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Sample records for elasto-plastic fracture mechanics

  1. An elasto-plastic fracture mechanics based model for assessment of hydride embrittlement in zircaloy cladding tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Karl-Fredrik; Jakšić, Nikola; Vokál, Vratko

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a finite element based fracture mechanics model to assess how hydrides affect the integrity of zircaloy cladding tubes. The hydrides are assumed to fracture at a low load whereas the propagation of the fractured hydrides in the matrix material and failure of the tube is controlled by non-linear fracture mechanics and plastic collapse of the ligaments between the hydrides. The paper quantifies the relative importance of hydride geometrical parameters such as size, orientation and location of individual hydrides and interaction between adjacent hydrides. The paper also presents analyses for some different and representative multi-hydride configurations. The model is adaptable to general and complex crack configurations and can therefore be used to assess realistic hydride configurations. The mechanism of cladding failure is by plastic collapse of ligaments between interacting fractured hydrides. The results show that the integrity can be drastically reduced when several radial hydrides form continuous patterns.

  2. Mechanics of a contracting reservoir in an elastic half-space with an intervening visco-elasto-plastic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossop, A.; Fredrich, J. T.

    2004-12-01

    The extraction of fluids from porous rocks within the Earth's crust leads to localised volume strains. These in turn induce stress changes and displacements in the surrounding rock mass. The relationships between these processes are governed by the constitutive properties of the rocks. For the case of a poroelastic fluid reservoir in a linear-elastic matrix the mechanics are relatively well known and understood. In this study we extend these models by investigating the case of a contracting rock body (caused by declining pore pressure) embedded within a linear-elastic half space, but with the addition of a visco-elasto-plastic layer between the contracting reservoir and the free surface. The problem is of growing importance as the exploitation of hydrocarbon reservoirs beneath salt bodies occurs at ever greater depths in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. This is because the creep properties of salt are strongly temperature dependent, so that as depths increase, and hence ambient temperatures, creep can occur at a rate that is impossible to ignore over the reservoir lifecycle. The models are explored using a finite element approach and make use of sophisticated salt constitutive models and large-deformation three-dimensional geomechanical simulation codes; the reservoir deformations are governed by either poro-elastic or cap plasticity constitutive laws. However, a general behaviour pattern can be observed: the visco-elasto-plastic salt layer tends to decouple the deformation fields from the free surface with stress and displacements accentuated below the salt. The magnitude of the increased horizontal displacements below the salt layer are relatively independent of the layer thickness. The accentuated vertical displacements though are more strongly dependent on the thickness of the salt layer. This work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories funded by the US DOE under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sandia is a multiprogam laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration.

  3. Elasto-plastic characteristics and mechanical properties of as-sprayed 8 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia coating under nano-scales measured by nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J. M.; Dai, C. Y.; Shen, Y. G.; Mao, W. G.

    2014-08-01

    The elasto-plastic characteristics and mechanical properties of as-received 8 mol% Y2O3-ZrO2 (8YSZ) coatings were studied by nanoindentation at ultra-low loads with a Berkovich indenter at room temperature. All experimental data including hardness H and elastic modulus E were analyzed by the Weibull statistical method due to the porous and heterogeneous nature of the tested samples. It was found that the hardness firstly exhibits interesting reverse indentation size effect, and then shows normal indentation size effect within different indentation scales. The average elastic modulus of 8YSZ was estimated as 214.8 ± 13.2 GPa. In order to reveal the elasto-plastic characteristics of 8YSZ at nano-scales, the distribution of resolved shear stresses underneath the indenter tip region was evaluated by Hertzian contact theory when the deformation behavior of 8YSZ changed from fully elastic to elasto-plastic stages. The results shed light on understanding possible foreign object damage mechanisms of thermal barrier coating systems.

  4. Elasto-Plastic FEM Stress Analysis and Mechanical Characteristics of Pipe Flange Connections with Non-Asbestos Gaskets under Internal Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Yoshio; Omiya, Yuya; Kobayashi, Takashi; Sawa, Toshiyuki

    The effects of the nominal diameter of pipe flange connections with non-asbestos spiral wound gaskets(SWG) under internal pressure on the mechanical characteristics such as the contact gasket stress distribution which governs the sealing performance, the load factor and the hub stress of the connections were evaluated. The stresses in the connections with the nominal diameters from 3” to 24” under internal pressure are analyzed using the elasto-plastic(EP) FEM analysis taking account the hysteresis and non-linearity of deformation behavior of the non-asbestos SWG. As a result, it is found that the variations in the contact gasket stress distributions are substantial due to the flange rotation in the connections with the larger nominal diameter. Leakage tests were conducted to measure the axial bolt forces (the load factor) and the hub stress. The results obtained from the EP-FEM analyses are fairly consistent with the experimental results concerning the variation in the axial bolt forces (the load factor) and the hub stress. Using the obtained contact gasket stress distributions and the fundamental relationship between the amount of leakage and the contact gasket stress, the amount of the leakage of the connections is estimated. It is observed that the sealing performance of the connections with larger nominal diameter is worse than that of the connection with smaller nominal diameter because of the flange rotation. The estimated results are in a fairly good agreement with the measured results. The difference in the hub stress between the EP-FEM and ASME code is demonstrated and the differences in the load factor and the sealing performance of the connections are shown between the asbestos and non-asbestos gaskets.

  5. Wetting and elasto-plasticity based sculpture of liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianlin; Zuo, Pingcheng

    2016-02-01

    As an emerging material with exotic properties, liquid marble holds great potential for such areas as microfluidics, stimuli-responsive sensors, micro-chemical reactors, micro-bioreactors, energy harvesting devices, and mechanical structures. In this study, we mainly concentrate on the mechanical behaviors, such as elasto-plasticity of liquid marble with the decrease of liquid volume. The contact radius with the substrate and Young's contact angle of liquid marble are both measured with the change of water volume, and those of a water droplet are compared. The mechanism for the different responses for liquid marble and water droplet is clarified according to the mechanics analysis. Moreover, it is found that liquid marble can behave like an elasto-plastic material when the particle surface density is big enough. Based upon this fact, liquid marble can be sculpted to all kinds of special shapes as expected. These investigations may cast new light on how to engineer multifunctional materials and devices, which are beneficial to microprinting and micromachining. PMID:26920520

  6. On finite deformation elasto-plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemat-Nasser, S.

    1982-01-01

    Lee (1969) has proposed a theory based on the decomposition of the total deformation gradient to an elastic and plastic part, and from it has concluded that the additive decomposition of the strain rates holds only approximately. Lubarda and Lee (1981) have declared that Lee's 'exact finite-deformation kinematics shows the almost universal assumption that the total velocity strain or rate of deformation is the sum of elastic and plastic rates to be in error'. Hence questions are raised regarding the validity of essentially all finite deformation elasto-plasticity theories. The present investigation is concerned with these questions. It is shown that the additive decomposition of the strain rates follows from all common finite elasto-plasticity concepts. Lee's theory is examined, and it is shown that this theory also leads to an additive strain rate decomposition, and therefore, his conclusion stems from misinterpretation. It is found that the elastic and the plastic strain rates considered by Lee do not correspond to the same configuration. They are, therefore, not compatible measures.

  7. A study of fatigue mesoscopic elasto-plastic properties of a nickel-base superalloy by instrumented microindentation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Duyi; Cha, Haibo; Xiao, Lei; Xu, Xuandong

    2012-01-01

    In this study the fatigue mesoscopic elasto-plastic properties of nickel-base superalloy GH4145/SQ were investigated using the instrumented microindentation testing coupled with the analytic calculation. The indentation characteristic parameters of low-cycle fatigue specimens, such as the indentation curvature ( C), the maximum penetration depth ( hmax), the initial unloading slope ( S), the residual depth of penetration ( h r), the recovered elastic work ( W e) and the residual plastic work ( W p), were determined from the experimental load-penetration depth ( P- h) curves, and the fatigue mesoscopic elasto-plastic properties ( E, σ y and n) were estimated using a well-developed analysis algorithm proposed by Dao et al. The distribution patterns of the fatigue mesoscopic mechanical properties were further verified in a statistical sense. The dependence of the fatigue mesoscopic elasto-plastic properties upon the imposed strain amplitude was discussed preliminarily in terms of microstructural examinations of fatigue failure specimens.

  8. LaMEM: a Massively Parallel Staggered-Grid Finite-Difference Code for Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Lithospheric Deformation with Visco-Elasto-Plastic Rheologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaus, B.; Popov, A.

    2014-12-01

    The complexity of lithospheric rheology and the necessity to resolve the deformation patterns near the free surface (faults and folds) sufficiently well places a great demand on a stable and scalable modeling tool that is capable of efficiently handling nonlinearities. Our code LaMEM (Lithosphere and Mantle Evolution Model) is an attempt to satisfy this demand. The code utilizes a stable and numerically inexpensive finite difference discretization with the spatial staggering of velocity, pressure, and temperature unknowns (a so-called staggered grid). As a time discretization method the forward Euler, or a combination of the predictor-corrector and the fourth-order Runge-Kutta can be chosen. Elastic stresses are rotated on the markers, which are also used to track all relevant material properties and solution history fields. The Newtonian nonlinear iteration, however, is handled at the level of the grid points to avoid spurious averaging between markers and grid. Such an arrangement required us to develop a non-standard discretization of the effective strain-rate second invariant. Important feature of the code is its ability to handle stress-free and open-box boundary conditions, in which empty cells are simply eliminated from the discretization, which also solves the biggest problem of the sticky-air approach - namely large viscosity jumps near the free surface. We currently support an arbitrary combination of linear elastic, nonlinear viscous with multiple creep mechanisms, and plastic rheologies based on either a depth-dependent von Mises or pressure-dependent Drucker-Prager yield criteria.LaMEM is being developed as an inherently parallel code. Structurally all its parts are based on the building blocks provided by PETSc library. These include Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov nonlinear solvers with convergence globalization techniques (line search), equipped with different linear preconditioners. We have also implemented the coupled velocity-pressure multigrid prolongation and restriction operators specific for staggered grid discretization. The capabilities of the code are demonstrated with a set of geodynamically-relevant benchmarks and example problems on parallel computers.This project is funded by ERC Starting Grant 258830

  9. Micropillar compression technique applied to micron-scale mudstone elasto-plastic deformation.

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Joseph Richard; Chidsey, Thomas; Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Boyce, Brad Lee; Buchheit, Thomas Edward

    2010-12-01

    Mudstone mechanical testing is often limited by poor core recovery and sample size, preservation and preparation issues, which can lead to sampling bias, damage, and time-dependent effects. A micropillar compression technique, originally developed by Uchic et al. 2004, here is applied to elasto-plastic deformation of small volumes of mudstone, in the range of cubic microns. This study examines behavior of the Gothic shale, the basal unit of the Ismay zone of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation and potential shale gas play in southeastern Utah, USA. Precision manufacture of micropillars 5 microns in diameter and 10 microns in length are prepared using an ion-milling method. Characterization of samples is carried out using: dual focused ion - scanning electron beam imaging of nano-scaled pores and distribution of matrix clay and quartz, as well as pore-filling organics; laser scanning confocal (LSCM) 3D imaging of natural fractures; and gas permeability, among other techniques. Compression testing of micropillars under load control is performed using two different nanoindenter techniques. Deformation of 0.5 cm in diameter by 1 cm in length cores is carried out and visualized by a microscope loading stage and laser scanning confocal microscopy. Axisymmetric multistage compression testing and multi-stress path testing is carried out using 2.54 cm plugs. Discussion of results addresses size of representative elementary volumes applicable to continuum-scale mudstone deformation, anisotropy, and size-scale plasticity effects. Other issues include fabrication-induced damage, alignment, and influence of substrate.

  10. Elasto-plastic properties of Cu-Nb nanolaminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betekhtin, V. I.; Kolobov, Yu. R.; Kardashev, B. K.; Golosov, E. V.; Narykova, M. V.; Kadomtsev, A. G.; Klimenko, D. N.; Karpov, M. I.

    2012-02-01

    The Young's modulus, internal friction, and microplastic flow stress in Cu-Nb nanolaminate has been determined by an acoustic technique. The influence of high hydrostatic compression (1 GPa) on these elasto-plastic properties of the nanolaminate has been studied.

  11. Micropillar Compression Technique Applied to Micron-Scale Mudstone Elasto-Plastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewers, T. A.; Boyce, B.; Buchheit, T.; Heath, J. E.; Chidsey, T.; Michael, J.

    2010-12-01

    Mudstone mechanical testing is often limited by poor core recovery and sample size, preservation and preparation issues, which can lead to sampling bias, damage, and time-dependent effects. A micropillar compression technique, originally developed by Uchic et al. 2004, here is applied to elasto-plastic deformation of small volumes of mudstone, in the range of cubic microns. This study examines behavior of the Gothic shale, the basal unit of the Ismay zone of the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation and potential shale gas play in southeastern Utah, USA. Precision manufacture of micropillars 5 microns in diameter and 10 microns in length are prepared using an ion-milling method. Characterization of samples is carried out using: dual focused ion - scanning electron beam imaging of nano-scaled pores and distribution of matrix clay and quartz, as well as pore-filling organics; laser scanning confocal (LSCM) 3D imaging of natural fractures; and gas permeability, among other techniques. Compression testing of micropillars under load control is performed using two different nanoindenter techniques. Deformation of 0.5 cm in diameter by 1 cm in length cores is carried out and visualized by a microscope loading stage and laser scanning confocal microscopy. Axisymmetric multistage compression testing and multi-stress path testing is carried out using 2.54 cm plugs. Discussion of results addresses size of representative elementary volumes applicable to continuum-scale mudstone deformation, anisotropy, and size-scale plasticity effects. Other issues include fabrication-induced damage, alignment, and influence of substrate. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Anisotropic elasto-plastic transition of MgO single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashimo, Tsutomu; Murai, Mitsuru; Kawayanagi, Naoto

    2009-06-01

    The elasto-plastic transition of ceramics has not been well understood, and the yield mechanism has been further unknown. Magnesium oxide (MgO) has been used as a pressure -scale material, and the Hugoniot data have been measured on single crystal and polycrystal. In this study, we performed the Hugoniot-measurement experiments on MgO single crystals for <100> and <110> axis directions, etc., using the powder gun and two-stage light gas gun, to study the elasto-plastic transition and the equation of state (EOS). The Hugoniot data were measured by the inclined-mirror method combined with the long-pulsed dye laser and mirror-rotating type streak camera. The Hugoniot-elastic limits along <110> axis were much larger than those along <100> axis, and the difference increased with driving stress. This suggests that the dynamic strength should be carefully considered to draw the EOS of MgO. In the plastic region, the present Hugoniot data showed some differences from the previous data.

  13. Elasto-plastic model with second order defect density tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleja-Ţigoiu, Sanda

    2011-05-01

    The paper deals with a second order finite elasto-plastic model, which involves the defect density tensor, as a measure of the extra material defects existing in the damaged microstructure. The material behaviour is described with respect to an anholonomic configuration, which is introduced through the second order plastic deformation, consisting in plastic distortion and plastic connection. The defect density tensor enters the expression of the plastic connection through its gradient and represents a measure of non-metricity. The constitutive and evolution equations are derived to be compatible with the free energy imbalance. The evolution equation for the defect density tensor is non-local and coupled with the plastic distortion.

  14. LaMEM: a massively parallel 3D staggered-grid finite-difference code for coupled nonlinear themo-mechanical modeling of lithospheric deformation with visco-elasto-plastic rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Anton; Kaus, Boris

    2015-04-01

    This software project aims at bringing the 3D lithospheric deformation modeling to a qualitatively different level. Our code LaMEM (Lithosphere and Mantle Evolution Model) is based on the following building blocks: * Massively-parallel data-distributed implementation model based on PETSc library * Light, stable and accurate staggered-grid finite difference spatial discretization * Marker-in-Cell pedictor-corector time discretization with Runge-Kutta 4-th order * Elastic stress rotation algorithm based on the time integration of the vorticity pseudo-vector * Staircase-type internal free surface boundary condition without artificial viscosity contrast * Geodynamically relevant visco-elasto-plastic rheology * Global velocity-pressure-temperature Newton-Raphson nonlinear solver * Local nonlinear solver based on FZERO algorithm * Coupled velocity-pressure geometric multigrid preconditioner with Galerkin coarsening Staggered grid finite difference, being inherently Eulerian and rather complicated discretization method, provides no natural treatment of free surface boundary condition. The solution based on the quasi-viscous sticky-air phase introduces significant viscosity contrasts and spoils the convergence of the iterative solvers. In LaMEM we are currently implementing an approximate stair-case type of the free surface boundary condition which excludes the empty cells and restores the solver convergence. Because of the mutual dependence of the stress and strain-rate tensor components, and their different spatial locations in the grid, there is no straightforward way of implementing the nonlinear rheology. In LaMEM we have developed and implemented an efficient interpolation scheme for the second invariant of the strain-rate tensor, that solves this problem. Scalable efficient linear solvers are the key components of the successful nonlinear problem solution. In LaMEM we have a range of PETSc-based preconditioning techniques that either employ a block factorization of the velocity-pressure matrix, or treat it as a monolithic piece. In particular we have implemented the custom restriction-interpolation operators for the coupled Galerkin multigrid preconditioner. We have found that this type of algorithm is very robust with respect to the high grid resolutions and realistic viscosity variations. The coupled Galerking geometric multigrid implemented with the custom restriction-interpolation operators currently enables LaMEM to run efficiently with the grid sizes up to 1000-cube cells on the IBM Blue Gene/Q machines. This project is funded by ERC Starting Grant 258830 Computer facilities are provided by Jülich supercomputer center (Germany)

  15. An Orthotropic Cosserat Elasto-Plastic Model for Layered Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikary, D. P.; Guo, H.

    2002-08-01

    Modelling the behaviour of rock masses consisting of a large number of layers is often necessary in mining applications (e.g. coal mining). Such a modelling can be carried out in a discontinuum manner by explicit introduction of joints. When the number of rock layers is large, it is advantageous to devise a continuum-based model in which case the joints are considered to be virtually smeared across the mass. In this study, a fully elasto-plastic equivalent continuum model suitable for describing the behaviour of such layered rock masses is considered. The model is based on the Cosserat continuum theory and incorporates the moment stresses in its formulation. In contrast to the earlier Cosserat models, the possibility of rock layer plasticity is considered. The accuracy of the developed Cosserat model is verified against analytical and experimental results.

  16. STUDY ON ELASTO-PLASTIC BEHAVIOR OF DIFFERENT CARBON TYPES IN CARBON/CARBON COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, Soydan; Tezcan, Jale; Howe, Jane Y; Filip, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Indentation tests combined with the knowledge of corresponding microstructure of carbonaceous materials offer valuable information that cannot be extracted from the conventional indentation tests alone. Since mechanical properties of carbon are sensitive to the crystal orientation, inelastic mechanisms can be detected by studying the stress-strain behavior of carbon/carbon composites. The aim of this paper is to investigate the elasto-plastic behavior and related microstructure of pan-fiber reinforced carbon matrix composites heat-treated at 2100 C. The microstructure was characterized using polarized light microscopy and high-resolution electron microscopy. Elastic modulus of each constituent of the composites was measured. Nanoindentation tests were carried out to obtain loading-unloading cycles at different indentation depths using a berkovich-type diamond indenter tip. The residual displacement at complete unloading was correlated with the microstructure data to reveal the extent of the deformation mechanisms of crystallites and graphene sheets. The pitch fiber and rough laminar pyrocarbon exhibited plastic behavior, which can be attributed to the low shear resistance due to weak bonding between the well-organized graphene sheets. On the other hand, the PAN fiber, charred resin and isotropic pyrocarbon, exhibited almost full elasticity within applied displacement limits.

  17. Sensitivity Analysis of Failure Probability on PTS Benchmark Problems of Pressure Vessel Using a Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics Analysis Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinsheng; Kato, Daisuke; Shibata, Katsuyuki

    In this paper, the results of the sensitivity analyses of failure probability are presented for pressure vessel under PTS (Pressurized Thermal Shock) transient, by using our new probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis code. The pressure, the fluid temperature at the inner surface of pressure vessel and other analysis conditions are based on an international benchmark study on PTS. The temperature and stress distributions through wall thickness during transient are obtained by a heat transfer and an elasto-plastic stress analysis with FEM. The new models and methodologies introduced in our code are summarized and the effect of overlay clad and behavior of semi-elliptical crack on the failure probability are investigated especially.

  18. Contact dynamics of elasto-plastic thin beams simulated via absolute nodal coordinate formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing-Tao; Tian, Qiang; Hu, Hai-Yan

    2015-12-01

    Under the frame of multibody dynamics, the contact dynamics of elasto-plastic spatial thin beams is numerically studied by using the spatial thin beam elements of absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF). The internal force of the elasto-plastic spatial thin beam element is derived under the assumption that the plastic strain of the beam element depends only on its longitudinal deformation. A new body-fixed local coordinate system is introduced into the spatial thin beam element of ANCF for efficient contact detection in the contact dynamics simulation. The linear isotropic hardening constitutive law is used to describe the elasto-plastic deformation of beam material, and the classical return mapping algorithm is adopted to evaluate the plastic strains. A multi-zone contact approach of thin beams previously proposed by the authors is also introduced to detect the multiple contact zones of beams accurately, and the penalty method is used to compute the normal contact force of thin beams in contact. Four numerical examples are given to demonstrate the applicability and effectiveness of the proposed elasto-plastic spatial thin beam element of ANCF for flexible multibody system dynamics.

  19. Modeling subduction megathrust earthquakes: Insights from a visco-elasto-plastic analog model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Stéphane; Malavieille, Jacques; Mazzotti, Stéphane; Martin, Nicolas; Caniven, Yannick; Cattin, Rodolphe; Soliva, Roger; Peyret, Michel; Lallemand, Serge

    2015-04-01

    As illustrated recently by the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman or the 2011 Tohoku earthquakes, subduction megathrust earthquakes generate heavy economic and human losses. Better constrain how such destructive seismic events nucleate and generate crustal deformations represents a major societal issue but appears also as a difficult scientific challenge. Indeed, several limiting factors, related to the difficulty to analyze deformation undersea, to access deep source of earthquake and to integrate the characteristic time scales of seismic processes, must be overcome first. With this aim, we have developed an experimental approach to complement numerical modeling techniques that are classically used to analyze available geological and geophysical observations on subduction earthquakes. Objectives were to design a kinematically and mechanically first-order scaled analogue model of a subduction zone capable of reproducing megathrust earthquakes but also realistic seismic cycle deformation phases. The model rheology is based on multi-layered visco-elasto-plastic materials to take into account the mechanical behavior of the overriding lithospheric plate. The elastic deformation of the subducting oceanic plate is also simulated. The seismogenic zone is characterized by a frictional plate interface whose mechanical properties can be adjusted to modify seismic coupling. Preliminary results show that this subduction model succeeds in reproducing the main deformation phases associated to the seismic cycle (interseismic elastic loading, coseismic rupture and post-seismic relaxation). By studying model kinematics and mechanical behavior, we expect to improve our understanding of seismic deformation processes and better constrain the role of physical parameters (fault friction, rheology, ...) as well as boundary conditions (loading rate,...) on seismic cycle and megathrust earthquake dynamics. We expect that results of this project will lead to significant improvement on interpretation of geophysical data, satellite observations and seismological records.

  20. REVERSING CYCLIC ELASTO-PLASTIC DEMANDS ON STRUCTURES DURING STRONG MOTION EARTHQUAKE EXCITATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perez, V.; Brady, A.G.; Safak, E.

    1986-01-01

    Using the horizontal components from El Centro 1940, Taft 1952, and 4 accelerograms from the San Fernando earthquake of 2/9/71, the time history of the elasto-plastic displacement response was calculated for oscillators having periods within the range of 1 to 6 s and ductility factors within the range of 3 to 6. The Nth largest peak of the elasto-plastic response (N equals 2,4,8,16), when expressed as a percentage of maximum response (that is, N equals 1), is fairly independent of period within our period range. When considering only plastic peaks occurring, sometimes in a one-directional group of peaks, in the reverse direction from the preceding plastic peak, the amplitude of the Nth reversing plastic peak is similar to the Nth elastic peak, regardless of the ductility factor.

  1. A 6-node co-rotational triangular elasto-plastic shell element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongxue; Xiang, Yu; Izzuddin, Bassam A.; Vu-Quoc, Loc; Zhuo, Xin; Zhang, Chuanjie

    2015-05-01

    A 6-node co-rotational triangular elasto-plastic shell element is developed. The local coordinate system of the element is defined by the vectors directing from one vertex to the other two vertices and their cross product. Based on such a co-rotational framework, the element rigid-body rotations are excluded in calculating the local nodal variables from the global nodal variables. The two smallest components of each nodal orientation vector are defined as rotational variables, resulting in the desired additive property for all nodal variables in a nonlinear incremental solution procedure. Different from other existing co-rotational finite element formulations, both the element tangent stiffness matrices in the local and in the global coordinate systems are symmetric owing to the commutativity of the nodal variables in calculating the second derivatives of the strain energy with respect to the local nodal variables and, through chain differentiation, with respect to the global nodal variables. For elasto-plastic analysis, the Maxwell-Huber-Hencky-von Mises yield criterion is employed together with the backward-Euler return-mapping method for the evaluation of the elasto-plastic stress state, where a consistent tangent modulus matrix is employed. To overcome locking problems, the assumed linear membrane strains and shear strains are obtained by using the line integration method proposed by MacNeal, and the assumed higher-order membrane strains are obtained by enforcing the stationarity of the mixed displacement-strain canonical functional, these assumed strains are then employed to replace the corresponding conforming strains. The reliability and convergence of the present 6-node triangular shell element formulation are verified through two elastic plate patch tests as well as two elastic and five elasto-plastic plate/shell problems undergoing large displacements and large rotations.

  2. The p-version of the finite element method in incremental elasto-plastic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzer, Stefan M.; Yosibash, Zohar

    1993-01-01

    Whereas the higher-order versions of the finite elements method (the p- and hp-version) are fairly well established as highly efficient methods for monitoring and controlling the discretization error in linear problems, little has been done to exploit their benefits in elasto-plastic structural analysis. Aspects of incremental elasto-plastic finite element analysis which are particularly amenable to improvements by the p-version is discussed. These theoretical considerations are supported by several numerical experiments. First, an example for which an analytical solution is available is studied. It is demonstrated that the p-version performs very well even in cycles of elasto-plastic loading and unloading, not only as compared to the traditional h-version but also in respect to the exact solution. Finally, an example of considerable practical importance - the analysis of a cold-worked lug - is presented which demonstrates how the modeling tools offered by higher-order finite element techniques can contribute to an improved approximation of practical problems.

  3. The importance of visco-elasto-plastic rheology in numerical modeling of two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, T.; Kaus, B. J. P.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the behaviour of a two-phase system that involves propagation of partial melt through a visco-elasto-plastic continental lithosphere and crust under ongoing tectonic deformation. Using two-dimensional numerical simulations we examine the coupled magmatic and tectonic processes leading to intrusive rock formation. The numerical modeling approach is based on the assumption that the melt fraction is equal to the porosity of the rock and that porosity changes reflect the compaction or dilation of the matrix framework due to visco-elasto-plastic processes. All modes of compaction are connected to the effective pressure, which can be understood as effective compaction/decompaction stress acting on the host rock. The rheology of the solid phase largely determines the mode and efficiency of melt transport. Therefore it is of considerable importance to formulate a realistic visco-elasto-plastic rheology. In the case of two-phase flow modeling, we additionally formulate a volumetric rheology to consitute compaction/decompaction deformation along with a standard deviatoric rheology for shear deformation. First results indicate that melt propagation is strongly related to the regional stress field, and that plastic failure zones (decompaction tubes, dikes and sills) form important conduits for the propagation of partial melt, especially through the more competent parts of lithosphere and crust. We may distinguish three distinct regimes of style and efficiency of melt propagation that occur at increasing competence of the host rock. A possible application of such models is to deepen the understanding of the processes involved in, and the geometry and field relations expected from, the emplacement of hydrated slab melts into the overriding continental plate in an ocean-continent subduction setting, covering rheological conditions in both the hot and weak asthenosphere as well as in the cooler and more rigid parts of lithosphere and crust.

  4. A review of developments in the theory of elasto-plastic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swedlow, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of elasto-plastic flow is developed so that it may accommodate features such as work-hardening, anisotropy, plastic compressibility, non-continuous loading including local or global unloading, and others. A complete theory is given in quasi-linear form; as a result, many useful attributes are accessible. Several integral theorems may be written, finite deformations may be incorporated, and efficient methods for solving problems may be developed; these and other aspects are described in some detail. The theory is reduced to special forms for 2-space, and extensive experience in solving such problems is cited.

  5. A numerical model for the thermo-elasto-plastic behaviour of a material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Sujit K.; Utki, Senol

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model for the thermo-elasto-plastic behavior of an isotropic material. The model is based on the assumption that the yielding of the material obeys von Mises distortion energy theory and the material exhibits isotropic strain hardening. This unique model can be used both for isothermal and non-isothermal cases. The original formulation for the non-isothermal three-dimensional case has been specialized for plane stress conditions and the equations for the computation of warping and thickness change are provided. The finite element implementation of this model is also outlined.

  6. Orthotropic elasto-plastic behavior of AS4/APC-2 thermoplastic composite in compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Rui, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Uniaxial compression tests were performed on off-axis coupon specimens of unidirectional AS4/APC-2 thermoplastic composite at various temperatures. The elasto-plastic and strength properties of AS4/APC-2 composite were characterized with respect to temperature variation by using a one-parameter orthotropic plasticity model and a one-parameter failure criterion. Experimental results show that the orthotropic plastic behavior can be characterized quite well using the plasticity model, and the matrix-dominant compressive strengths can be predicted very accurately by the one-parameter failure criterion.

  7. A case of elasto-plastic flow using a new special element. [crack tip analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swedlow, J. L.; Karabin, M. E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Using a new special element for elasto-plastic flow, a nearly square, center-cracked plate of simulated A533 steel is analyzed. Selected results are examined locally to the crack's tip. It is found that a sharp transition in the distribution of deformation and stress occurs after the initial elastic response, and that this state is followed by fairly stable behavior over a considerable portion of the load range. Distribution of strain energy density is noted, and implications for use of the parameter J and for additional work are discussed briefly.

  8. A new multilayered visco-elasto-plastic experimental model to study strike-slip fault seismic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniven, Y.; Dominguez, S.; Soliva, R.; Cattin, R.; Peyret, M.; Marchandon, M.; Romano, C.; Strak, V.

    2015-02-01

    Nowadays, technological advances in satellite imagery measurements as well as the development of dense geodetic and seismologic networks allow for a detailed analysis of surface deformation associated with active fault seismic cycle. However, the study of earthquake dynamics faces several limiting factors related to the difficulty to access the deep source of earthquake and to integrate the characteristic time scales of deformation processes that extend from seconds to thousands of years. To overcome part of these limitations and better constrain the role and couplings between kinematic and mechanical parameters, we have developed a new experimental approach allowing for the simulation of strike-slip fault earthquakes and analyze in detail hundreds of successive seismic cycle. Model rheology is made of multilayered visco-elasto-plastic analog materials to account for the mechanical behavior of the upper and lower crust and to allow simulating brittle/ductile coupling, postseismic deformation phase and far-field stress transfers. The kinematic evolution of the model surface is monitored using an optical system, based on subpixel spectral correlation of high-resolution digital images. First, results show that the model succeed in reproducing the deformation mechanisms and surface kinematics associated to the main phases of the seismic cycle indicating that model scaling is satisfactory. These results are comforted by using numerical algorithms to study the strain and stress distribution at the surface and at depth, along the fault plane. Our analog modeling approach appears, then, as an efficient complementary approach to investigate earthquake dynamics.

  9. Elasto-Plastic Analysis of Tee Joints Using HOT-SMAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steve M. (Technical Monitor); Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Yarrington, Phillip W.

    2004-01-01

    The Higher Order Theory - Structural/Micro Analysis Code (HOT-SMAC) software package is applied to analyze the linearly elastic and elasto-plastic response of adhesively bonded tee joints. Joints of this type are finding an increasing number of applications with the increased use of composite materials within advanced aerospace vehicles, and improved tools for the design and analysis of these joints are needed. The linearly elastic results of the code are validated vs. finite element analysis results from the literature under different loading and boundary conditions, and new results are generated to investigate the inelastic behavior of the tee joint. The comparison with the finite element results indicates that HOT-SMAC is an efficient and accurate alternative to the finite element method and has a great deal of potential as an analysis tool for a wide range of bonded joints.

  10. On the symbolic manipulation and code generation for elasto-plastic material matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T. Y.; Saleeb, A. F.; Wang, P. S.; Tan, H. Q.

    1991-01-01

    A computerized procedure for symbolic manipulations and FORTRAN code generation of an elasto-plastic material matrix for finite element applications is presented. Special emphasis is placed on expression simplifications during intermediate derivations, optimal code generation, and interface with the main program. A systematic procedure is outlined to avoid redundant algebraic manipulations. Symbolic expressions of the derived material stiffness matrix are automatically converted to RATFOR code which is then translated into FORTRAN statements through a preprocessor. To minimize the interface problem with the main program, a template file is prepared so that the translated FORTRAN statements can be merged into the file to form a subroutine (or a submodule). Three constitutive models; namely, von Mises plasticity, Drucker-Prager model, and a concrete plasticity model, are used as illustrative examples.

  11. A fast elasto-plastic formulation with hierarchical matrices and the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechner, Jürgen; Beer, Gernot

    2013-04-01

    Boundary element methods offer some advantages for the simulation of tunnel excavation since the radiation condition is implicitly fulfilled and only the excavation and ground surfaces have to be discretized. Hence, large meshes and mesh truncation, as required in the finite element method, are avoided. Recently, capabilities for efficiently dealing with inelastic behavior and ground support have been developed, paving the way for the use of the method to simulate tunneling. However, for large scale three dimensional problems one drawback of the boundary element method becomes prominent: the computational effort increases quadratically with the problem size. To reduce the computational effort several fast methods have been proposed. Here a fast boundary element solution procedure for small strain elasto-plasticity based on a collocation scheme and hierarchical matrices is presented. The method allows the solution of problems with the computational effort and sparse storage increasing almost linearly with respect to the problem size.

  12. Elasto-plastic and hydromechanical models of failure around an infinitely long magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbault, Muriel; Cappa, Frederic; Hassani, Riad

    2012-03-01

    Surface displacements solutions of elastic deformation around an inflating magma chamber generally assume that the associated internal overpressure is limited by the bedrock tensile strength. When considering stress equilibrium in the bedrock adjacent to a spherical or infinitely long cylinder, the gravity body force actually resists tensile failure, thus leading to a much larger pressure threshold. And when considering a Coulomb failure criterion, analytical and numerical models predict that shear failure develops instead of tensile failure. Here, three numerical codes are used to compare elasto-plastic solutions of surface displacements and patterns of failure in plane-strain. Shear failure propagates independently from the surface downward, then from the chamber walls upwards, and finally the two plasticized domains connect. Another test with internal underpressure (simulating source deflation) fits standard solutions from tunneling engineering. The effect of pore fluid pressures is also explored. In case of lithostatic fluid pore pressure in the bedrock, the gravity effect cancels out, and tensile failure is enabled for an overpressure close to the tensile strength. Coupled hydromechanical models in undrained conditions indicate that the initial bedrock porosity modifies the evolution of fluid pressure, volumetric strain and effective normal stress, and consequently also the pressure threshold for the onset of failure. We show that a bedrock of low porosity is more prone to fail than a bedrock of high porosity. In summary, our elasto-plastic and hydromechanical models illustrate the contexts for either tensile or shear failure around magmatic bodies, at the same time complementing and delimiting predictions deduced from elasticity.

  13. Model Experiments and Elasto-Plastic Finite Element Analysis about Seepage Failure of Sand Behind Fixed Sheet Pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okajima, Kenji; Tanaka, Tadatsugu; Zhang, Shanji; Komatsu, Takahiro

    Constructing civil engineering structures, temporaly or permanent water proofing sheet piles often are used. The stability of seepage failure are carefully applied to those sheet piles, although many troubles of seepage failure were reported. On this problem the predictive method of the deformation and critical water head is required. In this study we carried out the model experiments which were designed for studying the seepage failure of soil behind fixed sheet piles and our elasto-plastic finite element method was applied to verify the effectiveness. Terzaghi method is very famous method for this problem and Terzaghi method was investigated by experiments data. As a result, it was confirmed that elasto-plastic finite element method was effectiveness and Terzaghi method was useful for this problem.

  14. Mechanical Models of Bed-Perpendicular Fractures in Layered Rocks Subjected to Extensional Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, P.; Pollard, D. D.; Borja, R. I.

    2010-12-01

    Natural fractures (joints) enhance permeability and therefore are important for the economical production of low-permeability hydrocarbon reservoirs and aquifers. In this work we investigate the formation of bed-perpendicular joints during extension in a stiff brittle layer surrounded by thick softer layers. The quasi-static finite element models consist of three elasto-plastic layers with frictional bedding interfaces and the middle layer contains layer-perpendicular fractures that can accommodate opening at the bedding surface accompanied by interface sliding. The upper and lower boundaries are subject to normal tractions appropriate for the depth of burial. Lateral boundaries are displaced horizontally to represent the extensional tectonic regime. We use an interface model that captures the most important mechanical features during sliding of bedding interfaces and opening of joints: unilateral contact, elastic and plastic relative deformation, tensile strength, cohesion, frictional sliding, and non-associative plastic flow. The constitutive law extends the Coulomb slip criterion to the tensile regime to capture opening of fractures in a quasi-brittle manner. The finite element implementation employs a penalty scheme to impose the contact constraints along the interfaces. The numerical simulations show the effects of mechanical properties of layers and interfaces in the development and spacing of bed-perpendicular joints. We evaluate the concepts of fracture saturation and sequential infilling, and the relationship between joint spacing and layer thickness in the context of the new modeling capabilities.

  15. Finite Element Modeling to Simulate the Elasto-Plastic Behavior of Polycrystalline in 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifaz, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    A 3D strain gradient plasticity finite element model was developed to simulate the elasto-plastic behavior of polycrystalline IN 718 alloys. The proposed model constructed in the basis of the so-called Kocks-Mecking model is used to determine the influence of microstructure attributes on the inelastic stress-strain distribution. Representative Volume Elements (RVEs) of different edge size but similar grain morphology and affordable computational meshes were tested to investigate the link between micro and macro variables of deformation and stress. The virtual specimens subjected to continuous monotonic straining loading conditions were constrained with random periodic boundary conditions. The difference in crystallographic orientation (which evolves in the process of straining) and the incompatibility of deformation between neighboring grains were accounted by the introduction of averaged Taylor factors and the evolution of geometrically necessary dislocation density. The effect of plastic deformation gradients imposed by the microstructure is clearly observed. Results demonstrate a strong dependence of flow stress and plastic strain on phase type and grain size. A main strategy for constitutive modeling of individual bulk grains is presented. The influence of the grain size on the aggregate response, in terms of local stress variations and aggregate elastic moduli was analyzed. It was observed that the elastic modulus in the bulk material is not dependent on grain size.

  16. Elasto-Plastic Constitutive Behavior in Three Lithofacies of the Cambrian Mt. Simon Sandstone, Illinois Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewers, T.; Newell, P.; Broome, S. T.; Heath, J. E.; Bauer, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Mt. Simon Formation, a basal Cambrian sandstone underlying the Illinois Basin in the Central US, is a target for underground storage and waste injection which require an assessment of geomechanical behavior. The range of depositional environments, from braided streams and minor eolean features in the lower Mt Simon, to tidally-influenced near- and on-shore sands in the upper Mt. Simon, yield a heterogeneous formation with a range in porosity, permeability, and mechanical properties. We examine the experimental deformational behavior of three distinct Mt. Simon lithofacies via axisymmetric compressional testing. Initial yielding is confirmed with acoustic emissions in many of the tests and failure envelopes are determined for each lithofacies. The evolution of (assumed) isotropic elastic moduli are examined during testing by use of unload-reload cycles, which permit the separation of total measured strains into elastic and plastic (permanent) strains. The upper Mt Simon samples deform largely elastically at stresses encountered in the Illinois Basin, with very little modulus degradation. The lower Mt. Simon facies are weaker and deform plastically, with varying amounts of modulus degradation. Results are interpreted via petrographic observation of textural contrasts. This range in constitutive response is captured up to failure with a phenomenological elasto-plasticity model. Essential aspects to describe observed behavior used in the model include non-associative plasticity, stress-invariant dependent failure, an elliptical cap surface capturing shear effects on pore collapse, kinematic and isotropic hardening, nonlinear elasticity and elastic-plastic coupling, among other features. Static moduli derived from laboratory tests are compared to dynamic moduli from wellbore log response which can allow experimental results and model to be extrapolated to Mt. Simon occurrences across the basin. This work was funded in part by the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001114 and by the Department of Energy Office of Electricity. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. A new uniformly valid asymptotic integration algorithm for elasto-plastic-creep and unified viscoplastic theories including continuum damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chulya, A.; Walker, K. P.

    1989-01-01

    A new scheme to integrate a system of stiff differential equations for both the elasto-plastic creep and the unified viscoplastic theories is presented. The method has high stability, allows large time increments, and is implicit and iterative. It is suitable for use with continuum damage theories. The scheme was incorporated into MARC, a commercial finite element code through a user subroutine called HYPELA. Results from numerical problems under complex loading histories are presented for both small and large scale analysis. To demonstrate the scheme's accuracy and efficiency, comparisons to a self-adaptive forward Euler method are made.

  18. A new uniformly valid asymptotic integration algorithm for elasto-plastic creep and unified viscoplastic theories including continuum damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chulya, Abhisak; Walker, Kevin P.

    1991-01-01

    A new scheme to integrate a system of stiff differential equations for both the elasto-plastic creep and the unified viscoplastic theories is presented. The method has high stability, allows large time increments, and is implicit and iterative. It is suitable for use with continuum damage theories. The scheme was incorporated into MARC, a commercial finite element code through a user subroutine called HYPELA. Results from numerical problems under complex loading histories are presented for both small and large scale analysis. To demonstrate the scheme's accuracy and efficiency, comparisons to a self-adaptive forward Euler method are made.

  19. Elasto-plastic flow in cracked bodies using a new finite element model. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karabin, M. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Cracked geometries were studied by finite element techniques with the aid of a new special element embedded at the crack tip. This model seeked to accurately represent the singular stresses and strains associated with the elasto-plastic flow process. The present model was not restricted to a material type and did not predetermine a singularity. Rather the singularity was treated as an unknown. For each step of the incremental process the nodal degrees of freedom and the unknown singularity were found through minimization of an energy-like functional. The singularity and nodal degrees of freedom were determined by means of an iterative process.

  20. Fluid focusing and breaching of low permeability layers in reacting and visco-elasto-plastically deforming reservoir rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Nina S. C.

    2013-04-01

    The on-going injection of one million tons per year of CO2 into the Utsira sand at Sleipner is used as an example for a highly successful CO2 storage operation. Even at Sleipner, however, we observe features that are not straightforward to explain and quantify with exiting models. One such feature is the so- called chimneys that show up in the time laps seismic images. They are zones of disturbed layering that cut nearly vertically through the interbedded thin shale layers in the reservoir sands, not unlink the frequently observed pipe structures due to fluid venting. These chimneys have been ascribed to artefacts in the data or pre-existing fractures or pipes, and these explanations are difficult to rule out. If we take the seismic interpretations at face value, however, then the data suggest that the intensity and extent of the chimneys changes through time. The extent and thickness of the observed plume supports that the injected CO2 is migrating through focused zones in the shales from the well at the bottom of the reservoir to the top layer immediately below the caprock much faster than predicted by Darcy flow through intact, low permeable shale layers. We developed a fully coupled numerical model for fluid flow through a reacting and deforming porous rock. Reactions may be upscaled to add a viscous component to the rheology, or be modelled explicitly. In laboratory experiments, viscous compaction has been shown to take place in typical reservoir rocks due to the high reactivity of CO2-rich brine. Other experimental studies show that unconsolidated sands, such as the Utsira sand, and clay-rich shales follow a visco-plastic flow law rather than behaving as purely poro-elastically. Hence, viisco-elasto-plastic deformation of the porous matrix is taken into account in our model and fluid focusing may occur due to non-linear couplings between porosity and permeability and viscosity. This phenomenon is known as a porosity wave. A non-linear viscous rheology (or viscous compaction in combination with plastic failure in decompaction) lead to the formation of high-porosity channels or jets. The formation of channels (or chimneys) in layered sediments depends on the rheological bulk behaviour of the rocks, the spacing and thickness of the low permeability layers, the permeability contrast between the shale and the sand and the effective pressure in the reservoir. We will present examples of models that predict the formation of high porosity channels at Sleipner using realistic input parameters. These channels also develop if the low-permeability layers are discontinuous. Another implication of our modelling results is that low permeability caprock may fail as a barrier to flow if significant fluid overpressure is build up by the injection and/or due to viscous compaction. These results may be applicable to observations at In Salah. However, the temporal and spatial scales for the onset of focused flow in porosity waves strongly depend on a set of poorly constrained parameters. Thus, more experimental and numerical work and comparison to field data is needed to correctly assess these coupled reaction-deformation-flow processes.

  1. The mechanism of fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on the fracture mechanics of metals. Topics considered at the conference included microcrack mechanics, pressurized thermal shock behavior of LWR pressure vessels, stress intensity factors, submerged arc welding, weldments in power plants, pipeline weld quality, natural gas tanks, cast iron for spent nuclear fuel shipping casks, pipe ruptures, physical radiation effects, pressure tubes, hydrogen embrittlement, critical flaw size curves, and the fracture mechanics of steels in turbines of power stations.

  2. Elasto-plastic bending of cracked plates, including the effects of crack closure. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    A capability for solving elasto-plastic plate bending problems is developed using assumptions consistent with Kirchhoff plate theory. Both bending and extensional modes of deformation are admitted with the two modes becoming coupled as yielding proceeds. Equilibrium solutions are obtained numerically by determination of the stationary point of a functional which is analogous to the potential strain energy. The stationary value of the functional for each load increment is efficiently obtained through use of the conjugate gradient. This technique is applied to the problem of a large centrally through cracked plate subject to remote circular bending. Comparison is drawn between two cases of the bending problem. The first neglects the possibility of crack face interference with bending, and the second includes a kinematic prohibition against the crack face from passing through the symmetry plane. Results are reported which isolate the effects of elastoplastic flow and crack closure.

  3. An Optimized Elasto-Plastic Subgrade Reaction For Modeling The Response Of A Nonlinear Foundation For A Structural Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Richard Paul

    2015-09-01

    Geotechnical and structural engineers are faced with a difficult task when their designs interact with each other. For complex projects, this is more the norm than the exception. In order to help bridge that gap, a method for modeling the behavior of a foundation using a simple elasto-plastic subgrade reaction was developed. The method uses an optimization technique to position 4-6 springs along a pile foundation to produce similar load deflection characteristics that were modeled by more sophisticated geotechnical finite element software. The methodology uses an Excel spreadsheet for accepting user input and delivering an optimized subgrade spring stiffness, yield, and position along the pile. In this way, the behavior developed from the geotechnical software can be transferred to the structural analysis software. The optimization is achieved through the solver add-in within Excel. Additionally, a beam on a nonlinear elastic foundation model is used to compute deflections of the optimized subgrade reaction configuration.

  4. Mechanical and petrophysical study of fractured shale materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnelye, A.; Schubnel, A.; David, C.; Henry, P.; Guglielmi, Y.; Gout, C.; Dick, P.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding of the mechanical and physical properties of shales is of major importance in many fields such as faults hydro-mechanical behavior, cap-rock and unconventional reservoir studies or nuclear waste disposal. In particular, relationships between fluid transport properties, applied stress and textural anisotropy are critical both in intact and fractured shales. Therefore, these relations need to be investigated in the laboratory in order to have a better understanding on in-situ mechanisms. Hence, the mechanical behavior and the petrophysical properties of Toarcian shale of the Tournemire underground laboratory (France) have been investigated. The petrophysical properties have been measured along a 20 meters core drilled through a fault zone from the Tournemire tunnel. Along the core, P and S waves velocity and anisotropy, as well as magnetic susceptibility anisotropy and porosity were measured. In addition, conventional triaxial tests have been performed in order to determine the elasto-plastic yield envelope on three sets of samples with different orientations relative to bedding (0°, 45°, and 90° to the vertical axe). For each set, six experiments were carried out at increasing confining pressures (2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80MPa). Experiments were performed in dry conditions, at a strain rate of 5x10-7 s-1 up to failure. During each experiment, P and S wave elastic velocities were continuously measured along different directions, in order to assess both P wave anisotropy and shear wave splitting and their evolutions with deformation. Our results show that brittle failure is preceded by the development of P wave anisotropy and shear wave splitting, due to crack re-opening and crack growth. However, the orientation of principal stress components relative to the bedding plane plays an important role on both the brittle strength, as well as on the magnitude of shear-enhanced P wave velocity anisotropy and S wave splitting. Our perspective is now to perform fluid injections, both at the field and laboratory scale and measure the evolution of hydraulic diffusivity by tracking the fluid front by both passive and active seismic measurements.

  5. Micromechanical modeling of open cell structures with application in finite element analysis of vertebral body mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overaker, David Wolfgang

    1997-12-01

    A nonlinear micromechanical model for two-dimensional irregular hexagonal foams has been developed that allows for anisotropy in morphology and/or material. Based upon the orientation, cross-section, length, and material properties of each strut, the resulting micro-level beam behavior within the unit cell determines its structural properties. Nonlinearity is introduced as coupled elasto-plastic beam behavior, where the elasto-plastic behavior of each beam is considered. The analytical formulation for the stiffness matrix of the general elasto-plastic unit cell is found by considering compatibility and equilibrium of the unit cell. The structural properties of the elasto-plastic unit cell are embedded in a continuum finite element model as material properties, thus capturing the microstructure of the foam in an accurate and efficient model. Structural nonlinearity is therefore directly linked to localized plasticity and its evolution at the micro-level. Elastic analyses investigated the degree of anisotropy in structural properties that was induced by various morphological changes. Plastic analyses showed how structural nonlinearity could be explained by localized microstructural behavior. The formulation for the three-dimensional regular hexagonal foam was then developed as an extension of the two-dimensional formulation. Sensitivity of the constitutive properties to the microstructure and its orientation was studied. The model was then validated for application as an idealized model of the porous trabecular bone material of the human vertebra. The mechanical behavior of the model was shown to capture the basic characteristics of actual bone, where changes in behavior associated with age-related changes in bone architecture (increasing porosity with age) were also considered. Nonlinearity in the load-displacement behavior of trabecular bone specimens was directly linked to localized microstructural nonlinearity and its evolution. Validation was followed by applications in static compression of a whole vertebra. Elastic finite element analyses showed that the relative contribution of the shell to the load-bearing ability of the vertebra decreases with increasing age and lateral wall curvature. Nonlinear elasto-plastic analyses showed regions of failure concentrated in the upper posterior region of the vertebra in both the shell and core components. The model has provided a clearer understanding of the relative role of the core and shell in vertebral body mechanics and has shed light on the mechanism of vertebral burst fracture.

  6. Phase Field Fracture Mechanics.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Brett Anthony

    2015-11-01

    For this assignment, a newer technique of fracture mechanics using a phase field approach, will be examined and compared with experimental data for a bend test and a tension test. The software being used is Sierra Solid Mechanics, an implicit/explicit finite element code developed at Sandia National Labs in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The bend test experimental data was also obtained at Sandia Labs while the tension test data was found in a report online from Purdue University.

  7. Plane elasto-plastic analysis of v-notched plate under bending by boundary integral equation method. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rzasnicki, W.

    1973-01-01

    A method of solution is presented, which, when applied to the elasto-plastic analysis of plates having a v-notch on one edge and subjected to pure bending, will produce stress and strain fields in much greater detail than presently available. Application of the boundary integral equation method results in two coupled Fredholm-type integral equations, subject to prescribed boundary conditions. These equations are replaced by a system of simultaneous algebraic equations and solved by a successive approximation method employing Prandtl-Reuss incremental plasticity relations. The method is first applied to number of elasto-static problems and the results compared with available solutions. Good agreement is obtained in all cases. The elasto-plastic analysis provides detailed stress and strain distributions for several cases of plates with various notch angles and notch depths. A strain hardening material is assumed and both plane strain and plane stress conditions are considered.

  8. Large-deformation, elasto-plastic analysis of frames under nonconservative loading, using explicitly derived tangent stiffnesses based on assumed stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondoh, K.; Atluri, S. N.

    1987-03-01

    Simple and economical procedures for large-deformation elasto-plastic analysis of frames, whose members can be characterized as beams, are presented. An assumed stress approach is employed to derive the tangent stiffness of the beam, subjected in general to non-conservative type distributed loading. The beam is assumed to undergo arbitrarily large rigid rotations but small axial stretch and relative (non-rigid) point-wise rotations. It is shown that if a plastic-hinge method (with allowance being made for the formation of the hinge at an arbitrary location or locations along the beam) is employed, the tangent stiffness matrix may be derived in an explicit fashion, without numerical integration. Several examples are given to illustrate the relative economy and efficiency of the method in solving large-deformation elasto-plastic problems. The method is of considerable utility in analysing off-shore structures and large structures that are likely to be deployed in outerspace.

  9. A finite element formulation for evaluation of crack blunting effects in elasto-plastic solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osias, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The sharp crack model allows the use of continuum analysis, linear elasticity, as a basic for predicting a micromechanical process, fracture, by providing a characterization of loading conditions affecting a very small volume of material. The model is described in detail.

  10. First-order description of the mechanical fracture behavior of fine-grained surficial marine sediments during gas bubble growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, M. A.; Boudreau, B. P.; Johnson, B. D.; Reed, A. H.

    2010-12-01

    Bubbles in sediments, imaged via Computed Tomography (CT) scanning, and in surrogate transparent material (gelatin), are well-described geometrically as eccentric oblate spheroids. While sediments are undoubtedly visco-elasto-plastic solids, only part of that complex behavior appears to influence significantly the formation and shape of gas bubbles. Specifically, the shape of these bubbles can be explained if the mechanical response of fine-grained sediment is approximated by Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM). To determine the adequacy of the LEFM approximation for gas bubble growth in fine-grained sediments, a number of gas bubbles were injected and grown in natural sediments, while monitoring the size and shape using an industrial CT scanner. A comparison of measured inverse aspect ratios (IARs) of the injected bubbles with calculated IARs from pressure records provides support for the LEFM theory. Deviations from LEFM are observable in the data, but as bubbles grow larger they trend more closely toward the theory. The use of LEFM has been shown to describe gas bubble growth in shallow coastal sediments to first order.

  11. Computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, J. R.; Tracey, D. M.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical procedures for accurate determination of elastic stress intensity factors for the general two-dimensional crack problem are reviewed. The elastic perfectly plastic state of crack tip deformation is studied by a finite element procedure. Elastic-plastic fields in the immediate vicinity of a crack tip are determined numerically by finite element procedures based on asymptotic studies of crack tip singularities in plastic materials. The small-scale yielding problem is modeled, and expressions for crack tip opening displacement, shear singularity amplitude, and plastic zone extent are derived. A finite element solution to the large-scale yielding of a circumferentially cracked round tension bar is obtained. The three-dimensional aspects of flawed structures and numerical methods of treating them are studied. Ductile fracture mechanisms, in particular crack tip fracture on the microscale, are discussed.

  12. Fracture mechanics validity limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Dennis M.; Ernst, Hugo A.

    1994-01-01

    Fracture behavior is characteristics of a dramatic loss of strength compared to elastic deformation behavior. Fracture parameters have been developed and exhibit a range within which each is valid for predicting growth. Each is limited by the assumptions made in its development: all are defined within a specific context. For example, the stress intensity parameters, K, and the crack driving force, G, are derived using an assumption of linear elasticity. To use K or G, the zone of plasticity must be small as compared to the physical dimensions of the object being loaded. This insures an elastic response, and in this context, K and G will work well. Rice's J-integral has been used beyond the limits imposed on K and G. J requires an assumption of nonlinear elasticity, which is not characteristic of real material behavior, but is thought to be a reasonable approximation if unloading is kept to a minimum. As well, the constraint cannot change dramatically (typically, the crack extension is limited to ten-percent of the initial remaining ligament length). Rice, et al investigated the properties required of J-type parameters, J(sub x), and showed that the time rate, dJ(sub x)/dt, must not be a function of the crack extension rate, da/dt. Ernst devised the modified-J parameter, J(sub M), that meets this criterion. J(sub M) correlates fracture data to much higher crack growth than does J. Ultimately, a limit of the validity of J(sub M) is anticipated, and this has been estimated to be at a crack extension of about 40-percent of the initial remaining ligament length. None of the various parameters can be expected to describe fracture in an environment of gross plasticity, in which case the process is better described by deformation parameters, e.g., stress and strain. In the current study, various schemes to identify the onset of the plasticity-dominated behavior, i.e., the end of fracture mechanics validity, are presented. Each validity limit parameter is developed in detail, and then data is presented and the various schemes for establishing a limit of the validity are compared. The selected limiting parameter is applied to a set of fracture data showing the improvement of correlation gained.

  13. Linear elastic fracture mechanics primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Christopher D.

    1992-01-01

    This primer is intended to remove the blackbox perception of fracture mechanics computer software by structural engineers. The fundamental concepts of linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented with emphasis on the practical application of fracture mechanics to real problems. Numerous rules of thumb are provided. Recommended texts for additional reading, and a discussion of the significance of fracture mechanics in structural design are given. Griffith's criterion for crack extension, Irwin's elastic stress field near the crack tip, and the influence of small-scale plasticity are discussed. Common stress intensities factor solutions and methods for determining them are included. Fracture toughness and subcritical crack growth are discussed. The application of fracture mechanics to damage tolerance and fracture control is discussed. Several example problems and a practice set of problems are given.

  14. Shallow slip deficit due to large strike-slip earthquakes in dynamic rupture simulations with elasto-plastic off-fault response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Y.; Fialko, Y.

    2011-09-01

    Slip inversions of geodetic data from several large (magnitude ˜7) strike-slip earthquakes point to coseismic slip deficit at shallow depths (<3-4 km), that is, coseismic slip appears to decrease towards the Earth surface. While the inferred slip distribution may be consistent with laboratory-derived rate and state friction laws suggesting that the uppermost brittle crust may be velocity strengthening, there remains a question of how the coseismic slip deficit is accommodated throughout the earthquake cycle. The consequence of velocity-strengthening fault friction at shallow depths is that the deficit of coseismic slip is relieved by post-seismic afterslip and interseismic creep. However, many seismic events with inferred shallow slip deficit were not associated with either resolvable shallow interseismic creep or robust shallow afterslip. Hence, the origin of shallow 'slip deficit' remains uncertain. In this study, we investigate whether inelastic failure in the shallow crust due to dynamic earthquake rupture can explain the inferred deficit of shallow slip. Evidence for such failure is emerging from geologic, seismic and geodetic observations. We find that the amount of shallow slip deficit is proportional to the amount of inelastic deformation near the Earth surface. Such deformation occurs under a wide range of parameters that characterize rock strength in the upper crust. However, the largest magnitude of slip deficit in models accounting for off-fault yielding is 2-4 times smaller than that inferred from kinematic inversions of geodetic data. To explain this discrepancy, we further explore to what extent assumptions in the kinematic inversions may bias the inferred slip distributions. Inelastic deformation in the shallow crust reduces coseismic strain near the fault, introducing an additional 'artificial' deficit of up to 10 per cent of the maximum slip in inversions of geodetic data that are based on purely elastic models. The largest magnitude of slip deficit in our models combined with the bias in inversions accounts for up to 25 per cent of shallow slip deficit, which is comparable, but still smaller than 30-60 per cent deficit inferred from kinematic inversions. We discuss potential mechanisms that may account for the remaining discrepancy between slip deficit predicted by elasto-plastic rupture models and that inferred from inversions of space geodetic data.

  15. Mechanics of Hydraulic Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detournay, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic fractures represent a particular class of tensile fractures that propagate in solid media under pre-existing compressive stresses as a result of internal pressurization by an injected viscous fluid. The main application of engineered hydraulic fractures is the stimulation of oil and gas wells to increase production. Several physical processes affect the propagation of these fractures, including the flow of viscous fluid, creation of solid surfaces, and leak-off of fracturing fluid. The interplay and the competition between these processes lead to multiple length scales and timescales in the system, which reveal the shifting influence of the far-field stress, viscous dissipation, fracture energy, and leak-off as the fracture propagates.

  16. Elasto-Plastic Behavior of High RRR Niobium: Effects of Crystallographic Texture, Microstructure and Hydrogen Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    G.R. Myneni; S.R. Agnew

    2002-11-01

    Conventional assessments of the mechanical properties of polycrystalline high RRR niobium via tensile testing have revealed unusually low apparent Young's moduli and yield strength in annealed samples. These observations motivated the current investigation of a variety of possible contributors: crystallographic texture, grain size, and impurity concentration. It is shown that the crystallographic textures of a single lot of niobium are essentially unchanged by post-recrystallization anneals at temperatures up to 800 C. Ultrasonic measurements reveal that the elastic response is not degraded by annealing. Rather, the material's extremely low yield point gives the impression of a low elastic modulus during tensile testing.

  17. Elasto-plastic analysis of a mode I edge crack with application to a surface notch.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, P. H.

    1971-01-01

    A finite element analysis has been undertaken of the mechanical state of a plate containing a crack subjected to mode I loading. Specifically, a localized, well-defined surface depression (dimple) previously observed on the back surface of plate specimens immediately behind the plane of the crack was examined. The approach taken is concerned with defining more precisely the dimpling behavior as a function of relative flaw depth and applied stress level, as well as the development of the plastic zone at the crack tip.

  18. Contact Problems for Elasto-Plastic Impact in Multi-Body Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stronge, W. J.

    Low to moderate speed collision between elastic-plastic bodies results in imperceptible permanent indentation of the contact surfaces if the bodies are hard. Nevertheless in these collisions the contact force-indentation relation is irreversible since internal energy gained from work done by the contact force during the compression is partially trapped in elastic waves, work done in plastic deformation and work done to overcome friction during sliding. These sources of kinetic energy l oss in collisions depend on relative velocity between the bodies at the contact point, material properties, inertia properties related to the impact configuration and geometric constraints on the deformation field. Colliding bodies that can be represented as elastic-plastic or visco-plastic solids have been analyzed using specific models of contact compliance to calculate the energy transformed into irrecoverable forms. These calculations show how elastic waves, plastic deformation and friction affect the energetic coefficient of restitution - a coefficient that is a measure of impact energy loss from internal sources. The calculations indicate that there is considerable difference in the sources of energy loss f or 2D and 3D deformations. Also, that friction little affects the plastic energy losses unless the impact speed is large enough to cause uncontained plastic deformation beneath the contact area. Consequently, for low-speed impact rhonu_3^2 (0) / Y , the energetic coefficient of friction e* is insensitive to friction. In analysing impact of multi-body systems (e.g. mechanisms, kinematic chains or agglomerates of granules), it is crucial to employ these ideas by specifically modelling the contact compliance. During impact on a mechanism, the velocity changes in one area of contact induce small displacements that develop at other compliant contacts where the impacted body is supported or connected to other elements; the force that develops at these secondary contacts (as a consequence of relative displacement at each i ndividual contact) is the means of transmitting the impact process through system. Although the global compliance of elements of the system may be small enough so that vibration energy is negligible, the dynamics of multi-body collisions requires consideration of local compliance in each contact regions. Previously impact on a system of interconnected bodies has been analyzed as either a sequence of separate collisions or a set of simultaneous collisions. In general neither of these assumptions gives an accurate representation of the dynamic behaviour of multi-body systems. Rather, it is necessary to model the compliance of each contact and consider the contact forces which develop since it is these forces which prevent interpenetration or overlap. When applied to impact on multi-body systems such as me chanisms, the impulse-momentum methods used in rigid body dynamics give but one limit of the range of response - a range that depends on the distribution of local compliance at each contact between bodies in the system. An accurate analysis of multi-body system response to impact generally requires consideration of the time-dependent contact forces in a wave of reaction that propagates away from the initial site of impact.

  19. PLAN2D - A PROGRAM FOR ELASTO-PLASTIC ANALYSIS OF PLANAR FRAMES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, C.

    1994-01-01

    PLAN2D is a FORTRAN computer program for the plastic analysis of planar rigid frame structures. Given a structure and loading pattern as input, PLAN2D calculates the ultimate load that the structure can sustain before collapse. Element moments and plastic hinge rotations are calculated for the ultimate load. The location of hinges required for a collapse mechanism to form are also determined. The program proceeds in an iterative series of linear elastic analyses. After each iteration the resulting elastic moments in each member are compared to the reserve plastic moment capacity of that member. The member or members that have moments closest to their reserve capacity will determine the minimum load factor and the site where the next hinge is to be inserted. Next, hinges are inserted and the structural stiffness matrix is reformulated. This cycle is repeated until the structure becomes unstable. At this point the ultimate collapse load is calculated by accumulating the minimum load factor from each previous iteration and multiplying them by the original input loads. PLAN2D is based on the program STAN, originally written by Dr. E.L. Wilson at U.C. Berkeley. PLAN2D has several limitations: 1) Although PLAN2D will detect unloading of hinges it does not contain the capability to remove hinges; 2) PLAN2D does not allow the user to input different positive and negative moment capacities and 3) PLAN2D does not consider the interaction between axial and plastic moment capacity. Axial yielding and buckling is ignored as is the reduction in moment capacity due to axial load. PLAN2D is written in FORTRAN and is machine independent. It has been tested on an IBM PC and a DEC MicroVAX. The program was developed in 1988.

  20. A coupled ductile fracture phase-field model for crystal plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez Padilla, Carlos Alberto; Markert, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays crack initiation and evolution play a key role in the design of mechanical components. In the past few decades, several numerical approaches have been developed with the objective to predict these phenomena. The objective of this work is to present a simplified, nonetheless representative phenomenological model to predict the crack evolution of ductile fracture in single crystals. The proposed numerical approach is carried out by merging a conventional elasto-plastic crystal plasticity model and a phase-field model modified to predict ductile fracture. A two-dimensional initial boundary value problem of ductile fracture is introduced considering a single-crystal setup and Nickel-base superalloy material properties. The model is implemented into the finite element context subjected to a quasi-static uniaxial tension test. The results are then qualitatively analyzed and briefly compared to current benchmark results in the literature.

  1. Dynamic fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, A. S.; Ramulu, M.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic fracture and crack propagation concepts for ductile materials are reviewed. The equations for calculating dynamic stress integrity and the dynamic energy release rate in order to study dynamic crack propagation are provided. The stress intensity factor versus crack velocity relation is investigated. The uses of optical experimental techniques and finite element methods for fracture analyses are described. The fracture criteria for a rapidly propagating crack under mixed mode conditions are discussed; crack extension and fracture criteria under combined tension and shear loading are based on maximum circumferential stress or energy criteria such as strain energy density. The development and use of a Dugdale model and finite element models to represent crack and fracture dynamics are examined.

  2. Geometrically Frustrated Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Noah; Koning, Vinzenz; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-03-01

    When a flat elastic sheet is forced to conform to a surface with Gaussian curvature, stresses arise in the sheet. The mismatch between initial and final metrics gives rise to new fracture behavior which cannot be achieved by boundary loading alone. Using experiments of PDMS sheets frustrated on 3D-printed surfaces and a linearized analytical model, we demonstrate the ability of curvature to govern the sheets' fracture phenomenology. In this talk, we first show that curvature can both stimulate and suppress fracture initiation, depending on the position and orientation of the initial slit. Secondly, we show that curvature can steer the path of a crack as it propagates through the material. Lastly, the curvature can arrest cracks which would otherwise continue to propagate.

