryoongbin; Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Byung-Gook

    2016-06-01

    It is widely accepted that the operation mechanism of pH-sensitive ion sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET) can be divided into three categories; reaction of surface sites, chemical modification of insulator surface, and ionic diffusion into the bulk of insulator. The first mechanism is considered as the main operation mechanism of pH sensors due to fast response, while the others with relatively slow responses disturb accurate pH detection. In this study, the slow responses (often called drift effects) are investigated in silicon nanowire (SiNW) pH-sensitive ISFETs. Based on the dependence on the channel type of SiNW, liquid gate bias, and pH, it is clearly revealed that the drift of n-type SiNW results from H+ diffusion into the insulator whereas that of p-type SiNW is caused by chemical modification (hydration) of the insulator.

  10. Qualitative investigation of fresh human scalp hair with full-field optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woo June; Pi, Long-Quan; Min, Gihyeon; Lee, Won-Soo; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2012-03-01

    We have investigated depth-resolved cellular structures of unmodified fresh human scalp hairs with ultrahigh-resolution full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT). The Linnik-type white light interference microscope has been home-implemented to observe the micro-internal layers of human hairs in their natural environment. In hair shafts, FF-OCT has qualitatively revealed the cellular hair compartments of cuticle and cortex layers involved in keratin filaments and melanin granules. No significant difference between black and white hair shafts was observed except for absence of only the melanin granules in the white hair, reflecting that the density of the melanin granules directly affects the hair color. Anatomical description of plucked hair bulbs was also obtained with the FF-OCT in three-dimensions. We expect this approach will be useful for evaluating cellular alteration of natural hairs on cosmetic assessment or diagnosis of hair diseases.

  11. Rapid arsenite oxidation by Thermus aquaticus and Thermus thermophilus: Field and laboratory investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gihring, T.M.; Druschel, G.K.; McCleskey, R.B.; Hamers, R.J.; Banfield, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    Thermus aquaticus and Thermus thermophilus, common inhabitants of terrestrial hot springs and thermally polluted domestic and industrial waters, have been found to rapidly oxidize arsenite to arsenate. Field investigations at a hot spring in Yellowstone National Park revealed conserved total arsenic transport and rapid arsenite oxidation occurring within the drainage channel. This environment was heavily colonized by Thermus aquaticus. In laboratory experiments, arsenite oxidation by cultures of Thermus aquaticus YT1 (previously isolated from Yellowstone National Park) and Thermus thermophilus HB8 was accelerated by a factor of over 100 relative to abiotic controls. Thermus aquaticus and Thermus thermophilus may therefore play a large and previously unrecognized role in determining arsenic speciation and bioavailability in thermal environments.

  12. Toward scalable information processing with ultracold polar molecules in an electric field: A numerical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Bomble, Laeetitia; Pellegrini, Philippe; Ghesquiere, Pierre; Desouter-Lecomte, Michele

    2010-12-15

    We numerically investigate the possibilities of driving quantum algorithms with laser pulses in a register of ultracold NaCs polar molecules in a static electric field. We focus on the possibilities of performing scalable logical operations by considering circuits that involve intermolecular gates (implemented on adjacent interacting molecules) to enable the transfer of information from one molecule to another during conditional laser-driven population inversions. We study the implementation of an arithmetic operation (the addition of 0 or 1 on a binary digit and a carry in) which requires population inversions only and the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm which requires a control of the phases. Under typical experimental conditions, our simulations show that high-fidelity logical operations involving several qubits can be performed in a time scale of a few hundreds of microseconds, opening promising perspectives for the manipulation of a large number of qubits in these systems.

