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Sample records for elastic potential energy

  1. NN inversion potentials intermediate energy proton-nucleus elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Arellano, H.F.; Brieva, F.A.; Love, W.G.; Geramb, H.V. von

    1995-10-01

    Recently developed nucleon-nucleon interactions using the quantum inverse scattering method shed new fight on the off-shell properties of the internucleon effective force for nucleon-nucleus scattering. Calculations of proton elastic scattering from {sup 40}Ca and {sup 208}Pb in the 500 MeV region show that variations in off-shell contributions are determined to a great extent by the accuracy with which the nucleon-nucleon phase shifts are reproduced. The study is based on the full-folding approach to the nucleon-nucleus optical potential which allows a deep understanding of the interplay between on- and off-shell effects in nucleon scattering. Results and the promising extension offered by the inversion potentials beyond the range of validity of the low-energy internucleon forces will be discussed.

  2. Energy-harvesting potential of multiple elastic structures in tandem arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Bo; Luo, Haoxiang

    2011-11-01

    Vortex-induced flapping vibrations of elastic structures attached with piezoelectric materials, i.e., ``piezo-leaves'', have recently been explored for its potential application in wind energy harvesting (e.g., Li, Yuan, and Lipson, J. Appl. Phys., 2011). In this work, we explore the possibility of enhancing the structural vibration and energy harvesting performance of the generator by putting the leaves in tandem arrangement and within close range of hydrodynamic interaction. A two-dimensional model is developed, where two or more elastic plates are mounted in a cross flow. In the case of two plates, the numerical simulation shows that at a particular distance, the vibration of the downstream plate is greatly increased, and so is the energy level of the entire system. For multiple plates, we observed both synchronized and apparently chaotic vibration modes. The characteristics of the vortex interaction, plate deformation, and energetics will be presented for those coupling modes.

  3. Dynamic polarization potentials for the halo nucleus {sup 6}He in medium-energy elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Ibrahim, B.; Suzuki, Y.

    2004-07-01

    We study dynamic polarization potentials for a halo nucleus {sup 6}He scattered by a {sup 12}C target in the eikonal approximation. We use a realistic, six-nucleon wave function of {sup 6}He to include both the halo-neutron and the core-nucleon excitations on an equal footing. We discuss the energy dependence of the polarization potential in relation to that of the nucleon-target optical potential. The imaginary part of the polarization potential changes a sign (negative to positive with increasing energy) around the incident energy of 200 MeV/nucleon, which gives different contributions, depending on the energy, to the elastic differential cross section as well as the reaction cross section.

  4. Polarization potential for elastic scattering of {sup 6,7}Li + {sup 28}Si at near-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Pakou, Athena

    2008-12-15

    The polarization potential for the elastic scattering of {sup 6,7}Li + {sup 28}Si at near barrier energies has been investigated in the context of an optical model framework. The effect on the elastic scattering was found to be strong, energy dependent, and compatible with the transfer channel.

  5. Global optical potential for the elastic scattering of {sup 6}He at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kucuk, Y.; Boztosun, I.; Topel, T.

    2009-11-15

    A set of global optical potentials has been derived to describe the interactions of {sup 6}He at low energies. The elastic scattering angular distribution data measured so far for many systems, ranging from {sup 12}C to {sup 209}Bi, have been considered within the framework of the optical model to find a global potential set to describe the experimental data consistently. We report that very good agreement between theoretical and experimental results has been obtained with small {chi}{sup 2}/N values by using the derived potential set. The reaction cross section and volume integrals of the potentials have been deduced from the theoretical calculations for all studied systems at relevant energies.

  6. Modeling the elastic energy of alloys: Potential pitfalls of continuum treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, Arvind; Ratsch, Christian; Smereka, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Some issues that arise when modeling elastic energy for binary alloys are discussed within the context of a Keating model and density-functional calculations. The Keating model is a simplified atomistic formulation based on modeling elastic interactions of a binary alloy with harmonic springs whose equilibrium length is species dependent. It is demonstrated that the continuum limit for the strain field are the usual equations of linear elasticity for alloys and that they correctly capture the coarse-grained behavior of the displacement field. In addition, it is established that Euler-Lagrange equation of the continuum limit of the elastic energy will yield the same strain field equation. This is the same energy functional that is often used to model elastic effects in binary alloys. However, a direct calculation of the elastic energy atomistic model reveals that the continuum expression for the elastic energy is both qualitatively and quantitatively incorrect. This is because it does not take atomistic scale compositional nonuniformity into account. Importantly, this result also shows that finely mixed alloys tend to have more elastic energy than segregated systems, which is the exact opposite of predictions made by some continuum theories. It is also shown that for strained thin films the traditionally used effective misfit for alloys systematically underestimate the strain energy. In some models, this drawback is handled by including an elastic contribution to the enthalpy of mixing, which is characterized in terms of the continuum concentration. The direct calculation of the atomistic model reveals that this approach suffers serious difficulties. It is demonstrated that elastic contribution to the enthalpy of mixing is nonisotropic and scale dependent. It is also shown that such effects are present in density-functional theory calculations for the Si-Ge system. This work demonstrates that it is critical to include the microscopic arrangements in any elastic model to achieve even qualitatively correct behavior.

  7. Elastic alpha scattering experiments and the alpha-nucleus optical potential at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, P.; Kiss, G.G.; Flp, Zs.; Galaviz, D.; Gyrky, Gy.; Somorjai, E.

    2013-11-15

    High precision angular distribution data of (?,?) elastic scattering are presented for the nuclei {sup 89}Y, {sup 92}Mo, {sup 106,110,116}Cd, {sup 112,124}Sn, and {sup 144}Sm at energies around the Coulomb barrier. Such data with small experimental uncertainties over the full angular range (20170) are the indispensable prerequisite for the extraction of local optical potentials and for the determination of the total reaction cross section ?{sub reac}. A systematic fitting procedure was applied to the experimental scattering data presented to obtain comprehensive local potential parameter sets that are composed of a real folding potential and an imaginary potential of WoodsSaxon surface type. The potential parameters obtained were used in turn to construct a new systematic ?-nucleus potential with very few parameters. Although this new potential cannot reproduce the angular distributions with the same small deviations as the local potential, the new potential is able to predict the total reaction cross sections for all cases under study.

  8. Notepad-like triboelectric generator for efficiently harvesting low-velocity motion energy by interconversion between kinetic energy and elastic potential energy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanlin; Leng, Qiang; Lian, Jiawei; Guo, Hengyu; Yi, Xi; Hu, Chenguo

    2015-01-21

    Great attention has been paid to nanogenerators that harvest energy from ambient environments lately. In order to give considerable output current, most nanogenerators require high-velocity motion that in most cases can hardly be provided in our daily life. Here we report a notepad-like triboelectric generator (NTEG), which uses simple notepad-like structure to generate elastic deformation so as to turn a low-velocity kinetic energy into high-velocity kinetic energy through the conversion of elastic potential energy. Therefore, the NTEG can achieve high current output under low-velocity motion, which completely distinguishes it from tribogenerators previously reported. The factors that may affect the output performance are explored, including the number of slices, active length of slice, press speed, and vertical displacement. In addition, the working mechanism is systematically studied, indicating that the efficiency of the generator can be greatly enhanced by interconversion between kinetic energy and elastic potential energy. The short-circuit current, the open-circuit voltage, and power density are 205 μA and 470 V and 9.86 W/m(2), respectively, which is powerful enough to light up hundreds of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and charge a commercial capacitor. Besides, NTEGs have been successfully applied to a self-powered door monitor. PMID:25564956

  9. Elastic compression of nanoparticles with surface energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yue; Niu, Xin-Rui; Wang, Gang-Feng

    2015-12-01

    The compression of elastic nanoparticles by two rigid planes is analyzed in the present paper. Through a finite element approach with the incorporation of surface energy, we calculate the elastic field of nanoparticles and obtain the explicit expressions for contact radius and indent depth with respect to the compressive load. It is found that when the contact radius is comparable with the ratio of surface energy density to elastic modulus, surface effect significantly affects the elastic field and the overall compressive response of nanoparticles. This study provides an effective tool to analyze the elastic deformation of nanoparticles, and is helpful to measure their elastic properties through compression.

  10. The elastic energy of damaged rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamiel, Y.; Lyakhovsky, V.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Crustal rocks are typically treated as linear elastic material with constant elastic moduli. This assumption is appropriate for rock with relatively low damage, associated with low concentration of cracks and flaws, and under relatively small strains. However, laboratory and field data indicate that rocks subjected to sufficiently high loads exhibit clear deviations from linear behavior. In general, nonlinear stress-strain relationships of rocks can be approximated by including higher-order terms of the strain tensor in the elastic energy expression (e.g., the Murnaghan model). Such models are successful for calculating rock deformation under high confining pressure. However, values of the third (higher order) Murnaghan moduli estimated from acoustic experiments are one to two orders of magnitude above the expected values of the same moduli estimated from the stress-strain relations in quasi-static rock-mechanics experiments. The Murnaghan model also fails to reproduce an abrupt change in the elastic moduli when deformation changes from compression to tension. Such behavior was observed in laboratory experiments with rocks, concrete, and composite brittle material samples. Bi-linear elastic models with abrupt change of the moduli under stress reversal were suggested based on acoustic experiments ("clapping" nonlinearity) and in continuum damage mechanics (unilateral damage model). Here we present a theoretical basis for general second-order nonlinear expression of the elastic potential. We then show that a simplified version of the general nonlinear model is consistent with bi-linear elastic behavior and accounts for non-linearity even under small strains. We apply the simplified nonlinear model to various laboratory observations, including quasi-static modeling of rocks and composite material with different effective moduli under tension and compression; rock dilation under shear; stress- and damage-induced seismic wave anisotropy observed during cycling load of granite samples; and acoustic experiments analyzing shift of the resonance frequency in rock samples. Comparison between analytical and numerical calculations and experimental results demonstrate that the suggested expression for the elastic potential for rocks accounts for both quasi-static damage accumulation and nonlinear dynamic effects.

  11. Elastic lattice in a random potential

    SciTech Connect

    Chudnovsky, E.M.; Dickman, R.

    1998-02-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we study the properties of an elastic triangular lattice subject to a random background potential. As the cooling rate is reduced, we observe a rather sudden crossover between two different glass phases, with exponential decay of translational correlations, the other with power-law decay. Contrary to predictions derived for continuum models, no evidence of a crossover in the mean-square displacement B(r) from the quadratic growth at small r to the logarithmic growth at large r is found. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Storage and utilization of elastic strain energy during jumping.

    PubMed

    Anderson, F C; Pandy, M G

    1993-12-01

    Based upon the optimal control solutions to a maximum-height countermovement jump (CMJ) and a maximum-height squat jump (SJ), this paper provides a quantitative description of how tendons and the elastic elements of muscle store and deliver energy during vertical jumping. After confirming the ability of the model to replicate the major features of each jump (i.e. muscle activation patterns, body-segmental motions, ground reaction forces, jump height, and total ground contact time), the time histories of the forces and shortening velocities of all the musculotendon actuators in the model were used to calculate the work done on the skeleton by tendons as well as the series-elastic elements, the parallel-elastic elements, and the contractile elements of muscle. We found that all the elastic tissues delivered nearly the same amount of energy to the skeleton during a CMJ and an SJ. The reason is twofold: first, nearly as much elastic strain energy was stored during the SJ as the CMJ; second, more stored elastic strain energy was lost as heat during the CMJ. There was also a difference in the way energy was stored during each jump. During the CMJ, strain energy stored in the elastic tissues came primarily from the gravitational potential energy of the skeleton as the more proximal extensor muscles were stretched during the downward phase of the jump. During the SJ, on the other hand, energy stored in the elastic tissues came primarily from the contractile elements as they did work to stretch the tendons and the series-elastic elements of the muscles. Increasing tendon compliance in the model led to an increase in elastic energy storage and utilization, but it also decreased the amount of energy delivered by the contractile elements to the skeleton. Jump height therefore remained almost the same for both jumps. These results suggest that elastic energy storage and utilization enhance jumping efficiency much more than overall jumping performance. PMID:8308046

  13. Elastic scattering using an artificial confining potential.

    PubMed

    Mitroy, J; Zhang, J Y; Varga, K

    2008-09-19

    The discrete energies of a scattering Hamiltonian calculated under the influence of an artificial confining potential of almost arbitrary functional form can be used to determine its phase shifts. The method exploits the result that two short-range Hamiltonians having the same energy will have the same phase shifts upon removal of the confining potential. An initial verification is performed on a simple model problem. Then the stochastic variational method is used to determine the energies of the confined e(-)-He(2)S(e) system and thus determine the low energy phase shifts. PMID:18851369

  14. Elastic energy release in great earthquakes and eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudmundsson, Agust

    2014-05-01

    The sizes of earthquakes are measured using well-defined, measurable quantities such as seismic moment and released (transformed) elastic energy. No similar measures exist for the sizes of volcanic eruptions, making it difficult to compare the energies released in earthquakes and eruptions. Here I provide a new measure of the elastic energy (the potential mechanical energy) associated with magma chamber rupture and contraction (shrinkage) during an eruption. For earthquakes and eruptions, elastic energy derives from two sources: (1) the strain energy stored in the volcano/fault zone before rupture, and (2) the external applied load (force, pressure, stress, displacement) on the volcano/fault zone. From thermodynamic considerations it follows that the elastic energy released or transformed (dU) during an eruption is directly proportional to the excess pressure (pe) in the magma chamber at the time of rupture multiplied by the volume decrease (-dVc) of the chamber, so that . This formula can be used as a basis for a new eruption magnitude scale, based on elastic energy released, which can be related to the moment-magnitude scale for earthquakes. For very large eruptions (>100 km3), the volume of the feeder-dike is negligible, so that the decrease in chamber volume during an eruption corresponds roughly to the associated volume of erupted materials , so that the elastic energy is . Using a typical excess pressures of 5 MPa, it is shown that the largest known eruptions on Earth, such as the explosive La Garita Caldera eruption (27-28 million years ago) and largest single (effusive) Colombia River basalt lava flows (15-16 million years ago), both of which have estimated volumes of about 5000 km3, released elastic energy of the order of 10EJ. For comparison, the seismic moment of the largest earthquake ever recorded, the M9.5 1960 Chile earthquake, is estimated at 100 ZJ and the associated elastic energy release at 10EJ.

  15. Elastic energy of protein-DNA chimeras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Chiao-Yu; Wang, Andrew; Zocchi, Giovanni; Rolih, Biljana; Levine, Alex J.

    2009-12-01

    We present experimental measurements of the equilibrium elastic energy of protein-DNA chimeras, for two different sets of attachment points of the DNA molecular spring on the surface of the protein. Combining these with measurements of the enzymes activity under stress and a mechanical model of the system, we determine how the elastic energy is partitioned between the DNA and the protein. The analysis shows that the protein is mechanically stiffer than the DNA spring.

  16. An excitation potential imaging condition for elastic reverse time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bingluo; Liu, Youshan; Li, Zhiyuan; Ma, Xiaona; Liang, Guanghe

    2014-09-01

    Elastic reverse time migration (ERTM) has been demonstrated to be more accurate than scalar RTM. However, low efficiency (large storage and heavy calculated amount) and strong artifacts caused by the crosstalk between different wave modes are the two primary barriers to the application of the ERTM during the processing of real data. The scalar (P) and vector (S) potentials of the elastic wavefield and the arrival times corresponding to the first energy extremum of the wavefield are saved at each grid point during the forward modeling of the source wavefield. The angle-dependent reflection coefficient images are subsequently obtained by dividing the scalar and vector potentials of the backward extrapolated receiver wavefield by the saved scalar and vector potentials at the grid points that satisfy the image time at each time step, respectively. The proposed imaging condition does not need to store the snapshots of the source wavefield, while it can considerably improve the computational efficiency and decrease the amount of storage and Input/Output manipulation (compared with the cross-correlation imaging condition) in addition to suppressing the crosstalk between compressive and shear wave modes. Compared with the excitation time imaging condition, the proposed imaging condition reduces the energy loss caused by the opposite polarity of the horizontal component at opposite sides of the source in stacked images. Numerical tests with synthetic data of the Sigsbee2a model have demonstrated that this imaging condition is a cost-effective and practical imaging condition for use in prestack ERTM.

  17. Optical potential parameters from 12C + Zr elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, L.; Li, Z. H.; Sun, H. B.; Su, J.; Li, Y. J.; Yan, S. Q.; Wang, Y. B.; Zeng, S.; Bai, X. X.; Du, X. C.; Wu, Z. D.; Jin, S. J.; Zhang, W. J.; Liu, W. P.; Li, E. T.

    2016-02-01

    The angular distributions of 12C + 90,92,94,96Zr elastic scattering were measured with the Q3D magnetic spectrometer at the HI-13 tandem accelerator, Beijing. The real part of optical potential were extracted by analysing these angular distributions. The analysis enable us to avoid the influence of Coulomb effect and to observe the dependence of optical potential on the nuclear properties. With the deduced potential parameters, the experimental elastic scattering angular distributions can be reproduced very well. Formulas to infer global heavy-ion potential parameters were obtained then by analyzing the extracted optical potential parameters. The formulas can be used widely in heavy-ion nuclear reactions.

  18. Elastic epsilon/sup + -/-He scattering with the use of the model-potential method

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, P.; Datta, S.K.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1984-06-01

    A model-potential method has been used to evaluate the elastic e/sup + -/-He scattering at the low-incident energies. The potential contains one parameter to include the effect of short-range correlation. The results for the elastic e/sup + -/-He scattering have been obtained using the same parameter. Two model exchange potentials, one for s wave and the other for higher partial waves, have been employed. The present results are in good agreement with the measured values and refined theoretical predictions.

  19. Expression for the granular elastic energy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yimin; Zheng, Hepeng; Peng, Zheng; Fu, Liping; Song, Shixiong; Sun, Qicheng; Mayer, Michael; Liu, Mario

    2012-05-01

    Granular solid hydrodynamics (GSH) is a broad-ranged continual mechanical description of granular media capable of accounting for static stress distributions, yield phenomena, propagation and damping of elastic waves, the critical state, shear band, and fast dense flow. An important input of GSH is an expression for the elastic energy needed to deform the grains. The original expression, though useful and simple, has some drawbacks. Therefore a slightly more complicated expression is proposed here that eliminates three of them: (1) The maximal angle at which an inclined layer of grains remains stable is increased from 26^{?} to the more realistic value of 30^{?}. (2) Depending on direction and polarization, transverse elastic waves are known to propagate at slightly different velocities. The old expression neglects these differences, the new one successfully reproduces them. (3) Most importantly, the old expression contains only the Drucker-Prager yield surface. The new one contains in addition those named after Coulomb, Lade-Duncan, and Matsuoka-Nakai-realizing each, and interpolating between them, by shifting a single scalar parameter. PMID:23004747

  20. Velocity-dependent optical potential for neutron elastic scattering from 1 p -shell nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabar, I. N.; Jaghoub, M. I.

    2015-06-01

    Background: The conventional optical model is quite successful in describing the nucleon elastic scattering data from medium and heavy nuclei. However, its success in describing the light 1 p -shell nuclei is somewhat limited. The velocity-dependent optical potential resulted in a significant improvement in describing the elastic angular distributions for light nuclei in the low energy region. Purpose: To extend the formalism of the velocity-dependent potential to higher energies, and to assess its importance in describing neutron elastic scattering data from light 1 p -shell nuclei at high energies. Method: We fit the angular distribution data for neutron elastic scattering from 12C and 16O using (i) the velocity-dependent optical potential and (ii) the conventional optical potential. The results of the two models are then compared. At low energies, we compare our angular distribution fits with the fits of other works that exist in the literature. Furthermore, the total integrated cross sections in addition to the analyzing power are calculated using the velocity-dependent optical potential and compared to the experimental data. Results: The velocity-dependent potential resulted in significant improvements in describing the angular distributions particularly in the large-angle scattering region and for certain energy ranges. This model is important where the experimental data show structural effects from nuclear surface deformations, which are important in light nuclei. Furthermore, the calculated total elastic cross sections and analyzing power are in good agreement with the experimental data. Conclusions: The velocity-dependent potential gives rise to surface-peaked real terms in the optical model. Such terms account, at least partly, for the structural effects seen in the angular distribution data. The energy range over which the surface terms are needed is found to depend on the target nucleus. Other works that have introduced real surface terms in the optical potential are discussed.

  1. Low energy elastic electron scattering from CF3Br molecules.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, L R; Brunton, J R; Maddern, T M; Brunger, M J

    2015-03-28

    CF3Br is a potentially valuable precursor molecule for generating beams of gas phase Br radicals suitable for electron collisions studies. However, the utility of CF3Br for this purpose depends critically on the availability of sound scattering cross sections to allow the contribution of the precursor to be isolated within the total scattering signal. To this end, here we present elastic differential cross section (DCS) measurements for CF3Br at incident energies between 15 and 50?eV. Comparison of these DCSs to those from the only other available experimental study [Sunohara et al., J. Phys. B: At., Mol. Opt. Phys. 36, 1843 (2003)] and a Schwinger multichannel with pseudo potentials (SMCPPs) calculation [Bettega et al., J. Phys. B: At., Mol. Opt. Phys. 36, 1263 (2003)] shows generally a very good accord. Integral elastic and momentum transfer cross sections, derived from our DCSs, are also found to be in quite good agreement with the SMCPP results. PMID:25833582

  2. Hybrid Simulation Modeling to Estimate U.S. Energy Elasticities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylin-Stern, Adam C.

    This paper demonstrates how an U.S. application of CIMS, a technologically explicit and behaviourally realistic energy-economy simulation model which includes macro-economic feedbacks, can be used to derive estimates of elasticity of substitution (ESUB) and autonomous energy efficiency index (AEEI) parameters. The ability of economies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions depends on the potential for households and industry to decrease overall energy usage, and move from higher to lower emissions fuels. Energy economists commonly refer to ESUB estimates to understand the degree of responsiveness of various sectors of an economy, and use estimates to inform computable general equilibrium models used to study climate policies. Using CIMS, I have generated a set of future, 'pseudo-data' based on a series of simulations in which I vary energy and capital input prices over a wide range. I then used this data set to estimate the parameters for transcendental logarithmic production functions using regression techniques. From the production function parameter estimates, I calculated an array of elasticity of substitution values between input pairs. Additionally, this paper demonstrates how CIMS can be used to calculate price-independent changes in energy-efficiency in the form of the AEEI, by comparing energy consumption between technologically frozen and 'business as usual' simulations. The paper concludes with some ideas for model and methodological improvement, and how these might figure into future work in the estimation of ESUBs from CIMS. Keywords: Elasticity of substitution; hybrid energy-economy model; translog; autonomous energy efficiency index; rebound effect; fuel switching.

  3. Transport of elastically coupled particles in an asymmetric periodic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csahók, Z.; Family, F.; Vicsek, T.

    1997-05-01

    We study the motion of a chain of elastically coupled particles in an asymmetric potential. The particles are also subject to thermal fluctuations and a stochastic driving force of zero temporal average. The main motivation for investigating such systems originates from their partial analogy with a number of important models, including stochastic ratchets, the Frenkel-Kontorova model, and the various approaches to the microscopic description of friction and stick-slip motion having attracted great interest recently. We find that the collective behavior of the elastically coupled particles under certain conditions leads to an average velocity v which is larger than that of a single particle. The dependence of v on the coupling constant shows interesting anomalies discussed in the paper.

  4. The role of elastic energy storage and recovery in downhill and uphill running.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Kristine L; Kram, Rodger; Gottschall, Jinger S

    2012-07-01

    In level running, humans and other animals store and recover elastic energy during each step. What role does elastic energy play during downhill and uphill running? We measured the fluctuations of the mechanical energy of the center of mass (CoM) of 15 human participants running at 3 m s(-1) on the level, downhill and uphill on a force-measuring treadmill mounted at 3, 6 and 9 deg. In level running, nearly symmetrical decreases and increases of the combined gravitational potential and kinetic (GPE+KE) energy of the CoM indicated equal possible elastic energy storage and recovery. However, asymmetrical fluctuations during hill running indicate reduced maximum possible elastic energy storage and return. We analyzed mechanical energy generation and dissipation during level and hill running by quantifying the anatomically estimated elastic energy storage (AEEE) in the arch and Achilles' tendon using peak ground reaction forces and anatomical characteristics. AEEE did not change with grade. At shallow downhill grades, the body must generate mechanical energy, though it dissipates more than it generates. At steeper downhill grades, little to no energy generation is required and only mechanical energy dissipation must occur. The downhill grade at which mechanical energy must no longer be generated occurs at approximately -9 deg, near the metabolically optimal running grade. At shallow uphill grades, mechanical energy must be generated to raise the CoM, and at steeper grades, additional energy must be generated to offset reduced elastic energy storage and return. PMID:22675189

  5. Elastic Energy Transfer in Turbulence of Dilute Polymer Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Heng-Dong; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Xu, Haitao

    2012-11-01

    We present an experimental study of the energy transfer in the bulk of a turbulent flow with small amount long-chain polymer additives. By varying the Reynolds numbers R?, Wissenberg number Wi and polymer concentration ?. We test quantitively the elastic theory proposed by de Gennes and Tabor (Europhys. Lett., 1986; Physica A, 1986). The rate of energy transfer by polymer elasticity as inferred from the theory is consistent with that measured from the second order Eulerian structure functions. The unknown parameter n in the theory, which represents the flow topology of the stretching field, is found to be nearly 1. Based on energy transfer rate balance, We propose an elastic length scale, r?, which describes the effect of polymer elasticity on turbulence energy cascade and captures the scale dependence of the elastic energy transfer rate. We are grateful to the Max Planck Society, the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft for their support.

  6. Low-energy elastic differential scattering of He/++/ by He.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, S. K.; Doverspike, L. D.; Champion, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental results are developed for the relative elastic differential scattering of He(++) by He for collision energies in the range 4 equal to or less than E equal to or less than 75 eV. In the analysis of the data, semiclassical considerations are utilized, assuming that the dynamics of the scattering is governed solely by the B and E states of He2(++). It is shown that existing ab initio calculations for the intermolecular potentials predict differential cross sections which are not in particularly good agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Energy in elastic fiber embedded in elastic matrix containing incident SH wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, James H., Jr.; Nagem, Raymond J.

    1989-01-01

    A single elastic fiber embedded in an infinite elastic matrix is considered. An incident plane SH wave is assumed in the infinite matrix, and an expression is derived for the total energy in the fiber due to the incident SH wave. A nondimensional form of the fiber energy is plotted as a function of the nondimensional wavenumber of the SH wave. It is shown that the fiber energy attains maximum values at specific values of the wavenumber of the incident wave. The results obtained here are interpreted in the context of phenomena observed in acousto-ultrasonic experiments on fiber reinforced composite materials.

  8. Low energy electron elastic reflection from solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starý, Vladimír.; Zemek, Josef

    2004-09-01

    Using our Monte-Carlo (MC) code, we calculated the ratio of the coefficients of elastic reflection of electrons from Si, SiO 2 and Au to those of Cu and Al in the electron energy range 0.2-1.0 and 1.5 keV (Au-Cu), respectively. The electron scattering was simulated by a single scattering model. For the MC calculations, we compared the elastic differential cross-sections calculated using a static field approximation with relativistic partial wave analysis on either the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac potential of free atoms (TFD model) or the Hartree-Fock-Wigner-Seitz (muffin-tin) potential of atoms in the solid state (HFWS model). The MC data were compared with the experimental values. For both models, reasonably good agreement for Si-Cu and SiO 2-Cu systems was found. In the Au-Cu system, better agreement was achieved using the TFD model. The addition of C in a surface interaction layer of 2-5 nm improves the agreement between simulated and experimental values for the Si-Al and Si-SiO 2 systems.

  9. Lateral density variations in elastic Earth models from an extended minimum energy approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, B. V.

    1980-01-01

    Kaula's minimum energy approach was extended to include the nonhydrostatic gravitational potential energy and the density perturbation field was obtained to degree and order eight. The depth profiles for the density perturbation show a stratification with density excesses and deficiencies alternating with depth. The addition of the gravitational potential energy in the minimization process does not change significantly the conclusions based on results for the minimum shear strain energy case, concerning the inability of the mantle to withstand the lateral loading elastically.

  10. Calculations of {sup 8}He+p elastic cross sections using a microscopic optical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Lukyanov, V. K.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Kadrev, D. N.; Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Massen, S. E.

    2009-08-15

    An approach to calculate microscopic optical potential with the real part obtained by a folding procedure and with the imaginary part inherent in the high-energy approximation is applied to study the {sup 8}He+p elastic-scattering data at energies of tens of MeV/nucleon. The neutron and proton density distributions obtained in different models for {sup 8}He are used in the calculations of the differential cross sections. The role of the spin-orbit potential is studied. Comparison of the calculations with the available experimental data on the elastic-scattering differential cross sections at beam energies of 15.7, 26.25, 32, 66, and 73 MeV/nucleon is performed. The problem of the ambiguities of the depths of each component of the optical potential is considered by means of the imposed physical criterion related to the known behavior of the volume integrals as functions of the incident energy. It is shown also that the role of the surface absorption is rather important, in particular for the lowest incident energies (e.g., 15.7 and 26.25 MeV/nucleon)

  11. A Microscopic Optical Potential Approach to {sup 6,8}He+p Elastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lukyanov, V. K.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Kadrev, D. N.; Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Massen, S. E.

    2009-08-26

    A microscopic approach to calculate the optical potential (OP) with the real part obtained by a folding procedure and with the imaginary part inherent in the high-energy approximation (HEA) is applied to study the {sup 6,8}He+p elastic scattering data at energies of tens of MeV/N. The OP's and the cross sections are calculated using different models for the neutron and proton densities of {sup 6,8}He. The role of the spin-orbit (SO) potential and effects of the energy and density dependence of the effective NN forces are studied. Comparison of the calculations with the available experimental data on the elastic scattering differential cross sections at beam energies <100 MeV/N is performed and conclusions on the role of the aforesaid effects are made. It is shown that the present approach, which uses only parameters that renormalize the depths of the OP, can be applied along with other methods like that from the microscopic g-matrix description of the complex proton optical potential.

  12. Low-energy elastic electron interactions with pyrimidine

    SciTech Connect

    Palihawadana, Prasanga; Sullivan, James; Buckman, Stephen; Brunger, Michael; Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent; Garcia, Gustavo; Blanco, F.

    2011-12-15

    We present results of measurements and calculations of elastic electron scattering from pyrimidine in the energy range 3-50 eV. Absolute differential and integral elastic cross sections have been measured using a crossed electron-molecule beam spectrometer and the relative flow technique. The measured cross sections are compared with results of calculations using the well-known Schwinger variational technique and an independent-atom model. Agreement between the measured differential cross sections and the results of the Schwinger calculations is good at lower energies but less satisfactory at higher energies where inelastic channels that should be open are kept closed in the calculations.

  13. Comparison of Electron Elastic-Scattering Cross Sections Calculated from Two Commonly Used Atomic Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, A.; Salvat, F.; Powell, C. J.

    2004-06-01

    We have analyzed differential cross sections (DCSs) for the elastic scattering of electrons by neutral atoms that have been derived from two commonly used atomic potentials: the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac (TFD) potential and the Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) potential. DCSs from the latter potential are believed to be more accurate. We compared DCSs for six atoms (H, Al, Ni, Ag, Au, and Cm) at four energies (100, 500, 1000, and 10 000 eV) from two databases issued by the National Institute of Standards and Technology in which DCSs had been obtained from the TFD and DHF potentials. While the DCSs from the two potentials had similar shapes and magnitudes, there can be pronounced deviations (up to 70%) for small scattering angles for Al, Ag, Au, and Cm. In addition, there were differences of up to 400% at scattering angles for which there were deep minima in the DCSs; at other angles, the differences were typically less than 20%. The DCS differences decreased with increasing electron energy. DCSs calculated from the two potentials were compared with measured DCSs for six atoms (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Hg) at energies between 50 eV and 3 keV. For Ar, the atom for which experimental data are available over the largest energy range there is good agreement between the measured DCSs and those calculated from the TFD and DHF potentials at 2 and 3 keV, but the experimental DCSs agree better with the DCSs from the DHF potential at lower energies. A similar trend is found for the other atoms. At energies less than about 1 keV, there are increasing differences between the measured DCSs and the DCSs calculated from the DHF potential. These differences were attributed to the neglect of absorption and polarizability effects in the calculations. We compare transport cross sections for H, Al, Ni, Ag, Au, and Cm obtained from the DCSs for each potential. For energies between 200 eV and 1 keV, the largest differences are about 20% (for H, Au, and Cm); at higher energies, the differences are smaller. We also examine the extent to which three quantities derived from DCSs vary depending on whether the DCSs were obtained from the TFD or DHF potential. First, we compare calculated and measured elastic-backscattered intensities for thin films of Au on a Ni substrate with different measurement conditions, but it is not clear whether DCSs from the TFD or DHF potential should be preferred. Second, we compare electron inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs) derived from relative and absolute measurements by elastic-peak electron spectroscopy and from analyses with DCSs obtained from the TFD and DHF potentials. In four examples, for a variety of materials and measurement conditions, we find differences between the IMFPs from the TFD and DHF potentials ranging from 1.3% to 17.1%. Third, we compare mean escape depths for two photoelectron lines and two Auger-electron lines in solid Au obtained using DCSs from the TFD and DHF potentials. The relative differences between these mean escape depths vary from 4.3% at 70 eV to0.5% at 2016 eV at normal electron emission, and become smaller with increasing emission angle. Although measured DCSs for atoms can differ from DCSs calculated from the DHF potential by up to a factor of 2, we find that the atomic DCSs are empirically useful for simulations of electron transport in solids for electron energies above about 300 eV. The atomic DCSs can also be useful for energies down to at least 200 eV if relative measurements are made.

  14. Quasi-elastic nuclear scattering at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1992-01-01

    The quasi-elastic scattering of two nuclei is considered in the high-energy optical model. Energy loss and momentum transfer spectra for projectile ions are evaluated in terms of an inelastic multiple-scattering series corresponding to multiple knockout of target nucleons. The leading-order correction to the coherent projectile approximation is evaluated. Calculations are compared with experiments.

  15. Intermediate energy proton-deuteron elastic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    A fully symmetrized multiple scattering series is considered for the description of proton-deuteron elastic scattering. An off-shell continuation of the experimentally known twobody amplitudes that retains the exchange symmeteries required for the calculation is presented. The one boson exchange terms of the two body amplitudes are evaluated exactly in this off-shell prescription. The first two terms of the multiple scattering series are calculated explicitly whereas multiple scattering effects are obtained as minimum variance estimates from the 146-MeV data of Postma and Wilson. The multiple scattering corrections indeed consist of low order partial waves as suggested by Sloan based on model studies with separable interactions. The Hamada-Johnston wave function is shown consistent with the data for internucleon distances greater than about 0.84 fm.

  16. Partitioning of the elastic energy in protein-DNA chimeras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Andrew; Tseng, Chiao-Yu; Rolih, Biljana; Levine, Alex; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2010-03-01

    We synthesize Protein-DNA chimeras where a DNA molecular spring mechanically perturbs the conformation of the protein. We measured the elastic energy stored in one such molecule, consisting of the enzyme Guanylate Kinase coupled to a 60 bp DNA spring. From these measurements, the response of the protein in terms of its enzymatic activity, and a mechanical model of the DNA spring we deduce that, in this case, most of the elastic energy of the molecule is stored in the DNA spring. Thus the DNA spring is ``softer'' than the protein.

  17. Multistable Architected Materials for Trapping Elastic Strain Energy.

    PubMed

    Shan, Sicong; Kang, Sung H; Raney, Jordan R; Wang, Pai; Fang, Lichen; Candido, Francisco; Lewis, Jennifer A; Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-08-01

    3D printing and numerical analysis are combined to design a new class of architected materials that contain bistable beam elements and exhibit controlled trapping of elastic energy. The proposed energy-absorbing structures are reusable. Moreover, the mechanism of energy absorption stems solely from the structural geometry of the printed beam elements, and is therefore both material- and loading-rate independent. PMID:26088462

  18. High precision elastic ? scattering on the even-odd 115In nucleus at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, G. G.; Szcs, T.; Mohr, P.; Flp, Zs; Gyrky, Gy; Halsz, Z.; Soha, R. F.; Somorjai, E.; Ornelas, A.; Galaviz, D.; Yal?n, C.; Gray, R. T.; zkan, N.

    2016-01-01

    Elastic alpha scattering cross sections on the even-odd 115In nucleus have been measured at energies Elab. = 16.15 MeV and 19.50 MeV. The high precision experimental data are used to derive the parameters of a local a nucleus optical potential.

  19. Elastic and total cross sections for simple biomolecules in the intermediate energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Dhanoj; Naghma, Rahla; Antony, Bobby

    2015-09-01

    The elastic and total cross sections for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, 2-butanone and formamide are calculated using the spherical complex optical potential formalism in the intermediate energy range from 50 eV to 10 keV. These cross sections find application to various fields like radiation damage and biological sciences. The present results are compared with the available experimental and theoretical data and are found to give excellent agreement. The elastic cross sections reported for most of the targets in the present energy range are done for the first time. The energy dependence of the contribution of ionization and elastic cross section with respect to the total cross section and the correlation of total cross section with polarizability of the molecules are also studied.

  20. Measurements of radiated elastic wave energy from dynamic tensile cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boler, Frances M.

    1990-01-01

    The role of fracture-velocity, microstructure, and fracture-energy barriers in elastic wave radiation during a dynamic fracture was investigated in experiments in which dynamic tensile cracks of two fracture cofigurations of double cantilever beam geometry were propagating in glass samples. The first, referred to as primary fracture, consisted of fractures of intact glass specimens; the second configuration, referred to as secondary fracture, consisted of a refracture of primary fracture specimens which were rebonded with an intermittent pattern of adhesive to produce variations in fracture surface energy along the crack path. For primary fracture cases, measurable elastic waves were generated in 31 percent of the 16 fracture events observed; the condition for radiation of measurable waves appears to be a local abrupt change in the fracture path direction, such as occurs when the fracture intersects a surface flaw. For secondary fractures, 100 percent of events showed measurable elastic waves; in these fractures, the ratio of radiated elastic wave energy in the measured component to fracture surface energy was 10 times greater than for primary fracture.

  1. Low-energy elastic electron scattering from ethylene: Elastic scattering and vibrational excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakoo, M. A.; Khakoo, S. M.; Sakaamini, A.; Hlousek, B. A.; Hargreaves, L. R.; Lee, J.; Murase, R.

    2016-01-01

    Normalized experimental differential and integral cross sections for elastic and vibrationally inelastic scattering of low-energy electrons from ethylene (C2H4 ) have been measured over a large number of incident electron energies and angles. The differential cross sections are measured at incident energies from 0.5 to 100 eV and scattering angles from 5 to 130. These measurements are made to monitor the role of the 2g2B(?1.8 eV ) and the higher 2u2B+1u2B+A2g (?7.5 eV ) resonances in the scattering dynamics. Our differential cross section measurements are in very good to excellent agreement with past measurements, and in reasonable agreement with theory as regards forward scattering. A feature in the elastic cross section at 90 scattering angle at ?3.5 eV is tentatively associated with the onset of excitation of the a 1u3B triplet electronic state. Differential cross sections for vibrational excitation of four composite energy features in ethylene are also presented from incident energies of 1.25-15 eV. These results are compared to previous measurements with satisfactory results regarding resonant behavior of these features also concerning the role of the 2g2B (?1.8 eV ) and the higher 2u2B+1u2B+A2g (?7.5 eV ) resonances in the scattering dynamics.

  2. An elastic-support model for enhanced bistable piezoelectric energy harvesting from random vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Y. G.; Gao, Y. J.; Tan, D.; Fan, S. B.; Lai, Z. H.

    2015-02-01

    To overcome the defect of conventional nonlinear piezoelectric cantilever vibration energy harvesters, in this paper we conceive an elastic-support model to study the performance of energy converters under two types of variable-intensity excitation conditions: filtered Gaussian noises and pink noises. When excitation intensity is insufficient, thanks to the system's variable potential function, frequent bistable transition oscillations between two wells occur in elastic-support systems, while only weak oscillations in either well could be observed in rigid-support systems. In practical applications, the structural parameters of energy harvesters are not allowed to make real-time changes. If considered remaining the magnet interval and the spring's elastic stiffness unchanged while receiving stable maximum output voltage, elastic-support systems can be made full use toward variable-intensity filtered Gaussian noises. It has been proven that elastic-support systems are capable of adapting to random excitations with variable intensity, through which maximum power output and sufficient electromechanical energy conversion of the system can be accomplished.

  3. Gravitational potential as a source of earthquake energy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrows, L.; Langer, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    Some degree of tectonic stress within the earth originates from gravity acting upon density structures. The work performed by this "gravitational tectonics stress" must have formerly existed as gravitational potential energy contained in the stress-causing density structure. According to the elastic rebound theory (Reid, 1910), the energy of earthquakes comes from an elastic strain field built up by fairly continuous elastic deformation in the period between events. For earthquakes resulting from gravitational tectonic stress, the elastic rebound theory requires the transfer of energy from the gravitational potential of the density structures into an elastic strain field prior to the event. An alternate theory involves partial gravitational collapse of the stress-causing density structures. The earthquake energy comes directly from a net decrease in gravitational potential energy. The gravitational potential energy released at the time of the earthquake is split between the energy released by the earthquake, including work done in the fault zone and an increase in stored elastic strain energy. The stress associated with this elastic strain field should oppose further fault slip. ?? 1981.

  4. Elastic positron-cadmium scattering at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, M. W. J.; Mitroy, J.

    2010-05-01

    The elastic and annihilation cross sections for positron-cadmium scattering are reported up to the positronium-formation threshold (at 2.2 eV). The low-energy phase shifts for the elastic scattering of positrons from cadmium were derived from the bound and pseudostate energies of a very large basis configuration-interaction calculation of the e+-Cd system. The s-wave binding energy is estimated to be 12642 meV, with a scattering length of Ascat=(14.22.1)a0, while the threshold annihilation parameter, Zeff, was 93.926.5. The p-wave phase shift exhibits a weak shape resonance that results in a peak Zeff of 9117 at a collision energy of about 49050 meV.

  5. Elastic positron-cadmium scattering at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, M. W. J.; Mitroy, J.

    2010-05-15

    The elastic and annihilation cross sections for positron-cadmium scattering are reported up to the positronium-formation threshold (at 2.2 eV). The low-energy phase shifts for the elastic scattering of positrons from cadmium were derived from the bound and pseudostate energies of a very large basis configuration-interaction calculation of the e{sup +}-Cd system. The s-wave binding energy is estimated to be 126{+-}42 meV, with a scattering length of A{sub scat}=(14.2{+-}2.1)a{sub 0}, while the threshold annihilation parameter, Z{sub eff}, was 93.9{+-}26.5. The p-wave phase shift exhibits a weak shape resonance that results in a peak Z{sub eff} of 91{+-}17 at a collision energy of about 490{+-}50 meV.

  6. Investigation of 17F+p elastic scattering at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Azab Farid, M.; Ibraheem, Awad A.; Al-Hajjaji, Arwa S.

    2015-10-01

    The 17F +p elastic scattering at two near-barrier energies of 3.5 and 4.3 MeV/nucleon, have been analyzed in the framework of the single folding approach. The folded potentials are constructed by folding the density-dependent (DDM3Y) effective nucleon-nucleon interaction over the nuclear density of the one-proton halo nucleus 17F. Two versions of the density are considered. In addition, two versions of the one-nucleon knock-on exchange potentials are introduced to construct the real microscopic potentials. The derived potentials supplemented by phenomenological Woods-Saxon imaginary and spin-orbit potentials produced excellent description of the differential elastic scattering cross sections at the higher energy without need to introduce any renormalization. At the lower energy, however, in order to successfully reproduce the data, it is necessary to reduce the strength of the constructed real DDM3Y potential by about 25% of its original value. Furthermore, good agreement with data is obtained using the extracted microscopic DDM3Y potentials for both real and imaginary parts. Moreover, the interesting notch test is applied to investigate the sensitivity of the elastic scattering cross section to the radial distribution of the constructed microscopic potentials. The extracted reaction (absorption) cross sections are, also, investigated.

  7. Investigation of 16O+12C refractive elastic scattering using the ?-cluster model potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanain, Mahmoud A.

    2016-01-01

    Differential cross-section of the 16O+12C elastic scattering at E_{lab}=132, 181, 200, 260, 300, 608 and 1503MeV has been reanalyzed in the framework of double-folding cluster (DFC1) potential over a wide angular range which cover both diffractive and refractive regions. Based upon the ?-cluster structure of both colliding nuclei, the real DFC1 optical potential has been generated by using ?- ? effective interaction and new cluster modified Gaussian (CMGD) of target and projectile has also been extracted. Successful descriptions of the data were obtained over the full measured angular range at all considered energies. The results have been compared with the findings obtained by using the phenomenological approach as well as experimental data. Furthermore, the consistency between the real and imaginary volume integrals is checked by the dispersion relation and the total reaction cross-section has also been investigated.

  8. An energy formulation of continuum magneto-electro-elasticity with applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liping

    2014-02-01

    We present an energy formulation of continuum electro-elasticity and magneto-electro-elasticity. Based on the principle of minimum free energy, we propose a form of total free energy of the system in three dimensions, and then systematically derive the theories for a hierarchy of materials including dielectric elastomers, piezoelectric ceramics, ferroelectrics, flexoelectric materials, magnetic elastomers, magnetoelectric materials, piezo-electric-magnetic materials among others. The effects of mechanical, electrical and magnetic boundary devices, external charges, polarizations and magnetization are taken into account in formulating the free energy. The linear and nonlinear boundary value problems governing these materials are explicitly derived as the Euler-Lagrange equations of the principle of minimum free energy. Finally, we illustrate the applications of the formulations by presenting solutions to a few simple problems and give an outlook of potential applications.

  9. Low-Energy Elastic Electron Scattering by Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zatsarinny O.; Bartschat, K.; Tayal, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    The B-spline R-matrix method is employed to investigate the low-energy elastic electron scattering by atomic oxygen. Flexible non-orthogonal sets of radial functions are used to construct the target description and to represent the scattering functions. A detailed investigation regarding the dependence of the predicted partial and total cross sections on the scattering model and the accuracy of the target description is presented. The predicted angle-integrated elastic cross sections are in good agreement with experiment, whereas significant discrepancies are found in the angle-differential elastic cross sections near the forward direction. .The near-threshold results are found to strongly depend on the treatment of inner-core short-range correlation effects in the target description, as well as on a proper account of the target polarizability. A sharp increase in the elastic cross sections below 1 eV found in some earlier calculations is judged to be an artifact of an unbalanced description of correlation in the N-electron target structure and the (N+l)-electron-collision problems.

  10. Absolute elastic differential electron scattering cross sections in the intermediate energy region. IV - CO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, H.; Srivastava, S. K.; Chutjian, A.

    1978-01-01

    Using a crossed electron beam-molecular beam scattering geometry and a relative-flow technique, ratios of elastic differential cross sections of CO to those of He have been measured at electron impact energies of 3, 5, 7.5, 9.9, 15, 20, 30, 50, 75, and 100 eV. At each energy, an angular range of 15 to 130 deg has been covered. These ratios have been multiplied by previously known He elastic differential cross sections to obtain elastic differential cross sections for CO. Since pure rotational excitations were not resolved, the elastic differential cross sections are a sum of elastic and pure rotational excitations at room temperature. From a knowledge of differential cross sections (DCS), integral and momentum transfer cross sections have been calculated. Both the DCS and integral cross sections are compared at 50, 75, and 100 eV to a recent two-potential theory of e-molecule scattering. Present results show that the isoelectronic molecules CO and N2 have very similar magnitudes and shapes of their differential cross sections.

  11. Energy distribution of elastically scattered electrons from double layer samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tőkési, K.; Varga, D.

    2016-02-01

    We present a theoretical description of the spectra of electrons elastically scattered from thin double layered Au-C samples. The analysis is based on the Monte Carlo simulation of the recoil and Doppler effects in reflection and transmission geometries of the scattering at a fixed angle of 44.3 ° and a primary energy of 40 keV. The relativistic correction is taken into account. Besides the experimentally measurable energy distributions the simulations give many partial distributions separately, depending on the number of elastic scatterings (single, and multiple scatterings of different types). Furthermore, we present detailed analytical calculations for the main parameters of the single scattering, taking into account both the ideal scattering geometry, i.e. infinitesimally small angular range, and the effect of the real, finite angular range used in the measurements. We show our results for intensity ratios, peak shifts and broadenings for four cases of measurement geometries and layer thicknesses. While in the peak intensity ratios of gold and carbon for transmission geometries were found to be in good agreement with the results of the single scattering model, especially large deviations were obtained in reflection geometries. The separation of the peaks, depending on the geometry and the thickness, generally smaller, and the peak width generally larger than it can be expected from the nominal values of the primary energy, scattering angle, and mean kinetic energy of the atoms. We also show that the peaks are asymmetric even for the case of the single scattering due to the finite solid angle. Finally, we present a qualitative comparison with the experimental data. We find our resulting energy distribution of elastically scattered electrons to be in good agreement with recent measurements.

  12. Inertia of Potential Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higbie, J.

    1975-01-01

    Demonstrates that when a system of attracting or repelling bodies is bound, its rest mass will generally be different than the sum of the rest masses of the individual bodies. The mass excess or defect is simply related to the stored potential energy of the system. (Author/MLH)

  13. High energy elastic and inelastic electron scattering by the Ne and Ar atoms: Electron correlation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Duguet, A.; Bennani, A.L.; Rouault, M.

    1983-09-15

    Elastic and inelastic differential cross sections (DCS) of high energy electrons (25 keV) scattered by neon and argon have been separately measured by totally independent methods. The effects of electronic correlations on the DCS and on the radial distribution functions D(R) and P(R) are deduced from experiment by comparison with theoretical Hartree--Fock values. An estimate of the correlation energy is also given. In the case of neon, the differences, with respect to Hartree--Fock, of the various contributions to atomic potential energy ..delta.. Vne, ..delta.. Vee/sup Coul/, and ..delta..Vee/sup exch/ are calculated from experiment and compared to theoretical results.

  14. Breakup and Elastic Scattering in the {sup 9}Be + {sup 144}Sm system at near barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Paes, B.; Garcia, V. N.; Lubian, J.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Padron, I.

    2010-05-21

    Breakup and elastic scattering in the Be + {sup 144}Sm system, at near barrier energies, are investigated. We calculate theoretically the non-capture breakup cross section by performing coupled reaction channel calculations. The energy dependence of the optical potential does not show the usual threshold anomaly found in tightly bound systems.

  15. Equivalent local potentials for energy dependent nonlocal interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fiedeldey, H. ); Lipperheide, R. ); Rawitscher, G.H. ); Sofianos, S.A. )

    1992-06-01

    Various equivalent local potentials and their Perey factors are discussed. The Wronskian and inversion-type equivalent local potentials for the energy dependent nonlocal interaction induced by the coupling of the elastic to the nonelastic channels are investigated numerically. Their Perey factors are found to be closer to unity than those associated with exchange-type nonlocal potentials.

  16. Reinterpreting the energy dependence of the optical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamon, L. C.; Gasques, L. R.

    2016-01-01

    In earlier works, we proposed a model for the nuclear potential of ?-nucleus systems which is energy independent and has no adjustable parameters. This interaction has been successfully applied in the description of fusion, elastic and inelastic scattering data for many of those systems in regions of low energy. In the present work, we assume the same interaction as the bare potential to study the elastic scattering for ? + 208Pb in a wide energy range. We demonstrate that the corresponding data set can be described if couplings to inelastic states with high excitation energy are explicitly considered through coupled-channel calculations.

  17. An elastic potential for the nonlinear response of unidirectional graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, M.-J.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    An elastic potential is proposed that is capable of modeling the reversible portion of the observed nonlinear response of unidirectional graphite fiber composites. The model includes both the stiffening stress-strain behavior as well as the softening Poisson's response for loading in the fiber direction. The model is compared with experimental results for Celion 6000/PMR-15 graphite-polyimide.

  18. Elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by nitromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, A. R.; D'A Sanchez, S.; Bettega, M. H. F.

    2011-06-15

    In this work, we present integral, differential, and momentum transfer cross sections for elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by nitromethane, for energies up to 10 eV. We calculated the cross sections using the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials, in the static-exchange and in the static-exchange plus polarization approximations. The computed integral cross sections show a {pi}* shape resonance at 0.70 eV in the static-exchange-polarization approximation, which is in reasonable agreement with experimental data. We also found a {sigma}* shape resonance at 4.8 eV in the static-exchange-polarization approximation, which has not been previously characterized by the experiment. We also discuss how these resonances may play a role in the dissociation process of this molecule.

  19. Elastic scattering of {sup 9}Li on {sup 208}Pb at energies around the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Cubero, M.; Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Lay, J. A.; Moro, A. M.; Acosta, L.; Martel, I.; Sanchez-Benitez, A. M.; Alcorta, M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Tengblad, O.; Buchmann, L.; Shotter, A.; Walden, P.; Diget, D. G.; Fulton, B.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Galaviz, D.; Gomez-Camacho, J.; Mukha, I.

    2011-10-28

    We have studied the dynamical effects of the halo structure of {sup 11}Li on the scattering on heavy targets at energies around the Coulomb barrier. This experiment was performed at ISAC-II at TRIUMF with a world record in production of the post-accelerated {sup 11}Li beam. As part of this study we report here on the first measurement of the elastic cross section of the core nucleus, i.e. {sup 9}Li on {sup 208}Pb, at energies around the Coulomb barrier. A preliminary optical model analysis has been performed in order to extract a global optical potential to describe the measured angular distributions.

  20. Low-energy elastic electron scattering from furan

    SciTech Connect

    Khakoo, M. A.; Muse, J.; Ralphs, K.; Costa, R. F.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.

    2010-06-15

    We report normalized experimental and theoretical differential cross sections for elastic electron scattering by C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O (furan) molecules from a collaborative project between several Brazilian theoretical groups and an experimental group at California State Fullerton, USA. The measurements are obtained by using the relative flow method with helium as the standard gas and a thin aperture target gas collimating source. The relative flow method is applied without the restriction imposed by the relative flow pressure condition on helium and the unknown gas. The experimental data were taken at incident electron energies of 1, 1.5, 1.73, 2, 2.7, 3, 5, 7, 10, 20, 30, and 50 eV and covered the angular range between 10 deg. and 130 deg. The measurements verify observed {pi}* shape resonances at 1.65{+-}0.05eV and 3.10{+-}0.05 eV scattering energies, in good agreement with the transmission electron data of Modelli and Burrow [J. Phys. Chem. A 108, 5721 (2004)]. Furthermore, the present results also indicated both resonances dominantly in the d-wave channel. The differential cross sections are integrated in the standard way to obtain integral elastic cross sections and momentum transfer cross sections. The calculations employed the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials and were performed in the static-exchange and in the static-exchange plus polarization approximations. The calculated integral and momentum transfer cross sections clearly revealed the presence of two shape resonances located at 1.95 and 3.56 eV and ascribed to the B{sub 1} and A{sub 2} symmetries of the C{sub 2v} point group, respectively, in very good agreement with the experimental findings. Overall agreement between theory and experiment regarding the differential, momentum transfer, and integral cross sections is very good, especially for energies below 10 eV.

  1. Failure of the Woods-Saxon nuclear potential to simultaneously reproduce precise fusion and elastic scattering measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, A.; Hinde, D. J.; Dasgupta, M.; Newton, J. O.; Butt, R. D.; Hagino, K.

    2007-04-15

    A precise fusion excitation function has been measured for the {sup 12}C+{sup 208}Pb reaction at energies around the barrier, allowing the fusion barrier distribution to be extracted. The fusion cross sections at high energies differ significantly from existing fusion data. Coupled reaction channels calculations have been carried out with the code FRESCO. A bare potential previously claimed to uniquely describe a wide range of {sup 12}C+{sup 208}Pb near-barrier reaction channels failed to reproduce the new fusion data. The nuclear potential diffuseness of 0.95 fm which fits the fusion excitation function over a broad energy range fails to reproduce the elastic scattering. A diffuseness of 0.55 fm reproduces the fusion barrier distribution and elastic scattering data, but significantly overpredicts the fusion cross sections at high energies. This may be due to physical processes not included in the calculations. To constrain calculations, it is desirable to have precisely measured fusion cross sections, especially at energies around the barrier.

  2. Failure of the Woods-Saxon nuclear potential to simultaneously reproduce precise fusion and elastic scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, A.; Hinde, D. J.; Dasgupta, M.; Hagino, K.; Newton, J. O.; Butt, R. D.

    2007-04-01

    A precise fusion excitation function has been measured for the C12+Pb208 reaction at energies around the barrier, allowing the fusion barrier distribution to be extracted. The fusion cross sections at high energies differ significantly from existing fusion data. Coupled reaction channels calculations have been carried out with the code FRESCO. A bare potential previously claimed to uniquely describe a wide range of C12+Pb208 near-barrier reaction channels failed to reproduce the new fusion data. The nuclear potential diffuseness of 0.95 fm which fits the fusion excitation function over a broad energy range fails to reproduce the elastic scattering. A diffuseness of 0.55 fm reproduces the fusion barrier distribution and elastic scattering data, but significantly overpredicts the fusion cross sections at high energies. This may be due to physical processes not included in the calculations. To constrain calculations, it is desirable to have precisely measured fusion cross sections, especially at energies around the barrier.

  3. Anchoring energy and orientational elasticity of a ferroelectric liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Kaznacheev, A. V.; Pozhidaev, E. P.

    2012-06-15

    The dielectric susceptibility of a helix-free ferroelectric liquid crystal layer has been experimentally and theoretically studied as a function of the layer thickness. The investigation has been performed on the inner branch of the polarization hysteresis loop, in the region of a linear dependence of the polarization on the electric field. The experimental results are explained using the notion of effective layer thickness, which involves the characteristic distance {xi} over which the orienting effect of interfaces is operative. Comparison of the experimental data and theoretical results made it possible to estimate this distance as {xi} = 41 {mu}m and evaluate the anchoring energy (W = 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}-1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} J/m{sup 2}) and the intralayer elastic constant (K Double-Prime Almost-Equal-To 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}-3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} N).