  3. (Fracture mechanics of porous materials)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L.J.

    1989-09-15

    The primary subject of this trip was the development of a boundary element/finite element analysis system for computational fracture mechanics. The procedures for merging the ORNL/Cornell University boundary element fracture code with the finite element program SESAM were agreed upon, and are currently being implemented. The adopted algorithm relies on the superelement capabilities of the SESAM code. Discussions were held with scientists at the Bergen Scientific Centre on the modeling of fractured rock. A project to develop realistic computer models of naturally occurring fracture patterns is being carried out by a geologist and a physicist; it is expected that these models can be employed in future environmental modeling work. 6 refs.

  4. Modelling the graphite fracture mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquemoud, C.; Marie, S.; Nedelec, M.

    2012-07-01

    In order to define a design criterion for graphite components, it is important to identify the physical phenomena responsible for the graphite fracture, to include them in a more effective modelling. In a first step, a large panel of experiments have been realised in order to build up an important database; results of tensile tests, 3 and 4 point bending tests on smooth and notched specimens have been analysed and have demonstrated an important geometry related effects on the behavior up to fracture. Then, first simulations with an elastic or an elastoplastic bilinear constitutive law have not made it possible to simulate the experimental fracture stress variations with the specimen geometry, the fracture mechanisms of the graphite being at the microstructural scale. That is the reason why a specific F.E. model of the graphite structure has been developed in which every graphite grain has been meshed independently, the crack initiation along the basal plane of the particles as well as the crack propagation and coalescence have been modelled too. This specific model has been used to test two different approaches for fracture initiation: a critical stress criterion and two criteria of fracture mechanic type. They are all based on crystallographic considerations as a global critical stress criterion gave unsatisfactory results. The criteria of fracture mechanic type being extremely unstable and unable to represent the graphite global behaviour up to the final collapse, the critical stress criterion has been preferred to predict the results of the large range of available experiments, on both smooth and notched specimens. In so doing, the experimental observations have been correctly simulated: the geometry related effects on the experimental fracture stress dispersion, the specimen volume effects on the macroscopic fracture stress and the crack propagation at a constant stress intensity factor. In addition, the parameters of the criterion have been related to experimental observations: the local crack initiation stress of 8 MPa corresponds to the non-linearity apparition on the global behavior observed experimentally and the the maximal critical stress defined for the particle of 30 MPa is equivalent to the fracture stress of notched specimens. This innovative combination of crack modelling and a local crystallographic critical stress criterion made it possible to understand that cleavage initiation and propagation in the graphite microstructure was driven by a mean critical stress criterion. (authors)

  5. Fracture mechanics of cellular glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwissler, J. G.; Adams, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    The fracture mechanics of cellular glasses (for the structural substrate of mirrored glass for solr concentrator reflecting panels) are discussed. Commercial and developmental cellular glasses were tested and analyzed using standard testing techniques and models developed from linear fracture mechanics. Two models describing the fracture behavior of these materials were developed. Slow crack growth behavior in cellular glass was found to be more complex than that encountered in dense glasses or ceramics. The crack velocity was found to be strongly dependent upon water vapor transport to the tip of the moving crack. The existence of a static fatigue limit was not conclusively established, however, it is speculated that slow crack growth behavior in Region 1 may be slower, by orders of magnitude, than that found in dense glasses.

  6. Fracture mechanics and corrosion fatigue.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcevily, A. J.; Wei, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state-of-the-art in fracture mechanics, particularly in relation to the study of problems in environment-enhanced fatigue crack growth. The usefulness of this approach in developing understanding of the mechanisms for environmental embrittlement and its engineering utility are discussed. After a brief review of the evolution of the fracture mechanics approach and the study of environmental effects on the fatigue behavior of materials, a study is made of the response of materials to fatigue and corrosion fatigue, the modeling of the mechanisms of the fatigue process is considered, and the application of knowledge of fatigue crack growth to the prediction of the high cycle life of unnotched specimens is illustrated.

  7. On the plumbing system of volcanic complexes: field constraints from the Isle of Skye (UK) and FEM elasto-plastic modelling including gravity and tectonics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistacchi, A.; Pisterna, R.; Romano, V.; Rust, D.; Tibaldi, A.

    2009-04-01

    The plumbing system that connects a sub-volcanic magma reservoir to the surface has been the object of field characterization and mechanical modelling efforts since the pioneering work by Anderson (1936), who produced a detailed account of the spectacular Cullin Cone-sheet Complex (Isle of Skye, UK) and a geometrical and mechanical model aimed at defining the depth to the magma chamber. Since this work, the definition of the stress state in the half space comprised between the magma reservoir and the surface (modelled either as a flat surface or a surface comprising a volcanic edifice) was considered the key point in reconstructing dike propagation paths from the magma chamber. In fact, this process is generally seen as the propagation in an elastic media of purely tensional joints (mode I or opening mode propagation), which follow trajectories perpendicular to the least compressive principal stress axis. Later works generally used different continuum mechanics methodologies (analytic, BEM, FEM) to solve the problem of a pressure source (the magma chamber, either a point source or a finite volume) in an elastic (in some cases heterogeneous) half space (bounded by a flat topography or topped by a "volcano"). All these models (with a few limited exceptions) disregard the effect of the regional stress field, which is caused by tectonic boundary forces and gravitational body load, and consider only the pressure source represented by the magma chamber (review in Gudmundsson, 2006). However, this is only a (sometimes subordinate) component of the total stress field. Grosfils (2007) first introduced the gravitational load (but not tectonic stresses) in an elastic model solved with FEM in a 2D axisymmetric half-space, showing that "failure to incorporate gravitational loading correctly" affect the calculated stress pattern and many of the predictions that can be drawn from the models. In this contribution we report on modelling results that include: 2D axisymmetric or true 3D geometry; gravitational body load; anisotropic tectonic stresses; different shapes and depths of the magma chamber; different overpressure levels in the magma chamber; different shapes of the topographic surface (e.g. flat, volcano, caldera); linear-elastic or elasto-plastic Drucker-Prager rheology. The latter point, which in our opinion constitutes a fundamental improvement in the model, has proven necessary because in a purely elastic model the stress state would rise at levels that cannot be sustained by geologic materials. Particularly around and above the magma chamber, yielding is expected, influencing the stress field in the remaining modelling domain. The non-linear problem has been solved with the commercial finite element package Comsol Multiphysics, using a parametric solver. At the same time, a field structural analysis of the classical Cuillin Cone-sheet Complex has been performed. This analysis has shown that four distinct families of cone sheets of different age do exist. Among these, the sheets with the higher dip angle range (80-65°) are confirmed as purely tensional joints, but those with a lower dip angle range (60-40°) are quite often (when suitable markers are available) associated with a measurable shear component. Combining these new field observations with mechanical modelling results, we propose a new interpretation for the Cuillin Cone Sheet Complex. The plumbing system was composed by both purely tensional joints and mesoscopic faults with a shear component, produced in response to the regional stress field perturbed by the magma chamber, and later passively re-used as magma emplacement conduits. Under this assumption, the observed geometry of the Cuillin Cone-sheet Complex is consistent with a relatively shallow magma chamber with a flattened laccolite shape. The shape of the palaeotopography, now completely eroded, has also been considered, but is more weakly constrained by modelling results. References: Anderson E.M., 1936. The dynamics of the formation of cone-sheets, ring-dykes and cauldron subsidences. Proc R Soc Edinburgh, 56, 128-157. Grosfils E.B., 2007. Magma reservoir failure on the terrestrial planets: Assessing the importance of gravitational loading in simple elastic models. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 166 (2), 47-75. Gudmundsson A. , 2006. How local stresses control magma-chamber ruptures, dyke injections, and eruptions in composite volcanoes. Earth Science Reviews, 79 (1), 1-31.

  8. Structural reliability through fracture mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, G. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-06-01

    This article describes how engineers are using fracture mechanics to help them determine the potential severity of visible and seemingly invisible flaws in mechanical components. Nearly all mechanical engineering components contain flaws, albeit if only at the microscopic level. In service, these flaws can grow into small but visible cracks. To design for structural reliability under these circumstances, an engineer needs to know how and when the crack might grow further and run, with the component ultimately breaking apart. Fracture mechanics is the technology that helps to answer these questions. When cracks do suddenly run, the outcome is often dramatic and sometimes catastrophic. In 1987, while in flight, an aging Aloha Airlines 737 suddenly developed a hole in its side that was bigger than the main cabin door. This failure emphasizes the need for even greater vigilance with respect to this issue; the FAA is responding to this need. In all, fracture mechanics can be expected to play an important role in engineering for years to come.

  9. Theory of fracture mechanics based upon plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    A theory of fracture mechanics is formulated on the foundation of continuum mechanics. Fracture surface is introduced as an unknown quantity and is incorporated into boundary and initial conditions. Surface energy is included in the global form of energy conservation law and the dissipative mechanism is formulated into constitutive equations which indicate the thermodynamic irreversibility and the irreversibility of fracture process as well.

  10. Mechanical Coal-Face Fracturer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Radial points on proposed drill bit take advantage of natural fracture planes of coal. Radial fracture points retracted during drilling and impacted by piston to fracture coal once drilling halts. Group of bits attached to array of pneumatic drivers to fracture large areas of coal face.

  11. Compendium of fracture mechanics problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallworth, R.; Wilson, C.; Meyers, C.

    1990-01-01

    Fracture mechanics analysis results are presented from the following structures/components analyzed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) between 1982 and 1989: space shuttle main engine (SSME), Hubble Space Telescope (HST), external tank attach ring, B-1 stand LOX inner tank, and solid rocket booster (SRB). Results from the SSME high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) second stage blade parametric analysis determine a critical flaw size for a wide variety of stress intensity values. The engine 0212 failure analysis was a time dependent fracture life assessment. Results indicated that the disk ruptured due to an overspeed condition. Results also indicated that very small flaws in the curvic coupling area could propagate and lead to failure under normal operating conditions. It was strongly recommended that a nondestructive evaluation inspection schedule be implemented. The main ring of the HST, scheduled to launch in 1990, was analyzed by safe-life and fail-safe analyses. First safe-life inspection criteria curves for the ring inner and outer skins and the fore and aft channels were derived. Afterwards the skins and channels were determined to be fail-safe by analysis. A conservative safe-life analysis was done on the 270 redesign external tank attach ring. Results from the analysis were used to determine the nondestructive evaluation technique required.

  12. Fracture healing: mechanisms and interventions.

    PubMed

    Einhorn, Thomas A; Gerstenfeld, Louis C

    2015-01-01

    Fractures are the most common large-organ, traumatic injuries to humans. The repair of bone fractures is a postnatal regenerative process that recapitulates many of the ontological events of embryonic skeletal development. Although fracture repair usually restores the damaged skeletal organ to its pre-injury cellular composition, structure and biomechanical function, about 10% of fractures will not heal normally. This article reviews the developmental progression of fracture healing at the tissue, cellular and molecular levels. Innate and adaptive immune processes are discussed as a component of the injury response, as are environmental factors, such as the extent of injury to the bone and surrounding tissue, fixation and the contribution of vascular tissues. We also present strategies for fracture treatment that have been tested in animal models and in clinical trials or case series. The biophysical and biological basis of the molecular actions of various therapeutic approaches, including recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins and parathyroid hormone therapy, are also discussed. PMID:25266456

  13. Fracture healing: mechanisms and interventions

    PubMed Central

    Einhorn, Thomas A.; Gerstenfeld, Louis C.

    2015-01-01

    Fractures are the most common large-organ, traumatic injuries to humans. The repair of bone fractures is a postnatal regenerative process that recapitulates many of the ontological events of embryonic skeletal development. Although fracture repair usually restores the damaged skeletal organ to its pre-injury cellular composition, structure and biomechanical function, about 10% of fractures will not heal normally. This article reviews the developmental progression of fracture healing at the tissue, cellular and molecular levels. Innate and adaptive immune processes are discussed as a component of the injury response, as are environmental factors, such as the extent of injury to the bone and surrounding tissue, fixation and the contribution of vascular tissues. We also present strategies for fracture treatment that have been tested in animal models and in clinical trials or case series. The biophysical and biological basis of the molecular actions of various therapeutic approaches, including recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins and parathyroid hormone therapy, are also discussed. PMID:25266456

  14. Fracture mechanics evaluation of GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    A data base of mechanical and fracture properties for GaAs was generated. The data for single crystal GaAs will be used to design reusable GaAs solar modules. Database information includes; (1) physical property characterizations; (2) fracture behavior evaluations; and (3) strength of cells determined as a function of cell processing and material parameters.

  15. Mechanisms for shrinkage fracturing at Meridiani Planum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watters, W. A.; Squyres, S. W.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the role of water in fracturing at Meridiani Planum with the aim of shedding light on the history of densely-fractured outcroppings of light-toned rocks at low-latitudes on Mars. The fractures that occur throughout the inter-crater plains at Meridiani exhibit many characteristics of shrinkage cracks: they have significant width (i.e., not hairline), commonly connect in 90-degree and 120-degree junctions, and exhibit a "hierarchical" organization: i.e., the longest fractures are widest, and narrower fractures terminate against wider fractures at 90-degree junctions (T-shaped). Using the Pancam and Navcam stereo-pair images acquired by the Opportunity rover, we have measured the geometric scaling of fracture networks at Meridiani (e.g., fracture width vs. fracture separation) as well as the total volume change. We have also characterized the diversity of patterns in detail, as well as the modification of fractures and polygonal "tiles" by wind-blown sand abrasion. Identical observations were carried-out for an analogue site where similar fractures are ubiquitous in the playas of Death Valley, California, and where modification processes are also comparable. By also estimating the expected volume change and results from numerical models of shrinkage fracturing, we evaluate the likelihood of three candidate contraction mechanisms: loss of water bound in hydrated minerals (dehydration), loss of water from pore spaces (desiccation), and contraction from cooling (thermal fracturing). The evidence to date favors the second of these (desiccation); this result would have significant implications for the history of Meridiani since the time when sulfate-rich sediments were deposited.

  16. A Hierarchical Approach to Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saether, Erik; Taasan, Shlomo

    2004-01-01

    Recent research conducted under NASA LaRC's Creativity and Innovation Program has led to the development of an initial approach for a hierarchical fracture mechanics. This methodology unites failure mechanisms occurring at different length scales and provides a framework for a physics-based theory of fracture. At the nanoscale, parametric molecular dynamic simulations are used to compute the energy associated with atomic level failure mechanisms. This information is used in a mesoscale percolation model of defect coalescence to obtain statistics of fracture paths and energies through Monte Carlo simulations. The mathematical structure of predicted crack paths is described using concepts of fractal geometry. The non-integer fractal dimension relates geometric and energy measures between meso- and macroscales. For illustration, a fractal-based continuum strain energy release rate is derived for inter- and transgranular fracture in polycrystalline metals.

  17. Fracture mechanics of snow avalanches.

    PubMed

    Aström, J A; Timonen, J

    2001-07-01

    Dense snow avalanches are analyzed by modeling the snow slab as an elastic and brittle plate, attached by static friction to the underlying ground. The grade of heterogeneity in the local fracture (slip) thresholds, and the ratio of the average substrate slip threshold to the average slab fracture threshold, are the decisive parameters for avalanche dynamics. For a strong pack of snow there appears a stable precursor of local slips when the frictional contacts are weakened (equivalent to rising temperature), which eventually trigger a catastrophic crack growth that suddenly releases the entire slab. In the opposite limit of very high slip thresholds, the slab simply melts when the temperature is increased. In the intermediate regime, and for a homogeneous slab, the model display features typical of real snow avalanches. The model also suggests an explanation to why avalanches are impossible to forecast reliably based on precursor observations. This explanation may as well be applicable to other catastrophic rupture phenomena such as earthquakes. PMID:11461247

  18. Rabotnov damageparameter and description of delayed fracture: Results, current status, application to fracture mechanics, and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, L. V.; Igonin, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a review of studies of delayed fracture and fracture mechanics problems in which the hypotheses and ideas of Yu. N. Rabotnov and L. M. Kachanov on the mechanisms of delayed fracture under creep conditions are extended to describe fracture processes using scalar and tensor measures of damage. The results of current research in the theory of elasticity, the mathematical theory of plasticity and creep, the mechanics of composites, and linear and nonlinear fracture mechanics, with material damage taken into account.

  19. Fracture Mechanism Maps in Unirradiated and Irradiated Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Meimei; Zinkle, Steven J

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for computing a fracture mechanism map in two-dimensional space of tensile stress and temperature using physically-based constitutive equations. Four principal fracture mechanisms were considered: cleavage fracture, low temperature ductile fracture, transgranular creep fracture, and intergranular creep fracture. The methodology was applied to calculate fracture mechanism maps for several selected reactor materials, CuCrZr, 316 type stainless steel, F82H ferritic-martensitic steel, V4Cr4Ti and Mo. The calculated fracture maps are in good agreement with empirical maps obtained from experimental observations. The fracture mechanism maps of unirradiated metals and alloys were modified to include radiation hardening effects on cleavage fracture and high temperature helium embrittlement. Future refinement of fracture mechanism maps is discussed.

  20. Failure mechanism models for ductile fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Abhijit; Hu, Jun M.

    1992-12-01

    This tutorial illustrates design situations where ductile fracture of some components can compromise system performance, thereby acting as an overstress failure mechanism. Analytic (physics-of-failure) methods, based on continuum fracture-mechanics principles, are presented to design against such failures. Examples illustrate the use of these models in practical design situations in mechanical engineering and electronic packaging. The design equations are based on continuum mechanics rather than on molecular micro-mechanics, and can be implemented in an engineering design environment. The associated stress-analysis often requires numerical finite-element techniques. The methods for material-property characterizations have matured appreciably over the past 40 years and are specified in engineering handbooks.

  1. A review of fracture mechanics life technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Besuner, P. M.; Harris, D. O.; Thomas, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Lifetime prediction technology for structural components subjected to cyclic loads is examined. The central objectives of the project are: (1) to report the current state of the art, and (2) recommend future development of fracture mechanics-based analytical tools for modeling subcritical fatigue crack growth in structures. Of special interest is the ability to apply these tools to practical engineering problems and the developmental steps necessary to bring vital technologies to this stage. The authors conducted a survey of published literature and numerous discussions with experts in the field of fracture mechanics life technology. One of the key points made is that fracture mechanics analyses of crack growth often involve consideration of fatigue and fracture under extreme conditions. Therefore, inaccuracies in predicting component lifetime will be dominated by inaccuracies in environment and fatigue crack growth relations, stress intensity factor solutions, and methods used to model given loads and stresses. Suggestions made for reducing these inaccuracies include development of improved models of subcritical crack growth, research efforts aimed at better characterizing residual and assembly stresses that can be introduced during fabrication, and more widespread and uniform use of the best existing methods.

  2. Computational simulation methods for composite fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1988-01-01

    Structural integrity, durability, and damage tolerance of advanced composites are assessed by studying damage initiation at various scales (micro, macro, and global) and accumulation and growth leading to global failure, quantitatively and qualitatively. In addition, various fracture toughness parameters associated with a typical damage and its growth must be determined. Computational structural analysis codes to aid the composite design engineer in performing these tasks were developed. CODSTRAN (COmposite Durability STRuctural ANalysis) is used to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the progressive damage occurring in composite structures due to mechanical and environmental loads. Next, methods are covered that are currently being developed and used at Lewis to predict interlaminar fracture toughness and related parameters of fiber composites given a prescribed damage. The general purpose finite element code MSC/NASTRAN was used to simulate the interlaminar fracture and the associated individual as well as mixed-mode strain energy release rates in fiber composites.

  3. Some contribution to process zone fracture mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, H.; Kikuchi, M.; Kubo, M.

    1990-09-01

    The mechanism of the ductile fracture is studied theoretically for the Al Alloy 7075-T6 specimens. A model for the interaction of a crack tip with a void nearby is analyzed by using the Modified Gurson's Model. Taking fracture criterion into consideration, the analysis of a crack propagation is carried out and besides the distribution of the equivalent plastic strain, the void volume fraction f and the localization are obtained. Microcracks nucleate on the ligament between crack and void, and grow and coalesce each other, and at last the main crack thus formed coalesces with the void and the coalescence of the crack and void is completed. And these phenomenon occurs in the localized region. The initiation of the microcrack of 7075 occurs at small J and the microcrack penetration between crack and void occurs at larger J, and the propagation does not occur smoothly. These results coincide with the results of the experiments by FRASTA (FRActure Surface Topographic Analysis) and Fractography.

  4. Applications of advanced fracture mechanics to fuselage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanninen, M. F.; O'Donoghue, P. E.; Green, S. T.; Leung, C. P.; Roy, S.; Burnside, O. H.

    Multi-site damage (MSD) in the form of cracking at rivet holes in lap splice joints has been identified as a serious threat to the integrity of commercial aircraft nearing their design life targets. Consequently, to assure the safety of aircraft that have accumulated large numbers of flights, flight hours and years in service requires requires inspection procedures that are based on the possibility that MSD may be present. For inspections of aircraft components to be properly focused on me defect sizes that are critical for structural integrity, fracture analyses are needed. The current methods are essentially those of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) which are strictly valid only for cracks that extend in a quasi-static manner under small-scale crack tip plasticity conditions. While LEFM is very likely to be appropriate for subcritical crack growth, quantifying the conditions for fracture instability and subsequent propagation may require advanced fracture mechanics techniques. The specific focus in this paper was to identify the conditions in which inelastic-dynamic effects occur in (1) the linking up Of local damage in a lap splice joint to form a major crack, and (2) large-scale fuselage failure by a rapidly occurring fluid structure interaction process.

  5. Coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical analyses of the YuccaMountain Drift Scale Test - Comparison of field measurements topredictions of four different numerical models

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.; Barr, D.; Datta, R.; Gens, A.; Millard, A.; Olivella, S.; Tsang, C.-F.; Tsang, Y.

    2004-08-30

    The Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test (DST) is a multiyear, large-scale underground heater test designed to study coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical behavior in unsaturated fractured and welded tuff. As part of the international cooperative code-comparison project DECOVALEX, four research teams used four different numerical models to simulate and predict coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes at the DST. The simulated processes included above-boiling temperature changes, liquid and vapor water movements, rock-mass stress and displacement, and THM-induced changes in fracture permeability. Model predictions were evaluated by comparison to measurements of temperature, water saturation,displacement, and air permeability. The generally good agreement between simulated and measured THM data shows that adopted continuum model approaches are adequate for simulating relevant coupled THM processes at the DST. Moreover, TM-induced rock-mass deformations were reasonably well predicted using elastic models, although some individual displacements appeared to be better captured using an elasto-plastic model. It is concluded that fracture closure/opening caused by change in normal stress across fractures is the dominant mechanism for TM-induced changes in intrinsic fracture permeability at the DST, whereas fracture shear dilation appears to be less significant. This indicates that TM-induced changes in intrinsic permeability at the DST, which are within one order of magnitude, tend to be reversible.

  6. Determining Individual Phase Flow Properties in a Quench and Partitioning Steel with In Situ High-Energy X-Ray Diffraction and Multiphase Elasto-Plastic Self-Consistent Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaohua; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Sun, Xin; Ren, Yang; Wang, Yangdong

    2016-02-01

    The micromechanical properties of the constituent phases were characterized for advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) produced by a quenching and partitioning (Q&P) process with in situ tensile loading under synchrotron-based, high-energy X-ray diffraction. The constituent phases present are retained austenite and three martensites (tempered, untampered, and freshly formed martensites). For the material investigated, the 200 and 220 lattice strains of the retained austenite phase were calculated by examining the changes of the X-ray diffraction peak positions during deformation. The 200 and 211 lattice strains of the various martensitic phases with similar crystal structures were determined by separating their overlapped diffraction peaks. Apart from tempered and untempered martensite, the diffraction peaks of freshly formed martensite as a result of austenite-to-martensite transformation can also be separated due to a high initial austenite volume fraction. The phase stresses are first estimated with an empirical relationship through the X-ray diffraction elastic constants. A multiphase elasto-plastic self-consistent model is next used for more accurate determination of the constitutive behaviors of the various phases by comparing the predicted lattice strain distributions and global stress-strain curves with the measured ones. The determined constitutive laws will be used for microstructure-based modeling for sheet formability of the Q&P AHSS steel.

  7. Analogy between fluid cavitation and fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mullen, R. L.; Braun, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    When the stresses imposed on a fluid are sufficiently large, rupture or cavitation can occur. Such conditions can exist in many two-phase flow applications, such as the choked flows, which can occur in seals and bearings. Nonspherical bubbles with large aspect ratios have been observed in fluids under rapid acceleration and high shear fields. These bubbles are geometrically similar to fracture surface patterns (Griffith crack model) existing in solids. Analogies between crack growth in solid and fluid cavitation are proposed and supported by analysis and observation (photographs). Healing phenomena (void condensation), well accepted in fluid mechanics, have been observed in some polymers and hypothesized in solid mechanics. By drawing on the strengths of the theories of solid mechanics and cavitation, a more complete unified theory can be developed.

  8. Fracture mechanics methodology: Evaluation of structural components integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sih, G. C.; de Oliveira Faria, L.

    1984-09-01

    The application of fracture mechanics to structural-design problems is discussed in lectures presented in the AGARD Fracture Mechanics Methodology course held in Lisbon, Portugal, in June 1981. The emphasis is on aeronautical design, and chapters are included on fatigue-life prediction for metals and composites, the fracture mechanics of engineering structural components, failure mechanics and damage evaluation of structural components, flaw-acceptance methods, and reliability in probabilistic design. Graphs, diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  9. Fracture mechanics parameters for small fatigue cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a review of some common small-crack test specimens, the underlying causes of the small-crack effect, and the fracture-mechanics parameters that have been used to correlate or predict their growth behavior. This review concentrates on continuum mechanics concepts and on the nonlinear behavior of small cracks. The paper reviews some stress-intensity factor solutions for small-crack test specimens and develops some simple elastic-plastic J integral and cyclic J integral expressions that include the influence of crack-closure. These parameters were applied to small-crack growth data on two aluminum alloys, and a fatigue life prediction methodology is demonstrated. For these materials, the crack-closure transient from the plastic wake was found to be the major factor in causing the small-crack effect.

  10. Patterns and perspectives in applied fracture mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Merkle, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    This lecture begins with a overview of applied fracture mechanics pertinent to safety of pressure vessels. It then progresses to a chronological panorama of experimental and analytical results. To be useful and dependable in safety analysis of real structures, new analysis developments must be physically realistic, which means that they must accurately describe physical cause and effect. Consequently, before mathematical modeling can begin, cause and effect must be established from experimental data. This can be difficult and time consuming, but worth the effort. Accordingly, the theme of this paper is that the search for patterns is constant and vital. This theme is illustrated by the development of small, single-specimen, fracture toughness testing techniques. It is also illustrated by the development, based on two different published large-strain, elastic-plastic, three-dimensional finite-element analyses, of a hypothesis concerning three-dimensional loss of constraint. When a generalization of Irwin`s thickness-normalized plastic-zone parameter, reaches a value close to 2{pi}, the through-thickness contraction strain at the apex of the near-tip logarithmic-spiral slip-line region becomes the dominant negative strain accommodating crack opening. Because slip lines passing from the midplane to the stress-free side surfaces do not have to curve, once these slip lines are established, stresses near the crack tip are only elevated by strain hardening and constraint becomes significantly relaxed. This hypothesis, based on published three-dimensional elastic-plastic analyses, provides a potentially valuable means for gaining additional insight into constraint effects on fracture toughness by considering the roles played by the plastic strains as well as the stresses that develop near a crack tip.

  11. Mechanics of fracture - Fundamentals and some recent developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Subramonian, N.; Lee, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    An overview is presented of the fundamental aspects of and recent developments in fracture mechanics. Reference is made to linear elastic fracture mechanics including the state of stresses and displacements in the vicinity of cracks, effects of crack geometry and orientation on stress intensity factors, energy balance of Griffith, Irwin's stress intensity concept, and linear elastic fracture mechanics testing for fracture toughness. Other aspects of this paper include the non-linear behavior of materials and their influence on fracture mechanics parameters, consideration of viscoelasticity and plasticity, non-linear fracture toughness parameters as C.O.D., R-curve and J-integral, and a non-linear energy method, proposed by Liebowitz. Finite element methods applied to fracture mechanics problems are indicated. Also, consideration has been given to slow crack growth, dynamic effects on K(IC), Sih's criterion for fracture, Lee and Liebowitz's criterion relating crack growth with plastic energy, and applications of fracture mechanics to aircraft design. Suggestions are offered for future research efforts to be undertaken in fracture mechanics.

  12. Mechanical Behavior of Carbide-free Medium Carbon Bainitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Xu, Guang; Wang, Xiang; Embury, David; Bouaziz, Olivier; Purdy, Gary R.; Zurob, Hatem S.

    2013-11-01

    The effect of bainitic transformation time on the microstructure and mechanical properties was investigated in a steel containing 0.4 pct C-2.8 pct Mn-1.8 pct Si. The microstructure was characterized using optical and transmission electron microscopy; it consisted of bainitic ferrite, martensite, and retained austenite. The volume fraction of bainite increased from 0.4 for the shortest bainitic transformation time (30 minutes) to 0.9 at the longest time (120 minutes). The above microstructures exhibited an extended elasto-plastic transition leading to very high initial work-hardening rates. The work-hardening behavior was investigated in detail using strain-path reversals to measure the back stresses. These measurements point to a substantial kinematic hardening due to the mechanical contrast between the microstructural constituents. The onset of necking coincided with the saturation of kinematic hardening. Examination of the fracture surfaces indicated that the prior austenite grain boundaries play an important role in the fracture process.

  13. Solution-adaptive finite element method in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element method in linear elastic two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element method for validating the applications of new methodology to fracture mechanics problems by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  14. Application of fracture mechanics on the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Hu, T.

    1984-01-01

    During the design stages of the shuttle orbiter, fracture-mechanics concepts were applied extensively to the highly stressed areas of the structure. This was the first space program to require a comprehensive fracture mechanics approach to prevent structural failures from crack or crack-like defects. As anticipated, some difficult problems were encountered. This paper briefly describes some of them together with the procedure used for fracture control on the orbiter. It is believed that the principles and methods as presented herein can serve as an example of fracture control for aerospace and other industries.

  15. Breakdown of Continuum Fracture Mechanics at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Takahiro; Ouchi, Kenji; Chihara, Yuu; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2015-02-01

    Materials fail by the nucleation and propagation of a crack, the critical condition of which is quantitatively described by fracture mechanics that uses an intensity of singular stress field characteristically formed near the crack-tip. However, the continuum assumption basing fracture mechanics obscures the prediction of failure of materials at the nanoscale due to discreteness of atoms. Here, we demonstrate the ultimate dimensional limit of fracture mechanics at the nanoscale, where only a small number of atoms are included in a singular field of continuum stress formed near a crack tip. Surprisingly, a singular stress field of only several nanometers still governs fracture as successfully as that at the macroscale, whereas both the stress intensity factor and the energy release rate fail to describe fracture below a critically confined singular field of 2-3 nm, i.e., breakdown of fracture mechanics within the framework of the continuum theory. We further propose an energy-based theory that explicitly accounts for the discrete nature of atoms, and demonstrate that our theory not only successfully describes fracture even below the critical size but also seamlessly connects the atomic to macroscales. It thus provides a more universal fracture criterion, and novel atomistic insights into fracture.

  16. Breakdown of Continuum Fracture Mechanics at the Nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Takahiro; Ouchi, Kenji; Chihara, Yuu; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Materials fail by the nucleation and propagation of a crack, the critical condition of which is quantitatively described by fracture mechanics that uses an intensity of singular stress field characteristically formed near the crack-tip. However, the continuum assumption basing fracture mechanics obscures the prediction of failure of materials at the nanoscale due to discreteness of atoms. Here, we demonstrate the ultimate dimensional limit of fracture mechanics at the nanoscale, where only a small number of atoms are included in a singular field of continuum stress formed near a crack tip. Surprisingly, a singular stress field of only several nanometers still governs fracture as successfully as that at the macroscale, whereas both the stress intensity factor and the energy release rate fail to describe fracture below a critically confined singular field of 2–3 nm, i.e., breakdown of fracture mechanics within the framework of the continuum theory. We further propose an energy-based theory that explicitly accounts for the discrete nature of atoms, and demonstrate that our theory not only successfully describes fracture even below the critical size but also seamlessly connects the atomic to macroscales. It thus provides a more universal fracture criterion, and novel atomistic insights into fracture. PMID:25716684

  17. Integration of NDE Reliability and Fracture Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, F. L.; Doctor, S. R.; Heas!er, P. G.; Morris, C. J.; Pitman, S. G.; Selby, G. P.; Simonen, F. A.

    1981-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting a four-phase program for measuring and evaluating the effectiveness and reliability of in-service inspection (lSI} performed on the primary system piping welds of commercial light water reactors (LWRs). Phase I of the program is complete. A survey was made of the state of practice for ultrasonic rsr of LWR primary system piping welds. Fracture mechanics calculations were made to establish required nondestrutive testing sensitivities. In general, it was found that fatigue flaws less than 25% of wall thickness would not grow to failure within an inspection interval of 10 years. However, in some cases failure could occur considerably faster. Statistical methods for predicting and measuring the effectiveness and reliability of lSI were developed and will be applied in the "Round Robin Inspections" of Phase II. Methods were also developed for the production of flaws typical of those found in service. Samples fabricated by these methods wilI be used in Phase II to test inspection effectiveness and reliability. Measurements were made of the influence of flaw characteristics {i.e., roughness, tightness, and orientation) on inspection reliability. These measurernents, as well as the predictions of a statistical model for inspection reliability, indicate that current reporting and recording sensitivities are inadequate.

  18. Compressive fracture morphology and mechanism of metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2013-11-01

    We quantitatively investigated the fracture morphologies of Zr52.5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10Ti5 and Pd78Cu6Si16 metallic glasses (MGs) under compression. The characteristic features of the compressive fracture morphology were captured, and the shear vein patterns were found to be not a one-to-one correspondence between two opposing fracture surfaces in an identical sample. This finding experimentally confirms that the compressive failure behaves in a fracture mode of pure shear (mode II). Quantitative measurements show that a ˜1 μm thickness layer with materials not only inside but also adjacent to the major shear band contributes to the formation of shear vein patterns. The critical shear strain to break a shear band was found to be more than 105% and higher in more ductile MGs under compression than tension. Estimation on the temperature rise at the fracture moment indicates that only ˜5% of the total elastic energy stored in the sample converts into the heat required for melting the layer to form the vein patterns. The mode II fracture toughness was also estimated based on the quantitative measurements of shear vein pattern and found larger than the mode I fracture toughness. Finally, the deformation and fracture mechanisms of MGs under tension and compression were compared and discussed. These results may improve the understanding on the fracture behaviors and mechanisms of MGs and may provide instructions on future design for ductile MGs with high resistance for fracture.

  19. Chemical and Mechanical Alteration of Fractured Caprock Under Reactive Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhoury, J. E.; Ameli, P.; Detwiler, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Permeability evolution of fractures depends on chemical and mechanical processes. Stress perturbations lead to mechanical deformation and fracture propagation that can increase formation permeability. Chemical disequilibrium between fluids and resident minerals leads to dissolution and precipitation that further alter fracture porosity and permeability. The ability to predict whether these coupled chemical and mechanical processes will enhance or diminish fracture permeability remains elusive. Here, we present results from reactive-transport experiments in fractured anhydrite cores, with significant alteration of the rock matrix, where only the flow rate differed. For high flow rate, the transformation of anhydrite to gypsum occurred uniformly within the fracture leading to compaction and a two-order-of-magnitude decrease in permeability. For low flow rate, rock-fluid reactions proceeded to near equilibrium within the fracture with preferential flow paths persisting over the 6-month duration of the experiment and a negligible change in permeability. Anticipating such permeability evolution is critical for successful geologic CO2 sequestration and waste injection. Additionally, reactive alteration of the porous matrix bounding fractures will influence the strength of earthquake fault zones. Comparison of the aperture field before (a) and after (b) the reactive flow-through experiment at low flow rate. a) Aperture field from optical profilometry measurements of the fracture surfaces. b) Inferred aperture from x-ray computed tomography scans. Color scale I (blue) denotes mainly unaltered regions of the fracture and/or aperture < 200 μm. Color scale II (green/yellow) denotes reacted regions of the fracture surfaces and the matrix adjacent to the fracture. Persistent flow paths are clearly observed in panel (b) (color scale III corresponds to aperture > 200 μm) leading to negligible change in permeability after a 6-month run.

  20. Fracture Mechanics for Composites: State of the Art and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Krueger, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    Interlaminar fracture mechanics has proven useful for characterizing the onset of delaminations in composites and has been used with limited success primarily to investigate onset in fracture toughness specimens and laboratory size coupon type specimens. Future acceptance of the methodology by industry and certification authorities however, requires the successful demonstration of the methodology on the structural level. In this paper, the state-of-the-art in fracture toughness characterization, and interlaminar fracture mechanics analysis tools are described. To demonstrate the application on the structural level, a panel was selected which is reinforced with stringers. Full implementation of interlaminar fracture mechanics in design however remains a challenge and requires a continuing development effort of codes to calculate energy release rates and advancements in delamination onset and growth criteria under mixed mode conditions.

  1. Constraints on the mantle and lithosphere dynamics from the observed geoid with the effect of visco-elasto-plastic rheology in the upper 300 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osei Tutu, Anthony; Steinberger, Bernhard; Rogozhina, Irina; Sobolev, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decades rheological properties of the Earth's mantle and lithosphere have been extensively studied using numerical models calibrated versus a range of surface observations (e.g., free-air-gravity anomaly/geoid, dynamic topography, plate velocity, etc.).The quality of model predictions however strongly depends on the simplifying assumptions, spatial resolution and parameterizations adopted by numerical models. The geoid is largely (Hager & Richards, 1989) determined by both the density anomalies driving the mantle flow and the dynamic topography at the Earth surface and the core-mantle boundary. This is the effect of the convective processes within the Earth's mantle. The remainder is mostly due to strong heterogeneities in the lithospheric mantle and the crust, which also need to be taken into account. The surface topography caused by density anomalies both in the sub-lithospheric mantle and within the lithosphere also depends on the lithosphere rheology. Here we investigate the effects of complex lithosphere rheology on the modelled dynamic topography, geoid and plate motion using a spectral mantle flow code (Hager & O'Connell, 1981) considering radial viscosity distribution and a fully coupled code of the lithosphere and mantle accounting for strong heterogeneities in the upper mantle rheology in the 300 km depths (Popov & Sobolev, 2008). This study is the first step towards linking global mantle dynamics with lithosphere dynamics using the observed geoid as a major constraint. Here we present the results from both codes and compare them with the observed geoid, dynamic topography and plate velocities from GPS measurements. This method allows us to evaluate the effects of plate rheology (e.g., strong plate interiors and weak plate margins) and stiff subducted lithosphere on these observables (i.e. geoid, topography, plate boundary stresses) as well as on plate motion. This effort will also serve as a benchmark of the two existing numerical methods used. Finally, given significant dispersion of geodynamic predictions from different seismic tomography models currently available, we further look for seismic models that provide predictions closest to observations at both regional and global scales. References 1. Hager B.H & O'Connell R.J., 1981. A simple global model of plate dynamics and mantle convection, J.Geophys. Res. 86, 4843-4867 2. Popov A.A., Sobolev S.V., 2008. SLIM3D: A tool for three-dimensional thermo- mechanical modelling of lithospheric deformation with elasto-visco-plastic rheology, J.pepi.2008.03.007 3. Steinberger B., 2014. Dynamic topography: A comparison between observations and models based on seismic tomography. (Submitted) 4. Becker T and Boschi L., 2002, A comparison of tomographic and geodynamic mantle models. , J.Geophys. Res. 115, 0148-0227

  2. Use of fractography and sectioning techniques to study fracture mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Stone, R. H.; Cox, T. B.

    1976-01-01

    Recent investigations of the effect of microstructure on the fracture mechanisms and fracture toughness of steels, aluminum alloys, and titanium alloys have used standard fractographic techniques and a sectioning technique on specimens plastically deformed to various strains up to fracture. The specimens are prepared metallographically for observation in both optical and electron beam instruments. This permits observations to be made about the fracture mechanism as it occurs in thick sections and helps remove speculation from the interpretation of fractographic features. This technique may be used in conjunction with other standard techniques such as extraction replicas and microprobe analyses. Care must be taken to make sure that the microstructural features which are observed to play a role in the fracture process using the sectioning technique can be identified with fractography.

  3. Fracture mechanics /Dryden Lecture/. [aerospace structural design applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardrath, H. F.

    1974-01-01

    A historical outline of the engineering discipline of fracture mechanics is presented, and current analytical procedures are summarized. The current status of the discipline is assessed, and engineering applications are discussed, along with recommended directions for future study.

  4. A nonlinear high temperature fracture mechanics basis for strainrange partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, Takayuki; Halford, Gary R.

    1989-01-01

    A direct link was established between Strainrange Partitioning (SRP) and high temperature fracture mechanics by deriving the general SRP inelastic strain range versus cyclic life relationships from high temperature, nonlinear, fracture mechanics considerations. The derived SRP life relationships are in reasonable agreement based on the experience of the SRP behavior of many high temperature alloys. In addition, fracture mechanics has served as a basis for derivation of the Ductility-Normalized SRP life equations, as well as for examination of SRP relations that are applicable to thermal fatigue life prediction. Areas of additional links between nonlinear fracture mechanics and SRP were identified for future exploration. These include effects of multiaxiality as well as low strain, nominally elastic, long life creep fatigue interaction.

  5. Application of fracture mechanics to graphite under complex stress conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yahr, G. T.; Valachovic, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the applicability of linear-elastic fracture mechanics to graphite under multiaxial stress conditions. The specimens were thick-walled graphite cylinders with flat heads which were internally pressurized. Two series of specimens were used. The first series had complete circumferential notches machined diagonally into the head-cylinder juncture region, while the second series was unnotched. The methods of linear-elastic fracture mechanics and a finite-element analysis were used to predict pressures to cause fracture for both notched and unnotched specimens.

  6. Algorithms for elasto-plastic-creep postbuckling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, J.; Tovichakchaikul, S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper considers the development of an improved constrained time stepping scheme which can efficiently and stably handle the pre-post-buckling behavior of general structure subject to high temperature environments. Due to the generality of the scheme, the combined influence of elastic-plastic behavior can be handled in addition to time dependent creep effects. This includes structural problems exhibiting indefinite tangent properties. To illustrate the capability of the procedure, several benchmark problems employing finite element analyses are presented. These demonstrate the numerical efficiency and stability of the scheme. Additionally, the potential influence of complex creep histories on the buckling characteristics is considered.

  7. Finite deformation of elasto-plastic solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osias, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical basis is established for analysis of finite deformation of metals. The observation that finite deformation of such elastoplastic materials may be viewed as a process rather than an event leads to derivation of a complete initial and boundary value problem distinguished by its quasilinear nature. This feature of the formulation motivates adoption of an incremental approach to numerical problem solving. Numerical solution capability is established for problems of plane stress and plane strain. The validity of the theory and numerical analysis is demonstrated by consideration of a number of problems of homogeneous finite deformation for which analytic solutions are available. Subsequently the analysis is employed for the investigation of necking in flat metal tensile bars. The results of this investigation provide the first full numerical solutions for tensile necking in plane stress and plane strain. In addition a basis is provided for assessment of the validity of stress-strain relations inferred from tensile test data.

  8. Study of thermo-hydro-mechanical processes at a potential site of an Indian nuclear waste repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwar, Sachin; Verma, A. K.; Singh, T. N.; Bajpai, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    A detailed scientific study is required for the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes because they generate extremely high heat during their half-life period. Although, several methods have been proposed for the disposal of nuclear wastes, deep underground repository is considered to be a suitable option. In this paper, field investigation has been done near to Bhima basin of peninsular India. Detailed fracture analysis near the borehole shows very prominent maxima of fractures striking N55∘E coinciding with the trace of master basement cover metasediment fault. Physico-mechanical properties of rocks have been determined in the laboratory. The host rock chosen is granite and engineered barrier near the canister is proposed to be clay. A thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) analysis has been done to study the effect of heat on deformations, stresses and pore-pressure variation in granite and clay barriers. For this purpose, finite difference method has been used. Suitable rheological models have been used to model elastic canister and elasto-plastic engineered barrier and host rock. It has been found that both temperature and stresses at any point in the rockmass is below the design criteria which are 100∘C for temperature and 0.2 for damage number.

  9. Formation stability after hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanastasiou, Panos

    1999-12-01

    This paper investigates stress changes resulting from fracturing in a weak formation and estimates the reduced risk of formation failure. The analysis is based on fracture propagation and closure of a plane strain elasto-plastic fracture. It is shown that during fracture propagation the area near the fracture tip undergoes plastic deformation, with the result that the in situ stresses there are significantly reduced from the original compressive state. The stress relief is driven by the reduction of the minimum in situ stress and the consistency condition which requires the stress state to remain on the yield or failure envelope. After fracture closure, due to permanent deformation the stress state does not return to its original state, as in the case of elastic material. The risk of formation failure, which is quantified with the introduction of a yield factor, is significantly reduced after fracturing and closure. The residual width from plastic deformation results in a non-uniform closure stress on proppant with higher values near the tip and lower value near the wellbore which is detrimental to the stability of proppant. The closure stress becomes more uniform with increasing fracture length.

  10. Work of fracture of a composite resin: fracture-toughening mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baudin, Carmen; Osorio, Raquel; Toledano, Manuel; de Aza, Salvador

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate those mechanical parameters able to describe the fracture behavior of dental composite resins. A commercially available fine-particle micro-hybrid resin composite was used. Classical parameters as Young's modulus, strength distribution, and critical stress intensity factor were considered. Strength values were determined using the diametrical compression of discs test and for the critical stress intensity factor both unstable and controlled fracture tests were used. Controlled fracture tests allowed determining the work of fracture. Microstructure was studied by optical and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The obtained properties have been Young's modulus, 17.7 +/- 0.6 GPa; Weibull modulus, m = 14 (upper and lower limits for 90% confidence: 17 and 10); characteristic strength 51 MPa (upper and lower limits for 90% confidence: 53 and 49 MPa); critical stress intensity factor in mode I, K(IC) = 1.3 +/- 0.1 and work of fracture, gamma(wof) = 8-9 J/m(2). Pores and bubbles formed during the packing of the composite were identified as critical defects in the tested specimens. Crack deflection and branching have been identified as toughening mechanisms. Classical mechanical parameters (Young's modulus, hardness...) are not able to efficiently predict the major clinical failure mode of composite resins by fatigue. Work of fracture analysis, which is dependant on microstructural parameters such as particle size and shape, have to be included when testing mechanical properties of dental composite resins in future research studies. PMID:18465813

  11. Mechanics of dynamic fracture in notched polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faye, Anshul; Parmeswaran, Venkitanarayanan; Basu, Sumit

    2015-04-01

    Fracture toughness of brittle amorphous polymers (e.g. polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)) has been reported to decrease with loading rate at moderate rates and increase abruptly thereafter to close to 5 times the static value at very high loading rates. Dynamic fracture toughness that is much higher than the static values has attractive technological possibilities. However, the reasons for the sharp increase remain unclear. Motivated by these observations, the present work focuses on the dynamic fracture behavior of polycarbonate (PC), which is also an amorphous polymer but unlike PMMA, is ductile at room temperature. Towards this end, a combined experimental and numerical approach is adopted. Dynamic fracture experiments at various loading rates are conducted on single edge notched (SEN) specimens with a notch of radius 150 μm, using a Hopkinson bar setup equipped with ultra high-speed imaging (>105 fps) for real-time observation of dynamic processes during fracture. Concurrently, 3D dynamic finite element simulations are performed using a well calibrated material model for PC. Experimentally, we were able to clearly capture the intricate details of the process, for both slowly and dynamically loaded samples, of damage nucleation and growth ahead of the notch tip followed by unstable crack propagation. These observations coupled with fractography and computer simulations led us to conclude that in PC, the fracture toughness remains invariant with loading rate at Jfrac = 12 ± 3 kN / m for the entire range of loading rates (J ˙) from static to 1 ×106 kN / m - s. However, the damage initiation toughness is significantly higher in dynamic loading compared to static situations. In dynamic situations, damage nucleation is quickly followed by initiation of radial crazes from around the void periphery that initiate and quickly bridge the ligament between the initial damaged region and the notch. Thus for PC, two criteria for two major stages in the failure process emerge. Firstly, a mean stress based defect initiation is suggested. The value of the critical mean stress for defect initiation under dynamic loading is found to be 115±5 MPa, which is significantly higher than its static value of 80 MPa. The critical normal plastic stretch needed for crazes to nucleate from the nucleated defect is estimated to be about 1.78±0.2.

  12. Fracture mechanics of monolayer molybdenum disulfide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaonan; Tabarraei, Alireza; Spearot, Douglas E

    2015-05-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) modeling is used to study the fracture toughness and crack propagation path of monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS(2)) sheets under mixed modes I and II loading. Sheets with both initial armchair and zigzag cracks are studied. The MD simulations predict that crack edge chirality, tip configuration and the loading phase angle influence the fracture toughness and crack propagation path of monolayer MoS(2) sheets. Furthermore, under all loading conditions, both armchair and zigzag cracks prefer to extend along a zigzag path, which is in agreement with the crack propagation path in graphene. A remarkable out-of-plane buckling can occur during mixed mode loading which can lead to the development of buckling cracks in addition to the propagation of the initial cracks. PMID:25834943

  13. Fracture mechanics of monolayer molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaonan; Tabarraei, Alireza; Spearot, Douglas E.

    2015-05-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) modeling is used to study the fracture toughness and crack propagation path of monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) sheets under mixed modes I and II loading. Sheets with both initial armchair and zigzag cracks are studied. The MD simulations predict that crack edge chirality, tip configuration and the loading phase angle influence the fracture toughness and crack propagation path of monolayer MoS2 sheets. Furthermore, under all loading conditions, both armchair and zigzag cracks prefer to extend along a zigzag path, which is in agreement with the crack propagation path in graphene. A remarkable out-of-plane buckling can occur during mixed mode loading which can lead to the development of buckling cracks in addition to the propagation of the initial cracks.

  14. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics of compact bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiahau

    Bone is a composite composed mainly of organics, minerals and water. Most studies on the fracture toughness of bone have been conducted at room temperature. Considering that the body temperature of animals is higher than room temperature, and that bone has a high volumetric percentage of organics (generally, 35--50%), the effect of temperature on fracture toughness of bone should be studied. Single-edged V-shaped notched (SEVN) specimens were prepared to measure the fracture toughness of bovine femur and manatee rib in water at 0, 10, 23, 37 and 50°C. The fracture toughness of bovine femur and manatee rib were found to decrease from 7.0 to 4.3 MPa·m1/2 and from 5.5 to 4.1 MPa·m1/2, respectively, over a temperature range of 50°C. The decreases were attributed to inability of the organics to sustain greater stresses at higher temperatures. We studied the effects of water and organics on fracture toughness of bone using water-free and organics-free SEVN specimens at 23°C. Water-free and organics-free specimens were obtained by placing fresh bone specimen in a furnace at different temperatures. Water and organics significantly affected the fracture toughness of bone. Fracture toughness of the water-free specimens was 44.7% (bovine femur) and 32.4% (manatee rib) less than that of fresh-bone specimens. Fracture toughness of the organics-free specimens was 92.7% (bovine femur) and 91.5% (manatee rib) less than that of fresh bone specimens. Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) is widely used to study bone. However, bone often has small to moderate scale yielding during testing. We used J integral, an elastic-plastic fracture-mechanics parameter, to study the fracture process of bone. The J integral of bovine femur increased from 6.3 KJ/mm2 at 23°C to 6.7 KJ/mm2 at 37°C. Although the fracture toughness of bovine bone decreases as the temperature increases, the J integral results show a contrary trend. The energy spent in advancing the crack beyond the linear-elastic deformation was much greater than the energy spent in linear-elastic deformation. This could be because bone has at least four toughening mechanisms and a high volumetric percentage of organics (approximately 42% for bovine femur). The J integral is shown to better describe the fracture process of bovine femur and manatee rib.

  15. Multiescalar studies of fracturing mechanisms in fluvial-lacustrine basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreon-Freyre, D.; Cerca, M.; Hidalgo, C.; Hernandez-Marin, M.

    2007-05-01

    Fracturing of clayey fluvial and lacustrine deposits has become a major problem in several cities of central Mexico. The available data reveals the coexistence of several factors determining fracturing at different scales. As main factors we analyze the variation in compressibility of sediments causing differential deformation and withdrawal of groundwater causing a drop in pore pressure. Compressibility depends on consolidation, a term that in soil mechanics refers to the expulsion of interstitial water, and provokes volume decrease and land subsidence. Although major volume decrease occurs in the vertical scale, consolidation of silty clayey materials generates also horizontal tensile stresses. Considering that this factor can be determining to the generation of fractures, the deformational conditions of clayey, silty and sandy sequences is analyzed integrating their stratigraphy and mechanical characteristics. A particular emphasis is made in the mineralogical heterogeneity of the clay fraction that can be related to compressibility variations and can generate micro-fracturing by differential deformation. As study case we analyze the mechanical and geological properties of two sedimentary sequences with contrasting hydraulic and mechanical behavior. Our results show that the paleoenvironmental history of sediments can be used to determine a specific type of fracturing. Thus, the fracturing in fluvial lacustrine deposits is not a random phenomenon but is highly dependent of the geological properties of materials.

  16. Mechanical testing - In situ fracture device for Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    An in situ fracture device for Auger spectroscopy is described. The device is designed to handle small tensile specimens or small double-cantilever beam specimens and is fully instrumented with load and displacement transducers so that quantitative stress-strain measurements can be made directly. Some initial test results for specimens made from 4130 and 1020 steel are presented. Results indicate that impurity segregation at interfaces other than grain boundary may play a significant role in the mechanism of ductile fracture.

  17. Toughness of carbon nanotubes conforms to classic fracture mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Greenfeld, Israel; Wagner, H. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Defects in crystalline structure are commonly believed to degrade the ideal strength of carbon nanotubes. However, the fracture mechanisms induced by such defects, as well as the validity of solid mechanics theories at the nanoscale, are still under debate. We show that the fracture toughness of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) conforms to the classic theory of fracture mechanics, even for the smallest possible vacancy defect (~2 Å). By simulating tension of SWNTs containing common types of defects, we demonstrate how stress concentration at the defect boundary leads to brittle (unstable) fracturing at a relatively low strain, degrading the ideal strength of SWNTs by up to 60%. We find that, owing to the SWNT’s truss-like structure, defects at this scale are not sharp and stress concentrations are finite and low. Moreover, stress concentration, a geometric property at the macroscale, is interrelated with the SWNT fracture toughness, a material property. The resulting SWNT fracture toughness is 2.7 MPa m0.5, typical of moderately brittle materials and applicable also to graphene. PMID:26989774

  18. RSRM nozzle actuator bracket/lug fracture mechanics qualification test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Peggy

    1993-01-01

    This is the final report for the actuator bracket/lug fracture mechanics qualification test. The test plan (CTP-0071) outlined a two-phase test program designed to answer questions about the fracture criticality of the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) nozzle actuator bracket. An analysis conducted using the NASA/FLAGRO fracture mechanics computer program indicated that the actuator bracket might be a fracture critical component. In the NASA/FLAGRO analysis, a simple lug model was used to represent the actuator bracket. It was calculated that the bracket would fracture if subjected to an actuator stall load in the presence of a 0.10 in. corner crack at the actuator attachment hole. The 0.10 in. crack size corresponds to the nondestructive inspection detectability limit for the actuator bracket. The inspection method used is the dye penetrant method. The actuator stall load (103,424 lb) is the maximum load which the actuator bracket is required to withstand during motor operation. This testing was designed to establish the accuracy of the analytical model and to directly determine whether the actuator bracket is capable of meeting fracture mechanics safe-life requirements.

  19. Toughness of carbon nanotubes conforms to classic fracture mechanics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Greenfeld, Israel; Wagner, H Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Defects in crystalline structure are commonly believed to degrade the ideal strength of carbon nanotubes. However, the fracture mechanisms induced by such defects, as well as the validity of solid mechanics theories at the nanoscale, are still under debate. We show that the fracture toughness of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) conforms to the classic theory of fracture mechanics, even for the smallest possible vacancy defect (~2 Å). By simulating tension of SWNTs containing common types of defects, we demonstrate how stress concentration at the defect boundary leads to brittle (unstable) fracturing at a relatively low strain, degrading the ideal strength of SWNTs by up to 60%. We find that, owing to the SWNT's truss-like structure, defects at this scale are not sharp and stress concentrations are finite and low. Moreover, stress concentration, a geometric property at the macroscale, is interrelated with the SWNT fracture toughness, a material property. The resulting SWNT fracture toughness is 2.7 MPa m(0.5), typical of moderately brittle materials and applicable also to graphene. PMID:26989774

  20. Fracture mechanics life analytical methods verification testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favenesi, J. A.; Clemons, T. G.; Riddell, W. T.; Ingraffea, A. R.; Wawrzynek, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate NASCRAC (trademark) version 2.0, a second generation fracture analysis code, for verification and validity. NASCRAC was evaluated using a combination of comparisons to the literature, closed-form solutions, numerical analyses, and tests. Several limitations and minor errors were detected. Additionally, a number of major flaws were discovered. These major flaws were generally due to application of a specific method or theory, not due to programming logic. Results are presented for the following program capabilities: K versus a, J versus a, crack opening area, life calculation due to fatigue crack growth, tolerable crack size, proof test logic, tearing instability, creep crack growth, crack transitioning, crack retardation due to overloads, and elastic-plastic stress redistribution. It is concluded that the code is an acceptable fracture tool for K solutions of simplified geometries, for a limited number of J and crack opening area solutions, and for fatigue crack propagation with the Paris equation and constant amplitude loads when the Paris equation is applicable.

  1. Theoretical Analysis of the Mechanism of Fracture Network Propagation with Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV) Fracturing in Tight Oil Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yuliang; Ren, Long; Meng, Fankun; Xu, Chen; Wang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) fracturing in tight oil reservoirs often induces complex fracture-network growth, which has a fundamentally different formation mechanism from traditional planar bi-winged fracturing. To reveal the mechanism of fracture network propagation, this paper employs a modified displacement discontinuity method (DDM), mechanical mechanism analysis and initiation and propagation criteria for the theoretical model of fracture network propagation and its derivation. A reasonable solution of the theoretical model for a tight oil reservoir is obtained and verified by a numerical discrete method. Through theoretical calculation and computer programming, the variation rules of formation stress fields, hydraulic fracture propagation patterns (FPP) and branch fracture propagation angles and pressures are analyzed. The results show that during the process of fracture propagation, the initial orientation of the principal stress deflects, and the stress fields at the fracture tips change dramatically in the region surrounding the fracture. Whether the ideal fracture network can be produced depends on the geological conditions and on the engineering treatments. This study has both theoretical significance and practical application value by contributing to a better understanding of fracture network propagation mechanisms in unconventional oil/gas reservoirs and to the improvement of the science and design efficiency of reservoir fracturing. PMID:25966285

  2. Theoretical Analysis of the Mechanism of Fracture Network Propagation with Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV) Fracturing in Tight Oil Reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuliang; Ren, Long; Meng, Fankun; Xu, Chen; Wang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) fracturing in tight oil reservoirs often induces complex fracture-network growth, which has a fundamentally different formation mechanism from traditional planar bi-winged fracturing. To reveal the mechanism of fracture network propagation, this paper employs a modified displacement discontinuity method (DDM), mechanical mechanism analysis and initiation and propagation criteria for the theoretical model of fracture network propagation and its derivation. A reasonable solution of the theoretical model for a tight oil reservoir is obtained and verified by a numerical discrete method. Through theoretical calculation and computer programming, the variation rules of formation stress fields, hydraulic fracture propagation patterns (FPP) and branch fracture propagation angles and pressures are analyzed. The results show that during the process of fracture propagation, the initial orientation of the principal stress deflects, and the stress fields at the fracture tips change dramatically in the region surrounding the fracture. Whether the ideal fracture network can be produced depends on the geological conditions and on the engineering treatments. This study has both theoretical significance and practical application value by contributing to a better understanding of fracture network propagation mechanisms in unconventional oil/gas reservoirs and to the improvement of the science and design efficiency of reservoir fracturing. PMID:25966285

  3. [HAND FRACTURES IN CHILDREN - CAUSES AND MECHANISMS OF INJURY].

    PubMed

    Antabak, Anko; Barii?, Branimir; Andabak, Matej; Pape, Dino; Romi?, Ivan; Fuchs, Nino; Lueti?, Tomislav

    2015-01-01

    Hand is extremely exposed to various loads and traumas of everyday tasks and activities, resulting in fist fractures being fairly common injuries. The most common mechanism of injury is a direct blow. This retrospective study analyzed the data on 274 children admitted for hand fractures at Clinical Hospital Center Zagreb in the period from 2006 to 2014. The study included 76 girls (28%) and 198 boys (72%). The average patient age was 11.9 years and most were between 10 and 13 years of age. Phalangeal fractures accounted for 80%, metacarpal fractures for 17%, and carpal fractures for 3% of all injuries. Most commonly injuries occurred during recreation (4 1%), at home (37%), at school (18%) and in the street (4%). Direct blow was the major cause of injury (76%), and 24% were caused by fall. Injuries during sport activities are the most common cause of the hand fractures in pediatric population and direct blow is the main mechanism of injury. The peak incidence is at the age of 10-13 years in boys and girls, so prevention should be aimed at this age group. Preventive actions should be focused on injuries that tend to occur in parks, schools and during sport activities. PMID:26749954

  4. Statistical fracture mechanics approach to the strength of brittle rock

    SciTech Connect

    Ratigan, J.L.

    1981-06-01

    Statistical fracture mechanics concepts used in the past for rock are critically reviewed and modifications are proposed which are warranted by (1) increased understanding of fracture provided by modern fracture mechanics and (2) laboratory test data both from the literature and from this research. Over 600 direct and indirect tension tests have been performed on three different rock types; Stripa Granite, Sierra White Granite and Carrara Marble. In several instances assumptions which are common in the literature were found to be invalid. A three parameter statistical fracture mechanics model with Mode I critical strain energy release rate as the variant is presented. Methodologies for evaluating the parameters in this model as well as the more commonly employed two parameter models are discussed. The experimental results and analysis of this research indicate that surfacially distributed flaws, rather than volumetrically distributed flaws are responsible for rupture in many testing situations. For several of the rock types tested, anisotropy (both in apparent tensile strength and size effect) precludes the use of contemporary statistical fracture mechanics models.

  5. Relating Cohesive Zone Model to Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.

    2010-01-01

    The conditions required for a cohesive zone model (CZM) to predict a failure load of a cracked structure similar to that obtained by a linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analysis are investigated in this paper. This study clarifies why many different phenomenological cohesive laws can produce similar fracture predictions. Analytical results for five cohesive zone models are obtained, using five different cohesive laws that have the same cohesive work rate (CWR-area under the traction-separation curve) but different maximum tractions. The effect of the maximum traction on the predicted cohesive zone length and the remote applied load at fracture is presented. Similar to the small scale yielding condition for an LEFM analysis to be valid. the cohesive zone length also needs to be much smaller than the crack length. This is a necessary condition for a CZM to obtain a fracture prediction equivalent to an LEFM result.

  6. Fracture mechanics criteria for turbine engine hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The application of several fracture mechanics data correlation parameters to predicting the crack propagation life of turbine engine hot section components was evaluated. An engine survey was conducted to determine the locations where conventional fracture mechanics approaches may not be adequate to characterize cracking behavior. Both linear and nonlinear fracture mechanics analyses of a cracked annular combustor liner configuration were performed. Isothermal and variable temperature crack propagation tests were performed on Hastelloy X combustor liner material. The crack growth data was reduced using the stress intensity factor, the strain intensity factor, the J integral, crack opening displacement, and Tomkins' model. The parameter which showed the most effectiveness in correlation high temperature and variable temperature Hastelloy X crack growth data was crack opening displacement.

  7. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis of APT blanket tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Barsell, A. W.; Kern, K. T.

    2001-01-01

    A probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) model that is specific to the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) helium tubes was developed. The model performs Monte Carlo analyses of potential failure modes caused by cyclic stresses generated by beam trips and depressurizations 60m normal operation, coupled with material aging due to irradiation. Dominant failure probabilities are due to crack through-growth while brittle fracture and ductile tearing have lower probability. Failure mechanisms of global plastic collapse and buckling or crack initiation mechanisms of fatigue or local fracture (upon loss of ductility) have negligible probability. For the population of (7,311) tubes in the APT blanket, the worst-case, annual probability of one tube failing is 3 percent. The probability of 2 or more failures is substantially lower; therefore, unavailability impacts are driven by single failure. The average annual loss of production (unavailability) is below about 0.2 percent. Helium outflow and water inflow rates were characterized for the failures.

  8. Effect of silicon configurations on the mechanical integrity of silicon-carbon nanotube heterostructured anode for lithium ion battery: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damle, Sameer S.; Pal, Siladitya; Kumta, Prashant N.; Maiti, Spandan

    2016-02-01

    Heterostructures of silicon and carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been widely studied as Li-ion battery anodes. The focus of the current study is to investigate the role of silicon configurations on the mechanical integrity of the Si-CNT heterostructured anodes during electrochemical cycling. We hypothesize that void nucleation and growth in silicon during electrochemical cycling of Li can induce fracture and eventual failure. To test this hypothesis, we utilized a custom developed multiphysics finite element modeling framework considering the lithium diffusion induced elasto-plastic deformation of silicon. We systematically varied the silicon component configuration and enumerated the stress field within it for one complete electrochemical cycle. Resulting evolution of stress state reveals that reducing the mechanical constraints on Si reduces the plastic flow of the material, and thus possibility of void nucleation and growth. We find that the Si droplet configuration is mechanically stable while the continuous Si coating configuration is prone to void growth induced mechanical failure. Present analysis provides a mechanistic understanding of the effect of Si configurations in heterostructured electrodes on its mechanical integrity, which can help in design of next-generation hetersostructured electrodes with improved capacity retention.

  9. Mechanical stability of propped hydraulic fractures: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Asgian, M.I.; Cundall, P.A.; Brady, B.H.

    1995-03-01

    Proppant is sometimes produced along with hydrocarbons in hydraulically fractured petroleum wells. Sometimes 10% to 20% of the proppant is backproduced, which can lead to damaged equipment and downtime. Furthermore, proppant flowback can lead to a substantial loss of fracture conductivity. A numerical study was conducted to help understand what conditions are likely to lead to proppant flowback. In the simulations, the mechanical interaction of a larger number (several thousand) individual proppant grains was modeled with a distinct-element-type code. The numerical simulations show that hydraulic fractures propped with cohesionless, unbonded proppant fail under closure stress at a critical ratio of mean grain diameter to fracture width. This is consistent with published laboratory studies. The simulations identify the mechanism (arch failure) that triggers the mechanical instability and also show that the primary way that drawdowns (less than {approx} 75 psi/ft) affect proppant flowback is to transport loose proppant grains in front of the stable arch to the wellbore. Drawdowns > 75 psi/ft are sufficient to destabilize the arch and to cause progressive failure of the propped fractures.