  13. NMR investigation of field-induced magnetic order in barium manganese oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Steve

    the triangular Mn5+ magnetic lattice of Ba3Mn2O8 coupled with interdimer interaction is predicted to result in incommensurate spin structure when the symmetry axis of Ba3Mn2O8 is aligned parallel to the field. Because of single ion anisotropy of the system, Ba3Mn 2O8 has phase diagram that depends on its alignment with respect to the external field[5]. This means that the microscopic spin structure is different depending on whether the material's symmetry axis is aligned parallel or perpendicular to the field. Also, since we are dealing with S = 1, we have potential to investigate spin-gap closure due to singlet and triplet states as well as triplet and quintet states if we are able to access high enough fields (15T to 30T). Measurements at National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), gives us a superficial taste of what it is like to be in the phase created by triplet and quintet gap closure. The temperature range allowed by the Oxford dilution refrigerator system at Brown Lab, UCLA is from 1K down to 30mK. The magnetic field range allowed by the superconducting magnet at Brown Lab, UCLA is from 0T up to 12T. This combination of temperature and field range allows us to investigate the first quantum critical point (Hc1) in detail with various NMR measurements. Normal state frequency shift as a function of temperature near Hc1 reveals behavior consistent with dilute hardcore bose gas. Analysis of the lineshapes of NMR spectra going into spin order BEC phase as a function of field, we directly observe incommensurate nature of spin order and deduce development of order parameter consistent with mean-field theory. Finally, we verify that the language of dilute 3D Bosons also applies to Ba3Mn2O8 through T1 measurements. From critical behavior inferred in T1 measurements, we complete phase boundary diagram at low temperatures and apply general concept of softening in Goldstone mode near Hc1 to describe our T 1 dependence as a function of temperature.

  14. Metabolic Investigation in Gluconacetobacter xylinus and Its Bacterial Cellulose Production under a Direct Current Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Liu, Miao; Zhong, Cheng; Zhang, Yu Ming; Xu, Ze Ming; Qiao, Chang Sheng; Jia, Shi Ru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of a direct current (DC) electric field on the growth and metabolism of Gluconacetobacter xylinus were investigated in static culture. When a DC electric field at 10 mA was applied using platinum electrodes to the culture broth, bacterial cellulose (BC) production was promoted in 12 h but was inhibited in the last 12 h as compared to the control (without DC electric field). At the cathode, the presence of the hydrogen generated a strong reductive environment that is beneficial to cell growth. As compared to the control, the activities of glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle, as well as BC productivity were observed to be slightly higher in the first 12 h. However, due to the absence of sufficient oxygen, lactic acid was accumulated from pyruvic acid at 18 h, which was not in favor of BC production. At the anode, DC inhibited cell growth in 6 h when compared to the control. The metabolic activity in G. xylinus was inhibited through the suppression of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis. At 18-24 h, cell density was observed to decrease, which might be due to the electrolysis of water that significantly dropped the pH of cultural broth far beyond the optimal range. Meanwhile, metabolites for self-protection were accumulated, for instance proline, glutamic acid, gluconic acid, and fatty acids. Notably, the accumulation of gluconic acid and lactic acid made it a really tough acid stress to cells at the anode and finally led to depression of cell growth. PMID:27014248

  15. Metabolic Investigation in Gluconacetobacter xylinus and Its Bacterial Cellulose Production under a Direct Current Electric Field

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Zhong, Cheng; Zhang, Yu Ming; Xu, Ze Ming; Qiao, Chang Sheng; Jia, Shi Ru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of a direct current (DC) electric field on the growth and metabolism of Gluconacetobacter xylinus were investigated in static culture. When a DC electric field at 10 mA was applied using platinum electrodes to the culture broth, bacterial cellulose (BC) production was promoted in 12 h but was inhibited in the last 12 h as compared to the control (without DC electric field). At the cathode, the presence of the hydrogen generated a strong reductive environment that is beneficial to cell growth. As compared to the control, the activities of glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle, as well as BC productivity were observed to be slightly higher in the first 12 h. However, due to the absence of sufficient oxygen, lactic acid was accumulated from pyruvic acid at 18 h, which was not in favor of BC production. At the anode, DC inhibited cell growth in 6 h when compared to the control. The metabolic activity in G. xylinus was inhibited through the suppression of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glycolysis. At 18–24 h, cell density was observed to decrease, which might be due to the electrolysis of water that significantly dropped the pH of cultural broth far beyond the optimal range. Meanwhile, metabolites for self-protection were accumulated, for instance proline, glutamic acid, gluconic acid, and fatty acids. Notably, the accumulation of gluconic acid and lactic acid made it a really tough acid stress to cells at the anode and finally led to depression of cell growth. PMID:27014248

  16. PIXELS: Using field-based learning to investigate students' concepts of pixels and sense of scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, A.; Tinigin, L.; Petcovic, H. L.; Ormand, C. J.; LaDue, N.