  4. Scaling of elastic energy storage in mammalian limb tendons: do small mammals really lose out?

    PubMed Central

    Bullimore, Sharon R; Burn, Jeremy F

    2005-01-01

    It is widely believed that elastic energy storage is more important in the locomotion of larger mammals. This is based on: (a) comparison of kangaroos with the smaller kangaroo rat; and (b) calculations that predict that the capacity for elastic energy storage relative to body mass increases with size. Here we argue that: (i) data from kangaroos and kangaroo rats cannot be generalized to other mammals; (ii) the elastic energy storage capacity relative to body mass is not indicative of the importance of elastic energy to an animal; and (iii) the contribution of elastic energy to the mechanical work of locomotion will not increase as rapidly with size as the mass-specific energy storage capacity, because larger mammals must do relatively more mechanical work per stride. We predict how the ratio of elastic energy storage to mechanical work will change with size in quadrupedal mammals by combining empirical scaling relationships from the literature. The results suggest that the percentage contribution of elastic energy to the mechanical work of locomotion decreases with size, so that elastic energy is more important in the locomotion of smaller mammals. This now needs to be tested experimentally. PMID:17148127

  5. Spheroidal and Toroidal Modes for Tidal Kinetic Energy in Axisymmetric, Slightly Elliptical, Elastic Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getino, Juan; Escapa, Alberto; Garca, Amelia

    This paper is an extension of the previous one by Getino et al. (2002), where we studied the increase of the kinetic energy of spherical elastic bodies due to the tital perturbation, taking into account the spheroidal and toroidal modes of the displacement vector. In this paper we consider axisymmetrical, slightly elliptical bodies, whose density and rheological parameters are expressed as a sum of a term with radial dependence, corresponding to a spherical body, and terms that depend on the radius and on the latitude. By using the well-known properties of the Legendre polynomials, we prove that for the spheroidal modes, the only terms of the expansion of the perturbing potential that intervene in the kinetic energy correspond to n=0, 2, 4, while for the toroidal modes we have the contributions of n=1, 3. The corresponding tensor of inertia of each of these terms is obtained as a function of some integrals in r whose numerical values depend on the internal structure of the body. The result thus obtained are the general one, and is valid for any elastic body in the linear theory of the elasticity under the above-mentioned symmetrical properties.

  6. Full-potential calculations of structural, elastic and electronic properties of MgAl2O4 and ZnAl2O4 compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khenata, R.; Sahnoun, M.; Baltache, H.; Rrat, M.; Reshak, Ali H.; Al-Douri, Y.; Bouhafs, B.

    2005-09-01

    Theoretical studies of structural, elastic and electronic properties of spinel MgAl2O4 and ZnAl2O4 oxides are presented, using the full-potential linear augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method as implemented in the WIEN97 code. In this approach the local density approximation (LDA) is used for the exchange-correlation (XC) potential. Results are given for lattice constant, bulk modulus, and its pressure derivative. The band structure, density of states, pressure coefficients of energy gaps and elastic constants are also given. We present a detailed comparison with available experimental data and previous calculations. Good agreement is found.

  7. Phenomenological optical potential analysis of proton-carbon elastic scattering at 200 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidasaria, H. B.; Townsend, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    Differential cross sections for 200 MeV protons elastically scattered from C-12 were analyzed utilizing a local, complex, spin-dependent optical potential with a harmonic well radial dependence. Analyses were performed using the WKB and eikonal approximations. For the latter, first-order corrections to he phase shifts were incorporated to account for the spin-orbit contribution. Large disagreement between theory and experiment was observed when the usual Thomas form for the spin-orbit potential was utilized. Substantial improvement was obtained by allowing the parameters in the central and spin-orbit potential terms to vary independently.

  8. Solution for boson-diboson elastic scattering at zero energy in the shape-independent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macek, J. H.; Ovchinnikov, Serge; Gasaneo, Gustavo

    2005-09-01

    We derive an exact analytic expression for the boson-diboson elastic scattering phase shift in the shape-independent model for positive two-body scattering lengths when the total energy vanishes. A three-body hard-core potential depending upon a hyperradial cutoff parameter R0 is introduced to obtain a finite result. The exact result is compared with adiabatic hyperspherical calculations of the phase shift, and a similar functional dependence on the cutoff parameter is found. The cutoff parameter plays the role of a renormalization constant in that it renormalizes the wave function at vanishing hyperradius.

  9. Experimental validation of theoretical methods to estimate the energy radiated by elastic waves during an impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farin, Maxime; Mangeney, Anne; Rosny, Julien de; Toussaint, Renaud; Sainte-Marie, Jacques; Shapiro, Nikolaï M.

    2016-02-01

    Estimating the energy lost in elastic waves during an impact is an important problem in seismology and in industry. We propose three complementary methods to estimate the elastic energy radiated by bead impacts on thin plates and thick blocks from the generated vibration. The first two methods are based on the direct wave front and are shown to be equivalent. The third method makes use of the diffuse regime. These methods are tested for laboratory experiments of impacts and are shown to give the same results, with error bars of 40 percent and 300 percent for impacts on a smooth plate and on a rough block, respectively. We show that these methods are relevant to establish the energy budget of an impact. On plates of glass and PMMA, the radiated elastic energy increases from 2 percent to almost 100 percent of the total energy lost as the bead diameter approaches the plate thickness. The rest of the lost energy is dissipated by viscoelasticity. For beads larger than the plate thickness, plastic deformation occurs and reduces the amount of energy radiated in the form of elastic waves. On a concrete block, the energy dissipation during the impact is principally inelastic because only 0.2-2 percent of the energy lost by the bead is transported by elastic waves. The radiated elastic energy estimated with the presented methods is quantitatively validated by Hertz's model of elastic impact.

  10. A deformation-fluctuation hybrid method for fast evaluation of elastic constants with many-body potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Yubao; Chu, Chengbiao

    2012-02-01

    A universal, fast deformation-fluctuation hybrid approach with the merits of both the direct and fluctuation methods for evaluation of elastic constants is proposed. Deformation is shown to provide an inherent connection between the latter two methods. Based on this finding, the hybrid method utilizes group perturbation of atoms by means of six homogeneous deformations for fast evaluation of the Born term in the stress fluctuation method. The hybrid method is tested with three typical and widely used many-body potentials, i.e., for crystalline silicon with a Stillinger-Weber potential, for crystalline copper with second nearest-neighbor modified embedded-atom method and for diamond with a second-generation reactive empirical bond order potential. The calculated elastic constants agree well with either the theoretical or experimental results for all three cases. The hybrid method is especially valuable for complicated many-body potentials for which the analytical second derivative of the energy is challenging or impractical to obtain.

  11. Low-energy electron elastic scattering cross sections for excited Au and Pt atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felfli, Zineb; Eure, Amanda R.; Msezane, Alfred Z.; Sokolovski, Dmitri

    2010-05-01

    Electron elastic total cross sections (TCSs) and differential cross sections (DCSs) in both impact energy and scattering angle for the excited Au and Pt atoms are calculated in the electron impact energy range 0 ⩽ E ⩽ 4.0 eV. The cross sections are found to be characterized by very sharp long-lived resonances whose positions are identified with the binding energies of the excited anions formed during the collisions. The recent novel Regge-pole methodology wherein is embedded through the Mulholland formula the electron-electron correlations is used together with a Thomas-Fermi type potential incorporating the crucial core-polarization interaction for the calculations of the TCSs. The DCSs are evaluated using a partial wave expansion. The Ramsauer-Townsend minima, the shape resonances and the binding energies of the excited Au - and Pt - anions are extracted from the cross sections, while the critical minima are determined from the DCSs.

  12. Microscopic study on proton elastic scattering of light exotic nuclei at energies below than 100 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, M. Y. H.; Esmael, E. H.; Maridi, H. M.

    2012-11-01

    The proton elastic scattering data on some light exotic nuclei, namely, 6, 8He, 9, 11Li, and 10, 11, 12Be, at energies below than 100MeV/nucleon are analyzed using the single folding optical model. The real, imaginary, and spin-orbit parts of the optical potential (OP) are constructed only from the folded potentials and their derivatives using M3Y effective nucleon-nucleon interaction. These OP parts, their renormalization factors and their volume integrals are studied. The surface and spin-orbit potentials are important to fit the experimental data. Three model densities for halo nuclei are used and the sensitivity of the cross-sections to these densities is tested. The imaginary OP within high-energy approximation is used and compared with the single folding OP. This OP with few and limited fitting parameters, which have systematic behavior with incident energy, successfully describes the proton elastic scattering data with exotic nuclei.

  13. The elastic modulus correction term in creep activation energies Applied to oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malu, M.; Tien, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of elastic modulus and the temperature dependence of elastic modulus on creep activation energies for an oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base superalloy are investigated. This superalloy is commercially known as Inconel Alloy MA 753, strengthened both by gamma-prime precipitates and by yttria particles. It is shown that at intermediate temperatures, say below 1500 F, where elastic modulus is weakly dependent on temperature, the modulus correction term to creep activation energy is small. Accordingly, modulus corrections are insignificant for the superalloy considered, which shows high apparent creep activation energies at this temperature. On the contrary, at very high temperatures, the elastic modulus correction term can be significant, thus reducing the creep activation energy to that of vacancy self-diffusion. In order to obtain high-temperature creep resistance, a high-value elastic modulus with a weak dependence on temperature is required.

  14. Magneto-elasticity in hydrogels containing Fe3O4 nanoparticles and their potential applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunaryono, Taufiq, Ahmad; Munaji, Indarto, Bahtera; Triwikantoro, Zainuri, Mochamad; Darminto

    2013-09-01

    The magnetic hydrogels have been fabricated via standard method of polymer preparation. Hydrogels were the mixture of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and water by certain ratio of mass. Magnetism in hydrogels was presented by introduction of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles with crystal size ranging from 11 nm to 15 nm, prepared by coprecipitation technique from iron-sands. According to the magnetic induction experiment, it has shown that the magneto-elasticity of gels containing Fe3O4 of around 2.5% - 15% tends to decrease as increasing Fe3O4 concentration. The magneto-elasticity responses of the gels clearly form hysteresis in the increasing and decreasing applied magnetic field, where in turn open the potential applications of these magnetic hydrogels.

  15. Alaska's renewable energy potential.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2009-02-01

    This paper delivers a brief survey of renewable energy technologies applicable to Alaska's climate, latitude, geography, and geology. We first identify Alaska's natural renewable energy resources and which renewable energy technologies would be most productive. e survey the current state of renewable energy technologies and research efforts within the U.S. and, where appropriate, internationally. We also present information on the current state of Alaska's renewable energy assets, incentives, and commercial enterprises. Finally, we escribe places where research efforts at Sandia National Laboratories could assist the state of Alaska with its renewable energy technology investment efforts.

  16. Analysis of Dermal Elastic Fibers in the Absence of Fibulin-5 Reveals Potential Roles for Fibulin-5 in Elastic Fiber Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jiwon; Bergdahl, Andreas; Zheng, Qian; Starcher, Barry; Yanagisawa, Hiromi; Davis, Elaine C.

    2009-01-01

    Fibulin-5 is a 66 kDa modular, extracellular matrix protein that localizes to elastic fibers. Although in vitro protein-protein binding studies have shown that fibulin-5 binds many proteins involved in elastic fiber formation, the specific role of fibulin-5 in elastogenesis remains unclear. To provide a more detailed analysis of elastic fiber assembly in the absence of fibulin-5, the dermis of wild-type and fibulin-5 gene knockout (Fbln5?/?) mice was examined with electron microscopy (EM). Although light microscopy showed apparently normal elastic fibers near the hair follicles and the absence of elastic fibers in the intervening dermis of the Fbln5?/? mouse, EM revealed the presence of aberrantly assembled elastic fibers in both locales. Instead of the elastin being incorporated into the microfibrillar scaffold, the elastin appeared as globules juxtaposed to the microfibrils. Desmosine analysis showed significantly lower levels of mature cross-linked elastin in the the Fbln5?/? dermis, however, gene expression levels for tropoelastin and fibrillin-1, the major elastic fiber components, were unaffected. Based on these results, the nature of tropoelastin cross-linking was investigated using domain specific antibodies to lysyl oxidase like-1 (LOXL-1). Immunolocalization with an antibody to the N-terminal pro-peptide, which is cleaved to generate the active enzyme, revealed abundant staining in the Fbln5?/? dermis and no staining in the wild-type dermis. Overall, these results suggest two previously unrecognized functions for fibulin-5 in elastogenesis; first, to limit the extent of aggregation of tropoelastin monomers and/or coacervates and aid in the incorporation of elastin into the microfibril bundles, and second, to potentially assist in the activation of LOXL-1. PMID:19321153

  17. The effect of breakup of 6Li on elastic scattering and fusion with 28Si at near barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Mandira; Roy, Subinit; Basu, P.; Majumdar, H.

    2016-01-01

    Elastic scattering angular distributions for 6Li+28Si system were measured at Elab = 16, 21MeV and analyzed along with the existing data from the previous measurements in the energy range of Elab = 7.5 ‑ 27MeV. The measured cross-sections and the existing data, forming a set of angular distributions over a range of E/Vb = 0.9 ‑ 3.23, were analyzed using the phenomenological optical model potential (OMP). Three different sets of potential parameters were used. The energy dependence of the real and the imaginary potential strengths were, subsequently, extracted at the radius of sensitivity (Rav) for the system. Continuum Discretized Coupled Channel (CDCC) calculation was performed to explore the contribution of projectile break-up (BU) on the observed energy dependence of the effective potential for elastic scattering of 6Li from 28Si. The energy variation of the strength of the real potential with continuum coupling was found to agree with the energy dependence of the same extracted from the (OMP) analysis at energies around the barrier. But the behavior of the imaginary strength appeared to be different. The calculated fusion cross-sections, including the effect of BU, clearly overestimated the measured fusion excitation function data in the below and near barrier energies but compared well with the data at higher energies.

  18. The elastic energy and character of quakes in solid stars and planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, D.; Shaham, J.

    1972-01-01

    The quadrupolar mechanical energy of a rotating axially symmetric solid planet (with or without a liquid interior) is calculated using methods previously developed for neutron stars in which an elastic reference tensor is introduced to describe the build-up of elastic energy in the star. The basic parameters of the theory (the gravitational energy A and elastic energy B) depend upon the internal structure of the planet and may be calculated from specific planetary models. Explicit expressions are obtained for the Love numbers, and for the planetary wobble frequency. The theory provides a simple relationship between changes in shape or axis of figure of the planet and elastic energy release. The theory is extended to describe the Earth by taking into account isostasy, triaxiality and the observed lithospheric configuration.

  19. Close-coupling calculations with an INDOX/1s static potential, semiclassical exchange, and a semi-empirical polarisation potential for electron-CO2 elastic scattering and rotational excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onda, K.; Truhlar, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    A semiempirical molecular-orbital method for modelling the effective potential for electron-molecule scattering is applied to elastic scattering and rotational excitation of CO2 at 20 eV impact energy. Agreement with experiment is reasonably good. The calculated rotationally summed integral cross section is 67.8 a sub 0 squared.

  20. Contribution to the theory of tidal oscillations of an elastic earth. External tidal potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, P.

    1974-01-01

    The differential equations of the tidal oscillations of the earth were established under the assumption that the interior of the earth is laterally inhomogeneous. The theory was developed using vectorial and dyadic symbolism to shorten the exposition and to reduce the differential equations to a symmetric form convenient for programming and for numerical integration. The formation of tidal buldges on the surfaces of discontinuity and the changes in the internal density produce small periodic variations in the exterior geopotential which are reflected in the motion of artificial satellites. The analoques of Love elastic parameters in the expansion of exterior tidal potential reflect the asymmetric and inhomogeneous structure of the interior of the earth.

  1. Curve crossing for low-energy elastic scattering of He/+/ by Ne.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobbio, S. M.; Doverspike, L. D.; Champion, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The perturbation seen in the experimental differential elastic-scattering cross section for the 40-eV He/+/ + Ne system has been attributed to a single crossing of two intermolecular potential-energy curves. A new theoretical treatment of the curve-crossing problem, namely, that of Delos and Thorson, is employed to obtain the crossing probabilities and phases associated with the crossing. These are determined by utilizing ab initio potentials involved in the crossing and are further used in a partial-wave calculation of the cross section, which is compared with our experiment. The origin of the oscillatory structure observed in the differential cross section is discussed in semiclassical terms by defining the problem in terms of two pseudo-deflection-functions. A rainbow effect is shown to be related to a particular feature (a maximum rather than a minimum) of these deflection functions.

  2. Analysis of structures in the cross sections for elastic scattering and spin exchange in low-energy H+ +H collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstić, P. S.; Macek, J. H.; Ovchinnikov, S. Yu.; Schultz, D. R.

    2004-10-01

    Elastic scattering and spin exchange cross sections in H++H collisions are computed using accurate adiabatic potential curves for the center-of-mass energy range 10-4energy grid to resolve them. We analyze the structures using a comparison equation method to find the poles of the scattering matrix in the complex energy plane. We show that many features of the cross sections can be correlated with these poles and tabulate the positions of the most important poles. Finding stationary phases in the partial wave cross sections, we also explain in all details the glory oscillations of the elastic cross section that extends below 100eV down to the lowest energies.

  3. New approach to polarization phenomena in dp backward elastic scattering at intermediate and high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanifuji, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Iseri, Y.

    1998-05-01

    The spin observables T20, ?0=32Kyy (d-->p), Kyxz, Kyy (p-->p), and Cyy are investigated for dp backward elastic scattering at intermediate and high energies by the invariant-amplitude method with the one-nucleon-exchange assumption. Recently observed discrepancies between the conventional calculations and the experimental data for the ?0-T20 correlation are mostly dissolved by including effects of imaginary parts as the contribution of absorption in the invariant amplitudes. The dependence of the measured T20 and ?0 on the proton-neutron relative momentum is explained by the calculation with the specification of nuclear potentials, except T20 at high energies, for which possible solutions are investigated. Clear dependence on the imaginary parts of the amplitudes is found for Kyxz, measurements of which are suggested to be useful to distinguish between the solutions.

  4. Parton-parton elastic scattering and rapidity gaps at SSC and LHC energies

    SciTech Connect

    Duca, V.D.

    1993-08-01

    The theory of the perturbative pomeron, due to Lipatov and collaborators, is used to compute the probability of observing parton-parton elastic scattering and rapidity gaps between jets in hadron collisions at SSC and LHC energies.

  5. Analytical representation of elastic scattering cross sections of low energy electrons by atmospheric gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, V. Y.; Sipov, N. K.; Shneyder, V. A.

    1977-01-01

    Analytical representations of the elastic scattering cross sections of electrons with energies of 0.01-1 keV in atmospheric gases of N2, O2, O are given. These representations are suitable for the Monte Carlo method.

  6. Low energy elastic electron scattering from CF{sub 3}Br molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Hargreaves, L. R.; Brunton, J. R.; Maddern, T. M.; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-03-28

    CF{sub 3}Br is a potentially valuable precursor molecule for generating beams of gas phase Br radicals suitable for electron collisions studies. However, the utility of CF{sub 3}Br for this purpose depends critically on the availability of sound scattering cross sections to allow the contribution of the precursor to be isolated within the total scattering signal. To this end, here we present elastic differential cross section (DCS) measurements for CF{sub 3}Br at incident energies between 15 and 50 eV. Comparison of these DCSs to those from the only other available experimental study [Sunohara et al., J. Phys. B: At., Mol. Opt. Phys. 36, 1843 (2003)] and a Schwinger multichannel with pseudo potentials (SMCPPs) calculation [Bettega et al., J. Phys. B: At., Mol. Opt. Phys. 36, 1263 (2003)] shows generally a very good accord. Integral elastic and momentum transfer cross sections, derived from our DCSs, are also found to be in quite good agreement with the SMCPP results.

  7. Elastic energy loss with respect to the reaction plane in a Monte Carlo model

    SciTech Connect

    Auvinen, Jussi; Eskola, Kari J.; Holopainen, Hannu; Renk, Thorsten

    2010-11-15

    We present a computation of {pi}{sup 0} nuclear modification factor with respect to the reaction plane in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV, based on a Monte Carlo model of elastic energy loss of hard partons traversing the bulk hydrodynamical medium created in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We find the incoherent nature of elastic energy loss incompatible with the measured data.

  8. Target Flexibility in RNA−Ligand Docking Modeled by Elastic Potential Grids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The highly flexible nature of RNA provides a formidable challenge for structure-based drug design approaches that target RNA. We introduce an approach for modeling target conformational changes in RNA−ligand docking based on potential grids that are represented as elastic bodies using Navier's equation. This representation provides an accurate and efficient description of RNA−ligand interactions even in the case of a moving RNA structure. When applied to a data set of 17 RNA−ligand complexes, filtered out of the largest validation data set used for RNA−ligand docking so far, the approach is twice as successful as docking into an apo structure and still half as successful as redocking to the holo structure. The approach allows considering RNA movements of up to 6 Å rmsd and is based on a uniform and robust parametrization of the properties of the elastic potential grids, so that the approach is applicable to different RNA−ligand complex classes. PMID:24900336

  9. On granular elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qicheng; Jin, Feng; Wang, Guangqian; Song, Shixiong; Zhang, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscopic structures form in dense granular materials due to the self-organisation of the constituent particles. These structures have internal structural degrees of freedom in addition to the translational degree of freedom. The resultant granular elasticity, which exhibits intrinsic variations and inevitable relaxation, is a key quantity that accounts for macroscopic solid- or fluid-like properties and the transitions between them. In this work, we propose a potential energy landscape (PEL) with local stable basins and low elastic energy barriers to analyse the nature of granular elasticity. A function for the elastic energy density is proposed for stable states and is further calibrated with ultrasonic measurements. Fluctuations in the elastic energy due to the evolution of internal structures are proposed to describe a so-called configuration temperature Tc as a counterpart of the classical kinetic granular temperature Tk that is attributed to the translational degrees of freedom. The two granular temperatures are chosen as the state variables, and a fundamental equation is established to develop non-equilibrium thermodynamics for granular materials. Due to the relatively low elastic energy barrier in the PEL, granular elasticity relaxes more under common mechanical loadings, and a simple model based on mean-field theory is developed to account for this behaviour. PMID:25951049

  10. Fusion and elastic scattering for the sup 12 C+ sup 144 Sm system at energies near to the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Abriola, D.; Sonzogni, A.A.; di Tada, M.; Etchegoyen, A.; Etchegoyen, M.C.; Fernandez Niello, J.O.; Gil, S.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Pacheco, A.J.; Piegaia, R.; Testoni, J.E. )

    1992-07-01

    Fusion cross sections have been measured for {sup 12}C+{sup 144}Sm at bombarding energies in the range 46.5{le}{ital E}{sub lab}{le}75 MeV by off-line observations of x rays and gamma rays emitted in the decay of the evaporation residues and their daughters. Elastic scattering angular distributions for the same system have also been measured in the range 49{le}{ital E}{sub lab}{le}63 MeV. These data were used to obtain the parameters of an optical-model potential. It was found that a simultaneous description of both elastic scattering and fusion leads to an energy-dependent potential, with its real and imaginary parts connected by a dispersion relation.

  11. Volumetric and structural contributions to the interatomic potentials and elastic moduli of cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milstein, Frederick; Rasky, Daniel J.

    1986-02-01

    A popular model for metals considers the binding energy Ebind to consist of a structure-dependent part Estr and a volume-dependent part Evol. An analysis of each part's contributions to the pressure, the bulk modulus ?, and the shear moduli ? and ?' reveals combinations of elastic moduli that are evidently fundamental as is evidenced by their systematic variation in the Periodic Table. If ?vol and Pvol are the contributions of Evol to ? and P, respectively, at arbitrary applied pressure P, ?vol-2Pvol=?-2P-?'-(2 /3)?. If nearest-neighbor interactions provide the dominant contributions to the structure-dependent parts of ?, ?, and ?', for fcc crystals, ?vol=?-(1/3)(9?'-10?) and Pvol=2?-?'+P. For aluminum, ?vol/?~=1 (i.e., ?/?'~=0.9) this is considered to be more basic (and is more accurate) than the ``usual'' expression of aluminum's high isotropy (i.e., ?/?'~=1). Similar elastic behavior is predicted for the fcc metals calcium and strontium. For the metals copper, silver, nickel, and lead, ?vol/? is small; i.e., ?~=(1/3)(9?'-10?). Theoretical and empirical considerations suggest the utility of a specific analytical form for Ebind for the noble metals copper, silver, and gold; the form has four model-adjusting constants, the values of which are determined from experimental values of the zero pressure atomic volume and elastic moduli ?, ?, and ?'. The resultant expressions for Ebind are used to compute Pvol, ?vol, theoretical pressure-versus-volume relations, and the first and second pressure derivatives of ?, ?, and ?'. The results compare favorably with experiment and with other (more complex) theoretical computations.

  12. The human iliotibial band is specialized for elastic energy storage compared with the chimp fascia lata.

    PubMed

    Eng, Carolyn M; Arnold, Allison S; Biewener, Andrew A; Lieberman, Daniel E

    2015-08-01

    This study examines whether the human iliotibial band (ITB) is specialized for elastic energy storage relative to the chimpanzee fascia lata (FL). To quantify the energy storage potential of these structures, we created computer models of human and chimpanzee lower limbs based on detailed anatomical dissections. We characterized the geometry and force-length properties of the FL, tensor fascia lata (TFL) and gluteus maximus (GMax) in four chimpanzee cadavers based on measurements of muscle architecture and moment arms about the hip and knee. We used the chimp model to estimate the forces and corresponding strains in the chimp FL during bipedal walking, and compared these data with analogous estimates from a model of the human ITB, accounting for differences in body mass and lower extremity posture. We estimate that the human ITB stores 15- to 20-times more elastic energy per unit body mass and stride than the chimp FL during bipedal walking. Because chimps walk with persistent hip flexion, the TFL and portions of GMax that insert on the FL undergo smaller excursions (origin to insertion) than muscles that insert on the human ITB. Also, because a smaller fraction of GMax inserts on the chimp FL than on the human ITB, and thus its mass-normalized physiological cross-sectional area is about three times less in chimps, the chimp FL probably transmits smaller muscle forces. These data provide new evidence that the human ITB is anatomically derived compared with the chimp FL and potentially contributes to locomotor economy during bipedal locomotion. PMID:26026035

  13. Detailed study and mean field interpretation of {sup 16}O+{sup 12}C elastic scattering at seven medium energies

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoli, M. P.; Haas, F.; Freeman, R. M.; Szilner, S.; Basrak, Z.; Morsad, A.; Satchler, G. R.; Brandan, M. E.

    2000-03-01

    Detailed measurements of the elastic scattering of {sup 16}O ions from {sup 12}C have been carried out at seven energies from 62 to 124 MeV, at center-of-mass angles from about 10 degree sign to about 145 degree sign . A coherent optical model analysis of these data has been performed using both the Woods-Saxon and the folding-model potentials. The extracted results are consistent with analyses of data at higher energies for this and similar light heavy-ion systems. Some model-independent spline forms for the real potentials were also investigated. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  14. Variation of the energy release rate as a crack approaches and passes through an elastic inclusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Rongshun; Chudnovsky, A.

    1993-01-01

    The variation of the energy release rate (ERP) at the tip of a crack penetrating an elastic inclusion is analyzed using an approach involving modeling the random array of microcracks or other defects by an elastic inclusion with effective elastic properties. Computations are carried out using a finite element procedure. The eight-noded isoparametric serendipity element with the shift of the midpoint to the quarter-point is used to simulate the singularity at the crack tip, and the crack growth is accommodated by implementing a mesh regeneration technique. The ERP values were calculated for various crack tip positions which simulate the process of the crack approaching and penetrating the inclusion.

  15. The series elastic shock absorber: tendon elasticity modulates energy dissipation by muscle during burst deceleration.

    PubMed

    Konow, Nicolai; Roberts, Thomas J

    2015-04-01

    During downhill running, manoeuvring, negotiation of obstacles and landings from a jump, mechanical energy is dissipated via active lengthening of limb muscles. Tendon compliance provides a 'shock-absorber' mechanism that rapidly absorbs mechanical energy and releases it more slowly as the recoil of the tendon does work to stretch muscle fascicles. By lowering the rate of muscular energy dissipation, tendon compliance likely reduces the risk of muscle injury that can result from rapid and forceful muscle lengthening. Here, we examine how muscle-tendon mechanics are modulated in response to changes in demand for energy dissipation. We measured lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle activity, force and fascicle length, as well as leg joint kinematics and ground-reaction force, as turkeys performed drop-landings from three heights (0.5-1.5 m centre-of-mass elevation). Negative work by the LG muscle-tendon unit during landing increased with drop height, mainly owing to greater muscle recruitment and force as drop height increased. Although muscle strain did not increase with landing height, ankle flexion increased owing to increased tendon strain at higher muscle forces. Measurements of the length-tension relationship of the muscle indicated that the muscle reached peak force at shorter and likely safer operating lengths as drop height increased. Our results indicate that tendon compliance is important to the modulation of energy dissipation by active muscle with changes in demand and may provide a mechanism for rapid adjustment of function during deceleration tasks of unpredictable intensity. PMID:25716796

  16. Price Elasticities for Energy Use in Buildings of the United States

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    Energy demand tends to be responsive to changes in energy prices, a concept in economics known as price elasticity. Generally, an increase in a fuel price causes users to use less of that fuel or switch to a different fuel. The extent to which each of these changes takes place is of high importance to stakeholders in the energy sector and especially in energy planning. The purpose of this analysis is to determine fuel-price elasticities in stationary structures, particularly in the residential and commercial sectors.

  17. Nucleation rate of critical droplets on an elastic string in a {phi}{sup 6} potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, W.C.; Graham, A.J.

    2004-12-01

    We obtain the nucleation rate of critical droplets for an elastic string moving in a {phi}{sup 6} local potential and subject to noise and damping forces. The critical droplet is a bound soliton-antisoliton pair that carries a section of the string out of the metastable central minimum into one of the stable side minima. The frequencies of small oscillations about the critical droplet are obtained from a Heun equation. We solve the Fokker-Planck equation for the phase-space probability density by projecting it onto the eigenfunction basis obtained from the Heun equation. We employ Farkas' 'flux-overpopulation' method to obtain boundary conditions for solving the Fokker-Planck equation; these restrict the validity of our solution to the moderate to heavy damping regime. We present results for the rate as a function of temperature, well depth, and damping.

  18. Study of elastic and inelastic pion-nucleus scattering using the microscopic model of optical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukyanov, V. K.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Ellithi, A. Y.; Abdul-Magead, I. A. M.

    2015-05-01

    The pion-nucleus microscopic optical potential (OP), defined by the pion-nucleon scattering amplitude and by the generalized density distribution of a target nucleus that incudes internal degrees of freedom, is applied to construct the pion-nucleus differential cross-sections of elastic and inelastic scattering on the nuclei 28Si, 58Ni, 208Pb at Tlab = 291 MeV. Calculations are based on the relativistic wave equation and thus relativistic effects and distortions on the relative motion wave functions are taken into account. The respective experimental data are analyzed and the in-medium parameters of the elementary ?N-amplitude are established and compared with those from the pion scattering on free nucleons.

  19. Characterization of Elastic Properties in Basalts of the Western Snake River Plain, Idaho: a Mechanostratigraphic Analysis of a Potential Geothermal Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, J. A.; Evans, J. P.; Schmitt, D. R.; Shervais, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    The western Snake River Plain is a region of high crustal heat flow and has the potential for commercial geothermal energy development. High-temperature crystalline reservoirs commonly have connected fracture networks and other discontinuities that provide the primary fluid storage and permeability (Type I fractures). A borehole was drilled during the DOE/ICDP Snake River Scientific Drilling Program near Mountain Home, Idaho to a depth of ~1,800 m (6,000 ft) with 85 - 90% slimhole core recovery to assess the potential for geothermal energy development. A high-temperature artesian flow zone was encountered in basalt at a depth of 1,745 m (5,726 ft) in the MH-2 borehole with fluid temperatures above 140°C (240°F). Analysis of geomechanical behavior of rocks requires an understanding of basic physical and elastic properties under dynamic in-situ stress conditions. Here we conduct unconfined uniaxial compressive stress experiments on core samples to measure static elastic properties and compressive strength over a ~305 m (1,000 ft) interval of the borehole above and including the geothermal reservoir. Acoustic velocities are measured under pressure and temperature scenarios to calculate dynamic elastic properties and describe the anisotropy of elastic moduli and compressive strength. Dynamic elastic properties are calculated from dipole sonic borehole log data and compare the results to the previous dynamic and static interpretations. The comparison demonstrates that the calculation of dynamic elastic properties from borehole data is an effective method to interpret and describe mechanical stratigraphy and elastic properties in the case that core is not available for analysis in this area. Natural fractures, induced fractures, and breakouts are mapped in acoustic televiewer data. Fracture density is calculated and compared to lithological and mechanical stratigraphy, defined by the physical properties, elastic properties, and strength measurements. The stratigraphic relationships indicate that a ~15 m (50 ft) section of weak, non-brittle, low-permeability, highly altered basalt may act as a caprock to the geothermal reservoir at depth. Lithological descriptions of core show that the basalt in MH-2 has been altered and reworked in many cases. The alternating zones of ductile rocks and brittle basalts affect fracture density and can control fracture permeability. The induced fracture and breakout data are used to identify the direction of each of the two horizontal principal stresses. Interpretation of breakout data and induced fracture data indicate that the maximum horizontal principal stress (Shmax) is oriented 50° + 15°. This direction is antithetical to the expected Shmax direction based on the orientation of the normal fault-bounded basin that is oriented approximately 320°.

  20. LHC Physics Potential versus Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2009-08-01

    Parton luminosities are convenient for estimating how the physics potential of Large Hadron Collider experiments depends on the energy of the proton beams. I present parton luminosities, ratios of parton luminosities, and contours of fixed parton luminosity for gg, u{bar d}, and qq interactions over the energy range relevant to the Large Hadron Collider, along with example analyses for specific processes.

  1. All-electron full-potential calculation of the electronic band structure, elastic constants, and equation of state for graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Boettger, J.C.

    1997-05-01

    The all-electron full-potential linear combinations of Gaussian-type orbitals{emdash}fitting-function technique has been used to calculate the electronic structure, equation of state (EOS), and elastic constants for crystalline graphite. An analysis of the zero-pressure band structure is used to resolve inconsistencies between previous local-density-approximation (LDA) calculations. The calculated band structure is consistent with experimental data to the extent expected given the known limits of LDA one-electron energies. The in-plane lattice constant found here exhibits the usual LDA-induced contraction, whereas the interlayer separation and the unit-cell volume exhibit an anomalous expansion due to a LDA underestimate of the weak interlayer bonding. The calculated values of C{sub 11}+C{sub 12} and C{sub 33} are in good agreement with ultrasound measurements, while the value of C{sub 13}({approx}0) is much smaller than the ultrasound value. The bulk modulus and pressure derivatives of the lattice constants derived from the theoretical elastic constants are in very good agreement with diamond anvil cell (DAC) data, suggesting that the theoretical value for C{sub 13} is more reliable than the ultrasound measurement. An analytical EOS has been determined for pressures up to 50 GPa, well beyond the range of stability for the graphite structure. The EOS and the pressure dependencies of c/a and the optical transition energies (A{sub 1} and A{sub 2}) are in reasonable agreement with DAC data up to 14 GPa. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Addressing preservation of elastic contrast in energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brown, H G; D'Alfonso, A J; Forbes, B D; Allen, L J

    2016-01-01

    Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) images with resolutions of the order of an ngstrm can be obtained using modern microscopes corrected for chromatic aberration. However, the delocalized nature of the transition potentials for atomic ionization often confounds direct interpretation of EFTEM images, leading to what is known as "preservation of elastic contrast". In this paper we demonstrate how more interpretable images might be obtained by scanning with a focused coherent probe and incoherently averaging the energy-filtered images over probe position. We dub this new imaging technique energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy (EFISTEM). We develop a theoretical framework for EFISTEM and show that it is in fact equivalent to precession EFTEM, where the plane wave illumination is precessed through a range of tilts spanning the same range of angles as the probe forming aperture in EFISTEM. It is demonstrated that EFISTEM delivers similar results to scanning transmission electron microscopy with an electron energy-loss spectrometer but has the advantage that it is immune to coherent aberrations and spatial incoherence of the probe and is also more resilient to scan distortions. PMID:26476801

  3. Energy dissipation associated with crack extension in an elastic-plastic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Crack extension in elastic-plastic material involves energy dissipation through the creation of new crack surfaces and additional yielding around the crack front. An analytical procedure, using a two-dimensional elastic-plastic finite element method, was developed to calculate the energy dissipation components during a quasi-static crack extension. The fracture of an isotropic compact specimen was numerically simulated using the critical crack-tip-opening-displacement (CTOD) growth criterion. Two specimen sizes were analyzed for three values of critical CTOD. Results from the analyses showed that the total energy dissipation rate consisted of three components: the crack separation energy rate, the plastic energy dissipation rate, and the residual strain energy rate. All three energy dissipation components and the total energy dissipation rate initially increased with crack extension and finally reached constant values.

  4. Spectral Modeling of Residual Stress and Stored Elastic Strain Energy in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Donegan, Sean; Rolett, Anthony

    2013-12-31

    Solutions to the thermoelastic problem are important for characterizing the response under temperature change of refractory systems. This work extends a spectral fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique to analyze the thermoelastic behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), with the intent of probing the local origins of failure in TBCs. The thermoelastic FFT (teFFT) approach allows for the characterization of local thermal residual stress and strain fields, which constitute the origins of failure in TBC systems. A technique based on statistical extreme value theory known as peaks-over-threshold (POT) is developed to quantify the extreme values ("hot spots") of stored elastic strain energy (i.e., elastic energy density, or EED). The resolution dependence of the teFFT method is assessed through a sensitivity study of the extreme values in EED. The sensitivity study is performed both for the local (point-by-point) #12;eld distributions as well as the grain scale #12;eld distributions. A convergence behavior to a particular distribution shape is demonstrated for the local #12;elds. The grain scale fields are shown to exhibit a possible convergence to a maximum level of EED. To apply the teFFT method to TBC systems, 3D synthetic microstructures are created to approximate actual TBC microstructures. The morphology of the grains in each constituent layer as well as the texture is controlled. A variety of TBC materials, including industry standard materials and potential future materials, are analyzed using the teFFT. The resulting hot spots are quantified using the POT approach. A correlation between hot spots in EED and interface rumpling between constituent layers is demonstrated, particularly for the interface between the bond coat (BC) and the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer.

  5. Study of the Elastic Scattering of 32S by 24Mg at Low Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanain, Mahmoud A.; Ibraheem, Awad A.

    2015-12-01

    The elastic scattering angular distribution of 32S on 24Mg at energies ranging from 65 to 110 MeV has been analyzed in the framework of the double folding (DF) model, using different effective nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions based on the M3Y-Reid interaction. The Pauli correlation, zero-range, and finite-range exchange parts of the NN interactions are considered in the folding procedure to treat the single nucleon knock-on exchange term (SNKE) in the optical model. Successful reproduction of the data has been obtained with all the potentials considered in the present study. It is clear that the effect of Pauli correlation increases as the energy increases. Our calculations are insensitive to the strength of the imaginary potential used in the fit of the experimental data. We find also that the threshold anomaly is less pronounced in the 32S + 24Mg system. Our reaction cross sections are compared with the data, and the consistency between the real and imaginary volume integrals are checked by the dispersion relation.

  6. The elastic free energy of a tandem modular protein under force.

    PubMed

    Valle-Orero, Jessica; Eckels, Edward C; Stirnemann, Guillaume; Popa, Ionel; Berkovich, Ronen; Fernandez, Julio M

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have provided a theoretical framework for including entropic elasticity in the free energy landscape of proteins under mechanical force. Accounting for entropic elasticity using polymer physics models has helped explain the hopping behavior seen in single molecule experiments in the low force regime. Here, we expand on the construction of the free energy of a single protein domain under force proposed by Berkovich et al. to provide a free energy landscape for N tandem domains along a continuous polypeptide. Calculation of the free energy of individual domains followed by their concatenation provides a continuous free energy landscape whose curvature is dominated by the worm-like chain at forces below 20 pN. We have validated our free energy model using Brownian dynamics and reproduce key features of protein folding. This free energy model can predict the effects of changes in the elastic properties of a multidomain protein as a consequence of biological modifications such as phosphorylation or the formation of disulfide bonds. This work lays the foundations for the modeling of tissue elasticity, which is largely determined by the properties of tandem polyproteins. PMID:25796331

  7. Nonlinear Elastic Effects on the Energy Flux Deviation of Ultrasonic Waves in GR/EP Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Kriz, R. D.; Fitting, Dale W.

    1992-01-01

    In isotropic materials, the direction of the energy flux (energy per unit time per unit area) of an ultrasonic plane wave is always along the same direction as the normal to the wave front. In anisotropic materials, however, this is true only along symmetry directions. Along other directions, the energy flux of the wave deviates from the intended direction of propagation. This phenomenon is known as energy flux deviation and is illustrated. The direction of the energy flux is dependent on the elastic coefficients of the material. This effect has been demonstrated in many anisotropic crystalline materials. In transparent quartz crystals, Schlieren photographs have been obtained which allow visualization of the ultrasonic waves and the energy flux deviation. The energy flux deviation in graphite/epoxy (gr/ep) composite materials can be quite large because of their high anisotropy. The flux deviation angle has been calculated for unidirectional gr/ep composites as a function of both fiber orientation and fiber volume content. Experimental measurements have also been made in unidirectional composites. It has been further demonstrated that changes in composite materials which alter the elastic properties such as moisture absorption by the matrix or fiber degradation, can be detected nondestructively by measurements of the energy flux shift. In this research, the effects of nonlinear elasticity on energy flux deviation in unidirectional gr/ep composites were studied. Because of elastic nonlinearity, the angle of the energy flux deviation was shown to be a function of applied stress. This shift in flux deviation was modeled using acoustoelastic theory and the previously measured second and third order elastic stiffness coefficients for T300/5208 gr/ep. Two conditions of applied uniaxial stress were considered. In the first case, the direction of applied uniaxial stress was along the fiber axis (x3) while in the second case it was perpendicular to the fiber axis along the laminate stacking direction (x1).

  8. Ab initio Potential Energy Surface for H-H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Stallcop, James R.; Levin, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    Ab initio calculations employing large basis sets are performed to determine an accurate potential energy surface for H-H2 interactions for a broad range of separation distances. At large distances, the spherically averaged potential determined from the calculated energies agrees well with the corresponding results determined from dispersion coefficients; the van der Waals well depth is predicted to be 75 +/- (mu)E(sub h). Large basis sets have also been applied to reexamine the accuracy of theoretical repulsive potential energy surfaces. Multipolar expansions of the computed H-H2 potential energy surface are reported for four internuclear separation distances (1.2, 1.401, 1.449, and 1.7a(sub 0) of the hydrogen molecule. The differential elastic scattering cross section calculated from the present results is compared with the measurements from a crossed beam experiment.

  9. The elastic relaxation energy and equilibrium aspect ratio of self-organized pyramidal quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wang Min; Cai, Cheng Yu; Yin, Shu Yuan; Wang, Chong Yu

    2008-12-01

    The formation of dislocation-free three-dimensional island by heteroepitaxial growth of lattice-mismatched materials is used to produce quantum dots. The equilibrium shape of these islands results from the competition between surface and elastic energies. The system Ge/Si has been studied in detail. The elastic relaxation energy of the islands has been calculated within a continuum elasticity theory using finite element method, and the fitted function of relaxation factor with respect to aspect ratio, and functional relation between the aspect ratio and the volume of the deposited material when the epitaxial system is at equilibrium state has been obtained. The results obtained show that equilibrium aspect ration is increased with increasing QDs volume.

  10. Energies of Screened Coulomb Potentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    This article shows that, by applying the Hellman-Feynman theorem alone to screened Coulomb potentials, the first four coefficients in the energy series in powers of the perturbation parameter can be obtained from the unperturbed Coulomb system. (Author/HM)

  11. High-precision, all-electron, full-potential calculation of the equation of state and elastic constants of corundum

    SciTech Connect

    Boettger, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    The all-electron, full-potential linear combinations of Gaussian type orbitals{endash}fitting function technique has been used to perform high-precision total-energy calculations on {alpha}-alumina (corundum). The calculations yield zero-pressure lattice parameters that are in 0.3{percent} agreement with experiment and symmetry-preserving elastic constants that agree with experiment to within 5{percent}. The bulk modulus and pressure derivatives of the lattice parameters are also in good agreement with existing data. The calculated energies have been used to generate an analytical equation of state (EOS) for corundum that should be valid up to at least 250 GPa. The fitted EOS agrees with room temperature diamond anvil cell data up to 175 GPa to within the known limitations of the experimental data. The c/a ratio, band gap, and tetragonal shear modulus have been determined for pressures up to 250 GPa. The c/a ratio varies by less than 3{percent} over the entire pressure range. For pressures above 150 GPa, the band gap changes from direct to indirect and the tetragonal shear modulus softens. The linear pressure coefficient of the band gap is estimated to be 5.1 meV/kbar at zero pressure. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. High energy proton-proton elastic scattering at the Large Hadron Collider and nucleon structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luddy, Richard Joseph

    To gain insight into the structure of the nucleon, we pursue the development of the phenomenological model of Islam et al. (IIFS model) for high energy elastic pp and pp scattering. We determine the energy dependence of the parameters of the IIFS model using the available elastic differential cross section data from SPS Collider and Tevatron and the known asymptotic behavior of sigmatot (s) and rho(s) from dispersion relation calculations and more recent analyses of Cudell et al. (COMPETE Collaboration). Next, we incorporate a high energy elastic valence quark-quark scattering amplitude into the model based on BFKL pomeron to describe small impact parameter (large | t|) pp collisions. Finally, we predict the pp elastic differential cross section at the unprecedented c.m. energy of s = 14.0 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This prediction assumes crucial significance---because of an approved experiment at LHC: TOTal and Elastic Measurement (TOTEM). The TOTEM group plans to measure pp elastic dsigma/dt at 14.0 TeV all the way from momentum transfer |t| = 0 to |t| ? 10 GeV 2. Their measurement will stringently test not only the diffraction and o-exchange descriptions of the original IIFS model, but also the additional valence quark-quark scattering contribution that we find to be dominant for large |t|. Successful quantitative verification of the predicted dsigma/dt will mean that our picture of the nucleon with an outer cloud of qq condensed ground state, an inner core of topological baryonic charge, and a still smaller core of massless valence quarks provides a realistic description of nucleon structure.

  13. Examining the Potential of Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-09-01

    This outreach document goes to potential partners for NREL's Renewable Energy Potential Initiative, which will explore the long-term potential of Renewable Energy to meet a substantial share of U.S. energy needs.

  14. Tough and elastic hydrogel of hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate as potential cell scaffold materials.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yilu; Tang, Zhurong; Cao, Wanxu; Lin, Hai; Fan, Yujiang; Guo, Likun; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-03-01

    Natural polysaccharides are extensively investigated as cell scaffold materials for cellular adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation due to their excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability, and biofunctions. However, their application is often severely limited by their mechanical behavior. In this study, a tough and elastic hydrogel scaffold was prepared with hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS). HA and CS were conjugated with tyramine (TA) and the degree of substitution (DS) was 10.7% and 11.3%, respectively, as calculated by (1)H NMR spectra. The hydrogel was prepared by mixing HA-TA and CS-TA in presence of H2O2 and HRP. The sectional morphology of hydrogels was observed by SEM, static and dynamic mechanical properties were analyzed by Shimadzu electromechanical testing machine and dynamic mechanical thermal analyzer Q800. All samples showed good ability to recover their appearances after deformation, the storage modulus (E') of hydrogels became higher as the testing frequency went up. Hydrogels also showed fatigue resistance to cyclic compression. Mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in hydrogels showed good cell viability as detected by CLSM. This study suggests that the hydrogels have both good mechanical properties and biocompatibility, and may serve as model systems to explore mechanisms of deformation and energy dissipation or find some applications in tissue engineering. PMID:25445680

  15. Structural, vibrational, and elastic properties of a calcium aluminosilicate glass from molecular dynamics simulations: The role of the potential

    SciTech Connect

    Bauchy, M.

    2014-07-14

    We study a calcium aluminosilicate glass of composition (SiO{sub 2}){sub 0.60}(Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 0.10}(CaO){sub 0.30} by means of molecular dynamics. To this end, we conduct parallel simulations, following a consistent methodology, but using three different potentials. Structural and elastic properties are analyzed and compared to available experimental data. This allows assessing the respective abilities of the potentials to produce a realistic glass. We report that, although all these potentials offer a reasonable glass structure, featuring tricluster oxygen atoms, their respective vibrational and elastic predictions differ. This allows us to draw some general conclusions about the crucial role, or otherwise, of the interaction potential in silicate systems.

  16. Studying conformally flat spacetimes with an elastic stress energy tensor using 1 + 3 formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, I.; Ramos, M. P. Machado

    2015-12-01

    Conformally flat spacetimes with an elastic stress-energy tensor having diagonal trace-free anisotropic pressure are investigated using 1 + 3 formalism. The 1 + 3 Bianchi and Jacobi identities and Einstein field equations are written for a particular case with a conformal factor dependent on only one spatial coordinate. Solutions with non zero anisotropic pressure are obtained.

  17. Shape of hollow dislocation cores: Anisotropic surface energy and elastic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Srolovitz, D.J.; Sridhar, N.; Hirth, J.P.; Cahn, J.W.

    1998-08-04

    Equilibrium morphologies are frequently determined by a competition between interfacial and elastic energies. Holes at the cores of dislocations in materials with large Burgers vectors are a prime example of this type of competition because their existence is solely due to this type of competition. In this paper, the authors presented an approach for addressing these issues both in terms of determination of morphologies for which the energy is an extremum and a procedure for examining the stability of those solutions. The authors found that the circular core holes around screw dislocations predicted by Frank are stable in an isotropic material. Core holes around edge dislocations are stable, but are not circular because of the symmetry of their elastic field even in isotropic materials. Even isotropic elastic energy leads to core shapes in which the effect of surface anisotropy is exaggerated over what it would be in the Wulff shape. Most of the present results were derived on the basis of a parametric form for the hole shape and as an expansion of the energies valid for small perturbations about a circular cross-section. Calculations based upon a completely different proposed shape with exact elasticity results led to predictions of hole shapes which are nearly identical.

  18. California Industrial Energy Efficiency Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Coito, Fred; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Masanet, Eric; RafaelFriedmann; Rufo, Mike

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the modeling approach andhighlights key findings of a California industrial energy efficiencypotential study. In addition to providing estimates of technical andeconomic potential, the study examines achievable program potential undervarious program-funding scenarios. The focus is on electricity andnatural gas savings for manufacturing in the service territories ofCalifornia's investor-owned utilities (IOUs). The assessment is conductedby industry type and by end use. Both crosscutting technologies andindustry-specific process measures are examined. Measure penetration intothe marketplace is modeled as a function of customer awareness, measurecost effectiveness, and perceived market barriers. Data for the studycomes from a variety of sources, including: utility billing records, theEnergy Information Association (EIA) Manufacturing Energy ConsumptionSurvey (MECS), state-sponsored avoided cost studies, energy efficiencyprogram filings, and technology savings and cost data developed throughLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The study identifies 1,706GWh and 47 Mth (million therms) per year of achievable potential over thenext twelve years under recent levels of program expenditures, accountingfor 5.2 percent of industrial electricity consumption and 1.3 percent ofindustrial natural gas consumption. These estimates grow to 2,748 GWh and192 Mth per year if all cost-effective and achievable opportunities arepursued. Key industrial electricity end uses, in terms of energy savingspotential, include compressed air and pumping systems that combine toaccount for about half of the total achievable potential estimates. Fornatural gas, savings are concentrated in the boiler and process heatingend uses, accounting for over 99 percent to total achievablepotential.

  19. Tsunami earthquake generation by the release of gravitational potential energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Dan; Jackson, James

    2012-09-01

    Earthquakes that generate large tsunamis share a number of unusual features. They commonly have long source-time functions, involve large displacements, of 10 m or more, of the prisms of poorly consolidated sediment that form the accretionary wedge, and have many aftershocks with normal faulting mechanisms on the landward side of the trench. These features are not easily understood if the only source of the energy involved is the stored elastic strain. The observations, especially those from the Tohoku, Japan, 2011 earthquake, instead suggest that the observed behaviour results from the release of gravitational potential energy, as well as elastic strain. A simple model of this process can account for these and other observations.

  20. A Benchmark Calculation for Resonant Electron-Hydrogen Elastic Scattering at Low Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. D.; Lin, C. D.; Fon, W. C.; Odgers, B. R.

    1996-05-01

    Accurate differential cross sections (DCS) and spin-asymmetries for the elastic scattering of electrons from ground state hydrogen over the energies of the lowest ^1S and ^3P resonances have been obtained using the Intermediate R-matrix method of Odgers et al and the direct numerical approach of Wang and Callaway. The effects of ionization continuum on DCS, resonant positions, and spin-asymmetries are reexamined in light of the present calculations. The calculated elastic DCS are compared with the experiments of Williams and the calculation of McCarthy and Shang.

  1. Transmitting electric energy through a closed elastic wall by acoustic waves and piezoelectric transducers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zengtao; Guo, Shaohua; Yang, Jiashi

    2008-01-01

    Transmission of electric energy through a closed elastic wall by piezoelectric transducers and acoustic waves is studied based on the linear theory of piezoelectricity and elasticity. A theoretical analysis is performed. For the structure and motion considered, the 3-D equations of linear piezoelectricity reduce to a 1-D mathematical problem. An exact solution is obtained. Transmitted voltage, current, power, efficiency and stress distribution are obtained. Their dependence on various parameters is examined. The model and results of this paper are closer to real situations compared with those in a previous analysis. PMID:18599426

  2. Energy dissipation in heavy systems: the transition from quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; van den Berg, A.; Kolata, J.J.; Kovar, D.G.; Kutschera, W.; Rosner, G.; Stephans, G.S.F.; Yntema, J.L.; Lee, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of medium mass projectiles (A = 28 - 64) with /sup 208/Pb has been studied using a split-pole spectrograph which allows single mass and charge identification. The reaction process in all systems studied so far is dominated by quasi-elastic neutron transfer reactions, especially at incident energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In addition to the quasi-elastic component deep inelastic contributions are present in all reaction channels. The good mass and charge separation allows to generate Wilczynski plots for individual channels; for the system /sup 48/Ti + /sup 208/Pb we observe that the transition between the quasi-elastic and deep-inelastic reactions occurs around Q = -(30 to 35) MeV.

  3. Elastic Scattering Of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 80}Se At Near And Above Barrier Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Fimiani, L.; Marti, G. V.; Capurro, O. A.; Barbara, E. de; Testoni, J. E.; Zalazar, L.; Arazi, A.; Cardona, M. A.; Carnelli, P.; Figueira, J. M.; Hojman, D.; Martinez Heimann, D.; Negri, A. E.; Pacheco, A. J.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.

    2010-08-04

    In this work we propose to study the elastic scattering of the weakly bound projectiles {sup 6,7}Li on an intermediate mass target {sup 80}Se. From the experimental results presented here, precise angular distributions at energies below, around and above the nominal Coulomb barriers of the systems were obtained. The final goal of our work is to determine the characteristic parameters of the optical potential and use them to address the question of whether the usual threshold anomaly or the breakup threshold anomaly are present or not in these systems.

  4. Proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scattering at high energies: Theory, phenomenology, and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tai Tsun

    1990-12-31

    This is a brief review of the progress in the understanding, during the past twenty years, of hadronic elastic scattering near the forward direction at high energies. On the basis of quantum gauge field theories, the Pomeron is found to be a branch cut above 1. Using the physical picture that this result implies, phenomenology for proton-proton and antiproton-proton elastic scattering is constructed. Two noteworthy features are that, at high energies, both the total cross section and the ratio of the integrated elastic cross section to the total cross section to the total cross section are increasing functions of the center-of-mass energy. Detailed predictions are given for the elastic differential cross sections, Coulomb interference and the ratios of the real to imaginary parts of the forward amplitudes. These predictions have been extensively and accurately confirmed by experiments, and have also been given both for future experiments on existing accelerators and for experiments on future accelerators. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Proton-proton and proton-antiproton elastic scattering at high energies: Theory, phenomenology, and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tai Tsun.

    1990-01-01

    This is a brief review of the progress in the understanding, during the past twenty years, of hadronic elastic scattering near the forward direction at high energies. On the basis of quantum gauge field theories, the Pomeron is found to be a branch cut above 1. Using the physical picture that this result implies, phenomenology for proton-proton and antiproton-proton elastic scattering is constructed. Two noteworthy features are that, at high energies, both the total cross section and the ratio of the integrated elastic cross section to the total cross section to the total cross section are increasing functions of the center-of-mass energy. Detailed predictions are given for the elastic differential cross sections, Coulomb interference and the ratios of the real to imaginary parts of the forward amplitudes. These predictions have been extensively and accurately confirmed by experiments, and have also been given both for future experiments on existing accelerators and for experiments on future accelerators. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  6. The potential of renewable energy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    On June 27 and 28, 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories were convened to discuss plans for the development of a National Energy Strategy (NES) and, in particular, the analytic needs in support of NES that could be addressed by the laboratories. As a result of that meeting, interlaboratory teams were formed to produce analytic white papers on key topics, and a lead laboratory was designated for each core laboratory team. The broad-ranging renewables assignment is summarized by the following issue statement from the Office of Policy, Planning and Analysis: to what extent can renewable energy technologies contribute to diversifying sources of energy supply What are the major barriers to greater renewable energy use and what is the potential timing of widespread commercialization for various categories of applications This report presents the results of the intensive activity initiated by the June 1989 meeting to produce a white paper on renewable energy. Scores of scientists, analysts, and engineers in the five core laboratories gave generously of their time over the past eight months to produce this document. Their generous, constructive efforts are hereby gratefully acknowledged. 126 refs., 44 figs., 32 tabs.

  7. Non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Avijit Ray, Debasis

    2015-03-15

    The non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by the bound valence electron in the ground state 3s of atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas is investigated theoretically. The incident photon energy is assumed to be much smaller than the 3s-3p excitation energy. The alkali atom sodium is first formulated as an effective one-electron problem in which the attractive interaction between the valence electron and the atomic ion core is simulated by a spherically symmetric model potential. The Shukla-Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential model is then used to mimic the effective two-body (valence-core) interaction within quantum plasmas. Non-relativistic calculations performed within the electric dipole approximation indicate that the non-resonant elastic photon scattering cross-section undergoes a dramatic growth by several orders of magnitude as the quantum wave number increases. A qualitative explanation of this phenomenon is presented. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, a similar growth is observed at larger values of the quantum wave number. Our computed relevant atomic data are in very good agreement with the experimental as well as the previous theoretical data for the zero-screening (free atom) case, and with the very limited, accurate theoretical results available for the case of exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction, without the cosine screening term.

  8. Non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Avijit; Ray, Debasis

    2015-03-01

    The non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by the bound valence electron in the ground state 3s of atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas is investigated theoretically. The incident photon energy is assumed to be much smaller than the 3s-3p excitation energy. The alkali atom sodium is first formulated as an effective one-electron problem in which the attractive interaction between the valence electron and the atomic ion core is simulated by a spherically symmetric model potential. The Shukla-Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential model is then used to mimic the effective two-body (valence-core) interaction within quantum plasmas. Non-relativistic calculations performed within the electric dipole approximation indicate that the non-resonant elastic photon scattering cross-section undergoes a dramatic growth by several orders of magnitude as the quantum wave number increases. A qualitative explanation of this phenomenon is presented. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, a similar growth is observed at larger values of the quantum wave number. Our computed relevant atomic data are in very good agreement with the experimental as well as the previous theoretical data for the zero-screening (free atom) case, and with the very limited, accurate theoretical results available for the case of exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction, without the cosine screening term.

  9. Energy and momentum transfer to a 'fully-clamped' elastic plate in an air-blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Y.; Tan, P. J.