  10. A phase-field model for ductile fracture at finite strains and its experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambati, Marreddy; Kruse, Roland; De Lorenzis, Laura

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a phase-field model for ductile fracture previously proposed in the kinematically linear regime is extended to the three-dimensional finite strain setting, and its predictions are qualitatively and quantitatively compared with several experimental results, both from ad-hoc tests carried out by the authors and from the available literature. The proposed model is based on the physical assumption that fracture occurs when a scalar measure of the accumulated plastic strain reaches a critical value, and such assumption is introduced through the dependency of the phase-field degradation function on this scalar measure. The proposed model is able to capture the experimentally observed sequence of elasto-plastic deformation, necking and fracture phenomena in flat specimens; the occurrence of cup-and-cone fracture patterns in axisymmetric specimens; the role played by notches and by their size on the measured displacement at fracture; and the sequence of distinct cracking events observed in more complex specimens.

  11. Fracture mechanics: proceedings of the 12th national symposium on fracture mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The conference proceedings contains 30 papers of which five are abstracted separately. The subjects covered include fatigue crack growth in aircraft materials, fractographic measurements, fatigue cracks in nylon 66 blends, cyclic inelastic deformation aspects, prestressing, tensile cracks in creeping solids, creep-crack-growth in 304 stainless steel, high-temperature fatigue, parallel impact loading, numerical fracture dynamic code, J-resistance curves, specimen geometry effects, reactor piping systems, temperature dependence of fracture toughness, small-scale yielding, compact specimens, power hardening materials, semi-empirical fracture analyses, pipeline girth welds, wrought steels, and A36 bridge steels.

  12. Fracture mechanics evaluation for at typical PWR primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Shimizu, S.; Ogata, Y.

    1997-04-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years.

  13. Measurements of residual stress in fracture mechanics coupons

    SciTech Connect

    Prime, Michael B; Hill, Michael R; Nav Dalen, John E

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of residual stress in coupons used for fracture mechanics testing. The primary objective of the measurements is to quantify the distribution of residual stress acting to open (and/or close) the crack across the crack plane. The slitting method and the contour method are two destructive residual stress measurement methods particularly capable of addressing that objective, and these were applied to measure residual stress in a set of identically prepared compact tension (C(T)) coupons. Comparison of the results of the two measurement methods provides some useful observations. Results from fracture mechanics tests of residual stress bearing coupons and fracture analysis, based on linear superposition of applied and residual stresses, show consistent behavior of coupons having various levels of residual stress.

  14. Investigation of the fracture mechanics of boride composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clougherty, E. V.; Pober, R. L.; Kaufman, L.

    1972-01-01

    Significant results were obtained in fabrication studies of the role of metallic additives of Zr, Ti, Ni, Fe and Cr on the densification of ZrB2. All elemental additions lower the processing temperatures required to effect full densification of ZrB2. Each addition effects enhanced densification by a clearly distinguishable and different mechanism and the resulting fabricated materials are different. A significant improvement in strength and fracture toughness was obtained for the ZrB2/Ti composition. Mechanical characterization studies for the ZrB2/SiC/C composites and the new ZrB2/Metal materials produced data relevant to the effect of impacting load on measured impact energies, a specimen configuration for which controlled fracture could occur in a suitably hard testing apparatus, and fracture strength data. Controlled fracture--indicative of measurable fracture toughness--was obtained for the ZrB2-SiC-C composite, and a ZrB2/Ti composite fabricated from ZrB2 with an addition of 30 weight per cent Ti. The increased strength and toughness of the ZrB2/Ti composite is consistent with the presence of a significantly large amount of a fine grained acicular phase formed by reaction of Ti with ZrB2 during processing.

  15. Fracture mechanics applied to the machining of brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hiatt, G.D.; Strenkowski, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Research has begun on incorporating fracture mechanics into a model of the orthogonal cutting of brittle materials. Residual stresses are calculated for the machined material by a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian finite element models and then used in the calculation of stress intensity factors by the Green`s Function Method.

  16. A comparative study of tensile fracture mechanisms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullin, J. V.; Mazzio, V. F.

    1972-01-01

    Identification of the failure mechanism characteristic for the more widely used carbon fibers in epoxy matrices under tensile loads as an aid toward improvements and more reliable predictions of the performance of these composites. The presented results pertain to high-strength, high-modulus, and low-modulus fibers in unmodified and modified epoxy novolac matrices.

  17. Structure, mechanical properties, and fracture of 20GL cast steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schastlivtsev, V. M.; Tabatchikova, T. I.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Klyueva, S. Yu.

    2014-04-01

    The structure and mechanical properties of 20GL steel are studied. It is shown that a significant decrease in the ductility and impact toughness of the steel is caused by intercrystalline fracture, which is induced by a weakening of the intercrystallite bonds due to the existence of coarse lamellar pearlite and nonmetallic inclusions, namely, film inclusions and eutectic-type oxysulfides, at the boundaries of primary crystals. Annealing from a temperature in the intercritical range is found to improve the mechanical properties.

  18. Mapping the Isotropic Component of Focal Mechanisms in Hydraulic Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baig, A. M.; Urbancic, T. I.

    2009-12-01

    We present the results of a hydraulic fracture monitoring study where the events induced by the treatment are recorded with a three-dimensional sensor distribution. The fact that the microseismicity is recorded over multiple azimuths allows not only for better convergence of the location algorithm, but also acheives sufficient coverage of the focal sphere to reliably invert for the full moment tensor. Unlike in tectonic settings, many of these focal mechanisms have very strong non-double-couple components, due to the intrusion of proppants into the surrounding rock, and are thus characterized by mechanisms consistant with tensile cracks opening or closing. Mapping these mechanisms in time and space offers insight into both the processes responsible for the fracturing, but also how effectively the treatment propped open the rock and identifying which areas may have opened and subsequently closed.

  19. Hydraulic Fracture Extending into Network in Shale: Reviewing Influence Factors and Their Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lan; Zhao, Jinzhou; Hu, Yongquan

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracture in shale reservoir presents complex network propagation, which has essential difference with traditional plane biwing fracture at forming mechanism. Based on the research results of experiments, field fracturing practice, theory analysis, and numerical simulation, the influence factors and their mechanism of hydraulic fracture extending into network in shale have been systematically analyzed and discussed. Research results show that the fracture propagation in shale reservoir is influenced by the geological and the engineering factors, which includes rock mineral composition, rock mechanical properties, horizontal stress field, natural fractures, treating net pressure, fracturing fluid viscosity, and fracturing scale. This study has important theoretical value and practical significance to understand fracture network propagation mechanism in shale reservoir and contributes to improving the science and efficiency of shale reservoir fracturing design. PMID:25032240

  20. Hydraulic fracture extending into network in shale: reviewing influence factors and their mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lan; Zhao, Jinzhou; Hu, Yongquan

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracture in shale reservoir presents complex network propagation, which has essential difference with traditional plane biwing fracture at forming mechanism. Based on the research results of experiments, field fracturing practice, theory analysis, and numerical simulation, the influence factors and their mechanism of hydraulic fracture extending into network in shale have been systematically analyzed and discussed. Research results show that the fracture propagation in shale reservoir is influenced by the geological and the engineering factors, which includes rock mineral composition, rock mechanical properties, horizontal stress field, natural fractures, treating net pressure, fracturing fluid viscosity, and fracturing scale. This study has important theoretical value and practical significance to understand fracture network propagation mechanism in shale reservoir and contributes to improving the science and efficiency of shale reservoir fracturing design. PMID:25032240

  1. A NEW FRACTURE ASSESSMENT APPROACH COUPLING HR-pQCT IMAGING AND FRACTURE MECHANICS-BASED FINITE ELEMENT MODELING

    PubMed Central

    Ural, Ani; Bruno, Peter; Zhou, Bin; Shi, X. Tony; Guo, X. Edward

    2013-01-01

    A new fracture assessment approach that combines HR-pQCT imaging with fracture mechanics-based finite element modeling was developed to evaluate distal radius fracture load. Twenty distal radius images obtained from postmenopausal women (fracture, n = 10; nonfracture, n = 10) were processed to obtain a cortical and a whole bone model for each subject. The geometrical properties of each model were evaluated and the corresponding fracture load was determined under realistic fall conditions using cohesive finite element modeling. The results showed that the whole bone fracture load can be estimated based on the cortical fracture load for nonfracture (R2 = 0.58, p = 0.01) and pooled data (R2 = 0.48, p < 0.001) but not for the fracture group. The portion of the whole bone fracture load carried by the cortical bone increased with increasing cortical fracture load (R2 ≥ 0.5, p < 0.05) indicating that a more robust cortical bone carries a larger percentage of whole bone fracture load. Cortical thickness was found to be the best predictor of both cortical and whole bone fracture load for all groups (R2 range: 0.49–0.96, p < 0.02) with the exception of fracture group whole bone fracture load showing the predictive capability of cortical geometrical properties in determining whole bone fracture load. Fracture group whole bone fracture load was correlated with trabecular thickness (R2 = 0.4, p < 0.05) whereas the nonfracture and the pooled group did not show any correlation with the trabecular parameters. In summary, this study introduced a new modeling approach that coupled HR-pQCT imaging with fracture mechanics-based finite element simulations, incorporated fracture toughness and realistic fall loading conditions in the models, and showed the significant contribution of the cortical compartment to the overall fracture load of bone. Our results provide more insight into the fracture process in bone and may lead to improved fracture load predictions. PMID:23497802

  2. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics methodology for surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Hugo A.; Lambert, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    The Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics Methodology has evolved significantly in the last several years. Nevertheless, some of these concepts need to be extended further before the whole methodology can be safely applied to structural parts. Specifically, there is a need to include the effect of constraint in the characterization of material resistance to crack growth and also to extend these methods to the case of 3D defects. As a consequence, this project was started as a 36 month research program with the general objective of developing an elastic plastic fracture mechanics methodology to assess the structural reliability of pressure vessels and other parts of interest to NASA which may contain flaws. The project is divided into three tasks that deal with (1) constraint and thickness effects, (2) three-dimensional cracks, and (3) the Leak-Before-Burst (LBB) criterion. This report period (March 1994 to August 1994) is a continuation of attempts to characterize three dimensional aspects of fracture present in 'two dimensional' or planar configuration specimens (Chapter Two), especially, the determination of, and use of, crack face separation data. Also, included, are a variety of fracture resistance testing results (J(m)R-curve format) and a discussion regarding two materials of NASA interest (6061-T651 Aluminum alloy and 1N718-STA1 nickel-base super alloy) involving a bases for like constraint in terms of ligament dimensions, and their comparison to the resulting J(m)R-curves (Chapter Two).

  3. Deformation and fracture of Macadamia nuts Part 2: Microstructure and fracture mechanics analysis of nutshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Hui; Mai, Yiu-Wing

    A study of the microstructure and mechanical properties of Macadamia nutshells subjected to various heat treatments is given in Part 2 of this paper. It is found that the nutshell has a three-dimensional, close-packed, cell structure. The cells have a diameter to length ratio of about 1 to 3, and the orientation of the cells is reasonably isotropic with no apparent variation with either position or direction. The material behaves in a very brittle manner under tension and compression. Based on the elastic stress analysis of a nut under diametrical compression and the mechanical properties of the shell, it is shown that cracks that cause the final fracture are initiated from the inner surface beneath the loading point. A theoretical model is proposed and predictions of the fracture load for Macadamia nuts are in good agreement with experimental results.

  4. Fracture control methods for space vehicles. Volume 2: Assessment of fracture mechanics technology for space shuttle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehret, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    The concepts explored in a state of the art review of those engineering fracture mechanics considered most applicable to the space shuttle vehicle include fracture toughness, precritical flaw growth, failure mechanisms, inspection methods (including proof test logic), and crack growth predictive analysis techniques.

  5. Fracture development and mechanical stratigraphy of Austin Chalk, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, K.; Friedman, M.; Spang, J.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanical stratigraphy of the Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk is established from study of fracture intensity along its outcrop trend from Dallas to San Antonio and westward to Langtry, Texas, and in the subsurface from study of cores and/or fracture identification logs from 30 wells. Three mechanical-stratigraphic units are recognized. Representative samples from the three mechanical-stratigraphic units were experimentally shortened, dry, at 10, 17, 34, and 70 MPa confining pressure, at 24/sup 0/C, and at a strain rate of 2.5 x 10/sup -4/ sec/sup -1/ to determine if the relative mechanical behavior observed at the surface could be extrapolated into the subsurface at different simulated burial depths. SEM photomicrographs of undeformed specimens show that smectite and other clays are distributed as large (30 ..mu..m), discrete, amorphous, concentrated masses throughout the chalk. They are comminuted along the induced fracture surfaces where their grain size is 0.5 ..mu..m or less. These observations suggest that smectite acts as a soft-inclusion, localizing shear failure and corresponding weakening the material. 9 figures, 5 tables.

  6. Effect of heat treatment on deformation and mechanical properties of 8 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia by Berkovich nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, W. G.; Luo, J. M.; Dai, C. Y.; Shen, Y. G.

    2015-05-01

    The effect of thermal treatment on the elasto-plastic transition and mechanical properties of air plasma-sprayed 8 mol% Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings was studied by nanoindentation test at ultra-low loads with a Berkovich indenter. The area contact function of the indenter was calibrated repeatedly under nano-scales, and the indenter tip radius was estimated under different indentation depths, respectively. Owing to the heterogeneous and porous microstructure, the scatter of all collected experimental data was analyzed by Weibull statistic method. It is interesting to observe that the hardness exhibits an apparent reverse indentation size effect under very small depths. The Young's modulus of 8YSZ varies with ranging from 213 to 246 GPa due to the sintering effect. True hardness of 8YSZ increases from as-received 72.9 GPa to a top value 79.7 GPa under 100 thermal cycles, and then slightly decreases from this value to 75.5 GPa under 175 thermal cycles. The pure elastic and elasto-plastic indentation curves were obtained by adjusting the indentation load magnitude. The elasto-plastic transition and resolved shear stress fields were discussed carefully from the use of energetic models and Hertzian contact theory.

  7. Quantitative Integration of Ndt with Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics for the Assessment of Fracture Risk in Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, J. H.; Cioclov, D.; Dobmann, G.; Boller, C.

    2010-02-01

    In the context of probabilistic paradigm of fracture risk assessment in structural components a computer simulation rationale is presented which has at the base the integration of Quantitative Non-destructive Inspection and Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics. In this study the static failure under static loading is assessed in the format known as Failure Assessment Diagram (FAD). The fracture risk is evaluated in probabilistic terms. The superposed probabilistic pattern over the deterministic one is implemented via Monte-Carlo sampling. The probabilistic fracture simulation yields a more informative analysis in terms of probability of failure. The ability to simulate the influence of the quality and reliability of non-destructive inspection (NDI) is an important feature of this approach. It is achieved by integrating, algorithmically, probabilistic FAD analysis and the Probability of Detection (POD). The POD information can only be applied in a probabilistic analysis and leads to a refinement of the assessment. By this means, it can be ascertained the decrease of probability of failure when POD-characterized NDI is applied. Therefore, this procedure can be used as a tool for inspection based life time conceptions. In this paper results of sensitivity analyses are presented with the aim to outline, in terms of non-failure probabilities, the benefits of applying NDI, in various qualities, in comparison with the situation when NDI is lacking. A better substantiation is enabled of both the component reliability management and the costs-effectiveness of NDI timing.

  8. Extrinsic fracture mechanisms in two laminated metal composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.; Syn, C.; Riddle, R.; Sherby, O.

    1994-11-29

    The crack growth behavior and fracture toughness of two laminated metal composites (6090/SiC/25p laminated with 5182 and ultrahigh-carbon steel laminated with brass) have been studied in both ``crack arrester`` and ``crack divider`` orientations. The mechanisms of crack growth were analyzed and extrinsic toughening mechanisms were found to contribute significantly to the toughness. The influence of laminate architecture (layer thickness and component volume function), component material properties and residual stress on these mechanisms and the resulting crack growth resistance are discussed.

  9. Mechanical Stability and Reversible Fracture of Vault Particles

    PubMed Central

    Llauró, Aida; Guerra, Pablo; Irigoyen, Nerea; Rodríguez, José F.; Verdaguer, Núria; de Pablo, Pedro J.

    2014-01-01

    Vaults are the largest ribonucleoprotein particles found in eukaryotic cells, with an unclear cellular function and promising applications as vehicles for drug delivery. In this article, we examine the local stiffness of individual vaults and probe their structural stability with atomic force microscopy under physiological conditions. Our data show that the barrel, the central part of the vault, governs both the stiffness and mechanical strength of these particles. In addition, we induce single-protein fractures in the barrel shell and monitor their temporal evolution. Our high-resolution atomic force microscopy topographies show that these fractures occur along the contacts between two major vault proteins and disappear over time. This unprecedented systematic self-healing mechanism, which enables these particles to reversibly adapt to certain geometric constraints, might help vaults safely pass through the nuclear pore complex and potentiate their role as self-reparable nanocontainers. PMID:24507609

  10. Mechanical properties and fracture dynamics of silicene membranes.

    PubMed

    Botari, T; Perim, E; Autreto, P A S; van Duin, A C T; Paupitz, R; Galvao, D S

    2014-09-28

    As graphene has become one of the most important materials, there is renewed interest in other similar structures. One example is silicene, the silicon analogue of graphene. It shares some of the remarkable graphene properties, such as the Dirac cone, but presents some distinct ones, such as a pronounced structural buckling. We have investigated, through density functional based tight-binding (DFTB), as well as reactive molecular dynamics (using ReaxFF), the mechanical properties of suspended single-layer silicene. We calculated the elastic constants, analyzed the fracture patterns and edge reconstructions. We also addressed the stress distributions, unbuckling mechanisms and the fracture dependence on the temperature. We analysed the differences due to distinct edge morphologies, namely zigzag and armchair. PMID:25102369

  11. Use of three-dimensional photoelasticity in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    The philosophy of fracture mechanics is reviewed and utilized to formulate a simplified approach to the determination of the stress-intensity factor photoelastically for three-dimensional problems. The method involves a Taylor Series correction for the maximum in-plane shear stress (TSCM) and does not involve stress separation. The results are illustrated by applying the TSCM to surface flaws in bending fields. Other three-dimensional problems solved by the TSCM are cited.

  12. Non-destructive testing and fracture mechanics: A short discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbst, Uwe; Heckel, Thomas; Carboni, Michele

    2016-02-01

    A short discussion is provided on the relationship between non-destructive testing and fracture mechanics. The basic tasks behind this are to guarantee the safety of a component at a potential hazard loading event, to specify inspection intervals or, alternatively, of demands on non-destructive testing for a fixed inspection regime, to plan accompanying actions for cases of temporary continued operation of structures in which cracks have been detected, and, finally, fatigue strength considerations which take into account initial defects.

  13. Wide-range displacement expressions for standard fracture mechanics specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapp, J. A.; Gross, B.; Leger, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    Wide-range algebraic expressions for the displacement of cracked fracture mechanics specimens are developed. For each specimen two equations are given: one for the displacement as a function of crack length, the other for crack length as a function of displacement. All the specimens that appear in ASTM Test for Plane-Strain Fracture Toughness of Metallic Materials (E 399) are represented in addition to the crack mouth displacement for a pure bending specimen. For the compact tension sample and the disk-shaped compact tension sample, the displacement at the crack mouth and at the load line are both considered. Only the crack mouth displacements for the arc-shaped tension samples are presented. The agreement between the displacements or crack lengths predicted by the various equations and the corresponding numerical data from which they were developed are nominally about 3 percent or better. These expressions should be useful in all types of fracture testing including fracture toughness, K-resistance, and fatigue crack growth.

  14. Results of fracture mechanics tests on PNC SUS 304 plate

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.; James, L.A.; Blackburn, L.D.

    1985-08-01

    PNC provided SUS 304 plate to be irradiated in FFTF at about 400/sup 0/C to a target fluence of 5 x 10/sup 21/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV). The actual irradiation included two basically different exposure levels to assure that information would be available for the exposure of interest. After irradiation, tensile properties, fatigue-crack growth rates and J-integral fracture toughness response were determined. These same properties were also measured for the unirradiated material so radiation damage effects could be characterized. This report presents the results of this program. It is expected that these results would be applicable for detailed fracture analysis of reactor components. Recent advances in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics enable reasonably accurate predictions of failure conditions for flawed stainless steel components. Extensive research has focused on the development of J-integral-based engineering approach for assessing the load carrying capacity of low-strength, high-toughness structural materials. Furthermore, Kanninen, et al., have demonstrated that J-integral concepts can accurately predict the fracture response for full-scale cracked structures manufactured from Type 304 stainless steel.

  15. State-of-the-art report on piping fracture mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.M.; Olson, R.J.; Scott, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    This report is an in-depth summary of the state-of-the-art in nuclear piping fracture mechanics. It represents the culmination of 20 years of work done primarily in the US, but also attempts to include important aspects from other international efforts. Although the focus of this work was for the nuclear industry, the technology is also applicable in many cases to fossil plants, petrochemical/refinery plants, and the oil and gas industry. In compiling this detailed summary report, all of the equations and details of the analysis procedure or experimental results are not necessarily included. Rather, the report describes the important aspects and limitations, tells the reader where he can go for further information, and more importantly, describes the accuracy of the models. Nevertheless, the report still contains over 150 equations and over 400 references. The main sections of this report describe: (1) the evolution of piping fracture mechanics history relative to the developments of the nuclear industry, (2) technical developments in stress analyses, material property aspects, and fracture mechanics analyses, (3) unresolved issues and technically evolving areas, and (4) a summary of conclusions of major developments to date.

  16. Fracture and Stress Evolution on Europa: New Insights Into Fracture Interpretation and Ice Thickness Estimates Using Fracture Mechanics Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattenhorn, Simon

    2004-01-01

    The work completed during the funding period has provided many important insights into fracturing behavior in Europa's ice shell. It has been determined that fracturing through time is likely to have been controlled by the effects of nonsynchronous rotation stresses and that as much as 720 deg of said rotation may have occurred during the visible geologic history. It has been determined that there are at least two distinct styles of strike-slip faulting and that their mutual evolutionary styles are likely to have been different, with one involving a significant dilational component during shear motion. It has been determined that secondary fracturing in perturbed stress fields adjacent to older structures such as faults is a prevalent process on Europa. It has been determined that cycloidal ridges are likely to experience shear stresses along the existing segment portions as they propagate, which affects propagation direction and ultimately induces tailcracking at the segment tip than then initiates a new cycle of cycloid segment growth. Finally, it has been established that mechanical methods (e.g., flexure analysis) can be used to determine the elastic thickness of the ice shell, which, although probably only several km thick, is likely to be spatially variable, being thinner under bands but thicker under ridged plains terrain.

  17. Dynamic Fracture Toughness and Failure Mechanisms of ZnO Whiskers Secondary Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Ji-Li; Wang, Xi; Cao, Mao-Sheng; Xu, Tian-Fu

    2010-08-01

    Quasi-static and dynamic fracture properties and damage mechanism of glass fiber polymer composites embedded with different mass percentages of ZnO whiskers are investigated by using an Instron Testing machine and a Split-Hopkinson pressure bar. According to the experimental results and linear fracture mechanics, the quasi-static fracture toughness KIc and the dynamic fracture toughness KId under various impact velocities of specimens are obtained. Fracture mechanism is investigated by fractography analysis with a scanning electron microscope. The experimental results show that the mass percentage of ZnOw has little influence on the quasi-static fracture toughness, but a little influence on the dynamic fracture toughness and time of initial fracture point of specimens by the reason of various fracture mechanisms.

  18. A field theory of distortion incompatibility for coupled fracture and plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fressengeas, Claude; Taupin, Vincent

    2014-08-01

    The displacement discontinuity arising between the crack surfaces is assigned to smooth areal/tensorial densities of crystal defects referred to as disconnections, through the incompatibility of the continuous distortion tensor. In a dual way, the disconnections are defined as line defects terminating surfaces where the displacement encounters a discontinuity. A conservation argument for their strength (the crack opening displacement) provides a natural framework for their dynamics in the form of a transport law for the disconnection densities. Similar methodology is applied to the discontinuity of the plastic displacement arising from the presence of dislocations in the body, which results in the concurrent involvement of the dislocation density tensor in the analysis. The present model can therefore be viewed as an extension of the mechanics of dislocation fields to the case where continuity of the body is disrupted by cracks. From the continuity of the elastic distortion tensor, it is expected that the stress field remains bounded everywhere in the body, including at the crack tip. Thermodynamic arguments provide the driving forces for disconnection and dislocation motion, and guidance for the formulation of constitutive relationships insuring non-negative dissipation. The conventional Peach-Koehler force on dislocations is retrieved in the analysis, and a Peach-Koehler-type force on disconnections is defined. A threshold in the disconnection driving force vs. disconnection velocity constitutive relationship provides for a Griffith-type fracture criterion. Application of the theory to the slit-crack (Griffith-Inglis crack) in elastic and elasto-plastic solids through finite element modeling shows that it allows recovering earlier results on the stress field around cracks, and that crack propagation can be consistently described by the transport scheme. Shielding/anti-shielding of cracks by dislocations is considered to illustrate the static/dynamic interactions between dislocations and disconnections resulting from the theory. Sample size effects on crack growth are evidenced in solids encountering plastic yielding.

  19. Study of mechanism of cleavage fracture at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. H.; Wang, G. Z.

    1992-02-01

    In this investigation, a series of crack opening displacement (COD) tests were carried out at several low temperatures for C-Mn weld steel. Some of the specimens were loaded until fracture, and the mechanical properties and microscopic parameters on fracture surfaces were measured. Other specimens were unloaded before fracture at different applied loads. The distributions of the elongated cavities and the cleavage microcracks ahead of fatigue crack tips were observed in detail. Based on the experimental results, the combined criterion of a critical strain ɛ p ≥ ɛc) for initiating a crack nucleus, a critical stress triaxiality (σ m/σ ≥ tc) for preventing it from blunting, and a critical normal stress (σ yy/σf) for the cleavage extension was proposed again, and the critical values of ɛp and σm/-σ for the C-Mn weld steel were measured. The reason why the minimum COD value could not be zero is explained. The mechanism of generation of the lower limit COD value on the lower shelf of the toughness transition curve is proposed.

  20. Measurement of residual stresses using fracture mechanics weight functions

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y.

    2000-10-01

    A residual stress measurement method has been developed to quantify through-the-thickness residual stresses. Accurate measurement of residual stresses is crucial for many engineering structures. Fabrication processes such as welding and machining generate residual stresses that are difficult to predict. Residual stresses affect the integrity of structures through promoting failures due to brittle fracture, fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, and wear. In this work, the weight function theory of fracture mechanics is used to measure residual stresses. The weight function theory is an important development in computational fracture mechanics. Stress intensity factors for arbitrary stress distribution on the crack faces can be accurately and efficiently computed for predicting crack growth. This paper demonstrates that the weight functions are equally useful in measuring residual stresses. In this method, an artificial crack is created by a thin cut in a structure containing residual stresses. The cut relieves the residual stresses normal to the crack-face and allows the relieved residual stresses to deform the structure. Strain gages placed adjacent to the cut measure the relieved strains corresponding to incrementally increasing depths of the cut. The weight functions of the cracked body relate the measured strains to the residual stresses normal to the cut within the structure. The procedure details, such as numerical integration of the singular functions in applying the weight function method, will be discussed.

  1. Conference addresses thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling in fractured rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmpel, Hans-Joachim

    Various environmental problems and the use of certain energy resources are closely related to fluid flow in and the mechanical behavior of porous or fractured rock. Subjects of obvious socioeconomic relevance are the supply and protection of groundwater, the production of hydrocarbon reservoirs, land subsidence in coastal areas, exploitation of geothermal energy and the long-term disposal of critical wastes. Efficient management of such issues is often hampered by the fact that rocks and rock formations are inherently complex. Any rock sample is an aggregate of the myriad mineral particles forming its matrix and fluid molecules residing in voids. Any two rock samples differ in many aspects, including geochemical constituents, size and shape of grains, structure of pore space, and fracture networks.

  2. [Radius fractures in children--causes and mechanisms of injury].

    PubMed

    Antabak, Anko; Stani?, Lana; Matkovi?, Nika; Pape, Dino; Romi?, Ivan; Fuchs, Nino; Lueti?, Tomislav

    2015-01-01

    Radius fractures are the most common fractures in childhood. The main mechanism of injury is fall onto an outstretched hand. This retrospective study analyzed the data on 201 children admitted for radius fractures at KBC-Zagreb in the period 2011-2013. The study included 85 girls (42.3%) and 116 boys (57.7%) . The average age of the children was 9.6 years. Radius was injured in the distal segment in 79.1% of children. The sites of injuries were: park, campi and beach (24.9% of all children), playground, skate park and swimming pool (23.9%), kindergarten or school (20.9%), at home and around the house (17.9%), in the street (11.4%) and in the store or at a hotel (0.9%). The boys were mostly injured at playgrounds, during skating and at swimming pools (37.1% of all boys), while girls were mostly injured in parks, camps and at beach (42.4% girls). Fall was the major cause of the injury (49.3%), and children usually fell during ice skating and skating (32.3% of all falls). In 20.4% the injury was caused by pushing and hitting. The smallest percentage (9.5%) of children were injured in traffic accidents while riding a bike (only one child was hit by a car). Sport related activities caused injuries in 53.7% of the cases. Sport activities are the most important cause of the radial fractures in the pediatric population and falls during sports are the main mechanism of injury. The peak incidence is at 12 years for boys and at 10 years for girls, so intervention and/or prevention should be aimed at the age groups. Preventive actions should be focused on injuries that tend to occur in parks, schools and during sport activities. PMID:26065283

  3. Toughened semicrystalline engineering polymers: Morphology, impact resistance, and fracture mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Flexman, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    Major factors that contribute to maximized impact resistance of semicrystalline engineering polymers include increased matrix molecular weight, minimal rubber glass-transition temperature, and optimal rubber-particle size, which depends on matrix type. Additional constraints are posed by the limitations of available materials and commercial requirements. Expanding the understanding of impact-modified crystalline engineering polymers will further extend their property ranges and utility. This chapter describes the phenomenology of certain factors, illustrates a new technique to measure rubber particle size, and contrasts the fracture mechanisms of poly(butylene terephthalate), nylon 66, and polyacetal. 49 refs., 24 figs.

  4. Probabilistic/Fracture-Mechanics Model For Service Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, T., Jr.; Annis, C. G., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program makes probabilistic estimates of lifetime of engine and components thereof. Developed to fill need for more accurate life-assessment technique that avoids errors in estimated lives and provides for statistical assessment of levels of risk created by engineering decisions in designing system. Implements mathematical model combining techniques of statistics, fatigue, fracture mechanics, nondestructive analysis, life-cycle cost analysis, and management of engine parts. Used to investigate effects of such engine-component life-controlling parameters as return-to-service intervals, stresses, capabilities for nondestructive evaluation, and qualities of materials.

  5. (Environmental and geophysical modeling, fracture mechanics, and boundary element methods)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L.J.

    1990-11-09

    Technical discussions at the various sites visited centered on application of boundary integral methods for environmental modeling, seismic analysis, and computational fracture mechanics in composite and smart'' materials. The traveler also attended the International Association for Boundary Element Methods Conference at Rome, Italy. While many aspects of boundary element theory and applications were discussed in the papers, the dominant topic was the analysis and application of hypersingular equations. This has been the focus of recent work by the author, and thus the conference was highly relevant to research at ORNL.

  6. Elastic, plastic, and fracture mechanisms in graphene materials.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Colin; Horning, Andrew; Phillips, Anthony; Massote, Daniel V P; Liang, Liangbo; Bullard, Zachary; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent

    2015-09-23

    In both research and industry, materials will be exposed to stresses, be it during fabrication, normal use, or mechanical failure. The response to external stress will have an important impact on properties, especially when atomic details govern the functionalities of the materials. This review aims at summarizing current research involving the responses of graphene and graphene materials to applied stress at the nanoscale, and to categorize them by stress-strain behavior. In particular, we consider the reversible functionalization of graphene and graphene materials by way of elastic deformation and strain engineering, the plastic deformation of graphene oxide and the emergence of such in normally brittle graphene, the formation of defects as a response to stress under high temperature annealing or irradiation conditions, and the properties that affect how, and mechanisms by which, pristine, defective, and polycrystalline graphene fail catastrophically during fracture. Overall we find that there is significant potential for the use of existing knowledge, especially that of strain engineering, as well as potential for additional research into the fracture mechanics of polycrystalline graphene and device functionalization by way of controllable plastic deformation of graphene. PMID:26325114

  7. Elastic, plastic, and fracture mechanisms in graphene materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Colin; Horning, Andrew; Phillips, Anthony; Massote, Daniel V. P.; Liang, Liangbo; Bullard, Zachary; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Meunier, Vincent

    2015-09-01

    In both research and industry, materials will be exposed to stresses, be it during fabrication, normal use, or mechanical failure. The response to external stress will have an important impact on properties, especially when atomic details govern the functionalities of the materials. This review aims at summarizing current research involving the responses of graphene and graphene materials to applied stress at the nanoscale, and to categorize them by stress-strain behavior. In particular, we consider the reversible functionalization of graphene and graphene materials by way of elastic deformation and strain engineering, the plastic deformation of graphene oxide and the emergence of such in normally brittle graphene, the formation of defects as a response to stress under high temperature annealing or irradiation conditions, and the properties that affect how, and mechanisms by which, pristine, defective, and polycrystalline graphene fail catastrophically during fracture. Overall we find that there is significant potential for the use of existing knowledge, especially that of strain engineering, as well as potential for additional research into the fracture mechanics of polycrystalline graphene and device functionalization by way of controllable plastic deformation of graphene.

  8. Coupled Flow and Mechanics in Porous and Fractured Media*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, M. J.; Newell, P.; Bishop, J.

    2012-12-01

    Numerical models describing subsurface flow through deformable porous materials are important for understanding and enabling energy security and climate security. Some applications of current interest come from such diverse areas as geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2, hydro-fracturing for stimulation of hydrocarbon reservoirs, and modeling electrochemistry-induced swelling of fluid-filled porous electrodes. Induced stress fields in any of these applications can lead to structural failure and fracture. The ultimate goal of this research is to model evolving faults and fracture networks and flow within the networks while coupling to flow and mechanics within the intact porous structure. We report here on a new computational capability for coupling of multiphase porous flow with geomechanics including assessment of over-pressure-induced structural damage. The geomechanics is coupled to the flow via the variation in the fluid pore pressures, whereas the flow problem is coupled to mechanics by the concomitant material strains which alter the pore volume (porosity field) and hence the permeability field. For linear elastic solid mechanics a monolithic coupling strategy is utilized. For nonlinear elastic/plastic and fractured media, a segregated coupling is presented. To facilitate coupling with disparate flow and mechanics time scales, the coupling strategy allows for different time steps in the flow solve compared to the mechanics solve. If time steps are synchronized, the controller allows user-specified intra-time-step iterations. The iterative coupling is dynamically controlled based on a norm measuring the degree of variation in the deformed porosity. The model is applied for evaluation of the integrity of jointed caprock systems during CO2 sequestration operations. Creation or reactivation of joints can lead to enhanced pathways for leakage. Similarly, over-pressures can induce flow along faults. Fluid flow rates in fractures are strongly dependent on the effective hydraulic aperture, which is a non-linear function of effective normal stress. The dynamically evolving aperture field updates the effective, anisotropic permeability tensor, thus resulting in a highly coupled multiphysics problem. Two models of geomechanical damage are discussed: critical shear-slip criteria and a sub-grid joint model. Leakage rates through the caprock resulting from the joint model are compared to those assuming intact material, allowing a correlation between potential for leakage and injection rates/pressures, for various in-situ stratigraphies. *This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001114. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Fracture Mechanics Modelling of an In Situ Concrete Spalling Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siren, Topias; Uotinen, Lauri; Rinne, Mikael; Shen, Baotang

    2015-07-01

    During the operation of nuclear waste disposal facilities, some sprayed concrete reinforced underground spaces will be in use for approximately 100 years. During this time of use, the local stress regime will be altered by the radioactive decay heat. The change in the stress state will impose high demands on sprayed concrete, as it may suffer stress damage or lose its adhesion to the rock surface. It is also unclear what kind of support pressure the sprayed concrete layer will apply to the rock. To investigate this, an in situ experiment is planned in the ONKALO underground rock characterization facility at Olkiluoto, Finland. A vertical experimental hole will be concreted, and the surrounding rock mass will be instrumented with heat sources, in order to simulate an increase in the surrounding stress field. The experiment is instrumented with an acoustic emission system for the observation of rock failure and temperature, as well as strain gauges to observe the thermo-mechanical interactive behaviour of the concrete and rock at several levels, in both rock and concrete. A thermo-mechanical fracture mechanics study is necessary for the prediction of the damage before the experiment, in order to plan the experiment and instrumentation, and for generating a proper prediction/outcome study due to the special nature of the in situ experiment. The prediction of acoustic emission patterns is made by Fracod 2D and the model later compared to the actual observed acoustic emissions. The fracture mechanics model will be compared to a COMSOL Multiphysics 3D model to study the geometrical effects along the hole axis.

  10. NASGRO(registered trademark): Fracture Mechanics and Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce; Shivakumar, V.; Mettu, Sambi; Beek, Joachim; Williams, Leonard; Yeh, Feng; McClung, Craig; Cardinal, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes NASGRO, which is a fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analysis software package that is used to reduce risk of fracture in Space Shuttles. The contents include: 1) Consequences of Fracture; 2) NASA Fracture Control Requirements; 3) NASGRO Reduces Risk; 4) NASGRO Use Inside NASA; 5) NASGRO Components: Crack Growth Module; 6) NASGRO Components:Material Property Module; 7) Typical NASGRO analysis: Crack growth or component life calculation; and 8) NASGRO Sample Application: Orbiter feedline flowliner crack analysis.

  11. Fracture mechanics of ceramics. Vol. 8. Microstructure, methods, design, and fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Bradt, R.C.; Evans, A.G.; Hasselman, D.P.H.; Lange, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents information on the following topics: fracture mechanics and microstructures; non-lubricated sliding wear of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, PSZ and SiC; mixed-mode fracture of ceramics; some fracture properties of alumina-containing electrical porcelains; transformation toughening in the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3//ZrO/sub 2/-HfO/sub 2/ system; strength toughness relationships for transformation toughened ceramics; tensile strength and notch sensitivity of Mg-PSZ; fracture mechanisms in lead zirconate titanate ceramics; loading-unloading techniques for determining fracture parameters of brittle materials utilizing four-point bend, chevron-notched specimens; application of the potential drop technique to the fracture mechanics of ceramics; ceramics-to-metal bonding from a fracture mechanics perspective; observed changes in fracture strength following laser irradiation and ion beam mixing of Ni overlayers on sintered alpha-SiC; crack growth in single-crystal silicon; a fracture mechanics and non-destructive evaluation investigation of the subcritical-fracture process in rock; slow crack growth in sintered silicon nitride; uniaxial tensile fatigue testing of sintered silicon carbide under cyclic temperature change; and effect of surface corrosion on glass fracture.

  12. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics and Optimum Fracture Control Analytical Procedures for a Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, S.; Uppaluri, B.

    1977-01-01

    A methodology for the reliability analysis of a reusable solid rocket motor case is discussed. The analysis is based on probabilistic fracture mechanics and probability distribution for initial flaw sizes. The developed reliability analysis is used to select the structural design variables of the solid rocket motor case on the basis of minimum expected cost and specified reliability bounds during the projected design life of the case. Effects of failure prevention plans such as nondestructive inspection and the material erosion between missions are also considered in the developed procedure for selection of design variables. The reliability-based procedure can be modified to consider other similar structures of reusable space vehicle systems with different failure prevention plans.

  13. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics methodology for surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Hugo A.; Boatwright, D. W.; Curtin, W. J.; Lambert, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    The Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics (EPFM) Methodology has evolved significantly in the last several years. Nevertheless, some of these concepts need to be extended further before the whole methodology can be safely applied to structural parts. Specifically, there is a need to include the effect of constraint in the characterization of material resistance to crack growth and also to extend these methods to the case of 3D defects. As a consequence, this project was started as a 36 month research program with the general objective of developing an EPFM methodology to assess the structural reliability of pressure vessels and other parts of interest to NASA containing defects. This report covers a computer modelling algorithm used to simulate the growth of a semi-elliptical surface crack; the presentation of a finite element investigation that compared the theoretical (HRR) stress field to that produced by elastic and elastic-plastic models; and experimental efforts to characterize three dimensional aspects of fracture present in 'two dimensional', or planar configuration specimens.

  14. Fracture Mechanics Analysis of LH2 Feed Line Flow Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark A.; Dawicke, David S.; Brzowski, Matthew B.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Harris, Charles E.

    2006-01-01

    Inspections of the Space Shuttle Main Engine revealed fatigue cracks growing from slots in the flow liner of the liquid hydrogen (LH2) feed lines. During flight, the flow liners experience complex loading induced by flow of LH2 and the resonance characteristics of the structure. The flow liners are made of Inconel 718 and had previously not been considered a fracture critical component. However, fatigue failure of a flow liner could have catastrophic effect on the Shuttle engines. A fracture mechanics study was performed to determine if a damage tolerance approach to life management was possible and to determine the sensitivity to the load spectra, material properties, and crack size. The load spectra were derived separately from ground tests and material properties were obtained from coupon tests. The stress-intensity factors for the fatigue cracks were determined from a shell-dynamics approach that simulated the dominant resonant frequencies. Life predictions were obtained using the NASGRO life prediction code. The results indicated that adequate life could not be demonstrated for initial crack lengths of the size that could be detected by traditional NDE techniques.

  15. Fundamental mechanisms of tensile fracture in aluminum sheet undirectionally reinforced with boron filament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, H. W.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental study of the tensile-fracture process in aluminum sheet unidirectionally reinforced with boron filament. The tensile strength of the material is severely limited by a noncumulative fracture mechanism which involves the initiation and sustenance of a chain reaction of filament fractures at a relatively low stress level. Matrix fracture follows in a completely ductile manner. The minimum filament stress for initiation of the fracture mechanism is shown to be approximately 1.17 GN/sq m (170 ksi), and appears to be independent of filament diameter, number of filament layers, and the strength of the filament-matrix bond. All the commonly observed features of tensile fracture surfaces are explained in terms of the observed noncumulative fracture mechanism.

  16. Fracture and mechanical stratigraphy for Mississippian-Pennsylvanian age carbonates, Ozark Dome, NW Arkansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peppers, M.; Burberry, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Identifying natural fracture patterns in an area gives a detailed look into the local tectonic history. Comparing those fractures to the mechanical properties of the rocks provides key insights into predicting fractures in the subsurface. The Ozark Dome is an ideal study area for fracture research due to multiple fracturing events resulting from the multi-stage deformation Ouachita Orogeny during the late Paleozoic. This study used field observations of lithology and fracture attributes over ~10 outcrops in the Mississppian-Pennsylvanian (360-298 ma) carbonate sequence of the Ozark Plateau. Outcrops were chosen having excellent lithological exposure up the sequence from the Boone to Atoka formations and with 3D representations of the fracture patterns. In all, the area investigated covered nearly 60 square miles. Fracture attributes collected included fracture intensity, length, and abutting relationships; and rock hardness data collected from a Schmidt Hammer. Data was analyzed using programs such as Stereonet and MOVE structural software that generated rose diagrams, structural cross sections, and products. Initial results indicate 4 main fracture orientations that resulted from at least 3 discrete phases of deformation during the Miss-Penn. Initial results also indicate that the present-day mechanical stratigraphy is not the same one that existed during the deformation phases. Work done at the Tiger Blvd. outcrops showed at least 2 distinct mechanical units. Fractures observed at the outcrop did not respect mechanical bed boundaries, and showed no relationship to the differences in mechanical properties observed. This study will aid in the interpretation of fractures in regards to mechanical stratigraphy, which allows for a better understanding of subsurface fracture prediction in carbonate sequences worldwide. Finally, the fracture work here will also help in elucidating the tectonic history of the field area during the Mississippian and Pennsylvanian.

  17. Microstructural fracture mechanics in high-cycle fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, E.R. de los; Navarro, A.

    1997-12-31

    Microstructural Fracture Mechanics principles are used to develop a model of crack growth in long life fatigue. In its simplest form microstructural modelling considers the material as a polycrystal of uniform grain size D, with a crack system divided into three zones: the crack, the plastic zone and the microstructural barrier zone. The solution of the equilibrium equation allows for the calculation of the stresses sustained by the crack wake, plastic zone, barrier zone and elastic enclave, and the crack tip plastic displacement {phi}. Crack growth rate is calculated through a Paris type relationship in terms of {phi}, i.e., da/dN = C{phi}{sup n}. Conditions for crack arrest and instability are established.

  18. Fracture mechanics concepts in reliability analysis of monolithic ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manderscheid, Jane M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Basic design concepts for high-performance, monolithic ceramic structural components are addressed. The design of brittle ceramics differs from that of ductile metals because of the inability of ceramic materials to redistribute high local stresses caused by inherent flaws. Random flaw size and orientation requires that a probabilistic analysis be performed in order to determine component reliability. The current trend in probabilistic analysis is to combine linear elastic fracture mechanics concepts with the two parameter Weibull distribution function to predict component reliability under multiaxial stress states. Nondestructive evaluation supports this analytical effort by supplying data during verification testing. It can also help to determine statistical parameters which describe the material strength variation, in particular the material threshold strength (the third Weibull parameter), which in the past was often taken as zero for simplicity.

  19. Chemical and Mechanical Alteration of Fractures: Micro-Scale Simulations and Comparison to Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameli, P.; Detwiler, R. L.; Elkhoury, J. E.; Morris, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Fractures are often the main pathways for subsurface fluid flow especially in rocks with low matrix porosity. Therefore, the hydro-mechanical properties of fractures are of fundamental concern for subsurface CO2 sequestration, enhanced geothermal energy production, enhanced oil recovery, and nuclear waste disposal. Chemical and mechanical stresses induced during these applications may lead to significant alteration of the hydro-mechanical properties of fractures. Laboratory experiments aimed at understanding the chemo-hydro-mechanical response of fractures have shown a range of results that contradict simple conceptual models. For example, under conditions favoring mineral dissolution, where one would expect an overall increase in permeability and fracture aperture, permeability increases under some conditions and decreases under others. Recent experiments have attempted to link these core-scale observations to the relevant small-scale processes occurring within fractures. Results suggest that the loss of mechanical strength in asperities due to chemical alteration may cause non-uniform deformation and alteration of fracture apertures. However, it remains difficult to directly measure the coupled chemical and mechanical processes that lead to alteration of contacting fracture surfaces, which challenges our ability to predict the long-term evolution of the hydro-mechanical properties of fractures. Here, we present a computational model that uses micro-scale surface roughness and explicitly couples dissolution and elastic deformation to calculate local alterations in fracture aperture under chemical and mechanical stresses. Chemical alteration of the fracture surfaces is modeled using a depth-averaged algorithm of fracture flow and reactive transport. Then, we deform the resulting altered fracture-surfaces using an algorithm that calculates the elastic deformation. Nonuniform dissolution may cause the location of the resultant force between the two contacting surfaces to shift away from the equilibrium location. We apply a relative rotation of the fracture surfaces to preserve force equilibrium during each iteration. The results of the model are compared with flow-through experiments conducted on fractured limestone cores and on analogue rough-surfaced KDP-glass fractures. The fracture apertures are mapped before, during (for some) and after the experiments. These detailed aperture measurements are used as input to our new coupled model. The experiments cover a wide range of transport and reaction conditions; some exhibit permeability increase due to channel formation and others exhibit fracture closure due to deformation of contacting asperities. Simulation results predict these general trends as well as the small-scale details in regions of contacting asperities.n example of an aperture field under chemical and mechanical alterations. The color scale is in microns.

  20. Fracture mechanics; Proceedings of the Seventeenth National Symposium, Albany, NY, August 7-9, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, J. M. (Editor); Chait, R. (Editor); Smith, C. W. (Editor); Wilhem, D. P. (Editor); Andrews, W. A. (Editor); Newman, J. C. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The present conference gives attention to topics in the application of fracture mechanics, subcritical crack growth phenomena, fracture testing methods, ductile fracture behavior, and fracture mechanisms and their analysis. Specific papers treat the resistance curve approach to composite materials characterization, fracture toughness in ductile iron and cast steel, hold-time effects in elevated temperature fatigue crack propagation, creep crack growth under nonsteady conditions, viscoplastic fatigue in a superalloy at elevated temperatures, fracture testing with arc bend specimens, one-point bend impact test application, and a compact mode II fracture specimen. Also discussed are the computation of stable crack growth using the J-integral, the use of plastic energy dissipation to characterize crack growth, the extension of surface cracks under cyclic loading, the minimum time criterion for crack instability in structural materials, dynamic crack propagation and branching under biaxial loading, and boundary layer effects in cracked bodies.

  1. Fracture mechanics analysis for various fiber/matrix interface loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, R. A.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Fiber/matrix (F/M) cracking was analyzed to provide better understanding and guidance in developing F/M interface fracture toughness tests. Two configurations, corresponding to F/M cracking at a broken fiber and at the free edge, were investigated. The effects of mechanical loading, thermal cooldown, and friction were investigated. Each configuration was analyzed for two loadings: longitudinal and normal to the fiber. A nonlinear finite element analysis was performed to model friction and slip at the F/M interface. A new procedure for fitting a square-root singularity to calculated stresses was developed to determine stress intensity factors (K sub I and K sub II) for a bimaterial interface crack. For the case of F/M cracking at a broken fiber with longitudinal loading, crack tip conditions were strongly influenced by interface friction. As a result, an F/M interface toughness test based on this case was not recommended because nonlinear data analysis methods would be required. For the free edge crack configuration, both mechanical and thermal loading caused crack opening, thereby avoiding frictional effects. A F/M interface toughness test based on this configuration would provide data for K(sub I)/K(sub II) ratios of about 0.7 and 1.6 for fiber and radial normal loading, respectively. However, thermal effects must be accounted for in the data analysis.

  2. Isolated posterior malleolus fracture: a rare injury mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Serbest, Sancar; Tiftikçi, Uğur; Tosun, Haci Bayram; Kesgin, Engin; Karataş, Metin

    2015-01-01

    Sprain of the ankle is undoubtedly a common injury during athletic activity, and the sprain can be also associated with fracture of the ankle. Isolated posterior malleolus fracture is a very rare condition, which is usually missed. Here, we are presenting a 37 years old female patient, who suffered injury secondary pressing on brake pedal during collision in a traffic accident. Clinical evaluation is based on Ottawa Ankle Rules and a fracture is diagnosed; patient is started on daily activities at postoperative Week 8. This study aims to emphasize that Ottawa Ankle Rules are usually efficient for evaluating fractures of ankle, but clinicians should always make a detailed physical examination. PMID:26097627

  3. Investigation of translaminar fracture in fibrereinforced composite laminates---applicability of linear elastic fracture mechanics and cohesive-zone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Fang

    With the extensive application of fiber-reinforced composite laminates in industry, research on the fracture mechanisms of this type of materials have drawn more and more attentions. A variety of fracture theories and models have been developed. Among them, the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and cohesive-zone model (CZM) are two widely-accepted fracture models, which have already shown applicability in the fracture analysis of fiber-reinforced composite laminates. However, there remain challenges which prevent further applications of the two fracture models, such as the experimental measurement of fracture resistance. This dissertation primarily focused on the study of the applicability of LEFM and CZM for the fracture analysis of translaminar fracture in fibre-reinforced composite laminates. The research for each fracture model consisted of two sections: the analytical characterization of crack-tip fields and the experimental measurement of fracture resistance parameters. In the study of LEFM, an experimental investigation based on full-field crack-tip displacement measurements was carried out as a way to characterize the subcritical and steady-state crack advances in translaminar fracture of fiber-reinforced composite laminates. Here, the fiber-reinforced composite laminates were approximated as anisotropic solids. The experimental investigation relied on the LEFM theory with a modification with respect to the material anisotropy. Firstly, the full-field crack-tip displacement fields were measured by Digital Image Correlation (DIC). Then two methods, separately based on the stress intensity approach and the energy approach, were developed to measure the crack-tip field parameters from crack-tip displacement fields. The studied crack-tip field parameters included the stress intensity factor, energy release rate and effective crack length. Moreover, the crack-growth resistance curves (R-curves) were constructed with the measured crack-tip field parameters. In addition, an error analysis was carried out with an emphasis on the influence of out-of-plane rotation of specimen. In the study of CZM, two analytical inverse methods, namely the field projection method (FPM) and the separable nonlinear least-squares method, were developed for the extraction of cohesive fracture properties from crack-tip full-field displacements. Firstly, analytical characterizations of the elastic fields around a crack-tip cohesive zone and the cohesive variables within the cohesive zone were derived in terms of an eigenfunction expansion. Then both of the inverse methods were developed based on the analytical characterization. With the analytical inverse methods, the cohesive-zone law (CZL), cohesive-zone size and position can be inversely computed from the cohesive-crack-tip displacement fields. In the study, comprehensive numerical tests were carried out to investigate the applicability and robustness of two inverse methods. From the numerical tests, it was found that the field projection method was very sensitive to noise and thus had limited applicability in practice. On the other hand, the separable nonlinear least-squares method was found to be more noise-resistant and less ill-conditioned. Subsequently, the applicability of separable nonlinear least-squares method was validated with the same translaminar fracture experiment for the study of LEFM. Eventually, it was found that the experimental measurements of R-curves and CZL showed a great agreement, in both of the fracture energy and the predicted load carrying capability. It thus demonstrated the validity of present research for the translaminar fracture of fiber-reinforced composite laminates.

  4. Spartan Release Engagement Mechanism (REM) stress and fracture analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlowe, D. S.; West, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    The revised stress and fracture analysis of the Spartan REM hardware for current load conditions and mass properties is presented. The stress analysis was performed using a NASTRAN math model of the Spartan REM adapter, base, and payload. Appendix A contains the material properties, loads, and stress analysis of the hardware. The computer output and model description are in Appendix B. Factors of safety used in the stress analysis were 1.4 on tested items and 2.0 on all other items. Fracture analysis of the items considered fracture critical was accomplished using the MSFC Crack Growth Analysis code. Loads and stresses were obtaind from the stress analysis. The fracture analysis notes are located in Appendix A and the computer output in Appendix B. All items analyzed met design and fracture criteria.

  5. Ductile fracture of mechanically alloyed iron-yttria alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosco, J. B.; Koss, D. A.

    1993-03-01

    The influence of Y203 particle content on the tensile fracture of mechanically alloyed iron has been studied for a series of dispersion-strengthened alloys containing up to 10 vol pct particles. When compared to the behavior of spheroidized steels, the present results indicate that at comparable volume fractions of particles, the Fe-Y203 alloys exhibit a much decreased tensile ductility. Observations of microscopic damage indicate that this is a consequence of rapid void nucleation at small strains, limited void growth, and enhanced void linking, especially at high particle contents. Analysis of these observations suggests (a) a surprisingly high oxide particle-matrix interfacial bond strength, (b) an influence of rapid strain hardening at small strains in creating high flow stresses, which assist void initiation, (c) enhanced void nucleation at high volume fractions of particles due to neighboring particles and voids, and (d) an accelerated void-linking process at high volume fractions of particles when interparticle spacing approaches particle/ void size.

  6. Fracture Mechanics Analyses for Interface Crack Problems - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Shivakumar, Kunigal; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in fracture mechanics analyses of the interfacial crack problem are reviewed. The intent of the review is to renew the awareness of the oscillatory singularity at the crack tip of a bimaterial interface and the problems that occur when calculating mode mixity using numerical methods such as the finite element method in conjunction with the virtual crack closure technique. Established approaches to overcome the nonconvergence issue of the individual mode strain energy release rates are reviewed. In the recent literature many attempts to overcome the nonconvergence issue have been developed. Among the many approaches found only a few methods hold the promise of providing practical solutions. These are the resin interlayer method, the method that chooses the crack tip element size greater than the oscillation zone, the crack tip element method that is based on plate theory and the crack surface displacement extrapolation method. Each of the methods is validated on a very limited set of simple interface crack problems. However, their utility for a wide range of interfacial crack problems is yet to be established.

  7. Probalistic Finite Elements (PFEM) structural dynamics and fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wing-Kam; Belytschko, Ted; Mani, A.; Besterfield, G.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop computationally efficient methodologies for assessing the effects of randomness in loads, material properties, and other aspects of a problem by a finite element analysis. The resulting group of methods is called probabilistic finite elements (PFEM). The overall objective of this work is to develop methodologies whereby the lifetime of a component can be predicted, accounting for the variability in the material and geometry of the component, the loads, and other aspects of the environment; and the range of response expected in a particular scenario can be presented to the analyst in addition to the response itself. Emphasis has been placed on methods which are not statistical in character; that is, they do not involve Monte Carlo simulations. The reason for this choice of direction is that Monte Carlo simulations of complex nonlinear response require a tremendous amount of computation. The focus of efforts so far has been on nonlinear structural dynamics. However, in the continuation of this project, emphasis will be shifted to probabilistic fracture mechanics so that the effect of randomness in crack geometry and material properties can be studied interactively with the effect of random load and environment.

  8. Chemically- and mechanically-mediated influences on the transport and mechanical characteristics of rock fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Min, K.-B.; Rutqvist, J.; Elsworth, D.

    2009-02-01

    A model is presented to represent changes in the mechanical and transport characteristics of fractured rock that result from coupled mechanical and chemical effects. The specific influence is the elevation of dissolution rates on contacting asperities, which results in a stress- and temperature-dependent permanent closure. A model representing this pressure-dissolution-like behavior is adapted to define the threshold and resulting response in terms of fundamental thermodynamic properties of a contacting fracture. These relations are incorporated in a stress-stiffening model of fracture closure to define the stress- and temperature-dependency of aperture loss and behavior during stress and temperature cycling. These models compare well with laboratory and field experiments, representing both decoupled isobaric and isothermal responses. The model was applied to explore the impact of these responses on heated structures in rock. The result showed a reduction in ultimate induced stresses over the case where chemical effects were not incorporated, with permanent reduction in final stresses after cooling to ambient conditions. Similarly, permeabilities may be lower than they were in the case where chemical effects were not considered, with a net reduction apparent even after cooling to ambient temperature. These heretofore-neglected effects may have a correspondingly significant impact on the performance of heated structures in rock, such as repositories for the containment of radioactive wastes.

  9. Effects of Strain Rates on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Mechanism of DP780 Dual Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengci; Kang, Yonglin; Zhu, Guoming; Kuang, Shuang

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical properties of DP780 dual phase steel were measured by quasi-static and high-speed tensile tests at strain rates between 0.001 and 1000 s-1 at room temperature. The deformation and fracture mechanisms were analyzed by observation of the tensile fracture and microstructure near the fracture. Dynamic factor and feret ratio quantitative methods were applied to study the effect of strain rate on the microstructure and properties of DP780 steel. The constitutive relation was described by a modified Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong model. The results showed that the strain rate sensitivity of yield strength is bigger than that of ultimate tensile strength; as strain rate increased, the formation of microcracks and voids at the ferrite/martensite interface can be alleviated; the strain rate effect is unevenly distributed in the plastic deformation region. Moreover, both models can effectively describe the experimental results, while the modified Zerilli-Armstrong model is more accurate because the strain-hardening rate of this model is independent of strain rate.

  10. Mechanical test and fractal analysis on anisotropic fracture of cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Dagang; Chen, Bin; Ye, Wei; Gou, Jihua; Fan, Jinghong

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical properties of the cortical bone of fresh bovine femora along three different directions are tested through four-point bending experiments. It is indicated that the fracture energy along the transversal direction of the bone is distinctly larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture surfaces of the three different directions are observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is shown that the roughness of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is obviously larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. It is also revealed that the osteons in the bone are perpendicular to the fracture surface of the transversal direction and parallel to the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. Based on these experimental results, the fractal dimensions of the fracture surfaces of different directions are calculated by box-counting method in MATLAB. The calculated results show that the fractal dimension of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture energies of different directions are also calculated based on their fractal models. It is denoted that the fracture energy of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The calculated results are in good agreement with the tested results.

  11. A numerical study on intended and unintended failure mechanisms in blanking of sandwich plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Soyarslan, C.; Tekkaya, A. E.

    2013-05-01

    Metal-polymer-metal sandwich plates are widely used in the automotive and aerospace industry. As for different applications the sandwich plates can be divided into two types. They are sound-damping laminates with a polymer core much thinner than the metallic faces and low-density laminates with a core thickness of approximately 40-60% of the total thickness. One frequent process step in production of parts made of these plates is the blanking process whose hereditary effects draw the limits of further forming stages or service performance and life; e.g. the failure of the adhesive in the thermoplastic polymer interface affects the sound-damping efficiency intensively. With this motivation, we present FE simulation of an axi-symmetric blanking process of steel/polyethylene/steel sound-damping laminates. The mechanical behavior of the metallic layers was characterized by finite strain rate independent elasto-plasticity where progressive material deterioration and fracture are given account for using continuum damage mechanics (CDM). This material model is made accessible via implementations as VUMAT subroutines for ABAQUS/Explicit. Possible failure of the thermoplastic polymer which may lead to delamination of the metallic layers is modeled using ABAQUS built-in cohesive zone elements. The results show that existing intended and unintended failure modes, e.g. blanking of the metallic and thermoplastic polymer constituents as well as failure of polymer layer under shear and compression, can be effectively studied with the proposed framework for process enhancement. As a future work, a damage coupled nonlinear visco-elastic constitutive model will be devised for the simulation of the thermoplastic layer in low-density laminates.

  12. Numerical Assessment of the Progressive Rock Fracture Mechanism of Cracked Chevron Notched Brazilian Disc Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, F.; Wei, M. D.; Xu, N. W.; Ma, Y.; Yang, D. S.

    2015-03-01

    The International Society of Rock Mechanics (ISRM) suggested cracked chevron notched Brazilian disc method falls into a major testing category of rock fracture toughness measurement by virtue of chevron notched rock samples. A straight through crack front during the whole fracturing process is assumed in the testing principle but is never assessed. In this study, the progressive rock fracture mechanism of cracked chevron notched Brazilian disc rock specimens is numerically simulated for the first time. Two representative sample types with distinct geometry of notch ligaments are modelled. The assumption of a straight through crack front for chevron notched fracture samples is critically assessed. The results show that not only the notch tip but also the saw-cut chevron notch cracks during the experiments. The straight through crack front assumption is never satisfied in the realistic rock fracture progress of chevron notched disc samples. In addition, the crack features prominent curved front, far from being straight. In contrast to the sample type with narrow notch ligament, the acoustic emission (AE) of the simulation on the sample with wide notch ligament depicts obvious biased fracturing of the prescript fracturing route of the notch. The numerically observed progressive fracture mechanism calls for more attention on how to accurately calibrate the critical dimensionless stress intensity factor for a better measurement of Mode I fracture toughness via chevron notched samples.

  13. Mechanical properties of bioactive glass (13-93) scaffolds fabricated by robotic deposition for structural bone repair

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Rahaman, Mohamed N.; Hilmas, Gregory E.; Bal, B. Sonny

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to develop synthetic scaffolds for repairing large defects in load-bearing bones. Bioactive glasses have attractive properties as a scaffold material for bone repair, but data on their mechanical properties are limited. The objective of the present study was to comprehensively evaluate the mechanical properties of strong porous scaffolds of silicate 13-93 bioactive glass fabricated by robocasting. As-fabricated scaffolds with a grid-like microstructure (porosity = 47%; filament diameter = 330 μm; pore width = 300) were tested in compressive and flexural loading to determine their strength, elastic modulus, Weibull modulus, fatigue resistance, and fracture toughness. Scaffolds were also tested in compression after they were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) in vitro or implanted in a rat subcutaneous model in vivo. As fabricated, the scaffolds had a strength = 86 ± 9 MPa, elastic modulus = 13 ± 2 GPa, and a Weibull modulus = 12 when tested in compression. In flexural loading, the strength, elastic modulus, and Weibull modulus were 11 ± 3 MPa, 13 ± 2 GPa, and 6, respectively. In compression, the as-fabricated scaffolds had a mean fatigue life of ~106 cycles when tested in air at room temperature or in phosphate-buffered saline at 37 °C under cyclic stresses of 1–10 MPa or 2–20 MPa. The compressive strength of the scaffolds decreased markedly during the first 2 weeks of immersion in SBF or implantation in vivo, but more slowly thereafter. The brittle mechanical response of the scaffolds in vitro changed to an elasto-plastic response after implantation for longer than 2–4 weeks in vivo. In addition to providing critically needed data for designing bioactive glass scaffolds, the results are promising for the application of these strong porous scaffolds in loaded bone repair. PMID:23438862

  14. A molecular dynamics investigation of rapid fracture mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Farid F.; Brodbeck, Dominique; Rudge, William E.; Xu, Xiaopeng

    1997-09-01

    Dynamic fracture is investigated for two-dimensional notched solids under tension using million atom systems. Brittle material and ductile material are modeled through the choice of interatomic potential functions which are Lennard-Jones and embedded-atom potentials, respectively. Numerical calculations are carried out on the IBN SP parallel computer and molecular dynamics is implemented using a spatial-decomposition algorithm. Many recent laboratory findings occur in our simulation experiments. A detailed comparison between laboratory and computer experiments is presented, and microscopic processes are identified. For rapid brittle fracture, the dynamic instability of the crack growth is observed as the crack velocity approaches one-third of the Rayleigh wave speed. At higher crack velocity, the crack either follows a wavy path or branches and the anisotropy due to the large deformation at the crack tip plays the governing role in determining the crack path. Limited comparison of rapid brittle fracture process with the rapid ductile fracture process is made.

  15. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open ... falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the ...

  16. Fracture mechanics; Proceedings of the 22nd National Symposium, Atlanta, GA, June 26-28, 1990. Vols. 1 & 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Hugo A.; Saxena, Ashok; McDowell, David L.; Atluri, Satya N.; Newman, James C., Jr.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Epstein, Jonathan S.

    Current research on fracture mechanics is reviewed, focusing on ductile fracture; high-temperature and time-dependent fracture; 3D problems; interface fracture; microstructural aspects of fatigue and fracture; and fracture predictions and applications. Particular attention is given to the determination and comparison of crack resistance curves from wide plates and fracture mechanics specimens; a relationship between R-curves in contained and uncontained yield; the creep crack growth behavior of titanium alloy Ti-6242; a crack growth response in three heat resistant materials at elevated temperature; a crack-surface-contact model for determining effective-stress-intensity factors; interfacial dislocations in anisotropic bimaterials; an effect of intergranular crack branching on fracture toughness evaluation; the fracture toughness behavior of exservice chromium-molybdenum steels; the application of fracture mechanics to assess the significance of proof loading; and a load ratio method for estimating crack extension. (For individual items see A93-31577 to A93-31616)

  17. Fracture mechanics; Proceedings of the 22nd National Symposium, Atlanta, GA, June 26-28, 1990. Vols. 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Hugo A. (Editor); Saxena, Ashok (Editor); Mcdowell, David L. (Editor); Atluri, Satya N. (Editor); Newman, James C., Jr. (Editor); Raju, Ivatury S. (Editor); Epstein, Jonathan S. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Current research on fracture mechanics is reviewed, focusing on ductile fracture; high-temperature and time-dependent fracture; 3D problems; interface fracture; microstructural aspects of fatigue and fracture; and fracture predictions and applications. Particular attention is given to the determination and comparison of crack resistance curves from wide plates and fracture mechanics specimens; a relationship between R-curves in contained and uncontained yield; the creep crack growth behavior of titanium alloy Ti-6242; a crack growth response in three heat resistant materials at elevated temperature; a crack-surface-contact model for determining effective-stress-intensity factors; interfacial dislocations in anisotropic bimaterials; an effect of intergranular crack branching on fracture toughness evaluation; the fracture toughness behavior of exservice chromium-molybdenum steels; the application of fracture mechanics to assess the significance of proof loading; and a load ratio method for estimating crack extension.