    2015-12-01

    Empirical work over the past decade supports the notion that a high level of spatial thinking skill is critical to success in the geosciences. Spatial thinking incorporates a host of sub-skills such as mentally rotating an object, imagining the inside of a 3D object based on outside patterns, unfolding a landscape, and disembedding critical patterns from background noise. In this study, we focus on sense of scale, which refers to how an individual quantified space, and is thought to develop through kinesthetic experiences. Remote sensing data are increasingly being used for wide-reaching and high impact research. A sense of scale is critical to many areas of the geosciences, including understanding and interpreting remotely sensed imagery. In this exploratory study, students (N=17) attending the Juneau Icefield Research Program participated in a 3-hour exercise designed to study how a field-based activity might impact their sense of scale and their conceptions of pixels in remotely sensed imagery. Prior to the activity, students had an introductory remote sensing lecture and completed the Sense of Scale inventory. Students walked and/or skied the perimeter of several pixel types, including a 1 m square (representing a WorldView sensor's pixel), a 30 m square (a Landsat pixel) and a 500 m square (a MODIS pixel). The group took reflectance measurements using a field radiometer as they physically traced out the pixel. The exercise was repeated in two different areas, one with homogenous reflectance, and another with heterogeneous reflectance. After the exercise, students again completed the Sense of Scale instrument and a demographic survey. This presentation will share the effects and efficacy of the field-based intervention to teach remote sensing concepts and to investigate potential relationships between students' concepts of pixels and sense of scale.

  17. Investigation on critical breakdown electric field of hot carbon dioxide for gas circuit breaker applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; Rong, Mingzhe; Wu, Yi; Chen, Zhexin; Yang, Fei; Murphy, Anthony B.; Zhang, Hantian

    2015-02-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) gas is widely used in high-voltage circuit breakers, but due to its high global warming potential, substitutes are being sought. CO2 has been investigated as a candidate based on its arc interruption performance. The hot gas in the circuit breaker after current zero, with a complicated species composition caused by the dissociation and many other reactions, will lead to the electrical breakdown, which is one of the major concerns in assessing the arc interruption performance. Despite this, little research has been reported on the dielectric strength of hot CO2. In this paper, the dielectric properties of hot CO2 related to the dielectric recovery phase of the circuit breaker were investigated in the temperature range from 300 to 4000 K and in the pressure range from 0.01 to 1.0 MPa. Under the assumptions of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and local chemical equilibrium (LCE), the equilibrium compositions of hot CO2 were obtained based on Gibbs free energy minimization. The cross sections for interactions between electrons and the species are presented. The critical reduced electric field strength of CO2 was determined by balancing electron generation and loss. These were evaluated using the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) derived from the two-term Boltzmann transport equation. The result indicates that unlike SF6 or air, in hot CO2 the reduced critical electric field strength does not change monotonically with increasing heavy-particle temperature from 300 to 4000 K. CO2 has a superior dielectric strength to pure SF6 above 2500 K at 0.5 MPa, which means it has the potential to improve the interruption performance of the circuit breakers, while reducing the global warming effect. Good agreement was found with published experimental results and calculations for CO2 at room temperature, and with previous calculations for hot CO2.