    2013-07-01

    The momentum transfer by a planar wave impinging upon a rigid, free-standing plate in water, a largely incompressible medium, is well understood [1]. Kambouchev et al. [2] extended the results of Taylor [1] to include the nonlinear effects of compressibility whilst Hutchinson [3] has recently addressed the issues of energy and momentum transfer to a rigid, free-standing plate. In this paper, key conclusions from the aforementioned studies are critically re-examined in the context of a 'fully-clamped' elastic plate. The dynamic response of an elastic plate is represented by an equivalent single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system. A numerical method based on a Lagrangian formulation of the Euler equations of compressible flow and conventional shock-capturing techn iques, similar to that employed in [2, 3], were employed to solve numerically the interaction between the air blast wave and elastic plate. Particular emphasis is placed on elucidating the energy and momentum transfer to a 'fully-clamped' elastic plate compared to its rigid, free-standing counterpart, and on whether enhancement in the beneficial effects of FSI as a result of fluid compressibility remains and to what extent.

  10. Three nucleon force effects in intermediate-energy deuteron analyzing powers for dp elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiguchi, K.; Okamura, H.; Sakamoto, N.; Sakaguchi, S.; Sasano, M.; Suzuki, H.; Dozono, M.; Wakasa, T.; Maeda, Y.; Saito, T.; Sakai, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Yako, K.; Witala, H.; Golak, J.; Gloeckle, W.; Kamada, H.; Nogga, A.

    2011-06-15

    A complete high precision set of deuteron analyzing powers for elastic deuteron-proton (dp) scattering at 250 MeV/nucleon (MeV/N) has been measured. The new data are presented together with data from previous measurements at 70, 100, 135 and 200 MeV/N. They are compared with the results of three-nucleon (3N) Faddeev calculations based on modern nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials alone or combined with two models of three nucleon forces (3NFs): the Tucson-Melbourne 99 (TM99) and Urbana IX. At 250 MeV/N large discrepancies between pure NN models and data, which are not resolved by including 3NFs, were found at c.m. backward angles of {theta}{sub c.m.} > or approx. 120 deg. for almost all the deuteron analyzing powers. These discrepancies are quite similar to those found for the cross section at the same energy. We found small relativistic effects that cannot resolve the discrepancies with the data indicating that other, short-ranged 3NFs are required to obtain a proper description of the data.

  11. Elastic electron scattering in krypton in the energy range from 5 to 10 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Linert, Ireneusz; Mielewska, Brygida; Zubek, Mariusz; King, George C.

    2010-01-15

    Differential cross sections for elastic electron scattering in krypton have been measured at the energies of 5,7.5, and 10 eV over the scattering angle range from 30 deg. to 180 deg. The measurements for backward scattering employed the magnetic angle-changing technique. These differential cross sections have been integrated to yield the elastic integral and momentum transfer cross sections at the above energies. These new results are compared with the most recent measurements and calculations of the respective cross sections in krypton. The dependence of the differential cross sections on atomic polarizability of the heavier rare gas atoms argon, krypton, and xenon has also been investigated over the electron energy range 5-30 eV and for forward, backward, and intermediate scattering angles.

  12. Elastic Scattering of Low-Energy Electrons byTetrahydrofuran

    SciTech Connect

    Trevisan, Cynthia S.; Orel, Ann E.; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2006-05-09

    We present the results of ab initio calculations for elasticelectron scattering by tetrahydrofuran (THF) using the complex Kohnvariational method. We carried out fixed-nuclei calculations at theequilibrium geometry of the target molecule for incident electronenergies up to 20 eV. The calculated momentum transfer cross sectionsclearly reveal the presence of broad shape resonance behavior in the 8-10eV energy range, in agreement with recent experiments. The calculateddifferential cross sections at 20 eV, which include the effects of thelong-range electron-dipole interaction, are alsofound to be in agreementwith the most recent experimental findings.

  13. Electron Attachment in Low-Energy Electron Elastic Collisions with Au and Pt Atoms: Identification of Excited Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Msezane, A. Z.; Eure, A.; Felfli, Z.; Sokolovski, D.

    2009-11-01

    The recent Regge-pole methodology has been benchmarked [1] on the accurately measured binding energies of the excited Ge= and Sn= anions [2] through the binding energies (BEs) extracted from the Regge-pole calculated elastic total cross sections (TCSs). Here the methodology is applied together with a Thomas-Fermi type potential that incorporates the vital core polarization interaction to investigate the possibility of forming excited Au= and Pt= anions in low-energy electron elastic collisions with Au and Pt atoms. From the positions of the characteristic extremely narrow resonances in the total cross sections, we extract the binding energies of the excited Au= and Pt= anions formed as Regge resonances during the collisions. The angular life of the complexes thus formed is used to differentiate the stable excited bound states of the anions from the shape resonances [3]. The BEs for the excited Au= and Pt= anions are found to be 0.475eVand 0.543eV, respectively, challenging both theory and experiment to verify. [1] A. Msezane et al, Phys. Rev. A, Submitted (2009) [2] M. Scheer et al, Phys. Rev. A 58, 2844 (1998) [3] Z. Felfli et al, Phys. Rev. A 79, 012714 (2009)

  14. Radius exponent in elastic and rigid arterial models optimized by the least energy principle.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Awa, Shoichi

    2014-02-01

    It was analyzed in normal physiological arteries whether the least energy principle would suffice to account for the radius exponent x. The mammalian arterial system was modeled as two types, the elastic or the rigid, to which Bernoulli's and Hagen-Poiseuille's equations were applied, respectively. We minimized the total energy function E, which was defined as the sum of kinetic, pressure, metabolic and thermal energies, and loss of each per unit time in a single artery transporting viscous incompressible blood. Assuming a scaling exponent ? between the vessel radius (r) and length (l) to be 1.0, x resulted in 2.33 in the elastic model. The rigid model provided a continuously changing x from 2.33 to 3.0, which corresponded to Uylings' and Murray's theories, respectively, through a function combining Reynolds number with a proportional coefficient of the l - r relationship. These results were expanded to an asymmetric arterial fractal tree with the blood flow preservation rule. While x in the optimal elastic model accounted for around 2.3 in proximal systemic (r >1 mm) and whole pulmonary arteries (r ?0.004 mm), optimal x in the rigid model explained 2.7 in elastic-muscular (0.1 < r ?1 mm) and 3.0 in peripheral resistive systemic arteries (0.004 ? r ?0.1 mm), in agreement with data obtained from angiographic, cast-morphometric, and in vivo experimental studies in the literature. The least energy principle on the total energy basis provides an alternate concept of optimality relating to mammalian arterial fractal dimensions under ? = 1.0. PMID:24744905

  15. Clutchable series-elastic actuator: design of a robotic knee prosthesis for minimum energy consumption.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Elliott J; Mooney, Luke M; Martinez-Villalpando, Ernesto C; Herr, Hugh M

    2013-06-01

    The cyclic and often linear torque-angle relationship of locomotion presents the opportunity to innovate on the design of traditional series-elastic actuators (SEAs). In this paper, a novel modification to the SEA architecture was proposed by adding a clutch in parallel with the motor within the SEA--denoted as a CSEA. This addition permits bimodal dynamics where the system is characterized by an SEA when the clutch is disengaged and a passive spring when the clutch is engaged. The purpose of the parallel clutch was to provide the ability to store energy in a tuned series spring, while requiring only reactionary torque from the clutch. Thus, when the clutch is engaged, a tuned elastic relationship can be achieved with minimal electrical energy consumption. The state-based model of the CSEA is introduced and the implementation of the CSEA mechanism in a powered knee prosthesis is detailed. The series elasticity was optimized to fit the spring-like torque-angle relationship of early stance phase knee flexion and extension during level ground walking. In simulation, the CSEA knee required 70% less electrical energy than a traditional SEA. Future work will focus on the mechanical implementation of the CSEA knee and an empirical demonstration of reduced electrical energy consumption during walking. PMID:24187202

  16. Global Optical Potential for {sup 6}He Interactions at Low Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kucuk, Y.; Boztosun, I.; Topel, T.

    2009-08-26

    Within the framework of optical model, we present a set of global optical potential for the elastic scattering of {sup 6}He halo nucleus from different target nuclei ranging from {sup 12}C to {sup 209}Bi at low energies. Consistent agreement with the experimental data has been obtained by using this global potential.

  17. An energy absorbing far-field boundary condition for the elastic wave equation

    SciTech Connect

    Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B

    2008-07-15

    The authors present an energy absorbing non-reflecting boundary condition of Clayton-Engquist type for the elastic wave equation together with a discretization which is stable for any ratio of compressional to shear wave speed. They prove stability for a second order accurate finite-difference discretization of the elastic wave equation in three space dimensions together with a discretization of the proposed non-reflecting boundary condition. The stability proof is based on a discrete energy estimate and is valid for heterogeneous materials. The proof includes all six boundaries of the computational domain where special discretizations are needed at the edges and corners. The stability proof holds also when a free surface boundary condition is imposed on some sides of the computational domain.

  18. Walking on potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Jeff; Taylor, Hugh; Schmidt, Peter; Simons, Jack

    1990-01-01

    An algorithm for locating stationary points corresponding to local minima and transition states on potential energy surfaces is developed and analyzed. This method, which represents a substantial extension of an earlier algorithm, utilizes local gradient and Hessian (i.e., first and second energy derivative) information to generate a series of ``steps'' that are followed to the desired stationary point. By designing the step sequence to move energetically downhill in all coordinates, local minima can be found. By stepping uphill along one local eigenmode of the Hessian while minimizing the energy along all other modes, one locates transition states. A key element of this development is a more efficient parametrization of the step vector in terms of quantities that permit the direction (i.e., uphill or downhill) and length of the step to be carefully controlled. This, in turn, allows ``walks'' that trace streambeds connecting local minima to transition states and to neighboring local minima more closely than has been found using the earlier methods. Such streambed walks provide information that can be used in subsequent reaction-path dynamics simulations.

  19. Synergy of inelastic and elastic energy loss. Temperature effects and electronic stopping power dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-06-16

    A combination of an inelastic thermal spike model suitable for insulators and molecular dynamics simulations is used to study the effects of temperature and electronic energy loss on ion track formation, size and morphology in SrTiO3 systems with pre-existing disorder. We find temperature dependence of the ion track size. In addition, we find a threshold in the electronic energy loss for a given pre-existing defect concentration, which indicates a threshold in the synergy between the inelastic and elastic energy loss.

  20. Absolute Beam Energy Measurement using Elastic ep Scattering at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deur, Alexandre

    1999-10-01

    The Jefferson Lab beam energy measurement in Hall A using the elastic ep scattering will be described. This new, non-magnetic, energy measurement method allows a ( triangle E/E=10-4 ) precision. First-order corrections are canceled by the measurements of the electron and proton scattering angles for two symmetric kinematics. The measurement principle will be presented as well as the device and measurement results. Comparison with independent magnetic energy measurements of the same accuracy will be shown. This project is the result of a collaboration between the LPC: université Blaise Pascal/in2p3), Saclay and Jefferson Lab.

  1. Synergy of inelastic and elastic energy loss. Temperature effects and electronic stopping power dependence

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-06-16

    A combination of an inelastic thermal spike model suitable for insulators and molecular dynamics simulations is used to study the effects of temperature and electronic energy loss on ion track formation, size and morphology in SrTiO3 systems with pre-existing disorder. We find temperature dependence of the ion track size. In addition, we find a threshold in the electronic energy loss for a given pre-existing defect concentration, which indicates a threshold in the synergy between the inelastic and elastic energy loss.

  2. Folded Elastic Strip-Based Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Harvesting Human Motion Energy for Multiple Applications.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yue; Wang, Bo; Dai, Shuge; Liu, Guanlin; Pu, Yanping; Hu, Chenguo

    2015-09-16

    A folded elastic strip-based triboelectric nanogenerator (FS-TENG) made from two folded double-layer elastic strips of Al/PET and PTFE/PET can achieve multiple functions by low frequency mechanical motion. A single FS-TENG with strip width of 3 cm and length of 27 cm can generate a maximum output current, open-circuit voltage, and peak power of 55 μA, 840 V, and 7.33 mW at deformation frequency of 4 Hz with amplitude of 2.5 cm, respectively. This FS-TENG can work as a weight sensor due to its good elasticity. An integrated generator assembled by four FS-TENGs (IFS-TENG) can harvest the energy of human motion like flapping hands and walking steps. In addition, the IFS-TENG combined with electromagnetically induced electricity can achieve a completely self-driven doorbell with flashing lights. Moreover, a box-like generator integrated by four IFS-TENGs inside can work in horizontal or random motion modes and can be improved to harvest energy in all directions. This work promotes the research of completely self-driven systems and energy harvesting of human motion for applications in our daily life. PMID:26305461

  3. Outstanding mechanical properties of monolayer MoS2 and its application in elastic energy storage.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qing; De, Suvranu

    2013-11-28

    The structural and mechanical properties of graphene-like honeycomb monolayer structures of MoS2 (g-MoS2) under various large strains are investigated using density functional theory (DFT). g-MoS2 is mechanically stable and can sustain extra large strains: the ultimate strains are 0.24, 0.37, and 0.26 for armchair, zigzag, and biaxial deformation, respectively. The in-plane stiffness is as high as 120 N m(-1) (184 GPa equivalently). The third, fourth, and fifth order elastic constants are indispensable for accurate modeling of the mechanical properties under strains larger than 0.04, 0.07, and 0.13 respectively. The second order elastic constants, including in-plane stiffness, are predicted to monotonically increase with pressure while the Poisson ratio monotonically decreases with increasing pressure. With the prominent mechanical properties including large ultimate strains and in-plane stiffness, g-MoS2 is a promising candidate of elastic energy storage for clean energy. It possesses a theoretical energy storage capacity as high as 8.8 MJ L(-1) and 1.7 MJ kg(-1), or 476 W h kg(-1), larger than a Li-ion battery and is environmentally friendly. PMID:24126736

  4. Outstanding mechanical properties of monolayer MoS2 and its application in elastic energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qing; de, Suvranu

    2014-03-01

    The structural and mechanical properties of graphene-like honeycomb monolayer structures of MoS2(g-MoS2) under various large strains are investigated using density functional theory (DFT). g-MoS2 is mechanically stable and can sustain extra large strains: the ultimate strains are 0.24, 0.37, and 0.26 for armchair, zigzag, and biaxial deformation, respectively. The in-plane stiffness is as high as 120 N/m (184 GPa equivalently). The third, fourth, and fifth order elastic constants are indispensable for accurate modeling of the mechanical properties under strains larger than 0.04, 0.07, and 0.13 respectively. The second order elastic constants, including in-plane stiffness, are predicted to monotonically increase with pressure while the Poisson ratio monotonically decreases with increasing pressure. With the prominent mechanical properties including large ultimate strains and in-plane stiffness, g-MoS2 is a promising candidate of elastic energy storage for clean energy. It possesses a theoretical energy storage capacity as high as 8.8 MJ/L and 1.7 MJ/kg, or 476 Wh/kg, larger than a Li-ion battery and is environmentally friendly. Financial support from the Defence Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Grant # BRBAA08-C-2-0130 and.

  5. Energy-loss of He ions in carbon allotropes studied by elastic resonance in backscattering spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosaki, Mitsuo; Rauhala, Eero

    2015-10-01

    Backscattering spectra for 4He ions incident on carbon allotropes have been measured in the energy range from 4.30 to 4.95 MeV in steps of 50-100 keV at scattering angles of 106 and 170. We used three carbon allotropes: graphite, diamond and amorphous carbon. For all these allotropes, we can observe the sharp (4He, 12C) elastic nuclear resonance at the He ion energy of 4.265 MeV in the backscattering spectra. By varying the incident He energy, we have systematically analyzed the profiles of the resonance peaks to study the energy-loss processes: stopping cross-sections and energy-loss straggling around the interesting region of the stopping maximum at about 500 keV. We focus on the resonance profiles and investigate an allotropic effect concerning the energy-loss. Furthermore, an energy bunching effect on the straggling is presented and the mechanism is discussed.

  6. Potential application of shape memory plastic as elastic material in clinical orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Nakasima, A; Hu, J R; Ichinose, M; Shimada, H

    1991-06-01

    Polynorbornen, a shape memory plastic developed in Japan, has a glass transitional point of 35 degrees C. Once the environmental temperature exceeds the critical point, this plastic will begin to display an elastic property, then return to its original shape, if deformed. We examined whether the force generated during the elastic phase of polynorbornen could be used to displace human teeth. We found that the shape memory plastic wire of 1 mm in diameter stretched to two to three times of its original length at a temperature of 50 degrees C and a speed of 0.5 mm/sec would exert a relatively stable continuous light force of 119-156 g to move the teeth. This new material, compared with conventional elastic modules used in orthodontic therapy, exhibited a lesser degree of force degradation at a body temperature of 37 degrees C for a long period, and can be manufactured to near the tooth colour required. These advantages make feasible clinical application of the shape memory plastic in orthodontics. PMID:1936135

  7. Elastic resistance change and action potential generation of non-faradaic Pt/TiO2/Pt capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyungkwang; Jang, Ho Won; Lee, Doh-Kwon; Kim, Inho; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Jeong, Doo Seok

    2013-06-01

    Electric current in the mixed ionic-electronic conductor TiO2 is hysteretic, i.e. history-dependent, and its use is versatile in electronic devices. Nowadays, biologically inspired, analogue-type computing systems, known as neuromorphic systems, are being actively investigated owing to their new and intriguing physical concepts. The realization of artificial synapses is important for constructing neuromorphic systems. In mammalians' brains, the plasticity of synapses between neighbouring nerve cells arises from action potential firing. Emulating action potential firing via inorganic systems has therefore become important in neuromorphic engineering. In this work, the current-voltage hysteresis of TiO2-based non-faradaic capacitors is investigated to primarily focus on the correlation between the blocking contact and the elasticity, i.e. non-plasticity, of the capacitors' resistance change, in experimental and theoretical methods. The similarity between the action potential firing behaviour in nerve cells and the elasticity of the non-faradaic capacitors is addressed.Electric current in the mixed ionic-electronic conductor TiO2 is hysteretic, i.e. history-dependent, and its use is versatile in electronic devices. Nowadays, biologically inspired, analogue-type computing systems, known as neuromorphic systems, are being actively investigated owing to their new and intriguing physical concepts. The realization of artificial synapses is important for constructing neuromorphic systems. In mammalians' brains, the plasticity of synapses between neighbouring nerve cells arises from action potential firing. Emulating action potential firing via inorganic systems has therefore become important in neuromorphic engineering. In this work, the current-voltage hysteresis of TiO2-based non-faradaic capacitors is investigated to primarily focus on the correlation between the blocking contact and the elasticity, i.e. non-plasticity, of the capacitors' resistance change, in experimental and theoretical methods. The similarity between the action potential firing behaviour in nerve cells and the elasticity of the non-faradaic capacitors is addressed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02154h

  8. Evidence for a vertebrate catapult: elastic energy storage in the plantaris tendon during frog jumping.

    PubMed

    Astley, Henry C; Roberts, Thomas J

    2012-06-23

    Anuran jumping is one of the most powerful accelerations in vertebrate locomotion. Several species are hypothesized to use a catapult-like mechanism to store and rapidly release elastic energy, producing power outputs far beyond the capability of muscle. Most evidence for this mechanism comes from measurements of whole-body power output; the decoupling of joint motion and muscle shortening expected in a catapult-like mechanism has not been demonstrated. We used high-speed marker-based biplanar X-ray cinefluoroscopy to quantify plantaris muscle fascicle strain and ankle joint motion in frogs in order to test for two hallmarks of a catapult mechanism: (i) shortening of fascicles prior to joint movement (during tendon stretch), and (ii) rapid joint movement during the jump without rapid muscle-shortening (during tendon recoil). During all jumps, muscle fascicles shortened by an average of 7.8 per cent (54% of total strain) prior to joint movement, stretching the tendon. The subsequent period of initial joint movement and high joint angular acceleration occurred with minimal muscle fascicle length change, consistent with the recoil of the elastic tendon. These data support the plantaris longus tendon as a site of elastic energy storage during frog jumping, and demonstrate that catapult mechanisms may be employed even in sub-maximal jumps. PMID:22090204

  9. Evidence for a vertebrate catapult: elastic energy storage in the plantaris tendon during frog jumping

    PubMed Central

    Astley, Henry C.; Roberts, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Anuran jumping is one of the most powerful accelerations in vertebrate locomotion. Several species are hypothesized to use a catapult-like mechanism to store and rapidly release elastic energy, producing power outputs far beyond the capability of muscle. Most evidence for this mechanism comes from measurements of whole-body power output; the decoupling of joint motion and muscle shortening expected in a catapult-like mechanism has not been demonstrated. We used high-speed marker-based biplanar X-ray cinefluoroscopy to quantify plantaris muscle fascicle strain and ankle joint motion in frogs in order to test for two hallmarks of a catapult mechanism: (i) shortening of fascicles prior to joint movement (during tendon stretch), and (ii) rapid joint movement during the jump without rapid muscle-shortening (during tendon recoil). During all jumps, muscle fascicles shortened by an average of 7.8 per cent (54% of total strain) prior to joint movement, stretching the tendon. The subsequent period of initial joint movement and high joint angular acceleration occurred with minimal muscle fascicle length change, consistent with the recoil of the elastic tendon. These data support the plantaris longus tendon as a site of elastic energy storage during frog jumping, and demonstrate that catapult mechanisms may be employed even in sub-maximal jumps. PMID:22090204

  10. Synergy of elastic and inelastic energy loss on ion track formation in SrTiO?.

    PubMed

    Weber, William J; Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli H; Sachan, Ritesh; Chisholm, Matthew F; Liu, Peng; Xue, Haizhou; Jin, Ke; Zhang, Yanwen

    2015-01-01

    While the interaction of energetic ions with solids is well known to result in inelastic energy loss to electrons and elastic energy loss to atomic nuclei in the solid, the coupled effects of these energy losses on defect production, nanostructure evolution and phase transformations in ionic and covalently bonded materials are complex and not well understood due to dependencies on electron-electron scattering processes, electron-phonon coupling, localized electronic excitations, diffusivity of charged defects, and solid-state radiolysis. Here we show that a colossal synergy occurs between inelastic energy loss and pre-existing atomic defects created by elastic energy loss in single crystal strontium titanate (SrTiO?), resulting in the formation of nanometer-sized amorphous tracks, but only in the narrow region with pre-existing defects. These defects locally decrease the electronic and atomic thermal conductivities and increase electron-phonon coupling, which locally increase the intensity of the thermal spike for each ion. This work identifies a major gap in understanding on the role of defects in electronic energy dissipation and electron-phonon coupling; it also provides insights for creating novel interfaces and nanostructures to functionalize thin film structures, including tunable electronic, ionic, magnetic and optical properties. PMID:25578009

  11. A method to estimate the elastic energy stored in braided DNA molecules using hydrodynamic equations

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sierra, Mónica; Delgado-Martí, Violeta; Colón-García, Jorge E.; Quiñones, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    We present a single-molecule method for measuring the torque exerted by braided DNA molecules undergoing spontaneous unbraiding while attached to a paramagnetic dumbbell in the absence of external manipulation. A magnetic tweezers setup is employed to braid pairs of lambda DNA molecules covalently bound to a surface. Upon removing the magnetic field, the braided DNA molecules undergo spontaneous unbraiding, efficiently transforming the stored elastic energy into enough mechanical energy to rotate the tethered dumbbells for periods as long as 30 minutes. Using hydrodynamic equations we estimate the torque exerted on the dumbbells by the DNA braids, yielding values ranging from 47 to 166 pN nm. PMID:21765578

  12. Elastic scattering for the system {sup 6}Li+p at near barrier energies with MAGNEX

    SciTech Connect

    Soukeras, V.; Pakou, A.; Sgouros, O.; Cappuzzello, F.; Bondi, M.; Nicolosi, D.; Acosta, L.; Marquinez-Duran, G.; Martel, I.; Agodi, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Cunsolo, A.; Di Pietro, A.; Fernández-García, J. P.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Alamanos, N.; De Napoli, M.; Foti, A.; and others

    2015-02-24

    Elastic scattering measurements have been performed for the {sup 6}Li+p system in inverse kinematics at the energies of 16, 20, 25 and 29 MeV. The heavy ejectile was detected by the large acceptance MAGNEX spectrometer at the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) in Catania, in the angular range between ∼2{sup 0} and 12{sup 0} in the laboratory system, giving us the possibility to span almost a full angular range in the center of mass system. Results will be presented and discussed for one of the energies.

  13. Bundle structures of stretching-energy and nonlinear interactions among modes in elastic wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaoka, Masanori; Yokoyama, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    The real-space dynamics and the nonlinear interactions among Fourier modes in elastic wave turbulence are investigated by simulating the Foppl-von Karman equation. We find that the bundle structures of ridges appear intermittently in the time evolution of the stretching energy field. The time-evolution of the nonlinearity indicates the existence of active and moderate phases in turbulent state. Conditional sampling analysis reveals that the bundle structure, which is the embodiment of the strong nonlinear interactions among modes, induces the energy supply from an external force to the system.

  14. Low-energy elastic electron scattering from chloromethane, CH3Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, C.; Sakaamini, A.; Cross, J.; Hargreaves, L. R.; Khakoo, M. A.; Fedus, Kamil; Winstead, C.; McKoy, V.

    2015-10-01

    We report theoretical as well as (normalized) experimental differential and integral cross sections for vibrationally elastic scattering of low-energy electrons from chloromethane, CH3Cl, also known as methyl chloride. The theoretical cross sections were computed using the Schwinger multichannel variational method in the single-channel approximation, with polarization effects included via virtual excitations. Cross section measurements were made at incident energies ranging from 0.5 to 100 eV and at scattering angles from {5}\\circ to {125}\\circ . We compare our data to earlier previous results for this molecule.

  15. Low-energy elastic electron scattering form chloroethane, C2H5Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaamini, A.; Navarro, C.; Cross, J.; Hargreaves, L. R.; Khakoo, M. A.; Fedus, Kamil; Winstead, C.; McKoy, V.

    2015-10-01

    We report theoretical as well as (normalized) experimental differential and integral cross sections for vibrationally elastic scattering of low-energy electrons from chloroethane, C2H5Cl, also known as ethyl chloride. The theoretical cross sections were computed using the Schwinger multichannel variational method in the single-channel approximation, with polarization effects included via virtual excitations. Cross section measurements were made at incident energies ranging from 1 to 30 eV and at scattering angles from {10}\\circ to {125}\\circ . We compare our data to previous results for C2H5Cl and for the related molecule chloromethane.

  16. EMTA’s Evaluation of the Elastic Properties for Fiber Polymer Composites Potentially Used in Hydropower Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Paquette, Joshua

    2010-08-01

    Fiber-reinforced polymer composites can offer important advantages over metals where lightweight, cost-effective manufacturing and high mechanical performance can be achieved. To date, these materials have not been used in hydropower systems. In view of the possibility to tailor their mechanical properties to specific applications, they now have become a subject of research for potential use in hydropower systems. The first step in any structural design that uses composite materials consists of evaluating the basic composite mechanical properties as a function of the as-formed composite microstructure. These basic properties are the elastic stiffness, stress-strain response, and strength. This report describes the evaluation of the elastic stiffness for a series of common discontinuous fiber polymer composites processed by injection molding and compression molding in order to preliminarily estimate whether these composites could be used in hydropower systems for load-carrying components such as turbine blades. To this end, the EMTA (Copyright © Battelle 2010) predictive modeling tool developed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been applied to predict the elastic properties of these composites as a function of three key microstructural parameters: fiber volume fraction, fiber orientation distribution, and fiber length distribution. These parameters strongly control the composite mechanical performance and can be tailored to achieve property enhancement. EMTA uses the standard and enhanced Mori-Tanaka type models combined with the Eshelby equivalent inclusion method to predict the thermoelastic properties of the composite based on its microstructure.

  17. Pole structure from energy-dependent and single-energy fits to GWU-SAID ? N elastic scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    varc, Alfred; Hadimehmedovi?, Mirza; Osmanovi?, Hedim; Stahov, Jugoslav; Workman, Ron L.

    2015-01-01

    The pole structure of the current George Washington University (GWU-SAID) partial-wave analysis of elastic ? N scattering and ? N production data is studied. Pole positions and residues are extracted from both the energy-dependent and single-energy fits, using two different methods. For the energy-dependent fits, both contour integration and a Laurent + Pietarinen approach are used. In the case of single-energy fits, the Laurent+Pietarinen approach is used. Errors are estimated and the two sets of results are compared to other fits to data.

  18. Microscopic positive-energy potential based on the Gogny interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchon, G.; Dupuis, M.; Arellano, H. F.; Vinh Mau, N.

    2015-01-01

    We present a nucleon elastic scattering calculation based on Green's function formalism in the random-phase approximation. For the first time, the finite-range Gogny effective interaction is used consistently throughout the whole calculation to account for the complex, nonlocal, and energy-dependent optical potential. Effects of intermediate single-particle resonances are included and found to play a crucial role in the account for measured reaction cross sections. Double counting of the particle-hole second-order contribution is carefully addressed. The resulting integro-differential Schrdinger equation for the scattering process is solved without localization procedures. The method is applied to neutron and proton elastic scattering from 40Ca. A successful account for differential and integral cross sections, including analyzing powers, is obtained for incident energies up to 30 MeV. Discrepancies at higher energies are related to a much-too-high volume integral of the real potential for large partial waves. This work opens the way to simultaneously assess effective interactions suitable for both nuclear structure and reactions.

  19. Radius exponent in elastic and rigid arterial models optimized by the least energy principle

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Awa, Shoichi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract It was analyzed in normal physiological arteries whether the least energy principle would suffice to account for the radius exponent x. The mammalian arterial system was modeled as two types, the elastic or the rigid, to which Bernoulli's and Hagen‐Poiseuille's equations were applied, respectively. We minimized the total energy function E, which was defined as the sum of kinetic, pressure, metabolic and thermal energies, and loss of each per unit time in a single artery transporting viscous incompressible blood. Assuming a scaling exponent α between the vessel radius (r) and length (l) to be 1.0, x resulted in 2.33 in the elastic model. The rigid model provided a continuously changing x from 2.33 to 3.0, which corresponded to Uylings’ and Murray's theories, respectively, through a function combining Reynolds number with a proportional coefficient of the l − r relationship. These results were expanded to an asymmetric arterial fractal tree with the blood flow preservation rule. While x in the optimal elastic model accounted for around 2.3 in proximal systemic (r >1 mm) and whole pulmonary arteries (r ≥0.004 mm), optimal x in the rigid model explained 2.7 in elastic‐muscular (0.1 < r ≤1 mm) and 3.0 in peripheral resistive systemic arteries (0.004 ≤ r ≤0.1 mm), in agreement with data obtained from angiographic, cast‐morphometric, and in vivo experimental studies in the literature. The least energy principle on the total energy basis provides an alternate concept of optimality relating to mammalian arterial fractal dimensions under α = 1.0. PMID:24744905

  20. Energy dependence of the optical potential for the /sup 16/O+/sup 144/Sm system near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Abriola, D.; DiGregorio, D.; Testoni, J.E.; Etchegoyen, A.; Etchegoyen, M.C.; Fernandez Niello, J.O.; Ferrero, A.M.J.; Gil, S.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Pacheco, A.J.; and others

    1989-02-01

    Angular distributions for elastic and inelastic scattering of /sup 16/O+/sup 144/Sm have been measured at bombarding energies E = 69.2 and 72.3 MeV. Excitation functions were measured between E = 61 and 76.3 MeV at backward angles. The present elastic scattering data plus existing fusion data were adjusted with both energy-independent and energy-dependent optical-model potentials. The energy dependence appears to be consistent with the dispersion relations which correlate the real and imaginary components of the potentials. The potentials behave similarly when coupling to inelastic channels is considered.

  1. Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface for H-H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patridge, Harry; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Stallcop, James R.; Levin, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    Ab initio calculations employing large basis sets are performed to determine an accurate potential energy surface for H-H2 interactions for a broad range of separation distances. At large distances, the spherically averaged potential determined from the calculated energies agrees well with the corresponding results determined from dispersion coefficients; the van der Waals well depth is predicted to be 75 +/- 3 micro E(h). Large basis sets have also been applied to reexamine the accuracy of theoretical repulsive potential energy surfaces (25-70 kcal/mol above the H-H2 asymptote) at small interatomic separations; the Boothroyd, Keogh, Martin, and Peterson (BKMP) potential energy surface is found to agree with results of the present calculations within the expected uncertainty (+/- 1 kcal/mol) of the fit. Multipolar expansions of the computed H-H2 potential energy surface are reported for four internuclear separation distances (1.2, 1.401, 1.449, and 1.7a(0)) of the hydrogen molecule. The differential elastic scattering cross section calculated from the present results is compared with the measurements from a crossed beam experiment.

  2. Nonlinear elastic effects on the energy flux deviation of ultrasonic waves in gr/ep composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Kriz, R. D.; Fitting, Dale W.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of nonlinear elasticity on energy flux deviation in undirectional gr/ep composites are examined. The shift in the flux deviation is modeled using acoustoelasticity theory and the second- and third-order elastic stiffness coefficients for T300/5208 gr/ep. Two conditions of applied uniaxial stress are considered. In the first case, the direction of applied uniaxial stress was along the fiber axis (x3), while in the second case it was perpendicular to the fiber axis along the laminate stacking direction (x1). For both conditions, the change in the energy flux deviation angle from the condition of zero applied stress is computed over the range of propagation directions of 0 to 60 deg from the fiber axis at two-degree intervals. A positive flux deviation angle implies the energy deviates away from the fiber direction toward the x1 axis, while a negative deviation means that the energy deviates toward the fibers. Over this range of fiber orientation angles, the energy of the quasi-longitudinal and pure mode transverse waves deviates toward the fibers, while that of the quasi-transverse mode deviates away from the fibers.

  3. Numerical simulations for width fluctuations in compound elastic and inelastic scattering at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Talou, Patrick

    2012-09-18

    The statistical theories - the Hauser-Feshbach model with the width fluctuation correction - play a central role in studying nuclear reactions in the fast energy region, hence the statistical model codes are essential for the nuclear data evaluations nowadays. In this paper, we revisit issues regarding the statistical model calculations in the fast energy range, such as the inclusion of the direct channels, and the energy averaged cross sections using different statistical assumptions. Although they have been discussed for a long time, we need more precise quantitative investigations to understand uncertainties coming from the models deficiencies in the fast energy range. For example, the partition of compound formation cross section into the elastic and inelastic channels depends on the elastic enhancement factor calculated from the statistical models. In addition, unitarity of S-matrix constrains this partition when the direct reactions are involved. Practically some simple assumptions, which many nuclear reaction model codes adopt, may work reasonably for the nuclear data evaluations. However, the uncertainties on the evaluated cross sections cannot go lower than the model uncertainty itself. We perform numerical simulations by generating the resonances using the R-matrix theory, and compare the energy (ensemble) averaged cross sections with the statistical theories, such as the theories of Moldauer, HRTW (Hofmann, Richert, Tepel, and Weidenmueller), KKM (Kawai-Kerman-McVoy), and GOE (Gaussian orthogonal ensemble).

  4. Analysis of Elastic Scattering of 8He+208Pb System at around the Coulomb Barrier Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Direkci, M.; Kucuk, Y.; Boztosun, I.

    2015-04-01

    The elastic scattering angular distribution of 8He+208Pb system is investigated at Elab = 22.0 MeV within the framework of Optical Model by using phenomenological and microscopic potentials. For the phenomenological Optical Model calculations, both real and imaginary parts of the complex nuclear potential have been chosen to have the Wood-Saxon shape. In the microscopic Optical Model calculations, we have used double folding procedure to calculate the real part of optical potential for different kinds of density distributions of 8He. A comparative study of this system has been conducted for the fist time by using phenomenological and microscopic potentials. It is observed that large imaginary radius value due to the existence of long-range absorption mechanism acting at large distances provides a very good agreement between theoretical results and experimental data with small ?2/N values.

  5. Measurement of the elastic, total and diffraction cross sections at tevatron energies

    SciTech Connect

    Belforte, S.; CDF Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    The CDF collaboration has measured the differential elastic cross section d{sigma}{sub el}/dt, the single diffraction dissociation double differential cross section d{sup 2}{sigma}{sub sd}/dM{sup 2}dt and the total inelastic cross section for antiproton-proton collisions at center of mass energies {radical}s = 546 and 1,800 GeV. Data for this measurement have been collected in short dedicated runs during the 1988--1989 data taking period of CDF. The elastic scattering slope is 15.28 {+-} 0.58 (16.98 {+-} 0.25) GeV{sup {minus}2} at {radical}s = 546 (1,800) GeV. Using the luminosity independent method (1 + {rho}{sup 2}){sigma}{sub T} is measured to be 62.64 {+-} 0.95 (81.83 {+-} 2.29) mb at {radical}s = 546 (1,800) GeV. Assuming {rho} = 0.15 the elastic, total and single diffraction cross sections are {sigma}{sub el} = 12.87 {+-} 0.30, {sigma}{sub T} = 61.26 {+-} 0.93 and {sigma}{sub sd} = 7.89 {+-} 0.33 mb ({sigma}{sub el} = 19.70 {+-} 0.85, {sigma}{sub T} = 80.03 {+-} 2.24 and {sigma}{sub sd} = 9.46 {+-} 0.44 mb) at {radical}s = 546 (1,800) GeV.

  6. Measurement of the elastic, total and single diffraction cross sections at Tevatron energies

    SciTech Connect

    Belforte, S.; CDF Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    CDF collaboration has measured the differential elastic cross section d{sigma}{sub el}/dt, the single diffraction dissociation double differential cross section d{sup 2}{sigma}{sub sd}/dM{sup 2}dt and the total inelastic cross section in antiproton-proton collisions at center of mass energies {radical}s=546 and 1800 GeV. The elastic scattering slope is 15.28{plus_minus}0.58 (16.98{plus_minus}0.25) GeV{sup {minus}2} at {radical}s = 546 (1800) GeV. Using the luminosity independent method, (1 + {rho}{sup 2}){sigma}{sub T} is measured to be 62.64{plus_minus}0.95 (81.83{plus_minus}2.29) mb at {radical}s = 546 (1800) GeV. Assuming {rho} = 0.15, the elastic, total and signal diffraction cross sections are {sigma}{sub el} = 12.87{plus_minus}0.30, {sigma}{sub T} = 61.26{plus_minus}0.93 and {sigma}{sub sd} = 7.89{plus_minus}0.33 mb ({sigma}{sub el} = 19.70{plus_minus}0.85, {sigma}{sub T} = 80.03{plus_minus}2.24 and {sigma}{sub sd} = 9.46{plus_minus}0.44 mb) at 546 (1800) GeV.

  7. Price and income elasticities of energy demand: Some estimates for Kuwait using two econometric models

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mutairi, N.H.; Eltony, M.N.

    1995-12-31

    This paper estimates the demand for energy in Kuwait for the period 1965-1989 using two econometric models: a cointegration and error correction model (ECM) and a simultaneous-equation model (SEM). The results obtained from both models are similar. It is found that the energy demand is inelastic with respect to price in the short and long run, and while it is elastic in the long run, the energy demand is inelastic with respect to income in the short run. Both models` validation shows that the ECM performed better in replicating the past than the simultaneous model, suggesting the need to use the ECM to identify future prospects for energy demand in Kuwait.

  8. Geothermal Energy: Tapping the Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Bill

    2008-01-01

    Ground source geothermal energy enables one to tap into the earth's stored renewable energy for heating and cooling facilities. Proper application of ground-source geothermal technology can have a dramatic impact on the efficiency and financial performance of building energy utilization (30%+). At the same time, using this alternative energy…

  9. Simultaneous optical model analysis of elastic scattering, fusion, and breakup for the {sup 9}Be+{sup 144}Sm system at near-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Camacho, A.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Padron, I.

    2008-05-15

    A simultaneous optical model calculation of elastic scattering, complete fusion, and breakup cross sections for energies around the Coulomb barrier is presented for reactions involving the weakly bound projectile {sup 9}Be on the medium size target {sup 144}Sm. In the calculations, the nuclear polarization potential U is split into a volume part U{sub F}, which is responsible for fusion reactions, and a surface part U{sub DR}, which accounts for direct reactions. A simultaneous {chi}{sup 2} analysis of elastic and complete fusion data shows that the extracted optical potential parameters of the real V{sub F} and imaginary W{sub F} parts of U{sub F} and the corresponding parts V{sub DR} and W{sub DR} of U{sub DR} satisfy separately the dispersion relation. Energy-dependent forms for the fusion and direct reaction potentials indicate that, at the strong absorption radius, the direct reaction potentials dominate over the fusion potentials. Moreover, the imaginary direct reaction potential results in a rather smooth function of E around the barrier energy. These findings show that the threshold anomaly, usually present in reactions with tightly bound projectiles, is not exhibited for the system {sup 9}Be+{sup 144}Sm. Within this formalism, the effect of breakup reactions on complete fusion is studied by turning on and off the potentials responsible for breakup reactions.

  10. Elastic scattering of low energy electrons in partially ionized dense semiclassical plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Shalenov, E. O.; Ramazanov, T. S.

    2015-08-01

    Elastic scattering of electrons by hydrogen atoms in a dense semiclassical hydrogen plasma for low impact energies has been studied. Differential scattering cross sections were calculated within the effective model of electron-atom interaction taking into account the effect of screening as well as the quantum mechanical effect of diffraction. The calculations were carried out on the basis of the phase-function method. The influence of the diffraction effect on the Ramsauer-Townsend effect was studied on the basis of a comparison with results made within the effective polarization model of the Buckingham type.

  11. Energy dependence of the {rho} resonance in {pi} {pi} elastic scattering from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, Christopher Thomas

    2013-02-01

    We determine the energy-dependent amplitude for elastic {pi} {pi} P-wave scattering in isospin-1 by computing part of the discrete energy spectrum of QCD in finite cubic boxes. We observe a rapidly rising phase shift that can be well described by a single {rho} Resonance. The spectrum is obtained from hadron correlators computed using lattice QCD with light quark masses corresponding to m{sub {pi}}~400 MeV. Variational analyses are performed with large bases of hadron interpolating fields including, as well as fermion bilinears that resemble q{anti q} Constructions, also operators that look like pairs of pions with definite relative and total momentum. We compute the spectrum for a range of center-of-mass momenta and in various irreducible representations of the relevant symmetry group. Hence we determine more than thirty values of the isospin-1 P-wave scattering phase shift in the elastic region, mapping out its energy dependence in unprecedented detail.

  12. Potential of renewable and alternative energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, V.; Pogharnitskaya, O.; Rostovshchikova, A.; Matveenko, I.

    2015-11-01

    The article deals with application potential of clean alternative renewable energy sources. By means of system analysis the forecast for consumption of electrical energy in Tomsk Oblast as well as main energy sources of existing energy system have been studied up to 2018. Engineering potential of renewable and alternative energy sources is evaluated. Besides, ranking in the order of their efficiency descending is performed. It is concluded that Tomsk Oblast has high potential of alternative and renewable energy sources, among which the most promising development perspective is implementation of gasification stations to save fuel consumed by diesel power stations as well as building wind-power plants.

  13. Nudged-elastic band method with two climbing images: finding transition states in complex energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A; Johnson, Duane D

    2015-01-14

    The nudged-elastic band (NEB) method is modified with concomitant two climbing images (C2-NEB) to find a transition state (TS) in complex energy landscapes, such as those with a serpentine minimal energy path (MEP). If a single climbing image (C1-NEB) successfully finds the TS, then C2-NEB finds it too. However, improved stability of C2-NEB makes it suitable for more complex cases, where C1-NEB misses the TS because the MEP and NEB directions near the saddle point are different. Generally, C2-NEB not only finds the TS, but also guarantees, by construction, that the climbing images approach it from the opposite sides along the MEP. In addition, C2-NEB provides an accuracy estimate from the three images: the highest-energy one and its climbing neighbors. C2-NEB is suitable for fixed-cell NEB and the generalized solid-state NEB. PMID:25591337

  14. Nudged-elastic band method with two climbing images: Finding transition states in complex energy landscapes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2015-01-09

    The nudged-elastic band (NEB) method is modified with concomitant two climbing images (C2-NEB) to find a transition state (TS) in complex energy landscapes, such as those with a serpentine minimal energy path (MEP). If a single climbing image (C1-NEB) successfully finds the TS, then C2-NEB finds it too. Improved stability of C2-NEB makes it suitable for more complex cases, where C1-NEB misses the TS because the MEP and NEB directions near the saddle point are different. Generally, C2-NEB not only finds the TS, but guarantees, by construction, that the climbing images approach it from the opposite sides along the MEP.more » In addition, C2-NEB provides an accuracy estimate from the three images: the highest-energy one and its climbing neighbors. C2-NEB is suitable for fixed-cell NEB and the generalized solid-state NEB.« less

  15. Shear effects on energy dissipation from an elastic beam on a rigid foundation

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Adam Ray; Quinn, D. Dane

    2015-10-20

    This paper describes the energy dissipation arising from microslip for an elastic shell incorporating shear and longitudinal deformation resting on a rough-rigid foundation. This phenomenon is investigated using finite element (FE) analysis and nonlinear geometrically exact shell theory. Both approaches illustrate the effect of shear within the shell and observe a reduction in the energy dissipated from microslip as compared to a similar system neglecting shear deformation. In particular, it is found that the shear deformation allows for load to be transmitted beyond the region of slip so that the entire interface contributes to the load carrying capability of the shell. The energy dissipation resulting from the shell model is shown to agree well with that arising from the FE model, and this representation can be used as a basis for reduced order models that capture the microslip phenomenon.

  16. Shear effects on energy dissipation from an elastic beam on a rigid foundation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brink, Adam Ray; Quinn, D. Dane

    2015-10-20

    This paper describes the energy dissipation arising from microslip for an elastic shell incorporating shear and longitudinal deformation resting on a rough-rigid foundation. This phenomenon is investigated using finite element (FE) analysis and nonlinear geometrically exact shell theory. Both approaches illustrate the effect of shear within the shell and observe a reduction in the energy dissipated from microslip as compared to a similar system neglecting shear deformation. In particular, it is found that the shear deformation allows for load to be transmitted beyond the region of slip so that the entire interface contributes to the load carrying capability of themore » shell. The energy dissipation resulting from the shell model is shown to agree well with that arising from the FE model, and this representation can be used as a basis for reduced order models that capture the microslip phenomenon.« less

  17. Nudged-elastic band method with two climbing images: Finding transition states in complex energy landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2015-01-09

    The nudged-elastic band (NEB) method is modified with concomitant two climbing images (C2-NEB) to find a transition state (TS) in complex energy landscapes, such as those with a serpentine minimal energy path (MEP). If a single climbing image (C1-NEB) successfully finds the TS, then C2-NEB finds it too. Improved stability of C2-NEB makes it suitable for more complex cases, where C1-NEB misses the TS because the MEP and NEB directions near the saddle point are different. Generally, C2-NEB not only finds the TS, but guarantees, by construction, that the climbing images approach it from the opposite sides along the MEP. In addition, C2-NEB provides an accuracy estimate from the three images: the highest-energy one and its climbing neighbors. C2-NEB is suitable for fixed-cell NEB and the generalized solid-state NEB.

  18. Energy scavenging from acousto-elastic metamaterial using local resonance phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Riaz U.; Adiba, Afifa; Banerjee, Sourav

    2015-04-01

    This article presents the possibility of energy scavenging (ES) utilizing the physics of acousto-elastic metamaterial (AEMM) and use them in a dual mode (Acoustic Filter and Energy Harvester), simultaneously. Concurrent wave filtering and energy harvesting mechanism is previously presented using local resonance phenomenon in phononic crystal, however energy harvesting capabilities of AEMM is not reported extensively. Traditionally acoustic metamaterials are used in filtering acoustic waves by trapping or guiding the acoustic energy, whereas this work presents that the trapped dynamic energy inside the soft constituent (matrix) of metamaterials can be significantly harvested by strategically embedding piezoelectric wafers in the matrix. With unit cell model, we asserted that at lower acoustic frequencies maximum power in the micro Watts (~36?W) range can be generated, which is significantly higher than the existing harvesters of same kind. Efficient energy scavengers at low acoustic frequencies are almost absent due to large required size relevant to the acoustic wavelength. In this work we propose sub wave length scale energy scavengers utilizing the coupled physics of local, structural and matrix resonances. Upon validation of the argument through analytical, numerical and experimental studies, a broadband energy scavenger (ES) with multi-cell model is designed with varying geometrical properties.

  19. Repulsive nature of optical potentials for high-energy heavy-ion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Furumoto, T.; Sakuragi, Y.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2010-10-15

    The recent works by the present authors predicted that the real part of heavy-ion optical potentials changes its character from attraction to repulsion around the incident energy per nucleon E/A=200-300 MeV on the basis of the complex G-matrix interaction and the double-folding model (DFM) and revealed that the three-body force plays an important role there. In the present paper, we have precisely analyzed the energy dependence of the calculated DFM potentials and its relation to the elastic-scattering angular distributions in detail in the case of the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C system in the energy range of E/A=100-400 MeV. The tensor force contributes substantially to the energy dependence of the real part of the DFM potentials and plays an important role to lower the attractive-to-repulsive transition energy. The nearside and farside (N/F) decompositions of the elastic-scattering amplitudes clarify the close relation between the attractive-to-repulsive transition of the potentials and the characteristic evolution of the calculated angular distributions with the increase of the incident energy. Based on the present analysis, we propose experimental measurements for the predicted strong diffraction phenomena of the elastic-scattering angular distribution caused by the N/F interference around the attractive-to-repulsive transition energy together with the reduced diffractions below and above the transition energy.

  20. Pseudo-potential calculations of structural and elastic properties of spinel oxides ZnX2O4 (X=Al, Ga, In) under pressure effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhemadou, A.; Khenata, R.

    2006-12-01

    First principle calculations of structural and elastic properties of ZnAl2O4, ZnGa2O4 and ZnIn2O4 compounds are presented, using the pseudo-potential plane-waves approach based on density functional theory, within the generalized gradient approximation GGA. The lattice constants and internal parameters are in good agreement with the available experimental results. Young's modulus, Poisson ratio, bulk modulus, elastic constants and their pressure dependence are also calculated. As the experimental elastic constants are not available hence our results were only compared with the available theoretical values obtained at equilibrium volume.

  1. Impulsive correction to the elastic moduli obtained using the stress-fluctuation formalism in systems with truncated pair potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Wittmer, J. P.; Poli?ska, P.; Baschnagel, J.

    2012-10-01

    The truncation of a pair potential at a distance rc is well known to imply, in general, an impulsive correction to the pressure and other moments of the first derivatives of the potential. That, depending on rc, the truncation may also be of relevance to higher derivatives is shown theoretically for the Born contributions to the elastic moduli obtained using the stress-fluctuation formalism in d dimensions. Focusing on isotropic liquids for which the shear modulus G must vanish by construction, the predicted corrections are tested numerically for binary mixtures and polydisperse Lennard-Jones beads in, respectively, d=3 and 2 dimensions. Both models being glass formers, we comment briefly on the temperature (T) dependence of the (corrected) shear modulus G(T) around the glass transition temperature Tg.

  2. Elastic cross sections for low-energy electron collisions with tetrahydropyran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Bettega, Márcio H. F.

    2016-02-01

    We report on calculated elastic cross sections for low-energy electron collisions with the cyclic ether tetrahydropyran (C5H10O). The calculations were carried out with the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with norm-conserving pseudopotentials in the static-exchange-polarization approximation for energies up to 20 eV. Our cross sections are compared with previous results obtained for cyclohexane and 1,4-dioxane, since the three molecules present similar structures. The calculated differential cross sections for these three molecules present similarities, except at low scattering angles, where the differential cross sections of tetrahydropyran present a sharp increase due to the permanent dipole moment of the molecule. The similarities observed in the cross sections reveal that the molecular geometry plays an important role in the description of scattering process. We also compared our calculated elastic integral cross section for tetrahydropyran with experimental total cross sections data available in the literature and found a good qualitative agreement between both results.

  3. Elastic cross sections for low-energy electron collisions with tetrahydropyran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza Barbosa, Alessandra; Bettega, Márcio H. F.

    2016-02-01

    We report on calculated elastic cross sections for low-energy electron collisions with the cyclic ether tetrahydropyran (C5H10O). The calculations were carried out with the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with norm-conserving pseudopotentials in the static-exchange-polarization approximation for energies up to 20 eV. Our cross sections are compared with previous results obtained for cyclohexane and 1,4-dioxane, since the three molecules present similar structures. The calculated differential cross sections for these three molecules present similarities, except at low scattering angles, where the differential cross sections of tetrahydropyran present a sharp increase due to the permanent dipole moment of the molecule. The similarities observed in the cross sections reveal that the molecular geometry plays an important role in the description of scattering process. We also compared our calculated elastic integral cross section for tetrahydropyran with experimental total cross sections data available in the literature and found a good qualitative agreement between both results. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  4. Rapid conversion of elastic energy into plastic shear heating during incipient necking of the lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Yuen, David A.

    An important and novel mechanism for ductile failure of the lithosphere is identified here, which is intrinsic to the thermal-mechanical feedback in a temperature dependent plastic body with coupled elastic fields. Both a temperature-dependent power-law visco-elasto-plastic rheology and a temperature-dependent elasto-plastic rheology are employed to study in a self-consistent fashion the deformation of the lithosphere subject to extension by means of a two-dimensional, finite-element code. A structural perturbation initially localizes elasto-plastic deformation only in its immediate vicinity. However, after 800,000 years have elapsed the localized zone of deformation takes off in a crack-like fashion and travels to the bottom of the lithosphere in about 50,000 years time. When the plate is severed, thermal runaway is caused by mechanical heating triggered by the rapid energy transfer of the globally stored elastic energy into localized plastic dissipation in the ductile fault.

  5. Energy-dependent microscopic optical potential for scattering of nucleons on light nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, M. Y. H.; Esmael, E. H.; Maridi, H. M.

    2014-06-01

    We present an energy-dependent microscopic optical model potential for elastic scattering of nucleons on light nuclei. The single-folding model is used for the real part of the optical potential (OP), while the imaginary part is derived within the high-energy approximation theory. The energy dependence of the OP is determined from the parameterization of the volume integrals those calculated from the best-fit OP that fit the experimental data of the cross sections and analyzing powers. This energy-dependent OP is successfully applied to analyze the proton elastic scattering of 4,6,i8He, 6,7Li, and 9,10Be nuclei at low and intermediate incident energies up to 200MeV/nucleon.

  6. Elastic Energy Storage and Radial Forces in the Myofilament Lattice Depend on Sarcomere Length

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C. David; Regnier, Michael; Daniel, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    We most often consider muscle as a motor generating force in the direction of shortening, but less often consider its roles as a spring or a brake. Here we develop a fully three-dimensional spatially explicit model of muscle to isolate the locations of forces and energies that are difficult to separate experimentally. We show the strain energy in the thick and thin filaments is less than one third the strain energy in attached cross-bridges. This result suggests the cross-bridges act as springs, storing energy within muscle in addition to generating the force which powers muscle. Comparing model estimates of energy consumed to elastic energy stored, we show that the ratio of these two properties changes with sarcomere length. The model predicts storage of a greater fraction of energy at short sarcomere lengths, suggesting a mechanism by which muscle function shifts as force production declines, from motor to spring. Additionally, we investigate the force that muscle produces in the radial or transverse direction, orthogonal to the direction of shortening. We confirm prior experimental estimates that place radial forces on the same order of magnitude as axial forces, although we find that radial forces and axial forces vary differently with changes in sarcomere length. PMID:23166482

  7. Prediction of Dyke Propagation using the Minimum Potential Energy Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimisson, Elas; Hooper, Andrew; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn

    2015-04-01

    An important aspect of eruption forecasting is the prediction and monitoring of dyke propagation. Eruptions occur where dykes propagate to the surface, with lava flows causing a major threat. When such eruption occur under ice, as is common in Iceland, they become explosive and often cause hazardous and destructive floods. Dykes have also been known to trigger explosive eruption when hot basaltic magma comes in contact with more developed volatile saturated magma. Such explosive eruptions pose a danger to both lives and property. At divergent plate boundaries new crust is formed primarily by dyke injections. These injections usually grow laterally away from a central volcano. Lateral growth of a dyke is expected to follow the minimum potential energy principle. Assuming a closed system, a dyke will tend to be emplaced such that it minimizes the total potential energy, ?T, given by: ?T = ?s + ?g (1) where ?s is the strain potential and ?g the gravitational energy potential. Assuming that the elastic medium behaves linearly the strain potential can be calculated by numerically integrating the strain energy density over a large volume. If the dyke is assumed to be propagating at a constant depth with respect to sea level the gravitational potential energy can be turned into a two dimensional integral. We do this by integrating the predicted vertical displacements multiplied by the local topographic load above a reference surface and the acceleration of gravity. We approximate strain and stress due to plate movements and then consider strain changes induced by the dyke formation. Opening of a dyke is energetically favourable when it releases strain energy built up at a divergent plate boundary, but once deviatoric stress in the crust adjacent to a segment is released it becomes favourable to propagate laterally. Dyke formation is associated with uplift on their flanks; the lower the topographic load over the flanks, the less energy it costs. For any given location on a volcano, the strike of a new dyke segment will influence the strain and gravitational potential energy change in a different way. This type of model was applied to the more than 45 km long dyke formed in the Brarbunga volcanic system in Iceland in a rifting event in August 2014. Large observed changes in strike can be explained mostly by interplay of gravitational effects of topography and plate boundary strain. The model minimizing the total potential energy explains this propagation path. Our results suggest that by applying the total minimum potential energy principle we can forecast dyke propagation.

  8. Cross sections for elastic electron scattering by tetramethylsilane in the intermediate-energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Sugohara, R. T.; Lee, M.-T.; Iga, I.; Souza, G. L. C. de; Homem, M. G. P.

    2011-12-15

    Organosilicon compounds are of current interest due to the numerous applications of these species in industries. Some of these applications require the knowledge of electron collision cross sections, which are scarce for such compounds. In this work, we report absolute values of differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections for elastic electron scattering by tetramethylsilane (TMS) measured in the 100-1000 eV energy range. The relative-flow technique is used to normalize our data. In addition, the independent-atom-model (IAM) and the additivity rule (AR), widely used to model electron collisions with light hydrocarbons, are also applied for e{sup -}-TMS interaction. The comparison of our measured results of cross sections and the calculated data shows good agreement, particularly near the higher-end of incident energies.

  9. Development of an elastic-impulse power transmission for wind energy conversion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahl, B.

    1986-01-01

    A multiload-capable elastic-impulse power transmission for use in Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) was designed, prototype constructed and bench tested. The transmission interposes a temporary energy storage device between the input and output shafts, and therefore allows the two shafts to rotate at virtually independent speeds. For utility interface induction generators which must run at essentially constant speed, the transmission allows the turbine rotor to run at variable speed, thereby maintaining the constant tip-speed ratio corresponding to the peak-power point. The transmission was found to work in principle, but the first construction prototype exhibited low efficiencies (24%) due to the constraints imposed by the utilization of commercial components.

