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Sample records for elderly high risk

  1. High Risk Situations for Elderly Alcohol Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupree, Larry W.; Schonfeld, Lawrence

    The Gerontology Alcohol Project, a treatment/research program investigating the characteristics of the late-life onset elderly alcohol abuser, was used as a model for a new program which emphasized teaching the elderly abusers how to break down their personal drinking behavior chain and deal with the antecedents of drinking behavior, to use…

  2. Waist-to-Height Ratio and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Elderly Individuals at High Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Bulló, Mònica; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Corella, Dolores; Estruch, Ramon; Covas, María-Isabel; Arós, Fernando; Wärnberg, Julia; Fiol, Miquel; Lapetra, José; Muñoz, Miguel Ángel; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Pintó, Xavier; Babio, Nancy; Díaz-López, Andrés; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Several anthropometric measurements have been associated with cardiovascular disease, type-2 diabetes mellitus and other cardiovascular risk conditions, such as hypertension or metabolic syndrome. Waist-to-height-ratio has been proposed as a useful tool for assessing abdominal obesity, correcting other measurements for the height of the individual. We compared the ability of several anthropometric measurements to predict the presence of type-2 diabetes, hyperglycemia, hypertension, atherogenic dyslipidemia or metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods In our cross-sectional analyses we included 7447 Spanish individuals at high cardiovascular risk, men aged 55–80 years and women aged 60–80 years, from the PREDIMED study. Logistic regression models were fitted to evaluate the odds ratio of presenting each cardiovascular risk factor according to various anthropometric measures. The areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) were used to compare the predictive ability of these measurements. Results In this relatively homogeneous cohort with 48.6% of type-2 diabetic individuals, the great majority of the studied anthropometric parameters were significantly and positively associated with the cardiovascular risk factors. No association was found between BMI and body weight and diabetes mellitus. The AUCs for the waist-to-height ratio and waist circumference were significantly higher than the AUCs for BMI or weight for type-2 diabetes, hyperglycemia, atherogenic dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome. Conversely, BMI was the strongest predictor of hypertension. Conclusions We concluded that measures of abdominal obesity showed higher discriminative ability for diabetes mellitus, high fasting plasma glucose, atherogenic dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome than BMI or weight in a large cohort of elderly Mediterranean individuals at high cardiovascular risk. No significant differences were found between the predictive abilities of waist

  3. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting in elderly and high-risk patients--a review.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Edward A; Edelman, J James B; Wilson, Michael K; Bannon, Paul G; Vallely, Michael P

    2011-11-01

    Elderly and high-risk patients are increasingly being considered for myocardial revascularisation. Most trials comparing the various options for revascularisation exclude elderly and 'high-risk' patients. We have reviewed the options for myocardial revascularisation for elderly patients, and for patients with a number of common 'high-risk' co-morbidities--diabetes mellitus, renal insufficiency, poor left ventricular ejection fraction, peripheral vascular disease, left main coronary artery disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease--with a focus on coronary artery bypass grafting without the use of cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic manipulation. PMID:21862405

  4. The challenge of individualised risk assessment and therapy planning in elderly high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients.

    PubMed

    Stauder, Reinhard

    2012-09-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent one of the most frequent and serious haematologic diseases of the elderly. Effective therapies exist ranging from best supportive care to haematologic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Decision making, however, is rather complex in this group of patients because ageing is a multidimensional process involving not only physiological changes but also changes in functional, social, emotional and cognitive capacities. All these factors can have a significant impact on the efficacy and tolerability of a potential therapy and therefore have to be thoroughly assessed before deciding on individual treatment regimens. Risk assessment tools are available both to classify the stage and prognosis of MDS and to meet the needs of elderly patients. A tool explicitly focussing on elderly MDS patients, however, is still missing. The current report approached this issue by combining the well established MDS-risk score 'International Prognostic Scoring System' (IPSS) with the 'Multidimensional Geriatric Assessment' (MGA). As decision making is most complex in high-risk MDS patients, the new algorithm is presented exemplarily for this group of patients. In a first step, MDS-related risk is identified using IPSS, in a second step, patients are assigned to one of three risk categories of the MGA (go-go/fit, slow-go/vulnerable, no-go/frail). While go-go patients might be subjected to therapies comparable to those given to younger patients, in no-go patients, a palliative therapy combined with best supportive care will probably be most appropriate. In slow-go patients, age-related life expectancy taken from public age statistics should be compared to the MDS-related life expectancy. Based on this combined assessment procedure and also on treatment tolerance in terms of the expectations/wishes of the patient and his/her family, an individualised therapeutic approach should be developed. Specific treatment recommendations for these three groups of

  5. Obesity Indexes and Total Mortality among Elderly Subjects at High Cardiovascular Risk: The PREDIMED Study

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, Miguel A.; García-Arellano, Ana; Toledo, Estefanía; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Bulló, Mónica; Corella, Dolores; Fito, Montserrat; Ros, Emilio; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa Maria; Rekondo, Javier; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Fiol, Miquel; Santos-Lozano, Jose Manuel; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Martínez, J. Alfredo; Eguaras, Sonia; Sáez-Tormo, Guillermo; Pintó, Xavier; Estruch, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Background Different indexes of regional adiposity have been proposed for identifying persons at higher risk of death. Studies specifically assessing these indexes in large cohorts are scarce. It would also be interesting to know whether a dietary intervention may counterbalance the adverse effects of adiposity on mortality. Methods We assessed the association of four different anthropometric indexes (waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), waist circumference (WC), body mass index (BMI) and height) with all-cause mortality in 7447 participants at high cardiovascular risk from the PREDIMED trial. Forty three percent of them were men (55 to 80 years) and 57% were women (60 to 80 years). All of them were initially free of cardiovascular disease. The recruitment took place in 11 recruiting centers between 2003 and 2009. Results After adjusting for age, sex, smoking, diabetes, hypertension, intervention group, family history of coronary heart disease, and leisure-time physical activity, WC and WHtR were found to be directly associated with a higher mortality after 4.8 years median follow-up. The multivariable-adjusted HRs for mortality of WHtR (cut-off points: 0.60, 0.65, 0.70) were 1.02 (0.78–1.34), 1.30 (0.97–1.75) and 1.55 (1.06–2.26). When we used WC (cut-off points: 100, 105 and 110 cm), the multivariable adjusted Hazard Ratios (HRs) for mortality were 1.18 (0.88–1.59), 1.02 (0.74–1.41) and 1.57 (1.19–2.08). In all analyses, BMI exhibited weaker associations with mortality than WC or WHtR. The direct association between WHtR and overall mortality was consistent within each of the three intervention arms of the trial. Conclusions Our study adds further support to a stronger association of abdominal obesity than BMI with total mortality among elderly subjects at high risk of cardiovascular disease. We did not find evidence to support that the PREDIMED intervention was able to counterbalance the harmful effects of increased adiposity on total mortality. Trial

  6. Evaluation of perioperative risk in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Aubrun, F; Gazon, M; Schoeffler, M; Benyoub, K

    2012-05-01

    From a medical point of view, aging is characterized by a potential failure to maintain homeostasis under conditions of physiological stress. This failure is associated with an increase in vulnerability. Physiological changes associated with aging are progressive but concomitant injury or diseases may rapidly worsen the health status of the patient. Increasing age independently predicts morbidity and mortality. Hypertension and dyspnea are probably two of the most frequent risk factors in elderly patients. The history of the elderly patient should assess functional status, including cardiovascular reserve sufficient to withstand very stressful operations. The type of surgery has important implications for perioperative risk and emergency surgery, particularly in the elderly, is associated with a high risk of morbidity. Elderly patients who are otherwise acceptable surgical candidates should not be denied surgery based solely on their age and concerns for postoperative renal, cardiovascular, cognitive or pulmonary complications. Renal impairment becomes more prevalent with advancing age as the glomerular filtration rate decreases. The surgical site is the single most important predictor of pulmonary complications. Concerning postoperative comfort and neurological complications, age is the highest risk factor for developing dementia. Pain is underassessed and undermanaged. The elderly are at higher risk of adverse consequences from unrelieved or undertreated pain. PMID:22269928

  7. [Suicide risk factors among the elderly].

    PubMed

    Pérez Barrero, Sergio Andrés

    2012-08-01

    The author offers a brief overview of suicide risk factors among the elderly such as depression, all manner of abuse of the elderly, as well as medical, psychological and social risk factors, etc. By way of conclusion, a practical guide to evaluate suicide risk among the elderly is provided. PMID:22899142

  8. Alternative Medications for Medications Included in the Use of High-Risk Medications in the Elderly and Potentially Harmful Drug–Disease Interactions in the Elderly Quality Measures

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Joseph T.; Semla, Todd P.; Schmader, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    The National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) and the Pharmacy Quality Alliance (PQA) use the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Beers Criteria to designate the quality measure Use of High-Risk Medications in the Elderly (HRM). The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) use the HRM measure to monitor and evaluate the quality of care provided to Medicare beneficiaries. NCQA additionally uses the AGS Beers Criteria to designate the quality measure Potentially Harmful Drug–Disease Interactions in the Elderly. Medications included in these measures may be harmful to elderly adults, negatively affect a health care plan’s quality ratings, and be denied as a health care plan drug benefit. Prescribers, pharmacists, patients, and health care plans may benefit from evidence-based alternative medication treatments to avoid these problems. Therefore the goal of this work was to develop a list of alternative medications to those included in the two measures. The authors conducted a comprehensive literature review for 2000 to 2014 and a search of their personal files. From the evidence, they prepared a list of drug-therapy alternatives with supporting references. A reference list of non-pharmacological approaches was also provided when appropriate. NCQA, PQA, the 2015 AGS Beers Criteria panel, and the Executive Committee of the AGS reviewed the drug therapy alternatives and nonpharmacological approaches. Recommendations by these groups were incorporated into the final list of alternatives. The final product of drug-therapy alternatives to medications included in the two quality measures and some nonpharmacological resources will be useful to health professionals, consumers, payers, and health systems that care for older adults. PMID:26447889

  9. Low all-cause mortality despite high cardiovascular risk in elderly Greek-born Australians: attenuating potential of diet?

    PubMed

    Kouris-Blazos, Antigone; Itsiopoulos, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Elderly Greek-born Australians (GA) consistently show lower rates of all-cause and CVD mortality compared with Australian-born. Paradoxically, however, this is in spite of a higher prevalence of CVD risk factors. This paper reviews the findings from the Food Habits in Later Life (FHILL) study, other studies on Greek migrants to Australia and clinical studies investigating dietary mechanisms which may explain the "morbidity mortality paradox". The FHILL study collected data between 1988 and 1991 on diet, health and psycho-social variables on 818 people aged 70 and over from Sweden, Greece, Australia (Greeks and Anglo-Celts), Japan and were followed up for 5-7 years to determine survival status. The FHILL study was the first to develop a score which captured the key features of a traditional plant-based Mediterranean diet pattern (MDPS). A higher score improved overall survival in both Greek and non-Greek elderly reducing the risk of death by 50% after 5-7 years. Of the 5 cohorts studied, elderly GA had the lowest risk of death, even though they had the highest rates of obesity and other CVD risk factors (developed in the early years of migration with the introduction of energy dense foods). GA appeared to be "getting away" with these CVD risk factors because of their continued adherence in old age to a Mediterranean diet, especially legumes. We propose that the Mediterranean diet may, in part, be operating to reduce the risk of death and attenuate established CVD risk factors in GA by beneficially altering the gut microbiome and its metabolites. PMID:25516310

  10. Cortical Modulation of Motor Control Biofeedback among the Elderly with High Fall Risk during a Posture Perturbation Task with Augmented Reality

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Ju; Yang, Tsui-Fen; Yang, Sai-Wei; Chern, Jen-Suh

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral cortex provides sensorimotor integration and coordination during motor control of daily functional activities. Power spectrum density based on electroencephalography (EEG) has been employed as an approach that allows an investigation of the spatial–temporal characteristics of neuromuscular modulation; however, the biofeedback mechanism associated with cortical activation during motor control remains unclear among elderly individuals. Thirty one community-dwelling elderly participants were divided into low fall-risk potential (LF) and high fall-risk potential (HF) groups based upon the results obtained from a receiver operating characteristic analysis of the ellipse area of the center of pressure. Electroencephalography (EEG) was performed while the participants stood on a 6-degree-of-freedom Stewart platform, which generated continuous perturbations and done either with or without the virtual reality scene. The present study showed that when there was visual stimulation and poor somatosensory coordination, a higher level of cortical response was activated in order to keep postural balance. The elderly participants in the LF group demonstrated a significant and strong correlation between postural-related cortical regions; however, the elderly individuals in the HF group did not show such a relationship. Moreover, we were able to clarify the roles of various brainwave bands functioning in motor control. Specifically, the gamma and beta bands in the parietal–occipital region facilitate the high-level cortical modulation and sensorimotor integration, whereas the theta band in the frontal–central region is responsible for mediating error detection during perceptual motor tasks. Finally, the alpha band is associated with processing visual challenges in the occipital lobe.With a variety of motor control demands, increment in brainwave band coordination is required to maintain postural stability. These investigations shed light on the cortical modulation

  11. Cortical Modulation of Motor Control Biofeedback among the Elderly with High Fall Risk during a Posture Perturbation Task with Augmented Reality.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Ju; Yang, Tsui-Fen; Yang, Sai-Wei; Chern, Jen-Suh

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral cortex provides sensorimotor integration and coordination during motor control of daily functional activities. Power spectrum density based on electroencephalography (EEG) has been employed as an approach that allows an investigation of the spatial-temporal characteristics of neuromuscular modulation; however, the biofeedback mechanism associated with cortical activation during motor control remains unclear among elderly individuals. Thirty one community-dwelling elderly participants were divided into low fall-risk potential (LF) and high fall-risk potential (HF) groups based upon the results obtained from a receiver operating characteristic analysis of the ellipse area of the center of pressure. Electroencephalography (EEG) was performed while the participants stood on a 6-degree-of-freedom Stewart platform, which generated continuous perturbations and done either with or without the virtual reality scene. The present study showed that when there was visual stimulation and poor somatosensory coordination, a higher level of cortical response was activated in order to keep postural balance. The elderly participants in the LF group demonstrated a significant and strong correlation between postural-related cortical regions; however, the elderly individuals in the HF group did not show such a relationship. Moreover, we were able to clarify the roles of various brainwave bands functioning in motor control. Specifically, the gamma and beta bands in the parietal-occipital region facilitate the high-level cortical modulation and sensorimotor integration, whereas the theta band in the frontal-central region is responsible for mediating error detection during perceptual motor tasks. Finally, the alpha band is associated with processing visual challenges in the occipital lobe.With a variety of motor control demands, increment in brainwave band coordination is required to maintain postural stability. These investigations shed light on the cortical modulation of

  12. Primary Care Fall Risk Assessment for Elderly West Virginians.

    PubMed

    Minkemeyer, Vivian M; Meriweather, Matt; Shuler, Franklin D; Mehta, Saurabh P; Qazi, Zain N

    2015-01-01

    West Virginia is ranked second nationally for the percent of its population 65 years of age. The elderly are especially susceptible to falls with fall risk increasing as age increases. Because falls are the number one cause of injury-related morbidity and mortality in the West Virginia elderly, evaluation of fall risk is a critical component of the patient evaluation in the primary care setting. We therefore highlight fall risk assessments that require no specialized equipment or training and can easily be completed at an established office visit. High quality clinical practice guidelines supported by the American Geriatric Society recommend yearly fall risk evaluation in the elderly. Those seniors at greatest risk of falls will benefit from the standardized therapy protocols outlined and referral to a balance treatment center. Patients with low-to-moderate fall risk attributed to muscle weakness or fatigue should be prescribed lower extremity strengthening exercises, such as kitchen counter exercises, to improve strength and balance. PMID:26665892

  13. Transversus abdominis plane block for an emergency laparotomy in a high-risk, elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Surekha S; Pawar, Shonali C; Divekar, VM; Bakhshi, Rochana G

    2010-01-01

    A 72-year-old male patient with gall bladder perforation and small intestinal obstruction from impacted gall stone was posted for emergency laparotomy. He had congestive heart failure, severe hypertension at admission and history of multiple other coexisting diseases. On admission, he developed pulmonary oedema from systolic hypertension which was controlled by ventilatory support, nitroglycerine and furosemide. Preoperative international normalized ratio was 2.34 and left ventricular ejection fraction was only 20%. Because of risk of exaggerated fall in blood pressure during induction of anaesthesia (general or neuraxial), a transversus abdominis plane block via combined Petit triangle and subcostal technique was administered and supplemented with Propofol sedation. PMID:20885876

  14. Bendamustine and Rituximab, as First Line Treatment, in Intermediate, High Risk Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphomas of Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Roberto; Gidaro, Antonio; Deliliers, Giorgio Lambertenghi

    2016-01-01

    Background Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) is a chronic B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder, comprising less than 2% of non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas, and affecting mainly middle-aged and elderly patients with a median survival of >10 years. The typical clinical features of SMZL include splenomegaly. Treatment should be patient-tailored and can range from a ‘watchful waiting’ approach for asymptomatic patients without cytopenias to surgery, localized radiation therapy or immuno/chemotherapies. Recently, the combination of rituximab and Bendamustine (R-Benda) has been defined as highly active in patients with follicular lymphomas, but little is known about the efficacy of R-Benda in SMZL. Aim of the study The purpose of this retrospective study was to report our experience on the efficacy of R-Benda as first line treatment in 23 consecutive elderly SMZL patients. Results All patients had a complete resolution of splenomegaly along with restoration of their blood counts. Nineteen patients (83%) achieved a complete response (CR) to therapy; three patients (13%) achieved a partial response (PR).Ten patients (43%) obtained molecular remission. Toxicities were mild and mainly haematological and result in dose reductions for fourteen patients. Conclusions Our data suggest a high activity and good tolerance of R-Benda, despite dose reduction due to potential toxicity. PMID:27413523

  15. Serum antibody response to respiratory syncytial virus F and N proteins in two populations at high risk of infection: children and elderly.

    PubMed

    Sastre, P; Cusi, M G; Manoha, C; Schildgen, O; Ruiz, T; Vela, C; Rueda, P

    2010-09-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the main viral cause of severe respiratory infections in children and a common cause of morbidity in the elderly. The nucleocapsid (N) and fusion (F) proteins of hRSV were expressed in insect cells and used as antigens in two independent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) to measure the serum antibody response in two populations at high risk of hRSV infection, children and the elderly. Fifty-seven serum specimens from children aged from 1 to 10 years old and 91 sera from adults over 60 years old were tested. The ELISA results were compared with those obtained by an immunofluorescence assay (IFA) based on hRSV-infected cells, which was considered as the reference technique. Sensitivity and specificity were 94% and 85% for the N-ELISA and 86% and 81% for the F-ELISA, respectively. When the immune responses of the two groups of individuals were compared, it appeared that almost 100% of the elderly had antibodies against the N or F protein whereas only 50% of the sera from children had antibodies against either of the two viral proteins. In conclusion, the F and N ELISAs can be used successfully for detecting a specific antibody response to hRSV. PMID:20488207

  16. Risk factors associated with elder abuse: the importance of differentiating by type of elder maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Shelly L; Hafemeister, Thomas L

    2011-01-01

    Elder abuse research rarely differentiates by the type of elder maltreatment involved when identifying risk factors. The purpose of this study was to compare risk factors across four predominant types of elder maltreatment (financial exploitation, physical abuse, neglect by others, and hybrid financial exploitation [HFE]). Data were collected from two sources: interviews with victims of substantiated elder abuse, responding adult protective services (APS) caseworkers (N = 71), and third-party informants; and a statewide database that contained all substantiated cases over a corresponding 2-year period (N = 2,142). Using chi-square (interview data) and logistic regressions (Adult Services/Adult Protective Services [ASAPS] data), significant differences across the four types of elder maltreatment were found. These two datasets provide converging evidence for the importance of differentiating by type of maltreatment when identifying risk factors for elder maltreatment and for the importance of considering both the elderly victim and the abusive individual when predicting type of elder maltreatment. PMID:22288093

  17. Hemiarthroplasty in high risk elderly patient under epidural anesthesia with 0.75% ropivacaine-fentanyl versus 0.5% bupivacaine-fentanyl: Clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Bhawna; Gupta, Kumkum; Rastogi, Avinash; Gupta, Prashant K.; Singhal, Apoorva B.; Singh, Ivesh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Anesthetic management of elderly patients is a challenge as aging makes them more susceptible to hemodynamic fluctuations during regional anesthesia. This study was aimed to compare the clinical efficacy of epidural 0.75% ropivacaine fentanyl (RF)– with 0.5% bupivacaine–fentanyl (BF) for hemiarthroplasty in high-risk elderly patients. Methods: Sixty elderly consented patients of either sex with American Society of Anesthesiologist ASA II and III, scheduled for elective hemiarthroplasty were randomized into two Groups of 30 patients to receive epidural study solution of 15 mL of 0.75% Ropivacaine or 0.5% Bupivacaine with 1 mL fentanyl (50 μg). The hemodynamic variability with onset and duration of sensory and motor blocks were recorded. The adequacy and quality of surgical anesthesia were assessed. The post-epidural nausea and vomiting, shivering, respiratory parameters, or any other side effects were also recorded. Results: There was no difference in the demographic profile between groups. The mean onset time to achieve sensory block to the T10 dermatome was rapid in the Group BF (12.4±6.9 vs. 17.5±3.7 min in Group RF). The mean time to achieve motor block was 17.5±3.4 min in Group BF versus 21.7±7.8 min in Group RF. The intraoperative hemodynamic fluctuations showed statistically significant differences between groups. The pruritis was observed in five patients but post-epidural shivering, nausea, vomiting, respiratory depression, or urinary retention were not observed in any patient. Conclusion: Epidural 0.75% Ropivacaine with fentanyl showed better clinical profile as compared to 0.5% Bupivacaine with fentanyl for hemiarthroplasty in elderly patients. PMID:23956712

  18. [Suicide in the elderlyrisk factors and prevention].

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Christoph; Leyhe, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Suicide rates are highest among the elderly in Switzerland. The estimated number of unreported cases is particularly high in this age group. The risk factors are multidimensional, including depression and social isolation. The detection and management of the controllable risk factors, foremost depression, is of particular importance for suicide prevention. Old age depression often shows an atypical presentation, is misinterpreted as a normal process of aging and is not adequately treated. PMID:26423881

  19. Elderly patients with a hip fracture: the risk for delirium.

    PubMed

    Schuurmans, Marieke J; Duursma, Sijmen A; Shortridge-Baggett, Lillie M; Clevers, Gert-Jan; Pel-Littel, Ruth

    2003-05-01

    This prospective study investigated risk factors for delirium in elderly hip fracture patients that could be recognized by nurses. Data were collected on predisposing and precipitating factors for delirium from 92 elderly patients with a hip fracture. Predisposing factors included age, gender, sensory impairments, functional impairment before the hip fracture, residency before admission, pre-existing cognitive impairment, comorbidities, and medication use. Precipitating factors included factors related to surgery and to the postoperative period. Factors related to surgery included time between admission and surgery, type of surgery, type of anesthesia, duration of surgery and anesthesia, and complications during surgery. Factors studied in the postoperative period were slow recovery, malnutrition, dehydration, addition of three or more medications, introduction of bladder catheter, infections, complications and falls, and use of morphine. Eighteen patients developed delirium, as diagnosed by a geriatrician by using the Diagnostic Statistical Manual-IV criteria. Data on delirious patients were compared with the data on non-delirious patients. The findings confirm that elderly hip fracture patients with premorbid ADL dependency, psychiatric comorbidities (including dementia), and a high number of other comorbid problems are at risk for the development of delirium. Based on these findings, it is recommended that nurses should assess patients' pre-fracture functional and cognitive capacities in an early stage of the hospital stay. Nurses should also be alert to postoperative delirium in "healthy elderly" patients. Monitoring of symptoms postoperatively in all elderly patients is advised. PMID:12764718

  20. Aliskiren/amlodipine as a single-pill combination in hypertensive patients: subgroup analysis of elderly patients, with metabolic risk factors or high body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Axthelm, Christoph; Sieder, Christian; Meister, Franziska; Pittrow, David; Kaiser, Edelgard

    2013-01-01

    Aims Blood pressure (BP) reduction in hypertensive patients is more difficult to achieve in the elderly or in the presence of comorbidities. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of the single-pill combination (SPC) aliskiren/amlodipine in hypertensive elderly patients, patients with high body mass index (BMI), with at least one metabolic risk factor, and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods In an open-label non-randomized study, patients not adequately controlled by previous treatment with the SPC olmesarten 40/amlodipine 10 (phase 1) were switched to the SPC aliskiren 300/amlodipine 10 (phase 2). The present post-hoc analysis investigated BP reduction in phase 2 in the named subgroups. The EudraCT identifier was 2009-016693-33, ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01113047. Results Of the 187 patients not adequately controlled in phase 1 and thus treated with the SPC aliskiren 300/amlodipine 10 in phase 2, 69 were of advanced age (≥65 years), 74 or 89 were overweight or obese (BMI 25.0–29.9 kg/m2 or ≥30 kg/m2, respectively), 91 had metabolic risk factors (without DM) and 41 had DM. At the beginning of phase 2, depending on the subgroup, baseline SBP was 168–169 mmHg and DBP 103–104 mmHg. After 4 weeks of treatment with aliskiren 300/amlodipine 10, SBP/DBP was lowered by −5.1/−4.8 mmHg in the total cohort, by −5.5/−5.1 mmHg in elderly patients, by −6.7/−5.5 in overweight and by −4.2/−4.5 mmHg in obese patients, by −6.4/−4.7 mmHg in patients with metabolic risk factors without DM, and by −3.3/−5.0 mmHg in DM patients. Limitations include low sample size, limited treatment duration and the fact that the post-hoc defined groups were not mutually exclusive. Conclusions In this study reflecting clinical practice, the aliskiren/amlodipine combination achieved effective BP reduction in elderly patients or with metabolic comorbidities, including DM that might be more difficult to treat. This consistent BP lowering

  1. Prediction of critical illness in elderly outpatients using elder risk assessment: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Biehl, Michelle; Takahashi, Paul Y; Cha, Stephen S; Chaudhry, Rajeev; Gajic, Ognjen; Thorsteinsdottir, Bjorg

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Identifying patients at high risk of critical illness is necessary for the development and testing of strategies to prevent critical illness. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between high elder risk assessment (ERA) score and critical illness requiring intensive care and to see if the ERA can be used as a prediction tool to identify elderly patients at the primary care visit who are at high risk of critical illness. Methods A population-based historical cohort study was conducted in elderly patients (age >65 years) identified at the time of primary care visit in Rochester, MN, USA. Predictors including age, previous hospital days, and comorbid health conditions were identified from routine administrative data available in the electronic medical record. The main outcome was critical illness, defined as sepsis, need for mechanical ventilation, or death within 2 years of initial visit. Patients with an ERA score of 16 were considered to be at high risk. The discrimination of the ERA score was assessed using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results Of the 13,457 eligible patients, 9,872 gave consent for medical record review and had full information on intensive care unit utilization. The mean age was 75.8 years (standard deviation ±7.6 years), and 58% were female, 94% were Caucasian, 62% were married, and 13% were living in nursing homes. In the overall group, 417 patients (4.2%) suffered from critical illness. In the 1,134 patients with ERA >16, 154 (14%) suffered from critical illness. An ERA score ≥16 predicted critical illness (odds ratio 6.35; 95% confidence interval 3.51–11.48). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.75, which indicated good discrimination. Conclusion A simple model based on easily obtainable administrative data predicted critical illness in the next 2 years in elderly outpatients with up to 14% of the highest risk population suffering from critical illness

  2. Risk reduction of falls and fractures, reduction of back pain and safety in elderly high risk patients receiving combined therapy with alfacalcidol and alendronate: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Schacht, Erich; Ringe, Johann D

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy and safety of a new combination package containing 4 or 12 self-explanatory one-week blisters, each with one tablet of 70 mg alendronate (CAS 260055-05-8) and 7 capsules of 1 microg alfacalcidol (CAS 41294-56-8) (Tevabone) on muscle power, muscle function, balance and back pain was investigated in an open, multi-centered, uncontrolled, prospective study on a cohort of elderly patients with a high risk of falls and fractures. 818 practicing physicians all over Germany recruited 2579 patients for a 3-month observational trial being treated with the above combination package. 92.4% were women [89.7% of the women had postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO)]. Their average age was 74.1 years and the mean body mass index 26.4 kg/m2. 55.4% had a history of falls. Prevalent vertebral and non-vertebral fractures were documented in 62.9% and 61.4% of the patients, respectively, and a creatinine clearance below 65 ml/min was documented in 65.5%. Main outcome parameters were the Chair Rising Test (CRT), Timed Up and Go Test (TUG), back pain and safety at onset and after 3 months. In addition an evaluation of the package design was done at the end of the study. The percentage of patients able to perform the CRT within 10 sec increased from 26.3% to 42.9% after 3 months (increase 63%, p < 0.0001), while successful performance within 10 sec of TUG increased by 54% (p < 0.0001) from 30.6% at onset to 47.1% after 3 months. The average overall improvement of CRT was 2.3 sec (p < 0.0001) and of TUG amounted to 2.4 sec (p < 0.0001). It was shown in another recently published study that a mean increase of 2.6 sec in the performance of TUG results in a 24% increased risk for non-vertebral fractures. Mean back pain measured by a 0-10 visual analogue scale decreased significantly by 41% from 5.9 to 3.5 (p < 0.0001). Throughout the study, 178 adverse events (AE) were reported in 85 of the 2579 patients (incidence: 3.3 %). Only 3 patients experienced serious AE, 2 without causal

  3. Association between dietary phylloquinone intake and peripheral metabolic risk markers related to insulin resistance and diabetes in elderly subjects at high cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitamin K has been related to glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity and diabetes. Because inflammation underlies all these metabolic conditions, it is plausible that the potential role of vitamin K in glucose metabolism occurs through the modulation of cytokines and related molecules. The purpose of the study was to assess the associations between dietary intake of vitamin K and peripheral adipokines and other metabolic risk markers related to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods Cross-sectional and longitudinal assessments of these associations in 510 elderly participants recruited in the PREDIMED centers of Reus and Barcelona (Spain). We determined 1-year changes in dietary phylloquinone intake estimated by food frequency questionnaires, serum inflammatory cytokines and other metabolic risk markers. Results In the cross-sectional analysis at baseline no significant associations were found between dietary phylloquinone intake and the rest of metabolic risk markers evaluated, with exception of a negative association with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. After 1-year of follow-up, subjects in the upper tertile of changes in dietary phylloquinone intake showed a greater reduction in ghrelin (−15.0%), glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (−12.9%), glucagon-like peptide-1 (−17.6%), IL-6 (−27.9%), leptin (−10.3%), TNF (−26.9%) and visfatin (−24.9%) plasma concentrations than those in the lowest tertile (all p<0.05). Conclusion These results show that dietary phylloquinone intake is associated with an improvement of cytokines and other markers related to insulin resistance and diabetes, thus extending the potential protection by dietary phylloquinone on chronic inflammatory diseases. Trial registration http://www.controlled-trials.com as ISRCTN35739639 PMID:23298335

  4. A Mediterranean Diet Enriched with Olive Oil Is Associated with Higher Serum Total Osteocalcin Levels in Elderly Men at High Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Navarrete, José Maria; Ricart, Wifredo; Ros, Emilio; Estruch, Ramon; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Background: The intake of olive oil has been related to the prevention of osteoporosis in experimental and in in vitro models. Very few prospective studies have evaluated the effects of olive oil intake on circulating osteocalcin (OC) in humans. Objective: The objective of the study was to examine the longitudinal effects of a low-fat control diet (n = 34), a Mediterranean diet enriched with nuts (MedDiet+nuts, n = 51), or a Mediterranean diet enriched with virgin olive oil (MedDiet+VOO, n = 42) on circulating forms of OC and bone formation markers in elderly men at high cardiovascular risk. Design: Longitudinal associations between baseline and follow-up (2 yr) measurements of total OC, undercarboxylated osteocalcin, C-telopeptide of type I collagen, and procollagen I N-terminal propeptide (P1NP) concentrations were examined in 127 elderly men randomized to three healthy dietary interventions. Results: Baseline characteristics (age, body mass index, waist circumference, lipid profile, fasting insulin levels, and bone formation and resorption markers) were similar in all intervention groups. The total osteocalcin concentration increased robustly in the MedDiet+VOO group (P = 0.007) in parallel to increased P1NP levels (P = 0.01) and homeostasis model assessment-β-cell function (P = 0.01) but not in subjects on the MedDiet+nuts (P = 0.32) or after the control diet (P = 0.74). Interestingly, the consumption of olives was associated positively with both baseline total osteocalcin (r = 0.23, P = 0.02) and the 2-yr osteocalcin concentrations (r = 0.21, P = 0.04) in the total cohort. Conclusions: Consumption of a Mediterranean diet enriched with virgin olive oil for 2 years is associated with increased serum osteocalcin and P1NP concentrations, suggesting protective effects on bone. PMID:22855341

  5. Nutritional risk and cognitive impairment in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Soo; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Kim, Eun A; Kim, Kyung Ran; Oh, Byoung Hoon; Hong, Chang Hyung

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between nutritional risk and cognitive impairment in the elderly living in the community. Data obtained from 2934 subjects (912 men and 2022 women) aged above 60 years was analyzed from the Gwangju Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment Study (GDEMCIS). The study questionnaire comprised demographic characteristics, history of current and past illnesses, drug history, Korean version-Mini Mental State Examination (K-MMSE), and Nutritional Screening Initiative (NSI) checklist. Additionally, we examined the blood pressure, fasting serum glucose level, lipid profile, body mass index, and ApoE genotype. Of the total, 1942 (66.2%) demonstrated good nutritional state (NSI checklist score< or =2) and 992 (33.8%) were at moderate or high nutritional risk (NSI checklist score>2). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that moderate or high nutritional risk subjects were associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment (K-MMSE score< or =17) after adjustment for age, sex, educational level, and Korean version of Short form Geriatric Depression Scale (K-SGDS) score (Odds ratio=OR=1.71, 95%; confidence interval=CI=1.17-2.50). These results suggest that nutritional risk may be associated with cognitive impairment in the elderly. PMID:18160145

  6. The Efficacy of Percutaneous Transhepatic Gallbladder Drainage on Acute Cholecystitis in High-Risk Elderly Patients Based on the Tokyo Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Qingqiang; Chen, Dongbo; Xu, Rui; Shang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage (PTGD) for high-risk elderly patients with acute cholecystitis. Retrospective analysis of 159 acute cholecystitis patients who were admitted to General Surgery Division III of the First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University between January 2005 and November 2012. A total of 123 patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC), and 36 received only PTGD treatment. The LC patients were divided into 3 groups based on their preoperative treatment: group A, emergency patients (33 patients); group B (26 patients), patients who were treated with PTGD prior to LC; and group C (64 patients), patients who received nonsurgical treatment prior to LC. General conditions, LC surgery duration, intraoperative blood loss, rate of conversion to open surgery, incidence of postoperative complications, total fasting time, and total hospitalization time were analyzed and compared among the 3 groups. The remission rates of patients in the PTGD treatment groups (including group B and PTGD treatment only group) were significantly higher within 24 and 48 hours than those of patients who received nonsurgical treatment prior to LC (P < 0.05). Among the patients in the 3 surgery groups, the operation conversion rate (19.2%) of group B was significantly higher than that of group A (3.0%) and group C (1.6%) (P < 0.05). The total hospitalization time of the patients in group B (18.5 ± 4.5 days) was longer than that of the patients in group A (8.2 ± 3.9 days) and group C (10.5 ± 6.4 days). The total fasting time of the patients in group A (2.4 ± 1.2 days) was significantly shorter than that of those in group B (4.1 ± 1.7 days) and group C (3.4 ± 2.7 days) (P < 0.05). For high-risk elderly patients, if there is any emergency surgery contraindication, PTGD therapy may be safe and effective and can relieve the symptoms within a short time. For acute

  7. The Efficacy of Percutaneous Transhepatic Gallbladder Drainage on Acute Cholecystitis in High-Risk Elderly Patients Based on the Tokyo Guidelines: A Retrospective Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qingqiang; Chen, Dongbo; Xu, Rui; Shang, Dong

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage (PTGD) for high-risk elderly patients with acute cholecystitis.Retrospective analysis of 159 acute cholecystitis patients who were admitted to General Surgery Division III of the First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University between January 2005 and November 2012. A total of 123 patients underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC), and 36 received only PTGD treatment. The LC patients were divided into 3 groups based on their preoperative treatment: group A, emergency patients (33 patients); group B (26 patients), patients who were treated with PTGD prior to LC; and group C (64 patients), patients who received nonsurgical treatment prior to LC. General conditions, LC surgery duration, intraoperative blood loss, rate of conversion to open surgery, incidence of postoperative complications, total fasting time, and total hospitalization time were analyzed and compared among the 3 groups.The remission rates of patients in the PTGD treatment groups (including group B and PTGD treatment only group) were significantly higher within 24 and 48 hours than those of patients who received nonsurgical treatment prior to LC (P < 0.05). Among the patients in the 3 surgery groups, the operation conversion rate (19.2%) of group B was significantly higher than that of group A (3.0%) and group C (1.6%) (P < 0.05). The total hospitalization time of the patients in group B (18.5 ± 4.5 days) was longer than that of the patients in group A (8.2 ± 3.9 days) and group C (10.5 ± 6.4 days). The total fasting time of the patients in group A (2.4 ± 1.2 days) was significantly shorter than that of those in group B (4.1 ± 1.7 days) and group C (3.4 ± 2.7 days) (P < 0.05).For high-risk elderly patients, if there is any emergency surgery contraindication, PTGD therapy may be safe and effective and can relieve the symptoms within a short time. For acute cholecystitis patients

  8. Dyadic Vulnerability and Risk Profiling for Elder Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulmer, Terry; Paveza, Gregory; VandeWeerd, Carla; Fairchild, Susan; Guadagno, Lisa; Bolton-Blatt, Marguarette; Norman, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Neglect of older adults accounts for 60% to 70% of all elder-mistreatment reports made to adult protective services. The purpose of this article is to report data from research, using a risk-and-vulnerability model, that captures the independent contributions of both the elder and the caregiver as they relate to the outcome of neglect.…

  9. Usefulness of a single item in a mail survey to identify persons with possible dementia: a new strategy for finding high-risk elders.

    PubMed

    Brody, Kathleen K; Maslow, Katie; Perrin, Nancy A; Crooks, Valerie; DellaPenna, Richard; Kuang, Daniel

    2005-04-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the characteristics of elderly persons who responded positively to a question about "severe memory problems" on a mailed health questionnaire yet were missed by the existing health risk algorithm to identify vulnerable elderly persons. A total of 324,471 respondents aged 65 and older completed a primary care health status questionnaire that gathered clinical information to quickly identify members with functional impairment, multiple chronic diseases, and higher medical care needs. The respondents were part of a large, integrated, not-for-profit managed care organization that implemented a model of care for elders using a uniform risk identification method across eight regions. Respondents with severe memory problems were compared to general respondents by morbidity, geriatric syndromes, functional impairments, service utilization, sensory impairments, sociodemographic characteristics, and activities of daily living. Of the respondents, 13,902 persons (4.3%) reported severe memory problems; the existing health risk algorithm missed 47.1% of these. When severe memory problems were included in the risk algorithm, identification increased from 11% to 13%, and risk prevalence by age groups ranged from 4.4% to 40.5%; one third had severe memory problems, a finding that was fairly consistent within age groups (28.4% to 36.5%). A question about severe memory problems should be incorporated into population risk-identification techniques. While false-negative rates are unknown, the false-positive rate of a self-report mail survey appears to be minimal. Persons reporting severe memory problems clearly have multiple comorbidities, higher prevalence of geriatric syndromes, and greater functional and sensory impairments. PMID:15815155

  10. Evaluation of early interventional treatment opportunity of the elderly & high-risk patients with non-ST segment elevation acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Lipei; Li, Yibo; Wang, Zhifang; Liu, Lingling; Zhang, Fucheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of treatment on prognosis of patients with different timing of early interventional treatment for non-ST segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). Methods: Forty two cases above 75 years old, diagnosed with high-risk on NSTEMI, were selected in cardiology department of Xinxiang central hospital. They were randomly divided into two groups: 22 in group A and 20 in group B. Group A was performed PCI surgery within 12 hours after the onset while group B from 12 to 24 hour after the onset. Major adverse cardiovascular events (including death, heart failure readmission rates after ischemia, malignant arrhythmias, again target vessel revascularization) and bleeding data were recorded at the three terms of hospitalization, one month after the onset and six months after the onset. Results: Angina, malignant arrhythmia and heart failure during hospitalization can be reduced after interventional treatment carried out within 12 hours after the onset. Readmission rates after ischemia, heart failure and the incidence of death can be significantly reduced after interventional treatment carried out during 1-6 month after the onset with no significant increase in bleeding rate. Conclusion: In the treatment of elderly patients with NSTEMI, early interventional treatment is safe and effective. PMID:26648985

  11. Dairy consumption, cardiovascular risk factors and inflammation in elderly subjects

    PubMed Central

    Rashidi Pour Fard, Nafiseh; Karimi, Majid; Baghaei, Mohammad Hassan; Haghighatdoost, Fahimeh; Rouhani, Mohammad Hossein; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Azadbakht, Leila

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Previous epidemiological studies of dairy product consumption and health outcomes have reported mixed findings. Despite increasing in life expectancy, scarce data are available in this field in elderly individuals. We tested the hypothesis that greater dairy intake is associated with lower high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) level and better lipid profile and glycemic control. METHODS This cross-sectional study was undertaken on 107 elderly individuals who aged 60-78 years. Usual dietary intakes were assessed by means of a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Anthropometric measures and biochemical markers were determined using standard protocols. RESULTS The reported mean ± standard deviation (SD) of daily intake of dairy products and age were 588.02 ± 418.88 g/d and 63.22 ± 6.92 years, respectively. After control for demographic characteristics and dietary intakes, dairy consumption was not significantly related to the increased risk of insulin resistance [Odds ratio (OR): 2.19, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.54, 8.86; P = 0.520] and elevated hs-CRP (OR: 1.54, 95% CI: 0.37, 6.35; P = 0.550). Participants in the top tertile of dairy had greater, but statistically not a significant risk of elevated triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). No significant relations were seen for hs-CRP, insulin resistance and lipid profile across tertiles of dairy products. CONCLUSION In this elderly population, total dairy consumption was not associated with inflammatory biomarkers levels and other cardiometabolic risk factors. PMID:26862340

  12. Applying Atherosclerotic Risk Prevention Guidelines to Elderly Patients: A Bridge Too Far?

    PubMed

    Feldman, Ross D; Harris, Stewart B; Hegele, Robert A; Pickering, J Geoffrey; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    The primary prevention of atherosclerotic disease is on the basis of optimal management of the major risk factors. For the major risk factors of diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, management for most patients is on the basis of well developed and extensive evidence-based diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines. However, for a growing segment of the population who are at the highest risk for atherosclerotic disease (ie, older adults), the application of these guidelines is problematic. First, few studies that form the evidence base for these primary prevention guidelines actually include substantial numbers of elderly subjects. Second, elderly patients represent a special population from multiple perspectives related to their accumulation of health deficits and in their development of frailty. These patients with frailty and multiple comorbidities have been mostly excluded from the primary prevention studies upon which the guidelines are based yet comprise a very significant proportion of the very elderly population. Third, elderly people are at most risk from adverse drug reactions because of the increasing number of medications prescribed in this patient population. When applying the existing guidelines to elderly people the limitations of our knowledge must be recognized regarding how best to mitigate the high risk of heart disease in our aging population and how to generalize these recommendations to the management of the largest subgroup of elderly patients (ie, those with multiple comorbidities and frail older adults). PMID:27040095

  13. Sex differences in response to angiotensin II receptor blocker-based therapy in elderly, high-risk, hypertensive Japanese patients: a subanalysis of the OSCAR study.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Kunihiko; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei; Ogawa, Hisao; Jinnouchi, Tomio; Jinnouchi, Hideaki; Arakawa, Kikuo

    2014-06-01

    The OlmeSartan Calcium Antagonists Randomized (OSCAR) study is a multicenter, prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded, end point study of elderly hypertensive Japanese patients that compared the efficacy of a high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) treatment to an ARB plus calcium channel blocker (CCB) combination. In this pre-specified subgroup analysis, we compared the response to such therapy according to sex. A total of 1164 patients (515 (44%) men and 649 (56%) women) were included, and each gender was split into two nearly equal treatment groups. The primary end point was a composite of cardiovascular events and non-cardiovascular death. The baseline characteristics between the two treatment groups in each sex were similar, except for some variables. Male patients had lower systolic and higher diastolic blood pressure than female patients (156.8/85.7 vs. 158.5/84.2 mm Hg). At the end of the study, the mean systolic pressure was higher in the ARB group (134.4 mm Hg) than in the ARB plus CCB group (131.5 mm Hg; P=0.03) for men but not for women (135.4 vs. 133.4 mm Hg; P=0.12). For men, the primary outcome events tended to be higher in the ARB group than in the ARB plus CCB group (hazard ratio (HR)=1.66; P=0.055) but not for women (HR=0.97; P=0.92). This difference in men was due to cardiovascular events (HR=1.86; P=0.03). The interaction between sex and treatment group was not significant (P=0.17). These findings suggest that, in addition to blood pressure control, appropriate patient risk assessment is important for the treatment of hypertension, especially in male patients, as opposed to possible sex differences in treatment effects. PMID:24599010

  14. Nonanalgesic benefits of combined thoracic epidural analgesia with general anesthesia in high risk elderly off pump coronary artery bypass patients

    PubMed Central

    Zawar, Bhanu Prakash; Mehta, Yatin; Juneja, Rajiv; Arora, Dheeraj; Raizada, Arun; Trehan, Naresh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Epidural anesthesia is a central neuraxial block technique with many applications. It is a versatile anesthetic technique, with applications in surgery, obstetrics and pain control. Its versatility means it can be used as an anesthetic, as an analgesic adjuvant to general anesthesia, and for postoperative analgesia. Off pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery triggers a systemic stress response as seen in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA), combined with general anesthesia (GA) attenuates the stress response to CABG. There is Reduction in levels of Plasma epinephrine, Cortisol and catecholamine surge, tumor necrosis factor-Alpha(TNF ά), interleukin-6 and leucocyte count. Design: A prospective randomised non blind study. Setting: A clinical study in a multi specialty hospital. Participants: Eighty six patients. Material and Methods/intervention: The study was approved by hospital research ethics committee and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients were randomised to receive either GA plus epidural (study group) or GA only (control group). Inclusion Criteria (for participants) were -Age ≥ 70 years, Patient posted for OPCAB surgery, and patient with comorbidities (diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, renal dysfunction). Serum concentration of Interlukin: – 6, TNF ά, cortisol, Troponin – I, CK-MB, and HsCRP (highly sensitive C reactive protein), was compared for both the group and venous blood samples were collected and compared just after induction, at day 2, and day 5 postoperatively. Time to mobilization, extubation, total intensive care unit stay and hospital stay were noted and compared. Independent t test was used for statistical analysis. Primary Outcomes: Postoperative complications, total intensive care unit stay and hospital stay. Secondary Outcome: Stress response. Result: Study group showed

  15. AB174. Clinical analysis of transurethral end-fire greenlight PVRP-ST for the treatment of elderly and high-risk patients with

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guosheng; Qiu, Xiaofo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Analyzing the features of transurethral end-fire greenlight photoselective vaporesection of prostate-shovel technique (PVRP-ST) and evaluating the safety and efficacy of transurethral end-fire greenlight PVRP-ST for high-risk and elderly patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) by comparing with TURP. Methods We analyzed a total of 93 high-risk and elderly patients with BPH underwent PVRP-ST (50 cases) and TURP (43 cases) from September 2013 to March 2015 in Guangdong NO. 2 Provincial People’s Hospital prospectively. We collected their generally information (including age, duration of oral drug finasteride time, prostate volume, past medical history, PSA situation and complications etc.), and recorded operative time, blood loss, the number of intraoperative flushing fluid bag, postoperative bladder irrigation time, postoperative catheter indwelling time, the postoperative hospitalization days, intraoperative complications and postoperative complications. The variables such as sodium (Na+) concentration, potassiumions (K+) concentration, hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, and hematocrit (HCT) were compared before and after operation. Detecting the maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), residual urine volume (RUV), fill in the International Prostate Symptom (IPSS) score sheet, quality of life (QoL) score sheet before the surgery. Following up the IPSS, QoL, Qmax and RUV after 3 months of operation. The IPSS, QoL, Qmax and RUV were compared between preoperation and 3 months after operation. Using relevant statistical methods to compare the data between preoperation and postoperation with SPSS 17.0 software. Results All patients were successfully performed surgery with no serious complications, no deaths, no case turn to open surgery and no capsular perforation. (I) There were not significant differences in values of preoperative general information between two the groups of patients (P>0.05); (II) the average operative time of group PVRP-ST was (68.2±23

  16. Benzodiazepine Misuse in the Elderly: Risk Factors, Consequences, and Management.

    PubMed

    Airagnes, Guillaume; Pelissolo, Antoine; Lavallée, Mélanie; Flament, Martine; Limosin, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    Benzodiazepine (BZD) inappropriate use (i.e., misuse and overuse) is a worldwide public health problem. Despite current knowledge about increased sensitivity to side effects in the elderly, that should lead to more caution, only a third of BZD prescriptions in this age group are considered appropriate. The most frequent inadequate situations are excessive duration and/or dosage of a medical prescription or self-medication, especially in a context where it would be contraindicated, e.g., long-acting BZD in the elderly. Polypharmacy and comorbidities are major risk factors. Consequences of BZD inappropriate use are falls, delirium and other cognitive dysfunction, acute respiratory failure, car accidents, dependence, and withdrawal symptoms. An emerging concern is a potentially increased risk of dementia. Contrary to most clinicians' belief, discontinuation of chronic BZD use in elderly patients is feasible, with adequate psychotherapeutic or pharmacological strategies, and can lead to long-term abstinence. Brief cognitive therapy mostly relies on psychoeducation and motivational enhancement and is particularly useful in this context. Further research is needed, notably in three areas: (1) assessing the impact of public health programs to prevent BZD inappropriate use in the elderly, (2) developing alternative strategies to treat anxiety and insomnia in elderly patients, and (3) exploring the association between chronic BZD use and dementia. PMID:27549604

  17. Risk Factors and Prevention Strategies for Suicide among the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franks, Rebecca; Burnett, Donna O.; Evans, Retta R.

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is a preventable public health concern affecting the nation as the 10th leading cause of death. The prevalence of suicide among the elderly is higher than any other group. Risk factors attributed to this phenomenon are depression, social isolation, substance abuse, poor physical health or function, financial stress, and access to lethal…

  18. Ambulatory monitoring derived blood pressure variability and cardiovascular risk factors in elderly hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Magdás, Annamária; Szilágyi, László; Belényi, Boglárka; Incze, Alexandru

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension in the elderly is characterized by isolated systolic hypertension and high variability, but its clinical significance is not yet fully understood. The goal of this paper was to assess circadian blood pressure variability (BPV) in elderly hypertensives, and to determine its relationship to cardiovascular risk factors. To achieve this goal, a number of 75 inefficiently treated hypertensive patients were studied, 45 elderly, aged over 60 years, 30 middle-aged, younger than 60 years. After 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), blood pressure (BP) values, pulse pressure (PP), morning surge were compared between the groups. BPV was calculated using average real variability (ARV). The relationships between BPV, pulse pressure, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and cardiovascular risk factors were assessed in both groups. As a result, it was found that left ventricular mass (p=0.01), PP, morning surge, 24-hour systolic ARV were significantly higher in the elderly group (p<0.05). In both groups, higher 24-hour BPV was associated with an increase in LVMI. In the elderly population 24-hour BPV was positively correlated to increased PP, total cholesterol and triglyceride levels (p<0.05). Moreover, it was concluded that ABPM-derived BP variability index could be an early predictive marker of end-organ damage in hypertension. Its reduction might be an important objective of hypertension management in elderly. PMID:25226958

  19. Controlling hospital readmission of elderly persons living at home: a risk factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, F R; Brickner, P W; Conley, L; Conroy, M

    1991-01-01

    A large proportion of hospital stays stem from rapid readmission of elderly patients. These patients represent high cost users of inpatient care. Intervention in the hospital admission-readmission cycle may serve the interests of patients and payors alike. Data collected through comprehensive geriatric assessment can be useful in identifying those patients at high risk of readmission and who might benefit from more intensive in-hospital or post hospital attention. However, risk factors for readmission are largely unknown. We conducted a prospective study of elderly patients admitted to a metropolitan teaching hospital medical service and assessed by a geriatric team, to increase our knowledge of the factors associated with hospital readmissions. The most powerful predictor of hospital readmission within 6 months proved to be prior hospitalization. Attempts to reduce rehospitalizations in elderly patients must focus on those with prior recent hospitalizations. PMID:10115077

  20. Aging and Risk: Physical and Sexual Abuse of Elders in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brozowski, Kari; Hall, David R.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we review the literature on physical and sexual elder abuse within the context of risk theory and feminist sociology. Employing data from the 1999 General Social Survey, we also examine several variables potentially associated with the risk for physical or sexual abuse of elders. Women, Aboriginal Canadians, and elders who are…

  1. Assessment of caries risk in elderly patients using the Cariogram model.

    PubMed

    Alian, Anna Y; McNally, Mary E; Fure, Solveig; Birkhed, Dowen

    2006-06-01

    For several decades, Swedish researchers, clinicians and educators have recognized risk assessment as an important part of routine management of dental caries. Innovative caries risk assessment models, such as the Cariogram software program, have been developed to systematize the evaluation of various risk factors for caries and to develop targeted prevention interventions based on caries risk. The benefits derived from these models in terms of improving the health of high-risk groups such as older adults have not been well studied. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the application of the Cariogram software in the management of dental care for 3 elderly patients. PMID:16772072

  2. Zolpidem Use and Risk of Fracture in Elderly Insomnia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong-Yoon; Park, Soyoung; Rhee, Chul-Woo; Kim, Ye-Jee; Choi, Nam-Kyong; Lee, Joongyub

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the risk of fractures related with zolpidem in elderly insomnia patients. Methods Health claims data on the entire South Korean elderly population from January 2005 to June 2006 were extracted from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database. We applied a case-crossover design. Cases were defined as insomnia patients who had a fracture diagnosis. We set the hazard period of 1 day length prior to the fracture date and four control periods of the same length at 5, 10, 15, and 20 weeks prior to the fracture date. Time independent confounding factors such as age, gender, lifestyle, cognitive function level, mobility, socioeconomic status, residential environment, and comorbidity could be controlled using the casecrossover design. Time dependent confounding factors, especially co-medication of patients during the study period, were adjusted by conditional logistic regression analysis. The odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for the risk of fracture related to zolpidem. Results One thousand five hundred and eight cases of fracture were detected in insomnia patients during the study period. In our data, the use of zolpidem increased the risk of fracture significantly (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.72; 95% CI, 1.37 to 2.16). However, the association between benzodiazepine hypnotics and the risk of fracture was not statistically significant (aOR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.83 to 1.21). Likewise, the results were not statistically significant in stratified analysis with each benzodiazepine generic subgroup. Conclusions Zolpidem could increase the risk of fracture in elderly insomnia patients. Therefore zolpidem should be prescribed carefully and the elderly should be provided with sufficient patient education. PMID:22880153

  3. [Cognitive impairment and the risk of falling in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Casas Herrero, Alvaro; Martínez Velilla, Nicolás; Alonso Renedo, Francisco Javier

    2011-01-01

    Risk of fall is significantly increased in old people with cognitive decline due to specific associations between gait parameters and cognition. This association has recently been demonstrated, there being increasing evidence that cognitive domains such as attention, executive function and types of memory are critical for the correct regulation of gait. Gait disturbances can appear as early predictors of dementia in elderly patients. In the assessment of the fall risk, the use of dual tasks is novel, simple and relevant, especially in cognitive decline. Evidence for interventions in this population is limited, with vitamin D and physical exercise being the most encouraging, for decreasing the risk of fall in dementia. PMID:22030218

  4. Risk factors for fires and burns in homebound, urban elderly.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Amy R; Bak, Rebecca Y; Wald-Cagan, Paulette; Greenberg, Debra F

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the prevalence of risk factors for fires and burns in homebound urban elderly. A home safety assessment was performed on 83 patients enrolled in a physician home visiting program. Information was collected on the presence and functioning of smoke alarms, the presence of fire extinguishers and the maximum temperature of hot tap water. Functional smoke alarms were not present in 37% of households, 82% of households had no access to a fire extinguisher, 46% of households had hot tap water temperature greater than the recommended 120 degrees F. Multiple risk factors for burns and fires exist in the homes of elderly homebound patients that are well known to the medical community. Further attention to burn and fire prevention should be incorporated into the medical and geriatrics curriculum. PMID:18849831

  5. Prevalence and risk factors of depression among community dwelling elderly.

    PubMed

    Yaka, Erdem; Keskinoglu, Pembe; Ucku, Reyhan; Yener, Görsev Gülmen; Tunca, Zeliha

    2014-01-01

    Depression in the elderly is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors of depression among community-dwelling older population in an urban setting in Turkey. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 482 elderly individuals 65 years and over in an urban area. Cluster sampling method was used for sample size. Depression in the elderly had been diagnosed by a clinical interview and Geriatric Depression Scale. Data were collected by door-to-door survey. Chi square test was used for statistical analysis. P value, which was calculated by the results of chi square test and coefficient of phi (φ), below 0.05 was included in the analysis of logistic regression. Depression was significantly associated with female gender, being single or divorced, lower educational status, low income, unemployment, and lack of health insurance. However, logistic regression analysis revealed higher depression rates in the elderly with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, psychiatric disease, cerebrovascular disease, low income and being dependent. Depression is common among community-dwelling older people in an urban area of Izmir, Turkey. Older adults living in community should be cautiously screened to prevent or manage depression. PMID:24767692

  6. Elder Abuse and Neglect Risk Alleviation in Protective Services.

    PubMed

    Burnes, David P R; Rizzo, Victoria M; Courtney, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about conditions associated with favorable elder mistreatment (EM) case outcomes. The fundamental goal of EM protective service programs is to alleviate risk associated with substantiated cases of elder abuse and neglect. Using the EM socio-cultural model, this study examined victim, perpetrator, victim-perpetrator relationship, social embeddedness, and socio-cultural factors predicting risk alleviation of EM cases. Data from a random sample of EM protective social service cases (n = 250) at a large community agency in New York City were collected and coded by multiple, independent raters. Multinomial and binary logistic regression were used to examine undifferentiated risk alleviation for the entire sample of EM cases as well as differentiated financial, emotional, and physical abuse sub-types. Undifferentiated EM risk alleviation was associated with male victim gender, older victim age, previous community help-seeking, and victim-perpetrator dyads characterized by a separate living arrangement and shorter term abuse longevity. Financial abuse cases with younger perpetrators were less likely to have risk reduction. Physical abuse risk reduction was less likely when the perpetrator was male and the victim-perpetrator dyad included different genders. Distinct findings across EM sub-types suggest a need to develop targeted practice strategies with clients experiencing different forms of EM. Findings highlight a need to develop EM protective service infrastructure around perpetrator rehabilitation. PMID:24407144

  7. Urban-Hazard Risk Analysis: Mapping of Heat-Related Risks in the Elderly in Major Italian Cities

    PubMed Central

    Morabito, Marco; Crisci, Alfonso; Gioli, Beniamino; Gualtieri, Giovanni; Toscano, Piero; Di Stefano, Valentina; Orlandini, Simone; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2015-01-01

    Background Short-term impacts of high temperatures on the elderly are well known. Even though Italy has the highest proportion of elderly citizens in Europe, there is a lack of information on spatial heat-related elderly risks. Objectives Development of high-resolution, heat-related urban risk maps regarding the elderly population (≥65). Methods A long time-series (2001–2013) of remote sensing MODIS data, averaged over the summer period for eleven major Italian cities, were downscaled to obtain high spatial resolution (100 m) daytime and night-time land surface temperatures (LST). LST was estimated pixel-wise by applying two statistical model approaches: 1) the Linear Regression Model (LRM); 2) the Generalized Additive Model (GAM). Total and elderly population density data were extracted from the Joint Research Centre population grid (100 m) from the 2001 census (Eurostat source), and processed together using “Crichton’s Risk Triangle” hazard-risk methodology for obtaining a Heat-related Elderly Risk Index (HERI). Results The GAM procedure allowed for improved daytime and night-time LST estimations compared to the LRM approach. High-resolution maps of daytime and night-time HERI levels were developed for inland and coastal cities. Urban areas with the hazardous HERI level (very high risk) were not necessarily characterized by the highest temperatures. The hazardous HERI level was generally localized to encompass the city-centre in inland cities and the inner area in coastal cities. The two most dangerous HERI levels were greater in the coastal rather than inland cities. Conclusions This study shows the great potential of combining geospatial technologies and spatial demographic characteristics within a simple and flexible framework in order to provide high-resolution urban mapping of daytime and night-time HERI. In this way, potential areas for intervention are immediately identified with up-to-street level details. This information could support public

  8. Teaching Art to High Risk Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossol, Monona

    The role of art therapy is considered in working with such high risk groups as the institutionalized, mentally retarded, elderly, visually impaired, physically handicapped, asthmatic, hyper- and hypo-active children, hearing impaired, and patients on mind altering drugs. The special risks of infectious diseases (such as serum hepatitis), and…

  9. Aging and risk: physical and sexual abuse of elders in Canada.

    PubMed

    Brozowski, Kari; Hall, David R

    2010-07-01

    In this article, we review the literature on physical and sexual elder abuse within the context of risk theory and feminist sociology. Employing data from the 1999 General Social Survey, we also examine several variables potentially associated with the risk for physical or sexual abuse of elders. Women, Aboriginal Canadians, and elders who are divorced, living in urban areas with low income have a higher risk of physical or sexual abuse. This supports risk and anxiety as factors. Further testing of elder abuse using this theoretical framework is required. PMID:19717787

  10. The Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index Predicts Survival in Elderly Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients with Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kunlun; Liu, Yang; You, Jie; Cui, Han; Zhu, Yiwei; Yuan, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The impact of nutritional status on survival among elderly esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients undergoing radiotherapy is unclear. In this study, we aimed at validating the performance of the geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) in predicting overall survival time in elderly ESCC patients with radiotherapy. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 239 ESCC patients aged 60 and over admitted consecutively from January 2008 to November 2014 in the Department of Radiotherapy, Henan Tumor Hospital (Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Zhengzhou University), Zhengzhou, Henan, China. All patients were subjected to nutritional screening using GNRI, and were followed for the occurrence of lymphatic node metastasis, radiation complication and mortality. The Kaplan–Meier method with Log-rank test was used to estimate survival curves. Univariable Cox regression analysis was used to identify variables associated with overall survival time. Among the 239 patients, 184 patients (76.9%) took no nutritional risk, 32 patients (13.4%) took moderate risk of malnutrition, and 23 patients (9.7%) took a high risk of malnutrition. Univariable Cox regression showed that both high nutritional risk group and moderate nutritional risk group were significantly less likely to survive than no nutritional risk patients (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.688, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.019–2.798 for moderate risk group, and HR = 2.699, 95% CI = 1.512–4.819 for high risk group, respectively). The GNRI is an independent prognostic factor for overall survival time in elderly ESCC patients with radiotherapy. A GNRI ≤98 can be suggested as an indicator of surviving less. PMID:27196126

  11. Risk factors for hip fracture among elderly patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoshihiro; Kanoko, Tomohiro; Satoh, Kei; Iwamoto, Jun

    2004-08-30

    Incidence of hip fracture among patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), especially in elderly patients, is high. To analyze risk factors of hip fracture, we prospectively studied a cohort of elderly female patients with AD. Subjects studied were 225 female patients with AD, and the average age was 76 years old. At baseline, we recorded body mass index (BMI), a score of Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and bone mineral density (BMD), and measured serum concentrations of ionized calcium, intact parathyroid hormone (PTH), pyridinoline cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), intact bone Gla protein (BGP), 25-hydroxyvitamin (25-OHD) and 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1, 25-[OH]2D). The patients were followed for 2 years. During the 2-year study, hip fractures occurred in 29 patients. We compared baseline variables between the 29 patients with and 176 patients without hip fracture. AD patients with lower BMD, low concentrations of serum ionized calcium and 25-OHD (mean 3.0 ng/ml) with compensatory hyperparathyroidism were found to have an increased risk of hip fracture. Also, concentrations of serum ICTP and BGP were higher in the fracture group than in the nonfracture group. Elderly female AD patients with low BMD and serum 25-OHD concentrations <5 ng/ml with secondary hyperparathyroidism have a high risk of hip fracture, and the risk may be reduced by vitamin D supplementation. PMID:15337610

  12. Sending the elderly home. Assessing the risk.

    PubMed

    Daly, S; Sawchuk, P J; Wertenberger, D H

    2000-03-01

    In our current health care system, health care agencies are seeing their budgets reduced and their human and support resources stretched to the limit. Many health regions are grappling with decreasing dollars by finding ways to reduce patient length-of-stay in acute care hospitals. But sending patients home earlier can present problems, especially for geriatric patients, whose numbers are swelling as baby boomers age. Society's traditional caregivers, women, are more and more likely to be employed outside the home, therefore are unavailable to assist with the care of older adults. Additionally, consumers have become more actively involved in their health care and are demanding a high quality of care. For all these reasons, it is essential that discharge planning be an integral part of acute-care services. PMID:11143658

  13. Severe pneumonia in the elderly: a multivariate analysis of risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Ding, Cheng; Yin, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is the second leading reason for hospitalization of medicare beneficiaries. The mortality rate is high, especially in the elderly. In this study, we aimed to determine the risk factors associated with severe pneumonia in the elderly. Retrospective study was conducted and data of old patients with severe pneumonia were collected. They were divided into two groups: the experiment group (death group) and the control (living group). The general situation, underlying diseases, laboratory tests, types of etiology, imaging analysis and treatment situation of patients were analyzed and compared. Univariate analysis and logistic multivariate regression analysis were used to screen the related and independent risk factors for the diagnosis of severe pneumonia in the elderly. In univariate analysis, there were many factors had statistical significance including chronic kidney disease, electrolyte disturbance, low phosphorus and so on. Result of logistic multivariate regression analysis showed pro-BNP level and serum prealbumin were independent risk factors. In sputum culture, the relevance ratio of acinetobacter baumannii was the highest in gram negative bacteria followed by klebsiella pneumoniae. In gram positive bacteria, the relevance ratio of staphylococcus aureus was the highest. In conclusion, the analysis on risk factors for severe pneumonia has great clinical significance on improving the prognosis. PMID:26550157

  14. Severe pneumonia in the elderly: a multivariate analysis of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Ding, Cheng; Yin, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is the second leading reason for hospitalization of medicare beneficiaries. The mortality rate is high, especially in the elderly. In this study, we aimed to determine the risk factors associated with severe pneumonia in the elderly. Retrospective study was conducted and data of old patients with severe pneumonia were collected. They were divided into two groups: the experiment group (death group) and the control (living group). The general situation, underlying diseases, laboratory tests, types of etiology, imaging analysis and treatment situation of patients were analyzed and compared. Univariate analysis and logistic multivariate regression analysis were used to screen the related and independent risk factors for the diagnosis of severe pneumonia in the elderly. In univariate analysis, there were many factors had statistical significance including chronic kidney disease, electrolyte disturbance, low phosphorus and so on. Result of logistic multivariate regression analysis showed pro-BNP level and serum prealbumin were independent risk factors. In sputum culture, the relevance ratio of acinetobacter baumannii was the highest in gram negative bacteria followed by klebsiella pneumoniae. In gram positive bacteria, the relevance ratio of staphylococcus aureus was the highest. In conclusion, the analysis on risk factors for severe pneumonia has great clinical significance on improving the prognosis. PMID:26550157

  15. Acute Kidney Injury Increases Risk of ESRD among Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ishani, Areef; Xue, Jay L.; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Eggers, Paul W.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Molitoris, Bruce A.; Collins, Allan J.