  18. The peel test in experimental adhesive fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. P.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Several testing methods have been proposed for obtaining critical energy release rate or adhesive fracture energy in bond systems. These tests include blister, cone, lap shear, and peel tests. Peel tests have been used for many years to compare relative strengths of different adhesives, different surface preparation techniques, etc. The present work demonstrates the potential use of the peel test for obtaining adhesive fracture energy values.

  19. Mechanisms and Management of Stress Fractures in Physically Active Persons

    PubMed Central

    Romani, William A.; Gieck, Joe H.; Perrin, David H.; Saliba, Ethan N.; Kahler, David M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe the anatomy of bone and the physiology of bone remodeling as a basis for the proper management of stress fractures in physically active people. Data Sources: We searched PubMed for the years 1965 through 2000 using the key words stress fracture, bone remodeling, epidemiology, and rehabilitation. Data Synthesis: Bone undergoes a normal remodeling process in physically active persons. Increased stress leads to an acceleration of this remodeling process, a subsequent weakening of bone, and a higher susceptibility to stress fracture. When a stress fracture is suspected, appropriate management of the injury should begin immediately. Effective management includes a cyclic process of activity and rest that is based on the remodeling process of bone. Conclusions/Recommendations: Bone continuously remodels itself to withstand the stresses involved with physical activity. Stress fractures occur as the result of increased remodeling and a subsequent weakening of the outer surface ofthe bone. Once a stress fracture is suspected, a cyclic management program that incorporates the physiology of bone remodeling should be initiated. The cyclic program should allow the physically active person to remove the source of the stress to the bone, maintain fitness, promote a safe return to activity, and permit the bone to heal properly. PMID:16558676

  20. Injection-Sensitive Mechanics of Hydraulic Fracture Interaction with Discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuprakov, D.; Melchaeva, O.; Prioul, R.

    2014-09-01

    We develop a new analytical model, called OpenT, that solves the elasticity problem of a hydraulic fracture (HF) contact with a pre-existing discontinuity natural fracture (NF) and the condition for HF re-initiation at the NF. The model also accounts for fluid penetration into the permeable NFs. For any angle of fracture intersection, the elastic problem of a blunted dislocation discontinuity is solved for the opening and sliding generated at the discontinuity. The sites and orientations of a new tensile crack nucleation are determined based on a mixed stress- and energy-criterion. In the case of tilted fracture intersection, the finite offset of the new crack initiation point along the discontinuity is computed. We show that aside from known controlling parameters such stress contrast, cohesional and frictional properties of the NFs and angle of intersection, the fluid injection parameters such as the injection rate and the fluid viscosity are of first-order in the crossing behavior. The model is compared to three independent laboratory experiments, analytical criteria of Blanton, extended Renshaw-Pollard, as well as fully coupled numerical simulations. The relative computational efficiency of OpenT model (compared to the numerical models) makes the model attractive for implementation in modern engineering tools simulating hydraulic fracture propagation in naturally fractured environments.

  1. Comparison of fracture mechanisms for carbon-epoxy composites under tensile loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazzio, V. F.; Mullin, J. V.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of oxidative surface treatments and differences in resin crack sensitivity on the tensile properties of carbon-epoxy composites have been investigated. A comparison of the fracture mechanisms for two different fiber batches was made in both model and engineering composites, using unmodified and modified epoxy resin. It has been observed that two distinct characteristics occur in the fracture surfaces of most engineering composites; first, fibers which fracture at the surface result in cleavage failure and, second, those which have fractured elsewhere and pulled out. A detailed discussion of these observations is contained in this paper.

  2. Measurements and micro-mechanical modelling of the response of sintered titanium foams.

    PubMed

    Siegkas, P; Petrinic, N; Tagarielli, V L

    2016-04-01

    Titanium foams of relative density in the range 0.35-0.50 are tested in quasi-static compression, tension and shear. The response is ductile in compression but brittle, and weaker, in shear and tension. Virtual foam microstructures are generated by an algorithm based on Voronoi tessellation of three-dimensional space, capable of reproducing the measured size distribution of the pores in the foam. Finite Element (FE) simulations are conducted to explore the mechanical response of the material, by analysing the elasto-plastic response of a statistical volume element (SVE). The simulations correctly predict the ductile compressive response and its dependence on relative density. PMID:26947273

  3. An extension of fracture mechanics/technology to larger and smaller cracks/defects

    PubMed Central

    Abé, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Fracture mechanics/technology is a key science and technology for the design and integrity assessment of the engineering structures. However, the conventional fracture mechanics has mostly targeted a limited size of cracks/defects, say of from several hundred microns to several tens of centimeters. The author and his group has tried to extend that limited size and establish a new version of fracture technology for very large cracks used in geothermal energy extraction and for very small cracks/defects or damage often appearing in the combination of mechanical and electronic components of engineering structures. Those new versions are reviewed in this paper. PMID:19907123

  4. An extension of fracture mechanics/technology to larger and smaller cracks/defects.

    PubMed

    Abé, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Fracture mechanics/technology is a key science and technology for the design and integrity assessment of the engineering structures. However, the conventional fracture mechanics has mostly targeted a limited size of cracks/defects, say of from several hundred microns to several tens of centimeters. The author and his group has tried to extend that limited size and establish a new version of fracture technology for very large cracks used in geothermal energy extraction and for very small cracks/defects or damage often appearing in the combination of mechanical and electronic components of engineering structures. Those new versions are reviewed in this paper. PMID:19907123

  5. Cracked finite elements proposed for NASTRAN. [based on application of finite element method to fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aberson, J. A.; Anderson, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The recent introduction of special crack-tip singularity elements, usually referred to as cracked elements, has brought the power and flexibility of the finite-element method to bear much more effectively on fracture mechanics problems. This paper recalls the development of two cracked elements and presents the results of some applications proving their accuracy and economy. Judging from the available literature on numerical methods in fracture mechanics, it seems clear that the elements described have been used more extensively than any others in practical fracture mechanics applications.

  6. A numerical model of hydro-thermo-mechanical coupling in a fractured rock mass

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, K.M.

    1996-06-01

    Coupled hydro-thermo-mechanical codes with the ability to model fractured materials are used for predicting groundwater flow behavior in fractured aquifers containing thermal sources. The potential applications of such a code include the analysis of groundwater behavior within a geothermal reservoir. The capability of modeling hydro-thermo systems with a dual porosity, fracture flow model has been previously developed in the finite element code, FEHM. FEHM has been modified to include stress coupling with the dual porosity feature. FEHM has been further developed to implicitly couple the dependence of fracture hydraulic conductivity on effective stress within two dimensional, saturated aquifers containing fracture systems. The cubic law for flow between parallel plates was used to model fracture permeability. The Bartin-Bandis relationship was used to determine the fracture aperture within the cubic law. The code used a Newton Raphson iteration to implicitly solve for six unknowns at each node. Results from a model of heat flow from a reservoir to the moving fluid in a single fracture compared well with analytic results. Results of a model showing the increase in fracture flow due to a single fracture opening under fluid pressure compared well with analytic results. A hot dry rock, geothermal reservoir was modeled with realistic time steps indicating that the modified FEHM code does successfully model coupled flow problems with no convergence problems.

  7. Analysis of seismic sources for different mechanisms of fracture growth for microseismic monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchkov, A. A.; Stefanov, Yu. P.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed and illustrated an approach for geomechanic modeling of elastic wave generation (microsiesmic event occurrence) during incremental fracture growth. We then derived properties of effective point seismic sources (radiation patterns) approximating obtained wavefields. These results establish connection between geomechanic models of hydraulic fracturing and microseismic monitoring. Thus, the results of the moment tensor inversion of microseismic data can be related to different geomechanic scenarios of hydraulic fracture growth. In future, the results can be used for calibrating hydrofrac models. We carried out a series of numerical simulations and made some observations about wave generation during fracture growth. In particular when the growing fracture hits pre-existing crack then it generates much stronger microseismic event compared to fracture growth in homogeneous medium (radiation pattern is very close to the theoretical dipole-type source mechanism).

  8. MECHANICAL ADVANTAGES OF A TRUSS-STRUCTURE-BASED FRACTURE FIXATION SYSTEM – A NOVEL FRACTURE FIXATION DEVICE "PINFIX" –

    PubMed Central

    ARAI, TETSUYA; YAMAMOTO, MICHIRO; IWATSUKI, KATSUYUKI; NATSUME, TADAHIRO; SHINOHARA, TAKAAKI; TATEBE, MASAHIRO; KURIMOTO, SHIGERU; OTA, HIDEYUKI; KATO, SHUICHI; HIRATA, HITOSHI

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A small, light, ball-joint device called PinFix, which can instantly convert a simple percutaneous cross pin fracture fixation system into a rigid external fracture fixation system based on truss structure, was developed. The purpose of this study was to compare the mechanical load and breaking strength of this truss-structure-based fixation system to that of the conventionally used external cantilever structure-based fixation system. Three types of mechanical loading tests, axial, bending, and torsion, were performed on an artificial fractured bone treated with either three-dimensional PinFix fixation, two-dimensional PinFix fixation, or conventional external fixation. The three- and two-dimensional PinFix fixations showed significantly more stiffness than conventional fixation on all three loading tests. Finite element analysis was next performed to calculate the stress distribution of the parts in PinFix and in the conventional fixator. The applied stress to the rod and connectors of PinFix was much less than that of the conventional external fixator. These results reflected the physical characteristic of truss structure in which applied load is converted to pure tension or compression forces along the members of the PinFix. In conclusion, PinFix is a simple fracture fixation system that has a truss-structure with a high rigidity. PMID:24640174

  9. A fracture mechanics based material acceptance method for oil tool equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Frishmuth, R.E.

    1984-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to show how fracture mechanics technology can be used to establish inexpensive charpy test criteria for materials acceptance of oil field equipment that will insure leak-before-break failure conditions. Fracture mechanics equations, material toughness test data nd charpy impact data are combined in a way that allows for the determination of 50% fracture area transition temperature (FATT) required for leak-before-break conditions for a given wall thickness and operating temperature. The 50% FATT value is easily determined from a series of charpy impact tests at various temperatures on the material of interest. The use of the proposed criteria would allow manufacturers and users of oil field equipment to qualify components based on charpy impact tests of the component material. This qualification would help insure that components would develop leaks before catastrophic fracture could occur. The alternative tests required to insure leak-before-break involve expensive fracture toughness tests.

  10. Thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in fractured rock formations during a glacial advance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, A. P. S.; Suvorov, A. P.; Selvadurai, P. A.

    2015-07-01

    The paper examines the coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes that develop in a fractured rock region within a fluid-saturated rock mass due to loads imposed by an advancing glacier. This scenario needs to be examined in order to assess the suitability of potential sites for the location of deep geologic repositories for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The THM processes are examined using a computational multiphysics approach that takes into account thermo-poroelasticity of the intact geological formation and the presence of a system of sessile but hydraulically interacting fractures (fracture zones). The modelling considers coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical effects in both the intact rock and the fracture zones due to contact normal stresses and fluid pressure at the base of the advancing glacier. Computational modelling provides an assessment of the role of fractures in modifying the pore pressure generation within the entire rock mass.

  11. Subcritical fracture propagation in rocks: An examination using the methods of fracture mechanics and non-destructive testing. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, P. L.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation of tensile rock fracture is presented with an emphasis on characterizing time dependent crack growth using the methods of fracture mechanics. Subcritical fracture experiments were performed in moist air on glass and five different rock types at crack velocities using the double torsion technique. The experimental results suggest that subcritical fracture resistance in polycrystals is dominated by microstructural effects. Evidence for gross violations of the assumptions of linear elastic fracture mechanics and double torsion theory was found in the tests on rocks. In an effort to obtain a better understanding of the physical breakdown processes associated with rock fracture, a series of nondestructive evaluation tests were performed during subcritical fracture experiments on glass and granite. Comparison of the observed process zone shape with that expected on the basis of a critical normal principal tensile stress criterion shows that the zone is much more elongated in the crack propagation direction than predicted by the continuum based microcracking model alone.

  12. Mechanical behavior and fracture characteristics of off-axis fiber composites. 2: Theory and comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanical behavior and stresses inducing fracture modes of unidirectional high-modulus graphite-fiber/epoxy composites subjected to off-axis tensile loads were investigated theoretically. The investigation included the use of composite mechanics, combined-stress failure criteria, and finite-element stress analysis. The results are compared with experimental data and led to the formulation of criteria and convenient plotting procedures for identifying, characterizing, and quantifying these fracture modes.

  13. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of the Slip-Side Joggle Regions of Wing-Leading-Edge Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Phillips, Dawn R.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle wing-leading edge consists of panels that are made of reinforced carbon-carbon. Coating spallation was observed near the slip-side region of the panels that experience extreme heating. To understand this phenomenon, a root-cause investigation was conducted. As part of that investigation, fracture mechanics analyses of the slip-side joggle regions of the hot panels were conducted. This paper presents an overview of the fracture mechanics analyses.

  14. Mode I cracking versus dilatancy banding: Experimental constraints on the mechanisms of extension fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemenda, A. I.; Nguyen, S.-H.; Petit, J.-P.; Ambre, J.

    2011-04-01

    Fractures or discontinuities perpendicular to the least stress ?3 were generated in a synthetic rock analogue (granular, frictional, cohesive, and dilatant) material in axisymmetric extension tests. These fractures are of two types defined by the mean stress ?. When ? is very small, the fractures form through the mode I cracking at tensile ?3 equal to the material tensile strength. The fracture walls have smooth surfaces. At higher ?, these surfaces become rougher, with the topography features forming faint or delicate plumose patterns. The amplitude of the plumose topography increases with ?. The axial stress ?3 at fracturing reduces in magnitude and changes in sign with the ? increase. Thus ?3 orthogonal discontinuities can form at compressive ?3. SEM observations show that these discontinuities are deformation localization bands where the material is characterized by the heterogeneous decohesion and volume and porosity increase due to dilatancy. The band thickness is several grain sizes. At formation, the bands are not opened, so they are not mode I fractures. They become fractures with plumose fractography after the separation of the sample parts along the band. The formation mechanism of these discontinuities or fractures is not completely clear, but it is suggested that it represents a running constitutive instability in the form of dilatancy banding (with further ? increase the bands become inclined to ?1, i.e., shear). The similarity between the experimentally generated plumose surface fractures and natural joints is discussed, and it is suggested that they can be formed as propagating constitutive instabilities.

  15. Spinal fractures in recreational bobsledders: an unexpected mechanism of injury

    PubMed Central

    Severson, Erik P.; Sofianos, Dmitri A.; Powell, Amy; Daubs, Michael; Patel, Rakesh; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2012-01-01

    Study design: Retrospective case series and literature review. Objective: To report and discuss spinal fractures occurring in recreational bobsledders. Summary of background data: Spinal fractures have been commonly described following traumatic injury during a number of recreational sports. Reports have focused on younger patients and typically involved high-impact sports or significant injuries. With an aging population and a wider array of recreational sports, spinal injuries may be seen after seemingly benign activities and without a high-impact injury. Methods: A retrospective review of two patients and review of the literature was performed. Results: Two patients with spinal fractures after recreational bobsledding were identified. Both patients, aged 57 and 54 years, noticed a simultaneous onset of severe back pain during a routine turn on a bobsled track. Neither was involved in a high-impact injury during the event. Both patients were treated conservatively with resolution of symptoms. An analysis of the bobsled track revealed that potential forces imparted to the rider may be greater than the yield strength of vertebral bone. Conclusions: Older athletes may be at greater risk for spinal fracture associated with routine recreational activities. Bobsledding imparts large amounts of force during routine events and may result in spinal trauma. Older patients, notably those with osteoporosis or metabolic bone disease, should be educated about the risks associated with seemingly benign recreational sports. PMID:23230417

  16. Modeling the hydro-mechanical responses of strip and circular punch loadings on water-saturated collapsible geomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, WaiChing; Chen, Qiushi; Ostien, Jakob T.

    2013-11-22

    A stabilized enhanced strain finite element procedure for poromechanics is fully integrated with an elasto-plastic cap model to simulate the hydro-mechanical interactions of fluid-infiltrating porous rocks with associative and non-associative plastic flow. We present a quantitative analysis on how macroscopic plastic volumetric response caused by pore collapse and grain rearrangement affects the seepage of pore fluid, and vice versa. Results of finite element simulations imply that the dissipation of excess pore pressure may significantly affect the stress path and thus alter the volumetric plastic responses.

  17. A Fracture-Mechanical Model of Crack Growth and Interaction: Application to Pre-eruptive Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, C.; Sammonds, P.; Kilburn, C.

    2007-12-01

    A greater understanding of the physical processes occurring within a volcano is a key aspect in the success of eruption forecasting. By considering the role of fracture growth, interaction and coalescence in the formation of dykes and conduits as well as the source mechanism for observed seismicity we can create a more general, more applicable model for precursory seismicity. The frequency of volcano-tectonic earthquakes, created by fracturing of volcanic rock, often shows a short-term increase prior to eruption. Using fracture mechanics, the model presented here aims to determine the conditions necessary for the acceleration in fracture events which produces the observed pre-eruptive seismicity. By focusing on the cause of seismic events rather than simply the acceleration patterns observed, the model also highlights the distinction between an accelerating seismic sequence ending with an eruption and a short-term increase which returns to background levels with no activity occurring, an event also observed in the field and an important capability if false alarms are to be avoided. This 1-D model explores the effects of a surrounding stress field and the distribution of multi-scale cracks on the interaction and coalescence of these cracks to form an open pathway for magma ascent. Similarly to seismic observations in the field, and acoustic emissions data from the laboratory, exponential and hyperbolic accelerations in fracturing events are recorded. Crack distribution and inter-crack distance appears to be a significant controlling factor on the evolution of the fracture network, dominating over the effects of a remote stress field. The generality of the model and its basis on fundamental fracture mechanics results makes it applicable to studies of fracture networks in numerous situations. For example looking at the differences between high temperature fracture processes and purely brittle failure the model can be similarly applied to fracture dynamics in the edifice of a long repose volcano and a lava dome.

  18. Molecular mechanisms of osteoporotic hip fractures in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Föger-Samwald, Ursula; Vekszler, György; Hörz-Schuch, Edith; Salem, Sylvia; Wipperich, Markus; Ritschl, Peter; Mousavi, Mehdi; Pietschmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A common manifestation of age-related bone loss and resultant osteoporosis are fractures of the hip. Age-related osteoporosis is thought to be determined by a number of intrinsic factors including genetics, hormonal changes, changes in levels of oxidative stress, or an inflammatory status associated with the aging process. The aim of this study was to investigate gene expression and bone architecture in bone samples derived from elderly osteoporotic women with hip fractures (OP) in comparison to bone samples from age matched women with osteoarthritis of the hip (OA). Femoral heads and adjacent neck tissue were collected from 10 women with low-trauma hip fractures (mean age 83±6) and consecutive surgical hip replacement. Ten bone samples from patients undergoing hip replacement due to osteoarthritis (mean age 80±5) served as controls. One half of each bone sample was subjected to gene expression analysis. The second half of each bone sample was analyzed by microcomputed tomography. From each half, samples from four different regions, the central and subcortical region of the femoral head and neck, were analyzed. We could show a significantly decreased expression of the osteoblast related genes RUNX2, Osterix, Sclerostin, WNT10B, and Osteocalcin, a significantly increased ratio of RANKL to Osteoprotegerin, and a significantly increased expression of the enzymes superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and glutathione peroxidase GPX3, and of the inflammatory cytokine IL6 in bone samples from hip fracture patients compared to controls. Major microstructural changes in OP bone were seen in the neck and were characterized by a significant decrease of bone volume, trabecular number, and connectivity density and a significant increase of trabecular separation. In conclusion, our data give evidence for a decreased expression of osteoblast related genes and increased expression of osteoclast related genes. Furthermore, increased expression of SOD2 and GPX3 suggest increased antioxidative activity in bone samples from elderly osteoporotic women with hip fractures. PMID:26608808

  19. Influence of grain size on the mechanism of fracture of the aluminum alloy V95

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, A. N.; Brodova, I. G.; Shirinkina, I. G.; Lyapunova, E. A.; Naimark, O. B.

    2012-07-01

    Mechanical behavior and mechanisms of fracture of the ultrafine-crystalline (UFC) and the coarse-crystalline (CC) aluminum alloy V95 (Al-6.0 Zn-2.3 Mg-2.0 Cu-0.4 Mn (wt %)) manufactured via using severe plastic deformation, namely, by dynamic equal-channel angular pressing (DCAP), have been studied. It has been demonstrated that the UFC material exhibits improved mechanical properties in comparison with the CC analog. A correlation analysis of fracture surfaces and the determination of the Hurst exponent have made it possible to perform a comparative estimation of the uniformity of the fracture structure and of the fractions of ductile and brittle fractures in the samples with the structure-scale characteristics different in value.

  20. Correlating laboratory observations of fracture mechanical properties to hydraulically-induced microseismicity in geothermal reservoirs.

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen L. Karner, Ph.D

    2006-02-01

    To date, microseismicity has provided an invaluable tool for delineating the fracture network produced by hydraulic stimulation of geothermal reservoirs. While the locations of microseismic events are of fundamental importance, there is a wealth of information that can be gleaned from the induced seismicity (e.g. fault plane solutions, seismic moment tensors, source characteristics). Closer scrutiny of the spatial and temporal evolution of seismic moment tensors can shed light on systematic characteristics of fractures in the geothermal reservoir. When related to observations from laboratory experiments, these systematic trends can be interpreted in terms of mechanical processes that most likely operate in the fracture network. This paper reports on mechanical properties that can be inferred from observations of microseismicity in geothermal systems. These properties lead to interpretations about fracture initiation, seismicity induced after hydraulic shut-in, spatial evolution of linked fractures, and temporal evolution of fracture strength. The correlations highlight the fact that a combination of temperature, stressing rate, time, and fluid-rock interactions can alter the mechanical and fluid transport properties of fractures in geothermal systems.

  1. The phase-field approach as a tool for experimental validations in fracture mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dally, Tim; Weinberg, Kerstin

    2015-05-01

    In a phase-field approach to fracture crack propagation is modeled by means of an additional continuous field. In this paper, two problems of linear elastic fracture mechanics are studied experimentally and numerically in order to evaluate the practicability of the phase-field approach and to validate the measured parameters. At first, a three-point bending experiment of silicon dies is simulated assuming static plate bending. Then, wave propagation and spallation in a Hopkinson bar test are analyzed in a dynamic regime. The simulations show that phase-field fracture reproduces the experimental results with high accuracy. The results are comparable to other fracture simulations, e.g., the cohesive element technique. In total, the phase-field approach to fracture is capable of tracking crack evolution in a very convenient and quantitatively correct way.

  2. Potential impact of enhanced fracture-toughness data on fracture mechanics assessment of PWR vessel integrity for pressurized thermal shock

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, T.L.; Theiss, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program is involved with the generation of enhanced fracture-initiation toughness and fracture-arrest toughness data of prototypic nuclear reactor vessel steels. These two sets of data are enhanced because they have distinguishing characteristics that could potentially impact PWR pressure vessel integrity assessments for the pressurized-thermal shock (PTS) loading condition which is a major plant-life extension issue to be confronted in the 1990's. A series of large-scale fracture-mechanics experiments have produced crack-arrest (K{sub Ia}) data with the distinguishing characteristic that the values are considerably above 220 MPA {center dot} {radical}m. The implicit limit of the ASME Code and the limit used in the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) studies. Currently, the HSST Program is planning experiments to verify and quantify for A533B steel the distinguishing characteristic of elevated the distinguishing characteristic of elevated initiation-fracture toughness for shallow flaws which has been observed for other steels. The results of the analyses indicated that application of the enhanced K{sub Ia} data does reduce the conditional probability of failure P(F{vert bar}E); however, it does not appear to have the potential to significantly impact the results of PTS analyses. The application of enhanced fracture-initiation-toughness data for shallow flaws also reduces P(F{vert bar}E), and does appear to have a potential for significantly affecting the results of PTS analyses. 19 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Radiology of Fractures in Intoxicated Emergency Department Patients: Locations, Mechanisms, Presentation, and Initial Interpretation Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuka; Nozaki, Taiki; Starkey, Jay; Okajima, Yuka; Ohde, Sachiko; Matsusako, Masaki; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Saida, Yukihisa; Kurihara, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of alcohol intoxication to time-to-presentation following injury, fracture type, mechanism of injury leading to fracture, and initial diagnostic radiology interpretation performance of emergency physicians versus diagnostic radiologists in patients who present to the emergency department (ED) and are subsequently diagnosed with fracture. Medical records of 1286 patients who presented to the ED and were diagnosed with fracture who also underwent plain film or computed tomography (CT) imaging were retrospectively reviewed. The subjects were divided into intoxicated and sober groups. Patient characteristics, injury-to-presentation time, fracture location, and discrepancies between initial clinical and radiological evaluations were compared. Of 1286 subjects, 181 patients were included in the intoxicated group. Only intoxicated patients presented with head/neck fractures more than 24 hours after injury. The intoxicated group showed a higher rate of head/neck fractures (skull 23.2% vs 5.8%, face and orbit 30.4% vs 9.5%; P < 0.001) and a lower rate of extremity injuries. The rate of nondiagnosis of fractures by emergency physicians later identified by radiologists was the same in both groups (7.7% vs 7.7%, P = 0.984). While the same proportion of intoxicated patients presented more than 24 hours following injury, only intoxicated patients presented with craniofacial and cervical spinal fractures during this period. Alcohol-related injuries are more often associated with head/neck fractures but less extremity injuries. The rate of fractures missed by emergency physicians but later diagnosed by radiologists was the same in intoxicated and sober patients. PMID:26091471

  4. Radiology of Fractures in Intoxicated Emergency Department Patients: Locations, Mechanisms, Presentation, and Initial Interpretation Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuka; Nozaki, Taiki; Starkey, Jay; Okajima, Yuka; Ohde, Sachiko; Matsusako, Masaki; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Saida, Yukihisa; Kurihara, Yasuyuki

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of alcohol intoxication to time-to-presentation following injury, fracture type, mechanism of injury leading to fracture, and initial diagnostic radiology interpretation performance of emergency physicians versus diagnostic radiologists in patients who present to the emergency department (ED) and are subsequently diagnosed with fracture. Medical records of 1286 patients who presented to the ED and were diagnosed with fracture who also underwent plain film or computed tomography (CT) imaging were retrospectively reviewed. The subjects were divided into intoxicated and sober groups. Patient characteristics, injury-to-presentation time, fracture location, and discrepancies between initial clinical and radiological evaluations were compared. Of 1286 subjects, 181 patients were included in the intoxicated group. Only intoxicated patients presented with head/neck fractures more than 24 hours after injury. The intoxicated group showed a higher rate of head/neck fractures (skull 23.2% vs 5.8%, face and orbit 30.4% vs 9.5%; P < 0.001) and a lower rate of extremity injuries. The rate of nondiagnosis of fractures by emergency physicians later identified by radiologists was the same in both groups (7.7% vs 7.7%, P = 0.984). While the same proportion of intoxicated patients presented more than 24 hours following injury, only intoxicated patients presented with craniofacial and cervical spinal fractures during this period. Alcohol-related injuries are more often associated with head/neck fractures but less extremity injuries. The rate of fractures missed by emergency physicians but later diagnosed by radiologists was the same in intoxicated and sober patients. PMID:26091471

  5. Investigation of the fracture mechanics of boride composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, L.; Clougherty, E. V.; Nesor, H.

    1971-01-01

    Fracture energies of WC-6Co, Boride 5 (ZrB2+SiC), Boride 8(ZrB2+SiC+C) and Boride 8-M2(ZrB2+SiC+C) were measured by slow bend and impact tests of notched charpy bars. Cobalt bonded tungsten carbide exhibited impact energies of 0.76 ft-lb or 73.9 in-lb/square inch. Boride 5 and the Boride 8 exhibit impact energies one third and one quarter of that observed for WC-6Co comparing favorably with measurements for SiC and Si3N4. Slow bend-notched bar-fracture energies for WC-6Co were near 2.6 in-lb/square inch or 1/20 the impact energies. Slow bend energies for Boride 8-M2, Boride 8 and Boride 5 were 58%, 42% and 25% of the value observed for WC-6Co. Fractograph showed differences for WC-6Co where slow bend testing resulted in smooth transgranular cleavage while samples broken by impact exhibited intergranular failures. By contrast the boride fractures showed no distinction based on testing method. Fabrication studies were conducted to effect alteration of the boride composites by alloying and introduction of graphite cloth.

  6. Mechanical properties and fracture toughness of rail steels and thermite welds at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan-qing; Zhou, Hui; Shi, Yong-jiu; Feng, Bao-rui

    2012-05-01

    Brittle fracture occurs frequently in rails and thermite welded joints, which intimidates the security and reliability of railway service. Railways in cold regions, such as Qinghai-Tibet Railway, make the problem of brittle fracture in rails even worse. A series of tests such as uniaxial tensile tests, Charpy impact tests, and three-point bending tests were carried out at low temperature to investigate the mechanical properties and fracture toughness of U71Mn and U75V rail steels and their thermite welds. Fracture micromechanisms were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on the fracture surfaces of the tested specimens. The ductility indices (percentage elongation after fracture and percentage reduction of area) and the toughness indices (Charpy impact energy A k and plane-strain fracture toughness K IC) of the two kinds of rail steels and the corresponding thermite welds all decrease as the temperature decreases. The thermite welds are more critical to fracture than the rail steel base metals, as indicated by a higher yield-to-ultimate ratio and a much lower Charpy impact energy. U71Mn rail steel is relatively higher in toughness than U75V, as demonstrated by larger A k and K IC values. Therefore, U71Mn rail steel and the corresponding thermite weld are recommended in railway construction and maintenance in cold regions.

  7. Mechanisms of orbital floor fractures: a clinical, experimental, and theoretical study.

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, J D; Warwar, R E; Ballal, D R; Ballal, R D

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the two accepted mechanisms of the orbital blow-out fracture (the hydraulic and the buckling theories) from a clinical, experimental, and theoretical standpoint. METHODS: Clinical cases in which blow-out fractures resulted from both a pure hydraulic mechanism and a pure buckling mechanism are presented. Twenty-one intact orbital floors were obtained from human cadavers. A metal rod was dropped, experimentally, onto each specimen until a fracture was produced, and the energy required in each instance was calculated. A biomathematical model of the human bony orbit, depicted as a thin-walled truncated conical shell, was devised. Two previously published (by the National Aeronautics Space Administration) theoretical structural engineering formulas for the fracture of thin-walled truncated conical shells were used to predict the energy required to fracture the bone of the orbital floor via the hydraulic and buckling mechanisms. RESULTS: Experimentally, the mean energy required to fracture the bone of the human cadaver orbital floor directly was 78 millijoules (mj) (range, 29-127 mj). Using the engineering formula for the hydraulic theory, the predicted theoretical energy is 71 mj (range, 38-120 mj); for the buckling theory, the predicted theoretical energy is 68 mj (range, 40-106 mj). CONCLUSION: Through this study, we have experimentally determined the amount of energy required to fracture the bone of the human orbital floor directly and have provided support for each mechanism of the orbital blow-out fracture from a clinical and theoretical basis. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5A FIGURE 5B FIGURE 5E FIGURE 5F PMID:10703119

  8. Elasto-plasticity in wrinkled polymerized lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2014-01-01

    Biomembranes shown to behave like elastic sheets, can also suffer plastic deformations. Neutron scattering experiments on partially polymerised wrinkled membranes revealed that when a critical degree of polymerisation is crossed, the wrinkled membranes do not resume their spherical shapes. Instead they remain wrinkled and rigid while their non-polymerised counterparts resume their spherical floppy shapes. The yield stress of these membranes, measured for the first time via the fractal dimension, is intimately related to the degree of polymerisation probably through a 2D disorder that quenches the lateral diffusion of the lipid molecules. This work might shed light on the physical reason behind the irreversible deformation of echinocytes, acanthocytes and malaria infected red blood cells. PMID:24424373

  9. Elasto-plasticity in wrinkled polymerized lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2014-01-01

    Biomembranes shown to behave like elastic sheets, can also suffer plastic deformations. Neutron scattering experiments on partially polymerised wrinkled membranes revealed that when a critical degree of polymerisation is crossed, the wrinkled membranes do not resume their spherical shapes. Instead they remain wrinkled and rigid while their non-polymerised counterparts resume their spherical floppy shapes. The yield stress of these membranes, measured for the first time via the fractal dimension, is intimately related to the degree of polymerisation probably through a 2D disorder that quenches the lateral diffusion of the lipid molecules. This work might shed light on the physical reason behind the irreversible deformation of echinocytes, acanthocytes and malaria infected red blood cells.

  10. Evolution of Stiffness and Permeability in Fractures Subject to - and Mechanically-Activated Dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faoro, I.; Elsworth, D.; Candela, T.

    2013-12-01

    Strong feedbacks link thermal gradients (T), hydrologic flow (H), chemical alteration (C) and mechanical deformation (M) in fractured rock. These processes are strongly interconnected since one process effects the initiation and progress of another. Dissolution and precipitation of minerals are affected by temperature and stress, and can result in significant changes in permeability and solute transport characteristics. Understanding these couplings is important for oil, gas, and geothermal reservoir engineering and for waste disposal in underground repositories and reservoirs. In order to experimentally investigate the interactions between THCM processes in a natural stressed fracture, we report on heated ( up to 150C) flow-through experiments on fractured core samples of Westerly granite. These experiments are performed to examine the influence of thermally and mechanically activated dissolution on the mechanical (stress/strain) and transport (permeability) characteristics of fractures. The evolutions of both the permeability and stiffness of the sample are recorded as the experimental thermal conditions change and chemical alteration progresses. Furthermore efflux of dissolved mineral mass is measured periodically to provide a record of the net mass removal, to correlate this with observed changes in fracture aperture, defined by the flow test. During the experiments the fracture shows high hydraulic sensitivity to the changing conditions of stress and temperature. Significant variation of the effluent fluid chemistry is observed. We argue that the formation of clay (Kaolinite) is the main mechanism responsible for the permanent change in permeability recorded at higher confining stresses (40 MPa).

  11. The fracture mechanics of human bone: influence of disease and treatment.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Busse, Björn; Ritchie, Robert O

    2015-01-01

    Aging and bone diseases are associated with increased fracture risk. It is therefore pertinent to seek an understanding of the origins of such disease-related deterioration in bone's mechanical properties. The mechanical integrity of bone derives from its hierarchical structure, which in healthy tissue is able to resist complex physiological loading patterns and tolerate damage. Indeed, the mechanisms through which bone derives its mechanical properties make fracture mechanics an ideal framework to study bone's mechanical resistance, where crack-growth resistance curves give a measure of the intrinsic resistance to the initiation of cracks and the extrinsic resistance to the growth of cracks. Recent research on healthy cortical bone has demonstrated how this hierarchical structure can develop intrinsic toughness at the collagen fibril scale mainly through sliding and sacrificial bonding mechanisms that promote plasticity. Furthermore, the bone-matrix structure develops extrinsic toughness at much larger micrometer length-scales, where the structural features are large enough to resist crack growth through crack-tip shielding mechanisms. Although healthy bone tissue can generally resist physiological loading environments, certain conditions such as aging and disease can significantly increase fracture risk. In simple terms, the reduced mechanical integrity originates from alterations to the hierarchical structure. Here, we review how human cortical bone resists fracture in healthy bone and how changes to the bone structure due to aging, osteoporosis, vitamin D deficiency and Paget's disease can affect the mechanical integrity of bone tissue. PMID:26380080

  12. Mechanical behavior and essential work of fracture of starch-based blown films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nottez, M.; Chaki, S.; Soulestin, J.; Lacrampe, M. F.; Krawczak, P.

    2015-05-01

    A fracture mechanics approach (Essential Work of Fracture, EWF) was applied to assess the toughness of novel partly starch-grafted polyolefin blown films, compared to that of a neat polyethylene reference. Tests were performed on double-end notched samples. The digital image correlation method was used to monitor the deformation field around the notch. Regular tensile and tear tests were also carried out. The specific essential work of fracture is a characteristic which is much more sensitive to materials structural modifications than the tensile or tear properties.

  13. Fracture mechanics; Proceedings of the Nineteenth National Symposium, San Antonio, TX, June 30-July 2, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume provide an overview of current theoretical and experimental research in the field of fracture mechanics. Topics discussed include three-dimensional issues, computational and analytical issues, damage tolerance and fatigue, elastoplastic fracture, dynamic inelastic fracture, and crack arrest theory and applications. Papers are presented on approximate methods for analysis of dynamic crack growth and arrest, constraint-loss model for the growth of surface fatigue cracks, fatigue crack growth in aircraft main landing gear wheels, and near-threshold crack growth in nickel-base superalloys.

  14. Fracture Mechanisms of Layer-By-Layer Polyurethane/Poly(Acrylic Acid) Nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheng, Eugene R.

    A layer-by-layer(LBL) manufactured material is examined in detail in this thesis. Improvements are made to the method of its manufacture. Efforts are made to understand its fracture mechanisms and take advantage of these fracture mechanisms in the absorption of impact energy. A novel series of experiments has been performed on LBL manufactured thin films to demonstrate their unique fracture mechanisms. Polyurethane/Poly(Acrylic Acid) (PU/PAA) and PU/PAA/(PU/Clay)5 nanocomposite films readily undergo Interlaminar mode II fracture, because of the relatively weak elctrostatic bonds between monolayers. Tensile tests performed while under observation by a scanning electron microscope demonstrate the tendency of these nanocomposite films to undergo interlaminar mode II fracture even when loads are applied in the plane of nanocomposite film. It is concluded that these mechanisms of energy dissipation are responsible for the enhanced toughness of these films when used as layers between glass blocks in the prevention of impact damage to the glass. A novel automated manufacturing facility has been designed and built to deposit large sheets of Layer-by-Layer nanocomposite film. These large sheets are incorporated into a borosillicate glass composite in order to compare the ballistic characteristics of LBL PU based nanocomposite films to a single cast layer of polyurethane. It is demonstrated that shear fracture is the mode of failure in the blocks containing the nanocomposite film. The shear fracture surface in the nanocomposite after it has undergone a ballistic impact is characterized. Additional experiments are performed to characterize the interlaminar fracture stresses and toughnesses of the nanocomposite LBL layers, to assist in the implementation of a numerical crack band model that describes the nanocomposite film. The computational model predicts the failure of the ballistic nanocomposite samples, and the predicted V50 velocity is found to be in good agreement with experimental results.

  15. Development and fracture mechanics data for 6Al-6V-2 Sn titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiftal, C. F.; Beck, E. J.

    1974-01-01

    Fracture mechanics properties of 6Al-6V-2Sn titanium in the annealed, solution-treated, and aged condition are presented. Tensile, fracture toughness, cyclic flaw growth, and sustained-load threshold tests were conducted. Both surface flaw and compact tension-specimen geometries were employed. Temperatures and/or environments used were -65 F (220 K) air, ambient, 300 F (422 K) air, and room-temperature air containing 10 and 100% relative humidity.

  16. Correlation between high resolution sequence stratigraphy and mechanical stratigraphy for enhanced fracture characteristic prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Kharusi, Laiyyan M.

    Sequence stratigraphy relates changes in vertical and lateral facies distribution to relative changes in sea level. These relative changes in carbonates effect early diagenesis, types of pores, cementation and dissolution patterns. As a result, in carbonates, relative changes in sea level significantly impact the lithology, porosity, diagenesis, bed and bounding surfaces which are all factors that control fracture patterns. This study explores these relationships by integrating stratigraphy with fracture analysis and petrophysical properties. A special focus is given to the relationship between mechanical boundaries and sequence stratigraphic boundaries in three different settings: (1) Mississippian strata in Sheep Mountain Anticline, Wyoming, (2) Mississippian limestones in St. Louis, Missouri, and (3) Pennsylvanian limestones intermixed with elastics in the Paradox Basin, Utah. The analysis of these sections demonstrate that a fracture hierarchy exists in relation to the sequence stratigraphic hierarchy. The majority of fractures (80%) terminate at genetic unit boundaries or the internal flooding surface that separates the transgressive from regressive hemicycle. Fractures (20%) that do not terminate at genetic unit boundaries or their internal flooding surface terminate at lower order sequence stratigraphic boundaries or their internal flooding surfaces. Secondly, the fracture spacing relates well to bed thickness in mechanical units no greater than 0.5m in thickness but with increasing bed thickness a scatter from the linear trend is observed. In the Paradox Basin the influence of strain on fracture density is illustrated by two sections measured in different strain regimes. The folded strata at Raplee Anticline has higher fracture densities than the flat-lying beds at the Honaker Trail. Cemented low porosity rocks in the Paradox Basin do not show a correlation between fracture pattern and porosity. However velocity and rock stiffness moduli's display a slight correlation to fracture spacing. Furthermore, bed thickness is found to be only one factor in determining fracture density but with increasing strain, internal bedforms and rock petrophysical heterogeneities influence fracture density patterns. This study illustrates how integrating sedimentologic and sequence stratigraphic interpretations with data on structural kinematics can lead to refined predictive understanding of fracture attributes.

  17. Updated Fatigue-Crack-Growth And Fracture-Mechanics Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Shivakumar, Venkataraman; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    NASA/FLAGRO 2.0 developed as analytical aid in predicting growth and stability of preexisting flaws and cracks in structural components of aerospace systems. Used for fracture-control analysis of space hardware. Organized into three modules to maximize efficiency in operation. Useful in: (1) crack-instability/crack-growth analysis, (2) processing raw crack-growth data from laboratory tests, and (3) boundary-element analysis to determine stresses and stress-intensity factors. Written in FORTRAN 77 and ANSI C.

  18. Mechanical behavior and fracture characteristics of off-axis fiber composites. 1: Experimental investigation. [at the Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, J. H.; Chamis, C. C.

    1977-01-01

    The mechanical behavior, fracture surfaces, and fracture modes of unidirectional high-modulus graphite-fiber/epoxy composites subjected to off-axis tensile loads were investigated experimentally. The investigation included the generation of stress-strain-to-fracture data and scanning electron microscope studies of the fractured surfaces. The results led to the identification of fracture modes and distinct fracture surface characteristics for off-axis tensile loading. The results also led to the formulation of critical for identifying and characterizing these fracture modes and their associated fracture surfaces. The results presented and discussed herein were used in the theoretical investigation and comparisons described in Part 2. These results should also provide a good foundation for identifying, characterizing, and quantifying fracture modes in both off-axis and angle-plied laminates.

  19. Fracture mechanics analyses of ceramic/veneer interface under mixed-mode loading.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoqi; Zhang, Song; Bian, Cuirong; Kong, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have focused on the interface fracture performance of zirconia/veneer bilayered structure, which plays an important role in dental all-ceramic restorations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture mechanics performance of zirconia/veneer interface in a wide range of mode-mixities (at phase angles ranging from 0° to 90°), and to examine the effect of mechanical properties of the materials and the interface on the fracture initiation and crack path of an interfacial crack. A modified sandwich test configuration with an oblique interfacial crack was proposed and calibrated to choose the appropriate geometry dimensions by means of finite element analysis. The specimens with different interface inclination angles were tested to failure under three-point bending configuration. Interface fracture parameters were obtained with finite element analyses. Based on the interfacial fracture mechanics, three fracture criteria for crack kinking were used to predict crack initiation and propagation. In addition, the effects of residual stresses due to coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between zirconia and veneer on the crack behavior were evaluated. The crack initiation and propagation were well predicted by the three fracture criteria. For specimens at phase angle of 0, the cracks propagated in the interface; whereas for all the other specimens the cracks kinked into the veneer. Compressive residual stresses in the veneer can improve the toughness of the interface structure. The results suggest that, in zirconia/veneer bilayered structure the veneer is weaker than the interface, which can be used to explain the clinical phenomenon that veneer chipping rate is larger than interface delamination rate. Consequently, a veneer material with larger fracture toughness is needed to decrease the failure rate of all-ceramic restorations. And the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch of the substrates can be larger to produce larger compressive stresses in the veneer. PMID:25123435

  20. Results of fracture mechanics analyses of the ederer cranes in the device assembly facility using reduced static fracture-toughness values

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E. N. C.

    1996-11-01

    The effects of a decreased static fracture-toughness value from that used in the previous fracture-mechanics analyses of the Ederer cranes in the Device Assembly Facility were examined to see what effects, if any, would be exerted on the fatigue crack growth and fracture behavior of the cranes. In particular, the behavior of the same 3 critical locations on the lower flanges of the load beams of the Ederer 5 ton and 4 ton cranes, were examined, with the reduced static fracture-toughness value.

  1. Micromechanical fracture modeling on underground nuclear waste storage: Coupled mechanical, thermal, and hydraulic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leem, Junghun

    Coupling effects between thermal, hydraulic, chemical and mechanical (THCM) processes for rock materials are one of major issues in Geological engineering, Civil engineering, Hydrology, Petroleum engineering, and Environmental engineering. In all of these fields, at least two mechanisms of THCM coupling are considered. For an example, thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical coupling effects are important in Geological engineering and Civil engineering. The THM coupling produces effects on underground structures, since the underground structures are under influences of geothermal gradient, groundwater, gravitational stresses, and tectonic forces. In particular, underground repository of high-level nuclear waste involves all four of the THCM coupling processes. Thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling model for fractured rock media has been developed based on micromechanical fracture model [Kemeny 1991, Kemeny & Cook 1987]. The THM coupling model is able to simulate time- and rate-dependent fracture propagation on rock materials, and quantify characteristics of damage by extensile and shear fracture growth. The THM coupling model can also simulate coupled thermal effects on underground structures such as high-level nuclear waste repository. The results of thermo-mechanical coupling model are used in conducting a risk analysis on the structures. In addition, the THM coupling model is able to investigate variations of fluid flow and hydraulic characteristics on rock materials by measuring coupled anisotropic permeability. Later, effects of chemical coupling on rock materials are investigated and modified in the THM coupling model in order to develop a thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical coupling model on fractured rocks. The THCM coupling model is compared with thermal, hydraulic, chemical, and mechanical coupling tests conducted at the University of Arizona. The comparison provides a reasonable prediction for the THCM coupling tests on various rock materials. Finally, the THCM coupling model for fractured rocks simulates the underground nuclear waste storage in Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and conducted performance and risk analysis on the repository.

  2. Fracture mechanics in fiber reinforced composite materials, taking as examples B/A1 and CRFP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, P. W. M.

    1982-01-01

    The validity of linear elastic fracture mechanics and other fracture criteria was investigated with laminates of boron fiber reinforced aluminum (R/A1) and of carbon fiber reinforced epoxide (CFRP). Cracks are assessed by fracture strength Kc or Kmax (critical or maximum value of the stress intensity factor). The Whitney and Nuismer point stress criterion and average stress criterion often show that Kmax of fiber composite materials increases with increasing crack length; however, for R/A1 and CFRP the curve showing fracture strength as a function of crack length is only applicable in a small domain. For R/A1, the reason is clearly the extension of the plastic zone (or the damage zone n the case of CFRP) which cannot be described with a stress intensity factor.

  3. Non-double-couple mechanisms of microearthquakes induced by hydraulic fracturing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sileny, J.; Hill, D.P.; Eisner, L.; Cornet, F.H.

    2009-01-01

    We have inverted polarity and amplitude information of representative microearthquakes to investigate source mechanisms of seismicity induced by hydraulic fracturing in the Carthage Cotton Valley, east Texas, gas field. With vertical arrays of four and eight three-component geophones in two monitoring wells, respectively, we were able to reliably determine source mechanisms of the strongest events with the best signal-to-noise ratio. Our analysis indicates predominantly non-double-couple source mechanisms with positive volumetric component consistent with opening cracks oriented close to expected hydraulic fracture orientation. Our observations suggest the induced events are directly the result of opening cracks by fluid injection, in contrast to many previous studies where the seismicity is interpreted to be primarily shearing caused by pore pressure diffusion into the surrounding rock or associated with shear stresses created at the hydraulic fracture tip. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Fracture processes and mechanisms of crack growth resistance in human enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, Devendra; Park, Saejin; Quinn, George D.; Arola, Dwayne

    2010-07-01

    Human enamel has a complex micro-structure that varies with distance from the tooth’s outer surface. But contributions from the microstructure to the fracture toughness and the mechanisms of crack growth resistance have not been explored in detail. In this investigation the apparent fracture toughness of human enamel and the mechanisms of crack growth resistance were evaluated using the indentation fracture approach and an incremental crack growth technique. Indentation cracks were introduced on polished surfaces of enamel at selected distances from the occlusal surface. In addition, an incremental crack growth approach using compact tension specimens was used to quantify the crack growth resistance as a Junction of distance from the occlusal surface. There were significant differences in the apparent toughness estimated using the two approaches, which was attributed to the active crack length and corresponding scale of the toughening mechanisms.

  5. Hydraulic Aperture Reduction of Shale Fractures Due to Mechanical Stressing, with Characterization of Physical Fracture Evolution Using Comuted Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, D.; Gill, M.; Moore, J.

    2014-12-01

    Flow in fractured shale is a topic of interest for both production from non-traditional fractured shale reservoirs and for estimating the leakage potential of sealing formations above geologic carbon dioxide repositories. The hydraulic aperture of a fracture quantifies how much fluid can be transported through a fracture, similarly to how permeability describes fluid flow through porous media. The advantage of defining the fracture hydraulic aperture as opposed to permeability, is that this property can be easily scaled up to fracture reservoir simulators. Many parameters affect the hydraulic aperture, however, including the fracture roughness, the physical aperture distribution, and the tortuosity of flow paths within the fracture.The computed tomography (CT) and flow facility at NETL has conducted an analysis of the changes in both physical and hydraulic aperture as fractures were subjected to varying external confining stresses. Changes in fracture geometry were tracked through the use of non-destructive CT imaging, allowing the determination of the physical aperture distribution, while hydraulic fracture apertures were derived from experimental fracture flow measurements. In order to evaluate the effects of fracture roughness and geometry, two fractures with different degrees of roughness were used. Tests were conducted with locally sourced shale.Experimental results show that the volume change in the fracture is a non-linear function of the confining pressure, and both physical and hydraulic apertures decrease rapidly as the fracture is first compressed.

  6. The Mechanical Benefit of Medial Support Screws in Locking Plating of Proximal Humerus Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanjie; Pan, Yao; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Changqing; Zeng, Bingfang; Chen, Yunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical advantages of medial support screws (MSSs) in the locking proximal humeral plate for treating proximal humerus fractures. Methods Thirty synthetic left humeri were randomly divided into 3 subgroups to establish two-part surgical neck fracture models of proximal humerus. All fractures were fixed with a locking proximal humerus plate. Group A was fixed with medial cortical support and no MSSs; Group B was fixed with 3 MSSs but without medial cortical support; Group C was fixed with neither medial cortical support nor MSSs. Axial compression, torsional stiffness, shear stiffness, and failure tests were performed. Results Constructs with medial support from cortical bone showed statistically higher axial and shear stiffness than other subgroups examined (P<0.0001). When the proximal humerus was not supported by medial cortical bone, locking plating with medial support screws exhibited higher axial and torsional stiffness than locking plating without medial support screws (P?0.0207). Specimens with medial cortical bone failed primarily by fracture of the humeral shaft or humeral head. Specimens without medial cortical bone support failed primarily by significant plate bending at the fracture site followed by humeral head collapse or humeral head fracture. Conclusions Anatomic reduction with medial cortical support was the stiffest construct after a simulated two-part fracture. Significant biomechanical benefits of MSSs in locking plating of proximal humerus fractures were identified. The reconstruction of the medial column support for proximal humerus fractures helps to enhance mechanical stability of the humeral head and prevent implant failure. PMID:25084520

  7. Micro-Computed Tomography Assessment of Fracture Healing: Relationships among Callus Structure, Composition, and Mechanical Function

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Elise F.; Mason, Zachary D.; Chien, Karen B.; Pfeiffer, Anthony J.; Barnes, George L.; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Gerstenfeld, Louis C.

    2009-01-01

    Non-invasive characterization of fracture callus structure and composition may facilitate development of surrogate measures of the regain of mechanical function. As such, quantitative computed tomography- (CT-) based analyses of fracture calluses could enable more reliable clinical assessments of bone healing. Although previous studies have used CT to quantify and predict fracture healing, it is unclear which of the many CT-derived metrics of callus structure and composition are the most predictive of callus mechanical properties. The goal of this study was to identify the changes in fracture callus structure and composition that occur over time and that are most closely related to the regain of mechanical function. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) imaging and torsion testing were performed on murine fracture calluses (n=188) at multiple post-fracture timepoints and under different experimental conditions that alter fracture healing. Total callus volume (TV), mineralized callus volume (BV), callus mineralized volume fraction (BV/TV), bone mineral content (BMC), tissue mineral density (TMD), standard deviation of mineral density (σTMD), effective polar moment of inertia (Jeff), torsional strength, and torsional rigidity were quantified. Multivariate statistical analyses, including multivariate analysis of variance, principal components analysis, and stepwise regression were used to identify differences in callus structure and composition among experimental groups and to determine which of the μCT outcome measures were the strongest predictors of mechanical properties. Although calluses varied greatly in the absolute and relative amounts of mineralized tissue (BV, BMC, and BV/TV), differences among timepoints were most strongly associated with changes in tissue mineral density. Torsional strength and rigidity were dependent on mineral density as well as the amount of mineralized tissue: TMD, BV, and σTMD explained 62% of the variation in torsional strength (p<0.001); and TMD, BMC, BV/TV, and σTMD explained 70% of the variation in torsional rigidity (p<0.001). These results indicate that fracture callus mechanical properties can be predicted by several μCT-derived measures of callus structure and composition. These findings form the basis for developing non-invasive assessments of fracture healing and for identifying biological and biomechanical mechanisms that lead to impaired or enhanced healing. PMID:19013264

  8. Micro-computed tomography assessment of fracture healing: relationships among callus structure, composition, and mechanical function.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Elise F; Mason, Zachary D; Chien, Karen B; Pfeiffer, Anthony J; Barnes, George L; Einhorn, Thomas A; Gerstenfeld, Louis C

    2009-02-01

    Non-invasive characterization of fracture callus structure and composition may facilitate development of surrogate measures of the regain of mechanical function. As such, quantitative computed tomography- (CT-) based analyses of fracture calluses could enable more reliable clinical assessments of bone healing. Although previous studies have used CT to quantify and predict fracture healing, it is unclear which of the many CT-derived metrics of callus structure and composition are the most predictive of callus mechanical properties. The goal of this study was to identify the changes in fracture callus structure and composition that occur over time and that are most closely related to the regain of mechanical function. Micro-computed tomography (microCT) imaging and torsion testing were performed on murine fracture calluses (n=188) at multiple post-fracture timepoints and under different experimental conditions that alter fracture healing. Total callus volume (TV), mineralized callus volume (BV), callus mineralized volume fraction (BV/TV), bone mineral content (BMC), tissue mineral density (TMD), standard deviation of mineral density (sigma(TMD)), effective polar moment of inertia (J(eff)), torsional strength, and torsional rigidity were quantified. Multivariate statistical analyses, including multivariate analysis of variance, principal components analysis, and stepwise regression were used to identify differences in callus structure and composition among experimental groups and to determine which of the microCT outcome measures were the strongest predictors of mechanical properties. Although calluses varied greatly in the absolute and relative amounts of mineralized tissue (BV, BMC, and BV/TV), differences among timepoints were most strongly associated with changes in tissue mineral density. Torsional strength and rigidity were dependent on mineral density as well as the amount of mineralized tissue: TMD, BV, and sigma(TMD) explained 62% of the variation in torsional strength (p<0.001); and TMD, BMC, BV/TV, and sigma(TMD) explained 70% of the variation in torsional rigidity (p<0.001). These results indicate that fracture callus mechanical properties can be predicted by several microCT-derived measures of callus structure and composition. These findings form the basis for developing non-invasive assessments of fracture healing and for identifying biological and biomechanical mechanisms that lead to impaired or enhanced healing. PMID:19013264

  9. An Overview of Innovative Strategies for Fracture Mechanics at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Jonathan B.; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Engineering fracture mechanics has played a vital role in the development and certification of virtually every aerospace vehicle that has been developed since the mid-20th century. NASA Langley Research Center s Durability, Damage Tolerance and Reliability Branch has contributed to the development and implementation of many fracture mechanics methods aimed at predicting and characterizing damage in both metallic and composite materials. This paper presents a selection of computational, analytical and experimental strategies that have been developed by the branch for assessing damage growth under monotonic and cyclic loading and for characterizing the damage tolerance of aerospace structures

  10. Permeability Evolution of Fractured Anhydrite Caused by Chemical and Mechanical Alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detwiler, R. L.; Elkhoury, J. E.; Ameli, P.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration requires competent structural seals (caprock) to prevent leakage over decadal time scales. Injection of large volumes of CO2 perturbs the target formation from chemical and mechanical equilibrium leading to the possible creation or enhancement of leakage pathways. We investigate the potential for leakage pathways (fractures) to grow over time under reservoir conditions in a series of anhydrite (Ca2SO4) cores. To simulate a potential leakage event in the laboratory, we fractured and jacketed the cores, and placed them in a flow-through reactor vessel. A high-pressure syringe pump applied confining stresses ranging from 7 to 17 MPa and another syringe pump pushed water through the sample at a constant flow rate with pressure control at the outlet. Effluent was sampled periodically and analyzed for Ca2+ and SO42- using an ion chromatograph. Before and after each experiment, we characterized the surfaces of the fractures using a high-resolution optical profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. Careful alignment of the surfaces during optical profiling allowed reproduction of the fracture aperture before and after each experiment. We present results from several experiments each carried out under different conditions in similar fractured anhydrite cores. One involved a well-mated pre-existing fracture and results showed that the permeability of the fractured core was similar to the intact rock matrix (O(10-18 m2); chemical alteration of the core was largely limited to the inflow face of the core and the fracture surfaces remained largely unaltered. To enhance permeability during subsequent experiments, we imposed a small (380 μm) shear displacement between the fracture surfaces resulting in a four-order-of-magnitude increase in initial permeability. The first of these was run at a constant flow rate of 0.6 ml/min for a period of 7 days. The measured pressure gradient within the core increased slowly for a period of 4 days followed by a rapid increase in differential pressure corresponding to a two-order-of-magnitude decrease in permeability. During the experiment, the diameter of the core decreased by ~300 μm at the inlet and a skin of gypsum (Ca2SO42H2O) was created along the length of the fracture. Dissolution of anhydrite and transition to gypsum of additional anhydrite weakened the fracture surfaces leading to closure of the fracture with a corresponding reduction in aperture and permeability. Additional experiments explore the influence of flow at a lower flow rate, which, in the absence of a large confining stress, has been shown to lead to the development of dissolution channels or wormholes.

  11. Glucocorticoids inhibit shaft fracture healing but not metaphyseal bone regeneration under stable mechanical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, O. H.; Aspenberg, P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Healing in cancellous metaphyseal bone might be different from midshaft fracture healing due to different access to mesenchymal stem cells, and because metaphyseal bone often heals without a cartilaginous phase. Inflammation plays an important role in the healing of a shaft fracture, but if metaphyseal injury is different, it is important to clarify if the role of inflammation is also different. The biology of fracture healing is also influenced by the degree of mechanical stability. It is unclear if inflammation interacts with stability-related factors. Methods We investigated the role of inflammation in three different models: a metaphyseal screw pull-out, a shaft fracture with unstable nailing (IM-nail) and a stable external fixation (ExFix) model. For each, half of the animals received dexamethasone to reduce inflammation, and half received control injections. Mechanical and morphometric evaluation was used. Results As expected, dexamethasone had a strong inhibitory effect on the healing of unstable, but also stable, shaft fractures. In contrast, dexamethasone tended to increase the mechanical strength of metaphyseal bone regenerated under stable conditions. Conclusions It seems that dexamethasone has different effects on metaphyseal and diaphyseal bone healing. This could be explained by the different role of inflammation at different sites of injury. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:170175. PMID:26490971

  12. Accurate in vitro identification of fracture onset in bones: failure mechanism of the proximal human femur.

    PubMed

    Juszczyk, Mateusz Maria; Cristofolini, Luca; Salvà, Marco; Zani, Lorenzo; Schileo, Enrico; Viceconti, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Bone fractures have extensively been investigated, especially for the proximal femur. While failure load can easily be recorded, and the fracture surface is readily accessible, identification of the point of fracture initiation is difficult. Accurate location of fracture initiation is extremely important to understand the multi-scale determinants of bone fracture. In this study, a recently developed technique based on electro-conductive lines was applied to the proximal femoral metaphysis to elucidate the fracture mechanism. Eight cadaveric femurs were prepared with 15-20 electro-conductive lines (crack-grid) covering the proximal region. The crack-grid was connected to a dedicated data-logger that monitored electrical continuity of each line at 700 kHz. High-speed videos (12,000 frames/s, 0.1-0.2 mm pixel size) of the destructive tests were acquired. Most crack-grid-lines failed in a time-span of 0.08-0.50 ms, which was comparable to that identified in the high-speed videos, and consistent with previous video recordings. However, on all specimens 1-3 crack-grid-lines failed significantly earlier (2-200 ms) than the majority of the crack-grid-lines. The first crack-grid-line to fail was always the closest one to the point of fracture initiation identified in the high-speed videos (superior-lateral neck region). Then the crack propagated simultaneously, at comparable velocity on the anterior and posterior sides of the neck. Such a failure pattern has never been observed before, as spatial resolution of the high-speed videos prevented from observing the initial opening of a crack. This mechanism (fracture onset, time-lag, followed by catastrophic failure) can be explained with a transfer of load to the internal trabecular structure caused by the initial fracture of the thin cortical shell. This study proves the suitability of the crack-grid method to investigate bone fractures associated to tensile stress. The crack-grid method enables significantly faster sampling than high-speed cameras. The present findings elucidate some aspects of the failure mechanism of the proximal human femoral metaphysis. PMID:23218142

  13. Advances in Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics Analyses for Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the advances that have been made in stress analyses of cracked aircraft components, in the understanding of the fatigue and fatigue-crack growth process, and in the prediction of residual strength of complex aircraft structures with widespread fatigue damage. Finite-element analyses of cracked structures are now used to determine accurate stress-intensity factors for cracks at structural details. Observations of small-crack behavior at open and rivet-loaded holes and the development of small-crack theory has lead to the prediction of stress-life behavior for components with stress concentrations under aircraft spectrum loading. Fatigue-crack growth under simulated aircraft spectra can now be predicted with the crack-closure concept. Residual strength of cracked panels with severe out-of-plane deformations (buckling) in the presence of stiffeners and multiple-site damage can be predicted with advanced elastic-plastic finite-element analyses and the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. These advances are helping to assure continued safety of aircraft structures.

  14. Mechanical properties and fracture strength of cathodically polarized prestressing wire

    SciTech Connect

    Kiszowski, S.; Hartt, W.H.

    1996-11-01

    Constant extension rate testing experiments were performed upon prestressing steel wire specimens prepared from three lots of Grade 270 and one lot of Grade 250 material for the purpose of characterizing susceptibility to environmental cracking under conditions associated with cathodic protection of prestressed concrete components and structures. Smooth, notched (six different geometries) and pitted (four different geometries) specimens were tested in air and deaerated saturated Ca(OH){sub 2}-distilled water at potentials of {minus}0.90 and {minus}1.30 v (SCE) and strength and ductility properties characterized. Relatively low strength was recorded for steel specimens at {minus}09.90 v from material for which the weight percent chromium was relatively high (0.24 w/o compared to 0.02 w/o). Under conditions that are likely to be most relevant to service, fracture load correlated with the amount by which the local wire cross section area was reduced, either from a notch or pit, and was independent of depth of the irregularity and of root radius to the extent to which these were addressed. It was concluded that it may be unsafe to apply cathodically protection to prestressing wire, even in situations where potential is maintained in the regime where hydrogen embrittlement should not occur.

  15. A fracture mechanics view of iceberg calving from large ice shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledoux, C. M.; Hulbe, C. L.

    2010-12-01

    Iceberg calving, an important mass loss mechanism for marine ice sheets, is an outstanding accounting problem in ice-sheet/ice-shelf models. Various parameterizations have been proposed but there is no consensus regarding relevant physical processes, key parameters and variables, or the applicability the various relationships have to different floating ice geometries. Long rifts at the fronts of Antarctic ice shelves, which become the planes along which icebergs calve, are observed to initiate as fractures along lateral margins of fast-flowing ice or downstream of grounded features. For most of the shelf, inhomogeneities due to structural boundaries limit propagation. Orientations of active fractures are explained by glaciological stresses. In a comparison of fractures observed in small to medium ice shelves around Antarctica, we find that “starter” fractures, derived from upstream, grounded ice, propagate where floating ice advects around a grounded feature or through a narrowing in the ice shelf, as between two grounded features or the embayment walls. This observation follows expectation because it is in such locations that compressive stresses in the transverse direction become relatively large. We use a numerical model of fracture propagation and shelf velocities derived from remote observation to investigate the growth of long fractures in ice shelves. We propose that principal stresses, computed in models of ice shelf flow, can be used to develop a calving parameterization appropriate for embayed marine margins of ice sheets.

  16. Disadvantages of interfragmentary shear on fracture healing--mechanical insights through numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Malte; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita; Simon, Ulrich; Wehner, Tim

    2014-07-01

    The outcome of secondary fracture healing processes is strongly influenced by interfragmentary motion. Shear movement is assumed to be more disadvantageous than axial movement, however, experimental results are contradictory. Numerical fracture healing models allow simulation of the fracture healing process with variation of single input parameters and under comparable, normalized mechanical conditions. Thus, a comparison of the influence of different loading directions on the healing process is possible. In this study we simulated fracture healing under several axial compressive, and translational and torsional shear movement scenarios, and compared their respective healing times. Therefore, we used a calibrated numerical model for fracture healing in sheep. Numerous variations of movement amplitudes and musculoskeletal loads were simulated for the three loading directions. Our results show that isolated axial compression was more beneficial for the fracture healing success than both isolated shearing conditions for load and displacement magnitudes which were identical as well as physiological different, and even for strain-based normalized comparable conditions. Additionally, torsional shear movements had less impeding effects than translational shear movements. Therefore, our findings suggest that osteosynthesis implants can be optimized, in particular, to limit translational interfragmentary shear under musculoskeletal loading. PMID:24648331

  17. Evaluation of fracture strength of metal/epoxy joint by interface mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, Yoshikazu

    1995-11-01

    Tension tests of metal/epoxy joints with or without interface cracks were conducted and fracture criteria of the joints were discussed based on interface mechanics. The variation of the fracture strength of each specimen was large, and the strength showed Gaussian distribution. The fracture strength of smooth specimens was lower for wider specimens, but the cumulative probability of fracture of smooth specimens was not controlled by the stress singularity parameter. In interface cracked specimens, the cracks were propagated either along the interface or in epoxy resin, depending on crack length. When cracks propagated along the interface, the cumulative probability of the fracture of the specimen was controlled by the real part of the complex stress intensity factor along the interface, K{sub 1}. When cracks kinked to epoxy resin, the angle was almost identical to that of the maximum tangential stress, {sigma}{sub {theta}max}. In this case, the cumulative probability of fracture was controlled by the value of K{sub {theta}max}.