  18. Limited field investigation report for the 100-HR-3 operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) was conducted to assess the applicability of interim remedial measures (IRM) for reducing human health and environmental risks within the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit. The 100-HR-3 Operable Unit is comprised of three subareas; the 100 D Area, the 100 H Area and those portions of the 600 Area between the two reactor areas. The operable unit is one of seven operable units associated with the 100 D and H Areas. Operable units 100-DR-1, 100-DR-2, 100-DR-3, 100-HR-1, 100-HR-2 and 100-IU-4 address contaminant sources while 100-HR-3 addresses contamination present in the underlying groundwater. The primary method of field investigation used during this LFI was the installation and sampling of monitoring wells. Samples were collected from the groundwater and soils, and submitted for laboratory analysis. Boreholes were surveyed for radiological contamination using downhole geophysical techniques to further delineate the locations and levels of contaminants. All samples were screened to ascertain the presence of volatile organic compounds and radionuclides. Analytical data were subjected to validation; all round one, two and three and a minimum of 10% of round four data associated with the LFI were validated. A screening method was used to identify contaminants of potential concern (COPC). This screening method eliminated from further consideration, constituents that were below background. Constituents which are considered non-toxic to humans were eliminated from the human health evaluation. Data consistency and blank contamination were also evaluated in the screening process. These COPC were then evaluated further in the qualitative risk assessment (QRA). A human health QRA was performed using conservative (maximum equilibrated contaminant levels from the LFI) analyses.

  19. Investigation of a delta-wing fighter model flow field at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bare, E. Ann; Reubush, David E.; Haddad, Raymond; Hathaway, Ross W.; Compton, Mike

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports a flow-field investigation on a 7.52-percent scale model of an advanced fighter aircraft design conducted in the NASA-Langley 16-ft Transonic Tunnel. The effects of free-stream Mach number, angle-of-attack, angle of sideslip, and various vortex control devices on the local flow values were studied. The model was tested at Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2 and the angles of sideslip of 0 and +/- 5 deg; the model angle-of-attack was varied from -4 to 30 deg. Results are presented in terms of contour plots of local total pressure recovery. The dominant influence on the over-wing flow field was found to be the wing leading-edge vortex which first appears in the survey region at an angle-of-attack of 8 deg and increases in strength and influence with increasing angle-of-attack, finally dominating the entire survey region at very high angles-of-attack.

  20. 32 CFR 989.20 - Final EIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... that it is a final EIS (40 CFR 1503.4(c)), to HQ USAF/A7CI for filing with the EPA (40 CFR 1506.9). If... analysis is required. (b) The EPF processes all necessary supplements to EISs (40 CFR 1502.9) in the same... approval of HQ USAF/A7CI and SAF/IEE, prepare a document containing only comments on the Draft EIS,...

  1. 32 CFR 989.20 - Final EIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... that it is a final EIS (40 CFR 1503.4(c)), to HQ USAF/A7CI for filing with the EPA (40 CFR 1506.9). If... analysis is required. (b) The EPF processes all necessary supplements to EISs (40 CFR 1502.9) in the same... approval of HQ USAF/A7CI and SAF/IEI, prepare a document containing only comments on the Draft EIS,...

  2. 32 CFR 989.20 - Final EIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... that it is a final EIS (40 CFR 1503.4(c)), to HQ USAF/A7CI for filing with the EPA (40 CFR 1506.9). If... analysis is required. (b) The EPF processes all necessary supplements to EISs (40 CFR 1502.9) in the same... approval of HQ USAF/A7CI and SAF/IEE, prepare a document containing only comments on the Draft EIS,...

  3. 32 CFR 989.20 - Final EIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... that it is a final EIS (40 CFR 1503.4(c)), to HQ USAF/A7CI for filing with the EPA (40 CFR 1506.9). If... analysis is required. (b) The EPF processes all necessary supplements to EISs (40 CFR 1502.9) in the same... approval of HQ USAF/A7CI and SAF/IEE, prepare a document containing only comments on the Draft EIS,...

  4. 32 CFR 989.20 - Final EIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... that it is a final EIS (40 CFR 1503.4(c)), to HQ USAF/A7CI for filing with the EPA (40 CFR 1506.9). If... analysis is required. (b) The EPF processes all necessary supplements to EISs (40 CFR 1502.9) in the same... approval of HQ USAF/A7CI and SAF/IEE, prepare a document containing only comments on the Draft EIS,...