    2009-01-01

    Risk for ESRD among elderly patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) has not been studied in a large, representative sample. This study aimed to determine incidence rates and hazard ratios for developing ESRD in elderly individuals, with and without chronic kidney disease (CKD), who had AKI. In the 2000 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries, clinical conditions were identified using Medicare claims; ESRD treatment information was obtained from ESRD registration during 2 yr of follow-up. Our cohort of 233,803 patients were hospitalized in 2000, were aged ≥67 yr on discharge, did not have previous ESRD or AKI, and were Medicare-entitled for ≥2 yr before discharge. In this cohort, 3.1% survived to discharge with a diagnosis of AKI, and 5.3 per 1000 developed ESRD. Among patients who received treatment for ESRD, 25.2% had a previous history of AKI. After adjustment for age, gender, race, diabetes, and hypertension, the hazard ratio for developing ESRD was 41.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 34.6 to 49.1) for patients with AKI and CKD relative to those without kidney disease, 13.0 (95% CI 10.6 to 16.0) for patients with AKI and without previous CKD, and 8.4 (95% CI 7.4 to 9.6) for patients with CKD and without AKI. In summary, elderly individuals with AKI, particularly those with previously diagnosed CKD, are at significantly increased risk for ESRD, suggesting that episodes of AKI may accelerate progression of renal disease. PMID:19020007

  16. Risk of rupture of unruptured cerebral aneurysms in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Date, Isao; Tokunaga, Koji; Tominari, Shinjiro; Nozaki, Kazuhiko; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Murayama, Yuichi; Ishibashi, Toshihiro; Takao, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Toshikazu; Nakayama, Takeo; Morita, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for rupture of unruptured cerebral aneurysms (UCAs) in elderly Japanese patients aged 70 years or older. Methods: The participants included all patients 70 years of age or older in 3 prospective studies in Japan (the Unruptured Cerebral Aneurysm Study of Japan [UCAS Japan], UCAS II, and the prospective study at the Jikei University School of Medicine). A total of 1,896 patients aged 70 years or older with 2,227 UCAs were investigated. The median and mean follow-up periods were 990 and 802.7 days, respectively. Results: The mean aneurysm size was 6.2 ± 3.9 mm. Sixty-eight patients (3.6%) experienced subarachnoid hemorrhage during the follow-up period. Multivariable analysis per patient revealed that in patients aged 80 years or older (hazard ratio [HR], 2.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16–3.49, p = 0.012), aneurysms 7 mm or larger (HR, 3.08; 95% CI, 1.35–7.03, p = 0.007 for 7–9 mm; HR, 7.82; 95% CI, 3.60–16.98, p < 0.001 for 10–24 mm; and HR, 43.31; 95% CI, 12.55–149.42, p < 0.001 for ≥25 mm) and internal carotid–posterior communicating artery aneurysms (HR, 2.45; 95% CI, 1.23–4.88, p = 0.011) were independent predictors for UCA rupture in elderly patients. Conclusions: In our pooled analysis of prospective cohorts in Japan, patient age and aneurysm size and location were significant risk factors for UCA rupture in elderly patients. PMID:26511450

  17. Anticholinergic Medication Use and Risk of Fracture in Elderly Adults with Depression.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Satabdi; Bali, Vishal; Carnahan, Ryan M; Chen, Hua; Johnson, Michael L; Aparasu, Rajender R

    2016-07-01

    Limited research exists regarding the effect of anticholinergics on falls and fractures in elderly nursing home residents in the United States. This study examined the risk of fractures associated with anticholinergic medication use in elderly nursing home residents with depression. A nested case-control design involving a cohort of elderly adults with depression from the 2007 to 2010 Minimum Data Set (MDS)-linked Medicare data was used to evaluate the risk of fractures. The study sample included Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and older diagnosed with depression having at least one nursing home stay during 2007 to 2010 and no history of falls or fractures in 2007 (base period). Cases were individuals with incident fractures after the baseline period. For each case, four age- and sex-matched controls were selected using incidence density sampling. Anticholinergic exposure was defined using the Anticholinergic Drug Scale (ADS). Prescription of Level 2 or 3 anticholinergic medications within 30 days before the event date was the primary exposure. The primary outcome was an inpatient or outpatient claim for a fracture between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010. A conditional logistic regression model stratified on matched case-control sets was used to evaluate association between anticholinergic use and fractures, controlling for other risk factors of the outcome. The study sample consisted of 40,452 individuals with fractures and 161,808 matched controls. After adjusting for other risk factors, high-level anticholinergic use was associated with 14% greater fracture risk than nonuse (odds ratio (OR) = 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.11-1.17). The high risk of fractures remained consistent across levels of anticholinergic potency (Level 2, OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.11-1.19; Level 3, OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.07-1.15). The study findings remained consistent in multiple sensitivity analyses. Overall, use of high-level anticholinergic medications was associated with

  18. Risk factors in road crossing among elderly pedestrians and readiness to adopt safe behavior in socio-economic comparison.

    PubMed

    Rosenbloom, Tova; Sapir-Lavid, Yael; Perlman, Amotz

    2016-08-01

    This research examines the Health Promotion Behavior (HPB) models regarding elderly pedestrians' behaviors and attitudes. We studied cognitive-psychological variables, such as risk estimation, self-efficacy and demographic variables and compared elderly pedestrians' attitudes and behaviors in a city with higher socio-economic level (Tel Aviv) versus a city with low socio-economic level (Beer Sheva). We expected to find more problematic behaviors among elderly pedestrians in the low socio-economic city compared to the high socio-economic city, and also less feeling of self-efficacy, and lessened awareness of the risks, that leads to lessened willingness to adopt preventive behaviors. The research was conducted in two studies. The first study was based on observations on 2591 pedestrians in six similar crosswalks in both cities. It revealed that pedestrians in the high socio-economic city demonstrated safer road crossing patterns than in the low socio-economic city and that elderly pedestrians reveal safer crossing patterns than younger pedestrians. We found an interaction of location and age due to greater gap of safe behaviors of elderly and young pedestrians in the high socio-economic city than in the low socio-economic city. In Tel Aviv elderly adhere to the crossing rules much more than the young while in Beer Sheva elderly and young people are almost similar in their crossing patterns. The second study used questionnaires that have been completed by 143 elderly in both cities. The questionnaires referred to (a) demographic variables such as gender, age, marital status, education, socio-economic level, (b) variables related to the affiliation to the main culture such as migration, date of migration, knowledge in Hebrew (local language) and connectivity to media and (c) cognitive as well as psychological variables related to the decline to adopt healthy behaviors based on Schwarzer and Fuchs (1995). This part also indicated that elderly in Tel Aviv have higher

  19. Risk factors for reported elder abuse and neglect: a nine-year observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lachs, M S; Williams, C; O'Brien, S; Hurst, L; Horwitz, R

    1997-08-01

    To determine longitudinal risk factors for elder abuse and neglect, an established cohort of community-dwelling older adults (n = 2,812) was linked with elderly protective service records over a 9-year follow-up period. Protective services saw 184 (6.5%) individuals in the cohort for any indication, and 47 cohort members were seen for corroborated elder abuse or neglect for a sampling adjusted 9-year prevalence of 1.6% (95% CI 1.0%, 2.1%). In pooled logistic regression, age, race, poverty, functional disability, and cognitive impairment were identified as risk factors for reported elder mistreatment. Additionally, the onset of new cognitive impairment was also associated with elder abuse and neglect. Because the mechanism of elder mistreatment case-finding in this study was a social welfare system (protective services), the influence of race and poverty as risk factors is likely to be overestimated due to reporting bias. PMID:9279035

  20. Risk factors associated with outcomes of hip fracture surgery in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Hoon; Yoo, Byunghoon; Lee, Woo Yong; Lim, Yunhee; Kim, Mun-Cheol; Yon, Jun Heum

    2015-01-01

    Background Hip fracture surgery on elderly patients is associated with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to identify the risk factors related to the postoperative mortality and complications following hip fracture surgery on elderly patients. Methods In this retrospective study, the medical records of elderly patients (aged 65 years or older) who underwent hip fracture surgery from January 2011 to June 2014 were reviewed. A total of 464 patients were involved. Demographic data of the patients, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, preoperative comorbidities, type and duration of anesthesia and type of surgery were collected. Factors related to postoperative mortality and complications; as well as to intensive care unit admission were analyzed using logistic regression. Results The incidence of postoperative mortality, cardiovascular complications, respiratory complications and intensive care unit (ICU) admission were 1.7, 4.7, 19.6 and 7.1%, respectively. Postoperative mortality was associated with preoperative respiratory comorbidities, postoperative cardiovascular complications (P < 0.05). Postoperative cardiovascular complications were related to frequent intraoperative hypotension (P <0.05). Postoperative respiratory complications were related to age, preoperative renal failure, neurological comorbidities, and bedridden state (P < 0.05). ICU admission was associated with the time from injury to operation, preoperative neurological comorbidities and frequent intraoperative hypotension (P < 0.05). Conclusions Adequate treatment of respiratory comorbidities and prevention of cardiovascular complications might be the critical factors in reducing postoperative mortality in elderly patients undergoing hip fracture surgery. PMID:26634079

  1. Depression - elderly

    MedlinePlus

    ... highest risk. Families should pay close attention to elderly relatives who are depressed and who live alone. ... health care provider. Alternative Names Depression in the elderly Images Depression among the elderly References Abbasi O, ...

  2. Effects of a Stroke Primary Prevention Program on Risk Factors for At-Home Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Mi Yang; Jeong, HyeonCheol

    2015-01-01

    Background To prevent stroke from occurring, stroke risk factors in at-risk subjects should be controlled and the diseases causing stroke should be managed. This study evaluated a nursing intervention to prevent stroke in at-risk elderly living at home. The program consisted of stroke and nutrition education as well as exercise guidance. Material/Methods This study targeted 93 elderly people living at home residing in E province with 1 or more stroke risk factors, including high blood pressure, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, obesity, smoking, or drinking alcohol. The 12-week program included a stroke education class once a week, a nutrition management class once a week, and exercise guidance 3 times a week. Each session lasted 50–70 min. Each disease education and nutrition management session lasted for 20 min and each exercise session lasted for 30–50 min. Results The experimental group’s body mass index (BMI) (t=8.27, p<.001), systolic blood pressure (t=2.39, p=.021), fasting blood sugar (t=0.39, p=.700), total cholesterol (t=4.18, p<.001), triglyceride levels (t=2.50, p=.016), and depression scores (t=5.48, p<.001) were significantly reduced and high-density phospholipid protein levels increased significantly by the end of the program (t=−2.94, p=.005). Conclusions Based on the results of this study, participating in a stroke prevention program enabled at-risk elderly participants who lived at home in rural areas to perform health-promoting behaviors. This program may reduce the incidence of stroke by reducing risk factors and managing stroke precursor diseases. PMID:26615035

  3. Effects of a Stroke Primary Prevention Program on Risk Factors for At-Home Elderly.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Mi Yang; Jeong, HyeonCheol

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND To prevent stroke from occurring, stroke risk factors in at-risk subjects should be controlled and the diseases causing stroke should be managed. This study evaluated a nursing intervention to prevent stroke in at-risk elderly living at home. The program consisted of stroke and nutrition education as well as exercise guidance. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study targeted 93 elderly people living at home residing in E province with 1 or more stroke risk factors, including high blood pressure, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, obesity, smoking, or drinking alcohol. The 12-week program included a stroke education class once a week, a nutrition management class once a week, and exercise guidance 3 times a week. Each session lasted 50-70 min. Each disease education and nutrition management session lasted for 20 min and each exercise session lasted for 30-50 min. RESULTS The experimental group's body mass index (BMI) (t=8.27, p<.001), systolic blood pressure (t=2.39, p=.021), fasting blood sugar (t=0.39, p=.700), total cholesterol (t=4.18, p<.001), triglyceride levels (t=2.50, p=.016), and depression scores (t=5.48, p<.001) were significantly reduced and high-density phospholipid protein levels increased significantly by the end of the program (t=-2.94, p=.005). CONCLUSIONS Based on the results of this study, participating in a stroke prevention program enabled at-risk elderly participants who lived at home in rural areas to perform health-promoting behaviors. This program may reduce the incidence of stroke by reducing risk factors and managing stroke precursor diseases. PMID:26615035

  4. Identification of Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment Based Risk Factors for Malnutrition in Elderly Asian Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Whee Sze; Rajasekaran, Tanujaa; Nee Koo, Khai; Chan, Li Li; Poon, Donald; Roy Chowdhury, Anupama; Krishna, Lalit; Kanesvaran, Ravindran

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Elderly cancer patients are at increased risk for malnutrition. We aim to identify comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) based clinical factors associated with increased nutritional risk and develop a clinical scoring system to identify nutritional risk in elderly cancer patients. Patients and Methods CGA data was collected from 249 Asian patients aged 70 years or older. Nutritional risk was assessed based on the Nutrition Screening Initiative (NSI) checklist. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to assess the association between patient clinical factors together with domains within the CGA and moderate to high nutritional risk. Goodness of fit was assessed using Hosmer-Lemeshow test. Discrimination ability was assessed based on the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC). Internal validation was performed using simulated datasets via bootstrapping. Results Among the 249 patients, 184 (74%) had moderate to high nutritional risk. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified stage 3–4 disease (Odds Ratio [OR] 2.54; 95% CI, 1.14–5.69), ECOG performance status of 2–4 (OR 3.04; 95% CI, 1.57–5.88), presence of depression (OR 5.99; 95% CI, 1.99–18.02) and haemoglobin levels <12 g/dL (OR 3.00; 95% CI 1.54–5.84) as significant independent factors associated with moderate to high nutritional risk. The model achieved good calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow test’s p = 0.17) and discrimination (AUC = 0.80). It retained good calibration and discrimination (bias-corrected AUC = 0.79) under internal validation. Conclusion Having advanced stage of cancer, poor performance status, depression and anaemia were found to be predictors of moderate to high nutritional risk. Early identification of patients with these risk factors will allow for nutritional interventions that may improve treatment tolerance, quality of life and survival outcomes. PMID:27231951

  5. Suicide Risk in Homebound Elderly Individuals What Home Care Clinicians Need to Know.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Tony

    2015-10-01

    Suicide rates and risk increase with age. Older people are heavy users of in-home services. Many of the reasons that older adults need home care are serious risk factors for suicide. These include disability, physical illness, and other conditions that affect self-sufficiency. Home care providers are well positioned to identify elder suicide risk. This requires some understanding of suicidal behavior, the key risk factors for suicide in elders, the warning signs, and what to do if suicidality is encountered. The suicide prevention field has not recognized home care as a means of reaching suicidal elders. It is critical that this be corrected as elder suicides stand to rise as the elder population increases. PMID:26418106

  6. High Serum SHBG Predicts Incident Vertebral Fractures in Elderly Men

    PubMed Central

    Vandenput, Liesbeth; Mellström, Dan; Kindmark, Andreas; Johansson, Helena; Lorentzon, Mattias; Leung, Jason; Redlund‐Johnell, Inga; Rosengren, Björn E; Karlsson, Magnus K; Wang, Yi‐Xiang; Kwok, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous prospective cohort studies have shown that serum levels of sex steroids and sex hormone‐binding globulin (SHBG) associate with nonvertebral fracture risk in men. The predictive value of sex hormones and SHBG for vertebral fracture risk specifically is, however, less studied. Elderly men (aged ≥65 years) from Sweden and Hong Kong participating in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study had baseline estradiol and testosterone analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC‐MS) and SHBG by immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). Incident clinical vertebral fractures (n = 242 cases) were evaluated in 4324 men during an average follow‐up of 9.1 years. In a subsample of these men (n = 2256), spine X‐rays were obtained at baseline and after an average follow‐up of 4.3 years to identify incident radiographic vertebral fractures (n = 157 cases). The likelihood of incident clinical and radiographic vertebral fractures was estimated by Cox proportional hazards models and logistic regression models, respectively. Neither serum estradiol (hazard ratio [HR] per SD increase = 0.93, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80–1.08) nor testosterone (1.05, 0.91–1.21) predicted incident clinical vertebral fractures in age‐adjusted models in the combined data set. High serum SHBG, however, associated with increased clinical vertebral fracture risk (1.24, 1.12–1.37). This association remained significant after further adjustment for FRAX with or without bone mineral density (BMD). SHBG also associated with increased incident radiographic vertebral fracture risk (combined data set; odds ratio [OR] per SD increase = 1.23, 95% CI 1.05–1.44). This association remained significant after adjustment for FRAX with or without BMD. In conclusion, high SHBG predicts incident clinical and radiographic vertebral fractures in elderly men and adds moderate information beyond FRAX with BMD for vertebral fracture risk prediction. © 2015 The

  7. Abdominal obesity is strongly associated with Cardiovascular Disease and its Risk Factors in Elderly and very Elderly Community-dwelling Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Huimin; Li, Xiaolin; Zheng, Liang; Chen, Xiaoli; lan, Qin; Wu, Hong; Ding, Xugang; Qian, Dingguang; Shen, Yixin; Yu, Zuoren; Fan, Lieying; Chen, Ming; Tomlinson, Brian; Chan, Paul; Zhang, Yuzhen; Liu, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is usually considered to predispose to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) but milder degrees of obesity or overweight may be protective in some elderly populations. We examined the relationships between general and abdominal obesity indices with ASCVD and its risk factors in elderly (aged ≥65 years) Shanghai community residents Among the 3950 participants, 21.5% had ASCVD, 56.2% had body mass index (BMI) ≥24 kg/m2, 50.1% had high waist circumference (WC) and 77.1% had waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) ≥0.50. WHtR increased with age in both men and women whereas WC increased with age only in women and BMI decreased with age only in men. The optimal WHtR cut-off value to predict the risk of ASCVD determined by receiver operating characteristic analysis was WHtR ≥0.53 with a prevalence of 55.8%. Having abdominal obesity was significantly associated with prevalent ASCVD with WHtR ≥0.53 having a higher value for the odds ratio than high WC, whereas high BMI was not associated. All three indices predicted high glucose, triglycerides and hsCRP levels but only the WHtR ≥0.53 showed a significant association with physical activity. Abdominal obesity indices, but not BMI, predicted prevalent ASCVD and its risk factors in this elderly Chinese population. PMID:26882876

  8. Strength training in the elderly: effects on risk factors for age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Hurley, B F; Roth, S M

    2000-10-01

    Strength training (ST) is considered a promising intervention for reversing the loss of muscle function and the deterioration of muscle structure that is associated with advanced age. This reversal is thought to result in improvements in functional abilities and health status in the elderly by increasing muscle mass, strength and power and by increasing bone mineral density (BMD). In the past couple of decades, many studies have examined the effects of ST on risk factors for age-related diseases or disabilities. Collectively, these studies indicate that ST in the elderly: (i) is an effective intervention against sarcopenia because it produces substantial increases in the strength, mass, power and quality of skeletal muscle; (ii) can increase endurance performance; (iii) normalises blood pressure in those with high normal values; (iv) reduces insulin resistance; (v) decreases both total and intra-abdominal fat; (vi) increases resting metabolic rate in older men; (vii) prevents the loss of BMD with age; (viii) reduces risk factors for falls; and (ix) may reduce pain and improve function in those with osteoarthritis in the knee region. However, contrary to popular belief, ST does not increase maximal oxygen uptake beyond normal variations, improve lipoprotein or lipid profiles, or improve flexibility in the elderly. PMID:11048773

  9. Short-course R-CHOP followed by 90Y-Ibritumomab tiuxetan in previously untreated high-risk elderly diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients: 7-year long-term results

    PubMed Central

    Stefoni, V; Casadei, B; Bottelli, C; Gaidano, G; Ciochetto, C; Cabras, M G; Ansuinelli, M; Argnani, L; Broccoli, A; Gandolfi, L; Pellegrini, C; Zinzani, P L

    2016-01-01

    An update at 7 years was conceived for our multicenter phase II study in which 55 elderly high-risk untreated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients were treated with 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan after a short course of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone (R-CHOP) as long-term follow-up analyses of this combined therapeutic modality are lacking. The overall response rate to the entire regimen was 80%, including 73% (40/55) of complete response (CR) rate and 7% (4/55) of partial response rate. At the time of writing, 24/55 (43.6%) patients experienced a progression disease and 20 of 40 (50%) patients who obtained a CR are still alive in continuous CR. With a median follow-up of 7 years, the disease-free survival was 43.3% and the progression-free survival was 36.1%. The overall survival at 7.9 years was 38.9% (27 deaths mainly because of lymphoma). Two patients developed secondary hematological malignancies, an acute myeloid leukemia and a myelodysplastic syndrome, at 4 and 3 years from radioimmunotherapy, respectively. Our data confirm the feasibility, efficacy and safety of four cycles of R-CHOP followed by radioimmunotherapy consolidation even in the long term: this combination allows dispensing less chemotherapy in a frail group of patients without invalidating response quality and duration. PMID:27176801

  10. Short-course R-CHOP followed by (90)Y-Ibritumomab tiuxetan in previously untreated high-risk elderly diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients: 7-year long-term results.

    PubMed

    Stefoni, V; Casadei, B; Bottelli, C; Gaidano, G; Ciochetto, C; Cabras, M G; Ansuinelli, M; Argnani, L; Broccoli, A; Gandolfi, L; Pellegrini, C; Zinzani, P L

    2016-01-01

    An update at 7 years was conceived for our multicenter phase II study in which 55 elderly high-risk untreated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients were treated with (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan after a short course of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone (R-CHOP) as long-term follow-up analyses of this combined therapeutic modality are lacking. The overall response rate to the entire regimen was 80%, including 73% (40/55) of complete response (CR) rate and 7% (4/55) of partial response rate. At the time of writing, 24/55 (43.6%) patients experienced a progression disease and 20 of 40 (50%) patients who obtained a CR are still alive in continuous CR. With a median follow-up of 7 years, the disease-free survival was 43.3% and the progression-free survival was 36.1%. The overall survival at 7.9 years was 38.9% (27 deaths mainly because of lymphoma). Two patients developed secondary hematological malignancies, an acute myeloid leukemia and a myelodysplastic syndrome, at 4 and 3 years from radioimmunotherapy, respectively. Our data confirm the feasibility, efficacy and safety of four cycles of R-CHOP followed by radioimmunotherapy consolidation even in the long term: this combination allows dispensing less chemotherapy in a frail group of patients without invalidating response quality and duration. PMID:27176801

  11. Low zinc status: a new risk factor for pneumonia in the elderly?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc may be a new risk factor for pneumonia in the elderly. In this special article, we reviewed the magnitude of the problem of pneumonia (its prevalence, morbidity and mortality) in the elderly, its etiology, and the dysregulation of the immune system associated with increasing age. In addition, w...

  12. Social-Relational Risk Factors for Predicting Elder Physical Abuse: An Ecological Bi-Focal Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Heydrich, Levente; Schiamberg, Lawrence B.; Chee, Grace

    2012-01-01

    Annually in the United States, 1 to 5 million older adults, 65 and above, are physically or sexually injured or mistreated by their caregivers in family settings. This study examined the prevalence and risk factors involved in elder physical abuse by adult child caregivers, moving from the immediate elderly parent/adult child relationship context…

  13. Biweekly rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, non-pegylated liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin and prednisone (R-COMP-14) in elderly patients with poor-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and moderate to high ‘life threat’ impact cardiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Corazzelli, Gaetano; Frigeri, Ferdinando; Arcamone, Manuela; Lucania, Anna; RosariaVilla, Maria; Morelli, Emanuela; Amore, Alfonso; Capobianco, Gaetana; Caronna, Antonietta; Becchimanzi, Cristina; Volzone, Francesco; Marcacci, Gianpaolo; Russo, Filippo; De Filippi, Rosaria; Mastrullo, Lucia; Pinto, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    This Phase II study assessed feasibility and efficacy of a biweekly R-COMP-14 regimen (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, non-pegylated liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) in untreated elderly patients with poor-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and moderate to high ‘life threat’ impact NIA/NCI cardiac comorbidity. A total of 208 courses were delivered, with close cardiac monitoring, to 41 patients (median age: 73 years, range: 62–82; 37% >75 years) at a median interval of 15·6 (range, 13–29) days; 67% completed all six scheduled courses. Response rate was 73%, with 68% complete responses (CR); 4-year disease-free survival (DFS) and time to treatment failure (TTF) were 72% and 49%, respectively. Failures were due to early death (n = 3), therapy discontinuations (no-response n = 2; toxicity n = 6), relapse (n = 6) and death in CR (n = 3). Incidence of cardiac grade 3–5 adverse events was 7/41 (17%; 95% confidence interval: 8–31%). Time to progression and overall survival at 4-years were 77% and 67%, respectively. The Age-adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index (aaCCI) correlated with failures (P = 0·007) with patients scoring ≤7 having a longer TTF (66% vs. 29%; P = 0·009). R-COMP-14 is feasible and ensures a substantial DFS to poor-risk DLBCL patients who would have been denied anthracycline-based treatment due to cardiac morbidity. The aaCCI predicted both treatment discontinuation rate and TTF. PMID:21707585

  14. Difference in nutritional risk between mild cognitive impairment group and normal cognitive function elderly group.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Soo; Hong, Chang Hyung; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Oh, Byoung Hoon

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate the difference in nutritional risk between mild cognitive impairment (MCI) groups and normal cognitive function (NCF) elderly groups in the community. Data obtained from 490 subjects (237 NCF elderly and 253 MCI subjects) between 60 and 90 years of age were analyzed. The study protocol comprised demographic characteristics, history of current and past illnesses, drug history, Korean version of short-form Geriatric Depression Scale (K-SGDS), and nutritional screening initiative (NSI) checklist. Cognitive function was assessed by digit span, Korean short version of Boston naming test (K-BNT), simple Rey figure test, auditory verbal learning test (AVLT), controlled oral word association test (COWAT), stroop, go-no go, and contrasting program. Also, we examined the blood pressure, fasting serum glucose level, lipid profile, body mass index (BMI), and ApoE genotype. Multiple logistic regression analysis found that MCI was associated with moderate or high nutritional risk after adjustment for age, sex, educational level, and K-SGDS score (odds ratio (OR)=1.13, 95%; confidence interval (CI)=1.01-1.26). These results suggest that MCI may be associated with nutritional risk. Screening for nutritional risk should be included in multidimensional geriatric evaluation. PMID:18524396

  15. Elderly Peritoneal Dialysis Compared with Elderly Hemodialysis Patients and Younger Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: Competing Risk Analysis of a Korean Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunsuk; An, Jung Nam; Kim, Dong Ki; Kim, Myoung-Hee; Kim, Ho; Kim, Yong-Lim; Park, Ki Soo; Oh, Yun Kyu; Lim, Chun Soo; Kim, Yon Su; Lee, Jung Pyo

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of peritoneal dialysis (PD) in elderly patients have not been thoroughly investigated. We aimed to investigate the clinical outcomes and risk factors associated with PD in elderly patients. We conducted a prospective observational nationwide adult end-stage renal disease (ESRD) cohort study in Korea from August 2008 to March 2013. Among incident patients (n = 830), patient and technical survival rate, quality of life, and Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI) scores of elderly PD patients (≥65 years, n = 95) were compared with those of PD patients aged ≤49 years (n = 205) and 50~64 years (n = 192); and elderly hemodialysis (HD) patients (n = 315). The patient death and technical failure were analyzed by cumulative incidence function. Competing risk regressions were used to assess the risk factors for survival. The patient survival rate of elderly PD patients was inferior to that of younger PD patients (P<0.001). However, the technical survival rate was similar (P = 0.097). Compared with elderly HD patients, the patient survival rate did not differ according to dialysis modality (P = 0.987). Elderly PD patients showed significant improvement in the BDI scores, as compared with the PD patients aged ≤49 years (P = 0.003). Low albumin, diabetes and low residual renal function were significant risk factors for the PD patient survival; and peritonitis was a significant risk factor for technical survival. Furthermore, low albumin and hospitalization were significant risk factors of patient survival among the elderly. The overall outcomes were similar between elderly PD and HD patients. PD showed the benefit in BDI and quality of life in the elderly. Additionally, the technical survival rate of elderly PD patients was similar to that of younger PD patients. Taken together, PD may be a comparable modality for elderly ESRD patients. PMID:26121574

  16. Elderly Peritoneal Dialysis Compared with Elderly Hemodialysis Patients and Younger Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: Competing Risk Analysis of a Korean Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsuk; An, Jung Nam; Kim, Dong Ki; Kim, Myoung-Hee; Kim, Ho; Kim, Yong-Lim; Park, Ki Soo; Oh, Yun Kyu; Lim, Chun Soo; Kim, Yon Su; Lee, Jung Pyo

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of peritoneal dialysis (PD) in elderly patients have not been thoroughly investigated. We aimed to investigate the clinical outcomes and risk factors associated with PD in elderly patients. We conducted a prospective observational nationwide adult end-stage renal disease (ESRD) cohort study in Korea from August 2008 to March 2013. Among incident patients (n = 830), patient and technical survival rate, quality of life, and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) scores of elderly PD patients (≥65 years, n = 95) were compared with those of PD patients aged ≤49 years (n = 205) and 50~64 years (n = 192); and elderly hemodialysis (HD) patients (n = 315). The patient death and technical failure were analyzed by cumulative incidence function. Competing risk regressions were used to assess the risk factors for survival. The patient survival rate of elderly PD patients was inferior to that of younger PD patients (P<0.001). However, the technical survival rate was similar (P = 0.097). Compared with elderly HD patients, the patient survival rate did not differ according to dialysis modality (P = 0.987). Elderly PD patients showed significant improvement in the BDI scores, as compared with the PD patients aged ≤49 years (P = 0.003). Low albumin, diabetes and low residual renal function were significant risk factors for the PD patient survival; and peritonitis was a significant risk factor for technical survival. Furthermore, low albumin and hospitalization were significant risk factors of patient survival among the elderly. The overall outcomes were similar between elderly PD and HD patients. PD showed the benefit in BDI and quality of life in the elderly. Additionally, the technical survival rate of elderly PD patients was similar to that of younger PD patients. Taken together, PD may be a comparable modality for elderly ESRD patients. PMID:26121574

  17. Suspicion of elder abuse in South Eastern Spain: the extent and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cárceles, M D; Rubio, L; Pereniguez, J E; Pérez-Flores, D; Osuna, E; Luna, A

    2009-01-01

    Elder abuse is recognized internationally as a growing problem. Recent years have seen an increase in the number of authors recommending that the MDs systematically question old people concerning possible abuse. The aim of our study was to ascertain the extent of suspicion of elder abuse and the different types of abuse. We design a cross-sectional survey including 460 patients > or = 65 years at different health centers (South East Spain). A face-to-face interview and a physical examination was carried out. Extent of suspected abuse was 44.6%. Female sex, > or = 75 years, widowhood, living alone or with children, accommodation in house of relatives and income < or = 300 euros/month were the associated sociodemographic variables. The risk factors associated are recent worsening of health, living with a mentally ill person, excessive consumption of alcohol or illegal drugs, arguing frequently with relatives or the dependence on someone to carry out a daily activity. The signs in the physical examination associated are dehydration/malnutrition, pressure ulcers and poor body and/or mouth hygiene. There is a high extent of suspicion of elder abuse and the keyword in this respect is prevention. PMID:18676036

  18. Elder Self-neglect and Abuse and Mortality Risk in a Community-Dwelling Population

    PubMed Central

    Dong, XinQi; Simon, Melissa; de Leon, Carlos Mendes; Fulmer, Terry; Beck, Todd; Hebert, Liesi; Dyer, Carmel; Paveza, Gregory; Evans, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Context Both elder self-neglect and abuse have become increasingly prominent public health issues. The association of either elder self-neglect or abuse with mortality remains unclear. Objective To examine the relationship of elder self-neglect or abuse reported to social services agencies with all-cause mortality among a community-dwelling elderly population. Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective, population-based cohort study (conducted from 1993 to 2005) of residents living in a geographically defined community of 3 adjacent neighborhoods in Chicago, Illinois, who were participating in the Chicago Health and Aging Project (CHAP; a longitudinal, population-based, epidemiological study of residents aged ≥65 years). A subset of these participants had suspected elder self-neglect or abuse reported to social services agencies. Main Outcome Measures Mortality ascertained during follow-up and by use of the National Death Index. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess independent associations of self-neglect or elder abuse reporting with the risk of all-cause mortality using time-varying covariate analyses. Results Of 9318 CHAP participants, 1544 participants were reported for elder self-neglect and 113 participants were reported for elder abuse from 1993 to 2005. All CHAP participants were followed up for a median of 6.9 years (interquartile range, 7.4 years), during which 4306 deaths occurred. In multivariable analyses, reported elder self-neglect was associated with a significantly increased risk of 1-year mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 5.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.20–6.51). Mortality risk was lower but still elevated after 1 year (HR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.67–2.14). Reported elder abuse also was associated with significantly increased risk of overall mortality (HR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.07–1.84). Confirmed elder self-neglect or abuse also was associated with mortality. Increased mortality risks associated with either elder self-neglect or

  19. Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk Score Can be Predicted from Structural Brain Images in Elderly Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Rondina, Jane Maryam; Squarzoni, Paula; Souza-Duran, Fabio Luis; Tamashiro-Duran, Jaqueline Hatsuko; Scazufca, Marcia; Menezes, Paulo Rossi; Vallada, Homero; Lotufo, Paulo A.; de Toledo Ferraz Alves, Tania Correa; Busatto Filho, Geraldo

    2014-01-01

    Recent literature has presented evidence that cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) play an important role on cognitive performance in elderly individuals, both those who are asymptomatic and those who suffer from symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders. Findings from studies applying neuroimaging methods have increasingly reinforced such notion. Studies addressing the impact of CVRF on brain anatomy changes have gained increasing importance, as recent papers have reported gray matter loss predominantly in regions traditionally affected in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular dementia in the presence of a high degree of cardiovascular risk. In the present paper, we explore the association between CVRF and brain changes using pattern recognition techniques applied to structural MRI and the Framingham score (a composite measure of cardiovascular risk largely used in epidemiological studies) in a sample of healthy elderly individuals. We aim to answer the following questions: is it possible to decode (i.e., to learn information regarding cardiovascular risk from structural brain images) enabling individual predictions? Among clinical measures comprising the Framingham score, are there particular risk factors that stand as more predictable from patterns of brain changes? Our main findings are threefold: (i) we verified that structural changes in spatially distributed patterns in the brain enable statistically significant prediction of Framingham scores. This result is still significant when controlling for the presence of the APOE 4 allele (an important genetic risk factor for both AD and cardiovascular disease). (ii) When considering each risk factor singly, we found different levels of correlation between real and predicted factors; however, single factors were not significantly predictable from brain images when considering APOE4 allele presence as covariate. (iii) We found important gender differences, and the possible causes of that finding are discussed. PMID

  20. Prevalence and risk factors associated with peripheral artery disease in elderly patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Ding-Wei; Li, Chiu-Leong; Kuok, Un-I; Cheung, Kin; Lio, Weng-In; Xin, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Background Rapid growth of the elderly peritoneal dialysis (PD) population is posing a special challenge for renal teams. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) has been reported to be an independent predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in hemodialysis patients. However, the prevalence and associated risk factors for PAD in elderly PD patients have not yet been fully investigated. Methods A total of 69 elderly PD patients were included in the present study. PAD was defined as either an ankle-brachial index < 0.9 or a history of intermittent claudication, lower-limb amputation, foot ulcers, or gangrene. On enrollment, clinical and biochemical characteristics were collected. Results The overall prevalence of PAD was 31.9%. Compared with non-PAD patients, PAD patients were significantly older and more likely to be female and have longer PD duration and lower diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.001, = 0.002, 0.018, and 0.007, respectively). Serum albumin level (P < 0.001) and residual renal Kt/V value (P < 0.001) were significantly lower, but the serum C-reactive protein level (P = 0.005) was significantly higher, in PAD patients compared with non-PAD patients. Logistic regression analysis showed that serum albumin level (odds ratio = 1.485, P = 0.040) and residual renal Kt/V value (odds ratio = 1.725, P = 0.016) were independently associated with PAD. Conclusion A high prevalence of PAD appeared among elderly PD patients in Macao. Serum albumin level and residual renal Kt/V value were independently related to PAD. PMID:23112578

  1. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Abuse among Community Dwelling Elderly of Guwahati City, Assam

    PubMed Central

    Saikia, Anku Moni; Mahanta, Neelakshi; Mahanta, Ajaya; Deka, Ashok Jyoti; Kakati, Arupjyoti

    2015-01-01

    Background: In spite of tremendous impact on health, elder abuse is still an underreported and unrecognized issue. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of abuse among community dwelling elderly and to identify the various risk factors. Materials and Methods: This community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in 10 randomly selected wards of Guwahati city. A total of 331 elderly (60 years and above) were interviewed. Abuse was screened by Hwalek-Sengstock Elder Abuse Screening Test (H-S EAST). Results: The study revealed 9.31% prevalence. Neglect was the most common type of abuse reported. Age, sex, socioeconomic status, living status, and functional status were found to be significantly associated with abuse. Conclusion: Abuse is prevalent among elderly population. PMID:26435603

  2. Alcohol and psychotropic drugs: risk factors for orthostatic hypotension in elderly fallers.

    PubMed

    Gaxatte, C; Faraj, E; Lathuillerie, O; Salleron, J; Deramecourt, V; Pardessus, V; Destailleur, M-H; Boulanger, E; Puisieux, F

    2013-09-19

    We assess orthostatic hypotension (OH) prevalence in elderly fallers and determine OH-associated risk factors in this patient population. A monocentric prospective study at Lille University Hospital Falls Clinic included 833 consecutive patients who had fallen or were at high risk of falls and who were assessed for the presence of OH. Among 833 patients aged 80.4±7.4 years, OH was found in 199 subjects (23.9% of cases). Multivariate analysis showed that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (odds ratio (OR) 2.42, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.56-3.75), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (OR 5.37, 95% CI: 1.93-14.97), Parkinsonian syndrome (OR 2.54, 95% CI: 1.54-4.19), excessive alcohol consumption (OR 2.17, 95% CI: 1.32-3.56), meprobamate (OR 2.65, 95% CI: 1.12-6.25) and calcium channel blockers (OR 1.79, 95% CI: 1.16-2.76) were all risk factors for OH. In contrast, angiotensin receptor blockers (OR 0.52, 95% CI: 0.30-0.91) appeared to be protective factors against OH. This study demonstrates that a systematic investigation should be made in all elderly fallers and those at high risk of falls to detect the presence of OH. In OH patients, in addition to the usual predisposing factors, excessive alcohol consumption and psychotropic drug intake-in particular, the intake of serotonergic antidepressants-should be taken into account as potential risk factors.Journal of Human Hypertension advance online publication, 19 September 2013; doi:10.1038/jhh.2013.82. PMID:24048292

  3. A Novel Risk Score to the Prediction of 10-year Risk for Coronary Artery Disease Among the Elderly in Beijing Based on Competing Risk Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Tang, Zhe; Li, Xia; Luo, Yanxia; Guo, Jin; Li, Haibin; Liu, Xiangtong; Tao, Lixin; Yan, Aoshuang; Guo, Xiuhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The study aimed to construct a risk prediction model for coronary artery disease (CAD) based on competing risk model among the elderly in Beijing and develop a user-friendly CAD risk score tool. We used competing risk model to evaluate the risk of developing a first CAD event. On the basis of the risk factors that were included in the competing risk model, we constructed the CAD risk prediction model with Cox proportional hazard model. Time-dependent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and time-dependent area under the ROC curve (AUC) were used to evaluate the discrimination ability of the both methods. Calibration plots were applied to assess the calibration ability and adjusted for the competing risk of non-CAD death. Net reclassification index (NRI) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) were applied to quantify the improvement contributed by the new risk factors. Internal validation of predictive accuracy was performed using 1000 times of bootstrap re-sampling. Of the 1775 participants without CAD at baseline, 473 incident cases of CAD were documented for a 20-year follow-up. Time-dependent AUCs for men and women at t = 10 years were 0.841 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.806–0.877], 0.804 (95% CI: 0.768–0.839) in Fine and Gray model, 0.784 (95% CI: 0.738–0.830), 0.733 (95% CI: 0.692–0.775) in Cox proportional hazard model. The competing risk model was significantly superior to Cox proportional hazard model on discrimination and calibration. The cut-off values of the risk score that marked the difference between low-risk and high-risk patients were 34 points for men and 30 points for women, which have good sensitivity and specificity. A sex-specific multivariable risk factor algorithm-based competing risk model has been developed on the basis of an elderly Chinese cohort, which could be applied to predict an individual's risk and provide a useful guide to identify the groups at a high risk for CAD among the Chinese

  4. [Elder].

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Pedro; Gutiérrez-Robledo, Luis Miguel

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this review is to present scientific evidence on the biological, dietary, cultural and economic advantages of cow´s milk and dairy products intake in adults, with emphasis on the elderly. The role of milk and dairy products as part of the regular diet, as well as their contribution to a healthy diet for the aged population is described. The updated scientific references on the importance of milk and dairy products on the dietary management of the most prevalent diseases of the eldery -among these energy-protein malnutrition, sarcopenia, obesity, sarcopenic obesity, osteoporosis, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases- are presented. PMID:27603886

  5. Considerations for resuscitation at high altitude in elderly and untrained populations and rescuers.

    PubMed

    Suto, Takashi; Saito, Shigeru

    2014-03-01

    With the development of transportation technologies, elderly people with chronic diseases are increasingly enjoying trekking and tours of nature resorts that include mountain highlands. Because of problems related to circulation, respiration, metabolism, and/or the musculoskeletal system in this population, the impact of high altitude on cardiopulmonary function is increased. Alpine accidents, therefore, tend to be more common in this population, and cases of cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) at high altitudes seem to be increasing. However, relatively few studies have described cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) at high altitudes. Although insufficient studies are available to standardize CPR guidelines at high altitude at this time, the aim of this review is to summarize previous studies relevant to physiologic changes after exposure to high-altitude environments and exercise, which may be a risk factor for CPA in elderly trekkers. In addition, we summarize our previous studies that described the effect of CPR procedures on cardiopulmonary function in untrained rescuers. The available data suggest that prolonged CPR at high altitudes requires strenuous work from rescuers and negatively affects their cardiopulmonary physics and subjectively measured fatigue. Alpine rescue teams should therefore be well prepared for their increased physical burden and difficult conditions. Elderly travelers should be made aware of their increased risk of CPA in alpine settings. The use of mechanical devices to assist CPR should be considered wherever possible. PMID:24388065

  6. Risk factors and manifestations of digoxin toxicity in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Wofford, J L; Ettinger, W H

    1991-03-01

    The incidence of digoxin toxicity increases with age, largely because the two most common conditions that benefit from use of digoxin, congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation, are markedly more prevalent in old age. Whether the elderly are more sensitive to the effects of digoxin because of age per se is unclear. However, several other factors render the elderly more susceptible to digoxin toxicity. These include an age-related decline in renal function and a decrease in volume of digoxin distribution. There is also an increase in the number of comorbid conditions, including cardiovascular and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which heighten susceptibility to digoxin toxicity. Moreover, treatment of these diseases with such interactive medications as quinidine and calcium channel blockers may increase the serum level of digoxin. Similarly, such electrolyte imbalances as hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia occur more frequently in the elderly as a result of diuretic therapy. However, recent data suggest that manifestations of digoxin toxicity among younger and older patients do not differ. Similar incidences of cardiac toxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity, and altered mental status are found in both patient populations. Treatment of digitalis toxicity in the elderly is the same as for younger patients. Response rates to Digibind are not diminished in the elderly. PMID:1997015

  7. Cognitive Impairment and Risk Factors in Elderly People Living in Fluorosis Areas in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Mang; Gao, Yanhui; Cui, Jing; Li, Yuanyuan; Li, Bingyun; Liu, Yang; Sun, Jing; Liu, Xiaona; Liu, Hongxu; Zhao, Lijun; Sun, Dianjun

    2016-07-01

    Residents living in fluorosis areas generally experienced long-term exposure to excessive fluoride in drinking water. The adverse effects of high fluoride levels on the nervous system have been studied; however, the effect of fluoride exposure on cognitive functions of elderly people in fluorosis areas is rarely reported. This study was aimed to find out the potential risk factors of cognitive impairment among elderly people who lived in fluorosis areas of China. A total of 511 subjects, aged 60 years or above, were investigated in fluorosis areas of Heilongjiang Province, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, Qinghai Province, and Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used to examine cognitive functions of the study subjects. Based on the MMSE scores, the study subjects were divided into normal group and cognitive impairment group that consisted of mild, moderate, and severe groups. Multivariable logistic regression showed that a higher risk of cognitive impairment was associated with increased age and decreased education levels. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that MMSE scores were negatively associated with serum homocysteine (Hcy) levels. However, both urinary fluoride and serum Hcy levels in the normal group were not the lowest among the four groups. Spearman's correlation analysis showed that urinary fluoride levels were positively correlated with serum Hcy (r s = 0.209, P < 0.01). Our study suggests that people with cognitive impairment in fluorosis areas have elevated serum Hcy levels, which was positively correlated with urinary fluoride concentrations. A certain low dose of fluoride intake may play a potential protective rather than harmful role in cognitive functions; however, high fluoride exposure is a potential risk factor for cognitive impairment. PMID:26606914

  8. Balancing risk versus benefit: the elderly patient’s perspective on warfarin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bajorek, Beata V.; Ogle, Susan J.; Duguid, Margaret J.; Shenfield, Gillian M.; Krass., Ines

    2009-01-01

    Warfarin therapy is underused in the target at-risk elderly population. Clinicians perceive that older patients are reluctant to use this therapy, however the perspective of patients or their carers has yet to be explored. Objective: To explore in-depth the perspectives of elderly patients and/or their carers regarding the use of warfarin therapy. Method: A qualitative study, using semi-structured group interviews was undertaken. The audio-taped discussions were transcribed verbatim, then thematically analysed to identify emergent themes. Group discussions were conducted at a major Sydney teaching hospital, over a 2-month period. Individuals aged 65 years or older (and/or their carers) who were using long-term (6 months) warfarin therapy were recruited by voluntary response to study flyers. Results: 17 patients and carers (mean age 77.2 SD=7.5 years) participated in one of two focus groups. Five core themes emerged regarding warfarin therapy: inadequate knowledge and understanding about it, patients/carers variable experience of information provision, cycle of reactions to being on it, issues in its practical management, and the spectrum of experiences with it. Overall, participants were very accepting of the therapy, describing a high level of compliance, despite initial fears and anxieties, and a relative lack of knowledge. Patients felt somewhat abandoned in their management of warfarin due to the lack of ongoing support services in the community, and inadequate information provision. Conclusions: Elderly patients and their carers appear to be quite accepting of warfarin therapy, in contrast to the perceptions of health care professionals. More effort is needed, however, in terms of information provision, particularly in the form of community-based services, to assist patients in the long-term management of warfarin. PMID:25152787

  9. Prevalence of peripheral arterial disease and related risk factors in Turkish elders

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is known that prevalence of peripheral arterial disease being a widespread atherosclerotic vascular disease increases by age. On the other hand, no comprehensive study showing the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in Turkish elders is seen. In this study, it is aimed to assess prevalence of peripheral arterial disease and related risk factors in Turkish elders in primary health center. Methods 507 elderly staying at Narlidere Geriatric Care Center and Residential Home and accepting to participate in the study were included in the study. Epidemiological data for diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease, risk factors, findings of physical examination and ankle brachial index measurements were assessed in the study. Data were analyzed in terms of prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, age and gender relation and other cardiovascular risk factors. Results Of the participants, 317 (62.5%) were female. The mean age was 77.61 ± 6.93 years (62-102). The most wide-spread chronic diseases in elderly included hypertension, coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia and Type 2 DM, respectively. On the other hand, only 7 (1.4%) elderly were diagnosed with peripheral arterial disease. The number of elderly ABI of whom was measured as < 0.90 and sent to cardiovascular surgery polyclinic with the diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease was assessed as 30 (5.9%). Intermittent claudication was seen in about half of these patients. Conclusions Peripheral arterial disease is expected to be seen prevailing in elderly. However, it was determined at very low rate before the study due to the fact that the disease cannot be diagnosed clinically especially in early-period. Peripheral arterial disease determined in the study is lower than expected as per the age group. This can be associated with practices of geriatrics nursing and family practice including continuous care to reduce cardiovascular risk factors of patients staying at the unit. PMID:21929797

  10. Mortality risk stratification in elderly trauma patients based on initial arterial lactate and base deficit levels.

    PubMed

    Neville, Angela L; Nemtsev, Denis; Manasrah, Raed; Bricker, Scott D; Putnam, Brant A

    2011-10-01

    Elderly trauma patients have worse outcomes than their younger counterparts. Early risk stratification remains difficult, particularly because traditional vital signs are less reliable. We hypothesized that arrival lactate and base deficit (BD) could be used to predict mortality in elderly trauma patients with a normal admission blood pressure. We retrospectively evaluated the prospectively collected trauma registry at our urban Level I trauma center between 2003 and 2009. Patients sustaining blunt trauma, age 55 years or older, with a systolic blood pressure 90 mmHg or higher, and who had arterial lactate and/or BD measured within 4 hours of arrival comprised the study group. Primary outcomes were in-hospital and 24-hour mortality. There were 364 patients with a lactate and 324 with a BD drawn. Patients with a lactate 2.5 mmol or greater were 3.7 times more likely to die than those with a lactate less than 2.5 mmol (95% CI, 1.6 to 8.2; P = 0.0018). The OR for mortality was 5.2 (95% CI, 2.5 to 11.2; P < 0.0001) in patients with a BD -4 or less. Elevated lactate and BD were even stronger predictors of early mortality (within first 24 hours). After increasing the hypotension threshold to a systolic blood pressure 110 mmHg or greater, lactate and BD remained highly predictive of in-hospital and 24-hour mortality. PMID:22127083

  11. Dietary inflammation factor rating™ system and risk of Alzheimer’s disease in elders

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yian; Nieves, Jeri W; Luchsinger, Jose A; Scarmeas, Nikolaos

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that inflammation is involved in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between inflammatory aspects of diet and incident AD risk. 2258 non-demented elderly (age ≥ 65) in New York who provided dietary information at baseline were followed-up prospectively for AD development. We examined the composite total Inflammation Factor Rating (tIFR), as a measure of inflammatory impact of foods, in relation with (i) serum level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and (ii) risk of incident AD using Cox proportional hazards model. The tIFR was not associated with serum hsCRP level. After an average of 4.0 years of follow-up, 262 subjects developed incident AD. The tIFR was not associated with AD risk: compared to the lowest tertile of tIFR (most pro-inflammatory), HRs (95% CI) for the highest tertile (most anti-inflammatory) was 0.97(0.69–1.35) (p-for-trend=0.84), in the adjusted model. We conclude that tIFR might not be a biologically relevant measure of the inflammatory impact of the diet. Additionally, although it remains possible that tIFR might be related with some other aspects of inflammation not captured by hsCRP, lack of association with AD risk suggests its limited clinical utility. PMID:21606905

  12. Stroke and atrial fibrillation: risks, prevention and therapy in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Raffaeli, S; Paciaroni, E

    1995-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) represents a high risk of systemic embolism, particularly of stroke (S). This is true not only when AF is associated with an organic cardiopathy, but also in the so-called nonvalvular AF (NVAF). Not all cases of AF are of the same S-risk; such risk is higher for rheumatic AF and lower for NVAF. Therefore, a risk stratification is important in order to decide long-term antithrombotic prophylaxis. Five major trials have recently examined the thromboembolic prophylaxis in this group of patients. These randomised prospective open studies showed a significant reduction of S and systematic embolism in patients receiving low dose of warfarin (W), even in the elderly, as compared to placebo, and the incidence of hemorrhagic complications was also very low. Significant benefits of aspirin (ASA) were observed only in one trial in patients, except those older than 75 years. In a double blind, randomised trial indobufene was found effective resulting in 67% reduction of S and systematic embolism in patients with various cardiac diseases in AF or sinus rhythm. Consequently, a reasonable policy would be to treat patients with NVAF (also old ones) with anticoagulants unless contraindications or lone atrial fibrillations are present; in the latter cases ASA and indobufene should be considered. In the secondary prevention of ischemic S, W has given good results, whereas ASA and indobufene seem to be promising. PMID:15374252

  13. Body mass index and the risk of incident functional disability in elderly Japanese

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu; Tomata, Yasutake; Sugiyama, Kemmyo; Kaiho, Yu; Honkura, Kenji; Watanabe, Takashi; Tanji, Fumiya; Sugawara, Yumi; Tsuji, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The relationship between the body mass index (BMI) and the incidence of cause-specific disability remains unclear. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 12,376 Japanese individuals aged ≥65 years who were followed up for 5.7 years. Information on BMI and other lifestyle factors was collected via a questionnaire in 2006. Functional disability data were retrieved from the public Long-term Care Insurance database. BMI was divided into 6 groups (<21, 21–<23, 23–<25, 25–<27[reference], 27–<29 and ≥29). Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for cause-specific disability were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models. A U-shaped relationship between BMI and functional disability was observed, with a nadir at 26. The nadir BMI values with the lowest disability risk were 28 for dementia, 25 for stroke, and 23 for joint disease. A low BMI (<23) was a risk factor for disability due to dementia, the HR values (95% CI) being 2.48 (1.70–3.63) for BMI <21 and 2.25 (1.54–3.27) for BMI 21 to <23; a high BMI (≥29) was a risk factor for disability due to joint disease, the HR value (95% CI) being 2.17 (1.40–3.35). There was no significant relationship between BMI and disability due to stroke. The BMI nadirs for cause-specific disability differed: a low BMI (<23) was a risk factor for disability due to dementia, and a high BMI (≥29) was a risk factor for disability due to joint disease. Because BMI values of 23 to <29 did not pose a significantly higher risk for each cause of disability, this range should be regarded as the optimal one for the elderly population. PMID:27495075

  14. Is chronic hyponatremia a novel risk factor for hip fracture in the elderly?

    PubMed Central

    Carlos Ayus, Juan; Negri, Armando Luis; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Moritz, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Hip fractures represent a serious health risk in the elderly, with significant associated morbidity and mortality. There is now an emerging literature that suggests that chronic hyponatremia increases the adjusted odds ratio (OR) for both falls and fractures in the elderly. Hyponatremia appears to contribute to falls and fractures by two mechanisms: (i) it produces mild cognitive impairment resulting in unsteady gait and falls and (ii) it directly contributes to osteoporosis and increased bone fragility by inducing increased bone resorption to mobilize sodium. There is debate over the effect of hyponatremia on the production of osteoporosis, as one study found decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and another did not. Should we be screening for low serum sodium in patients with osteoporosis or assessing BMD in patients with hyponatremia? The final answer is yet to come from prospective studies that allocate elderly individuals with mild hyponatremia to receive active treatment or not for hyponatremia and see if this intervention prevents gait disturbances and changes in BMD reducing fracture risk. In the meantime, physicians caring for elderly patients must be aware of the association between hyponatremia and bone problems. As serum sodium is a readily available, simple and affordable biochemical measurement, clinicians should look for hyponatremia in elderly patients who take medications that can cause hyponatremia. Also, elderly patients with unsteady gait and/or confusion should be checked for the presence of mild hyponatremia and if present it should not be ignored. Finally, elderly patients presenting with an orthopedic injury should have serum sodium checked and corrected if hyponatremia is present. PMID:23114899

  15. Cumulative Cardiovascular Polypharmacy Is Associated With the Risk of Acute Kidney Injury in Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Wu, Chia-Yi; Lin, Yu-Feng; Hsu, Nin-Chieh; Chen, Jin-Shin; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2015-08-01

    Polypharmacy is common in the elderly due to multimorbidity and interventions. However, the temporal association between polypharmacy and renal outcomes is rarely addressed and recognized. We investigated the association between cardiovascular (CV) polypharmacy and the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) in elderly patients.We used the Taiwan National Health Insurance PharmaCloud system to investigate the relationship between cumulative CV medications in the 3 months before admission and risk of AKI in the elderly at their admission to general medical wards in a single center. Community-dwelling elderly patients (>60 years) were prospectively enrolled and classified according to the number of preadmission CV medications. CV polypharmacy was defined as use of 2 or more CV medications.We enrolled 152 patients, 48% with AKI (based upon Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes [KDIGO] classification) and 64% with CV polypharmacy. The incidence of AKI was higher in patients taking more CV medications (0 drugs: 33%; 1 drug: 50%; 2 drugs: 57%; 3 or more drugs: 60%; P = 0.05) before admission. Patients with higher KDIGO grades also took more preadmission CV medications (P = 0.04). Multiple regression analysis showed that patients who used 1 or more CV medications before admission had increased risk of AKI at admission (1 drug: odds ratio [OR] = 1.63, P = 0.2; 2 drugs: OR = 4.74, P = 0.03; 3 or more drugs: OR = 5.92, P = 0.02), and that CV polypharmacy is associated with higher risk of AKI (OR 2.58; P = 0.02). Each additional CV medication increased the risk for AKI by 30%.We found that elderly patients taking more CV medications are associated with risk of adverse renal events. Further study to evaluate whether interventions that reduce polypharmacy could reduce the incidence of geriatric AKI is urgently needed. PMID:26252287

  16. Variation in nutritional risk among Mexican American and non-Mexican American homebound elders who receive home-delivered meals.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Joseph R

    2004-01-01

    Good nutritional health is essential to prevent functional decline and improve quality of life. Little is known of disparities in the extent of risk for poor nutritional health among homebound Mexican American (MA) elders who receive Older American Act Nutrition Program (OAANP) home-delivered meals. In order to assist OAANP service providers in understanding racial/ethnic differences in nutritional risk, this study examined routinely collected data on 908 homebound MA and non-MA in the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley. Homebound MA were more likely to report poverty, risk factors for and indicators of poor nutritional health. Independent of poverty and covariates,MA were more likely to report very high nutritional risk. This underscores the importance of understanding racial/ethnic disparities in the extent of risk for poor nutritional health for the development, implementation, and evaluation of effective strategies to alleviate nutritional health disparities. PMID:15149938

  17. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Obesity among Elderly Attending Geriatric Outpatient Clinics in Mansoura City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shebl, Amany Mohamed; Hatata, El Sayed Zaki; Boughdady, Aziza Mahmoud; El-Sayed, Sally Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem affecting all ages in both developed and developing countries. It is considered the fifth leading risk factor for deaths all over the world as about 2.8 million people die due to obesity each year directly or indirectly. Obesity in elderly is considered one of the most serious public health challenges for…

  18. [Oral anticoagulation in the elderly - practical aspects and risk-benefit trade-off in atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Frank, M

    2010-03-31

    Use of oral anticoagulants is common in elderly persons. Oral anticoagulation can be used safely in the elderly if careful titration of the loading dose, careful changes in maintenance doses as well as consideration of drug interactions are taken into account. Frequent monitoring of the INR is essential, especially with changes in medical status and in co-medication. Correction of elevated INRs can be done following the recommendations. If vitamin K is used in stable patients, only small doses are required. In patients with atrial fibrillation, ischemic stroke risk and bleeding risk are predicted by overlapping factors. So patients who profit most from stroke risk reduction also show high bleeding risk. Risk stratification for ischemic stroke can be done easily with CHADS2-Score. Fall risk tends to be overestimated as a contraindication, whereas cognitive decline in combination with an unstable social network argues against anticoagulation. In the end, the decision to start or withhold anticoagulation has to be taken individually. PMID:20358518

  19. Associations between urinary kidney injury biomarkers and cardiovascular mortality risk in elderly men with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tonkonogi, Aleksandra; Carlsson, Axel C.; Helmersson-Karlqvist, Johanna; Larsson, Anders; Ärnlöv, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Aim Three urinary biomarkers, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), and cystatin C, have been suggested as clinically relevant highly specific biomarkers of acute kidney tubular damage. Yet, the utility of these biomarkers in the prognostication of diabetic nephropathy has been less studied. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the longitudinal association between these urinary biomarkers and cardiovascular mortality in patients with diabetes. Methods The study sample consisted of participants with diabetes in the community-based Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (n = 91; mean age 77.8 years). During follow-up (median 8.3 years, interval 0.7–13.4 years), 33 participants died of cardiovascular causes. Results In a multivariable Cox regression model adjusting for age, glomerular filtration rate, and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, higher urinary KIM-1/creatinine was associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular mortality (HR per SD increase 1.51, 95% confidence intervals 1.03–2.24, P = 0.03). Neither urinary NGAL/creatinine nor urinary cystatin C/creatinine were independently associated with an increased cardiovascular mortality risk. Conclusion In elderly men with diabetes, higher urinary KIM-1/creatinine was associated with an increased long-term risk of cardiovascular mortality independently of established markers of diabetic nephropathy. Our data provide support for kidney tubular damage as an important aspect of diabetic nephropathy that merits further investigation. PMID:27321055

  20. Incidence and Risk Factors for Falling in Patients after Total Knee Arthroplasty Compared to Healthy Elderly Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hiromi; Okuno, Makoto; Nakamura, Tatsuhiko; Yamamoto, Kichizo; Osaki, Mari; Hagino, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Background It is possible that patients who have undergone total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are at a high risk of falling. However, there are insufficient data to confirm the incidence and risk factors for falling in patients after TKA compared with healthy elderly counterparts. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the incidence and risk factors for falling in patients after TKA compared to the age- and gender-matched healthy elderly. Methods Subjects who underwent TKA consisted of 252 patients over 60 years of age. Controls were 150 healthy elderly individuals over 60 years of age living independently in the community. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to patients after TKA and a similar questionnaire was distributed to the controls by investigators during the town-sponsored healthy aging program. The questionnaire included questions for ambulatory ability, functional status in daily living, knee pain, other joint pain and information on falls. Results Self-administered questionnares were returned by 192 of the 252 patients (76.1%) and 146 of the 150 controls (97.3%). Age and gender matching was performed for respondents between 70 and 80 years of age. There were 81 patients and 80 controls who fulfilled the inclusion criteria, and all of them agreed to participate. In the previous year, 34 of the 81 patients (38.2%) fell. The incidence of falls was significantly higher in patients than controls (23.8%, P = 0.041). In controls, ability to stand up from a chair without using the arms and restriction from joining social activities due to knee pain showed the strongest association with recent falls. In patients, self-reported kyphosis showed the strongest association with recent falls. Conclusion Patients after TKA are more likely to fall than the general Japanese population. Kyphosis showed the strongest association with recent falls in patients after TKA, which was different from the results obtained in the healthy elderly. PMID:25901101

  1. Anticoagulation in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Robert-Ebadi, Helia; Righini, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Management of anticoagulation in elderly patients represents a particularly challenging issue. Indeed, this patient population is at high thromboembolic risk, but also at high hemorrhagic risk. Assessment of the benefit-risk balance of anticoagulation is the key point when decisions are made about introducing and/or continuing such treatments in the individual elderly patient. In order to maximise the safety of anticoagulation in the elderly, some specific considerations need to be taken into account, including renal insufficiency, modified pharmacodynamics of anticoagulants, especially vitamin K antagonists, and the presence of multiple comorbidities and concomitant medications. New anticoagulants could greatly simplify and possibly increase the safety of anticoagulation in the elderly in the near future.