  10. A balance between membrane elasticity and polymerization energy sets the shape of spherical clathrin coats

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Mohammed; Morlot, Sandrine; Hohendahl, Annika; Manzi, John; Lenz, Martin; Roux, Aurlien

    2015-01-01

    In endocytosis, scaffolding is one of the mechanisms to create membrane curvature by moulding the membrane into the spherical shape of the clathrin cage. However, the impact of membrane elastic parameters on the assembly and shape of clathrin lattices has never been experimentally evaluated. Here, we show that membrane tension opposes clathrin polymerization. We reconstitute clathrin budding in vitro with giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), purified adaptors and clathrin. By changing the osmotic conditions, we find that clathrin coats cause extensive budding of GUVs under low membrane tension while polymerizing into shallow pits under moderate tension. High tension fully inhibits polymerization. Theoretically, we predict the tension values for which transitions between different clathrin coat shapes occur. We measure the changes in membrane tension during clathrin polymerization, and use our theoretical framework to estimate the polymerization energy from these data. Our results show that membrane tension controls clathrin-mediated budding by varying the membrane budding energy. PMID:25695735

  11. A balance between membrane elasticity and polymerization energy sets the shape of spherical clathrin coats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleem, Mohammed; Morlot, Sandrine; Hohendahl, Annika; Manzi, John; Lenz, Martin; Roux, Aurélien

    2015-02-01

    In endocytosis, scaffolding is one of the mechanisms to create membrane curvature by moulding the membrane into the spherical shape of the clathrin cage. However, the impact of membrane elastic parameters on the assembly and shape of clathrin lattices has never been experimentally evaluated. Here, we show that membrane tension opposes clathrin polymerization. We reconstitute clathrin budding in vitro with giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), purified adaptors and clathrin. By changing the osmotic conditions, we find that clathrin coats cause extensive budding of GUVs under low membrane tension while polymerizing into shallow pits under moderate tension. High tension fully inhibits polymerization. Theoretically, we predict the tension values for which transitions between different clathrin coat shapes occur. We measure the changes in membrane tension during clathrin polymerization, and use our theoretical framework to estimate the polymerization energy from these data. Our results show that membrane tension controls clathrin-mediated budding by varying the membrane budding energy.

  12. The surface-forming energy release rate based fracture criterion for elastic-plastic crack propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Si; Wang, He-Ling; Liu, Bin; Hwang, Keh-Chih

    2015-11-01

    The J-integral based criterion is widely used in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. However, it is not rigorously applicable when plastic unloading appears during crack propagation. One difficulty is that the energy density with plastic unloading in the J-integral cannot be defined unambiguously. In this paper, we alternatively start from the analysis on the power balance, and propose a surface-forming energy release rate (ERR), which represents the energy available for separating the crack surfaces during the crack propagation and excludes the loading-mode-dependent plastic dissipation. Therefore the surface-forming ERR based fracture criterion has wider applicability, including elastic-plastic crack propagation problems. Several formulae are derived for calculating the surface-forming ERR. From the most concise formula, it is interesting to note that the surface-forming ERR can be computed using only the stress and deformation of the current moment, and the definition of the energy density or work density is avoided. When an infinitesimal contour is chosen, the expression can be further simplified. For any fracture behaviors, the surface-forming ERR is proven to be path-independent, and the path-independence of its constituent term, so-called Js-integral, is also investigated. The physical meanings and applicability of the proposed surface-forming ERR, traditional ERR, Js-integral and J-integral are compared and discussed. Besides, we give an interpretation of Rice paradox by comparing the cohesive fracture model and the surface-forming ERR based fracture criterion.

  13. Elastic energy within the human plantar aponeurosis contributes to arch shortening during the push-off phase of running.

    PubMed

    Wager, Justin C; Challis, John H

    2016-03-21

    During locomotion, the lower limb tendons undergo stretch and recoil, functioning like springs that recycle energy with each step. Cadaveric testing has demonstrated that the arch of the foot operates in this capacity during simple loading, yet it remains unclear whether this function exists during locomotion. In this study, one of the arch׳s passive elastic tissues (the plantar aponeurosis; PA) was investigated to glean insights about it and the entire arch of the foot during running. Subject specific computer models of the foot were driven using the kinematics of eight subjects running at 3.1m/s using two initial contact patterns (rearfoot and non-rearfoot). These models were used to estimate PA strain, force, and elastic energy storage during the stance phase. To examine the release of stored energy, the foot joint moments, powers, and work created by the PA were computed. Mean elastic energy stored in the PA was 3.1±1.6J, which was comparable to in situ testing values. Changes to the initial contact pattern did not change elastic energy storage or late stance PA function, but did alter PA pre-tensioning and function during early stance. In both initial contact patterns conditions, the PA power was positive during late stance, which reveals that the release of the stored elastic energy assists with shortening of the arch during push-off. As the PA is just one of the arch׳s passive elastic tissues, the entire arch may store additional energy and impact the metabolic cost of running. PMID:26944691

  14. Wave energy transfer in elastic half-spaces with soft interlayers.

    PubMed

    Glushkov, Evgeny; Glushkova, Natalia; Fomenko, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    The paper deals with guided waves generated by a surface load in a coated elastic half-space. The analysis is based on the explicit integral and asymptotic expressions derived in terms of Green's matrix and given loads for both laminate and functionally graded substrates. To perform the energy analysis, explicit expressions for the time-averaged amount of energy transferred in the time-harmonic wave field by every excited guided or body wave through horizontal planes and lateral cylindrical surfaces have been also derived. The study is focused on the peculiarities of wave energy transmission in substrates with soft interlayers that serve as internal channels for the excited guided waves. The notable features of the source energy partitioning in such media are the domination of a single emerging mode in each consecutive frequency subrange and the appearance of reverse energy fluxes at certain frequencies. These effects as well as modal and spatial distribution of the wave energy coming from the source into the substructure are numerically analyzed and discussed. PMID:25920833

  15. Potential Water and Energy Savings from Showerheads

    SciTech Connect

    Biermayer, Peter J.

    2005-09-28

    This paper estimates the benefits and costs of six water reduction scenarios. Benefits and costs of showerhead scenarios are ranked in this paper by an estimated water reduction percentage. To prioritize potential water and energy saving scenarios regarding showerheads, six scenarios were analyzed for their potential water and energy savings and the associated dollar savings to the consumer.

  16. Low-energy electron elastic scattering from Os atom: New electron affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felfli, Z.; Kiros, F.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2013-05-01

    Bilodeau and Haugan measured the binding energies (BEs) of the ground state and the excited state of the Os- ion to be 1.07780(12) eV and 0.553(3) eV, respectively. These values are consistent with those calculated in. Here our investigation, using the recent complex angular momentum methodology wherein is embedded the crucial electron-electron correlations and the vital core polarization interaction, has found that the near threshold electron-Os elastic scattering total cross section (TCS) is characterized by three stable bound states of the Os- ion formed as resonances during the slow electron collision, with BEs of 1.910 eV, 1.230 eV and 0.224 eV. The new extracted electron affinity (EA) value from the TCS of 1.910 eV for the Os atom is significantly different from that measured in. Our calculated elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) also yield the relevant BEs for the ground and the two excited states of the Os- ion. The complex characteristic resonance structure in the TCS for the Os atom is ideal for catalysis, but makes it difficult to execute the Wigner threshold law in describing the threshold detachment behavior of complex atoms and extracting the reliable attendant EAs. Supported by U.S. DOE, AFOSR and CAU CFNM, NSF-CREST Program.

  17. Investigation of contact electrification based broadband energy harvesting mechanism using elastic PDMS microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakar, Lokesh; Tay, F. E. H.; Lee, Chengkuo

    2014-10-01

    Triboelectric energy harvesting has recently garnered a lot of interest because of its easy fabrication and high power output. Contact electrification depends on the chemical properties of contacting materials. Another important factor in contact electrification mechanism is surfaces’ elastic and topographical characteristics. One of the biggest limitations of resonant mechanism based devices is their narrow operating bandwidth. This paper presents a broadband mechanism which utilizes stiffness induced in the cantilever motion due to contact between two triboelectric surfaces. We have conducted experiments using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropad patterns to study the effect of micropad array configuration on the performance of triboelectric energy harvesting devices. The maximum power output measured from the device was observed to be 0.69 μW at an acceleration of 1 g. Due to the non-linearity introduced by contact separation mechanism, the bandwidth of the triboelectric energy harvester was observed to be increased by 63% at an acceleration level of 1 g. A hybrid energy harvesting mechanism has also been demonstrated by compounding the triboelectric energy harvester with a piezoelectric bimorph.

  18. Geothermal Energy Potential in Western United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryde, Philip R.

    1977-01-01

    Reviews types of geothermal energy sources in the western states, including hot brine systems and dry steam systems. Conversion to electrical energy is a major potential use of geothermal energy, although it creates environmental disruptions such as noise, corrosion, and scaling of equipment. (AV)

  19. Shape derivative of the energy functional in a problem for a thin rigid inclusion in an elastic body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudoy, E. M.

    2015-08-01

    The equilibrium problem of the elastic body with a delaminated thin rigid inclusion is considered. In this case, there is a crack between the rigid inclusion and the elastic body. We suppose that the nonpenetration conditions are prescribed on the crack faces. We study the dependence of the energy of the body on domain variations. The formula for the shape derivative of the energy functional is obtained. Moreover, it is shown that for the special cases of the domain perturbations such derivative can be represented as invariant integrals.

  20. Crystallography and elastic energy analysis of VN precipitates in Fe-Mn-Si-Cr shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Farjami, Susan . E-mail: sfarjami@stu.material.tohoku.ac.jp; Hiraga, Kenji; Kubo, Hiroshi

    2005-01-10

    High-resolution electron microscopy investigations are carried out to describe the morphology and crystallography of VN precipitates which are formed in an Fe-28Mn-6Si-5Cr (mass%) shape memory alloy. It is revealed that the shape change from a cube with (1 0 0) interfaces to an octahedral shape with (1 1 1) interfaces occurs on aging in the precipitate. In order to identify the equilibrium shape of the VN precipitate, elastic strain energy of the precipitate has been estimated on the basis of microscopic theory of elasticity. It is found that a coherent precipitate ({approx}4 nm in edge width) in a cube shape with (1 0 0) surfaces can be formed, at an early stage of precipitation, with no misfit dislocations existing at the interface of the precipitate. It is also shown that the octahedral-shaped precipitate ({approx}15 nm in edge width) has a minimum elastic energy, among the cube-shaped, sphere-shaped and octahedron-shaped precipitates, only when the misfit dislocations are introduced at the interfaces. The elastic interaction energy between the misfit dislocations and the precipitate-misfit dislocations is estimated for the first time using the Fourier transformed microscopic theory of elasticity.

  1. Elastic vs. radiative heavy quark energy loss within a transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uphoff, Jan; Fochler, Oliver; Xu, Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2014-12-01

    The full space-time evolution of gluons, light and heavy quarks in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions is studied within the partonic transport model Boltzmann Approach to MultiParton Scatterings (BAMPS). We discuss for light and heavy quarks the elastic and radiative energy loss with a running coupling. Radiative processes, in particular, are implemented through an improved version of the Gunion-Bertsch matrix element, which is derived from comparisons to the exact result, explicitly taking finite heavy quark masses into account. Subsequently, we present results with and without radiative processes and compare them to experimental data at LHC. A focus is put on the nuclear modification factor of charged hadrons and D mesons.

  2. Markov Chain Monte Carlo Effective Range Analysis of Low-Energy Electron Elastic Scattering from Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedus, Kamil

    2016-02-01

    Modified effective range theory formulated as a Bayesian statistical model through the combination with Markov Chain Monte Carlo integration and fitting techniques is used to check the compatibility of different e --Xe scattering data such as the total cross-sections, the momentum transfer cross-sections, and the differential cross-sections that were determined experimentally in the region of Ramsauer-Townsend minimum. On the basis of this predictive approach, the most probable value of the scattering length, (-6.51 0.05) a 0, is proposed. The present analysis suggests that the non-relativistic spinless effective range theory is suitable for the description of angular and energy dependencies of e --Xe elastic scattering cross-sections below the threshold for first inelastic process.

  3. Markov Chain Monte Carlo Effective Range Analysis of Low-Energy Electron Elastic Scattering from Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedus, Kamil

    2015-11-01

    Modified effective range theory formulated as a Bayesian statistical model through the combination with Markov Chain Monte Carlo integration and fitting techniques is used to check the compatibility of different e --Xe scattering data such as the total cross-sections, the momentum transfer cross-sections, and the differential cross-sections that were determined experimentally in the region of Ramsauer-Townsend minimum. On the basis of this predictive approach, the most probable value of the scattering length, (-6.51 0.05)a 0, is proposed. The present analysis suggests that the non-relativistic spinless effective range theory is suitable for the description of angular and energy dependencies of e --Xe elastic scattering cross-sections below the threshold for first inelastic process.

  4. Electro-magneto-thermo-elastic response of infinite functionally graded cylinders without energy dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenkour, Ashraf M.; Abbas, Ibrahim A.

    2015-12-01

    The electro-magneto-thermo-elastic analysis problem of an infinite functionally graded (FG) hollow cylinder is studied in the context of Green-Naghdi's (G-N) generalized thermoelasticity theory (without energy dissipation). Material properties are assumed to be graded in the radial direction according to a novel power-law distribution in terms of the volume fractions of the metal and ceramic constituents. The inner surface of the FG cylinder is pure metal whereas the outer surface is pure ceramic. The equations of motion and the heat-conduction equation are used to derive the governing second-order differential equations. A finite element scheme is presented for the numerical purpose. The system of differential equations is solved numerically and some plots for displacement, radial and electromagnetic stresses, and temperature are presented. The radial displacement, mechanical stresses and temperature as well as the electromagnetic stress are all investigated along the radial direction of the infinite cylinder.

  5. Reactions with Weakly Bound Nuclei, at near Barrier Energies, and the Breakup and Transfer Influences on the Fusion and Elastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Canto, L. F.; Otomar, D. R.; Junior, D. R. Mendes; de Faria, P. N.; Linares, R.; Sigaud, L.; Rangel, J.; Ferreira, J. L.; Ferioli, E.; Paes, B.; Cardozo, E. N.; Cortes, M. R.; Ermamatov, M. J.; Lotti, P.; Hussein, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    We present a brief review of the reaction mechanisms involved in collisions of weakly bound projectiles with tightly bound targets, at near-barrier energies. We discuss systematic behaviors of the data, with emphasis in fusion, breakup, nucleon transfer and elastic scattering. The dependence of the breakup cross section on the charge and mass of the target is discussed, and the influence of the breakup channel on complete fusion is investigated. For this purpose, we compare reduced fusion cross sections with a benchmark universal curve. The behaviors observed in the comparisons are explained in terms of polarization potentials and of nucleon transfer followed by breakup. The influence of the breakup process on elastic scattering is also discussed. Some apparent contradictions between results of different authors are explained and some perspectives of the field are presented.

  6. Reactions with Weakly Bound Nuclei, at near Barrier Energies, and the Breakup and Transfer Influences on the Fusion and Elastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Canto, L. F.; Otomar, D. R.; Junior, D. R. Mendes; de Faria, P. N.; Linares, R.; Sigaud, L.; Rangel, J.; Ferreira, J. L.; Ferioli, E.; Paes, B.; Cardozo, E. N.; Cortes, M. R.; Ermamatov, M. J.; Lotti, P.; Hussein, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We present a brief review of the reaction mechanisms involved in collisions of weakly bound projectiles with tightly bound targets, at near-barrier energies. We discuss systematic behaviors of the data, with emphasis in fusion, breakup, nucleon transfer and elastic scattering. The dependence of the breakup cross section on the charge and mass of the target is discussed, and the influence of the breakup channel on complete fusion is investigated. For this purpose, we compare reduced fusion cross sections with a benchmark universal curve. The behaviors observed in the comparisons are explained in terms of polarization potentials and of nucleon transfer followed by breakup. The influence of the breakup process on elastic scattering is also discussed. Some apparent contradictions between results of different authors are explained and some perspectives of the field are presented.

  7. Analysis of diffractive features in elastic scattering of {sup 7}Li by different target nuclei at different energies

    SciTech Connect

    Badran, R. I.; Masri, Dana Al

    2013-12-16

    The diffractive features of angular distribution have been investigated by analyzing the experimental data for a set of elastic scattering processes of {sup 7}Li by different target nuclei at different laboratory energies. Both Frahn-Venter and McIntyre models are used to analyze experimental data of angular distribution for elastic scattering processes. The theoretical models can reasonably reproduce the general pattern of the data. Some geometrical parameters for colliding nuclei have been obtained from the elastic scattering processes. It is found that interpretation of the diffractive features of the data is model-independent. The values of extracted parameters, from adopted models, are found comparable to each other and to those of others. The total reaction cross section is correlated to the incident laboratory energy for each scattering and values of total reaction cross section are found comparable with those of others.

  8. Elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by 1,4-dioxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Bettega, Mrcio H. F.

    2014-05-01

    We report calculated cross sections for elastic collisions of low-energy-electrons with 1,4-dioxane. Our calculations employed the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials and were carried out in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations for energies up to 30 eV. Our results show the presence of three shape resonances belonging to the Bu, Au, and Bg symmetries and located at 7.0 eV, 8.4 eV, and 9.8 eV, respectively. We also report the presence of a Ramsauer-Townsend minimum located at around 0.05 eV. We compare our calculated cross sections with experimental data and R-matrix and independent atom model along with the additivity rule corrected by using screening coefficients theoretical results for 1,4-dioxane obtained by Palihawadana et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 014308 (2013)]. The agreement between the present and the R-matrix theoretical calculations of Palihawadana et al. is relatively good at energies below 10 eV. Our calculated differential cross sections agree well with the experimental data, showing only some discrepancies at higher energies.

  9. Elastic scattering of low-energy electrons by 1,4-dioxane

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza; Bettega, Mrcio H. F.

    2014-05-14

    We report calculated cross sections for elastic collisions of low-energy-electrons with 1,4-dioxane. Our calculations employed the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials and were carried out in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations for energies up to 30 eV. Our results show the presence of three shape resonances belonging to the B{sub u}, A{sub u}, and B{sub g} symmetries and located at 7.0 eV, 8.4 eV, and 9.8 eV, respectively. We also report the presence of a Ramsauer-Townsend minimum located at around 0.05 eV. We compare our calculated cross sections with experimental data and R-matrix and independent atom model along with the additivity rule corrected by using screening coefficients theoretical results for 1,4-dioxane obtained by Palihawadana et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 014308 (2013)]. The agreement between the present and the R-matrix theoretical calculations of Palihawadana et al. is relatively good at energies below 10 eV. Our calculated differential cross sections agree well with the experimental data, showing only some discrepancies at higher energies.

  10. Electron-impact rotationally elastic total cross sections for H2CO and HCOOH over a wide range of incident energy (0.01-2000 eV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinodkumar, Minaxi; Bhutadia, Harshad; Antony, Bobby; Mason, Nigel

    2011-11-01

    This paper reports computational results of the total cross sections for electron impact on H2CO and HCOOH over a wide range of electron impact energies from 0.01 eV to 2 keV. The total cross section is presented as sum of the elastic and electronic excitation cross sections for incident energies. The calculation uses two different methodologies, below the ionization threshold of the target the cross section is calculated using the UK molecular R-matrix code through the Quantemol-N software package while cross sections at higher energies are evaluated using the spherical complex optical potential formalism. The two methods are found to be consistent at the transition energy (15 eV). The present results are, in general, found to be in good agreement with previous experimental and theoretical results (wherever available) and, thus, the present results can serve as a benchmark for the cross section over a wide range of energy.

  11. The study of dp-elastic scattering at the energies from 500 to 1000 MeV/nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhin, A. A.; Gurchin, Yu. V.; Isupov, A. Yu.; Khrenov, A. N.; Kurilkin, A. K.; Kurilkin, P. K.; Ladygin, V. P.; Ladygina, N. B.; Piyadin, S. M.; Reznikov, S. G.; Vnukov, I. E.

    2015-11-01

    The results of the differential cross section measurements of dp-elastic scattering at energies from 500 to 1000 MeV/nucleon at Nuclotron JINR are reported. The data were obtained for angels range of 75-120? in the c.m.s. The results are compared with existing world data.

  12. Free energy of contact formation in proteins: Efficient computation in the elastic network approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Kay

    2011-07-01

    Biomolecular simulations have become a major tool in understanding biomolecules and their complexes. However, one can typically only investigate a few mutants or scenarios due to the severe computational demands of such simulations, leading to a great interest in method development to overcome this restriction. One way to achieve this is to reduce the complexity of the systems by an approximation of the forces acting upon the constituents of the molecule. The harmonic approximation used in elastic network models simplifies the physical complexity to the most reduced dynamics of these molecular systems. The reduced polymer modeled this way is typically comprised of mass points representing coarse-grained versions of, e.g., amino acids. In this work, we show how the computation of free energy contributions of contacts between two residues within the molecule can be reduced to a simple lookup operation in a precomputable matrix. Being able to compute such contributions is of great importance: protein design or molecular evolution changes introduce perturbations to these pair interactions, so we need to understand their impact. Perturbation to the interactions occurs due to randomized and fixated changes (in molecular evolution) or designed modifications of the protein structures (in bioengineering). These perturbations are modifications in the topology and the strength of the interactions modeled by the elastic network models. We apply the new algorithm to (1) the bovine trypsin inhibitor, a well-known enzyme in biomedicine, and show the connection to folding properties and the hydrophobic collapse hypothesis and (2) the serine proteinase inhibitor CI-2 and show the correlation to Φ values to characterize folding importance. Furthermore, we discuss the computational complexity and show empirical results for the average case, sampled over a library of 77 structurally diverse proteins. We found a relative speedup of up to 10 000-fold for large proteins with respect to repeated application of the initial model.

  13. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L.B.

    1995-07-01

    MRCI (configuration interaction) calculations were used to examine possible pathways for the O{sub 2} + CCH reaction. The H{sub 2} + CN potential surface was examined. An initial survey was made of the HCl + CN potential energy surface at a low level of theory.

  14. Sources and potential uses of wave energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodbridge, D. D.

    An analysis of ocean wave energy and its uses is presented. The ocean energy conversion systems surveyed include the ocean valve, the spherical vane, the hinged raft and the oscillating water column systems. The configuration of the Ocean Swell and Wave Energy Converter (OSWEC) is detailed, and its potential power output is discussed. It is noted that the utilization of a single OSWEC system of 20 MW would result in a savings of nearly 25,000 barrels of oil a month.

  15. Internal oxidation of Cu-Fe-II. The morphology of oxide inclusions from the minimization of elastic misfit energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratzl, P.; Paris, O.

    1994-06-01

    Two types of iron-oxides, both with cubic spinel structure occur simultaneously during internal oxidation of Cu-Fe and form plates on different habit planes of the matrix. Khachaturyan's theory (Theory of Structural Transformations in Solids. Wiley, New York (1983)) for the elastic energy of coherent inclusions was applied to the present case and both habit planes were predicted correctly on the grounds of the orientation relations between the crystal lattices of matrix and precipitates. Moreover, the effect of uncertainties in the numerical values of misfit strain and elastic constants was explored and the result was found to be stable within reasonable variations of these parameters. This shows that the morphology of iron oxides in internally oxidized Cu-Fe is mainly due to elastic misfit strain.

  16. Economic Energy Savings Potential in Federal Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Daryl R.; Dirks, James A.; Hunt, Diane M.

    2000-09-04

    The primary objective of this study was to estimate the current life-cycle cost-effective (i.e., economic) energy savings potential in Federal buildings and the corresponding capital investment required to achieve these savings, with Federal financing. Estimates were developed for major categories of energy efficiency measures such as building envelope, heating system, cooling system, and lighting. The analysis was based on conditions (building stock and characteristics, retrofit technologies, interest rates, energy prices, etc.) existing in the late 1990s. The potential impact of changes to any of these factors in the future was not considered.

  17. Applying supersymmetry to energy dependent potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Yekken, R.; Lassaut, M.; Lombard, R.J.

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the supersymmetry properties of energy dependent potentials in the D=1 dimensional space. We show the main aspects of supersymmetry to be preserved, namely the factorization of the Hamiltonian, the connections between eigenvalues and wave functions of the partner Hamiltonians. Two methods are proposed. The first one requires the extension of the usual rules via the concept of local equivalent potential. In this case, the superpotential becomes depending on the state. The second method, applicable when the potential depends linearly on the energy, is similar to what has been already achieved by means of the Darboux transform. -- Highlights: •Supersymmetry extended to energy dependent potentials. •Generalization of the concept of superpotential. •An alternative method used for linear E-dependence leads to the same results as Darboux transform.

  18. Determination of solid material elastic modulus and surface energy based on JKR contact model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kuang-Chung; You, Hsien-I.

    2007-08-01

    The JKR contact theory is employed to study the adhesion phenomena between two solid materials in intimate contact. The elastic contact modulus and the work of adhesion of solid materials are obtained during adhesion tests by utilizing a micro force-deflection measuring apparatus. Six of the plastic materials, including polyethylene polyoxymethlene (POM), polyamide (PA), terephthalate (PET), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polypropylene (PP), and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) are used to evaluate the adhesion effect implied by the JKR theory. Comparison is made between surface energy obtained from the adhesion tests with that by a dynamic contact angle analyser. Results show that the load/deflection data in the loading phase are in good agreement with the predictions of JKR equation, and the experimental data of unloading phase deviate significantly from the JKR theory. The phenomena of adhesion hysteresis in loading tests are responsible for these results due to the effects of molecular reconstruction on solid surfaces in contact. The work of adhesions, and hence surface energies of plastic materials, calculated by the best fitting of JKR equation with the experimental data in the loading phase, agree satisfactorily in a comparable manner with that obtained using the contact angle analyser.

  19. Energy conservation in Kenya: progress, potentials, problems

    SciTech Connect

    Schipper, L.; Hollander, J.M.; Milukas, M.; Alcamo, J.; Meyers, S.; Noll, S.

    1981-09-01

    A study was carried out of the flows of commercial energy in the economy of Kenya. Indications were sought of the extent to which energy conservation, (i.e., increase in efficiency of energy use) has reduced the ratio of energy inputs to economic outputs, in the post-1973 years. An assessment was made of the potential for energy conservation to reduce the growth of Kenyan energy use in the future and of significant barriers to increasing energy efficiency. Consideration was given to the role of government policy and of international assistance in fostering energy conservation in Kenya and other developing countries. The study was performed by analyzing available energy data and statistics from the largest oil companies, the Kenyan electric utility, and the government. These sources were supplemented by conducting personal interviews with personnel of nearly 50 commercial firms in Kenya. Direct consumption of fuel accounts for 94% of the commercial energy use in Kenya, while electricity accounts for 6%. The sectoral division of fuel use is: transportation 53%, industry 21%, energy production 11%, agriculture 9%, buildings and residences 5%, and construction 1%. For electricity the division is: buildings and residences 48%, industry 45%, energy production 4%, agriculture 2%, and construction 1%. Recent progress in conservation is reported.

  20. Bulk elastic moduli and solute potentials in leaves of freshwater, coastal and marine hydrophytes. Are marine plants more rigid?

    PubMed Central

    Touchette, Brant W.; Marcus, Sarah E.; Adams, Emily C.

    2014-01-01

    Bulk modulus of elasticity (ɛ), depicting the flexibility of plant tissues, is recognized as an important component in maintaining internal water balance. Elevated ɛ and comparatively low osmotic potential (Ψπ) may work in concert to effectively maintain vital cellular water content. This concept, termed the ‘cell water conservation hypothesis’, may foster tolerance for lower soil-water potentials in plants while minimizing cell dehydration and shrinkage. Therefore, the accumulation of solutes in marine plants, causing decreases in Ψπ, play an important role in plant–water relations and likely works with higher ɛ to achieve favourable cell volumes. While it is generally held that plants residing in marine systems have higher leaf tissue ɛ, to our knowledge no study has specifically addressed this notion in aquatic and wetland plants residing in marine and freshwater systems. Therefore, we compared ɛ and Ψπ in leaf tissues of 38 freshwater, coastal and marine plant species using data collected in our laboratory, with additional values from the literature. Overall, 8 of the 10 highest ɛ values were observed in marine plants, and 20 of the lowest 25 ɛ values were recorded in freshwater plants. As expected, marine plants often had lower Ψπ, wherein the majority of marine plants were below −1.0 MPa and the majority of freshwater plants were above −1.0 MPa. While there were no differences among habitat type and symplastic water content (θsym), we did observe higher θsym in shrubs when compared with graminoids, and believe that the comparatively low θsym observed in aquatic grasses may be attributed to their tendency to develop aerenchyma that hold apoplastic water. These results, with few exceptions, support the premise that leaf tissues of plants acclimated to marine environments tend to have higher ɛ and lower Ψπ, and agree with the general tenets of the cell water conservation hypothesis. PMID:24876296

  1. Local distortion energy and coarse-grained elasticity of the twist-bend nematic phase.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C; Dozov, I

    2015-12-23

    The recently discovered twist-bend nematic phase of achiral bent-shaped molecules, NTB, has a doubly degenerate ground-state with a periodically modulated heliconical structure and unusual distortion elasticity, the theoretical description of which is still debated. We show that the NTB phase has the same macroscopic symmetry as another periodic mesophase, the chiral smectic-A, SmA*. Based on this NTB/SmA* analogy, we develop a coarse-grained elastic model for the NTB phase. Adopting one of the existing microscopic NTB elastic models, we calculate the coarse-grained elastic constants, coherence and penetration lengths in terms of a few Frank-like nematic elastic coefficients that can be measured in macroscopic experiments. The same coarse-grained approach, applied to different local elastic models, may provide an efficient experimental test of their validity. We show that the anisotropy of the NTB coarse-grained elasticity is opposite to that of the SmA*, leading probably to different configurations of some of the defects of the "layered" NTB structure. Moreover, we argue that the intrinsic chiral frustration of the NTB phase may be resolved by penetration of the twist field into the bulk through a network of screw dislocations of the NTB pseudo-layers, resulting in a twist-bend analogue of the twist grain boundary phase TGBA. PMID:26503741

  2. Elastic energy storage in the shoulder and the evolution of high-speed throwing in Homo

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Neil T.; Venkadesan, Madhusudhan; Rainbow, Michael J.; Lieberman, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Although some primates, including chimpanzees, throw objects occasionally1,2, only humans regularly throw projectiles with high speed and great accuracy. Darwin noted that humans unique throwing abilities, made possible when bipedalism emancipated the arms, enabled foragers to effectively hunt using projectiles3. However, there has been little consideration of the evolution of throwing in the years since Darwin made his observations, in part because of a lack of evidence on when, how, and why hominins evolved the ability to generate high-speed throws4-8. Here, we show using experimental studies of throwers that human throwing capabilities largely result from several derived anatomical features that enable elastic energy storage and release at the shoulder. These features first appear together approximately two million years ago in the species Homo erectus. Given archaeological evidence that suggests hunting activity intensified around this time9, we conclude that selection for throwing in order to hunt likely played an important role in the evolution of the human genus. PMID:23803849

  3. Forward pd elastic scattering and total spin-dependent pd cross sections at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Uzikov, Yu. N.; Haidenbauer, J.

    2009-02-15

    Spin-dependent total pd cross sections are considered using the optical theorem. For this aim the full spin dependence of the forward pd elastic scattering amplitude is considered in a model independent way. The single-scattering approximation is used to relate this amplitude to the elementary amplitudes of pp and pn scattering and the deuteron form factor. A formalism allowing to take into account Coulomb-nuclear interference effects in polarized pd cross sections is developed. Numerical calculations for the polarized total pd cross sections are performed at beam energies 20-300 MeV using the NN interaction models developed by the Juelich group. Double-scattering effects are estimated within the Glauber approach and found to be in the order of 10-20%. Existing experimental data on differential pd cross sections are in good agreement with the performed Glauber calculations. It is found that for the used NN models the total longitudinal and transversal pd cross sections are comparable in absolute value to those for pp scattering.

  4. Potential energy function for the hydroperoxyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, W.J.; Hase, W.L.

    1987-03-12

    A switching function formalism is used to derive an analytic potential energy surface for the O + OH in equilibrium HO/sub 2/ in equilibrium H + O/sub 2/ reactive system. Both experimental and ab initio data are used to derive parameters for the potential energy surface. Trajectory calculations for highly excited HO/sub 2/ are performed on this surface. From these trajectories quasi-periodic eigentrajectories are found for vibrational levels near the HO/sub 2/ dissociation threshold with small amounts of quanta in the OH stretch mode and large amounts of quanta in the OO stretch mode.

  5. Search for dark energy potentials in quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muromachi, Yusuke; Okabayashi, Akira; Okada, Daiki; Hara, Tetsuya; Itoh, Yutaka

    2015-09-01

    The time evolution of the equation of state w for quintessence models with a scalar field as dark energy is studied up to the third derivative big (d^3w/da^3big ) with respect to the scale factor a, in order to predict future observations and specify the scalar potential parameters with the observables. The third derivative of w for general potential V is derived and applied to several types of potentials. They are the inverse power law big (V=M^{4+? }/Q^{? }big ), the exponential big (V=M^4exp {? M/Q}big ), the mixed big (V=M^{4+? }exp {? M/Q}/Q^{? }big ), the cosine big (V=M^4[cos (Q/f)+1]big ), and the Gaussian types big (V=M^4exp big {-Q^2/? ^2big }big ), which are prototypical potentials for the freezing and thawing models. If the parameter number for a potential form is n, it is necessary to find at least n+2 independent observations to identify the potential form and the evolution of the scalar field (Q and dot {Q}). Such observations would be the values of ? _Q, w, dw/da,ldots , dw^n/da^n. From these specific potentials, we can predict the n+1 and higher derivatives of w: dw^{n+1}/da^{n+1},ldots . Since four of the abovementioned potentials have two parameters, it is necessary to calculate the third derivative of w for them to estimate the predicted values. If they are tested observationally, it will be understood whether the dark energy can be described by a scalar field with this potential. At least it will satisfy the necessary conditions. Numerical analysis for d^3w/da^3 is performed with some specified parameters in the investigated potentials, except for the mixed one. It becomes possible to distinguish the potentials by accurately observing dw/da and d^2w/da^2 for some parameters.

  6. Biomass resource potential using energy crops

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, L.L.; Cushman, J.H.; Martin, S.A.

    1993-09-01

    Biomass energy crops can provide a significant and environmentally beneficial source of renewable energy feedstocks for the future. They can revitalize the agricultural sector of the US economy by providing profitable uses for marginal cropland. Energy crops include fast-growing trees, perennial grasses, and annual grasses, all capable of collecting solar energy and storing it as cellulosic compounds for several months to several years. Once solar energy is thus captured, it can be converted by means of currently available technologies to a wide variety of energy products such as electricity, heat, liquid transportation fuels, and gases. Experimental results from field trials have generated optimism that selected and improved energy crops, established on cropland with moderate limitations for crop production, have the potential for producing high yields. Both trees and grasses, under very good growing conditions, have produced average annual yields of 20 to 40 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1}. Sorghum has shown especially high yields in the Midwest. Hybrids between sugar cane and its wild relatives, called energy cane, have yielded as much as 50 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} in Florida. These experimental results demonstrate that some species have the genetic potential for very rapid growth rates. New wood energy crop systems developed by the Department of Energy`s Biofuels Feedstock Development Program offer, at a minimum, a 100% increase in biomass production rates over the 2 to 4 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} of dry leafless woody biomass produced by most natural forest systems. Experimental data indicate that short rotation wood crops established on cropland with moderate limitations are capable of producing biomass yields of 8--20 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} with a present average about 11 dry Mg ha{sup {minus}1} year{sup {minus}1} on typical cropland sites.

  7. Potential energy sputtering of EUVL materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, J M; Ratliff, L P; Gillaspy, J D; Bajt, S

    2004-07-02

    Of the many candidates employed for understanding the erosion of critical Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) components, potential energy damage remains relatively uninvestigated. Unlike the familiar kinetic energy sputtering, which is a consequence of the momentum transferred by an ion to atoms in the target, potential energy sputtering occurs when an ion rapidly collects charge from the target as it neutralizes. Since the neutralization energy of a singly charged ion is typically on the order of 10 eV, potential energy effects are generally neglected for low charge state ions, and hence the bulk of the sputtering literature. As an ion's charge state is increased, the potential energy (PE) increases rapidly, e.g. PE(Xe{sup 1+})= 11 eV, PE(Xe{sup 10+}) = 810 eV, PE(Xe{sup 20+}) = 4.6 keV, etc. By comparison, the binding energy of a single atom on a surface is typically about 5 eV, so even relatively inefficient energy transfer mechanisms can lead to large quantities of material being removed, e.g. 25% efficiency for Xe{sup 10+} corresponds to {approx} 40 atoms/ion. By comparison, singly charged xenon ions with {approx} 20 keV of kinetic energy sputter only about 5 atoms/ion at normal incidence, and less than 1 atom/ion at typical EUV source energies. EUV light sources are optimized for producing approximately 10{sup 16} xenon ions per shot with an average charge state of q=10 in the core plasma. At operational rates of {approx}10 kHz, the number of ions produced per second becomes a whopping 10{sup 20}. Even if only one in a billion ions reaches the collector, erosion rates could reach {approx}10{sup 12} atoms per second, severely reducing the collector lifetime (for an average yield of 10 atoms/ion). In addition, efforts to reduce contamination effects may contribute to reduced neutralization and even larger potential energy damages rates (discussed further below). In order to provide accurate estimates for collector lifetimes and to develop mitigation schemes, NIST is working to understand and quantify potential energy damage mechanisms on materials relevant to EUVL. Accurate potential energy damage rates can then be used for projecting component lifetimes as source plasma conditions are modified and characterized. This chapter will serve to provide an introduction and some background to the physics of highly charged ions and some of the relevant experimental work in the literature. This chapter will first provide a brief background and an overview of the interaction of highly charged ions (HCIs) with solids as it is currently understood. Secondly, it will present current data from screen test measurements performed to isolate and evaluate the effects of potential energy damage on critical EUVL materials. We will then speculate on the implications of work to date and the outlook for EUVL development and, finally, summarize.

  8. How well do we understand quasi-elastic reactions at energies close to the barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    In collisions between too heavy nuclei a wide spectrum of different reaction modes is observed covering the range from simple processes like elastic scattering to complicated multistep transfers and fusion. On the theoretical side heavy ion reactions are usually analyzed using models that were developed first for light ion induced reactions: the optical model for elastic scattering and the DWBA for more inelastic processes like transfer and inelastic scattering. Some of the assumptions going into these approximations, however, are not valid for heavy ion induced reactions. The region between fusion and quasi-elastic reactions is not well understood theoretically. This region is associated with deep inelastic collisions, which are complex multiparticle reactions involving transfer of several protons and neutrons. In this paper, the author discusses to what extent experiments in the field of quasi-elastic scattering are understood within the framework of various theoretical models and in what areas more work is needed.

  9. Potential reduction of DSN uplink energy cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolinsky, S.; Degroot, N. F.

    1982-01-01

    DSN Earth stations typically transmit more power than that required to meet minimum specifications for uplink performance. Energy and cost savings that could result from matching the uplink power to the amount required for specified performance are studied. The Galileo mission was selected as a case study. Although substantial reduction in transmitted energy is possible, potential savings in source energy (oil or electricity) savings are much less. This is because of the rising inefficiency in power conversion and radio frequency power generation that accompanies reduced power output.

  10. Energy evolution of the large-t elastic scattering and its correlation with multiparticle production

    SciTech Connect

    Troshin, S. M.

    2013-04-15

    It is emphasized that the collective dynamics associated with color confinement is dominating over a point-like mechanism related to a scattering of the proton constituents at the currently available values of the momentum transferred in proton elastic scattering at the LHC. Deep-elastic scattering and its role in the dissimilation of the absorptive and reflective asymptotic scattering mechanisms are discussed with emphasis on the experimental signatures associated with the multiparticle production processes.

  11. The Effect of VMoS3 Point Defect on the Elastic Properties of Monolayer MoS2 with REBO Potentials.

    PubMed

    Li, Minglin; Wan, Yaling; Tu, Liping; Yang, Yingchao; Lou, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Structural defects in monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) have significant influence on the electric, optical, thermal, chemical, and mechanical properties of the material. Among all the types of structural defects of the chemical vapor phase-grown monolayer MoS2, the VMoS3 point defect (a vacancy complex of Mo and three nearby S atoms) is another type of defect preferentially generated by the extended electron irradiation. Here, using the classical molecular dynamics simulation with reactive empirical bond-order (REBO) potential, we first investigate the effect of VMoS3 point defects on the elastic properties of monolayer MoS2 sheets. Under the constrained uniaxial tensile test, the elastic properties of monolayer MoS2 sheets containing VMoS3 vacancies with defect fraction varying from 0.01 to 0.1 are obtained based on the plane anisotropic constitutive relations of the material. It is found that the increase of VMoS3 vacancy concentration leads to the noticeable decrease in the elastic modulus but has a slight effect on Poisson's ratio. The maximum decrease of the elastic modulus is up to 25 %. Increasing the ambient temperature from 10 K to 500 K has trivial influences on the elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio for the monolayer MoS2 without defect and with 5 % VMoS3 vacancies. However, an anomalous parabolic relationship between the elastic modulus and the temperature is found in the monolayer MoS2 containing 0.1 % VMoS3 vacancy, bringing a crucial and fundamental issue to the application of monolayer MoS2 with defects. PMID:27000023

  12. Free energy perturbation method for measuring elastic constants of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Abhijeet

    There is considerable interest in designing liquid crystals capable of yielding specific morphological responses in confined environments, including capillaries and droplets. The morphology of a liquid crystal is largely dictated by the elastic constants, which are difficult to measure and are only available for a handful of substances. In this work, a first-principles based method is proposed to calculate the Frank elastic constants of nematic liquid crystals directly from atomistic models. These include the standard splay, twist and bend deformations, and the often-ignored but important saddle-splay constant. The proposed method is validated using a well-studied Gay-Berne(3,5,2,1) model; we examine the effects of temperature and system size on the elastic constants in the nematic and smectic phases. We find that our measurements of splay, twist, and bend elastic constants are consistent with previous estimates for the nematic phase. We further outline the implementation of our approach for the saddle-splay elastic constant, and find it to have a value at the limits of the Ericksen inequalities. We then proceed to report results for the elastic constants commonly known liquid crystals namely 4-pentyl-4'-cynobiphenyl (5CB) using atomistic model, and show that the values predicted by our approach are consistent with a subset of the available but limited experimental literature.

  13. Differential elastic electron scattering cross sections for CCl4 by 1.5-100 eV energy electron impact.

    PubMed

    Limão-Vieira, P; Horie, M; Kato, H; Hoshino, M; Blanco, F; García, G; Buckman, S J; Tanaka, H

    2011-12-21

    We report absolute elastic differential, integral and momentum transfer cross sections for electron interactions with CCl(4). The incident electron energy range is 1.5-100 eV, and the scattered electron angular range for the differential measurements varies from 15°-130°. The absolute scale of the differential cross section was set using the relative flow technique with helium as the reference species. Comparison with previous total cross sections shows good agreement. Atomic-like behaviour in this scattering system is shown here for the first time, and is further investigated by comparing the CCl(4) elastic cross sections to recent results on the halomethanes and atomic chlorine at higher impact energies [H. Kato, T. Asahina, H. Masui, M. Hoshino, H. Tanaka, H. Cho, O. Ingólfsson, F. Blanco, G. Garcia, S. J. Buckman, and M. J. Brunger, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074309 (2010)]. PMID:22191877

  14. Predicting the Drop Performance of Solder Joints by Evaluating the Elastic Strain Energy from High-Speed Ball Pull Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Taehoon; Kim, Yunsung; Kim, Jina; Lee, Jaehong; Jung, Byungwook; Moon, Jungtak; Choe, Heeman

    2009-03-01

    Despite being expensive and time consuming, board-level drop testing has been widely used to assess the drop or impact resistance of the solder joints in handheld microelectronic devices, such as cellphones and personal digital assistants (PDAs). In this study, a new test method, which is much simpler and quicker, is proposed. The method involves evaluating the elastic strain energy and relating it to the impact resistance of the solder joint by considering the Youngs modulus of the bulk solder and the fracture stress of the solder joint during a ball pull test at high strain rates. The results show that solder joints can be ranked in order of descending elastic strain energy as follows: Sn-37Pb, Sn-1Ag-0.5Cu, Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu, and Sn-4Ag-0.5Cu. This order is consistent with the actual drop performances of the samples.

  15. Elastic internal flywheel gimbal

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenhorst, D.W.

    1981-01-13

    An elastic joint mounting and rotatably coupling a rotary inertial energy storage device or flywheel, to a shaft, the present gimbal structure reduces vibration and shock while allowing precession of the flywheel without the need for external gimbal mounts. The present elastic joint usually takes the form of an annular elastic member either integrally formed into the flywheel as a centermost segment thereof or attached to the flywheel or flywheel hub member at the center thereof, the rotary shaft then being mounted centrally to the elastic member.

  16. Elastic energy of strained islands: Contribution of the substrate as a function of the island aspect ratio and inter-island distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponchet, A.; Lacombe, D.; Durand, L.; Alquier, D.; Cardonna, J.-M.

    1998-06-01

    The finite element method is applied to strain-induced islands. The distribution of the elastic energy in the island and the substrate is determined as a function of the island aspect ratio and inter-island distance. When the height-over-base ratio increases, the total elastic energy density decreases and the relative contribution of the substrate increases. When the inter-island distance decreases, the elastic energy density increases and the relative contribution of the substrate decreases. The influence of the aspect ratio on the relaxation rate is amplified for short inter-island distances.

  17. Theory of evaporative cooling with energy-dependent elastic scattering cross section and application to metastable helium

    SciTech Connect

    Tol, Paul J.J.; Hogervorst, Wim; Vassen, Wim

    2004-07-01

    The kinetic theory of evaporative cooling developed by Luiten et al. [Phys. Rev. A 53, 381 (1996)] is extended to include the dependence of the elastic scattering cross section on collision energy. We introduce a simple approximation by which the transition range between the low-temperature limit and the unitarity limit is described as well. Applying the modified theory to our measurements on evaporative cooling of metastable helium, we find a scattering length a=10(5) nm.

  18. Low energy positron interactions with uracil--total scattering, positronium formation, and differential elastic scattering cross sections.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E K; Boadle, R A; Machacek, J R; Chiari, L; Makochekanwa, C; Buckman, S J; Brunger, M J; Garcia, G; Blanco, F; Ingolfsson, O; Sullivan, J P

    2014-07-21

    Measurements of the grand total and total positronium formation cross sections for positron scattering from uracil have been performed for energies between 1 and 180eV, using a trap-based beam apparatus. Angular, quasi-elastic differential cross section measurements at 1, 3, 5, 10, and 20 eV are also presented and discussed. These measurements are compared to existing experimental results and theoretical calculations, including our own calculations using a variant of the independent atom approach. PMID:25053319

  19. Low energy positron interactions with uracil—Total scattering, positronium formation, and differential elastic scattering cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, E. K.; Boadle, R. A.; Machacek, J. R.; Makochekanwa, C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Chiari, L.; Buckman, S. J.; Brunger, M. J.; Garcia, G.; Blanco, F.; Ingolfsson, O.

    2014-07-21

    Measurements of the grand total and total positronium formation cross sections for positron scattering from uracil have been performed for energies between 1 and 180 eV, using a trap-based beam apparatus. Angular, quasi-elastic differential cross section measurements at 1, 3, 5, 10, and 20 eV are also presented and discussed. These measurements are compared to existing experimental results and theoretical calculations, including our own calculations using a variant of the independent atom approach.

  20. Non-contacting transfer of elastic energy into explosive simulants for dynamic property estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeney, Nathan S.; Strovink, Kurt M.; Scales, John A.; Jessop, Andrew M.; Stuart Bolton, J.; Watson, Christopher C.; Adams, Douglas E.

    2014-05-01

    Non-contacting acoustical methods can be used to extract various material properties of liquid or solid samples without disturbing the sample. These methods are useful even in the lab since they do not involve coupling anything to the sample, which might change its properties. A forteriori, when dealing with potentially dangerous materials, non-contacting methods may be the only safe solutions to mechanical characterization. Here, we show examples of using laser ultrasound to remotely insonify and monitor the elastic properties of several granular explosive simulants. The relatively short near-infrared laser pulse length (a few hundred nanoseconds) provides a broad-band thermoelastic source of ultrasound; we intentionally stay in the thermoelastic regime to avoid damaging the material. Then, we use a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer to measure the ultrasonic response of the sample. LDV technology is well established and very sensitive at ultrasonic frequencies; atomic level motions can be measured with modest averaging. The resulting impulse response of the explosive simulant can be analyzed to determine decay rates and wave speeds, with stiffer samples showing faster wave speeds and lower decay rates. On the other hand, at the low-frequency end of the acoustic spectrum, we use an electronically phased array to couple into a freely suspended sample's normal modes. This allows us to gently heat up the sample (3 °C in just under 5 min, as shown with a thermal IR camera). In addition to the practical interest in making the sample more chemically visible through heat, these two measurements (low-frequency resonant excitation vs high-frequency wave propagation) bracket the frequency range of acoustic non-destructive evaluation methods available.

  1. Non-contacting transfer of elastic energy into explosive simulants for dynamic property estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Greeney, Nathan S.; Strovink, Kurt M.; Scales, John A.; Jessop, Andrew M.; Stuart Bolton, J.; Watson, Christopher C.; Adams, Douglas E.

    2014-05-21

    Non-contacting acoustical methods can be used to extract various material properties of liquid or solid samples without disturbing the sample. These methods are useful even in the lab since they do not involve coupling anything to the sample, which might change its properties. A forteriori, when dealing with potentially dangerous materials, non-contacting methods may be the only safe solutions to mechanical characterization. Here, we show examples of using laser ultrasound to remotely insonify and monitor the elastic properties of several granular explosive simulants. The relatively short near-infrared laser pulse length (a few hundred nanoseconds) provides a broad-band thermoelastic source of ultrasound; we intentionally stay in the thermoelastic regime to avoid damaging the material. Then, we use a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer to measure the ultrasonic response of the sample. LDV technology is well established and very sensitive at ultrasonic frequencies; atomic level motions can be measured with modest averaging. The resulting impulse response of the explosive simulant can be analyzed to determine decay rates and wave speeds, with stiffer samples showing faster wave speeds and lower decay rates. On the other hand, at the low-frequency end of the acoustic spectrum, we use an electronically phased array to couple into a freely suspended sample's normal modes. This allows us to gently heat up the sample (3 °C in just under 5 min, as shown with a thermal IR camera). In addition to the practical interest in making the sample more chemically visible through heat, these two measurements (low-frequency resonant excitation vs high-frequency wave propagation) bracket the frequency range of acoustic non-destructive evaluation methods available.

  2. Grain-boundary free energy in an assembly of elastic disks.

    PubMed

    Lusk, Mark T; Beale, Paul D

    2004-02-01

    Grain-boundary free energy is estimated as a function of misoriention for symmetric tilt boundaries in an assembly of nearly hard disks. Fluctuating cell theory is used to accomplish this since the most common techniques for calculating interfacial free energy cannot be applied to such assemblies. The results are analogous to those obtained using a Leonard-Jones potential, but in this case the interfacial energy is dominated by an entropic contribution. Disk assemblies colorized with free and specific volume elucidate differences between these two characteristics of boundary structure. Profiles are also provided of the Helmholtz and Gibbs free energies as a function of distance from the grain boundaries. Low angle grain boundaries are shown to follow the classical relationship between dislocation orientation/spacing and misorientation angle. PMID:14995530

  3. Potential energy savings from aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.R.; Weijo, R.O.

    1988-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory researchers developed an aggregate-level model to estimate the short- and long-term potential energy savings from using aquifer thermal storage (ATES) in the United States. The objectives of this effort were to (1) develop a basis from which to recommend whether heat or chill ATES should receive future research focus and (2) determine which market sector (residential, commercial, or industrial) offers the largest potential energy savings from ATES. Information was collected on the proportion of US land area suitable for ATES applications. The economic feasibility of ATES applications was then evaluated. The potential energy savings from ATES applications was calculated. Characteristic energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors was examined, as was the relationship between waste heat production and consumption by industrial end-users. These analyses provided the basis for two main conclusions: heat ATES applications offer higher potential for energy savings than do chill ATES applications; and the industrial sector can achieve the highest potential energy savings for the large consumption markets. Based on these findings, it is recommended that future ATES research and development efforts be directed toward heat ATES applications in the industrial sector. 11 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

  4. Sparse representation for a potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seko, Atsuto; Takahashi, Akira; Tanaka, Isao

    2014-07-01

    We propose a simple scheme to estimate the potential energy surface (PES) for which the accuracy can be easily controlled and improved. It is based on model selection within the framework of linear regression using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) technique. Basis functions are selected from a systematic large set of candidate functions. The sparsity of the PES significantly reduces the computational cost of evaluating the energy and force in molecular dynamics simulations without losing accuracy. The usefulness of the scheme for describing the elemental metals Na and Mg is clearly demonstrated.

  5. Potential energy hypersurface and molecular flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko?a, Jaroslav

    1993-02-01

    The molecular flexibility phenomenon is discussed from the conformational potential energy(hyper) surface (PES) point of view. Flexibility is considered as a product of three terms: thermodynamic, kinetic and geometrical. Several expressions characterizing absolute and relative molecular flexibility are introduced, depending on a subspace studied of the entire conformational space, energy level E of PES as well as absolute temperature. Results obtained by programs DAISY, CICADA and PANIC in conjunction with molecular mechanics program MMX for flexibility analysis of isopentane, 2,2-dimethylpentane and isohexane molecules are introduced.

  6. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to obtain accurate potential energy surfaces (PES's) for a number of reactions which are important in the H/N/O combustion process. The interest in this is centered around the design of the SCRAM jet engine for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), which was envisioned as an air-breathing hydrogen-burning vehicle capable of reaching velocities as large as Mach 25. Preliminary studies indicated that the supersonic flow in the combustor region of the scram jet engine required accurate reaction rate data for reactions in the H/N/O system, some of which was not readily available from experiment. The most important class of combustion reactions from the standpoint of the NASP project are radical recombinaton reactions, since these reactions result in most of the heat release in the combustion process. Theoretical characterizations of the potential energy surfaces for these reactions are presented and discussed.

  7. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum mechanical methods have been used to compute potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions. The reactions studied were among those believed to be important to the NASP and HSR programs and included the recombination of two H atoms with several different third bodies; the reactions in the thermal Zeldovich mechanism; the reactions of H atom with O2, N2, and NO; reactions involved in the thermal De-NO(x) process; and the reaction of CH(squared Pi) with N2 (leading to 'prompt NO'). These potential energy surfaces have been used to compute reaction rate constants and rates of unimolecular decomposition. An additional application was the calculation of transport properties of gases using a semiclassical approximation (and in the case of interactions involving hydrogen inclusion of quantum mechanical effects).

  8. Elastic scattering of {sup 16}O+{sup 16}O at energies E/A between 5 and 8 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Nicoli, M. P.; Haas, F.; Freeman, R. M.; Aissaoui, N.; Beck, C.; Elanique, A.; Nouicer, R.; Morsad, A.; Szilner, S.; Basrak, Z.

    1999-12-01

    The elastic scattering of {sup 16}O+{sup 16}O has been measured at nine energies between E{sub lab}=75 and 124 MeV. The data cover up to 100 degree sign in the c.m. and can be described in terms of phenomenological and folding model potentials which reproduce the main features observed. In agreement with studies at higher energies in this and similar systems, refractive effects are present in the angular distributions at all energies. In particular, the passage of Airy minima through 90 degree sign at E{sub c.m.}=40, 47.5, and 62 MeV explains the deep minima observed in the excitation function. The real part of the optical potential is found to vary very little with energy over the studied interval, but the imaginary part shows a rapid change in its shape at incident energy about 90 MeV. Nonetheless, the energy dependence of the volume integral of the real and imaginary parts is in agreement with dispersion relation predictions. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  9. Energy Savings Potential of Radiative Cooling Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Wang, Weimin; Alvine, Kyle J.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2015-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Program (BTP), conducted a study to estimate, through simulation, the potential cooling energy savings that could be achieved through novel approaches to capturing free radiative cooling in buildings, particularly photonic ‘selective emittance’ materials. This report documents the results of that study.

  10. Potential Energy Curves of Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fallon, Robert J.; Vanderslice, Joseph T.; Mason, Edward A.

    1960-01-01

    Potential energy curves for the X(sup 1)sigma+ and V(sup 1)sigma+ states of HF and DF have been calculated by the Rydberg-Klein-Rees method. The results calculated from the different sets of data for HF and DF are found to be in very good agreement. The theoretical results of Karo are compared to the experimental results obtained here.

  11. N3LO Chiral Predictions for Spin Observables in Nucleon-Deuteron Elastic Scattering at Low Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skibiński, R.; Golak, J.; Topolnicki, K.; Witała, H.

    2016-02-01

    The chiral next-to-next-to-next-to leading order nuclear forces1‑3 are used to obtain predictions for spin observables in elastic nucleon-deuteron scattering at E=13 MeV. The three-nucleon force is taken into account with all its complexity, including the short-range part and relativistic corrections. Presented examples of the polarization observables for elastic nucleon-deuteron scattering show visible contributions from these new structures in the three-nucleon potential which emerge for the first time at the next-to-next-to-next-to leading order. However, our results suggest that some modifications of the currently used model of the nuclear forces are necessary.

  12. Convective Available Potential Energy of World Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Thompson, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    Here, for the first time, we propose the concept of Ocean Convective Available Potential Energy (OCAPE), which is the maximum kinetic energy (KE) per unit seawater mass achievable by ocean convection. OCAPE occurs through a different mechanism from atmospheric CAPE, and involves the interplay of temperature and salinity on the equation of state of seawater. The thermobaric effect, which arises because the thermal coefficient of expansion increases with depth, is an important ingredient of OCAPE. We develop an accurate algorithm to calculate the OCAPE for a given temperature and salinity profile. We then validate our calculation of OCAPE by comparing it with the conversion of OCAPE to KE in a 2-D numerical model. We propose that OCAPE is an important energy source of ocean deep convection and contributes to deep water formation. OCAPE, like Atmospheric CAPE, can help predict deep convection and may also provide a useful constraint for modelling deep convection in ocean GCMs. We plot the global distribution of OCAPE using data from the World Ocean Atlas 2009 (WOA09) and see many important features. These include large values of OCAPE in the Labrador, Greenland, Weddell and Mediterranean Seas, which are consistent with our present observations and understanding, but also identify some new features like the OCAPE pattern in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). We propose that the diagnosis of OCAPE can improve our understanding of global patterns of ocean convection and deep water formation as well as ocean stratification, the meridional overturning circulation and mixed layer processes. The background of this work is briefly introduced as below. Open-ocean deep convection can significantly modify water properties both at the ocean surface and throughout the water column (Gordon 1982). Open-ocean convection is also an important mechanism for Ocean Deep Water formation and the transport of heat, freshwater and nutrient (Marshall and Schott 1999). Open-ocean convection may arise through strong surface buoyancy fluxes (Schott et al. 1996), or by thermobaric instability (Akitomo 1999a, b). Ingersoll (2005) demonstrated that thermobaric-induced deep convection is due to the abrupt release of ocean potential energy into kinetic energy. In atmospheric dynamics, Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) has long been an important thermodynamic variable (Arakawa and Schubert 1974) that has been used to forecast moist convection (Doswell and Rasmussen 1994) and to test the performance of GCMs (Ye et al. 1998). However, the development of a similar diagnostic in the ocean has received little attention.; World Ocean Convective Available Potential Energy distribution in North-Hemisphere Autumn (J/kg)

  13. The Elastic Strain Energy of Damaged Solids with Applications to Non-Linear Deformation of Crystalline Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamiel, Yariv; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    2011-12-01

    Laboratory and field data indicate that rocks subjected to sufficiently high loads clearly deviate from linear behavior. Non-linear stress-strain relations can be approximated by including third and higher-order terms of the strain tensor in the elastic energy expression (e.g., the Murnaghan model). Such classical non-linear models are successful for calculating deformation of soft materials, for example graphite, but cannot explain with the same elastic moduli small and large non-linear deformation of stiff rocks, such as granite. The values of the third (higher-order) Murnaghan moduli estimated from acoustic experiments are one to two orders of magnitude above the values estimated from stress-strain relations in quasi-static rock-mechanics experiments. The Murnaghan model also fails to reproduce an abrupt change in the elastic moduli upon stress reversal from compression to tension, observed in laboratory experiments with rocks, concrete, and composite brittle material samples, and it predicts macroscopic failure at stress levels lower than observations associated with granite. An alternative energy function based on second-order dependency on the strain tensor, as in the Hookean framework, but with an additional non-analytical term, can account for the abrupt change in the effective elastic moduli upon stress reversal, and extended pre-yielding deformation regime with one set of elastic moduli. We show that the non-analytical second-order model is a generalization of other non-classical non-linear models, for example "bi-linear", "clapping non-linearity", and "unilateral damage" models. These models were designed to explain the abrupt changes of elastic moduli and non-linearity of stiff rocks under small strains. The present model produces dilation under shear loading and other non-linear deformation features of the stiff rocks mentioned above, and extends the results to account for gradual closure of an arbitrary distribution of initial cracks. The results provide a quantitative framework that can be used to model simultaneously, with a small number of coefficients, multiple observed aspects of non-linear deformation of stiff rocks. These include, in addition to the features mentioned above, stress-induced anisotropy and non-linear effects in resonance experiments with damaged materials.