  18. Effect of root canal preparation, type of endodontic post and mechanical cycling on root fracture strength

    PubMed Central

    RIPPE, Marília Pivetta; SANTINI, Manuela Favarin; BIER, Carlos Alexandre Souza; BALDISSARA, Paolo; VALANDRO, Luiz Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of the type of root canal preparation, intraradicular post and mechanical cycling on the fracture strength of roots. Material and Methods eighty human single rooted teeth were divided into 8 groups according to the instruments used for root canal preparation (manual or rotary instruments), the type of intraradicular post (fiber posts- FRC and cast post and core- CPC) and the use of mechanical cycling (MC) as follows: Manual and FRC; Manual, FRC and MC; Manual and CPC; Manual, CPC and MC; Rotary and FRC; Rotary, FRC and MC; Rotary and CPC; Rotary, CPC and MC. The filling was performed by lateral compactation. All root canals were prepared for a post with a 10 mm length, using the custom #2 bur of the glass fiber post system. For mechanical cycling, the protocol was applied as follows: an angle of incidence of 45°, 37°C, 88 N, 4 Hz, 2 million pulses. All groups were submitted to fracture strength test in a 45° device with 1 mm/ min cross-head speed until failure occurred. Results The 3-way ANOVA showed that the root canal preparation strategy (p<0.03) and post type (p<0.0001) affected the fracture strength results, while mechanical cycling (p=0.29) did not. Conclusion The root canal preparation strategy only influenced the root fracture strength when restoring with a fiber post and mechanical cycling, so it does not seem to be an important factor in this scenario. PMID:25025556

  19. Mechanisms and impact of damage resulting from hydraulic fracturing. Topical report, May 1995-July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Penny, G.S.; Conway, M.W.; Almond, S.W.; Himes, R.; Nick, K.E.

    1996-08-01

    This topical report documents the mechanisms of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and their impact upon gas well productivity. The categories of damage reviewed include absolute or matrix permeability damage, relative permeability alterations, the damage of natural fracture permeability mechanisms and proppant conductivity impairment. Case studies are reviewed in which attempts are made to mitigate each of the damage types. Industry surveys have been conducted to determine the perceptions of the industry on the topic of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and to identify key formations in which formation damage is a problem. From this information, technical hurdles and new technology needs are identified and estimates are made of the benefits of developing and applying minimum formation damage technology.

  20. Size effect law and fracture mechanics of the triggering of dry snow slab avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baant, Zden?K. P.; Zi, Goangseup; McClung, David

    2003-02-01

    A size effect law for fracture triggering in dry snow slabs of high enough length-to-thickness ratio is formulated, based on simplified one-dimensional analysis by equivalent linear elastic fracture mechanics. Viscoelastic effects during fracture are neglected. The derived law, which is analogous to Baant's energetic size effect law developed for concrete and later for sea ice, fiber composites, rocks, and ceramics, is shown to agree with two-dimensional finite element analysis of mode II cohesive crack model with a finite residual shear stress. Fitting the proposed size effect law to fracture data for various slab thicknesses permits identifying the material fracture parameters. The value of preexisting shear stress in a thin weak zone of finite length is shown to have significant effect. There exists a certain critical snow depth, depending on the preexisting stress value, below which the size effect disappears. Practical applications require considering that the material properties (particularly the mode II fracture toughness or fracture energy) at the snow slab base are not constant but depend strongly on the slab thickness. This means that one must distinguish the material size effect from the structural size effect, and the combined size effect law must be obtained by introducing into the structural size effect law dependence of its parameters on snow thickness. The thickness dependence of these parameters can be obtained by matching the combined law to avalanche observations. Matching Perla's field data on 116 avalanches suggests that the mode II fracture toughness is approximately proportional to 1.8 power of snow thickness.

  1. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis for the life extension estimate of the high flux isotope reactor vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.J.

    1997-05-01

    The state of the vessel steel embrittlement as a result of neutron irradiation can be measured by its increase in the nil ductility temperature (NDT). This temperature is sometimes referred to as the brittle-ductile transition temperature (DBT) for fracture. The life extension of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) vessel is calculated by using the method of fracture mechanics. A new method of fracture probability calculation is presented in this paper. The fracture probability as a result of the hydrostatic pressure test (hydrotest) is used to determine the life of the vessel. The hydrotest is performed in order to determine a safe vessel static pressure. It is then followed by using fracture mechanics to project the safe reactor operation time from the time of the satisfactory hydrostatic test. The life extension calculation provides the following information on the remaining life of the reactor as a function of the NDT increase: (1) the life of the vessel is determined by the probability of vessel fracture as a result of hydrotest at several hydrotest pressures and vessel embrittlement conditions, (2) the hydrotest time interval vs the NDT increase rate, and (3) the hydrotest pressure vs the NDT increase rate. It is understood that the use of a complete range of uncertainties of the NDT increase is equivalent to the entire range of radiation damage that can be experienced by the vessel steel. From the numerical values for the probabilities of the vessel fracture as a result of hydrotest, it is estimated that the reactor vessel life can be extended up to 50 EFPY (100 MW) with the minimum vessel operating temperature equal to 85{degrees}F.

  2. Discrete fracture modeling of hydro-mechanical damage processes in geological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Rutqvist, J.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    This study presents a modeling approach for investigating coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) behavior, including fracture development, within geomaterials and structures. In the model, the coupling procedure consists of an effective linkage between two codes: TOUGH2, a simulator of subsurface multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach; and an implementation of the rigid-body-spring network (RBSN) method, a discrete (lattice) modeling approach to represent geomechanical behavior. One main advantage of linking these two codes is that they share the same geometrical mesh structure based on the Voronoi discretization, so that a straightforward representation of discrete fracture networks (DFN) is available for fluid flow processes. The capabilities of the TOUGH-RBSN model are demonstrated through simulations of hydraulic fracturing, where fluid pressure-induced fracturing and damage-assisted flow are well represented. The TOUGH-RBSN modeling methodology has been extended to enable treatment of geomaterials exhibiting anisotropic characteristics. In the RBSN approach, elastic spring coefficients and strength parameters are systematically formulated based on the principal bedding direction, which facilitate a straightforward representation of anisotropy. Uniaxial compression tests are simulated for a transversely isotropic material to validate the new modeling scheme. The model is also used to simulate excavation fracture damage for the HG-A microtunnel in the Opalinus Clay rock, located at the Mont Terri underground research laboratory (URL) near Saint-Ursanne, Switzerland. The Opalinus Clay has transversely isotropic material properties caused by natural features such as bedding, foliation, and flow structures. Preferential fracturing and tunnel breakouts were observed following excavation, which are believed to be strongly influenced by the mechanical anisotropy of the rock material. The simulation results are qualitatively representative of the nonuniform fracture patterns observed in the HG-A microtunnel.

  3. Fracture and failure: Analyses, mechanisms and applications; Proceedings of the Symposium, Los Angeles, CA, March 17-20, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tung, P. P. (Editor); Agrawal, S. P.; Kumar, A.; Katcher, M.

    1981-01-01

    Papers are presented on the application of fracture mechanics to spacecraft design, fracture control applications on the Space Shuttle reaction control thrusters, and an assessment of fatigue crack growth rate relationships for metallic airframe materials. Also considered are fracture mechanisms and microstructural relationships in Ni-base alloy systems, the use of surface deformation markings to determine crack propagation directions, case histories of metallurgical failures in the electronics industry, and a failure analysis of silica phenolic nozzle liners.

  4. Solid particle erosion mechanisms of protective coatings for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousser, Etienne

    The main objective of this PhD project is to investigate the material loss mechanisms during Solid Particle Erosion (SPE) of hard protective coatings, including nanocomposite and nanostructured systems. In addition, because of the complex nature of SPE mechanisms, rigorous testing methodologies need to be employed and the effects of all testing parameters need to be fully understood. In this PhD project, the importance of testing methodology is addressed throughout in order to effectively study the SPE mechanisms of brittle materials and coatings. In the initial stage of this thesis, we studied the effect of the addition of silicon (Si) on the microstructure, mechanical properties and, more specifically, on the SPE resistance of thick CrN-based coatings. It was found that the addition of Si significantly improved the erosion resistance and that SPE correlated with the microhardness values, i.e. the coating with the highest microhardness also had the lowest erosion rate (ER). In fact, the ERs showed a much higher dependence on the surface hardness than what has been proposed for brittle erosion mechanisms. In the first article, we study the effects of the particle properties on the SPE behavior of six brittle bulk materials using glass and alumina powders. First, we apply a robust methodology to accurately characterize the elasto-plastic and fracture properties of the studied materials. We then correlate the measured ER to materials' parameters with the help of a morphological study and an analysis of the quasi-static elasto-plastic erosion models. Finally, in order to understand the effects of impact on the particles themselves and to support the energy dissipation-based model proposed here, we study the particle size distributions of the powders before and after erosion testing. It is shown that tests using both powders lead to a material loss mechanism related to lateral fracture, that the higher than predicted velocity exponents point towards a velocity-dependent damage accumulation mechanism correlated to target yield pressure, and that damage accumulation effects are more pronounced for the softer glass powder because of kinetic energy dissipation through different means. In the second article, we study the erosion mechanisms for several hard coatings deposited by pulsed DC magnetron sputtering. We first validate a new methodology for the accurate measurement of volume loss, and we show the importance of optimizing the testing parameters in order to obtain results free from experimental artefacts. We then correlate the measured ERs to the material parameters measured by depth-sensing indentation. In order to understand the material loss mechanisms, we study three of the coating systems in greater detail with the help of fracture characterization and a morphological study of the eroded surfaces. Finally, we study the particle size distributions of the powders before and after erosion testing in an effort to understand the role of particle fracture. We demonstrate that the measured ERs of the coatings are strongly dependent on the target hardness and do not correlate with coating toughness. In fact, the material removal mechanism is found to occur through repeated ductile indentation and cutting of the surface by the impacting particles and that particle breakup is not sufficiently large to influence the results significantly. Studying SPE mechanisms of hard protective coating systems in detail has proven to be quite challenging in the past, given that conventional SPE testing is notoriously inaccurate due to its aggressive nature and its many methodological uncertainties. In the third article, we present a novel in situ real-time erosion testing methodology using a quartz crystal microbalance, developed in order to study the SPE process of hard protective coating systems. Using conventional mass loss SPE testing, we validate and discuss the advantages and challenges related to such a method. In addition, this time-resolved technique enables us to discuss some transient events present during SPE testing of hard coating systems leading to new insights into the erosion process. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  5. The imprint of hydro-mechanics of fractures in periodic pumping tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinci, C.; Steeb, H.; Renner, J.

    2015-09-01

    Modelling of pressure transients recorded in wells allows for characterization of reservoirs surrounding the well. Simulation of pressure transients furthermore permits sensitivity studies for individual model parameters. We numerically simulated pumping tests in a vertical well intersecting a single horizontal fracture to evaluate the diagnostic potential of periodic pumping procedures for subsurface characterization. The pressure responses in the pumping and monitoring wells were analysed with respect to their sensitivity to geometrical and hydraulic properties of the fracture and of the surrounding rock material. We focused on interference analysis that for periodic pumping tests reduces to a consideration of amplitude ratio and phase shift between pressure transients recorded at an injection well and monitoring points. Fluid flow in the deformable fracture was modelled employing (1) a hybrid-dimensional hydro-mechanically coupled approach and (2) an uncoupled-diffusion equation. Results of both approaches were compared to quantify the effects of hydro-mechanical coupling. While in the uncoupled-diffusion approach a bulk storage capacity value is prescribed for the fracture, storage capacity is implicitly accounted for by the coupling in the hybrid-dimensional approach. Results reveal that hydro-mechanical coupling strongly affects the pressure transient at the pumping well and the monitoring points. Asymmetry of the pressure profiles between injection and production phases at the injection point is a peculiar characteristic of the hydro-mechanical results and is related to changes in fracture permeability with fluid pressure caused by fracture deformation. Further hydro-mechanical effects, such as reverse-pressure response, occur at monitoring points along the fracture domain, in particular at positions in the conduit where the contribution of diffusive pressure propagation remains small, that is, at monitoring distances large compared to classic scaling for penetration depth using hydraulic diffusivity. During periodic pumping tests the reverse response is potentially triggered various times within one period and thus chances to unequivocally recognize this effect are largely enhanced in comparison to conventional pulse or step testing procedures. The standard scaling relation for diffusion processes, often employed in the analysis of induced seismicity, has limited applicability to deformable fractures.

  6. Structural Reliability of Ceramics at High Temperature: Mechanisms of Fracture and Fatigue Crack Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold H. Dauskardt

    2005-08-01

    Final report of our DOE funded research program. Aim of the research program was to provide a fundamental basis from which the mechanical reliability of layered structures may be understood, and to provide guidelines for the development of technologically relevant layered material structures with optimum resistance to fracture and subcritical debonding. Progress in the program to achieve these goals is described.

  7. Thermodynamic and fracture mechanical processes in the context of frost wedging in ice shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plate, Carolin; Müller, Ralf; Humbert, Angelika; Gross, Dietmar

    2015-04-01

    Ice shelves, the link between ice shields or glaciers and the ocean are sensitive elements of the polar environment. The ongoing break up and disintegration of huge ice shelf parts or entire ice shelf demands for an explication of the underlying processes. The first analyses of crack growth and break up events in ice shelves date back to more than half a century. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that trigger and influence the collapse of whole ice shelf parts are not yet fully understood. Popular presumptions link ice shelf disintegration to surface meltwater and hydro fracturing, explaining break up events in warm polar seasons. Fracture events during colder seasons are possibly triggered by more complex mechanisms. A well-documented break up event at the Wilkins Ice Shelf bridge inspires the possibility of frost wedging as disintegration cause. The present study shows a two-dimensional thermo-dynamical model simulating the growth of an ice lid in a water-filled crevasse for measured surface temperatures. The influence of the crevasse geometry and the ice shelf temperature are shown. The resulting lid thickness is then used for the linear elastic fracture mechanical analysis. The maximum crack depth is estimated by comparing the computed stress intensity factors to critical values KIc obtained from literature. The thermodynamic as well as the fracture mechanical simulation are performed using the commercial finite element code COMSOL. The computation of KI follows in post processing routines in MATLAB exploiting the benefits of the concept of configurational forces.

  8. Adaptive finite element methods for two-dimensional problems in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element methods in two-dimensional problems in linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element methods for validating the new methodology by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  9. Laser-driven mechanical fracture in fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmani, Faiz

    1999-10-01

    Fused silica, widely used as optical-window material in high-fluence requirements on glass and KrF lasers, experiences optical damage. Under fatigue conditions, the damage is initiated by slow crack growth and culminates, if not arrested, with catastrophic crack growth and implosive failure when the stress intensity approaches the critical value. Since laser-induced cracks cannot be eliminated entirely, the behavior of cracked structures under service conditions must be quantified to be predicted. Systematic scientific rules must be devised to characterize laser-induced cracks and their effects, and to predict if and when it may become necessary to replace the damaged components. This thesis makes a contribution toward this end. Measurements of fatigue failure strength of laser-cracked fused silica in air at room temperature for different number of laser pulses and laser fluences are presented. The failure-strength variability is found to be due mainly to the spectrum of crack depths. Agreement with theory suggests the incorporation of a residual term into the failure-strength equation. Experiments on residual stresses induced in fused silica by the presence of a laser-induced crack are carried out using two different techniques. Theoretical modelings show that this residual stress field is of shear nature and mouth-opening. A correlation between the reduction in fracture strength of fused silica and the increase of the residual-stress field is established, providing laser systems designers and operators with guidance on the rate of crack growth as well as on the stress-related ramifications such as laser-driven cracks entail. Specifically, a hoop-stress in the immediate vicinity of a crack growing along the beam propagation direction is identified as strongly coupling to both the laser fluence and the crack growth. This coupling prompted the question of whether or not breaking the hoop stress symmetry by some external perturbation will accelerate or stymie crack growth. Experimental results on stress-inhibited laser-driven crack growth and stress-delayed-laser-damage initiation thresholds in fused silica and borosilicate glass (BK7) are presented. The results obtained show that, for very low compressive stresses (<10 psi), the damage initiation threshold is raised by as much as 78%, while the crack growth is arrested by 70%. Different loading- geometries are tested, giving different crack growth rates and raising the distinction between uniaxial and biaxial states of stresses.

  10. Kinetics and fracture resistance of lithiated silicon nanostructure pairs controlled by their mechanical interaction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seok Woo; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Ryu, Ill; Nix, William D.; Gao, Huajian; Cui, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Following an explosion of studies of silicon as a negative electrode for Li-ion batteries, the anomalous volumetric changes and fracture of lithiated single Si particles have attracted significant attention in various fields, including mechanics. However, in real batteries, lithiation occurs simultaneously in clusters of Si in a confined medium. Hence, understanding how the individual Si structures interact during lithiation in a closed space is necessary. Here, we demonstrate physical and mechanical interactions of swelling Si structures during lithiation using well-defined Si nanopillar pairs. Ex situ SEM and in situ TEM studies reveal that compressive stresses change the reaction kinetics so that preferential lithiation occurs at free surfaces when the pillars are mechanically clamped. Such mechanical interactions enhance the fracture resistance of lithiated Si by lessening the tensile stress concentrations in Si structures. This study will contribute to improved design of Si structures at the electrode level for high-performance Li-ion batteries. PMID:26112834

  11. Identification of Fracture Toughness for Discrete Damage Mechanics Analysis of Glass-Epoxy Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, E. J.; Cosso, F. A.; Martinez, X.

    2014-08-01

    A methodology for determination of the intralaminar fracture toughness is presented, based on fitting discrete damage mechanics (DDM) model predictions to available experimental data. DDM is constitutive model that, when incorporated into commercial finite element software via user material subroutines, is able to predict intralaminar transverse and shear damage initiation and evolution in terms of the fracture toughness of the composite. The applicability of the DDM model is studied by comparison to available experimental data for Glass-Epoxy laminates. Sensitivity of the DDM model to h- and p-refinement is studied. Also, the effect of in-situ correction of strength is highlighted.

  12. Fracture mechanics research at NASA related to the aging commercial transport fleet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, James C., Jr.; Harris, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    NASA is conducting the Airframe Structural Integrity Program in support of the aging commercial transport fleet. This interdisciplinary program is being worked in cooperation with the U.S. airframe manufacturers, airline operators, and the FAA. Advanced analysis methods are under development and an extensive testing program is under way to study fatigue crack growth and fracture in complex built-up shell structures. Innovative nondestructive examination technologies are also being developed to provide large area inspection capability to detect corrosion, disbonds, and cracks. Recent fracture mechanics results applicable to predicting the growth of cracks under monotonic and cyclic loading at rivets in fuselage lap-splice joints are reviewed.

  13. Fracture mechanics research at NASA related to the aging commercial transport fleet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, James C., Jr.; Harris, Charles E.

    1992-07-01

    NASA is conducting the Airframe Structural Integrity Program in support of the aging commercial transport fleet. This interdisciplinary program is being worked in cooperation with the U.S. airframe manufacturers, airline operators, and the FAA. Advanced analysis methods are under development and an extensive testing program is under way to study fatigue crack growth and fracture in complex built-up shell structures. Innovative nondestructive examination technologies are also being developed to provide large area inspection capability to detect corrosion, disbonds, and cracks. Recent fracture mechanics results applicable to predicting the growth of cracks under monotonic and cyclic loading at rivets in fuselage lap-splice joints are reviewed.

  14. Fractured rock stress-permeability relationships from in situ data and effects of temperature and chemical-mechanical couplings

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rutqvist, J.

    2014-09-19

    The purpose of this paper is to (i) review field data on stress-induced permeability changes in fractured rock; (ii) describe estimation of fractured rock stress-permeability relationships through model calibration against such field data; and (iii) discuss observations of temperature and chemically mediated fracture closure and its effect on fractured rock permeability. The field data that are reviewed include in situ block experiments, excavation-induced changes in permeability around tunnels, borehole injection experiments, depth (and stress) dependent permeability, and permeability changes associated with a large-scale rock-mass heating experiment. Data show how the stress-permeability relationship of fractured rock very much depends on localmore » in situ conditions, such as fracture shear offset and fracture infilling by mineral precipitation. Field and laboratory experiments involving temperature have shown significant temperature-driven fracture closure even under constant stress. Such temperature-driven fracture closure has been described as thermal overclosure and relates to better fitting of opposing fracture surfaces at high temperatures, or is attributed to chemically mediated fracture closure related to pressure solution (and compaction) of stressed fracture surface asperities. Back-calculated stress-permeability relationships from field data may implicitly account for such effects, but the relative contribution of purely thermal-mechanical and chemically mediated changes is difficult to isolate. Therefore, it is concluded that further laboratory and in situ experiments are needed to increase the knowledge of the true mechanisms behind thermally driven fracture closure, and to further assess the importance of chemical-mechanical coupling for the long-term evolution of fractured rock permeability.« less

  15. Fractured rock stress-permeability relationships from in situ data and effects of temperature and chemical-mechanical couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.

    2014-09-19

    The purpose of this paper is to (i) review field data on stress-induced permeability changes in fractured rock; (ii) describe estimation of fractured rock stress-permeability relationships through model calibration against such field data; and (iii) discuss observations of temperature and chemically mediated fracture closure and its effect on fractured rock permeability. The field data that are reviewed include in situ block experiments, excavation-induced changes in permeability around tunnels, borehole injection experiments, depth (and stress) dependent permeability, and permeability changes associated with a large-scale rock-mass heating experiment. Data show how the stress-permeability relationship of fractured rock very much depends on local in situ conditions, such as fracture shear offset and fracture infilling by mineral precipitation. Field and laboratory experiments involving temperature have shown significant temperature-driven fracture closure even under constant stress. Such temperature-driven fracture closure has been described as thermal overclosure and relates to better fitting of opposing fracture surfaces at high temperatures, or is attributed to chemically mediated fracture closure related to pressure solution (and compaction) of stressed fracture surface asperities. Back-calculated stress-permeability relationships from field data may implicitly account for such effects, but the relative contribution of purely thermal-mechanical and chemically mediated changes is difficult to isolate. Therefore, it is concluded that further laboratory and in situ experiments are needed to increase the knowledge of the true mechanisms behind thermally driven fracture closure, and to further assess the importance of chemical-mechanical coupling for the long-term evolution of fractured rock permeability.

  16. The mechanics of tessellations - bioinspired strategies for fracture resistance.

    PubMed

    Fratzl, Peter; Kolednik, Otmar; Fischer, F Dieter; Dean, Mason N

    2016-01-21

    Faced with a comparatively limited palette of minerals and organic polymers as building materials, evolution has arrived repeatedly on structural solutions that rely on clever geometric arrangements to avoid mechanical trade-offs in stiffness, strength and flexibility. In this tutorial review, we highlight the concept of tessellation, a structural motif that involves periodic soft and hard elements arranged in series and that appears in a vast array of invertebrate and vertebrate animal biomaterials. We start from basic mechanics principles on the effects of material heterogeneities in hypothetical structures, to derive common concepts from a diversity of natural examples of one-, two- and three-dimensional tilings/layerings. We show that the tessellation of a hard, continuous surface - its atomization into discrete elements connected by a softer phase - can theoretically result in maximization of material toughness, with little expense to stiffness or strength. Moreover, the arrangement of soft/flexible and hard/stiff elements into particular geometries can permit surprising functions, such as signal filtering or 'stretch and catch' responses, where the constrained flexibility of systems allows a built-in safety mechanism for ensuring that both compressive and tensile loads are managed well. Our analysis unites examples ranging from exoskeletal materials (fish scales, arthropod cuticle, turtle shell) to endoskeletal materials (bone, shark cartilage, sponge spicules) to attachment devices (mussel byssal threads), from both invertebrate and vertebrate animals, while spotlighting success and potential for bio-inspired manmade applications. PMID:26377507

  17. Critical Chemical-Mechanical Couplings that Define Permeability Modifications in Pressure-Sensitive Rock Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Derek Elsworth; Abraham Grader; Susan Brantley

    2007-04-25

    This work examined and quantified processes controlling changes in the transport characteristics of natural fractures, subjected to coupled thermal-mechanical-chemical (TMC) effects. Specifically, it examined the effects of mineral dissolution and precipitation mediated by mechanical effects, using laboratory through-flow experiments concurrently imaged by X-ray CT. These were conducted on natural and artificial fractures in cores using water as the permeant. Fluid and mineral mass balances are recorded and are correlated with in-sample saturation, porosity and fracture aperture maps, acquired in real-time by X-ray CT-imaging at a maximum spatial resolution of 15-50 microns per pixel. Post-test, the samples were resin-impregnated, thin-sectioned, and examined by microscopy to define the characteristics of dissolution and precipitation. The test-concurrent X-ray imaging, mass balances, and measurements of permeability, together with the post-test microscopy, were used to define dissolution/precipitation processes, and to constrain process-based models. These models define and quantify key processes of pressure solution, free-face dissolution, and shear-dilation, and the influence of temperature, stress level, and chemistry on the rate of dissolution, its distribution in space and time, and its influence on the mechanical and transport properties of the fracture.

  18. Nonlinear fracture mechanics-based analysis of thin wall cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brust, Frederick W.; Leis, Brian N.; Forte, Thomas P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a simple analysis technique to predict the crack initiation, growth, and rupture of large-radius, R, to thickness, t, ratio (thin wall) cylinders. The method is formulated to deal both with stable tearing as well as fatigue mechanisms in applications to both surface and through-wall axial cracks, including interacting surface cracks. The method can also account for time-dependent effects. Validation of the model is provided by comparisons of predictions to more than forty full scale experiments of thin wall cylinders pressurized to failure.

  19. Nonlinear fracture mechanics-based analysis of thin wall cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brust, Frederick W.; Leis, Brian N.; Forte, Thomas P.

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents a simple analysis technique to predict the crack initiation, growth, and rupture of large-radius, R, to thickness, t, ratio (thin wall) cylinders. The method is formulated to deal both with stable tearing as well as fatigue mechanisms in applications to both surface and through-wall axial cracks, including interacting surface cracks. The method can also account for time-dependent effects. Validation of the model is provided by comparisons of predictions to more than forty full scale experiments of thin wall cylinders pressurized to failure.

  20. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of Directionally Solidified NiAl-V Eutectic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milenkovic, Srdjan; Caram, Rubens

    2015-02-01

    Directional solidification of eutectic alloys has been recognized as promising technique for producing in situ composite materials exhibiting balance of properties. Therefore, an in situ NiAl-V eutectic composite has been successfully directionally solidified using Bridgman technique. The mechanical behavior of the composite including fracture resistance, microhardness, and compressive properties at room and elevated temperatures was investigated. Damage evolution and fracture characteristics were also discussed. The obtained results indicate that the NiAl-V eutectic retains high yield strength up to 1073 K (800 °C), above which there is a rapid decrease in strength. Its yield strength is higher than that of binary NiAl and most of the NiAl-based eutectics. The exhibited fracture toughness of 28.5 MPa√m is the highest of all other NiAl-based systems investigated so far. The material exhibited brittle fracture behavior of transgranular type and all observations pointed out that the main fracture micromechanism was cleavage.

  1. Continuum mechanics analysis of fracture progression in the vitrified cryoprotective agent DP6

    PubMed Central

    Steif, Paul S.; Palastro, Matthew C.; Rabin, Yoed

    2008-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to study the continuum mechanics effects associated with cryopreservation, the current report focuses on the prediction of fracture formation in cryoprotective agents. Fractures had been previously observed in 1 mℓ samples of the cryoprotective agent cocktail DP6, contained in a standard 15 mℓ glass vial, and subjected to various cooling rates. These experimental observations were obtained by means of a cryomacroscope, which has been recently presented by the current research team. High and low cooling rates were found to produce very distinct patterns of cracking. The current study seeks to explain the observed patterns on the basis of stresses predicted from finite element analysis, which relies on a simple viscoelastic constitutive model and on estimates of the critical stress for cracking. The current study demonstrates that the stress which results in instantaneous fracture at low cooling rates is consistent with the stress to initiate fracture at high cooling rate. This consistency supports the credibility of the proposed constitutive model and analysis, and the unified criterion for fracturing, that is, a critical stress threshold. PMID:18412493

  2. The fifth metatarsal base: anatomic evaluation regarding fracture mechanism and treatment algorithms.

    PubMed

    DeVries, J George; Taefi, Erfan; Bussewitz, Bradly W; Hyer, Christopher F; Lee, Thomas H

    2015-01-01

    Fractures occurring within the 1.5-cm proximal portion of the fifth metatarsal are commonly considered avulsion fractures. The exact mechanisms of such fractures are controversial. The present study focused on determining the likely mechanism of fracture according to the exact anatomy to allow for more successful treatment. The research sample included 10 frozen cadaveric specimens. The lateral band of the plantar fascia, peroneus brevis, and articular surface were identified and separated from their attachments, thereby splitting the fifth metatarsal base into zones A, B, and C. In zone A, the attachment of the plantar fascia was 6.6 ± 2.2 mm from the inferior aspect, 9.5 ± 2.9 mm from the proximal aspect, and 11.5 ± 0.9 mm from the lateral aspect. In zone B, the attachment of the peroneus brevis was 12.0 ± 2.2 mm from the inferior aspect, 10.2 ± 2.2 mm from the proximal aspect, and 11.5 ± 0.9 mm from the lateral aspect. Zone C was measured from the border of zone B and encompassed the articulation of the fifth metatarsal to the cuboid. We propose that fractures occurring in the most proximal end of the fifth metatarsal, zone A, are caused by a lateral band of plantar fascia and might be able to be treated conservatively by immobilization with weightbearing. We also propose that fractures occurring in zones B and C result from traumatic tension on peroneus brevis and might need to be treated with strict immobilization and non-weightbearing or open reduction internal fixation. PMID:25441854

  3. Phenomenological and mechanics aspects of nondestructive evaluation and characterization by sound and ultrasound of material and fracture properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. S. W.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in fracture mechanics and elastic wave theory enhance the understanding of many physical phenomena in a mathematical context. Available literature in the material, and fracture characterization by NDT, and the related mathematical methods in mechanics that provide fundamental underlying principles for its interpretation and evaluation are reviewed. Information on the energy release mechanism of defects and the interaction of microstructures within the material is basic in the formulation of the mechanics problems that supply guidance for nondestructive evaluation (NDE).

  4. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Subsurface Defects in Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Joggles Subjected to Thermo-Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Song, Kyongchan

    2011-01-01

    Coating spallation events have been observed along the slip-side joggle region of the Space Shuttle Orbiter wing-leading-edge panels. One potential contributor to the spallation event is a pressure build up within subsurface voids or defects due to volatiles or water vapor entrapped during fabrication, refurbishment, or normal operational use. The influence of entrapped pressure on the thermo-mechanical fracture-mechanics response of reinforced carbon-carbon with subsurface defects is studied. Plane-strain simulations with embedded subsurface defects are performed to characterize the fracture mechanics response for a given defect length when subjected to combined elevated-temperature and subsurface-defect pressure loadings to simulate the unvented defect condition. Various subsurface defect locations of a fixed-length substrate defect are examined for elevated temperature conditions. Fracture mechanics results suggest that entrapped pressure combined with local elevated temperatures have the potential to cause subsurface defect growth and possibly contribute to further material separation or even spallation. For this anomaly to occur, several unusual circumstances would be required making such an outcome unlikely but plausible.

  5. Metal cutting simulation of 4340 steel using an accurate mechanical description of meterial strength and fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Maudlin, P.J.; Stout, M.G.

    1996-09-01

    Strength and fracture constitutive relationships containing strain rate dependence and thermal softening are important for accurate simulation of metal cutting. The mechanical behavior of a hardened 4340 steel was characterized using the von Mises yield function, the Mechanical Threshold Stress model and the Johnson- Cook fracture model. This constitutive description was implemented into the explicit Lagrangian FEM continuum-mechanics code EPIC, and orthogonal plane-strain metal cutting calculations were performed. Heat conduction and friction at the toolwork-piece interface were included in the simulations. These transient calculations were advanced in time until steady state machining behavior (force) was realized. Experimental cutting force data (cutting and thrust forces) were measured for a planning operation and compared to the calculations. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  6. The Merging of Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics Concepts: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, James C., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The seventh Jerry L. Swedlow Memorial Lecture presents a review of some of the technical developments, that have occurred during the past 40 years, which have led to the merger of fatigue and fracture mechanics concepts. This review is made from the viewpoint of 'crack propagation.' As methods to observe the 'fatigue' process have improved, the formation of fatigue micro-cracks have been observed earlier in life and the measured crack sizes have become smaller. These observations suggest that fatigue damage can now be characterized by 'crack size.' In parallel, the crack-growth analysis methods, using stress-intensity factors, have also improved. But the effects of material inhomogeneities, crack-fracture mechanisms, and nonlinear behavior must now be included in these analyses. The discovery of crack-closure mechanisms, such as plasticity, roughness, and oxide/corrosion/fretting product debris, and the use of the effective stress-intensity factor range, has provided an engineering tool to predict small- and large-crack-growth rate behavior under service loading, conditions. These mechanisms have also provided a rationale for developing, new, damage-tolerant materials. This review suggests that small-crack growth behavior should be viewed as typical behavior, whereas large-crack threshold behavior should be viewed as the anomaly. Small-crack theory has unified 'fatigue' and 'fracture mechanics' concepts; and has bridged the cap between safe-life and durability/damage-tolerance design concepts.

  7. Understanding Irreversible Degradation of Nb3Sn Wires with Fundamental Fracture Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Yuhu; Calzolaio, Ciro; Senatore, Carmine

    2014-08-01

    Irreversible performance degradation of advanced Nb3Sn superconducting wires subjected to transverse or axial mechanical loading is a critical issue for the design of large-scale fusion and accelerator magnets such as ITER and LHC. Recent SULTAN tests indicate that most cable-in-conduit conductors for ITER coils made of Nb3Sn wires processed by various fabrication techniques show similar performance degradation under cyclic loading. The irreversible degradation due to filament fracture and local strain accumulation in Nb3Sn wires cannot be described by the existing strand scaling law. Fracture mechanic modeling combined with X-ray diffraction imaging of filament micro-crack formation inside the wires under mechanical loading may reveal exciting insights to the wire degradation mechanisms. We apply fundamental fracture mechanics with a singularity approach to study influence of wire filament microstructure of initial void size and distribution to local stress concentration and potential crack propagation. We report impact of the scale and density of the void structure on stress concentration in the composite wire materials for crack initiation. These initial defects result in an irreversible degradation of the critical current beyond certain applied stress. We also discuss options to minimize stress concentration in the design of the material microstructure for enhanced wire performance for future applications.

  8. On the mechanisms and mechanics of fracture toughness of a V-4Cr-4Ti alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, E. G.; Odette, G. R.; Lucas, G. E.

    2000-12-01

    Effects of irradiation and crossrolling on fracture toughness-temperature curves of the program heat of the V-4Cr-4Ti were evaluated. The alloy undergoes normal stress controlled cleavage fracture at low temperatures and ductile tearing fracture at higher temperature. It appears that crossrolling lowers the cleavage transition temperature. A critical stress-critical-stressed area cleavage criterion is used to model toughness-temperature curves in the cleavage transition, including the effect of specimen size. Irradiation induced increases in the transition temperature are accurately predicted by an equivalent yield stress model. Ductile tearing toughness is also degraded by irradiation, correlating with reduced uniform strains measured in tensile tests. Large cleavage transition temperature shifts and ductile toughness decreases may limit the application of V-4Cr-4Ti alloys for service in low-to-intermediate temperature irradiation environments.

  9. Study on predicting residual life of elevator links by fracture mechanics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Li Helin; Zhang Yi; Deng Zengjie; Jin Dazeng

    1995-12-31

    On the basis of investigation, failure and fracture analysis of elevator links, residual life prediction of links using fracture mechanics approach is studied, and mechanical properties, fracture toughness value K{sub IC} and fatigue crack propagation rage da/dN of the steel for elevator links are determined. Using the relation between stress intensity factor K{sub I} and the strain-energy release rate, the two-dimensional conversion thickness finite element method has been used to calculate the stress intensity factors K{sub I} for dangerous sections in the ring part of links. Furthermore, the reliability of calculations of the finite element stress intensity factors K{sub I} for dangerous sections of elevator links and the residual life computation for links are verified by fatigue tests of actual links. Finally, the experimental verification of computed results by 150T link fractured at site indicates that the computed critical crack lengths and residual life tally well with those measured and meet the needs of oil drilling.

  10. Planar Porous Graphene Woven Fabric/Epoxy Composites with Exceptional Electrical, Mechanical Properties, and Fracture Toughness.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Sun, Xinying; Wang, Zhenyu; Shen, Xi; Wu, Ying; Kim, Jang-Kyo

    2015-09-30

    Planar interconnected graphene woven fabrics (GWFs) are prepared by template-based chemical vapor deposition and the GWFs are employed as multifunctional filler for epoxy-based composites. Apart from flexibility, transparency, lightweight, and high electrical conductivity, the GWFs have unique morphological features consisting of orthogonally interweaved, inherently percolated, hollow graphene tubes (GTs). The orthogonal GT structure means that the GWF/epoxy composites hold significant anisotropy in mechanical and fracture properties. The composites with 0.62 wt % graphene deliver a combination of excellent electrical and fracture properties: e.g., an electrical conductivity of ~0.18 S/cm; and fracture toughness of 1.67 and 1.78 MPa·m(1/2) when loaded along the 0° and 45° directions relative to the GT direction, respectively, equivalent to notable 57% and 67% rises compared to the solid epoxy. Unique fracture processes in GWF/epoxy composites are identified by in situ examinations, revealing crack tip blunting that occurs when the crack impinges GTs, especially those at 45° to the crack growth direction, as well as longitudinal tearing of hollow GTs as the two major toughening mechanisms. PMID:26331902

  11. Exploring particulate retention mechanisms through visualization of E. coli transport through a single, saturated fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, M. G.; Dickson, S. E.; Schutten, M.

    2011-12-01

    Groundwater is an extremely valuable resource; a large body of work has been conducted towards remediating, tracking and reducing its contamination. Even so, there are large gaps within the current understanding of groundwater flow and contaminant transport, particularly within fractured media. Fractured media has the ability transport contaminants over longer distances in less time relative to porous media. Furthermore, colloids display unique transport characteristics in comparison to dissolved constituents, including the fact that they typically exhibit earlier initial arrival times. Of particular concern to human health are pathogenic microorganisms, which often originate from fecal contamination. Escherichia coli is a common indicator for fecal contamination; some strains are pathogenic, causing acute illness and sometimes death, in humans. A comprehensive understanding of the transport and retention of E. coli in fractured media will improve our ability to accurately assess whether a site is at risk of becoming contaminated by pathogenic microorganisms. Therefore, the goal of this work is to expand our mechanistic understanding particulate retention, specifically E. coli, in fractures, and the influence of flow rate on these mechanisms. In order to achieve this goal, clear epoxy casts were fabricated of two dolomitic limestone fractures retrieved from a quarry in Guelph, Ontario. Each aperture field was characterized through hydraulic and tracer tests, and measured directly using the light transmission technique. E. coli RS2-GFP, which is a non-pathogenic strain of E. coli that has been tagged with a green fluorescent protein, was injected into the cast under three separate specific discharges ranging from 5 - 30 m/d. These experiments were conducted on an ultraviolet light source, and a high resolution charged-couple device (CCD) camera was employed to take photos at regular intervals in order to capture the dominant flow paths and the areas of retention within the epoxy fracture. Samples were drawn downstream to obtain the E. coli breakthrough curve and determine the percent retained within the fracture. This paper will present the dominant retention mechanisms of E. coli at various effective flow rates as determined from an analysis of the images showing trapped E. coli, together with the aperture field information from the direct measurement. This information will help to improve the robustness and of contaminant transport models in fractures, and will therefore improve the ability to assess the risk posed by using bedrock aquifers as drinking water sources.

  12. A study of fracture mechanisms in ATD roller bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zee, Ralph H.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate how microstructures, especially anisotropy, affects internal stresses and the overall mechanical response of bearings. Samples with the stress axis along the aligned carbide direction possessed high modulus values compared to those with their axis perpendicular to the carbide stringers. The difference in the modulus was found to be more than a factor of two. A series of experiments was conducted on rolled samples to further investigate this effect; the two sets of results were consistent with each other. The degree of anisotropy of the microstructure in terms of the carbide and matrix orientations was determined using x-ray diffraction. The stress state determination was conducted using neutron diffraction. It was found that there was little variation in the distribution of the internal stresses amongst different samples, indicating that small changes in the processing and geometrical conditions did not result in significant variations in the internal stress. A nominal tensile hoop stress of 39 ksi was obtained for the inner raceway. Furthermore, during the course of the investigation, it was apparent that there was a need to determine the stress state induced by the shrink fitting process. Therefore, a series of experiments was conducted using strain gages to identify the stress distribution in a shrink fitting process in three different types of geometries. Correlations were obtained to estimate the highest stress values in the outer and inner groove geometry. A finite element program based on the ANSYS system was developed to compute the stress distribution in the inner raceway geometry. This analysis indicates that the highest tensile stress in the system occurs at the ID of the ring with a stress value of over 5 times that of the applied radial stress. Results from all these facets were correlated with one another. It appears that the material does not fail as a result of any one single factor, but results from a combination of the various factors investigated.

  13. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Wing-Leading-Edge Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Phillips, Dawn R.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan

    2010-01-01

    Fracture mechanics analyses of subsurface defects within the joggle regions of the Space Shuttle wing-leading-edge RCC panels are performed. A 2D plane strain idealized joggle finite element model is developed to study the fracture behavior of the panels for three distinct loading conditions - lift-off and ascent, on-orbit, and entry. For lift-off and ascent, an estimated bounding aerodynamic pressure load is used for the analyses, while for on-orbit and entry, thermo-mechanical analyses are performed using the extreme cold and hot temperatures experienced by the panels. In addition, a best estimate for the material stress-free temperature is used in the thermo-mechanical analyses. In the finite element models, the substrate and coating are modeled separately as two distinct materials. Subsurface defects are introduced at the coating-substrate interface and within the substrate. The objective of the fracture mechanics analyses is to evaluate the defect driving forces, which are characterized by the strain energy release rates, and determine if defects can become unstable for each of the loading conditions.

  14. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics Evaluation of Selected Passive Components – Technical Letter Report

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, Fredric A.; Doctor, Steven R.; Gosselin, Stephen R.; Rudland, David L.; Xu, H.; Wilkowski, Gery M.; Lydell, Bengt O.

    2007-05-31

    This report addresses the potential application of probabilistic fracture mechanics computer codes to support the Proactive Materials Degradation Assessment (PMDA) program as a method to predict component failure probabilities. The present report describes probabilistic fracture mechanics calculations that were performed for selected components using the PRO-LOCA and PRAISE computer codes. The calculations address the failure mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking, intergranular stress corrosion cracking, and fatigue for components and operating conditions that are known to make particular components susceptible to cracking. It was demonstrated that the two codes can predict essentially the same failure probabilities if both codes start with the same fracture mechanics model and the same inputs to the model. Comparisons with field experience showed that both codes predict relatively high failure probabilities for components under operating conditions that have resulted in field failures. It was found that modeling assumptions and inputs tended to give higher calculated failure probabilities than those derived from data on field failures. Sensitivity calculations were performed to show that uncertainties in the probabilistic calculations were sufficiently large to explain the differences between predicted failure probabilities and field experience.

  15. A mechanical model for predicting the probability of osteoporotic hip fractures based in DXA measurements and finite element simulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteoporotic hip fractures represent major cause of disability, loss of quality of life and even mortality among the elderly population. Decisions on drug therapy are based on the assessment of risk factors for fracture, from BMD measurements. The combination of biomechanical models with clinical studies could better estimate bone strength and supporting the specialists in their decision. Methods A model to assess the probability of fracture, based on the Damage and Fracture Mechanics has been developed, evaluating the mechanical magnitudes involved in the fracture process from clinical BMD measurements. The model is intended for simulating the degenerative process in the skeleton, with the consequent lost of bone mass and hence the decrease of its mechanical resistance which enables the fracture due to different traumatisms. Clinical studies were chosen, both in non-treatment conditions and receiving drug therapy, and fitted to specific patients according their actual BMD measures. The predictive model is applied in a FE simulation of the proximal femur. The fracture zone would be determined according loading scenario (sideway fall, impact, accidental loads, etc.), using the mechanical properties of bone obtained from the evolutionary model corresponding to the considered time. Results BMD evolution in untreated patients and in those under different treatments was analyzed. Evolutionary curves of fracture probability were obtained from the evolution of mechanical damage. The evolutionary curve of the untreated group of patients presented a marked increase of the fracture probability, while the curves of patients under drug treatment showed variable decreased risks, depending on the therapy type. Conclusion The FE model allowed to obtain detailed maps of damage and fracture probability, identifying high-risk local zones at femoral neck and intertrochanteric and subtrochanteric areas, which are the typical locations of osteoporotic hip fractures. The developed model is suitable for being used in individualized cases. The model might better identify at-risk individuals in early stages of osteoporosis and might be helpful for treatment decisions. PMID:23151049

  16. Fracture mechanics determine the lengths of interface ruptures that mediate frictional motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayart, Elsa; Svetlizky, Ilya; Fineberg, Jay

    2016-02-01

    The transition from static to sliding friction is mediated by rapid interfacial ruptures propagating through the solid contacts forming a frictional interface. While propagating, these ruptures correspond to true shear cracks. Frictional sliding is initiated only when a rupture traverses the entire interface; however, arrested ruptures can occur at applied shears far below the transition to frictional motion. Here we show, by measuring the real contact area and strain fields near rough frictional interfaces, that fracture mechanics quantitatively describe rupture arrest and therefore determine the onset of overall frictional sliding. Our measurements reveal both the local dissipation and the global elastic energy released by the rupture. The balance of these quantities entirely determines rupture lengths, whether finite or system-wide. These results confirm a fracture-mechanics-based paradigm for describing frictional motion and shed light on the selection of an earthquake’s magnitude.

  17. Mechanisms of hydrogen-assisted fracture in austenitic stainless steel welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Balch, Dorian K.; Sofronis, Petros; Somerday, Brian P.; Novak, Paul

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the hydrogen-assisted fracture susceptibility of gas-tungsten arc (GTA) welds in the nitrogen-strengthened, austenitic stainless steels 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn (21-6-9) and 22Cr-13Ni-5Mn (22-13-5). In addition, mechanisms of hydrogen-assisted fracture in the welds were identified using electron microscopy and finite-element modeling. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics experiments were conducted on hydrogen-charged GTA welds at 25 C. Results showed that hydrogen dramatically lowered the fracture toughness from 412 kJ/m{sup 2} to 57 kJ/m{sup 2} in 21-6-9 welds and from 91 kJ/m{sup 2} to 26 kJ/m{sup 2} in 22-13-5 welds. Microscopy results suggested that hydrogen served two roles in the fracture of welds: it promoted the nucleation of microcracks along the dendritic structure and accelerated the link-up of microcracks by facilitating localized deformation. A continuum finite-element model was formulated to test the notion that hydrogen could facilitate localized deformation in the ligament between microcracks. On the assumption that hydrogen decreased local flow stress in accordance with the hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility argument, the finite-element results showed that deformation was localized in a narrow band between two parallel, overlapping microcracks. In contrast, in the absence of hydrogen, the finite-element results showed that deformation between microcracks was more uniformly distributed.

  18. Fracture mechanics analysis of a high-pressure hydrogen facility compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vroman, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The investigation and analysis of a high-pressure hydrogen facility compressor is chronicled, and a life prediction based on fracture mechanics is presented. Crack growth rates in SA 105 Gr II steel are developed for the condition of sustained loading, using a hypothesis of hydrogen embrittlement associated with plastic zone reverse yielding. The resultant formula is compared with test data obtained from laboratory specimens.

  19. The effect of adhesive layer elasticity on the fracture mechanics of a blister test specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Updike, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical model of a blister type specimen for evaluating adhesive bond strength was developed. Plate theory with shear deformation was used to model the deformation of the plate, and elastic deformation of the adhesive layer is taken into account. It is shown that the inclusion of the elastic deformation of the adhesive layer can have a significant influence in the energy balance calculations of fracture mechanics.

  20. Fatigue life prediction of circumferentially notched component based on elastic-plastic fracture mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, K.; Fujimitsu, T.; Omori, J.

    The elastic-plastic fracture mechanics parameters for the 3D surface and circumferential cracks generated in the circumferentially grooved cylinder component were analyzed from the viewpoint of engineering. Then, fatigue life spent during crack growth was estimated for the bluntly and acutely notched cylindrical components. Consequently, it was found that the crack propagation life of the notched cylinder component was successfully predicted by analyzing the extension of the semielliptical surface crack and the circumferential crack based on the proposed method.

  1. Plasticity and stress relaxation in fracture mechanics test of copper and cupronickel

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.

    1986-03-01

    Load relaxation tests were performed using precracked fracture mechanics specimens of annealed OFHC copper and as-received 90-10 cupronickel alloy. Test temperatures were 100/sup 0/, 150/sup 0/, and 250/sup 0/C with, in some cases, exposure times out to 2439 hours. Significant load relaxation was noted in some cases, and the applicability of using these specimens in such cases is discussed.

  2. Applications of FEM and BEM in two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Steeve, B. E.; Swanson, G. R.

    1992-01-01

    A comparison of the finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) for the solution of two-dimensional plane strain problems in fracture mechanics is presented in this paper. Stress intensity factors (SIF's) were calculated using both methods for elastic plates with either a single-edge crack or an inclined-edge crack. In particular, two currently available programs, ANSYS for finite element analysis and BEASY for boundary element analysis, were used.

  3. Investigation of the Thermal, Mechanical, and Fracture Properties of Alumina-Epoxy Composites

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath,L.; Parnas, R.; King, S.; Schroeder, J.; Fischer, D.; Lenhart, J.

    2008-01-01

    A combination of dynamic shear rheology, thermomechanical analysis (TMA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS), and fracture toughness testing was utilized to characterize the thermal, mechanical, chemical, and fracture properties of alumina (a-Al2O3)-filled epoxy resins as a function of average filler size, size distribution, particle shape, loading, and epoxy crosslink density. In general the cured properties of the filled composites were robust. Small changes in particle size, shape, and size distribution had little impact on the final properties. Resin crosslink density and filler loading were the most critical variables, causing changes in all properties. However, most applications could likely tolerate small changes in these variables also. SEM and NEXAFS characterization of the fracture surfaces revealed that the fracture occurs at the filler interface and the interfacial epoxy composition is similar to the bulk resin, indicating a weak epoxy-alumina interaction. These results are critical for implementation of particulate-filled polymer composites in practical applications because relaxed material specifications and handling procedures can be incorporated in production environments to improve efficiency.

  4. The microstructural, mechanical, and fracture properties of austenitic stainless steel alloyed with gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolman, D. G.; Bingert, J. F.; Field, R. D.

    2004-11-01

    The mechanical and fracture properties of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) alloyed with gallium require assessment in order to determine the likelihood of premature storage-container failure following Ga uptake. AISI 304 L SS was cast with 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 wt pct Ga. Increased Ga concentration promoted duplex microstructure formation with the ferritic phase having a nearly identical composition to the austenitic phase. Room-temperature tests indicated that small additions of Ga (less than 3 wt pct) were beneficial to the mechanical behavior of 304 L SS but that 12 wt pct Ga resulted in a 95 pct loss in ductility. Small additions of Ga are beneficial to the cracking resistance of stainless steel. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis indicated that 3 wt pct Ga alloys showed the greatest resistance to crack initiation and propagation as measured by fatigue crack growth rate, fracture toughness, and tearing modulus. The 12 wt pct Ga alloys were least resistant to crack initiation and propagation and these alloys primarily failed by transgranular cleavage. It is hypothesized that Ga metal embrittlement is partially responsible for increased embrittlement.

  5. Fracture toughness testing and toughening mechanisms of some commercial cobalt-free hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1998-04-27

    Hardfacing alloys are weld deposited to provide a wear resistant surface for structural base materials. Commercial low cobalt hardfacing alloys are being evaluated to reduce plant activation levels. Since hardfacing alloys typically must be resistant to cracking to assure adequate in service performance, fracture toughness is a critical material property. Fracture toughness (K{sub IC}) measurements of Fe base, Ni-base, and Co-base hardfacing were performed in accordance with ASTM E399-90 procedure in an effort to identify a tough cobalt-free alternative. Reduced scatter in K{sub IC} data was observed for the Fe base hardfacing, and the 95% lower bound K{sub IC} values were generally higher than the Ni-base Hardfacing alloys. Preliminary crack growth data obtained during precracking indicate that the Ni-base hardfacing possess better fatigue crack growth resistance. However, none of the Fe-base or Ni-base hardfacing have K{sub IC} values that are comparable to the reference Co-base hard facing. The test specimens were machined from thick (0.5 inches) weld deposits, and the microstructures of the test specimens are compared with the more prototypic, thinner deposits. Microstructural and fractographic examinations are used to characterize the fracture mechanisms and delineate the operative toughening mechanisms. Crack deflection and crack bridging toughening mechanisms are shown to be relevant for most of the commercial hardfacing.

  6. Unusual Mechanism of Injury Resulting in a Thoracic Chance Fracture in a Rodeo Athlete: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Boham, Mikaela; O'Connell, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To introduce the characteristics of a Chance fracture and increase awareness of the mechanism of injury that may occur during athletic activity. Background: A T12 Chance fracture was diagnosed in an 18-year-old male rodeo athlete. The rider was forced into extreme lumbothoracic hyperflexion when the horse bucked within the chute, pinning the rider's legs to his chest. Differential Diagnosis: Burst fracture, abdominal organ rupture, spinal dislocation, spinal cord injury, disk herniation, pars interarticularis fracture, spinal nerve injury, paralysis. Treatment: The patient underwent an open reduction and fixation of the thoracic fracture. Posterior stabilization was obtained with nonsegmental instrumentation. Allograft and autografts were used for posterolateral arthrodesis at T11–T12 and T12–L1. Uniqueness: Motor vehicle crashes with occupants wearing lap-type–only restraints account for nearly all previously reported Chance fractures. When only lap seatbelts are worn, the pelvis is stabilized, and the torso continues moving forward with impact. The stabilized body segment for this individual was reversed. Nearly 3 years after the initial surgery, fixation, and infection, the bareback rider has returned to full participation in rodeo. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first reported diagnosis of a T12 Chance fracture in a rodeo athlete. When animals buck, athletes can be forced into hyperflexion, exposing them to Chance fractures. Therefore, anyone treating rodeo athletes must suspect possible spinal fracture when this mechanism is present and must treat all athletes with early conservative management and hospital referral. PMID:24520836

  7. American Society of Biomechanics Journal of Biomechanics Award 2013: Cortical bone tissue mechanical quality and biological mechanisms possibly underlying atypical fractures

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Joseph R.; Bajaj, Devendra; Fritton, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The biomechanics literature contains many well-understood mechanisms behind typical fracture types that have important roles in treatment planning. The recent association of “atypical” fractures with long-term use of drugs designed to prevent osteoporosis has renewed interest in the effects of agents on bone tissue-level quality. While this class of fracture was recognized prior to the introduction of the anti-resorptive bisphosphonate drugs and recently likened to stress fractures, the mechanism(s) that lead to atypical fractures have not been definitively identified. Thus, a causal relationship between these drugs and atypical fracture has not been established. Physicians, bioengineers and others interested in the biomechanics of bone are working to improve fracture-prevention diagnostics, and the design of treatments to avoid this serious side-effect in the future. This review examines the mechanisms behind the bone tissue damage that may produce the atypical fracture pattern observed increasingly with long-term bisphosphonate use. Our recent findings and those of others reviewed support that the mechanisms behind normal, healthy excavation and tunnel filling by bone remodeling units within cortical tissue strengthen mechanical integrity. The ability of cortical bone to resist the damage induced during cyclic loading may be altered by the reduced remodeling and increased tissue age resulting from long-term bisphosphonate treatment. Development of assessments for such potential fractures would restore confidence in pharmaceutical treatments that have the potential to spare millions in our aging population from the morbidity and death that often follow bone fracture. PMID:25683519

  8. Studying physical properties of deformed intact and fractured rocks by micro-scale hydro-mechanical-seismicity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raziperchikolaee, Samin

    The pore pressure variation in an underground formation during hydraulic stimulation of low permeability formations or CO2 sequestration into saline aquifers can induce microseismicity due to fracture generation or pre-existing fracture activation. While the analysis of microseismic data mainly focuses on mapping the location of fractures, the seismic waves generated by the microseismic events also contain information for understanding of fracture mechanisms based on microseismic source analysis. We developed a micro-scale geomechanics, fluid-flow and seismic model that can predict transport and seismic source behavior during rock failure. This model features the incorporation of microseismic source analysis in fractured and intact rock transport properties during possible rock damage and failure. The modeling method considers comprehensive grains and cements interaction through a bonded-particle-model. As a result of grain deformation and microcrack development in the rock sample, forces and displacements in the grains involved in the bond breakage are measured to determine seismic moment tensor. In addition, geometric description of the complex pore structure is regenerated to predict fluid flow behavior of fractured samples. Numerical experiments are conducted for different intact and fractured digital rock samples, representing various mechanical behaviors of rocks and fracture surface properties, to consider their roles on seismic and transport properties of rocks during deformation. Studying rock deformation in detail provides an opportunity to understand the relationship between source mechanism of microseismic events and transport properties of damaged rocks to have a better characterizing of fluid flow behavior in subsurface formations.

  9. Mechanisms for fracture and fatigue-crack propagation in a bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, C. J.; Schroeder, V.; Ritchie, R. O.

    1999-07-01

    The fracture and fatigue properties of a newly developed bulk metallic glass alloy, Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5 Ni10Be22.5 (at. pct), have been examined. Experimental measurements using conventional fatigue precracked compact-tension C(T) specimens (7-mm thick) indicated that the fully amorphous alloy has a plane-strain fracture toughness comparable to polycrystalline aluminum alloys. However, significant variability was observed and possible sources are identified. The fracture surfaces exhibited a vein morphology typical of metallic glasses, and, in some cases, evidence for local melting was observed. Attempts were made to rationalize the fracture toughness in terms of a previously developed micromechanical model based on the Taylor instability, as well as on the observation of extensive crack branching and deflection. Upon partial or complete crystallization, however, the alloy was severely embrittled, with toughnesses dropping to 1 MPa sqrt m . Commensurate with this drop in toughness was a marginal increase in hardness and a reduction in ductility (as measured via depthsensing indentation experiments). Under cyclic loading, crack-propagation behavior in the amorphous structure was similar to that observed in polycrystalline steel and aluminum alloys. Moreover, the crack-advance mechanism was associated with alternating blunting and resharpening of the crack tip. This was evidenced by striations on fatigue fracture surfaces. Conversely, the (unnotched) stress/life (S/N) properties were markedly different. Crack initiation and subsequent growth occurred quite readily, due to the lack of microstructural barriers that would normally provide local crack-arrest points. This resulted in a low fatigue limit of 4 pct of ultimate tensile strength.

  10. Computational implementation of the multi-mechanism deformation coupled fracture model for salt

    SciTech Connect

    Koteras, J.R.; Munson, D.E.

    1996-05-01

    The Multi-Mechanism Deformation (M-D) model for creep in rock salt has been used in three-dimensional computations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a potential waste, repository. These computational studies are relied upon to make key predictions about long-term behavior of the repository. Recently, the M-D model was extended to include creep-induced damage. The extended model, the Multi-Mechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, is considerably more complicated than the M-D model and required a different technology from that of the M-D model for a computational implementation.

  11. Martensitic stainless steel AISI 420—mechanical properties, creep and fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brnic, J.; Turkalj, G.; Canadija, M.; Lanc, D.; Krscanski, S.

    2011-11-01

    In this paper some experimental results and analyses regarding the behavior of AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel under different environmental conditions are presented. That way, mechanical properties like ultimate tensile strength and 0.2 percent offset yield strength at lowered and elevated temperatures as well as short-time creep behavior for selected stress levels at selected elevated temperatures of mentioned material are shown. The temperature effect on mentioned mechanical properties is also presented. Fracture toughness was calculated on the basis of Charpy impact energy. Experimentally obtained results can be of importance for structure designers.

  12. Study of fracture mechanisms of short fiber reinforced AS composite by acoustic emission technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kida, Sotoaki; Suzuki, Megumu

    1995-11-01

    The fracture mechanisms of short fiber reinforced AS composites are studied by acoustic emission technique for examining the effects of fiber contents. The loads P{sub b} and P{sub c} which the damage mechanisms change are obtained at the inflection points of the total AE energy curve the energy gradient method. The damages are generated by fiber breaking at the load point of P{sub b} and P{sub c} in B material, and by the fiber breaking and the debonding between resin and fiber at the load points of P{sub b} and P{sub c} in C material.

  13. The Hydraulic Mechanism in the Orbital Blowout Fracture Because of a High-Pressure Air Gun Injury.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok Joo; Chung, Eui Han

    2015-10-01

    There are 2 predominant mechanisms that are used to explain the pathogenesis of orbital blowout fracture; these include hydraulic and buckling mechanisms. Still, however, its pathophysiology remains uncertain. To date, studies in this series have been conducted using dry skulls, cadavers, or animals. But few clinical studies have been conducted to examine whether the hydraulic mechanism is involved in the occurrence of pure orbital blowout fracture. The authors experienced a case of a 52-year-old man who had a pure medial blowout fracture after sustaining an eye injury because of a high-pressure air gun. Our case suggests that surgeons should be aware of the possibility that the hydraulic mechanism might be involved in the blowout fracture in patients presenting with complications, such as limitation of eye movement, diplopia, and enophthalmos. PMID:26468824

  14. Mechanics in the Production of Mandibular Fractures: A Clinical, Retrospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rongtao; Li, Zhi; Li, Zubing

    2016-01-01

    As the mandible is susceptible to fracture, the aim of this study was to use multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify and distinguish various internal factors that may influence the location of mandibular fractures. The study included 1131 patients with maxillofacial fractures during the period from January 2000 to December 2009 to evaluate the association of mandibular fracture location (unilateral symphysis, body, angle, condylar, or bilateral condylar fractures) with various internal factors. Among the 1131 patients, 869 had mandibular fractures. Data on age, sex, soft tissue injuries, dental trauma, and maxillofacial fracture type were collected and analyzed using multivariate logistic regression. In total, 387, 210, 139, 319, and 172 patients were diagnosed with unilateral symphysis, body, angle, unilateral, or bilateral condylar fractures, respectively. The dental trauma in patients with bilateral condylar fractures differed from that in patients with unilateral condylar fractures. Patients with mandibular fracture (unilateral symphysis, body, unilateral or bilateral condylar) possessed an approximately equal risk of soft tissue injuries in the mandible. Patients with either unilateral or bilateral condylar fractures were associated with a low risk of mandibular angle fracture (OR < 1). Similarly, patients with mandibular angle fracture were associated with a low risk of unilateral or bilateral condylar fractures (OR < 1). Moreover, patients with symphysis fracture were associated with a low risk of bilateral condylar fractures (90 of 387 [23.3%], OR 0.899). By contrast, patients with bilateral condylar fractures were associated with a high risk of symphysis fracture (90 of 172 [52.3%], OR 17.38). Patients with condylar fractures, particularly those with bilateral condylar fractures, were infrequently associated with secondary mandibular fractures. Mandibular fractures tended to have less of an association with midfacial fractures. The occurrence of mandibular fractures is strongly correlated with age, sex, soft tissue injuries, dental trauma, and the pattern and position of the maxillofacial fractures in patients. PMID:26900699

  15. Finite Element Study of the Mechanical Response in Spinal Cord during the Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zi-Xiang; Qiu, Tian-Xia; Teo, Ee-Chon; Lei, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Background The mechanical response of the spinal cord during burst fracture was seldom quantitatively addressed and only few studies look into the internal strain of the white and grey matters within the spinal cord during thoracolumbar burst fracture (TLBF). The aim of the study is to investigate the mechanical response of the spinal cord during TLBF and correlate the percent canal compromise (PCC) with the strain in the spinal cord. Methodology/Principal Findings A three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model of human T12-L1 spinal cord with visco-elastic property was generated based on the transverse sections images of spinal cord, and the model was validated against published literatures under static uniaxial tension and compression. With the validated model, a TLBF simulation was performed to compute the mechanical strain in the spinal cord with the PCC. Linear regressions between PCC and strain in the spinal cord show that at the initial stage, with the PCC at 20%, and 45%, the corresponding mechanical strains in ventral grey, dorsal grey, ventral white, dorsal white matters were 0.06, 0.04, 0.12, 0.06, and increased to 0.14, 0.12, 0.23, and 0.13, respectively. At the recoiled stage, when the PCC was decreased from 45% to 20%, the corresponding strains were reduced to 0.03, 0.02, 0.04 and 0.03. The strain was correlated well with PCC. Conclusions/Significance The simulation shows that the strain in the spinal cord correlated well with the PCC, and the mechanical strains in the ventral regions are higher than those in the dorsal regions of spinal cord tissue during burst fracture, suggesting that the ventral regions of the spinal cord may susceptible to injury than the dorsal regions. PMID:23028426

  16. ADDITIONAL STRESS AND FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL NOZZLES

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary; Sommerville, Daniel; Palm, Nathan; Heinecke, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP) Conferences. This work is also relevant to the ongoing efforts of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code, Section XI, Working Group on Operating Plant Criteria (WGOPC) efforts to incorporate nozzle fracture mechanics solutions into a revision to ASME B&PV Code, Section XI, Nonmandatory Appendix G.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms Controlling Bone Formation during Fracture Healing and Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    AI-Aql, Z.S.; Alagl, A.S.; Graves, D.T.; Gerstenfeld, L.C.; Einhorn, T.A.

    2011-01-01

    Fracture healing and distraction osteogenesis have important applications in orthopedic, maxillofacial, and periodontal treatment. In this review, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate fracture repair are contrasted with bone regeneration that occurs during distraction osteogenesis. While both processes have many common features, unique differences are observed in the temporal appearance and expression of specific molecular factors that regulate each. The relative importance of inflammatory cytokines in normal and diabetic healing, the transforming growth factor beta superfamily of bone morphogenetic mediators, and the process of angiogenesis are discussed as they relate to bone repair. A complete summary of biological activities and functions of various bioactive factors may be found at COPE (Cytokines & Cells Online Pathfinder Encyclopedia), http://www.copewithcytokines.de/cope.cgi. PMID:18218835

  18. Determination of mechanical and fracture properties of laser beam welded steel joints

    SciTech Connect

    Cam, G.; Kocak, M.; Erim, S.; Yeni, C.

    1999-06-01

    In the present work, two similar joints, namely, ferritic-ferritic and austenitic-austenitic and one dissimilar ferritic-austenitic joint were produced with a CO{sub 2} laser using 6-mm-thick steel plates. In addition to the testing of flat microtensile specimens, the mechanical properties were examined by microhardness survey and conventional transverse and round tensile specimens. The results of the microtensile specimens were compared with standard round tensile specimens, and this clearly showed the suitability of the microtensile specimen technique for such joints. The crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) tests were also performed to determine the fracture toughness of the LB welds using three-point bend specimens. The effect of strength heterogeneity (mismatching) across the weld joint and at the vicinity of the crack tip on the CTOD fracture toughness values was also discussed.

  19. Mechanical Modeling of Foods Including Fracture and Simulation of Food Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Masamichi; Mizunuma, Hiroshi; Sonomura, Mitsuhiro; Kohyama, Kaoru; Ogoshi, Hiro

    2008-07-01

    The purposes of this research are to simulate the swallowing of foods, and to investigate the relationship between the rheological properties of foods and the swallowing. Here we proposed the mechanical modeling of foods, and simulated the compression test using the finite element method. A linear plasticity model was applied as the rheological model of the foods, and two types of computational elements were used to simulate the fracture behavior. The compression tests with a wedged plunger were simulated for tofu, banana, and biscuit, and were compared with the experimental results. Other than the homogeneous food model, the simulations were conducted for the multi-layer models. Reasonable agreements on the behaviors of compression and fracture were obtained between the simulations and the experiments including the reaction forces on the plunger.