  2. [FIBRA-RJ Network: frailty and risk of hospitalization in the elderly in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Perez, Mariangela; Lourenço, Roberto Alves

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the risk profile and factors associated with frailty in elderly community residents. The population consisted of individuals 65 years or older living in the northern districts of the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and who held private health insurance policies. The cross-sectional study was done at baseline in a cohort with a sample (N = 764) stratified by gender and age. Risk stratification used probability of repeated admissions (PRA) as the screening instrument. Following bivariate analyses, logistic regression analyses were performed to study associations between probability of repeated admissions and socio-demographic, health-status, functional, and cognitive variables. Of the total sample, 6.7% were classified as high risk. Cancer, falls, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, use of medication, receiving a visit from a health professional, being bedridden at home, living alone, and level of activities of daily living were statistically associated with risk of hospitalization. The instrument appeared to be useful for stratifying risk in the elderly. PMID:23843005

  3. Frailty and cardiovascular risk in community-dwelling elderly: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Natalia Aquaroni; Pessoa, Germane Silva; Ferriolli, Eduardo; Dias, Rosangela Correa; Perracini, Monica Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests a possible bidirectional connection between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the frailty syndrome in older people. Purpose To verify the relationship between CVD risk factors and the frailty syndrome in community-dwelling elderly. Methods This population-based study used data from the Fragilidade em Idosos Brasileiros (FIBRA) Network Study, a cross-sectional study designed to investigate frailty profiles among Brazilian older adults. Frailty status was defined as the presence of three or more out of five of the following criteria: unintentional weight loss, weakness, self-reported fatigue, slow walking speed, and low physical activity level. The ascertained CVD risk factors were self-reported and/or directly measured hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, waist circumference measurement, and smoking. Results Of the 761 participants, 9.7% were characterized as frail, 48.0% as pre-frail, and 42.3% as non-frail. The most prevalent CVD risk factor was hypertension (84.4%) and the lowest one was smoking (10.4%). It was observed that among those participants with four or five risk factors there was a higher proportion of frail and pre-frail compared with non-frail (Fisher’s exact test: P=0.005; P=0.021). Self-reported diabetes mellitus was more prevalent among frail and pre-frail participants when compared with non-frail participants (Fisher’s exact test: P≤0.001; P≤0.001). There was little agreement between self-reported hypertension and hypertension identified by blood pressure measurement. Conclusion Hypertension was highly prevalent among the total sample. In addition, frail and pre-frail older people corresponded to a substantial proportion of those with more CVD risk factors, especially diabetes mellitus, highlighting the need for preventive strategies in order to avoid the co-occurrence of CVD and frailty. PMID:25336932

  4. [Comparison of treatment principles of elderly hypertensive patients with different cardiovascular risks based on Hungarian and international guidelines (2001-2015)].

    PubMed

    Bödör, Anikó; Kiss, István

    2016-02-14

    The aim of this review is to present recommendations of the currently valid Hungarian practice guidelines regarding antihypertensive therapy of the elderly and very elderly with different cardiovascular risk profiles, compare and contrast these with international guidelines, describe changes brought about by the past 15 years, and review the evidence behind. Hypertension treatment guidelines and relevant statements of the Hungarian and European Societies of Hypertension, of the Joint National Committee and American Heart Association were processed. The use of age-independent treatment threshold, goal blood pressure values, and the tendency towards more intensive control in co-morbidities conferring high cardiovascular risk were overcome by the upsurge of new evidence and the re-evaluation of previous clinical trial data. These lead to the introduction of age-specific and generally less stringent blood pressure targets in all regions compared. However, the guidelines currently in force still differ in terms of the attainable values in concomitant diabetes, chronic kidney disease or albuminuria, use of beta-blockers and the definition of elderly. Nevertheless, there is unanimous agreement that benefit from lowering of blood pressure under systolic 140 mmHg is not supported by evidence and further investigation is warranted to determine optimal treatment targets in the elderly, in the aged over 80 and specific elderly risk groups. PMID:26853726

  5. Elders' Knowledge about Risk Factors of Coronary Heart Disease, Their Perceived Risk, and Adopted Preventive Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Khayyal, Hatem; El Geneidy, Moshera; El Shazly, Somaya Abdel Moneim

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the most frequent single cause of death among persons over 65 years of age and it seems to continue to be a significant threat to the health and wellbeing of the elderly population all over the world, yet the condition is largely preventable. The aims of this study to assess and determine the relations among elder's…

  6. Plasma homocysteine level is a risk factor for osteoporotic fractures in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuefeng; Shen, Jie; Cheng, Qun; Fan, Yongqian; Lin, Weilong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship of plasma homocysteine (Hcy), bone turnover biomarkers (BTB), and bone mineral density (BMD) with osteoporotic fracture (OPF) in elderly people. Methods Eighty-two patients (aged 65 years or older) admitted to our orthopedics department between October 2014 and May 2015 were randomly divided into three groups: 1) OPF group: 39 cases with the mean age 81.82±5.49 years, which included 24 females and 15 males; 2) high-energy fracture (HEF) group: 22 cases with the mean age 78.88±5.75 years, which included 16 females and six males; 3) non-bone-fracture group: 21 cases with mean age 79.75±5.47 years without bone fracture, which included 14 females and seven males. Plasma Hcy, BTB, and BMD were measured. Analysis of variance and multiple regression analysis were used in the statistical analysis. Results There was no significant difference in either age or sex among the three groups. There were significant differences in plasma Hcy and hip BMD between the OPF and HEF groups; there was also significant difference in plasma Hcy, 25-(OH) Vit D, and hip BMD between the OPF and non-fracture groups. There was no difference in lumbar spine BMD between the OPF group and the other two groups. There was no significant difference in plasma Hcy, 25-(OH) Vit D, hip or lumbar spine BMD between the HEF and non-fracture group. There was no significant difference in procollagen type I N-propeptide of type I collagen, serum C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen, and parathyroid hormone among the three groups. Plasma Hcy was linearly correlated with age and serum C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen, but not correlated with either hip or lumbar spine BMD or any other BTBs. Conclusion In this study, we found that the plasma Hcy level in elderly patients with OPF is higher than that of nonosteoporotic patients. It is not correlated with BMD, but positively correlated with bone resorption markers. An increased Hcy

  7. Understanding of the risk of HIV infection among the elderly in Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Lekalakala-Mokgele, Eucebious

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The literature pertaining to the elderly shows that HIV infection among this population is on the increase, suggesting that the elderly population engages in activities risky for HIV infection. Reports on such behaviour include frequent sexual relations with much younger people and having multiple partners. A study was carried out in Ga-Rankuwa, a black township in Gauteng Province, South Africa to explore and describe the understanding of these elderly people regarding their risks of HIV infection and AIDS. Using a qualitative, exploratory design, three focus-group interviews were conducted with 32 women aged over 50 years. Findings revealed that older persons have knowledge about transmission of HIV infection and AIDS. However, a few had misconceptions as to how HIV infection is transmitted, as they believed that poor nutrition and sharing facilities play a role. Knowledge of mechanisms of protecting themselves against infection, such as use of a condom during coitus and wearing gloves when caring for infected family members, was also evident. The elderly indicated that they would prefer an older person, who they could identify with, to educate them more about HIV infection and AIDS. Although majority of participants had knowledge of how HIV is transmitted, and issues that put them at risk of transmission, a few the older persons had misconceptions about how HIV is transmitted due to lack of knowledge, as they believed that poor nutrition and sharing facilities can transmit infection. The lack of knowledge underscores the importance of addressing sexual risk with older people. It was very clear that more needs to be done in terms of education campaigns to dispel the myths of HIV infection and to empower the elderly. PMID:24957136

  8. Switching to low-dose oral prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone from WHO-Step I drugs in elderly patients with chronic pain at high risk of early opioid discontinuation

    PubMed Central

    Lazzari, Marzia; Marcassa, Claudio; Natoli, Silvia; Carpenedo, Roberta; Caldarulo, Clarissa; Silvi, Maria B; Dauri, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Chronic pain has a high prevalence in the aging population. Strong opioids also should be considered in older people for the treatment of moderate to severe pain or for pain that impairs functioning and the quality of life. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of the direct switch to low-dose strong opioids (World Health Organization-Step III drugs) in elderly, opioid-naive patients. Patients and methods This was a single-center, retrospective, observational study in opioid-naive patients aged ≥75 years, with moderate to severe chronic pain (>6-month duration) and constipation, who initiated treatment with prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone (OXN-PR). Patients were re-evaluated after 15, 30, and 60 days (T60, final observation). Response to treatment was defined as an improvement in pain of ≥30% after 30 days of therapy without worsening of constipation. Results One-hundred and eighty-six patients (mean ± SD age 80.7±4.7 years; 64.5% women) with severe chronic pain (mean average pain intensity 7.1±1.0 on the 11-point numerical rating scale) and constipation (mean Bowel Function Index 64.1±24.4; 89.2% of patients on laxatives) were initiated treatment with OXN-PR (mean daily dose 11.3±3.5 mg). OXN-PR reduced pain intensity rapidly and was well tolerated; 63.4% of patients responded to treatment with OXN-PR. At T60 (mean daily OXN-PR dose, 21.5±9.7 mg), the pain intensity was reduced by 66.7%. In addition, bowel function improved (mean decrease of Bowel Function Index from baseline to T60, −28.2, P<0.0001) and the use of laxatives decreased. Already after 15 days and throughout treatment, ~70% of patients perceived their status as much/extremely improved. Only 1.6% of patients discontinued treatment due to adverse events. Conclusion Low-dose OXN-PR in elderly patients naive to opioids proved to be an effective option for the treatment of moderate to severe chronic pain. Large-scale trials are needed to improve clinical guidance in

  9. Analysis of suicide in the elderly in Italy. Risk factors and prevention of suicidal behavior.

    PubMed

    Terranova, Claudio; Cardin, Fabrizio; Bruttocao, Andrea; Militello, Carmelo

    2012-06-01

    The authors describe the nationwide scale of suicides among the elderly in Italy for the period 1993-2010. The data are derived from the Italian Institute for Statistics (ISTAT) and the World Health Organization (WHO). The elderly turned out to represent the highest risk category for suicide, with risk increasing with age (suicide rates, per 100,000, in men aged 75 or over and aged 65-74 were respectively 28.3 and 15.7 in 2007). The rates for men were three times higher than those for women. The north-east and north-west regions of Italy had the highest rates of suicide in the elderly. Education was inversely related to the risk of suicide. Hanging was the most frequent method of suicide in men, and precipitation in women. The reasons for suicide, as inferred from available data, were predominantly mental-physical illnesses. The risk factors emerging from our analysis are discussed from the preventive point of view, in relation to the Italian situation and a review of the literature. PMID:23160501

  10. Elderly at Greater Risk for Root Caries: A Look at the Multifactorial Risks with Emphasis on Genetics Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Gati, Daniel; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2011-01-01

    Root caries is one of the most significant dental problems among older adults today. Many studies have demonstrated that older adults are at greater risk for developing root caries. Here we examine what risk factors older adults are prone to and explain how they contribute to higher rates of oral disease, in particular root caries. The elderly are at risk for root caries due to dentures, lack of dexterity, a shift from complex to simple sugars, and poor oral hygiene. Decreased salivary flow and its manifestations with other social/behavioral and medical factors may provide a more comprehensive explanation to a higher frequency of root caries in older adults. PMID:21754932

  11. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Atrial Fibrillation in Chinese Elderly: Results from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey

    PubMed Central

    Chei, Choy-Lye; Raman, Prassanna; Ching, Chi Keong; Yin, Zhao-Xue; Shi, Xiao-Ming; Zeng, Yi; Matchar, David B

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is increasing as the world ages. AF is associated with higher risk of mortality and disease, including stroke, hypertension, heart failure, and dementia. Prevalence of AF differs with each population studied, and research on non-Western populations and the oldest old is scarce. Methods: We used data from the 2012 wave of the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey, a community-based study in eight longevity areas in China, to estimate AF prevalence in an elderly Chinese population (n = 1418, mean age = 85.6 years) and to identify risk factors. We determined the presence of AF in our participants using single-lead electrocardiograms. The weighted prevalence of AF was estimated in subjects stratified according to age groups (65–74, 75–84, 85–94, 95 years and above) and gender. We used logistic regressions to determine the potential risk factors of AF. Results: The overall prevalence of AF was 3.5%; 2.4% of men and 4.5% of women had AF (P < 0.05). AF was associated with weight extremes of being underweight or overweight/obese. Finally, advanced age (85–94 years), history of stroke or heart disease, low high-density lipoprotein levels, low triglyceride levels, and lack of regular physical activity were associated with AF. Conclusions: In urban elderly, AF prevalence increased with age (P < 0.05), and in rural elderly, women had higher AF prevalence (P < 0.05). Further exploration of population-specific risk factors is needed to address the AF epidemic. PMID:26365957

  12. Ergothioneine levels in an elderly population decrease with age and incidence of cognitive decline; a risk factor for neurodegeneration?

    PubMed

    Cheah, Irwin K; Feng, Lei; Tang, Richard M Y; Lim, Keith H C; Halliwell, Barry

    2016-09-01

    Ergothioneine (ET), a naturally occurring thione, can accumulate in the human body at high concentrations from diet. Following absorption via a specific transporter, OCTN1, ET may accumulate preferentially in tissues predisposed to higher levels of oxidative stress and inflammation. Given its potential cytoprotective effects, we examined how ET levels change with age. We found that whole blood ET levels in elderly individuals decline significantly beyond 60 years of age. Additionally, a subset of these subjects with mild cognitive impairment had significantly lower plasma ET levels compared with age-matched subjects. This decline suggests that deficiency in ET may be a risk factor, predisposing individuals to neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27444382

  13. Aging Will Amplify the Heat-related Mortality Risk under a Changing Climate: Projection for the Elderly in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiantian; Horton, Radley M; Bader, Daniel A; Zhou, Maigeng; Liang, Xudong; Ban, Jie; Sun, Qinghua; Kinney, Patrick L

    2016-01-01

    An aging population could substantially enhance the burden of heat-related health risks in a warming climate because of their higher susceptibility to extreme heat health effects. Here, we project heat-related mortality for adults 65 years and older in Beijing China across 31 downscaled climate models and 2 representative concentration pathways (RCPs) in the 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s. Under a scenario of medium population and RCP8.5, by the 2080s, Beijing is projected to experience 14,401 heat-related deaths per year for elderly individuals, which is a 264.9% increase compared with the 1980s. These impacts could be moderated through adaptation. In the 2080s, even with the 30% and 50% adaptation rate assumed in our study, the increase in heat-related death is approximately 7.4 times and 1.3 times larger than in the 1980s respectively under a scenario of high population and RCP8.5. These findings could assist countries in establishing public health intervention policies for the dual problems of climate change and aging population. Examples could include ensuring facilities with large elderly populations are protected from extreme heat (for example through back-up power supplies and/or passive cooling) and using databases and community networks to ensure the home-bound elderly are safe during extreme heat events. PMID:27320724

  14. Aging Will Amplify the Heat-related Mortality Risk under a Changing Climate: Projection for the Elderly in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiantian; Horton, Radley M.; Bader, Daniel A.; Zhou, Maigeng; Liang, Xudong; Ban, Jie; Sun, Qinghua; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    An aging population could substantially enhance the burden of heat-related health risks in a warming climate because of their higher susceptibility to extreme heat health effects. Here, we project heat-related mortality for adults 65 years and older in Beijing China across 31 downscaled climate models and 2 representative concentration pathways (RCPs) in the 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s. Under a scenario of medium population and RCP8.5, by the 2080s, Beijing is projected to experience 14,401 heat-related deaths per year for elderly individuals, which is a 264.9% increase compared with the 1980s. These impacts could be moderated through adaptation. In the 2080s, even with the 30% and 50% adaptation rate assumed in our study, the increase in heat-related death is approximately 7.4 times and 1.3 times larger than in the 1980s respectively under a scenario of high population and RCP8.5. These findings could assist countries in establishing public health intervention policies for the dual problems of climate change and aging population. Examples could include ensuring facilities with large elderly populations are protected from extreme heat (for example through back-up power supplies and/or passive cooling) and using databases and community networks to ensure the home-bound elderly are safe during extreme heat events. PMID:27320724

  15. Aging Will Amplify the Heat-related Mortality Risk under a Changing Climate: Projection for the Elderly in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tiantian; Horton, Radley M.; Bader, Daniel A.; Zhou, Maigeng; Liang, Xudong; Ban, Jie; Sun, Qinghua; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2016-06-01

    An aging population could substantially enhance the burden of heat-related health risks in a warming climate because of their higher susceptibility to extreme heat health effects. Here, we project heat-related mortality for adults 65 years and older in Beijing China across 31 downscaled climate models and 2 representative concentration pathways (RCPs) in the 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s. Under a scenario of medium population and RCP8.5, by the 2080s, Beijing is projected to experience 14,401 heat-related deaths per year for elderly individuals, which is a 264.9% increase compared with the 1980s. These impacts could be moderated through adaptation. In the 2080s, even with the 30% and 50% adaptation rate assumed in our study, the increase in heat-related death is approximately 7.4 times and 1.3 times larger than in the 1980s respectively under a scenario of high population and RCP8.5. These findings could assist countries in establishing public health intervention policies for the dual problems of climate change and aging population. Examples could include ensuring facilities with large elderly populations are protected from extreme heat (for example through back-up power supplies and/or passive cooling) and using databases and community networks to ensure the home-bound elderly are safe during extreme heat events.

  16. Aging Will Amplify the Heat-Related Mortality Risk Under a Changing Climate: Projection for the Elderly in Beijing, China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Tiantian; Horton, Radley M.; Bader, Daniel A.; Zhou, Maigeng; Liang, Xudong; Ban, Jie; Sun, Qinghua; Kinney, Patrick L.

    2016-01-01

    An aging population could substantially enhance the burden of heat-related health risks in a warming climate because of their higher susceptibility to extreme heat health effects. Here, we project heatrelated mortality for adults 65 years and older in Beijing China across 31 downscaled climate models and 2 representative concentration pathways (RCPs) in the 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s. Under a scenario of medium population and RCP8.5, by the 2080s, Beijing is projected to experience 14,401 heat-related deaths per year for elderly individuals, which is a 264.9% increase compared with the 1980s. These impacts could be moderated through adaptation. In the 2080s, even with the 30% and 50% adaptation rate assumed in our study, the increase in heat-related death is approximately 7.4 times and 1.3 times larger than in the 1980s respectively under a scenario of high population and RCP8.5. These findings could assist countries in establishing public health intervention policies for the dual problems of climate change and aging population. Examples could include ensuring facilities with large elderly populations are protected from extreme heat (for example through back-up power supplies and/or passive cooling) and using databases and community networks to ensure the home-bound elderly are safe during extreme heat events.

  17. High temperatures-related elderly mortality varied greatly from year to year: important information for heat-warning systems

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuming; Barnett, Adrian G.; Tong, Shilu

    2012-01-01

    We examined the variation in association between high temperatures and elderly mortality (age ≥ 75 years) from year to year in 83 US cities between 1987 and 2000. We used a Poisson regression model and decomposed the mortality risk for high temperatures into: a “main effect” due to high temperatures using lagged non-linear function, and an “added effect” due to consecutive high temperature days. We pooled yearly effects across both regional and national levels. The high temperature effects (both main and added effects) on elderly mortality varied greatly from year to year. In every city there was at least one year where higher temperatures were associated with lower mortality. Years with relatively high heat-related mortality were often followed by years with relatively low mortality. These year to year changes have important consequences for heat-warning systems and for predictions of heat-related mortality due to climate change. PMID:23145322

  18. Metabolically Healthy Obesity and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in the Elderly Population

    PubMed Central

    Koolhaas, Chantal M.; van Rossum, Elisabeth F. C.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Hofman, Albert; Kavousi, Maryam; Franco, Oscar H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether being metabolically healthy obese (MHO)—defined by the presence of obesity in the absence of metabolic syndrome—is associated with subsequent cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains unclear and may depend on the participants’ age. We examined the association of being MHO with CVD risk in the elderly. Methods and Findings This study included 5,314 individuals (mean age 68 years) from the prospective population-based Rotterdam Study. We categorized our population in groups according to body mass index (BMI) and presence and absence of metabolic syndrome, and estimated the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (95%CI) for every group by using Cox proportional hazard models. Among 1048 (19.7%) obese individuals we identified 260 (24.8%) MHO subjects. Over 14 years of follow-up there were 861 incident CVD cases. In the multivariable adjusted analysis, we did not observe an increased CVD risk in MHO individuals (HR 1.07, 95%CI 0.75–1.53), compared to normal weight individuals without metabolic syndrome. CVD risk was increased by the presence of metabolic syndrome in normal weight (HR 1.35, 95%CI 1.02–1.80), overweight (HR 1.32, 95%CI 1.09–1.60) and obese (HR 1.33, 95%CI 1.07–1.66) individuals, compared to those with normal weight without metabolic syndrome. In a mediation analysis, 71.3% of the association between BMI and CVD was explained by the presence of metabolic syndrome. Conclusions In our elderly population, we found that the presence of obesity without metabolic syndrome did not confer a higher CVD risk. However, metabolic syndrome was strongly associated with CVD risk, and was associated with an increased risk in all BMI categories. Therefore, preventive interventions targeting cardiometabolic risk factors could be considered in elderly, regardless of weight status. PMID:27100779

  19. Connection between competence, usability, environment and risk of falls in elderly adults

    PubMed Central

    Leiva-Caro, José Alex; Salazar-González, Bertha Cecilia; Gallegos-Cabriales, Esther Carlota; Gómez-Meza, Marco Vinicio; Hunter, Kathleen F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to determine connections between competence, usability, environment and risk of falls in elderly adults. Method: correlational descriptive study, 123 elderly adults, both male and female, aged 70 years and older were included. Data was collected via the Tinetti Scale, CESD-7 Scale, Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Usability Questionnaire on Housing and Housing Enabler; and sociodemographic and health background certificate data. For data analysis, descriptive and inferential statistics were used, multivariate linear and logistic regression models were adjusted. Results: 42.0% of the elderly adults had presented with falls, with a higher prevalence in women, and in the group of 70-75 years. The physical environment of the house, gait, and usability were set as risk factors for falls. A negative relationship between usability and depressive symptoms, cognitive health, balance, gait, the social and physical environment was found, p <0.05; and a strong positive correlation between walking and balance, p <0.05. Conclusion: this study helps to better understand the phenomenon of falling, to find a connection between usability with the risk of falls, and other variables. PMID:26626006

  20. Phase angle as bioelectrical marker to identify elderly patients at risk of sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Basile, Claudia; Della-Morte, David; Cacciatore, Francesco; Gargiulo, Gaetano; Galizia, Gianluigi; Roselli, Mario; Curcio, Francesco; Bonaduce, Domenico; Abete, Pasquale

    2014-10-01

    Several markers have been associated with sarcopenia in the elderly, including bioelectrical indices. Phase angle (PhA) is an impedance parameter and it has been suggested as an indicator of cellular death. Thus, the relationship between PhA and muscle mass and strength was investigated in 207 consecutively elderly participants (mean age 76.2±6.7years) admitted for multidimensional geriatric evaluation. Muscle strength by grip strength using a hand-held dynamometer and muscle mass was measured by bioimpedentiometer. PhA was calculated directly with its arctangent (resistance/reactance×180°/π). Linear relationship among muscular mass and strength and with clinical and biochemical parameters, including PhA at uni- and multivariate analysis were performed. Linear regression analysis demonstrated that lower level of PhA is associated with reduction in grip strength (y=3.16+0.08x; r=0.49; p<0.001), and even more, with muscle mass (y=3.04+0.25x; r=0.60; p<0001). Multivariate analysis confirms these relationships (grip strength β=0.245, p=0.031; muscular mass β=0.623, p<0.01). Thus, PhA is inversely related to muscle mass and strength in elderly subjects and it may be considered a good bioelectrical marker to identify elderly patients at risk of sarcopenia. PMID:25034911

  1. Factors influencing prescribing of fall-risk-increasing drugs to the elderly: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Steinsbekk, Aslak; Granas, Anne Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Explore the situations in which GPs associate drug use with falls among their elderly patients, and the factors influencing the prescribing and cessation of fall-risk-increasing drugs (FRIDs). Design. A qualitative study with 13 GPs who participated in two semi-structured focus groups in Central Norway. Participants were encouraged to share overall thoughts on the use of FRIDs among elderly patients and stories related to prescribing and cessation of FRIDs in their own practice. Results. The main finding was that GPs did not immediately perceive the use of FRIDs to be a prominent factor regarding falls in elderly patients, exceptions being when the patient presented with dizziness, reported a fall, or when prescribing FRIDs for the first time. It was reported as common to renew prescriptions without performing a drug review. Factors influencing the prescribing and cessation of FRIDs were categorized into GPs’ clinical work conditions, uncertainty about outcome of changing prescriptions, patients’ prescribing demands, and lack of patient information. Conclusions. The results from this study indicate that GPs need to be reminded that there is a connection between FRID use and falls among elderly patients of enough clinical relevance to remember to assess the patient's drug list and perform regular drug reviews. PMID:25965505

  2. Preoperative patient assessment: Identifying patients at high risk.

    PubMed

    Boehm, O; Baumgarten, G; Hoeft, A

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative mortality remains alarmingly high with a mortality rate ranging between 0.4% and 4%. A small subgroup of multimorbid and/or elderly patients undergoing different surgical procedures naturally confers the highest risk of complications and perioperative death. Therefore, preoperative assessment should identify these high-risk patients and stratify them to individualized monitoring and treatment throughout all phases of perioperative care. A "tailored" perioperative approach might help further reduce perioperative morbidity and mortality. This article aims to elucidate individual morbidity-specific risks. It further suggests approaches to detect patients at the risk of perioperative complications. PMID:27396802

  3. Evaluating the fall risk among elderly population by choice step reaction test.

    PubMed

    Wang, Donghai; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Yuliang; Zhu, Wenfei; Tian, Shiliu; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Falls during daily activities are often associated with injuries and physical disabilities, thereby affecting quality of life among elder adults. Balance control, which is crucial in avoiding falls, is composed of two elements: muscle strength and central nervous system (CNS) control. A number of studies have reported that reduced muscle strength raises the risk of falling. However, to date there has been only limited research focused on the relationship between fall risk and the CNS. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between CNS and risk of falling among the elderly. A total of 140 elderly people (92 females and 48 males) were divided into faller and nonfaller groups based on questionnaire responses concerning falls in their daily life. Participants undertook a choice step reaction test in which they were required to respond to random visual stimuli using foot movements as fast as possible in the left or right directions. Response time was quantified as premotor time (PMT) and motor time (MT). In addition, the participants' electro-myography data were recorded during the choice step reaction test. A maximal isokinetic torque test was also performed. PMT was greater in the fallers than in the nonfallers group. There was a significant difference between fall status and direction on PMT. PMT of the left limb in nonfallers was faster than the right, but in fallers there was no difference between left and right limbs. A similar phenomenon was also observed for MT. There were significant differences between fallers and nonfallers in maximum isokinetic torque at knee and ankle joints. The correct rate of PMT was higher than other variables, such as MT and maximal isokinetic torque, in evaluating elderly fall risk by using logistic regression analyses. The results suggest that PMT in the choice step reaction test could be a useful parameter to assess risk of fall among elder adults. In addition, decreased maximal isokinetic torque was related to greater PMT

  4. Evaluating the fall risk among elderly population by choice step reaction test

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Donghai; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Yuliang; Zhu, Wenfei; Tian, Shiliu; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Falls during daily activities are often associated with injuries and physical disabilities, thereby affecting quality of life among elder adults. Balance control, which is crucial in avoiding falls, is composed of two elements: muscle strength and central nervous system (CNS) control. A number of studies have reported that reduced muscle strength raises the risk of falling. However, to date there has been only limited research focused on the relationship between fall risk and the CNS. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between CNS and risk of falling among the elderly. A total of 140 elderly people (92 females and 48 males) were divided into faller and nonfaller groups based on questionnaire responses concerning falls in their daily life. Participants undertook a choice step reaction test in which they were required to respond to random visual stimuli using foot movements as fast as possible in the left or right directions. Response time was quantified as premotor time (PMT) and motor time (MT). In addition, the participants’ electro-myography data were recorded during the choice step reaction test. A maximal isokinetic torque test was also performed. PMT was greater in the fallers than in the nonfallers group. There was a significant difference between fall status and direction on PMT. PMT of the left limb in nonfallers was faster than the right, but in fallers there was no difference between left and right limbs. A similar phenomenon was also observed for MT. There were significant differences between fallers and nonfallers in maximum isokinetic torque at knee and ankle joints. The correct rate of PMT was higher than other variables, such as MT and maximal isokinetic torque, in evaluating elderly fall risk by using logistic regression analyses. The results suggest that PMT in the choice step reaction test could be a useful parameter to assess risk of fall among elder adults. In addition, decreased maximal isokinetic torque was related to greater

  5. Peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor is related to cardiovascular risk factors in active and inactive elderly men.

    PubMed

    Zembron-Lacny, A; Dziubek, W; Rynkiewicz, M; Morawin, B; Woźniewski, M

    2016-06-20

    Regular exercise plays an important preventive and therapeutic role in heart and vascular diseases, and beneficially affects brain function. In blood, the effects of exercise appear to be very complex and could include protection of vascular endothelial cells via neurotrophic factors and decreased oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to identify the age-related changes in peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its relationship to oxidative damage and conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD) biomarkers, such as atherogenic index, C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and oxidized LDL (oxLDL), in active and inactive men. Seventeen elderly males (61-80 years) and 17 young males (20-24 years) participated in this study. According to the 6-min Åstrand-Rhyming bike test, the subjects were classified into active and inactive groups. The young and elderly active men had a significantly better lipoprotein profile and antioxidant status, as well as reduced oxidative damage and inflammatory state. The active young and elderly men had significantly higher plasma BDNF levels compared to their inactive peers. BDNF was correlated with VO2max (r=0.765, P<0.001). In addition, we observed a significant inverse correlation of BDNF with atherogenic index (TC/HDL), hsCRP and oxLDL. The findings demonstrate that a high level of cardiorespiratory fitness reflected in VO2max was associated with a higher level of circulating BDNF, which in turn was related to common CVD risk factors and oxidative damage markers in young and elderly men. PMID:27332774

  6. Peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor is related to cardiovascular risk factors in active and inactive elderly men

    PubMed Central

    Zembron-Lacny, A.; Dziubek, W.; Rynkiewicz, M.; Morawin, B.; Woźniewski, M.

    2016-01-01

    Regular exercise plays an important preventive and therapeutic role in heart and vascular diseases, and beneficially affects brain function. In blood, the effects of exercise appear to be very complex and could include protection of vascular endothelial cells via neurotrophic factors and decreased oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to identify the age-related changes in peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its relationship to oxidative damage and conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD) biomarkers, such as atherogenic index, C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and oxidized LDL (oxLDL), in active and inactive men. Seventeen elderly males (61-80 years) and 17 young males (20-24 years) participated in this study. According to the 6-min Åstrand-Rhyming bike test, the subjects were classified into active and inactive groups. The young and elderly active men had a significantly better lipoprotein profile and antioxidant status, as well as reduced oxidative damage and inflammatory state. The active young and elderly men had significantly higher plasma BDNF levels compared to their inactive peers. BDNF was correlated with VO2max (r=0.765, P<0.001). In addition, we observed a significant inverse correlation of BDNF with atherogenic index (TC/HDL), hsCRP and oxLDL. The findings demonstrate that a high level of cardiorespiratory fitness reflected in VO2max was associated with a higher level of circulating BDNF, which in turn was related to common CVD risk factors and oxidative damage markers in young and elderly men. PMID:27332774

  7. Mild Cognitive Impairment: Vascular Risk Factors in Community Elderly in Four Cities of Hebei Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lulu; Wang, Lan; An, Cuixia; Xun, Shunjiang; Zhao, Xiaochuan; Gao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xueyi

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence has demonstrated that vascular risk factors (VRFs) contribute to mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in the elderly population. Because of the race and different diagnosis standard, there is still no definitive conclusions. Objective To estimate the VRFs and potential protective factors for MCI in elderly population living in the community in North China. Methods A total of 3136 participants entered the study. They were screened for hypertension, coronary heart disease (CHD), and cerebrovascular disease (CVD). Cognitive function was assessed with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). The diagnosis of MCI was made according to Petersen’s criteria. We investigated the relationship between vascular risk factors, potential protective factors and MCI. Results A total of 2511 (80%) participant belonged to normal group and 625 (20%) participants showed MCI. Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that stroke and diabetes, but not hypertension or CHD was associated with MCI. Besides, exercise habit could lower the risk of MCI. Conclusions Vascular Risk Factors, including stroke and diabetes, rather than hypertension and CHD are independent risk factors of MCI. Involvement in physical activities seems to reduce the risk of MCI. PMID:25962184

  8. Pain and mortality risk among elderly persons in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Kåreholt, I; Brattberg, G

    1998-09-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse how the mortality risk varies with mild or severe pain in different locations: chest, back and hips, shoulders, the extremities, abdomen, rectum and head. A Swedish nationally representative sample of 1930 persons born 1892-1915 were interviewed in 1968 (ages 53-76). Survivors were also interviewed in 1974 and 1981 if they had not passed the age of 75 years. Proportional hazard regression was used to analyze mortality risk among persons ages 53-98 years for the period 1968-1991. Relationships were found between mortality risk and headache, chest pain, abdominal pain, pain in the extremities and rectal pain. No relationships were found between mortality and pain in back and hips or in shoulders. There was a correlation between chest pain and increased mortality among both men and women, but the association was significantly stronger among men. There was a significant association between severe rectal pain and mortality among men but no similar association among women. Significant associations between mortality and chest pain and abdominal pain were found among persons younger than 80 years, but not among those older than 80 years. Pain is an indicator of the quality of life and a symptom of underlying medical conditions. The finding that there are relationships between mortality risk and pain in the chest, abdomen, rectum, the extremities and head may be of clinical relevance. These results, however, must be further investigated since the relationships between reported pain and mortality do not imply that pain in these locations is necessarily symptomatic of lethal diseases. Abdominal pain, rectal pain and headache may be indicators of diseases but can also be side effects of treatments for other diseases correlated with higher mortality. PMID:9808352

  9. Elderly Benefit from Intensive Blood Pressure Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_158958.html Elderly Benefit From Intensive Blood Pressure Treatment No greater risk of complications such as ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive treatment of high blood pressure reduces older adults' risk of heart disease without ...

  10. Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Elderly Patients After Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery for Early-Stage Glottic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Julian C.; Kruser, Tim J.; Gondi, Vinai; Mohindra, Pranshu; Cannon, Donald M.; Harari, Paul M.; Bentzen, Søren M.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Comprehensive neck radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to increase cerebrovascular disease (CVD) risk in advanced-stage head-and-neck cancer. We assessed whether more limited neck RT used for early-stage (T1-T2 N0) glottic cancer is associated with increased CVD risk, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Methods and Materials: We identified patients ≥66 years of age with early-stage glottic laryngeal cancer from SEER diagnosed from 1992 to 2007. Patients treated with combined surgery and RT were excluded. Medicare CPT codes for carotid interventions, Medicare ICD-9 codes for cerebrovascular events, and SEER data for stroke as the cause of death were collected. Similarly, Medicare CPT and ICD-9 codes for peripheral vascular disease (PVD) were assessed to serve as an internal control between treatment groups. Results: A total of 1413 assessable patients (RT, n=1055; surgery, n=358) were analyzed. The actuarial 10-year risk of CVD was 56.5% (95% confidence interval 51.5%-61.5%) for the RT cohort versus 48.7% (41.1%-56.3%) in the surgery cohort (P=.27). The actuarial 10-year risk of PVD did not differ between the RT (52.7% [48.1%-57.3%]) and surgery cohorts (52.6% [45.2%-60.0%]) (P=.89). Univariate analysis showed an increased association of CVD with more recent diagnosis (P=.001) and increasing age (P=.001). On multivariate Cox analysis, increasing age (P<.001) and recent diagnosis (P=.002) remained significantly associated with a higher CVD risk, whereas the association of RT and CVD remained not statistically significant (HR=1.11 [0.91-1.37,] P=.31). Conclusions: Elderly patients with early-stage laryngeal cancer have a high burden of cerebrovascular events after surgical management or RT. RT and surgery are associated with comparable risk for subsequent CVD development after treatment in elderly patients.

  11. Tissular senescence and modifications of oral ecosystem in the elderly: risk factors for mucosal pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bodineau, Agnès; Folliguet, Marysette; Séguier, Sylvie

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this present review is to describe the pathogenesis and mechanisms behind mucosal pathologies in the elderly including a description of the risk factors for these pathologies. The oral cavity - and particularly oral mucosae - is exposed to many stresses as well as physical, chemical, thermic and pathogenic agents. In the elderly, mucosae are less resistant to the insults, and this increases the occurrence of diseases. Several factors contribute to the prevalence of mucosal pathologies with aging. There are two categories: intrinsic factors linked to the senescence of the tissues and functions, and extrinsic factors related to the older people general health status. The intrinsic factors are: 1) mucosal senescence which induces fragility 2) immunosenescence which causes a decrease in the host response against micro-organisms and an increase in the autoimmune diseases and 3) senescence of salivary glands and reduction of the saliva protective function. Furthermore, there are extrinsic factors which contribute to change the oral ecosystem during aging, such as polypathologies and polymedications, malnutrition, degradation of oral hygiene, pathogen proliferation (mainly bacteria and Candida species) and old or ill-fitted removable dentures. In the elderly several diseases occur on the oral mucosae: inflammation, bacterial infections or candidiasis, ulcerations, autoimmune dermatosis, tumoral processes. This review describes some common oral mucosal pathologies in the older people, which illustrate the impact of different risk factors described in the first part. PMID:20021405

  12. Orthostatic hypotension: prevalence and associated risk factors among the ambulatory elderly in an Asian population

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing Olivia; Tan, Choon Seng Gilbert; Tan, Hwee Leong; Wong, Ruining Geraldine; Joshi, Chinmaya Shrikant; Cuttilan, Ravi Amran; Sng, Gek Khim Judy; Tan, Ngiap Chuan

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The prevalence of orthostatic hypotension (OH) among the elderly population in Singapore, as defined by a decline in blood pressure upon a change in position, is not well-established. Studies associate OH with clinically significant outcomes such as falls. This study aims to determine the prevalence of OH among elderly patients attending a public primary care clinic (polyclinic) for chronic disease management, and examine the relationships between postulated risk factors and OH. METHODS Patients aged ≥ 65 years attending a typical polyclinic in Geylang were identified and targeted for recruitment at the study site. A questionnaire on symptoms and postulated risk factors was administered, followed by supine and standing blood pressure measurements. Cross-sectional analysis was performed with independent sample t-test for continuous data and chi-square test for categorical data. Prevalence rate ratios with 95% confidence interval were calculated for the latter. RESULTS A total of 364 multiethnic patients participated in the study. The prevalence of OH was 11.0%. Older age, comorbidities such as cardiac failure and kidney disease, being physically inactive at work, fatigue, self-reported dizziness in the past year, and the use of loop diuretics were found to be significantly associated with OH. CONCLUSION About one in ten elderly patients at a local polyclinic was affected by OH, which was associated with multiple factors. Some of these factors are modifiable and can be addressed to reduce the incidence of OH. PMID:27549316

  13. Faster cognitive decline in elders without dementia and decreased risk of cancer mortality

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Juan Pablo; Louis, Elan D.; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether faster cognitive decline in elders without dementia is associated with decreased risk of cancer mortality. Methods: In this population-based, prospective study of 2,627 people without dementia aged 65 years and older (Neurological Disorders in Central Spain), a 37-item version of the Mini-Mental State Examination (37-MMSE) was administered at 2 visits (baseline and follow-up, approximately 3 years later). We divided change in 37-MMSE into tertiles (lower tertile ≥2 point improvement in score, higher tertile ≥2 point decline in score). Community-dwelling elders were followed for a median of 12.9 years, after which the death certificates of those who died were examined. Results: A total of 1,003 (38.2%) died, including 339 (33.8%) deaths among participants who were in the higher tertile of 37-MMSE change and 664 (66.2%) deaths among those in the remaining tertiles. Cancer was reported significantly less often in those in the higher tertile of MMSE change (20.6%) than in those in the remaining tertiles (28.6%): in an unadjusted Cox model, hazard ratio for cancer mortality in participants within the higher tertile = 0.75 (p = 0.04) compared with the participants within the remaining tertiles. In a Cox model that adjusted for a variety of demographic factors and comorbidities, hazard ratio for cancer mortality in participants within the higher tertile = 0.70 (p = 0.01). Conclusion: In this population-based, prospective study of community-dwelling elders without dementia, faster cognitive decline was associated with a decreased risk of cancer mortality. Further studies are required to elucidate this inverse association in elders without dementia. PMID:24719490

  14. Genetic polymorphisms, Biochemical Factors, and Conventional Risk Factors in Young and Elderly North Indian Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Rupinder; Das, Reena; Ahluwalia, Jasmina; Kumar, Rohit Manoj; Talwar, K K

    2016-03-01

    This study compared genetic polymorphisms (factor V Leiden [FVL] 1691G/A, factor VII [FVII] 10976G/A, FVII HVR4, platelet membrane glycoproteins GP1BA 1018C/T, GP1BA VNTR, integrin ITGB3 1565T/C, ITGA2 807C/T and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase [MTHFR] 677C/T), biochemical (fibrinogen and homocysteine), and conventional risk factors in 184 young and 166 elderly north Indian patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Univariate analysis revealed higher prevalence of hypertension and obesity in elderly patients while smoking, alcohol intake, and low socioeconomic status in young patients (P < .001). Although mean fibrinogen predominated (P = .01) in elderly patients, mean homocysteine was higher (P < .001) among young patients. Prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia was greater in young than in elderly patients (odds ratio: 2.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.8-4.4, P < .001); however, genetic polymorphisms were equally prevalent in young and elderly patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed smoking (P < .001), alcohol intake (P = .046), and hyperhomocysteinemia (P = .001) to be associated with AMI in the young patients while hypertension (P = .006) in elderly patients. To conclude, smoking, alcohol intake, and elevated homocysteine are the risk factors for AMI among young while hypertension among elderly patients. PMID:25155498

  15. Tobacco use: a modifiable risk factor for dental disease among the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Jette, A M; Feldman, H A; Tennstedt, S L

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Because the public health literature contains few analytic studies of modifiable behavioral risk factors for dental disease among older community-dwelling populations, the New England Elders Dental Study was undertaken as an epidemiologic study of the oral health status of a representative sample of older adults living within the six New England states. METHODS. Five dentists conducted comprehensive in-home oral health examinations on 1156 community-dwelling adults aged 70 and older to determine whether lifetime use of tobacco products was a significant risk factor for tooth loss, caries, and periodontal disease. RESULTS. Among New England elders, tobacco use was more common among men (18.1%) than women (7.9%), with a combined rate of 12.3%. Further, 64.7% of men and 36.6% of women were previous tobacco users. Years of exposure to tobacco products was a statistically significant risk factor for tooth loss, coronal and root caries, and periodontal disease, regardless of other social and behavioral factors. CONCLUSIONS. Lifelong tobacco use is a modifiable risk factor for poor dental health among older adults. Dental practitioners need to intervene with all their adult patients to discourage use of tobacco products for oral as well as general preventive health care. PMID:8363003

  16. Components of Metabolic Syndrome and the Risk of Disability among the Elderly Population

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, Fang-Yih; Kao, Tung-Wei; Wu, Li-Wei; Wang, Chung-Ching; Yang, Hui-Fang; Peng, Tao-Chun; Sun, Yu-Shan; Chang, Yaw-Wen; Chen, Wei-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The direct relationship between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and function disability has not been established. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between MetS and functional disability in the elderly. This retrospective observational study included 1,778 participants aged 60–84 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2002). Impairments in activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), leisure and social activities (LSA), lower extremity mobility (LEM), and general physical activities (GPA) were assessed. Additionally, the associations between the features of MetS and disability were evaluated. MetS was associated with a high prevalence of functional dependence in ADL, IADL, LSA, LEM, and GPA. After adjusting for potential confounders, a high number of MetS components was found to be associated with increased disability (P = 0.002). Additionally, associations were observed between MetS components, including abdominal obesity and high triglycerides levels, and functional dependence in ADL, IADL, LSA, LEM, and GPA (all, P < 0.05). A linear increase in disability might be associated with the number of MetS components in an elderly population. Additionally, MetS abnormalities, particularly abdominal obesity and high triglycerides levels, might be highly predictive of functional dependence in the elderly. PMID:26948125

  17. Dementia in a tribal landlocked elderly population at high altitude: What explains the lower prevalence?

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Sunil Kumar; Chander, Vishav; Bhardwaj, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Studies across the populations have suggested that dementia is differentially distributed with a lower prevalence in developing regions than the developed ones. A comparison in the prevalence of dementia across populations may provide an insight into its risk factors. Earlier, we reported on the prevalence of dementia in elderly population in migrant, urban, rural, and tribal populations. The present study was conducted with a view to estimating the prevalence of dementia in Tribal Landlocked Elderly Population at high altitude and therefore to draw some conclusions on the differential distribution of dementia across populations. Methods: A cross-sectional comprehensive two-phase survey of all residents aged 60 years and older was conducted. Phase 1 involved screening of all individuals aged 60 and above with the help of a cognitive screen specifically developed for the tribal population. Phase 2 involved clinical examination of individuals who were suspected of dementia as per the developed cognitive screening test. Results: The results revealed that six individuals out of a total of 481 studied above 60 years of age in the studied population scored between 17 and 23, thus qualifying as suffering from mild cognitive impairment. Importantly, none of the individuals above 60 years of age scored <17. Discussion: The current study is in conformity with our previous study conducted on urban, rural, and migrant areas of the state of Himachal Pradesh again emphasizing on dementia being rare in tribal populations and thereby pointing to the presence of some protective factors among tribal people. PMID:27365961

  18. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after conditioning with I-131-anti-CD45 antibody plus fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation for elderly patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    SciTech Connect

    Pagel, John M.; Gooley, T. A.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wilson, Wendy A.; Sandmaier, B. M.; Matthews, D. C.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Gopal, Ajay K.; Martin, P. J.; Storb, R.; Press, Oliver W.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2009-12-24

    We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of I-131-anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with (131)I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3(+) and CD33(+) cells in the blood by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of I-131-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177.

  19. August 2003 heat wave in France: risk factors for death of elderly people living at home.

    PubMed

    Vandentorren, S; Bretin, P; Zeghnoun, A; Mandereau-Bruno, L; Croisier, A; Cochet, C; Ribéron, J; Siberan, I; Declercq, B; Ledrans, M

    2006-12-01

    The August 2003 heat wave in France resulted in many thousands of excess deaths particularly of elderly people. Individual and environmental risk factors for death among the community-dwelling elderly were identified. We conducted a case-control survey and defined cases as people aged 65 years and older who lived at home and died from August 8 through August 13 from causes other than accident, suicide, or surgical complications. Controls were matched with cases for age, sex, and residential area. Interviewers used questionnaires to collect data. Satellite pictures provided profiles of the heat island characteristics around the homes. Lack of mobility was a major risk factor along with some pre-existing medical conditions. Housing characteristics associated with death were lack of thermal insulation and sleeping on the top floor, right under the roof. The temperature around the building was a major risk factor. Behaviour such as dressing lightly and use of cooling techniques and devices were protective factors. These findings suggest people with pre-existing medical conditions were likely to be vulnerable during heat waves and need information on how to adjust daily routines to heat waves. In the long term, building insulation and urban planning must be adapted to provide protection from possible heat waves. PMID:17028103

  20. Fall Risk Assessment Tools for Elderly Living in the Community: Can We Do Better?

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Pierpaolo; Palmerini, Luca; Bandinelli, Stefania; Chiari, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Background Falls are a common, serious threat to the health and self-confidence of the elderly. Assessment of fall risk is an important aspect of effective fall prevention programs. Objectives and methods In order to test whether it is possible to outperform current prognostic tools for falls, we analyzed 1010 variables pertaining to mobility collected from 976 elderly subjects (InCHIANTI study). We trained and validated a data-driven model that issues probabilistic predictions about future falls. We benchmarked the model against other fall risk indicators: history of falls, gait speed, Short Physical Performance Battery (Guralnik et al. 1994), and the literature-based fall risk assessment tool FRAT-up (Cattelani et al. 2015). Parsimony in the number of variables included in a tool is often considered a proxy for ease of administration. We studied how constraints on the number of variables affect predictive accuracy. Results The proposed model and FRAT-up both attained the same discriminative ability; the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) for multiple falls was 0.71. They outperformed the other risk scores, which reported AUCs for multiple falls between 0.64 and 0.65. Thus, it appears that both data-driven and literature-based approaches are better at estimating fall risk than commonly used fall risk indicators. The accuracy–parsimony analysis revealed that tools with a small number of predictors (~1–5) were suboptimal. Increasing the number of variables improved the predictive accuracy, reaching a plateau at ~20–30, which we can consider as the best trade-off between accuracy and parsimony. Obtaining the values of these ~20–30 variables does not compromise usability, since they are usually available in comprehensive geriatric assessments. PMID:26716861

  1. A Screening Instrument for Identifying Elderly at Risk of Abuse and Neglect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwalek, Melanie A.; Sengstock, Mary C.

    Recently more attention has been focused on elder abuse, with laws enacted requiring reporting of this crime. Since service providers often do not recognize elder abuse, a validated screening tool for elder abuse is needed. A screening tool called the Hwalek-Sengstock Elder Abuse Screening Protocol has been developed and is currently being…

  2. Prevalence and risk factors for intestinal protozoa infection in elderly residents at Long Term Residency Institutions in Southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Girotto, Katymilla Guimarães; Grama, Daliane Faria; da Cunha, Maria Júlia Rodrigues; Faria, Elaine Silva Marques; Limongi, Jean Ezequiel; Pinto, Rogério de Melo Costa; Cury, Márcia Cristina

    2013-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of intestinal protozoa in Long Term Residency Institutions for the Elderly (ILPI) in elders, nurses and food handlers, identifying the risk factors associated with the infections. Stool samples taken from the elderly (n = 293), nurses (63) and food handlers (19) were studied. Questionnaires were used with questions related to sociodemographic variables, health, behavior and health characteristics. Stool samples were examined using the techniques of Faust and Ziehl Neelsen, and the prevalence of G. duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., E. histolytica/dispar in the elderly was 4.0%, 1.0% and 0.3% respectively. Nurses and food handlers showed 4.8% and 5.2% positivity only for G. duodenalis, respectively. The origin of the individuals and contact with domestic animals has been associated with infection by G. duodenalis in the elderly, and contact with domestic animals was considered a risk factor for infection. The last stool examinations were related to Cryptosporidium spp.. None of the variables were associated with E. histolytica/dispar. The frequency of hand washing was significantly associated with G. duodenalis among nurses. The frequency of positive samples of G. duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., E. histolytica/dispar showed that ILPIs environments are conducive to this occurring due to contact between the elderly, nurses and food handlers, which are often poorly trained in hygiene procedures and food handling. PMID:23328721

  3. Microalbuminuria is a risk factor for cerebral small vessel disease in community-based elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Wada, Manabu; Nagasawa, Hikaru; Kurita, Keiji; Koyama, Shingo; Arawaka, Shigeki; Kawanami, Toru; Tajima, Katsushi; Daimon, Makoto; Kato, Takeo

    2007-04-15

    Microalbuminuria (MA) is known as a marker for generalized vascular dysfunction. It occurs most commonly in the setting of diabetes and hypertension; however, its association with cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) in community-based elderly remains to be clarified. In this cross-sectional analysis, we evaluated the association between MA and cerebral SVD in total 651 community-based elderly subjects. We assessed cardiovascular risk factors by interviews and physical examinations, including an evaluation of urinary albumin creatinine ratio (UACR). All subjects underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and carotid ultrasonography. As endothelial markers, the serum levels of thrombomodulin (TM) and a tissue-type plasminogen activator/ plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 complex were also studied. The mean TM and UACR were higher in subjects with lacunar infarcts or with moderate white matter hyperintensities (mWMH) on MRI than in those without them. Additionally, the prevalence of lacunar infarcts or mWMH was higher in the highest tertile of UACR level than in the lowest or middle tertile. Furthermore, in logistic regression analysis, the elevation of logarithmically transformed UACR (log UACR) was associated with the higher likelihood for total lacunar infarcts (odds ratio [OR], 1.85 per one log UACR increase), multiple lacunar infarcts (OR, 1.89 per one log UACR increase), and mWMH (OR, 2.15 per one log UACR increase). The present study revealed that levels of urinary albumin are associated with cerebral SVD, independently of traditional cerebrovascular risk factors, in community-based elderly. PMID:17320908

  4. Risk Factors and Outcomes for Postoperative Delirium after Major Surgery in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Raats, Jelle W.; van Eijsden, Wilbert A.; Crolla, Rogier M. P. H.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; van der Laan, Lijckle

    2015-01-01

    Background Early identification of patients at risk for delirium is important, since adequate well timed interventions could prevent occurrence of delirium and related detrimental outcomes. The aim of this study is to evaluate prognostic factors for delirium, including factors describing frailty, in elderly patients undergoing major surgery. Methods We included patients of 65 years and older, who underwent elective surgery from March 2013 to November 2014. Patients had surgery for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) or colorectal cancer. Delirium was scored prospectively using the Delirium Observation Screening Scale. Pre- and peri-operative predictors of delirium were analyzed using regression analysis. Outcomes after delirium included adverse events, length of hospital stay, discharge destination and mortality. Results We included 232 patients. 51 (22%) underwent surgery for AAA and 181 (78%) for colorectal cancer. Postoperative delirium occurred in 35 patients (15%). Predictors of postoperative delirium included: delirium in medical history (Odds Ratio 12 [95% Confidence Interval 2.7–50]), advancing age (Odds Ratio 2.0 [95% Confidence Interval 1.1–3.8]) per 10 years, and ASA-score ≥3 (Odds Ratio 2.6 [95% Confidence Interval 1.1–5.9]). Occurrence of delirium was related to an increase in adverse events, length of hospital stay and mortality. Conclusion Postoperative delirium is a frequent complication after major surgery in elderly patients and is related to an increase in adverse events, length of hospital stay, and mortality. A delirium in the medical history, advanced age, and ASA-score may assist in defining patients at increased risk for delirium. Further attention to prevention of delirium is essential in elderly patients undergoing major surgery. PMID:26291459

  5. Prospective Validation of Modified NEXUS Cervical Spine Injury Criteria in Low-risk Elderly Fall Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tran, John; Jeanmonod, Donald; Agresti, Darin; Hamden, Khalief; Jeanmonod, Rebecca K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The National Emergency X-radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS) criteria are used extensively in emergency departments to rule out C-spine injuries (CSI) in the general population. Although the NEXUS validation set included 2,943 elderly patients, multiple case reports and the Canadian C-Spine Rules question the validity of applying NEXUS to geriatric populations. The objective of this study was to validate a modified NEXUS criteria in a low-risk elderly fall population with two changes: a modified definition for distracting injury and the definition of normal mentation. Methods This is a prospective, observational cohort study of geriatric fall patients who presented to a Level I trauma center and were not triaged to the trauma bay. Providers enrolled non-intoxicated patients at baseline mental status with no lateralizing neurologic deficits. They recorded midline neck tenderness, signs of trauma, and presence of other distracting injury. Results We enrolled 800 patients. One patient fall event was excluded due to duplicate enrollment, and four were lost to follow up, leaving 795 for analysis. Average age was 83.6 (range 65–101). The numbers in parenthesis after the negative predictive value represent confidence interval. There were 11 (1.4%) cervical spine injuries. One hundred seventeen patients had midline tenderness and seven of these had CSI; 366 patients had signs of trauma to the face/neck, and 10 of these patients had CSI. Using signs of trauma to the head/neck as the only distracting injury and baseline mental status as normal alertness, the modified NEXUS criteria was 100% sensitive (CI [67.9–100]) with a negative predictive value of 100 (98.7–100). Conclusion Our study suggests that a modified NEXUS criteria can be safely applied to low-risk elderly falls. PMID:27330655

  6. Limited Clinical Utility of a Genetic Risk Score for the Prediction of Fracture Risk in Elderly Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Joel; Evans, Daniel S.; Nielson, Carrie M.; Shen, Jian; Srikanth, Priya; Hochberg, Marc; McWeeney, Shannon; Cawthon, Peggy M.; Wilmot, Beth; Zmuda, Joseph; Tranah, Greg; Mirel, Daniel B; Challa, Sashi; Mooney, Michael; Crenshaw, Andrew; Karlsson, Magnus; Mellström, Dan; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Orwoll, Eric; Ohlsson, Claes

    2014-01-01

    Context It is important to identify the patients at highest risk of fractures. A recent large-scale meta-analysis identified 63 autosomal SNPs associated with bone mineral density (BMD), of which 16 were also associated with fracture risk. Based on these findings two genetic risk scores (GRS63 and GRS16) were developed. Objective To determine the clinical usefulness of these GRS for the prediction of BMD, BMD change and fracture risk in elderly subjects. Design, Settings and Participants Two male (MrOS US, MrOS Sweden) and one female (SOF) large prospective cohorts of older subjects. Main Outcome Measures BMD, BMD change and radiographically and/or medically confirmed incident fractures (8,067 subjects, 2,185 incident non-vertebral or vertebral fractures). Results GRS63 was associated with BMD (≅3% of the variation explained), but not with BMD change. Both GRS63 and GRS16 were associated with fractures. After BMD-adjustment, the effect sizes for these associations were substantially reduced. Similar results were found using an unweighted GRS63 and an unweighted GRS16 compared to those found using the corresponding weighted risk scores. Only minor improvements in C-statistics (AUC) for fractures were seen when the GRSs were added to a base model (age, weight and height) and no significant improvements in C-statistics were seen when they were added to a model further adjusted for BMD. Net reclassification improvements with the addition of the GRSs to a base model were modest and substantially attenuated in BMD-adjusted models. Conclusions and Relevance GRS63 is associated with BMD, but not BMD change, suggesting that the genetic determinants of BMD differ from those of BMD change. When BMD is known, the clinical utility of the two GRSs for fracture prediction is limited in elderly subjects. PMID:25043339

  7. Determining Prevalence and Correlates of Elder Abuse Using Promotores: Low Income Immigrant Latinos Report High Rates of Abuse and Neglect

    PubMed Central

    DeLiema, Marguerite; Gassoumis, Zachary D.; Homeier, Diana C.; Wilber, Kathleen H.

    2012-01-01

    Low-income Latino immigrants are understudied in elder abuse research. Limited English proficiency, economic insecurity, neighborhood seclusion, a tradition of resolving conflicts within the family, and mistrust of authorities may impede survey research and suppress abuse reporting. To overcome these barriers, we recruited and trained promotores, local Spanish-speaking Latinos, to interview a sample of Latino adults age 66 and older residing in low-income communities. The promotores conducted door-to-door interviews in randomly selected census tracts in Los Angeles to assess the frequency of psychological, physical, and sexual abuse, financial exploitation, and caregiver neglect. Overall, 40.4% of Latino elders experienced some form of abuse and/or neglect within the previous year. Nearly 25% reported psychological abuse, 10.7% indicated physical assault, 9% reported sexual abuse, 16.7% indicated financial exploitation, and 11.7% were neglected by their caregivers. Younger age, higher education, and experiencing sexual or physical abuse before age 65 were significant risk factors for psychological, physical, and/or sexual abuse. Years lived in the United States, younger age, and prior abuse were associated with increased risk of financial exploitation. Years spent living in the U.S. was a significant risk factor for caregiver neglect. Abuse prevalence was much higher in all mistreatment domains than findings from previous research on community-dwelling elders, suggesting that low-income Latino immigrants are highly vulnerable to elder mistreatment, or that respondents are more willing to disclose abuse to promotores who represent their culture and community. PMID:22697790

  8. High latitude and marine diet: vitamin D status in elderly Faroese.

    PubMed

    Dalgård, Christine; Petersen, Maria Skaalum; Schmedes, Anne V; Brandslund, Ivan; Weihe, Pal; Grandjean, Philippe

    2010-09-01

    Human subjects obtain their vitamin D from the diet, especially from marine food, and from endogenous synthesis following cutaneous sun exposure. The risk of an insufficient vitamin D synthesis is increased in northern populations, but it may be counteracted by a high intake of marine food in fishing populations, e.g. at the Faroe Islands. We examined the vitamin D status and its statistical determinants in a cross-sectional study of 713 elderly Faroese aged 70-74 years, about two-thirds of all the eligible residents in this age group. Clinical examination included measurement of body weight and height, and marine food intake was estimated using a questionnaire. We measured serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (S-25(OH)D3) by LC-MS/MS in 669 of the 713 subjects in whom sufficient serum was available. Of the population, 19% had S-25(OH)D3 concentrations < 25 nmol/l, and only 10.3% of the population had S-25(OH)D3 concentrations >80 nmol/l. In a logistic regression analysis, BMI < 30 kg/m2, blood sampling in summer season, eating pilot whale blubber more than once per month and female sex were positively associated with vitamin D levels >80 nmol/l. The high prevalence of low vitamin D levels among the elderly Faroese population reflects the low skin synthesis during most months of the year, which is caused by the limited sun exposure and insufficient benefits from marine diet. Thus, even in a population with a high intake of marine food, the northern latitude causes a low vitamin D status. Efforts to improve vitamin D status in this population are warranted. PMID:20441671

  9. High Fluoride Dentifrices for Elderly and Vulnerable Adults: Does It Work and if So, Then Why?

    PubMed

    Ekstrand, Kim Rud

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this work is to present the available evidence that toothpastes containing >1,500 ppm fluoride (2,500-2,800 and 5,000 ppm F) provide an additional caries preventive effect on root caries lesions in elderly patients compared to traditional dentifrices (1,000-1,450 ppm F). The secondary aim of this paper is to discuss why high fluoride dentifrices in general should perform better than traditional F-containing toothpaste. When examining the few studies that have considered the preventive benefits of high fluoride products on root caries the relative risk appears to be around 0.5, and the risk can thus be halved by exchanging traditional F-containing toothpaste for toothpaste containing 5,000 ppm F. There is reasonable evidence that high fluoride dentifrices significantly increase the fluoride concentration in saliva during the day and the fluoride concentration in plaque compared to traditional F toothpaste. Furthermore, the use of toothpaste with 5,000 ppm F significantly reduces the amount of plaque accumulated, decreases the number of mutans streptococci and lactobacilli and possibly promotes calcium fluoride deposits to a higher degree than after the use of traditional F-containing toothpaste. PMID:27101401

  10. Comparison of Cardiac and Non-Cardiac Biomarkers for Risk Stratification in Elderly Patients with Non-Massive Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Méan, Marie; Limacher, Andreas; Lescuyer, Pierre; Gerstel, Eric; Bounameaux, Henri; Aujesky, Drahomir; Righini, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers unrelated to myocardial necrosis, such as cystatin C, copeptin, and mid-regional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM), showed promise for cardiovascular risk prediction. Knowing whether they are comparable to cardiac biomarkers such as high-sensitive cardiac-troponin T (hs-cTnT) or N-terminal pro-Brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in elderly patients with acute non-massive pulmonary embolism (NMPE) remains elusive. This study aims at comparing the prognostic accuracy of cardiac and non-cardiac biomarkers in patients with NMPE aged ≥65 years over time. In the context of the SWITCO65+ cohort, we evaluated 227 elderly patients with an available blood sample taken within one day from diagnosis. The primary study endpoint was defined as PE-related mortality and the secondary endpoint as PE-related complications. The biomarkers’ predictive ability at 1, 3, 12 and 24 months was determined using C-statistics and Cox regression. For both study endpoints, C-statistics (95% confidence interval) were stable over time for all biomarkers, with the highest value for hs-cTnT, ranging between 0.84 (0.68–1.00) and 0.80 (0.70–0.90) for the primary endpoint, and between 0.74 (0.63–0.86) and 0.65 (0.57–0.73) for the secondary endpoint. For both study endpoints, cardiac biomarkers were found to be independently associated with risk, NT-proBNP displaying a negative predictive value of 100%. Among non-cardiac biomarkers, only copeptin and MR-proADM were independent predictors of PE-related mortality but they were not independent predictors of PE-related complications, and displayed lower negative predictive values. In elderly NMPE patients, cardiac biomarkers appear to be valuable prognostic to identify very low-risk individuals. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00973596 PMID:27219621

  11. Elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus-the need for high-quality, inpatient diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Sinclair, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Elderly patients (aged > 70 years) with diabetes are at high risk of -hospitalization. We provide a detailed commentary about recent international clinical guidelines and a consensus statement devoted to elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the context of hospitalization. In emergency departments, the 4 medication agents associated with the greatest number of patient adverse drug events are warfarin, oral glucose-lowering medications, insulin, and antiplatelet agents, all of which are commonly prescribed in older patients with diabetes. Comprehensive gerontological assessment, including review and, if indicated, discontinuation of all potentially unsafe or inappropriate patient medications should be done upstream to reduce the likelihood of adverse drugs events. Severe infections and ischemic heart disease are also frequent causes of acute admission into hospital in patients aged > 75 years. These patients are also likely to be malnourished and nutritional status should be monitored. Nutritional support, combined with specific products to avoid uncontrolled hyperglycemia must be implemented in patients at risk of malnutrition. Early exercise prescription may help patients maintain physical function and prevent the risk of falling. Clinical guidelines should be applied to achieve safe and effective patient target glucose levels. Insulin should be used earlier for its anabolic properties and patients closely monitored to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia and excessive hyperglycemia. The discharge plan needs to address full medical and social needs along with suitable follow-up to ensure a high level of patient safety. PMID:24145589

  12. Elder Abuse and Substance Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Additional Resources Return to: What is Elder Abuse? Elder Abuse and Substance Abuse Substance abuse has been identified ... the most frequently cited risk factor associated with elder abuse and neglect. It may be the victim and/ ...