  14. Synergy of elastic and inelastic energy loss on ion track formation in SrTiO3

    PubMed Central

    Weber, William J.; Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Sachan, Ritesh; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Liu, Peng; Xue, Haizhou; Jin, Ke; Zhang, Yanwen

    2015-01-01

    While the interaction of energetic ions with solids is well known to result in inelastic energy loss to electrons and elastic energy loss to atomic nuclei in the solid, the coupled effects of these energy losses on defect production, nanostructure evolution and phase transformations in ionic and covalently bonded materials are complex and not well understood due to dependencies on electron-electron scattering processes, electron-phonon coupling, localized electronic excitations, diffusivity of charged defects, and solid-state radiolysis. Here we show that a colossal synergy occurs between inelastic energy loss and pre-existing atomic defects created by elastic energy loss in single crystal strontium titanate (SrTiO3), resulting in the formation of nanometer-sized amorphous tracks, but only in the narrow region with pre-existing defects. These defects locally decrease the electronic and atomic thermal conductivities and increase electron-phonon coupling, which locally increase the intensity of the thermal spike for each ion. This work identifies a major gap in understanding on the role of defects in electronic energy dissipation and electron-phonon coupling; it also provides insights for creating novel interfaces and nanostructures to functionalize thin film structures, including tunable electronic, ionic, magnetic and optical properties. PMID:25578009

  15. Absolute elastic differential electron scattering cross sections in the intermediate energy region. III - SF6 and UF6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S. K.; Trajmar, S.; Chutjian, A.; Williams, W.

    1976-01-01

    A recently developed technique has been used to measure the ratios of elastic differential electron scattering cross sections (DCS) for SF6 and UF6 to those of He at electron impact energies of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 75 eV and at scattering angles of 20 to 135 deg. In order to obtain the absolute values of DCS from these ratios, He DCS of McConkey and Preston have been employed in the 20 to 90 deg range. At angles in the 90 to 135 deg range the recently determined cross sections of Srivastava and Trajmar have been utilized. From these DCS, elastic integral and momentum transfer cross sections have been obtained.

  16. The Wind Energy Potential of Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawri, Nikolai; Nna Petersen, Gurn; Bjornsson, Halldr; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Jnasson, Kristjn; Bay Hasager, Charlotte; Clausen, Niels-Erik

    2014-05-01

    While Iceland has an abundant wind energy resource, its use for electrical power production has so far been limited. Electricity in Iceland is generated primarily from hydro- and geothermal sources, and adding wind energy has so far not been considered practical or even necessary. However, wind energy is becoming a more viable option, as opportunities for new hydro- or geothermal power installations become limited. In order to obtain an estimate of the wind energy potential of Iceland, a wind atlas has been developed as part of the joint Nordic project 'Improved Forecast of Wind, Waves and Icing' (IceWind). Downscaling simulations performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were used to determine the large-scale wind energy potential of Iceland. Local wind speed distributions are represented by Weibull statistics. The shape parameter across Iceland varies between 1.2 and 3.6, with the lowest values indicative of near-exponential distributions at sheltered locations, and the highest values indicative of normal distributions at exposed locations in winter. Compared with summer, average power density in winter is increased throughout Iceland by a factor of 2.0 - 5.5. In any season, there are also considerable spatial differences in average wind power density. Relative to the average value within 10 km of the coast, power density across Iceland varies between 50 - 250%, excluding glaciers, or between 300 - 1500 W m-2 at 50 m above ground level in winter. At intermediate elevations of 500 - 1000 m above mean sea level, power density is independent of the distance to the coast. In addition to seasonal and spatial variability, differences in average wind speed and power density also exist for different wind directions. Along the coast in winter, power density of onshore winds is higher by 100 - 700 W m-2 than that of offshore winds. The regions with the highest average wind speeds are impractical for wind farms, due to the distances from road infrastructure and the power grid, as well as due to the harsh winter climate. However, even in easily accessible regions, wind energy potential in Iceland, as measured by annual average power density, is among the highest in Western Europe. Based on these results, 14 test sites were selected for more detailed analyses using the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP). These calculations show that a modest wind farm of ten medium size turbines would produce more energy throughout the year than a small hydro power plant, making wind energy a viable additional option.

  17. Relativistic and close-coupling effects in the spin polarization of low-energy electrons scattered elastically from cadmium.

    PubMed

    Bostock, Christopher J; Berrington, Michael J; Fursa, Dmitry V; Bray, Igor

    2011-08-26

    The measurements of the Sherman function in elastic electron-cadmium scattering by Bartsch et al. [J. Phys. B 25, 1511 (1992)] have been in serious disagreement with scattering theories for nearly two decades. The recently developed relativistic convergent close-coupling method is applied to the problem and found to be in excellent agreement with experiment over the complete energy range measured. The unusually rapid variation in the spin asymmetry parameter in the vicinity of 4 eV projectile energy is now explained in terms of unitarity of the close-coupling formalism. PMID:21929240

  18. A method for using neutron elastic scatter to create a variable energy neutron beam from a nearly monoenergetic neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetstone, Z. D.; Kearfott, K. J.

    2015-07-01

    This work describes preliminary investigation into the design of a compact, portable, variable energy neutron source. The proposed method uses elastic neutron scatter at specific angles to reduce the energy of deuterium-deuterium or deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutrons. The research focuses on D-T Monte Carlo simulations, both in idealized and more realistic scenarios. Systematic uncertainty of the method is also analyzed. The research showed promise, but highlighted the need for discrimination of multiply-scattered neutrons, either through a pulsed generator or associated particle imaging.

  19. Potential energy surfaces of Polonium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerlo-Pomorska, B.; Pomorski, K.; Schmitt, C.; Bartel, J.

    2015-11-01

    The evolution of the potential energy landscape is analysed in detail for ten eveneven polonium isotopes in the mass range 188\\lt A\\lt 220 as obtained within the macroscopicmicroscopic approach, relying on the LublinStrasbourg drop model and the Yukawa-folded single-particle energies for calculating the microscopic shell and pairing corrections. A variant of the modified FunnyHills nuclear shape parametrization is used to efficiently map possible fission paths. The approach explains the main features of the fragment partition as measured in low-energy fission along the polonium chain. The latter lies in a transitional region of the nuclear chart, and will be essential to consistently understand the evolution of fission properties from neutron-deficient mercury to heavy actinides. The ability of our method to predict fission observables over such an extended region looks promising.

  20. Momentum-space calculation of electronCO elastic collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan-Cheng; Ma, Jia; Zhou, Ya-Jun

    2013-02-01

    We report a momentum-space study on low-energy electron-CO collisions. Elastic differential cross sections (DCS) are obtained using a static-exchange-optical (SEO) model for the incident energies of 2, 3, 5, and 10 eV. Polarization effect of higher reaction channels, including the ionization continuum, on the elastic collision is represented by an ab initio equivalent-local optical potential. The cross sections are compared with experimental measurements and other theoretical results.

  1. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Levin, Eugene

    1993-01-01

    A new global potential energy surface (PES) is being generated for O(P-3) + H2 yields OH + H. This surface is being fit using the rotated Morse oscillator method, which was used to fit the previous POL-CI surface. The new surface is expected to be more accurate and also includes a much more complete sampling of bent geometries. A new study has been undertaken of the reaction N + O2 yields NO + O. The new studies have focused on the region of the surface near a possible minimum corresponding to the peroxy form of NOO. A large portion of the PES for this second reaction has been mapped out. Since state to state cross sections for the reaction are important in the chemistry of high temperature air, these studies will probably be extended to permit generation of a new global potential for reaction.

  2. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L. B.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this program is to calculate accurate potential energy surfaces for both reactive and nonreactive systems. To do this the electronic Schroedinger equation must be solved. Our approach starts with multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) reference wave functions. These reference wavefunctions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to accurately describe changes in electronic structure over a broad range of geometries. Dynamical electron correlation effects are included via multireference, singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations. With this approach, we are able to provide chemically useful predictions of the energetics for many systems. A second aspect of this program is the development of techniques to fit multi-dimensional potential surfaces to convenient, global, analytic functions that can then be used in dynamics calculations.

  3. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L.B.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to calculate accurate potential energy surfaces (PES) for both reactive and nonreactive systems. To do this the electronic Schrodinger equation must be solved. Our approach to this problem starts with multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) reference wavefunctions. These reference wavefunctions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to accurately describe changes in electronic structure over a broad range of geometries. Electron correlation effects are included via multireference, singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRSDCI) calculations. With this approach, the authors are able to provide useful predictions of the energetics for a broad range of systems.

  4. Jumping sans legs: does elastic energy storage by the vertebral column power terrestrial jumps in bony fishes?

    PubMed

    Ashley-Ross, Miriam A; Perlman, Benjamin M; Gibb, Alice C; Long, John H

    2014-02-01

    Despite having no obvious anatomical modifications to facilitate movement over land, numerous small fishes from divergent teleost lineages make brief, voluntary terrestrial forays to escape poor aquatic conditions or to pursue terrestrial prey. Once stranded, these fishes produce a coordinated and effective "tail-flip" jumping behavior, wherein lateral flexion of the axial body into a C-shape, followed by contralateral flexion of the body axis, propels the fish into a ballistic flight-path that covers a distance of multiple body lengths. We ask: how do anatomical structures that evolved in one habitat generate effective movement in a novel habitat? Within this context, we hypothesized that the mechanical properties of the axial skeleton play a critical role in producing effective overland movement, and that tail-flip jumping species demonstrate enhanced elastic energy storage through increased body flexural stiffness or increased body curvature, relative to non-jumping species. To test this hypothesis, we derived a model to predict elastic recoil work from the morphology of the vertebral (neural and hemal) spines. From ground reaction force (GRF) measurements and high-speed video, we calculated elastic recoil work, flexural stiffness, and apparent material stiffness of the body for Micropterus salmoides (a non-jumper) and Kryptolebias marmoratus (adept tail-flip jumper). The model predicted no difference between the two species in work stored by the vertebral spines, and GRF data showed that they produce the same magnitude of mass-specific elastic recoil work. Surprisingly, non-jumper M. salmoides has a stiffer body than tail-flip jumper K. marmoratus. Many tail-flip jumping species possess enlarged, fused hypural bones that support the caudal peduncle, which suggests that the localized structures, rather than the entire axial skeleton, may explain differences in terrestrial performance. PMID:24388492

  5. California's biomass and its energy potential

    SciTech Connect

    Lucarelli, F.B. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    The potentials for using California's biomass for energy have been assessed. The study relies on the recent work of Amory Lovins and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's (LBL) Distributed Energy System's Project to specify an energy future for Californians. These works identify transportation fuels as the most valuable energy conversion for biomass. Within this context, the extent of five categories of terrestial biomass is estimated, in addition to the environmental impacts and monetary cost of collecting and transporting each biomass category. Estimates of the costs of transforming biomass into different fuels as well as a survey of government's role in a biomass energy program are presented. The major findings are summarized below. (1) California's existing biomass resources are sufficient to provide only 20 percent of its future liquid fuel requirements. (2) Meeting the full transportation demand with biomass derived fuels will require the development of exotic biomass sources such as kelp farms and significant reductions in automobile travel in the State. (3) Under assumptions of moderate increases in gasoline prices and without major new government incentives, the cost of transforming biomass into transport fuels will be competitive with the price of gasoline on a Btu basis by the year 1990. (4) The environmental impacts of collecting most forms of biomass are beneficial and should reduce air pollution from agricultural burning and water pollution from feedlot and dairy farm runoff. Moreover, the collection of logging residues should improve timber stand productivity and the harvest of chaparral should reduce the risk of wildfire in the State. (5) The institutional context for implementing biomass energy projects is complex and fragmented.

  6. Coulomb suppression in the low-energy p-p elastic scattering via the Trojan Horse Method

    SciTech Connect

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Campajola, L.; Elekes, Z.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gyuerky, G.; Kiss, G. G.; Somorjai, E.; Gialanella, L.

    2010-11-24

    We present here an important test of the main feature of the Trojan Horse Method (THM), namely the suppression of Coulomb effects in the entrance channel due to off-energy-shell effects. This is done by measuring the THM p-p elastic scattering via the p+d{yields}p+p+n reaction at 4.7 and 5 MeV, corresponding to a p-p relative energy ranging from 80 to 670 keV. In contrast to the on-energy-shell (OES) case, the extracted p-p cross section does not exhibit the Coulomb-nuclear interference minimum due to the suppression of the Coulomb amplitude. This is confirmed by the half-off-energy shell (HOES) calculations and strengthened by the agreement with the calculated OES nuclear cross sections.

  7. Coulomb suppression in the low-energy p-p elastic scattering via the Trojan Horse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Campajola, L.; Cherubini, S.; Crucill, V.; Elekes, Z.; Flp, Zs.; Gialanella, L.; Gulino, M.; Gyrky, G.; Kiss, G. G.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Ordine, A.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Somorjai, E.

    2010-11-01

    We present here an important test of the main feature of the Trojan Horse Method (THM), namely the suppression of Coulomb effects in the entrance channel due to off-energy-shell effects. This is done by measuring the THM p-p elastic scattering via the p+d-->p+p+n reaction at 4.7 and 5 MeV, corresponding to a p-p relative energy ranging from 80 to 670 keV. In contrast to the on-energy-shell (OES) case, the extracted p-p cross section does not exhibit the Coulomb-nuclear interference minimum due to the suppression of the Coulomb amplitude. This is confirmed by the half-off-energy shell (HOES) calculations and strengthened by the agreement with the calculated OES nuclear cross sections.

  8. Size dependent stability analysis of circular ultrathin films in elastic medium with consideration of surface energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assadi, Abbas; Farshi, Behrooz

    2011-03-01

    In this article, analytical framework is developed for size dependent symmetric stability and self-instability of circular nanoplates including surface effects using modified Kirchhoff plate theory. The surrounding elastic medium is modeled as Winkler elastic foundation and its effect is comprehensively studied on self-instability problems. The derived explicit solutions contain Bessel functions with modified arguments reflecting the size dependency of the buckling loads. In order to check the results an inverse formulation is presented for effective Young's modulus using the buckling loads to be verified by previous experimental results for nanowires. Several numerical examples are given for two types of materials with positive and negative surface properties to show the general trends of size dependencies. Some problems and limitations are explored for consistency of results with experiments and suggestions for future works.

  9. Potential energy surfaces of superheavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, M.; Rutz, K.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.; Reinhard, P.-G. Rutz, K.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.

    1998-10-01

    We investigate the structure of the potential energy surfaces of the superheavy nuclei {sub 158}{sup 258}Fm{sub 100}, {sub 156}{sup 264}Hs{sub 108}, {sub 166}{sup 278}112, {sub 184}{sup 298}114, and {sub 172}{sup 292}120 within the framework of self-consistent nuclear models, i.e., the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach and the relativistic mean-field model. We compare results obtained with one representative parametrization of each model which is successful in describing superheavy nuclei. We find systematic changes as compared to the potential energy surfaces of heavy nuclei in the uranium region: there is no sufficiently stable fission isomer any more, the importance of triaxial configurations to lower the first barrier fades away, and asymmetric fission paths compete down to rather small deformation. Comparing the two models, it turns out that the relativistic mean-field model gives generally smaller fission barriers. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Low-energy proton-deuteron elastic scattering and the A(y) puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Michael H.

    2000-10-01

    Angular distributions of cross sections and complete sets of analyzing powers have been measured for d-p scattering at a center-of-mass energy of 667 +/- 1 keV. This set of high-precision data was compared to the most recent variational calculations with the nucleon- nucleon potential AV18 alone and with AV18 plus the UR three- nucleon potential. The calculations have the best agreement with the cross-section data while the comparison with the tensor analyzing powers showed good agreement. However, a comparison between the vector analyzing powers revealed differences of approximately 40% in the maxima of the angular distributions. These NAP discrepancies have been observed at Ec.m. >= 2.0 MeV as well as in the n-d scattering case. After the n-d experiments, the problem has been labelled the `` Ay Puzzle''. A ?2/datum analysis was performed with the lowest values achieved by the inclusion of a three- nucleon force in the theoretical calculations. This fact provides more credence for the existence of three-nucleon forces. However, the ?2/datum for the VAPs remained approximately 100. To investigate the root of the problem in addition to other differences between the theory and the data, a single-energy phase shift analysis (PSA) was performed. The best fits to the NAP data displayed an ~20% increase in the mixing parameter e/- and an increase in the splitting between 4 PJ phase shifts from the variational calculations with the AV18+UR potentials.

  11. Energy potential of sugarcane and sweet sorghum

    SciTech Connect

    Elawad, S.H.; Gascho, G.J.; Shih, S.F.

    1980-01-01

    The potential of sugarcane and sweet sorghum as raw materials for the production of ethanol and petrochemical substitutes is discussed. Both crops belong to the grass family and are classified as C/sub 4/ malateformers which have the highest rate of photosynthesis among terrestrial plants. Large amounts of biomass are required to supply a significant fraction of US energy consumption. Biomass production could be substantially increased by including tops and leaves, adopting narrow row spacing and improving cultural practices. This presents challenges for cultivating, harvesting, and hauling the biomass to processing centers. Large plants and heavy capital investment are essential for energy production. Ethanol and ammonia are the most promising candidates of a biomass program. If sugarcane were to be used for biomass production, breeding programs should be directed for more fermentable sugars and fiber. Energy research on sweet sorghum should be done with syrup varieties. Sweet sorghum needs to be incorporated with other crops because of its short growing season. The disposal of stillage from an extensive ethanol industry may pose environmental problems.

  12. Response to 'Comment on 'Elastic incoherent neutron scattering operating by varying instrumental energy resolution: Principle, simulations, and experiments of the resolution elastic neutron scattering (RENS)'' [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 107101 (2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Magazu, Salvatore; Migliardo, Federica; Benedetto, Antonio

    2012-10-15

    Recently [S. Magazu et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82, 105115 (2011)] we have proposed a new method for characterizing, by neutron scattering, the dynamical properties of complex material systems, such as, the ones of interest in the biophysical field. This approach called Resolution Elastic Neutron Scattering, in short RENS, is based on the detection of the elastically scattered neutron intensity as a function of the instrumental energy resolution. By experimental, theoretical, and numerical findings, we have pointed out that an inflection point occurs in the elastic intensity when the system relaxation time approaches the instrumental energy resolution time. This approach, differently from quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS), gives the chance to evaluate the system relaxation times without using pre-defined models that can be wrong and/or misleading. Here, we reply to a Comment on the above-mentioned main paper in which Wuttke proposes a different approach to evaluate the above-mentioned inflection point; on this regard, it should be noticed that the existence of the inflection point, which is the main topic of our work, is not questioned and that the approach proposed by Wuttke in the Comment, although valid for a class of dynamical processes, is not applicable when different and distinct processes occur simultaneously at different time scale.

  13. Elastic and Inelastic Scattering of Low Energy Nucleons from SILICON-28, SULFUR-32, SULFUR-34, and Calcium -40.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcon, Ricardo

    1985-12-01

    Differential cross sections for the elastic and inelastic scattering of neutrons from the s-d shell nuclei ('28)Si, ('32)S, ('34)S and ('40)Ca have been measured in the 19-26 MeV region. For ('28)Si and ('32)S the measurements were done at 21.7 MeV. For ('34)S the neutron measurements were done at 21.7 and 25.5 MeV. Also data for the elastic and inelastic scattering of protons from ('34)S were measured at 29.8 MeV. For ('40)Ca the neutron measurements were done at 19.0, 21.7 and 25.5 MeV. The present data for ('28)Si and ('32)S were analyzed in terms of rotation-vibration and anharmonic vibration collective models respectively. Isoscalar E2, E3 and E4 transition matrix elements were obtained from the normalized multipole moments of the real potential and the results were compared with those obtained from electromagnetic probes and from nuclear structure theoretical calculations. The present nucleon data for ('34)S were used in a consistent analysis to obtain values and relative signs for proton (M(,p)) and neutron (M(,n)) multipole matrix elements for E2 transitions to the first three 2('+) states in ('34)S. The present neutron data were also analyzed in terms of an anharmonic vibration collective model. The present neutron elastic data for ('40)Ca along with previous neutron measurements and additional proton elastic scattering data were analyzed using three different approaches to the optical model potential : Woods-Saxon parametrization, model independent analysis and microscopic. The difference between the phenomenological neutron and proton real potentials was studied in terms of Coulomb effects, nuclear polarization and charge symmetry breaking in the nuclear mean field. The present neutron inelastic data from ('40)Ca were studied in terms of a vibration collective model using both standard Woods-Saxon and model independent form factors.

  14. Calculation of Average Collision Cross Sections of Low Energy for Elastic e-Ar Scattering Using MERT4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanpour, S.; Nguyen-Kuok, S.

    2015-01-01

    Cross sections in the very low energy range are also represented by the modified effective-range theory (MERT) for low-energy electron scattering from the rare gas (argon). Simulations using published (theoretical) phase shifts indicate that extended versions of the standard effective-range theory with four adjustable parameters are required to give an adequate description of the phase shifts for argon. A four-parameter MERT fit gives a good representation of a recent electron-argon (e-Ar) total cross section experiment at energies less than 10.0 eV. Cross section Q(l) (E) for collision in dilute gases is given for any order l. Here Q(l) (E) are presented for l = 1. . .6. We present calculations for the elastic cross sections for electron scattering from argon. The improvement in the agreement between our theoretical calculations and the experimental measurements in the case of argon in scattering calculations are showed. Differential scattering experiments have been performed for the systems e-Ar in the energy range E = 0-10 eV and the angular range θ = 0-20° using a crossed-beam arrangement. Differential and integrated cross sections for the elastic scattering of low- and intermediate-energy (0-50 eV) electrons by argon atoms are calculated. For each impact energy, the phase shifts of the lower partial waves are obtained exactly by numerical integration of the radial equation. Transport coefficients of argon plasma are requested exactly, which is why we calculated the average collision cross sections for s = 1. . .11, l = 1. . .6.

  15. Certification and the potential energy landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Dhagash; Hauenstein, Jonathan D.; Wales, David J.

    2014-06-14

    Typically, there is no guarantee that a numerical approximation obtained using standard nonlinear equation solvers is indeed an actual solution, meaning that it lies in the quadratic convergence basin. Instead, it may lie only in the linear convergence basin, or even in a chaotic region, and hence not converge to the corresponding stationary point when further optimization is attempted. In some cases, these non-solutions could be misleading. Proving that a numerical approximation will quadratically converge to a stationary point is termed certification. In this report, we provide details of how Smale's α-theory can be used to certify numerically obtained stationary points of a potential energy landscape, providing a mathematical proof that the numerical approximation does indeed correspond to an actual stationary point, independent of the precision employed.

  16. The {sup 6}He Optical Potential at energies around the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Moro, A. M.

    2010-04-26

    We present an Optical Model (OM) study of {sup 6}He on {sup 208}Pb elastic scattering data, measured at laboratory energies around the Coulomb barrier (E{sub lab} = 14, 16, 18, 22, and 27 MeV)[1]. For the projectile-target bare interaction, we use the microscopic Sao Paulo Potential (SPP). This bare interaction is supplemented with a Coulomb Dipole Polarization (CDP) potential, as well as a diffuse complex Woods-Saxon potential. Four-body Continuum-Discretized-Coupled-Channels (CDCC) calculations have been performed in order to support the optical model analysis. We have also studied the alpha channel, which is the dominant reaction process. In the analysis of this channel, we compare the angular and energy distributions of the alpha particles measured at 22 MeV, with Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA) calculations.

  17. Biopolymer Chain Elasticity: a novel concept and a least deformation energy principle predicts backbone and overall folding of DNA TTT hairpins in agreement with NMR distances

    PubMed Central

    Pakleza, Christophe; Cognet, Jean A. H.

    2003-01-01

    A new molecular modelling methodology is presented and shown to apply to all published solution structures of DNA hairpins with TTT in the loop. It is based on the theory of elasticity of thin rods and on the assumption that single-stranded B-DNA behaves as a continuous, unshearable, unstretchable and flexible thin rod. It requires four construction steps: (i) computation of the tri-dimensional trajectory of the elastic line, (ii) global deformation of single-stranded helical DNA onto the elastic line, (iii) optimisation of the nucleoside rotations about the elastic line, (iv) energy minimisation to restore backbone bond lengths and bond angles. This theoretical approach called Biopolymer Chain Elasticity (BCE) is capable of reproducing the tri-dimensional course of the sugarphosphate chain and, using NMR-derived distances, of reproducing models close to published solution structures. This is shown by computing three different types of distance criteria. The natural description provided by the elastic line and by the new parameter, ?, which corresponds to the rotation angles of nucleosides about the elastic line, offers a considerable simplification of molecular modelling of hairpin loops. They can be varied independently from each other, since the global shape of the hairpin loop is preserved in all cases. PMID:12560506

  18. Energy dependence of the optical potentials for the 9Be +208Pb and 9Be +209Bi systems at near-Coulomb-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmez Camacho, A.; Yu, N.; Zhang, H. Q.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Jia, H. M.; Lubian, J.; Lin, C. J.

    2015-04-01

    We analyze the energy dependence of the interacting optical potential, at near barrier energies, for two systems involving the weakly bound projectile 9Be and the heavy 208Pb and 209Bi targets, by the simultaneous fit of elastic scattering angular distributions and fusion excitation functions. The approach used consists of dividing the optical potential into two parts. A short-range potential VF+i WF that is responsible for fusion, and a superficial potential VDR+i WDR for direct reactions. It is found, for both systems studied, that the fusion imaginary potential WF presents the usual threshold anomaly (TA) observed in tightly bound systems, whereas the direct reaction imaginary potential WDR shows a breakup threshold anomaly (BTA) behavior. Both potentials satisfy the dispersion relation. The direct reaction polarization potential predominates over the fusion potential and so a net overall behavior is found to follow the BTA phenomenon.

  19. Energy Functionals from Low-Momentum Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogner, S. K.

    2006-04-01

    The nonperturbative nature of conventional inter-nucleon interactions is strongly scale or resolution dependent, and can be radically modified by using the renormalization group to lower the momentum cutoff of the two-nucleon potential. Recent calculations demonstrate that using low-momentum potentials (``Vlow k'') with consistent three-body forces leads to saturating nuclear matter at the Hartree-Fock level, with rapidly converging perturbative corrections in the particle-particle channel ^a. With these interactions, the density matrix expansion (DME) becomes a natural tool for the microscopic construction of a universal energy functional for nuclei ^b. By varying the cutoff, the resolution dependence of the functional can be studied. The use of sharp momentum cutoffs in Vlow k complicates the application of the DME in coordinate space. This problem is resolved with the recent generalization of Vlow k to smooth cutoff regulators. ^aS. K. Bogner, A. Schwenk, R. J. Furnstahl and A. Nogga, Nucl. Phys. A 763, 59 (2005). ^bJ. W. Negele and D. Vautherin, Phys. Rev. C 5, 1472 (1972).

  20. Energy resource potential of natural gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of large gas hydrate accumulations in terrestrial permafrost regions of the Arctic and beneath the sea along the outer continental margins of the world's oceans has heightened interest in gas hydrates as a possible energy resource. However, significant to potentially insurmountable technical issues must be resolved before gas hydrates can be considered a viable option for affordable supplies of natural gas. The combined information from Arctic gas hydrate studies shows that, in permafrost regions, gas hydrates may exist at subsurface depths ranging from about 130 to 2000 m. The presence of gas hydrates in offshore continental margins has been inferred mainly from anomalous seismic reflectors, known as bottom-simulating reflectors, that have been mapped at depths below the sea floor ranging from about 100 to 1100 m. Current estimates of the amount of gas in the world's marine and permafrost gas hydrate accumulations are in rough accord at about 20,000 trillion m3. Disagreements over fundamental issues such as the volume of gas stored within delineated gas hydrate accumulations and the concentration of gas hydrates within hydrate-bearing strata have demonstrated that we know little about gas hydrates. Recently, however, several countries, including Japan, India, and the United States, have launched ambitious national projects to further examine the resource potential of gas hydrates. These projects may help answer key questions dealing with the properties of gas hydrate reservoirs, the design of production systems, and, most important, the costs and economics of gas hydrate production.

  1. Molecular Multipole Potential Energy Functions for Water.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ming-Liang; Tran, Kelly N; Pickard, Frank C; Simmonett, Andrew C; Brooks, Bernard R; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2016-03-01

    Water is the most common liquid on this planet, with many unique properties that make it essential for life as we know it. These properties must arise from features in the charge distribution of a water molecule, so it is essential to capture these features in potential energy functions for water to reproduce its liquid state properties in computer simulations. Recently, models that utilize a multipole expansion located on a single site in the water molecule, or "molecular multipole models", have been shown to rival and even surpass site models with up to five sites in reproducing both the electrostatic potential around a molecule and a variety of liquid state properties in simulations. However, despite decades of work using multipoles, confusion still remains about how to truncate the multipole expansions efficiently and accurately. This is particularly important when using molecular multipole expansions to describe water molecules in the liquid state, where the short-range interactions must be accurate, because the higher order multipoles of a water molecule are large. Here, truncation schemes designed for a recent efficient algorithm for multipoles in molecular dynamics simulations are assessed for how well they reproduce results for a simple three-site model of water when the multipole moments and Lennard-Jones parameters of that model are used. In addition, the multipole analysis indicates that site models that do not account for out-of-plane electron density overestimate the stability of a non-hydrogen-bonded conformation, leading to serious consequences for the simulated liquid. PMID:26562223

  2. Elastic collisions of low-energy electrons with SiY{sub 4} (Y = Cl, Br, I) molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bettega, M. H. F.

    2011-11-15

    We employed the Schwinger multichannel method to compute elastic integral, differential, and momentum transfer cross sections for low-energy electron collisions with SiY{sub 4} (Y = Cl, Br, I) molecules. The calculations were carried out in the static-exchange and static-exchange plus polarization approximations for energies up to 10 eV. The elastic integral cross section for SiCl{sub 4} and SiBr{sub 4}, computed in the static-exchange plus polarization approximation, shows two shape resonances belonging to the T{sub 2} and E symmetries of the T{sub d} group, and for SiI{sub 4} shows one shape resonance belonging to the E symmetry of the T{sub d} group. The present results agree well in shape with experimental total cross sections. The positions of the resonances observed in the calculated integral cross sections are also in agreement with the experimental positions. We have found the presence of a virtual state for SiCl{sub 4} and a Ramsauer-Townsend minimum for SiI{sub 4} at 0.5 eV. The present results show that the proper inclusion of polarization effects is crucial in order to correctly describe the resonance spectra of these molecules and also to identify a Ramsauer-Townsend minimum for SiI{sub 4} and a virtual state for SiCl{sub 4}.

  3. Computed potential energy surfaces for chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1988-01-01

    The minimum energy path for the addition of a hydrogen atom to N2 is characterized in CASSCF/CCI calculations using the (4s3p2d1f/3s2p1d) basis set, with additional single point calculations at the stationary points of the potential energy surface using the (5s4p3d2f/4s3p2d) basis set. These calculations represent the most extensive set of ab initio calculations completed to date, yielding a zero point corrected barrier for HN2 dissociation of approx. 8.5 kcal mol/1. The lifetime of the HN2 species is estimated from the calculated geometries and energetics using both conventional Transition State Theory and a method which utilizes an Eckart barrier to compute one dimensional quantum mechanical tunneling effects. It is concluded that the lifetime of the HN2 species is very short, greatly limiting its role in both termolecular recombination reactions and combustion processes.

  4. Rapid Hydrogel Microactuator Using Elastic Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Howon; Xia, Chunguang; Fang, Nicholas

    2009-03-01

    Rapid Hydrogel Microactuator Using Elastic Instability Inspired by rapid movement of sensitive plants such as Venus flytrap [1], we present an innovative way to enhance actuation speed of hydrogel micro devices by exploiting elastic instability. In this work, hydrogel micro devices in doubly curved shape are designed and fabricated using projection micro-stereolithography[2], with embedded microfluidic channels on the surface. Local swelling of hydrogel around channels causes bending which subsequently induces stretching of the soft structure. Such coupling gives rise to elastic instability, the onset of which triggers rapid conversion of stored elastic energy into kinetic energy in fast motion. We further designed a set of devices with different dimensions, which leads to different coupling of elastic energy in bending and stretching [1]. Our experimental results verified the critical coupling parameter that triggers snap-buckling motion. Ongoing experiments are investigating the actuation speed as a function of coupling parameter. This novel approach promises new potential applications for hydrogel based devices in various fields of study including microfluidics, soft robotics, artificial muscle, and drug delivery. Reference [1] Forterre, Y., et al, Nature, 433, 421-425 (2005) [2] Sun, C., et al, Sensors and Actuators A, 121:1, 113-120 (2005)

  5. The HCO{sup +}H{sub 2} van der Waals interaction: Potential energy and scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mass, H.; Wiesenfeld, L.

    2014-11-14

    We compute the rigid-body, four-dimensional interaction potential between HCO{sup +} and H{sub 2}. The ab initio energies are obtained at the coupled-cluster single double triple level of theory, corrected for Basis Set Superposition Errors. The ab initio points are fit onto the spherical basis relevant for quantum scattering. We present elastic and rotationally inelastic coupled channels scattering between low lying rotational levels of HCO{sup +} and para-/ortho-H{sub 2}. Results are compared with similar earlier computations with He or isotropic para-H{sub 2} as the projectile. Computations agree with earlier pressure broadening measurements.

  6. Energy dependence of the optical model potential for fast neutron scattering from cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. B.; Guenther, P. T.; Lawson, R. D.

    1988-06-01

    Differential elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured from 1.5 to 10.0 MeV over the scattering-angle range 18 to 160, with sufficient detail to define the energy-averaged behavior. Inelastic neutron groups were observed corresponding to measured excitation energies of: 1115 29, 1212 24, 1307 24, 1503 33, 1778 40, 2112 40, 2224 35, 2423 39, 2593 41 and 2810 67 keV. The experimental results were interpreted in terms of spherical-optical-statistical and coupled-channels models. A successful description of the differential elastic scattering below 10 MeV and the total cross section in the range 0-20 MeV was achieved using the spherical optical model with energy-dependent strengths and geometries. These energy dependencies are large below approximately 7.0 MeV, but become smaller and similar to those reported for "global" potentials at higher energies. This change in the energy dependence of the parameters, which occurs about 19 MeV above the Fermi energy, was also seen in the analysis of the 209Bi data and probably marks the onset of the Fermi surface anomaly. Inelastic scattering to the levels below 1.8 MeV displays a forward peaked behavior. This non-statistical component is interpreted using the weak coupling model in which the f{7}/{2} proton hole is coupled to the 2 + state in 60Ni. This vibrational characteristic provides an explanation of the unusual energy dependence and relatively small radius found for the imaginary optical model potential. In conjunction with the fact that cobalt is four neutrons away from the N = 28 closed shell, the coupling also provides an explanation for the large value of this potential. The real spherical optical-model potential derived from the neutron-scattering results was extrapolated to bound energies using the dispersion relationship and the method of moments. The resulting real-potential strength and radius peak at -10.0 MeV, whereas the real diffuseness is at a minimum at this energy. The extrapolated potential is 8% larger than that implied by reported particle-state energies, and 13% smaller than indicated by hole-state energies.

  7. Calcium Binding Restores Gel Formation of Succinylated Gelatin and Reduces Brittleness with Preservation of the Elastically Stored Energy.

    PubMed

    Baigts Allende, Diana; de Jongh, Harmen H J

    2015-08-12

    To better tailor gelatins for textural characteristics in (food) gels, their interactions are destabilized by introduction of electrostatic repulsions and creation of affinity sites for calcium to "lock" intermolecular interactions. For that purpose gelatins with various degrees of succinylation are obtained. Extensive succinylation hampers helix formation and gel strength is slightly reduced. At high degrees of succinylation the helix propensity, gelling/melting temperatures, concomitant transition enthalpy, and gel strength become calcium-sensitive, and relatively low calcium concentrations largely restore these properties. Although succinylation has a major impact on the brittleness of the gels formed and the addition of calcium makes the material less brittle compared to nonmodified gelatin, the modification has no impact on the energy balance in the gel, where all energy applied is elastically stored in the material. This is explained by the unaffected stress relaxation by the network and high water-holding capacity related to the small mesh sizes in the gels. PMID:26154824

  8. An ab initio method for locating potential energy minima

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, Nicolas; Peery, Travis; Venneri, Giulia; Chisolm, Eric; Wallace, Duane; Lizarraga, Raquel; Holmstrom, Erik

    2009-01-01

    We study the potential energy landscape underlying the motion of monatomic liquids by quenching from random initial configurations (stochastic configurations) to the nearest local minimum of the potential energy. We show that this procedure reveals the underlying potential energy surface directly. This is in contrast to the common technique of quenching from a molecular dynamics trajectory which does not allow a direct view of the underlying potential energy surface, but needs to be corrected for thermodynamic weighting factors.

  9. Full potential study of the elastic, electronic, and optical properties of spinels MgIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} and CdIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} under pressure effect

    SciTech Connect

    Semari, F.; Khenata, R.; Rabah, M.; Bouhemadou, A.; Bin Omran, S.; Reshak, Ali H.; Rached, D.

    2010-12-15

    The structural, elastic, electronic, and optical properties of cubic spinel MgIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} and CdIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} compounds have been calculated using a full relativistic version of the full-potential linearized-augmented plane wave with the mixed basis FP/APW+lo method. The exchange and correlation potential is treated by the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA). Moreover, the Engel-Vosko GGA formalism is also applied to optimize the corresponding potential for band structure calculations. The ground state properties, including the lattice constants, the internal parameter, the bulk modulus, and the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus are in reasonable agreement with the available data. Using the total energy-strain technique, we have determined the full set of first-order elastic constants C{sub ij} and their pressure dependence, which have not been calculated or measured yet. The shear modulus, Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio are calculated for polycrystalline XIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} aggregates. The Debye temperature is estimated from the average sound velocity. Electronic band structures show a direct band gap ({Gamma}-{Gamma}) for MgIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} and an indirect band gap (K-{Gamma}) for CdIn{sub 2}S{sub 4}. The calculated band gaps with EVGGA show a significant improvement over the GGA. The optical constants, including the dielectric function {epsilon}({omega}), the refractive index n({omega}), the reflectivity R({omega}), and the energy loss function L({omega}) were calculated for radiation up to 30 eV. -- Graphical abstract: Calculated total and partial densities of states for MgIn{sub 2}S{sub 4} and CdIn{sub 2}S{sub 4}

  10. Search for rapid angular and energy dependence of dsigma/d. cap omega. and iT/sub 11/ in large angle. pi. -d elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mathie, E.L.; Smith, G.R.; Boschitz, E.T.; Meyer, M.; Vogler, F.; Daum, M.; Mango, S.; Konter, J.A.

    1983-12-01

    The ..pi..-d elastic differential cross-section and the vector analyzing power have been measured between CTHETA/sub c.m./ = 95/sup 0/ and 165/sup 0/ at incident pion energies between 117 and 151 MeV. Both observables show a smooth behavior as a function of angle and energy.

  11. Synergistic effects from graphene and carbon nanotubes endow ordered hierarchical structure foams with a combination of compressibility, super-elasticity and stability and potential application as pressure sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Jun; Dai, Zhaohe; Liu, Luqi; Yang, Zhou; Jin, Ming; Zhang, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructured carbon material based three-dimensional porous architectures have been increasingly developed for various applications, e.g. sensors, elastomer conductors, and energy storage devices. Maintaining architectures with good mechanical performance, including elasticity, load-bearing capacity, fatigue resistance and mechanical stability, is prerequisite for realizing these functions. Though graphene and CNT offer opportunities as nanoscale building blocks, it still remains a great challenge to achieve good mechanical performance in their microarchitectures because of the need to precisely control the structure at different scales. Herein, we fabricate a hierarchical honeycomb-like structured hybrid foam based on both graphene and CNT. The resulting materials possess excellent properties of combined high specific strength, elasticity and mechanical stability, which cannot be achieved in neat CNT and graphene foams. The improved mechanical properties are attributed to the synergistic-effect-induced highly organized, multi-scaled hierarchical architectures. Moreover, with their excellent electrical conductivity, we demonstrated that the hybrid foams could be used as pressure sensors in the fields related to artificial skin.Nanostructured carbon material based three-dimensional porous architectures have been increasingly developed for various applications, e.g. sensors, elastomer conductors, and energy storage devices. Maintaining architectures with good mechanical performance, including elasticity, load-bearing capacity, fatigue resistance and mechanical stability, is prerequisite for realizing these functions. Though graphene and CNT offer opportunities as nanoscale building blocks, it still remains a great challenge to achieve good mechanical performance in their microarchitectures because of the need to precisely control the structure at different scales. Herein, we fabricate a hierarchical honeycomb-like structured hybrid foam based on both graphene and CNT. The resulting materials possess excellent properties of combined high specific strength, elasticity and mechanical stability, which cannot be achieved in neat CNT and graphene foams. The improved mechanical properties are attributed to the synergistic-effect-induced highly organized, multi-scaled hierarchical architectures. Moreover, with their excellent electrical conductivity, we demonstrated that the hybrid foams could be used as pressure sensors in the fields related to artificial skin. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00841g

  12. Theoretical elastic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, J. T.; Landis, B. A.; Mintmire, J. W.

    Carbon fiber nanotubes are a relatively new material with amazing physical and electrical properties. We report the results of the first-principles calculations for the elastic properties of several single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with diameters of 4-17 . We show that the torsional and axial strain potential energy curves can be well described in terms of the experimental elastic constants of bulk graphite.

  13. Variational calculations of low-energy elastic Ps-H scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Denton; Ward, S. J.; van Reeth, P.

    2013-05-01

    Ps-H scattering is of interest, as it is a fundamental 4-body Coulomb problem, and measurements have been made of Ps scattering with atoms and molecules. We have computed accurate 1,3 S and 1,3 P phase shifts for elastic Ps-H scattering using the Kohn, inverse Kohn, generalized Kohn and complex Kohn variational methods. We improved upon the numerics of the previous accurate Kohn and inverse Kohn variational calculations. Using the quantum defect theory for the van der Waals interaction, we computed the 1 P and 3 P scattering lengths. We are in the process of computing the 1 D -wave phase shifts. S.J.W. acknowledges support from NSF under grant no. PHYS-968638.

  14. Total, inelastic and (quasi-)elastic cross sections of high energy p A and ? ? A reactions with the dipole formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafson, Gsta; Lnnblad, Leif; Ster, Andrs; Csrg?, Tams

    2015-10-01

    In order to understand the initial partonic state in proton-nucleus and electron-nucleus collisions, we investigate the total, inelastic, and (quasi-)elastic cross sections in p A and ? ? A collisions, as these observables are insensitive to possible collective effects in the final state interactions. We used as a tool the DIPSY dipole model, which is based on BFKL dynamics including non-leading effects, saturation, and colour interference, which we have extended to describe collisions of protons and virtual photons with nuclei. We present results for collisions with O, Cu, and Pb nuclei, and reproduce preliminary data on the pPb inelastic cross section at LHC by CMS and LHCb. The large NN cross section results in p A scattering that scales approximately with the area. The results are compared with conventional Glauber model calculations, and we note that the more subtle dynamical effects are more easily studied in the ratios between the total, inelastic and (quasi-)elastic cross sections. The smaller photon interaction makes the ? ? A collisions more closely proportional to A, and we see here that future electron-ion colliders would be valuable complements to the p A collisions in studies of dynamical effects from correlations, coherence and fluctuations in the initial state in high energy nuclear collisions.

  15. ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY RECOVERY POTENTIAL OF INDUSTRIAL COMBUSTION EQUIPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    An assessment was conducted to evaluate the waste heat content and energy recovery potential of flue gases from 30 industrial combustion devices. Pollution controls on nine of the devices were evaluated to estimate energy requirements and particulate reduction; energy requirement...

  16. Transiting the molecular potential energy surface along low energy pathways: the TRREAT algorithm.

    PubMed

    Campa, Carlos; Miller, Ronald E

    2013-11-01

    The Transition Rapidly exploring Random Eigenvector Assisted Tree (TRREAT) algorithm is introduced to perform searches along low curvature pathways on a potential energy surface (PES). The method combines local curvature information about the PES with an iterative Rapidly exploring Random Tree algorithm (LaValle, Computer Science Department, Iowa State University, 1998, TR98-11) that quickly searches high-dimensional spaces for feasible pathways between local minima. Herein, the method is applied to identifying conformational changes of molecular systems using Cartesian coordinates while avoiding a priori definition of collective variables. We analyze the pathway identification problem for alanine dipeptide, cyclohexane and glycine using nonreactive and reactive forcefields. We show how TRREAT-identified pathways can be used as valuable input guesses for double-ended methods such as the Nudged Elastic Band when ascertaining transition state energies. This method can be utilized to improve/extend the reaction databases that lie at the core of automatic chemical reaction mechanism generator software currently developed to build kinetic models of chemical reactions. PMID:24018749

  17. Transportation Energy Use and Conservation Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirst, Eric

    1973-01-01

    Analyzes transportation energy consumption and energy intensiveness for inter-city freight and passenger traffic and urban passenger traffic with the definition of energy intensiveness as Btu per ton-mile or per passenger-mile. Indicates that public education is one of three ways to achieve the goals of energy conservation. (CC)

  18. Relaxed elastic lines of second kind in semi-dual spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin ?ekerci, Gl?ah; Ceylan ken, A.

    2015-09-01

    Theory of elasticity is a topic that keeps improving by using on many fields such as geometry, physics, chemistry and engineering. Energy density is given as some functions of curvature and torsion. If the curve of the Is will be an external for the variation problem that minimizes the value of energy density: then this curve is called as relaxed elastic line. The relaxed elastic line on an oriented surface is considered as a model of DNA molecule. In this study, we worked on the second type relaxed elastic lines on the semi-dual spaces which has an important point on kinematic and Einstein's relativity theory. We also obtained boundary conditions for this type of curves. Moreover, the minimization problem of the energy which occurs with an applied force on an elastic line was discussed. Then, we researched the formed potential energy due to the applied force. Also, during the calculation of the potential energy on the elastic line, the amount of the potential energy for unit length of the elastic line was used. Afterwards, by integrating that amount, total potential energy calculated. So, we study to make a contribute both Einstein's relativity theory and kinematic.

  19. Simulation of 12C+12C elastic scattering at high energy by using the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chen-Lei; Zhang, Gao-Long; Tanihata, I.; Le, Xiao-Yun

    2012-03-01

    The Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the 12C+12C reaction process. Taking into account the size of the incident 12C beam spot and the thickness of the 12C target, the distributions of scattered 12C on the MWPC and the CsI detectors at a detective distance have been simulated. In order to separate elastic scattering from the inelastic scattering with 4.4 MeV excited energy, we set several variables: the kinetic energy of incident 12C, the thickness of the 12C target, the ratio of the excited state, the wire spacing of the MWPC, the energy resolution of the CsI detector and the time resolution of the plastic scintillator. From the simulation results, the preliminary establishment of the experiment system can be determined to be that the beam size of the incident 12C is phi5 mm, the incident kinetic energy is 200-400 A MeV, the target thickness is 2 mm, the ratio of the excited state is 20%, the flight distance of scattered 12C is 3 m, the energy resolution of the CsI detectors is 1%, the time resolution of the plastic scintillator is 0.5%, and the size of the CsI detectors is 7 cm7 cm, and we need at least 16 CsI detectors to cover a 0 to 5 angular distribution.

  20. The interfascicular matrix enables fascicle sliding and recovery in tendon, and behaves more elastically in energy storing tendons

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Godinho, Marta S.C.; Riley, Graham P.; Birch, Helen L.; Clegg, Peter D.; Screen, Hazel R.C.

    2015-01-01

    While the predominant function of all tendons is to transfer force from muscle to bone and position the limbs, some tendons additionally function as energy stores, reducing the cost of locomotion. Energy storing tendons experience extremely high strains and need to be able to recoil efficiently for maximum energy storage and return. In the equine forelimb, the energy storing superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) has much higher failure strains than the positional common digital extensor tendon (CDET). However, we have previously shown that this is not due to differences in the properties of the SDFT and CDET fascicles (the largest tendon subunits). Instead, there is a greater capacity for interfascicular sliding in the SDFT which facilitates the greater extensions in this particular tendon (Thorpe et al., 2012). In the current study, we exposed fascicles and interfascicular matrix (IFM) from the SDFT and CDET to cyclic loading followed by a test to failure. The results show that IFM mechanical behaviour is not a result of irreversible deformation, but the IFM is able to withstand cyclic loading, and is more elastic in the SDFT than in the CDET. We also assessed the effect of ageing on IFM properties, demonstrating that the IFM is less able to resist repetitive loading as it ages, becoming stiffer with increasing age in the SDFT. These results provide further indications that the IFM is important for efficient function in energy storing tendons, and age-related alterations to the IFM may compromise function and predispose older tendons to injury. PMID:25958330

  1. Elastic Barrier Dynamical Freezing in Free Energy Calculations: A Way To Speed Up Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulations by Orders of Magnitude.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, Edoardo; Cardini, Gianni; Chelli, Riccardo

    2016-03-01

    An important issue concerning computer simulations addressed to free energy estimates via nonequilibrium work theorems, such as the Jarzynski equality [ Phys. Rev. Lett. 1997 , 78 , 2690 ], is the computational effort required to achieve results with acceptable accuracy. In this respect, the dynamical freezing approach [ Phys. Rev. E 2009 , 80 , 041124 ] has been shown to improve the efficiency of this kind of simulations, by blocking the dynamics of particles located outside an established mobility region. In this report, we show that dynamical freezing produces a systematic spurious decrease of the particle density inside the mobility region. As a consequence, the requirements to apply nonequilibrium work theorems are only approximately met. Starting from these considerations, we have developed a simulation scheme, called "elastic barrier dynamical freezing", according to which a stiff potential-energy barrier is enforced at the boundaries of the mobility region, preventing the particles from leaving this region of space during the nonequilibrium trajectories. The method, tested on the calculation of the distance-dependent free energy of a dimer immersed into a Lennard-Jones fluid, provides an accuracy comparable to the conventional steered molecular dynamics, with a computational speedup exceeding a few orders of magnitude. PMID:26771534

  2. First principles phase transition, elastic properties and electronic structure calculations for cadmium telluride under induced pressure: density functional theory, LDA, GGA and modified BeckeJohnson potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabita, Kh; Maibam, Jameson; Indrajit Sharma, B.; Brojen Singh, R. K.; Thapa, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    We report first principles phase transition, elastic properties and electronic structure for cadmium telluride (CdTe) under induced pressure in the light of density functional theory using the local density approximation (LDA), generalised gradient approximation (GGA) and modified BeckeJohnson (mBJ) potential. The structural phase transition of CdTe from a zinc blende (ZB) to a rock salt (RS) structure within the LDA calculation is 2.2 GPa while that within GGA is found to be at 4 GPa pressure with a volume collapse of 20.9%. The elastic constants and parameters (Zener anisotropy factor, Shear modulus, Poissons ratio, Youngs modulus, Kleinmann parameter and Debyes temperature) of CdTe at different pressures of both the phases have been calculated. The band diagram of the CdTe ZB structure shows a direct band gap of 1.46 eV as predicted by mBJ calculation which gives better results in close agreement with experimental results as compared to LDA and GGA. An increase in the band gap of the CdTe ZB phase is predicted under induced pressure while the metallic nature is retained in the CdTe RS phase.

  3. The role of elasticity in slab bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourel, Loic; Goes, Saskia; Morra, Gabriele

    2014-11-01

    studies showed that plate rheology exerts a dominant control on the shape and velocity of subducting plates. Here, we perform a systematic investigation of the role of elasticity in slab bending, using fully dynamic 2-D models where an elastic, viscoelastic, or viscoelastoplastic plate subducts freely into a purely viscous mantle. We derive a scaling relationship between the bending radius of viscoelastic slabs and the Deborah number, De, which is the ratio of Maxwell time over deformation time. We show that De controls the ratio of elastically stored energy over viscously dissipated energy and find that at De>10-2, substantially less energy is required to bend a viscoelastic slab to the same shape as a purely viscous slab with the same intrinsic viscosity. Elastically stored energy at higher De favors retreating modes of subduction via unbending, while trench advance only occurs for some cases with De<10-2. We estimate the apparent Deborah numbers of natural subduction zones and find values ranging from 10-3 to > 1, where most zones have low De<10-2, but a few young plates have De > 0.1. Slabs with De<10-2 either have very low viscosities or they may be yielding, in which case our De estimates may be underestimated by up to an order of magnitude, potentially pointing towards a significant role of elasticity in 60% of the subduction zones. In support of such a role of elasticity in subduction, we find that increasing De correlates with increasing proportion of larger seismic events in both instrumental and historic catalogues.

  4. Synergistic effects from graphene and carbon nanotubes endow ordered hierarchical structure foams with a combination of compressibility, super-elasticity and stability and potential application as pressure sensors.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Jun; Dai, Zhaohe; Liu, Luqi; Yang, Zhou; Jin, Ming; Zhang, Zhong

    2015-05-28

    Nanostructured carbon material based three-dimensional porous architectures have been increasingly developed for various applications, e.g. sensors, elastomer conductors, and energy storage devices. Maintaining architectures with good mechanical performance, including elasticity, load-bearing capacity, fatigue resistance and mechanical stability, is prerequisite for realizing these functions. Though graphene and CNT offer opportunities as nanoscale building blocks, it still remains a great challenge to achieve good mechanical performance in their microarchitectures because of the need to precisely control the structure at different scales. Herein, we fabricate a hierarchical honeycomb-like structured hybrid foam based on both graphene and CNT. The resulting materials possess excellent properties of combined high specific strength, elasticity and mechanical stability, which cannot be achieved in neat CNT and graphene foams. The improved mechanical properties are attributed to the synergistic-effect-induced highly organized, multi-scaled hierarchical architectures. Moreover, with their excellent electrical conductivity, we demonstrated that the hybrid foams could be used as pressure sensors in the fields related to artificial skin. PMID:25932597

  5. Light element analysis in steel by high energy heavy ion time of flight elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wan; Hayakawa, Shinjiro; Maeda, Kuniko; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Gohshi, Yohichi

    1999-01-01

    Time of flight elastic recoil detection analysis (TOF-ERDA) using high-energy heavy ions has been applied to determining the composition of light elements in stainless-steel (SUS304) samples before and after welding in order to monitor the variation in the composition of light elements in sample surfaces during a welding process. An argon-welding method using a welding rod (SUS304) and an arc-welding method using a welding rod were used to prepare samples. Four samples, welded and non-welded using two welding methods, were measured. 40Ar ions accelerated to 40.3 MeV were used as a probe. Carbon, oxygen and sodium were measured. It was found that the oxygen distributions near to the surfaces of the welded samples increased compared with those of the non-welded samples. However, variations in the carbon distributions were relatively smaller than that of oxygen distributions.

  6. Monte Carlo simulation and parameterized treatment on the effect of nuclear elastic scattering in high-energy proton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hai-Bo; Zheng, Na

    2015-07-01

    A version of Geant4 has been developed to treat high-energy proton radiography. This article presents the results of calculations simulating the effects of nuclear elastic scattering for various test step wedges. Comparisons with experimental data are also presented. The traditional expressions of the transmission should be correct if the angle distribution of the scattering is Gaussian multiple Coulomb scattering. The mean free path (which depends on the collimator angle) and the radiation length are treated as empirical parameters, according to transmission as a function of thickness obtained by simulations. The results can be used in density reconstruction, which depends on the transmission expressions. Supported by NSAF (11176001) and Science and Technology Developing Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (2012A0202006)

  7. Magnetic inhomogeneity on a triangular lattice: the magnetic-exchange versus the elastic energy and the role of disorder

    PubMed Central

    Zorko, A.; Kokalj, J.; Komelj, M.; Adamopoulos, O.; Luetkens, H.; Ar?on, D.; Lappas, A.

    2015-01-01

    Inhomogeneity in the ground state is an intriguing, emergent phenomenon in magnetism. Recently, it has been observed in the magnetostructural channel of the geometrically frustrated ?-NaMnO2, for the first time in the absence of active charge degrees of freedom. Here we report an in-depth numerical and local-probe experimental study of the isostructural sister compound CuMnO2 that emphasizes and provides an explanation for the crucial differences between the two systems. The experimentally verified, much more homogeneous, ground state of the stoichiometric CuMnO2 is attributed to the reduced magnetoelastic competition between the counteracting magnetic-exchange and elastic-energy contributions. The comparison of the two systems additionally highlights the role of disorder and allows the understanding of the puzzling phenomenon of phase separation in uniform antiferromagnets. PMID:25786810

  8. Complex, energy-independent, local potential reproducing an absorptive phase shift and a bound state

    SciTech Connect

    Alt, E.O.; Howell, L.L.; Rauh, M.; Sofianos, S.A. Physics Department, University of South Africa, Pretoria )

    1994-01-01

    The triton binding energy, and the partly real and partly complex neutron-deuteron doublet channel elastic scattering phase shifts, calculated by means of the exact three-body theory, are used as input in the fixed-[ital l] inverse scattering theory of Marchenko. The local potentials obtained hereby are independent of energy, and complex. Their strong imaginary part reflects the strong absorption in the doublet channel arising from the opening of the deuteron breakup channel. For total orbital angular momentum [ital l] different from zero the potentials are unique, reproducing the input phase shift in the whole energy region. For [ital l]=0 where there exists, in addition, a bound state we construct a one-parameter class of complex local potentials which are phase--binding-energy equivalent; that is, each of its members reproduces, in addition to the partly complex phase shifts, the bound state with the physical, i.e., real binding energy. Correlations between the oscilliations in the radial independence of these equivalent potentials and physical properties of the input data are established.