  5. Investigation of CO2 induced biogeochemical reactions and active microorganisms of two German gas fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoth, N.; Kassahun, A.; Seifert, J.; Krüger, M.; Bretschneider, H.; Gniese, C.; Frerichs, J.; Simon, A.; Simon, E.; Muschalle, T.

    2009-04-01

    The BMBF-Geotechnologien project "RECOBIO 2" continues the investigation of the long-term biogeochemical transformation of stored CO2. In addition to the Upper Carboniferous gas reservoir Schneeren (Westphalian C) the almost depleted Altmark gas field (Permian - Upper Rotliegend) is also investigated. Both sandstone reservoirs belong to the North German Basin and are operated by the GDF SUEZ E&P Germany (GDF SUEZ). The reservoirs differ in depth, initial and current fluid pressure as well as reservoir temperature, which is a biogeochemical important parameter. While the uplifted horst structure of Schneeren (approx. depth 2700 m) has a temperature level of 80 - 90 °C, the Altmark gas field (approx. depth 3300 m) shows temperatures around 120 °C. The Altmark site is known to be favourable for underground CO2-storage by enhanced gas recovery (EGR). This EGR process is operated by GDF SUEZ at the small and hydraulic isolated reservoir block "Altensalzwedel". This pilot test is accompanied by the scientific large-scale project CLEAN. In addition the RECOBIO2 project characterises the biogeochemical situation of the both large reservoir blocks of the Altmark gas field - „Salzwedel/ Peckensen" and „Heidberg/ Mellin". The produced formation waters of these reservoir blocks were sampled on different wellheads. The redox potentials are partly very low (Eh up to -300 mV) with slightly acidic pH-values (5,5 to 6). The high saline and (nearly) sulphate free formation waters of Na/Ca-Cl type have very high loads of Zn, Pb, Hg and As. In combination to the analysed DOC levels the talk discusses the importance of metal organic complexes. Also results of fluid geochemical calculations will be presented. Furthermore the diversity of bacteria and archaea of the formation waters as well as the potentials of CH4-, CO2-formation and sulphate reduction will be shown. Therefore the cultivation experiments were carried out with different substrates (H2/CO2, acetate, methanol). It

  6. Limited field investigation report for the 100-KR-4 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) was conducted to optimize the use of interim remedial measures (IRM) for expediting clean up while maintaining a technically sound and cost-effective program. The 100-KR-4 Operable Unit is one of four operable units associated with the 100 K Area. Operable units KR-1, KR-2 and KR-3 address contaminant sources while 100-KR-4 addresses contamination present in the underlying groundwater. The IRM decision process for groundwater operable units is based on three aspects: (1) Is the concentration greater than Hanford background? (2) Does the concentration present a medium or high human-health risk? (3) Does the concentration exceed an ecologically based applicable, relevant and appropriate requirements (ARAR) or present an environmental hazard quotient > I? The primary methods of investigation used during this LFI were the installation of monitoring wells and sampling of groundwater. The samples collected from the groundwater and soils were submitted for laboratory analysis. Boreholes were surveyed for radiological contamination using downhole geophysical techniques to further delineate the location and degree of contamination. All soil samples were screened to ascertain the presence of volatile organic compounds and radionuclides. Analytical data were subjected to validation; all first round and a minimum of 10% of subsequent round data were validated.

  7. An experimental investigation of velocity fields in divergent glottal models of the human vocal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2005-09-01

    In speech, sound production arises from fluid-structure interactions within the larynx as well as viscous flow phenomena that is most likely to occur during the divergent orientation of the vocal folds. Of particular interest are the flow mechanisms that influence the location of flow separation points on the vocal folds walls. Physiologically scaled pulsatile flow fields in 7.5 times real size static divergent glottal models were investigated. Three divergence angles were investigated using phase-averaged particle image velocimetry (PIV). The pulsatile glottal jet exhibited a bi-modal stability toward both glottal walls, although there was a significant amount of variance in the angle the jet deflected from the midline. The attachment of the Coanda effect to the glottal model walls occurred when the pulsatile velocity was a maximum, and the acceleration of the waveform was zero. The location of the separation and reattachment points of the flow from the glottal models was a function of the velocity waveform and divergence angle. Acoustic analogies show that a dipole sound source contribution arising from the fluid interaction (Coanda jet) with the vocal fold walls is expected. [Work funded by NIH Grant RO1 DC03577.