  13. Body mass index and the risk of incident functional disability in elderly Japanese: The OHSAKI Cohort 2006 Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Tomata, Yasutake; Sugiyama, Kemmyo; Kaiho, Yu; Honkura, Kenji; Watanabe, Takashi; Tanji, Fumiya; Sugawara, Yumi; Tsuji, Ichiro

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between the body mass index (BMI) and the incidence of cause-specific disability remains unclear.We conducted a prospective cohort study of 12,376 Japanese individuals aged ≥65 years who were followed up for 5.7 years. Information on BMI and other lifestyle factors was collected via a questionnaire in 2006. Functional disability data were retrieved from the public Long-term Care Insurance database. BMI was divided into 6 groups (<21, 21-<23, 23-<25, 25-<27[reference], 27-<29 and ≥29). Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for cause-specific disability were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression models.A U-shaped relationship between BMI and functional disability was observed, with a nadir at 26. The nadir BMI values with the lowest disability risk were 28 for dementia, 25 for stroke, and 23 for joint disease. A low BMI (<23) was a risk factor for disability due to dementia, the HR values (95% CI) being 2.48 (1.70-3.63) for BMI <21 and 2.25 (1.54-3.27) for BMI 21 to <23; a high BMI (≥29) was a risk factor for disability due to joint disease, the HR value (95% CI) being 2.17 (1.40-3.35). There was no significant relationship between BMI and disability due to stroke.The BMI nadirs for cause-specific disability differed: a low BMI (<23) was a risk factor for disability due to dementia, and a high BMI (≥29) was a risk factor for disability due to joint disease. Because BMI values of 23 to <29 did not pose a significantly higher risk for each cause of disability, this range should be regarded as the optimal one for the elderly population. PMID:27495075

  14. Long sleep duration in elders without dementia increases risk of dementia mortality (NEDICES)

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Elan D.; Villarejo-Galende, Alberto; Romero, Juan P.; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine in a population-based study whether long sleep duration was associated with increased risk of dementia mortality. Methods: In this prospective, population-based study of 3,857 people without dementia aged 65 years and older (NEDICES [Neurological Disorders in Central Spain]), participants reported their daily sleep duration. The average daily total sleep duration was grouped into 3 categories: ≤5 hours (short sleepers), 6–8 hours (reference category), and ≥9 hours (long sleepers). Community-dwelling elders were followed for a median of 12.5 years, after which the death certificates of those who died were examined. Results: A total of 1,822 (47.2%) of 3,857 participants died, including 201 (11.0%) deaths among short sleepers, 832 (45.7%) among long sleepers, and 789 (43.3%) among those participants in the reference category. Of 1,822 deceased participants, 92 (5.1%) had a dementia condition reported on the death certificate (49 [53.3%] were long sleepers, 36 [39.1%] reported sleeping between 6 and 8 hours, and 7 [7.6%] were short sleepers). In an unadjusted Cox model, risk of dementia-specific mortality was increased in long sleepers (hazard ratio for dementia mortality in long sleepers = 1.58, p = 0.04) when compared with the reference group. In a Cox model that adjusted for numerous demographic factors and comorbidities, the hazard ratio for dementia mortality in long sleepers was 1.63 (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Self-reported long sleep duration was associated with 58% increased risk of dementia-specific mortality in this cohort of elders without dementia. Future studies are required to confirm these findings. PMID:25253755

  15. Compensatory larger cortical thickness in healthy elderly individuals with electroencephalographic risk for cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Castro-Chavira, Susana A; Barrios, Fernando A; Pasaye, Erick H; Alatorre-Cruz, Graciela C; Fernández, Thalía

    2016-06-15

    Excess theta electroencephalographic (EEG) activity has been described as an accurate predictor for cognitive decline at least 7 years before symptom presentation. To test whether this predictor for cognitive decline correlates with structural changes in the brains of healthy elderly individuals, we compared the magnetic resonance structural images of healthy individuals with excess of theta activity [group with a risk for cognitive decline, risk group (RG); n=14] with healthy controls with normal EEG activity (control group; n=14). Neuropsychological and epidemiological analyses showed significant differences in only two features: more years of education and better performance in the visuospatial process task in the control group. Voxel-based morphometry results were not conclusive, but showed tendencies toward larger volumes in the prefrontal and parietal lobes, and smaller volumes in the right temporal lobe, right occipital lobe, and left cerebellum for the RG; these tendencies are in agreement with those proposed by the posterior-anterior shift in an aging model. Cortical-thickness analyses yielded a significant correlation between cortical thickness and years of education in the prefrontal and inferior-temporal regions, and larger cortical thickness in the RG, independent of age and years of education, in the right superior temporal region. These results suggest changes in the cortical thickness of structures related to memory and visuospatial functions in healthy, cognitively normal individuals before the appearance of cognitive decline. Thus, the performance of healthy elderly individuals with EEG risk may only be slightly different from normal because of compensation mechanisms allowing them to fulfill daily-life tasks, masking structural changes during preclinical neurocognitive disorders. PMID:27171033

  16. Assessment of mortality risk in elderly patients after proximal femoral fracture.

    PubMed

    Meessen, Jennifer M T A; Pisani, Salvatore; Gambino, Maria L; Bonarrigo, Domenico; van Schoor, Natasja M; Fozzato, Stefania; Cherubino, Paolo; Surace, Michele F

    2014-02-01

    Mortality after hip fracture is a major problem in the Western world, but its mechanisms remain uncertain. This study assessed the 2-year mortality rate after hip fracture in elderly patients by including hospital factors (eg, intervention type, surgical delay), underlying health conditions, and, for a subset, lifestyle factors (eg, body mass index, smoking, alcohol). A total of 828 patients (183 men) 70 to 99 years old experiencing a hip fracture in 2009 in the province of Varese were included in the study. The risk factors for death were assessed through Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards analysis. Hip fracture incidence per 1000 persons was higher in women (8.4 vs 3.7 in men) and in elderly patients (12.4 for 85-99 years vs 4.4 for 70-84 years). The mortality rate after 1, 6, 12, and 24 months was 4.7%, 16%, 20.7%, and 30.4%, respectively. For the province of Varese, sex (hazard ratio, 0.39 for women), age group (hazard ratio, 2.2 for 85-99 years), and Charlson Comorbidity Index score (hazard ratio, 2.06 for score greater than 1) were found to be statistically significant. The 2-year mortality rate in hip fractures is associated with sex, age, and comorbidities. Male sex, age older than 85 years, and Charlson Comorbidity Index score greater than 1 are associated with a higher risk. Surgical delay was significant in the Kaplan-Meier survival time analysis but not in the Cox hazard analysis, suggesting that early surgery reduces risk in patients with numerous comorbidities. PMID:24679208

  17. Air pollution and mortality in The Netherlands: are the elderly more at risk?

    PubMed

    Fischer, P; Hoek, G; Brunekreef, B; Verhoeff, A; van Wijnen, J

    2003-05-01

    The association between daily mortality and short-term variations in the ambient levels of ozone (O3), black smoke (BS), sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter was studied in The Netherlands. Daily total and cause-specific mortality counts (cardiovascular, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and pneumonia), air quality, temperature, relative humidity and influenza data were obtained from 1986-1994. The relationship between daily mortality and air pollution was modelled using Poisson regression analysis. All pollution mortality associations were adjusted for potential confounding due to long-term trends, seasonal trends, influenza epidemics, ambient temperature, ambient relative humidity, day of the week and holidays, using generalised additive models. Statistically significant associations were mostly found in the elderly, that is the age categories of 65-74 and > or = 75 yrs for the pollutants PM10 (particles with a 50%, cut-off aerodynamic diameter of 10 microm), BS, SO2, NO2 and CO. This may partly be due to a better precision of relative risk (RR) estimates for the larger numbers of deaths in these age groups. Significant associations for those < 65 yrs were found for O3 (total and COPD mortality), PM10 (pneumonia), NO2 (pneumonia) and CO (pneumonia). RR estimates for deaths between 45-65 yrs tended to be smaller than those in > 65 yrs, with the exception of ozone; for cardiovascular mortality the RR for PM10, O3 and CO were similar in these age groups. In conclusion, larger relative risks for air pollution were mostly found in the elderly except for ozone and for death-cause pneumonia which showed larger relative risk in younger age groups. PMID:12762572

  18. Relocation, Residence & Risk: A Study of Housing Risks and the Causes of Homelessness among the Urban Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keigher, Sharon M.; And Others

    Homelessness is growing among the elderly as it is among every other age cohort in America, but the elderly appear to be underrepresented. This underrepresentation is puzzling, since the elderly appear to have unique vulnerabilities to homelessness. This study explored the connection between the growing shortage of low rent housing, the unique…

  19. Efficacy of linezolid on gram-positive bacterial infection in elderly patients and the risk factors associated with thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Li-qing; Zhou, Jing; Huang, Ming; Zhou, Su-ming

    2013-01-01

    Objective : Linezolid is active against drug-resistant gram-positive bacteria. However, the efficacy and safety of linezolid in the treatment of the elderly have not been well characterized. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of linezolid in the treatment of the elderly with gram-positive bacterial infection and to investigate the risk factors associated with the development of thrombocytopenia in these patients. Methodology: This was a retrospective analysis of 50 elderly patients who were treated with intravenous linezolid for gram-positive bacterial infection. Clinical data and bacteriological responses were assessed. Risk factors associated with thrombocytopenia in elderly patients were analyzed. Results: The overall clinical cure rate of linezolid was 74%, and the bacteriological eradication rate was 69%. Thrombocytopenia occurred in 24 patients, and thrombocytopenia was associated with both the duration of treatment (P = 0.005) and the baseline platelet count (P = 0.042). Based on a logistic regression analysis, the baseline platelet count <200×109/L (OR = 0.244; 95% CI = 0.068- 0.874; P = 0.030) was identified as the only significant risk factor for linezolid-associated thrombocytopenia in elderly patients. The mean platelet count decreased significantly from the 7th day of treatment, and decreased to the lowest value 1-2 days after the end of therapy. Conclusions : Linezolid is effective and safe for the elderly with gram-positive bacterial infections. Adverse effects such as thrombocytopenia are of greater concern. Platelet counts should be monitored in patients who are treated with linezolid and that measures should be taken in advance to avoid hemorrhagic tendencies. PMID:24353639

  20. Investigation of gait features for stability and risk identification in elders.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jun; Abbott, Carmen C; Skubic, Marjorie; Keller, James

    2009-01-01

    Today, eldercare demands a greater degree of versatility in healthcare. Automatic monitoring devices and sensors are under development to help senior citizens achieve greater autonomy, and, as situations arise, alert healthcare providers. In this paper, we study gait patterns based on extracted silhouettes from image sequences. Three features are investigated through two different image capture perspectives: shoulder level, spinal incline, and silhouette centroid. Through the evaluation of fourteen image sequences representing a range of healthy to frail gait styles, features are extracted and compared to validation results using a Vicon motion capture system. The results obtained show promise for future studies that can increase both the accuracy of feature extraction and pragmatism of machine monitoring for at-risk elders. PMID:19965074

  1. Elderly Benefit from Intensive Blood Pressure Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158958.html Elderly Benefit From Intensive Blood Pressure Treatment No greater risk ... may suffer complications of high blood pressure can benefit from intensive blood pressure lowering and it is ...

  2. High homocysteine and epistasis between MTHFR and APOE: association with cognitive performance in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Polito, Letizia; Poloni, Tino Emanuele; Vaccaro, Roberta; Abbondanza, Simona; Mangieri, Michela; Davin, Annalisa; Villani, Simona; Guaita, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    High total homocysteine (tHcy) is associated with cognitive impairment in the elderly. The impact of high tHcy on different cognitive domains deserves further investigation, as does the role of the C677T polymorphism of the 5,10 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene. A cross-sectional analysis of 903 subjects from the population-based "InveCe.Ab" study was performed. The participants had no psychosis or active neurological disorders. They underwent a neuropsychological assessment. Principal component analysis allowed cognitive performance to be condensed into two components: executive functions and memory. Novel components were evaluated for association with tHcy, controlling for potential confounders. Regression models showed that high serum tHcy was associated with lower executive functions, but not with memory. MTHFR C677T TT was associated with higher tHcy but did not affect cognitive performance per se. However, when combined with the apolipoprotein E (APOE)-ε4 allele, it was a risk factor for lower executive performance, independently of tHcy levels. In summary, high tHcy per se, or MTHFR C677T TT in combination with the APOE-ε4 allele, might be associated primarily with executive dysfunctions rather than memory loss. PMID:26774227

  3. Fall risks assessment among community dwelling elderly using wearable wireless sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockhart, Thurmon E.; Soangra, Rahul; Frames, Chris

    2014-06-01

    Postural stability characteristics are considered to be important in maintaining functional independence free of falls and healthy life style especially for the growing elderly population. This study focuses on developing tools of clinical value in fall prevention: 1) Implementation of sensors that are minimally obtrusive and reliably record movement data. 2) Unobtrusively gather data from wearable sensors from four community centers 3) developed and implemented linear and non-linear signal analysis algorithms to extract clinically relevant information using wearable technology. In all a total of 100 community dwelling elderly individuals (66 non-fallers and 34 fallers) participated in the experiment. All participants were asked to stand-still in eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) condition on forceplate with one wireless inertial sensor affixed at sternum level. Participants' history of falls had been recorded for last 2 years, with emphasis on frequency and characteristics of falls. Any participant with at least one fall in the prior year were classified as faller and the others as non-faller. The results indicated several key factors/features of postural characteristics relevant to balance control and stability during quite stance and, showed good predictive capability of fall risks among older adults. Wearable technology allowed us to gather data where it matters the most to answer fall related questions, i.e. the community setting environments. This study opens new prospects of clinical testing using postural variables with a wearable sensor that may be relevant for assessing fall risks at home and patient environment in near future.

  4. High prevalence of arrhythmias in elderly male athletes with a lifelong history of regular strenuous exercise

    PubMed Central

    Jensen-Urstad, K; Bouvier, F; Saltin, B; Jensen-Urstad, M

    1998-01-01

    Objective—To characterise cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac autonomic function in 11 elderly men (mean (SD) age 73.2 (2.8) years) with a lifelong history of regular very strenuous exercise. A control group of 12 healthy sedentary or moderately physically active men (74.5 (2.7) years) was also studied.
Design—48 hour ambulatory electrocardiograms were recorded. Cardiac autonomic function was estimated from power spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Maximal oxygen uptake during treadmill exercise testing was 2.91 (0.52) l (41 (7) ml/kg).
Results—Nine of 11 athletes had complex ventricular arrhythmias compared with five of 12 controls. Seven athletes but none of the controls had episodes of heart rate below 40 beats/min and two athletes had RR intervals longer than two seconds. Heart rate variability in the athletes was higher than in the controls. 
Conclusions—Elderly athletes with a lifelong training history seem to have more complex arrhythmias and profound bradyarrhythmias than do healthy elderly controls, which may increase the risk of sudden cardiac death. In contrast, the age related decrease in heart rate variability seems to be retarded, which has a positive prognostic value and may decrease the risk of life threatening ventricular arrhythmias.

 Keywords: arrhythmias;  heart rate variability;  athletes;  exercise;  elderly men PMID:9538309

  5. High prevalence of aspirin resistance in elderly patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and hyperhomocysteinaemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaxin; Chen, Xiuying; Liu, Lin; Fan, Li; Cao, Jian; Li, Xiaoli; Hu, Guoliang; Hu, Yixin; Zhu, Bingpo; Liu, Xianfeng; Gao, Yan; Ma, Cong; Leng, Wenxiu

    2014-01-01

    Although aspirin resistance is well reported in CVD, little is known about aspirin response in elderly patients with hyperhomocysteinaemia. The aim of the present study was to explore the prevalence of aspirin resistance in elderly patients with CVD and hyperhomocysteinaemia. A total of 370 elderly patients with CVD were recruited. The study included 216 patients with hyperhomocysteinaemia and 154 patients with normohomocysteinaemia receiving daily aspirin therapy (≥ 75 mg) over 1 month. The effect of aspirin was assessed using by light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Aspirin resistance was defined as ≥ 20% arachidonic acid induced aggregation according to LTA. Aspirin resistance was defined in 48 (13.0%) of 370 patients. The prevalence of aspirin resistance was higher in hyperhomocysteinaemic patients than normohomocysteinaemic patients (16.7% vs. 7.8%, odds ratio (OR)=2.367; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.188-4.715, p=0.012). In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, hyperhomocysteinaemia (OR=2.406, 95% CI=1.201-4.820, p=0.013) was a significant risk factor for aspirin resistance. A significant number of CVD patients with hyperhomocysteinemia are resistant to aspirin therapy. Hyperhomocysteinemia is a significant risk factor for aspirin resistance in elderly patients with CVD. PMID:24880196

  6. Fracture Risk in Diabetic Elderly Men: The MrOS Study

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, Nicola; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Sellmeyer, Deborah E.; Bauer, Douglas C.; Hoffman, Andrew R.; Dam, Thuy-Tien L.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Palermo, Lisa; Orwoll, Eric S.; Cummings, Steven R.; Black, Dennis M; Schwartz, Ann V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased fracture risk in women but few studies are available in men. To evaluate the relationship between diabetes and prospective non-vertebral fractures in elderly men, we used data from the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study. Research Design and Methods MrOS enrolled 5,994 men (≥65 years). Diabetes (ascertained by self-report, use of diabetes medication or elevated fasting glucose) was reported in 881 subjects of whom 80 used insulin. Hip and spine bone mineral density (BMD) were measured with dual x-ray absorptiometry. After recruitment, men were followed for incident nonvertebral fracture with a tri-annual questionnaire for an average of 9.1 (SD 2.7) years. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess incident risk of fractures. Results In models adjusted for age, race, clinic site and total hip BMD, the risk of non-vertebral fracture was higher in men with diabetes, compared with normoglycemic men, [hazard ratio (HR) 1.30 (95% CI: 1.09–1.54)] and was elevated in men using insulin (HR 2.46; 95% CI 1.69–3.59). Men with impaired fasting glucose did not have a higher risk of fracture compared to normoglycemic men (HR 1.04; 95% CI 0.89–1.21). After multivariable adjustment, the risk of non-vertebral fracture remained higher only among men with diabetes who were using insulin (HR 1.74; 95% CI 1.13–2.69). Conclusions Men with diabetes who are using insulin have an increased risk of non-vertebral fracture for a given age and BMD. PMID:24908567

  7. Low Serum Albumin Level, Male Sex, and Total Gastrectomy Are Risk Factors of Severe Postoperative Complications in Elderly Gastric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung Chan; Kim, Hyun Il

    2016-01-01

    Purpose It is well known that old age is a risk factor for postoperative complications. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the risk factors for poor postoperative surgical outcomes in elderly gastric cancer patients. Materials and Methods Between January 2006 and December 2015, 247 elderly gastric cancer patients who underwent curative gastrectomy were reviewed. In this study, an elderly patient was defined as a patient aged ≥65 years. All possible variables were used to explore the risk factors for poor early surgical outcomes in elderly gastric cancer patients. Results Based on multivariate analyses of preoperative risk factors, preoperative low serum albumin level (<3.5 g/dl) and male sex showed statistical significance in predicting severe postoperative complications. Additionally, in an analysis of surgery-related risk factors, total gastrectomy was a risk factor for severe postoperative complications. Conclusions Our study findings suggest that low serum albumin level, male sex, and total gastrectomy could be risk factors of severe postoperative complications in elderly gastric cancer patients. Therefore, surgeons should work carefully in cases of elderly gastric cancer patients with low preoperative serum albumin level and male sex. We believe that efforts should be made to avoid total gastrectomy in elderly gastric cancer patients. PMID:27104026

  8. Low morale is associated with increased risk of mortality in the elderly: a population-based prospective study (NEDICES)

    PubMed Central

    Benito-León, Julián; Louis, Elan D.; Rivera-Navarro, Jesús; Medrano, María José; Vega, Saturio; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix

    2010-01-01

    Objective: the study aimed to assess the association between morale and mortality. Design: we used data from the Neurological Disorders in Central Spain (NEDICES), a population-based study. Subjects: 2,516 older persons (mean age 75.7 years) participated in the study. Methods: Cox models were used to estimate risk of mortality. Morale was assessed using the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale. Results: 489 (21.8%) participants died over a median follow-up of 5.9 years (range 0.1–7.7 years), including 253 (21.8%) deaths among 1,163 participants with low morale scores, 168 (19.3%) among 870 participants with moderate scores and 68 (14.1%) among participants with high scores. In an unadjusted Cox model, relative risk (RR) of mortality in participants with low morale scores = 1.69 (P < 0.001) and RR in participants with moderate scores = 1.47 (P < 0.01) were compared to the reference group (participants with high scores). In a Cox model that adjusted for a variety of demographic factors and co-morbidities, RR of mortality in participants with low morale scores = 1.35 (P <0.05) and moderate scores = 1.16 (not significant) were compared to the reference group. Conclusion: low morale may be an independent predictor of mortality in the elderly. By assessing morale, practitioners might be better positioned to identify patients with poorer prognoses. PMID:20299322

  9. The role of lipid profile in determining the risk of ischemic stroke in the elderly: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Denti, Licia; Cecchetti, Alessandra; Annoni, Valentina; Merli, Maria Francesca; Ablondi, Fabrizio; Valenti, Giorgio

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the association of lipids with ischemic stroke and its different subtypes in elderly patients. In particular, lipid parameters not extensively investigated so far in previous case-control studies specifically focused in the old population, such as lipoprotein Lp (a) and Apoproteins AI (ApoAI) and B (ApoB), have been taken into account. Seventy nine patients (mean age 83 +/- 7.4, range 67-99), consecutively admitted to a Geriatric Ward between January 1998 and June 2000 with acute stroke (first event) were studied. A complete clinical and laboratory assessment, including neurological evaluation, head CT scan, carotid ultrasonography and ECG, was employed to define the clinical and etiologic stroke subtype, according to standardized criteria. Fasting blood samples were collected within 48 h from admission, for determination of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), High Density Lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), Lp(a), ApoAI and ApoB; Low Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol (LDL-C) was estimated by Friedwald formula. Eighty eight age and sex-matched outpatients, referred to the hospital for non-inflammatory disorders of joints and musculoskeletal system, served as controls. Patients showed HDL-C and HDL-C/ApoAI ratio significantly lower than controls, with higher LDL-C/HDL-C ratio. Analysis on quartiles of lipoprotein concentrations showed also a significant increase in odds of stroke for LDL-C concentrations over 100 mg/dl, in absence of a linear relationship between LDL-C levels and risk. Multiple logistic regression, adjusting for non-lipid risk factors for stroke, confirmed the independent association of low HDL-C and HDL-C/ApoAI with all strokes, as well as with each subtype. In conclusion, these data suggest that lipids give some contribution to stroke risk even in the elderly, with a more prevalent role for HDL than LDL, and that lipid profile assessment must be taken into account in estimating the individual risk of stroke. PMID

  10. Medical and Financial Risks Associated with Surgery in the Elderly Obese

    PubMed Central

    Silber, Jeffrey H.; Rosenbaum, Paul R.; Kelz, Rachel R.; Reinke, Caroline E.; Neuman, Mark D.; Ross, Richard N.; Even-Shoshan, Orit; David, Guy; Saynisch, Philip A.; Kyle, Fabienne A.; Bratzler, Dale W.; Fleisher, Lee A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the medical and financial outcomes associated with surgery in the elderly obese patient and ask if obesity itself influences outcomes above and beyond effects from comorbidities known to be associated with obesity. BACKGROUND Obesity is a surgical risk factor not present in Medicare’s risk adjustment or payment algorithms, as BMI is not collected in administrative claims. METHODS 2045 severely or morbidly obese patients (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2, age between 65 and 80) selected from 15,914 elderly patients in 47 hospitals undergoing hip and knee surgery, colectomy, and thoracotomy were matched to two sets of 2045 non-obese patients (BMI = 20 – 30 kg/m2). A “limited match” controlled for age, sex, race, procedure and hospital. A “complete match” also controlled for 30 additional factors such as diabetes and admission clinical data from chart abstraction. RESULTS Mean BMI in the obese was 40kg/m2 versus 26kg/m2 in the non-obese. In the complete match, obese patients displayed increased odds of wound infection: OR = 1.64 (95% CI 1.21, 2.21); renal dysfunction: OR = 2.05(1.39, 3.05); urinary tract infection: OR = 1.55 (1.24, 1.94); hypotension: OR = 1.38 (1.07, 1.80); respiratory events: OR = 1.44 (1.19, 1.75); 30-day readmission: OR = 1.38 (1.08, 1.77); and a 12% longer length of stay (8%, 17%); Provider costs were 10% (7%, 12%) greater in the obese than non-obese, while Medicare payments increased only 3% (2%, 5%). Findings were similar in the limited match. CONCLUSIONS Obesity increases the risks and costs of surgery. Better approaches are needed to reduce these risks. Furthermore, to avoid incentives to under-serve this population, Medicare should consider incorporating incremental costs of caring for obese patients into payment policy and include obesity in severity adjustment models. PMID:22566017

  11. Increased Risk for Lymphoid and Myeloid Neoplasms in Elderly Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Quinlan, Scott C.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Anderson, Lesley A.; Landgren, Ola; Warren, Joan L.; Engels, Eric A.

    2010-01-01

    Background By assessing the spectrum of hematologic malignancies associated with solid organ transplantation in the elderly, we provide information on the pathogenesis of lymphoid and myeloid neoplasms and the clinical manifestations of immunosuppression. Methods Using data from the U.S. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Medicare database, we identified 83,016 cases with a hematologic malignancy (age 66-99 years) and 166,057 population-based controls matched to cases by age, sex, and calendar year. Medicare claims were used to identify a history of solid organ transplantation. We utilized polytomous logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (ORs) comparing transplantation history among cases with various hematologic malignancy subtypes and controls, adjusting for the matching factors and race. Results A prior solid organ transplant was identified in 216 (0.26%) cases and 204 (0.12%) controls. Transplantation was associated with increased risk for non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) (OR=2.13, 95%CI 1.67-2.72), especially diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (OR=3.29, 95%CI 2.28-4.76), marginal zone lymphoma (OR=2.48, 95%CI 1.17-5.22), lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (OR=3.32, 95%CI 1.41-7.81), and T-cell lymphoma (OR=3.07, 95%CI 1.56-6.06). Transplantation was also associated with elevated risk of Hodgkin lymphoma (OR=2.53, 95%CI 1.01-6.35) and plasma cell neoplasms (OR=1.91, 95%CI 1.24-2.93). Risks for myeloid neoplasms were also elevated (OR=1.99, 95%CI 1.41-2.81). Conclusion Solid organ transplantation is associated with a wide spectrum of hematologic malignancies in the elderly. Risk was increased for four specific NHL subtypes for which a viral agent has been implicated, supporting an added role for immunosuppression. Impact Our results support monitoring for a wide spectrum of hematologic malignancies following solid organ transplant. PMID:20406959

  12. Denture wearing during sleep doubles the risk of pneumonia in the very elderly.

    PubMed

    Iinuma, T; Arai, Y; Abe, Y; Takayama, M; Fukumoto, M; Fukui, Y; Iwase, T; Takebayashi, T; Hirose, N; Gionhaku, N; Komiyama, K

    2015-03-01

    Poor oral health and hygiene are increasingly recognized as major risk factors for pneumonia among the elderly. To identify modifiable oral health-related risk factors, we prospectively investigated associations between a constellation of oral health behaviors and incident pneumonia in the community-living very elderly (i.e., 85 years of age or older). At baseline, 524 randomly selected seniors (228 men and 296 women; mean age, 87.8 years) were examined for oral health status and oral hygiene behaviors as well as medical assessment, including blood chemistry analysis, and followed up annually until first hospitalization for or death from pneumonia. During a 3-year follow-up period, 48 events associated with pneumonia (20 deaths and 28 acute hospitalizations) were identified. Among 453 denture wearers, 186 (40.8%) who wore their dentures during sleep were at higher risk for pneumonia than those who removed their dentures at night (log rank P = 0.021). In a multivariate Cox model, both perceived swallowing difficulties and overnight denture wearing were independently associated with an approximately 2.3-fold higher risk of the incidence of pneumonia (for perceived swallowing difficulties, hazard ratio [HR], 2.31; and 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-4.82; and for denture wearing during sleep, HR, 2.38; and 95% CI, 1.25-4.56), which was comparable with the HR attributable to cognitive impairment (HR, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.06-4.34), history of stroke (HR, 2.46; 95% CI, 1.13-5.35), and respiratory disease (HR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.20-4.23). In addition, those who wore dentures during sleep were more likely to have tongue and denture plaque, gum inflammation, positive culture for Candida albicans, and higher levels of circulating interleukin-6 as compared with their counterparts. This study provided empirical evidence that denture wearing during sleep is associated not only with oral inflammatory and microbial burden but also with incident pneumonia, suggesting potential

  13. Six simple questions to detect malnutrition or malnutrition risk in elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Gómez, Tranquilina; Cortés, Ernesto; Peñarrieta-de Córdova, Isabel; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco; Ferrer-Diego, Rosa María

    2015-01-01

    Of the numerous instruments available to detect nutritional risk, the most widely used is the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), but it takes 15–20 min to complete and its systematic administration in primary care units is not feasible in practice. We developed a tool to evaluate malnutrition risk that can be completed more rapidly using just clinical variables. Between 2008 and 2013, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 418 women aged ≥60 years from Mexico. Our outcome was positive MNA and our secondary variables included were: physical activity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, educational level, dentition, psychological problems, living arrangements, history of falls, age and the number of tablets taken daily. The sample was divided randomly into two groups: construction and validation. Construction: a risk table was constructed to estimate the likelihood of the outcome, and risk groups were formed. Validation: the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was calculated and we compared the expected and the observed outcomes. The following risk factors were identified: physical activity, hypertension, diabetes, dentition, psychological problems and living with the family. The AUC was 0.77 (95% CI [0.68–0.86], p < 0.001). No differences were found between the expected and the observed outcomes (p = 0.902). This study presents a new malnutrition screening test for use in elderly women. The test is based on six very simple, quick and easy-to-evaluate questions, enabling the MNA to be reserved for confirmation. However, it should be used with caution until validation studies have been performed in other geographical areas. PMID:26500824

  14. Risk of Pre-and Post-Operative Delirium and the Delirium Elderly At Risk (DEAR) Tool in Hip Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Freter, Susan; Dunbar, Michael; Koller, Katalin; MacKnight, Chris; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Delirium is common after hip fracture. Previous work has shown that a simple delirium risk factor tool, the Delirium Elderly At Risk instrument (DEAR), has a high inter-rater reliability in this population. Little research has looked at the ability of risk factor screening tools to identify patients at high risk of pre-operative delirium. This study investigates the ability of the DEAR to identify patients at high risk of pre-operative delirium, as well as reporting its performance in a post-operative validation sample. Associations between delirium risk factors and pre-operative delirium are explored. Methods This prospective cohort study took place on an orthopedic in-patient service at a University-affiliated tertiary care hospital. Patients aged 65 and older who were admitted for surgical repair of hip fracture (N = 283) were assessed pre-operatively for 5 delirium risk factors (cognitive impairment, sensory impairment, functional dependence, substance use, age) using the DEAR. Patients were assessed for delirium using the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Confusion Assessment Method pre-operatively and on post-operative days 1, 3 and 5. Characteristics of patients who developed delirium were compared with the characteristics of those who did not. Results Delirium was present in 58% (95% CI = 52–63%) of patients pre-operatively and 42% (95% CI = 36–48%) post-operatively. Individually, sensory impairment (χ2 = 21.7, p = .0001), functional dependence (χ2 = 24.1, p = .0001), cognitive impairment (χ2 = 55.5, p = .0001) and substance use (χ2 = 7.5, p = .007) were significantly associated with pre-operative delirium, as was wait-time for surgery (t = 3.1, p = .003) and length of stay (t = 2.8, p =.03). In multivariate modeling, the strongest association with pre-operative delirium was cognitive impairment. Conclusions The DEAR, a simple, delirium risk factor screening tool, can be used to identify hip fracture patients at risk of

  15. The Nicoya region of Costa Rica: a high longevity island for elderly males

    PubMed Central

    Dow, William H.; Rehkopf, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Reliable data show that the Nicoyan region of Costa Rica is a hot spot of high longevity. A survival follow-up of 16,300 elderly Costa Ricans estimated a Nicoya death rate ratio (DRR) for males 1990–2011 of 0.80 (0.69–0.93 CI). For a 60-year-old Nicoyan male, the probability of becoming centenarian is seven times that of a Japanese male, and his life expectancy is 2.2 years greater. This Nicoya advantage does not occur in females, is independent of socio-economic conditions, disappears in out-migrants and comes from lower cardiovascular (CV) mortality (DRR = 0.65). Nicoyans have lower levels of biomarkers of CV risk; they are also leaner, taller and suffer fewer disabilities. Two markers of ageing and stress—telomere length and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate—are also more favourable. The Nicoya diet is prosaic and abundant in traditional foods like rice, beans and animal protein, with low glycemic index and high fibre content. PMID:25426140

  16. [Chances and risks of prevention in elderly people for the three major cancers: breast-, prostate- and colorectal cancers].

    PubMed

    Kolb, G F

    2006-06-01

    The big three, breast cancer (BC), prostate cancer (PC) and colorectal carcinoma are the most frequent malignancies world wide and also typical tumors of advanced age. Therefore the question to screen and how to screen for these tumors in the elderly is the main question for reduction of the total cancer burden and mortality in all western countries. BREAST CANCER (BC): The age related risk of BC increases from 1 : 2,500 at age 30+ to > 1 : 10 at age 80. Nevertheless, most of the national BC-Screening-Programs stop at age 60 or earlier. Therefore the majority of all advanced i. e. T (4) stages of BC are found in women age > 60. Frequently it is suggested that age related comorbidity should eliminate the benefit of treatment. Recently two longitudinal studies have clearly shown that correct standard treatment is as effective in elderly as in younger individuals. Mammography (MG) has been shown to reduce mortality of BC significantly with best results for specificity and sensitivity at age 70+. PROSTATE CANCER (PC): The screening situation of PC is quite different to BC, because risk profiles are poorly defined and the benefit of radical prostatectomy is not clearly demonstrated in the early non symptomatic stages of PC. At the other side watchful waiting leads to an elevated frequency of incontinence and enuresis as well. Two studies are now under progress and may possibly change the situation; but the final results are expected 2005-2008 at the earliest. Therefore an assisted individual decision making is the only recommendation at this time. COLORECTAL CANCER (CC): Risk groups are clearly defined. Risk of the elderly (> 60) is the average risk. The incidence increases from < 50/10 (5) to more than 500 at age 75+(male) and 500 (female). When to start and when to stop screening? Experts give the advice to begin at age 50 and to end at age 80; but this is not really evidence based. There are several unanswered questions and open problems: we are not exactly informed

  17. Comparison of percentage body fat and body mass index for the prediction of inflammatory and atherogenic lipid risk profiles in elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Funghetto, Silvana Schwerz; de Oliveira Silva, Alessandro; de Sousa, Nuno Manuel Frade; Stival, Marina Morato; Tibana, Ramires Alsamir; Pereira, Leonardo Costa; Antunes, Marja Letícia Chaves; de Lima, Luciano Ramos; Prestes, Jonato; Oliveira, Ricardo Jacó; Dutra, Maurílio Tiradentes; Souza, Vinícius Carolino; da Cunha Nascimento, Dahan; de Oliveira Karnikowski, Margô Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical classification of the body mass index (BMI) and percentage body fat (PBF) for the prediction of inflammatory and atherogenic lipid profile risk in older women. Method Cross-sectional analytical study with 277 elderly women from a local community in the Federal District, Brazil. PBF and fat-free mass (FFM) were determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The investigated inflammatory parameters were interleukin 6 and C-reactive protein. Results Twenty-five percent of the elderly women were classified as normal weight, 50% overweight, and 25% obese by the BMI. The obese group had higher levels of triglycerides and very low-density lipoproteins than did the normal weight group (P≤0.05) and lower levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) than did the overweight group (P≤0.05). According to the PBF, 49% of the elderly women were classified as eutrophic, 28% overweight, and 23% obese. In the binomial logistic regression analyses including age, FFM, and lipid profile, only FFM (odds ratio [OR]=0.809, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.739–0.886; P<0.0005) proved to be a predictor of reaching the eutrophic state by the BMI. When the cutoff points of PBF were used for the classification, FFM (OR=0.903, CI=0.884–0.965; P=0.003) and the total cholesterol/HDL ratio (OR=0.113, CI=0.023–0.546; P=0.007) proved to be predictors of reaching the eutrophic state. Conclusion Accurate identification of obesity, systemic inflammation, and atherogenic lipid profile is key to assessing the risk of cardiometabolic diseases. Classification based on dual energy X-ray absorptiometry measures, along with biochemical and inflammatory parameters, seems to have a great clinical importance, since it allows the lipid profile eutrophic distinction in elderly overweight women. PMID:25609936

  18. The Motives of Intergenerational Transfer to the Elderly Parents in China: Consequences of High Medical Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoyu; Li, Lixing

    2014-01-01

    The support for the elderly is facing big challenges with the problem of population aging. Transfers from adult children could partly insure elderly parents against low income and high medical expenditure. There are two main motives for transfers in the literature, namely altruism and exchange. Using data from a new household survey of people aged 45 and above in China, we estimate the transfer derivatives with the adjustment of medical expenditure in elderly parents’ income. We find a large negative impact of adjusted income on transfers at the lower end of income distribution, which is consistent with the altruistic motive. Evidence on the exchange motive is found only for sons, but not for daughters. In addition, there is evidence on the “exchange-for-service” motive, which interprets transfer as a payment to parents’ family services, such as taking care of grandchildren. PMID:23681718

  19. Risk factors for elder abuse and neglect: brief descriptions of different scenarios in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Marais, Sandra; Conradie, Gerna; Kritzinger, Andrienetta

    2006-09-01

    Aim.  To describe various situations in which older people in South Africa are vulnerable. Background.  Poverty compromises the health of many older people in South Africa but the circumstances and ways in which this is managed and risk thought of is poorly understood. This paper presents three scenarios that describe individual studies and provide insight into the factors influencing the lives of some older people. Method.  Scenario 1 concerns people with dementia. Pilot work has collected interview data from four people with dementia, their four informal carers and three hospital nursing staff. Scenario 2 concerns an analysis of data collected routinely as part of the Halt Elder Abuse Line, a telephone-based service for people to report abuse. Scenario 3 concerns an interview study with farm workers who have retired and who are vulnerable to being displaced from the farms. Conclusion.  A variety of policy, social and individual factors result in older people being vulnerable and continuing research is required to further develop an understanding of these dynamics of risk to promote changes to current policy and practices. PMID:20925749

  20. Metabolic syndrome and subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in elderly women: Challenging the current definition.

    PubMed

    Dragsbæk, Katrine; Neergaard, Jesper S; Laursen, Janne M; Hansen, Henrik B; Christiansen, Claus; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Karsdal, Morten A; Brix, Susanne; Henriksen, Kim

    2016-09-01

    The prognostic value of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) is believed to vary with age. With an elderly population expecting to triple by 2060, it is important to evaluate the validity of MetS in this age group. We examined the association of MetS risk factors with later risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in elderly Caucasian women. We further investigated if stratification of individuals not defined with MetS would add predictive power in defining future disease prevalence of individuals with MetS.The Prospective Epidemiological Risk Factor Study, a community-based cohort study, followed 3905 Danish women since 2000 (age: 70.1 ± 6.5) with no previous diagnosis of T2DM or CVD, holding all measurements used for MetS definition; central obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and hyperglycemia combined with register-based follow-up information.Elderly women with defined MetS presented a 6.3-fold increased risk of T2DM (95% confidence interval: [3.74-10.50]) and 1.7-fold increased risk of CVD (1.44-2.05) compared to women with no MetS risk factors. Subdividing the control group without defined MetS revealed that both centrally obese controls and controls holding other MetS risk factors also had increased risk of T2DM (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.21 [1.25-3.93] and HR = 1.75 [1.04-2.96]) and CVD (HR = 1.51 [1.25-1.83] and HR = 1.36 [1.15-1.60]) when compared to controls with no MetS risk factors.MetS in elderly Caucasian women increased risk of future T2DM and CVD. While not defined with MetS, women holding only some risk factors for MetS were also at increased risk of T2DM or CVD compared to women with no MetS risk factors. PMID:27603394

  1. Effects of endurance, circuit, and relaxing training on cardiovascular risk factors in hypertensive elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Venturelli, Massimo; Cè, Emiliano; Limonta, Eloisa; Schena, Federico; Caimi, Barbara; Carugo, Stefano; Veicsteinas, Arsenio; Esposito, Fabio

    2015-10-01

    Recommendations for prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) risk factors among older adults highlighted the importance of exercise-based interventions, including endurance training (ET). However, the evidence of efficacy of other interventions based on short-bouts of exercise (circuit training, CT), and the practice of breath-control and meditation (relaxing training, RT) is growing. The aim of this study was to elucidate if CT or RT are equally effective in CVD risk factors reduction compared to ET. To this purpose, in 40 elderly participants, with clinically diagnosed grade 1 hypertension, resting blood pressure, blood glucose, and cholesterol levels, peak oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]), mechanical efficiency and quality of life were evaluated before and after 12 weeks of ET, CT, and RT treatments. Resting blood pressure reduced significantly in all groups by ∼11 %. In ET, blood cholesterol levels (-18 %), [Formula: see text] (+8 %), mechanical efficiency (+9 %), and quality of life scores (+36 %) ameliorated. In CT blood glucose levels (-11 %), [Formula: see text] (+7 %) and quality of life scores (+35 %) were bettered. Conversely, in RT, the lower blood pressure went along only with an improvement in the mental component of quality of life (+42 %). ET and CT were both appropriate interventions to reduce CVDs risk factors, because blood pressure reduction was accompanied by decreases in blood glucose and cholesterol levels, increases in [Formula: see text], mechanical efficiency, and quality of life. Although RT influenced only blood pressure and quality of life, this approach would be an attractive alternative for old individuals unable or reluctant to carry out ET or CT. PMID:26381921

  2. Project Teen-Ager - A Skills Exchange Program: High School Students Volunteering with the Elderly in a Rural Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Judson H., Jr.

    Designed to improve self esteem and quality of life for rural adolescents and elderly, Project Teen-Ager enables these groups to exchange knowledge and skills for their mutual benefit. Initial sponsors of the program were Manning High School and South Carolina Community Long Term Care, a state agency for elderly/disabled persons who need help to…

  3. Risk factors for chronic subdural hematoma after a minor head injury in the elderly: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Jen-Ho; Tseng, Ming-Yuan; Liu, Ann-Jeng; Lin, Wen-Hsiung; Hu, Hsiao-Yun; Hsiao, Sheng-Huang

    2014-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the major comorbidities in elderly resulting in disability and death. Early recognition of CSDH is important for early management. However, manifestations of CSDH are nonspecific and subtle. Therefore, identification of risk factors of CSDH can offer clinical follow-up strategies for patients after episodes of head injury. The purpose of the study aimed at identifying risk factors of CSDH of Taiwanese. Analysis of data from the National Health Insurance provides important information on predictive factors influencing the early diagnosis of CSDH in elderly patients following minor head injuries. The current study is the first nationwide population-based study in Taiwan, showing that old age (≥75 years), male gender, and coexisting hydrocephalus are significantly predictive factors, irrespective to their medical comorbidities. PMID:25295251

  4. Physical activity reduces hippocampal atrophy in elders at genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J. Carson; Nielson, Kristy A.; Woodard, John L.; Seidenberg, Michael; Durgerian, Sally; Hazlett, Kathleen E.; Figueroa, Christina M.; Kandah, Cassandra C.; Kay, Christina D.; Matthews, Monica A.; Rao, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the impact of physical activity (PA) on longitudinal change in hippocampal volume in cognitively intact older adults at varying genetic risk for the sporadic form of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hippocampal volume was measured from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans administered at baseline and at an 18-month follow-up in 97 healthy, cognitively intact older adults. Participants were classified as High or Low PA based on a self-report questionnaire of frequency and intensity of exercise. Risk status was defined by the presence or absence of the apolipoprotein E-epsilon 4 (APOE-ε4) allele. Four subgroups were studied: Low Risk/High PA (n = 24), Low Risk/Low PA (n = 34), High Risk/High PA (n = 22), and High Risk/Low PA (n = 17). Over the 18 month follow-up interval, hippocampal volume decreased by 3% in the High Risk/Low PA group, but remained stable in the three remaining groups. No main effects or interactions between genetic risk and PA were observed in control brain regions, including the caudate, amygdala, thalamus, pre-central gyrus, caudal middle frontal gyrus, cortical white matter (WM), and total gray matter (GM). These findings suggest that PA may help to preserve hippocampal volume in individuals at increased genetic risk for AD. The protective effects of PA on hippocampal atrophy were not observed in individuals at low risk for AD. These data suggest that individuals at genetic risk for AD should be targeted for increased levels of PA as a means of reducing atrophy in a brain region critical for the formation of episodic memories. PMID:24795624

  5. Perforated Duodenal Ulcer in High Risk Patients: Is Percutaneous Drainage Justified?

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Aly; Gad, Mohammad A; Ellabban, Gouda M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Conservative treatment was recommended as the treatment of choice in perforated acute peptic ulcer. Here, we adjunct percutaneous peritoneal drainage with nonoperative conservative treatment in high risk elderly patients with perforated duodenal ulcer. Aim: The work was to study the efficacy of percutaneous peritoneal drainage under local anesthesia supported by conservative measures in high risk elderly patients, according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists grading, with perforated duodenal ulcer. Patients and Methods: Twenty four high risk patients with age >65 years having associated medical illness with evidence of perforated duodenal ulcer. Results: The overall morbidity and mortality were comparable with those treated by conservative measures alone. Conclusion: In high risk patients with perforated peptic ulcer and established peritonitis, percutaneous peritoneal drainage under local anesthesia seems to be effective with least operative trauma and mortality rate. PMID:22393546

  6. Kinematic effect of Nintendo Wii(TM) sports program exercise on obstacle gait in elderly women with falling risk.

    PubMed

    Jung, Dae-In; Ko, Dae-Sik; Jeong, Mi-Ae

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the changes in balance ability and obstacle gait after lumbar stabilization exercise and Nintendo Wii(TM) Sports in elderly at risk for falls. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four elderly women with at risk for falls were randomly divided into the control, lumbar stabilization exercise, and Nintendo Wii Sports groups. Static balance was measured by the Berg Balance Scale and functional reach test, dynamic balance by the timed up-and-go test, and obstacle negotiation function by crossing velocity and maximum vertical heel clearance. [Results] Both the lumbar stabilization exercise and Nintendo Wii Sports groups showed significant improvements in obstacle negotiation function after the exercise compared to the control group. Berg Balance Scale and functional reach test scores were greater in the lumbar stabilization exercise group, while the timed up-and-go test time was significantly better in the Nintendo Wii Sports groups. [Conclusion] Lumbar stabilization exercises and Nintendo Wii Sports improve falling related balance and obstacle negotiation function in elderly women at risk for falls. PMID:26157228

  7. Kinematic effect of Nintendo WiiTM sports program exercise on obstacle gait in elderly women with falling risk

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Dae-In; Ko, Dae-Sik; Jeong, Mi-Ae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the changes in balance ability and obstacle gait after lumbar stabilization exercise and Nintendo WiiTM Sports in elderly at risk for falls. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four elderly women with at risk for falls were randomly divided into the control, lumbar stabilization exercise, and Nintendo Wii Sports groups. Static balance was measured by the Berg Balance Scale and functional reach test, dynamic balance by the timed up-and-go test, and obstacle negotiation function by crossing velocity and maximum vertical heel clearance. [Results] Both the lumbar stabilization exercise and Nintendo Wii Sports groups showed significant improvements in obstacle negotiation function after the exercise compared to the control group. Berg Balance Scale and functional reach test scores were greater in the lumbar stabilization exercise group, while the timed up-and-go test time was significantly better in the Nintendo Wii Sports groups. [Conclusion] Lumbar stabilization exercises and Nintendo Wii Sports improve falling related balance and obstacle negotiation function in elderly women at risk for falls. PMID:26157228

  8. Plasma selenium and risk of dysglycemia in an elderly French population: results from the prospective Epidemiology of Vascular Ageing Study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A preventive role of selenium on the risk of diabetes has been reported and ascribed to the "insulin-like" activity of selenium and the antioxidant properties of the selenoenzymes. By contrast, data from cross-sectional studies and clinical trials have suggested an adverse effect of high selenium status and selenium supplementation on type-2 diabetes risk. Given these controversial results, we investigated prospectively the relationship between baseline plasma selenium concentration and occurrence of dysglycemia (impaired fasting glucose or type 2 diabetes) in an elderly French cohort. Methods The Epidemiology of Vascular Ageing (EVA) study (n = 1389, 59-71 years) is a 9-year longitudinal study in which, fasting plasma glucose was measured at baseline, 2, 4 and 9 years. Analyses were performed on 1162 participants with complete data. Results At baseline plasma selenium mean levels were 1.08 (0.21) μmol/l in men and 1.10 (0.20) μmol/l in women. During the 9-year follow-up, 127 cases of dysglycemia occurred. A significant interaction was found between plasma selenium and sex. Risk of dysglycemia was significantly lower in men with plasma selenium in the highest tertile (T3:1.19-1.97) compared to those in the lowest tertile (T1:0.18-1.00) [HR = 0.48 (0.25-0.92)], but no significant relationship was observed in women. After controlling for socio-demographic factors, lifestyle factors, cardiovascular diseases, body mass index, hypertension and lipid profile, plasma selenium remained marginally significantly associated with occurrence of dysglycemia in men [T3 vs. T1, HR = 0.50 (0.24-1.04)] and unrelated in women. Conclusions This prospective study suggests a sex-specific protective effect of higher selenium status at baseline on later occurrence of dysglycemia. PMID:20298544

  9. Greater Cognitive Decline with Aging among Elders with High Serum Concentrations of Organochlorine Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se-A; Lee, Yu-Mi; Lee, Ho-Won; Jacobs, David R; Lee, Duk-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Although cognitive decline is very common in elders, age-related cognitive decline substantially differs among elders and the determinants of the differences in age-related cognitive decline are unclear. We investigated our hypothesis that the association between age and cognition was stronger in those with higher serum concentrations of organochlorine (OC) pesticides, common persistent and strongly lipophilic neurotoxic chemicals. Participants were 644 elders aged 60-85, participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002. Six OC pesticides (p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), p,p'-dichlorodipenyldichloroethylene (DDE), β-hexachlorocyclohexane, trans-nonachlor, oxychlordane, and heptachlor epoxide) were evaluated. “Lower cognitive function” was defined as having a low Digit-Symbol Substitution Test (DSST) score (<25th percentile of DSST score, cutpoint 28 symbols substituted). Higher levels of β-hexachlorocyclohexane, trans-nonachlor, oxychlordane, and heptachlor epoxide modified the associations between age and lower cognitive function (Pinteraction<0.01, 0.03, <0.01, and 0.02, respectively). Elders in the 3rd tertile of these chemicals demonstrated a greater risk of lower cognitive function with aging, compared to those in the combined 1st and 2nd tertiles. Among those with highest OC pesticides (3rd tertile), the odds ratio for the risk of lower cognitive function was about 6 to 11 for the highest quintile of age (80-85 years) vs. the first quintile of age (60-63 years), while the association between age and lower cognitive function became flatter in those with lower OC pesticides (combined 1st and 2nd tertiles). Both DDT and DDE showed no interaction, with lower DSST scores for higher age irrespective of serum concentrations of DDT or DDE. Even though DSST score measures only one aspect of cognition, several OC pesticides modified aging-related prevalence of low cognitive score, a finding which should be evaluated in

  10. Mild cognitive impairment risk factor survey of the Xinjiang Uyghur and Han elderly

    PubMed Central

    Keyimu, Kabinuer; Zhou, Xiao-Hui; Miao, Hai-Jun; Zou, Ting

    2015-01-01

    To understand risk factors of the Xinjiang Uyghur, Han two ethnic elderly with mild cognitive impairment (mild cognitive impairment, MCI), and provide evidence for in-depth study of the causes and prevention of MCI. The MCI epidemiological survey was based on Xinjiang Uyghur and Han residents with 60 years of age or older. The total number of participants is 5398, including 3931 Uyghur residents, and 1467 Han residents. There are 456 participants with MMSE score 2 points above the demarcation points, excluded from the survey for dementia, cerebrovascular disease and other central nervous system disorders, according to case-control study method of random selection in epidemiological survey. In accordance with the clinical diagnostic criteria of MCI, which is from Disorder Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (the revised version of the fourth edition (DSM-IV) from of the American Psychiatric Association, there are 305 cases of MCI, including 159 cases of Han, 146 cases of Uyghur. In the Han groups: univariate analysis showed a correlation (P < 0.05) between sex, age, blood pressure, triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein (LDL-ch) and MCI. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed: age, hypertension, TG, LDL-ch (increased) may increase the risk of MCI (OR values were: 1.115, 1.981, 1.315, 1.495, with P < 0.05). In the Uyghur groups: univariate analysis showed a correlation (P < 0.05) between age, gender, hypertension, abnormal glucose metabolism, TG, TC, LDL-ch and MCI. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed: age, hypertension, abnormal glucose metabolism, TG, TC, LDL-ch (increased), women have a higher risk of MCI (OR values were: 1.063, 2.145, 2.879, 2.078, 1.429, 1.485, 0.462, P < 0.05). Age, hypertension, TG and LDL-ch are risk factors of MCI for Han population, while age, hypertension, abnormal glucose metabolism, TG, TC and LDL-ch are risk factors of MCI for Uyghur population. PMID:26550345

  11. Prognosis Predicting Score for Endovascular Treatment of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Risk Modeling Study for Individual Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Duan, Guoli; Yang, Pengfei; Li, Qiang; Zuo, Qiao; Zhang, Lei; Hong, Bo; Xu, Yi; Zhao, Wenyuan; Liu, Jianmin; Huang, Qinghai

    2016-02-01

    The elderly patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) have a greater risk of poor clinical outcome after endovascular treatment (EVT) than younger patients do. Hence, it is necessary to explore which factors are associated with poor outcome and develop a predictive score specifically for elderly patients with aSAH receiving EVT. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a predictive score for 1-year outcomes in individual elderly patients with aSAH underwent EVT.In this 10-year prospective study, 520 consecutive aSAH elderly (age ≥ 60 years) patients underwent EVT in a single center were included. The risk factors, periprocedural, and 1-year follow-up data of all patients were entered in a specific prospective database. The modified Rankin scale was used for evaluating clinical outcome. To optimize the model's predictive capacity, the original matrix was randomly divided in 2 submatrices (learning and testing). The predictive score was developed using Arabic numerals for all variables based on the variable coefficients (β) of multivariable logistic regression analysis in the learning set and the predictive performance evaluation was assessed in the testing set. The risk classes were constructed using classification criteria based on sensitivity and specificity. The poor outcome rate at 1 year was 26.15%. Six risk factors, including age, hypertension, Hunt-Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications, were independently associated with poor outcome and assembled the Changhai score. The discriminative power analysis with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of the Changhai score was statistically significant (0.864, 0.824-0.904, P < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of the Changhai score were 82.07% and 78.06%, respectively. Our study indicated that age, hypertension, Hunt-Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications were independent risk

  12. Maintenance of the Therapeutic Effect of Two High-Dosage Antimuscarinics in the Management of Overactive Bladder in Elderly Women

    PubMed Central

    Loparev, Sergey; Ivanovskaya, Marina; Kosilova, Liliya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To improve the long-term efficiency of the pharmacologic management of overactive bladder (OAB) in elderly women. Methods The study comprised 229 women (mean age, 66.3 years; range, 65-77 years) with urodynamically and clinically confirmed OAB. All patients received the most effective treatment regimen based on the data obtained in the initial part of the study (trospium 60 mg/day + solifenacin 40 mg/day, for 6 weeks), and positive results similar to those in the first phase were obtained. They were then divided into four groups, based on the maintenance therapy: group A (59 women), trospium (60 mg/day) + solifenacin (40 mg/day) for 1 month; group B (51 women), electrical stimulation of the detrusor muscle for 1 month; group C (63 women), laser puncture for 1 month; group D (56 women), placebo. Maintenance therapy was administered 2.5 months after completion of primary treatment. The patients' condition was monitored through the OAB questionnaire for 1 year and by urodynamic examination at months 6 and 7 from the start of the study. Results In group A, the clinical and urodynamic results achieved after the initial + main treatment phase (two high-dosage antimuscarinics of different generations, trospium and solifenacin, for a total of 2.5 months) were maintained for at least 7 months. Electrical stimulation of the urinary bladder as a method of maintenance therapy proved to be less effective. In groups C and D, deterioration in results was observed at 6-8 months, which led us to conclude that laser puncture was an inefficient method of maintenance therapy in elderly women with OAB. Conclusions Maintenance treatment of OAB in elderly women with a combination of high-dosage antimuscarinics is an effective method for reducing the risk of recurrence of the disease. PMID:24466467

  13. Bone metabolism status and associated risk factors in elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    PubMed

    Xiaomei, Wang; Hang, Xiao; Lingling, Liu; Xuejun, Li

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of osteoporosis in older patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is higher than in the age-matched elderly patients, but the exact cause in relation to COPD is not clear. We hypothesized that the underlying causes for this difference are related to bone metabolism with the possible risk factors that include the duration of COPD, GOLD grade, cor pulmonale, the frequencies of acute exacerbations within the past year, smoking and inhaled corticosteroid therapy. We conducted a matched-pair study of 100 patients aged older than 65 years at the Southwest Hospital from May to November 2012. The enrolled patients with COPD were matched to controls for age and gender. Clinical characteristics of cohorts were recorded. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and osteoporosis was diagnosed according to the definition of WHO. All cohorts accepted bone metabolism marker measurement, including Procollagen type 1 aminoterminal propeptide (P1NP), β-C-telopeptides of type I collagen (βCTX), and N-terminal midmolecule fragment osteocalcin (N-MID OC). Statistical analysis was calculated using the student's t test, ANOVA and multiple regression analysis at a significance level set at a p < 0.05. Circulating biochemical markers of bone formation (P1NP), resorption (βCTX) and turnover (N-MID OC) were significantly lower in the COPD group than control group, while mean 25-OH Vitamin D was similar in two groups. The P1NP, βCTX, and N-MID OC were still lower in men with COPD, but only P1NP was lower in women with COPD compared to that of controls. Multiple regression analysis in COPD group suggests that age, the frequency of acute exacerbation, and BMD are independent risk factors for P1NP. The frequency of acute exacerbation within the past one year and 25-OH D level are independent risk factors for βCTX; the frequency of acute exacerbation is the only independent risk factor for N-MID OC. These were significant

  14. Primary prevention for risk factors of ischemic stroke with Baduanjin exercise intervention in the community elder population: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Stroke is a major cause of death and disability in the world, and the prevalence of stroke tends to increase with age. Despite advances in acute care and secondary preventive strategies, primary prevention should play the most significant role in the reduction of the burden of stroke. As an important component of traditional Chinese Qigong, Baduanjin exercise is a simple, safe exercise, especially suitable for older adults. However, current evidence is insufficient to inform the use of Baduanjin exercise in the prevention of stroke. The aim of this trail is to systematically evaluate the prevention effect of Baduanjin exercise on ischemic stroke in the community elder population with high risk factors. Methods A total of 170 eligible participants from the community elder population will be randomly allocated into the Baduanjin exercise group and usual physical activity control group in a 1:1 ratio. Besides usual physical activity, participants in the Baduanjin exercise group will accept a 12-week Baduanjin exercise training with a frequency of five days a week and 40 minutes a day. Primary and secondary outcomes will be measured at baseline, 13 weeks (at end of intervention) and 25 weeks (after additional 12-week follow-up period). Discussion This study will be the randomized trial to evaluate the effectiveness of Baduanjin exercise for primary prevention of stroke in community elder population with high risk factors of stroke. The results of this trial will help to establish the optimal approach for primary prevention of stroke. Trial registration Chinese Clinical Trial Registry: ChiCTR-TRC-13003588. Registration date: 24 July, 2013. PMID:24712684

  15. Prevention of Dehydration in Independently Living Elderly People at Risk: A Study Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Konings, Francis J. C. M.; Mathijssen, Jolanda J. P.; Schellingerhout, Jasper M.; Kroesbergen, Ike H. T.; Goede de, Joyce; Goor de, Ien A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dehydration of elderly people living independently is a very important public health issue. This study compares two interventions to prevent dehydration in elderly people at risk: an educational intervention and an educational intervention in combination with a drink reminder device. Methods: This is an experimental two-armed parallel study. A Public Health Service develops the interventions and will be partnering with a general practice and a university to evaluate the effects. Two groups – all people aged 80 years and older, and people of 65 years and older who have cardiovascular disease – receive a letter from the general practice in which they are asked whether they want to participate in the study and if so to return the form. People who want to participate and whose daily fluid intake is insufficient are randomized to receive either the educational intervention or the educational intervention in combination with a drink reminder device. The participants are asked to fill in a questionnaire before the intervention, 6 weeks after the start of the intervention and 6 months after the start (or after the end) of the intervention. Changes between the two groups in fluid intake, knowledge, awareness of the risks of dehydration, and quality-of-life will be tested by Linear Mixed Model analyses. Conclusions: This study will improve the knowledge of the effectiveness of interventions designed to prevent dehydration in elderly people. PMID:26644904

  16. Risk of Ischemic Stroke Associated with the Use of Antipsychotic Drugs in Elderly Patients: A Retrospective Cohort Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ju-Young; Choi, Nam-Kyong; Lee, Joongyub; Seong, Jong-Mi; Park, Mi-Ju; Lee, Shin Haeng; Park, Byung-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Objective Strong concerns have been raised about whether the risk of ischemic stroke differs between conventional antipsychotics (CAPs) and atypical antipsychotics (AAPs). This study compared the risk of ischemic stroke in elderly patients taking CAPs and AAPs. Method We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 71,584 elderly patients who were newly prescribed the CAPs (haloperidol or chlorpromazine) and those prescribed the AAPs (risperidone, quetiapine, or olanzapine). We used the National Claims Database from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA) from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2009. Incident cases for ischemic stroke (ICD-10, I63) were identified. The hazard ratios (HR) for AAPs, CAPs, and for each antipsychotic were calculated using multivariable Cox regression models, with risperidone as a reference. Results Among a total of 71,584 patients, 24,668 patients were on risperidone, 15,860 patients on quetiapine, 3,888 patients on olanzapine, 19,564 patients on haloperidol, and 7,604 patients on chlorpromazine. A substantially higher risk was observed with chlorpromazine (HR = 3.47, 95% CI, 1.97–5.38), which was followed by haloperidol (HR = 2.43, 95% CI, 1.18–3.14), quetiapine (HR = 1.23, 95% CI, 0.78–2.12), and olanzapine (HR = 1.12, 95% CI, 0.59–2.75). Patients who were prescribed chlorpromazine for longer than 150 days showed a higher risk (HR = 3.60, 95% CI, 1.83–6.02) than those who took it for a shorter period of time. Conclusions A much greater risk of ischemic stroke was observed in patients who used chlorpromazine and haloperidol compared to risperidone. The evidence suggested that there is a strong need to exercise caution while prescribing these agents to the elderly in light of severe adverse events with atypical antipsychotics. PMID:25790285

  17. Investigation of the prevalent fall-related risk factors of fractures in elderly referred to Tehran hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Kavoosi, Azam; Shafiee, Zahra; Kahlaee, Amir H; Raei, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Background Prevalence of fall-related mortality is rising in the elderly population. Falling is one of the causes of the murderous and non-murderous injuries in the elderly population which can lead to disability, dependence and decline of quality of life. Fractures constitute a major part of the fall-related injuries. The present study is designed to investigate the prevalence of fall-related risk factors of fractures in the Iranian elderly population. Methods This descriptive study was performed on 240 elderly adults (aged 72.24±8.81 years) referred to Tehran hospitals in 2011 with wrist, femoral and proximal humeral fractures, using a questionnaire designed for this purpose. Results Ninety four (39.2%) cases were males and 146 (60.8%) were females. Slipping was the most prevalent mechanism of falling with the rate of 26.9% followed by falling from height and falling outdoors. Femur was the most frequently injured site (57.5%) while wrist and humerus were the next sites to be injured. Only 7.5% of the cases lived in a safe environment while in 37.2% and 55.2% cases, home environment was partly safe and non-safe, respectively. Conclusion Fall-related fractures in the studied population is related to cardiovascular and musculoskeletal disorders, low level of physical activity and ignorance of safety principles but, the prevalence of neurologic diseases and drug and alcohol abuse, which have been mentioned as relevant risk factors in some studies, was very low in this population. PMID:23483674

  18. Prescribing Strategies for the Frail Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, John P.

    1992-01-01

    Current recommendations for prescribing for the frail elderly can be supplemented by others of value to family physicians. Minimization or simplification of medication regimens, proof of medication efficacy, vigilance for adverse drug reactions, and knowledge of aging and medications are important. Compliance is critical for the community-dwelling frail elderly but is rarely a problem in long-term care facilities. High-yield, high-risk conditions with presentations different from the “geriatric giants” must be recognized. Less medication is not necessarily the best treatment. Routine surveillance and frequent follow up are essential to adequate pharmacotherapy of frail elderly people. PMID:21221302

  19. Hyperhomocysteinemia and venous thromboembolism: a risk factor more prevalent in the elderly and in idiopathic cases.