  9. Effective potential for e-neon and e-argon scattering by DCS minimization at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Paikeday, J.M.; Longstreet, A.

    1998-11-01

    The differential scattering cross-section (DCS) for electrons scattered elastically by neon and argon atoms is studied using a model potential. In the present study the long-range polarization potential is represented by an energy-dependent function, and the short-range part is constructed from the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock wave function of the target atom. The computed differential cross section obtained using the approximate effective interaction potential for electrons scattered by neon and argon atoms in their ground state is compared with available published results. In the present study the parameters contained in the energy-dependent effective potential are determined by the minimization of the DCS with respect to angle {theta} and the incident energy. The resulting DCS in the angular range 2{degree} < {theta} < 178{degree} is found to be in good agreement with the available experimental and theoretical results in the intermediate energy range.

  10. Effective potential for e-argon and e-krypton scattering by DCS and minimization at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Paikeday, J.M.

    1999-12-01

    The differential scattering cross section (DCS) for electrons scattered elastically by argon and krypton atoms is studied using a model potential. In the present study, the long-range polarization potential is represented by an energy-dependent function and the short-range part is constructed from the nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock wave function of the target atom. The computed differential cross section obtained using the approximate effective interaction potential for electrons scattered by neon and argon atoms in their ground state is compared with available published results. In the present study, the parameters contained in the energy-dependent effective potential are determined by the minimization of the DCS with respect to angle {theta} and the incident energy. The resulting DCS in the angular range 2{degree} {lt} {theta} {lt} 178{degree} is found to be in good agreement with the available experimental and theoretical results in the intermediate energy range.

  11. An Elastic Continuum Model for Fullerene Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoyu, Xia; Ji-Xing, Liu; Zhong-Can, Ou-Yang

    By analogy with the elastic theory of solid shells1 and fluid membranes,2 it has been suggested that fullerenes, at least large ones, might somehow resemble the classic elastic continuum, as indicated by Schnur.3 Some related works dealt with nanotubes do show positive evidence for this suggestion.4 Here we propose an elastic continuum model appropriate to graphite-like networks. Applying it to various shapes of fullerenes, such as spheres, tubes, tori, and minimal surfaces, we found good agreement between this model and previous numerical results given by approaches of ab initio or empirical potential. Furthermore, this model enables one to understand the puzzling phenomena such as why Schwarzite P216 and Schwarzite D216 have nearly identical bending energies while their geometric forms are very different (see Fig. 1). The prospect of this model is also discussed.

  12. Multichannel quantum defect theory for cold molecular collisions with a strongly anisotropic potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, James F. E.; Hutson, Jeremy M.

    2013-03-01

    We show that multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) can be applied successfully as an efficient computational method for cold molecular collisions in Li+NH, which has a deep and strongly anisotropic interaction potential. In this strongly coupled system, closed-channel poles restrict the range over which the MQDT Y can be interpolated. We present an improved procedure to transform the MQDT reference functions so that the poles are removed from the energy range of interest. Effects due to very-long-range spin dipolar couplings are outside the scope of MQDT, but can be added perturbatively. This procedure makes it possible to calculate the elastic and inelastic cross sections, over the entire range of energies and fields needed to evaluate the feasibility of sympathetic cooling of NH by Li, using coupled-channel calculations at only five combinations of energy and field.

  13. Robust jumping performance and elastic energy recovery from compliant perches in tree frogs.

    PubMed

    Astley, Henry C; Haruta, Alison; Roberts, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Arboreal animals often move on compliant branches, which may deform substantially under loads, absorbing energy. Energy stored in a compliant substrate may be returned to the animal or it may be lost. In all cases studied so far, animals jumping from a static start lose all of the energy imparted to compliant substrates and performance is reduced. Cuban tree frogs (Osteopilus septentrionalis) are particularly capable arboreal jumpers, and we hypothesized that these animals would be able to recover energy from perches of varying compliance. In spite of large deflections of the perches and consequent substantial energy absorption, frogs were able to regain some of the energy lost to the perch during the recoil. Takeoff velocity was robust to changes in compliance, but was lower than when jumping from flat surfaces. This highlights the ability of animals to minimize energy loss and maintain dependable performance on challenging substrates via behavioral changes. PMID:26538173

  14. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS POTENTIAL AT MUON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    2000-04-07

    In this paper, high energy physics possibilities and future colliders are discussed. The {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collider and experiments with high intensity muon beams as the stepping phase towards building Higher Energy Muon Colliders (HEMC) are briefly reviewed and encouraged.

  15. Energy conservation potential of surface modification technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Le, H.K.; Horne, D.M.; Silberglitt, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    This report assesses the energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries. The energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries is assessed by estimating their friction and wear tribological sinks and the subsequent reduction in these sinks when surface modified tools are used. Ion implantation, coatings, and laser and electron beam surface modifications are considered.

  16. Energy in America: Progress and Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Petroleum Inst., Washington, DC.

    An overview of America's energy situation is presented with emphasis on recent progress, the risk of depending upon foreign oil, and policy choices. Section one reviews the energy problems of the 1970s, issues of the 1980s, concerns for the future, and choices that if made today could alleviate future problems. Section two examines past problems,…

  17. Energy in America: Progress and Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Petroleum Inst., Washington, DC.

    An overview of America's energy situation is presented with emphasis on recent progress, the risk of depending upon foreign oil, and policy choices. Section one reviews the energy problems of the 1970s, issues of the 1980s, concerns for the future, and choices that if made today could alleviate future problems. Section two examines past problems,

  18. Elastic differential cross sections for C₄F₆ isomers in the 1.5-200 eV energy electron impact: similarities with six fluorine containing molecules and evidence of F-atom like scattering.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, M; Limão-Vieira, P; Anzai, K; Kato, H; Cho, H; Mogi, D; Tanioka, T; Ferreira da Silva, F; Almeida, D; Blanco, F; García, G; Ingólfsson, O; Tanaka, H

    2014-09-28

    We report absolute elastic differential cross sections for electron interactions with the C4F6 isomers, hexafluoro-1,3-butadiene (1,3-C4F6), hexafluoro-2-butyne (2-C4F6), and hexafluorocyclobutene (c-C4F6). The incident electron energy range is 1.5-200 eV, and the scattered electron angular range for the differential measurements varies from 15° to 150°. In all cases the absolute scale of the differential cross section was set using the relative flow technique, with helium as the reference species. Atomic-like behaviour in these scattering systems is shown here for the first time, and is further investigated by comparing the elastic cross sections for the C4F6 isomers with other fluorinated molecules, such as SF6 and CnF6 (n = 2, 3, and 6). We note that for all the six-F containing molecules, the scattering process for electron energies above 30 eV is indistinguishable. Finally, we report results for calculations of elastic differential cross sections for electron scattering from each of these isomers, within an optical potential method and assuming a screened corrected independent atom representation. The level of agreement between these calculations and our measurements is found to be quite remarkable in all cases. PMID:25273432

  19. Elastic spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mladenov, I. M.; Marinov, P. I.; Hadzhilazova, M. Ts.

    2014-11-01

    In the present article we extend previous results on the elastic Sturmian spirals. We use a relation between the infinitesimal angle of inclination and the infinitesimal polar radius in this particular set up. New parametrizations are given in terms of the polar radius a nd the angle of inclination, all in closed form. Plots of the relevant cases are presented as well.

  20. Energy harvesting from axial fluid-elastic instabilities of a cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kiran; Michelin, Sbastien; de Langre, Emmanuel

    2012-04-01

    A flexible cylindrical system unstable to flutter oscillations is analysed from the perspective of energy harvesting. In this work we analyse the non-linear reduced order model of a two-degree of freedom system of cylinders modelled with discrete stiffness and damping. The non-linear system of equations is solved in terms of cylinder deflection angles. We seek the flow speed range over which flutter oscillations are stable and correspondingly amenable to energy harvesting. Energy harvesters are modelled as viscous dashpots and the coefficients of damping are parametrised in order to determine combinations that harvest maximum power. We show that for harvesting the maximum possible energy the viscous dashpot should be placed away from the region driving the instability and for this model the optimal location is the fixed end. This result is robust to flow speed variation, action of viscous drag and to variations in cylinder geometry.

  1. Evidence of Cholesterol Accumulated in High Curvature Regions: Implication ot the Curvature Elastic Energy for Lipid Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,W.; Yang, L.; Huang, H.

    2007-01-01

    Recent experiments suggested that cholesterol and other lipid components of high negative spontaneous curvature facilitate membrane fusion. This is taken as evidence supporting the stalk-pore model of membrane fusion in which the lipid bilayers go through intermediate structures of high curvature. How do the high-curvature lipid components lower the free energy of the curved structure? Do the high-curvature lipid components modify the average spontaneous curvature of the relevant monolayer, thereby facilitate its bending, or do the lipid components redistribute in the curved structure so as to lower the free energy? This question is fundamental to the curvature elastic energy for lipid mixtures. Here we investigate the lipid distribution in a monolayer of a binary lipid mixture before and after bending, or more precisely in the lamellar, hexagonal, and distorted hexagonal phases. The lipid mixture is composed of 2:1 ratio of brominated di18:0PC and cholesterol. Using a newly developed procedure for the multiwavelength anomalous diffraction method, we are able to isolate the bromine distribution and reconstruct the electron density distribution of the lipid mixture in the three phases. We found that the lipid distribution is homogenous and uniform in the lamellar and hexagonal phases. But in the distorted hexagonal phase, the lipid monolayer has nonuniform curvature, and cholesterol almost entirely concentrates in the high curvature region. This finding demonstrates that the association energies between lipid molecules vary with the curvature of membrane. Thus, lipid components in a mixture may redistribute under conditions of nonuniform curvature, such as in the stalk structure. In such cases, the spontaneous curvature depends on the local lipid composition and the free energy minimum is determined by lipid distribution as well as curvature.

  2. /sup 6/Li real potential volume integrals in elastic scattering and distorted-waveBorn approximation analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Lezoch, P.; Trost, H.; Strohbusch, U.

    1981-06-01

    The magnitudes of volume integrals per interacting nucleon pair J/sub R/' calculated from a compilation of /sup 6/Li potentials vary between 100 and 500 MeV fm/sup 3/. They are grouped in discrete branches with J/sub R/(A) smoothly increasing with decreasing target mass. Comparison with the results for lighter projectiles restricts the ''physically meaningful'' branches to those characterized by J/sub R/ (A> or =48)< or =270 MeV fm/sup 3/. (/sup 6/Li,d) reaction analyses yield the same fit qualities for /sup 6/Li potentials of the different discrete families, but deduced spectroscopic factors jump (by factors of approx.3) when changing between successive families.

  3. Zeta-function approach to Casimir energy with singular potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Khusnutdinov, Nail R.

    2006-01-15

    In the framework of zeta-function approach the Casimir energy for three simple model system: single delta potential, step function potential and three delta potentials are analyzed. It is shown that the energy contains contributions which are peculiar to the potentials. It is suggested to renormalize the energy using the condition that the energy of infinitely separated potentials is zero which corresponds to subtraction all terms of asymptotic expansion of zeta-function. The energy obtained in this way obeys all physically reasonable conditions. It is finite in the Dirichlet limit, and it may be attractive or repulsive depending on the strength of potential. The effective action is calculated, and it is shown that the surface contribution appears. The renormalization of the effective action is discussed.

  4. The energy of naturally curved elastic rods with an application to the stretching and contraction of a free helical spring as a model for DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Gerald S.

    2015-09-01

    We give a contemporary and direct derivation of a classical, but insufficiently familiar, result in the theory of linear elasticitya representation for the energy of a stressed elastic rod with central axis that intrinsically takes the shape of a general space curve. We show that the geometric torsion of the space curve, while playing a crucial role in the bending energy, is physically unrelated to the elastic twist. We prove that the twist energy vanishes in the lowest-energy states of a rod subject to constraints that do not restrict the twist. The stretching and contraction energies of a free helical spring are computed. There are local high-energy minima. We show the possibility of using the spring to model the chirality of DNA. We then compare our results with an available atomic level energy simulation that was performed on DNA unconstrained in the same sense as the free spring. We find some possible reflections of springlike behavior in the mechanics of DNA, but, unsurprisingly, the base pairs lend a material substance to the core of DNA that a spring does not capture.

  5. The energy of naturally curved elastic rods with an application to the stretching and contraction of a free helical spring as a model for DNA.

    PubMed

    Manning, Gerald S

    2015-09-14

    We give a contemporary and direct derivation of a classical, but insufficiently familiar, result in the theory of linear elasticity-a representation for the energy of a stressed elastic rod with central axis that intrinsically takes the shape of a general space curve. We show that the geometric torsion of the space curve, while playing a crucial role in the bending energy, is physically unrelated to the elastic twist. We prove that the twist energy vanishes in the lowest-energy states of a rod subject to constraints that do not restrict the twist. The stretching and contraction energies of a free helical spring are computed. There are local high-energy minima. We show the possibility of using the spring to model the chirality of DNA. We then compare our results with an available atomic level energy simulation that was performed on DNA unconstrained in the same sense as the free spring. We find some possible reflections of springlike behavior in the mechanics of DNA, but, unsurprisingly, the base pairs lend a material substance to the core of DNA that a spring does not capture. PMID:26374056

  6. Regional Differences in the Price-Elasticity of Demand for Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, M. A.; Griffin, J.

    2006-02-01

    At the request of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the RAND Corporation examined the relationship between energy demand and energy prices with the focus on whether the relationships between demand and price differ if these are examined at different levels of data resolution. In this case, RAND compares national, regional, state, and electric utility levels of data resolution. This study is intended as a first step in helping NREL understand the impact that spatial disaggregation of data can have on estimating the impacts of their programs. This report should be useful to analysts in NREL and other national laboratories, as well as to policy nationals at the national level. It may help them understand the complex relationships between demand and price and how these might vary across different locations in the United States.

  7. An experimental method to obtain the elastic strain energy function from torsion-tension tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, S. T. J.; Landel, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that by employing a torsion-tension test, it is possible to have a complete mapping near the origin of the two principal strain invariants associated with the rate of change of the strain energy function. However, the mathematical representation of the twist moment and normal forces vs strain and the strain energy function are complex. This problem is solved by using a set of solid cylindrical bars with different diameters such that the difference in diameter of two successive bars is small. The stress-strain equations can be grossly oversimplified by considering differences in twist moment and normal force as a function of difference in radius.

  8. Potential Energy Sources Pose Mining Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes the discussions of a Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry symposium on solids handling for synthetic fuels production. Included is a description of technical difficulties with the use of coal seams and deposits of oil shale and oil sand as potential sources of fuel. (CC)

  9. Energy Savings Potential and Research & Development Opportunities for Commercial Refrigeration

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-09-01

    This study documents the energy consumption of commercial refrigeration equipment (CRE) in the U.S. and evaluated the energy savings potential of various technologies and energy efficiency measures that could be applied to such equipment. The study provided an overview of CRE applications, assessed the energy-savings potential of CRE in the U.S., outline key barriers to adoption of energy-savings technologies, and recommended opportunities for advanced energy saving technology research. The study was modeled after an earlier 1996 report by Arthur D. Little, Inc., and updated key information, examined more equipment types, and outlined long-term research and development opportunities.

  10. Solar Energy: Potential Powerhouse for Jobs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallion, Tom

    1976-01-01

    Components of solar energy systems are described, the development of the solar industry discussed, and implications are drawn for employment opportunities in industries (which may expand into new, solar-related areas) and in the professions, from law to sales, upon the advent of solar heating. (AJ)

  11. Potential energy landscapes of elemental and heterogeneous chalcogen clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro, John C.; Loucks, Roger J.; Balakrishnan, Jitendra; Varshneya, Arun K.

    2006-02-01

    We describe the potential energy landscapes of elemental S8 , Se8 , and Te8 clusters using disconnectivity graphs. Inherent structures include both ring and chain configurations, with rings especially dominant in Se8 . We also map the potential energy landscapes of heterogeneous Sen(S,Te)8-n clusters, which offer insights into the structure of heterogeneous chalcogen glasses.

  12. Theoretical study of the elastic breakup of weakly bound nuclei at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otomar, D. R.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Canto, L. F.; Hussein, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    We have performed continuum discretized coupled channel (CDCC) calculations for collisions of 7Li projectiles on 59Co,144Sm, and 208Pb targets at near-barrier energies, to assess the importance of the Coulomb and the nuclear couplings in the breakup of 7Li, as well as the Coulomb-nuclear interference. We have also investigated scaling laws, expressing the dependence of the cross sections on the charge and the mass of the target. This work is complementary to that previously reported by us on the breakup of 6Li. Here we explore the similarities and differences between the results for the two lithium isotopes. The relevance of the Coulomb dipole and quadrupole strengths at low energy for the two-cluster projectile is investigated in detail.

  13. Analysis of energy dissipation in an elastic moving string with a viscous damper at one end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, E. W.; Ferguson, N. S.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper transverse vibration of an axially moving viscoelastic string with a viscous damper at one end is investigated analytically. The string is assumed to be travelling with constant velocity and the length of string is constant or time varying. The linear and nonlinear mathematical models are derived using the Lagrangian function and implemented using a finite element method. The method considers a time varying state space function applied to the linear model, the Newmark-Beta method is used to solve the response for the nonlinear problem numerically. The case of energy dissipated by a viscoelastic damper at one end of the string for different axial string velocities is considered. When a disturbance arrives at the boundary an exact value for the damper which provides maximum energy dissipation is investigated. Finally, numerical simulations are presented to establish the feasibility of the method.

  14. Waves and energy in random elastic guided media through the stochastic wave finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Souf, M. A.; Bareille, O.; Ichchou, M. N.; Bouchoucha, F.; Haddar, M.

    2013-11-01

    Energy propagation in random viscoelastic media is considered in this Letter. The forced response of uncertain waveguide subject to time harmonic loading is treated. This energy model is based on a spectral approach called the Stochastic Wave Finite Element (SWFE) method which is detailed in this Letter. Assuming that the random properties are spatially homogeneous in the media, the SWFE is a hybridization of the deterministic wave finite element and a parametric probabilistic approach. The proposed model is applicable in a wide frequency band with reduced time consumption. Numerical examples show the effectiveness of the proposed approach to predict the statistics of kinematic and quadratic variables of guided wave propagation. The results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations.

  15. Potential production of energy cane for fuel in the Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Samuels, G.

    1984-12-01

    Sugarcane presents a tremendous potential as a renewable energy source for the non-oil producing countries of the Caribbean. The energy cane concept is sugarcane managed for maximum dry matter (total fermentable solids for alcohol fuel and combustible solids for electricity) rather than sucrose. The use of sugarcane as a renewable energy source can provide a solution, either partial or total, to the Caribbean energy problem. Sugar cane production and the use of this crop as a renewable energy source are described.

  16. Brittle fracture in a periodic structure with internal potential energy

    PubMed Central

    Mishuris, Gennady S.; Slepyan, Leonid I.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a brittle fracture taking account of self-equilibrated distributed stresses existing at microlevel in the absence of external forces. To determine how the latter can affect the crack equilibrium and growth, a model of a structured linearly elastic body is introduced, consisting of two equal symmetrically arranged layers (or half-planes) connected by an interface as a prospective crack path. The interface comprises a discrete set of elastic bonds. In the initial state, the bonds are assumed to be stressed in such a way that tensile and compressive forces of the same value alternate. In the general considerations, the layers are assumed to be of an unspecified periodic structure, where such self-equilibrated stresses may also exist. A two-line chain and a lattice are examined as the specified structure. We consider the states of the body-with-a-crack under such microlevel stresses (MS) and under a combined action of the remote forces and MS. Analytical solutions to the considered problems are presented based on the introduction of a selective discrete transform. We demonstrate that MS can increase as well as decrease the crack resistance depending on the internal energy level. We also discuss different scenarios of the crack growth. PMID:24808756

  17. Regge pole analysis of elastic scattering of ? particles by even isotopes of Ni target nuclei at incident energies above Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badran, R. I.; Istaiti, A. I.; Mashaqbeh, W. N.; Al-Lehyani, I. H.

    2015-10-01

    Regge pole model is adopted to account for the angular distribution at backward angles for a set of elastic scattering processes of incident ?-particles by different isotopes of nickel ions, 58,60,62,64Ni, at different laboratory energies above Coulomb barrier. The reproduction of cross-sections at backward angles is preceded by an attempt to fit the experimental data at forward angles of the scattering. Three-parameter McIntyre model which is based on concept of strong absorption parametrization of the scattering matrix elements, has been employed to analyze and reproduce the experimental data of angular distribution of different elastic scattering reactions at forward angles. The three parameters extracted from McIntyre model analysis are employed as fixed entries in the fitting process of the full angle-range of angular distribution where another four free parameters are employed using the Regge pole model. Diffractive features observed in the angular distributions are studied. The Fresnel-type diffraction pattern is found dominant for all investigated elastic scatterings where Coulomb interaction is strong. The interaction radius of elastic scattering is found decreasing and the total cross-section increasing when the incident projectile energy increases. Moreover, the interaction radius and total reaction cross-section are found increasing with the increase in the size of target ion. Such diffractive behavior is consistent with the prescriptions of strong absorption model (SAM). Furthermore, the explanation of the diffractive features of studied elastic scattering reactions is model-independent. The Regge pole analysis reveals the existence of a pole which has its location, width, amplitude and phase angle exhibiting a common peak at energy of 24.1MeV with oscillatory behaviour at energies around this peak energy, for all elastic scattering of alpha particle on isotopes of Ni targets except that of 58Ni target which exhibits extra peaks for energy larger than 24.1MeV. We believe that the presence of poles is responsible for the oscillatory structure of the backward cross-sections. The variation of Regge pole parameters with both incident energy and size of target nucleus is illustrated.

  18. Coupled channel effect in elastic scattering and fusion for 6,7Li+28Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Mandira; Roy, Subinit; Basu, P.; Majumdar, H.; Santra, S.; Parkar, V. V.; Golda, K. S.; Kailas, S.

    2011-10-01

    The fusion excitation and elastic angular distribution were measured for 6,7Li+28Si from below to above Coulomb barrier (? 3Vb) energies. The barrier distribution derived from the fusion data was found to be broad and asymmetric at the sub-barrier region, compared to 1D BPM estimation. Effect of rotational coupling on fusion was found to be not so dominant. Phenomenological optical potential parameters, with surface and volume type imaginary potentials, were obtained from f tting of elastic scattering data and energy dependence of real and imaginary surface strengths were investigated around the barrier. CDCC calculations considering only breakup of projectile were performed for 6,7Li+28Si with the elastic scattering data, using the code FRESCO. The effects of breakup of projectile on elastic cross section do not agree with the energy dependence of real and imaginary strength with volume type imaginary potential around the barrier.

  19. Energy savings potential from energy-conserving irrigation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wilfert, G.L.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Clark, M.A.

    1982-11-01

    This report systematically compares, within a consistent framework, the technical and economic characteristics of energy-conserving irrigation systems with those of conventional irrigation systems and to determine total energy savings. Levelized annual costs of owning and operating both energy-conserving and conventional irrigation systems have been developed and compared for all 17 states to account for the differences in energy costs and irrigation conditions in each state. Market penetration of energy-conserving systems is assessed for those systems having lower levelized annual costs than conventional systems performing the same function. Annual energy savings were computed by matching the energy savings per system with an assumed maximum market penetration of 100 percent in those markets where the levelized annual costs of energy-conserving systems are lower than the levelized annual costs of conventional systems.

  20. Preliminary evaluation of wind energy potential: Cook Inlet area, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Hiester, T.R.

    1980-06-01

    This report summarizes work on a project performed under contract to the Alaska Power Administration (APA). The objective of this research was to make a preliminary assessment of the wind energy potential for interconnection with the Cook Inlet area electric power transmission and distribution systems, to identify the most likely candidate regions (25 to 100 square miles each) for energy potential, and to recommend a monitoring program sufficient to quantify the potential.

  1. Elastic and rotationally inelastic cross sections for low-energy electron scattering by SO2 molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natalense, A. P. P.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Ferreira, L. G.; Lima, M. A. P.

    1999-12-01

    We show rotationally summed and rotationally inelastic differential, integral and momentum transfer cross sections for electron scattering by SO2 in the 3-30 eV impact energy range in the static exchange approximation. Our results were obtained with the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials, including a first Born approximation to describe the influence of the molecular permanent dipole moment on the scattering cross sections. The rotational excitation cross sections were obtained through the adiabatic-nuclei-rotation approximation. Our results show good agreement with available experimental and theoretical data. The rotationally inelastic cross sections were found to be very large.

  2. Geothermal energy potential in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, B.A.

    1980-01-01

    The background of the area itself is investigated considering the geography, population, economy, attitudes of residents, and energy demands of the area. The requirements for geothermal energy development are considered, including socio-economic, institutional, and environmental conditions as well as some technical aspects. The current, proposed, and potential geothermal energy developments are described. The summary, conclusions, and methodology are included. (MHR)

  3. [Energy cost of postextrasystolic potentiation in man].

    PubMed

    Geschwind, H; Huet, Y; Laine, J F; Teisseire, B; Dhainaut, J F; Laurent, D

    1984-07-01

    The energetic costs of post-extrasystolic potentiation (PEP) were assessed by evaluating left ventricular function and coronary blood flow in 16 patients with different forms of cardiac disease during cardiac catheterisation under basal conditions and sustained coupled right ventricular pacing. The coronary blood flow was measured by thermodilution techniques with sampling in the aorta and coronary sinus to measure O2 concentration, glucose, and plasma lactate and catecholamine levels. Parameters of LV function were calculated from data obtained from biplane left cineventriculography. During PEP, the ejection fraction increased from 0.48 +/- 0.8 to 0.62 +/- 0.22, the mean velocity of circumferential fibre shortening from 0.79 +/- 0.37 to 1.12 +/- 0.45 circ/s (p less than 0.001) and systolic work from 97 +/- 46 to 139 +/- 67 g/m2 (p less than 0.05). Coronary blood flow increased from 176 +/- 60 to 305 +/- 155 ml/min; myocardial oxygen consumption per potentialized beat rose from 0.15 +/- 0.07 to 0.50 +/- 0.33 ml/beat (p less than 0.001) whilst cardiac efficiency fell from 19.1 +/- 8 to 9.2 +/- 4% (p less than 0.001). PEP was associated with increased myocardial noradrenaline secretion (-3.1 +/- 31.5 ng/min under basal conditions to 30.2 +/- 42.8 ng/min, p less than 0.05). Therefore, the inotropic effect of PEP imposes a high metabolic demand and is associated with increased myocardial noradrenaline secretion. PMID:6433837

  4. Analysis of proton scattering of stable and exotic light nuclei using an energy-dependent microscopic optical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maridi, H. M.; Farag, M. Y. H.; Esmael, E. H.

    2016-01-01

    The proton elastic scattering off the 9,10,11,12Be isotopes at a wide energy range from 3 to 200 MeV/nucleon is analyzed using the optical model with the partial-wave expansion method. The microscopic optical potential (OP) is taken within the single-folding model. The density- and isospin-dependent M3YParis nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction is used for the real part and the NN-scattering amplitude of the highenergy approximation for the imaginary one. The cross-section data are reproduced well at energies up to 100 MeV/nucleon by use of the partial-wave expansion. For higher energies, the eikonal approximation is successfully used. The volume integrals of the OP parts have systematic energy dependencies and they can be parameterized as functions of energy. From these parametrization, an energy-dependent OP can be obtained.

  5. Extended Hartree-Fock study of the single-particle potential: The nuclear symmetry energy, nucleon effective mass, and folding model of the nucleon optical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loan, Doan Thi; Loc, Bui Minh; Khoa, Dao T.

    2015-09-01

    The nucleon mean-field potential has been thoroughly investigated in an extended Hartree-Fock (HF) calculation of nuclear matter (NM) using the CDM3Y3 and CDM3Y6 density dependent versions of the M3Y interaction. The single-particle (SP) energies of nucleons in NM are determined according to the Hugenholtz-Van Hove theorem, which gives rise naturally to a rearrangement term (RT) of the SP potential at the Fermi momentum. Using the RT obtained exactly at the different NM densities and neutron-proton asymmetries, a consistent method is suggested to take into account effectively the momentum dependence of the RT of the SP potential within the standard HF scheme. To obtain a realistic momentum dependence of the nucleon optical potential (OP), the high-momentum part of the SP potential was accurately readjusted to reproduce the observed energy dependence of the nucleon OP over a wide range of energies. The impact of the RT and momentum dependence of the SP potential on the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy and nucleon effective mass has been studied in detail. The high-momentum tail of the SP potential was found to have a sizable effect on the slope of the symmetry energy and the neutron-proton effective mass splitting at supranuclear densities of the NM. Based on a local density approximation, the folding model of the nucleon OP of finite nuclei has been extended to take into account consistently the RT and momentum dependence of the nucleon OP in the same mean-field manner, and successfully applied to study the elastic neutron scattering on the lead target at the energies around the Fermi energy.

  6. Electron-Hydrogen Elastic Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.

    2004-01-01

    Scattering by single-electron systems is always of interest because the wave function of the target is known exactly. Various approximations have been employed to take into account distortion produced in the target. Among them are the method of polarized orbitals and the close coupling approximation. Recently, e-H and e-He+ S-wave scattering in the elastic region has been studied using the Feshbach projection operator formalism. In this approach, the usual Hartree-Fock and exchange potentials are augmented by an optical potential and the resulting phase shifts have rigorous lower bounds. Now this method is being applied to the e-H P-wave scattering in the elastic region. The number of terms in the Hylleraas-type wave function for the 1,3 P phase shifts is 84 and the resulting phase shifts (preliminary) are given. The results have been given up to five digits because to that accuracy they are rigorous lower bounds. They are in general agreement with the variational (VAR) results of Armstead, and those obtained from the intermediate energy R-matrix method (RM) of Scholz et al., and the finite element method (FEM) of Botero and Shertzer. The later two methods do not provide any bounds on phase shifts.

  7. Exploring wind energy potential off the California coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qingfang; Doyle, James D.; Haack, Tracy; Dvorak, Michael J.; Archer, Cristina L.; Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2008-10-01

    Wind energy represents the nearest term cost-effective renewable energy source. While efforts have been made to assess wind energy potential over land around the world, offshore wind energy resources are largely unexplored, in part because these regions have relatively sparse wind observations. In this study, the wind energy potential offshore of the California coast is evaluated using a well-tested high-resolution numerical model dataset. We found that along the coastline, the low-level winds exhibit strong spatial variation and are characterized by alternating windspeed maxima and minima near coastal promontories associated with the interaction between the marine boundary layer and coastal topography. Further analysis highlights the enormous and reliable wind energy development potential in these persistent offshore windspeed maxima.

  8. Comparison of elastic scattering spectroscopy with histology in ex vivo prostate glands: potential application for optically guided biopsy and directed treatment.

    PubMed

    A'Amar, O M; Liou, L; Rodriguez-Diaz, E; De las Morenas, A; Bigio, I J

    2013-09-01

    The false-negative rate of ultrasound-guided sextant prostate biopsy has been estimated to be as high as 35%. A significant percentage (10-35%) of these prostate cancers diagnosed at a second or later attempt are high grade and, therefore, potentially lethal. We discuss the feasibility for performing optically guided biopsy using elastic scattering spectroscopy (ESS) to reduce sampling errors and improve sensitivity. ESS measurements were performed on 42 prostate glands ex vivo and correlated with standard histopathological assessment. Sliced glands were examined with wavelength ranges of 330-760nm. The ESS portable system used a new fiber-optic probe with integrated cutting tool, designed specifically for ex vivo pathology applications. ESS spectra were grouped by diagnosis from standard histopathological procedure and then classified using linear support vector machine. Preliminary data are encouraging. ESS data showed strong spectral trends correlating with the histopathological assignments. The classification results showed a sensitivity of 0.83 and specificity of 0.87 for distinguishing dysplastic prostatic tissue from benign prostatic tissue. Similar results were obtained for distinguishing dysplastic prostatic tissue from prostatitis with a sensitivity and specificity of 0.80 and 0.88, respectively. The negative predictive values obtained with ESS are better than those obtained with transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided core-needle biopsy. PMID:23247663

  9. A Frontier orbital energy approach to redox potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conradie, Jeanet

    2015-09-01

    The prediction of the oxidation and reduction potentials of molecules is important in many research areas. A review of relationships obtained between frontier orbital energies (eV), the calculated ionization potentials (IP in eV), or adiabatic electron affinities (EA in eV) with the experimental oxidation and reduction potentials is presented, for selected series of ?- diketones, rhodium-?-diketonato complexes, as well as metal-tris-?-diketonato complexes, with the metal Fe or Mn. The good linear relationships obtained for related series of complexes show that the oxidation and reduction potentials of these complexes can be predicted by their DFT-calculated energies.

  10. Assessing the Potential for Renewable Energy on Public Lands

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-02-01

    This report represents an initial activity of the Bureau of Land Managements (BLM) proposed National Energy Policy Implementation Plan: identify and evaluate renewable energy resources on federal lands and any limitations on accessing them. Ultimately, BLM will prioritize land-use planning activities to increase industrys development of renewable energy resources. These resources include solar, biomass, geothermal, water, and wind energy. To accomplish this, BLM and the Department of Energys National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) established a partnership to conduct an assessment of renewable energy resources on BLM lands in the western United States. The objective of this collaboration was to identify BLM planning units in the western states with the highest potential for private-sector development of renewable resources. The assessment resulted in the following findings: (1) 63 BLM planning units in nine western states have high potential for one or more renewable energy technologies; and (2) 20 BLM planning units in seven western states have high potential for power production from three or more renewable energy sources. This assessment report provides BLM with information needed to prioritize land-use planning activities on the basis of potential for the development of energy from renewable resources.

  11. New approach to calculating the potential energy of colliding nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kurmanov, R. S.; Kosenko, G. I.

    2014-12-15

    The differential method proposed by the present authors earlier for the reduction of volume integrals in calculating the potential energy of a compound nucleus is generalized to the case of two interacting nuclei. The Coulomb interaction energy is obtained for the cases of a sharp and a diffuse boundary of nuclei, while the nuclear interaction energy is found only for nuclei with a sharp boundary, the finiteness of the nuclear-force range being taken into account. The present method of calculations permits reducing the time it takes to compute the potential energy at least by two orders of magnitude.

  12. Energy Consumption and Renewable Energy Development Potential on Indian Lands

    EIA Publications

    2000-01-01

    Includes information on the electricity use and needs of Indian households and tribes, the comparative electricity rates that Indian households are paying, and the potential for renewable resources development of Indian lands.

  13. Intermolecular potential energy surface for CS2 dimer.

    PubMed

    Farrokhpour, Hossein; Mombeini, Zainab; Namazian, Mansoor; Coote, Michelle L

    2011-04-15

    A new four-dimensional intermolecular potential energy surface for CS(2) dimer is obtained by ab initio calculation of the interaction energies for a range of configurations and center-of-mass separation distances for the first time. The calculations were performed using the supermolecular approach at the Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation (MP2) level of theory with the augmented correlation consistent basis sets (aug-cc-pVxZ, x = D, T) and corrected for the basis-set superposition error using the full counterpoise correction method. A two-point extrapolation method was used to extrapolate the calculated energy points to the complete basis set limit. The effect of using the higher levels of theory, quadratic configuration interaction containing single, double, and perturbative triple excitations QCISD(T) and coupled cluster singles, doubles and perturbative triples excitations CCSD(T), on the shape of potential energy surface was investigated. It is shown that the MP2 level of theory apparently performs extremely poorly for describing the intermolecular potential energy surface, overestimating the total energy by a factor of nearly 1.73 in comparison with the QCISD(T) and CCSD(T) values. The value of isotropic dipole-dipole dispersion coefficient (C(6) ) of CS(2) fluid was obtained from the extrapolated MP2 potential energy surface. The MP2 extrapolated energy points were fitted to well-known analytical potential functions using two different methods to represent the potential energy surface analytically. The most stable configuration of the dimer was determined at R = 6.23 au, α = 90°, β = 90°, and γ = 90°, with a well depth of 3.980 kcal mol(-1) at the MP2 level of theory. Finally, the calculated second virial coefficients were compared with experimental values to test the quality of the presented potential energy surface. PMID:20941736

  14. Biomass energy: the scale of the potential resource.

    PubMed

    Field, Christopher B; Campbell, J Elliott; Lobell, David B

    2008-02-01

    Increased production of biomass for energy has the potential to offset substantial use of fossil fuels, but it also has the potential to threaten conservation areas, pollute water resources and decrease food security. The net effect of biomass energy agriculture on climate could be either cooling or warming, depending on the crop, the technology for converting biomass into useable energy, and the difference in carbon stocks and reflectance of solar radiation between the biomass crop and the pre-existing vegetation. The area with the greatest potential for yielding biomass energy that reduces net warming and avoids competition with food production is land that was previously used for agriculture or pasture but that has been abandoned and not converted to forest or urban areas. At the global scale, potential above-ground plant growth on these abandoned lands has an energy content representing approximately 5% of world primary energy consumption in 2006. The global potential for biomass energy production is large in absolute terms, but it is not enough to replace more than a few percent of current fossil fuel usage. Increasing biomass energy production beyond this level would probably reduce food security and exacerbate forcing of climate change. PMID:18215439

  15. Re-examining Potential for Geothermal Energy in United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    New technological initiatives, along with potential policy and economic incentives, could help to bring about a resurgence in geothermal energy development in the United States, said several experts at a 22 May forum in Washington, D.C. The forum was sponsored by the House and Senate Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Caucuses, the Sustainable Energy Coalition, and the Environmental and Energy Study Institute. Among these initiatives is an ambitious program of the U.S. Department of Energy to expand existing geothermal energy fields and potentially create new fields through ``enhanced geothermal systems.'' In addition, a program of the Bush administration encourages geothermal development on some public lands, and current legislation would provide tax credits and other incentives for geothermal development.

  16. Potential energy landscapes of elemental and heterogeneous chalcogen clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, John C.; Loucks, Roger J.; Balakrishnan, Jitendra; Varshneya, Arun K.

    2006-02-15

    We describe the potential energy landscapes of elemental S{sub 8}, Se{sub 8}, and Te{sub 8} clusters using disconnectivity graphs. Inherent structures include both ring and chain configurations, with rings especially dominant in Se{sub 8}. We also map the potential energy landscapes of heterogeneous Se{sub n}(S,Te){sub 8-n} clusters, which offer insights into the structure of heterogeneous chalcogen glasses.

  17. Evolution of metastable elastic shockwaves in nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaske, Brian J.; Zhakhovsky, Vasily V.; White, Carter T.; Oleynik, Ivan I.

    2012-03-01

    Shock waves in nickel were simulated by molecular dynamics using a new EAM potential. Three distinct regimes of shock propagation were observed, including a single elastic shock wave, two split elastic and plastic shock waves, and a single two-zone elastic-plastic shock wave, in order of increasing piston velocity. The single two-zone wave consists of a leading lower-pressure elastic zone, followed by a higher-pressure plastic wave, both moving with the same average speed. The elastic zone of this wave is compressed to a metastable state having an average pressure above the Hugoniot elastic limit. Similar metastable states appear in the elastic precursor during the early stage of split wave development. The mechanism for relaxation of the metastable elastic state is discussed.

  18. Three-dimensional elastic image registration based on strain energy minimization: application to prostate magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao; Arola, Dwayne D; Roys, Steve; Gullapalli, Rao P

    2011-08-01

    The use of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in conjunction with an endorectal coil is currently the clinical standard for the diagnosis of prostate cancer because of the increased sensitivity and specificity of this approach. However, imaging in this manner provides images and spectra of the prostate in the deformed state because of the insertion of the endorectal coil. Such deformation may lead to uncertainties in the localization of prostate cancer during therapy. We propose a novel 3-D elastic registration procedure that is based on the minimization of a physically motivated strain energy function that requires the identification of similar features (points, curves, or surfaces) in the source and target images. The Gauss-Seidel method was used in the numerical implementation of the registration algorithm. The registration procedure was validated on synthetic digital images, MR images from prostate phantom, and MR images obtained on patients. The registration error, assessed by averaging the displacement of a fiducial landmark in the target to its corresponding point in the registered image, was 0.2 0.1 pixels on synthetic images. On the prostate phantom and patient data, the registration errors were 1.0 0.6 pixels (0.6 0.4 mm) and 1.8 0.7 pixels (1.1 0.4 mm), respectively. Registration also improved image similarity (normalized cross-correlation) from 0.72 0.10 to 0.96 0.03 on patient data. Registration results on digital images, phantom, and prostate data in vivo demonstrate that the registration procedure can be used to significantly improve both the accuracy of localized therapies such as brachytherapy or external beam therapy and can be valuable in the longitudinal follow-up of patients after therapy. PMID:20552248

  19. Fusion at deep subbarrier energies: potential inversion revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Hagino, K.; Rowley, N.

    2009-03-04

    For a single potential barrier, the barrier penetrability can be inverted based on the WKB approximation to yield the barrier thickness. We apply this method to heavy-ion fusion reactions at energies well below the Coulomb barrier and directly determine the inter-nucleus potential between the colliding nuclei. To this end, we assume that fusion cross sections at deep subbarrier energies are governed by the lowest barrier in the barrier distribution. The inverted inter-nucleus potentials for the {sup 16}O+{sup 144}Sm and {sup 16}O+{sup 208}Pb reactions show that they are much thicker than phenomenological potentials. We discuss a consequence of such thick potential by fitting the inverted potentials with the Bass function.

  20. Potential geothermal energy applications for Idaho Elks Rehabilitation Hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, J. C.

    1981-11-01

    Several potential applications of geothermal energy for the Idaho Elks Rehabilitation Hospital are outlined. A brief background on the resource and distribution system, is provided; which hospital heating systems should be considered for potential geothermal retrofit is discussed; and technical and economic feasibility are addressed.

  1. Low-energy elastic positron cross sections for H2 and N2 using an ab initio target polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenfen, W.; Mazon, K. T.; Michelin, S. E.; Arretche, F.

    2012-10-01

    Using an ab initio model to account the polarization effects of molecules in the presence of slow positrons, we have obtained low-energy positron cross sections for H2 and N2 molecules. The polarization model proposed here is calculated with the expected values of the positron-electron interaction operator in the polarized target wave function for each fixed distance of the positron. Together with the electrostatic potential, this polarization describes the interaction potential in a static-polarization approximation. Within this interaction level, we have obtained differential and integral cross sections that are in good agreement with recent measurements of the Trento group and other theoretical approaches.

  2. Potential production of energy cane for fuel in the Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Samuels, G.

    1984-08-01

    Sugarcane grown as energy cane presents a new potential to the Caribbean countries to provide their own energy needs and to reduce or eliminate fuel oil imports. The use of proper agronomic techniques can convert conventional sugarcane growing to a crop capable of giving energy feedstocks in the form of fiber for boiler fuel for electricity and fermentable solids for alcohol for motor fuel. Sugarcane can still be obtained from the energy cane for domestic consumption and export if desired. The aerable land now devoted to sugarcane can utilized for energy-cane production without causing any serious imbalance in food crop production.

  3. Geospatial Analysis of Renewable Energy Technical Potential on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect

    Doris, E.; Lopez, A.; Beckley, D.

    2013-02-01

    This technical report uses an established geospatial methodology to estimate the technical potential for renewable energy on tribal lands for the purpose of allowing Tribes to prioritize the development of renewable energy resources either for community scale on-tribal land use or for revenue generating electricity sales.

  4. Investigating energy-saving potentials in the cloud.

    PubMed

    Lee, Da-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Collecting webpage messages can serve as a sensor for investigating the energy-saving potential of buildings. Focusing on stores, a cloud sensor system is developed to collect data and determine their energy-saving potential. The owner of a store under investigation must register online, report the store address, area, and the customer ID number on the electric meter. The cloud sensor system automatically surveys the energy usage records by connecting to the power company website and calculating the energy use index (EUI) of the store. Other data includes the chain store check, company capital, location price, and the influence of weather conditions on the store; even the exposure frequency of store under investigation may impact the energy usage collected online. After collecting data from numerous stores, a multi-dimensional data array is constructed to determine energy-saving potential by identifying stores with similarity conditions. Similarity conditions refer to analyzed results that indicate that two stores have similar capital, business scale, weather conditions, and exposure frequency on web. Calculating the EUI difference or pure technical efficiency of stores, the energy-saving potential is determined. In this study, a real case study is performed. An 8-dimensional (8D) data array is constructed by surveying web data related to 67 stores. Then, this study investigated the savings potential of the 33 stores, using a site visit, and employed the cloud sensor system to determine the saving potential. The case study results show good agreement between the data obtained by the site visit and the cloud investigation, with errors within 4.17%. Among 33 the samples, eight stores have low saving potentials of less than 5%. The developed sensor on the cloud successfully identifies them as having low saving potential and avoids wasting money on the site visit. PMID:24561405

  5. Analysis of elastic scattering of {sup 16}O+{sup 28}Si and {sup 12}C+{sup 24}Mg by a new optical potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mallick, G.S.; Agarwalla, S.K.; Sahu, B.; Shastry, C.S.

    2006-05-15

    We construct a new phenomenological nucleus-nucleus optical potential based on the interesting potential developed by Ginocchio that has the versatility to control the surface and volume regions of the potential. Using this potential with suitable energy dependence of some of the parameters, we are able to fit remarkably well experimental results of the differential scattering cross section for the {sup 16}O+{sup 28}Si system in the center-of-mass energy E{sub c.m.} range from 18.67 to 90.681 MeV and the excitation function in the E{sub c.m.} range from 13.0 to 52.0 MeV. We also fit equally well the exhaustive experimental differential scattering data available for the {sup 12}C+{sup 24}Mg system in the E{sub c.m.} range from 10.67 to 16.0 MeV. The new optical potential used has significantly fewer parameters. The results are interpreted in terms of wave mechanical aspects leading to superposition of partial waves undergoing different phase shifts generated by an optical potential characterized by volume and surface parts.

  6. Kappa distribution in the presence of a potential energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, George

    2015-02-01

    The present paper develops the theory and formulations of the kappa distributions that describe particle systems characterized by a nonzero potential energy. As yet, kappa distributions were used for the statistical description of the velocity or kinetic energy of particles but not of the potential energy. With the results provided here, it is straightforward to use the developed kappa distributions to describe any particle population of space plasmas subject to a nonnegligible potential energy. Starting from the kappa distribution of the Hamiltonian function, we develop the distributions that describe either the complete phase space or the marginal spaces of positions and velocities. The study shows, among others: (a) The kappa distributions of velocities that describe space plasmas can be vastly different from the standard formulation of the kappa distribution, because of the presence of a potential energy; the correct formulation should be given by the marginal kappa distribution of velocities by integrating the distribution of the Hamiltonian over the potential energy. (b) The long-standing problem of the divergence of the Boltzmannian exponential distribution for bounded radial potentials is solved using kappa distributions of negative kappa index. (c) Anisotropic distributions of velocities can exist in the presence of a velocity-dependent potential. (d) A variety of applications, including derivations/verifications of the following: (i) the Jeans', the most frequent, and the maximum radii in spherical/linear gravitational potentials; (ii) the Virial theorem for power law potentials; (iii) the generalized barometric formula, (iv) the plasma density profiles in Saturnian magnetosphere, and (v) the average electron magnetic moment in Earth's magnetotail.

  7. Testing excited-state energy-density functionals and potentials with the ionization potential theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbola, Manoj; Myneni, Hemanadhan; Shamim, Md.

    2014-03-01

    The modified local spin density functional and the related local potential for excited-states are tested by employing the ionization potential theorem. The functional is constructed by splitting k-space. Since its functional derivative cannot be obtained easily, the corresponding potential is given by analogy to its ground-state counterpart. Further, to calculate the highest occupied orbital energy ?max accurately, the potential is corrected for its asymptotic behavior by employing the van Leeuwen-Barends correction to it. The highest occupied orbital energy ?max thus obtained is then compared with the ?SCF ionization energy calculated using the excited-state functional. It is shown that the two match quite accurately, demonstrating thereby that our approach of constructing excited-state functional is on sound footing.

  8. Potential Energy Calculations for Water Adsorption on Poly (methyl methacrylate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuba, Mateusz J.; Howard, Patrick; Familo, Brian; Kane, Thorin; Netusil, Ross L.; Ilie, Carolina C.

    2015-03-01

    The generosity of the NOYCE Research Grant enabled me to focus on the study of various polymers. The main goal was to study the molecular orbitals of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and calculate the energy band gap. We also performed the potential energy calculations for our system: two polymer chains and water molecules. We obtained the activation energy from thermal desorption spectra of water on poly (methyl methacrylate) by employing Arrhenius analysis. NSF - Noyce Scholarship Program.

  9. Communication: Separable potential energy surfaces from multiplicative artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Werner Zhang, Dong H.

    2014-07-14

    We present a potential energy surface fitting scheme based on multiplicative artificial neural networks. It has the sum of products form required for efficient computation of the dynamics of multidimensional quantum systems with the multi configuration time dependent Hartree method. Moreover, it results in analytic potential energy matrix elements when combined with quantum dynamics methods using Gaussian basis functions, eliminating the need for a local harmonic approximation. Scaling behavior with respect to the complexity of the potential as well as the requested accuracy is discussed.

  10. Framework for State-Level Renewable Energy Market Potential Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kreycik, C.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Doris, E.

    2010-01-01

    State-level policymakers are relying on estimates of the market potential for renewable energy resources as they set goals and develop policies to accelerate the development of these resources. Therefore, accuracy of such estimates should be understood and possibly improved to appropriately support these decisions. This document provides a framework and next steps for state officials who require estimates of renewable energy market potential. The report gives insight into how to conduct a market potential study, including what supporting data are needed and what types of assumptions need to be made. The report distinguishes between goal-oriented studies and other types of studies, and explains the benefits of each.

  11. Saint Paul Energy Park: the potential for district heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.; Kron, R.; Davis, H.

    1980-03-01

    The results of ANL's study of the energy and economic aspects of using district heating in the St. Paul Energy Park are summarized. The Energy Park is a 6 million ft/sup 2/ residential, commercial office, and light industrial complex to be built in the midway area of St. Paul, Minnesota. Space heating and cooling design loads for the park were calculated assuming that the ASHRAE's 90-75 energy-conserving construction standards would be used in constructing the park's buildings. Based in part on this assumption, ANL estimated the costs and energy use characteristics of six possible energy system options for supplying Energy Park's space heating, space cooling, and domestic hot water heating needs. The results indicate that in today's economy, a central heating and cooling plant with natural gas boilers and electrically driven centrifugal chillers with thermal storage has good potential for energy and economic savings and clearly merits further consideration.

  12. Potential of energy farms in the Dominican Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, L.C.; Park, W.R.; Trehan, R.K.

    1980-12-01

    This report assesses the potential of biomass energy farms to supply feedstock for electrical energy needs in the Dominican Republic. That part of the dry forest area not used for agriculture production (1.3 million acres) is found to have a production potential of 200 MW to 1400 MW, depending upon the level of management and choice of species. A biomass energy farm design and conversion facility is described and the economics of operating a wood fired facility of 50 MW, 20 MW, 5 MW, and 2 MW is compared to 50 MW and 20 MW.

  13. Separable representation of energy-dependent optical potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlophe, L.; Elster, Ch.

    2016-03-01

    Background: One important ingredient for many applications of nuclear physics to astrophysics, nuclear energy, and stockpile stewardship are cross sections for reactions of neutrons with rare isotopes. Since direct measurements are often not feasible, indirect methods, e.g., (d ,p ) reactions, should be used. Those (d ,p ) reactions may be viewed as three-body reactions and described with Faddeev techniques. Purpose: Faddeev equations in momentum space have a long tradition of utilizing separable interactions in order to arrive at sets of coupled integral equations in one variable. Optical potentials representing the effective interactions in the neutron (proton) nucleus subsystem are usually non-Hermitian as well as energy dependent. Potential matrix elements as well as transition matrix elements calculated with them must fulfill the reciprocity theorem. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a separable, energy-dependent representation of complex, energy-dependent optical potentials that fulfill reciprocity exactly. Methods: Momentum space Lippmann-Schwinger integral equations are solved with standard techniques to obtain the form factors for the separable representation. Results: Starting from a separable, energy-independent representation of global optical potentials based on a generalization of the Ernst-Shakin-Thaler (EST) scheme, a further generalization is needed to take into account the energy dependence. Applications to n +48Ca ,n +208Pb , and p +208Pb are investigated for energies from 0 to 50 MeV with special emphasis on fulfilling reciprocity. Conclusions: We find that the energy-dependent separable representation of complex, energy-dependent phenomenological optical potentials fulfills reciprocity exactly. In addition, taking into account the explicit energy dependence slightly improves the description of the S matrix elements.

  14. Electrical energy and cost savings potential at DOD facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.; Lister, L.; DeBaille, L.

    1996-06-01

    The US Department of Defense (DOD) has been mandated to reduce energy consumption and costs by 20% from 1985 to 2000 and by 30% from 1985 to 2005. Reduction of electrical energy consumption at DOD facilities requires a better understanding of energy consumption patterns and energy and financial savings potential. This paper utilizes two independent studies--EDA (End-Use Disaggregation Algorithm) and MEIP (Model Energy Installation Program)--and whole-installation electricity use data obtained from a state utility to estimate electrical energy conservation potential (ECP) and cost savings potential (CSP) at the Fort Hood, Texas, military installation and at DOD nationwide. At Fort Hood, the authors estimated an annual electricity savings of 62.2 GWh/yr (18%), a peak demand savings of 10.1 MW (14%), and an annual energy cost savings of $6.5 million per year. These savings could be attained with an initial investment of $41.1 million, resulting in a simple payback of 6.3 years. Across the DOD, they estimated an annual electricity savings of 4,900 GWh/yr, a peak demand savings of 694 MW, and an annual energy cost savings of $316 million per year. The estimated cost savings is 16% of the total nationwide DOD 1993 annual energy costs. These savings could be attained with an initial investment of $1.23 billion, resulting in a simple payback of 3.9 years.

  15. Differential, total, and transport cross sections for elastic scattering of low energy positrons by neutral atoms (Z = 1--92, E = 500--4000 eV)

    SciTech Connect

    Dapor, M.; Miotello, A.

    1998-05-01

    The authors present tables of the differential, total, and transport cross sections for the elastic scattering of 500--4000 eV positrons by neutral atoms in the atomic number range Z = 1--92. The cross sections were computed by numerically solving the Dirac equation for a central electrostatic field up to a large radius where the atomic potential becomes negligible. The atomic potential used was Hartree-Fock for Z = 1--18 and Dirac-Hartree-Fock-Slater for Z = 19--92.

  16. Renewable energy potential in Bulgaria - Some computer simulations results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganev, K.; Jordanov, G.; Gadzhev, G.; Miloshev, N.; Syrakov, D.; Prodanova, M.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents a work, which aims at numerical study of the wind and solar energy potential of the country. The wind/solar energy fields simulations were performed applying the 5th generation PSU/NCAR Meso-Meteorological Model MM5 for years 2000-2007 with a spatial resolution of 3 km over Bulgaria. The computer simulated data base is large and rather comprehensive. In this sense it can be considered as statistically significant ensemble. This allows statistical treatment in order various wind and solar energy potential evaluations to be retrieved from the data base. Some evaluations of the country wind and solar energy potential, based on the simulation output are demonstrated in the paper.

  17. High elastic modulus polymer electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Singh, Mohit; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gomez, Enrique Daniel

    2013-10-22

    A polymer that combines high ionic conductivity with the structural properties required for Li electrode stability is useful as a solid phase electrolyte for high energy density, high cycle life batteries that do not suffer from failures due to side reactions and dendrite growth on the Li electrodes, and other potential applications. The polymer electrolyte includes a linear block copolymer having a conductive linear polymer block with a molecular weight of at least 5000 Daltons, a structural linear polymer block with an elastic modulus in excess of 1.times.10.sup.7 Pa and an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-5 Scm.sup.-1. The electrolyte is made under dry conditions to achieve the noted characteristics.

  18. Hopf solitons and elastic rods

    SciTech Connect

    Harland, Derek; Sutcliffe, Paul; Speight, Martin

    2011-03-15

    Hopf solitons in the Skyrme-Faddeev model are stringlike topological solitons classified by the integer-valued Hopf charge. In this paper we introduce an approximate description of Hopf solitons in terms of elastic rods. The general form of the elastic rod energy is derived from the field theory energy and is found to be an extension of the classical Kirchhoff rod energy. Using a minimal extension of the Kirchhoff energy, it is shown that a simple elastic rod model can reproduce many of the qualitative features of Hopf solitons in the Skyrme-Faddeev model. Features that are captured by the model include the buckling of the charge three solution, the formation of links at charges five and six, and the minimal energy trefoil knot at charge seven.

  19. Elasticity of fractal inspired interconnects.

    PubMed

    Su, Yewang; Wang, Shuodao; Huang, YongAn; Luan, Haiwen; Dong, Wentao; Fan, Jonathan A; Yang, Qinglin; Rogers, John A; Huang, Yonggang

    2015-01-21

    The use of fractal-inspired geometric designs in electrical interconnects represents an important approach to simultaneously achieve large stretchability and high aerial coverage of active devices for stretchable electronics. The elastic stiffness of fractal interconnects is determined analytically in this paper. Specifically, the elastic energy and the tensile stiffness for an order n fractal interconnect of arbitrary shape are obtained, and are verified by the finite element analysis and experiments. PMID:25183293

  20. Potential for energy conservation in the glass industry

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, A.G.; Bruno, G.A.

    1986-06-01

    While the glass industry (flat glass, container glass, pressed and blown glass, and insulation fiber glass) has reduced its specific energy use (Btu/ton) by almost 30% since 1972, significant potential for further reduction still remains. State-of-the-art technologies are available which could lead to incremental improvements in glass industry energy productivity; however, these technologies must compete for capital with projects undertaken for other reasons (e.g., capacity expansion, equipment rebuild, labor cost reduction, product quality improvement, or compliance with environmental, health or safety regulations). Narrowing profit margins in the large tonnage segments of the glass industry in recent years and the fact that energy costs represent less than 25% of the value added in glass manufacture have combined to impede the widespread adoption of many state-of-the-art conservation technologies. Savings in energy costs alone have not provided the incentive to justify the capital expenditures required to realize the energy savings. Beyond implementation of state-of-the-art technologies, significant potential energy savings could accrue from advanced technologies which represent a radical departure from current glass making technology. Long-term research and development (R and D) programs, which address the technical and economic barriers associated with advanced, energy-conserving technologies, offer the opportunity to realize this energy-saving potential.

  1. Solar energy in California industry - Applications, characteristics and potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbieri, R. H.; Pivirotto, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    Results of a survey to determine the potential applicability of solar thermal energy to industrial processes in California are presented. It is found that if the heat for all industrial processes at temperatures below 212 F were supplied by solar energy, total state energy consumption could be reduced by 100 trillion Btus (2%), while the use of solar energy in processes between 212 and 350 F could displace 500 trillion Btus. The issues and problems with which solar energy must contend are illustrated by a description of fluid milk processing operations. Solar energy application is found to be technically feasible for processes with thermal energy requirements below 212 F, with design, and degree of technical, economic and management feasibility being site specific. It is recommended that the state provide support for federal and industrial research, development and demonstration programs in order to stimulate acceptance of solar process heat application by industry.