  20. A fracture mechanics study of the turbine wheel in the Space Shuttle auxiliary power unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental and analytical efforts performed for fracture control of the Space Shuttle auxiliary power unit (APU) wheel are described and a summary of fracture mechanics concepts relevant to safe-life analysis of fatigue loaded parts is given. An environmental crack growth test program is conducted by NASA on candidate wheel materials exposed to decomposed hydrazine which is found to be no more severe in causing crack growth than an environment of high-temperature air. Details of the crack growth testing and the safe-life analysis are presented. The results show that special nondestructive examination is needed for the APU wheel to meet the required mission life for either the maximum design or expected speed-range operations.

  1. Correlation of Mechanical Properties with Fracture Surface Features in a Newly Developed Dual-Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaheri, Y.; Saeidi, N.; Kermanpur, A.; Najafizadeh, A.

    2015-04-01

    Dual-phase (DP) steels were produced by a newly developed method utilizing simple cold-rolling and subsequent short intercritical annealing of a martensite-ferrite duplex starting structure. Tensile testing revealed an excellent strength-elongation balance (UTS × UE ≈ 110-150 J/cm3) for the DP steels in comparison with the commercially used high strength steels. Fracture surfaces of the tensile specimens were studied by scanning electron microscopy analysis and image processing. Mechanical properties were correlated with fracture surface features. It was found that the variation of the total elongation and strength-elongation balance with the martensite volume fraction could be well correlated with the variation of the average dimple area. The variation of the yield strength and dimple areal density with the martensite volume fraction followed the same trend.

  2. Investigation of the fracture mechanism in Ti-5Al-2.5Sn at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanstone, R. H.; Low, J. R., Jr.; Shannon, J. L., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of microstructure on the fracture mechanism and plane-strain fracture toughness of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn was studied through the use of fractography and metallographic sectioning techniques. One-inch thick plates of extra low interstitial (ELI) and normal interstitial Ti-5Al-2.5Sn were mill annealed at 815 C followed by either air or furnace cooling. These variations in composition and cooling rate resulted in differences in the volume fraction and internal structure of the iron-stabilized phase, and in the crystallographic texture and ordering of the alpha matrix. The tensile properties of these plates were determined at 20 K, 77 K, and 295 K. The air-cooled ELI plate was the toughest material evaluated.

  3. A nonlocal continuum damage mechanics approach to simulation of creep fracture in ice sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duddu, Ravindra; Waisman, Haim

    2013-06-01

    We present a Lagrangian finite element formulation aimed at modeling creep fracture in ice-sheets using nonlocal continuum damage mechanics. The proposed formulation is based on a thermo-viscoelastic constitutive model and a creep damage model for polycrystalline ice with different behavior in tension and compression. In this paper, mainly, we detail the nonlocal numerical implementation of the constitutive damage model into commercial finite element codes (e.g. Abaqus), wherein a procedure to handle the abrupt failure (rupture) of ice under tension is proposed. Then, we present numerical examples of creep fracture under four-point bending, uniaxial tension, and biaxial tension in order to illustrate the viability of the current approach. Finally, we present simulations of creep crack propagation in idealized rectangular ice slabs so as to estimate calving rates at low deformation rates. The examples presented demonstrate the mesh size and mesh directionality independence of the proposed nonlocal implementation.

  4. Fracture of disordered solids in compression as a critical phenomenon. I. Statistical mechanics formalism.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Renaud; Pride, Steven R

    2002-09-01

    This is the first of a series of three articles that treats fracture localization as a critical phenomenon. This first article establishes a statistical mechanics based on ensemble averages when fluctuations through time play no role in defining the ensemble. Ensembles are obtained by dividing a huge rock sample into many mesoscopic volumes. Because rocks are a disordered collection of grains in cohesive contact, we expect that once shear strain is applied and cracks begin to arrive in the system, the mesoscopic volumes will have a wide distribution of different crack states. These mesoscopic volumes are the members of our ensembles. We determine the probability of observing a mesoscopic volume to be in a given crack state by maximizing Shannon's measure of the emergent-crack disorder subject to constraints coming from the energy balance of brittle fracture. The laws of thermodynamics, the partition function, and the quantification of temperature are obtained for such cracking systems. PMID:12366212

  5. A novel Lagrangian approach for the stable numerical simulation of fault and fracture mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschini, Andrea; Ferronato, Massimiliano; Janna, Carlo; Teatini, Pietro

    2016-06-01

    The simulation of the mechanics of geological faults and fractures is of paramount importance in several applications, such as ensuring the safety of the underground storage of wastes and hydrocarbons or predicting the possible seismicity triggered by the production and injection of subsurface fluids. However, the stable numerical modeling of ground ruptures is still an open issue. The present work introduces a novel formulation based on the use of the Lagrange multipliers to prescribe the constraints on the contact surfaces. The variational formulation is modified in order to take into account the frictional work along the activated fault portion according to the principle of maximum plastic dissipation. The numerical model, developed in the framework of the Finite Element method, provides stable solutions with a fast convergence of the non-linear problem. The stabilizing properties of the proposed model are emphasized with the aid of a realistic numerical example dealing with the generation of ground fractures due to groundwater withdrawal in arid regions.

  6. Dyke propagation and tensile fracturing at high temperature and pressure, insights from experimental rock mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Richard; Benson, Philip; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that magma ascends trough the crust by the process of dyking. To enable dyke emplacement, basement rocks typically fail in a mode 1 fracture, which acts as conduits for magma transport. An overpressure of the ascending magma will further open/widen the fracture and permit the fracture to propagate. In order to further understand the emplacement and arrest of dykes in the subsurface, analogue and numerical studies have been conducted. However, a number of assumptions regarding rock mechanical behaviour frequently has to be made as such data are very hard to directly measure at the pressure/temperature conditions of interest: high temperatures at relatively shallow depths. Such data are key to simulating the magma intrusion dynamics through the lithologies that underlie the volcanic edifice. Here we present a new laboratory setup, which allows us to investigate the tensile fracturing properties under both temperature and confining pressure, and the emplacement of molten material within the newly formed fracture. We have modified a traditional tri-axial test assembly setup to be able to use a Paterson type High Pressure, High Temperature deformation apparatus. Sample setup consists of cylindrical rock samples with a 22 mm diameter and a 8 mm bore at their centre, filled with a material chosen as such that it's in a liquid state at the experimental temperature and solid at room temperature to enable post-experiment analysis. The top and lower parts of the rock sample are fitted with plugs, sealing in the melt. The assembly is then placed between ceramic pistons to ensure there are no thermal gradients across the sample. The assembly is jacketed to ensure the confining medium (Ar) cannot enter the assembly. A piston is driven into the sample such that the inner conduit materials pressure is slowly increased. At some point a sufficient pressure difference between the inner and outer surfaces causes the sample to deform and fail in the tensile regime. Tensile fractures can occur when the hoop stress exerted on the outer shell exceeds its tensile strength. The molten conduit material is then likely to flow into the newly formed fracture, depending on its viscosity and the fracture dimensions, allowing comparisons to be made between the temperature and intrusions dynamics of the simulated dyke process. As a starting point, we are now testing an analogue material to replace the magma to avoid complex multi-phase rheology (bubbles, crystals) and the need for high experimental temperatures, relying of maintaining similar temperature/viscosity ratios between magma/country rock in the laboratory and the field. We chose PMMA (commonly known as plexiglass) for this task as it displays a large range in viscosities (log(visc)range = 10 -1) with temperatures between 100 and 300 °C, making it an excellent analogue material. In the future experiments at higher temperatures will be conducted with NIST-glasses and field collected glasses. 2D and 3D imaging of post-deformation samples show no preferential location of the fractures. Fractures are formed both around and trough crystals. Some evidence suggests the formation of microcracks and linking up as predicted by Griffith's theory. Correcting for apparatus distortion and friction of o-rings and the filler material we can calculate the conduit stress and arrive at a tensile strength values for different basement rock types in the order of 1-15 MPa.

  7. NESC-VII: Fracture Mechanics Analyses of WPS Experiments on Large-scale Cruciform Specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Shengjun; Williams, Paul T; Bass, Bennett Richard

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes numerical analyses performed to simulate warm pre-stress (WPS) experiments conducted with large-scale cruciform specimens within the Network for Evaluation of Structural Components (NESC-VII) project. NESC-VII is a European cooperative action in support of WPS application in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) integrity assessment. The project aims in evaluation of the influence of WPS when assessing the structural integrity of RPVs. Advanced fracture mechanics models will be developed and performed to validate experiments concerning the effect of different WPS scenarios on RPV components. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA contributes to the Work Package-2 (Analyses of WPS experiments) within the NESCVII network. A series of WPS type experiments on large-scale cruciform specimens have been conducted at CEA Saclay, France, within the framework of NESC VII project. This paper first describes NESC-VII feasibility test analyses conducted at ORNL. Very good agreement was achieved between AREVA NP SAS and ORNL. Further analyses were conducted to evaluate the NESC-VII WPS tests conducted under Load-Cool-Transient- Fracture (LCTF) and Load-Cool-Fracture (LCF) conditions. This objective of this work is to provide a definitive quantification of WPS effects when assessing the structural integrity of reactor pressure vessels. This information will be utilized to further validate, refine, and improve the WPS models that are being used in probabilistic fracture mechanics computer codes now in use by the NRC staff in their effort to develop risk-informed updates to Title 10 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G.

  8. Ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Mandi, Denise M

    2012-04-01

    Ankle fractures are important injuries involving a weight-bearing joint critical to mobility. This article will discuss the necessity of and justification for surgical correction of virtually all ankle fractures. Various ankle fracture types will be explored, mechanisms illuminated and proper treatment outlined for these complex injuries. PMID:22424483

  9. Breaking the limits of structural and mechanical imaging of the heterogeneous structure of coal macerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, L.; Tselev, A.; Jesse, S.; Okatan, M. B.; Proksch, R.; Mathews, J. P.; Mitchell, G. D.; Rodriguez, B. J.; Kalinin, S. V.; Ivanov, I. N.

    2014-10-01

    The correlation between local mechanical (elasto-plastic) and structural (composition) properties of coal presents significant fundamental and practical interest for coal processing and for the development of rheological models of coal to coke transformations. Here, we explore the relationship between the local structural, chemical composition, and mechanical properties of coal using a combination of confocal micro-Raman imaging and band excitation atomic force acoustic microscopy for a bituminous coal. This allows high resolution imaging (10s of nm) of mechanical properties of the heterogeneous (banded) architecture of coal and correlating them to the optical gap, average crystallite size, the bond-bending disorder of sp2 aromatic double bonds, and the defect density. This methodology allows the structural and mechanical properties of coal components (lithotypes, microlithotypes, and macerals) to be understood, and related to local chemical structure, potentially allowing for knowledge-based modeling and optimization of coal utilization processes.

  10. Characterization of an injectable, degradable polymer for mechanical stabilization of mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Henslee, Allan M; Yoon, Diana M; Lu, Benjamin Y; Yu, Joseph; Arango, Andrew A; Marruffo, Liann P; Seng, Luke; Anver, Tamir D; Ather, Hunaiza; Nair, Manitha B; Piper, Sean O; Demian, Nagi; Wong, Mark E K; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the use of injectable poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) formulations for mandibular fracture stabilization applications. A full factorial design with main effects analysis was employed to evaluate the effects of the PPF:N-vinyl pyrrolidone (NVP, crosslinking agent) ratio and dimethyl toluidine (DMT, accelerator) concentration on key physicochemical properties including setting time, maximum temperature, mechanical properties, sol fraction, and swelling ratio. Additionally, the effects of formulation crosslinking time on the mechanical and swelling properties were investigated. The results showed that increasing the PPF:NVP ratio from 3:1 to 4:1 or decreasing the DMT concentration from 0.05 to 0.01 v/w % significantly decreased all mechanical properties as well as significantly increased the sol fraction and swelling ratio. Also, increasing the crosslinking time at 37°C from 1 to 7 days significantly increased all mechanical properties and decreased both the sol fraction and swelling ratio. This study further showed that the flexural stiffness of ex vivo stabilized rabbit mandibles increased from 1.7 ± 0.3 N/mm with a traditional mini-plate fixator to 14.5 ± 4.1 N/mm for the 4:1 (0.05 v/w % DMT) PPF formulation at day 1. Overall, the formulations tested in this study were found to have properties suitable for potential further consideration in mandibular fracture fixation applications. PMID:24934595

  11. A nonlinear fracture mechanics approach to the growth of small cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical model of crack closure is used to study the crack growth and closure behavior of small cracks in plates and at notches. The calculated crack opening stresses for small and large cracks, together with elastic and elastic plastic fracture mechanics analyses, are used to correlate crack growth rate data. At equivalent elastic stress intensity factor levels, calculations predict that small cracks in plates and at notches should grow faster than large cracks because the applied stress needed to open a small crack is less than that needed to open a large crack. These predictions agree with observed trends in test data. The calculations from the model also imply that many of the stress intensity factor thresholds that are developed in tests with large cracks and with load reduction schemes do not apply to the growth of small cracks. The current calculations are based upon continuum mechanics principles and, thus, some crack size and grain structure exist where the underlying fracture mechanics assumptions become invalid because of material inhomogeneity (grains, inclusions, etc.). Admittedly, much more effort is needed to develop the mechanics of a noncontinuum. Nevertheless, these results indicate the importance of crack closure in predicting the growth of small cracks from large crack data.

  12. Kinetics and fracture resistance of lithiated silicon nanostructure pairs controlled by their mechanical interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seok Woo; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Ryu, Ill; Nix, William D.; Gao, Huajian; Cui, Yi; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept. /SLAC

    2015-06-01

    Following an explosion of studies of silicon as a negative electrode for Li-ion batteries, the anomalous volumetric changes and fracture of lithiated single Si particles have attracted significant attention in various fields, including mechanics. However, in real batteries, lithiation occurs simultaneously in clusters of Si in a confined medium. Hence, understanding how the individual Si structures interact during lithiation in a closed space is necessary. Herein, we demonstrate physical/mechanical interactions of swelling Si structures during lithiation using well-defined Si nanopillar pairs. Ex situ SEM and in situ TEM studies reveal that compressive stresses change the reaction kinetics so that preferential lithiation occurs at free surfaces when the pillars are mechanically clamped. Such mechanical interactions enhance the fracture resistance of This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515. SLAC-PUB-16300 2 lithiated Si by lessening the tensile stress concentrations in Si structures. This study will contribute to improved design of Si structures at the electrode level for high performance Li-ion batteries.

  13. Fracture mechanisms in dual phase steels based on the acicular ferrite + martensite/austenite microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poruks, Peter

    The fracture mechanisms of low carbon microalloyed plate steels based on the acicular ferrite + marten site/austenite microstructure (AF + M/A) are investigated. The final microstructure consists of a dispersed phase of submicron equi-axed martensite particles with a bainitic ferrite matrix. A series of plates with M/A volume fractions of 0.076--0.179 are studied. Brittle fracture is investigated by Instrumented Charpy impact testing of samples at -196°C and subsequent metallography. The M/A particles are identified as the crack nucleation sites and the cleavage fracture stress calculated to be 2400 MPa in a complete AF microstrucuture. This value is significantly larger than in steels that contain significant proportions of conventional bainite. Standard Charpy and Instrumented Charpy impact testing is conducted through a temperature range from -80 to + 22°C to study ductile fracture behaviour. The total absorbed energy is separated into energies of crack nucleation and of crack propagation. It is found that the energy of crack nucleation is weakly dependent on the volume fraction of M/A and completely independent of temperature over the range studied. The crack propagation energy varies significantly with both variables, decreasing with increased volume fraction of M/A and with decreasing temperature. The peak load in the instrumented Charpy data is used to calculate the dynamic fracture toughness, KId, which is found to be 105--120 MPa-m1/2. The void nucleation and void growth stages of ductile fracture are studied by metallographic examination of tensile bars. The sites of void nucleation are identified as inclusions and M/A particles. Voids nucleate at the M/A particles by decohesion of the particle-matrix interface. A constant void nucleation strain of epsilon = 0.90 +/- 0.05 is measured for all of the samples independent of the volume fraction of M/A. A stress-based criterion is used to predict void nucleation and the interface strength is determined to be 2500--2700 MPa. The void growth strains are measured and an inverse relationship is observed with decreasing void growth strain with increasing volume fraction of M/A. The data is compared to several models of void growth available in the literature and found to be in good agreement.

  14. Friction Stir-Welded Titanium Alloy Ti-6Al-4V: Microstructure, Mechanical and Fracture Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, D. G.; Edwards, P.; Cantrell, A. M.; Gangwar, K.; Ramulu, M.

    2015-05-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been refined to create butt welds from two sheets of Ti-6Al-4V alloy to have an ultra-fine grain size. Weld specimen testing was completed for three different FSW process conditions: As welded, stress relieved, stress relieved and machined, and for the un-welded base material. The investigation includes macrostructure, microstructure, microhardness, tensile property testing, notched bar impact testing, and fracture toughness evaluations. All experiments were conducted in accordance with industry standard testing specifications. The microstructure in the weld nugget was found to consist of refined and distorted grains of alpha in a matrix of transformed beta containing acicular alpha. The enhanced fracture toughness of the welds is a result of increased hardness, which is attributed to an increase in alpha phase, increase in transformed beta in acicular alpha, and grain refinement during the weld process. The noted general trend in mechanical properties from as welded, to stress relieved, to stress relieved and machined conditions exhibited a decrease in ultimate tensile strength, and yield strength with a small increase in ductility and a significant increase in fracture toughness.

  15. Investigation of the fracture mechanism of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Stone, R. H.; Low, J. R., Jr.; Shannon, J. L., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Fractography and metallographic sectioning were used to investigate the influence of microstructure on the fracture mechanism and fracture toughness (KIC) of normal interstitial and extra low interstitial (ELI) Ti-5Al-25Sn at 20 K (-423 F) and 77 K (-320 F). Plates of each grade were mill annealed at 815 C followed by either air or furnace cooling. These variations in composition and cooling rate resulted in differences in the volume fraction and internal structure of the dispersed beta phase and in the ordering of the alpha matrix. The ELI alloys were tougher than the normal interstitial plates. KIC of the furnace-cooled ELI plate was 25% lower than that of the air-cooled ELI material. Variations in cooling rate had no influence of KIC of the normal interstitial alloys. Fractography showed that a large portion of the fracture surfaces were covered with elongated dimples. Metallographic sections of specimens deformed at 77 K showed that these features form at the intersections of slip bands or deformation twins with grain or twin boundaries. Ordering and higher interstitial levels increase the local strain in slip bands resulting in void nucleation at lower macroscopic strains and lower KIC values.

  16. Fracture Mechanisms of Zirconium Diboride Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics under Pulse Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Bragov, Anatolii M.; Skripnyak, Vladimir A.; Lomunov, Andrei K.; Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.; Vaganova, Irina K.

    2015-06-01

    Mechanisms of failure in ultra-high temperature ceramics (UHTC) based on zirconium diboride under pulse loading were studied experimentally by the method of SHPB and theoretically using the multiscale simulation method. The obtained experimental and numerical data are evidence of the quasi-brittle fracture character of nanostructured zirconium diboride ceramics under compression and tension at high strain rates and the room temperatures. Damage of nanostructured porous zirconium diboride -based UHTC can be formed under stress pulse amplitude below the Hugoniot elastic limit. Fracture of nanostructured ultra-high temperature ceramics under pulse and shock-wave loadings is provided by fast processes of intercrystalline brittle fracture and relatively slow processes of quasi-brittle failure via growth and coalescence of microcracks. A decrease of the shear strength can be caused by nano-voids clusters in vicinity of triple junctions between ceramic matrix grains and ultrafine-grained ceramics. This research was supported by grants from ``The Tomsk State University Academic D.I. Mendeleev Fund Program'' and also N. I. Lobachevski State University of Nizhny Novgorod (Grant of post graduate mobility).

  17. Type II odontoid fracture from frontal impact: case report and biomechanical mechanism of injury.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Baisden, Jamie L; Maiman, Dennis J; Pintar, Frank A

    2005-04-01

    The authors report a case of Type II odontoid fracture from a frontal impact sustained in the crash of a late-model motor vehicle. They discuss the biomechanical mechanisms of injury after considering patient demographic data, type and use of restraint systems including seatbelt and airbags, crash characteristics, and laboratory-based experimental studies. Multiple factors contributed to the Type II odontoid fracture: the patient's tall stature and intoxicated state; lack of manual three-point seat belt use; obliqueness of the frontal impact; and the most likely preflexed position of the head-neck complex at the time of impact, which led to contact of the parietal region with the A-pillar roof-rail area of the vehicle and resulted in the transfer of the dynamic compressive force associated with lateral bending. Odontoid fractures still occur in individuals involved in late-model motor vehicle frontal crashes, and because this injury occurs secondary to head impact, airbags may not play a major role in mitigating this type of trauma to an unrestrained occupant. It may be more important to use seat belts than to depend on the airbag alone for protection from injury. PMID:15871490

  18. Analyses of some benchmark cases in fracture mechanics using boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuhkuri, J.

    1994-05-01

    The boundary element method and especially the analysis of fracture mechanics problems by using the dual boundary element program Cracker is introduced. This code is especially suitable for studying crack growth in two-dimensional, linear, and elastic problems. Cracker can automatically model an incremental crack extension, and no user made remeshing is needed. Eleven different benchmark cases have been analyzed to verify the results given by Cracker. The stress intensity factors and the crack paths calculated by the program are similar to those given in the literature.

  19. Materials characterization and fracture mechanics of a space grade dielectric silicone insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Latif, A. I.; Tweedie, A. T.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the DC 93-500 high voltage silicone insulation material employed to pot the gun and the collector end of a traveling wave tube (TWT) used on the Landsat D Satellite. The fracture mechanics behavior of the silicone resin was evaluated by measuring the slow crack velocity as a function of the opening mode of the stress intensity factor at +25 and -10 C, taking into account various uniaxial discrete strain values. It was found that the silicone resins slow crack growth is faster than that for a high voltage insulation polyurethane material at the same stress intensity factor value and room temperature.

  20. Fracture mechanics. [review of fatigue crack propagation and technology of constructing safe structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardrath, H. F.

    1974-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a rapidly emerging discipline for assessing the residual strength of structures containing flaws due to fatigue, corrosion or accidental damage and for anticipating the rate of which such flaws will propagate if not repaired. The discipline is also applicable in the design of structures with improved resistance to such flaws. The present state of the design art is reviewed using this technology to choose materials, to configure safe and efficient structures, to specify inspection procedures, to predict lives of flawed structures and to develop reliability of current and future airframes.

  1. Results of fracture mechanics analyses of the ederer cranes in the device assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.

    1996-08-01

    Fracture mechanics analyses were conducted on three critical locations on the lower flange of the load-beam of the Ederer 5 ton and 4 ton cranes in the D.A.F. Facility. Based on these results, it appears that: 1. Propagation of a 5 mm long flaw, previously undetected by non-destructive examination (NDE), to a length sufficient to cause structural failure of either flange, should not occur in at least 100 times the postulated operating scenarios for each crane; 2. Should each crane undergo annual inspection, any surface flaw with a length greater that 20 mm should be removed and repaired by qualified and approved repair procedures.

  2. Use of holographic optical elements in speckle metrology. Part 3: application to fracture mechanics.

    PubMed

    Shakher, C; Yadav, H L

    1991-09-01

    In this work a two-hololens imaging system has been used to measure crack-mouth opening displacement and crack-tip opening displacement to determine the stress intensity factor K(1), the crack-tip plastic zone size r(p)(*) and the rotational factor r in a beam specimen having the central edge crack subjected to three-point bending using focused plane speckle photography. Experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Current experimental investigations establish that low-cost holographic optics can be advantageously used in speckle metrology to solve complex problems of fracture mechanics. PMID:20706433

  3. A review on recent contribution of meshfree methods to structure and fracture mechanics applications.

    PubMed

    Daxini, S D; Prajapati, J M

    2014-01-01

    Meshfree methods are viewed as next generation computational techniques. With evident limitations of conventional grid based methods, like FEM, in dealing with problems of fracture mechanics, large deformation, and simulation of manufacturing processes, meshfree methods have gained much attention by researchers. A number of meshfree methods have been proposed till now for analyzing complex problems in various fields of engineering. Present work attempts to review recent developments and some earlier applications of well-known meshfree methods like EFG and MLPG to various types of structure mechanics and fracture mechanics applications like bending, buckling, free vibration analysis, sensitivity analysis and topology optimization, single and mixed mode crack problems, fatigue crack growth, and dynamic crack analysis and some typical applications like vibration of cracked structures, thermoelastic crack problems, and failure transition in impact problems. Due to complex nature of meshfree shape functions and evaluation of integrals in domain, meshless methods are computationally expensive as compared to conventional mesh based methods. Some improved versions of original meshfree methods and other techniques suggested by researchers to improve computational efficiency of meshfree methods are also reviewed here. PMID:24516359

  4. Modeling mechanical degradation in lithium ion batteries during cycling: Solid electrolyte interphase fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laresgoiti, Izaro; Käbitz, Stefan; Ecker, Madeleine; Sauer, Dirk Uwe

    2015-12-01

    During cycling, mechanical stresses can occur in the composite electrode, inside the active material, but also in the solid electrolyte interphase layer. A mechanical model is proposed based on a system made of a spherical graphite particle surrounded by the solid electrolyte interphase layer. During lithium intercalation or de-intercalation, stresses in the graphite are produced, governed by the diffusion induced stress phenomena and in the solid electrolyte interphase, driven by the graphite expansion. The stresses in both materials were simulated and a sensitivity analysis was performed to clarify the influence of principal parameters on both processes. Finally, assuming that the solid electrolyte interphase is the weakest material and therefore more prone to fracture than graphite, the experimental capacity fade during cycling was modeled based on its break and repair effect rather than on the fracture of the active material. The mechanical model of the solid electrolyte interphase was implemented in a single particle lithium ion battery model in order to reproduce capacity fade during battery lifetime. The model results were compared against cycle life aging experimental data, reproducing accurately the influence of the depth of discharge as well as the average state of charge on the capacity fade.

  5. Modeling and additive manufacturing of bio-inspired composites with tunable fracture mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Dimas, Leon S; Buehler, Markus J

    2014-07-01

    Flaws, imperfections and cracks are ubiquitous in material systems and are commonly the catalysts of catastrophic material failure. As stresses and strains tend to concentrate around cracks and imperfections, structures tend to fail far before large regions of material have ever been subjected to significant loading. Therefore, a major challenge in material design is to engineer systems that perform on par with pristine structures despite the presence of imperfections. In this work we integrate knowledge of biological systems with computational modeling and state of the art additive manufacturing to synthesize advanced composites with tunable fracture mechanical properties. Supported by extensive mesoscale computer simulations, we demonstrate the design and manufacturing of composites that exhibit deformation mechanisms characteristic of pristine systems, featuring flaw-tolerant properties. We analyze the results by directly comparing strain fields for the synthesized composites, obtained through digital image correlation (DIC), and the computationally tested composites. Moreover, we plot Ashby diagrams for the range of simulated and experimental composites. Our findings show good agreement between simulation and experiment, confirming that the proposed mechanisms have a significant potential for vastly improving the fracture response of composite materials. We elucidate the role of stiffness ratio variations of composite constituents as an important feature in determining the composite properties. Moreover, our work validates the predictive ability of our models, presenting them as useful tools for guiding further material design. This work enables the tailored design and manufacturing of composites assembled from inferior building blocks, that obtain optimal combinations of stiffness and toughness. PMID:24700202

  6. A Review on Recent Contribution of Meshfree Methods to Structure and Fracture Mechanics Applications

    PubMed Central

    Daxini, S. D.; Prajapati, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Meshfree methods are viewed as next generation computational techniques. With evident limitations of conventional grid based methods, like FEM, in dealing with problems of fracture mechanics, large deformation, and simulation of manufacturing processes, meshfree methods have gained much attention by researchers. A number of meshfree methods have been proposed till now for analyzing complex problems in various fields of engineering. Present work attempts to review recent developments and some earlier applications of well-known meshfree methods like EFG and MLPG to various types of structure mechanics and fracture mechanics applications like bending, buckling, free vibration analysis, sensitivity analysis and topology optimization, single and mixed mode crack problems, fatigue crack growth, and dynamic crack analysis and some typical applications like vibration of cracked structures, thermoelastic crack problems, and failure transition in impact problems. Due to complex nature of meshfree shape functions and evaluation of integrals in domain, meshless methods are computationally expensive as compared to conventional mesh based methods. Some improved versions of original meshfree methods and other techniques suggested by researchers to improve computational efficiency of meshfree methods are also reviewed here. PMID:24516359

  7. Computational mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Raboin, P J

    1998-01-01

    The Computational Mechanics thrust area is a vital and growing facet of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This work supports the development of computational analysis tools in the areas of structural mechanics and heat transfer. Over 75 analysts depend on thrust area-supported software running on a variety of computing platforms to meet the demands of LLNL programs. Interactions with the Department of Defense (DOD) High Performance Computing and Modernization Program and the Defense Special Weapons Agency are of special importance as they support our ParaDyn project in its development of new parallel capabilities for DYNA3D. Working with DOD customers has been invaluable to driving this technology in directions mutually beneficial to the Department of Energy. Other projects associated with the Computational Mechanics thrust area include work with the Partnership for a New Generation Vehicle (PNGV) for ''Springback Predictability'' and with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for the ''Development of Methodologies for Evaluating Containment and Mitigation of Uncontained Engine Debris.'' In this report for FY-97, there are five articles detailing three code development activities and two projects that synthesized new code capabilities with new analytic research in damage/failure and biomechanics. The article this year are: (1) Energy- and Momentum-Conserving Rigid-Body Contact for NIKE3D and DYNA3D; (2) Computational Modeling of Prosthetics: A New Approach to Implant Design; (3) Characterization of Laser-Induced Mechanical Failure Damage of Optical Components; (4) Parallel Algorithm Research for Solid Mechanics Applications Using Finite Element Analysis; and (5) An Accurate One-Step Elasto-Plasticity Algorithm for Shell Elements in DYNA3D.

  8. Alteration of Fractured Rocks Due to Coupled Chemical and Mechanical Processes: High-Resolution Simulations and Experimental Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameli, Pasha

    Engineering activities such as enhanced geothermal energy production and improved oil recovery techniques are heavily dependent on the permeability of the subsurface, while others such as CO2 sequestration and nuclear waste disposal rely on the efficiency of rock formations as transport barriers. In either case fractures provide the main pathways for fluid flow and transport, especially in rocks with lower matrix porosity. Laboratory experiments aimed at quantifying the chemo-mechanical responses of fractures have shown a range of results, some of which contradict simple conceptual models. For example, under conditions favoring mineral dissolution, where one would expect an overall increase in permeability, experiments show that permeability increases under some conditions and decreases under others. Recent experiments have attempted to link these core-scale observations to the relevant small-scale processes occurring within fractures. Results suggest that the loss of mechanical strength in asperities due to chemical alteration may cause non-uniform deformation and alteration of fracture apertures. However, due to the lack of direct micro-scale measurements of the coupled chemical and mechanical processes that lead to alteration of contacting fracture surfaces, our ability to predict the long-term evolution of fractures is still limited. To explore the processes that control permeability evolution, I developed a computational model that uses micro-scale surface roughness and explicitly couples dissolution and elastic deformation to calculate local alterations in fracture aperture under chemical and mechanical stresses. A depth-averaged algorithm of fracture flow is used to model reactive transport and chemical alteration of the fracture surfaces. Then, I deform the resulting altered fracture-surfaces using an algorithm that calculates the elastic deformation. The results of the model are compared with flow-through experiments conducted on fractured limestone. The fracture apertures are mapped before and after the experiments. These detailed aperture measurements are used as input to the new coupled model. The experiments cover a wide range of transport and reaction conditions; some exhibited negligible reaction-induced deformation and formation of distinct dissolution channels and others more uniform dissolution and measurable deformation caused by dissolution. Simulation results predict these general trends and the small-scale details in regions of contacting asperities.

  9. Simulation of the behavior of the cutting force during ultrasonic rotary machining of materials using structure-time fracture mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbushin, N. A.; Volkov, G. A.; Petrov, Yu. V.

    2014-06-01

    An analytical model is developed for the behavior of the cutting force during ultrasonic rotary polishing, and it is based on the concepts of dynamic fracture mechanics and the solution to the problem of impact surface fracture. The dependence of the threshold fracture energy obtained in the problem of erosion using a structure-time approach is used to construct the cutting force model. The dependences of the cutting force on the material feed rate and the rate of tool rotation are obtained, and the developed model is shown to be efficient to explain the effects observed in experiments.

  10. Deformation limits on two-parameter fracture mechanics in terms of higher order asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, D. L.; Anderson, T. L.

    1994-09-01

    This report addresses the limitations of two-parameter fracture mechanics. We performed an asymptotic analysis of the general power series representation of the crack tip stress potential in an elastic plastic material that obeys a Ramberg-Osgood constitutive law. Expansion of the power series over a substantial number of terms yields. only three independent coefficients for low. and medium-hardening materials. The first independent The second and third independent coefficients, K2 and K4 are a function of geometry and loading level. A two-parameter theory implies that the crack tip stress fields have two degrees of freedom, but the asymptotic analysis implies that three parameters are required to characterize near-tip conditions. Thus two-parameter fracture theory is a valid engineering model only when there is an approximately unique relationship between K2 and K4. We performed elastic-plastic finite element analyses on several geometries and evaluated K2 and K4 as a function of deformation level. A reference,two-parameter solution (which gives a unique relation between K2 and K4) was provided by the modified boundary layer (MBL) geometry. Results indicate that the near tip stresses in all but the deeply cracked SENT (a/W-.5.O.9) and SENT (a/W-0.9) lend themselves to a two-parameter characterization. However, the deeply cracked SENT and SENT specimens maintain a high level of constraint to relatively large deformation levels. Thus single-parameter fracture mechanics is fairly robust for these high constraint geometries, but two-parameter theory is of little value when constraint loss eventually occurs.

  11. Fracture mechanics investigations on high-temperature gas-cooled reactor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Krompholz, K.; Bodmann, E.; Gnirss, G.K.; Huthmann, H.

    1984-08-01

    The prototype nuclear process heat plant and the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor need materials that can withstand temperatures up to 1223 K (950/sup 0/C). An elaboration of fracture mechanics concepts that holds for the complete temperature regime must consider all possible phenomena like creep damage and precipitation during exposure, etc. In tests on the Inconel-617, Hastelloy-X, and Nimonic-86 alloys with respect to fatigue crack growth, creep crack growth, and toughness (J integral R curves) up to 1273 K (1000/sup 0/C), the first creep crack growth results were obtained in helium to compare with the air results. It was shown that pure fatigue crack growth behavior can be described by linear elastic fracture mechanics up to 1273 K. An example of Hastelloy-X at 1223 K proves that evaluating fatigue crack growth according to the J intergral concept gives, within a small scatterband, the same results as by following the linear elastic concept. Hastelloy-X shows a decreasing fracture toughness with increasing temperatures. It is emphasized that the J integral concept holds only if creep deformation can be neglected. The experimental evidence at highest temperatures shows that the J integral R curve is not at all similar to that found at lower temperatures under ideal conditions. Creep crack growth for Nimonic-86 at 1073 less than or equal to T/K less than or equal to 1273 shows that crack growth at 1223 K in helium is found to be larger than in air. Problems arise when correlating the creep crack growth results. The application of the energy rate integral C* seems promising, but this has yet to be proven. A combination of long-term creep with fatigue crack growth is presently impossible.

  12. Mechanisms of defect complex formation and environmental-assisted fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B.R.; Muratov, L.S.; Kang, B.S.J.; Li, K.Z.

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide has excellent corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments; however, there are problems at room and medium temperature with hydrogen embrittlement as related to exposure to moisture. In this research, a coordinated computational modeling/experimental study of mechanisms related to environmental-assisted fracture behavior of selected iron aluminides is being undertaken. The modeling and the experimental work will connect at the level of coordinated understanding of the mechanisms for hydrogen penetration and for loss of strength and susceptibility to fracture. The focus of the modeling component at this point is on the challenging question of accurately predicting the iron vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell} and the subsequent tendency, if present, for vacancy clustering. The authors have successfully performed, on an ab initio basis, the first calculation of the vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell}. These calculations include lattice relaxation effects which are quite large. This has significant implications for vacancy clustering effects with consequences to be explored for hydrogen diffusion. The experimental work at this stage has focused on the relationship of the choice and concentration of additives to the improvement of resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hence to the fracture behavior. For this reason, comparative crack growth tests of FA-186, FA-187, and FA-189 iron aluminides (all with basic composition of Fe-28A{ell}-5Cr, at % with micro-alloying additives of Zr, C or B) under, air, oxygen, or water environment have been performed. These tests showed that the alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement in both B2 and DO{sub 3} conditions. Test results indicated that FA-187, and FA-189 are intrinsically more brittle than FA-186.

  13. Fracture of hard thin films using nanoindentation and nanoscratch techniques: A materials and mechanics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, N.R.; Medlin, D.; Hwang, R.Q.; Boehme, D.; Venkataraman, S.; Gerberich, W.W.

    1998-03-19

    Thin films are used in many applications where special properties are needed to insure performance and reliability. Of particular interest are thin tantalum nitride films. They are used extensively in microelectronic applications because of their long term stability and low thermal coefficient of resistance. They are sputter deposited which produces films with a high structural defect content and high compressive residual stresses both of which can alter the physical and mechanical properties of microelectronic thin films. Although these films are strong heat generators, they exhibit no changes in structure or composition of the interface with aluminum oxide substrates that degrade performance or reliability. However, the use of high power density components is driving a move to replace aluminum oxide with aluminum nitride for greater heat transfer. 6 This replacement substrate creates concern as residual stresses and long-term operation could induce detrimental changes along the thin film interface not observed in aluminum oxide devices. As a result, the authors employed nanoindentation and continuous nanoscratch testing to determine the effects of the intrinsic compressive residual stresses on the properties and fracture resistance of the thin tantalum nitride films. These techniques sample small volumes of material while preserving the production configuration of a free surface. Although nanoscratch tests lack a rigorous derivation of stress distributions and strain energy release rates, good approximations for strain energy release rates can be obtained using mechanics-based models for blister formation where residual stresses dominate interfacial fracture behavior. When combined with scanning and transmission electron microscopy, the results define structure-property relationships and resistance to fracture of these hard films.

  14. Fracture mechanics models developed for piping reliability assessment in light water reactors: piping reliability project

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.O.; Lim, E.Y.; Dedhia, D.D.; Woo, H.H.; Chou, C.K.

    1982-06-01

    The efforts concentrated on modifications of the stratified Monte Carlo code called PRAISE (Piping Reliability Analysis Including Seismic Events) to make it more widely applicable to probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis of nuclear reactor piping. Pipe failures are considered to occur as the result of crack-like defects introduced during fabrication, that escape detection during inspections. The code modifications allow the following factors in addition to those considered in earlier work to be treated: other materials, failure criteria and subcritical crack growth characteristic; welding residual and vibratory stresses; and longitudinal welds (the original version considered only circumferential welds). The fracture mechanics background for the code modifications is included, and details of the modifications themselves provided. Additionally, an updated version of the PRAISE user's manual is included. The revised code, known as PRAISE-B was then applied to a variety of piping problems, including various size lines subject to stress corrosion cracking and vibratory stresses. Analyses including residual stresses and longitudinal welds were also performed.

  15. Mechanoanions produced by mechanical fracture of bacterial cellulose: ionic nature of glycosidic linkage and electrostatic charging.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masato; Makino, Masakazu; Ohura, Takeshi; Iwata, Tadahisa

    2012-10-11

    Mechanoanions were produced by heterogeneous scission of the glycosidic linkages of the main chain of bacterial cellulose (BC); scission was induced by mechanical fracture of the BC in a vacuum in the dark at 77 K. The mechanoanions were detected using electron-spin-trapping methods with tetracyanoethylene. The yield of mechanoanions was positively correlated with the absolute value of the change in the Mulliken atomic charge, which was used as a descriptor of the ionic nature of the glycosidic linkage. Homogeneous scission of the glycosidic linkages induced by mechanical fracture generated mechanoradicals, the electron affinity of which was estimated on the basis of the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital for the model structure of the mechanoradical. It was concluded that the electrostatic charging of BC is caused by electron transfer from mechanoanions to mechanoradicals, which have high electron affinities. The electrostatic charge density of BC in a vacuum in the dark at 77 K was estimated to be 6.00 × 10(-1) C/g. PMID:22978760

  16. Mechanisms of fracture of the free surface of shock-compressed metals

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhova, V. V. Mikhailov, A. L.; Til’kunov, A. V.; Orlov, N. I.; Kanunova, L. I.; Bragunets, V. A.; Tkachenko, M. I.; Simakov, V. G.; Sokolov, S. S.; Podurets, A. M.

    2015-12-15

    The mechanisms of the ejection of aluminum and copper microparticles from the free surfaces of these metals have been studied under conditions of the escape of a moderate-intensity shock wave from a sample. The free surfaces of samples contained 0.7–0.9 mm deep artificial wells and protrusions simulating (on a greater scale of 10: 1) the natural surface roughness retained upon mechanical processing. The pressure in a shock-wave pulse at the base of a protrusion was controlled within P = 5–20 GPa (i.e., below the melting region), and the variable duration of pressure pulses was 0.02, 0.2, and 1 μs. Analysis of the free surfaces of postloaded samples showed that, for certain loading and roughness parameters, the ejection of metal from vertices of protruding ridges or pyramids (as a result of the longitudinal fracture) was about ten times greater than the amount of metal ejected in the form of cumulative jets from wells. The amount of ejected metal and the size distribution of metal microparticles were quantitatively characterized using “soft collecting targets” and by measuring mass losses of samples upon fracture.

  17. A New Approximate Fracture Mechanics Analysis Methodology for Composites with a Crack or Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, H. C.; Arocho, A.

    1990-01-01

    A new approximate theory which links the inherent flaw concept with the theory of crack tip stress singularities at a bi-material interface was developed. Three assumptions were made: (1) the existence of inherent flaw (i.e., damage zone) at the tip of the crack, (2) a fracture of the filamentary composites initiates at a crack lying in the matrix material at the interface of the matrix/filament, and (3) the laminate fails whenever the principal load-carrying laminae fails. This third assumption implies that for a laminate consisting of 0 degree plies, cracks into matrix perpendicular to the 0 degree filaments are the triggering mechanism for the final failure. Based on this theory, a parameter bar K sub Q which is similar to the stress intensity factor for isotropic materials but with a different dimension was defined. Utilizing existing test data, it was found that bar K sub Q can be treated as a material constant. Based on this finding a fracture mechanics analysis methodology was developed. The analytical results are correlated well with test results. This new approximate theory can apply to both brittle and metal matrix composite laminates with crack or hole.

  18. Mechanisms of fracture of the free surface of shock-compressed metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhova, V. V.; Mikhailov, A. L.; Til'kunov, A. V.; Orlov, N. I.; Kanunova, L. I.; Bragunets, V. A.; Tkachenko, M. I.; Simakov, V. G.; Sokolov, S. S.; Podurets, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms of the ejection of aluminum and copper microparticles from the free surfaces of these metals have been studied under conditions of the escape of a moderate-intensity shock wave from a sample. The free surfaces of samples contained 0.7-0.9 mm deep artificial wells and protrusions simulating (on a greater scale of 10: 1) the natural surface roughness retained upon mechanical processing. The pressure in a shock-wave pulse at the base of a protrusion was controlled within P = 5-20 GPa (i.e., below the melting region), and the variable duration of pressure pulses was 0.02, 0.2, and 1 μs. Analysis of the free surfaces of postloaded samples showed that, for certain loading and roughness parameters, the ejection of metal from vertices of protruding ridges or pyramids (as a result of the longitudinal fracture) was about ten times greater than the amount of metal ejected in the form of cumulative jets from wells. The amount of ejected metal and the size distribution of metal microparticles were quantitatively characterized using "soft collecting targets" and by measuring mass losses of samples upon fracture.

  19. Node-to-segment and node-to-surface interface finite elements for fracture mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paggi, M.; Wriggers, P.

    2016-03-01

    The topologies of existing interface elements used to discretize cohesive cracks are such that they can be used to compute the relative displacements (displacement discontinuities) of two opposing segments (in 2D) or of two opposing facets (in 3D) belonging to the opposite crack faces and enforce the cohesive traction-separation relation. In the present work we propose a novel type of interface element for fracture mechanics sharing some analogies with the node-to-segment (in 2D) and with the node-to-surface (in 3D) contact elements. The displacement gap of a node belonging to the finite element discretization of one crack face with respect to its projected point on the opposite face is used to determine the cohesive tractions, the residual vector and its consistent linearization for an implicit solution scheme. The following advantages with respect to classical interface finite elements are demonstrated: (i) non-matching finite element discretizations of the opposite crack faces is possible; (ii) easy modelling of cohesive cracks with non-propagating crack tips; (iii) the internal rotational equilibrium of the interface element is assured. Detailed examples are provided to show the usefulness of the proposed approach in nonlinear fracture mechanics problems.

  20. Fracture mechanics based design for radioactive material transport packagings -- Historical review

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.A.; Salzbrenner, D.; Sorenson, K.; McConnell, P.

    1998-04-01

    The use of a fracture mechanics based design for the radioactive material transport (RAM) packagings has been the subject of extensive research for more than a decade. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has played an important role in the research and development of the application of this technology. Ductile iron has been internationally accepted as an exemplary material for the demonstration of a fracture mechanics based method of RAM packaging design and therefore is the subject of a large portion of the research discussed in this report. SNL`s extensive research and development program, funded primarily by the U. S. Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation, Energy Management and Analytical Services (EM-76) and in an auxiliary capacity, the office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, is summarized in this document along with a summary of the research conducted at other institutions throughout the world. In addition to the research and development work, code and standards development and regulatory positions are also discussed.

  1. Laser Speckle Metrology Using Holo-Lens Imaging System And Its Application In Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakher, Chandra; Rao, G. Venkata; Lal Yadav, Heera; Gupta, B. N.

    1987-01-01

    It has already been shown 1,2 that by using proper recording and playback geometries, almost diffraction limited performance in speckle metrology can be achieved over the entire object field which can be imaged by two hololens configuration. Because of the complexities encountered in closed form or numerical solutions in the area of theoretical fracture mechanics, carefully controlled experiment which can provide more accurate data is essential for validating the theoretical results. Therefore use of holographic optics in fracture mechanics has an edge over conventional optics. This paper concentrates on the study of crack opening problem, in a beam specimen having central edge crack subjected to three point bending (Fig.1), using focused plane speckle photography and two holo-lens imaging configuration. Fig. 2 shows the schematic of the typical imaging system used in the experiment. The lenses used in the experiment were all recorded using di vering spherical and plane waves. The recording and play back geometries are discussed elsewhere (See Ref. 2).

  2. Long-term cumulative survival and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos Implants: focus on the abutment neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the cumulative survival rate (CSR) and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos® implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a retrospective clinical study that analyzed 450 single Ankylos® implants installed in 275 patients between December 2005 and December 2012. The main outcomes were survival results CSR and implant failure) and mechanical complications (screw loosening, fracture, and cumulative fracture rate [CFR]). The main outcomes were analyzed according to age, sex, implant length or diameter, bone graft, arch, and position. RESULTS The 8-year CSR was 96.9%. Thirteen (2.9%) implants failed because of early osseointegration failure in 3, marginal bone loss in 6, and abutment fracture in 4. Screw loosening occurred in 10 implants (2.2%), and 10 abutment fractures occurred. All abutment fractures were located in the neck, and concurrent screw fractures were observed. The CSR and rate of screw loosening did not differ significantly according to factors. The CFR was higher in middle-aged patients (5.3% vs 0.0% in younger and older patients); for teeth in a molar position (5.8% vs 0.0% for premolar or 1.1% for anterior position); and for larger-diameter implants (4.5% for 4.5 mm and 6.7% for 5.5 mm diameter vs 0.5% for 3.5 mm diameter) (all P<.05). CONCLUSION The Ankylos® implant is suitable for single-tooth restoration in Koreans. However, relatively frequent abutment fractures (2.2%) were observed and some fractures resulted in implant failures. Middle-aged patients, the molar position, and a large implant diameter were associated with a high incidence of abutment fracture. PMID:26813443

  3. Thermo-mechanically coupled fracture analysis of shape memory alloys using the extended finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatefi Ardakani, S.; Ahmadian, H.; Mohammadi, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the extended finite element method is used for fracture analysis of shape memory alloys for both cases of super elastic and shape memory effects. Heat generation during the forward and reverse phase transformations can lead to temperature variation in the material because of strong thermo-mechanical coupling, which significantly influences the SMA mechanical behavior. First, the stationary crack mode is studied and the effects of loading rate on material behavior in the crack tip are examined. Then, the crack propagation analysis is performed in the presence of an initial crack by adopting a weighted averaging criterion, where the direction of crack propagation is determined by weighted averaging of effective stresses at all the integration points in the vicinity of the crack tip. Finally, several numerical examples are analyzed and the obtained results are compared with the available reference results.

  4. Simulating Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Evolution Surrounding Fluid Injection in a Fractured Porous Geothermal Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taron, J.; Min, K.; Elsworth, D.

    2006-12-01

    Computational analysis is conducted on the coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical-chemical (THMC) behavior of a stimulated EGS geothermal reservoir. Numerical analyses utilize a newly developed simulator capable of examining THMC processes in fractured porous geologic media. The simulator links the thermal-hydrologic- chemical (THC) computational code TOUGHREACT with the mechanical (M) capability of FLAC3D, where the response of pore fluid pressure to mechanical disturbance is treated as an undrained system and mineral precipitation/dissolution generates porosity and permeability change within each dual-permeability continuum. Non-linear permeability response to thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) mechanisms is accommodated via embryonic mechanical and transport constitutive laws, and is considered to act in union with permeability changes associated with the removal or addition of minerals within the system. This construct is applied to the geometry of an injector-withdrawal doublet within the Coso Geothermal field, where in situ stress conditions, thermal state, and mineralogical composition at 3000m depth are extracted from recorded field data. Initial results for feasible parametric settings show that permeability reduction in the vicinity of a cool (80C) injection well may be significant, within an order of magnitude, and accompanied by large (MPa) changes in the stress field throughout the reservoir for imposed boundary conditions of constant stress.

  5. An efficient numerical simulation of coupled thermal-hydro-mechanical process in CO2 leakage through fractured caprocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. S.; Huang, Z.; Winterfeld, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    The safety of CO2 sequestration in geological formations relies on the integrity of the caprock. However, the elevated fluid pressure during CO2 injection changes the stress states in the caprock, and may lead to reactivate pre-existing fractures or even fracture the caprock. It is necessary to develop an efficient and practical monitor technology to detect and identify CO2 leakage pathways. To this end, we should understand the transport behavior of CO2 coupled with geomechanical effects during injection. In this work, we first developed an efficient parallel fully-coupled thermal-hydro-mechanical simulator to model CO2 transport in geological formations. The numerical model was verified through classical problems with analytical solutions. Then, based on this simulator, we investigated the fluid flow behavior when CO2 leakage occurs through fluid-driven fracturing zones. We proposed an implicit, physics-based model to simulate the fluid-driven fracturing process by using several practical correlations, including fracturing pressure functions, porosity/permeability-stress relationships, which can be obtained by lab experiments. A set of numerical simulations have been conducted by considering various scenarios, such as different injection rates, locations and distributions of fracture zones, and initial fracture permeability. The numerical results show that there are several characteristics can be used to detect CO2 leakage pathways, and it is possible to develop an advanced inverse modeling and monitoring technology to identify leakage locations, times and rates using measured pressure data of permanent downhole gauges and our simulator.

  6. Stability-based classification for ankle fracture management and the syndesmosis injury in ankle fractures due to a supination external rotation mechanism of injury.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, Harri

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this thesis was to confirm the utility of stability-based ankle fracture classification in choosing between non-operative and operative treatment of ankle fractures, to determine how many ankle fractures are amenable to non-operative treatment, to assess the roles of the exploration and anatomical repair of the AITFL in the outcome of patients with SER ankle fractures, to establish the sensitivities, specificities and interobserver reliabilities of the hook and intraoperative stress tests for diagnosing syndesmosis instability in SER ankle fractures, and to determine whether transfixation of unstable syndesmosis is necessary in SER ankle fractures. The utility of stability based fracture classification to choose between non-operative and operative treatment was assessed in a retrospective study (1) of 253 ankle fractures in skeletally mature patients, 160 of whom were included in the study to obtain an epidemiological profile in a population of 130,000. Outcome was assessed after a minimum follow-up of two years. The role of AITFL repairs was assessed in a retrospective study (2) of 288 patients with Lauge-Hansen SE4 ankle fractures; the AITFL was explored and repaired in one group (n=165), and a similar operative method was used but the AITFL was not explored in another group (n=123). Outcome was measured with a minimum follow-up of two years. Interobserver reliability of clinical syndesomosis tests (study 3) and the role of syndesmosis transfixation (study 4) were assessed in a prospective study of 140 patients with Lauge-Hansen SE4 ankle fractures. The stability of the distal tibiofibular joint was evaluated by the hook and ER stress tests. Clinical tests were carried out by the main surgeon and assistant, separately, after which a 7.5-Nm standardized ER stress test for both ankles was performed; if it was positive, the patient was randomized to either syndesmosis transfixation (13 patients) or no fixation (11 patients) treatment groups. The sensitivity and specificity of both clinical tests were calculated using the standard 7.5-Nm external rotation stress test as reference. Outcome was assessed after a minimum of one year of follow-up. Olerud-Molander (OM) scoring system, RAND 36-Item Health Survey, and VAS to measure pain and function were used as outcome measures in all studies. In study 1, 85 (53%) fractures were treated operatively using the stability based fracture classification. Non-operatively treated patients reported less pain and better OM (good or excellent 89% vs. 71%) and VAS functional scores compared to operatively treated patients although they experienced more displacement of the distal fibula (0 mm 30% vs. 69%; 0-2 mm 65% vs. 25%) after treatment. No non-operatively treated patients required operative fracture fixation during follow-up. In study 2, AITFL exploration and suture lead to equal functional outcome (OM mean, 77 vs. 73) to no exploration or fixation. In study 3, the hook test had a sensitivity of 0.25 and a specificity of 0.98. The external rotation stress test had a sensitivity of 0.58 and a specificity of 0.9. Both tests had excellent interobserver reliability; the agreement was 99% for the hook test and 98% for the stress test. There was no statistically significant difference in functional scores (OM mean, 79.6 vs. 83.6) or pain between syndesmosis transfixation and no fixation groups (Study 4). Our results suggest that a simple stability-based fracture classification is useful in choosing between non-operative and operative treatment of ankle fractures; approximately half of the ankle fractures can be treated non-operatively with success. Our observations also suggest that relevant syndesmosis injuries are rare in ankle fractures due to an SER mechanism of injury. According to our research, syndesmotic repair or fixation in SER ankle fracture has no influence on functional outcome or pain after minimum one year compared with no fixation. PMID:23205893

  7. Analysis of mechanical strength to fixing the femoral neck fracture in synthetic bone type Asnis

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Anderson; Lula, Welder Fernandes; de Oliveira, Jonathan Sampaio; Maciel, Rafael Almeida; Souto, Diogo Ranier de Macedo; Godinho, Patrick Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the results of biomechanical assays of fixation of Pauwels type III femoral neck fracture in synthetic bone, using 7.5mm cannulated screws in inverted triangle formation, in relation to the control group. METHODS: Ten synthetic bones were used, from a domestic brand, divided into two groups: test and control. In the test group, a 70° tilt osteotomy of the femoral neck was fixated using three cannulated screws in inverted triangle formation. The resistance of this fixation and its rotational deviation were analyzed at 5mm displacement (phase 1) and 10mm displacement (phase 2). The control group was tested in its integrity until the fracture of the femoral neck occurred. The Mann-Whitney test was used for group analysis and comparison. RESULTS: The values in the test group in phase 1, in samples 1-5, showed a mean of 579N and SD =77N. Rotational deviations showed a mean of 3.33°, SD = 2.63°. In phase 2, the mean was 696N and SD =106N. The values of the maximum load in the control group had a mean of 1329N and SD=177N. CONCLUSION: The analysis of mechanical strength between the groups determined a statistically significant lower value in the test group. Level of Evidence III, Control Case. PMID:25246851

  8. Pressurized thermal shock probabilistic fracture mechanics sensitivity analysis for Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, T.L.; Cheverton, R.D.; Bryson, J.W.; Bass, B.R.; Shum, D.K.M.; Keeney, J.A.

    1993-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform a pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) sensitivity analysis for the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel, for the fluences corresponding to the end of operating cycle 22, using a specific small-break-loss- of-coolant transient as the loading condition. Regions of the vessel with distinguishing features were to be treated individually -- upper axial weld, lower axial weld, circumferential weld, upper plate spot welds, upper plate regions between the spot welds, lower plate spot welds, and the lower plate regions between the spot welds. The fracture analysis methods used in the analysis of through-clad surface flaws were those contained in the established OCA-P computer code, which was developed during the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) Program. The NRC request specified that the OCA-P code be enhanced for this study to also calculate the conditional probabilities of failure for subclad flaws and embedded flaws. The results of this sensitivity analysis provide the NRC with (1) data that could be used to assess the relative influence of a number of key input parameters in the Yankee Rowe PTS analysis and (2) data that can be used for readily determining the probability of vessel failure once a more accurate indication of vessel embrittlement becomes available. This report is designated as HSST report No. 117.

  9. Evaluation of hydrogen pressure vessels using slow strain rate testing and fracture mechanics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, S.H.; Desai, V.H.

    1998-12-31

    A total of 108 seamless, forged pressure vessels, fabricated from ASTM A372 type IV (UNS K14508) and type V low alloy steel, are currently in 4,200 psi (29 MPa) gaseous hydrogen (GH{sub 2}) service at the Kennedy Space Center`s (KSC) Space Shuttle Launch Complex 39 (LC-39). The vessels were originally used in 6,000 psi (41 MPa) GH{sub 2} service during the Apollo program. NASA recently received a letter of warning from the manufacturer of the vessels stating that the subject vessels should be now be removed from GH{sub 2} service due to the fact that the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of many of the vessels exceeds the maximum limit of 126 ksi (869 MPa) now imposed on A372 steel intended for GH{sub 2} service, and therefore are susceptible to hydrogen environment embrittlement. Due to the expense associated with vessel replacement, it was decided to determine by testing and analysis whether or not the vessels needed to be removed from GH{sub 2} service. Slow strain rate testing was performed under hydrogen charging conditions to determine the value of the threshold fracture toughness for sustained loading crack growth in GH{sub 2}, (K{sub H}) for the vessel material, this value was then used in a fracture mechanics safe-life analysis (a 20-year service life was modeled) that indicated the vessels are safe for continued use.

  10. Influences of process parameters and microstructure on the fracture mechanisms of ODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouffié, A. L.; Wident, P.; Ziolek, L.; Delabrouille, F.; Tanguy, B.; Crépin, J.; Pineau, A.; Garat, V.; Fournier, B.

    2013-02-01

    The present work investigates the impact response of three ODS steels containing 9%Cr and 14%Cr. These steels were produced by hot extrusion in the shapes of a rod and a plate. The 9%Cr ODS steel has a quasi-isotropic microstructure and is given as a reference material. In comparison, the 14%Cr ODS steel has a strong morphological and crystallographic texture given by the process route. The impact behaviour is anisotropic and the fracture energies are higher when the material is tested in the longitudinal direction compared to the transverse direction. Moreover, the 14%Cr ODS steel has a better impact behaviour when it is extruded in the shape of a rod rather than in the shape of a plate. This work focuses on the fracture mechanisms involved in the ductile to brittle transition regime and in the brittle regime of these materials. In the case of the 14%Cr ODS steel, the cleavage facets observed at very low temperature are much larger than the actual size of the grains. Packets of grains with less than 15° of internal misorientation were defined as effective grains for cleavage. In the transition range, the texture enhances intergranular delamination on the 14%Cr rod material. The occurrence of delamination consumes a lot of energy and tends to enhance scattering in impact energies.

  11. An investigation on quench cracking behavior of superalloy Udimet 720LI using a fracture mechanics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, J.; Keefer, V.L.; Chang, K.M.; Furrer, D.

    2000-04-01

    Quench cracking can be a serious problem in the heat treatment of high strength superalloys. A new fracture mechanics approach, quench cracking toughness (K{sub Q}), was introduced to evaluate the on-cooling quench cracking resistance of superalloy Udimet 720LI. A fully automatic computer controlled data acquisition and processing system was set up to track the on-cooling quenching process and to simulate the quench cracking. The influences of grain size, cooling rate, solution temperature, and alloy processing routes on quench cracking resistance were investigated. Research results indicate that quench cracking revealed a typical brittle and intergranular failure at high temperatures, which causes a lower quench cracking toughness in comparison to fracture toughness at room temperature. Fine grain structures show the higher quench cracking resistance and lower failure temperatures than intermediate grain structures at the same cooling rates. Moreover, higher cooling rate results in lower cracking toughness under the same grain size structures. In comparison of processing routes, powder metallurgy (PM) alloys show higher cracking resistance than cast and wrought (CW) alloys for fine grain structures at the same cooling rates. However, for immediate grain structure, there is no obvious difference of K{sub Q} between the two processing route in this study.

  12. Fracture mechanics analysis of cast duplex stainless steel elbows containing a surface crack

    SciTech Connect

    Delliou, P.A. le; Semete, P.; Ignaccolo, S.

    1998-12-31

    Some components of the primary loop of a PWR are made of cast duplex stainless steel. This kind of steel may age even at relatively low temperatures, (below 400 C, which is within the temperature range of PWR service conditions), leading to a significant decrease of its toughness. This is why a large research program was initiated on the fracture behavior of aged duplex stainless steel elbows in France. The main task of this program was to test three 2/3-scale models of aged PWR primary loop elbows. The first two tests (called SEM1 and SEM2) were conducted under in-plane closure bending at 320 C; the third (called SEM3) was conducted under constant internal pressure and in-plane closure bending at 60 C. The first two elbows contained a semi-elliptical notch machined into the outer surface of one flank, oriented either longitudinally (SEM1 test) or circumferentially (SEM2 test); the third elbow contained both notches described above, one on each flank. This paper presents the results of the experiments, the finite element calculations and the ductile fracture mechanics analyses that were performed.

  13. A coupled thermo-poro-mechanical finite element analysis of fractured porous rocks using a cohesive interface element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Regueiro, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The coupling between multiphase flow, heat transfer, and poromechanics in fractured geomaterials has aroused great interest in the areas of geomechanics, geoenvironmental engineering, and petroleum engineering. Relevant applications include nuclear waste repositories, geological sequestration of CO2, geothermal systems, and exploitation of shale gas reservoirs. The paper presents a fully coupled thermo-poro-mechanical (TPM) cohesive interface element (CIE) model, which can represent fluid and heat flow along and across the fracture, and shear/normal deformation of the fracture surfaces. The proposed model is then applied to analyze two popular geological engineering problems using the finite element method (FEM) with a small strain formulation. The first application is the fracturing process in organic-rich shale due to heating. In the finite element analysis, multiple horizontal microcracks parallel to the bedding plane are assumed to preexist in the porous source rock, and are represented by coupled TPM cohesive interface elements. The porous bulk rock is assumed to be homogeneous, isotropic (for the time being, with transverse isotropy a natural extension), and linearly elastic. The excess pore fluid pressure, which mainly causes the development of the fractures, is actually induced by the rapid decomposition of organic matter during heating according to the literature. However, the involved complex chemical reaction process is beyond the scope of the paper, and is therefore substituted by a fluid injection process within the cracks under room temperature (25C) and high temperature (400C) in the paper. We investigate the fracture propagation due to pore fluid pressure increase and the development of fracture-induced permeability. The second application is a nuclear waste repository in a partially saturated fractured rock. Multiphase transport of moisture and heat, thermally-induced stress, as well as the change of fracture apertures are investigated due to short-and long-term high temperature effects.

  14. Mechanics of tungsten blistering II: Analytical treatment and fracture mechanical assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Muyuan; You, Jeong-Ha

    2015-10-01

    Since a decade the blistering of pure tungsten under hydrogen implantation has been one of the major research topics in relation to the plasma-wall interaction of tungsten-armored first wall. Overall blistering may reduce the erosion lifetime of the wall. Mature blisters grown by high internal pressure are likely to burst leading to exfoliation of the surface. Therefore, the control and suppression of blistering is an important concern for sustainable operation of the tungsten-armored plasma-facing components. In this context, a quantitative assessment of the mechanical conditions for blister bulging and growth is an important concern. In this article a theoretical framework is presented to describe the bulging deformation of tungsten blisters and to estimate the mechanical driving force of blister growth. The validity of the analytical formulations based on the theory of elastic plates is evaluated with the help of finite element analysis. Plastic strains and J-integral values at the blister boundary edge are assessed by means of numerical simulation. Extensive parametric studies were performed for a range of blister geometry (cap aspect ratio), gas pressure, yield stress and hardening rate. The characteristic features of the blistering mechanics are discussed and the cracking energy is quantitatively estimated for the various combinations of parameters.

  15. Identification of fracture mechanisms of fiberglass laminate based on the acoustic emission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panteleev, Ivan; Naimark, Oleg

    2015-10-01

    This work is devoted to classification of the acoustic emission pulses on the base of cluster analysis of acoustic emission data registered during quasistatic uniaxial tensile of fiberglass laminate samples. There were established characteristic parameters and stages of acoustic emission for each type of fracture: matrix fracture, fiber fracture, fiber/matrix debonding, delamination.

  16. Teardrop fracture following head-first impact in an ice hockey player: Case report and analysis of injury mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yue, James J.; Scott, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Background We report a case of a young male athlete who sustained a three column displaced teardrop fracture of the C5 vertebra due to a head-first impact in hockey, suffered neurapraxia, yet made full neurological recovery. This full recovery was in sharp contrast to multiple case series which reported permanent quadriplegia in the vast majority of teardrop fracture patients. We investigate the etiology and biomechanical mechanisms of injury. Methods Admission imaging revealed the teardrop fracture which consisted of: a frontal plane fracture which separated an anterior quadrilateral-shaped fragment from the posterior vertebral body; a vertical fracture of the posterior vertebral body in the sagittal plane; and incomplete fractures of the neural arch that initiated superiorly at the anterior aspect of the spinous process and left lamina adjacent to the superior facet. Epidural hematoma in the region of the C5 vertebra was observed in addition to disc and ligamentous disruptions at C4-5 and C5-6. Our patient was ultimately treated surgically with anterior fusion from C4 through C6 and subsequently with bilateral posterior fusion at C5-6. Results The injuries were caused by high-energy axial compression with the neck in a pre-flexed posture. The first fracture event consisted of the anterior vertebral body fragment being sheared off of the posterior fragment under the compression load due in part to the sagittal plane concavity of the C5 inferior endplate. The etiology of the vertical fracture of the posterior vertebral body fragment in the sagittal plane was consistent with a previously described hypothesis of the mechanistic injury events. First, the C4-5 disc height decreased under load which increased its hoop stress. Next, this increased hoop stress transferred lateral forces to the C5 uncinate processes which caused their outward expansion. Finally, the outward expansion of the uncinate processes caused the left and right sides of the vertebral body to split and spread. Evidence in support of this mechanistic event sequence was provided by the neural arch fractures which initiated superiorly, average angulation of the C5 uncinate processes, and similar well-established mechanisms causing vertical fractures at other spinal regions. Conclusions Our case study and analyses provide insight into the etiology of the specific teardrop fracture patterns observed clinically. PMID:27162711

  17. Fracture mechanics of matrix cracking and delamination in glass/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caslini, M.; Zanotti, C.; Obrien, T. K.