    PubMed

    Hainaut, Philippe; Jaumotte, Carine; Verhelst, David; Wallemacq, Pierre; Gala, Jean-Luc; Lavenne, Edith; Heusterspreute, Michel; Zech, Francis; Moriau, Maurice

    2002-04-15

    Fasting plasma homocysteine level and the related clinical findings were analysed in 240 consecutive patients with venous thromboembolism. Hyperhomocysteinemia, defined as a plasma level above 20 micromol/l (corresponding to the percentile 95th in the controls), was present in 11.2% of the patients. Plasma homocysteine level was similar in patients presenting with either deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism or both conditions. It was significantly higher in patients with primary (unprovoked) VTE than in patients with secondary disease (associated with at least one risk factor): 12.3 vs. 9.55 micromol/l (p < 0.005). Mean homocysteine was higher in male than in female patients (14.51 vs. 12.9 micromol/l, p < 0.05) and increased significantly with age. Hyperhomocysteinemia was more frequent in patients with relapsing disease (14 of 76, 18.4%) than in those presenting with a single episode (13 of 164, 7.9%) (p = 0.034). Furthermore, hyperhomocysteinemia was correlated with reduced protein C level (p = 0.013). In a multivariate analysis, two factors were significantly associated with hyperhomocysteinemia: older age (p < 0.0001) and idiopathic occurrence (p < 0.02). Since the frequency of homozygous MTHFR thermolabile variant was rather similar in patients and controls, testing for C677T mutation was not helpful in screening VTE patients. However, the homozygous mutation was significantly more prevalent among hyperhomocysteinemia patients, confirming its role in the genesis of hyperhomocysteinemia. According to its prevalence, to the putative role in venous and arterial disease and the availability of an effective and low-cost corrective therapy, hyperhomocysteinemia deserves interest, especially in the elderly and in the patients with idiopathic VTE disease. PMID:12182910

  20. Multi-Indication Carbamazepine and the Risk of Severe Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions in Korean Elderly Patients: A Korean Health Insurance Data-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Young; Lee, Joongyub; Ko, Young-Jin; Shin, Ju-Young; Jung, Sun-Young; Choi, Nam-Kyong; Park, Byung-Joo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the risk of severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCAR) after exposure to multi-indication antiepileptic drugs for in Korean elderly patients. Methods We used a nationwide database from the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service claims constructed for the monitoring of drug utilization among the entire Korean elderly population from January 2005 to June 2006. We identified cases of SCARs among inpatients aged ≥65 years and those newly diagnosed with erythema multiforme according to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision code (L51). Each case was matched to four controls for gender, age, and the first hospitalization date as the index date. The use of carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, topiramate, phenobarbital, phenytoin, and valproate during a 60-day period before the index date was compared. A conditional logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of SCARs for antiepileptic drug. Results We identified 286 cases of SCAR and 1,144 matched controls. Among the 25 patients who were prescribed antiepileptic drugs within 60 days of the index date. There were 11 cases (3.8%) of severe ocular manifestations, and most elderly patients were first-time or short-term users of antiepileptic drugs. Among the 10 cases of carbamazepine use, only 2 cases were prescribed carbamazepine for seizure. All antiepileptic drugs were associated with an increased SCAR risk (adjusted OR = 3.42, 95% CI: 1.75–6.63). The SCAR risk was highest in patients treated with carbamazepine (adjusted OR = 10.39, 95% CI: 2.64–40.86, for multi-indication; adjusted OR = 6.84, 95% CI: 1.55–30.10, for neuropathic pain). Conclusion Carbamazepine use was associated with a nearly 10-fold increase in severe cutaneous drug reactions in Korean elderly patients. This association was consistently high with SCAR patients who received carbamazepine for neuropathic

  1. Hypertension in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Robles, Nicolas R; Macias, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    Data collected over a 30-year period have demonstrated the increasing prevalence of hypertension with age. Aging is an inevitable part of life and brings along two inconvenient events: physiologic decline and disease state. High blood pressure (HBP) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, particularly in the elderly. It is a significant and often asymptomatic chronic disease, which requires optimal control and persistent adherence to prescribed medication to reduce the risks of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and renal disease. Hypertension in the elderly patients represents a management dilemma to geriatric and cardiovascular specialists and other practitioners. Furthermore, with the wide adoption of multiple drug strategies targeting subgroups of hypertensive patients with specific risk conditions to lower blood pressure (BP), difficult questions arise about how aggressive treatment of elderly patients should be. The purpose of the following chapter article is to review the pathophysiology of aging as well as the epidemiology and the clinical assessment of high blood pressure (HBP) in older people. PMID:25761101

  2. Nutrition and health risks in the elderly: the nutrition screening initiative.

    PubMed Central

    Posner, B M; Jette, A M; Smith, K W; Miller, D R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The Nutrition Screening Initiative is a national collaborative effort committed to the identification and treatment of nutritional problems in older persons. METHODS. A 14-item checklist of characteristics associated with nutritional status was administered to a random sample of Medicare beneficiaries, aged 70 years and older, in New England. Regression analysis was used to derive item weights that would predict poor nutrient intakes and low perceived health status. Sensitivity and specificity values were reviewed to define low, moderate, and high nutritional risk scores. RESULTS. A revised checklist containing 10 yes/no items was adopted. Scores of 6 or more points defined persons at high nutritional risk. Twenty-four percent of the Medicare population was estimated to be at high nutritional risk according to the checklist. Among those in the high-risk group, 56% perceived their health to be "fair" or "poor" and 38% had dietary intakes below 75% of the recommended dietary allowances for three or more nutrients. CONCLUSIONS. The Nutrition Screening Initiative Checklist is a brief, easily scored instrument that can accurately identify noninstitutionalized older persons at risk for low nutrient intake and health problems. PMID:8328619

  3. Perception and Understanding of the Elderly: A High School Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spisak, Loretta Joan

    1978-01-01

    Describes a five-week course developed at Marie Curie High School in Chicago to help teenagers understand older people and the aging process. Consultants, guest speakers, movies, and some community projects and experiences were included. (MF)

  4. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure Anyone can develop high blood pressure; however, age, ... can increase your risk for developing high blood pressure. Age Blood pressure tends to rise with age. About 65 ...

  5. ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY AMONG THE ELDERLY: CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    PubMed Central

    Leme, Luiz Eugênio Garcez; Sitta, Maria do Carmo; Toledo, Manuella; da Silva Henriques, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Care for elderly patients undergoing orthopedic surgery, particularly for those requiring emergency surgery, needs to take into account an analysis of physical capacity and risks specific to elderly individuals, in an attempt to reduce the risks. Nevertheless, these remain high in this group. Despite the risks, procedures developed promptly have a positive effect on these patients’ evolution. Coordinated care, composed of teams of specialists within clinical medicine, geriatrics, orthopedics, anesthesiology and critical care, along with other healthcare professionals, may be highly beneficial for this group of patients. PMID:27027017

  6. [Immunization schedule in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Gavazzi, Gaëtan; Berrut, Gilles; Jeandel, Claude

    2015-09-01

    Elderly people are more likely to develop severe infections diseases. Given the significant increase in the number of the elderly population, reducing the risk of infection by vaccination is a major preventive approach. The immunization schedule for 2014 in France yields, for the first time, vaccination recommendations for patients over 65 years. Tetanus-Diphtheria-Poliomyelitis vaccination is recommended to be given at the age of 65 years and then every 10 years, together with the pertussis vaccine to protect infants less than 6 months. Recommendation for vaccinations against seasonal influenza in autumn is maintained by the High Council for Public Health, which estimates that the population benefit persists despite the lower individual effectiveness in the elderly. The pneumococcal vaccine is recommended only in high-risk populations, and only once after the age 65. Zoster vaccine is recommended between 65 and 74, and the first year of its availability, can be proposed to elderly patients between 75 and 79 years. Vaccination in the elderly must be enhanced, and information about its advantages should be disseminated. PMID:26967928

  7. Determining prevalence and correlates of elder abuse using promotores: low-income immigrant Latinos report high rates of abuse and neglect.

    PubMed

    DeLiema, Marguerite; Gassoumis, Zachary D; Homeier, Diana C; Wilber, Kathleen H

    2012-07-01

    Low-income Latino immigrants are understudied in elder abuse research. Limited English proficiency, economic insecurity, neighborhood seclusion, a tradition of resolving conflicts within the family, and mistrust of authorities may impede survey research and suppress abuse reporting. To overcome these barriers, promotores, local Spanish-speaking Latinos, were recruited and trained to interview a sample of Latino adults aged 66 and older residing in low-income communities. The promotores conducted door-to-door interviews in randomly selected census tracts in Los Angeles to assess the frequency of psychological, physical, and sexual abuse; financial exploitation; and caregiver neglect. Overall, 40.4% of elderly Latino adults had experienced some form of abuse or neglect within the previous year. Nearly 25% reported psychological abuse, 10.7% physical assault, 9% sexual abuse, and 16.7% financial exploitation, and 11.7% were neglected by their caregivers. Younger age, higher education, and experiencing sexual or physical abuse before age 65 were significant risk factors for psychological, physical, and sexual abuse. Years lived in the United States, younger age, and prior abuse were associated with greater risk of financial exploitation. Years spent living in the United States was a significant risk factor for caregiver neglect. Abuse prevalence was much higher in all mistreatment domains than findings from previous research on community-dwelling elderly adults, suggesting that low-income Latino immigrants are highly vulnerable to elder mistreatment or that respondents are more willing to disclose abuse to promotores who represent their culture and community. PMID:22697790

  8. Is Zolpidem Associated with Increased Risk of Fractures in the Elderly with Sleep Disorders? A Nationwide Case Cross-Over Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Fang-Ying; Chen, Hung-An; Yin, Yun-Ju; Lee, Hua-Chin; Chu, William Cheng-Chung; Yeh, Hui-Wen; Chiang, Wei-Shan; Yeh, Chia-Lun; Huang, Hui-Ling; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background We conducted a study using a case-crossover design to clarify the risk of acute effects of zolpidem and benzodiazepine on all-sites of fractures in the elderly. Design of study Case-crossover design. Methods and Materials Elderly enrollees (n = 6010) in Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database with zolpidem or benzodiazepine use were analyzed for the risk of developing fractures. Results After adjusting for medications such as antipsychotics, antidepressants, and diuretics, or comorbidities such as hypertension, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and depression, neither zolpidem nor benzodiazepine was found to be associated with increased risk in all-sites fractures. Subjects without depression were found to have an increased risk of fractures. Diazepam is the only benzodiazepine with increased risk of fractures after adjusting for medications and comorbidities. Hip and spine were particular sites for increased fracture risk, but following adjustment for comorbidities, the associations were found to be insignificant. Conclusion Neither zolpidem nor benzodiazepine was associated with increased risk of all-site fractures in this case cross-over study after adjusting for medications or comorbidities in elderly individuals with insomnia. Clinicians should balance the benefits and risks for prescribing zolpidem or benzodiazepine in the elderly accordingly. PMID:26716836

  9. Factors Influencing Cancer Risk Perception in High Risk Populations: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients at higher than average risk of heritable cancer may process risk information differently than the general population. However, little is known about clinical, demographic, or psychosocial predictors that may impact risk perception in these groups. The objective of this study was to characterize factors associated with perceived risk of developing cancer in groups at high risk for cancer based on genetics or family history. Methods We searched Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, Ovid PsycInfo, and Scopus from inception through April 2009 for English-language, original investigations in humans using core concepts of "risk" and "cancer." We abstracted key information and then further restricted articles dealing with perceived risk of developing cancer due to inherited risk. Results Of 1028 titles identified, 53 articles met our criteria. Most (92%) used an observational design and focused on women (70%) with a family history of or contemplating genetic testing for breast cancer. Of the 53 studies, 36 focused on patients who had not had genetic testing for cancer risk, 17 included studies of patients who had undergone genetic testing for cancer risk. Family history of cancer, previous prophylactic tests and treatments, and younger age were associated with cancer risk perception. In addition, beliefs about the preventability and severity of cancer, personality factors such as "monitoring" personality, the ability to process numerical information, as well as distress/worry also were associated with cancer risk perception. Few studies addressed non-breast cancer or risk perception in specific demographic groups (e.g. elderly or minority groups) and few employed theory-driven analytic strategies to decipher interrelationships of factors. Conclusions Several factors influence cancer risk perception in patients at elevated risk for cancer. The science of characterizing and improving risk perception in cancer for high risk groups, although evolving, is still

  10. Statins for primary cardiovascular prevention in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Pedro-Botet, Juan; Climent, Elisenda; Chillarón, Juan J; Toro, Rocio; Benaiges, David; Flores-Le Roux, Juana A

    2015-01-01

    The elderly population is increasing worldwide, with subjects > 65 years of age constituting the fastest-growing age group. Furthermore, the elderly face the greatest risk and burden of cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity. Although elderly patients, particularly those older > 75, have not been well represented in randomized clinical trials evaluating lipid-lowering therapy, the available evidence supporting the use of statin therapy in primary prevention in older individuals is derived mainly from subgroup analyses and post-hoc data. On the other hand, elderly patients often have multiple co-morbidities that require a high number of concurrent medications; this may increase the risk for drug-drug interactions, thereby reducing the potential benefits of statin therapy. The aim of this review was to present the relevant literature regarding statin use in the elderly for their primary cardiovascular disease, with the associated risks and benefits of treatment. PMID:26345308

  11. Risk Factors Associated with Dislocation after Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty in Elderly Patients with Femoral Neck Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeesuk; Kim, Joon-Kuk; Joo, Il-Han; Hwang, Kyu-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the incidence and time of dislocation and other factors associated with dislocation of bipolar hemiarthroplasty related to the treatment of femoral neck fracture in old age patients. Materials and Methods Between January 2002 and April 2014, 498 femoral neck fractures (467 patients) were treated with bipolar hemiarthroplasty and included in this study. All surgeries were performed using the postero-lateral approach. The incidence of dislocation was investigated. A comparative analysis between a control group and dislocation group was performed with respect to patient factors including age, gender, body mass index, comorbidities, the ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) score, mental status and center-edge angle, and surgical factors including type of femoral stem, leg length discrepancy, femoral offset and method of short external rotator (SER) reconstruction. Results The incidence of dislocation was 3.8%, and the dislocation occurred on average 2.2 months (range, 0.6-6.5 months) after operation. No difference in patient-related factors was observed between the two groups. However, a smaller center edge (CE) angle was observed in the dislocation group (42.1°±3.2° vs. 46.9°±5.4°, P<0.001), and significantly lower incidence of dislocation was observed in tendon to bone repair group (0.7% vs 7.8%, P<0.001). Conclusion SERs should be repaired using the tendon-to-bone repair method to reduce dislocation rate in elderly patients who undergo bipolar hemiarthroplasty using the postero-lateral approach due to femoral neck fracture. In addition, patients with smaller CE angle should be carefully monitored due to high incidence of dislocation. PMID:27536652

  12. Psychoactive drugs and the risk of injurious motor vehicle crashes in elderly drivers.

    PubMed

    Ray, W A; Fought, R L; Decker, M D

    1992-10-01

    To determine whether commonly used psychoactive drugs increase the risk of involvement in motor vehicle crashes for drivers > or = 65 years of age, the authors conducted a retrospective cohort study. Data were obtained from computerized files from the Tennessee Medicaid program, driver's license files, and police reports of injurious crashes. Cohort members were Medicaid enrollees 65-84 years of age who had a valid driver's license during the study period 1984-1988 and who met other criteria designed to exclude persons unlikely to be drivers and to ensure availability of necessary study data. There were 16,262 persons in the study cohort with 38,701 person-years of follow-up and involvement in 495 injurious crashes. For four groups of psychoactive drugs (benzodiazepines, cyclic antidepressants, oral opioid analgesics, and antihistamines), the risk of crash involvement was calculated with Poisson regression models that controlled for demographic characteristics and use of medical care as an indicator of health status. The relative risk of injurious crash involvement for current users of any psychoactive drug was 1.5 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-1.9). This increased risk was confined to benzodiazepines (relative risk = 1.5; 95% CI 1.2-1.9) and cyclic antidepressants (relative risk = 2.2; 95% CI 1.3-3.5). For these drugs, the relative risk increased with dose and was substantial for high doses: 2.4 (95% CI 1.3-4.4) for > or = 20 mg of diazepam and 5.5 (95% CI 2.6-11.6) for > or = 125 mg of amitriptyline. Analysis of data for the crash-involved drivers suggested that these findings were not due to confounding by alcohol use or driving frequency. PMID:1442753

  13. Equity in Access to Health Promotion and Risk Reduction Services: Implications for Elder Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nancy H.; Howze, Elizabeth Harper

    Although there is a national emphasis on health promotion and preventive practices, questions remain regarding the equity of access to these services by low income and minority groups, and the implications of inequities for elder health. Data from a systematic survey of 500 public and private providers of health promotion services in northern…

  14. An increased need for dietary cysteine in support of glutathione synthesis may underlie the increased risk for mortality associated with low protein intake in the elderly.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2015-10-01

    Restricted dietary intakes of protein or essential amino acids tend to slow aging and boost lifespan in rodents, presumably because they downregulate IGF-I/Akt/mTORC1 signaling that acts as a pacesetter for aging and promotes cancer induction. A recent analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III cohort has revealed that relatively low protein intakes in mid-life (under 10 % of calories) are indeed associated with decreased subsequent risk for mortality. However, in those over 65 at baseline, such low protein intakes were associated with increased risk for mortality. This finding accords well with other epidemiology correlating relatively high protein intakes with lower risk for loss of lean mass and bone density in the elderly. Increased efficiency of protein translation reflecting increased leucine intake and consequent greater mTORC1 activity may play a role in this effect; however, at present there is little solid evidence that leucine supplementation provides important long-term benefits to the elderly. Aside from its potential pro-anabolic impact, higher dietary protein intakes may protect the elderly in another way-by providing increased amino acid substrate for synthesis of key protective factors. There is growing evidence, in both rodents and humans, that glutathione synthesis declines with increasing age, likely reflecting diminished function of Nrf2-dependent inductive mechanisms that boost expression of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), rate-limiting for glutathione synthesis. Intracellular glutathione blunts the negative impact of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on cell health and functions both by acting as an oxidant scavenger and by opposing the pro-inflammatory influence of hydrogen peroxide on cell signaling. Fortunately, since GCL's K m for cysteine is close to intracellular cysteine levels, increased intakes of cysteine-achieved from whole proteins or via supplementation with N-acetylcysteine (NAC)-can achieve a

  15. [Accidental falls in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Heinimann, Niklas B; Kressig, Reto W

    2014-06-18

    Falls in the elderly are common with consecutive high mortality and morbidity. Recent consecutive data focus on identification and therapy of intrinsic risk factors. Sarcopenia, imbalance and gait disorders represent the major risk factors. Sarcopenia is caused by a disequilibrium of protein synthesis and breakdown, probably in consequence of age-related changes in protein metabolism. Protein supplements in combination with strength training shows the best benefit. Disorders in balance and gait are caused by age-related or pathologic changes in a complex regulation system of gait. The individual fall risk correlates with the gait variability and even increases with bad dual task performance. Activities with high requirements of attention and body awareness are the most effective prevention for falls in the elderly (-50%). PMID:24938159

  16. Burden on informal caregivers of elderly cancer survivors: risk versus resilience.

    PubMed

    Jones, Simeon B W; Whitford, Hayley S; Bond, Melissa J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed psychological morbidity and resilience, including the subjective burden of 76 caregivers of elderly cancer survivors utilizing a cross-sectional questionnaire. Participants were mainly elderly female spouses, sole-caregiving > 35 hours per week; 19.1% and 23.6% reported moderate or greater anxiety and depression, respectively. A significant regression model found depression, emotion-focused coping, and greater years since diagnosis as significant predictors of subjective caregiver burden. Thus, caregiving appears a dominant role for this group and the Brief Assessment Scale for Caregivers of the Medically Ill (BASC) appears to be an efficient screening tool for psychological morbidity in this under-supported group. PMID:25658457

  17. [Dyslipidemia in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Lasses y Ojeda, Luis Alberto; Gutiérrez, Jorge Luis Torres; Salazar, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    Age is an independent and unmodifiable risk factor for coronary atherosclerosis. In Mexico, coronary heart disease is responsible for 50 % of the deaths for those older than 65 years of age. Aging produces major differences in the presentation, diagnosis, prognosis, and response to therapy in coronary heart disease. The goal of treatment is the prolongation of survival and the improvement of the quality of life. However, in the elderly, the aim of therapy should focus on attaining a meaningful quality of life thus allowing them to be functionally independent. Clinical trials demonstrate conclusively that lowering serum cholesterol levels will reduce the incidence of coronary heart disease irrespective of age. Dietary advise and life-style modifications are the first-line approach in the elderly. When these measures are insufficient to achieve target lipid reductions, statins are the drug of choice. Fibrates may be indicated if triglycerides are high and C-HDL is low. Given the grater coronary risk of older population, the absolute benefit will be greater in the elderly. PMID:15709510

  18. Prospective Cohort Study of Central Adiposity and Risk of Death in Middle Aged and Elderly Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Warren Andersen, Shaneda; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zhang, Xianglan; Cai, Hui; Yang, Gong; Li, Hong-Lan; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Asians have high prevalence of central obesity despite the low prevalence of general obesity. We evaluated associations between the central obesity measure, waist-hip ratio (WHR) with total and cause-specific mortality in middle-aged and elderly Chinese participants. Data arise from two prospective population-based cohort studies: the Shanghai Men’s Health Study involves 53,425 men (participation rate = 74.0%), age 40–74 at baseline, and the Shanghai Women’s Health Study involves 63,017 women (participation rate = 92.7%), age 40–70 at baseline. Information on lifestyle factors and anthropometric measurements were taken at baseline interview. Vital status and causes of death were obtained via surveys and annual linkages to relevant Shanghai registries through December 31, 2011. After median follow-up time of 7.5 years for the Shanghai Men’s Health Study and 13.2 years for the Shanghai Women’s Health Study, there were 2,058 and 3,167 deaths, respectively. In models adjusted for BMI and other potential confounders, WHR was associated with all-cause mortality; hazard ratios (HRs) (95% confidence intervals) across the first to fifth quintile increased from 1 (Reference), 1.10 (0.95,1.27), 1.21 (1.04,1.41), 1.11 (0.96,1.30), to 1.42 (1.22,1.65) in men and from 1 (Reference), 1.10 (0.96,1.27), 1.11 (0.97,1.27), 1.20 (1.05,1.37), to 1.48 (1.30,1.69) in women. WHR had a stronger association with cardiovascular disease, with multivariate-adjusted HRs of 1.5 to 1.7 observed for the highest versus lowest quintile of WHR. Dose-response associations were also seen for cancer and other-cause deaths. Stratified analyses suggested a stronger association with mortality among normal weight (BMI <25) than over-weight (BMI ≥25) individuals. Positive associations with mortality were observed in subgroups defined by follow-up duration, comorbidity, age, smoking, and physical activity. Greater central adiposity is associated with increased mortality in Chinese adults, even

  19. Underreporting High-Risk Prescribing Among Medicare Advantage Plans

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Alicia L.; Kazis, Lewis E.; Dore, David D.; Mor, Vincent; Trivedi, Amal N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although Medicare Advantage plans are required to report clinical performance using Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) quality indicators, the accuracy of plan-reported performance rates is unknown. Objective To compare calculated and reported rates of high-risk prescribing among Medicare Advantage plans. Design Cross-sectional comparison. Setting 172 Medicare Advantage plans. Patients A random sample of beneficiaries in 172 Medicare Advantage plans in 2006 (n = 177 227) and 2007 (n = 173 655). Measurements Plan-reported HEDIS rates of high-risk prescribing among elderly persons were compared with rates calculated from Medicare Advantage plans’ Part D claims by using the same measure specifications and source population. Results The mean rate of high-risk prescribing derived from Part D claims was 26.9% (95% CI, 25.9% to 28.0%), whereas the mean plan-reported rate was 21.1% (CI, 20.0% to 22.3%). Approximately 95% of plans underreported rates of high-risk prescribing relative to calculated rates derived from Part D claims. The differences in the calculated and reported rates negatively affected quality rankings for the plans that most accurately reported rates. For example, the 9 plans that reported rates of high-risk prescribing within 1 percentage point of calculated rates were ranked 43.4 positions lower when reported rates were used instead of calculated rates. Among 103 680 individuals present in both the sample of Part D claims and HEDIS data in 2006, Medicare Advantage plans incorrectly excluded 10.3% as ineligible for the HEDIS high-risk prescribing measure. Among those correctly included in the high-risk prescribing denominator, the reported rate of high-risk prescribing was 21.9% and the calculated rate was 26.2%. Limitation A single quality measure was assessed. Conclusion Medicare Advantage plans underreport rates of high-risk prescribing, suggesting a role for routine audits to ensure the validity of publicly reported

  20. Multiple risk factors and ischaemic stroke in the elderly Asian population with and without atrial fibrillation. An analysis of 425,600 Chinese individuals without prior stroke.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yutao; Wang, Hao; Tian, Yingchun; Wang, Yutang; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    -VASc =1 had a 1.9 fold increase in stroke risk, and those with CHA2DS2-VASc ≥ 2 had more than four-fold increased risk for stroke, compared with those with CHA2DS2-VASc=0. In conclusion, an increasing cluster of multiple cardiovascular risk factors (besides AF) contributes to a greater risk for ischaemic stroke, especially in the elderly population. If elderly and with multiple risk factors, non-AF patients may have a risk of incident ischaemic stroke that is comparable or even higher than patients with AF, suggesting that the incremental stroke risk attributable to AF is marginal in such 'high risk' patients. PMID:26322338

  1. Falls in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Hodgetts, P. Geoffrey

    1992-01-01

    Falls are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. One in three older people will fall every year. Assessing intrinsic (patient) factors and extrinsic (environmental) factors that increase the risk of falling is an important part of caring for the elderly. Physicians can readily assess balance and mobility as part of a preventive approach. PMID:21221300

  2. Malnutrition among the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Rauscher, C.

    1993-01-01

    Nutrition is a significant determinant of health. Undernutrition presenting as malnutrition is a serious health concern for frail elderly people with many health problems. Understanding the risk factors for malnutrition helps physicians assess and manage the condition. Primary care physicians are in an excellent position to screen, educate, and manage their elderly malnourished patients. Images p1396-a PMID:8324408

  3. Caregiving and risk of mortality and functional decline in white and black elderly adults: findings from the Health ABC study

    PubMed Central

    Fredman, Lisa; Cauley, Jane A.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Simonsick, Eleanor; Spencer, S. Melinda; Ayonayon, Hilsa N.; Harris, Tamara B.

    2012-01-01

    Context Although caregivers report more stress than non-caregivers, few studies have found greater health decline in older caregivers. We hypothesized that caregivers may be more physically active than non-caregivers, which may protect them from health decline. Objective To evaluate total, and race- and gender-specific risk of mortality and functional decline in elderly caregivers versus non-caregivers, and whether these associations were mediated by total physical activity (including daily routine, leisure-time exercise, and caregiving activity). Design and setting The Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) study, a cohort study of 3075 healthy adults, aged 70–79 years in 1997–1998 who resided in Memphis, Tennessee or Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and were followed through their eighth year of participation. Participants Participants were classified as caregivers (n=680, 22%) or non-caregivers (n=2369) if they reported providing “regular care or assistance for a child or a disabled or sick adult”. Main Outcome Measure All-cause mortality and incident mobility limitation, defined as reported difficulty walking ¼ mile or climbing 10 steps on two consecutive semi-annual contacts. Results Overall, 20.6% of caregivers died and 50.9% developed mobility limitation, versus 22.0% and 48.9% of non-caregivers, respectively. Associations with health outcomes differed by race and gender. Mortality and mobility limitation rates were 1.5 times higher in white caregivers compared to non-caregivers (e.g., among white females, adjusted hazards ratio for mortality, HR = 1.6, 1.0–2.5), but were lower in black female caregivers versus non-caregivers (e.g., HR for mortality = 0.9, 0.5–1.4). Physical activity mediated these associations in most race-gender groups. High-intensity caregivers (i.e., spending ≥ 24 hours/week caregiving) had elevated rates of decline when adjusted for physical activity, but lower rates when not adjusted for it. Conclusion Older white

  4. Organizing principles and management climate in high-performing municipal elderly care.

    PubMed

    Kajonius, Petri; Kazemi, Ali; Tengblad, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - Previous research has shown that user-oriented care predicts older persons' satisfaction with care. What is yet to be researched is how senior management facilitates the implementation of user-oriented care. The purpose of this study is to investigate the organizing principles and management climate characterizing successful elderly care. Design/methodology/approach - The department in one highly ranked municipality was selected and compared with a more average municipality. On-site in-depth semi-structured interviews with department managers and participatory observations at managers' meetings were conducted in both municipalities. Findings - Results revealed three key principles for successful elderly care: organizing care from the viewpoint of the older person; recruiting and training competent and autonomous employees; instilling a vision for the mission that guides operations at all levels in the organization. Furthermore, using climate theory to interpret the empirical material, in the highly successful municipality the management climate was characterized by affective support and cognitive autonomy, in contrast to a more instrumental work climate primarily focusing on organizational structure and doing the right things characterizing the more average municipality. Originality/value - The authors suggest that guiding organizing principles are intertwined with management climate and that there are multiple perspectives that must be considered by the management, that is, the views of the older persons, the co-workers and the mission. These results can guide future care quality developments, and increase the understanding of the importance of organizational climate at the senior management level. PMID:26764962

  5. Incidence and risk factors of postoperative delirium in elderly patients undergoing transurethral resection of prostate: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Peng; Wu, Ziyu; Wang, Kunpeng; Tu, Chuanquan; Wang, Xiangbo

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of the present study was to investigate the occurrence of postoperative delirium (POD) in elderly patients undergoing transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) and to identify those factors associated with delirium. Methods From July 2010 to February 2015, 358 patients, aged ≥65 years and undergoing TURP were prospectively enrolled. Personal, medical and cognitive data, laboratory assessments, pain intensity, preoperative medications, and details of hemodynamic control were collected as predictors of delirium. POD was assessed using the Confusion Assessment Method. Results In the present study, POD occurred in 28 out of 358 cases (7.8%) after TURP, with duration of 1–4 days. The multivariate analysis showed that old age and visual analog scale pain scores were associated with POD. Marital status, body mass index, education, alcohol consumption, smoking history, preoperative psychotropic medication usage, activities of daily living scores, preoperative Mini-Mental Status Examination score, anesthesia type, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, or hypotensive episodes during surgery did not significantly correlate with the occurrence of POD. Conclusion Old age and pain intensity after surgery were found as the risk factors for the development of delirium in elderly patients undergoing TURP. These findings might help develop preventive strategies to decrease POD through targeted evaluation. PMID:26834475

  6. Cardiac Structure and Function Across the Glycemic Spectrum in Elderly Men and Women Free of Prevalent Heart Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk In the Community (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Skali, Hicham; Shah, Amil; Gupta, Deepak K.; Cheng, Susan; Claggett, Brian; Liu, Jiankang; Bello, Natalie; Aguilar, David; Vardeny, Orly; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Selvin, Elizabeth; Solomon, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background Individuals with diabetes mellitus and pre-diabetes are at particularly high risk of incident heart failure or death, even after accounting for known confounders. Nevertheless, the extent of impairments in cardiac structure and function in elderly individuals with diabetes and pre-diabetes is not well known. We aimed to assess the relationship between echocardiographic measures of cardiac structure and function and dysglycemia Methods and Results We assessed measures of cardiac structure and function in 4419 participants without prevalent coronary heart disease or heart failure who attended the ARIC Visit 5 examination (2011-2013) and underwent transthoracic echocardiography (age 75±6 years; 61% female, 23% African-American). Subjects were grouped across the dysglycemia spectrum as normal (39%), pre-diabetes (31%), or diabetes (30%) based on medical history, antidiabetic medication use, and HbA1c levels. Glycemic status was related to measures of cardiac structure and function. Worsening dysglycemia was associated with increased LV mass, worse diastolic function, and subtle reduction in left ventricular systolic function (p ≤ 0.01 for all). For every 1% higher HbA1c, LV mass was higher by 3.0 grams (95% CI: 1.5-4.6 grams), E/E’ by 0.5 (95% CI: 0.4-0.7), and global longitudinal strain by 0.3% (95% CI: 0.2-0.4) in multivariable analyses. Conclusions In a large contemporary bi-racial cohort of elderly subjects without prevalent cardiovascular disease or heart failure, dysglycemia was associated with subtle and subclinical alterations of cardiac structure, and left ventricular systolic and diastolic function. It remains unclear whether these are sufficient to explain the heightened risk of heart failure in individuals with diabetes. PMID:25759458

  7. Informal Caregivers and the Risk of Nursing Home Admission among Individuals Enrolled in the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Susan M.; Steinwachs, Donald M.; Temkin-Greener, Helena; Mukamel, Dana B.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to determine whether participants in the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) with an informal caregiver have a higher or lower risk of nursing home admission than those without caregivers. Design and Methods: We performed a secondary data analysis of 3,189 participants aged 55 years or older who were enrolled in…

  8. Nutrition, Balance and Fear of Falling as Predictors of Risk for Falls among Filipino Elderly in Nursing Homes: A Structural Equation Model (SEM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Ines, Joanna Louise C.; Inofinada, Nina Josefa A.; Ituralde, Nielson Louie J.; Janolo, John Robert E.; Jerezo, Jnyv L.; Jhun, Hyae Suk J.

    2013-01-01

    While a number of empirical studies have been conducted regarding risk for falls among the elderly, there is still a paucity of similar studies in a developing country like the Philippines. This study purports to test through Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) a model that shows the interaction between and among nutrition, balance, fear of…

  9. Septic hematogenous lumbar spondylodiscitis in elderly patients with multiple risk factors: efficacy of posterior stabilization and interbody fusion with iliac crest bone graft

    PubMed Central

    Mater, Eckhardt; Schön, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    The conservative and operative treatment strategies of hematogenous spondylodiscitis in septic patients with multiple risk factors are controversial. The present series demonstrates the outcome of 18 elderly patients (median age, 72 years) with septic hematogenous spondylodiscitis and intraspinal abscess treated with microsurgical decompression and debridement of the infective tissue, followed by posterior stabilization and interbody fusion with iliac crest bone graft in one or two lumbar segments. The majority of the patients were unsuccessfully treated with intravenous antibiotics prior to the operation. Antibiotic therapy was continued for more than 6 weeks postoperatively. Morbidity and early mortality amounted to 50 and 17%, respectively. Three patients died in the hospital from internal complications after an initial postoperative improvement of the inflammatory clinical signs and laboratory parameters. Fifteen patients recovered from the spinal infection. Three of them died several months after discharge (cerebral hemorrhage, malignancy and unknown cause). Twelve patients had excellent or good outcomes during the follow-up period of at least 1 year. The series shows that operative decompression and eradication of the intraspinal and intervertebral infective tissue with fusion and stabilization via a posterior approach is possible in septic patients with multiple risk factors and leads to good results in those patients, who survive the initial severe stage of the septic disease. However, the morbidity and mortality suggest that this surgical treatment is not the therapy of first choice in high-risk septic patients, but may be considered in patients when conservative management has failed. PMID:20495933

  10. Improving antenatal risk assessment in women exposed to high risks.

    PubMed

    Perry, Natasha; Newman, Louise K; Hunter, Mick; Dunlop, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Antenatal substance use and related psychosocial risk factors are known to increase the likelihood of child protection involvement; less is known about the predictive nature of maternal reflective functioning (RF) in this population. This preliminary study assessed psychosocial and psychological risk factors for a group of substance dependent women exposed to high risks in pregnancy, and their impact on child protection involvement. Pregnant women on opiate substitution treatment (n = 11) and a comparison group (n = 15) were recruited during their third trimester to complete measures of RF (Pregnancy Interview), childhood trauma, mental health and psychosocial assessments. At postnatal follow-up, RF was reassessed (Parent Development Interview - Revised Short Version) and mother-infant dyads were videotaped to assess emotional availability (EA). Child protection services were contacted to determine if any concerns had been raised for infant safety. Significant between-group differences were observed for demographics, psychosocial factors, trauma and mental health symptoms. Unexpectedly, no significant differences were found for RF or EA between groups. Eight women in the 'exposed to high risks' group became involved with child protection services. Reflective functioning was not significantly associated with psychosocial risk factors, and therefore did not mediate the outcome of child protection involvement. Women 'exposed to high risks' were equally able to generate a model of their own and their infants' mental states and should not be seen within a deficit perspective. Further research is required to better understand the range of risk factors that predict child protection involvement in high risk groups. PMID:23982989

  11. Risk Factors and Levels of Risk for High School Dropouts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Suhyun; Suh, Jingyo

    2007-01-01

    The study in this article identifies three major risk categories of high school dropouts and evaluates the impact of possible prevention strategies. As students accumulate these risks, they became more likely to drop out and prevention programs become less effective. Additionally, it was found that factors influencing the decision to drop out vary…

  12. High-risk sexual behaviors.

    PubMed

    Troussier, Thierry; Benghozi, Pierre; Ganem, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Adolescence is a time of life characterized by danger because of the many changes that occur, the many ties that are severed: ties to childhood, ties to the child's body as it begins to take on an adult appearance, ties to a once-familiar body image and psyche as hormones complete the transformation to adulthood, ties to an unconscious that is struggling to restructure itself anew. The creation of the romantic couple is a danger inherent in any human society. This text was written from the professional practices of each author in a multidisciplinary approach combining the approaches of public health, risk reduction, and sexual, psychological and clinical care of adolescents. How to help anticipate the dangers is to use preventive insurance verifying that security is guaranteed before committing. Risk-taking is accepting all the challenges that boost the self with oneself and with others. The risk is therefore also the commitment in love. It is still the risk to speak, to feel, to express feelings, choices, and refusal of unwanted sex. The ability of adolescents to play and defeat the risk by learning the ethical value not only to protect themselves from contracting AIDS, but also to protect others is part of the pedagogy of risk. This pedagogy of risk, as we have seen, includes three areas: information, care and initiation into love. Adolescents must be supported in their emergence by responsible people to protect them from the dangers ahead. The support is not only to prevent them from engaging in risky behavior, but to help them better manage their anxieties and support the fragility of their families in a network approach. Not knowing how to confront the risk stifles the chance of allowing the child to grow up to be independent and helps reassure parents who may resent being removed from the empowerment of their children. PMID:22846539

  13. Prevalence of falls in elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Vitor, Priscila Regina Rorato; de Oliveira, Ana Carolina Kovaleski; Kohler, Renan; Winter, Gabriele Regiane; Rodacki, Cintia; Krause, Maressa Priscila

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To verify prevalence of falls and fear of falling, and to compare functional fitness among elderly women fallers and non-fallers. METHODS: Seventy-eight elderly women participated in this study. Cases of falls and the fear of falling were self-reported by the elderly women, while the functional fitness was measured by a set of functional tests. Mean and standard deviation were used to describe the sample. Independent t-test was used to compare functional fitness between groups. RESULTS: The prevalence of falls in this sample was 32.4%. Among women fallers, 40% self-reported a high fear of falling. CONCLUSION: It is recommended that functional and resistance exercises are included in the preventive strategies for reducing risk factors for falls and its determinants in elderly women. Level of Evidence II, Prognostic-Prospective Study. PMID:26207095

  14. [Obesity in elderly].

    PubMed

    Lechleitner, Monika

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing also in the elderly population. The European Euronut-Seneca study described an obesity prevalence of 12-41% in elderly women and of 8-24% in elderly men. Obesity in the elderly is related to the cardiometabolic risk, but also to degenerative joint diseases and impaired physical functions. Some discrepancies are caused by the description of a so-called obesity paradox with a more favourable prognosis for certain diseases in the presence of overweight compared to normal or reduced body weight. The so-called sarcopenic obesity is associated with the worst prognosis.Preventive and therapeutic regimens should consider the increased risk of malnutrition in elderly. The combinations of individually tailored nutritional recommendations and physical exercise is of advantage for the prognosis of comorbidities and the quality of life. PMID:26820990

  15. Association between Dietary Patterns and Cardiovascular Risk Factors among Middle-Aged and Elderly Adults in Taiwan: A Population-Based Study from 2003 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Muga, Miriam Adoyo; Owili, Patrick Opiyo; Hsu, Chien-Yeh; Rau, Hsiao-Hsien; Chao, Jane C-J

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the leading causes of mortality and loss of disability-adjusted life years in developed countries. This study derived a dietary pattern using an a priori method and additionally derived dietary patterns using a posteriori methods, and assessed the relationship with CVD risk factors in Taiwanese middle-aged and elderly adults. Methods Cross-sectional analyses of 62,965 subjects aged 40 years and above from the Mei Jau (MJ) database collected between 2003 and 2012 in Taiwan. Diet was assessed using a 22 item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Using this information, three dietary patterns were generated. The a priori diet was labeled the Taiwanese dietary pattern and was derived using hypothesized effect of 22 food groups, while two a posteriori dietary patterns, “vegi-fruits” and “meat-processed”, were derived using principal component analysis. The association between dietary patterns and a range of CVD risk factors (i.e. blood lipids, blood glucose and C-reactive protein) was evaluated using linear regression. Results The results showed that high intake (Q5, quintile 5) of Taiwanese diet was negatively associated with CVD risk factors at (p < 0.001, model 3), but not with triacylglycerol. In addition, high intake of vegi-fruit dietary pattern (Q5) was negatively associated with CVD risk factors (p < 0.001), but not with high-density lipoprotein, while high consumption of meat-processed dietary pattern (Q5) was positively associated with CVD risk factors (p < 0.001), but negatively related with triacylglycerol in Q3 level and no association with C-reactive protein. Conclusion A negative association was observed between Taiwanese or vegi-fruit dietary patterns and CVD risk factors, while a positive association was found between meat-processed dietary pattern and CVD risk factors. The findings suggested that a diet rich in vegetables and fruits has a beneficial effect in the management of CVD risk

  16. High prevalence of aspirin resistance in elderly patients with cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin; Gao, Ying-Hui; Cao, Jian; Zhang, Hua-Xin; Fan, Li; Hu, Guo-Liang; Hu, Yi-Xin; Li, Xiao-Li; Zou, Xiao; Li, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome is known to be a prothrombotic state. We undertook this study to examine a hypothesis that aspirin resistance may be associated with metabolic syndrome, and to assess other potential determinants of aspirin resistance in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods A total of 469 elderly patients with CVD were recruited. One hundred and seventy-two patients with metabolic syndrome and 297 without metabolic syndrome (control group) received daily aspirin therapy (≥ 75 mg) over one month. Platelet aggregation was measured by light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Aspirin resistance was defined as ≥ 20% arachidonic acid (AA)- and ≥ 70% adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced aggregation according to LTA. Aspirin semi-responders were defined as meeting one (but not both) of these criteria. Results By LTA, 38 of 469 (8.1%) patients were aspirin resistant. The prevalence of aspirin resistance was higher in the metabolic syndrome group compared with the control group [11.6 % vs. 6.6%, odds ratio (OR) = 2.039; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.047–3.973]. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, metabolic syndrome (OR = 4.951, 95% CI: 1.440–17.019, P = 0.011) was a significant risk factor for aspirin resistance. Conclusions A significant number of patients with CVD and metabolic syndrome are resistant to aspirin therapy. This might further increase the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in these patients. PMID:27582771

  17. The Greater Sensitivity of Elderly APOE ε4 Carriers to Anticholinergic Medications Is Independent of Cerebrovascular Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Nebes, Robert D.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Perera, Subashan; Halligan, Edythe M.; Saxton, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies found use of anticholinergic medications to be associated with greater performance decrements in older persons who carry an ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene than in those carrying only ε2 or ε3 alleles. Objectives The present study examined whether the apparently greater behavioral toxicity of anticholinergic drugs in ε4 carriers may result from an increased risk of cerebrovascular disease, which is more common in ε4 carriers. Methods Cross-sectional data were available from 240 normal elderly [pe1]community volunteers who had participated in 2 different studies of the cognitive and motor effects of normal aging. As part of these studies, information was gathered on subjects' use of anticholinergic medications (based on an inventory of medications taken within 24 hours of testing), risk of cerebrovascular disease (Framingham Stroke Risk Profile), and APOE genotype. Performance data were also available from measures of general cognitive status (Mini-Mental State Examination), executive function (Trail Making Test), mood (Geriatric Depression Scale), sleep (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and walking speed. Logistic and linear regression models were used to examine how outcomes differed between genotypes and drug use, independent of the risk of cerebrovascular disease. Results In persons with a non-ε4 genotype, anticholinergic medication use did not significantly affect any of the behavioral measures. By contrast, among ε4 carriers, those taking anticholinergic drugs performed significantly worse than did those not taking such drugs on tests of general cognitive status, executive function, mood, and sleep. Adjusting for participants' stroke risk had a minimal effect on these results. Conclusions Anticholinergic medication use was associated with poorer performance on measures of cognition, sleep, and mood only in older persons who carried 1 or more ε4 alleles of the APOE gene; this effect did not appear to be the result

  18. Accuracy of physician assessment of treatment preferences and health status in elderly patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Caocci, G; Voso, M T; Angelucci, E; Stauder, R; Cottone, F; Abel, G; Nguyen, K; Platzbecker, U; Beyne-Rauzy, O; Gaidano, G; Invernizzi, R; Molica, S; Criscuolo, M; Breccia, M; Lübbert, M; Sanpaolo, G; Buccisano, F; Ricco, A; Palumbo, G A; Niscola, P; Zhang, H; Fenu, S; La Nasa, G; Mandelli, F; Efficace, F

    2015-08-01

    Higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are rarely curable and have a poor prognosis. We investigated the accuracy of physicians' perception of patients' health status and the patients' preferences for involvement in treatment decisions. We examined 280 newly diagnosed higher-risk elderly MDS patients paired with their physicians. Survey tools included the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the Control Preference Scale. Overall concordance was 49% for physician perception of patient preferences for involvement in treatment decisions. In 36.4% of comparisons there were minor differences and in 14.6% there were major differences. In 44.7% of the patients preferring a passive role, physicians perceived them as preferring an active or collaborative role. Absence of the patient's request for prognostic information (P=0.001) and judging the patient as having a poor health status (P=0.036) were factors independently associated with the physicians' attitude toward a lower degree of patient involvement in clinical decisions. Agreement on health status was found in 27.5% of cases. Physicians most frequently tended to overestimate health status of patients who reported low-level health status. The value of decision aid-tools in the challenging setting of higher-risk MDS should be investigated to further promote patient-centered care. PMID:26120100

  19. Assessment of the risk of falling with the use of timed up and go test in the elderly with lower extremity osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zasadzka, Ewa; Borowicz, Adrianna Maria; Roszak, Magdalena; Pawlaczyk, Mariola

    2015-01-01

    Background Falling in the elderly results in a significant number of admissions to hospitals and long-term care facilities, especially among patients with lower extremity osteoarthritis (OA). Objective The aim of the study was to assess the risk of falling in adults older than 60 years with OA using timed up and go (TUG) test. Materials and methods A total of 187 patients (aged >60 years) were enrolled in the study. The assessment included: basic activities of daily living (ADLs), lower extremity strength with the use of the 30-second chair stand test (30 CST), and assessment of the risk of falling (TUG test). Pain intensity was evaluated with the numeric rating scale (NRS). Results The TUG test results were significantly better in younger OA patients (aged 60–69 years), as compared with their older peers (aged 70–79 years; P<0.01) and the oldest group (aged >80 years; P<0.001). Also, the 30 CST results were significantly higher in younger OA patients (P<0.05). Subjects older than 80 years had a significantly worse ADL score (P<0.05 and P<0.001). Pain complaints were reported significantly more frequently by women than men (P<0.05). A correlation between age and the TUG test score (r=0.412; P<0.0004) as well as between the TUG test and the 30 CST scores (r=0.7368; P=0.000) was detected. In the group with the TUG test score of <13.5 seconds, the 30 CST (P<0.0001) and ADL (P<0.003) results were significantly better. A comparison of fallers vs nonfallers revealed that the number of falls was significantly higher in the group of subjects who scored ≥13.5 when compared to <13.5 (P=0.003). Fallers significantly more often reported pain (P<0.0001), whereas nonfallers had significantly better 30 CST results (P=0.0003). Conclusion Elderly population with OA is at an elevated risk of falling, which increases with progressing age, pain, and muscle weakness. It seems prudent to identify individuals at a high risk of falling and to propose an adequate treatment for them

  20. Potential effect of PCV13 introduction on Emergency Department accesses for lower respiratory tract infections in elderly and at risk adults

    PubMed Central

    Ansaldi, Filippo; Orsi, Andrea; Trucchi, Cecilia; De Florentiis, Daniela; Ceravolo, Antonella; Coppelli, Martina; Schiaffino, Sergio; Turello, Valter; Rosselli, Roberto; Carloni, Roberto; Icardi, Giancarlo; Study Group, Ligurian Pneumococcal; Canepa, Paola; Sticchi, Laura; Zanetti, Roberta; Cremonesi, Ilaria; Brasesco, PierClaudio; Moscatelli, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Liguria, an administrative region in northern Italy characterized by a decade of high PCV coverage in paediatric age group, has issued new PCV13 recommendations for free active immunization in adults with risk factors and subjects aged ≥ 70 years old. Main aims of this study are: (1) a descriptive epidemiology of the clinical burden of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in adults ≥18 years of age; and (2) a crossover evaluation of the effect of introduction of PCV13 vaccination in adults aged ≥70 years old, in terms of ED accesses for LRTI, obtained by a Syndrome Surveillance System (SSS). The ED access, chief complaint based SSS will allow an active surveillance of a population cohort of >430 000 individuals resident in Genoa metropolitan area, aged ≥18 years old, for a period of 60 months. During pre-PCV period, annual cumulative incidence of ED accesses for LRTI was equal to 7/1000 and 2% in ≥65 and ≥85 year adults, respectively. In ≥65 years adults, more than 70% of subjects identified by the SSS has at least one risk condition, with a peak of 87% in ≥85 year cohort. New Ligurian PCV13 recommendations can potentially reach more than 75% of ED accesses for LRTI. Data highlights the heavy impact of LRTI in terms of ED accesses, especially in the elderly and subjects with chronic conditions and the usefulness of SSS tool for monitoring PCV vaccination effect. PMID:25483530

  1. Elevated White Blood Cell Count Is Associated with Higher Risk of Glucose Metabolism Disorders in Middle-Aged and Elderly Chinese People

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Yan, Wen-Hua; Li, Chan-Juan; Wang, An-Ping; Dou, Jing-Tao; Mu, Yi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    White blood cell (WBC) count has been associated with diabetic risk, but whether the correlation is independent of other risk factors has hardly been studied. Moreover, very few such studies with large sample sizes have been conducted in Chinese. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between WBC count and glucose metabolism in china. We also examined the relevant variables of WBC count. A total of 9,697 subjects (mean age, 58.0 ± 9.1 years) were recruited. The subjects were classified into four groups, including subjects with normal glucose tolerance, isolated impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We found that WBC count increased as glucose metabolism disorders exacerbated. WBC count was also positively correlated with waist hip ratio, body mass index, smoking, triglycerides, glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and 2-h postprandial glucose. In addition, high density lipoprotein and the female gender were inversely correlated with WBC levels. In patients with previously diagnosed T2DM, the course of T2DM was not correlated with WBC count. Our findings indicate that elevated WBC count is independently associated with worsening of glucose metabolism in middle-aged and elderly Chinese. In addition, loss of weight, smoking cessation, lipid-modifying therapies, and control of postprandial plasma glucose and HbA1c may ameliorate the chronic low-grade inflammation. PMID:24852600

  2. Genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease alters the five-year trajectory of semantic memory activation in cognitively intact elders.

    PubMed

    Rao, Stephen M; Bonner-Jackson, Aaron; Nielson, Kristy A; Seidenberg, Michael; Smith, J Carson; Woodard, John L; Durgerian, Sally

    2015-05-01

    Healthy aging is associated with cognitive declines typically accompanied by increased task-related brain activity in comparison to younger counterparts. The Scaffolding Theory of Aging and Cognition (STAC) (Park and Reuter-Lorenz, 2009; Reuter-Lorenz and Park, 2014) posits that compensatory brain processes are responsible for maintaining normal cognitive performance in older adults, despite accumulation of aging-related neural damage. Cross-sectional studies indicate that cognitively intact elders at genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) demonstrate patterns of increased brain activity compared to low risk elders, suggesting that compensation represents an early response to AD-associated pathology. Whether this compensatory response persists or declines with the onset of cognitive impairment can only be addressed using a longitudinal design. The current prospective, 5-year longitudinal study examined brain activation in APOE ε4 carriers (N=24) and non-carriers (N=21). All participants, ages 65-85 and cognitively intact at study entry, underwent task-activated fMRI, structural MRI, and neuropsychological assessments at baseline, 18, and 57 months. fMRI activation was measured in response to a semantic memory task requiring participants to discriminate famous from non-famous names. Results indicated that the trajectory of change in brain activation while performing this semantic memory task differed between APOE ε4 carriers and non-carriers. The APOE ε4 group exhibited greater activation than the Low Risk group at baseline, but they subsequently showed a progressive decline in activation during the follow-up periods with corresponding emergence of episodic memory loss and hippocampal atrophy. In contrast, the non-carriers demonstrated a gradual increase in activation over the 5-year period. Our results are consistent with the STAC model by demonstrating that compensation varies with the severity of underlying neural damage and can be exhausted with the onset

  3. Stroke prevention in the elderly atrial fibrillation patient with comorbid conditions: focus on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    PubMed Central

    Turagam, Mohit K; Velagapudi, Poonam; Flaker, Greg C

    2015-01-01

    Stroke prevention in elderly atrial fibrillation patients remains a challenge. There is a high risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism but also a high risk of bleeding if anticoagulants are prescribed. The elderly have increased chronic kidney disease, coronary artery disease, polypharmacy, and overall frailty. For all these reasons, anticoagulant use is underutilized in the elderly. In this manuscript, the benefits of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants compared with warfarin in the elderly patient population with multiple comorbid conditions are reviewed. PMID:26366064

  4. High Levels of Heavy Metals Increase the Prevalence of Sarcopenia in the Elderly Population

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jun-Il; Lee, Young-Kyun; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite increasing concern regarding health problems as a result of environmental pollutants, no association of toxic heavy metals with sarcopenia has been demonstrated in the general population. We investigated the association of heavy metals, including lead, mercury and cadmium, with sarcopenia in the Korean population. Methods Participants included 344 males and 360 females older than 65 years based on data from the fourth and fifth Korea National Health and Nutritional Examination Surveys. Measurements of blood lead, mercury and cadmium levels were performed. To evaluate the cumulative effect of the three heavy metals, subjects were categorized into quartiles. Sarcopenia was defined according to the criteria for the Asia Working Group for Sarcopenia (AWGS) (SMI<5.4 kg/m2 in females and <7.0 kg/m2 in males). Results Of 704 elderly persons (344 in males and 360 in females), prevalences of sarcopenia were 26.7% (92/344) in male and 7.5% (27/360) in female. Mean serum levels of lead in sarcopenia group were significantly higher than non-sarcopenia males (P=0.03). After adjustment for confounding factors, odds ratio for sarcopenia were increased with concentration category of lead (P=0.005 and P<0.001), mercury (P=0.001 and P<0.001) and cadmium (P=0.010 and P<0.001) in males and females, respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrates that high levels of blood lead, mercury and cadmium increase the prevalence of sarcopenia in both genders of elderly populations. PMID:27294082

  5. Achieving high quality long-term care for elderly people: consumers' wishes and providers' responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Morse, R; Jenkinson, D

    1995-01-01

    The organisation of long-term care for older people has major implications for all hospital and community health services. However, even health professionals have a poor understanding of the structure and purpose of long-term care and national professional bodies are still not giving enough attention to the issues involved. In the wider context, care of disabled older people has received little public debate in the UK despite the ethical, social, and financial issues involved and despite the recent major organisational changes in the health service. The past ten years have seen a huge expansion in private residential and nursing homes with a concomitant fall in NHS long-stay beds. Currently, approximately 500,000 elderly people in the UK are living in some form of long-stay care facility, and many other elderly people with multiple disabilities are being supported at home and should also be included under the umbrella of long-term care. Ensuring appropriate, equitable, and high-quality care is a responsibility not only for health and social services but also for society as a whole. This conference, organised jointly by the Royal College of Physicians, the British Geriatrics Society, and Age Concern England, with support from the Department of Health, was a much-needed and welcomed initiative. Over 200 delegates attended, consisting of doctors (geriatricians, psychiatrists, general practitioners), nurses (public and private sector), social services representatives, Department of Health representatives, managers of nursing homes, and members of charities such as Age Concern and the Relatives Association. PMID:7658422

  6. National Center on Elder Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Synthesize and disseminate high quality research on elder abuse to encourage the translation of research into practice. ... to further the field for those interested in elder abuse identification and prevention. What’s Happening National Center on ...