  2. The potential energy surface of H2 16O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyansky, Oleg L.; Jensen, Per; Tennyson, Jonathan

    1996-10-01

    We report here a new determination of the H216O potential energy surface from experimental data. The calculations have been carried out by means of the very accurate and highly efficient method proposed and applied to H216O in a previous paper [Polyansky, Jensen, and Tennyson, J. Chem. Phys. 101, 7651 (1994)]. This previous work has been significantly improved by inclusion of additional terms in the analytical expression used to represent the potential energy surface. Previously, 1600 rotation-vibration term values for H216O were fitted with a standard deviation of 0.36 cm-1. With the extended model of the present work, this standard deviation could be improved to 0.25 cm-1. With the extended model and the new fitted potential function we have calculated a data set comprising 3200 term values, all of which can be compared with experimentally derived values. The standard deviation for this data set is 0.6 cm-1. The data set contains rotationally excited energy levels for all the 63 vibrational states which have been characterized by high resolution spectroscopy. The potential energy function obtained in the present work improves drastically the agreement with experiment for the highly excited local mode stretching states above 20 000 cm-1. For the vibrational band origins of these states, the highest of which is measured at 25 118 cm-1, our previous fitted potential produced discrepancies of more than 100 cm-1. These deviations are reduced to less than 1 cm-1 by the potential energy function of the present work. We show that no significant improvement of the fit can be obtained by extending the analytical expression for the potential energy by further high-order terms. An analysis of the residuals shows that at the level of accuracy achieved, the major contribution to the error originates in the neglect of nonadiabatic correction terms in the Born-Oppenheimer kinetic energy operator. We conclude that any further improvement of the potential energy surface requires that such correction terms be included in the Hamiltonian. With the present potential, reliable extrapolations towards higher rotational and vibrational energies can be carried out, and we expect that such calculations can be very helpful in the assignment of experimental spectra involving highly excited states.

  3. Elastic scattering of nuclear systems induced by weakly bound projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mart, G. V.; Fimiani, L.; Figueira, J. M.; Testoni, J. E.; Arazi, A.; Capurro, O. A.; Crdenas, W. H. Z.; Cardona, M. A.; Carnelli, P.; de Barbar, E.; Hojman, D.; Heimann, D. Martinez; Negri, A.; Pacheco, A. J.

    2012-02-01

    The influence of the breakup channel on the elastic scattering and on the fusion process for systems that involve weakly bound stable nuclei has been widely investigated in the last years. One of the most used approaches to address these problems is to investigate the energy dependence of the nuclear interaction potential. For tightly bound systems at energies close to the Coulomb barrier, this energy dependence exhibits the behavior known as threshold anomaly. On the other hand, for various weakly bound systems the nuclear potential as a function of energy has a completely different behavior known as breakup threshold anomaly. In this report we present an overview of the subject discussing the different experimental measurements and theoretical interpretations that have been published. In this framework, we present the results of the elastic scattering cross sections for the 6,7Li+80Se systems that have been recently measured at the TANDAR laboratory and we discuss the conclusions obtained from these studies.

  4. Nonlinear elasticity of biological tissues with statistical fibre orientation.

    PubMed

    Federico, Salvatore; Gasser, T Christian

    2010-06-01

    The elastic strain energy potential for nonlinear fibre-reinforced materials is customarily obtained by superposition of the potentials of the matrix and of each family of fibres. Composites with statistically oriented fibres, such as biological tissues, can be seen as being reinforced by a continuous infinity of fibre families, the orientation of which can be represented by means of a probability density function defined on the unit sphere (i.e. the solid angle). In this case, the superposition procedure gives rise to an integral form of the elastic potential such that the deformation features in the integral, which therefore cannot be calculated a priori. As a consequence, an analytical use of this potential is impossible. In this paper, we implemented this integral form of the elastic potential into a numerical procedure that evaluates the potential, the stress and the elasticity tensor at each deformation step. The numerical integration over the unit sphere is performed by means of the method of spherical designs, in which the result of the integral is approximated by a suitable sum over a discrete subset of the unit sphere. As an example of application, we modelled the collagen fibre distribution in articular cartilage, and used it in simulating displacement-controlled tests: the unconfined compression of a cylindrical sample and the contact problem in the hip joint. PMID:20053655

  5. The metabolic energy cost of action potential velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotty, Patrick; Sangrey, Thomas; Levy, William

    2006-03-01

    Voltage changes in neurons and other active cells are caused by the passage of ions across the cell membrane. These ionic currents depend on the transmembrane ion concentration gradients, which in unmyelinated axons are maintained during rest and restored after electrical activity by an ATPase sodium-potassium exchanger in the membrane. The amount of ATP consumed by this exchanger can be taken as the metabolic energy cost of any electrical activity in the axon. We use this measure, along with biophysical models of voltage-gated sodium and potassium ion channels, to quantify the energy cost of action potentials propagating in squid giant axons. We find that the energy of an action potential can be naturally divided into three separate components associated with different aspects of the action potential. We calculate these energy components as functions of the ion channel densities and axon diameters and find that the component associated with the rising phase and velocity of the action potential achieves a minimum near the biological values of these parameters. This result, which is robust with respect to other parameters such as temperature, suggests that evolution has optimized the axon for the energy of the action potential wavefront.

  6. Split kinetic energy method for quantum systems with competing potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Mineo, H.; Chao, Sheng D.

    2012-09-15

    For quantum systems with competing potentials, the conventional perturbation theory often yields an asymptotic series and the subsequent numerical outcome becomes uncertain. To tackle such a kind of problems, we develop a general solution scheme based on a new energy dissection idea. Instead of dividing the potential energy into 'unperturbed' and 'perturbed' terms, a partition of the kinetic energy is performed. By distributing the kinetic energy term in part into each individual potential, the Hamiltonian can be expressed as the sum of the subsystem Hamiltonians with respective competing potentials. The total wavefunction is expanded by using a linear combination of the basis sets of respective subsystem Hamiltonians. We first illustrate the solution procedure using a simple system consisting of a particle under the action of double {delta}-function potentials. Next, this method is applied to the prototype systems of a charged harmonic oscillator in strong magnetic field and the hydrogen molecule ion. Compared with the usual perturbation approach, this new scheme converges much faster to the exact solutions for both eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. When properly extended, this new solution scheme can be very useful for dealing with strongly coupling quantum systems. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new basis set expansion method is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Split kinetic energy method is proposed to solve quantum eigenvalue problems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant improvement has been obtained in converging to exact results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extension of such methods is promising and discussed.

  7. Optimizing potential energy functions for maximal intrinsic hyperpolarizability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Juefei; Szafruga, Urszula B.; Kuzyk, Mark G.; Watkins, David S.

    2007-11-15

    We use numerical optimization to study the properties of (1) the class of one-dimensional potential energy functions and (2) systems of point nuclei in two dimensions that yield the largest intrinsic hyperpolarizabilities, which we find to be within 30% of the fundamental limit. In all cases, we use a one-electron model. It is found that a broad range of optimized potentials, each of very different character, yield the same intrinsic hyperpolarizability ceiling of 0.709. Furthermore, all optimized potential energy functions share common features such as (1) the value of the normalized transition dipole moment to the dominant state, which forces the hyperpolarizability to be dominated by only two excited states and (2) the energy ratio between the two dominant states. All optimized potentials are found to obey the three-level ansatz to within about 1%. Many of these potential energy functions may be implementable in multiple quantum well structures. The subset of potentials with undulations reaffirm that modulation of conjugation may be an approach for making better organic molecules, though there appear to be many others. Additionally, our results suggest that one-dimensional molecules may have larger diagonal intrinsic hyperpolarizability {beta}{sub xxx}{sup int} than higher-dimensional systems.

  8. Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Its Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Clarke, L.; Luckow, P.; Smith, S.

    2011-12-01

    Wind power, a clean and renewable energy resource, can play an important role in providing energy and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Yet there are substantial and important uncertainties about the potential costs and supplies of wind that influence our ability to understand today the strategic role of wind power in the future. A detailed global assessment of onshore wind energy potential and its uncertainties will help decision-makers develop policies and strategies to meet energy and environmental goals. In this study, we assess the technical and economic potential of onshore wind energy and its spatial distribution using reanalysis wind speed data from the National Centers for Environmental Modeling (Figure 1). The study focuses in particular in exploring a range of uncertainties that impact the economic potential of wind power by constructing quantitative scenarios for eight key physical and economic parameters. We present quantification of the impact of uncertainties in these parameters, focusing on areas relevant to geoscience research (Figure 2). The amount of economic potential of wind energy depends strongly on several uncertain parameters such as wind speed, turbine cost, and land-suitability. The distribution of wind speed at fine temporal and spatial scales is a key parameter, but is not well quantified in many regions of the world. Reanalysis datasets with more accurate wind fields are a first step, along with computationally tractable downscaling methodologies. Another key assumption is land-suitability, which is the fraction of a particular land-cover type assumed to be available for wind farm development. There is currently little scientific basis for land-suitability assumptions. While some of the data needed for progress in these areas is readily available, such as high-resolution land-cover and terrain data, further advances are likely to require new methodologies and inter-disciplinary collaboration. We outline a number of areas where further research is needed to construct improved estimates of global wind energy potential.

  9. Systematic CDCC calculations for 11Be + p elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Lou, JianLing; Pang, DanYang; Ye, YanLin

    2016-03-01

    Continuum discretised coupled-channels (CDCC) method with a 10Be(0+) + n two-body cluster model is applied to systematically analyze the elastic scattering of the halo nucleus 11Be from the proton target at various incident energies below 100 MeV/nucleon. Using the renormalized 10Be- p potential deduced from the 10Be + p elastic scattering data, the differential cross sections of 11Be + p scattering are well reproduced by the CDCC calculations without any further adjustment parameters, demonstrating the applicability of this approach for describing the scattering of exotic nuclei based on the scattering of the less exotic core nuclei.

  10. Collisionless Plasma Modeling in an Arbitrary Potential Energy Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for calculating a collisionless plasma along a field line is presented. The primary feature of the new model is that it can handle an arbitrary (including nonmonotonic) potential energy distribution. This was one of the limiting constraints on the existing models in this class, and these constraints are generalized for an arbitrary potential energy composition. The formulation for relating current density to the field-aligned potential as well as formulas for density, temperature and energy flux calculations are presented for several distribution functions, ranging from a bi-Lorentzian with a loss cone to an isotropic Maxwellian. A comparison of these results with previous models shows that the formulation reduces.to the earlier models under similar assumptions.

  11. Saturation wind power potential and its implications for wind energy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Mark Z; Archer, Cristina L

    2012-09-25

    Wind turbines convert kinetic to electrical energy, which returns to the atmosphere as heat to regenerate some potential and kinetic energy. As the number of wind turbines increases over large geographic regions, power extraction first increases linearly, but then converges to a saturation potential not identified previously from physical principles or turbine properties. These saturation potentials are >250 terawatts (TW) at 100 m globally, approximately 80 TW at 100 m over land plus coastal ocean outside Antarctica, and approximately 380 TW at 10 km in the jet streams. Thus, there is no fundamental barrier to obtaining half (approximately 5.75 TW) or several times the world's all-purpose power from wind in a 2030 clean-energy economy. PMID:23019353

  12. Saturation wind power potential and its implications for wind energy

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Mark Z.; Archer, Cristina L.

    2012-01-01

    Wind turbines convert kinetic to electrical energy, which returns to the atmosphere as heat to regenerate some potential and kinetic energy. As the number of wind turbines increases over large geographic regions, power extraction first increases linearly, but then converges to a saturation potential not identified previously from physical principles or turbine properties. These saturation potentials are >250terawatts (TW) at 100m globally, approximately 80TW at 100m over land plus coastal ocean outside Antarctica, and approximately 380TW at 10km in the jet streams. Thus, there is no fundamental barrier to obtaining half (approximately 5.75TW) or several times the worlds all-purpose power from wind in a 2030 clean-energy economy. PMID:23019353

  13. Hydroelastic response and energy harvesting potential of flexible piezoelectric beams in viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcabay, Deniz Tolga; Young, Yin Lu

    2012-05-01

    Electroactive polymers such as piezoelectric elements are able to generate electric potential differences from induced mechanical deformations. They can be used to build devices to harvest ambient energy from natural flow-induced deformations, e.g., as flapping flags subject to flowing wind or artificial seaweed subject to waves or underwater currents. The objectives of this study are to (1) investigate the transient hydroelastic response and energy harvesting potential of flexible piezoelectric beams fluttering in incompressible, viscous flow, and (2) identify critical non-dimensional parameters that govern the response of piezoelectric beams fluttering in viscous flow. The fluid-structure interaction response is simulated using an immersed boundary approach coupled with a finite volume solver for incompressible, viscous flow. The effects of large beam deformation, membrane tension, and coupled electromechanical responses are all considered. Validation studies are shown for the motion of a flexible filament in uniform flow, and for a piezoelectric beam subject to base vibration. The predicted flutter velocities and frequencies also compared well with published experimental and numerical data over a range of Reynolds numbers for varying fluid and solid combinations. The results showed that for a heavy beam in a light fluid (i.e., high βρ regime), flutter incepts at a lower critical speed with a lower reduced frequency than for a light beam in a heavy fluid (i.e., low βρ regime). In the high βρ regime, flutter develops at the second mode and is only realized when the fluid inertial forces are in balance with the solid elastic restoring forces, which leads to large amplitude oscillations and complex wake patterns; the flutter speed is practically independent of the Reynolds number (Re) and solid to fluid mass ratio (βρ), because the response is dominated by the solid inertial forces. In the low βρ regime, fluid inertial forces dominate, flutter develops at higher modes and is only realized when the solid inertial forces are proportioned to the solid elastic restoring forces; the flutter speed depends on both Re and βρ, and viscous force and beam tension effects tend to delay flutter and reduce vibration amplitudes, leading to thinner, more simplified wake patterns. The results demonstrate that energy extraction via fluttering piezoelectric beams is possible. The overall efficiency was observed to be influenced by the piezoelectric circuit resistance, which is known to be directly related to the square of the piezoelectric coupling factor. The results show that the maximum strain limit of piezoelectrics may be exceeded, and hence careful optimization of the material and geometry is recommended to maximize the energy capture for a given range of expected flow conditions while satisfying safety and reliability requirements.

  14. Elastic and hierarchical porous carbon nanofibrous membranes incorporated with NiFe2O4 nanocrystals for highly efficient capacitive energy storage.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jianlong; Fan, Gang; Si, Yang; He, Jianxin; Kim, Hak-Yong; Ding, Bin; Al-Deyab, Salem S; El-Newehy, Mohamed; Yu, Jianyong

    2016-01-21

    Flexible membranes created from porous carbon nanofibers (CNFs) hold great promise in the next generation wearable energy storage devices, but challenges still remain due to the poor mechanical properties of porous carbon nanofibers. Here, we report a facile strategy to fabricate elastic and hierarchical porous CNF membranes with NiFe2O4 nanocrystals embedded via multicomponent electrospinning and nano-doping methods. Benefiting from the scattering effect of NiFe2O4 nanocrystals and graphitized carbon layers for the condensed stress, the resultant CNF membranes exhibit an enhanced elasticity with a bending radius <12 μm, rapid recovery from the deformations, and a superior softness. Quantitative pore size distribution and fractal analysis reveal that the CNFs possessed tunable porous structures with a high surface area of 493 m(2) g(-1) and a pore volume of 0.31 cm(3) g(-1). Benefiting from the robust mechanical stability, hierarchical porous structures and good electrochemical properties, the NiFe2O4 doped CNF membranes demonstrate a high electrical capacitance of 343 F g(-1), and good reversibility with a cycling efficiency of 97.4% even after 10 000 cycles. The successful synthesis of elastic porous CNF membranes also provided a versatile platform for the design and development of functional CNF based materials for various applications. PMID:26731700

  15. Low-energy potential scattering in two and three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Khuri, N. N.; Martin, Andre; Richard, J.-M.; Wu, T. T.

    2009-07-15

    Conditions are established for the existence of a scattering length and an effective range in the low-energy expansion of the S-wave phase shift of a central potential in two and three dimensions. The behavior of the phase shift as a function of the momentum is also derived for longer-range power-law potentials which do not fulfill these conditions.

  16. Elastic Properties of Graphene Nanomeshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Carpenter, Corinne; Muniz, Andre; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2014-03-01

    We report results on the elastic properties of graphene nanomeshes following a systematic analysis based on molecular-statics and molecular-dynamics simulations of uniaxial tensile deformation tests according to reliable bond-order classical interatomic potentials. Elastic properties are determined as a function of the nanomesh architecture, including the regular arrangement of pores in the nanomesh (pore lattice structure), pore morphology, nanomesh density (?), and pore edge passivation. We report scaling laws for the density dependence of the elastic modulus M and find that M scales with the square of the density, consistently with other cellular materials, for circular unpassivated pores over the range of temperature and nanomesh architectural parameters examined. We find that pore edge passivation strengthens the elastic moduli. The effects of passivation and pore morphology, namely, the aspect ratio of elliptical pores, on the M(?) scaling laws are analyzed in detail. Presently at University of California, Santa Barbara.

  17. Reference pressure changes and available potential energy in isobaric coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, F. R.

    1985-01-01

    A formulation of the available potential energy (APE) equation in isobaric coordinates which alleviates the need for computing temporal derivatives of reference pressure and describes how work done relates to changes in the APE of a limited region is presented. The APE budget equation possesses terms analogous to those in Johnson's (1970) isentropic version. It is shown that APE changes result from either mechanical work inside the domain or an exchange of energy via boundary processes with the surrounding environment.

  18. Potential structural material problems in a hydrogen energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Mcpherson, W. B.; Howard, F. S.; Swisher, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    Potential structural material problems that may be encountered in the three components of a hydrogen energy system - production, transmission/storage, and utilization - have been identified. Hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, oxidation, and erosion may occur during the production of hydrogen. Hydrogen embrittlement is of major concern during both transmission and utilization of hydrogen. Specific materials research and development programs necessary to support a hydrogen energy system are described. An awareness of probable shortages of strategic materials has been maintained in these suggested programs.

  19. Potential structural material problems in a hydrogen energy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Mcpherson, B.; Howard, F. S.; Swisher, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Potential structural material problems that may be encountered in the three components of a hydrogen energy system - production, transmission/storage, and utilization - were identified. Hydrogen embrittlement, corrosion, oxidation, and erosion may occur during the production of hydrogen. Hydrogen embrittlement is of major concern during both transmission and utilization of hydrogen. Specific materials research and development programs necessary to support a hydrogen energy system are described.

  20. The mechanics of elastic loading and recoil in anuran jumping.

    PubMed

    Astley, Henry C; Roberts, Thomas J

    2014-12-15

    Many animals use catapult mechanisms to produce extremely rapid movements for escape or prey capture, resulting in power outputs far beyond the limits of muscle. In these catapults, muscle contraction loads elastic structures, which then recoil to release the stored energy extremely rapidly. Many arthropods employ anatomical 'catch mechanisms' to lock the joint in place during the loading period, which can then be released to allow joint motion via elastic recoil. Jumping vertebrates lack a clear anatomical catch, yet face the same requirement to load the elastic structure prior to movement. There are several potential mechanisms to allow loading of vertebrate elastic structures, including the gravitational load of the body, a variable mechanical advantage, and moments generated by the musculature of proximal joints. To test these hypothesized mechanisms, we collected simultaneous 3D kinematics via X-ray Reconstruction of Moving Morphology (XROMM) and single-foot forces during the jumps of three Rana pipiens. We calculated joint mechanical advantage, moment and power using inverse dynamics at the ankle, knee, hip and ilio-sacral joints. We found that the increasing proximal joint moments early in the jump allowed for high ankle muscle forces and elastic pre-loading, and the subsequent reduction in these moments allowed the ankle to extend using elastic recoil. Mechanical advantage also changed throughout the jump, with the muscle contracting against a poor mechanical advantage early in the jump during loading and a higher mechanical advantage late in the jump during recoil. These 'dynamic catch mechanisms' serve to resist joint motion during elastic loading, then allow it during elastic recoil, functioning as a catch mechanism based on the balance and orientation of forces throughout the limb rather than an anatomical catch. PMID:25520385

  1. Extraction of analytical potential function parameters from ab initio potential energy surfaces and analytical forces*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, J. M.; Greer, J. C.

    2002-09-01

    The program PAROPT has been written to extract forcefield parameters from ab initio calculations of potential energy surfaces (PES) and ab initio analytical forces. The ability to use either energies or forces, or a combination of the two to determine forcefield parameters is a novel feature of the program. Simulated annealing is used within the program to minimise the difference between a set of forces and energies calculated using ab initio techniques and the same quantities calculated using an empirical forcefield. Details of the program and methods used to extract forcefield parametrizations are presented.

  2. Renewable energy technologies adoption in Kazakhstan: potentials, barriers and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatayev, Marat; Marazza, Diego; Contin, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The growth in environmental pollution alongside an increasing demand for electricity in Kazakhstan calls for a higher level of renewable energy penetration into national power systems. Kazakhstan has great potential for renewable energies from wind, solar, hydro and biomass resources that can be exploited for electricity production. In 2013, the Kazakhstani Ministry of Energy initiated a new power development plan, which aims to bring the share of renewable energy to 3% by 2020 rising to 30% by 2030 and 50% by 2050. The current contribution of renewable energy resources in the national electricity mix, however, is less than 1%. As a developing country, Kazakhstan has faced a number of barriers to increase renewable energy use, which have to be analysed and translated into a comprehensive renewable energy policy framework. This study presents an overview of the current conditions of renewable energy development in Kazakhstan. Secondly, it identifies and describes the main barriers that prevent diffusion of renewable energy technologies in Kazakhstan. Finally, the paper provides solutions to overcome specific barriers in order to successfully develop a renewable energy technology sector in Kazakhstan.

  3. LHC Physics Potential vs. Energy: Considerations for the 2011 Run

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2011-02-01

    Parton luminosities are convenient for estimating how the physics potential of Large Hadron Collider experiments depends on the energy of the proton beams. I quantify the advantage of increasing the beam energy from 3.5 TeV to 4 TeV. I present parton luminosities, ratios of parton luminosities, and contours of fixed parton luminosity for gg, u {bar d}, qq, and gq interactions over the energy range relevant to the Large Hadron Collider, along with example analyses for specific processes. This note extends the analysis presented in Ref. [1]. Full-size figures are available as pdf files at lutece.fnal.gov/PartonLum11/.

  4. Elastic ?+ and ?- scattering on 14C at 164 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Carol J.; Baer, Helmut W.; Johnstone, J. A.; Morris, C. L.; Seestrom-Morris, S. J.; Dehnhard, D.; Holtkamp, D. B.; Greene, S. J.

    1986-04-01

    Differential cross sections for ?+/- elastic scattering on 14C at a pion kinetic energy of 164 MeV were measured over the angular range 20-91. A contaminant analysis was performed for the target sample based on the kinematic separation of the elastic scattering peaks and the use of previously measured or calculated elastic cross sections. The data are compared to a newly developed, momentum-space, optical-potential calculation which shows clearly the importance of including Pauli suppression and three-body kinematics in the microscopic scattering description.

  5. The Potential Role of Fusion Energy in China and India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, John

    2004-11-01

    It is projected that both China and India will install many 100's of megawatts electric (MWe) of additional electrical capacity by 2050 with more additions later. All energy resources will be required to meet such a demand. Fortunately, while world energy demand will be increasing, the world is well endowed with a variety of energy resources. However, their distribution does not match well the areas of demand and there are many environmental issues. Such geopolitical issues affect China and India and make it important for them to be able to deploy improved technologies. International collaborations in developing these technologies, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), may be important in all energy areas. In this regard, Korea is an interesting example of a country that has worked with other countries to develop its own capability to do advanced technologies - such as nuclear fission plants - in a relatively short time. Fusion energy is viewed as interesting potential option in these three countries.

  6. Unified Technical Concepts. Module 7: Potential and Kinetic Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This concept module on potential and kinetic energy is one of thirteen modules that provide a flexible, laboratory-based physics instructional package designed to meet the specialized needs of students in two-year, postsecondary technical schools. Each of the thirteen concept modules discusses a single physics concept and how it is applied to each…

  7. Teaching Field Concept and Potential Energy at A-Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Argues for a greater emphasis on the reality of fields in electronics and gravitation instruction. Advocates that the potential energy in a system be regarded as stored in the field rather than in the material bodies of the system. Provides a rationale and examples for this position. (ML)

  8. A highly accurate potential energy curve for the mercury dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahl, Elke; Figgen, Detlev; Thierfelder, Christian; Peterson, Kirk A.; Calvo, Florent; Schwerdtfeger, Peter

    2010-03-01

    The potential energy curve of the electronic ground state of the mercury dimer based on CCSD(T) calculations at the complete basis set (CBS) limit, including corrections for the full triples ?T and explicit spin-orbit (SO) interactions at the CCSD(T) level of theory, is presented. In the far long-range part, the potential energy curve is complemented by symmetry-adapted perturbation theory calculations. Potential curves of an analytically simple, extended Lennard-Jones form are obtained from very accurate fits to the CBS/CCSD(T)+SO and CBS/CCSD(T)+SO+?T data. The Hg2 potential curves yield dissociation energies of De=424/392 cm-1 and equilibrium distances of re=3.650/3.679 at the CBS/CCSD(T)+SO and CBS/CCSD(T)+SO+?T levels of theory, respectively. By including perturbative quadruple corrections in our coupled-cluster calculations and corrections from correlating the 4f-core, we arrive at a final dissociation energy of De=405 cm-1, in excellent agreement with the experimentally estimated value of 407 cm-1 by Greif and Hensel. In addition, the rotational and vibrational spectroscopic constants as well as the second virial coefficient B(T ) in dependence of the temperature T are calculated and validated against available experimental and theoretical data.

  9. Unified Technical Concepts. Module 7: Potential and Kinetic Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This concept module on potential and kinetic energy is one of thirteen modules that provide a flexible, laboratory-based physics instructional package designed to meet the specialized needs of students in two-year, postsecondary technical schools. Each of the thirteen concept modules discusses a single physics concept and how it is applied to each

  10. Folding model analysis of pion elastic and inelastic scattering from 6Li and 12C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahim, A. A.

    2013-04-01

    ? -Nucleus scattering cross sections are calculated applying the Watanabe superposition model with a phenomenological Woods-Saxon potential. The phenomenological potential parameters are searched for ? scattering from 6Li and 12C to reproduce not only differential elastic cross sections but also inelastic and total and reaction cross sections at pion kinetic energies from 50 to 672 MeV. The optical potentials of 6Li and 12C are calculated in terms of the alpha particle and deuteron optical potentials. Inelastic scattering has been analyzed using the distorted waves from elastic-scattering data. The values of deformation lengths thus obtained compare very well with the ones reported earlier.

  11. Elastic Scattering of {sup 7}Li+{sup 27}Al at Backward Angles in the 7-11 MeV Energy Range for Application in RBS

    SciTech Connect

    Carnelli, P. F. F.; Arazi, A.; Cardona, M. A.; Figueira, J. M.; Hojman, D.; Martinez Heimann, D.; Negri, A. E.; Pacheco, A. J.; Abriola, D.; Capurro, O. A.; Fimiani, L.; Grinberg, P.; Marti, G. V.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.

    2010-08-04

    We have measured elastic excitation functions for the {sup 7}Li+{sup 27}Al system, in an energy range close to its Coulomb barrier (E{sub lab} = 8.4 MeV) in steps of 0.25 MeV. For this purpose, an array of eight surface-barrier detectors was used. To get an insight on the background composition (mainly {alpha} particles), a telescope-detector was used for atomic-number identification. Identical measurements for the {sup 6}Li+{sup 27}Al system are planned for the near future.

  12. Potentials and policy implications of energy and material efficiency improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Worrell, Ernst; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Martin, Nathan; van den Broek, Richard; Block, Kornelis

    1997-01-01

    There is a growing awareness of the serious problems associated with the provision of sufficient energy to meet human needs and to fuel economic growth world-wide. This has pointed to the need for energy and material efficiency, which would reduce air, water and thermal pollution, as well as waste production. Increasing energy and material efficiency also have the benefits of increased employment, improved balance of imports and exports, increased security of energy supply, and adopting environmentally advantageous energy supply. A large potential exists for energy savings through energy and material efficiency improvements. Technologies are not now, nor will they be, in the foreseeable future, the limiting factors with regard to continuing energy efficiency improvements. There are serious barriers to energy efficiency improvement, including unwillingness to invest, lack of available and accessible information, economic disincentives and organizational barriers. A wide range of policy instruments, as well as innovative approaches have been tried in some countries in order to achieve the desired energy efficiency approaches. These include: regulation and guidelines; economic instruments and incentives; voluntary agreements and actions, information, education and training; and research, development and demonstration. An area that requires particular attention is that of improved international co-operation to develop policy instruments and technologies to meet the needs of developing countries. Material efficiency has not received the attention that it deserves. Consequently, there is a dearth of data on the qualities and quantities for final consumption, thus, making it difficult to formulate policies. Available data, however, suggest that there is a large potential for improved use of many materials in industrialized countries.

  13. Global Potential of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling Programs

    SciTech Connect

    McNeil, Michael A; McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2008-06-15

    This report estimates the global potential reductions in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 for energy efficiency improvements associated with equipment (appliances, lighting, and HVAC) in buildings by means of energy efficiency standards and labels (EES&L). A consensus has emerged among the world's scientists and many corporate and political leaders regarding the need to address the threat of climate change through emissions mitigation and adaptation. A further consensus has emerged that a central component of these strategies must be focused around energy, which is the primary generator of greenhouse gas emissions. Two important questions result from this consensus: 'what kinds of policies encourage the appropriate transformation to energy efficiency' and 'how much impact can these policies have'? This report aims to contribute to the dialogue surrounding these issues by considering the potential impacts of a single policy type, applied on a global scale. The policy addressed in this report is Energy Efficient Standards and Labeling (EES&L) for energy-consuming equipment, which has now been implemented in over 60 countries. Mandatory energy performance standards are important because they contribute positively to a nation's economy and provide relative certainty about the outcome (both timing and magnitudes). Labels also contribute positively to a nation's economy and importantly increase the awareness of the energy-consuming public. Other policies not analyzed here (utility incentives, tax credits) are complimentary to standards and labels and also contribute in significant ways to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. We believe the analysis reported here to be the first systematic attempt to evaluate the potential of savings from EES&L for all countries and for such a large set of products. The goal of the analysis is to provide an assessment that is sufficiently well-quantified and accurate to allow comparison and integration with other strategies under consideration.

  14. Turkey's High Temperature Geothermal Energy Resources and Electricity Production Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgin, .

    2012-04-01

    Turkey is in the first 7 countries in the world in terms of potential and applications. Geothermal energy which is an alternative energy resource has advantages such as low-cost, clean, safe and natural resource. Geothermal energy is defined as hot water and steam which is formed by heat that accumulated in various depths of the Earth's crust; with more than 20oC temperature and which contain more than fused minerals, various salts and gases than normal underground and ground water. It is divided into three groups as low, medium and high temperature. High-temperature fluid is used in electricity generation, low and medium temperature fluids are used in greenhouses, houses, airport runways, animal farms and places such as swimming pools heating. In this study high temperature geothermal fields in Turkey which is suitable for electricity production, properties and electricity production potential was investigated.

  15. Heterobarrier for converting hot-phonon energy to electric potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungha; Melnick, Corey; Kaviany, Massoud

    2013-02-01

    We show that hot phonons emitted in energy conversion or resistive processes can be converted to electric potential in heterobarrier structures. Using phonon and electron interaction kinetics and self-consistent ensemble Monte Carlo, we find the favorable conditions for unassisted absorption of hot phonons and design graded heterobarriers for their direct conversion into electric energy. Tandem barriers with nearly optical-phonon height allow for substantial potential gain without current loss. We find that 19% of hot phonons can be harvested with an optimized GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs barrier structure over a range of current and electron densities, thus enhancing the overall energy conversion efficiency and reducing waste heat.

  16. Understanding Potential Climate Variability Impacts on the Offshore Energy Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stear, J.

    2014-12-01

    Climate variability may have important implications for the offshore energy industry. Scenarios of increased storm activity and changes in sea level could require the retrofit of existing offshore platforms and coastal infrastructure, the decommissioning of facilities for which upgrade or relocation is not economically viable, and the development of new methods and equipment which are removed from or less sensitive to environmental loads. Over the past years the energy industry has been actively involved in collaborative research efforts with government and academia to identify the potential changes in the offshore operating environment, and corresponding risk implications. This presentation will review several of these efforts, and for several of the hypothetical climate variation scenarios, review the potential impacts on and possible mitigations for offshore and coastal energy infrastructure and operations.

  17. Three-dimensional potential energy surface of Ar–CO

    SciTech Connect

    Sumiyoshi, Yoshihiro; Endo, Yasuki

    2015-01-14

    A three-dimensional intermolecular potential energy surface of the Ar–CO complex has been determined by fitting most of the previously reported spectroscopic data, where observed transition frequencies by microwave, millimeter-wave, submillimeter-wave, and infrared spectroscopy were reproduced simultaneously within their experimental accuracies. A free rotor model Hamiltonian considering all the freedom of motions for an atom-diatom system was applied to calculate vibration-rotation energies. A three-dimensional potential energy surface obtained by ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T)-F12b/aug-cc-pV5Z level of theory was parameterized by a model function consisting of 46 parameters. They were used as initial values for the least-squares analysis of the experimental data. A total of 20 parameters were optimized to reproduce all the spectroscopic data.

  18. Elastic scattering measurement for the system 17O + 58Ni at Coulomb barrier energies with silicon strip detectors exploiting ASIC electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorini, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Molini, P.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Boiano, C.; Manea, C.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Di Meo, P.; Nicoletto, M.; Boiano, A.; Glodariu, T.; Grebosz, J.; Guglielmetti, A.; La Commara, M.; Parascandolo, C.; Parascandolo, L.; Sandoli, M.; Soramel, F.; Stroe, L.; Toniolo, N.; Veronese, F.

    2013-03-01

    The quasi elastic scattering of a 17O projectile from a 58Ni target has been studied at beam energies ranging from 42.5 to 55.0 MeV in 2.5 MeV steps. The total reaction cross sections were derived from the measured angular distributions by using an optical model fit within the coupled-channel code FRESCO. These cross sections are very similar to those measured for 17F (loosely bound by 0.6 MeV), mirror nucleus of 17O (tightly bound by 4.14 MeV). This outcome points out that, in this energy range, the small binding energy of the 17F valence proton has negligible influence onto the reactivity of such a loosely bound projectile, contrary to simple expectations, and to what observed for other loosely bound nuclei. The reaction dynamics seems to be influenced mainly by the Coulomb interaction which is similar for both mirror projectiles.

  19. U.S. Building-Sector Energy Efficiency Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Rich; Borgeson, Sam; Koomey, Jon; Biermayer, Peter

    2008-09-30

    This paper presents an estimate of the potential for energy efficiency improvements in the U.S. building sector by 2030. The analysis uses the Energy Information Administration's AEO 2007 Reference Case as a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario, and applies percentage savings estimates by end use drawn from several prior efficiency potential studies. These prior studies include the U.S. Department of Energy's Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future (CEF) study and a recent study of natural gas savings potential in New York state. For a few end uses for which savings estimates are not readily available, the LBNL study team compiled technical data to estimate savings percentages and costs of conserved energy. The analysis shows that for electricity use in buildings, approximately one-third of the BAU consumption can be saved at a cost of conserved energy of 2.7 cents/kWh (all values in 2007 dollars), while for natural gas approximately the same percentage savings is possible at a cost of between 2.5 and 6.9 $/million Btu. This cost-effective level of savings results in national annual energy bill savings in 2030 of nearly $170 billion. To achieve these savings, the cumulative capital investment needed between 2010 and 2030 is about $440 billion, which translates to a 2-1/2 year simple payback period, or savings over the life of the measures that are nearly 3.5 times larger than the investment required (i.e., a benefit-cost ratio of 3.5).

  20. Electron-impact rotationally elastic total cross sections for H{sub 2}CO and HCOOH over a wide range of incident energy (0.01-2000 eV)

    SciTech Connect

    Vinodkumar, Minaxi; Bhutadia, Harshad; Antony, Bobby; Mason, Nigel

    2011-11-15

    This paper reports computational results of the total cross sections for electron impact on H{sub 2}CO and HCOOH over a wide range of electron impact energies from 0.01 eV to 2 keV. The total cross section is presented as sum of the elastic and electronic excitation cross sections for incident energies. The calculation uses two different methodologies, below the ionization threshold of the target the cross section is calculated using the UK molecular R-matrix code through the Quantemol-N software package while cross sections at higher energies are evaluated using the spherical complex optical potential formalism. The two methods are found to be consistent at the transition energy ({approx}15 eV). The present results are, in general, found to be in good agreement with previous experimental and theoretical results (wherever available) and, thus, the present results can serve as a benchmark for the cross section over a wide range of energy.

  1. Elasticity in crystals under pressure.

    PubMed

    Marcus, P M; Qiu, S L

    2009-03-18

    The elastic behavior and stability of elemental crystals are studied in the neighborhood of a stable equilibrium state, also called a phase, at finite pressure p. It is shown that two kinds of elastic constants are needed to describe elasticity under pressure. One set, designated as c(ij),i,j = 1-6, determines stability or lack of it; another set, designated as c(ij)(p), describes the linear relation between small additional stresses and strains added to the crystal in equilibrium at p. The stress-strain coefficients c(ij)(p) differ from previous formulations of the stress-strain relations by Barron and Klein (1965 Proc. Phys. Soc. 85 523) and Wallace (1972 Thermodynamics of Crystals (New York: Wiley)), who give c(ij) as stress-strain coefficients. Hence we were led to verify the use of the c(ij)(p) using a first-principles numerical calculation example for face centered cubic Al at 1500kbar. The Gibbs free energy G of the crystal under pressure is shown to provide both a simple definition of equilibrium and an efficient way to calculate all the elastic constants of a general crystal. A computer program finds stable phases by making jumps in structure from an arbitrary initial structure; the jumps converge to minima of G with respect to the structure. In the calculation, 21 elastic constants are evaluated from a special set of G values and the 6 6 elastic constant matrix is tested for stability. PMID:21693916

  2. Energy gap in graphene nanoribbons with structured external electric potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, W.; Pal, G.; Schweitzer, L.

    2011-03-01

    The electronic properties of graphene zigzag nanoribbons with electrostatic potentials along the edges are investigated. Using the Dirac-fermion approach, we calculate the energy spectrum of an infinitely long nanoribbon of finite width w, terminated by Dirichlet boundary conditions in the transverse direction. We show that a structured external potential that acts within the edge regions of the ribbon can induce a spectral gap and thus switch the nanoribbon from metallic to insulating behavior. The basic mechanism of this effect is the selective influence of the external potentials on the spinorial wave functions that are topological in nature and localized along the boundary of the graphene nanoribbon. Within this single-particle description, the maximal obtainable energy gap is Emax???vF/w, i.e., ?0.12 eV for w=15 nm. The stability of the spectral gap against edge disorder and the effect of disorder on the two-terminal conductance is studied numerically within a tight-binding lattice model. We find that the energy gap persists as long as the applied external effective potential is larger than ?0.55W, where W is a measure of the disorder strength. We argue that there is a transport gap due to localization effects even in the absence of a spectral gap.

  3. An exploration of the ozone dimer potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Azofra, Luis Miguel; Alkorta, Ibon; Scheiner, Steve

    2014-06-28

    The (O{sub 3}){sub 2} dimer potential energy surface is thoroughly explored at the ab initio CCSD(T) computational level. Five minima are characterized with binding energies between 0.35 and 2.24 kcal/mol. The most stable may be characterized as slipped parallel, with the two O{sub 3} monomers situated in parallel planes. Partitioning of the interaction energy points to dispersion and exchange as the prime contributors to the stability, with varying contributions from electrostatic energy, which is repulsive in one case. Atoms in Molecules analysis of the wavefunction presents specific O?O bonding interactions, whose number is related to the overall stability of each dimer. All internal vibrational frequencies are shifted to the red by dimerization, particularly the antisymmetric stretching mode whose shift is as high as 111 cm{sup ?1}. In addition to the five minima, 11 higher-order stationary points are identified.

  4. Technical Potential of Solar Energy to Address Energy Poverty and Avoid GHG Emissions in Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Cowlin, S. C.; Heimiller, D.; Bilello, D.; Renne, D.

    2008-01-01

    This analysis explores the technical potential of photovoltaics (PV) or concentrating solar power (CSP) to address energy poverty in Africa through a geographic information system (GIS) screening of solar resource data developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

  5. Role of the clean energy potential for energy savings and air pollution control in Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Kaygusuz, K.; Kargi, H.; Kaygusuz, A.

    1996-12-01

    This article begins with a brief review of the technical potential, the regional distribution, and the air pollution effects of all fossil energy sources as well as of all clean and renewable energy sources that could be used in Turkey. Air pollution levels due to fossil fuel consumption are examined. In this context, the role of clean energy sources is indicated.

  6. NVU dynamics. III. Simulating molecules at constant potential energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond S.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2012-12-01

    This is the final paper in a series that introduces geodesic molecular dynamics at constant potential energy. This dynamics is entitled NVU dynamics in analogy to standard energy-conserving Newtonian NVE dynamics. In the first two papers [T. S. Ingebrigtsen, S. Toxvaerd, O. J. Heilmann, T. B. Schrøder, and J. C. Dyre, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 104101 (2011), 10.1063/1.3623585; T. S. Ingebrigtsen, S. Toxvaerd, T. B. Schrøder, and J. C. Dyre, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 104102 (2011), 10.1063/1.3623586], a numerical algorithm for simulating geodesic motion of atomic systems was developed and tested against standard algorithms. The conclusion was that the NVU algorithm has the same desirable properties as the Verlet algorithm for Newtonian NVE dynamics, i.e., it is time-reversible and symplectic. Additionally, it was concluded that NVU dynamics becomes equivalent to NVE dynamics in the thermodynamic limit. In this paper, the NVU algorithm for atomic systems is extended to be able to simulate the geodesic motion of molecules at constant potential energy. We derive an algorithm for simulating rigid bonds and test this algorithm on three different systems: an asymmetric dumbbell model, Lewis-Wahnström o-terphenyl (OTP) and rigid SPC/E water. The rigid bonds introduce additional constraints beyond that of constant potential energy for atomic systems. The rigid-bond NVU algorithm conserves potential energy, bond lengths, and step length for indefinitely long runs. The quantities probed in simulations give results identical to those of Nosé-Hoover NVT dynamics. Since Nosé-Hoover NVT dynamics is known to give results equivalent to those of NVE dynamics, the latter results show that NVU dynamics becomes equivalent to NVE dynamics in the thermodynamic limit also for molecular systems.

  7. Geochemical energy potentially available to organisms in martian hydrothermal systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnes, E. S.; Jakosky, B. M.; McCollom, T. M.

    2001-11-01

    Although a global average of energy available to potentially support life from chemosynthesis on Mars has been estimated, issues of how the energy is distributed and which environments have the greatest potential to support life remain unresolved. We have begun to address these questions by developing numerical geochemical models of martian hydrothermal systems using the software package EQ3/6. In order to model hydrothermal systems, the elemental composition of the initial fluid (the groundwater) and the initial host rock with which it interacts must be defined. The host rock was defined using the composition of LEW 88516, which is similar to the martian mantle. This host rock was reacted at high temperature (350 deg C) with a series of groundwaters. Groundwaters are either pure water in equilibrium with present martian atmosphere or in equilibrium with Pathfinder-composition soils and the atmosphere. The hot fluid resulting from the rock/groundwater reaction was then reacted with increments of fresh groundwater, simulating the mixing that occurs in hydrothermal systems. During mixing, oxidation and reduction reactions are kinetically inhibited; organisms may exploit this inhibition to derive metabolic energy. The maximum amount of energy an organism can obtain from a given reaction is determined from the Gibbs free energy of that reaction. For each model run, we have calculated the Gibbs free energy of reactions that are important for terrestrial chemosynthetic organisms and likely representative for putative martians. Our results indicate that substantial amounts of energy may be derived from these reactions, but they depend sensitively on the oxidation state of the groundwater and whether saturated species precipitate to equilibrium. Thus, it is unknown whether sufficient energy is available to support martian life, although it is likely that suitable environments exist.

  8. Evaluation of global onshore wind energy potential and generation costs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J; Clarke, Leon

    2012-07-17

    In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance, land suitability factors, cost assumptions, and explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of the world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region and with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global economic wind potential under central assumptions, that is, intermediate between optimistic and pessimistic, is estimated to be approximately 119.5 petawatt hours per year (13.6 TW) at less than 9 cents/kWh. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly wind speed (varying by -70% to +450% at less than 9 cents/kWh), land suitability (by -55% to +25%), turbine density (by -60% to +80%), and cost and financing options (by -20% to +200%), many of which have important policy implications. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power. PMID:22715929

  9. Residential energy efficiency: Progress since 1973 and future potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Arthur H.

    1985-11-01

    Today's 85 million U.S. homes use 100 billion of fuel and electricity (1150/home). If their energy intensity (resource energy/ft2) were still frozen at 1973 levels, they would use 18% more. With well-insulated houses, need for space heat is vanishing. Superinsulated Saskatchewan homes spend annually only 270 for space heat, 150 for water heat, and 400 for appliances, yet they cost only 20001000 more than conventional new homes. The concept of Cost of Conserved Energy (CCE) is used to rank conservation technologies for existing and new homes and appliances, and to develop supply curves of conserved energy and a least cost scenario. Calculations are calibrated with the BECA and other data bases. By limiting investments in efficiency to those whose CCE is less than current fuel and electricity prices, the potential residential plus commercial energy use in 2000 AD drops to half of that estimated by DOE, and the number of power plants needed drops by 200. For the whole buildings sector, potential savings by 2000 are 8 Mbod (worth 50B/year), at an average CCE of 10/barrel.

  10. Flapping states of an elastically anchored plate in a uniform flow with applications to energy harvesting by fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchini, A.; Mazzino, A.; Guerrero, J.; Festa, R.; Boragno, C.

    2013-09-01

    Linear stability analysis of an elastically anchored flat plate in a uniform flow is investigated both analytically and numerically. The analytical formulation explicitly takes into account the effect of the wake on the plate by means of Theodorsen's theory. Three different parameters non-trivially rule the observed dynamics: mass density ratio between plate and fluid, spring elastic constant, and distance between the plate center of mass and the spring anchor point on the plate. We found relationships between these parameters which rule the transition between stable equilibrium and fluttering. The shape of the resulting marginal curve has been successfully verified by high Reynolds number numerical simulations. Finally, the limiting case corresponding to a simply supported rigid rod is also analyzed and the resulting flapping instability traced back to a simple resonance condition. Our findings are of interest in applications related to energy harvesting by fluid-structure interaction, a problem that has recently attracted a great deal of attention. The main aim in that context is to identify the optimal physical/geometrical system configuration leading to large sustained motion, which is the source of energy one aims to extract.

  11. Quintom dark energy models with nearly flat potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Setare, M. R.; Saridakis, E. N.

    2009-02-15

    We examine quintom dark energy models, produced by the combined consideration of a canonical and a phantom field, with nearly flat potentials and dark energy equation-of-state parameter w{sub DE} close to -1. We find that all such models converge to a single expression for w{sub DE}(z), depending only on the initial field values and their derivatives. We show that this quintom paradigm allows for a description of the transition through -1 in the near cosmological past. In addition, we provide the necessary conditions for the determination of the direction of the -1 crossing.

  12. Parallel unconstrained minimization of potential energy in LAMMPS

    SciTech Connect

    Plantenga, T.

    1997-10-13

    This report describes a new minimization capability added to LAMMPS V4.0. Minimization of potential energy is used to find molecular conformations that are close to structures found in nature. The new minimization algorithm uses LAMMPS subroutines for calculating energy and force vectors, and follows the LAMMPS partitioning scheme for distributing large data objects on multiprocessor machines. Since gradient-based algorithms cannot tolerate nonsmoothness, a new Coulomb style that smoothly cuts off to zero at a finite distance is provided. This report explains the minimization algorithm and its parallel implementation within LAMMPS. Guidelines are given for invoking the algorithm and interpreting results.

  13. No strings attached potential vs. interaction energy in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, T.

    1996-10-20

    In infrared-stable fixed-point field theories, the interaction energy of a test particle is proportional to the non-relativistic (heavy source) coordinate-space potential derived from the field strength produced by that source. This is no longer true in ultraviolet-stable fixed-point field theories (UVSFPFT) as they may not have a finite infrared fixed point. This leads to the possibility that UVSFPFTs may have quite conventional field strength distributions despite the unusual spatial dependence expected for the interaction energy.

  14. Bifurcations on Potential Energy Surfaces of Organic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Ess, Daniel H.; Wheeler, Steven E.; Iafe, Robert G.; Xu, Lai; Çelebi-Ölçüm, Nihan; Houk, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    A single transition state may lead to multiple intermediates or products if there is a post-transition state reaction path bifurcation. These bifurcations arise when there are sequential transition states with no intervening energy minimum. For such systems, the shape of the potential energy surface and dynamic effects control selectivity rather than transition state energetics. This minireview covers recent investigations of organic reactions exhibiting reaction pathway bifurcations. Such phenomena are surprisingly general and affect experimental observables such as kinetic isotope effects and product distributions. PMID:18767086

  15. Threshold anomaly in the elastic scattering of {sup 6}He on {sup 209}Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, A. R.; Padron, I.; Lubian, J.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lacerda, T.; Garcia, V. N.

    2007-12-15

    The energy dependence of the optical potential for the elastic scattering of {sup 6}He on {sup 209}Bi at near and subbarrier energies is studied. Elastic angular distributions and the reaction cross section were simultaneously fitted by performing some modifications in the ECIS code. A phenomenological optical model potential with the Woods-Saxon form was used. There are signatures that the so-called breakup threshold anomaly (BTA) is present in this system having a halo projectile {sup 6}He, as it had been found earlier for systems involving stable weakly bound nuclei.

  16. The Potential For Energy Efficiency In The State of Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, SW

    2001-12-05

    The purpose of this study was to do an initial estimate of the potential for energy savings in the state of Iowa. Several methods for determining savings were examined, including existing programs, surveys, savings calculators, and economic simulation. Each method has advantages and disadvantages, trading off between detail of information, accuracy of results, and scope. This paper concentrated on using economic simulation (the NEMS model (EIA 2000a)) to determine market potential for energy savings for the residential and commercial sectors. The results of surveys were used to calculate the economic potential for savings in the industrial sector. The NEMS model is used by the Energy Information Administration to calculate twenty-year projections of energy use for every region of the country. The results of the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 were used as the Base case (EIA 1999a). Two alternative cases were created to simulate energy savings policies. Voluntary, market-related programs were simulated by lowering the effective discount rates that end-users use when making decisions on equipment purchases. Standards programs in the residential sector were simulated by eliminating the availability of low efficiency equipment in future years. The parameters for these programs were based on the Moderate scenario from the DOE Clean Energy Futures study (Interlaboratory Working Group 2000), which assumed increased concern by society on energy efficiency but not to the point of fiscal policies such as taxes or direct subsidies. The study only considered a subset of the various programs, policies, and technologies that could reduce energy use. The major end-uses in the residential sector affected by the policies were space cooling (20% savings by 2020) and water heating (14% savings by 2020.) Figure S-1 shows the space cooling savings when voluntary programs and minimum efficiency standards were implemented. Refrigerators, freezers, and clothes dryers saw slight improvements. The study did not involve changes to the building shell (e.g., increased insulation) or residential lighting improvements. Nevertheless, the residential sector's market potential for electrical energy savings was calculated to be 5.3% of expected electrical use, representing 850 GWh by 2020. Natural gas savings could be 2.4% of expected gas use, representing 2.1 trillion Btus. Using expected prices for energy in that year, these represent savings of $47 million and $12 million per year. In the commercial sector, the study only considered voluntary market-based policies for some of the technologies. The most notable savings were in ventilation (12% savings by 2020), lighting (12% savings), refrigeration (7% savings), water heating (6% savings), and space heating (5% savings by 2020). The commercial sector's market potential for electrical energy savings based on the programs modeled was calculated to be 5.1% of its total expected electrical use, representing 605 GWh of power by 2020. Natural gas savings were 2.3 trillion Btu, 3.7% of use. Using the same prices as the residential sector (5.5{cents}/kWh and $5.74/MBtu), the savings represent $33 million and $13 million per year, respectively.

  17. Energy dependence of the optical potential of weakly and tightly bound nuclei as projectiles on a medium-mass target

    SciTech Connect

    Figueira, J. M.; Arazi, A.; Carnelli, P.; Heimann, D. Martinez; Negri, A. E.; Pacheco, A. J.; Niello, J. O. Fernandez; Capurro, O. A.; Fimiani, L.; Marti, G. V.; Lubian, J.; Monteiro, D. S.; Gomes, P. R. S.

    2010-02-15

    Angular distributions for the elastic scattering of the weakly bound {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 144}Sm systems were measured with high accuracy at bombarding energies from 85% up to 170% of the Coulomb barrier. An optical model analysis was performed, and the relevant parameters of the real and imaginary parts of the optical potential were extracted. The results are compared with those previously published for the tightly bound {sup 12}C+{sup 144}Sm and {sup 16}O+{sup 144}Sm systems. The usual threshold anomaly observed in the behavior of the potential of tightly bound systems was not observed for either weakly bound system. This absence is attributed to the repulsion due to breakup coupling which cancels the attraction arising from couplings with bound channels.

  18. MCSCF potential energy surface for photodissociation of formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, R. L.; Morokuma, K.

    1976-01-01

    The ground state potential energy surface for the dissociation of formaldehyde (H2CO to H2 and CO) is calculated with the ab initio MCSCF method with an extended (4-31G) basis set. The location, barrier height, and force constants of the transition state are determined, and the normal coordinate analysis is carried out. The calculated barrier height is 4.5 eV. Based on the calculated quantities, the detailed mechanism of the photochemical dissociation is discussed.

  19. Electronic structure, molecular bonding and potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ruedenberg, K.

    1993-12-01

    By virtue of the universal validity of the generalized Born-Oppenheimer separation, potential energy surfaces (PES`) represent the central conceptual as well as quantitative entities of chemical physics and provide the basis for the understanding of most physicochemical phenomena in many diverse fields. The research in this group deals with the elucidation of general properties of PES` as well as with the quantitative determination of PES` for concrete systems, in particular pertaining to reactions involving carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen molecules.

  20. The potential impact of hydrogen energy use on the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ruijven, B. J.; Lamarque, J. F.; van Vuuren, D. P.; Kram, T.; Eerens, H.

    2009-04-01

    Energy models show very different trajectories for future energy systems (partly as function of future climate policy). One possible option is a transition towards a hydrogen-based energy system. The potential impact of such hydrogen economy on atmospheric emissions is highly uncertain. On the one hand, application of hydrogen in clean fuel cells reduces emissions of local air pollutants, like SOx and NOx. On the other hand, emissions of hydrogen from system leakages are expected to change the atmospheric concentrations and behaviour (see also Price et al., 2007; Sanderson et al., 2003; Schultz et al., 2003; Tromp et al., 2003). The uncertainty arises from several sources: the expected use of hydrogen, the intensity of leakages and emissions, and the atmospheric chemical behaviour of hydrogen. Existing studies to the potential impacts of a hydrogen economy on the atmosphere mostly use hydrogen emission scenarios that are based on simple assumptions. This research combines two different modelling efforts to explore the range of impacts of hydrogen on atmospheric chemistry. First, the potential role of hydrogen in the global energy system and the related emissions of hydrogen and other air pollutants are derived from the global energy system simulation model TIMER (van Vuuren, 2007). A set of dedicated scenarios on hydrogen technology development explores the most pessimistic and optimistic cases for hydrogen deployment (van Ruijven et al., 2008; van Ruijven et al., 2007). These scenarios are combined with different assumptions on hydrogen emission factors. Second, the emissions from the TIMER model are linked to the NCAR atmospheric model (Lamarque et al., 2005; Lamarque et al., 2008), in order to determine the impacts on atmospheric chemistry. By combining an energy system model and an atmospheric model, we are able to consistently explore the boundaries of both hydrogen use, emissions and impacts on atmospheric chemistry. References: Lamarque, J.-F., Kiehl, J. T., Hess, P. G., Collins, W. D., Emmons, L. K., Ginoux, P., Luo, C. and Tie, X. X. (2005). "Response of a coupled chemistry-climate model to changes in aerosol emissions: Global impact on the hydrological cycle and the tropospheric burdens of OH, ozone and NOx." Geophysical Research Letters 32(16). Lamarque, J.-F., Kinnison, D. E., Hess, P. G. and Vitt, F. (2008). "Simulated lower stratospheric trends between 1970 and 2005: identifying the role of climate and composition changes." Journal of Geophysical Research 113(D12301). Price, H., Jaegle, L., Rice, A., Quay, P., Novelli, P. C. and Gammon, R. (2007). "Global budget of molecular hydrogen and its deuterium content: constraints from ground station, cruise, and aircraft observations." Journal of Geophysical Research 112(D22108). Sanderson, M. G., Collins, W. J., Derwent, R. G. and Johnson, C. E. (2003). "Simulation of Global Hydrogen Levels Using a Lagrangian Three-Dimensional Model." Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry 46(1): 15-28. Schultz, M. G., Diehl, T., Brasseur, G. P. and Zittel, W. (2003). "Air Pollution and Climate-Forcing Impacts of a Global Hydrogen Economy." Science 302(5645): 624-627. Tromp, T. K., Shia, R. L., Allen, M., Eiler, J. M. and Yung, Y. L. (2003). "Potential environmental impact of a hydrogen economy on the stratosphere." Science 300(5626): 1740-1742. van Ruijven, B., Hari, L., van Vuuren, D. P. and de Vries, B. (2008). "The potential role of hydrogen in India and Western Europe." Energy Policy 36(5): 1649-1665. van Ruijven, B., van Vuuren, D. P. and de Vries, B. (2007). "The potential role of hydrogen in energy systems with and without climate policy." International Journal of Hydrogen Energy 32(12): 1655-1672. van Vuuren, D. P. (2007). Energy systems and climate policy. Dept. of Science, Technology and Society, Faculty of Science. Utrecht, Utrecht University: 326.