    1986-01-01

    This study focused on characterizing matrix cracking and delamination behavior in multidirectional laminates. Static tension and tension-tension fatigue tests were conducted on two different layups. Damage onset, accumulation, and residual properties were measured. Matrix cracking was shown to have a considerable influence on residual stiffness of glass epoxy laminates, and could be predicted reasonably well for cracks in 90 deg piles using a simple shear lag analysis. A fracture mechanics analysis for the strain energy release rate associated with 90 deg ply-matrix crack formation was developed and was shown to correlate the onset of 90 deg ply cracks in different laminates. The linear degradation of laminate modulus with delamination area, previously observed for graphite epoxy laminates, was predicted for glass epoxy laminates using a simple rule of mixtures analysis. The strain energy release rate associated with edge delamination formation under static and cyclic loading was difficult to analyze because of the presence of several contemporary damage phenomena.

  18. Microdamage detection and repair in bone: fracture mechanics, histology, cell biology.

    PubMed

    Hazenberg, Jan G; Hentunen, Teuvo A; Heino, Terhi J; Kurata, Kosaku; Lee, Thomas C; Taylor, David

    2009-01-01

    Bone is an elementary component in the human skeleton. It protects vital organs, regulates calcium levels and allows mobility. As a result of daily activities, bones are cyclically strained causing microdamage. This damage, in the form of numerous microcracks, can cause bones to fracture and therefore poses a threat to mechanical integrity. Bone is able to repair the microcracks through a process called remodelling which is tightly regulated by bone forming and resorbing cells. However, the manner by which microcracks are detected, and repair initiated, has not been elucidated until now. Here we show that microcrack accumulation causes damage to the network of cellular processes, resulting in the release of RANKL which stimulates the differentiation of cells specialising in repair. PMID:19478407

  19. A fracture mechanics analysis of impact damage in a thick composite laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy filament-wound cases (FWC) for the solid rocket motors of the space shuttle are being made by NASA. The FWC cases are wound with AS4W graphite fiber impregnated with an epoxy resin and are about 1.4 inches or more thick. Graphite-epoxy composite laminates, unlike metals, can be damaged easily by low velocity impacts of objects like dropped tools. The residual tension strength of the FWC laminate, after impact, is being studied at Langley Research Center. The conditions that give minimum visual evidence of damage are being emphasized. A fracture mechanics analysis was developed to predict the residual strength, after impact, using radiographs to measure the size of the damage and an equivalent surface crack to represent the damage.

  20. The role of fracture mechanics in the design of fuel tanks in space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denton, S. J.; Liu, C. K.

    1976-01-01

    With special reference to design of fuel tanks in space vehicles, the principles of fracture mechanics are reviewed. An approximate but extremely simple relationship is derived among the operating stress level, the length of crack, and the number of cycles of failure. Any one of the variables can be computed approximately from the knowledge of the other two, if the loading schedule (mission of the tank) is not greatly altered. Two sample examples illustrating the procedures of determining the allowable safe operating stress corresponding to a set of assumed loading schedule are included. The selection of sample examples is limited by the relatively meager available data on the candidate material for various stress ratios in the cycling.

  1. Addendum to the User Manual for NASGRO Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics Software Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, M. Wayne (Technical Monitor); Chell, Graham; Gardner, Brian

    2003-01-01

    The elastic-plastic fracture mechanics modules in NASGRO have been enhanced by the addition of of the following: new J-integral solutions based on the reference stress method and finite element solutions; the extension of the critical crack and critical load modules for cracks with two degrees of freedom that tear and failure by ductile instability; the addition of a proof test analysis module that includes safe life analysis, calculates proof loads, and determines the flaw screening 1 capability for a given proof load; the addition of a tear-fatigue module for ductile materials that simultaneously tear and extend by fatigue; and a multiple cycle proof test module for estimating service reliability following a proof test.

  2. A micromechanical mechanism of fracture initiation in discontinuously reinforced metal-matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Mawsouf, N.M.

    2000-03-01

    Fracture initiation by cracking of silicon particles during plastic deformation has been studied for the Al-17wt.% Si-nucleated alloy. The number of cracked particles increases with the applied strain. The larger and longer particles are more prone to cracking. In coarser structures, particle cracking occurs at low strains, while in more homogeneous structure the progressions of damage is more gradual. The variation of the fraction of broken silicon particles with stress, strain, and cleavage plane orientation has been obtained. The features of cracking reveal that cracking of silicon particles is a very localized event. A dislocation pile up mechanism is the most probable one among all crack initiation theories for explaining the behavior. A relationship between the fraction of broken particles and metallurgical factors was found.

  3. The use of a coherent gradient sensor in dynamic mixed-mode fracture mechanics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, J. J.; Lambros, J.; Rosakis, A. J.

    T HE USE of a coherent gradient sensing (CGS) apparatus is explored in dynamic fracture mechanics investigations. The ability of the method to quantify mixed-mode crack tip deformation fields accurately is tested under dynamic loading conditions. The specimen geometry and loading follow that of Lee and Freund who gave the theoretical and numerical mixed-mode K values as a function of lime for the testing conditions. The CGS system's measurements of KI and KII are compared with the predicted results, and good agreement is found. The method is used to measure K beyond the time domain of the known solution; it is seen that a shift from primarily mode II deformation to primarily mode I deformation occurs.

  4. Characterization methods of bone-implant-interfaces of bioresorbable and titanium implants by fracture mechanical means.

    PubMed

    Tschegg, E K; Lindtner, R A; Doblhoff-Dier, V; Stanzl-Tschegg, S E; Holzlechner, G; Castellani, C; Imwinkelried, T; Weinberg, A

    2011-07-01

    Bioresorbable materials for implants have become increasingly researched over the last years. The bone-implant-interfaces of three different implant materials, namely a new bioresorbable magnesium alloy, a new self-reinforced polymer implant and a conventional titanium alloy, were tested using various methods: push-out tests, SEM and EDX analyses as well as surface analyses based on stereoscopic 3D pictures were conducted. The fracture energy is proposed as a very significant reference value for characterizing the mechanical performance of a bone-implant system. By using a video-extensometer system instead of, as is commonly done, tracking the movement of the crosshead in the push-out tests, the accuracy of measurement could be increased. PMID:21565724

  5. A probabilistic fracture mechanics approach for structural reliability assessment of space flight systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutharshana, S.; Creager, M.; Ebbeler, D.; Moore, N.

    1992-01-01

    A probabilistic fracture mechanics approach for predicting the failure life distribution due to subcritical crack growth is presented. A state-of-the-art crack propagation method is used in a Monte Carlo simulation to generate a distribution of failure lives. The crack growth failure model expresses failure life as a function of stochastic parameters including environment, loads, material properties, geometry, and model specification errors. A stochastic crack growth rate model that considers the uncertainties due to scatter in the data and mode misspecification is proposed. The rationale for choosing a particular type of probability distribution for each stochastic input parameter and for specifying the distribution parameters is presented. The approach is demonstrated through a probabilistic crack growth failure analysis of a welded tube in the Space Shuttle Main Engine. A discussion of the results from this application of the methodology is given.

  6. DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE OF POORLY CONSOLIDATED MEDIA - Borehole Failure Mechanisms in High-Porosity Sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Bezalel c. Haimson

    2005-06-10

    We investigated failure mechanisms around boreholes and the formation of borehole breakouts in high-porosity sandstone, with particular interest to grain-scale micromechanics of failure leading to the hitherto unrecognized fracture-like borehole breakouts and apparent compaction band formation in poorly consolidated granular materials. We also looked at a variety of drilling-related factors that contribute to the type, size and shape of borehole breakouts. The objective was to assess their effect on the ability to establish correlations between breakout geometry and in situ stress magnitudes, as well as on borehole stability prediction, and hydrocarbon/water extraction in general. We identified two classes of medium to high porosity (12-30%) sandstones, arkosic, consisting of 50-70% quartz and 15 to 50% feldspar, and quartz-rich sandstones, in which quartz grain contents varied from 90 to 100%. In arkose sandstones critical far-field stress magnitudes induced compressive failure around boreholes in the form of V-shaped (dog-eared) breakouts, the result of dilatant intra-and trans-granular microcracking subparallel to both the maximum horizontal far-field stress and to the borehole wall. On the other hand, boreholes in quartz-rich sandstones failed by developing fracture-like breakouts. These are long and very narrow (several grain diameters) tabular failure zones perpendicular to the maximum stress. Evidence provided mainly by SEM observations suggests a failure process initiated by localized grain-bond loosening along the least horizontal far-field stress springline, the packing of these grains into a lower porosity compaction band resembling those discovered in Navajo and Aztec sandstones, and the emptying of the loosened grains by the circulating drilling fluid starting from the borehole wall. Although the immediate several grain layers at the breakout tip often contain some cracked or even crushed grains, the failure mechanism enabled by the formation of the compaction band is largely non-dilatant, a major departure from the dilatant mechanism observed in Tablerock sandstone. The experimental results suggest that unlike our previous assertion, the strength of grain bonding and the mineral composition, rather than the porosity, are major factors in the formation of compaction bands and the ensuing fracture-like breakouts. Some breakout dimensions in all rocks were correlatable to the far-field principal stresses, and could potentially be used (in conjunction with other information) as indicators of their magnitudes. However, we found that several factors can significantly influence breakout geometry. Larger boreholes and increased drilling-fluid flow rates produce longer fracture-like breakouts, suggesting that breakouts in field-scale wellbores could reach considerable lengths. On the other hand, increased drilling-fluid weight and increased drill-bit penetration rate resulted in a decrease in breakout length. These results indicate that breakout growth can be controlled to some degree by manipulating drilling variables. Realizing how drilling variables impact borehole breakout formation is important in understanding the process by which breakouts form and their potential use as indicators of the far-field in situ stress magnitudes and as sources of sand production. As our research indicates, the final breakout size and mechanism of formation can be a function of several variables and conditions, meaning there is still much to be understood about this phenomenon.

  7. Fundamental Mechanisms of Tensile Fracture in Aluminum Sheet Unidirectionally Reinforced with Boron Filament. Ph.D. Thesis - Virginia Polytechnic Inst.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, H. W.

    1971-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental research effort to gain a more complete understanding of the physics of tensile fracture in unidirectionally reinforced B-Al composite sheet. By varying the degree of filament degradation resulting from fabrication, composite specimens were produced which failed in tension by the cumulative mode, the noncumulative mode, or by any desired combination of the two modes. Radiographic and acoustic emission techniques were combined to identify and physically describe a previously unrecognized fundamental fracture mechanism which was responsible for the noncumulative mode. The tensile strength of the composite was found to be severely limited by the noncumulative mechanism which involved the initiation and sustenance of a chain reaction of filament fractures at a relatively low stress level followed by ductile fracture of the matrix. The minimum average filament stress required for initiation of the fracture mechanism was shown to be approximately 170 ksi, and appeared to be independent of filament diameter, number of filament layers, and the identity of the matrix alloy.

  8. Earthquake Induced Damage Mechanism of Long Period Structures Using Energy Response

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yongfeng; Li Hui

    2008-07-08

    This paper presents a method of expounding the damage of RC long period frame structure using energy analysis method. Since the damage of structures usually occurs under major earthquakes, the structure is assumed to be in elasto-plastic state, and degraded Bouc-Wen model is used to describe the hysteretic component of the restoring force. A double index damage criterion defined by the maximum drift and energy absorption is used as the damage criterion. The energy transferring relation in a structure is derived, and both momentary and cumulative energy response is used to reflect the delay of the collapse of a long period structure. The mechanism of collapse delay of the long period structure is suggested through a numerical example combing the energy response and time history response.

  9. Homogenized finite element analysis on effective elastoplastic mechanical behaviors of composite with imperfect interfaces.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wu-Gui; Zhong, Ren-Zhi; Qin, Qing H; Tong, Yong-Gang

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) representative volume element (RVE) model was developed for analyzing effective mechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with imperfect interfaces. In the model, the fiber is assumed to be perfectly elastic until its tensile strength, and the ceramic material is modeled by an elasto-plastic Drucker-Prager constitutive law. The RVE model is then used to study the elastic properties and the tensile strength of composites with imperfect interfaces and validated through experiments. The imperfect interfaces between the fiber and the matrix are taken into account by introducing some cohesive contact surfaces. The influences of the interface on the elastic constants and the tensile strengths are examined through these interface models. PMID:25522170

  10. Homogenized Finite Element Analysis on Effective Elastoplastic Mechanical Behaviors of Composite with Imperfect Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wu-Gui; Zhong, Ren-Zhi; Qin, Qing H.; Tong, Yong-Gang

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) representative volume element (RVE) model was developed for analyzing effective mechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with imperfect interfaces. In the model, the fiber is assumed to be perfectly elastic until its tensile strength, and the ceramic material is modeled by an elasto-plastic Drucker-Prager constitutive law. The RVE model is then used to study the elastic properties and the tensile strength of composites with imperfect interfaces and validated through experiments. The imperfect interfaces between the fiber and the matrix are taken into account by introducing some cohesive contact surfaces. The influences of the interface on the elastic constants and the tensile strengths are examined through these interface models. PMID:25522170

  11. Stress and Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Boiling Water Reactor and Pressurized Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Shengjun; Bass, Bennett Richard; Stevens, Gary; Kirk, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes stress analysis and fracture mechanics work performed to assess boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) nozzles located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Various RPV nozzle geometries were investigated: 1. BWR recirculation outlet nozzle; 2. BWR core spray nozzle3 3. PWR inlet nozzle; ; 4. PWR outlet nozzle; and 5. BWR partial penetration instrument nozzle. The above nozzle designs were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-license (EOL) to require evaluation as part of establishing the allowed limits on heatup, cooldown, and hydrotest (leak test) conditions. These nozzles analyzed represent one each of the nozzle types potentially requiring evaluation. The purpose of the analyses performed on these nozzle designs was as follows: To model and understand differences in pressure and thermal stress results using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) versus a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for all nozzle types. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated; To verify the accuracy of a selected linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solution for stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for both thermal and pressure loading for all nozzle types; To assess the significance of attached piping loads on the stresses in the nozzle corner region; and To assess the significance of applying pressure on the crack face with respect to the stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack.

  12. Rib stress fractures in elite rowers. A case series and proposed mechanism.

    PubMed

    Karlson, K A

    1998-01-01

    The potential cause of stress fractures of the rib in elite rowers was examined by a retrospective review of 14 fractures in 10 patients. Fractures occurred on the antero- to posterolateral aspects of ribs 5 through 9 and were most often associated with long-distance training and heavy load per stroke. A review of the literature yields striking similarities between these stress fractures and fractures caused by cough. It is suggested that actions of the serratus anterior and external oblique muscles on the rib cause stress fracture because of the repetitive bending forces in both rowing and coughing. A technique involving less use of both muscles through a truncated arm pull-through and a decreased layback position at the end of the stroke, and equipment changes to decrease length of the lever arm, should yield a decreased risk of rib stress fractures in rowing. PMID:9689370

  13. Mechanical properties and fracture mechanism of Ni[sub 3]Al intermetallic produced by powder metallurgy and standard melting and casting processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, M.; Bozic, D.; Ilic, N.; Mitkov, M. ); Drobnjak, D. . Faculty of Technology)

    1994-03-01

    The room and high-temperature compression strength and ductility, microstructure, and fracture mechanism of Ni[sub 3]Al base intermetallic doped with boron have been investigated. Ni[sub 3]Al was produced by powder metallurgy (gas atomization and hot pressing), and vacuum melting and casting process. The strength of the material exhibits a positive temperature dependence with a maximum at approximately 700 C and then begins to decrease. The ductility remains practically unchanged up to 700 C and then increases significantly as the temperature increases. The ductility of Ni[sub 3]Al cannot be correlated with fracture mechanism.

  14. The possibilities of fracture mechanics as applied to problems of strength, service life, and substantiation of safe operation of heat-generating and mechanical equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grin', E. A.

    2013-01-01

    The fundamentals of fracture mechanics are briefly outlined, and its possibilities as a tool for estimating the longevity and bearing capacity of equipment components the metal of which contains cracklike flaws are pointed out. Experimentally obtained kinetic crack resistance diagrams lying at the heart of methods for determining the survivability of structures are given for some steels. Practical application of the methods of fracture mechanics is demonstrated on a particular example of substantiating temporary operability of a boiler drum having cracklike flaws near the holes for water downtake pipes.

  15. Complementary hydro-mechanical coupled finite/discrete element and microseismic modelling to predict hydraulic fracture propagation in tight shale reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Profit, Matthew; Dutko, Martin; Yu, Jianguo; Cole, Sarah; Angus, Doug; Baird, Alan

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to predict the propagation of hydraulic fractures in tight shale reservoirs. Many hydraulic fracture modelling schemes assume that the fracture direction is pre-seeded in the problem domain discretisation. This is a severe limitation as the reservoir often contains large numbers of pre-existing fractures that strongly influence the direction of the propagating fracture. To circumvent these shortcomings, a new fracture modelling treatment is proposed where the introduction of discrete fracture surfaces is based on new and dynamically updated geometrical entities rather than the topology of the underlying spatial discretisation. Hydraulic fracturing is an inherently coupled engineering problem with interactions between fluid flow and fracturing when the stress state of the reservoir rock attains a failure criterion. This work follows a staggered hydro-mechanical coupled finite/discrete element approach to capture the key interplay between fluid pressure and fracture growth. In field practice, the fracture growth is hidden from the design engineer and microseismicity is often used to infer hydraulic fracture lengths and directions. Microseismic output can also be computed from changes of the effective stress in the geomechanical model and compared against field microseismicity. A number of hydraulic fracture numerical examples are presented to illustrate the new technology.

  16. Complementary hydro-mechanical coupled finite/discrete element and microseismic modelling to predict hydraulic fracture propagation in tight shale reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Profit, Matthew; Dutko, Martin; Yu, Jianguo; Cole, Sarah; Angus, Doug; Baird, Alan

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to predict the propagation of hydraulic fractures in tight shale reservoirs. Many hydraulic fracture modelling schemes assume that the fracture direction is pre-seeded in the problem domain discretisation. This is a severe limitation as the reservoir often contains large numbers of pre-existing fractures that strongly influence the direction of the propagating fracture. To circumvent these shortcomings, a new fracture modelling treatment is proposed where the introduction of discrete fracture surfaces is based on new and dynamically updated geometrical entities rather than the topology of the underlying spatial discretisation. Hydraulic fracturing is an inherently coupled engineering problem with interactions between fluid flow and fracturing when the stress state of the reservoir rock attains a failure criterion. This work follows a staggered hydro-mechanical coupled finite/discrete element approach to capture the key interplay between fluid pressure and fracture growth. In field practice, the fracture growth is hidden from the design engineer and microseismicity is often used to infer hydraulic fracture lengths and directions. Microseismic output can also be computed from changes of the effective stress in the geomechanical model and compared against field microseismicity. A number of hydraulic fracture numerical examples are presented to illustrate the new technology.

  17. Magnesium alloys as body implants: fracture mechanism under dynamic and static loadings in a physiological environment.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Lokesh; Raman, R K Singh

    2012-02-01

    It is essential that a metallic implant material possesses adequate resistance to cracking/fracture under the synergistic action of a corrosive physiological environment and mechanical loading (i.e. stress corrosion cracking (SCC)), before the implant can be put to actual use. This paper presents a critique of the fundamental issues with an assessment of SCC of a rapidly corroding material such as magnesium alloys, and describes an investigation into the mechanism of SCC of a magnesium alloy in a physiological environment. The SCC susceptibility of the alloy in a simulated human body fluid was established by slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) testing using smooth specimens under different electrochemical conditions for understanding the mechanism of SCC. However, to assess the life of the implant devices that often possess fine micro-cracks, SCC susceptibility of notched specimens was investigated by circumferential notch tensile (CNT) testing. CNT tests also produced important design data, i.e. threshold stress intensity for SCC (KISCC) and SCC crack growth rate. Fractographic features of SCC were examined using scanning electron microscopy. The SSRT and CNT results, together with fractographic evidence, confirmed the SCC susceptibility of both smooth and notched specimens of a magnesium alloy in the physiological environment. PMID:22075121

  18. On the mechanical interaction between a fluid-filled fracture and the earth's surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollard, D.D.; Holzhausen, G.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanical interaction between a fluid-filled fracture (e.g., hydraulic fracture joint, or igneous dike) and the earth's surface is analyzed using a two-dimensional elastic solution for a slit of arbitrary inclination buried beneath a horizontal free surface and subjected to an arbitrary pressure distribution. The solution is obtained by iteratively superimposing two fundamental sets of analytical solutions. For uniform internal pressure the slit behaves essentially as if it were in an infinite region if the depth-to-center is three times greater than the half-length. For shallower slits interaction with the free surface is pronounced: stresses and displacements near the slit differ by more than 10% from values for the deeply buried slit. The following changes are noted as the depth-to-center decreases: 1. (1) the mode I stress intensity factor increases for both ends of the slit, but more rapidly at the upper end; 2. (2) the mode II stress-intensity factor is significantly different from zero (except for vertical slits) suggesting propagation out of the original plane of the slit; 3. (3) displacements of the slit wall are asymmetric such that the slit gaps open more widely near the upper end. Similar changes are noted if fluid density creates a linear pressure gradient that is smaller than the lithostatic gradient. Under such conditions natural fractures should propagate preferentially upward toward the earth's surface requiring less pressure as they grow in length. If deformation near the surface is of interest, the model should account explicitly for the free surface. Stresses and displacements at the free surface are not approximated very well by values calculated along a line in an infinite region, even when the slit is far from the line. As depth-to-center of a shallow pressurized slit decreases, the following changes are noted: 1. (1) displacements of the free surface increase to the same order of magnitude as the displacements of the slit walls, 2. (2) tensile stresses of magnitude greater than the pressure in the slit are concentrated along the free surface. The relative surface displacements over a shallow vertical slit are downward over the slit and upward to both sides of this area. The tensile stress acting parallel to the free surface over a shallow vertical slit is concentrated in two maxima adjacent to a point of very low stress immediately over the slit. The solution is used to estimate the length-to-depth ratio at which igneous sills have gained sufficient leverage on overlying strata to bend these strata upward and form a laccolith. The pronounced mode II stress intensity associated with shallow horizontal slits explains the tendency for some sills to climb to higher stratigraphie horizons as they grow in length. The bimodal tensile stress concentration over shallow vertical slits correlates qualitatively with the distribution of cracks and normal faults which flank fissure eruptions on volcanoes. The solution may be used to analyze surface displacements and tilts over massive hydraulic fractures in oil fields and to understand the behavior of hydraulic fractures in granite quarries. ?? 1979.

  19. Structure-Property-Fracture Mechanism Correlation in Heat-Affected Zone of X100 Ferrite-Bainite Pipeline Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xueda; Ma, Xiaoping; Subramanian, S. V.; Misra, R. D. K.; Shang, Chengjia

    2015-03-01

    Structural performance of a weld joint primarily depends on the microstructural characteristics of heat-affected zone (HAZ). In this regard, the HAZ in X100 ferrite-bainite pipeline steel was studied by separating the HAZ into intercritically reheated coarse-grained (ICCG) HAZ containing and non-containing regions. These two regions were individually evaluated for Charpy impact toughness and characterized by electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD). Low toughness of ~50 J was obtained when the notch of impact specimen encountered ICCGHAZ and high toughness of ~180 J when the notch did not contain ICCGHAZ. Fracture surface was ~60 pct brittle in the absence of ICCGHAZ, and 95 pct brittle (excluding shear lip) in the presence of ICCGHAZ in the impact tested samples. The underlying reason is the microstructure of ICCGHAZ consisted of granular bainite and upper bainite with necklace-type martensite-austenite (M-A) constituent along grain boundaries. The presence of necklace-type M-A constituent notably increases the susceptibility of cleavage microcrack nucleation. ICCGHAZ was found to be both the initiation site of the whole fracture and cleavage facet initiation site during brittle fracture propagation stage. Furthermore, the study of secondary microcracks beneath CGHAZ and ICCGHAZ through EBSD suggested that the fracture mechanism changes from nucleation-controlled in CGHAZ to propagation-controlled in ICCGHAZ because of the presence of necklace-type M-A constituent in ICCGHAZ. Both fracture mechanisms contribute to the poor toughness of the sample contained ICCGHAZ.

  20. Dynamic tensile response of Zr-based bulk amorphous alloys: Fracture morphologies and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, J. P.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2010-06-01

    Plate impact experiments were conducted to examine the dynamic tensile response of Zr-based bulk amorphous alloys (BAAs) having a nominal composition of Zr56.7Cu15.3Ni12.5Nb5.0Al10.0Y0.5. The experimental configuration used in our work permitted soft recovery of the samples to allow a careful examination of the fractured samples along with real-time measurements of the sample free-surface velocity (FSV) histories. Tensile loading was preceded by elastic compressive loading to peak stresses in the 3.6 to 6.0 GPa range. Tensile damage in the recovered samples was examined using optical and electron microscopy. The microscopy results showed that the BAA samples exhibit a brittle behavior (as a glass) at the macroscopic level and a ductile behavior (as a metal) at the microscopic level; in addition, corrugations and bumps are observed at the nanoscale. The observed fracture morphologies are related to three key features present in our spall experiments: preceding compressive stress (3.6-6.0 GPa), high tensile loading rate (˜106/s), high mean tensile stress (˜2.3 GPa); and are intrinsically related to the amorphous glassy structure of the BAAs (free volume content). We propose that the compressive stress depletes the free volume content. With increasing compressive stress, the available free volume decreases causing a suppression of shear stresses during tension. Thus, the mean tensile component becomes more dominant at higher stresses. Consequently, the observed surface morphology results from brittle cleavage, causing an increased damage localization in the recovered samples spalled at higher stresses. These observations support the inferences made from measurements of FSV histories. The high tensile loading rate is proposed to be responsible for cracking by multiple shear band propagation and interception, rendering the observed serrated surface morphology. Finally, we proposed that the corrugations are created due to a succession of arrest and propagation of mode I cracks. A subsequent dilatation, due to the effect of the tensile mean stress, caused the corrugations to evolve to bump-type features with sizes in the range of 10-100 nm. Our proposed mechanisms, although qualitative, constitute a systematic attempt to provide an explanation for the fracture morphologies observed in spalled BAA samples.

  1. Fracture of ECAP-deformed iron and the role of extrinsic toughening mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hohenwarter, A.; Pippan, R.

    2013-01-01

    The fracture behaviour of pure iron deformed by equal-channel angular pressing via route A was examined. The fracture toughness was determined for different specimen orientations and measured in terms of the critical plane strain fracture toughness, KIC, the critical J integral, JIC, and the crack opening displacement for crack initiation, CODi. The results demonstrate that the crack plane orientation has a pronounced effect on the fracture toughness. Different crack plane orientations lead to either crack deflection or delamination, resulting in increased fracture resistance in comparison to one remarkably weak specimen orientation. The relation between the microstructure typical for the applied deformation route and the enormous differences in the fracture toughness depending on the crack plane orientation will be analyzed in this paper. PMID:23645995

  2. THERMO-HYDRO-MECHANICAL MODELING OF WORKING FLUID INJECTION AND THERMAL ENERGY EXTRACTION IN EGS FRACTURES AND ROCK MATRIX

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Podgorney; Chuan Lu; Hai Huang

    2012-01-01

    Development of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) will require creation of a reservoir of sufficient volume to enable commercial-scale heat transfer from the reservoir rocks to the working fluid. A key assumption associated with reservoir creation/stimulation is that sufficient rock volumes can be hydraulically fractured via both tensile and shear failure, and more importantly by reactivation of naturally existing fractures (by shearing), to create the reservoir. The advancement of EGS greatly depends on our understanding of the dynamics of the intimately coupled rock-fracture-fluid-heat system and our ability to reliably predict how reservoirs behave under stimulation and production. Reliable performance predictions of EGS reservoirs require accurate and robust modeling for strongly coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) processes. Conventionally, these types of problems have been solved using operator-splitting methods, usually by coupling a subsurface flow and heat transport simulators with a solid mechanics simulator via input files. An alternative approach is to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations that govern multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, and rock mechanics simultaneously, using a fully coupled, fully implicit solution procedure, in which all solution variables (pressure, enthalpy, and rock displacement fields) are solved simultaneously. This paper describes numerical simulations used to investigate the poro- and thermal- elastic effects of working fluid injection and thermal energy extraction on the properties of the fractures and rock matrix of a hypothetical EGS reservoir, using a novel simulation software FALCON (Podgorney et al., 2011), a finite element based simulator solving fully coupled multiphase fluid flow, heat transport, rock deformation, and fracturing using a global implicit approach. Investigations are also conducted on how these poro- and thermal-elastic effects are related to fracture permeability evolution.

  3. Fracture mechanics by three-dimensional crack-tip synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Withers, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the relationship between the nucleation and growth of defects and the local stresses and phase changes that cause them, we need both imaging and stress mapping. Here, we explore how this can be achieved by bringing together synchrotron X-ray diffraction and tomographic imaging. Conventionally, these are undertaken on separate synchrotron beamlines; however, instruments capable of both imaging and diffraction are beginning to emerge, such as ID15 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and JEEP at the Diamond Light Source. This review explores the concept of three-dimensional crack-tip X-ray microscopy, bringing them together to probe the crack-tip behaviour under realistic environmental and loading conditions and to extract quantitative fracture mechanics information about the local crack-tip environment. X-ray diffraction provides information about the crack-tip stress field, phase transformations, plastic zone and crack-face tractions and forces. Time-lapse CT, besides providing information about the three-dimensional nature of the crack and its local growth rate, can also provide information as to the activation of extrinsic toughening mechanisms such as crack deflection, crack-tip zone shielding, crack bridging and crack closure. It is shown how crack-tip microscopy allows a quantitative measure of the crack-tip driving force via the stress intensity factor or the crack-tip opening displacement. Finally, further opportunities for synchrotron X-ray microscopy are explored. PMID:25624521

  4. Fracture mechanics by three-dimensional crack-tip synchrotron X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Withers, P J

    2015-03-01

    To better understand the relationship between the nucleation and growth of defects and the local stresses and phase changes that cause them, we need both imaging and stress mapping. Here, we explore how this can be achieved by bringing together synchrotron X-ray diffraction and tomographic imaging. Conventionally, these are undertaken on separate synchrotron beamlines; however, instruments capable of both imaging and diffraction are beginning to emerge, such as ID15 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and JEEP at the Diamond Light Source. This review explores the concept of three-dimensional crack-tip X-ray microscopy, bringing them together to probe the crack-tip behaviour under realistic environmental and loading conditions and to extract quantitative fracture mechanics information about the local crack-tip environment. X-ray diffraction provides information about the crack-tip stress field, phase transformations, plastic zone and crack-face tractions and forces. Time-lapse CT, besides providing information about the three-dimensional nature of the crack and its local growth rate, can also provide information as to the activation of extrinsic toughening mechanisms such as crack deflection, crack-tip zone shielding, crack bridging and crack closure. It is shown how crack-tip microscopy allows a quantitative measure of the crack-tip driving force via the stress intensity factor or the crack-tip opening displacement. Finally, further opportunities for synchrotron X-ray microscopy are explored. PMID:25624521

  5. Fatigue and life prediction for cobalt-chromium stents: A fracture mechanics analysis.

    PubMed

    Marrey, Ramesh V; Burgermeister, Robert; Grishaber, Randy B; Ritchie, R O

    2006-03-01

    To design against premature mechanical failure, most implant devices such as coronary and endovascular stents are assessed on the basis of survival, i.e., if a fatigue life of 10(8) cycles is required, testing is performed to ascertain whether the device will survive 10(8) cycles under accelerated in vitro loading conditions. This is a far from satisfactory approach as the safety factors, which essentially tell you how close you are to failure, remain unknown; rather, the probability of fatigue failure should instead be assessed on the basis of testing to failure. In this work, a new damage-tolerant analysis of a cardiovascular stent is presented, where the design life is conservatively evaluated using a fracture mechanics methodology. In addition to enabling estimates of safe in vivo lifetimes to be made, this approach serves to quantify the effect of flaws in terms of their potential effect on device failure, and as such provides a rational basis for quality control. PMID:16260033

  6. Environment enhanced fatigue crack propagation in metals: Inputs to fracture mechanics life prediction models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Kim, Sang-Shik

    1993-01-01

    This report is a critical review of both environment-enhanced fatigue crack propagation data and the predictive capabilities of crack growth rate models. This information provides the necessary foundation for incorporating environmental effects in NASA FLAGRO and will better enable predictions of aerospace component fatigue lives. The review presents extensive literature data on 'stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue.' The linear elastic fracture mechanics approach, based on stress intensity range (Delta(K)) similitude with microscopic crack propagation threshold and growth rates, provides a basis for these data. Results are presented showing enhanced growth rates for gases (viz., H2 and H2O) and electrolytes (e.g. NaCl and H2O) in aerospace alloys including: C-Mn and heat treated alloy steels, aluminum alloys, nickel-based superalloys, and titanium alloys. Environment causes purely time-dependent accelerated fatigue crack growth above the monotonic load cracking threshold (KIEAC) and promotes cycle-time dependent cracking below (KIEAC). These phenomenon are discussed in terms of hydrogen embrittlement, dissolution, and film rupture crack tip damage mechanisms.

  7. Modeling of the fracture behavior of spot welds using advanced micro-mechanical damage models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Silke

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents the modeling of deformation and fracture behavior of resistance spot welded joints in DP600 steel sheets. Spot welding is still the most commonly used joining technique in automotive engineering. In overloading situations like crash joints are often the weakest link in a structure. For those reasons, crash simulations need reliable and applicable tools to predict the load bearing capacity of spot welded components. Two series of component tests with different spot weld diameters have shown that the diameter of the weld nugget is the main influencing factor affecting fracture mode (interfacial or pull-out fracture), load bearing capacity and energy absorption. In order to find a correlation between nugget diameter, load bearing capacity and fracture mode, the spot welds are simulated with detailed finite element models containing base metal, heat affected zone and weld metal in lap-shear loading conditions. The change in fracture mode from interfacial to pull-out or peel-out fracture with growing nugget diameter under lap-shear loading was successfully modeled using the Gologanu-Leblond model in combination with the fracture criteria of Thomason and Embury. A small nugget diameter is identified to be the main cause for interfacial fracture. In good agreement with experimental observations, the calculated pull-out fracture initiates in the base metal at the boundary to the heat affected zone.

  8. Indentation Fracture, Acoustic Emission and Modelling of the Mechanical Properties of Thin Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, S. J.; Arce-Garcia, I.; Berasetegui, E. G.; Page, T. F.

    Fracture is an almost inevitable consequence of highly loaded contacts in ceramiccoated systems. For relatively thick coatings fracture is often similar to that observed in bulk samples of the coating but as the coating thickness is reduced the substrate plays an increasing role in influencing or even controlling fracture behaviour. Both through-thickness and interfacial fracture may be observed depending on the relative toughness of the substrate, coating and interface. Through-thickness, fracture is exacerbated by plastic deformation in the substrate and therefore the load support from the substrate is critically important in determining the type and extent of fracture observed. In this paper, nanoindentation testing and post facto atomic force and scanning electron microscopy is used to characterise the types of fracture which occur for hard coatings on softer substrates and multilayer coatings on glass. The effect of fracture on the nanoindentation load-displacement curves and the hardness and Young's Modulus values obtained from them is discussed and a simple model to account for the observed behaviour is introduced. The use of acoustic emission to monitor plasticity and fracture during the indentation cycle is also discussed.

  9. Formation of conical fractures in sedimentary basins: Experiments involving pore fluids and implications for sandstone intrusion mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourgues, R.; Bureau, D.; Bodet, L.; Gay, A.; Gressier, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    Large sand intrusions often exhibit conical morphologies analogous to magmatic intrusions such as saucer-shaped or cup-shaped sills. Whereas some physical processes may be similar, we show with scaled experiments that the formation of conical sand intrusions may be favoured by the pore-pressure gradients prevailing in the host rock before sand injection. Our experiments involve injecting air into a permeable and cohesive analogue material to produce hydraulic fractures while controlling the pore pressure field. We control the state of overpressure in the overburden by applying homogeneous basal pore pressure, and then adding a second local pore pressure field by injecting air via a central injector to initiate hydraulic fractures near the injection point. In experiments involving small vertical effective stresses (small overburden, or high pore fluid overpressure), the fracturing pressure ( λfract) is supralithostatic and two dipping fractures are initiated at the injection point forming a conical structure. From theoretical considerations, we predict that high values of λfract are due to strong cohesion or high pore fluid overpressure distributed in the overburden. Such conditions are favoured by the pore pressure/stress coupling induced by both pore pressure fields. The dips of cones can be accounted for elastic-stress rotation occurring around the source. Contrary to magmatic chamber models, the aqueous fluid overpressure developed in a parent sandbody (and prevailing before the formation of injectites) may diffuse into the surrounding overburden, thus favouring stress rotation and the formation of inclined sheets far from the parent source. For experiments involving higher vertical effective stresses (thick overburden or low pore fluid overpressure), the fracturing pressure is lower than the lithostatic stress, and a single fracture is opened in mode I which then grows vertically. At a critical depth, the fracture separates into two dilatant branches forming a flat cone. We make use of a P.I.V. (Particle Imaging Velocimetry) technique to analyse plastic deformation, showing that these inclined fractures are opened in mixed modes. Close to the surface, they change into steep shear bands where fluids can infiltrate. The final morphology of the fracture network is very similar to the common tripartite architecture of various injection complexes, indicating that different mechanisms may be involved in the formation of dykes. Feeder dykes under the sill zones may open as tensile fractures, while overlying dykes may be guided by the deformation induced by the growth of sills. These deformation conditions may also favour the formation of fluid escape structures and pockmarks.

  10. Rib stress fractures among rowers: definition, epidemiology, mechanisms, risk factors and effectiveness of injury prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Lisa K; Hume, Patria A; Nolte, Volker

    2011-11-01

    Rib stress fractures (RSFs) can have serious effects on rowing training and performance and accordingly represent an important topic for sports medicine practitioners. Therefore, the aim of this review is to outline the definition, epidemiology, mechanisms, intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors, injury management and injury prevention strategies for RSF in rowers. To this end, nine relevant books, 140 journal articles, the proceedings of five conferences and two unpublished presentations were reviewed after searches of electronic databases using the keywords 'rowing', 'rib', 'stress fracture', 'injury', 'mechanics' and 'kinetics'. The review showed that RSF is an incomplete fracture occurring from an imbalance between the rate of bone resorption and the rate of bone formation. RSF occurs in 8.1-16.4% of elite rowers, 2% of university rowers and 1% of junior elite rowers. Approximately 86% of rowing RSF cases with known locations occur in ribs four to eight, mostly along the anterolateral/lateral rib cage. Elite rowers are more likely to experience RSF than nonelite rowers. Injury occurrence is equal among sweep rowers and scullers, but the regional location of the injury differs. The mechanism of injury is multifactorial with numerous intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors contributing. Posterior-directed resultant forces arising from the forward directed force vector through the arms to the oar handle in combination with the force vector induced by the scapula retractors during mid-drive, or repetitive stress from the external obliques and rectus abdominis in the 'finish' position, may be responsible for RSF. Joint hypomobility, vertebral malalignment or low bone mineral density may be associated with RSF. Case studies have shown increased risk associated with amenorrhoea, low bone density or poor technique, in combination with increases in training volume. Training volume alone may have less effect on injury than other factors. Large differences in seat and handle velocity, sequential movement patterns, higher elbow-flexion to knee-extension strength ratios, higher seat-to-handle velocity during the initial drive, or higher shoulder angle excursion may result in RSF. Gearing may indirectly affect rib loading. Increased risk may be due to low calcium, low vitamin D, eating disorders, low testosterone or use of depot medroxyprogesterone injections. Injury management involves 1-2 weeks cessation of rowing with analgesic modalities followed by a slow return to rowing with low-impact intensity and modified pain-free training. Some evidence shows injury prevention strategies should focus on strengthening the serratus anterior, strengthening leg extensors, stretching the lumbar spine, increasing hip joint flexibility, reducing excessive protraction, training with ergometers on slides or floating-head ergometers, and calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Future research should focus on the epidemiology of RSF over 4-year Olympic cycles in elite rowers, the aetiology of the condition, and the effectiveness of RSF prevention strategies for injury incidence and performance in rowing. PMID:21985212

  11. A Numerical Study on Generation Mechanism of Vertical Cracks in Top Coat of TBCs During APS Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, K.; Kuriki, H.; Enoki, M.

    2015-06-01

    Clarification of crack generation mechanism in the top coat of the thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) during atmospheric plasma spray process is important to improve the reliability of TBC. In this study, finite element analyses of stress and strain during the deposition process were conducted with layer-by-layer method to understand the cracking behaviors. Stress relaxation by generation of vertical cracks was expressed as an elasto-plastic behavior of the coating. The effects of pre-heating temperature of the substrate and plasma power on crack development were analyzed by changing of the initial and atmospheric temperatures in simulation, respectively. The simulation results of radial strain explained the experimental results of crack monitoring by non-contact laser acoustic emission method.

  12. In vitro mechanical assessment of 2.0-mm system three-dimensional miniplates in anterior mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, K P; de Moraes, P H; da Silva, J S P; de Queiroz, W F; Germano, A R

    2014-05-01

    This study constituted a comparative assessment of the mechanical resistance of square and rectangular 2.0-mm system three-dimensional miniplates as compared to the standard configuration using two straight miniplates. 90 polyurethane replica mandibles were used for the mechanical trials. Groups 1, 2, and 3 simulated complete symphyseal fractures characterized by linear separation of the central incisors; groups 4, 5, and 6 simulated parasymphyseal fractures with an oblique configuration. Groups 1 and 4 represented the standard method with two straight miniplates set parallel to one another. Square miniplates were used in groups 2 and 5, and rectangular miniplates in groups 3 and 6. A universal testing machine set to a velocity of 10mm/min and delivering a vertical linear load to the first left molar was used to test each group. Maximum load values and load values with pre-established dislocation of 5mm were obtained and submitted to statistical analysis using a calculated reliability interval of 95%. The mechanical performances of the devices were similar, except in the case of rectangular plates used in the parasymphyseal fractures. The innovative fixation methods used showed significantly better results in the case of symphyseal fractures. PMID:24239141

  13. Liquid metal embrittlement of T91 and 316L steels by heavy liquid metals: A fracture mechanics assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, T.; Hamouche, Z.; Medina-Almazàn, L.; Gorse, D.

    2008-06-01

    LME of the martensitic T91 and the austenitic 316L steels have been investigated in the CCT geometry in the plane-stress condition. Using such a geometry, premature cracking induced by a liquid metal (PbBi and Hg) can be studied using a fracture mechanics approach based on CTOD, J-Δ a and fracture assessment diagram. One is able to measure a reduction of the crack tip blunting and a reduction of the energy required for crack propagation induced by the liquid metal. In spite of some limitations, this qualitative evaluation shows that liquid metals do not induce strong embrittlement on steels in plane-stress condition. Rather, the effect of the liquid metal seems to promote a fracture mode by plastic collapse linked with strain localization. It indicates that the materials, in spite of a potential embrittlement, should still be acceptable in terms of safety criteria.

  14. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of Electroless Ni-Plated Short Carbon Fiber Reinforced Geopolymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tiesong; Jia, Dechang

    Electroless Ni-plated short carbon fiber reinforced geopolymer matrix composites with various carbon fiber/matrix interface coating thicknesses have been successfully fabricated. The influences of coating thickness on the mechanical properties and fracture behavior have been investigated by three-point bending test and scanning electron microscopy. The flexural strength and Young's modulus of Ni-plated short carbon fiber reinforced geopolymer composites exhibit maximums as the average fiber coating thickness increases, but the work of fracture has a sharp decrease, and the fracture manner changes from ductile to brittle. This is mainly attributed to the fact that the carbon fibers favor breakage rather than pulling-out during loading because of the higher interface bonding strength of fiber/matrix, and pliability of the carbon fibers decreases with the increase of the coating thickness.

  15. Continuum mechanics modeling and experimental confirmation for the prediction of nanoscale transitional fracture behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Michael James

    2002-01-01

    A continuum mechanics-based model is used to explore the fracture properties of nanoscale multilayered materials. Length scale appears via inclusion of potential emission of discrete dislocations from a crack tip following the Rice-Thomson approach. For nanoscale multilayers, the high density of interfaces has a strong effect on the propensity for a crack to emit blunting dislocations, which relieve high local stresses, or not emit them, which promotes cleavage. The model is used to predict how material combination, layer thickness, crystal structure, and flaw size influence the effective fracture toughness of the material system for the "mesoscopic" size regime that bridges atomistics and continuum mechanics. To confirm validity of the continuum model at the nanoscale and test certain critical predictions, viz. the directions of dislocation emission from crack tips, Bragg bubble raft experiments are performed. Perfect (dislocation-free) two-dimensional bubble rafts with sharp internal and interfacial cracks are subjected to the bounding cases of uniform displacement or traction to examine the nucleation and emission of dislocations. The experiments verify, qualitatively and quantitatively, the trends predicted by the model. Theory and experiment demonstrate transitions in emission behavior that take place over a large range of crack dimensions, crack locations, and loading conditions. Remarkably, the continuum model is confirmed to predict the crack dislocation emission behavior down to length scales approaching several atomic (bubble) spacings. The continuum model is applied to materials and material systems to make predictions of nominal crack response as a function of specimen size and geometry. The model predicts substantial modifications to crack behavior on the nanoscale. Most notable are predictions of brittle-to-ductile transition in macroscopically brittle materials such as silicon and germanium. Finally, it is proposed that the theoretical model may have utility in making predictions of brittle-to-ductile transitions during precision machining operations involving nanoscale depths of cut. A preliminary investigation into an elastic cutting model, featuring a simple chip formation geometry, predicts a physical transition from purely elastic response to elastoplastic response in silicon and germanium on the nanoscale. These predictions exhibit intriguing consistency with experimental machining data.

  16. Fracture Profile and Crack Propagation of Ultra-High Strength Hot-Stamped Boron Steel During Mechanical Trimming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xianhong; Yang, Kun; Chen, Sisi; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical trimming process for ultra-high strength boron steel after hot stamping was carried out in this study. Shear and tensile tests were designed to analyze the influences of stress state on the fracture mode; trimmed fracture surface and profile were observed and compared to other commonly used steels such as DP980 and Q235 etc.; the crack propagation during trimming process was studied through step-by-step tests. The observation and analysis reveal that the fracture mode of hot-stamped boron steel is highly related to the stress state, it belongs to cleavage fracture on low stress triaxiality but dimple fracture on high stress triaxiality. Such phenomenon is reflected in the trimming process, during which the stress state changes from shear-dominated state to tensile-dominated state. In addition, the burnish zone of trimmed boron steel is much smaller than other high strength steels, and the profile of cutting surface shows an `S'-like shape which is destructive to the trimming tool. Moreover, during the trimming process, most martensite laths near the cutting edge are stretched and rotated markedly to the direction of the shear band, and the main crack expands along those grain boundaries, which may penetrate through a few martensite laths and form small crack branches.

  17. Fracture mechanics behavior of the T91 martensitic steel in contact with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic for application in an accelerator driven system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, T.; Gorse, D.; Hamouche-Hadjem, Z.; Van den Bosch, J.; Coen, G.; Almazouzi, A.; Hojna, A.; Dalikova, K.; Di Gabriele, F.; Serrano, M.; Gessi, A.; Agostini, P.; Vogt, J.-B.; Serre, I.

    2011-08-01

    The fracture toughness of the T91 martensitic steel in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic has been measured at 300 °C in plane stress and plane strain conditions. The effect of achieving wetting at the crack tip prior starting mechanical testing is demonstrated to be the key factor for a correct evaluation of the potential effect of LBE on fracture toughness. In plane stress, one observes a serrated fracture mode associated with a reduction of fracture toughness between 20% and 30%. The toughness reduction is higher in plane strain where the cleavage fracture mode prevails. The difference between the two fracture modes is due to the higher plastic deformation level reached at final fracture in plane stress and to the higher crack growth rate in plane strain. These results will be useful for the design of future nuclear systems cooled by LBE planning to use martensitic steels as structural materials.

  18. Architecture, fracture system, mechanical properties and permeability structure of a fault zone in Lower Triassic sandstone, Upper Rhine Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Johanna F.; Meier, Silke; Philipp, Sonja L.

    2015-04-01

    Close to the western Upper Rhine Graben Main Fault, Alsace, a NNE-SSW-striking fault zone, crosscutting porous, thick bedded Lower Triassic Bunter sandstone was investigated in detail, including its architecture, discontinuity system, mechanical rock properties and implications on its permeability structure and fault zone type. Field observations indicate a three-part fault zone structure including core-, transition- and damage zone. The at least 14 m thick fault core is composed of various slip surfaces and deformation bands, which encompass fractured host rock lenses. When connected, host rock lenses may transport fluids through the core zone. Adjacent transition zones are highly fractured in R1-orientation, show folded beds and contain P1-oriented deformation bands. R1 and P1-fractures are synthetic shear fractures and project with an acute angle (10-20°) toward the fault plane. Only in the damage zone, fault-parallel striking fractures occur. Here, increasing fracture apertures and connectivity may increase the permeability toward the fault core. Mechanical rock properties from 12 rock samples (Young's modulus, uniaxial compressive strength, tensile strength) measured in all the parts of the fault zone, show highest values within the transition zone. In-situ measurements of rebound-hardnesses with a Schmidt-Hammer and analytical approaches, however, indicate that effective Young's moduli are two to sixteen times lower than the Young's moduli of intact rock. Values clearly decrease toward the fault core, even in the transition zone and are in average lower than effective Young's moduli in the damage zone. Although many fault zones in sandstone are sealing structures these field study show, that fault zones in porous sandstone may allow fluid flow.

  19. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR plant. Volume 5. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis. Load Combination Program Project I final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D.O.; Lim, E.Y.; Dedhia, D.D.

    1981-06-01

    The primary purpose of the Load Combination Program covered in this report is to estimate the probability of a seismic induced LOCA in the primary piping of a commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR). Best estimates, rather than upper bound results are desired. This was accomplished by use of a fracture mechanics model that employs a random distribution of initial cracks in the piping welds. Estimates of the probability of cracks of various sizes initially existing in the welds are combined with fracture mechanics calculations of how these cracks would grow during service. This then leads to direct estimates of the probability of failure as a function of time and location within the piping system. The influence of varying the stress history to which the piping is subjected is easily determined. Seismic events enter into the analysis through the stresses they impose on the pipes. Hence, the influence of various seismic events on the piping failure probability can be determined, thereby providing the desired information.

  20. The fracture energy and some mechanical properties of a polyurethane elastomer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, H. K.; Knauss, W. G.

    1971-01-01

    The energy required to form a unit of new surface in the fracture of a polyurethane elastomer is determined. The rate sensitivity of the material has been reduced by swelling it in toluene. This paper primarily describes the experimental work of measuring the lower limit of the fracture energy. With this value and the creep compliance as a basis, the rate dependence of fracture energy for the unswollen material has been determined. It is thus shown that the dependence of the fracture energy on the rate of crack propagation can be explained by energy dissipation around the tip of the crack. Good agreement between the theoretically and experimentally determined relationships for the rate-sensitive fracture energy is demonstrated.

  1. Scaling of strength and lifetime probability distributions of quasibrittle structures based on atomistic fracture mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bažant, Zdeněk P.; Le, Jia-Liang; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2009-01-01

    The failure probability of engineering structures such as aircraft, bridges, dams, nuclear structures, and ships, as well as microelectronic components and medical implants, must be kept extremely low, typically <10−6. The safety factors needed to ensure it have so far been assessed empirically. For perfectly ductile and perfectly brittle structures, the empirical approach is sufficient because the cumulative distribution function (cdf) of random material strength is known and fixed. However, such an approach is insufficient for structures consisting of quasibrittle materials, which are brittle materials with inhomogeneities that are not negligible compared with the structure size. The reason is that the strength cdf of quasibrittle structure varies from Gaussian to Weibullian as the structure size increases. In this article, a recently proposed theory for the strength cdf of quasibrittle structure is refined by deriving it from fracture mechanics of nanocracks propagating by small, activation-energy-controlled, random jumps through the atomic lattice. This refinement also provides a plausible physical justification of the power law for subcritical creep crack growth, hitherto considered empirical. The theory is further extended to predict the cdf of structural lifetime at constant load, which is shown to be size- and geometry-dependent. The size effects on structure strength and lifetime are shown to be related and the latter to be much stronger. The theory fits previously unexplained deviations of experimental strength and lifetime histograms from the Weibull distribution. Finally, a boundary layer method for numerical calculation of the cdf of structural strength and lifetime is outlined. PMID:19561294

  2. Development of fracture mechanics data for two hydrazine APU turbine wheel materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curbishley, G.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of high temperature, high pressure ammonia were measured on the fracture mechanics and fatigue properties of Astroloy and Rene' 41 turbine wheel materials. Also, the influence of protective coatings on these properties was investigated. Specimens of forged bar stock were subjected to LCF and HCF tests at 950 K (1250 F) and 3.4 MN/sq m (500 psig) pressure, in ammonia containing about 1.5 percent H2O. Aluminized samples (Chromizing Company's Al-870) and gold plated test bars were compared with uncoated specimens. Comparison tests were also run in air at 950 K (1250 F), but at ambient pressures. K sub IE and K sub TH were determined on surface flawed specimens in both the air and ammonia in both uncoated and gold plated conditions. Gold plated specimens exhibited better properties than uncoated samples, and aluminized test bars generally had lower properties. The fatigue properties of specimens tested in ammonia were higher than those tested in air, yet the K sub TH values of ammonia tested samples were lower than those tested in air. However, insufficient specimens were tested to develop significant design data.

  3. Mechanical Fracturing of Core-Shell Undercooled Metal Particles for Heat-Free Soldering

    PubMed Central

    Çınar, Simge; Tevis, Ian D.; Chen, Jiahao; Thuo, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change materials, such as meta-stable undercooled (supercooled) liquids, have been widely recognized as a suitable route for complex fabrication and engineering. Despite comprehensive studies on the undercooling phenomenon, little progress has been made in the use of undercooled metals, primarily due to low yields and poor stability. This paper reports the use of an extension of droplet emulsion technique (SLICE) to produce undercooled core-shell particles of structure; metal/oxide shell-acetate (‘/’ = physisorbed, ‘-’ = chemisorbed), from molten Field’s metal (Bi-In-Sn) and Bi-Sn alloys. These particles exhibit stability against solidification at ambient conditions. Besides synthesis, we report the use of these undercooled metal, liquid core-shell, particles for heat free joining and manufacturing at ambient conditions. Our approach incorporates gentle etching and/or fracturing of outer oxide-acetate layers through mechanical stressing or shearing, thus initiating a cascade entailing fluid flow with concomitant deformation, combination/alloying, shaping, and solidification. This simple and low cost technique for soldering and fabrication enables formation of complex shapes and joining at the meso- and micro-scale at ambient conditions without heat or electricity. PMID:26902483

  4. Scaling of strength and lifetime probability distributions of quasibrittle structures based on atomistic fracture mechanics.

    PubMed

    Bazant, Zdenek P; Le, Jia-Liang; Bazant, Martin Z

    2009-07-14

    The failure probability of engineering structures such as aircraft, bridges, dams, nuclear structures, and ships, as well as microelectronic components and medical implants, must be kept extremely low, typically <10(-6). The safety factors needed to ensure it have so far been assessed empirically. For perfectly ductile and perfectly brittle structures, the empirical approach is sufficient because the cumulative distribution function (cdf) of random material strength is known and fixed. However, such an approach is insufficient for structures consisting of quasibrittle materials, which are brittle materials with inhomogeneities that are not negligible compared with the structure size. The reason is that the strength cdf of quasibrittle structure varies from Gaussian to Weibullian as the structure size increases. In this article, a recently proposed theory for the strength cdf of quasibrittle structure is refined by deriving it from fracture mechanics of nanocracks propagating by small, activation-energy-controlled, random jumps through the atomic lattice. This refinement also provides a plausible physical justification of the power law for subcritical creep crack growth, hitherto considered empirical. The theory is further extended to predict the cdf of structural lifetime at constant load, which is shown to be size- and geometry-dependent. The size effects on structure strength and lifetime are shown to be related and the latter to be much stronger. The theory fits previously unexplained deviations of experimental strength and lifetime histograms from the Weibull distribution. Finally, a boundary layer method for numerical calculation of the cdf of structural strength and lifetime is outlined. PMID:19561294

  5. A review of path-independent integrals in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, task 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.

    1985-01-01

    The path independent (P-I) integrals in elastic plastic fracture mechanics which have been proposed in recent years to overcome the limitations imposed on the J integral are reviewed. The P-I integrals considered herein are the J integral by Rice, the thermoelastic P-I integrals by Wilson and Yu and by Gurtin, the J* integral by Blackburn, the J sub theta integral by Ainsworth et al., the J integral by Kishimoto et al., and the delta T sub p and delta T* sub p integrals by Atluri et al. The theoretical foundation of these P-I integrals is examined with emphasis on whether or not path independence is maintained in the presence of nonproportional loading and unloading in the plastic regime, thermal gradients, and material inhomogeneities. The similarities, differences, salient features, and limitations of these P-I integrals are discussed. Comments are also made with regard to the physical meaning, the possibility of experimental measurement, and computational aspects.

  6. Percutaneous fixation of hand fractures using locked K-wires: mechanical analysis and clinical application.

    PubMed

    De Spirito, Daniele

    2013-09-01

    Closed percutaneous wire fixation of hand fractures frequently requires protection with external splintage. This splintage increases the risk of joint stiffness, prolongs recovery time, and increases therapy input. We have developed a method of linking external Kirschner wires (K-wires), using a metal clamp, after their insertion, so as to increase the security of fixation and facilitate postoperative mobilization. The mechanical properties of this method have been assessed in vitro and compared with conventionally fixed, unlinked, K-wires. We have been able to establish that the linked K-wire system is better able to resist loosening. This work proposes that linkage of K-wires permits omission of all additional external splintage, with no detriment to management. The technique has been applied in clinical cases over the past 8 years and results of treatments were evaluated mainly to detect unexpected complications. We report a low rate of complications and good results in terms of bone healing and recovery of function. PMID:23970195

  7. NASCRAC - A computer code for fracture mechanics analysis of crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, D. O.; Eason, E. D.; Thomas, J. M.; Bianca, C. J.; Salter, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    NASCRAC - a computer code for fracture mechanics analysis of crack growth - is described in this paper. The need for such a code is increasing as requirements grow for high reliability and low weight in aerospace components. The code is comprehensive and versatile, as well as user friendly. The major purpose of the code is calculation of fatigue, corrosion fatigue, or stress corrosion crack growth, and a variety of crack growth relations can be selected by the user. Additionally, crack retardation models are included. A very wide variety of stress intensity factor solutions are contained in the code, and extensive use is made of influence functions. This allows complex stress gradients in three-dimensional crack problems to be treated easily and economically. In cases where previous stress intensity factor solutions are not adequate, new influence functions can be calculated by the code. Additional features include incorporation of J-integral solutions from the literature and a capability for estimating elastic-plastic stress redistribution from the results of a corresponding elastic analysis. An example problem is presented which shows typical outputs from the code.

  8. Development of Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics Analysis Code for Pipes with Stress Corrosion Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Hideo; Arakawa, Manabu; Yamashita, Norimichi; Yoshimura, Shinobu

    Risk-Informed integrity management methodologies have been developed for Japanese nuclear power plants. One of the issues of concern is the reliability assessment of piping with flaws due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Therefore, the probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis code has been developed, which can perform the reliability assessment for austenitic stainless steel piping with flaws due to SCC. This paper describes technical basis of this code. This method is based on Monte-Carlo technique considering many sample cases in a piping section, where the initiation and growth of cracks are calculated and piping failures, including leaks and rapture, are evaluated. A notable feature is that multiple cracks can be treated, consequently, assessment of coalescence of cracks and intricate break evaluation of piping section have been included. Moreover, the in-service inspection (ISI) and integrity evaluation by Fitness-for-Service (FFS) code are integrated into the analysis, and the contribution to failure probability decrease can be assessed. Key parameters are determined on a probability basis with the designated probability type throughout the procedure. Size, location and time of crack initiation, coefficients of crack growth due to SCC and factors for piping failure are included in those parameters. With this method the reliability level of the piping through the operation periods can be estimated and the contribution of various parameters including ISI can be quantitatively evaluated.

  9. Mechanical Fracturing of Core-Shell Undercooled Metal Particles for Heat-Free Soldering.

    PubMed

    Çınar, Simge; Tevis, Ian D; Chen, Jiahao; Thuo, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change materials, such as meta-stable undercooled (supercooled) liquids, have been widely recognized as a suitable route for complex fabrication and engineering. Despite comprehensive studies on the undercooling phenomenon, little progress has been made in the use of undercooled metals, primarily due to low yields and poor stability. This paper reports the use of an extension of droplet emulsion technique (SLICE) to produce undercooled core-shell particles of structure; metal/oxide shell-acetate ('/' = physisorbed, '-' = chemisorbed), from molten Field's metal (Bi-In-Sn) and Bi-Sn alloys. These particles exhibit stability against solidification at ambient conditions. Besides synthesis, we report the use of these undercooled metal, liquid core-shell, particles for heat free joining and manufacturing at ambient conditions. Our approach incorporates gentle etching and/or fracturing of outer oxide-acetate layers through mechanical stressing or shearing, thus initiating a cascade entailing fluid flow with concomitant deformation, combination/alloying, shaping, and solidification. This simple and low cost technique for soldering and fabrication enables formation of complex shapes and joining at the meso- and micro-scale at ambient conditions without heat or electricity. PMID:26902483

  10. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of the Slip-Side Joggle Regions of Wing-Leading Edge Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Phillips, Dawn R.

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter wing comprises of 22 leading edge panels on each side of the wing. These panels are part of the thermal protection system that protects the Orbiter wings from extreme heating that take place on the reentry in to the earth atmosphere. On some panels that experience extreme heating, liberation of silicon carbon (SiC) coating was observed on the slip side regions of the panels. Global structural and local fracture mechanics analyses were performed on these panels as a part of the root cause investigation of this coating liberation anomaly. The wing-leading-edge reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels, Panel 9, T-seal 10, and Panel 10, are shown in Figure 1 and the progression of the stress analysis models is presented in Figure 2. The global structural analyses showed minimal interaction between adjacent panels and the T-seal that bridges the gap between the panels. A bounding uniform temperature is applied to a representative panel and the resulting stress distribution is examined. For this loading condition, the interlaminar normal stresses showed negligible variation in the chord direction and increased values in the vicinity of the slip-side joggle shoulder. As such, a representative span wise slice on the panel can be taken and the cross section can be analyzed using plane strain analysis.

  11. Mechanical Fracturing of Core-Shell Undercooled Metal Particles for Heat-Free Soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çınar, Simge; Tevis, Ian D.; Chen, Jiahao; Thuo, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Phase-change materials, such as meta-stable undercooled (supercooled) liquids, have been widely recognized as a suitable route for complex fabrication and engineering. Despite comprehensive studies on the undercooling phenomenon, little progress has been made in the use of undercooled metals, primarily due to low yields and poor stability. This paper reports the use of an extension of droplet emulsion technique (SLICE) to produce undercooled core-shell particles of structure; metal/oxide shell-acetate (‘/’ = physisorbed, ‘-’ = chemisorbed), from molten Field’s metal (Bi-In-Sn) and Bi-Sn alloys. These particles exhibit stability against solidification at ambient conditions. Besides synthesis, we report the use of these undercooled metal, liquid core-shell, particles for heat free joining and manufacturing at ambient conditions. Our approach incorporates gentle etching and/or fracturing of outer oxide-acetate layers through mechanical stressing or shearing, thus initiating a cascade entailing fluid flow with concomitant deformation, combination/alloying, shaping, and solidification. This simple and low cost technique for soldering and fabrication enables formation of complex shapes and joining at the meso- and micro-scale at ambient conditions without heat or electricity.

  12. Low Magnitude Mechanical Signals Reduce Risk-Factors for Fracture during 90-Day Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muir, J. W.; Xia, Y.; Holquin, N.; Judex, S.; Qin, Y.; Evans, H.; Lang, T.; Rubin, C.

    2007-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight leads to multiple deleterious changes to the musculoskeletal system, where loss of bone density, an order of magnitude more severe than that which follows the menopause, combined with increased instability, conspire to elevate the risk of bone fracture due to falls on return to gravitational fields. Here, a ground-based analog for spaceflight is used to evaluate the efficacy of a low-magnitude mechanical intervention, VIBE (Vibrational Inhibition of Bone Erosion), as a potential countermeasure to preserve musculoskeletal integrity in the face of disuse. Twenty-six subjects consented to ninety days of six-degree head-down tilt bed-rest. 18 completed the 90d protocol, 8 of which received daily 10-minute exposure to 30 Hz, 0.3g VIBE, applied in the supine position using a vest elastically coupled to the vibrating platform. The shoulder harness induced a load of 60% of the subjects body weight. At baseline and 90d, Qualitative Ultrasound Scans (QUS) of the calcaneus and CT-scans of the hip and spine were performed to measure changes in bone density. Postural control (PC) was assessed through center of pressure (COP) recordings while subjects stood on a force platform for 4 minutes of quiet stance with eyes closed, and again with eyes opened. As compared to control bedrest subjects,

  13. Tissue level microstructure and mechanical properties of the femoral head in the proximal femur of fracture patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Linwei; Meng, Guangwei; Gong, He; Zhu, Dong; Gao, Jiazi; Fan, Yubo

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the regional variations of trabecular morphological parameters and mechanical parameters of the femoral head, as well as to determine the relationship between trabecular morphological and mechanical parameters. Seven femoral heads from patients with fractured proximal femur were scanned using a micro-CT system. Each femoral head was divided into 12 sub-regions according to the trabecular orientation. One trabecular cubic model was reconstructed from each sub-region. A total of 81 trabecular models were reconstructed, except three destroyed sub-regions from two femoral heads during the surgery. Trabecular morphological parameters, i.e. trabecular separation (Tb.Sp), trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), specific bone surface (BS/BV), bone volume fraction (BV/TV), structural model index (SMI), and degree of anisotropy (DA) were measured. Micro-finite element analyses were performed for each cube to obtain the apparent Young's modulus and tissue level von Mises stress distribution under 1 % compressive strain along three orthogonal directions, respectively. Results revealed significant regional variations in the morphological parameters (). Young's moduli along the trabecular orientation were significantly higher than those along the other two directions. In general, trabecular mechanical properties in the medial region were lower than those in the lateral region. Trabecular mechanical parameters along the trabecular orientation were significantly correlated with BS/BV, BV/TV, Tb.Th, and DA. In this study, regional variations of microstructural features and mechanical properties in the femoral head of patients with proximal femur fracture were thoroughly investigated at the tissue level. The results of this study will help to elucidate the mechanism of femoral head fracture for reducing fracture risk and developing treatment strategies for the elderly.

  14. Recent advances in hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Gidley, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a reference to the application of significant technological advances in hydraulic fracturing. It features illustrative problems to demonstrate specific applications of advanced technologies. Chapters examine pretreatment formation evaluation, rock mechanics and fracture geometry, 2D and 3D fracture-propagation models, propping agents and fracture conductivity, fracturing fluids and additives, fluid leakoff, flow behavior, proppant transport, treatment design, well completions, field implementation, fracturing-pressure analysis, postfracture formation evaluation, fracture azimuth and geometry determination, and economics of fracturing.

  15. Structural Mechanics Predictions Relating to Clinical Coronary Stent Fracture in a 5 Year Period in FDA MAUDE Database.