  7. Participation in Physical, Social, and Religious Activity and Risk of Depression in the Elderly: A Community-Based Three-Year Longitudinal Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Hyun Woong; Hong, Chang Hyung; Lee, Yunhwan; Oh, Byoung Hoon; Lee, Kang Soo; Chang, Ki Jung; Kang, Dae Ryong; Kim, Jinhee; Lee, SooJin; Back, Joung Hwan; Chung, Young Ki; Lim, Ki Young; Noh, Jai Sung; Kim, Dongsoo; Son, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined the longitudinal association between participation in individual or combinations of physical, social, and religious activity and risk of depression in the elderly. Methods Elderly subjects aged ≥60 years who completed the Living Profiles of Older People Survey in Korea (n = 6,647) were included. The baseline assessment, Wave 1, was conducted in 2008, and a follow-up assessment, Wave 2, was conducted in 2011. We defined participation in frequent physical activity as ≥3 times weekly (at least 30 minutes per activity). Frequent participation in social and religious activity was defined as ≥1 activity weekly. The primary outcome was depression at 3-year follow up. Results Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that subjects who participated in frequent physical, social, and religious activity had an adjusted odds ratio of 0.81 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69–0.96), 0.87 (95% CI, 0.75–1.00), and 0.78 (95% CI, 0.67–0.90), respectively, compared with participants who did not participate in each activity. Participants who participated in only one type of activity frequently and participants who participated in two or three types of activities frequently had an adjusted odds ratio of 0.86 (95% CI, 0.75–0.98) and 0.64 (95% CI, 0.52–0.79), respectively, compared with participants who did not participate in any type of physical, social, and religious activity frequently. Conclusion Participation in physical, social, and religious activity was associated with decreased risk of depression in the elderly. In addition, risk of depression was much lower in the elderly people who participated in two or three of the above-mentioned types of activity than that in the elderly who did not. PMID:26172441

  8. Sequential azacitidine plus lenalidomide in previously treated elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia and higher risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Rupa; Garcia, Jacqueline S; Percival, Mary-Elizabeth M; Berube, Caroline; Coutre, Steve; Gotlib, Jason; Greenberg, Peter; Liedtke, Michaela; Hewitt, Rhonda; Regan, Kathleen; Williamson, Charles; Doykan, Camille; Cardone, Michael H; McMillan, Alex; Medeiros, Bruno C

    2016-03-01

    The outcome of sequential azacitidine with lenalidomide has not been reported in previously treated patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and higher risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). This study describes a phase 2 study evaluating the safety and efficacy of this combination in elderly patients with AML and MDS with prior hypomethylating agent (HMA) and/or immunomodulatory agent exposure. Patients were treated on a 42-day cycle with azacitidine at 75 mg/m(2) SQ/IV daily on days 1-7, followed by lenalidomide 50 mg orally daily on days 8-28. The median number of treatment cycles on study was two (range = 1-11). Of 32 evaluable patients, the overall response rate was 25%. Neutropenic fever was the most common serious adverse event, but overall the combination was well-tolerated. The median overall survival (OS) for responders vs non-responders was 9.8 vs 4.0 months, respectively (HR = 0.36, p = 0.016). In conclusion, this combination demonstrated modest clinical activity in this poor risk population. PMID:26374199

  9. Acceptability of the Components of a Loneliness Intervention among Elderly Dutch People: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honigh-de Vlaming, R.; Haveman-Nies, A.; Ziylan, C.; Renes, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Healthy Ageing is a complex intervention aimed at reducing the prevalence of loneliness among elderly Dutch people. Purpose: This study aimed to assess how mass media communication materials, information meetings, and psychosocial courses were received by elderly people at high risk of loneliness. Methods: Face-to-face interviews with…

  10. Nutrition of the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, R K; Imbach, A; Moore, C; Skelton, D; Woolcott, D

    1991-01-01

    The progressively increasing number of elderly people in the Canadian population and the disproportionate expenditure on their health care has stimulated interest in prevention of common illnesses observed in this age group. It is now recognized that nutrition plays an important role in health status, and both undernutrition and overnutrition are associated with greater risk of morbidity and mortality. Nutritional problems in the elderly can be suspected if there are several high-risk factors present--for example, living alone, physical or mental disability, recent loss of spouse or friend, weight loss, use of multiple medications, poverty, and high consumption of alcohol. Physical examination, anthropometry, and measurements of serum albumin levels and hemoglobin and lymphocyte counts are simple but helpful tools in confirming the presence of nutritional disorders. The prevention and correction of nutritional problems is likely to prove beneficial in the management of common geriatric illnesses. In these efforts, it is desirable to have a team approach in which the physician, the dietitian and the nurse each have a defined interactive role. Home care support services are important adjuncts in continuing care. Nutrition should receive a greater emphasis in the training of physicians and other health professionals. PMID:1959109

  11. Career goals in the high risk adolescent.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Charlene; Woods, Charles; Barkin, Shari L

    2006-10-01

    Possessing a career goal might serve as a protective factor for an adolescent's healthy development. This could be especially important in adolescents who engage in high risk behaviors. The relationship between high risk adolescents' future career goals and selected predictor variables were examined. Almost half (49%) the students indicated a career goal. Students who reported a job were 5.1-fold more likely to have listed a future career goal. Females, those aged 18 years, and those whose mothers were employed were twice as likely to have a career goal. Considerations for fostering career goals for high risk students are warranted. PMID:16968962

  12. Understanding Suicide Risk: Identification of High Risk Groups during High Risk Times

    PubMed Central

    Overholser, James C.; Braden, Abby; Dieter, Lesa

    2012-01-01

    Background The assessment of suicide risk is a complex task for mental health professionals. Certain demographic groups are associated with completed suicide including males, divorced adults, and Caucasians. However, demographic variables alone provide a crude assessment of suicide risk. Psychiatric diagnosis and recent life events may improve the identification of high risk individuals. Method The current study evaluated 148 individuals who died by suicide compared to 257 adults who died suddenly from accidents or medical problems. Psychological autopsy was used to assess Axis I psychiatric diagnosis and recent stressful life events. Results Suicide completers were significantly more likely than comparison subjects to have a depressive disorder, a substance abuse disorder, and to have experienced interpersonal conflict in the months leading up to their death. A discriminant function analysis revealed that the combination of demographic variables, recent stressful life events, and psychiatric diagnoses best discriminated between suicide completers and comparison subjects. Conclusions Proper assessment of suicide risk should include a comprehensive evaluation of demographic characteristics, recent life stressors, and psychiatric diagnosis. PMID:22140004

  13. Predictive Validity of Pressure Ulcer Risk Assessment Tools for Elderly: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Hi; Lee, Young-Shin; Kwon, Young-Mi

    2016-04-01

    Preventing pressure ulcers is one of the most challenging goals existing for today's health care provider. Currently used tools which assess risk of pressure ulcer development rarely evaluate the accuracy of predictability, especially in older adults. The current study aimed at providing a systemic review and meta-analysis of 29 studies using three pressure ulcer risk assessment tools: Braden, Norton, and Waterlow Scales. Overall predictive validities of pressure ulcer risks in the pooled sensitivity and specificity indicated a similar range with a moderate accuracy level in all three scales, while heterogeneity showed more than 80% variability among studies. The studies applying the Braden Scale used five different cut-off points representing the primary cause of heterogeneity. Results indicate that commonly used screening tools for pressure ulcer risk have limitations regarding validity and accuracy for use with older adults due to heterogeneity among studies. PMID:26337859

  14. Team Performance and Risk-Adjusted Health Outcomes in the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukamel, Dana B.; Temkin-Greener, Helena; Delavan, Rachel; Peterson, Derick R.; Gross, Diane; Kunitz, Stephen; Williams, T. Franklin

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) is a community-based program providing primary, acute, and long-term care to frail elderly individuals. A central component of the PACE model is the interdisciplinary care team, which includes both professionals and non-professionals. The purpose of this study was to examine the…

  15. A cross-sectional study on risk factors and their interactions with suicidal ideation among the elderly in rural communities of Hunan, China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huilan; Qin, Lulu; Wang, Jinhong; Zhou, Liang; Luo, Dan; Hu, Mi; Li, Zhenhua; Xiao, Shuiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To identify risk factors, and their interactions, for suicidal ideation among the elderly in rural communities of Hunan and to provide some scientific basis for suicide prevention. Design, setting and participants A cross-sectional survey was conducted among the elderly in rural communities in China's Hunan Province. Thirteen areas were selected by multi-staged cluster random sampling, and 1887 rural elders were investigated via face-to-face interviews. Main outcome measures Measures included sociodemographic information, suicidal ideation, activities of daily living (ADL), major depression disorder (MDD), drinking, stressful life events and social support. Non-conditional logistic regression was preformed to explore the influencing factors for suicidal ideation, and additive interaction was used to analyse the interaction between risk factors. Results Incidence of suicidal ideation among the elderly was 14.5% (95% CI 12.9% to 16.1%) in rural communities of Hunan. The independent influencing factors for suicidal ideation were annual personal income (OR 3.14; 95% CI 2.15 to 4.59), MDD (OR 17.04; 95% CI 11.91 to 24.39), chronic diseases (OR 2.99; 95% CI 1.84 to 4.85) and ADL (OR 2.00; 95% CI 1.37 to 2.94). Additive interactions were detected between MDD and ADL with a relative excess risk of interaction (RERI) of 21.18 (95% CI 5.47 to 36.89), and between MDD and annual personal income with an RERI of 35.00 (95% CI 9.00 to 61.00). Conclusions The independent risk factors for suicidal ideation are annual personal income (≤2200 CNY), MDD, chronic diseases and disabled ADL status. MDD has additive interactions with ADL and annual personal income. These findings have significant implications for the prediction and prevention of suicidal behaviours. PMID:27084285

  16. Pharmacokinetics in the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Mayersohn, M

    1994-01-01

    Animals undergo substantial changes in many physiologic and biochemical functions as a natural consequence of aging. In the absence of disease or other pathologic conditions, these changes occur in a gradual manner with time (generally expressed as a fractional or percentage change in that function per year or decade). Furthermore, for any given function and at any given chronologic age, there is large variation in that function among individuals. Given the increase in life expectancy, the substantial increase in the number of elderly (and aged elderly) in the population, and the escalating costs of health care, there is great interest in learning more about the risks associated with aging as a result of toxic exposure. Are the elderly at greater risk than younger adults to the toxic effects of drugs and environmental exposure? Is the elderly population an inherently more sensitive one? PMID:7737036

  17. Altered regional brain volumes in elderly carriers of a risk variant for drug abuse in the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2)

    PubMed Central

    Roussotte, Florence F.; Jahanshad, Neda; Hibar, Derrek P.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine D2 receptors mediate the rewarding effects of many drugs of abuse. In humans, several polymorphisms in DRD2, the gene encoding these receptors, increase our genetic risk for developing addictive disorders. Here, we examined one of the most frequently studied candidate variants for addiction in DRD2 for association with brain structure. We tested whether this variant showed associations with regional brain volumes across two independent elderly cohorts, totaling 1,032 subjects. We first examined a large sample of 738 elderly participants with neuroimaging and genetic data from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI1). We hypothesized that this addiction-related polymorphism would be associated with structural brain differences in regions previously implicated in familial vulnerability for drug dependence. Then, we assessed the generalizability of our findings by testing this polymorphism in a non-overlapping replication sample of 294 elderly subjects from a continuation of the first ADNI project (ADNI2) to minimize the risk of reporting false positive results. In both cohorts, the minor allele – previously linked with increased risk for addiction – was associated with larger volumes in various brain regions implicated in reward processing. These findings suggest that neuroanatomical phenotypes associated with familial vulnerability for drug dependence may be partially mediated by DRD2 genotype. PMID:24634060

  18. Potential contribution of the Alzheimer's disease risk locus BIN1 to episodic memory performance in cognitively normal Type 2 diabetes elderly.

    PubMed

    Greenbaum, Lior; Ravona-Springer, Ramit; Lubitz, Irit; Schmeidler, James; Cooper, Itzik; Sano, Mary; Silverman, Jeremy M; Heymann, Anthony; Beeri, Michal Schnaider

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, several promising susceptibility loci for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) were discovered, by implementing genome-wide association studies (GWAS) approach. Recent GWAS meta-analysis has demonstrated the association of 19 loci (in addition to the APOE locus) with AD in the European ancestry population at genome-wide significance level. Since Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) is a substantial risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia, the 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that represent the 19 AD loci were studied for association with performance in episodic memory, a primary cognitive domain affected by AD, in a sample of 848 cognitively normal elderly Israeli Jewish T2D patients. We found a suggestive association of SNP rs6733839, located near the bridging integrator 1 (BIN1) gene, with this phenotype. Controlling for demographic (age, sex, education, disease duration and ancestry) covariates, carriers of two copies of the AD risk allele T (TT genotype) performed significantly worse (p=0.00576; p=0.00127 among Ashkenazi origin sub-sample) in episodic memory compared to carriers of the C allele (CT+CC genotypes). When including additional potential covariates (clinical and APOE genotype), results remained significant (p=0.00769; p=0.00148 among Ashkenazi). Interestingly, as validated in multiple large studies, BIN1 is one of the most established AD risk loci, with a high odds ratio. Although preliminary and require further replications, our findings support a contribution of BIN1 to individual differences in episodic memory performance among T2D patients. PMID:26947052

  19. Cardiovascular disease, risk factors and heart rate variability in the elderly general population: Design and objectives of the CARdiovascular disease, Living and Ageing in Halle (CARLA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Greiser, Karin H; Kluttig, Alexander; Schumann, Barbara; Kors, Jan A; Swenne, Cees A; Kuss, Oliver; Werdan, Karl; Haerting, Johannes

    2005-01-01

    Background The increasing burden of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in the ageing population of industrialized nations requires an intensive search for means of reducing this epidemic. In order to improve prevention, detection, therapy and prognosis of cardiovascular diseases on the population level in Eastern Germany, it is necessary to examine reasons for the East-West gradient of CVD morbidity and mortality, potential causal mechanisms and prognostic factors in the elderly. Psychosocial and nutritional factors have previously been discussed as possible causes for the unexplained part of the East-West gradient. A reduced heart rate variability appears to be associated with cardiovascular disease as well as with psychosocial and other cardiovascular risk factors and decreases with age. Nevertheless, there is a lack of population-based data to examine the role of heart rate variability and its interaction with psychosocial and nutritional factors regarding the effect on cardiovascular disease in the ageing population. There also is a paucity of epidemiological data describing the health situation in Eastern Germany. Therefore, we conduct a population-based study to examine the distribution of CVD, heart rate variability and CVD risk factors and their associations in an elderly East German population. This paper describes the design and objectives of the CARLA Study. Methods/design For this study, a random sample of 45–80 year-old inhabitants of the city of Halle (Saale) in Eastern Germany was drawn from the population registry. By the end of the baseline examination (2002–2005), 1750 study participants will have been examined. A multi-step recruitment strategy aims at achieving a 70 % response rate. Detailed information is collected on own and family medical history, socioeconomic, psychosocial, behavioural and biomedical factors. Medical examinations include anthropometric measures, blood pressure of arm and ankle, a 10-second and a 20-minute electrocardiogram

  20. MTHFR and ACE Gene Polymorphisms and Risk of Vascular and Degenerative Dementias in the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandey, Pratima; Pradhan, Sunil; Modi, Dinesh Raj; Mittal, Balraj

    2009-01-01

    Focal lacunar infarctions due to cerebral small vessel atherosclerosis or single/multiple large cortical infarcts lead to vascular dementia, and different genes and environmental factors have been implicated in causation or aggravation of the disease. Previous reports suggest that some of the risk factors may be common to both vascular as well as…

  1. High risk of permafrost thaw

    SciTech Connect

    Schuur, E.A.G.; Abbott, B.; Koven, C.D,; Riley, W.J.; Subin, Z.M.; al, et

    2011-11-01

    In the Arctic, temperatures are rising fast, and permafrost is thawing. Carbon released to the atmosphere from permafrost soils could accelerate climate change, but the likely magnitude of this effect is still highly uncertain. A collective estimate made by a group of permafrost experts, including myself, is that carbon could be released more quickly than models currently suggest, and at levels that are cause for serious concern. While our models of carbon emission from permafrost thaw are lacking, experts intimately familiar with these landscapes and processes have accumulated knowledge about what they expect to happen, based on both quantitative data and qualitative understanding of these systems. We (the authors of this piece) attempted to quantify this expertise through a survey developed over several years, starting in 2009. Our survey asked experts what percentage of surface permafrost they thought was likely to thaw, how much carbon would be released, and how much of that would be methane, for three time periods and under four warming scenarios that are part of the new IPCC Fifth Assessment Report.

  2. Clinical risk factors for osteoporosis are common among elderly people in Nuuk, Greenland

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Anna; Laurberg, Peter; Vestergaard, Peter; Andersen, Stig

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a debilitating condition characterized by fractures, pain and premature death. Risk factors for osteoporosis predict the risk of fragility fractures. Aim To describe the occurrence of risk factors for osteoporosis among populations in Nuuk, the capital of Greenland. Methods A random sample of women born in 1934–42, 1945–47, 1956, and men born in 1956 were selected from the national civil registry. A questionnaire was sent out in Greenlandic and Danish on risk factors for osteoporosis: family history, smoking habits, alcohol intake, presence of disease, sun exposure, intake of dairy products, age at menopause (women) and number of falls. Additional questions included the frequency of back pain, previous fractures, intake of vitamin D and calcium supplements, use of anti-osteoporotic drugs, steroids and other drugs. Results The questionnaire was sent to 317 subjects confirmed to be living at an address in Nuuk and 181 (57.1%) responded. More young women than older women were smokers (60.6% vs. 35.0%; p=0.022) while limited sun exposure was reported by more of the old women (37.2% vs. 5.6%; p=0.003). Family history of osteoporosis was reported by 15.0%, without difference between groups. Alcohol and milk intake did not differ between groups. Premature menopause was reported by 17.9% of the women. Falls within the last year were reported by 42.4% with fewer falls in the oldest age group (21.9% vs. 50.0%; p=0.005). Frequency of fragility fractures increased with age (5.7% vs. 24.3% vs. 30.4%; p=0.02) and the risk of a fragility fracture increased with age (p=0.004; OR, 95% CI: 4.5, 1.6–12.2, reference: below 70 years), when adjusted for smoking, gender and falls. The use of anti-osteoporotic drugs was low (3.4%) while 28.8% took calcium and vitamin D supplements. Conclusions Age is a dominating risk factor for fragility fractures in Greenland. The use of anti-osteoporotic drugs is low in Greenland, even if osteoporotic fractures are

  3. Oxidative stress as a risk factor for osteoporosis in elderly Mexicans as characterized by antioxidant enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Martha A; Ruiz-Ramos, Mirna; Correa-Muñoz, Elsa; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress (OxS) has recently been linked with osteoporosis; however, we do not know the influence of OxS as an independent risk factor for this disease. Methods We conducted a case-control study in 94 subjects ≥60 years of age, 50 healthy and 44 with osteoporosis. We measured total antioxidant status, plasma lipid peroxides, antioxidant activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and calculated the SOD/GPx ratio. Bone mineral density was obtained at the peripheral DXA in calcaneus using a portable Norland Apollo Densitometer®. Osteoporosis was considered when subjects had a BMD of 2.5 standard deviations or more below the mean value for young adults. Results GPx antioxidant activity was significantly lower in the group of subjects with osteoporosis in comparison with the group of healthy subjects (p < 0.01); in addition, the SOD/GPx ratio was significantly higher in the group of individuals with osteoporosis (p < 0.05). In logistic regression analysis, we found OxS to be an independent risk factor for osteoporosis (odds ratio [OR] = 2.79; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.08–7.23; p = 0.034). Conclusion Our findings suggest that OxS is an independent risk factor for osteoporosis linked to increase of SOD/GPx ratio. PMID:18088440

  4. Student Assistance Programs and High Risk Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casale, Jenni

    This manual discusses a method for developing a comprehensive drug abuse prevention and intervention program for students in special education. The first section contains introductory material regarding high risk students in general and implications for special education. The second section outlines material on specific types of high-risk…

  5. [Drug-drug interactions in the elderly : Which ones really matter?].

    PubMed

    Bitter, K; Schlender, J F; Woltersdorf, R

    2016-07-01

    Pharmacotherapy in the elderly is challenging due to age-related physiological changes, high interindividual variability, and increasing frequency of multimorbidity. The resulting polypharmacy increases the risk of drug-drug interactions and requires an individual risk assessment. Some drug-drug interactions are documented to be associated with harm in older adults including intoxication, gastrointestinal bleeding, or falls. Therefore, they are considered to be of special importance in the elderly. Moreover, frequent risk factors and continuous physiological alterations in the elderly should be taken into account during risk assessment. This review exemplifies clinically relevant drug-drug interactions and risk factors in the elderly. In addition, assessment tools as well as prevention and management strategies for clinical practice are presented. PMID:27294383

  6. Quality of life in the elderly after major lung resection for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Salati, Michele; Brunelli, Alessandro; Xiumè, Francesco; Refai, Majed; Sabbatini, Armando

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the residual quality of life (QoL) in elderly patients submitted to major lung resection for lung cancer. From July 2004 through August 2007 a total of 218 patients, 85 of whom were elderly (70 years), had complete preoperative and postoperative (3 months) quality of life measures assessed by the Short Form 36v2 health survey. QoL scales were compared between elderly and younger patients. Furthermore, limited to the elderly group, we compared the preoperative with the postoperative SF36v2 measures and the physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores between high-risk patients and low-risk counterparts. The postoperative SF36 PCS (50.3 vs. 50, P=0.7) and MCS (50.6 vs. 49, P=0.2) and all SF36 domains did not differ between elderly and younger patients. Within the elderly, the QoL returns to the preoperative values three months after the operation. Moreover, we did not find any significant differences between elderly higher-risk patients and their lower-risk counterparts postoperatively. The information that residual QoL in elderly patients will be similar to the one experienced by younger and fitter individuals may help them in their decision to proceed with surgery. PMID:18940832

  7. Extreme precipitation and beach closures in the great lakes region: evaluating risk among the elderly.

    PubMed

    Bush, Kathleen F; Fossani, Cheryl L; Li, Shi; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Gronlund, Carina J; O'Neill, Marie S

    2014-02-01

    As a result of climate change, extreme precipitation events are expected to increase in frequency and intensity. Runoff from these extreme events poses threats to water quality and human health. We investigated the impact of extreme precipitation and beach closings on the risk of gastrointestinal illness (GI)-related hospital admissions among individuals 65 and older in 12 Great Lakes cities from 2000 to 2006. Poisson regression models were fit in each city, controlling for temperature and long-term time trends. City-specific estimates were combined to form an overall regional risk estimate. Approximately 40,000 GI-related hospital admissions and over 100 beach closure days were recorded from May through September during the study period. Extreme precipitation (≥90th percentile) occurring the previous day (lag 1) is significantly associated with beach closures in 8 of the 12 cities (p < 0.05). However, no association was observed between beach closures and GI-related hospital admissions. These results support previous work linking extreme precipitation to compromised recreational water quality. PMID:24534768

  8. Mortality risk score prediction in an elderly population using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Rose, Sherri

    2013-03-01

    Standard practice for prediction often relies on parametric regression methods. Interesting new methods from the machine learning literature have been introduced in epidemiologic studies, such as random forest and neural networks. However, a priori, an investigator will not know which algorithm to select and may wish to try several. Here I apply the super learner, an ensembling machine learning approach that combines multiple algorithms into a single algorithm and returns a prediction function with the best cross-validated mean squared error. Super learning is a generalization of stacking methods. I used super learning in the Study of Physical Performance and Age-Related Changes in Sonomans (SPPARCS) to predict death among 2,066 residents of Sonoma, California, aged 54 years or more during the period 1993-1999. The super learner for predicting death (risk score) improved upon all single algorithms in the collection of algorithms, although its performance was similar to that of several algorithms. Super learner outperformed the worst algorithm (neural networks) by 44% with respect to estimated cross-validated mean squared error and had an R2 value of 0.201. The improvement of super learner over random forest with respect to R2 was approximately 2-fold. Alternatives for risk score prediction include the super learner, which can provide improved performance. PMID:23364879

  9. Evidence that Patent Foramen Ovale is not a Risk Factor for Cerebral Ischemia in the Elderly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Elizabeth F.; Calafiore, Paul; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Tonkin, Andrew M.

    1994-01-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) may be a risk factor for ischemic stroke in young patients. The aim of this study was to assess the importance of PFO in subjects with a wider age range using patient-control methodology. Transesophageal contrast echocardiography and carotid imaging were performed in 220 consecutive patients with cerebral ischemia (mean age 66 +/- 13 years) and in 202 community-based control subjects (mean age 64 +/- 11 years). Of patients with stroke, 35 (16%) had PFO compared with 31 control subjects (15%) (p = 0.98). Analysis of PFO prevalence by age did not show a significant difference between patients and control subjects in the age groups <50 years (27% vs 11%p; = 0.33), 50 to 69 years (17% vs 15%; p = 0.78), and > or equal to 70 years (12% vs 17%; p = 0.43). However, the group aged 450 years was relatively small (26 cases, 19 controls). No significant difference in PFO prevalence was detected between patients with cryptogenic stroke (20%), noncryptogenic stroke (14%), and control subjects (15%). These results suggest that PFO is not a risk factor for cerebral ischemia in subjects aged >50 years, which would have major implications for the investigation and management of stroke patients in this age group. Longitudinal studies are now required to assess the incidence of stroke in symptom free patients with PFO.

  10. The Effects of Highly Challenging Balance Training in Elderly With Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Löfgren, Niklas; Nero, Håkan; Hagströmer, Maria; Ståhle, Agneta; Lökk, Johan; Franzén, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Background. Highly challenging exercises have been suggested to induce neuroplasticity in individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD); however, its effect on clinical outcomes remains largely unknown. Objective. To evaluate the short-term effects of the HiBalance program, a highly challenging balance-training regimen that incorporates both dual-tasking and PD-specific balance components, compared with usual care in elderly with mild to moderate PD. Methods. Participants with PD (n = 100) were randomized, either to the 10-week HiBalance program (n = 51) or to the control group (n = 49). Participants were evaluated before and after the intervention. The main outcomes were balance performance (Mini-BESTest), gait velocity (during normal and dual-task gait), and concerns about falling (Falls Efficacy Scale–International). Performance of a cognitive task while walking, physical activity level (average steps per day), and activities of daily living were secondary outcomes. Results. A total of 91 participants completed the study. After the intervention, the between group comparison showed significantly improved balance and gait performance in the training group. Moreover, although no significant between group difference was observed regarding gait performance during dual-tasking; the participants in the training group improved their performance of the cognitive task while walking, as compared with the control group. Regarding physical activity levels and activities of daily living, in comparison to the control group, favorable results were found for the training group. No group differences were found for concerns about falling. Conclusions. The HiBalance program significantly benefited balance and gait abilities when compared with usual care and showed promising transfer effects to everyday living. Long-term follow-up assessments will further explore these effects. PMID:25608520

  11. Endometrial carcinoma in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, K; Nekhlyudov, L; Deligdisch, L

    1995-08-01

    Endometrial carcinoma remains the most common invasive gynecologic malignancy. Increased longevity is associated with an increased incidence of endometrial carcinoma (EC) in elderly women. While recent studies have looked at aging and its relation to ovarian, breast, and cervical cancer, few have focused on EC in the growing elderly population. This study analyzed 35 histologic specimens of EC in women 75-92 years of age. Findings revealed that only 23% of the tumors were Stage I, G1. The majority (77%) were deeply invasive or of advanced stage (IC-IV). These were G2, G3, or "virulent" types of nonendometrioid EC (undifferentiated, clear cell, uterine serous papillary, and squamous cell carcinoma). Fifty-seven percent of tumors were endometrioid, of which 9% were mixed, including a rare case of nongestational choriocarcinoma. The nonendometrioid tumors, compared to the endometrioid types, were more often high-stage tumors with vascular invasion. They were also more often associated with atrophic (vs hyperplastic) uninvolved endometrium. Clinical risk factors (nulliparity, obesity, estrogen replacement therapy) were assessed and correlated with the histologic findings. It was shown that tumors in the elderly were less likely to be estrogen-related. It was concluded that EC in this age group is more aggressive, histologically less differentiated, and often nonendometrioid compared with EC in the general population. The increased virulence of EC in the elderly may be related to the tumor's independence from hormonal factors, to the poorly understood but well-known diminished immunologic defense against cancer in general in elderly patients, and/or to the belated diagnosis of the disease in this population. PMID:7622105

  12. Gynecological surveillance in high risk women.

    PubMed

    Dilley, James; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha

    2016-10-01

    In high-risk women, risk reducing surgery remains the cornerstone of prevention. However, the resulting premature menopause has led to continued efforts to develop effective screening strategies for those who wish to delay or avoid surgery. This review describes how the screening of women at risk of ovarian and endometrial cancer has evolved to its current state. Serial monitoring of CA125 is core to ovarian cancer screening and most recent studies have used the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Algorithm (ROCA) to interpret CA125 profile. The additional use of a second tumour marker, HE4, is reviewed. The results to date of key ovarian cancer screening studies in high-risk women are summarised ahead of their concluding findings due later in 2016. The role of both ultrasound and endometrial sampling in the management of women at increased risk of endometrial cancer is outlined. Exciting new methodology, which could help shape the future of screening is investigated. The article summarises the current recommendations and guidelines from recognised international bodies to aid the clinician with management of these women. PMID:26930388

  13. Qualitative Evaluation of Baduanjin (Traditional Chinese Qigong) on Health Promotion among an Elderly Community Population at Risk for Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guohua; Fang, Qianying; Chen, Bai; Yi, Hongmei; Lin, Qiu; Chen, Lidian

    2015-01-01

    Background. Baduanjin is a traditional Chinese qigong that has been practiced for a long time in China as a mind-body exercise in community elderly populations. The objective of this study was to qualitatively evaluate the perceived benefit of regular Baduanjin qigong in community elders. Methods. A total of 20 participants who had completed the 12-week Baduanjin qigong training were interviewed regarding their perceived effect on physical and psychological health and whether Baduanjin qigong was suitable for the elderly. Results. Almost all participants agreed that Baduanjin qigong could promote their multisystem or organ functions (e.g., digestive and circulatory systems), increase their immunity, make their bodies relax, and improve their mood and confidence. Most of the participants also agreed that Baduanjin qigong was appropriate for elderly individuals. Few individuals felt bored because of an hour Baduanjin training each day. Conclusions. The findings suggest that regular Baduanjin qigong may be potentially helpful to promote the overall physical and psychological health of elderly community populations and may be useful and feasible as a body-mind exercise in the health promotion in the elderly community populations. PMID:26483845

  14. Qualitative Evaluation of Baduanjin (Traditional Chinese Qigong) on Health Promotion among an Elderly Community Population at Risk for Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guohua; Fang, Qianying; Chen, Bai; Yi, Hongmei; Lin, Qiu; Chen, Lidian

    2015-01-01

    Background. Baduanjin is a traditional Chinese qigong that has been practiced for a long time in China as a mind-body exercise in community elderly populations. The objective of this study was to qualitatively evaluate the perceived benefit of regular Baduanjin qigong in community elders. Methods. A total of 20 participants who had completed the 12-week Baduanjin qigong training were interviewed regarding their perceived effect on physical and psychological health and whether Baduanjin qigong was suitable for the elderly. Results. Almost all participants agreed that Baduanjin qigong could promote their multisystem or organ functions (e.g., digestive and circulatory systems), increase their immunity, make their bodies relax, and improve their mood and confidence. Most of the participants also agreed that Baduanjin qigong was appropriate for elderly individuals. Few individuals felt bored because of an hour Baduanjin training each day. Conclusions. The findings suggest that regular Baduanjin qigong may be potentially helpful to promote the overall physical and psychological health of elderly community populations and may be useful and feasible as a body-mind exercise in the health promotion in the elderly community populations. PMID:26483845

  15. General anesthetic and the risk of dementia in elderly patients: current insights

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Maria; Berger, Miles; Eckenhoff, Roderic G; Seitz, Dallas P

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we aim to provide clinical insights into the relationship between surgery, general anesthesia (GA), and dementia, particularly Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The pathogenesis of AD is complex, involving specific disease-linked proteins (amyloid-beta [Aβ] and tau), inflammation, and neurotransmitter dysregulation. Many points in this complex pathogenesis can potentially be influenced by both surgery and anesthetics. It has been demonstrated in some in vitro, animal, and human studies that some anesthetics are associated with increased aggregation and oligomerization of Aβ peptide and enhanced accumulation and hyperphosphorylation of tau protein. Two neurocognitive syndromes that have been studied in relation to surgery and anesthesia are postoperative delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction, both of which occur more commonly in older adults after surgery and anesthesia. Neither the route of anesthesia nor the type of anesthetic appears to be significantly associated with the development of postoperative delirium or postoperative cognitive dysfunction. A meta-analysis of case-control studies found no association between prior exposure to surgery utilizing GA and incident AD (pooled odds ratio =1.05, P=0.43). The few cohort studies on this topic have shown varying associations between surgery, GA, and AD, with one showing an increased risk, and another demonstrating a decreased risk. A recent randomized trial has shown that patients who received sevoflurane during spinal surgery were more likely to have progression of preexisting mild cognitive impairment compared to controls and to patients who received propofol or epidural anesthesia. Given the inconsistent evidence on the association between surgery, anesthetic type, and AD, well-designed and adequately powered studies with longer follow-up periods are required to establish a clear causal association between surgery, GA, and AD. PMID:25284995

  16. Relation Between Alcohol Consumption and Cardiac Structure and Function in the Elderly: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Alexandra; Jhund, Pardeep S.; Claggett, Brian; Shah, Amil M.; Konety, Suma; Butler, Kenneth; Kitzman, Dalane W.; Rosamond, Wayne; Fuchs, Flavio D.; Solomon, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Excessive alcohol consumption is associated with cardiomyopathy, but the influence of moderate alcohol use on cardiac structure and function is largely unknown. Methods and Results We studied 4466 participants from visit 5 of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study (76±5 years and 60% women) who underwent transthoracic echocardiography, excluding former drinkers and those with significant valvular disease. Participants were classified into 4 categories based on self-reported alcohol intake: non-drinkers, drinkers of up to 7 drinks per week, ≥7 to 14 and ≥ 14 drinks per week. We related alcohol intake to measures of cardiac structure and function, stratified by sex, and fully adjusted for covariates. In both genders, increasing alcohol intake was associated with larger left ventricular (LV) diastolic and systolic diameters and larger left atrial diameter (p values <0.05). In men, increasing alcohol intake was associated with greater LV mass (8.2 ± 3.8 g per consumption category, p = 0.029) and higher E/E’ ratio (0.82±0.33 per consumption category, p= 0.014). In women, increasing alcohol intake was associated with lower LV ejection fraction (−1.9% ± 0.6% per consumption category, p=0.002) and a tendency for worse LV global longitudinal strain (0.45% ±0.25% per consumption category, p=0.07). Conclusions In an elderly community-based population, increasing alcohol intake is associated with subtle alterations in cardiac structure and function, with women appearing more susceptible than men to the cardiotoxic effects of alcohol. PMID:26015266

  17. [New vehicle technologies for supporting the mobility of the elderly].

    PubMed

    Färber, B

    2000-06-01

    Starting point for this analysis are the mobility needs and requirements of elderly, as well as problems concerning access and use of public transport. Elderly people as car drivers suffer from several performance deficits which are currently compensated by mobility restrictions and changed driving behaviour. Driver assistance systems, just available or soon on the market, are demonstrated and analysed with respect to their impact on elderly drivers. An expert evaluation comes to the conclusion that the most important systems for elderly are: emergency systems, enhanced vision systems and parking aids. Emergency systems can call rescue teams automatically or at driver's request, and direct them to the emergency location. Self imposed restrictions of elderly concerning night driving can partly be compensated by means of curve lightning and automatic dipping. Parking aids, using cameras or infrared technique are especially helpful for persons with moveability problems. The group of helpful, but not highly important driver assistance systems covers several means for longitudinal and lateral control of the car, comprising autonomous cruise control, antilock systems and electronic stability programmes. The value and impact of these systems are analysed in the light of risk homeostasis theory. Reduced work load and ease of mobility will at last result from user centered navigation systems, helping the elder driver also to move to new areas without orientational problems. The article demonstrates the particular importance of specific layouts of the man-machine-interface for elderly, to guarantee high acceptance and minimal distraction from traffic. PMID:10923369

  18. Detection of High-Risk Atherosclerotic Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Fleg, Jerome L.; Stone, Gregg W.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Granada, Juan F.; Hatsukami, Thomas S.; Kolodgie, Frank D.; Ohayon, Jacques; Pettigrew, Roderic; Sabatine, Marc S.; Tearney, Guillermo; Waxman, Sergio; Domanski, Michael J.; Srinivas, Pothur R.; Narula, Jagat

    2013-01-01

    The leading cause of major morbidity and mortality in most countries around the world is atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, most commonly caused by thrombotic occlusion of a high-risk coronary plaque resulting in myocardial infarction or cardiac death, or embolization from a high-risk carotid plaque resulting in stroke. The lesions prone to result in such clinical events are termed vulnerable or high-risk plaques, and their identification may lead to the development of pharmacological and mechanical intervention strategies to prevent such events. Autopsy studies from patients dying of acute myocardial infarction or sudden death have shown that such events typically arise from specific types of atherosclerotic plaques, most commonly the thin-cap fibroatheroma. However, the search in human beings for vulnerable plaques before their becoming symptomatic has been elusive. Recently, the PROSPECT (Providing Regional Observations to Study Predictors of Events in the Coronary Tree) study demonstrated that coronary plaques that are likely to cause future cardiac events, regardless of angiographic severity, are characterized by large plaque burden and small lumen area and/or are thin-cap fibroatheromas verified by radiofrequency intravascular ultrasound imaging. This study opened the door to identifying additional invasive and noninvasive imaging modalities that may improve detection of high-risk atherosclerotic lesions and patients. Beyond classic risk factors, novel biomarkers and genetic profiling may identify those patients in whom noninvasive imaging for vulnerable plaque screening, followed by invasive imaging for risk confirmation is warranted, and in whom future pharmacological and/or device-based focal or regional therapies may be applied to improve long-term prognosis. PMID:22974808

  19. High Vitamin C intake is associated with lower 4-year bone loss in elderly men

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin C is essential for collagen formation and normal bone development. Therefore, we evaluated associations of total, supplemental and dietary vitamin C intake with bone mineral density (BMD) at the hip (femoral neck and trochanter), spine and radial shaft and 4 y change in BMD, in elderly men a...

  20. The High Risk Freshman Chemist Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Miles

    1977-01-01

    Reports on the long term comparison between a group of "high risk" college freshmen who were given a supplemental chemistry course and another group who did not have the course. The supplemental course was found to produce only a short term rise in students' grades. (MR)

  1. Determination of high-risk cargo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Leo A.; Smith, Douglas E.; Khan, Siraj M.

    1994-10-01

    The approach and methodology used in the determination of the type of cargo containing concealments of commercial quantities of narcotics such as cocaine and heroin is described. This high-risk cargo enters the United States through border crossings at land, seaports and airports. The volume and variety of cargos make it a complex and challenging task for the U.S. Customs Service.

  2. Micronutrient requirements of high-risk infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micronutrient requirements are well-established for healthy full-term infants. However, few such recommendations exist for high-risk infants, including full-term infants with a variety of medical disorders or very preterm infants. Key micronutrients considered in this review are calcium, phosphorus,...

  3. High risk groups in oil shale workforce

    SciTech Connect

    Gratt, L.B.; Perry, B.W.; Marine, W.M.; Savitz, D.A.

    1984-04-01

    The workforce risks of a hypothetical one million barrels-per-day oil shale industry were estimated. The risks for the different workforce segments were compared and high risk groups were identified. Accidents and injuries were statistically described by rates for fatalities, for accidents with days lost from work, and for accidents with no days lost from work. Workforce diseases analyzed were cancers, silicosia, pneumoconiosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic airway obstruction, and high frequency hearing loss. A comparison of the workforce groups under different risk measures (occurrence, fatality, and life-loss expectancy) was performed. The miners represented the group with the largest fatality and the most serious accident rate, although the estimated rates were below the average industry-wide underground mining experience. Lung disease from inhalation exposure of about the nuisance dust threshold limit value presents a significant risk for future concerns. If future environmental dust exposure is at the 100 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ alpha-quartz level, safety improvements in the mining sector are of prime importance to reduce the oil shale worker's life-loss expectancy. 11 references, 1 figure, 11 tables.

  4. Use of anticoagulants in elderly patients: practical recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Robert-Ebadi, Helia; Le Gal, Grégoire; Righini, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Elderly people represent a patient population at high thromboembolic risk, but also at high hemorrhagic risk. There is a general tendency among physicians to underuse anticoagulants in the elderly, probably both because of underestimation of thromboembolic risk and overestimation of bleeding risk. The main indications for anticoagulation are venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in medical and surgical settings, VTE treatment, atrial fibrillation (AF) and valvular heart disease. Available anticoagulants for VTE prophylaxis and initial treatment of VTE are low molecular weight heparins (LMWH), unfractionated heparin (UFH) or synthetic anti-factor Xa pentasaccharide fondaparinux. For long-term anticoagulation vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are the first choice and only available oral anticoagulants nowadays. Assessing the benefit-risk ratio of anticoagulation is one of the most challenging issues in the individual elderly patient, patients at highest hemorrhagic risk often being those who would have the greatest benefit from anticoagulants. Some specific considerations are of utmost importance when using anticoagulants in the elderly to maximize safety of these treatments, including decreased renal function, co-morbidities and risk of falls, altered pharmacodynamics of anticoagulants especially VKAs, association with antiplatelet agents, patient education. Newer anticoagulants that are currently under study could simplify the management and increase the safety of anticoagulation in the future. PMID:19503778

  5. EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly: 2016 update on diagnosis, risk-stratification, and management.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Jorge J; Beltran, Brady E; Miranda, Roberto N; Young, Ken H; Chavez, Julio C; Sotomayor, Eduardo M

    2016-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the elderly is a provisional entity included in the 2008 WHO classification of lymphoid neoplasms. It is a disease typically seen in the elderly and thought to be associated with chronic EBV infection and severe immunosuppression with a component of immunosenescence. Recent research, however, has suggested that EBV-positive DLBCL can be seen in younger, immunocompetent patients. The diagnosis of EBV-positive DLBCL of the elderly is made through a careful pathological evaluation. The differential diagnosis includes infectious mononucleosis (specifically in younger patients), lymphomatoid granulomatosis, Hodgkin lymphoma, and gray zone lymphoma, among others. Detection of EBV-encoded RNA (EBER) is considered standard for diagnosis; however, a clear cutoff for positivity has not been defined. The International Prognostic Index (IPI), and the Oyama score can be used for risk-stratification. The Oyama score includes age >70 years and presence of B symptoms. The expression of CD30 is emerging as a potential adverse, and targetable, prognostic factor. Patients with EBV-positive DLBCL should be staged and managed following similar guidelines than patients with EBV-negative DLBCL. It has been suggested, however, that EBV-positive patients have a worse prognosis than EBV-negative counterparts in the era of chemoimmunotherapy. There is an opportunity to study and develop targeted therapy in the management of patients with EBV-positive DLBCL. Am. J. Hematol. 91:530-537, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27093913

  6. Serum Fatty Acids, Traditional Risk Factors, and Comorbidity as Related to Myocardial Injury in an Elderly Population with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Seljeflot, Ingebjørg; Schmidt, Erik B.; Myhre, Peder; Tveit, Arnljot; Arnesen, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Background. Epidemiological and randomized clinical trials indicate that marine polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) may have cardioprotective effects. Aim. Evaluate the associations between serum fatty acid profile, traditional risk factors, the presence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and peak Troponin T (TnT) levels in elderly patients with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Materials and Methods. Patients (n = 299) consecutively included in the ongoing Omega-3 fatty acids in elderly patients with myocardial infarction (OMEMI) trial were investigated. Peak TnT was registered during the hospital stay. Serum fatty acid analysis was performed 2–8 weeks later. Results. No significant correlations between peak TnT levels and any of the n-3 PUFAs were observed. However, patients with a history of atrial fibrillation had significantly lower docosahexaenoic acid levels than patients without. Significantly lower peak TnT levels were observed in patients with a history of hyperlipidemia, angina, MI, atrial fibrillation, intermittent claudication, and previous revascularization (all p < 0.02). Conclusions. In an elderly population with AMI, no association between individual serum fatty acids and estimated myocardial infarct size could be demonstrated. However, a history of hyperlipidemia and the presence of CVD were associated with lower peak TnT levels, possibly because of treatment with cardioprotective medications. PMID:26989512

  7. Serum Fatty Acids, Traditional Risk Factors, and Comorbidity as Related to Myocardial Injury in an Elderly Population with Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Laake, Kristian; Seljeflot, Ingebjørg; Schmidt, Erik B; Myhre, Peder; Tveit, Arnljot; Arnesen, Harald; Solheim, Svein

    2016-01-01

    Background. Epidemiological and randomized clinical trials indicate that marine polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) may have cardioprotective effects. Aim. Evaluate the associations between serum fatty acid profile, traditional risk factors, the presence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and peak Troponin T (TnT) levels in elderly patients with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Materials and Methods. Patients (n = 299) consecutively included in the ongoing Omega-3 fatty acids in elderly patients with myocardial infarction (OMEMI) trial were investigated. Peak TnT was registered during the hospital stay. Serum fatty acid analysis was performed 2-8 weeks later. Results. No significant correlations between peak TnT levels and any of the n-3 PUFAs were observed. However, patients with a history of atrial fibrillation had significantly lower docosahexaenoic acid levels than patients without. Significantly lower peak TnT levels were observed in patients with a history of hyperlipidemia, angina, MI, atrial fibrillation, intermittent claudication, and previous revascularization (all p < 0.02). Conclusions. In an elderly population with AMI, no association between individual serum fatty acids and estimated myocardial infarct size could be demonstrated. However, a history of hyperlipidemia and the presence of CVD were associated with lower peak TnT levels, possibly because of treatment with cardioprotective medications. PMID:26989512

  8. Predictors of Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality in Elderly Men With Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Brachytherapy With or Without External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nanda, Akash; Moran, Brian J.; Braccioforte, Michelle H.; Dosoretz, Daniel; Salenius, Sharon; Katin, Michael; Ross, Rudi; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical factors associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), adjusting for comorbidity, in elderly men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with brachytherapy alone or in conjunction with external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 1,978 men of median age 71 (interquartile range, 66-75) years with intermediate-risk disease (Gleason score 7, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 20 ng/mL or less, tumor category T2c or less). Fine and Gray's multivariable competing risks regression was used to assess whether prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD), age, treatment, year of brachytherapy, PSA level, or tumor category was associated with the risk of PCSM. Results: After a median follow-up of 3.2 (interquartile range, 1.7-5.4) years, the presence of CVD was significantly associated with a decreased risk of PCSM (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.20; 95% CI 0.04-0.99; p = 0.05), whereas an increasing PSA level was significantly associated with an increased risk of PCSM (adjusted hazard ratio 1.14; 95% CI 1.02-1.27; p = 0.02). In the absence of CVD, cumulative incidence estimates of PCSM were higher (p = 0.03) in men with PSA levels above as compared with the median PSA level (7.3 ng/mL) or less; however, in the setting of CVD there was no difference (p = 0.27) in these estimates stratified by the median PSA level (6.9 ng/mL). Conclusions: In elderly men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer, CVD status is a negative predictor of PCSM and affects the prognostic capacity of pretreatment PSA level. These observations support the potential utility of prerandomization stratification by comorbidity to more accurately assess prognostic factors and treatment effects within this population.

  9. The elderly depressed and treatment with fluvoxamine.

    PubMed

    Phanjoo, A

    1991-12-01

    Depression is highly prevalent in the elderly and there are difficulties with definition and diagnosis. The signs and symptoms of depression may differ from those in younger patients since the elderly are frequently preoccupied with physical ailments and may have more agitation, insomnia and hypochondriasis. The aetiology and cause of depression and its association with psychosocial and other risk factors are discussed, with particular reference to masked depression, depressive delusional illness and 'pseudo dementia'. A range of treatments have been used in depressive patients, including psychotherapy, cognitive therapy, ECT and various drug treatments. In the elderly drugs may cause more problems than in younger patients. These can be divided into those associated with: pharmacokinetics, polypharmacy, side effects, dosage and lethality. Trials of antidepressants in the elderly are discussed and include trials with tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors and SSRIs. Particular reference is made to a trial of fluvoxamine versus mianserin in the elderly, which demonstrated that fluvoxamine is as effective as mianserin in treating depression, and has fewer side effects. PMID:1806633

  10. Management of hepatocellular carcinoma in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Borzio, Mauro; Dionigi, Elena; Parisi, Giancarlo; Raguzzi, Ivana; Sacco, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Mean age of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients has been progressively increasing over the last decades and ageing of these patients is becoming a real challenge in every day clinical practice. Unfortunately, international guidelines on HCC management do not address this problem exhaustively and do not provide any specific recommendation. We carried out a literature search in MEDLINE database for studies reporting on epidemiology, clinical characteristics and treatment outcome of HCC in elderly patients. Available data seem to indicate that in elderly patients the outcome of HCC is mostly influenced by liver function and tumor stage rather than by age and the latter should not influence treatment allocation. Age is not a risk for resection and older patients with resectable HCC and good liver function could gain benefit from surgery. Mild comorbidities do not seem a contraindication for surgery in aged patients. Conversely, major resection in elderly, even when performed in experienced high-volume centres, should be avoided. Both percutaneous ablation and transarterial chemoembolization are not contraindicated in aged patients and safety profile of these procedures is acceptable. Sorafenib is a viable option for advanced HCC in elderly provided that a careful evaluation of concomitant comorbidities, particularly cardiovascular ones, is taken into account. Available data seem to suggest that in either elderly and younger, treatment is a main predictor of outcome. Consequently, a nihilistic attitude of physicians towards under- or no-treatment of aged patients should not be longer justified. PMID:26085911

  11. Stabilization of high-risk plaques

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Kohei; Zhang, Bo; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (ASCVDs) is increasing globally and they have become the leading cause of death in most countries. Numerous experimental and clinical studies have been conducted to identify major risk factors and effective control strategies for ASCVDs. The development of imaging modalities with the ability to determine the plaque composition enables us to further identify high-risk plaque and evaluate the effectiveness of different treatment strategies. While intensive lipid-lowering by statins can stabilize or even regress plaque by various mechanisms, such as the reduction of lipid accumulation in a necrotic lipid core, the reduction of inflammation, and improvement of endothelial function, there are still considerable residual risks that need to be understood. We reviewed important findings regarding plaque vulnerability and some encouraging emerging approaches for plaque stabilization. PMID:27500090

  12. Multimorbidity in elderly hospitalised patients and risk of Clostridium difficile infection: a retrospective study with the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS)

    PubMed Central

    Ticinesi, Andrea; Nouvenne, Antonio; Folesani, Giuseppina; Prati, Beatrice; Morelli, Ilaria; Guida, Loredana; Turroni, Francesca; Ventura, Marco; Lauretani, Fulvio; Maggio, Marcello; Meschi, Tiziana

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify the role of chronic comorbidities, considered together in a literature-validated index (Cumulative Illness Rating Scale, CIRS), and antibiotic or proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) treatments as risk factors for hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in elderly multimorbid hospitalised patients. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Subacute hospital geriatric care ward in Italy. Participants 505 (238 male (M), 268 female (F)) elderly (age ≥65) multimorbid patients. Main outcome measures The relationship between CDI and CIRS Comorbidity Score, number of comorbidities, antibiotic, antifungal and PPI treatments, and length of hospital stay was assessed through age-adjusted and sex-adjusted and multivariate logistic regression models. The CIRS Comorbidity Score was handled after categorisation in quartiles. Results Mean age was 80.7±11.3 years. 43 patients (22 M, 21 F) developed CDI. The prevalence of CDI increased among quartiles of CIRS Comorbidity Score (3.9% first quartile vs 11.1% fourth quartile, age-adjusted and sex-adjusted p=0.03). In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, patients in the highest quartile of CIRS Comorbidity Score (≥17) carried a significantly higher risk of CDI (OR 5.07, 95% CI 1.28 to 20.14, p=0.02) than patients in the lowest quartile (<9). The only other variable significantly associated with CDI was antibiotic therapy (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.21 to 5.66, p=0.01). PPI treatment was not associated with CDI. Conclusions Multimorbidity, measured through CIRS Comorbidity Score, is independently associated with the risk of CDI in a population of elderly patients with prolonged hospital stay. PMID:26503394

  13. Cough in the Elderly Population: Relationships with Multiple Comorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Woo-Jung; Morice, Alyn H.; Kim, Min-Hye; Lee, Seung-Eun; Jo, Eun-Jung; Lee, Sang-Min; Han, Ji-Won; Kim, Tae Hui; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Jang, Hak-Chul; Kim, Ki Woong; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2013-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of cough in the elderly population has not been studied comprehensively. The present study aimed to investigate the epidemiology of cough in a community elderly population, particularly in relation with their comorbidity. Methods A cross-sectional analysis was performed using a baseline dataset from the Korean Longitudinal Study on Health and Aging, a community-based elderly population cohort study. Three types of cough (frequent cough, chronic persistent cough, and nocturnal cough) were defined using questionnaires. Comorbidity was examined using a structured questionnaire. Health-related quality of life was assessed using the Short Form 36 questionnaire. Results The prevalence was 9.3% for frequent cough, 4.6% for chronic persistent cough, and 7.3% for nocturnal cough. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, smoking, asthma and allergic rhinitis were found to be risk factors for cough in the elderly. Interestingly, among comorbidities, constipation and uncontrolled diabetes mellitus (HbA1c ≥ 8%) were also found to have positive associations with elderly cough. In the Short Form 36 scores, chronic persistent cough was independently related to impairment of quality of life, predominantly in the mental component. Conclusions Cough has a high prevalence and is detrimental to quality of life in the elderly. Associations with smoking, asthma and rhinitis confirmed previous findings in younger populations. Previously unrecognised relationships with constipation and uncontrolled diabetes mellitus suggested the multi-faceted nature of cough in the elderly. PMID:24205100

  14. Neurobiology of Elderly Suicide.

    PubMed

    Richard-Devantoy, S; Turecki, G; Jollant, F

    2016-07-01

    Suicide in the elderly is an underestimated and complex issue that has mainly been explored in sociological, clinical and psychological perspectives. Suicide in non-elderly adults has been associated with diverse neurobiological alterations that may shed light on future predictive markers and more efficient preventative interventions. The aim of this paper was to review studies specifically investigating the neurobiology of elderly suicidal behaviour. We performed a systematic English and French Medline and EMBASE search until 2013. Contrary to literature about the non-elderly, we found a paucity of studies investigating the biomarkers of suicidal risk in elderly adults. Main findings were found in the neurocognitive domain. Studies generally supported the existence of cognitive deficits, notably decision-making impairment and reduced cognitive inhibition, in patients with a history of suicidal act compared to patients without such history. However, replications are needed to confirm findings. Due to several limitations including the small number of available studies, frequent lack of replication and small sample size, no firm conclusions can be drawn. The authors encourage further investigations in this field as insight in the neurobiology of these complex behaviors may limit clichés about end of life and aging, as well as improve future prevention of suicide in the elderly. PMID:26743828

  15. Favorable outcomes in elderly patients undergoing high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation for non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dahi, Parastoo B; Tamari, Roni; Devlin, Sean M; Maloy, Molly; Bhatt, Valkal; Scordo, Michael; Goldberg, Jenna; Zelenetz, Andrew D; Hamlin, Paul A; Matasar, Matthew J; Maragulia, Jocelyn; Giralt, Sergio A; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Moskowitz, Craig H; Sauter, Craig S

    2014-12-01

    High-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDT-ASCT) can offer potential long-term remission or cure in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Limited experience is available on the safety and efficacy of HDT-ASCT in elderly patients. This is a single-center, retrospective study examining outcomes of HDT-ASCT for 202 NHL patients, ages 60 years and older, between January 2001 and December 2012. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed according to age at HDT-ASCT, hematopoietic cell transplantation comorbidity index (HCT-CI), NHL histology, and remission status at the time of HDT-ASCT. The median age was 65 years (range, 60 to 74) and the majority had either diffuse large B cell lymphoma (n = 73, 37%) or mantle cell lymphoma (n = 69, 34%). One hundred and fifteen patients (57%) had high HCT-CI scores at the time of HDT-ASCT. With a median follow-up of 3.6 years (range, 4 to 11.9 years) for survivors, PFS and OS at 3 years were 60% (95% confidence interval [CI], 53% to 68%) and 73% (95% CI, 67% to 80%), respectively. Transplantation-related mortality (TRM) was 4% both at 100 days and at 1 year after HDT-ASCT. Age and HCT-CI score were not associated with OS or PFS, and high HCT-CI did not correlate with TRM. Seven patients (4%) developed secondary myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia at a median of 35 months (range, 6 to 48) after HDT-ASCT. In this single-center cohort of elderly patients with NHL undergoing HDT-ASCT, this intervention was proven tolerable and effective, with results similar to those of historic controls in younger patients. Our data suggest that age alone should not preclude HDT-ASCT in elderly patients. PMID:25175794

  16. Mortality Factors in Geriatric Blunt Trauma Patients: Creation of a Highly Predictive Statistical Model for Mortality Using 50,765 Consecutive Elderly Trauma Admissions from the National Sample Project

    PubMed Central

    HRANJEC, TJASA; SAWYER, ROBERT G.; YOUNG, JEFFREY S.; SWENSON, BRIAN R.; CALLAND, JAMES F.

    2013-01-01

    Elderly patients are at high risk for mortality after injury. We hypothesized that trauma benchmarking efforts would benefit from development of a geriatric-specific model for risk-adjusted analyses of trauma center outcomes. A total of 57,973 records of elderly patients (age older than 65 years), which met our selection criteria, were submitted to the National Trauma Database and included within the National Sample Project between 2003 and 2006. These cases were used to construct a multivariable logistic regression model, which was compared with the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma’s Trauma Quality Improvement Project’s (TQIP) existing model. Additional spline regression analyses were performed to further objectively quantify the physiologic differences between geriatric patients and their younger counterparts. The geriatric-specific and TQIP mortality models shared several covariates: age, Injury Severity Score, motor component of the Glasgow Coma Scale, and systolic blood pressure. Our model additionally used temperature and the presence of mechanical ventilation. Our geriatric-specific regression mode generated a superior c-statistic as compared with the TQIP approximation (0.85 vs 0.77; P = 0.048). Spline analyses demonstrated that elderly patients appear to be less likely to tolerate relative hypotension with higher observed mortality at initial systolic blood pressures of 90 to 130 mmHg. Although the TQIP model includes a single age component, these data suggest that each variable needs to be adjusted for age to more accurately predict mortality in the elderly. Clearly, a separate geriatric model for predicting outcomes is not only warranted, but necessary. PMID:23265126

  17. How I treat high-risk myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lonial, Sagar; Boise, Lawrence H; Kaufman, Jonathan

    2015-09-24

    The treatment of patients with myeloma has dramatically changed over the past decade due in part to the development of new agents and myeloma-specific targets. Despite these advancements, a group for whom the long-term benefit remains less clear are patients with genetically or clinically defined high-risk myeloma. In order to successfully treat these patients, it is important to first identify these patients, treat them with aggressive combination therapy, and employ the use of aggressive long-term maintenance therapy. Future directions include the use of new immune-based treatments (antibodies or cellular-based therapies) as well as target-driven approaches. Until these treatment approaches are better defined, this review will provide a potential treatment approach for standard- and high-risk myeloma that can be followed using agents and strategies that are currently available with the goal of improving progression-free and overall survival for these patients today. PMID:26272217

  18. High Prevalence of Respiratory Muscle Weakness in Hospitalized Acute Heart Failure Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo, Pedro; Timenetsky, Karina T.; Casalaspo, Thaisa Juliana André; Gonçalves, Louise Helena Rodrigues; Yang, Angela Shu Yun; Eid, Raquel Caserta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory Muscle Weakness (RMW) has been defined when the maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) is lower than 70% of the predictive value. The prevalence of RMW in chronic heart failure patients is 30 to 50%. So far there are no studies on the prevalence of RMW in acute heart failure (AHF) patients. Objectives Evaluate the prevalence of RMW in patients admitted because of AHF and the condition of respiratory muscle strength on discharge from the hospital. Methods Sixty-three patients had their MIP measured on two occasions: at the beginning of the hospital stay, after they had reached respiratory, hemodynamic and clinical stability and before discharge from the hospital. The apparatus and technique to measure MIP were adapted because of age-related limitations of the patients. Data on cardiac ejection fraction, ECG, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and on the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) were collected. Results The mean age of the 63 patients under study was 75 years. On admission the mean ejection fraction was 33% (95% CI: 31–35) and the BNP hormone median value was 726.5 pg/ml (range: 217 to 2283 pg/ml); 65% of the patients used NIV. The median value of MIP measured after clinical stabilization was -52.7 cmH2O (range: -20 to -120 cmH2O); 76% of the patients had MIP values below 70% of the predictive value. On discharge, after a median hospital stay of 11 days, the median MIP was -53.5 cmH2O (range:-20 to -150 cmH2O); 71% of the patients maintained their MIP values below 70% of the predictive value. The differences found were not statistically significant. Conclusion Elderly patients admitted with AHF may present a high prevalence of RMW on admission; this condition may be maintained at similar levels on discharge in a large percentage of these patients, even after clinical stabilization of the heart condition. PMID:25671566

  19. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Carotid Plaque Among Middle-aged and Elderly Adults in Rural Tianjin, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Changqing; Shi, Min; Yang, Ying; Pang, Hongbo; Fei, Shizao; Bai, Lingling; Liu, Bin; Tu, Jun; Huo, Yong; Ning, Xianjia; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jinghua

    2016-01-01

    Carotid plaque (CP) is associated with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. However, population-based studies with a large sample are rare in China, particularly those in the low-income population. We aimed to determine the prevalence of CP and the associated risk factors in the rural areas of northern China. Between April 2014 and June 2014, we recruited 3789 residents aged ≥45 years. B-mode ultrasonography was performed to measure the extent of CP. The prevalence of CP was 40.3% overall, 47.1% in men, and 35.4% in women (P < 0.001). The prevalence of CP increased with increasing age (P < 0.001). The participants with CP were more likely to have hypertension, diabetes, high total cholesterol (TC) levels, and high low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels and be a current smoker; however, they were less likely to be obese. Multiple logistic regression analysis, adjusted for confounders, indicated that age, male sex, hypertension, diabetes, current smoking, and high LDL-C levels were the independent risk factors for CP. There was a lower risk of CP with alcohol consumption. The findings suggest that managing the conventional risk factors is crucial to reduce the burden of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases in the low-income population in China. PMID:27029785

  20. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Carotid Plaque Among Middle-aged and Elderly Adults in Rural Tianjin, China.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Changqing; Shi, Min; Yang, Ying; Pang, Hongbo; Fei, Shizao; Bai, Lingling; Liu, Bin; Tu, Jun; Huo, Yong; Ning, Xianjia; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jinghua

    2016-01-01

    Carotid plaque (CP) is associated with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. However, population-based studies with a large sample are rare in China, particularly those in the low-income population. We aimed to determine the prevalence of CP and the associated risk factors in the rural areas of northern China. Between April 2014 and June 2014, we recruited 3789 residents aged ≥45 years. B-mode ultrasonography was performed to measure the extent of CP. The prevalence of CP was 40.3% overall, 47.1% in men, and 35.4% in women (P < 0.001). The prevalence of CP increased with increasing age (P < 0.001). The participants with CP were more likely to have hypertension, diabetes, high total cholesterol (TC) levels, and high low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels and be a current smoker; however, they were less likely to be obese. Multiple logistic regression analysis, adjusted for confounders, indicated that age, male sex, hypertension, diabetes, current smoking, and high LDL-C levels were the independent risk factors for CP. There was a lower risk of CP with alcohol consumption. The findings suggest that managing the conventional risk factors is crucial to reduce the burden of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases in the low-income population in China. PMID:27029785

  1. Non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteraemia in elderly patients: an increased risk for endovascular infections, osteomyelitis and mortality.