  1. Foundations of modeling in cryobiology-I: concentration, Gibbs energy, and chemical potential relationships.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Daniel M; Benson, James D; Kearsley, Anthony J

    2014-12-01

    Mathematical modeling plays an enormously important role in understanding the behavior of cells, tissues, and organs undergoing cryopreservation. Uses of these models range from explanation of phenomena, exploration of potential theories of damage or success, development of equipment, and refinement of optimal cryopreservation/cryoablation strategies. Over the last half century there has been a considerable amount of work in bio-heat and mass-transport, and these models and theories have been readily and repeatedly applied to cryobiology with much success. However, there are significant gaps between experimental and theoretical results that suggest missing links in models. One source for these potential gaps is that cryobiology is at the intersection of several very challenging aspects of transport theory: it couples multi-component, moving boundary, multiphase solutions that interact through a semipermeable elastic membrane with multicomponent solutions in a second time-varying domain, during a two-hundred Kelvin temperature change with multi-molar concentration gradients and multi-atmosphere pressure changes. In order to better identify potential sources of error, and to point to future directions in modeling and experimental research, we present a three part series to build from first principles a theory of coupled heat and mass transport in cryobiological systems accounting for all of these effects. The hope of this series is that by presenting and justifying all steps, conclusions may be made about the importance of key assumptions, perhaps pointing to areas of future research or model development, but importantly, lending weight to standard simplification arguments that are often made in heat and mass transport. In this first part, we review concentration variable relationships, their impact on choices for Gibbs energy models, and their impact on chemical potentials. PMID:25240602

  2. Elastic and hierarchical porous carbon nanofibrous membranes incorporated with NiFe2O4 nanocrystals for highly efficient capacitive energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jianlong; Fan, Gang; Si, Yang; He, Jianxin; Kim, Hak-Yong; Ding, Bin; Al-Deyab, Salem S.; El-Newehy, Mohamed; Yu, Jianyong

    2016-01-01

    Flexible membranes created from porous carbon nanofibers (CNFs) hold great promise in the next generation wearable energy storage devices, but challenges still remain due to the poor mechanical properties of porous carbon nanofibers. Here, we report a facile strategy to fabricate elastic and hierarchical porous CNF membranes with NiFe2O4 nanocrystals embedded via multicomponent electrospinning and nano-doping methods. Benefiting from the scattering effect of NiFe2O4 nanocrystals and graphitized carbon layers for the condensed stress, the resultant CNF membranes exhibit an enhanced elasticity with a bending radius <12 μm, rapid recovery from the deformations, and a superior softness. Quantitative pore size distribution and fractal analysis reveal that the CNFs possessed tunable porous structures with a high surface area of 493 m2 g-1 and a pore volume of 0.31 cm3 g-1. Benefiting from the robust mechanical stability, hierarchical porous structures and good electrochemical properties, the NiFe2O4 doped CNF membranes demonstrate a high electrical capacitance of 343 F g-1, and good reversibility with a cycling efficiency of 97.4% even after 10 000 cycles. The successful synthesis of elastic porous CNF membranes also provided a versatile platform for the design and development of functional CNF based materials for various applications.Flexible membranes created from porous carbon nanofibers (CNFs) hold great promise in the next generation wearable energy storage devices, but challenges still remain due to the poor mechanical properties of porous carbon nanofibers. Here, we report a facile strategy to fabricate elastic and hierarchical porous CNF membranes with NiFe2O4 nanocrystals embedded via multicomponent electrospinning and nano-doping methods. Benefiting from the scattering effect of NiFe2O4 nanocrystals and graphitized carbon layers for the condensed stress, the resultant CNF membranes exhibit an enhanced elasticity with a bending radius <12 μm, rapid recovery from the deformations, and a superior softness. Quantitative pore size distribution and fractal analysis reveal that the CNFs possessed tunable porous structures with a high surface area of 493 m2 g-1 and a pore volume of 0.31 cm3 g-1. Benefiting from the robust mechanical stability, hierarchical porous structures and good electrochemical properties, the NiFe2O4 doped CNF membranes demonstrate a high electrical capacitance of 343 F g-1, and good reversibility with a cycling efficiency of 97.4% even after 10 000 cycles. The successful synthesis of elastic porous CNF membranes also provided a versatile platform for the design and development of functional CNF based materials for various applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Tables of solution properties and porous structures, figures showing mechanical properties and nanostructures, and movie S1. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07368e

  3. Derivation of gravity wave potential energy density from NDMC measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wüst, Sabine; Wendt, Verena; Schmidt, Carsten; Lichtenstern, Sabrina; Bittner, Michael; Yee, Jeng-Hwa; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Russell, James M., III

    2016-02-01

    Within the Network for the Detection of Mesospheric Change, NDMC, We present an algorithm for the estimation of potential energy density using measurements of five GRIPS instruments from 2011 to 2014 at three stations in central and one in Northern Europe. Nightly temperature variations are retrieved for periods shorter and longer than ca. 60 min applying an iterative approach of sliding means. Based on these results, monthly mean potential energy density is estimated for the short and the long periods. The Brunt-Väisälä frequency, which is necessary for its calculation, is taken from TIMED-SABER and CIRA-86 data. In order to justify the combination of TIMED-SABER and GRIPS data sets, temperature time series at the different stations are compared. Depending on the periods, an annual and/or semi-annual variation of potential energy density can be observed in most cases which agree quite well with other publications addressing the mesopause at mid-latitudes but relying on different techniques. The influence of the vertical extension of the OH*-layer and of the size of the field-of-view on the results is discussed. Finally, we show for the first time that GRIPS measurements, which take place at the same station but which are characterized through differing sizes of the fields of view, can provide additional information about the dominating horizontal wavelengths at mesopause heights.

  4. Nuclear momentum distribution and potential energy surface in hexagonal ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lin; Morrone, Joseph; Car, Roberto; Parrinello, Michele

    2011-03-01

    The proton momentum distribution in ice Ih has been recently measured by deep inelastic neutron scattering and calculated from open path integral Car-Parrinello simulation. Here we report a detailed investigation of the relation between momentum distribution and potential energy surface based on both experiment and simulation results. The potential experienced by the proton is largely harmonic and characterized by 3 principal frequencies, which can be associated to weighted averages of phonon frequencies via lattice dynamics calculations. This approach also allows us to examine the importance of quantum effects on the dynamics of the oxygen nuclei close to the melting temperature. Finally we quantify the anharmonicity that is present in the potential acting on the protons. This work is supported by NSF and by DOE.

  5. Simultaneous analysis of the elastic scattering and breakup channel for the reaction 11Li+208Pb at energies near the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernndez-Garca, J. P.; Cubero, M.; Acosta, L.; Alcorta, M.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Borge, M. J. G.; Buchmann, L.; Diget, C. A.; Falou, H. A.; Fulton, B.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Galaviz, D.; Gmez-Camacho, J.; Kanungo, R.; Lay, J. A.; Madurga, M.; Martel, I.; Moro, A. M.; Mukha, I.; Nilsson, T.; Rodrguez-Gallardo, M.; Snchez-Bentez, A. M.; Shotter, A.; Tengblad, O.; Walden, P.

    2015-10-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the elastic scattering and breakup channel for the reaction of 11Li on 208Pb at incident laboratory energies of 24.3 and 29.8 MeV, measured at the radioactive ion beam facility of TRIUMF, in Vancouver, Canada. A large yield of 9Li fragments was detected by four charged particle telescopes in a wide angular range. The experimental angular and energy distributions of these 9Li fragments have been compared to coupled-reaction-channel and continuum-discretized coupled-channel calculations. The large production of 9Li fragments at small angles can be explained by considering a direct breakup mechanism, while at medium-large angles a competition between direct breakup and neutron transfer to the continuum of the 208Pb target was observed.

  6. Landscape of finite-temperature equilibrium behaviour of curvature-inducing proteins on a bilayer membrane explored using a linearized elastic free energy model

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Neeraj J.; Weinstein, Joshua; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    Using a recently developed multiscale simulation methodology, we describe the equilibrium behaviour of bilayer membranes under the influence of curvature-inducing proteins using a linearized elastic free energy model. In particular, we describe how the cooperativity associated with a multitude of proteinmembrane interactions and protein diffusion on a membrane-mediated energy landscape elicits emergent behaviour in the membrane phase. Based on our model simulations, we predict that, depending on the density of membrane-bound proteins and the degree to which a single protein molecule can induce intrinsic mean curvature in the membrane, a range of membrane phase behaviour can be observed including two different modes of vesicle-bud nucleation and repressed membrane undulations. A state diagram as a function of experimentally tunable parameters to classify the underlying states is proposed. PMID:21243078

  7. Data Network Equipment Energy Use and Savings Potential in Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzisera, Steven; Nordman, Bruce; Brown, Richard E.

    2010-06-09

    Network connectivity has become nearly ubiquitous, and the energy use of the equipment required for this connectivity is growing. Network equipment consists of devices that primarily switch and route Internet Protocol (IP) packets from a source to a destination, and this category specifically excludes edge devices like PCs, servers and other sources and sinks of IP traffic. This paper presents the results of a study of network equipment energy use and includes case studies of networks in a campus, a medium commercial building, and a typical home. The total energy use of network equipment is the product of the stock of equipment in use, the power of each device, and their usage patterns. This information was gathered from market research reports, broadband market penetration studies, field metering, and interviews with network administrators and service providers. We estimate that network equipment in the USA used 18 TWh, or about 1percent of building electricity, in 2008 and that consumption is expected to grow at roughly 6percent per year to 23 TWh in 2012; world usage in 2008 was 51 TWh. This study shows that office building network switches and residential equipment are the two largest categories of energy use consuming 40percent and 30percent of the total respectively. We estimate potential energy savings for different scenarios using forecasts of equipment stock and energy use, and savings estimates range from 20percent to 50percent based on full market penetration of efficient technologies.

  8. Potential system efficiencies for MEMS vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, S.

    2007-01-01

    Reliable power sources are needed for portable micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) devices such as wireless automobile tire pressure sensors. Vibration is an ubiquitous energy source that maybe 'harvested' as electrical energy at the site of the MEMS device. Existing vibration energy harvesting systems use either a piezoelectric or an electromagnetic transducer to convert vibrations into electrical energy. This electrical energy is then conditioned using a passive rectifier dc-dc converter circuit. Such vibration harvesting techniques have focused on optimising circuit efficiency and, hence, have ignored the system efficiency i.e. mechanical-to-electrical efficiency. Results obtained in the laboratory can be extrapolated to predict potential system efficiencies for MEMS vibration energy harvesting systems. Results to date, using a standard speaker as the electromagnetic transducer, have demonstrated system efficiencies of greater than 14%. Initial estimates suggest a MEMS system efficiency of more than 80% could be achieved with a high performance transducer. Research is continuing to demonstrate these higher system efficiencies with the experimental apparatus.

  9. Mashreq Arab interconnected power system potential for economic energy trading

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shehri, A.M.; El-Amin, I.M.; Opoku, G.; Al-Baiyat, S.A.; Zedan, F.M.

    1994-12-01

    The Mashreq Arab countries covered in this study are Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, the United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. A feasibility study for the interconnection of the electrical networks of the Mashreq Arab countries, sponsored by the Arab Fund, was completed in June 1992. Each country is served by one utility except Saudi Arabia, which is served by four major utilities and some smaller utilities serving remote towns and small load centers. The major utilities are the Saudi consolidated electric Company in the Eastern Province (SCECO East), SCECO Center, SCECO West, and SCECO South. These are the ones considered in this study. The Mashreq Arab region has a considerable mix of energy resources. Egypt and Syria have some limited amounts of hydropower resources, and the Arabian Gulf region is abundant in fossil fuel reserves. Owing to the differences in energy production costs, a potential exists for substantial energy trading between electric utilities in the region. The major objective of this project is to study the feasibility of electric energy trading between the Mashreq Arab countries. The basis, assumptions, and methodologies on which this energy trading study is based relate to the results and conclusions arising out of the previous study, power plant characteristics and costs, assumptions on economic parameters, rules for economy energy exchange, etc. This paper presents the basis, methodology, and major findings of the study.

  10. Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Generation Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

    2012-06-20

    In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance and cost assumptions as well as explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region as well as with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global wind potential under central assumptions is estimated to be approximately 89 petawatt hours per year at less than 9 cents/kWh with substantial regional variations. One limitation of global wind analyses is that the resolution of current global wind speed reanalysis data can result in an underestimate of high wind areas. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly those related to land suitability and turbine density as well as cost and financing assumptions which have important policy implications. Transmission cost has a relatively small impact on total wind costs, changing the potential at a given cost by 20-30%. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

  11. Potential energy surface of triplet N2O2.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zoltan; Meana-Paeda, Rubn; Song, Guoliang; Paukku, Yuliya; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-01-14

    We present a global ground-state triplet potential energy surface for the N2O2 system that is suitable for treating high-energy vibrational-rotational energy transfer and collision-induced dissociation. The surface is based on multi-state complete-active-space second-order perturbation theory/minimally augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence triple-zeta electronic structure calculations plus dynamically scaled external correlation. In the multireference calculations, the active space has 14 electrons in 12 orbitals. The calculations cover nine arrangements corresponding to dissociative diatom-diatom collisions of N2, O2, and nitric oxide (NO), the interaction of a triatomic molecule (N2O and NO2) with the fourth atom, and the interaction of a diatomic molecule with a single atom (i.e., the triatomic subsystems). The global ground-state potential energy surface was obtained by fitting the many-body interaction to 54?889 electronic structure data points with a fitting function that is a permutationally invariant polynomial in terms of bond-order functions of the six interatomic distances. PMID:26772574

  12. Potential energy surface of triplet N2O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Zoltan; Meana-Pañeda, Rubén; Song, Guoliang; Paukku, Yuliya; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2016-01-01

    We present a global ground-state triplet potential energy surface for the N2O2 system that is suitable for treating high-energy vibrational-rotational energy transfer and collision-induced dissociation. The surface is based on multi-state complete-active-space second-order perturbation theory/minimally augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence triple-zeta electronic structure calculations plus dynamically scaled external correlation. In the multireference calculations, the active space has 14 electrons in 12 orbitals. The calculations cover nine arrangements corresponding to dissociative diatom-diatom collisions of N2, O2, and nitric oxide (NO), the interaction of a triatomic molecule (N2O and NO2) with the fourth atom, and the interaction of a diatomic molecule with a single atom (i.e., the triatomic subsystems). The global ground-state potential energy surface was obtained by fitting the many-body interaction to 54 889 electronic structure data points with a fitting function that is a permutationally invariant polynomial in terms of bond-order functions of the six interatomic distances.

  13. Market potential for optical fiber sensors in the energy sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosselmann, T.

    2007-07-01

    For a long time electric power was taken as a natural unlimited resource. With globalisation the demand for energy has risen. This has brought rising prices for fossil fuels, as well as a diversification of power generation. Besides conventional fossil, nuclear plants are coming up again. Renewable energy sources are gaining importance resulting in recent boom of wind energy plants. In the past reliability and availability and an extremely long lifetime were of paramount importance. Today this has been added by cost, due to the global competition and the high fuel costs. New designs of power components have increased efficiency using lesser material. Higher efficiency causes inevitably higher stress on the materials, of which the machines are built. As a reduction of lifetime is not acceptable and maintenance costs are expected to be at a minimum, condition monitoring systems are going to being used now. This offers potentials for fibre optic sensor application.

  14. Characterization of the potential energy landscape of an antiplasticized polymer.

    PubMed

    Riggleman, Robert A; Douglas, Jack F; de Pablo, Juan J

    2007-07-01

    The nature of the individual transitions on the potential energy landscape (PEL) associated with particle motion are directly examined for model fragile glass-forming polymer melts, and the results are compared to those of an antiplasticized polymer system. In previous work, we established that the addition of antiplasticizer reduces the fragility of glass formation so that the antiplasticized material is a stronger glass former. In the present work, we find that the antiplasticizing molecules reduce the energy barriers for relaxation compared to the pure polymer, implying that the antiplasticized system has smaller barriers to overcome in order to explore its configuration space. We examine the cooperativity of segmental motion in these bulk fluids and find that more extensive stringlike collective motion enables the system to overcome larger potential energy barriers, in qualitative agreement with both the Stillinger-Weber and Adam-Gibbs views of glass formation. Notably, the stringlike collective motion identified by our PEL analysis corresponds to incremental displacements that occur within larger-scale stringlike particle displacement processes associated with PEL metabasin transitions that mediate structural relaxation. These "substrings" nonetheless seem to exhibit changes in relative size with antiplasticization similar to those observed in "superstrings" that arise at elevated temperatures. We also study the effects of confinement on the energy barriers in each system. Film confinement makes the energy barriers substantially smaller in the pure polymer, while it has little effect on the energy barriers in the antiplasticized system. This observation is qualitatively consistent with our previous studies of stringlike motion in these fluids at higher temperatures and with recent experimental measurements by Torkelson and co-workers. PMID:17677447

  15. Onshore wind energy potential over Iberia: present and future projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochinha, Carlos A.; Santos, João A.; Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2014-05-01

    Onshore grid-connected wind power generation has been explored for more than three decades in the Iberian Peninsula. Further, increasing attention has been devoted to renewable energy sources in a climate change context. While advantages of wind energy are widely recognized, its distribution is not spatially homogeneous and not uniform throughout the year. Hence, understanding these spatial-temporal distributions is critical in power system planning. The present study aims at assessing the potential power output estimated from 10 m wind components simulated by a regional climate model (CCLM), driven by ERA40 reanalysis. Datasets are available on a grid with a high spatial resolution (approximately 20 km) and over a 40-yr period (1961-2000). Furthermore, several target sites, located in areas with high installed wind generation capacity, are selected for local-to-regional scale assessments. The results show that potential wind power is higher over northern Iberia, mostly in Cantabria and Galicia, while Andalucía and Cataluña record the lowest values. With respect to the intra-annual variability, summer is by far the season with the lowest potential energy outputs. Furthermore, the inter-annual variability reveals an overall downward long-term trend over the 40-yr period, particularly in the winter time series. A CCLM transient experiment, forced by the SRES A1B emission scenario, is also discussed for a future period (2041-2070), after a model validation/calibration process (bias corrections). Significant changes in the wind power potential are projected for the future throughout Iberia, but their magnitude largely depends on the locations. This work was partially supported by FEDER (Fundo Europeu de Desenvolvimento Regional) funds through the COMPETE (Programa Operacional Factores de Competitividade) and by national funds through FCT (Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, Portugal) under project STORMEx FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER- 019524 (PTDC/AAC-CLI/121339/2010).

  16. Advanced Elastic/Inelastic Nuclear Data Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, Frank; Chowdhury, Partha; Greife, Uwe; Fisher Hicks, Sally; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Rahn Vanhoy, Jeffrey; Hill, Tony; Kawano, Toshihiko; Slaughter, David

    2015-06-08

    The optical model is used to analyze the elastic and inelastic scattering of nucleons, deuterons, hellions, tritons, and alpha particles by the nuclei. Since this paper covers primarily neutron-nucleus scattering, the focus will be limited to only that interaction. For the sake of this model, the nucleus is described as a blob of nuclear matter with properties based upon its number of nucleons. This infers that a single potential can describe the interaction of particles with different energies with different nuclei.

  17. Elastic scattering of electrons and positrons by atomic magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail Hossain, M.; Haque, A. K. F.; Atiqur, M.; Patoary, R.; Uddin, M. A.; Basak, A. K.

    2016-02-01

    The elastic, differential and integrated, and total cross sections for the scattering of electrons and positrons by magnesium atom have been calculated. These calculations are done within the framework of complex electron/positron-atom optical potential and relativistic Dirac partial wave analysis at the impact energies 0.1-1000 eV for both the projectiles. The present results are compared with available experimental data and some other theoretical calculations.

  18. GIS Assessment of Wind Energy Potential in California and Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, R. K.; Snow, M. M.

    2008-05-01

    Energy efficiency coupled with renewable energy technologies can provide most of the U.S. carbon emissions reductions needed to contain atmospheric carbon concentrations at 450-500 parts per million, considered by many to be a tipping point in mitigating climate change. Among the leaders in the alternative energy sector is wind power, which is now one of the largest sources of new power generation in the U.S. creating jobs and revenue for rural communities while powering our economy with an emissions-free source of energy. In 2006, wind turbines capable of generating more than 2,400 megawatts of electricity were installed in the U.S. and by 2007 this number had risen to 3,000 megawatts. The U.S. generated 31 billion kilowatt-hours of wind power in 2007, which is enough electricity to power the equivalent of nearly 3 million average homes. It is estimated that generating the same amount of electricity would require burning 16 million tons of coal or 50 million barrels of oil. This study examines the wind power potential of sites near populated areas in Florida and California to determine the practicability of installing wind turbines at these locations. A GIS was developed in order to conduct a spatial analysis of these sites based on mean annual wind speed measured in meters per second and wind power density ratings measured in watts per square meter. The analysis indicates that coastal areas of Cocoa Beach, Key West, Hollywood, and West Palm Beach, respectively, possess the greatest potential for wind energy in Florida with mean annual wind speeds of 4.9 m/s and average wind power density ratings of 171 w/m2 peaking at Cocoa Beach followed by wind speeds of 4.64 m/s and wind power ratings of 115 w/m2 at Key West. California wind energy potential is even greater than that of Florida with Fairfield exhibiting mean annual wind speeds of 5.9 m/s and average wind power density ratings of 327 w/m2 followed by the Mojave and Palmdale areas with mean annual wind speeds of 5.0 m/s and 4.6 m/s, respectively. Wind power density ratings for Mojave are 240 w/m2 and 153 w/m2 at Palmdale. These results help confirm that wind energy continues to offer a clean, cost-effective, inexhaustible, and readily available means of helping to curb global warming while answering the increasing demand for electricity.

  19. DNA kinks and bubbles: Temperature dependence of the elastic energy of sharply bent 10-nm-size DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Daniel S.; Qu, Hao; Bulla, Delenda; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2013-02-01

    A 10-nm-long DNA molecule can bend through large angles reversibly. Past the linear regime, its equilibrium nonlinear bending elasticity is governed by a critical bending torque ?c?30pNnm at which the molecule develops a kink. This nonlinearity has long been attributed to the nucleation of a bubble or melted region in the molecule. Here we measure the temperature dependence of the critical bending torque for nicked DNA, and determine that the entropy associated with the kink in the nonlinear regime is negligible. Thus in the case of nicked DNA the kink is not a bubble, but a compact region deformed beyond a yield strain. We further argue that, with our boundary conditions, the same is likely true for intact DNA. The present measurements confirm that the critical bending torque ?c is a materials parameter of DNA mechanics analogous to the bending modulus B?200pNnm.

  20. Electron-H Elastic Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    Precision calculations for e^{-}-H and e^{-}-He^{+} for S-wave scattering in the elastic region have been carried out using the optical potential approach. This formalism is now extended to e^{-}-H P-wave scattering in the elastic region. The scattering equations are solved by the non-iterative method. Phase shifts are calculated using Hylleraas-type correlation functions up to 84 terms. Results are rigorous lower bounds to the exact phase shifts and they are compared to those obtained in previous calculations.

  1. Proton-proton elastic scattering at the LHC energy of \\chem{\\sqrt{s} = 7\\,TeV}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TOTEM Collaboration; Antchev, G.; Aspell, P.; Atanassov, I.; Avati, V.; Baechler, J.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bozzo, M.; Brücken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F. S.; Calicchio, M.; Catanesi, M. G.; Covault, C.; Csanád, M.; Csörgö, T.; Deile, M.; Dimovasili, E.; Doubek, M.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferro, F.; Fiergolski, A.; Garcia, F.; Giani, S.; Greco, V.; Grzanka, L.; Heino, J.; Hilden, T.; Janda, M.; Kašpar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrát, V.; Kurvinen, K.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leszko, T.; Lippmaa, E.; Lokajíček, M.; Lo Vetere, M.; Rodríguez, F. Lucas; Macrí, M.; Magaletti, L.; Magazzù, G.; Mercadante, A.; Minutoli, S.; Nemes, F.; Niewiadomski, H.; Noschis, E.; Novák, T.; Oliveri, E.; Oljemark, F.; Orava, R.; Oriunno, M.; Österberg, K.; Perrot, A.-L.; Palazzi, P.; Pedreschi, E.; Petäjäjärvi, J.; Procházka, J.; Quinto, M.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ravotti, F.; Robutti, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Saarikko, H.; Santroni, A.; Scribano, A.; Sette, G.; Snoeys, W.; Spinella, F.; Sziklai, J.; Taylor, C.; Turini, N.; Vacek, V.; Vitek, M.; Welti, J.; Whitmore, J.

    2011-08-01

    Proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured by the TOTEM experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at \\sqrt{s} = 7\\,TeV in dedicated runs with the Roman Pot detectors placed as close as seven times the transverse beam size (σbeam) from the outgoing beams. After careful study of the accelerator optics and the detector alignment, |t|, the square of four-momentum transferred in the elastic scattering process, has been determined with an uncertainty of \\delta t = 0.1\\,\\rm{GeV} \\sqrt{\\vert t\\vert } . In this letter, first results of the differential cross-section are presented covering a |t|-range from 0.36 to 2.5 GeV2. The differential cross-section in the range 0.36 < |t| < 0.47 GeV2 is described by an exponential with a slope parameter B = (23.6 ± 0.5stat ± 0.4syst) GeV-2, followed by a significant diffractive minimum at |t| = (0.53 ± 0.01stat ± 0.01syst) GeV2. For |t|-values larger than ~1.5 GeV2, the cross-section exhibits a power law behaviour with an exponent of -7.8 ± 0.3stat ± 0.1syst. When compared to predictions based on the different available models, the data show a strong discriminative power despite the small t-range covered.

  2. A comprehensive and comparative study of elastic electron scattering from OCS and CS2 in the energy region from 1.2 to 200 eV.

    PubMed

    Murai, H; Ishijima, Y; Mitsumura, T; Sakamoto, Y; Kato, H; Hoshino, M; Blanco, F; García, G; Limão-Vieira, P; Brunger, M J; Buckman, S J; Tanaka, H

    2013-02-01

    We report absolute differential cross sections (DCSs) for elastic electron scattering from OCS (carbonyl sulphide) and CS(2) (carbon disulphide) in the impact energy range of 1.2-200 eV and for scattering angles from 10° to 150°. Above 10 eV, the angular distributions are found to agree quite well with our present calculations using two semi-phenomenological theoretical approaches. One employs the independent-atom model with the screening-corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR), while the other uses the continuum-multiple-scattering method in conjunction with a parameter-free exchange-polarization approximation. Since OCS is a polar molecule, further dipole-induced rotational excitation cross sections have been calculated in the framework of the first Born approximation and incoherently added to the IAM-SCAR results. In comparison with the calculated DCS for the S atom, atomic-like behavior for the angular distributions in both the OCS and CS(2) scattering systems is observed. Integrated elastic cross sections are obtained by extrapolating the experimental measurements, with the aid of the theoretical calculations, for those scattering angles below 10° and above 150°. These values are then compared with the available total cross sections. PMID:23406114

  3. Out-of-plane electret-based MEMS energy harvester with the combined nonlinear effect from electrostatic force and a mechanical elastic stopper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Kai; Woh Lye, Sun; Miao, Jianmin; Tang, Lihua; Hu, Xiao

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the fabrication, modeling and characterization of an out-of-plane electret-based vibrational energy harvester (e-VEH) that has both positive and negative charged electret plates integrated into a single seismic mass system. Strong electrostatic spring-softening effect is induced due to the electric field provided by the double-charged electret plates. An elastic stopper is introduced for reliability concern by limiting the motion of seismic mass and meanwhile serves as a functional element to realize spring-hardening effect. The device has an overall volume of about 0.14 cm3 and is fabricated based on MEMS compatible silicon micromachining technology. When subject to weak excitations, the device exhibits an approximately linear frequency response but changes to a significantly larger broadband when strongly excited due to the combined nonlinear effect from electrostatic force and a mechanical elastic stopper. At a high excitation level of 0.48 g, the experimental results show that the device has 3 dB bandwidths of 3.7 Hz for frequency-up sweep and 2.8 Hz for frequency-down sweep, respectively, which demonstrate a large enhancement compared to the linear response (1.3 Hz). An optimal output power of 0.95 μW is also achieved with a low resonance of 95 Hz. This corresponds to a normalized power density of 37.4 μW cm-3 g-2.

  4. Gravitational potential energy of the earth - A spherical harmonic approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    A spherical harmonic equation for the gravitational potential energy of the earth is derived for an arbitrary density distribution by conceptually bringing in mass-elements from infinity and building up the earth shell upon spherical shell. The zeroth degree term in the spherical harmonic expansion agrees with the usual expression for the energy of a radial density distribution. The second degree terms give a maximum nonhydrostatic energy in the crust and mantle of -2.77 x 10 to the 29th ergs, an order of magnitude below McKenzie's (1966) estimate. McKenzie's result stems from mathematical error. Our figure is almost identical with Kaula's (1963) estimate of the minimum shear strain energy in the mantle, a not unexpected result on the basis of the virial theorem. If the earth is assumed to be a homogeneous viscous oblate spheroid relaxing to an equilibrium shape, then a lower limit to the mantle viscosity of 1.3 x 10 to the 20th P is found by assuming that the total geothermal flux is due to viscous dissipation of energy. This number is almost six orders of magnitude below MacDonald's (1966) estimate of the viscosity and removes his objection to convection. If the nonequilibrium figure is dynamically maintained by the earth acting as a heat engine at 1% efficiency, then the viscosity is 10 to the 22nd P, a number preferred by Cathles (1975) and Peltier and Andrew (1976) as the viscosity of the mantle.

  5. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces and computational methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, R.

    2006-01-01

    This project involves the development, implementation, and application of theoretical methods for the calculation and characterization of potential energy surfaces (PES) involving molecular species that occur in hydrocarbon combustion. These potential energy surfaces require an accurate and balanced treatment of reactants, intermediates, and products. Most of our work focuses on general multiconfiguration self-consistent-field (MCSCF) and multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) methods. In contrast to the more common single-reference electronic structure methods, this approach is capable of describing accurately molecular systems that are highly distorted away from their equilibrium geometries, including reactant, fragment, and transition-state geometries, and of describing regions of the potential surface that are associated with electronic wave functions of widely varying nature. The MCSCF reference wave functions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to describe qualitatively the changes in the electronic structure over the broad range of molecular geometries of interest. The necessary mixing of ionic, covalent, and Rydberg contributions, along with the appropriate treatment of the different electron-spin components (e.g. closed shell, high-spin open-shell, low-spin open shell, radical, diradical, etc.) of the wave functions are treated correctly at this level. Further treatment of electron correlation effects is included using large scale multireference CI wave functions, particularly including the single and double excitations relative to the MCSCF reference space. This leads to the most flexible and accurate large-scale MRSDCI wave functions that have been used to date in global PES studies.

  6. Potential environmental effects of energy conservation measures in northwest industries

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, M C; Gygi, K F; Hendrickson, P L

    1992-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has identified 101 plants in the Pacific Northwest that account for 80% of the region's industrial electricity consumption. These plants offer a precise target for a conservation program. PNL determined that most of these 101 plants were represented by 11 major industries. We then reviewed 36 major conservation technologies used in these 11 industrial settings to determine their potential environmental impacts. Energy efficiency technologies designed for industrial use may result in direct or indirect environmental impacts. Effects may result from the production of the conservation measure technology, changes in the working environment due to different energy and material requirements, or changes to waste streams. Industry type, work-place conditions, worker training, and environmental conditions inside and outside the plant are all key variables that may affect environmental outcomes. To address these issues this report has three objectives: Describe potential conservation measures that Bonneville may employ in industrial programs and discuss potential primary impacts. Characterize industrial systems and processes where the measure may be employed and describe general environmental issues associated with each industry type. Review environmental permitting, licensing, and other regulatory actions required for industries and summarize the type of information available from these sources for further analysis.

  7. Potential impacts of nanotechnology on energy transmission applications and needs.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-30

    The application of nanotechnologies to energy transmission has the potential to significantly impact both the deployed transmission technologies and the need for additional development. This could be a factor in assessing environmental impacts of right-of-way (ROW) development and use. For example, some nanotechnology applications may produce materials (e.g., cables) that are much stronger per unit volume than existing materials, enabling reduced footprints for construction and maintenance of electricity transmission lines. Other applications, such as more efficient lighting, lighter-weight materials for vehicle construction, and smaller batteries having greater storage capacities may reduce the need for long-distance transport of energy, and possibly reduce the need for extensive future ROW development and many attendant environmental impacts. This report introduces the field of nanotechnology, describes some of the ways in which processes and products developed with or incorporating nanomaterials differ from traditional processes and products, and identifies some examples of how nanotechnology may be used to reduce potential ROW impacts. Potential environmental, safety, and health impacts are also discussed.

  8. Theoretical studies of potential energy surfaces and computational methods

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, R.

    1993-12-01

    This project involves the development, implementation, and application of theoretical methods for the calculation and characterization of potential energy surfaces involving molecular species that occur in hydrocarbon combustion. These potential energy surfaces require an accurate and balanced treatment of reactants, intermediates, and products. This difficult challenge is met with general multiconfiguration self-consistent-field (MCSCF) and multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) methods. In contrast to the more common single-reference electronic structure methods, this approach is capable of describing accurately molecular systems that are highly distorted away from their equilibrium geometries, including reactant, fragment, and transition-state geometries, and of describing regions of the potential surface that are associated with electronic wave functions of widely varying nature. The MCSCF reference wave functions are designed to be sufficiently flexible to describe qualitatively the changes in the electronic structure over the broad range of geometries of interest. The necessary mixing of ionic, covalent, and Rydberg contributions, along with the appropriate treatment of the different electron-spin components (e.g. closed shell, high-spin open-shell, low-spin open shell, radical, diradical, etc.) of the wave functions, are treated correctly at this level. Further treatment of electron correlation effects is included using large scale multireference CI wave functions, particularly including the single and double excitations relative to the MCSCF reference space. This leads to the most flexible and accurate large-scale MRSDCI wave functions that have been used to date in global PES studies.

  9. Intermolecular potential energy surface and thermophysical properties of ethylene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Crusius, Johann-Philipp Hassel, Egon; Hellmann, Robert; Bich, Eckard

    2014-10-28

    A six-dimensional potential energy hypersurface (PES) for two interacting rigid ethylene oxide (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O) molecules was determined from high-level quantum-chemical ab initio calculations. The counterpoise-corrected supermolecular approach at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory was utilized to determine interaction energies for 10178 configurations of two molecules. An analytical site-site potential function with 19 sites per ethylene oxide molecule was fitted to the interaction energies and fine tuned to agree with data for the second acoustic virial coefficient from accurate speed of sound measurements. The PES was validated by computing the second virial coefficient, shear viscosity, and thermal conductivity. The values of these properties are substantiated by the best experimental data as they tend to fall within the uncertainty intervals and also obey the experimental temperature functions, except for viscosity, where experimental data are insufficient. Due to the lack of reliable data, especially for the transport properties, our calculated values are currently the most accurate estimates for these properties of ethylene oxide.

  10. Potential for energy conservation in the cement industry

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett-Price, B.A.

    1985-02-01

    This report assesses the potential for energy conservation in the cement industry. Energy consumption per ton of cement decreased 20% between 1972 and 1982. During this same period, the cement industry became heavily dependent on coal and coke as its primary fuel source. Although the energy consumed per ton of cement has declined markedly in the past ten years, the industry still uses more than three and a half times the fuel that is theoretically required to produce a ton of clinker. Improving kiln thermal efficiency offers the greatest opportunity for saving fuel. Improving the efficiency of finish grinding offers the greatest potential for reducing electricity use. Technologies are currently available to the cement industry to reduce its average fuel consumption per ton by product by as much as 40% and its electricity consumption per ton by about 10%. The major impediment to adopting these technologies is the cement industry's lack of capital as a result of low or no profits in recent years.

  11. A model for a constrained, finitely deforming, elastic solid with rotation gradient dependent strain energy, and its specialization to von Krmn plates and beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasa, A. R.; Reddy, J. N.

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop the governing equations for a fully constrained finitely deforming hyperelastic Cosserat continuum where the directors are constrained to rotate with the body rotation. This is the generalization of small deformation couple stress theories and would be useful for developing mathematical models for an elastic material with embedded stiff short fibers or inclusions (e.g., materials with carbon nanotubes or nematic elastomers, cellular materials with oriented hard phases, open cell foams, and other similar materials), that account for certain longer range interactions. The theory is developed as a limiting case of a regular Cosserat elastic material where the directors are allowed to rotate freely by considering the case of a high "rotational mismatch energy". The theory is developed using the formalism of Lagrangian mechanics, with the static case being based on Castigliano's first theorem. By considering the stretch U and the rotation R as additional independent variables and using the polar decomposition theorem as an additional constraint equation, we obtain the governing and as well as the boundary conditions for finite deformations. The resulting equations are further specialized for plane strain and axisymmetric finite deformations, deformations of beams and plates with small strain and moderate rotation, and for small deformation theories. We also show that the boundary conditions for this theory involve "surface tension" like terms due to the higher gradients in the strain energy function. For beams and plates, the rotational gradient dependent strain energy does not require additional variables (unlike Cosserat theories) and additional differential equations; nor do they raise the order of the differential equations, thus allowing us to include a material length scale dependent response at no extra "computational cost" even for finite deformation beam/plate theories

  12. Energy and Momentum Relaxation Times of 2D Electrons Due to Near Surface Deformation Potential Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipa, Viktor; Vasko, Fedor; Mitin, Vladimir

    1997-03-01

    The low temperature energy and momentum relaxation rates of 2D electron gas placed near the free or clamped surface of a semi-infinit sample are calculated. To describe the electron-acoustic phonon interaction with allowance of the surface effect the method of elasticity theory Green functions was used. This method allows to take into account the reflection of acoustic waves from the surface and related mutual conversion of LA and TA waves. It is shown that the strength of the deformation potential scattering at low temperatures substantially depends on the mechanical conditions at the surface: relaxation rates are suppressed for the free surface while for the rigid one the rates are enhanced. The dependence of the conductivity on the distance between the 2D layer and the surface is discussed. The effect is most pronounced in the range of temperatures 2 sl pF < T < (2 hbar s_l)/d, where pF is the Fermi momentum, sl is the velocity of LA waves, d is the width of the quantum well.

  13. Photoacoustic elastic oscillation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2015-08-10

    Photoacoustic imaging and sensing have been studied extensively to probe the optical absorption of biological tissue in multiple scales ranging from large organs to small molecules. However, its elastic oscillation characterization is rarely studied and has been an untapped area to be explored. In literature, photoacoustic signal induced by pulsed laser is commonly modelled as a bipolar "N-shape" pulse from an optical absorber. In this paper, the photoacoustic damped oscillation is predicted and modelled by an equivalent mass-spring system by treating the optical absorber as an elastic oscillator. The photoacoustic simulation incorporating the proposed oscillation model shows better agreement with the measured signal from an elastic phantom, than conventional photoacoustic simulation model. More interestingly, the photoacoustic damping oscillation effect could potentially be a useful characterization approach to evaluate biological tissue's mechanical properties in terms of relaxation time, peak number and ratio beyond optical absorption only, which is experimentally demonstrated in this paper. PMID:26367914

  14. Potential energy surfaces and reaction dynamics of polyatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yan-Tyng

    1991-11-01

    A simple empirical valence bond (EVB) model approach is suggested for constructing global potential energy surfaces for reactions of polyatomic molecular systems. This approach produces smooth and continuous potential surfaces which can be directly utilized in a dynamical study. Two types of reactions are of special interest, the unimolecular dissociation and the unimolecular isomerization. For the first type, the molecular dissociation dynamics of formaldehyde on the ground electronic surface is investigated through classical trajectory calculations on EVB surfaces. The product state distributions and vector correlations obtained from this study suggest very similar behaviors seen in the experiments. The intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer in the formic acid dimer is an example of the isomerization reaction. High level ab initio quantum chemistry calculations are performed to obtain optimized equilibrium and transition state dimer geometries and also the harmonic frequencies.

  15. Assessing geothermal energy potential in upstate New York. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, D.S.

    1996-08-01

    The potential of geothermal energy for future electric power generation in New York State is evaluated using estimates of temperatures of geothermal reservoir rocks. Bottom hole temperatures from over 2000 oil and gas wells in the region were integrated into subsurface maps of the temperatures for specific geothermal reservoirs. The Theresa/Potsdam formation provides the best potential for extraction of high volumes of geothermal fluids. The evaluation of the Theresa/Potsdam geothermal reservoir in upstate New York suggests that an area 30 miles east of Elmira, New York has the highest temperatures in the reservoir rock. The Theresa/Potsdam reservoir rock should have temperatures about 136 {degrees}C and may have as much as 450 feet of porosity in excess of 8%. Estimates of the volumes of geothermal fluids that can be extracted are provided and environmental considerations for production from a geothermal well is discussed.

  16. Assessment of market potential of compressed air energy storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, D. W.; Buckley, O. E.; Clark, C. E., Jr.

    1983-12-01

    This report describes an assessment of potential roles that EPRI might take to facilitate the commercial acceptance of compressed air energy storage (CAES) systems. The assessment is based on (1) detailed analyses of the market potential of utility storage technologies, (2) interviews with representatives of key participants in the CAES market, and (3) a decision analysis synthesizing much of the information about market and technology status. The results indicate a large potential market for CAES systems if the overall business environment for utilities improves. In addition, it appears that EPRI can have a valuable incremental impact in ensuring that utilities realize the potential of CAES by (1) continuing an aggressive information dissemination and technology transfer program, (2) working to ensure the success of the first United States CAES installation at Soyland Power Cooperative, (3) developing planning methods to allow utilities to evaluate CAES and other storage options more effectively and more realistically, and (4) supporting R and D to resolve residual uncertainties in first-generation CAES cost and performance characteristics. Previously announced in STAR as N83-25121

  17. Rotational Energy Transfer of N2 Gas Determined Using a New Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Rotational energy transfer between two N2 molecules is a fundamental process of some importance. Exchange is expected to play a role, but its importance is somewhat uncertain. Rotational energy transfer cross sections of N2 also have applications in many other fields including modeling of aerodynamic flows, laser operations, and linewidth analysis in nonintrusive laser diagnostics. A number of N2-N2 rigid rotor potential energy surface (PES) has been reported in the literature.

  18. Two-potential approach for electron-molecular collisions at intermediate and high energies - Application to e-N2 scatterings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, B. H.; Poe, R. T.; Sun, J. C.; Shan, Y.

    1979-01-01

    A general theoretical approach is proposed for the calculation of elastic, vibrational, and rotational transitions for electron-molecule scattering at intermediate and high-electron-impact energies. In this formulation, contributions to the scattering process come from the incoherent sum of two dominant potentials: a short-range shielded nuclear Coulomb potential from individual atomic centers, and a permanent/induced long-range potential. Application to e-N2 scattering from 50-500 eV incident electron energies has yielded good agreement with absolutely calibrated experiments. Comparisons with other theoretical approaches are made. The physical picture as well as the general features of electron-molecule scattering process are discussed within the framework of the two-potential approach.

  19. Domestic refrigeration appliances in Poland: Potential for improving energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, S.; Schipper, L.; Lebot, B.

    1993-08-01

    This report is based on information collected from the main Polish manufacturer of refrigeration appliances. We describe their production facilities, and show that the energy consumption of their models for domestic sale is substantially higher than the average for similar models made in W. Europe. Lack of data and uncertainty about future production costs in Poland limits our evaluation of the cost-effective potential to increase energy efficiency, but it appears likely that considerable improvement would be economic from a societal perspective. Many design options are likely to have a simple payback of less than five years. We found that the production facilities are in need of substantial modernization in order to produce higher quality and more efficient appliances. We discuss policy options that could help to build a market for more efficient appliances in Poland and thereby encourage investment to produce such equipment.

  20. Potential for energy savings in old and new auto engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, John R.

    1985-11-01

    This paper disucsses the potential for energy savings in the transportation sector through the use of both improved and entirely new automotive engines. Although spark-ignition and diesel internal combustion engines will remain the dominant choices for passenger-car use throughout the rest of this century, improved versions of these engines (lean-burn, low-friction spark-ignition and adiabatic, low-friction diesel engines) could, in the long term, provide a 20-30 percent improvement in fuel economy over what is currently available. The use of new materials, and modifications to both vehicle structure and vehicle transmissions may yield further improvements. Over a longer time frame, the introduction of the high-temperature gas-turbine engine and the use of new synfuels may provide further opportunities for energy conservation.

  1. Stabilized quasi-Newton optimization of noisy potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Bastian; Goedecker, Stefan; Alireza Ghasemi, S.; Roy, Shantanu

    2015-01-21

    Optimizations of atomic positions belong to the most commonly performed tasks in electronic structure calculations. Many simulations like global minimum searches or characterizations of chemical reactions require performing hundreds or thousands of minimizations or saddle computations. To automatize these tasks, optimization algorithms must not only be efficient but also very reliable. Unfortunately, computational noise in forces and energies is inherent to electronic structure codes. This computational noise poses a severe problem to the stability of efficient optimization methods like the limited-memory Broyden–Fletcher–Goldfarb–Shanno algorithm. We here present a technique that allows obtaining significant curvature information of noisy potential energy surfaces. We use this technique to construct both, a stabilized quasi-Newton minimization method and a stabilized quasi-Newton saddle finding approach. We demonstrate with the help of benchmarks that both the minimizer and the saddle finding approach are superior to comparable existing methods.

  2. Energy Potential of Permeable Segmented Thermoelements in Cooling Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatychuk, L. I.; Cherkez, R. G.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we study a thermoelement used to cool liquid or gas fluxes that pass through legs consisting of permeable segments of thermoelectric materials connected in series. Methods for theoretical calculations and optimization of the thermoelement's energy characteristics are presented based on mathematical optimal control theory and computer design techniques. Computer design results are presented for the case when segmented materials based on Bi2Te3 are employed in the legs. The effect of the number of segments, contact resistance, and structural and thermophysical parameters on the thermoelement's energy potential is studied under optimal conditions of electric current and air pumping velocity. The results demonstrate the existence of optimal operating conditions for which the coefficient of performance is increased by 10% to 30% and the specific cooling capacity by 10% to 20%.

  3. Taboo search by successive confinement: Surveying a potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekmarev, Sergei F.

    2001-09-01

    A taboo search for minima on a potential energy surface (PES) is performed by means of confinement molecular dynamics: the molecular dynamics trajectory of the system is successively confined to various basins on the PES that have not been sampled yet. The approach is illustrated for a 13-atom Lennard-Jones cluster. It is shown that the taboo search radically accelerates the process of surveying the PES, with the probability of finding a new minimum defined by a propagating Fermi-like distribution.

  4. Terahertz absorption spectra and potential energy distribution of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zezhang; Jiang, Yurong; Jiang, Lulu; Ma, Heng

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the terahertz (THz) absorption spectra of a set of nematic liquid crystals were studied using the density functional theories (DFT). An accurate assignment of the vibrational modes corresponding to absorption frequencies were performed using potential energy distribution (PED) in a frequency range of 0-3 THz. The impacts of different core structures on THz absorption spectra were discussed. The results indicate that scope of application must be considered in the LC-based THz device designing. This proposed work may give a useful suggestion on the design of novel liquid crystal material in THz wave.

  5. Freezing of Energy of a Soliton in an External Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambusi, D.; Maspero, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study the dynamics of a soliton in the generalized NLS with a small external potential ɛV of Schwartz class. We prove that there exists an effective mechanical system describing the dynamics of the soliton and that, for any positive integer r, the energy of such a mechanical system is almost conserved up to times of order ɛ -r . In the rotational invariant case we deduce that the true orbit of the soliton remains close to the mechanical one up to times of order ɛ -r .

  6. Terahertz absorption spectra and potential energy distribution of liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zezhang; Jiang, Yurong; Jiang, Lulu; Ma, Heng

    2016-01-15

    In this work, the terahertz (THz) absorption spectra of a set of nematic liquid crystals were studied using the density functional theories (DFT). An accurate assignment of the vibrational modes corresponding to absorption frequencies were performed using potential energy distribution (PED) in a frequency range of 0-3 THz. The impacts of different core structures on THz absorption spectra were discussed. The results indicate that scope of application must be considered in the LC-based THz device designing. This proposed work may give a useful suggestion on the design of novel liquid crystal material in THz wave. PMID:26476072

  7. Isotopic dependence of fusion enhancement of various heavy ion systems using energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Manjeet Singh

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the fusion of symmetric and asymmetric projectile-target combinations are deeply analyzed within the framework of energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential model (EDWSP model) in conjunction with one dimensional Wong formula and the coupled channel code CCFULL. The neutron transfer channels and the inelastic surface excitations of collision partners are dominating mode of couplings and the coupling of relative motion of colliding nuclei to such relevant internal degrees of freedom produces a significant fusion enhancement at sub-barrier energies. It is quite interesting that the effects of dominant intrinsic degrees of freedom such as multi-phonon vibrational states, neutron transfer channels and proton transfer channels can be simulated by introducing the energy dependence in the nucleus-nucleus potential (EDWSP model). In the EDWSP model calculations, a wide range of diffuseness parameter ranging from a = 0.85 fm to a = 0.97 fm, which is much larger than a value (a = 0.65 fm) extracted from the elastic scattering data, is needed to reproduce sub-barrier fusion data. However, such diffuseness anomaly, which might be an artifact of some dynamical effects, has been resolved by trajectory fluctuation dissipation (TFD) model wherein the resulting nucleus-nucleus potential possesses normal diffuseness parameter.

  8. The Nonlinear Spring and Energy Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherfinski, John

    1989-01-01

    Describes an air track experiment demonstrating the transfer of mechanical energy from elastic potential to kinetic. Discusses four methods for calculating energy stored in the spring. Included are pictures, typical data, and graphs. (YP)

  9. Energy Conservation Simplified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    The standard formulation of energy conservation involves the subsidiary ideas of kinetic energy ("KE"), work ("W"), thermal energy, internal energy, and a half-dozen different kinds of potential energy ("PE"): elastic, chemical, nuclear, gravitational, and so forth. These quantities came to be recognized during the centuries over which the…

  10. Energy Conservation Simplified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    The standard formulation of energy conservation involves the subsidiary ideas of kinetic energy ("KE"), work ("W"), thermal energy, internal energy, and a half-dozen different kinds of potential energy ("PE"): elastic, chemical, nuclear, gravitational, and so forth. These quantities came to be recognized during the centuries over which the

  11. Constrained Broyden Dimer Method with Bias Potential for Exploring Potential Energy Surface of Multistep Reaction Process.

    PubMed

    Shang, Cheng; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2012-07-10

    To predict the chemical activity of new matter is an ultimate goal in chemistry. The identification of reaction pathways using modern quantum mechanics calculations, however, often requires a high demand in computational power and good chemical intuition on the reaction. Here, a new reaction path searching method is developed by combining our recently developed transition state (TS) location method, namely, the constrained Broyden dimer method, with a basin-filling method via bias potentials, which allows the system to walk out from the energy traps at a given reaction direction. In the new method, the reaction path searching starts from an initial state without the need for preguessing the TS-like or final state structure and can proceed iteratively to the final state by locating all related TSs and intermediates. In each elementary reaction step, a reaction direction, such as a bond breaking, needs to be specified, the information of which is refined and preserved as a normal mode through biased dimer rotation. The method is tested successfully on the Baker reaction system (50 elementary reactions) with good efficiency and stability and is also applied to the potential energy surface exploration of multistep reaction processes in the gas phase and on the surface. The new method can be applied for the computational screening of new catalytic materials with a minimum requirement of chemical intuition. PMID:26588954

  12. Energy dependence of the mean free path of excess hot electrons in solid xenon in the elastic scattering region

    SciTech Connect

    Plenkiewicz, B.; Plenkiewicz, P.; Jay-Gerin, J.

    1986-04-15

    It has been found recently from the analysis of low-energy electron-transmission experiments that the scattering mean free path lambda of excess hot electrons in solid xenon films oscillates with energy. We show in this paper that in these experiments lambda is predominantly controlled by the combined effect of both acoustical-phonon scattering and scattering by neutral point defects, and that its energy dependence is entirely caused by the changes in electron effective mass with energy.

  13. The Potential for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, SW

    2003-08-06

    As many states have restructured their electric power industry, they have established a ''systems benefit charge'' to help fund those activities that will no longer be funded by utilities in the new structure. Examples include weatherization of low-income housing, efficiency programs, and renewable energy development. Varying amounts have been collected and allocated depending on state needs and abilities. One question that arises is what are the potential results of funding the different types of programs. What is the potential for energy efficiency or for renewable power, and what would be accomplished given the amount of funding that the system benefit charge may provide? The purpose of this project is to provide an initial estimate of the potential for energy efficiency and renewable energy in North Carolina. This potential could be funded by a public benefits fund resulting from a green power program being considered in the state. It concentrates on electric energy savings and production. Savings in buildings can include improvements to space conditioning as well as improvements to lighting or other appliances. Distributed power potential, through use of combined heat and power and renewables such as photovoltaic, wind, and biomass were examined. The goal is to provide information to decision makers who are developing a green power program in North Carolina. It will not be a complete and detailed study of all efficiency potentials but is more of a scoping exercise to determine the relative impacts and begin the process for a more definitive study at a later date. Statewide energy savings potential cannot be directly measured but must be calculated. First, the word ''potential'' means that the savings have not occurred yet. Second, the savings are often only indirectly measured by estimating what energy use there would have been without the changes in technology or behavior. Calculations through sampling and statistical analysis or by simulation are a necessary part of any mechanism to determine energy savings potential. There are currently several methods for calculating savings. Extrapolation of savings achieved from specific programs, surveys of existing building stock or energy-using activities, computer calculations of representative building types, and economic simulations all provide insight into the amount of energy that could be saved.

  14. An Ab Initio Based Potential Energy Surface for Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Schwenke, David W.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We report a new determination of the water potential energy surface. A high quality ab initio potential energy surface (PES) and dipole moment function of water have been computed. This PES is empirically adjusted to improve the agreement between the computed line positions and those from the HITRAN 92 data base. The adjustment is small, nonetheless including an estimate of core (oxygen 1s) electron correlation greatly improves the agreement with experiment. Of the 27,245 assigned transitions in the HITRAN 92 data base for H2(O-16), the overall root mean square (rms) deviation between the computed and observed line positions is 0.125/cm. However the deviations do not correspond to a normal distribution: 69% of the lines have errors less than 0.05/cm. Overall, the agreement between the line intensities computed in the present work and those contained in the data base is quite good, however there are a significant number of line strengths which differ greatly.

  15. Computer simulations of glasses: the potential energy landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Zamaan; Alling, Bjrn; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2015-07-01

    We review the current state of research on glasses, discussing the theoretical background and computational models employed to describe them. This article focuses on the use of the potential energy landscape (PEL) paradigm to account for the phenomenology of glassy systems, and the way in which it can be applied in simulations and the interpretation of their results. This article provides a broad overview of the rich phenomenology of glasses, followed by a summary of the theoretical frameworks developed to describe this phenomonology. We discuss the background of the PEL in detail, the onerous task of how to generate computer models of glasses, various methods of analysing numerical simulations, and the literature on the most commonly used model systems. Finally, we tackle the problem of how to distinguish a good glass former from a good crystal former from an analysis of the PEL. In summarising the state of the potential energy landscape picture, we develop the foundations for new theoretical methods that allow the ab initio prediction of the glass-forming ability of new materials by analysis of the PEL.

  16. Colloidal particles driven across periodic optical-potential-energy landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juniper, Michael P. N.; Straube, Arthur V.; Aarts, Dirk G. A. L.; Dullens, Roel P. A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the motion of colloidal particles driven by a constant force over a periodic optical potential energy landscape. First, the average particle velocity is found as a function of the driving velocity and the wavelength of the optical potential energy landscape. The relationship between average particle velocity and driving velocity is found to be well described by a theoretical model treating the landscape as sinusoidal, but only at small trap spacings. At larger trap spacings, a nonsinusoidal model for the landscape must be used. Subsequently, the critical velocity required for a particle to move across the landscape is determined as a function of the wavelength of the landscape. Finally, the velocity of a particle driven at a velocity far exceeding the critical driving velocity is examined. Both of these results are again well described by the two theoretical routes for small and large trap spacings, respectively. Brownian motion is found to have a significant effect on the critical driving velocity but a negligible effect when the driving velocity is high.

  17. Energy-momentum conserving higher-order time integration of nonlinear dynamics of finite elastic fiber-reinforced continua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erler, Norbert; Groß, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Since many years the relevance of fibre-reinforced polymers is steadily increasing in fields of engineering, especially in aircraft and automotive industry. Due to the high strength in fibre direction, but the possibility of lightweight construction, these composites replace more and more traditional materials as metals. Fibre-reinforced polymers are often manufactured from glass or carbon fibres as attachment parts or from steel or nylon cord as force transmission parts. Attachment parts are mostly subjected to small strains, but force transmission parts usually suffer large deformations in at least one direction. Here, a geometrically nonlinear formulation is necessary. Typical examples are helicopter rotor blades, where the fibres have the function to stabilize the structure in order to counteract large centrifugal forces. For long-run analyses of rotor blade deformations, we have to apply numerically stable time integrators for anisotropic materials. This paper presents higher-order accurate and numerically stable time stepping schemes for nonlinear elastic fibre-reinforced continua with anisotropic stress behaviour.

  18. Acoustic emission during unloading of elastically stressed magnesium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. S.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A magnesium alloy was quasi-statically cycled elastically between zero load and tension. Both loading and unloading stress delays were found, and the unloading stress delay was further studied. An analytical expression was written for the unloading stress delay which is an elastic constitutive parameter. The potential use of these results for the acoustic emission monitoring of elastic stress states is discussed.

  19. Positron interactions with water–total elastic, total inelastic, and elastic differential cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tattersall, Wade; Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, 4810 Queensland ; Chiari, Luca; Machacek, J. R.; Anderson, Emma; Sullivan, James P.; White, Ron D.; Brunger, M. J.; Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur ; Buckman, Stephen J.; Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur ; Garcia, Gustavo; Blanco, Francisco

    2014-01-28

    Utilising a high-resolution, trap-based positron beam, we have measured both elastic and inelastic scattering of positrons from water vapour. The measurements comprise differential elastic, total elastic, and total inelastic (not including positronium formation) absolute cross sections. The energy range investigated is from 1 eV to 60 eV. Comparison with theory is made with both R-Matrix and distorted wave calculations, and with our own application of the Independent Atom Model for positron interactions.

  20. Relationships between available potential energy, kinetic energy, and extratropical cyclone activity within East Coast cyclogenetic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapotocny, John V.

    1987-07-01

    Interrelationships between the available potential energy and kinetic energy associated with extratropical cyclones are examined for portions of the First GARP Global Experiment (FGGE) year. The study is confined to the cyclogenetically active regions encompassing the eastern coasts of Asia and North America. Calculations of vertically integrated available potential energy (APE) and kinetic energy (KE) are done for an active winter storm period (February 14-28, 1979) and a relatively inactive summer period (July 1-15, 1979) using gridded isentropic data produced from the FGGE Level IIIa set of global analyses. During both the winter and summer study periods, good agreement is indicated between cyclone tracks and the spatial distributions of time mean and standard deviations of vertically integrated APE and KE. Energy distributions composited for rapidly strengthening and weakening storms show the patterns of available potential energy and kinetic energy which are associated with cyclones in these stages of development. The rapidly intensifying storms are accompanied by strong gradients in APE equatorward of the surface cyclone with maximum KE to the south and southwest of the storm center. Smaller values of kinetic energy and weaker gradients of available potential energy accompany the rapidly decaying storms. An examination of twice daily distributions of APE and KE for 29 individual cyclones reveals that a similar temporal evolution of vertically integrated energy patterns accompanies storms in these east coast regions. An example of this evolution is presented in conjunction with a case analysis of the February 1979 Presidents' Day cyclone along the east coast of North America.