    PubMed

    Everett, Kay D; Conway, Claire; Desany, Gerard J; Baker, Brian L; Choi, Gilwoo; Taylor, Charles A; Edelman, Elazer R

    2016-02-01

    Endovascular stents are the mainstay of interventional cardiovascular medicine. Technological advances have reduced biological and clinical complications but not mechanical failure. Stent strut fracture is increasingly recognized as of paramount clinical importance. Though consensus reigns that fractures can result from material fatigue, how fracture is induced and the mechanisms underlying its clinical sequelae remain ill-defined. In this study, strut fractures were identified in the prospectively maintained Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience Database (MAUDE), covering years 2006-2011, and differentiated based on specific coronary artery implantation site and device configuration. These data, and knowledge of the extent of dynamic arterial deformations obtained from patient CT images and published data, were used to define boundary conditions for 3D finite element models incorporating multimodal, multi-cycle deformation. The structural response for a range of stent designs and configurations was predicted by computational models and included estimation of maximum principal, minimum principal and equivalent plastic strains. Fatigue assessment was performed with Goodman diagrams and safe/unsafe regions defined for different stent designs. Von Mises stress and maximum principal strain increased with multimodal, fully reversed deformation. Spatial maps of unsafe locations corresponded to the identified locations of fracture in different coronary arteries in the clinical database. These findings, for the first time, provide insight into a potential link between patient adverse events and computational modeling of stent deformation. Understanding of the mechanical forces imposed under different implantation conditions may assist in rational design and optimal placement of these devices. PMID:26467552

  16. At the moment of occurrence of a fragility hip fracture, men have higher mechanical properties values in comparison with women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is well established that males have lower fracture risk in comparison with females, which suggests a higher bone resistance in men. The aim of our study was to find out if in older patients with hip fragility fractures, gender has also an impact on trabecular bone material behaviour, specifically to determine whether trabecular mechanical properties under compressive loading differ between men and women who suffered a fragility hip fracture. Methods Femoral epiphyses were consecutively collected during hip replacement surgery due to proximal femur fragility fracture. Trabecular bone cylinders were drilled and submitted to uniaxial compression tests and mechanical properties were assessed. Results Seventy-three patients, 55 women (mean age 81 years and standard deviation of 7 years) and 18 men (mean age 81 years and standard deviation of 8 years) were evaluated. The ultimate stress of trabecular bone was significantly higher in men than in women: the median values and the interquartile range (IQR) were respectively 8.04(5.35-10.90) MPa vs. 4.46(3.02-7.73) MPa, (p-value = 0.005). The same difference between male and female was observed in the Young’s modulus: 293.68(166.67-538.18) MPa vs. 174.26(73.07-322.28) MPa, (p-value = 0.028), and also in the energy to failure: 0.25(0.07-0.42) MJ/m3 vs. 0.11(0.05-0.25) MJ/m3, (p-value = 0.058). These differences were also verified after adjusting the analysis for age in a multivariate model analysis. Conclusions Our observations demonstrated that, even in a population who suffered a fragility hip fracture, men still have higher trabecular bone mechanical properties in comparison with women. PMID:24131745

  17. Brittle Fracture Mechanics of Snow : In Situ Testing and Distinct Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faillettaz, J.; Daudon, D.; Louchet, F.

    A snow slab avalanche release usually results from the rupture of the snow cover at the interface between an upper layer (slab) and an underlying substrate. Amazingly, the models proposed so far to predict this kind of rupture were only based on continuum mechanics, as they did not take into account the existing cracks or cohesion defects at the interface between the two layers, and their possible unstable propagation that eventually triggers the avalanche. This is why the present work, essentially devoted to human triggered avalanches, is based instead on Griffith's fracture approach, widely used in modelling brittle fracture of materials. The possible rupture scenario involves a propagation in a shear mode of a "basal crack" nucleated and gradually grown at the interface by the skier's weight, followed by a mode I opening and propagation of a "crown crack" at the top of the sheared zone. Different avalanche sizes are predicted according whether the basal crack propagation reaches or not the Griffith's instabil- ity size before crown crack opening (Louchet 2000). Accurate predictions therefore require a precise knowledge of snow toughness values in both modes. A theoretical estimation of toughness considering snow as an ice foam was proposed by Kirchner and Michot (2000), but the question of whether these results may be extended to an assembly of sintered grains is still open. A mode I toughness measurement of snow was also published for the first time by Kirchner and Michot on samples gathered in the Vosges range. In the present work, we developed an experimental set similar to Michot's, in order to measure mode I toughness: a vertical crack of increasing size is gradually machined from the top surface in an horizontal snow beam until failure takes place under its own weight. The toughness value is computed from the snow weight and the crack length at the onset of rapid crack propagation. A similar device was designed for mode II testing, but is still under development. The experimental cam- paign carried out in the Alps during the 2000-2001 winter on homogeneous sintered snow with a density of 200 kg/m3 (typical of a snow slab) gave results of the same or- der of magnitude as Michot's. A numerical modeling of these toughness experiments was performed using a distinct element code, considering snow as a cohesive granu- lar material. Both crack propagation and rupture patterns are in close agreement with experiments. References: Kirchner, Michot, Suzuki 2000 Fracture thoughness of snow in tension 1 Philisophical Magazine A, vol 80,N5, p1265-1272. Louchet 2001,A transition in dry snow slab avalanche triggering modes, Annales de glaciologie, vol 32,Symphosium on Snow, Avalanches and Impact of the Frest Cover, Innsbruck,Austria,22-26 may 2000, p2285-289 2

  18. Future target for geothermal development -- Fractal Fracture Mechanics and its application to conceptual HDR reservoir design

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hideaki; Watanable, Kimio; Hashida, Toshiyuki

    1995-01-26

    A simple model is proposed for water/rock interaction in rock fractures through which geothermal water flows. Water/rock interaction experiments were carried out at high temperature and pressure (200-350 C, 18 MPa) in order to obtain basic solubility and reaction rate data. Based on the experimental data, changes of idealized fracture apertures with time are calculated numerically. The results of the calculations show that the precipitation from water can lead to plugging of the fractures under certain conditions. Finally, the results are compared with the experimental data.

  19. Anisotropy in Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of an Oxide Dispersion Fe20Cr5Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, J.; Capdevila, C.

    2014-08-01

    Anisotropy of fracture toughness and fracture behavior of Fe20Cr5Al oxide dispersion-strengthened alloy has been investigated by means of compression tests, hardness tests, and wedge splitting test. The results show a small effect of the compression direction on yield strength (YS) and strain hardening. The YS is minimum for longitudinal direction and maximum for the tangential direction. The transverse plastic strain ratio is similar for tangential and longitudinal directions but very different from that in normal direction. Hardness depends on the indentation plane; it is lower for any plane parallel to the L-T plane and of similar magnitude for the other orthogonal planes, i.e., the L-S and T-S planes. Macroscopically, two failure modes have been observed after wedge-splitting tests, those of LS and TS specimens in which fracture deviates along one or two branches normal to the notch plane, and those of LT, TL, SL, and ST specimens in which fracture propagates along the notch plane. Besides LT and TL specimens present delaminations parallel to L-T plane. Both, the fracture surface of branching cracks and that of the delaminations, show an intergranular brittle fracture appearance. It is proposed that the main cause of the delamination and crack branching is the alignment in the mesoscopic scale of the ultrafine grains structure which is enhanced by the <110>-texture of the material and by the presence in the grain boundaries of both yttria dispersoids and impurity contaminations. An elastoplastic finite element analysis was performed to study what stress state is the cause of the branches and delaminations. It is concluded that the normal to the crack branches and/or the shear stress components could determine the crack bifurcation mechanism, whereas the delamination it seems that it is controlled by the magnitude of the stress component normal to the delamination plane.

  20. Engineering geological characteristics and the hydraulic fracture propagation mechanism of the sand-shale interbedded formation in the Xu5 reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cong; Li, Mei; Guo, Jian-Chun; Tang, Xu-Hai; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Yong-Hui, Wang; Liang, Hao

    2015-06-01

    In the Xu5 formation the sandstone reservoir and the shale reservoir are interbedded with each other. The average thickness of each formation is about 8 m, which increases the difficulty of the hydraulic fracturing treatment. The shale thickness ratio (the ratio of shale thickness to formation thickness) is 55-62.5%. The reservoir is characterized by ultra-low porosity and permeability. The brittleness index of sandstone is 0.5-0.8, and the brittleness index of shale is 0.3-0.8. Natural fractures are poorly developed and are mainly horizontal and at a low angle. The formation strength is medium and the reservoir is of the hybrid strike-slip fault and reverse fault stress regime. The difference between the minimum principal stress and the vertical stress is small, and the maximum horizontal principal stress is 20 MPa higher than the minimum horizontal principal stress and vertical stress. A mechanical model of a hydraulic fracture encountering natural fractures is built according to geological characteristics. Fracture mechanics theory is then used to establish a hydraulic fracturing model coupling the seepage-stress-damage model to simulate the initiation and propagation of a fracture. The hydraulic fracture geometry is mainly I-shaped and T-shaped, horizontal propagation dominates the extension, and vertical propagation is limited. There is a two to three meter stress diversion area around a single hydraulic fracture. The stress diversion between a hydraulic fracture and a natural fracture is advantageous in forming a complex fracture. The research results can provide theoretical guidance for tight reservoir fracturing design.

  1. Fracture mechanics of ceramics; Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, June 19-21, 1985. Volume 8 - Microstructure, methods, design, and fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Bradt, R.C.; Evans, A.G.; Hasselman, D.P.H.; Lange, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    Papers are presented on fracture mechanics and microstructures, mechanical behavior of light-weight ceramics, the effect of static loading on the fracture toughness of indentation-precracked alumina, the mixed-mode fracture of ceramics, some fracture properties of alumina-containing electrical porcelains, and strength-toughness relationships for transformation-toughened ceramics. Consideration is given to fracture mechanisms in lead zirconate titanate ceramics, application of the potential drop technique to the fracture mechanics of ceramics, ceramics-to-metal bonding from a fracture mechanics perspective, and crack growth in single-crystal silicon. Additional papers are on the static fatigue resistance of hot-pressed silicon nitride, the role of surface forces in fracture, slow crack growth in sintered silicon nitride, computer simulation of the growth of small surface-flaws in dynamic fatigue, and the effect of surface corrosion on glass fracture.

  2. Nose fracture

    MedlinePlus

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It ... with other fractures of the face. Sometimes a blunt injury can ...

  3. Effects of silylation on fracture and mechanical properties of mesoporous silica films interfaced with copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, D. D.; Singh, B.; Singh, A. P.; Moore, R.; Simonyi, E.; Lane, M. W.; Ramanath, G.

    2009-09-01

    Mesoporous silica (MPS) films are attractive for isolating Cu wiring in nanodevices but are susceptible to pore wall collapse and water and metal uptake. Pore-sealing and chemical passivation with molecular surfactants are potential solutions that could address these challenges. Here, we show that silylated MPS films capped with a Cu overlayer fracture near the Cu/MPS interface at a distance that correlates with the Cu penetration depth into MPS. Pristine MPS films fracture farther from the MPS/Cu interface than silylated MPS, where silylation-induced pore passivation hinders Cu penetration. Silylation also lowers the tensile stress and the fracture toughness of MPS films, but the relative extent of the decreases in these properties decreases the overall driving force for cracking. Such effects of molecular passivation on metal penetration, film stress, and fracture toughness and pathways are important for engineering stable porous dielectrics for nanodevice wiring structures.

  4. Aspects of fracture mechanics in cryogenic model design. Part 2: NTF materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Lisagor, W. B.

    1983-01-01

    Results of fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness tests conducted on three candidate materials are presented. Fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness tests were conducted on NITRONIC 40 at room temperature and -275 F. Fracture toughness tests were also conducted on Vascomax 200 and 250 maraging steel from room temperature to -320 F. NITRONIC 40 was used to make the Pathfinder 1 model. The fatigue crack growth rate tests were conducted at room temperature and -275 F on three-point notch bend specimens. The fracture toughness tests on the as received and stress relieved materials at -275 F were conducted on the center crack tension specimens. Toughness tests were also conducted on Vascomax CVM-200 and CVM-250 maraging steel from room temperature to -320 F using round and rectangular compact specimens.

  5. Computational fracture mechanics estimation of the strength of deep-water welded constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'in, A. V.; Filin, V. Yu.

    2013-04-01

    The principles of estimating the strength of deep-water engineering constructions using the brittle fracture prevention criterion are presented. They are based on the experimental results and theoretical developments accumulated in our works.

  6. Fracture mechanics data for 2024-T861 and 2124-T851 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pionke, L. J.; Linback, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    The fracture toughness and fatigue flaw growth characteristics of 2024-T861 and 2124-T851 aluminum were evaluated under plane stress conditions. Center cracked tension specimens were employed to evaluate these properties under a number of different test conditions which included variations in specimen thickness, specimen orientation, test environment, and initial flaw size. The effect of buckling was also investigated for all tests of thin gage specimens, and the effect of frequency and stress ratio was evaluated for the cyclic tests. Fracture toughness test results were analyzed and presented in terms of fracture resistance curves; fatigue flaw growth data was analyzed using empirical rate models. The results of the study indicate that both fracture toughness and resistance to fatigue crack growth improve with increasing temperature and decreasing thickness. The presence of buckling during testing of thin gage panels was found to degrade the resistance to fatigue flaw growth only at elevated temperatures.

  7. Application of fracture mechanics and half-cycle theory to the prediction of fatigue life of aerospace structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1989-01-01

    The service life of aircraft structural components undergoing random stress cycling was analyzed by the application of fracture mechanics. The initial crack sizes at the critical stress points for the fatigue crack growth analysis were established through proof load tests. The fatigue crack growth rates for random stress cycles were calculated using the half-cycle method. A new equation was developed for calculating the number of remaining flights for the structural components. The number of remaining flights predicted by the new equation is much lower than that predicted by the conventional equation. This report describes the application of fracture mechanics and the half-cycle method to calculate the number of remaining flights for aircraft structural components.

  8. Determination of the fracture mechanism of mild steel in an overprotective environment by slow strain rate testing

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Nonaka, H. )

    1994-03-01

    The susceptibility and fracture mechanism of hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC) of mild steel in an overprotective marine clay environment were investigated to identify cracking nucleation sites, crack initiation times, and cracking processes. Specimens were subjected to slow strain rate testing (SSRT) and to the fracture surface topography analysis (FRASTA) technique. The steel was susceptible to HAC in 30% marine clay. Microcrack initiation occurred at defects such as grain boundaries. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) showed manganous sulfide (MnS) existed near the crack initiation sites. H probably was trapped at the MnS sites and concentrated through the motion of dislocations when the crack initiated. The HAC mechanism in the soil environment was found to be similar to that of hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC).

  9. Mechanical behavior of polycrystalline ceramics: Brittle fracture of SiC-Si3N4 materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceipold, M. H.; Kapadia, C. M.; Kelkar, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Research on the fracture behavior of silicon nitride and silicon carbide is reported along with the role of anion impurities in the fabrication and behavior of magnesium oxide. The results of a survey of crack propagation in SiC and Si3N4 are presented. Studies in the following areas are reported: development of a fracture toughness testing technique, constant moment beam, microcrack examination, and etching techniques.

  10. Multifractal fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Williford, R.E.

    1988-11-01

    This paper discusses the relationship between fracture energies and the fractal dimensions (D/sub s/) of fracture surfaces. Fractal dimensions provide a means to describe complicated geometries in terms of transitions between the integer-valued Euclidean dimensions. For fracture surfaces, D/sub s/ is between 2 and 3 because the surface features (i.e., the roughness R) extend from the two-dimensional mean plane of the surface into the third dimension. It has generally been found that a greater R results in greater D/sub s/. Only single dimensions have been used in previous applications of fractals to fracture problems. The purpose of this paper is to propose an explanation for this negative correlation based on the above spectrum of dimensions. This spectrum is part of a recent extension of the fractal concept: multifractals. In the following, a brief description of the multifractal concept provides a new understanding of the correlation (ordering) between the energetics of various fracture mechanisms and the complicated geometries of material damage. This ordering is quantified by a multifractal fracture model that is based on a partitioning of fracture mechanisms into two basic types: ductile (shear) or brittle (tensile). Interactive mechanisms in heterogeneous materials (composites) are implicitely included in the model, and a method for model verification by comparison to measured values of D/sub s/ is demonstrated.

  11. Application of fracture mechanics to predict the strength of filament-wound composite specimens with surface damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. H.; Harris, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    The strength of a thick surface notched filament wound graphite/epoxy tensile specimen was predicted using fracture mechanics analysis. The prediction model depended upon the depth of the surface notch and upon the type of failure. Specimens failed in two stages: first a sublaminate with thickness equal to the depth of the surface cut, and second, for increasing load, a sublaminate with thickness equal to the initial thickness minus the cut depth. Analytical predictions and experimental data were in good agreement.

  12. Mechanics of tidally driven fractures in Europa's ice shell and implications for seismic and radar profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Makris, N. C.

    2005-12-01

    Among Europa's surface features, cycloidal cracks are probably the most important for proving the existence of a subsurface liquid ocean. This is because (1) there is strong evidence that they are caused by tidally induced stress [1], and (2) this stress likely only approaches the ice failure strength if an ocean is present. There are a number of outstanding issues, however, in quantitatively explaining cycloidal cracks. First, current estimates of the pure diurnal tidal stress necessary to cause cycloidal cracks even in the presence of an ocean [1,2] is well below the typical stress known to cause tensile failure in natural terrestrial ice [3]. Second, models of ridge formation suggest that cycloidal cracks penetrate through the entire brittle-ice layer [1,4], but current models limit the depth of tidally induced surface cracks to be less than 100 m even in the presence of an ocean [1,5]. Third, the 3-km/h crack propagation speed determined by [1] is three orders of magnitude lower than the roughly 2-km/s speed at which cracks are known to propagate in ice. Our goal is to quantitatively address these issues in a unified manner. To do this, a fracture mechanics model is developed for the initiation and propagation of a crack through an ice layer of finite thickness in the presence of gravitational overburden and porosity. It is shown that Europa's ice shell may be highly porous and salt-rich. This implies that the strength of Europa's outer ice shell may be sufficiently low to make the crack initiation strengths arrived at by current kinematic models [1,2] highly plausible, even though they are much lower than those typically measured for terrestrial ice. A model is developed for the stress intensity factor at a crack tip in an ice shell with finite thickness, gravitational overburden, and depth-dependent porosity. This leads to the conclusion that cycloids are generated as a sequence of discrete and near instantaneous fracture events, each of which penetrates through the entire brittle layer with horizontal length on the order of the brittle layer thickness. This mechanism yields an apparent propagation speed that is consistent with the 3 km/h crack propagation speed necessary to generate cycloids in current kinematic models [1,2]. An implication of this model is that the level of seismic activity should be higher by orders of magnitude in the presence of an ocean. High correlation is then expected between the level of seismic activity and the tidal period in the presence but not in the absence of an ocean. The cracks associated with cycloids that fully penetrate the brittle layer should be at least 106 times more energetic than the shallow, roughly 100-m deep, surface cracks. We show that this greatly improves the signal-to-noise ratio for the type of seismic profiling discussed in [6] if fully penetrating cracks are used as sources of opportunity. Although Europa's ice is likely highly porous, the size of vacuous pores is likely on the order of a millimeter. Since the pore size is at least three orders of magnitude smaller than the ice-penetrating radar wavelength, our calculations show that porosity-induced scattering should not be significant. [1] Hoppa et al. 1999, Science 285. [2] Crawford et al. 2005, LPSC XXXVI #2042. [3] Weeks and Cox 1984, Ocean Sci. Eng. 9. [4] Pappalardo et al. 1999, J. Geophys. Res. 97. [5] Crawford and Stevenson 1988, Icarus 73. [6] Lee et al. 2003, Icarus 165.

  13. Effects of heat treatment and testing temperature on fracture mechanics behavior of low-Si CA-15 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Cheng-Hsun; Lee, Shen-Chih; Teng, Hwei-Yuan

    2004-02-01

    This research studied the effects of heat treatment and testing temperature on fracture mechanics behavior of Si-modified CA-15 martensitic stainless steel (MSS), which is similar to AISI 403 grade stainless steel, which has been widely used in wall and blanket structures and in the pipe of nuclear power plant reactors, turbine blades, and nozzles. The results indicated that fracture toughness of low-Si CA-15 MSS is better than that of AISI 403. The specimens of the low-Si CA-15 MSS after austenitization at 1010 °C and then tempering at 300 °C have higher plane-strain fracture toughness (K IC ) values for both 25 °C and -150 °C testing temperatures. However, the specimens tested at 150 °C cannot satisfy the plane-strain fracture toughness criteria. The fatigue crack growth rate is the slowest after austenitization at 1010 °C for 2 hours and tempering at 400 °C. Observing the crack propagation paths using a metallographic test, it was found that the cracking paths preferred orientation and branched along ferrite phase, owing to martensite-phase strengthening and grain-boundary-carbide retarding after 300 °C to 400 °C tempering. Also, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed to correlate the properties attained to the microstructural observation.

  14. Application of Fracture Mechanics to Specify the Proof Load Factor for Clamp Band Systems of Launch Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singaravelu, J.; Sundaresan, S.; Nageswara Rao, B.

    2013-04-01

    This article presents a methodology for evaluation of the proof load factor (PLF) for clamp band system (CBS) made of M250 Maraging steel following fracture mechanics principles.CBS is most widely used as a structural element and as a separation system. Using Taguchi's design of experiments and the response surface method (RSM) the compact tension specimens were tested to establish an empirical relation for the failure load ( P max) in terms of the ultimate strength, width, thickness, and initial crack length. The test results of P max closely matched with the developed RSM empirical relation. Crack growth rates of the maraging steel in different environments were examined. Fracture strength (σf) of center surface cracks and through-crack tension specimens are evaluated utilizing the fracture toughness ( K IC). Stress induced in merman band at flight loading conditions is evaluated to estimate the higher load factor and PLF. Statistical safety factor and reliability assessments were made for the specified flaw sizes useful in the development of fracture control plan for CBS of launch vehicles.

  15. The Relationships between Weight Functions, Geometric Functions,and Compliance Functions in Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Rong

    2007-02-06

    Linear elastic fracture mechanics is widely used in industry because it established simple and explicit relationships between the permissible loading conditions and the critical crack size that is allowed in a structure. Stress intensity factors are the above-mentioned functional expressions that relate load with crack size through geometric functions or weight functions. Compliance functions are to determine the crack/flaw size in a structure when optical inspection is inconvenient. As a result, geometric functions, weight functions and compliance functions have been intensively studied to determine the stress intensity factor expressions for different geometries. However, the relations between these functions have received less attention. This work is therefore to investigate the intrinsic relationships between these functions. Theoretical derivation was carried out and the results were verified on single-edge cracked plate under tension and bending. It is found out that the geometric function is essentially the non-dimensional weight function at the loading point. The compliance function is composed of two parts: a varying part due to crack extension and a constant part from the intact structure if no crack exists. The derivative of the compliance function at any location is the product of the geometric function and the weight function at the evaluation point. Inversely, the compliance function can be acquired by the integration of the product of the geometric function and the weight function with respect to the crack size. The integral constant is just the unchanging compliance from the intact structure. Consequently, a special application of the relations is to obtain the compliance functions along a crack once the geometric function and weight functions are known. Any of the three special functions can be derived once the other two functions are known. These relations may greatly simplify the numerical process in obtaining either geometric functions, weight functions or compliance functions for new test geometries.

  16. Petrophysical and Mechanical Properties of Fractured Aquifers in the Northern Newark Basin: Implications for Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, N. V.; Goldberg, D.; Collins, D.; Olsen, P. E.

    2012-12-01

    One of the key factors in predicting the performance of low-permeability fractured reservoirs is a detailed understanding of the in-situ state of stress and the distribution and orientation of natural fractures and faults. In this study we analyze borehole geophysical data from a deep characterization well in the northern Newark Basin, a candidate CO2-storage site, and provide petrophysical and geomechanical characterization of fractured sedimentary and igneous formations. Previous studies in the northern Newark basin demonstrated no unique relationship between hydraulic conductivity and degree of fracturing, fracture apertures or orientation. Therefore, in the absence of hydraulic testing data predicting fracture behavior under CO2 injection condition presents a significant challenge for baseline formation characterization. Moreover, fluid injection in deep wells can cause reactivation of existing faults or new fracture initiation due to significant increase in the pore pressure. We analyze electrical resistivity images and full-wave sonic data to constrain the state of the current in-situ stress in the northern Newark basin, and to evaluate how the interaction between in-situ stress and the distribution and orientation of natural fractures influences their hydraulic properties. We then combine it with the full suite of wireline logs to describe petrophysical, hydraulic, and geomechanical properties of the fractured aquifers at the locality. The Sandia Technologies, LLC Tandem Lot #1 geologic characterization well (Rockland County, NY) is about 6,800 ft deep and transects Triassic terrestrial sediments and the Palisades diabase sill that are both characterized by abundant natural fractures. A suite of standard wireline logs, high-resolution electrical resistivity images and full-wave sonic data were collected in the borehole but no hydraulic data or in-situ stress estimates are available. Borehole breakouts are clearly observed in the resistivity images in distinct sedimentary layers and strike predominantly SSE-NNW. In the Palisades sill breakouts are absent but the wellbore is consistently enlarged by up to 4 inches in the SE-NW direction (nominal hole diameter is 8.5 in). Drilling-induced tensile fractures and drilling-enhanced natural fractures appear in the tensile quadrants striking NE-SW. Preliminary analysis of sonic wavefields also suggest the NE orientation of the fast shear azimuth. For a vertical borehole these factors indicate maximum horizontal stress in the NE-SW direction, and are consistent with earthquake focal plane solutions and previous stress direction estimates in the Newark Basin. Borehole images also provide an excellent tool to describe natural fracture distribution and orientation. Combined with other petrophysical data such as core-calibrated density log, elastic moduli and stress-induced shear-wave anisotropy indicator, they allow to constrain geomechanical properties of the formation and to predict fracture behavior for potential CO2 injection conditions.

  17. Application of small specimens to fracture mechanics characterization of irradiated pressure vessel steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, M.A.; Wallin, K.; McCabe, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    In this study, precracked Charpy V-notch (PCVN) specimens were used to characterize the fracture toughness of unirradiated and irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels in the transition region by means of three-point static bending. Fracture toughness at cleavage instability was calculated in terms of elastic-plastic K{sub Jc} values. A statistical size correction based upon weakest-link theory was performed. The concept of a master curve was applied to analyze fracture toughness properties. Initially, size-corrected PCVN data from A 533 grade B steel, designated HSST Plate O2, were used to position the master curve and a 5% tolerance bound for K{sub Jc} data. By converting PCVN data to IT compact specimen equivalent K{sub Jc} data, the same master curve and 5% tolerance bound curve were plotted against the Electric Power Research Institute valid linear-elastic K{sub Jc} database and the ASME lower bound K{sub Ic} curve. Comparison shows that the master curve positioned by testing several PCVN specimens describes very well the massive fracture toughness database of large specimens. These results give strong support to the validity of K{sub Jc} with respect to K{sub Ic} in general and to the applicability of PCVN specimens to measure fracture toughness of reactor vessel steels in particular. Finally, irradiated PCVN specimens of other materials were tested, and the results are compared to compact specimen data. The current results show that PCVNs demonstrate very good capacity for fracture toughness characterization of reactor pressure vessel steels. It provides an opportunity for direct measurement of fracture toughness of irradiated materials by means of precracking and testing Charpy specimens from surveillance capsules. However, size limits based on constraint theory restrict the operational test temperature range for K{sub Jc} data from PCVN specimens. 13 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. The Mechanisms of Dispersion Strengthening and Fracture in Al-based XD (TM) Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, R. M., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of reinforcement size, volume fraction, and matrix deformation behavior on room and elevated temperature strength, and the fracture toughness of metal matrix composites of both pure aluminum and Al(4 percent)Cu(1.5 percent)Mg with 0 to 15 vol percent TiB2 were examined. Higher TiB2 volume fractions increased the tensile yield strength both at room and elevated temperatures, and reduced the elongation to fracture. Tensile tests also indicate that small particles provided a greater increase in strength for a given volume fraction than larger particles, whereas elongation to fracture appeared to be insensitive to reinforcement size. The fracture toughness of the Al(4 percent)Cu(1.5 percent)Mg alloys decreased rapidly with TiB2 additions of 0 to 5 vol percent and more slowly with TiB2 additions of 5 to 15 vol percent. Fracture toughness appears to be independent of TiB2 particle size. The isothermal-aging response of the precipitation strengthened Al(4 percent)Cu(1.5 percent)Mg alloys was not altered by the presence of TiB2.

  19. Elastic stress transmission and transformation (ESTT) by confined liquid: A new mechanics for fracture in elastic lithosphere of the earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xing-Wang; Peters, Stephen G.; Liang, Guang-He; Zhang, Bao-Lin

    2016-03-01

    We report on a new mechanical principle, which suggests that a confined liquid in the elastic lithosphere has the potential to transmit a maximum applied compressive stress. This stress can be transmitted to the internal contacts between rock and liquid and would then be transformed into a normal compressive stress with tangential tensile stress components. During this process, both effective compressive normal stress and tensile tangential stresses arise along the liquid-rock contact. The minimum effective tensile tangential stress causes the surrounding rock to rupture. Liquid-driven fracture initiates at the point along the rock-liquid boundary where the maximum compressive stress is applied and propagates along a plane that is perpendicular to the minimum effective tensile tangential stress and also is perpendicular to the minimum principal stress. Liquid-driven fractures and dikes propagate along the axes of cylindrical zones that are perpendicular to the minimum compressive principal stress in rocks in non-tectonic regions. The minimum depth for liquid-driven fracture, which is induced by a spherical confined liquid and an isolated magma chamber in the elastic lithosphere, ranges from 2 to 6 km, whereas dikes with hemi-cylinder-shaped ends propagate upwards closer to the surface under gravity. Transmission of pumping pressure, i.e. the pressure differences on the underside of a dike that is connected with a chamber, from the source magma chamber to intermediate and shallow chambers increases liquid pressure and also the effective tensile tangential stress and therefore leads to new fractures and dike formation and to upwards transport of magmas that have stagnated in the intermediate chamber. Tectonic stress alters local stress fields in the surrounding country rocks and therefore synchronously varies the local effective tensile tangential stress and the nature and geometry of the liquid-driven fractures.

  20. Proximal fifth metatarsal fractures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2013-01-01

    The most common fracture of the foot is a fracture of the proximal fifth metatarsal. In general, there are 3 types of fractures involving the proximal fifth metatarsal area, including a proximal diaphyseal stress fracture, a Jones fracture, and an avulsion fracture of the tuberosity. Some fractures of the fifth metatarsal heal without difficulty, whereas some have the potential for nonunion or delayed healing. Each fracture has some variation in the anatomical location on the fifth metatarsal, the mechanism of injury, the radiographic findings, and the treatment plan. Avulsion fractures of the tuberosity often heal without difficulty, yet fractures distal to the area of insertion of the peroneus brevis tendon are prone to nonunion and delayed healing (). Differential diagnosis of a fifth metatarsal midfoot injury includes ankle sprains, midfoot sprains, plantar facial ruptures, peroneus tendon ruptures, and other foot fractures. PMID:24176827

  1. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Surfaces of Thixoformed HP9/4/30 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, M. Z.; Jaharah, A. G.; Atkinson, H. V.; Kapranos, P.

    2007-04-07

    Most work in semi-solid metal processing has been focused on relatively low-melting temperature materials such as aluminium, magnesium, tin, lead and their composites. Because of the high melting temperatures and related measurement difficulties, there is relatively small amount of experimental data available on the thixoforming of high temperature materials such as steels. This paper discusses the relationships between tensile tests data and the fracture surfaces of HP9/4/30 steel samples, in as-received and as-thixoformed conditions. Some of the as-thixoformed samples were subjected to commercial heat treatments before the tests were carried out. The as-received samples showed a typical ductile fracture of 'cup' and 'cone' surface appearance. The thixoformed samples, although showing some significant increase in tensile strength values, failed in a brittle manner, with the fracture surfaces showing a 'cobbled' surface appearance. The application of the commercial heat treatment to the thixoformed samples has significantly improved their ductility.

  2. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Surfaces of Thixoformed HP9/4/30 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, M. Z.; Atkinson, H. V.; Kapranos, P.; Jaharah, A. G.

    2007-04-01

    Most work in semi-solid metal processing has been focused on relatively low-melting temperature materials such as aluminium, magnesium, tin, lead and their composites. Because of the high melting temperatures and related measurement difficulties, there is relatively small amount of experimental data available on the thixoforming of high temperature materials such as steels. This paper discusses the relationships between tensile tests data and the fracture surfaces of HP9/4/30 steel samples, in as-received and as-thixoformed conditions. Some of the as-thixoformed samples were subjected to commercial heat treatments before the tests were carried out. The as-received samples showed a typical ductile fracture of `cup' and `cone' surface appearance. The thixoformed samples, although showing some significant increase in tensile strength values, failed in a brittle manner, with the fracture surfaces showing a `cobbled' surface appearance. The application of the commercial heat treatment to the thixoformed samples has significantly improved their ductility.

  3. Competition of Fracture Mechanisms in Monolithic Dental Ceramics: Flat Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Kim, Jae-Won; Bhowmick, Sanjit; Thompson, Van P.; Rekow, E. Dianne

    2015-01-01

    Monolithic (single layer) glass-ceramic restorations often fail from chipping and fracture. Using blunt indentation of a model flat porcelain-like brittle layer bonded onto a dentin-like polymer support system, a variety of fatigue fracture modes has been identified and analyzed: outer cone, inner cone, and median cracks developing in the near-contact region at the occlusal surface; radial cracks developing at the internal cementation surface along the loading axis. Our findings indicate that monolithic glass-ceramic layers are vulnerable to both occlusal surface damage and cementation internal surface fracture. Clinical issues in the longevity of ceramic restorations are discussed in relation to biting force, physical properties of ceramic crowns and luting cement, and thicknesses of ceramic and cement layers. PMID:18478533

  4. Mechanisms of Plastic and Fracture Instabilities for Alloy Development of Fusion Materials. Final Project Report for period July 15, 1998 - July 14, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoniem, N. M.

    2003-07-14

    The main objective of this research was to develop new computational tools for the simulation and analysis of plasticity and fracture mechanisms of fusion materials, and to assist in planning and assessment of corresponding radiation experiments.

  5. A partitioned model order reduction approach to rationalise computational expenses in nonlinear fracture mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Kerfriden, P.; Goury, O.; Rabczuk, T.; Bordas, S.P.A.

    2013-01-01

    We propose in this paper a reduced order modelling technique based on domain partitioning for parametric problems of fracture. We show that coupling domain decomposition and projection-based model order reduction permits to focus the numerical effort where it is most needed: around the zones where damage propagates. No a priori knowledge of the damage pattern is required, the extraction of the corresponding spatial regions being based solely on algebra. The efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated numerically with an example relevant to engineering fracture. PMID:23750055

  6. A partitioned model order reduction approach to rationalise computational expenses in nonlinear fracture mechanics.

    PubMed

    Kerfriden, P; Goury, O; Rabczuk, T; Bordas, S P A

    2013-04-01

    We propose in this paper a reduced order modelling technique based on domain partitioning for parametric problems of fracture. We show that coupling domain decomposition and projection-based model order reduction permits to focus the numerical effort where it is most needed: around the zones where damage propagates. No a priori knowledge of the damage pattern is required, the extraction of the corresponding spatial regions being based solely on algebra. The efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated numerically with an example relevant to engineering fracture. PMID:23750055

  7. Fracture mechanics characterization of welds: Fatigue life analysis of notches at welds: J(sub Ic) fracture toughness tests for weld metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, John H.

    1995-03-01

    In this report two methods of fracture analysis of welds will be emphasized, one addressing fatigue life testing and analysis of notches at welds, and the other addressing the final fracture of the welded component and the fracture toughness tests used to characterize final fracture. These fatigue and fracture methods will be described by referring to recent work from the technical literature and from the U.S. Army Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center, primarily fracture case study and fracture test method development investigations. A brief general summary will be given of fatigue and fracture methods and concepts that have application to welded structures. Specific fatigue crack initiation tests and analysis methods will be presented, using example results from a welded stainless steel box beam of a cannon carriage. Recent improvements and simplifications in J.integral fracture toughness tests will be described, particularly those related to welds. Fracture toughness measurements for various stainless steel weld metals and heat treatments will also be described.

  8. Crustal Rock Fracture Mechanics for Design and Control of Artificial Subsurface Cracks in Geothermal Energy Extraction Engineering ({Gamma}-Project)

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Hideaki

    1983-12-15

    Recently a significant role of artificial and/or natural cracks in the geothermal reservoir has been demonstrated in the literatures (Abe, H., et al., 1983, Nielson, D.L. and Hullen, J.B., 1983), where the cracks behave as fluid paths and/or heat exchanging surfaces. Until now, however, there are several problems such as a design procedure of hydraulic fracturing, and a quantitative estimate of fluid and heat transfer for reservoir design. In order to develop a design methodology of geothermal reservoir cracks, a special distinguished research project, named as ''{Lambda}-Project'', started at Tohoku University (5 years project, 1983-1988). In this project a basic fracture mechanics model of geothermal reservoir cracks is being demonstrated and its validation is being discussed both theoretically and experimentally. This paper descibes an outline of ''{Lambda}-Project''.

  9. Mechanisms affecting the transport and retention of bacteria, bacteriophage and microspheres in laboratory-scale saturated fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seggewiss, G.; Dickson, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater is becoming an increasingly important water source due to the ever-increasing demands from agricultural, residential and industrial consumers. In search of more secure sources, wells are routinely finished over large vertical depths in bedrock aquifers, creating new hydraulic pathways and thus increasing the risk of cross contamination. Moreover, hydraulic pathways are also being altered and created by increasing water withdrawal rates from these wells. Currently, it is not well understood how biological contaminants are transported through, and retained in, fractured media thereby making risk assessment and land use decisions difficult. Colloid transport within fractured rock is a complex process with several mechanisms affecting transport and retention, including: advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, diffusion, size exclusion, adsorption, and decay. Several researchers have investigated the transport of bacteria, bacteriophage, and microspheres (both carboxylated and plain) to evaluate the effects of surface properties and size on transport and retention. These studies have suggested that transport is highly dependent on the physico-chemical properties of the particle, the fracture, and the carrying fluid. However, these studies contain little detail regarding the specific mechanisms responsible for transport beyond speculating about their existence. Further, little work has been done to compare the transport of these particulate materials through the same fracture, allowing for direct observations based on particulate size and surface properties. This research examines the similarities and differences in transport and retention between four different particles through two different laboratory-scale, saturated fractures. This work is designed to explore the effects of particle size, surface properties, ionic strength of the carrying solution, and aperture field characteristics on transport and retention in single, saturated fractures. The particulates chosen for this work include E.coli RS2-GFP, MS2, and carboxylated microspheres with diameters of 0.0425 μm and 0.525 μm. The results of this work will contribute to the understanding of risk posed by contaminants to bedrock aquifer sources. Dolomite rock samples were collected from the DoLime quarry in Guelph, Ontario. A single fracture was induced in the sample by applying a uniaxial force. Lengthwise edges were sealed to create no-flow boundaries, and flow cells were fitted on the up- and down-stream ends of the fracture. Aperture size and variability were characterized using hydraulic and solute tracer tests. Particulate tracer tests were conducted by injecting a pulse of particles (E.coli RS2-GFP, MS2, or microspheres) into the upstream flow cell, and measuring the subsequent effluent concentration profile. From these tests, the percent recovery and mean residence time of the particulate were analyzed. Generally, it was found that microspheres are a poor indication of biological particulate transport, likely due to differences in surface properties affecting the retention mechanisms. This talk will provide an analysis of the breakthrough curves, with specific details regarding the transport and retention mechanisms for the various types and sizes of particles employed in these experiments.

  10. Mechanical characterization of a CO2 fractured reservoir by means of microseismicity induced by high pressure injection tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Silvia; Soler, Joaquim; Carrera, Jesus; Slooten, Luit Jan; Ortiz, Gema

    2014-05-01

    Reservoir characterization is an essential issue in geological storage of CO2 in Technological Development Plant (TDP). In particular, hydromechanical characterization of the caprock-reservoir system is crucial, in order to define the maximum suitable injection pressure and the in-situ mechanical properties. Thus, it is possible to conjecture the hydromechanical behavior of the system during CO2 injection. Microseismicity induced by fluid injection may be used as instruments to find out fractured reservoir properties. Indeed, the hydromechanical response is controlled by permeability (k), Young modulus (E) and Poisson ratio (ν). In caprock-reservoir systems, reservoir stiffness controls the stress transfer towards the caprock, where failure may occur. Therefore, the location of the microseismic hypocenters could give information on the reservoir stiffness. In this work we propose a simulation and calibration method of the microseismicity induced by high pressure fluid injection in a fractured reservoir. Coupled hydromechanical models are peformed. The methology is applied to a particular case study.

  11. Influence of Ni addition on mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of Ir-15Nb two-phase refractory superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Yuefeng; Yamabe-Mitarai, Y.; Ro, Y.; Yokokawa, T.; Harada, H.

    1999-07-01

    Ir-based alloys with fcc-L1{sub 2} two-phase coherent structure, which are called refractory superalloys, have good potentiality as structure materials used at ultra-high temperatures up to 2,000 C. Preliminary results showed that the refractory superalloys failed predominantly by brittle intergranular fracture at room temperature even though they showed higher strength at that temperature. This paper will present the influence of nickel (Ni) addition on mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of one of these alloys, Ir-15at%Nb. The results indicated that Ni addition was beneficial to the compression ductility and strength of two-phase Ir-15at%Nb alloy when Ni content was below the optimum content.

  12. Fracture mechanics and statistical modeling of ternary blends of polylactide/ethylene-acrylate copolymer /wood-flour composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrifah, Kojo Agyapong

    This study examined the mechanisms of toughening the brittle bio-based poly(lactic acid) (PLA) with a biodegradable rubbery impact modifier to develop biodegradable and cost effective PLA/wood-flour composites with improved impact strength, toughness, high ductility, and flexibility. Semicrystalline and amorphous PLA grades were impact modified by melt blending with an ethylene-acrylate copolymer (EAC) impact modifier. EAC content was varied to study the effectiveness and efficiency of the impact modifier in toughening the semicrystalline and amorphous grades of the PLA. Impact strength was used to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of the EAC in toughening the blends, whereas the toughening mechanisms were determined with the phase morphologies and the miscibilities of the blends. Subsequent tensile property analyses were performed on the most efficiently toughened PLA grade. Composites were made from PLA, wood flour of various particle sizes, and EAC. Using two-level factorial design the interaction between wood flour content, wood flour particle size, and EAC content and its effect on the mechanical properties of the PLA/wood-flour composites was statistically studied. Numerical optimization was also performed to statistically model and optimize material compositions to attain mechanical properties for the PLA/wood-flour composites equivalent to at least those of unfilled PLA. The J-integral method of fracture mechanics was applied to assess the crack initiation (Jin) and complete fracture (J f) energies of the composites to account for imperfections in the composites and generate data useful for engineering designs. Morphologies of the fractured surfaces of the composites were analyzed to elucidate the failure and toughening mechanisms of the composites. The EAC impact modifier effectively improved the impact strength of the PLA/EAC blends, regardless of the PLA type. However, the EAC was more efficient in the semicrystalline grades of PLA compared to the amorphous grade. The semicrystalline blends showed decreased tensile strength and modulus with increased impact modifier content. In contrast, the ductility, elongation at break, and energy to break increased significantly. Mechanisms of toughening of PLA with EAC included impact modifier debonding, fibrillization, crack bridging and matrix shear yielding resulting in a ductile behavior. Increasing the EAC content in PLA/wood-flour composites enhanced the impact strength and elongation at break, but reduced the tensile modulus and strength of the composites. Composites with fine wood particles showed greater improvement in elongation at break than those with coarse particles; an opposite trend was observed for impact strength, tensile modulus and tensile strength. Numerical optimization produced two scenarios based on materials compositions to produce composites with similar mechanical properties as unfilled PLA. These optimization solutions were successfully validated experimentally. The crack initiation (Jin) and complete fracture (Jf) energies of unmodified PLA/wood-flour composites showed the deleterious effect of wood fiber incorporation into the plastic matrix by significantly decreasing the fracture toughness of PLA as the wood flour content increased. By contrast, impact modification of wood plastic composites with EAC significantly increased both the resistance to crack initiation (Jin) and complete fracture (Jf). Microscopic morphological studies revealed that the major mechanisms of toughening was through the EAC existing as separate domains in the bulk matrix of the composites which tended to act as stress concentrators that initiated local yielding of the matrix around crack tips and enhanced the toughness of the composites.

  13. Mechanical Comparison of Headless Screw Fixation and Locking Plate Fixation for Talar Neck Fractures.

    PubMed

    Karakasli, Ahmet; Hapa, Onur; Erduran, Mehmet; Dincer, Cemal; Cecen, Berivan; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    For talar neck fractures, open reduction and internal fixation have been thought to facilitate revascularization and prevent osteonecrosis. Newer screw systems allow for placement of cannulated headless screws, which provide compression by virtue of a variable pitch thread. The present study compared the biomechanical fixation strength of cannulated headless variable-pitch screw fixation and locking plate fixation. A reproducible talar neck fracture was created in 14 fresh cadaver talar necks. Talar head fixation was then performed using 2 cannulated headless variable-pitch 4-mm/5-mm diameter (4/5) screws (Acutrak; Acumed, Hillsboro, OR) and locking plate fixation. Headless variable-pitch screw fixation had lower failure displacement than did locking plate fixation. No statistically significant differences were found in failure stiffness, yield stiffness (p = .655), yield load (p = .142), or ultimate load between the 2 fixation techniques. Cannulated headless variable-pitch screw fixation resulted in better failure displacement than locking plate fixation in a cadaveric talus model and could be considered a viable option for talus fracture fixation. Headless, fully threaded, variable-pitch screw fixation has inherent advantages compared with locking plate fixation, because it might cause less damage to the articular surface and can compress the fracture for improved reduction. Additionally, plate fixation can increase the risk of avascular necrosis owing to the wider incision and dissection of soft tissues. PMID:25998471

  14. Mechanical behavior of polycrystalline ceramics: Brittle fracture of Si C - Si3N4 materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.; Kapadia, C. M.; Kelkar, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    The results are described of the final stage of the research involving the role of anions in the behavior of magnesium oxide, as well as the continued efforts of the fracture behavior of silicon nitride materials. These efforts, particularly the first, are further sub-divided in subsections describing individual types of behavior of materials.

  15. The mechanics and physics of fracturing: application to thermal aspects of crack propagation and to fracking.

    PubMed

    Cherepanov, Genady P

    2015-03-28

    By way of introduction, the general invariant integral (GI) based on the energy conservation law is presented, with mention of cosmic, gravitational, mass, elastic, thermal and electromagnetic energy of matter application to demonstrate the approach, including Coulomb's Law generalized for moving electric charges, Newton's Law generalized for coupled gravitational/cosmic field, the new Archimedes' Law accounting for gravitational and surface energy, and others. Then using this approach the temperature track behind a moving crack is found, and the coupling of elastic and thermal energies is set up in fracturing. For porous materials saturated with a fluid or gas, the notion of binary continuum is used to introduce the corresponding GIs. As applied to the horizontal drilling and fracturing of boreholes, the field of pressure and flow rate as well as the fluid output from both a horizontal borehole and a fracture are derived in the fluid extraction regime. The theory of fracking in shale gas reservoirs is suggested for three basic regimes of the drill mud permeation, with calculating the shape and volume of the local region of the multiply fractured rock in terms of the pressures of rock, drill mud and shale gas. PMID:25713454

  16. Effect of orientation on the in vitro fracture toughness ofdentin: The role of toughening mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, R.K.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2003-01-28

    A micro-mechanistic understanding of bone fracture thatencompasses how cracks interact with the underlying microstructure anddefines their local failure mode is lacking, despite extensive research nthe response of bone to a variety of factors like aging, loading, and/ordisease.

  17. Interaction of Age and Mechanical Stability on Bone Defect Healing: An Early Transcriptional Analysis of Fracture Hematoma in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Ode, Andrea; Duda, Georg N.; Geissler, Sven; Pauly, Stephan; Ode, Jan-Erik; Perka, Carsten; Strube, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Among other stressors, age and mechanical constraints significantly influence regeneration cascades in bone healing. Here, our aim was to identify genes and, through their functional annotation, related biological processes that are influenced by an interaction between the effects of mechanical fixation stability and age. Therefore, at day three post-osteotomy, chip-based whole-genome gene expression analyses of fracture hematoma tissue were performed for four groups of Sprague-Dawley rats with a 1.5-mm osteotomy gap in the femora with varying age (12 vs. 52 weeks - biologically challenging) and external fixator stiffness (mechanically challenging). From 31099 analysed genes, 1103 genes were differentially expressed between the six possible combinations of the four groups and from those 144 genes were identified as statistically significantly influenced by the interaction between age and fixation stability. Functional annotation of these differentially expressed genes revealed an association with extracellular space, cell migration or vasculature development. The chip-based whole-genome gene expression data was validated by q-RT-PCR at days three and seven post-osteotomy for MMP-9 and MMP-13, members of the mechanosensitive matrix metalloproteinase family and key players in cell migration and angiogenesis. Furthermore, we observed an interaction of age and mechanical stimuli in vitro on cell migration of mesenchymal stromal cells. These cells are a subpopulation of the fracture hematoma and are known to be key players in bone regeneration. In summary, these data correspond to and might explain our previously described biomechanical healing outcome after six weeks in response to fixation stiffness variation. In conclusion, our data highlight the importance of analysing the influence of risk factors of fracture healing (e.g. advanced age, suboptimal fixator stability) in combination rather than alone. PMID:25187955

  18. Micromechanics, Fracture Mechanics and Gas Permeability of Composite Laminates for Cryogenic Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sukjoo; Sankar, Bhavani; Ebaugh, Newton C.

    2005-01-01

    A micromechanics method is developed to investigate microcrack propagation in a liquid hydrogen composite tank at cryogenic temperature. The unit cell is modeled using square and hexagonal shapes depends on fiber and matrix layout from microscopic images of composite laminates. Periodic boundary conditions are applied to the unit cell. The temperature dependent properties are taken into account in the analysis. The laminate properties estimated by the micromechanics method are compared with empirical solutions using constituent properties. The micro stresses in the fiber and matrix phases based on boundary conditions in laminate level are calculated to predict the formation of microcracks in the matrix. The method is applied to an actual liquid hydrogen storage system. The analysis predicts micro stresses in the matrix phase are large enough to cause microcracks in the composite. Stress singularity of a transverse crack normal to a ply-interface is investigated to predict the fracture behavior at cryogenic conditions using analytical and finite element analysis. When a transverse crack touches a ply-interface of a composite layer with same fiber orientation, the stress singularity is equal to 1/2. When the transverse crack propagates to a stiffer layer normal to the ply-direction, the singularity becomes less than 1/2 and vice versa. Finite element analysis is performed to predict the fracture toughness of a laminated beam subjected to fracture loads measured by four-point bending tests at room and cryogenic temperatures. As results, the fracture load at cryogenic temperature is significantly lower than that at room temperature. However, when thermal stresses are taken into consideration, for both cases of room and cryogenic temperatures, the difference of the fracture toughness becomes insignificant. The result indicates fracture toughness is a characteristic property, which is independent to temperature changes. The experimental analysis is performed to investigate the effect of cryogenic cycling on permeability for various composite material systems. Textile composites have lower permeability than laminated composites even with increasing number of cryogenic cycle. Nano-particles dispersed in laminated composites do not show improvement on permeability. The optical inspection is performed to investigate the microcrack propagation and void content in laminated composites and compared the microscopic results before and after cryogenic cycling.

  19. Dynamic Mechanical Properties and Fracture Surface Morphologies of Core-Shell Rubber (CSR) Toughened Epoxy at Liquid Nitrogen (Ln2) Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Magee, D.; Schneider, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties and fracture surface morphologies were evaluated for a commercial epoxy resin toughened with two types of core-shell rubber (CSR) toughening agents (Kane Ace(Registered TradeMark) MX130 and MX960). The impact resistance (R) was evaluated by the resulting breaking energy measured in Charpy impact tests conducted on an instrumented drop tower. The resulting fracture surface morphologies were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Fractographic observations of the CSR toughened epoxy tested at ambient temperature, showed a fracture as characterized by slender dendrite textures with large voids. The increasing number of dendrites and decreasing size of scale-like texture with more CSR particles corresponded with increased R. As the temperature decreased to Liquid Nitrogen (LN 2), the fracture surfaces showed a fracture characterized by a rough, torn texture containing many river markings and deep furrows.

  20. Experimental Investigation of Damage and Fracture Mechanisms Controlling the Performance of Full Aperture Easy Open Ends for Food Containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, D. L. P.; Nagy, G. T.; Owen, D. R. J.

    2011-05-01

    Can manufacturers produce hundreds of millions of cans annually, increasingly, food cans are being opened by lifting a tab on the can end that initiates a fracture, which then propagates around a circumferential score. The damage and fracture mechanisms that lead to crack initiation and propagation in the opening process, however, are not fully understood, therefore optimisation of easy open end scores is largely based on trial and error. This paper presents an experimental analysis that concentrates on the combined shear and bending forces as applied to the particular industrial method concerning full aperture easy open ends. The influence of a gradually increasing gap measured between the score and shear force location on traditional groove geometries and depths are examined for two different packaging steels. Earlier studies have shown that the complete opening cycle depends on fracture modes I, II & III as well as their combination. Experimental results for Modes I, II & III will be presented, however attention will focus on the behaviour of the initial fracture point, whereby prior investigations have shown it to be influenced primarily by mode II shearing. After initial specimen manufacture, where the score is formed by pressing a punch into a thin steel sheet the predeformed scored specimens are loaded in shear to simulate the local stress field found during the initial opening phase. Experiments have been completed using a novel Mode II experimental technique that has been designed for use in the majority of commercially available tensile test machines. Experimental results indicate that opening forces can change radically with different gap sizes and that there is considerable potential for the industrialised process of can end manufacture to be optimised through the efficient management and control of the can ends dimensional parameters.

  1. Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics Analysis of Critical Flaw Size in ARES I-X Flange-to-Skin Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chell, G. Graham; Hudak, Stephen J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Ares 1 Upper Stage Simulator (USS) is being fabricated from welded A516 steel. In order to insure the structural integrity of these welds it is of interest to calculate the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) to establish rational inspection requirements. The CIFS is in turn dependent on the critical final flaw size (CFS), as well as fatigue flaw growth resulting from transportation, handling and service-induced loading. These calculations were made using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM), which are thought to be conservative because they are based on a lower bound, so called elastic, fracture toughness determined from tests that displayed significant plasticity. Nevertheless, there was still concern that the yield magnitude stresses generated in the flange-to-skin weld by the combination of axial stresses due to axial forces, fit-up stresses, and weld residual stresses, could give rise to significant flaw-tip plasticity, which might render the LEFM results to be non-conservative. The objective of the present study was to employ Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics (EPFM) to determine CFS values, and then compare these values to CFS values evaluated using LEFM. CFS values were calculated for twelve cases involving surface and embedded flaws, EPFM analyses with and without plastic shakedown of the stresses, LEFM analyses, and various welding residual stress distributions. For the cases examined, the computed CFS values based on elastic analyses were the smallest in all instances where the failures were predicted to be controlled by the fracture toughness. However, in certain cases, the CFS values predicted by the elastic-plastic analyses were smaller than those predicted by the elastic analyses; in these cases the failure criteria were determined by a breakdown in stress intensity factor validity limits for deep flaws (a greater than 0.90t), rather than by the fracture toughness. Plastic relaxation of stresses accompanying shakedown always increases the calculated CFS values compared to the CFS values determined without shakedown. Thus, it is conservative to ignore shakedown effects.

  2. A Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical modeling of fracture opening and closing due heat extraction from geothermal reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nand Pandey, Sachchida; Chaudhuri, Abhijit; Kelkar, Sharad

    2015-04-01

    Increasing the carbon dioxide concentration in atmosphere become challenging task for the scientific community. To achieve the sustainable growth with minimum pollution in atmosphere requires the development of low carbon technology or switch towards renewable energy. Geothermal energy is one of the promising source of clean energy. Geothermal energy is also considered a sustainable, reliable and least-expensive. This study presents a numerical modeling of subsurface heat extraction from the reservoir. The combine flow, heat transfer and geo-mechanical problem are modeled using FEHM code, which was validated against existing field data, numerical code and commercial software. In FEHM the flow and heat transfer in reservoir are solved by control volume method while for mechanical deformation finite element technique is used. The 3-D computational domain (230m × 200m × 1000m) has single horizontal fault/fracture, which is located at 800 m depth from the ground surface. The fracture connects the injection and production wells. The distance between the wells is 100 m. A geothermal gradient 0.08 °C/m is considered. The temperatures at top and bottom boundaries are held fixed as 20 and 100 °C respectively. The zero heat and mass flux boundary conditions are imposed to all vertical side boundaries of the domain. The simulation results for 100 days suggests that the computational domain is sufficiently large as the temperature along the vertical boundaries are not affected by cold-water injection. To model the thermo-poro-elastic deformation, zero all three components of displacement are specified as zero at the bottom. The zero stress condition along all other boundaries allows the boundaries to move freely. The temperature and pressure dependent fluid properties such as density and viscosity with single phase flow in saturated medium is considered. We performed a series of thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) simulations to show aperture alteration due to cold-water injection. The initial fracture aperture was taken 1mm. The Young's modulus of rock matrix and joint stiffness were taken as 15GPa and 15GPa/m respectively. Our results show that the contraction of rock due to cooling causes the opening of the fracture near injection well. However in some regions where temperature drop is insignificant the compressive stress develops and fracture closes. As the heat extraction continues with time, further contraction of rock causes more aperture growth between the wells. For the above-mentioned computational domain, due to cold-water (20 °C) at mass flow rate 4kg/s, the aperture in the vicinity of the injection well increases by 75%. Our simulation for joint stiffness equal to 50GPa/m, show that the magnitudes of normal tensile and compressive stresses in the fracture/joint are almost same but the aperture alteration is proportionally reduced. Since the joint stiffness is a nonlinear function of opening, it is important to include a suitable nonlinear model for joint opening/closing while simulating the fracture transmissivity alter during heat extraction.

  3. Diabetes reduces mesenchymal stem cells in fracture healing through a TNFα-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Chen; Alblowi, Jazia; Kayal, Rayyan A.; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Gerstenfeld, Louis C.; Pignolo, Robert J.; Graves, Dana T.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Diabetes interferes with bone formation and impairs fracture healing, an important complication in humans and animal models. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of diabetes on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) during fracture repair. Methods Fracture of the long bones was induced in a streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mouse model with or without insulin or a specific TNFα inhibitor, pegsunercept. MSCs were detected with cluster designation-271 (also known as p75 neurotrophin receptor) or stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) antibodies in areas of new endochondral bone formation in the calluses. MSC apoptosis was measured by TUNEL assay and proliferation was measured by Ki67 antibody. In vitro apoptosis and proliferation were examined in C3H10T1/2 and human-bone-marrow-derived MSCs following transfection with FOXO1 small interfering (si)RNA. Results Diabetes significantly increased TNFα levels and reduced MSC numbers in new bone area. MSC numbers were restored to normal levels with insulin or pegsunercept treatment. Inhibition of TNFα significantly reduced MSC loss by increasing MSC proliferation and decreasing MSC apoptosis in diabetic animals, but had no effect on MSCs in normoglycaemic animals. In vitro experiments established that TNFα alone was sufficient to induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation of MSCs. Furthermore, silencing forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) prevented TNFα-induced MSC apoptosis and reduced proliferation by regulating apoptotic and cell cycle genes. Conclusions/interpretation Diabetes-enhanced TNFα significantly reduced MSC numbers in new bone areas during fracture healing. Mechanistically, diabetes-enhanced TNFα reduced MSC proliferation and increased MSC apoptosis. Reducing the activity of TNFα in vivo may help to preserve endogenous MSCs and maximise regenerative potential in diabetic patients. PMID:25563724

  4. Proppant backproduction during hydraulic fracturing -- A new failure mechanism for resin-coated proppants

    SciTech Connect

    Vreeburg, R.J.; Roodhart, L.P.; Davies, D.R.; Penny, G.S. )

    1994-10-01

    Backproduction of proppant from hydraulically fractured wells, particularly those completed in the northern European Rotliegend formation, is a major operational problem, necessitating costly and manpower-intensive surface-handling procedures. Further, the development of unmanned platform operations offshore, required in today's economic climate, is impossible as long as this problem remains unsolved. The most cost-effective potential solution to this problem is provided by curable resin-coated proppant (RCP), which consolidates in the fracture. Early field trials with RCP's, however, were not completely effective in stopping the backproduction of proppant. Typically, some 10% of the total volume of RCP placed in the fracture was backproduced. The authors performed a laboratory study to help clarify the effect of curing temperature, water production rate, proppant size, and stress cycling on the integrity of RCP packs. The experiments confirmed the field experience that stress cycling has a dramatic effect on proppant backproduction of commercial RCP packs. The number of applied stress cycles (i.e., the number of times the well is shut in) and the initial RCP pack strength appear to be the dominant factors that govern proppant backproduction. Dedicated experiments are therefore required to evaluate the use of RCP's to eliminate proppant backproduction for a particular field application.

  5. An investigation of the edge-sliding mode in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. L.; Chisholm, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    A boundary collocation procedure has been applied to the Williams stress function to determine the elastic stress distribution for the crack tip region of a finite, edge-cracked plate subjected to mode II loading at the crack tips. The asymmetric specimen selected was particularly suitable for the determination of plane strain fracture toughness for mode II loading. Numerical solutions for stress intensity factors for the edge-sliding mode obtained by the boundary collocation method were in close agreement with values obtained from photoelastic experiments. Fracture tests of several compact shear specimens of 2024-T4 aluminum were conducted in order to experimentally investigate the behavior of the edge-sliding mode. In each case a brittle shear failure was observed and mode II fracture toughness values were obtained. The average value for K-IIc obtained from two tests was 39.5 ksi radical (in). No K-Ic data for 2024-T4 were available for comparison purposes; however, K-Ic values for a similar alloy, 2024-T351, have been reported as 34 ksi radical (in) which is only about 15 per cent below the corresponding K-IIc value.

  6. Reaction mechanisms, microstructure, and fracture properties of thermoplastic polysulfone-modified epoxy resin

    SciTech Connect

    Min, B.G.; Stachurski, Z.H. . Dept. of Materials Engineering); Hodgkin, J.H. . Div. of Chemicals and Polymers)

    1993-11-10

    The microstructure and fracture properties of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy resins modified with phenolic hydroxyl-terminated polysulfone (PSF) and cured with diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS) hardener have been investigated as a function of the molecular weight and concentration of PSF. The microstructure changed from a typical particulate structure to a phase-inverted structure as the molecular weight and/or the concentration of the modifier increased. The fracture toughness, measured by compact tension tests, increased with the microstructural changes toward the phase-inverted structure. The level of minor reactions such as etherification and homopolymerization reactions increased with increasing molecular weight and/or concentration of the modifier, in line with the tendencies observed in microstructure and fracture toughness. In the system containing 20 wt% of M[sub n] 10,000 PSF, about 30% of the epoxy groups were consumed by etherification and homopolymerization reactions, whereas none of these reactions occurred in the unmodified system. The increase in minor reactions in the modified systems may be to be due to the restricted molecular mobility, resulting from the increase of system viscosity caused by the modification.

  7. On the Mechanisms for Defeating AP Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Z.; Dekel, E.; Ashuach, Y.; Yeshurun, Y.

    The important mechanisms for defeating armor piercing (AP) projectiles are reviewed in this paper. These mechanisms are based on the compressive strength of the target material (its inherent resistance to penetration) and on the asymmetrical forces which it exerts on the threat, through proper geometrical arrangements. We discuss the basic features of the resistance to penetration, starting with the classical analysis of the cavity expansion process in elasto-plastic solids. This property of the target is responsible for the deceleration of hard cored projectiles and for the erosion of long rods, under normal impact conditions. We then discuss the asymmetrical interaction of AP projectiles with inclined plates (metals and polymers) and with ceramic spheres. These asymmetric forces are responsible for their deflection and breakup. Our work combines experimental observations with numerical simulations and engineering models, which enhance the understanding of the various phenomena encountered in these complex situations. This understanding is necessary for optimizing the performance of any armor design against a given threat.

  8. Modeling Shear-Enhanced Permeability as the Mechanism for Fluid Flow in Fractured Reservoirs - A Promising Improvement to Predicting Reservoir Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C.; Moos, D.

    2011-12-01

    An accurate geomechanical reservoir model including constraints on stress magnitudes and orientations, mechanical rock properties, and the orientations and characteristics of natural fractures is essential to understanding reservoir response to stimulation and production in low permeability reservoirs such as crystalline basement geothermal or oil and gas reservoirs. In these low permeability reservoirs, stimulation response is controlled largely by the properties of natural and induced fracture networks which are in turn controlled by the in situ stresses, the fracture distribution and the hydraulic behavior of the fractures. These hydraulic properties of the fractures, their width, stiffness and strength are often difficult to quantify, leading to large uncertainties in predicted response to stimulation of fractured reservoirs. A well-constrained and calibrated fracture model makes it possible not only to predict reservoir response to stimulation, including the shape and orientation of the stimulated region, but also to predict the required stimulation pressure. Such a model also makes it possible to predict the change in flow properties during production due to depletion, resulting in better predictions of production rate and ultimate recovery. As part of the evaluation process of a compartmentalized fractured basement reservoir, wellbore image and other data were used to develop a 3D geomechanical model of stress and natural fractures through the reservoir volume. Although the results clearly defined the optimal directions in which to drill wells to exploit pre-existing natural fractures, large uncertainties in the models resulted in significant uncertainties in predictions of stimulation response. Because the pre-existing natural fractures were insufficiently permeable and operational constraints precluded the use of hydraulic fracturing to stimulate the reservoir, an innovative approach was taken to determine the extent to which injection at pressures below the least principal stress could enhance natural fracture conductivity. This approach involves injecting small amounts of water at successively higher rates, followed by a period of lower-rate injection, to determine pre- and post-stimulation fracture permeability and the required stimulation pressure. Additional successively higher rate injectivity tests were designed and conducted to verify reservoir permeability. These tests allowed assessment of the likely effects of stimulation on reservoir flow properties and helped to reduce uncertainties in the prediction of the optimal well trajectory for enhanced reservoir production. The approach applied in this basement reservoir is applicable to any field in which fractures provide the primary flow paths but are too impermeable in their natural state to make wells economic.

  9. Viscoelastic Fracturing As a Migration and Expulsion Mechanism for Hydrocarbons in Shales: Analog Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Damme, H.

    2014-12-01

    We report the results of simple laboratory experiments aimed at mimicking the generation, migration, and expulsion process of oil or gas from soft clayey sediments, triggered by thermal decomposition of organic matter. In previously published work, we showed that the injection of fluids into a soft sediment layer confined within a quasi-2D Hele-Shaw cell led to the transition from a viscous fingering invasion regime to a viscoelastic fracturing regime. The transition is controlled by the ratio of the characteristic times for the invasion process and for the structural relaxation in the sediment, respectively (Deborah number). Here we show that expulsion is a discontinuous quasi-periodic process, driven by the elastic energy stored in the embedding layers. We report also about two sets of experiments aimed at understanding the conditions in which fluid generation from multiple sources can generate a highly conne