    PubMed

    Chen, P L; Lee, H C; Lee, N Y; Wu, C J; Lin, S H; Shih, H I; Lee, C C; Ko, W C; Chang, C M

    2012-11-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) is a common pathogen causing foodborne infections, bacteraemia, and extra-intestinal focal infections (EFIs) in humans. The study compares the clinical characteristics of elderly patients with NTS bacteraemia with those of young adults. Of 272 adults with NTS bacteraemia identified in this study, 162 (59·6%) were aged ⩾55 years. EFIs were observed in 36% of the 162 patients. The most common EFIs in the elderly patients (⩾55 years) was mycotic aneurysm, followed by pulmonary infections and bone/joint infections. Elderly patients more often had chronic heart, lung, renal and malignant diseases, had more EFIs, and a higher 30-day mortality rate. Independent factors of 30-day mortality in elderly patients were solid-organ tumour [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 4·4, P=0·003], mycotic aneurysm (aOR 3·7, P=0·023) and shock (aOR 12·1, P<0·0001). HIV infection, autoimmune diseases, and receipt of immunosuppressive therapy were more often observed in young patients. PMID:22261309

  2. Development and Evaluation of an Online Fall-Risk Questionnaire for Nonfrail Community-Dwelling Elderly Persons: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Obrist, Seraina; Rogan, Slavko; Hilfiker, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Falls are frequent in older adults and may have serious consequences but awareness of fall-risk is often low. A questionnaire might raise awareness of fall-risk; therefore we set out to construct and test such a questionnaire. Methods. Fall-risk factors and their odds ratios were extracted from meta-analyses and a questionnaire was devised to cover these risk factors. A formula to estimate the probability of future falls was set up using the extracted odds ratios. The understandability of the questionnaire and discrimination and calibration of the prediction formula were tested in a cohort study with a six-month follow-up. Community-dwelling persons over 60 years were recruited by an e-mail snowball-sampling method. Results and Discussion. We included 134 persons. Response rates for the monthly fall-related follow-up varied between the months and ranged from low 38% to high 90%. The proportion of present risk factors was low. Twenty-five participants reported falls. Discrimination was moderate (AUC: 0.67, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.81). The understandability, with the exception of five questions, was good. The wording of the questions needs to be improved and measures to increase the monthly response rates are needed before test-retest reliability and final predictive value can be assessed. PMID:27247571

  3. Development and Evaluation of an Online Fall-Risk Questionnaire for Nonfrail Community-Dwelling Elderly Persons: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Obrist, Seraina; Rogan, Slavko; Hilfiker, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Falls are frequent in older adults and may have serious consequences but awareness of fall-risk is often low. A questionnaire might raise awareness of fall-risk; therefore we set out to construct and test such a questionnaire. Methods. Fall-risk factors and their odds ratios were extracted from meta-analyses and a questionnaire was devised to cover these risk factors. A formula to estimate the probability of future falls was set up using the extracted odds ratios. The understandability of the questionnaire and discrimination and calibration of the prediction formula were tested in a cohort study with a six-month follow-up. Community-dwelling persons over 60 years were recruited by an e-mail snowball-sampling method. Results and Discussion. We included 134 persons. Response rates for the monthly fall-related follow-up varied between the months and ranged from low 38% to high 90%. The proportion of present risk factors was low. Twenty-five participants reported falls. Discrimination was moderate (AUC: 0.67, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.81). The understandability, with the exception of five questions, was good. The wording of the questions needs to be improved and measures to increase the monthly response rates are needed before test-retest reliability and final predictive value can be assessed. PMID:27247571

  4. Potency of a combined alfacalcidol-alendronate therapy to reduce the risk of falls and fractures in elderly patients with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ringe, Johann D; Schacht, Erich; Dukas, Laurent; Mazor, Ze'ev

    2011-01-01

    This is a preplanned subgroup analysis on 318 patients with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIOP) from an open, prospective, multi-centered, uncontrolled study on a large cohort of elderly patients with a high risk of falls and fractures. The entire group of 2579 patients was recruited by 818 practicing physicians and treated for three months with a new combination package containing 4 or 12 self-explanatory one-week blisters, each with one tablet of 70 mg alendronate (CAS 260055-05-8) and 7 capsules of 1 pg alfacalcidol (CAS 41294-56-8) (Tevabone"). The average age of the GIOP patients was 71 years and the mean body mass index 26.7 kg/m2. 58% had a diagnosis of increased risk of falls, prevalent vertebral and non-vertebral fractures were documented in 70% and 65% of the patients, respectively, and a creatinine clearance (CrCl) below 65 ml/min was documented in 55 %. Main outcome parameters were the Chair Rising Test (CRT), Timed Up and Go Test (TUG), back pain and safety at onset and after 3 months. In addition, an evaluation of the package design was done at the end of the study. The percentage of patients able to perform the CRT within 10 sec increased from 21.1% to 39.4% after 3 months (increase 87%, p < 0.0001), while successful performance of TUG within 10 sec increased by 84% (p < 0.0001) from 23.1% at onset to 42.4% after 3 months. The mean time required to perform the CRT decreased after 3 months from an average of 15.92 to 14.02 sec (p = 0.0025) (difference of 1.9 sec) and for the TUG the mean time decreased from 16.86 sec to 14.64 sec (p = 0.0056) (difference of 2.2 sec). Mean back pain measured by a 0-10 visual analogue scale decreased significantly by 43% from 6.0 to 3.4 (p < 0.0001). Throughout the study 23 adverse events (AE) were reported in 11 of the 318 GIOP patients (incidence: 3.5 %). There were no patients who experienced serious AE. Patients using the new combined regimen of alfacalcidol plus alendronate for treating GIOP achieved

  5. Biodex Fall Risk Assessment in the Elderly With Ataxia: A New Age-Dependent Derived Index in Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Prometti, Paola; Olivares, Adriana; Gaia, Giuseppina; Bonometti, Giampietro; Comini, Laura; Scalvini, Simonetta

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate if the Biodex Fall Risk Assessment could provide an age-adjusted index useful for classifying patients at “risk of fall.” This was a cohort study conducted on 61 chronic patients, in stable conditions, having a history of ataxia, difficulty in walking or loss of balance, and aged >64 years. These patients were coming from home to our Institute undergoing a period of in-hospital standard rehabilitation. Assessment of clinical parameters was performed at entry. Functional scales (Functional Independence Measure [FIM] for motor and cognitive function, Barthel G, Tinetti POMA), and the Biodex Fall Risk Index (FRI) were performed at entry and discharge. The Normalized FRI, obtained adjusting FRI to the reported maximum predictive FRI for the relevant age, identified 2 types of patients: those with a greater risk of fall than expected for that age, labeled Case 1 (Normalized FRI>1); and those with an equal or even lesser risk of fall than expected for that age, labeled Case 0 (Normalized FRI≤1). FRI, Normalized FRI as well as independent variables as age, sex, pathology group, FIM, BarthelG, were considered in a multiple regression analysis to predict the functional improvement (i.e., delta Tinetti Total score) after rehabilitation. Normalized FRI is useful in assessing patients at risk of falls both before and after rehabilitation. At admission, the Normalized FRI evidenced high fall risk in 46% of patients (Case 1) which decreased to 12% after rehabilitation, being greater than age-predicted in 7 patients (Case 1–1) despite the functional improvement observed after the rehabilitation treatment. Normalized FRI evidenced Case 1–1 patients as neurological, “very old” (86% in age-group 75–84 years), and with serious events at 18 to 24 months’ follow-up. Normalized FRI, but not FRI, at admission was a predictor of improvement in Tinetti Total scores. The normalized FRI effectively indicated patients at higher

  6. Identifying risk for dementia across populations: A study on the prevalence of dementia in tribal elderly population of Himalayan region in Northern India

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Sunil Kumar; Raina, Sujeet; Chander, Vishav; Grover, Ashoo; Singh, Sukhjit; Bhardwaj, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Studies have suggested that dementia is differentially distributed across populations with a lower prevalence in developing regions than the developed ones. A comparison in the prevalence of dementia across populations may provide an insight into its risk factors. Keeping this in view, a study was planned to evaluate the prevalence of dementia in tribal elderly population. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional comprehensive two-phase survey of all residents aged 60 years and older was conducted. Phase one involved screening of all individuals aged 60 and above with the help of a cognitive screen specifically developed for the tribal population. Phase two involved clinical examination of individuals who were suspected of dementia as per the developed cognitive screening test. Results: The results revealed that no individual above 60 years of age in the studied population was diagnosed as a case of dementia. Thereby, pointing out at some unknown factors, which are responsible for prevention of dementia. Discussion: The differences between the prevalence rate in this study and other studies in India appear to be a function of a valid regional difference. Environmental, phenotypic and genetic factors may contribute to regional and racial variations in dementia. Societies living in isolated hilly and tribal areas seem less predisposed to dementia, particularly age related neurodegenerative and vascular dementia, which are the most common causes for dementia in elderly. This may be because some environmental risk factors are much less prevalent in these settings. PMID:24339597

  7. High-risk sex offenders may not be high risk forever.

    PubMed

    Hanson, R Karl; Harris, Andrew J R; Helmus, Leslie; Thornton, David

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the extent to which sexual offenders present an enduring risk for sexual recidivism over a 20-year follow-up period. Using an aggregated sample of 7,740 sexual offenders from 21 samples, the yearly recidivism rates were calculated using survival analysis. Overall, the risk of sexual recidivism was highest during the first few years after release, and decreased substantially the longer individuals remained sex offense-free in the community. This pattern was particularly strong for the high-risk sexual offenders (defined by Static-99R scores). Whereas the 5-year sexual recidivism rate for high-risk sex offenders was 22% from the time of release, this rate decreased to 4.2% for the offenders in the same static risk category who remained offense-free in the community for 10 years. The recidivism rates of the low-risk offenders were consistently low (1%-5%) for all time periods. The results suggest that offense history is a valid, but time-dependent, indicator of the propensity to sexually reoffend. Further research is needed to explain the substantial rate of desistance by high-risk sexual offenders. PMID:24664250

  8. Characterisation of the Faecal Bacterial Community in Adult and Elderly Horses Fed a High Fibre, High Oil or High Starch Diet Using 454 Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dougal, Kirsty; de la Fuente, Gabriel; Harris, Patricia A.; Girdwood, Susan E.; Pinloche, Eric; Geor, Raymond J.; Nielsen, Brian D.; Schott, Harold C.; Elzinga, Sarah; Newbold, C. Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Faecal samples were collected from seventeen animals, each fed three different diets (high fibre, high fibre with a starch rich supplement and high fibre with an oil rich supplement). DNA was extracted and the V1–V2 regions of 16SrDNA were 454-pyrosequenced to investigate the faecal microbiome of the horse. The effect of age was also considered by comparing mature (8 horses aged 5–12) versus elderly horses (9 horses aged 19–28). A reduction in diversity was found in the elderly horse group. Significant differences between diets were found at an OTU level (52 OTUs at corrected Q<0.1). The majority of differences found were related to the Firmucutes phylum (37) with some changes in Bacteroidetes (6), Proteobacteria (3), Actinobacteria (2) and Spirochaetes (1). For the forage only diet,with no added starch or oil, we found 30/2934 OTUs (accounting for 15.9% of sequences) present in all horses. However the core (i.e. present in all horses) associated with the oil rich supplemented diet was somewhat smaller (25/3029 OTUs, 10.3% ) and the core associated with the starch rich supplemented diet was even smaller (15/2884 OTUs, 5.4% ). The core associated with samples across all three diets was extremely small (6/5689 OTUs accounting for only 2.3% of sequences) and dominated by the order Clostridiales, with the most abundant family being Lachnospiraceae. In conclusion, forage based diets plus starch or oil rich complementary feeds were associated with differences in the faecal bacterial community compared with the forage alone. Further, as observed in people, ageing is associated with a reduction in bacterial diversity. However there was no change in the bacterial community structure in these healthy animals associated with age. PMID:24504261

  9. Characterisation of the faecal bacterial community in adult and elderly horses fed a high fibre, high oil or high starch diet using 454 pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Dougal, Kirsty; de la Fuente, Gabriel; Harris, Patricia A; Girdwood, Susan E; Pinloche, Eric; Geor, Raymond J; Nielsen, Brian D; Schott, Harold C; Elzinga, Sarah; Newbold, C Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Faecal samples were collected from seventeen animals, each fed three different diets (high fibre, high fibre with a starch rich supplement and high fibre with an oil rich supplement). DNA was extracted and the V1-V2 regions of 16SrDNA were 454-pyrosequenced to investigate the faecal microbiome of the horse. The effect of age was also considered by comparing mature (8 horses aged 5-12) versus elderly horses (9 horses aged 19-28). A reduction in diversity was found in the elderly horse group. Significant differences between diets were found at an OTU level (52 OTUs at corrected Q<0.1). The majority of differences found were related to the Firmucutes phylum (37) with some changes in Bacteroidetes (6), Proteobacteria (3), Actinobacteria (2) and Spirochaetes (1). For the forage only diet,with no added starch or oil, we found 30/2934 OTUs (accounting for 15.9% of sequences) present in all horses. However the core (i.e. present in all horses) associated with the oil rich supplemented diet was somewhat smaller (25/3029 OTUs, 10.3% ) and the core associated with the starch rich supplemented diet was even smaller (15/2884 OTUs, 5.4% ). The core associated with samples across all three diets was extremely small (6/5689 OTUs accounting for only 2.3% of sequences) and dominated by the order Clostridiales, with the most abundant family being Lachnospiraceae. In conclusion, forage based diets plus starch or oil rich complementary feeds were associated with differences in the faecal bacterial community compared with the forage alone. Further, as observed in people, ageing is associated with a reduction in bacterial diversity. However there was no change in the bacterial community structure in these healthy animals associated with age. PMID:24504261

  10. Depression and Altitude: Cross-Sectional Community-Based Study Among Elderly High-Altitude Residents in the Himalayan Regions.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Motonao; Yamanaka, Gaku; Yamamoto, Naomune; Nakaoka, Takashi; Okumiya, Kiyohito; Matsubayashi, Kozo; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Sakura, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Suicide rates are higher at high altitudes, and some hypothesize that hypoxia is the cause. There may be a significant correlation between rates of depression and altitude, but little data exist outside the United States. The purpose of the present study is to conduct a survey of depression among the elderly highlanders in Asia. We enrolled 114 persons aged 60 years or older (mean, 69.2 ± 6.7 years; women, 58.8%) in Domkhar (altitude, 3800 m), Ladakh, India and 173 ethnic Tibetans (mean, 66.5 ± 6.1 years; women, 61.3%) in Yushu (altitude, 3700 m), Qinghai Province, China. The two-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2) and the geriatric depression scale were administered. A psychiatrist interviewed the subjects who had a positive score on the PHQ-2. The results of the interview with the residents conducted by the specialist showed that two cases (1.8%) from Domkhar and four (2.3%) from Qinghai had depression. Despite the high altitude, the probability of depression was low in elderly highlander in Ladakh and Qinghai. Our finding seems to indicate that cultural factors such as religious outlook and social/family relationship inhibit the development of depression. PMID:26162459

  11. Pneumococcal Vaccination in High-Risk Individuals: Are We Doing It Right?

    PubMed

    Papadatou, Ioanna; Spoulou, Vana

    2016-05-01

    Controversy exists regarding the optimal use of the 23-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for the protection of high-risk individuals, such as children and adults with immunocompromising conditions and the elderly. The effectiveness and immunogenicity of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) are limited in such high-risk populations compared to the healthy, with meta-analyses failing to provide robust evidence on vaccine efficacy against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) or pneumonia. Moreover, several studies have demonstrated a PPV23-induced state of immune tolerance or hyporesponsiveness to subsequent vaccination, where the response to revaccination does not reach the levels achieved with primary vaccination. The clinical significance of hyporesponsiveness is not yet clarified, but attenuated humoral and cellular response could lead to reduced levels of protection and increased susceptibility to pneumococcal disease. As disease epidemiology among high-risk groups shows that we are still in need of maximum serotype coverage, the optimal use of PPV23 in the context of combined conjugate/polysaccharide vaccine schedules is an important priority. In this minireview, we discuss PPV23-induced hyporesponsiveness and its implications in designing highly effective vaccination schedules for the optimal protection for high-risk individuals. PMID:27009210

  12. [Nutritional status of institutionalized Venezuelan elderly].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Nahir; Hernández, Rosa; Herrera, Héctor; Barbosa, Johanna; Hernández-Valera, Yolanda

    2005-09-01

    With the aim of evaluating the nutritional status of institutionalized elders in different geriatric units of the metropolitan area of Caracas, 126 subjects with ages between 60 and 96 years old were evaluated. The Mini Nutritional Assessment was applied and were identified 48.4% individuals with nutritional risk, 5.6% malnourished and 46% without nutritional problems. Females presented higher prevalences of malnutrition and risk, while males presented an adequate nutritional state. By sex and age, females and males over 80 years presented a higher prevalence of malnutrition and risk when they were compared whit those younger. A low dayly liquid intake, a BMI equal or under of 23 kg/m2 and a limited physical performance were the items that presented the highest prevalence among the studied elders. In conclusion, the high prevalence of malnutrition risk in this population group, remarks the necessity to include into the global geriatric evaluation, a quick, simple and non-invasive instrument that allows to estimate the nutritional status of the elders. PMID:16152778

  13. The impact of aging on mitochondrial function and biogenesis pathways in skeletal muscle of sedentary high- and low-functioning elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Anna-Maria; Adhihetty, Peter J; Buford, Thomas W; Wohlgemuth, Stephanie E; Lees, Hazel A; Nguyen, Linda M-D; Aranda, Juan M; Sandesara, Bhanu D; Pahor, Marco; Manini, Todd M; Marzetti, Emanuele; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2012-10-01

    Age-related loss of muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia) leads to a decline in physical function and frailty in the elderly. Among the many proposed underlying causes of sarcopenia, mitochondrial dysfunction is inherent in a variety of aged tissues. The intent of this study was to examine the effect of aging on key groups of regulatory proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and how this relates to physical performance in two groups of sedentary elderly participants, classified as high- and low-functioning based on the Short Physical Performance Battery test. Muscle mass was decreased by 38% and 30% in low-functioning elderly (LFE) participants when compared to young and high-functioning elderly participants, respectively, and positively correlated to physical performance. Mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized muscle fibers was reduced (41%) in the LFE group when compared to the young, and this was associated with a 30% decline in cytochrome c oxidase activity. Levels of key metabolic regulators, SIRT3 and PGC-1α, were significantly reduced (50%) in both groups of elderly participants when compared to young. Similarly, the fusion protein OPA1 was lower in muscle from elderly subjects; however, no changes were detected in Mfn2, Drp1 or Fis1 among the groups. In contrast, protein import machinery components Tom22 and cHsp70 were increased in the LFE group when compared to the young. This study suggests that aging in skeletal muscle is associated with impaired mitochondrial function and altered biogenesis pathways and that this may contribute to muscle atrophy and the decline in muscle performance observed in the elderly population. PMID:22681576

  14. High risk factors of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Camara, Soriba Naby; Yin, Tao; Yang, Ming; Li, Xiang; Gong, Qiong; Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Gang; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Aroun, Tajoo; Kuete, Martin; Ramdany, Sonam; Camara, Alpha Kabinet; Diallo, Aissatou Taran; Feng, Zhen; Ning, Xin; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Tao, Jing; Qin, Qi; Zhou, Wei; Cui, Jing; Huang, Min; Guo, Yao; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wang, Bo; Liu, Tao; Olivier, Ohoya Etsaka Terence; Conde, Tenin; Cisse, Mohamed; Magassouba, Aboubacar Sidiki; Ballah, Sneha; Keita, Naby Laye Moussa; Souare, Ibrahima Sory; Toure, Aboubacar; Traore, Sadamoudou; Balde, Abdoulaye Korse; Keita, Namory; Camara, Naby Daouda; Emmanuel, Dusabe; Wu, He-Shui; Wang, Chun-You

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decades, cancer has become one of the toughest challenges for health professionals. The epidemiologists are increasingly directing their research efforts on various malignant tumor worldwide. Of note, incidence of cancers is on the rise more quickly in developed countries. Indeed, great endeavors have to be made in the control of the life-threatening disease. As we know it, pancreatic cancer (PC) is a malignant disease with the worst prognosis. While little is known about the etiology of the PC and measures to prevent the condition, so far, a number of risk factors have been identified. Genetic factors, pre-malignant lesions, predisposing diseases and exogenous factors have been found to be linked to PC. Genetic susceptibility was observed in 10% of PC cases, including inherited PC syndromes and familial PC. However, in the remaining 90%, their PC might be caused by genetic factors in combination with environmental factors. Nonetheless, the exact mechanism of the two kinds of factors, endogenous and exogenous, working together to cause PC remains poorly understood. The fact that most pancreatic neoplasms are diagnosed at an incurable stage of the disease highlights the need to identify risk factors and to understand their contribution to carcinogenesis. This article reviews the high risk factors contributing to the development of PC, to provide information for clinicians and epidemiologists. PMID:27376795

  15. Whole blood viscosity and erythrocyte deformability are related to endothelium-dependent vasodilation and coronary risk in the elderly. The prospective investigation of the vasculature in Uppsala seniors (PIVUS) study.

    PubMed

    Sandhagen, Bo; Lind, Lars

    2012-01-01

    It has previously been shown that a high hemoglobin value, a major determinant of whole blood viscosity (WBV), predicts cardiovascular events. One putative mechanism might be an impaired endothelial function. Erythrocyte deformability is another rheologic feature of the erythrocyte being of importance for the flow properties of the blood, especially in the capillaries. The present study evaluates the relationships between blood viscosity, erythrocyte deformability assessed as erythrocyte fluidity (EF), coronary risk and endothelial vasodilatory function. In the population-based PIVUS study (1016 subjects aged 70); endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDV) was evaluated by the invasive forearm technique with acetylcholine given in the brachial artery and the brachial artery ultrasound technique with measurement of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD). WBV, plasma viscosity (PV) and EF were measured in a random sample of 573 subjects. WBV and PV were positively and EF negatively related to Framingham risk score. EDV was inversely related to both whole blood and plasma viscosity. FMD was not related to any rheologic variable. In multiple regression analyses WBV and EF were significantly related to EDV independently of gender, hypertension, smoking, hypercholesterolemia, obesity and diabetes. Acetylcholine-induced vasodilation in the forearm, but not FMD, was negatively related to whole blood viscosity and positively related to EF independently of traditional risk factors in elderly subjects, indicating a pathophysiological link between impaired hemorheology and coronary risk. PMID:22240364

  16. Risk factors for lower respiratory complications of rhinovirus infections in elderly people living in the community: prospective cohort study.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, K. G.; Kent, J.; Hammersley, V.; Cancio, E.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the role of rhinoviruses in elderly people living in the community. DESIGN: Prospective community based surveillance of elderly people, without intervention. Subjects were telephoned weekly to identify symptomatic upper respiratory tract infections. Symptoms and impact of illnesses were monitored, and specimens were collected for diagnostic serology and human rhinovirus polymerase chain reaction. SETTING: Leicestershire, England. SUBJECTS: 533 subjects aged 60 to 90. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Symptoms, restriction of activity, medical consultations, and antibiotic use during 96 rhinovirus infections. Adjusted odds ratios for lower respiratory syndromes with respect to smoking and health status. RESULTS: A viral cause was established in 211 (43%) of 497 respiratory illnesses; rhinoviruses were identified in 121 (24%) and as single pathogens in 107. The median duration of the first or only rhinovirus infection in the 96 people with 107 rhinovirus infections was 16 days; 18 of the 96 patients were confined to bed and 25 were unable to cope with routine household activities. Overall, 60 patients with rhinovirus infections had lower respiratory tract syndromes; 41 patients consulted their doctor, 31 of them (76%) receiving antibiotics. One patient died. Logistic regression analysis showed that chronic medical conditions increased the estimated probability of lower respiratory rhinovirus illness by 40% (95% confidence interval 17% to 68%) and smoking by 47% (14% to 90%). There were almost six times as many symptomatic rhinovirus infections as influenza A and B infections. CONCLUSIONS: Rhinoviruses are an important cause of debility and lower respiratory illness among elderly people in the community. Chronic ill health and smoking increase the likelihood of lower respiratory complications from such infections. The overall burden of rhinovirus infections in elderly people may approach that of influenza. PMID:8916700

  17. Medication regimen complexity in adults and the elderly in a primary healthcare setting: determination of high and low complexities

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Juliana M.; Galato, Dayani; Melo, Angelita C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The complexity of a medication regimen is related to the multiple characteristics of the prescribed regimen and can negatively influence the health outcomes of patients. Objective: To propose cut-off points in the complexity of pharmacotherapy to distinguish between patients with low and high complexities seen in a primary health care (PHC) setting to enable prioritization of patient management. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study, which included 517 adult and elderly patients, analyzing different cut-off points to define the strata of low and high pharmacotherapy complexities based on percentiles of the population evaluated. Data collection began with the solicitation of prescriptions, followed by a questionnaire that was administered by an interviewer. The complexity of a medication regimen was estimated from the Medication Regimen Complexity Index (MRCI). High complexity pharmacotherapy scores were analyzed from patient profiles, the use of health services, and pharmacotherapy. The criteria for subject inclusion in the sample population were as follows: inhabitant of the area covered by the municipality, 18 years or older, and being prescribed at least one drug during the collection period. Exclusion criteria at the time of collection were the use of any medication whose prescription was not available. All medications were accessed through the Primary Healthcare Service (PHS). Results: The median total pharmacotherapy complexity score was 8.5. High MRCI scores were correlated with age, medications taken with in the Brazilian PHS, having at least one potential drug-related problem, receiving up to eight years of schooling, number of medications and polypharmacy (five or more medicines), number of medical conditions, number of medical appointments, and number of cardiovascular diseases and endocrine metabolic diseases. We suggest different complexity tracks according to age (e.g., adult or elderly) that consider the pharmacotherapy and population

  18. Suicide risk assessment in high-risk adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gray, Barbara P; Dihigo, Sharolyn K

    2015-09-13

    A significant number of adolescents experience depression and other mental health disorders that may put them at risk for suicide. Mental health assessment is an important component of primary healthcare. Depression and suicide risk screening can assist healthcare providers in preventing suicides. PMID:26262455

  19. Nutrition in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Morley, J E; Mooradian, A D; Silver, A J; Heber, D; Alfin-Slater, R B

    1988-12-01

    Nutritional modulation is one approach to successful aging. In animals, dietary restriction increases life span. Alterations in the macronutrient and micronutrient constituent of the diet can modulate gene expression. Anorexia is common in elderly persons. The results of studies in animals suggest that aging is associated with a decrease in the opioid feeding drive and an increase in the satiating effect of cholecystokinin. Unrecognized depression is a common, treatable cause of anorexia and weight loss in elderly persons. Protein synthesis decreases in elderly persons; nevertheless, nitrogen balance can be maintained in patients with fairly low intakes of protein. Carbohydrate intolerance is common and may be modulated by nutritional intervention and physical activity. The role of cholesterol in the development of heart disease in very old persons is controversial. Homebound and institutionalized elderly persons often do not expose their skin to sunlight; because the skin of older persons has a decreased ability to form vitamin D, the vitamin D status in these persons is precarious and they are at risk for osteopenia. Vitamins are often abused by elderly persons. Drug administration alters the vitamin requirements of persons. Borderline zinc state has been associated with deteriorating immune function, especially in persons who have diabetes mellitus or who abuse alcohol. Zinc administration appears to protect against the deteriorating vision associated with age-related macular degeneration. Selenium deficiency seems to be associated with an increased prevalence of cancer. PMID:3056165

  20. Cholesterol and Cardiovascular Disease in the Elderly. Facts and Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Félix-Redondo, Francisco J.; Grau, Maria; Fernández-Bergés, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major cardiovascular risk factor that increases the incidence of atherosclerotic diseases in adults, although the association is less well established in the elderly. The role of statins is well characterized for the reduction of myocardial infarction incidence or death in individuals with a history or high risk of cardiovascular diseases, regardless of age. Therapeutic measures recommended to prevent cardiovascular diseases and to reduce cholesterol levels in the elderly, such as lifestyle changes and lipid-lowering drugs, particularly statins, are based on studies conducted in younger adults. This narrative review aims to summarize the main observational studies and randomized clinical trials that have studied the relationship between cholesterol and cardiovascular diseases and the potential benefits and drawbacks of statins use in elderly patients. PMID:23730531

  1. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance National Alternative High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey, United States, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunbaum, Jo Anne; Kann, Laura; Kinchen, Steven A.; Ross, James G.; Gowda, Vani R.; Collins, Janet L.; Kolbe, Lloyd J.

    2000-01-01

    The 1998 National Alternative High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey measured health risk behaviors at alternative high schools. Many alternative students engaged in behaviors that made them high-risk for serious problems (e.g., motor vehicle safety, violence, nutrition, sexuality, exercise, and substance abuse). Their prevalence of high risk…

  2. Elder abuse.

    PubMed

    Costa, A J

    1993-06-01

    Elder abuse is a tragedy both for the individual and for society because it occupies a pivotal position in the family life cycle of violence. Great variety exists among victims, abusers, and situations; thus, no single model is adequate to explain cause and direct treatment. Primary care physicians must be alert to the possibility of elder abuse in their patients and aware of resources within their community for managing cases once identified. Federal laws and regulations must take a proactive, long-term approach to the solution of this problem and must respect the autonomy of competent elderly patients. PMID:8356158

  3. Elderly trauma.

    PubMed

    Holleran, Renee Semonin

    2015-01-01

    Across the world, the population is aging. Adults 65 years and older make up one of the fastest growing segments of the US population. Trauma is a disease process that affects all age groups. The mortality and morbidity that result from an injury can be influenced by many factors including age, physical condition, and comorbidities. The management of the elderly trauma patient can present some unique challenges. This paper addresses the differences that occur in the management of elderly patient who has been injured. This paper also includes a discussion of how to prevent injury in the elderly. PMID:26039652

  4. A High Dietary Glycemic Index Increases Total Mortality in a Mediterranean Population at High Cardiovascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Quezada, Itandehui; Sánchez-Villegas, Almudena; Estruch, Ramón; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Corella, Dolores; Schröder, Helmut; Álvarez-Pérez, Jacqueline; Ruiz-López, María Dolores; Artacho, Reyes; Ros, Emilio; Bulló, Mónica; Covas, María-Isabel; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Buil-Cosiales, Pilar; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Lapetra, José; Pintó, Xavier; Arós, Fernando; Fiol, Miquel; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa María; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Serra-Majem, Lluís

    2014-01-01

    Objective Different types of carbohydrates have diverse glycemic response, thus glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) are used to assess this variation. The impact of dietary GI and GL in all-cause mortality is unknown. The objective of this study was to estimate the association between dietary GI and GL and risk of all-cause mortality in the PREDIMED study. Material and Methods The PREDIMED study is a randomized nutritional intervention trial for primary cardiovascular prevention based on community-dwelling men and women at high risk of cardiovascular disease. Dietary information was collected at baseline and yearly using a validated 137-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). We assigned GI values of each item by a 5-step methodology, using the International Tables of GI and GL Values. Deaths were ascertained through contact with families and general practitioners, review of medical records and consultation of the National Death Index. Cox regression models were used to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% CI for mortality, according to quartiles of energy-adjusted dietary GI/GL. To assess repeated measures of exposure, we updated GI and GL intakes from the yearly FFQs and used Cox models with time-dependent exposures. Results We followed 3,583 non-diabetic subjects (4.7 years of follow-up, 123 deaths). As compared to participants in the lowest quartile of baseline dietary GI, those in the highest quartile showed an increased risk of all-cause mortality [HR = 2.15 (95% CI: 1.15–4.04); P for trend  = 0.012]. In the repeated-measures analyses using as exposure the yearly updated information on GI, we observed a similar association. Dietary GL was associated with all-cause mortality only when subjects were younger than 75 years. Conclusions High dietary GI was positively associated with all-cause mortality in elderly population at high cardiovascular risk. PMID:25250626

  5. Near-fatal asthma in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Arjona, Nydia

    2015-01-01

    Asthma affects the elderly as often as other age groups; however, it more often becomes fatal in the elderly. Unfortunately, asthma is often unmanaged or underdiagnosed in the older population. It is important for health care providers to recognize risk factors in the elderly and properly treat them before asthma becomes fatal. This article describes near-fatal asthma and identifies risk factors specifically for the elderly. Symptoms of asthma are reviewed as well as assessments and diagnostic tests to identify asthma severity and complications. Proper management needs to be urgently initiated to prevent worsening respiratory distress; this includes fast-acting drug treatments appropriate for elderly patients. Decompensated acute respiratory failure, secondary to severe asthma, requires the skills of an experienced anesthesiologist because these patients may rapidly deteriorate during induction and intubation. Ventilator management must include strategies to prevent worsening hyperinflation of the lungs. Elderly asthma patients have a higher mortality risk related to ventilator complications and other comorbidities. PMID:25470264

  6. Elder Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical, sexual, or emotional abuse Neglect or abandonment Financial abuse - stealing of money or belongings Possible signs ... may be a sudden change in the person's financial situation. Elder abuse will not stop on its ...

  7. Elder Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... facilities or nursing homes. The mistreatment may be Physical, sexual, or emotional abuse Neglect or abandonment Financial abuse - stealing of money or belongings Possible signs of elder abuse include unexplained bruises, burns, ...

  8. Design, methodology and baseline characteristics of Tai Chi and its protective effect against ischaemic stroke risk in an elderly community population with risk factors for ischaemic stroke: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guohua; Zheng, Xin; Li, Junzhe; Duan, Tingjin; Qi, Dalu; Ling, Kun; He, Jian; Chen, Lidian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Controlling risk factors with regular exercise is effective and cost-effective for the primary prevention of ischaemic stroke. As a traditional Chinese form of exercise, Tai Chi might be beneficial in decreasing ischaemic stroke, but the evidence remains insufficient. We hypothesise that elderly community adults with risk factors for ischaemic stroke will decrease their ischaemic stroke risk by improving cerebral haemodynamic parameters, cardiopulmonary function, motor function, plasma risk indices, physical parameters or psychological outcomes after receiving 12 weeks of regular Tai Chi training compared with those who maintained their original physical activities. Therefore, we designed a randomised controlled trial that will systematically evaluate the protective effects of Tai Chi exercise on ischaemic stroke risk in an elderly community population with risk factors for ischaemic stroke. Methods and analysis A total of 170 eligible participants were randomly allocated into either the Tai Chi training group or the usual physical activity group. This paper reports on the design, intervention development and baseline characteristics of the participants. There were no significant differences between comparison groups in demographic characteristics or the baseline data of primary or secondary outcomes. Participants in the Tai Chi training group will receive 12 weeks of Tai Chi training with a frequency of 5 days/week and 60 min/day, while those in the usual physical activities group will maintain their original activities. Primary and secondary outcomes will be measured at the 12-week and 24-week follow-ups. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the Medical Ethics Committee of The Affiliated People's Hospital of Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (number 2013-020-02). The findings of this study will be communicated to healthcare professionals, participants and the public through peer

  9. [Dignity of the elderly].

    PubMed

    Ribera Casado, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A discussion is presented on what is understood by «dignity» when applied to the elderly, highlighting it universal character and contrasting it with the greater risks of suffering «indignities» to which the elderly are exposed. The discussion is divided into 3 sections. In the first, the risk factors in this sense could lead to physiological losses and illnessess, which in in the physical, mental and social sense are associated with ageing. In the second, the question of discrimination of the elderly as a form of aggression due to age, and is so widespread and infrequently studied. Lastly, it is discussed how to interpret the advice of the United Nations on how to promote active ageing as a defence system against indignities. It concludes with the message that neither the limitations that accompany the ageing process, nor the different forms of aggression that the elderly may be subjected to, provide sufficient argument neither for a loss of individual nor collective dignity. This is something which we all must endeavour to achieve and which must be maintained and be respected by individuals and by society at all times. PMID:25777944

  10. [Gait disorders in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Amadori, K; Püllen, R; Steiner, T

    2014-06-01

    Gait disorders are one of the most common gerontoneurological symptoms. Falls that occasionally cause severe injuries are highly relevant consequences. A clinical neurological examination and inspectoral gait analysis are the core investigations of the diagnostic process, which yields hypotheses with respect to the impaired structures as well as to specific diagnostic measures. The supplemental motor assessment quantifies the resulting impairment of mobility and risk of falling with the help of well-established instruments. Characteristic of gait disorders in the elderly are the multifactorial causes which make the complete identification, correct prioritization and adequate treatment the biggest challenges. The therapeutic concept is multiprofessional and includes the causal treatment of underlying diseases, physiotherapeutic training programs, prescription of medical aids and nutritional interventions. Identification and modification of risk factors (including those that are iatrogenic) are of superior importance. PMID:24867798

  11. [High Risk Federal Program Areas]: An Overview. High-Risk Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This report reviews the status of government agencies and operations that have been identified as at "high risk" for waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement; describes successful progress in some agencies; and looks at recent reform legislation. Six categories being targeted include accountability of defense programs, ensuring that all revenues are…

  12. Safety culture in high-risk industries.

    PubMed

    Martyka, Joanna; Lebecki, Kazimierz

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of whether adopting safety culture improves hazard prevention in enterprises characterized by high primary risk. To answer this question, sample underground coal mines were examined to investigate the basic elements of the safety culture of employees. This paper presents the results of a diagnosis of the basic elements of the safety culture of supervisors (midlevel managers) and blue-collar workers in 3 underground coal mines. The study used 2 techniques: a Likert-type scale and a questionnaire. The results indicate the need to introduce changes in the safety culture of underground coal mine employees. This study also presents the conditions for improvement. Special attention was paid to (a) the conditions for improving safety culture and (b) a programme for modifying risky behaviours. PMID:25513792

  13. Renal Cancer in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    González León, Tania; Morera Pérez, Maricela

    2016-01-01

    The increase of the aging population corresponds with the rise of renal cancer in elderly patients. The distinction between functional and chronological age, quality of life, and survival estimate are important issues, among others, that should be considered in the management of renal cancer in elderly patients. We made this review with the purpose of synthesizing the most updated criteria regarding indications and outcomes of the different therapeutic options in the management of elderly patients with renal cancer, beginning from the physiologic considerations that characterize them, their capacity to tolerate different therapeutic possibilities, and the prognosis of the patients' risks and comorbidity assessment. PMID:26715222

  14. Consumer Education for the Rural Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ater, E. Carolyn; Baugh, Carroll W.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews problems of the elderly consumer and describes efforts to provide consumer education to rural elderly individuals through two series of one-day workshops. Evaluations indicated that consumer education can be effectively provided to rural elderly with a high degree of perceived usefulness and sharing of information. (Author/JAC)

  15. Modeling HIV Risk in Highly Vulnerable Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huba, G. J.; Panter, A. T.; Melchior, Lisa A.; Trevithick, Lee; Woods, Elizabeth R.; Wright, Eric; Feudo, Rudy; Tierney, Steven; Schneir, Arlene; Tenner, Adam; Remafedi, Gary; Greenberg, Brian; Sturdevant, Marsha; Goodman, Elizabeth; Hodgins, Antigone; Wallace, Michael; Brady, Russell E.; Singer, Barney; Marconi, Katherine

    2003-01-01

    This article examines the structure of several HIV risk behaviors in an ethnically and geographically diverse sample of 8,251 clients from 10 innovative demonstration projects intended for adolescents living with, or at risk for, HIV. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses identified 2 risk factors for men (sexual intercourse with men and a…

  16. [Family caregivers and health promotion. Pilot study to validate a German assessment to survey resources and risks of elderly family caregivers (ARR)].

    PubMed

    Budnick, A; Kummer, K; Blüher, S; Dräger, D

    2012-04-01

    The ARR is a German assessment instrument to survey physical and psychological resources and risks of elderly family caregivers (50+). Factor structure, reliability, and validity were investigated using a sample of 202 caregivers from a national health insurance company. The factorial validity was confirmed for the physical profile (PHP) and the psychological profile (PSP). Reliability is good (PHP: Cronbach's α=0.73; PSP: Cronbach's α=0.71) for the shortness of the profiles. The correlation with self-efficacy constitutes an indicator for construct validity. The psychometric qualities allow the conclusion that the ARR is a reliable and valid instrument which is of interest for family caregivers. Nevertheless, further testing of validity is required. PMID:22311698

  17. Evaluation of a skin barrier cream for managing IAD in elderly patients using high-frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Andy; Arrowsmith, Martin; Young, Steve; Jaimes, Henry

    2014-12-01

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is a defined pathological entity and presents a significant burden for patients and health-care systems. The main objective of this evaluation was to test the efficacy and safety of a skin barrier cream in the management of uncomplicated IAD in elderly patients. Ten incontinent patients with mobility problems that presented with signs of IAD were included in the evaluation. The evaluation took place during a 2-week period. The product's efficacy was objectively evaluated in each patient with high-frequency ultrasound scans taken from the irritated skin compared with an ultrasound scan taken from normal adjacent (control) skin. Data analysis showed a statistical significance in favour of the capacity of the product to help reduce inflammatory signs. Photographic follow-up allowed correlation of ultrasound findings and clinical signs. The product was effective in treating the skin irritation and preventing further skin breakdown. There were no adverse events during the evaluation. PMID:25475672

  18. Higher Fasting Plasma Glucose Levels, within the Normal Range, are Associated with Decreased Processing Speed in High Functioning Young Elderly.

    PubMed

    Raizes, Meytal; Elkana, Odelia; Franko, Motty; Ravona Springer, Ramit; Segev, Shlomo; Beeri, Michal Schnaider

    2015-01-01

    We explored the association of plasma glucose levels within the normal range with processing speed in high functioning young elderly, free of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A sample of 41 participants (mean age = 64.7, SD = 10; glucose 94.5 mg/dL, SD = 9.3), were examined with a computerized cognitive battery. Hierarchical linear regression analysis showed that higher plasma glucose levels, albeit within the normal range (<110 mg/dL), were associated with longer reaction times (p <  0.01). These findings suggest that even in the subclinical range and in the absence of T2DM, monitoring plasma glucose levels may have an impact on cognitive function. PMID:26484908

  19. Characteristics Predicting Nursing Home Admission in the Program of All-Inclusive Care for Elderly People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Susan M.; Steinwachs, Donald M.; Rathouz, Paul J.; Burton, Lynda C.; Mukamel, Dana B.

    2005-01-01

    Long term care in a nursing home prior to enrollment in PACE remain at high risk of readmission, despite the availability of comprehensive services. This study determined overall risk and predictors of long-term nursing home admission within the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE). Design and Methods: Data PACE records for 4,646…

  20. [Clinicopathological characteristics of colorectal carcinoma in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Tao, Kaixiong; Gao, Jinbo; Wang, Guobin

    2016-05-01

    Elderly patients with colorectal cancer have different clincopathological characteristics from younger patients. Colorectal cancers tend to localize in the proximal colon, from cecum to the splenic flexure in the elderly patients. Changes in the stools, rectal bleeding or black stool, abdominal pain, fatigue, weight loss and anemia are the common symptoms. Analysis showed that age is one of independent risk factors for lower completion rates of colonoscopy. Therefore, the choice of diagnosis methods in elderly patients should be careful. Achieving a clear diagnosis and avoiding complications should be considered at the same time. Most colorectal cancers in elderly are highly and moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas and locally advanced, and have less lymphatic and blood metastasis. The proportion of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma increases with the increase of age, which should be concerned. Multiple colorectal cancers and colorectal cancer with extra-colorectal malignancy are not rare in the elderly patients. The common extra-colorectal tumors consist of gastric cancer, lung cancer, biliary carcinoma, pancreas cancer and malignancy from blood system. Molecular events, such as mutations of KARS, BRAF, TP53 and deficiency of DNA mismatch repair, are more frequent in elderly colorectal cancer patients. Many factors have impact on treatment decision in elderly patients with colorectal cancer, including age, comorbidities, physiological functions of organs and willingness of patients and their relatives. Although surgery is still the main treatment, the proportion of radical surgery is lower and emergency surgery is higher as compared to younger patients. With the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques and advances in anesthesia and perioperative management, laparoscopic surgery has become widespread in elderly patients with colorectal cancer. In addition, more attention should be paid to adjuvant therapy. Comprehensive individualized

  1. ALCOHOL USE DISORDERS IN THE ELDERLY: A BRIEF OVERVIEW FROM EPIDEMIOLOGY TO TREATMENT OPTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Fabio; Vignoli, Teo; Leggio, Lorenzo; Addolorato, Giovanni; Zoli, Giorgio; Bernardi, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol-use-disorders (AUDs) afflict 1–3% of elderly subjects. The CAGE, SMAST-G, and AUDIT are the most common and validated questionnaires used to identify AUDs in the elderly, and some laboratory markers of alcohol abuse (AST, GGT, MCV, and CDT) may also be helpful. In particular, the sensitivity of MCV or GGT in detecting alcohol misuse is higher in older than in younger populations. The incidence of medical and neurological complications during alcohol withdrawal syndrome in elderly alcoholics is higher than in younger alcoholics. Chronic alcohol abuse is associated with tissue damage to several organs. Namely, an increased level of blood pressure is more frequent in the elderly than in younger adults, and a greater vulnerability to the onset of alcoholic liver disease, and an increasing risk of breast cancer in menopausal women have been described. In addition, the prevalence of dementia in elderly alcoholics is almost 5 times higher than in non-alcoholic elderly individuals, approximately 25% of elderly patients with dementia also present AUDs, and almost 20% of individuals aged 65 and over with a diagnosis of depression have a co-occurring AUD. Moreover, prevention of drinking relapse in older alcoholics is, in some cases, better than in younger patients; indeed, more than 20% of treated elderly alcohol-dependent patients remain abstinent after four years. Considering that the incidence of AUDs in the elderly is fairly high, and AUDs in the elderly are still underestimated, more studies in the fields of epidemiology, prevention and pharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatment of AUDs in the elderly are warranted. PMID:22575256

  2. Life Satisfaction of Elderly Individuals in Regular Community Housing, in Low-Cost Community Housing, and High and Low Self-Determination Nursing Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallerand, Robert J.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Administered life satisfaction questionnaire to 199 French-speaking older adults in Montreal, living in nursing homes and in the community. Found that elderly persons living in regular community housing, in low-cost community housing, and in high self-determination nursing homes had similar levels of life satisfaction, and more satisfaction than…

  3. A 10-year follow-up study of the association between calcium channel blocker use and the risk of dementia in elderly hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Liang; Wen, Shu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are widely used for reducing blood pressure of hypertensive patients. Recent reports document the beneficial effects of CCB for preventing dementia; however, the results are controversial. We aim to evaluate the risk of developing dementia among elderly hypertensive patients treated with CCB. We designed a retrospective population-based cohort study using the records of the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan dated from 2000 to 2010. The study cohort comprised 82,107 hypertensive patients of more than 60 years of age, and 4004 propensity score (PS)-matched pairs were selected according to age, sex, year of hypertension diagnosis, and baseline comorbidities. We employed a robust Cox proportional hazard model to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of developing dementia in the PS-matched cohort. The annual incidence of dementia in the CCB-exposure group was significantly lower than that in the comparator group (3.9 vs 6.9 per 1000 person-years, P < 0.01) during the follow-up period (4.4 ± 2.5 years). Based on the PS-matched cohort, the adjusted HR of dementia in the CCB-exposure group was significantly lower than that in comparator group (HR = 0.53, 95% confidence interval: 0.39–0.72, P < 0.01). Sensitivity and subgroup analyses also confirmed similar findings. Our results provided evidence for an association between CCB use and a lower risk of developing dementia among the elderly hypertensive patients. Further studies are required to explore the causal relationship between CCB use and dementia. PMID:27512890

  4. A Healthier Lifestyle Pattern for Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Is Associated With Better Bone Mass in Southern Chinese Elderly Men and Women.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao-min; Wong, Carmen Ka Man; Wong, Samuel Yeung-shan; Leung, Jason; Tse, Lap Ah; Chan, Ruth; Woo, Jean

    2015-08-01

    Lifestyle factors have been linked to bone health, however little is known about their combined impact on bone. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and osteoporosis are 2 major public health problems that share some common pathophysiology. We aimed to assess whether higher adherence to American Heart Association diet and lifestyle recommendations (AHA-DLR) was associated with better bone health in Chinese elderly.This was a cross-sectional study using data from the largest population-based study on osteoporosis in Asia (Mr and Ms Os, Hong Kong). The study recruited 4000 independent walking Chinese men and women aged ≥65 year. Information on demographic, health, and lifestyle factors was obtained by standardized questionnaires. An overall lifestyle score was estimated based on a modified adherence index of AHA-DLR. Bone mineral measurements of the whole body, total hip, lumbar spine, and femoral neck were made by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.Most lifestyle factors alone were not significantly associated bone mass. Overall lifestyle score in the highest quartile compared with the lowest quartile had significantly better bone mass at all sites in a dose-response manner. Every 10-unit of lifestyle score increase was associated with 0.005, 0.004, and 0.007 g/cm increases of bone mineral density (BMD) at whole body, femur neck, and total hip, respectively (all P < 0.05), and 13.2% (odds ratio 0.868; 95% CI 0.784, 0.961) decreased risk of osteoporosis at total hip after adjustment for potential covariates.Our study suggested that greater adherence to an overall healthy lifestyle for CVD risk reduction was associated with better bone mass among Chinese elderly. PMID:26252299

  5. Chronoecological health watch of arterial stiffness and neuro-cardio-pulmonary function in elderly community at high altitude (3524 m), compared with Japanese town.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, K; Norboo, T; Otsuka, Y; Higuchi, H; Hayajiri, M; Narushima, C; Sato, Y; Tsugoshi, T; Murakami, S; Wada, T; Ishine, M; Okumiya, K; Matsubayashi, K; Yano, S; Chogyal, T; Angchuk, D; Ichihara, K; Cornélissen, G; Halberg, F

    2005-10-01

    prevention of stroke and other adverse cardiovascular outcomes, including dementia, CAVI may be very useful, especially at high altitude. In conclusion, elderly people living at high altitude have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease than low-latitude peers. To determine how these indices are associated with maintained cognitive function deserves further study by the longitudinal follow-up of these communities in terms of longevity and aging in relation to their neuro-cardio-pulmonary function. PMID:16275510

  6. [Management of vitamin K antagonists in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Belleville, Tiphaine; Pautas, Éric; Gaussem, Pascale; Siguret, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    Elderly patients of 80 years and above are commonly frail, due to substantial comorbid conditions and numerous medications. Managing elderly patients receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKA) is challenging because those patients are at high risk of both thrombosis and bleeding. Special considerations on the choice of the VKA drug, dosing and monitoring have to be taken into account in the elderly in order to avoid over-anticoagulation and to minimize the haemorrhagic risk which consequences may be dramatic or fatal in this age group. In these patients, INR monitoring is crucial, especially at the start of treatment. The use of dosing algorithms specifically developed for elderly patients allows to decrease over-anticoagulation during the initiation period. INR has to be monitored more frequently in case of acute illness or in case of modification of the associated drugs. Patient information and education are of great importance, even in geriatric patients and has been shown to improve the quality of anticoagulation. Even though the use of direct oral anticoagulants is currently expanding, prescribing VKA in elderly patients in whom the prevalence of severe renal insufficiency remains up to date. PMID:24736138

  7. Impaired renal function and bleeding in elderly treated with dabigatran.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Emmanuelle; Lavenu-Bombled, Cecile; Orostegui-Giron, Lupe; Desconclois, Céline; Assayag, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    Advantages of dabigatran, a thrombin inhibitor, for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation are numerous. Elderly patients with impaired renal function are at high risk of bleeding. Recommendations about the renal monitoring in elderly patients are not precise enough. The hemoclot direct thrombin inhibitor (HTI) assay measures accurately the dabigatran activity. Both could help managing serious bleeding events in selected populations. Four elderly patients recently treated with appropriate doses of dabigatran were hospitalized for major bleeding. Three patients were very elderly (> 80 years) and three had impaired renal function (clearance < 50 ml/min) before treatment initiation. Serious bleeding events occurred shortly after dabigatran initiation (< 2 months). In all cases, there was a documented dabigatran plasma overdose associated with a renal function impairment concomitant with the bleeding. Why should physicians be aware of this finding?: A close follow-up of the renal function in clinically fragile elderly patient, before and during the weeks following dabigatran initiation, could help to detect the risk of major bleeding event. The HTI dosage could help managing the treatment in case of severe bleeding event. PMID:24509332

  8. Effects of 12-week exercise training on osteocalcin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and insulin resistance in elderly females with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Nayoung; Kim, Kijin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of exercise training on bone metabolism markers, inflammatory markers, and physical fitness in patients with osteoporosis from an osteoporosis-related immunological perspective. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine elderly female subjects (age, 74.2 ± 3.2 years) were classified into normal, osteopenia, and osteoporosis groups based on the T-score measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The exercise was performed voluntarily by the patients for 1 hour per day, three times per week, for 12 weeks. [Results] The differences between bone mineral content, bone mineral density, and osteocalcin concentrations increased significantly in the osteoporosis group after 12 weeks of exercise and were significantly higher than those in the normal and osteopenia groups. However, the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance score decreased significantly in the osteoporosis group after 12 weeks of exercise. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations tended to decrease in all groups after 12 weeks of exercise and showed an inverse correlation with osteocalcin concentration; however, no statistical significance was observed. [Conclusion] Our findings suggest that an exercise program in patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis effectively reduces the risk of osteoporotic fracture and related diseases since it improves bone density and physical fitness and reduces inflammatory marker levels.

  9. Tactile Intervention as a Novel Technique in Improving Body Stability in Healthy Elderly and Elderly with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alshammari, Faris S.; Daher, Noha; Alzoghbieh, Eman S.; Dehom, Salem O.; Laymon, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Body sway increases in the elderly because of normal aging and high incidence of disease such as diabetes. Prevalence of sway is greater in the elderly with diabetes because of damage to the central and peripheral nervous systems. Increase in body sway is associated with an elevated risk of falling. Falling is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The purpose of this study was to develop a new technique to improve body stability and decrease body sway in the elderly people with or without diabetes. Subjects and Methods: Twenty-two subjects—12 elderly (mean age, 75.5±7.3 years) and 10 age-matched elderly with diabetes (mean age, 72.5±5.3 years)—were recruited for this study. Subjects received tactile feedback as a tingling sensation resulting from electrical stimulation triggered by body sway. Results: The results showed a significant reduction in body sway in the elderly while standing on foam with eyes open (1.0±0.31 vs. 1.9±0.8; P=0.006) and eyes closed (1.8±0.7 vs. 3.3±1.5; P=0.001). In the group with diabetes, there was a significant reduction in body sway while standing on foam with eyes closed (1.4±0.5 vs. 2.3±0.8; P=0.045) but not with eyes open. Conclusions: In this small study, this technique offers a new tool for training people with diabetes and elderly people to improve body stability and balance. PMID:25299792

  10. Lack of Association between Pre-Operative Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 and the Risk of Post-Operative Delirium in Elderly Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Che-Sheng; Liang, Chih-Kuang; Chou, Ming-Yueh; Lin, Yu-Te; Hsu, Chien-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Objective Postoperative delirium (POD) is a highly prevalent complex neuropsychiatric syndrome in elderly patients. However, its pathophysiology is currently unknown. Early detection and prevention of POD is important; therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the link between preoperative insulin growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels in the serum and POD in the Chinese elderly patients. Methods One hundred and three patients who were undergoing an orthopedic operation took part in the study. Preoperative serum IGF-1 levels were measured. POD was determined daily using the Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) and DSM-IV TR. Baseline serum IGF-1 levels were compared between patients who did and did not develop POD. Correlation coefficients were calculated to evaluate relationship between baseline characteristics and serum IGF-1 levels. The relationship between baseline biomarkers and delirium status was investigated using logistic regression analysis, adjusting for potential confounding variables. Results Twenty-three patients developed POD. The POD group had lower MMSE scores and higher CCI scores and proportions of acute admission. Preoperative serum IGF-1 levels were correlated with MMSE scores and age (MMSE: r=0.230, p<0.05; age: r=-0.419, p<0.001). Baseline serum IGF-1 levels did not differ between patients who did and did not develop POD, even after adjusting for potential confounding factors, MMSE score, and age. Conclusion No association was found between preoperative IGF-1 levels and POD, suggesting that they are not direct biomarkers of the incidence of POD among the Chinese elderly population. Further research with larger sample sizes is warranted to clarify the relationship. PMID:27247600

  11. High hip fracture risk in men with severe aortic calcification: MrOS study.

    PubMed

    Szulc, Pawel; Blackwell, Terri; Schousboe, John T; Bauer, Douglas C; Cawthon, Peggy; Lane, Nancy E; Cummings, Steven R; Orwoll, Eric S; Black, Dennis M; Ensrud, Kristine E

    2014-04-01

    A significant link between cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis is established in postmenopausal women, but data for men are scarce. We tested the hypothesis that greater severity of abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) was associated with an increased risk of nonspine fracture in 5994 men aged ≥ 65 years. AAC was assessed on 5400 baseline lateral thoracolumbar radiographs using a validated visual semiquantitative score. Total hip bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Incident nonspine fractures were centrally adjudicated. After adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI), total hip BMD, fall history, prior fracture, smoking status, comorbidities, race, and clinical center, the risk of nonspine fracture (n=805) was increased among men with higher AAC (hazard ratio [HR] quartile 4 [Q4] [AAC score ≥ 9] versus quartile 1 [Q1] [0-1], 1.36; 96% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.68). This association was due to an increased risk of hip fracture (n=178) among men with higher AAC (HR Q4 versus Q1, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.41-3.87). By contrast, the association between AAC and the risk of nonspine, nonhip fracture was weaker and not significant (HR Q4 versus Q1, 1.22; 95% CI, 0.96-1.55). The findings regarding higher AAC and increased risk of fracture were not altered in additional analyses accounting for degree of trauma, estimated glomerular filtration rate, presence of lumbar vertebral fractures (which may bias AAC assessment), preexisting cardiovascular disease, ankle brachial index, or competing risk of death. Thus, in this large cohort of elderly men, greater AAC was independently associated with an increased risk of hip fracture, but not with other nonspine fractures. These findings suggest that AAC assessment may be a useful method for identification of older men at high risk of hip fracture. PMID:23983224

  12. Modeling biotic habitat high risk areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Despain, D.G.; Beier, P.; Tate, C.; Durtsche, B.M.; Stephens, T.

    2000-01-01

    Fire, especially stand replacing fire, poses a threat to many threatened and endangered species as well as their habitat. On the other hand, fire is important in maintaining a variety of successional stages that can be important for approach risk assessment to assist in prioritizing areas for allocation of fire mitigation funds. One example looks at assessing risk to the species and biotic communities of concern followed by the Colorado Natural Heritage Program. One looks at the risk to Mexican spottled owls. Another looks at the risk to cutthroat trout, and a fourth considers the general effects of fire and elk.

  13. A multidisciplinary QA program for enteral nutrition in high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    D'Addario, V; Danek, M

    1991-01-01

    An increase in elderly patients and severity of illness rates means greater use of nasogastric feeding tubes for both high-risk acutely ill and chronically ill patients. When the QA screening process at Booth Memorial Medical Center revealed a certain percentage of complications with small bore, weight-tipped feeding tubes inserted through the nares, a multidisciplinary peer review committee (MPRC) was formed to review the enteral nutrition program. After a literature review to determine possible complications, the MPRC identified lung perforations due to tube misplacement, tube feeding aspiration into the lungs leading to possible aspiration pneumonia, and an internal tip separation from the tube product failure. Unconscious incubated patients on ventilators were shown as at high risk for feeding tube misplacement in an initial MPRC patient study. A second study evaluated several different feeding tube products in the medical, respiratory and surgical ICU. The MPRC established a credentialing process for physician assistants, interns and residents in feeding tube placement. The MPRC proceedings were presented to the hospital-wide QA committee for review, endorsement and recommendations on all policy and procedure changes. The conclusions were that a more concerted effort must be made to improve medical management and encourage ongoing education in the administration of enteral feedings to high-risk patients. PMID:10113670

  14. Surgery in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Watters, James M.

    2002-01-01

    The elderly (those 75 years of age or older) are a heterogeneous group. They present with both elective and urgent surgical problems, and risk assessment, decision-making and perioperative care are typically more challenging than in younger patients. An appreciation for this heterogeneity and an understanding of how physiologic changes of aging affect surgical care are essential if the best outcomes are to be achieved. PMID:11939651

  15. [Understanding the elder abuse by family members].

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Ai, Xiaoqing; Cao, Yuping; Zhang, Yalin

    2012-04-01

    The issue of elder abuse not only influence on the elders' physical and mental health seriously, but also increase the social burden of geriatrics disease and the corresponding social welfare agencies. The text reviews the general concept, type and characteristics, total incidence rate and all kinds of abuse, and risk factors of social psychology and psychopathology, thus the elder abuse can be identificated and intervented. PMID:22561575

  16. Safety of Antithrombotic Agents in Elderly Patients with Acute Coronary Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Bianca; Husted, Steen

    2016-04-01

    There are unique challenges in the treatment and prevention of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) with antithrombotics in elderly patients: elderly patients usually require multiple drugs due to comorbidities, are highly susceptible to adverse drug reactions and drug-drug interactions, may have cognitive problems affecting compliance and complications, are especially exposed to the risk of falls and, most importantly, ageing is an independent risk factor for bleeding. Antithrombotic drugs, alone or in association, further and variously amplify age-related bleeding risk. Moreover, age-related changes in primary haemostasis may potentially affect the pharmacodynamics of some antiplatelet drugs. Thus, elderly subjects might be more or less sensitive to standard antiplatelet regimens depending on individual characteristics affecting antiplatelet drug response. Importantly, elderly patients are a rapidly growing population worldwide, have the highest incidence of ACS, but are poorly represented in clinical trials. As a consequence, evidence on antithrombotic drug benefits and risks is limited. Thus, in the real-world setting, older people are often denied antithrombotic drugs because of unjustified concerns, or might be over-treated and exposed to excessive bleeding risk. Personalized antithrombotic therapy in elderly patients is particularly critical, to minimize risks without affecting efficacy. PMID:26941087

  17. Risk Management in High Adventure Outdoor Pursuits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinnamon, Jerry

    This paper outlines management guidelines for outdoor adventure pursuits based on analysis of accident case studies in the literature. Managing risk, to a large degree, involves managing human errors related to natural environmental hazards. The knowledge needed to manage risk may be gained through personal experience (the most dangerous way),…

  18. Evaluation of Risk Management Strategies for a Low-Cost, High-Risk Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shishko, Robert; Jorgensen, Edward J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes work in progress to define and implement a risk management process tailored to a low-cost, high-risk, NASA mission -the Microrover Flight Experiment (MFEX, commonly called the Mars microrover).

  19. Exemestane Reduces Breast Cancer Risk in High-Risk Postmenopausal Women

    Cancer.gov

    Clinical trial results presented at the 2011 ASCO annual meeting showed that the aromatase inhibitor exemestane—used to treat early and advanced breast cancer—substantially reduced the risk of invasive breast cancer in high-risk postmenopausal women.

  20. Hypertension in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Coope, J

    1987-08-01

    Hypertension is a common finding in patients aged over 60 years, but the following questions need answering. How dangerous is it? Will lowering the blood pressure reduce the attendant risks? What is the 'cost' of such treatment in terms of side effects, drug-induced disease and health service finance? Two recently completed trials throw light on these problems: EWPHE (European Working Party on Hypertension in the Elderly), a European study based on hospital-clinic attenders, using a diuretic backed up with methyldopa; and HEP (randomized trial of treatment of Hypertension in Elderly Patients in Primary Care), based on general-practice screening in England and Wales using atenolol and bendrofluazide. The results of these trials were compared and the findings were broadly similar in the two studies. Some of the differences may be due to the different selection of patients. It is concluded that elderly patients with sustained blood pressures greater or equal to 170/90 mmHg would benefit from treatment by substantial reduction of stroke. Diuretics or beta-blockers, alone or together, are acceptable treatments in elderly subjects. PMID:3312529

  1. Physical Activity Types and Coronary Heart Disease Risk in Middle-Aged and Elderly Persons: The Rotterdam Study.

    PubMed

    Koolhaas, Chantal M; Dhana, Klodian; Golubic, Rajna; Schoufour, Josje D; Hofman, Albert; van Rooij, Frank J A; Franco, Oscar H

    2016-04-15

    Physical activity is associated with decreased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). The specific physical activity types that provide beneficial effects in an older population remain unclear. We assessed the association of total physical activity, walking, cycling, domestic work, sports, and gardening with CHD by using Cox proportional hazard models among 5,901 participants aged >55 (median age, 67) years from the prospective population-based Rotterdam Study, enrolled between 1997 and 2001. Activities were categorized into tertiles, and the lowest tertiles were used as reference. In the multivariable model, we adjusted for age, sex, smoking, alcohol consumption, education, diet, and other physical activity types. During 15 years of follow-up (median, 10.3 (interquartile range, 8.0-11.8) years), 642 participants (10.9%) experienced a CHD event. In the multivariable model, the respective hazard ratios for the medium and high categories compared with the low category were 0.79 (95% confidence interval CI): 0.66, 0.96) and 0.71 (95% CI: 0.58, 0.87) for total physical activity, 0.76 (95% CI: 0.63, 0.92) and 0.70 (95% CI: 0.57, 0.88) for cycling, and 0.81 (95% CI: 0.66, 0.98) and 0.71 (95% CI: 0.56, 0.90) for domestic work. Walking, sports, and gardening were not associated with CHD. In conclusion, in this long-term follow-up study of older adults, domestic work and cycling were associated with reduced CHD risk. Physical activity should be promoted in this population with the aim to prevent CHD. PMID:27022033

  2. Positron emission tomography imaging for vascular inflammation evaluation in elderly subjects with different risk factors for cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Abdelouahed; Orellana, Marlene Rossibel Montesino; Fulop, Tamas; Turcotte, Eric E; Bentourkia, M’hamed

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the usefulness of 18F-FDG-PET to differentiate vascular inflammation and to determine the effect of rosuvastatin. Eight subjects were recruited and were divided according to their health status in three groups; 3 healthy subjects, 3 patients with hypercholesterolemia and 2 patients with stable angina pectoris. Hypercholesterolemic patients were submitted immediately after their recruitment to rosuvastatin treatment (20 mg/d). Two PET/CT measurements were made throughout the course of the study, one at baseline and the second 12 months later. Our results showed that the ratio of calcified arteries to total analyzed arteries segments were 23%, 36% and 44% for healthy, hypercholesterolemic and stable angina patients respectively. Healthy subjects present, at baseline, a high level of vascular inflammation as measured by 18F-FDG uptake in both calcified and non-calcified segments of the arteries. This vascular inflammation increases as a function of the cardiovascular risk factors. After the 12-month follow-up period, non-calcified arteries showed a significant increase of 18F-FDG uptake in both healthy, hypercholesterolemic and stable angina patients. However, the highest increase was noted for the healthy subjects; (50% increase, p<0.0001), while hypercholesterolemic patients under rosuvastatin showed only 25% increase of 18F-FDG uptake (p<0.0001). This study confirms the usefulness of 18F-FDG measurement to localize and quantify arterial inflammation in each artery segments and as a function of the CVD risk factors. Rosuvastatin may have a protective effect against arterial inflammation however; other studies with higher rosuvastatin doses (>20 mg/d) are needed to confirm this beneficial effect. PMID:24795842

  3. Prognostic factors and survival study in high-grade glioma in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Álvarez de Eulate-Beramendi, Sayoa; Álvarez-Vega, Marco Antonio; Balbin, Milagros; Sanchez-Pitiot, Ana; Vallina-Alvarez, Aitana; Martino-González, Juan

    2016-06-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant primary brain tumour in adults. Due to the ageing of the population, diagnosis in the elderly is becoming more common. The aim of this study was to analyse different combinations of treatments and to identify preoperative factors, including O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase status, that may be associated with decreased survival among patients older than 70 years. Methods and materials We retrospectively included all patients over 70 years of age, who underwent surgery at the Department of Neurosurgery (HUCA and HUMV) and were diagnosed of GBM by pathological criteria from January 2007 to September 2014. Results Eighty-one patients were analysed, whose mean age was 75 (SD 4) and 48 were male. Karnofsky performance status (KPS) was over 70 in 61 patients and 38.3% presented with motor deficit. Sixty-three patients underwent resection, and 18 had only a diagnostic biopsy. The complication rate was 17.28% and mortality rate was 7.4%. Survival was increased in patients who received radiotherapy (n = 41) or additional chemotherapy (n = 26) (p < 0.001). KPS < 70 was an independent factor associated with low-rate survival. Patients with optimal treatment had a median survival of 8 months compared to patients with suboptimal treatment who had a median survival of 4 months (p < 0.001). Conclusions This study suggests that KPS is the most important preoperative prognostic factor. Maximal safe resection followed by radical radiotherapy and temozolomide might be the optimal treatment of choice since glioblastoma-diagnosed patients over 70 years of age showed a statistically significant survival benefit. PMID:26828095

  4. High-level gait and balance disorders in the elderly: a midbrain disease?

    PubMed

    Demain, Adèle; Westby, G W Max; Fernandez-Vidal, Sara; Karachi, Carine; Bonneville, Fabrice; Do, Manh Cuong; Delmaire, Christine; Dormont, Didier; Bardinet, Eric; Agid, Yves; Chastan, Nathalie; Welter, Marie-Laure

    2014-01-01

    The pathophysiology of gait and balance disorders in elderly people with 'higher level gait disorders' (HLGD) is poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to identify the brain networks involved in this disorder. Standardised clinical scores, biomechanical parameters of gait initiation and brain imaging data, including deep white matter lesions (DWML) and brain voxel-based morphometry analyses, were assessed in 20 HLGD patients in comparison to 20 age-matched controls. In comparison to controls, HLGD patients presented a near-normal preparatory phase of gait initiation, but a severe alteration of both locomotor and postural parameters of first-step execution, which was related to 'axial' hypokinetic-rigid signs. HLGD patients showed a significant grey matter reduction in the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) and the left primary motor cortex. This midbrain atrophy was related to the severity of clinical and neurophysiologically determined balance deficits. HLGD patients also showed a reduction in speed of gait, related to 'appendicular' hypokinetic-rigid signs and frontal-lobe-like cognitive deficits. These last two symptoms were correlated with the severity of DWML, found in 12/20 HLGD patients. In conclusion, these data suggest that the gait and balance deficits in HLGD mainly result from the lesion or dysfunction of the network linking the primary motor cortex and the MLR, brain regions known to be involved in the control of gait and balance, whereas cognitive and 'appendicular' hypokinetic-rigid signs mainly result from DWML that could be responsible for a dysfunction of the frontal cortico-basal ganglia loops. PMID:24202784

  5. Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Hip Arthroplasty: Routine and High Risk Patients.