  8. Field investigation on severely damaged aseismic buildings in 2014 Ludian earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xuchuan; Zhang, Haoyu; Chen, Hongfu; Chen, Hao; Lin, Junqi

    2015-03-01

    The 2014 magnitude 6.5 Ludian earthquake caused a death toll of 617, many landslides and tens of thousands of collapsed buildings. A field investigation to evaluate the damage to buildings was carried out immediately after the occurrence of the earthquake. Severely damaged aseismic buildings, which were basically observed in the downtown of Longtoushan Town, were carefully examined one by one with the aim to improve design codes. This paper summarizes the damage observed to the investigated aseismic buildings in both the structural and local levels. A common failure mode was observed that most of the aseismic buildings, such as RC frame structures and confined masonry structures, were similarly destroyed by severe damage or complete collapse of the first story. The related strong ground motion, which was recorded at the nearby station, had a short duration of less than 20 s but a very large PGA up to 1.0 g. The RC frames based on the new design codes still failed to achieve the design target for "strong column, weak beam". Typical local failure details, which were related to the interaction between RC columns and infill walls and between constructional columns and masonry walls, are summarized with preliminary analyses.

  9. Limited field investigation report for the 100-BC-5 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) was conducted to assess the applicability of interim remedial measures (IRM) for reducing human health and environmental risks within the 100-BC-5 Groundwater Operable Unit. The 100-BC-5 Operable Unit is one of three operable units associated with the 100 B/C Area. Operable units 1 and 2 address contaminant sources while 100-BC-5 addresses contamination present in the underlying groundwater. The primary method of investigation used during this LFI was the installation of monitoring wells. Samples were collected from the groundwater and soils and submitted for laboratory analysis. Boreholes were surveyed for radiological contamination using downhole geophysical techniques to further delineate the locations and levels of contaminants. All samples were screened to ascertain the presence of volatile organic compounds and radionuclides. Analytical data were subjected to validation; all first round and 10% of the subsequent rounds of data associated with the LFI were validated. The screening method was used to identify contaminants of potential concern (COPC). This screening method eliminated from further consideration constituents that were below background. Constituents considered nontoxic to humans were eliminated from the human health evaluation. Inconsistency and blank contamination were also evaluated in the screening process. These COPC were evaluated further in the qualitative risk assessment (QRA). Tritium and strontium-90 were identified as contaminants of concern at 100-BC-5 because the concentrations exceeded potential applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. The QRA determined that the risk is low for all of the site contaminants.

  10. Investigation of the validity of radiosity for sound-field prediction in cubic rooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosal, Eva-Marie; Hodgson, Murray; Ashdown, Ian

    2004-12-01

    This paper explores acoustical (or time-dependent) radiosity using predictions made in four cubic enclosures. The methods and algorithms used are those presented in a previous paper by the same authors [Nosal, Hodgson, and Ashdown, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 116(2), 970-980 (2004)]. First, the algorithm, methods, and conditions for convergence are investigated by comparison of numerous predictions for the four cubic enclosures. Here, variables and parameters used in the predictions are varied to explore the effect of absorption distribution, the necessary conditions for convergence of the numerical solution to the analytical solution, form-factor prediction methods, and the computational requirements. The predictions are also used to investigate the effect of absorption distribution on sound fields in cubic enclosures with diffusely reflecting boundaries. Acoustical radiosity is then compared to predictions made in the four enclosures by a ray-tracing model that can account for diffuse reflection. Comparisons are made of echograms, room-acoustical parameters, and discretized echograms. .