    PubMed

    Nam, Denis; Nunley, Ryan M; Johnson, Staci R; Keeney, James A; Clohisy, John C; Barrack, Robert L

    2015-12-01

    This study's purpose was to present the use of a risk stratification protocol in which "routine" risk patients receive a mobile compression device with aspirin and "high" risk patients receive warfarin for thromboprophylaxis after hip arthroplasty. 1859 hip arthroplasty patients were prospectively enrolled (1402 routine risk--75.4%, 457 high risk--24.6%). The cumulative rate of venous thromboembolism events was 0.5% in the routine versus 0.5% in the high-risk cohort within 6weeks postoperatively (P=1.00). Patients in the routine risk cohort had a lower rate of major bleeding (0.5% versus 2.0%, P=0.006) and wound complications (0.2% versus 1.2%, P=0.01). Use of our risk stratification protocol allowed the avoidance of more aggressive anticoagulation in 75% of patients while achieving a low overall incidence of symptomatic VTE. PMID:26182980

  6. Clinical features, comorbidity, and cognitive impairment in elderly bipolar patients

    PubMed Central

    Rise, Ida Vikan; Haro, Josep Maria; Gjervan, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Data specific to late-life bipolar disorder (BD) are limited. Current research is sparse and present guidelines are not adapted to this group of patients. Objectives We present a literature review on clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and cognitive impairment in patients with late-life BD. This review discusses common comorbidities that affect BD elders and how aging might affect cognition and treatment. Methods Eligible studies were identified in MedLine by the Medical Subject Headings terms “bipolar disorder” and “aged”. We only included original research reports published in English between 2012 and 2015. Results From 414 articles extracted, 16 studies were included in the review. Cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, type II diabetes, and endocrinological abnormalities were observed as highly prevalent. BD is associated with a high suicide risk. Bipolar elderly had an increased risk of dementia and performed worse on cognitive screening tests compared to age-matched controls across different levels of cognition. Despite high rates of medical comorbidity among bipolar elderly, a systematic under-recognition and undertreatment of cardiovascular disease have been suggested. Conclusion There was a high burden of physical comorbidities and cognitive impairment in late-life BD. Bipolar elderly might be under-recorded and undertreated in primary medical care, indicating that this group needs an adapted clinical assessment and specific clinical guidelines need to be established. PMID:27274256

  7. Relationship between seasonal weather changes, risk of dehydration, and incidence of severe bradyarrhythmias requiring urgent temporary transvenous cardiac pacing in an elderly population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmisano, Pietro; Accogli, Michele; Zaccaria, Maria; Vergari, Alessandra; De Luca De Masi, Gabriele; Negro, Luca; De Blasi, Sergio

    2014-09-01

    There is little information on any seasonal variations or meteorological factors associated with symptomatic bradyarrhythmias requiring cardiac pacing. The aim of this single-center study was to investigate the seasonal distribution of the incidence of severe, life-threatening bradyarrhythmias requiring urgent temporary transvenous cardiac pacing in an elderly population. Consecutive patients who underwent urgent temporary transvenous cardiac pacing between 2007 and 2012 were enrolled. The baseline characteristics of the patients and some meteorological parameters, including the calculation the daily heat index (HI), were recorded. During the study period, 79 consecutive patients (mean age 82 ± 8 years, 41 % male) underwent urgent temporary transvenous cardiac pacing, mainly for third-degree atrioventricular block (79 %). The incidence of bradyarrhythmias was significantly higher in summer than in the other seasons ( P < 0.001). Moreover, the highest incidence was observed in months with HI > 90 °F for >3 h per day for at least 10 days ( P < 0.001). A direct correlation was found between the average monthly temperature and the monthly number of patients undergoing temporary cardiac pacing (r = 0.54, P < 0.001). Compared with other patients, those observed during the hottest months were significantly older and more frequently affected by chronic disabling neurological diseases (all P < 0.05). In addition, they more frequently showed biochemical indices of dehydration, renal function impairment and hyperkalemia (all P < 0.05). This study showed an increased incidence of severe bradyarrhythmias in an elderly population during the hottest months of the year. In these months, in subjects characterized by increased susceptibility to dehydration, the risk of developing bradyarrhythmias was increased significantly.

  8. The Practicality of Targeted Prostate Biopsy Procedures on the Dominant Side of the Tumor Determined by Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Elderly Patients with High Serum Levels of Prostate-Specific Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jung Sik; Kim, Bong Soo; Kim, Young Joo; Kim, Sung Dae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the possibility of reducing the number of cores per prostate biopsy in elderly patients with high levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) without significantly lowering the detection rate of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods Two hundreds sixteen men with PSA levels >20 ng/mL who underwent prostate biopsies from May 2009 to April 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. With the help of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the laterality of the dominant tumor burden in patients was determined. The results of targeted biopsies were compared with those of conventional biopsy procedures. Results The mean age and PSA level were 79.5 years and 81.3 ng/mL, respectively, and the overall diagnostic rate of sextant biopsies was 81.9% (177/216). MRI was able to show the tumor burden in 189 of the 216 patients. The detection rate of transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided targeted biopsies was 87.3% (165/189). Detection rates were comparable with conventional biopsies (81.9% [177/216]) (p=0.23). Of the 177 men in whom the results of the sextant biopsy were positive, 12 men (6.8%) with PSA levels <29 ng/mL did not have any cancer cells according to targeted biopsies. However, all other patients were diagnosed with prostate cancer using the abovementioned techniques. Conclusions We believe that TRUS-guided targeted biopsies of the prostate in elderly men with high PSA levels could reduce the number of unnecessary cores per biopsy. However, a risk of detection loss remains. Therefore, we recommend that at least a sextant biopsy should be performed, even in elderly patients, in order to detect prostate cancer. PMID:26770939

  9. Who Needs More than 1,000 ppm? The Epidemiology of High-Risk Populations.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Ana Karina

    2016-01-01

    Good oral health is necessary to overall health and well-being. Most oral diseases, and in particular dental caries, are entirely preventable. However, in 2010, 3.9 billion people were globally affected by oral conditions, and the global prevalence of untreated caries in permanent teeth was 35.3%. The contemporary thinking is that dental caries starts as an infectious disease which then becomes a chronic disease. Public health measures and other caries-preventive approaches have resulted in dramatic reductions in dental caries across populations. However, in a given population, not all individuals have experienced these successes uniformly. High-risk populations, defined as those with a 'higher-than-expected risk', exist for most diseases and conditions including caries. The global scientific literature suggests that these are the following: (1) minorities, (2) individuals with low-socioeconomic status and (3) other vulnerable populations such as the very young and elderly who continue to battle with oral health disparities by experiencing higher oral disease levels including dental caries. As the science and resources exist to prevent caries, it is essential to identify and target these high-risk individuals and populations. PMID:27101141

  10. Low‐Level Cadmium Exposure Is Associated With Decreased Bone Mineral Density and Increased Risk of Incident Fractures in Elderly Men: The MrOS Sweden Study

    PubMed Central

    Barregard, Lars; Sallsten, Gerd; Lundh, Thomas; Karlsson, Magnus K; Lorentzon, Mattias; Ohlsson, Claes; Mellström, Dan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT One risk factor for osteoporosis that has attracted increasing attention in recent years is exposure to cadmium. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between low‐level cadmium exposure, from diet and smoking, and bone mineral density (BMD) and incident fractures in elderly men. The study population consisted of 936 men from the Swedish cohort of the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study, aged 70 to 81 years at inclusion (years 2002 to 2004), with reliable data on cadmium in urine (U‐Cd) analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in baseline samples. The participants also answered a questionnaire on lifestyle factors and medical history. BMD was measured at baseline using dual‐energy X‐ray absorptiometry (DXA) in the total body, hip, and lumbar spine. During the follow‐up period (until 2013), all new fractures were registered by date and type. Associations between BMD and U‐Cd were assessed using multiple linear regression, and associations between incident fractures and baseline U‐Cd were analyzed using Cox regression. In both cases, a number of potential confounders and other risk factors (eg, age, smoking, body mass index [BMI], and physical activity) were included in the models. We found significant negative associations between U‐Cd and BMD, with lower BMD (4% to 8%) for all sites in the fourth quartile of U‐Cd, using the first quartile as the reference. In addition, we found positive associations between U‐Cd and incident fractures, especially nonvertebral osteoporosis fractures in the fourth quartile of U‐Cd, with hazard ratios of 1.8 to 3.3 in the various models. U‐Cd as a continuous variable was significantly associated with nonvertebral osteoporosis fractures (adjusted hazard ratio 1.3 to 1.4 per μg Cd/g creatinine), also in never‐smokers, but not with the other fracture groups (all fractures, hip fractures, vertebral fractures, and other fractures). Our results indicate that even

  11. Genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease alters the five-year trajectory of semantic memory activation in cognitively intact elders

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Stephen M.; Bonner-Jackson, Aaron; Nielson, Kristy A.; Seidenberg, Michael; Smith, J. Carson; Woodard, John L.; Durgerian, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Healthy aging is associated with cognitive declines typically accompanied by increased task-related brain activity in comparison to younger counterparts. The Scaffolding Theory of Aging and Cognition (STAC) (Park and Reuter-Lorenz, 2009; Reuter-Lorenz and Park, 2014) posits that compensatory brain processes are responsible for maintaining normal cognitive performance in older adults, despite accumulation of aging-related neural damage. Cross-sectional studies indicate that cognitively intact elders at genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) demonstrate patterns of increased brain activity compared to low risk elders, suggesting that compensation represents an early response to AD-associated pathology. Whether this compensatory response persists or declines with the onset of cognitive impairment can only be addressed using a longitudinal design. The current prospective, 5-year longitudinal study examined brain activation in APOE ε4 carriers (N=24) and non-carriers (N=21). All participants, ages 65–85 and cognitively intact at study entry, underwent task-activated fMRI, structural MRI, and neuropsychological assessments at baseline, 18, and 57 months. fMRI activation was measured in response to a semantic memory task requiring participants to discriminate famous from non-famous names. Results indicated that the trajectory of change in brain activation while performing this semantic memory task differed between APOE ε4 carriers and non-carriers. The APOE ε4 group exhibited greater activation than the Low Risk group at baseline, but they subsequently showed a progressive decline in activation during the follow-up periods with corresponding emergence of episodic memory loss and hippocampal atrophy. In contrast, the non-carriers demonstrated a gradual increase in activation over the 5-year period. Our results are consistent with the STAC model by demonstrating that compensation varies with the severity of underlying neural damage and can be exhausted with the

  12. Low-Level Cadmium Exposure Is Associated With Decreased Bone Mineral Density and Increased Risk of Incident Fractures in Elderly Men: The MrOS Sweden Study.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Maria; Barregard, Lars; Sallsten, Gerd; Lundh, Thomas; Karlsson, Magnus K; Lorentzon, Mattias; Ohlsson, Claes; Mellström, Dan

    2016-04-01

    One risk factor for osteoporosis that has attracted increasing attention in recent years is exposure to cadmium. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between low-level cadmium exposure, from diet and smoking, and bone mineral density (BMD) and incident fractures in elderly men. The study population consisted of 936 men from the Swedish cohort of the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study, aged 70 to 81 years at inclusion (years 2002 to 2004), with reliable data on cadmium in urine (U-Cd) analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in baseline samples. The participants also answered a questionnaire on lifestyle factors and medical history. BMD was measured at baseline using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in the total body, hip, and lumbar spine. During the follow-up period (until 2013), all new fractures were registered by date and type. Associations between BMD and U-Cd were assessed using multiple linear regression, and associations between incident fractures and baseline U-Cd were analyzed using Cox regression. In both cases, a number of potential confounders and other risk factors (eg, age, smoking, body mass index [BMI], and physical activity) were included in the models. We found significant negative associations between U-Cd and BMD, with lower BMD (4% to 8%) for all sites in the fourth quartile of U-Cd, using the first quartile as the reference. In addition, we found positive associations between U-Cd and incident fractures, especially nonvertebral osteoporosis fractures in the fourth quartile of U-Cd, with hazard ratios of 1.8 to 3.3 in the various models. U-Cd as a continuous variable was significantly associated with nonvertebral osteoporosis fractures (adjusted hazard ratio 1.3 to 1.4 per μg Cd/g creatinine), also in never-smokers, but not with the other fracture groups (all fractures, hip fractures, vertebral fractures, and other fractures). Our results indicate that even relatively low cadmium exposure

  13. The Psychosis High-Risk State

    PubMed Central

    Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Borgwardt, Stefan; Bechdolf, Andreas; Addington, Jean; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Schultze-Lutter, Frauke; Keshavan, Matcheri; Wood, Stephen; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Seidman, Larry J.; Valmaggia, Lucia; Cannon, Tyrone; Velthorst, Eva; De Haan, Lieuwe; Cornblatt, Barbara; Bonoldi, Ilaria; Birchwood, Max; McGlashan, Thomas; Carpenter, William; McGorry, Patrick; Klosterkötter, Joachim; McGuire, Philip; Yung, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Context During the past 2 decades, a major transition in the clinical characterization of psychotic disorders has occurred. The construct of a clinical high-risk (HR) state for psychosis has evolved to capture the prepsychotic phase, describing people presenting with potentially prodromal symptoms. The importance of this HR state has been increasingly recognized to such an extent that a new syndrome is being considered as a diagnostic category in the DSM-5. Objective To reframe the HR state in a comprehensive state-of-the-art review on the progress that has been made while also recognizing the challenges that remain. Data Sources Available HR research of the past 20 years from PubMed, books, meetings, abstracts, and international conferences. Study Selection and Data Extraction Critical review of HR studies addressing historical development, inclusion criteria, epidemiologic research, transition criteria, outcomes, clinical and functional characteristics, neurocognition, neuroimaging, predictors of psychosis development, treatment trials, socioeconomic aspects, nosography, and future challenges in the field. Data Synthesis Relevant articles retrieved in the literature search were discussed by a large group of leading worldwide experts in the field. The core results are presented after consensus and are summarized in illustrative tables and figures. Conclusions The relatively new field of HR research in psychosis is exciting. It has the potential to shed light on the development of major psychotic disorders and to alter their course. It also provides a rationale for service provision to those in need of help who could not previously access it and the possibility of changing trajectories for those with vulnerability to psychotic illnesses. PMID:23165428

  14. Dysphagia in the elderly: focus on rehabilitation strategies.

    PubMed

    Di Pede, C; Mantovani, M E; Del Felice, A; Masiero, S

    2016-08-01

    Prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia among the elderly is high, but underestimated and underdiagnosed. It may give raise to relevant complications impacting on morbidity, hospital length of stay and health care costs. Dysphagia evaluation and management is a multidisciplinary task; it includes a detailed history taking, clinical and instrumental exams, and identification of the risk of aspiration. Long-standing individual abilities and impairments determine the goals of an ad hoc rehabilitation program. Currently there are no standard algorithmic approaches for the management of dysphagia in the elderly. Education of health professionals on early diagnosis and improvement of therapeutic strategies are mainstays to allow maximal recovery potential in this population. This narrative review summarizes the current rehabilitation approaches for dysphagia in the elderly. The aim is to inform the treating health care professionals, whether caring physician, physical medicine doctor, speech/swallowing therapist or nurse, on the state-of-the-art and stimulate discussion in the scientific community. PMID:26589905

  15. Cognitive Inference Device for Activity Supervision in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Human activity, life span, and quality of life are enhanced by innovations in science and technology. Aging individual needs to take advantage of these developments to lead a self-regulated life. However, maintaining a self-regulated life at old age involves a high degree of risk, and the elderly often fail at this goal. Thus, the objective of our study is to investigate the feasibility of implementing a cognitive inference device (CI-device) for effective activity supervision in the elderly. To frame the CI-device, we propose a device design framework along with an inference algorithm and implement the designs through an artificial neural model with different configurations, mapping the CI-device's functions to minimise the device's prediction error. An analysis and discussion are then provided to validate the feasibility of CI-device implementation for activity supervision in the elderly. PMID:25405211

  16. Can an active aging index (AAI) provide insight into reducing elder abuse? A case study in Rajshahi District, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Tareque, Md Ismail; Ahmed, Md Munsur; Tiedt, Andrew D; Hoque, Nazrul

    2014-01-01

    We use data from respondents aged 60 years and above, collected during April 2009 in the Rajshahi district of Bangladesh, to examine whether high activeness, as captured by an AAI or in sub-domains, can help reduce the risk of elder abuse. The findings suggest that more than half of rural elderly and 14 percent of urban elderly were at some point abused. High activeness in health and security dimensions lowers the risk of being abused while those who are low active in community participation have the lowest risk of being abused in both rural and urban areas. Being literate (elderly with primary/secondary education) is revealed to be a significant factor that lowers the risk of abuse in both rural and urban areas. These results imply a need for educational programs that bolster positive and proper community interaction, in turn promoting a secure later life for elders, and reducing burden for families and society. High activeness in health and security dimensions should also be promoted to keep the elderly healthy and protect from abusive behavior. PMID:24331549

  17. Fostering Resilience in At-Risk High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tepovich, Ann

    2012-01-01

    There is a large volume of literature that discusses the at-risk high school student. This literature tends to focus on the factors that create the at-risk student whether those are environmental factors or perhaps the failure of schools in general that create the at-risk problem in the United States. Although the causes are important to…

  18. Who takes risks in high-risk sports? A typological personality approach.

    PubMed

    Castanier, Carole; Le Scanff, Christine; Woodman, Tim

    2010-12-01

    We investigated the risk-taking behaviors of 302 men involved in high-risk sports (downhill skiing mountaineering rock climbing, paragliding, or skydiving). The sportsmen were classified using a typological approach to personality based on eight personality types, which were constructed from combinations of neuroticism, extraversion, and conscientiousness. Results showed that personality types with a configuration of low conscientiousness combined with high extraversion and/or high neuroticism (impulsive, hedonistic, insecure) were greater risk-takers. Conversely, personality types with a configuration of high conscientiousness combined with low extraversion and/or high extraversion (skeptic, brooder, entrepreneur) were lower risk-takers. Results are discussed in the context of typology and other approaches to understanding who takes risks in high-risk domains. PMID:21268472

  19. Elder Abuse.

    PubMed

    Lachs, Mark S; Pillemer, Karl A

    2015-11-12

    Because older victims of abuse tend to be isolated, their interactions with physicians are important opportunities to recognize abuse and intervene. This review explores the manifestations of elder abuse and the role of multidisciplinary teams in its assessment and management. PMID:26559573

  20. Isolated Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Lucy Rose; And Others

    The Minnesota Senior Study, the first statewide survey of the elderly in nearly 20 years, was based on a telephone survey with a statewide sample of 1,500 non-institutionalized Minnesotans age 60 and older. Substantial numbers of Minnesotans age 60-plus were found to have low social contacts. Five percent, or about 33,000 older Minnesotans, fell…

  1. Elderly Suicide

    MedlinePlus

    ... for completing suicide among the elderly. Men use firearms more often than women. • Alcohol or substance abuse plays a diminishing role in later life suicides compared to younger suicides. Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Vital Statistics System. Mortality Data. ...

  2. Suicide and Elderly People: Assessment and Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valente, Sharon M.

    1994-01-01

    Notes that people over age 60 have highest suicide rates and comprise one-fourth of all suicides. Presents case study illustrating risk assessment and intervention with elderly woman. Examines clinical issues related to recognition of suicidal elderly patients and presents practical approach to early detection, evaluation, and management of…

  3. Recommendations for the treatment of hypertension in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Guerra, Alberto F; Duran-Salgado, Montserrat B

    2015-01-01

    High blood pressure is a major cardiovascular risk factor. The prevalence of hypertension increases with aging. As a consequence of changes in arterial wall that leads to arterial stiffness, the majority of elderly patients suffer isolated systolic hypertension. The evidence strongly supports that hypertension in the elderly is associated with an increase in stroke risk and cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Several trials have shown the benefits of treating hypertension in elderly patients. Even in the very old patients, the use of antihypertensive agents such as calcium channel blockers, thiazide and thiazide-like diuretics, and inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system reduce the risk of complications in those patients. However, most patients will need two or more drugs to reach the recommended goals. Hypertension in the elderly has special conditions that must be assessed in the evaluation of the patient (as pseudohypertension and white coat hypertension), and issues that may affect the therapeutic choice and the response to treatment, as comorbidities and polypharmacy. PMID:25761106

  4. Incidence of bladder cancer discovered by urethrocystoscopy at prostate biopsy: extraordinary high incidence of tiny bladder cancer in elderly males.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Koichi; Suzuki, Takanori; Kurokawa, Kohei; Ito, Kazuto; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Yamanaka, Hidetoshi

    2004-05-01

    In order to clarify the incidence of bladder cancer with and without prostate cancer, we investigated bladder cancer discovered incidentally by urethrocystoscopy at prostate biopsy. Between April 1997 and December 2003, 498 patients who were suspected prostate cancer were performed prostate biopsy and urethrocystoscopy simultaneously. We investigate possible invasion of prostate cancer into the urethra or bladder mucosa as well as bladder cancer, including other benign lesions of the bladder by urethrocystoscopy. Prostate cancer was confirmed in 175 (35.1%) of the 498 patients histologically, and bladder cancer was discovered incidentally in 12 patients (2.4 %). The incidence of bladder cancer in patients with prostate cancer of 2.3% (4/175) was not significantly different from that in patients without prostate cancer, which was 2.5% (8/323). Superficial and those with a size less than 1 cm were noted in 11 patients (92%) and 10 patients (83%) respectively. High incidence rate of bladder cancer with prostate cancer was reported previously, however, there was no study to compare the incidence rate of bladder cancer between cases with and without prostate cancer. The present study suggests that asymptomatic tiny bladder cancer may be present at an unexpectedly high incidence rate in elderly males. PMID:15185969

  5. A retrospective analysis of kidney function and risk factors by Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation in elderly Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Yu, Feng; Wu, Yanhua; Fang, Xiaowu; Hu, Wenxue; Chen, Jian; Zhou, Ruili; Lin, Xinge; Hao, Wenke

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease accounts for much of the increased mortality, especially in the elder population. The prevalence of this disease is expected to increase significantly as the society ages. Our aim was to evaluate the kidney function and risk factors of reduced renal function among elderly Chinese patients. This study retrospectively collected clinical data from a total of 1062 inpatients aged 65 years or over. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated with the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Renal function and risk factors were also analyzed. For all 1062 subjects, the mean eGFR was 71.0 ± 24.8 mL/min/1.73 m(2), and the incidence rates of reduced renal function, proteinuria, hematuria and leukocyturia were 31.1%, 11.8%, 6.6% and 8.7%, respectively. The eGFR values were 83.4 ± 28.4, 72.2 ± 22.9, 67.8 ± 24.3 and 58.8 ± 29.1 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in the groups of 60-69, 70-79, 80-89 and ≥90 years age group (F = 15.101, p = 0.000), respectively; while the incidences of reduced renal function were 12.8%, 27.0%, 37.8% and 51.7% (χ(2) = 36.143, p = 0.000). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that hyperuricemia (OR = 4.62, p = 0.000), proteinuria (OR = 3.96, p = 0.000), urinary tumor (OR = 2.92, p = 0.015), anemia (OR = 2.45, p = 0.000), stroke (OR = 1.96, p = 0.000), hypertension (OR = 1.83, p = 0.006), renal cyst (OR = 1.64, p = 0.018), female (OR = 1.54, p = 0.015), coronary artery disease (OR = 1.53, p = 0.008) and age (OR = 1.05, p = 0.000) were the risk factors of reduced renal function. In conclusion, eGFR values decreased by age, while the incidence of reduced renal function, proteinuria, hematuria and leukocyturia increased with age. Treatment and control of comorbidities may slow the decline of renal function in elderly patients. PMID:26211499

  6. Evidence-based nutritional support of the elderly cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Bozzetti, Federico

    2015-04-01

    The papers included in this section represent the effort of the Task Force on Nutrition of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology to synthetize the evidence-based concepts on nutritional support of the elderly cancer patients. In the attempt of presenting a comprehensive overview of the topic, the panel included experts from different specialties: basic researchers, nutritionists, geriatricians, nurses, dieticians, gastroenterologists, oncologists. Cancer in elderly people is a growing problem. Not only in almost every country, the proportion of people aged over 60 years is growing faster than any other age group, but cancer per se is also a disease of old adult-elderly people, hence the oncologists face an increasing number of these patients both now and in the next years. The are several studies on nutrition of elderly subjects and many other on nutrition of cancer patients but relatively few specifically devoted to the nutritional support of the elderly cancer patients. However, the awareness that elderly subjects account for a high proportion of the mixed cancer patients population, in some way legitimates us to extend some conclusions of the literature also to the elderly cancer patients. Although the topics of this Experts' Consensus have been written by specialists in different areas of nutrition, the final message is addressed to the oncologists. Not only they should be more directly involved in the simplest steps of the nutritional care (recognition of the potential existence of a "nutritional risk" which can compromise the planned oncologic program, use of some oral supplements, etc.) but, as the true experts of the natural history of their cancer patient, they should also coordinate the process of the nutritional support, integrating this approach in the overall multidisciplinary cancer care. PMID:25770321

  7. Hypertension in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Lionakis, Nikolaos; Mendrinos, Dimitrios; Sanidas, Elias; Favatas, Georgios; Georgopoulou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The elderly are the most rapidly growing population group in the world. Data collected over a 30-year period have demonstrated the increasing prevalence of hypertension with age. The risk of coronary artery disease, stroke, congestive heart disease, chronic kidney insufficiency and dementia is also increased in this subgroup of hypertensives. Hypertension in the elderly patients represents a management dilemma to cardiovascular specialists and other practioners. During the last years and before the findings of the Systolic Hypertension in Europe Trial were published, the general medical opinion considered not to decrease blood pressure values similarly to other younger patients, in order to avoid possible ischemic events and poor oxygenation of the organs (brain, heart, kidney). The aim of this review article is to highlight the importance of treating hypertension in aged population in order to improve their quality of life and lower the incidence of the cardiovascular complications. PMID:22655162

  8. [Muscle and bone health as a risk factor of fall among the elderly. Fear of falling and the post-fall syndrome].

    PubMed

    Niino, Naoakira; Nishita, Yukiko

    2008-06-01

    Fear of falling and the post-fall syndrome (fear-related activity restriction) are serious psychological symptoms associated with falls. This paper reported the definition and prevalence of fear of falling. Prevalence has yielded highly varying estimates due to the various definitions and instruments used to measure fear. Correlates of fear of falling by a longitudinal study were also described. As most of the research on fear of falling has been cross-sectional, more longitudinal studies are needed. As to the post-fall syndrome, definition and prevalence among community-dwelling elderly was discussed. It is difficult to measure general prevalence due to the lack of solid criteria of this syndrome. PMID:18515948

  9. Adverse effects of outdoor pollution in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Baldacci, Sandra; Maio, Sara; Cerrai, Sonia; Sarno, Giuseppe; Viegi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    With fewer newborns and people living longer, older people are making up an increasing fraction of the total population. Epidemiological evidence shows that older-age-related health problems affect a wide and expanding proportion of the world population. One of the major epidemiological trends of this century is the rise of chronic diseases that affect more elderly than younger people. A total of 3.7 million premature deaths worldwide in 2012 are attributable to outdoor air pollution; the susceptibility to adverse effects of air pollution is expected to differ widely between people and within the same person, and also over time. Frailty history, a measure of multi-system decline, modifies cumulative associations between air pollution and lung function. Moreover, pre-existing diseases may determine susceptibility. In the elderly, due to comorbidity, exposure to air pollutants may even be fatal. Rapid and not-well-planned urbanization is associated with high level of ambient air pollution, mainly caused by vehicular exhausts. In general, there is sufficient evidence of the adverse effects related to short-term exposure, while fewer studies have addressed the longer-term health effects. Increased pollution exposures have been associated with increased mortality, hospital admissions/emergency-room visits, mainly due to exacerbations of chronic diseases or to respiratory tract infections (e.g., pneumonia). These effects may also be modulated by ambient temperature and many studies show that the elderly are mostly vulnerable to heat waves. The association between heat and mortality in the elderly is well-documented, while less is known regarding the associations with hospital admissions. Chronic exposure to elevated levels of air pollution has been related to the incidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic bronchitis (CB), asthma, and emphysema. There is also growing evidence suggesting adverse effects on lung function related to long-term exposure

  10. Adverse effects of outdoor pollution in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Simoni, Marzia; Baldacci, Sandra; Maio, Sara; Cerrai, Sonia; Sarno, Giuseppe; Viegi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    With fewer newborns and people living longer, older people are making up an increasing fraction of the total population. Epidemiological evidence shows that older-age-related health problems affect a wide and expanding proportion of the world population. One of the major epidemiological trends of this century is the rise of chronic diseases that affect more elderly than younger people. A total of 3.7 million premature deaths worldwide in 2012 are attributable to outdoor air pollution; the susceptibility to adverse effects of air pollution is expected to differ widely between people and within the same person, and also over time. Frailty history, a measure of multi-system decline, modifies cumulative associations between air pollution and lung function. Moreover, pre-existing diseases may determine susceptibility. In the elderly, due to comorbidity, exposure to air pollutants may even be fatal. Rapid and not-well-planned urbanization is associated with high level of ambient air pollution, mainly caused by vehicular exhausts. In general, there is sufficient evidence of the adverse effects related to short-term exposure, while fewer studies have addressed the longer-term health effects. Increased pollution exposures have been associated with increased mortality, hospital admissions/emergency-room visits, mainly due to exacerbations of chronic diseases or to respiratory tract infections (e.g., pneumonia). These effects may also be modulated by ambient temperature and many studies show that the elderly are mostly vulnerable to heat waves. The association between heat and mortality in the elderly is well-documented, while less is known regarding the associations with hospital admissions. Chronic exposure to elevated levels of air pollution has been related to the incidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic bronchitis (CB), asthma, and emphysema. There is also growing evidence suggesting adverse effects on lung function related to long-term exposure

  11. Women at High Risk for Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... 173-199. 3 Dabelea D, Crume T. Maternal environment and the transgenerational cycle of obesity and diabetes. Diabetes Care , 2011;60:1849-1855. 4 Kitzmiller JL, Dang-Kilduff L, Taslimi MM. Gestational diabetes after delivery: short-term management and long-term risks. Diabetes Care. 2007;30: ...

  12. Management of High-Risk Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma is an increasing public health concern, representing the second most common cancer in the United States. High-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma represents a subgroup of this disease, where patients are at higher risk of metastasis and death. To date, there are no accepted criteria for defining or managing these patients. This review discusses the current state of knowledge of high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and outlines reasonable management strategies based on available data. PMID:20725546

  13. Hourly differences in air pollution and risk of respiratory disease in the elderly: a time-stratified case-crossover study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have shown adverse effects of short-term exposure to air pollution on respiratory disease outcomes; however, few studies examined this association on an hourly time scale. We evaluated the associations between hourly changes in air pollution and the risk of respiratory disease in the elderly, using the time of the emergency call as the disease onset for each case. Methods We used a time-stratified case-crossover design. Study participants were 6,925 residents of the city of Okayama, Japan, aged 65 or above who were taken to hospital emergency rooms between January 2006 and December 2010 for onset of respiratory disease. We calculated city-representative hourly average concentrations of air pollutants from several monitoring stations. By using conditional logistic regression models, we estimated odds ratios per interquartile-range increase in each pollutant by exposure period prior to emergency call, adjusting for hourly ambient temperature, hourly relative humidity, and weekly numbers of reported influenza cases aged ≥60. Results Suspended particulate matter (SPM) exposure 24 to <72 hours prior to the onset and ozone exposure 48 to <96 hours prior to the onset were associated with the increased risk of respiratory disease. For example, following one interquartile-range increase, odds ratios were 1.05 (95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.09) for SPM exposure 24 to <48 hours prior to the onset and 1.13 (95% confidence interval: 1.04, 1.23) for ozone exposure 72 to <96 hours prior to the onset. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) exposure 0 to <24 hours prior to onset was associated with the increased risk of pneumonia and influenza: odds ratio was 1.07 per one interquartile-range increase (95% confidence interval: 1.00, 1.14). Elevated risk for pneumonia and influenza of SO2 was observed at shorter lags (i.e., 8–18 hours) than the elevated risks for respiratory disease of SPM or ozone. Overall, the effect estimates for chronic obstructive

  14. Determining Functional Vitamin B12 Deficiency in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Khodabandehloo, Niloofar; Vakili, Masoud; Hashemian, Zahra; Zare Zardini, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Elevated concentration of serum total homocysteine usually occurs in vitamin B-12 deficiency. This metabolite can be measured and used for screening functional vitamin B-12 deficiency. Objectives: We assessed functional vitamin B12 deficiency in Tehranian elderly admitted to elderly research center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences. Patients and Materials: A cross-sectional study was performed on 232 elderly admitted to elderly research center in Tehran, Iran in 2012. According to other studies, individuals were classified into two groups: high risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency (< 220 pmol/L) and borderline vitamin B-12 (220–258 pmol/L) accompanied by elevated homocysteine (> 15 micmol/L). Results: Cut-off of 15.0 pmol/L for homocysteine was identified for persons with normal or elevated concentrations. Among persons aged 65–74 and ≥ 75 years, respectively, 56% and 93% were at high risk of vitamin B-12 deficiency. Conclusions: The prevalence of B12 deficiency was higher in this study compared to other studies, so more attention and massive efficacious policy should be designed to reduce the deficiency of this vitamin. PMID:26430518

  15. Diagnosis and management of pulmonary embolism in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Robert-Ebadi, Helia; Righini, Marc

    2014-04-01

    Elderly patients are a population not only at particularly high risk of venous thromboembolism including pulmonary embolism (PE), but also at high risk of adverse clinical outcomes and treatment-related complications. Major progresses have been achieved in the diagnosis and treatment of PE over the last two decades. Nevertheless, some of elderly patients' specificities still represent important challenges in the management of PE in this population, from its suspicion to its diagnosis and treatment, and are discussed in this review. Perspectives for the future are from a diagnostic point of view the potential implementation of age-adjusted d-dimer cut-offs that will allow ruling out PE in a greater proportion of elderly patients without the need for thoracic imaging. From a therapeutic point of view, acquisition of post-marketing clinical experience with the use of new oral anticoagulants is still necessary, and in the meantime, these drugs should be prescribed with great caution in thoroughly selected elderly patients. PMID:24703814

  16. Rationale and Design of a Multicenter Echocardiographic Study to Assess the Relationship between Cardiac Structure and Function and Heart Failure Risk in a Biracial Cohort of Community Dwelling Elderly Persons: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amil M.; Cheng, Susan; Skali, Hicham; Wu, Justina; Mangion, Judy R.; Kitzman, Dalane; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Konety, Suma; Butler, Kenneth R.; Fox, Ervin R.; Cook, Nakela; Ni, Hanyu; Coresh, Joseph; Mosley, Thomas H.; Heiss, Gerardo; Folsom, Aaron R.; Solomon, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) is an important public health concern particularly among persons over 65 years of age. Women and African Americans are critically understudied populations that carry a sizeable portion of the HF burden. Limited normative and prognostic data exist regarding measures of cardiac structure, diastolic function, and novel measures of systolic deformation in older adults living in the community. Methods and Results The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study is a large, predominantly biracial NHLBI-sponsored epidemiologic cohort study. Between 2011 and 2013, approximately 6,000 surviving participants, now in their seventh to ninth decade of life, are expected to return for a 5th study visit during which comprehensive 2D, Doppler, tissue Doppler, and speckle-tracking echocardiography will be performed uniformly in all cohort clinic visit participants. The following objectives will be addressed: (1) to characterize cardiac structural and functional abnormalities among the elderly and determine how these differ by gender and race/ethnicity, (2) determine the relationship between ventricular and vascular abnormalities, and (3) prospectively examine the extent to which these non-invasive measures associate with incident HF. Conclusions We describe the design, imaging acquisition and analysis methods, and quality assurance metrics for echocardiography in Visit 5 of the ARIC cohort. A better understanding of the differences in cardiac structure and function through the spectrum of HF stages in the elderly generally, and between genders and racial/ethnic groups specifically, will deepen our understanding of the pathophysiology driving HF progression in these at-risk populations and may inform novel prevention or therapeutic strategies. PMID:24214885

  17. Social work services in a high-risk nursery.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, M S; Johnson, D R

    1976-05-01

    Why should a social worker be on the team of a neonatal intensive-care nursery? Helping parents cope with the crises that arise with high-risk births is only one important reason. Ameliorating staff stress is another. Also, by following up the high-risk babies, the social worker has an opportunity to play a preventive role. PMID:185126

  18. 15 CFR 14.14 - High risk special award conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false High risk special award conditions. 14.14 Section 14.14 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce UNIFORM...-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 14.14 High risk special award...

  19. 15 CFR 14.14 - High risk special award conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false High risk special award conditions. 14.14 Section 14.14 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce UNIFORM...-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 14.14 High risk special award...

  20. 15 CFR 14.14 - High risk special award conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false High risk special award conditions. 14.14 Section 14.14 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce UNIFORM...-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 14.14 High risk special award...

  1. 15 CFR 14.14 - High risk special award conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false High risk special award conditions. 14.14 Section 14.14 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce UNIFORM...-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 14.14 High risk special award...

  2. 15 CFR 14.14 - High risk special award conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false High risk special award conditions. 14.14 Section 14.14 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce UNIFORM...-PROFIT, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-Award Requirements § 14.14 High risk special award...

  3. 40 CFR 35.6790 - High risk recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... described in 40 CFR 31.12. Requirements for Administering a Superfund State Contract (SSC) ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false High risk recipients. 35.6790 Section... Actions Other Administrative Requirements for Cooperative Agreements § 35.6790 High risk recipients....

  4. 40 CFR 35.6790 - High risk recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... described in 40 CFR 31.12. Requirements for Administering a Superfund State Contract (SSC) ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false High risk recipients. 35.6790 Section... Actions Other Administrative Requirements for Cooperative Agreements § 35.6790 High risk recipients....

  5. 40 CFR 35.6790 - High risk recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... described in 40 CFR 31.12. Requirements for Administering a Superfund State Contract (SSC) ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false High risk recipients. 35.6790 Section... Actions Other Administrative Requirements for Cooperative Agreements § 35.6790 High risk recipients....

  6. 40 CFR 35.6790 - High risk recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... described in 40 CFR 31.12. Requirements for Administering a Superfund State Contract (SSC) ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false High risk recipients. 35.6790 Section... Actions Other Administrative Requirements for Cooperative Agreements § 35.6790 High risk recipients....

  7. 40 CFR 35.6790 - High risk recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... described in 40 CFR 31.12. Requirements for Administering a Superfund State Contract (SSC) ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false High risk recipients. 35.6790 Section... Actions Other Administrative Requirements for Cooperative Agreements § 35.6790 High risk recipients....

  8. Risk of cardiovascular disease? A qualitative study of risk interpretation among patients with high cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown the importance of paying attention to lay peoples’ interpretations of risk of disease, in order to explain health-related behavior. However, risk interpretations interplay with social context in complex ways. The objective was to explore how asymptomatic patients with high cholesterol interpret risk of cardiovascular disease. Methods Fourteen patients with high cholesterol and risk of cardiovascular disease were interviewed, and patterns across patient accounts were identified and analysed from an ethnographic approach. Results Information from the general practitioner about high cholesterol and risk of cardiovascular disease was reinterpreted in everyday social life. The risk associated with fatty foods was weighed against the pleasures of social and cultural events in which this type of food was common and cherished. A positive mindset was applied as a strategy to lower the risk of having high cholesterol, but knowledge about risk was viewed as a cause of anxiety and self-absorption, and this anxiety made the body susceptible to disease, hampering the chances for healthy life. Conclusion Interpretations of high cholesterol and risk of cardiovascular disease are embedded in social relations and everyday life concerns. This should be addressed in general practice in preference-sensitive cases about risk-reducing medication. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01187056 PMID:24040920

  9. Rates of violence in patients classified as high risk by structured risk assessment instruments

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jay P.; Fazel, Seena; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Buchanan, Alec

    2014-01-01

    Background Rates of violence in persons identified as high risk by structured risk assessment instruments (SRAIs) are uncertain and frequently unreported by validation studies. Aims To analyse the variation in rates of violence in individuals identified as high risk by SRAIs. Method A systematic search of databases (1995-2011) was conducted for studies on nine widely used assessment tools. Where violence rates in high-risk groups were not published, these were requested from study authors. Rate information was extracted, and binomial logistic regression was used to study heterogeneity. Results Information was collected on 13 045 participants in 57 samples from 47 independent studies. Annualised rates of violence in individuals classified as high risk varied both across and within instruments. Rates were elevated when population rates of violence were higher, when a structured professional judgement instrument was used and when there was a lower proportion of men in a study. Conclusions After controlling for time at risk, the rate of violence in individuals classified as high risk by SRAIs shows substantial variation. In the absence of information on local base rates, assigning predetermined probabilities to future violence risk on the basis of a structured risk assessment is not supported by the current evidence base. This underscores the need for caution when such risk estimates are used to influence decisions related to individual liberty and public safety. PMID:24590974

  10. Toddlers at High Risk of Chemical Eye Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160258.html Toddlers at High Risk of Chemical Eye Burns: Study Access to household cleaning products ... and 2 years have relatively high rates of chemical eye burns, with everyday cleaners a common cause, ...

  11. Itch Management in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Tabi Anika

    2016-01-01

    Itch is a common symptom in the elderly population over 65 years old, and is often a chronic condition lasting more than 6 weeks. As in all age groups, but especially in the elderly, there can be a significant effect on the general health status and quality of life, with impaired daily activities and lack of sleep, which can also lead in some cases to depression or anxiety. The cause of chronic itch in the elderly is often multifactorial due to physiological changes in the aging skin, including impaired skin barrier function, and also due to decline in immunological (immunosenescence), neurological, and psychological changes associated with age. Common causes of chronic pruritus in the aging skin include xerosis (dry skin), dermatological disorders (eczema, psoriasis, lichen planus), and systemic (renal, hepatic, endocrine), neurodegenerative, and psychological diseases. Comorbidities in the elderly population lead to polypharmacy, increasing the potential risk of drug side effects, which can result in causing or exacerbating itch in the elderly patient. It is essential to obtain a detailed history, including drugs, as well as a thorough clinical examination with appropriate subsequent investigations. Management of the elderly patient with chronic pruritus should include treatment with topical therapies such as emollients as well as other agents for symptomatic relief. Systemic therapies should be directed at any underlying cutaneous or systemic diseases. Often the cause of itch in the elderly cannot be found and some systemic treatments can be used for symptomatic control of the itch, including antihistamines, gabapentin, and selective antidepressants. A holistic approach needs to be taken on an individual basis to relieve chronic pruritus, as the management of itch in the elderly can be a challenge. PMID:27578088

  12. Multiple Risk Factor Intervention in the Delivery of Primary Health Care to the Elderly: Lessons from Community-Based Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kligman, Evan W.

    Within the past decade the role of the primary care physician caring for older patients has expanded to include counseling and "healthy aging" education to reduce multiple behavior risk factors. Project AGE WELL was a longitudinal study of the impact of a comprehensive and team delivered health promotion program on the health status of the…

  13. [Relationship between the number of daily meals and the energy and nutrient intake in the elderly. Effect on various cardiovascular risk factors].

    PubMed

    Ortega, R M; Redondo, M R; Zamora, M J; López-Sobaler, A M; Quintas, M E; Andrés, P; Gaspar, M J; Requejo, A M

    1998-01-01

    The metabolic consequences of the consumption of a diet depend, in part, on the frequency and distribution of meals. The aim of the present study was to examine the number of meals taken per day by elderly persons, and to analyse the relationship between the number of meals per day on the intake of energy and nutrients, the incidence of obesity/overweight, and different cardiovascular risk factors. Food intake was monitored for five consecutive days using 'precise individual weighing' for institutionalised subjects (n = 58), and by means of a 'food intake record' for independent subjects (n = 92). The number of meals taken per day was recorded, along with anthropometric data, blood pressure and serum lipid and lipoprotein levels. No subject took only one meal per day, 7.3% took two, 56.7% took three, 33.3% took four and 2.7% took five. Only 10% of subjects took a mid-morning meal. Breakfast and merienda (a light evening snack) were the meals most frequently omitted. A positive, significant relationship was found to exist between the number of meals taken per day and the intake of fibre (r = 0.2737), thiamin (r = 0.1671), pyridoxine (r = 0.2060), magnesium (r = 0.2423) and the percentage of energy provided by carbohydrates (r = 0.2144). Women subjects who took 2-3 meals per day showed greater body mass indices and a greater proportion were overweight/obese compared to those who took 4-5 meals per day. Subjects who took 4-5 meals per day showed higher levels of HDL-cholesterol and lower levels of LDL-cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol and cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol than did those who took fewer meals per day. Inverse, significant relationships were also found between the number of meals per day and serum cholesterol (r = 0.2297) and LDL-cholesterol levels (r = 0.1984). Taking into account energy and nutrient intakes, the incidence of obesity/overweight and serum lipid and lipoprotein levels, the consumption of 4-5 meals per day would seem more advisable for the elderly

  14. Vitamin D and health status in elderly.

    PubMed

    Timpini, Annalisa; Pini, Laura; Tantucci, Claudio; Cossi, Stefania; Grassi, Vittorio

    2011-02-01

    Recently, vitamin D has aroused considerable interest for several reasons. Many epidemiological studies have shown a widespread deficiency of vitamin D at all ages, and the recent finding that many organs and tissues have vitamin D receptors has fostered the clinical and biological relevance of vitamin D. Elderly people are at high risk for vitamin D deficiency if their life style entails few outdoor activities, their skin is thick and they exhibit impairment of renal function. In the elderly, vitamin D deficiency is very important because it can affect the function of many organs such as the muscle-skeletal, cardio-vascular systems and kidney, and may be involved in various diseases and pathological conditions including type II diabetes, cancer and cognitive decline. In the present review, the most relevant features of vitamin D are described as well as the clinical consequences of hypovitaminosis D in the elderly. Finally, the role of an adequate oral supplementation in the geriatric population is stressed. PMID:20517656

  15. An increased risk of reversible dementia may occur after zolpidem derivative use in the elderly population: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hsin-I; Lin, Che-Chen; Tu, Yi-Fang; Chang, Chia-Ming; Hsu, Hsiang-Chin; Chi, Chih-Hsien; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-05-01

    We evaluate the effects of zolpidem use to develop dementia or Alzheimer disease from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD).A retrospective population-based nested case-control study. Newly diagnosed dementia patients 65 years and older and controls were sampled. A total of 8406 dementia and 16,812 control subjects were enrolled from Taiwan NHIRD during 2006 to 2010. The relationships between zolpidem use and dementia were measured using odds and adjusted odds ratios. The relationship between the average cumulative doses for zolpidem and dementia was also analyzed.Zolpidem alone or with other underlying diseases, such as hypertension, diabetes, and stroke, was significantly associated with dementia after controlling for potential confounders, such as age, sex, coronary artery disease, diabetes, anti-hypertension drugs, stroke, anticholesterol statin drugs, depression, anxiety, benzodiazepine, anti-psychotic, and anti-depressant agents' use (Adjusted OR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.24-1.41). Zolpidem use also has significant dose-response effects for most of the types of dementia. In patient with Alzheimer diseases, the effects of zolpidem among patients with Alzheimer's disease remained obscure. The adjusted OR for patients whose cumulative exposure doses were between 170 and 819 mg/year (adjusted OR: 1.65, 95% CI 1.08-2.51, P = 0.0199) was significant; however, the effects for lower and higher cumulative dose were not significant.Zolpidem used might be associated with increased risk for dementia in elderly population. Increased accumulative dose might have higher risk to develop dementia, especially in patients with underlying diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, and stroke. PMID:25929937

  16. Influence of Statins on Influenza Vaccine Response in Elderly Individuals.

    PubMed

    Black, Steven; Nicolay, Uwe; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino

    2016-04-15

    Influenza vaccination strategies have targeted elderly individuals because they are at high risk of disease complications and mortality. Statins are a class of drugs used to treat hypercholesterolemia and are frequently used in the elderly population to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, statins are also known to have immunomodulatory effects that could impact influenza vaccine response. In a post hoc analysis, we performed a cross-sectional observational study nested within a comparative immunogenicity clinical trial of adjuvanted versus unadjuvanted influenza vaccine in elderly persons to evaluate the influence of statin therapy on the immune response to vaccination. Overall, data on >5000 trial participants were available for analysis. Comparison of hemagglutination-inhibiting geometric mean titers to influenza A(H1N1), A(H3N2), and B strains revealed that titers were 38% (95% confidence interval [CI], 27%-50%), 67% (95% CI, 54%-80%), and 38% (95% CI, 28%-29%) lower, respectively, in subjects receiving chronic statin therapy, compared with those not receiving chronic statin therapy. This apparent immunosuppressive effect of statins on the vaccine immune response was most dramatic in individuals receiving synthetic statins. These effects were seen in both the adjuvanted and unadjuvanted vaccine groups in the clinical trial. These results, if confirmed, could have implications both for future clinical trials design, as well as for vaccine use recommendations for elderly individuals. PMID:26516142

  17. Coordinating perioperative care for the 'high risk' general surgical patient using risk prediction scoring.

    PubMed

    Hafiz, Shaziz; Lees, Nicholas Peter

    2016-01-01

    Identifying 'high risk' (> 5% mortality score) emergency general surgical patients early, allows appropriate perioperative care to be allocated by securing critical care beds and ensuring the presence of senior surgeons and senior anesthetists intraoperatively. Scoring systems can be used to predict perioperative risk and coordinate resources perioperatively. Currently it is unclear which estimate of risk correlates with current resource deployment. A retrospective study was undertaken assessing the relationship between deployment of perioperative resources: senior surgeon, senior anesthetist and critical care bed. The study concluded that almost all high risk patients with high POSSUM mortality and morbidity scores had a consultant senior surgeon present intraoperatively. Critically unwell patients with higher operative severity and perioperative morbidity scores received higher care (HDU/ICU) beds postoperatively, ensuring that they received appropriate care if their condition deteriorated. Therefore POSSUM scoring should be used perioperatively in emergency cases to coordinate appropriate perioperative care for high risk general surgical patients. PMID:26901929

  18. High prevalence of suicide risk in people living with HIV: who is at higher risk?

    PubMed

    Passos, Susane Müller Klug; Souza, Luciano Dias de Mattos; Spessato, Bárbara Coiro

    2014-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was developed to evaluate suicide risk and associated factors in HIV/AIDS patients at a regional reference center for the treatment of HIV/AIDS in southern Brazil. We assessed 211 patients in regard to suicide risk, clinical and sociodemographic characteristics, drug use, depression, and anxiety. Suicide risk was assessed with Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Module C. Multivariate analysis was performed using Poisson regression. Of the total sample, 34.1% were at risk of suicide. In the multivariate analysis, the following variables were independently associated with suicide risk: female gender; age up to 47 years; unemployment; indicative of anxiety; indicative of depression; and abuse or addiction on psychoactive substances. Suicide risk is high in this population. Psychosocial factors should be included in the physical and clinical evaluation, given their strong association with suicide risk. PMID:24797027

  19. Elderly self-management: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Salehi, Shayesteh; Taleghani, Fariba; Abedi, Heidar Ali

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The population of elderly in Iran and in the world is increasing. It is predicted that the population of elderly reaches to 10 millions in Iran by the year 2019. Elders more than other age groups are at risk of chronic diseases and health problems; and elderly affects their self-management and makes them feel disabled. Since the knowledge of self-management for Iranian elderly is not well developed, this paper aimed to determine the concept of self-management for Iranian elders. METHODS: This was a qualitative study with grounded theory approach on Iranian elderly self-management. Data were collected through deep interviews with 26 participants in a period of one year and were analyzed using a Strauss Corbin analysis method. RESULTS: Self-management in the context of power means using different managing methods in dealing with daily life needs, especially in interactions with others in a way that accelerates affairs with efficiency and satisfaction. The main categories emerged from this qualitative study included: managing plans, managing life goals and policies, persuading the desired goals, managing self-care, directing others, coordinating and consulting with others. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study provided a deep understanding of elderly perceptions of self-management in their lives. These findings can be a baseline for future researches on developing effective health interventions such as developing a nursing model for increasing the elderly self-management abilities in Iran. Such a model can provide a strong basis for nursing care. PMID:21589781

  20. Incisional Reinforcement in High-Risk Patients

    PubMed Central

    Feldmann, Timothy F.; Young, Monica T.; Pigazzi, Alessio

    2014-01-01

    Hernia formation after surgical procedures continues to be an important cause of surgical morbidity. Incisional reinforcement at the time of the initial operation has been used in some patient populations to reduce the risk of subsequent hernia formation. In this article, reinforcement techniques in different surgical wounds are examined to identify situations in which hernia formation may be prevented. Mesh use for midline closure, pelvic floor reconstruction, and stoma site reinforcement is discussed. Additionally, the use of retention sutures, closure of the open abdomen, and reinforcement after component separation are examined using current literature. Although existing studies do not support the routine use of mesh reinforcement for all surgical incisions, certain patient populations appear to benefit from reinforcement with lower rates of subsequent hernia formation. The identification and characterization of these groups will guide the future use of mesh reinforcement in surgical incisions. PMID:25435823

  1. Propensity-Weighted Comparison of Long-Term Risk of Urinary Adverse Events in Elderly Women Treated For Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Sean P.; Fan, Yunhua; Jarosek, Stephanie; Chu, Haitao; Downs, Levi; Dusenbery, Kathryn; Geller, Melissa A.; Virnig, Beth A.

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Cervical cancer treatment is associated with a risk of urinary adverse events (UAEs) such as ureteral stricture and vesicovaginal fistula. We sought to measure the long-term UAE risk after surgery and radiation therapy (RT), with confounding controlled through propensity-weighted models. Methods and Materials: From the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database, we identified women ≥66 years old with nonmetastatic cervical cancer treated with simple surgery (SS), radical hysterectomy (RH), external beam RT plus brachytherapy (EBRT+BT), or RT+surgery. We matched them to noncancer controls 1:3. Differences in demographic and cancer characteristics were balanced by propensity weighting. Grade 3 to 4 UAEs were identified by diagnosis codes plus treatment codes. Cumulative incidence was measured using Kaplan-Meier methods. The hazard associated with different cancer treatments was compared using Cox models. Results: UAEs occurred in 272 of 1808 cases (17%) and 222 of 5424 (4%) controls; most (62%) were ureteral strictures. The raw cumulative incidence of UAEs was highest in advanced cancers. UAEs occurred in 31% of patients after EBRT+BT, 25% of patients after RT+surgery, and 15% of patients after RH; however, after propensity weighting, the incidence was similar. In adjusted Cox models (reference = controls), the UAE risk was highest after RT+surgery (hazard ratio [HR], 5.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.32-11.07), followed by EBRT+BT (HR, 3.33; 95% CI, 1.45-7.65), RH (HR, 3.65; 95% CI, 1.41-9.46) and SS (HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.32-3.01). The higher risk after RT+surgery versus EBRT+BT was statistically significant, whereas, EBRT+BT and RH were not significantly different from each other. Conclusions: UAEs are common after cervical cancer treatment, particularly in patients with advanced cancers. UAEs are more common after RT, but these women tend to have the advanced cancers. After propensity weighting, the risk after RT was similar

  2. The dark side of family communication: a communication model of elder abuse and neglect.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei-Chen; Giles, Howard

    2013-08-01

    To further address the potential factors that lead up to elder abuse in domestic settings, this paper proposes a model from a communication approach to explain dyadic influences between the family caregiver and the elderly care receiver that give rise to the abuse. That is, dysfunctional communication between the caregivers and care receivers may, therefore, increase the likelihood of elder abuse. Grounded in Bugental and her colleagues' work (1993, 1999, 2002) on child abuse, we propose a power-oriented communication model based, in part, on research in the fields of family violence and intergenerational communication to explain the likelihood of occurrence of elder abuse in family caregiving situations. We argue that certain risk factors pertaining to caregivers' characteristics--those who perceive high stress in caregiving, have mental health issues, have a history of substance abuse, and/or display verbal aggressiveness--may be more likely to attribute considerable power to those elderly under their custodianship. At the same time, such caregivers tend to feel powerless and experience loss of control when interacting with their elderly counterparts. When an elderly care receiver displays noncompliant behaviors, caregivers may be prone to employ abusive behaviors (in our model, it refers to physical abuse, verbal abuse, or communication neglect) to seek such compliance. Consequences of such abuse may result in lower self-esteem or lower confidence in one's ability to manage his/her life. It is suggested that researchers and practitioners investigate both parties' interactions closely and the role of elderly care receivers in order to detect, intervene, and prevent elder abuse. PMID:23388449

  3. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in elderly Japanese-Brazilians

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Natasha Priscilla; Chaim, Rita Cristina; Gimeno, Suely Godoy Agostinh; Ferreira, Sandra Roberta Gouvea; Hirai, Amelia Toyomi; Rosa, Camila Moreno; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Okoshi, Marina Politi; Okoshi, Katashi

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Prevalence of individuals with a high cardiovascular risk is elevated in elderly populations. Although metabolic syndrome (MS) increases cardiovascular risk, information is scarce on the prevalence of MS in the elderly. In this study we assessed MS prevalence in a population of elderly Japanese-Brazilians using different MS definitions according to waist circumference cutoff values. Material/Methods We studied 339 elderly subjects, 44.8% males, aged between 60 to 88 years (70.1±6.8). MS was defined according to criteria proposed by the Joint Interim Statement in 2009. As waist circumference cutoff point values remain controversial for Asian and Japanese populations, we employed 3 different cutoffs that are commonly used in Japanese epidemiological studies: 1) ≥90 cm for men and ≥80 cm for women; 2) ≥85 cm for men and ≥90 cm for women; 3) ≥85 cm for men and ≥80 cm for women. Results MS prevalence ranged from 59.9% to 65.8% according to the different definitions. We observed 90% concordance and no statistical difference (p>0.05) in MS prevalence between the 3 definitions. MS diagnosis according to all 3 cutoff values was found in 55.8% of our population, while in only 34.2% was MS discarded by all cutoffs. The prevalence of altered MS components was as follows: arterial blood pressure 82%, fasting glycemia 65.8%, triglyceride 43.4%, and HDL-C levels 36.9%. Conclusions Elderly Japanese-Brazilians present high metabolic syndrome prevalence independent of waist circumference cutoff values. Concordance between the 3 definitions is high, suggesting that all 3 cutoff values yield similar metabolic syndrome prevalence values in this population. PMID:22293888

  4. Giant high-pressure pulmonary artery aneurysm in an elderly patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Morais, Sandra A; Oliveira, Hugo M; de Almeida, José R; Eiras, Eduardo; Silva, Ana Catarina; Gavina, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    The authors report the case of a 74-year-old man, with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), GOLD grade 3, stable for the past two decades, who was admitted to our center with severe right heart failure. The chest radiograph showed moderate heart enlargement mainly of the right atrium and pulmonary artery, similar to previous chest radiographs in the previous 20 years. The transthoracic echocardiogram showed a pulmonary artery aneurysm (PAA), dilatation of the right chambers with pulmonary artery systolic pressure of 52 mmHg, and preserved right ventricular systolic function. A thoracic computed tomography scan confirmed the presence of a giant PAA 72 mm in diameter. The patient was started on high-dose diuretics, with significant clinical improvement. After optimization of medical therapy right heart catheterization was carried out with the patient in optimal clinical condition, which revealed mild precapillary pulmonary hypertension with a mean pulmonary artery pressure of 26 mmHg. On the basis of the clinical and imaging findings a stable, giant, high-pressure, PAA was diagnosed secondary to pulmonary hypertension induced by COPD, with a 20-year follow-up without need for surgical repair, which helped in our decision to maintain medical surveillance. The recent onset of heart failure is explained by the unfavorable evolution of COPD. This case may change the attitude expressed in previous studies favoring the choice of an invasive approach to treat giant high-pressure PAAs, instead supporting the maintenance of medical treatment. PMID:26922398

  5. Eye surgery in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Raczyńska, Dorota; Glasner, Leopold; Serkies-Minuth, Ewelina; Wujtewicz, Magdalena A; Mitrosz, Kamila

    2016-01-01

    Extending life expectancy is a human achievement. It does however entail problems. Ophthalmic treatments are widely recognized as having a low risk of general complications. A classic example is cataract surgery, considered to be one of the safest and most frequently performed surgical procedures in the world. However, advanced age brings with it risks that should be considered before surgery. Eye operations, as with procedures on other organs, are largely dependent on the quality of surgical tissues. Therefore, the elderly are at increased risk of complications. Improved general health and postoperative follow-up with the use of noninvasive technologies such as optical coherence tomography translate into lower intraoperative risk and better postoperative prognosis. In this review, we discuss the impact of general health on operational prognosis, therapeutic problems, and technical difficulties which a surgeon and anesthesiologist may encounter in the process. We also consider new technology and strategies specifically aimed at treating eye conditions in the elderly. PMID:27103794

  6. Eye surgery in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Raczyńska, Dorota; Glasner, Leopold; Serkies-Minuth, Ewelina; Wujtewicz, Magdalena A; Mitrosz, Kamila

    2016-01-01

    Extending life expectancy is a human achievement. It does however entail problems. Ophthalmic treatments are widely recognized as having a low risk of general complications. A classic example is cataract surgery, considered to be one of the safest and most frequently performed surgical procedures in the world. However, advanced age brings with it risks that should be considered before surgery. Eye operations, as with procedures on other organs, are largely dependent on the quality of surgical tissues. Therefore, the elderly are at increased risk of complications. Improved general health and postoperative follow-up with the use of noninvasive technologies such as optical coherence tomography translate into lower intraoperative risk and better postoperative prognosis. In this review, we discuss the impact of general health on operational prognosis, therapeutic problems, and technical difficulties which a surgeon and anesthesiologist may encounter in the process. We also consider new technology and strategies specifically aimed at treating eye conditions in the elderly. PMID:27103794

  7. Understand Your Risk for High Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... or trans fats also increases the amount of LDL cholesterol in your blood. If high blood cholesterol runs ... may not be enough to help lower your LDL blood cholesterol. View an animation of cholesterol . More information: Women ...

  8. The challenge of HIV prevention among high-risk adolescents.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, T R

    1996-02-01

    This article reports findings from an exploratory study of HIV knowledge and risk behaviors among 60 teenagers and young men engaged in the street life of Hollywood, California. The sample was composed largely of youths of homosexual or bisexual orientation who were substance abusers, prostitutes, or both. The data suggest that although community-based education efforts may be associated with lower-risk behavior among this population, the overall risk profiles of these socially marginalized youths remained high. Inferences are drawn about the cofactors of risk that must be addressed and the education needed to enhance the health prospects of these youths. PMID:8626159

  9. Elder neglect.

    PubMed

    del Carmen, Tessa; LoFaso, Veronica M

    2014-11-01

    Because neglect is the most common form of elder abuse, identifying patients who are vulnerable to neglect allows clinicians to intervene early and potentially prevent situations that can escalate and lead to harm or even death. Health care workers have a unique opportunity to uncover these unfortunate situations and in many cases may be the only other contact isolated vulnerable patients have with the outside world. Responding appropriately and quickly when neglect is suspected and using a team approach can improve the health and well-being of older victims of neglect. PMID:25439641

  10. Drug therapy for obesity in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, R; Starling, R D; Callés-Escandon, J; Sims, E A; Poehlman, E T

    1997-11-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing rapidly in the US and other developed countries. Even though the percentage of older individuals is increasing worldwide, obesity has only recently become a recognised problem in this population. Obesity occurs when energy intake chronically exceeds energy expenditure. Moreover, advancing age is associated with an inability to couple energy intake with energy expenditure. Obesity contributes to many adverse health outcomes, including non-insulin-dependent (type II) diabetes mellitus, as well as to an increase in both cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Only recently has the medical community begun to accept obesity as a disease with a multifactorial pathogenesis that requires systematic lifestyle changes and pharmacological treatment. Several groups of drugs are available for the pharmacotherapy of obesity; anorectic medications (e.g. fenfluramine, dexfenfluramine); substances affecting energy expenditure and body composition [e.g. chromium (chromium picolinate), ephedrine, anabolic steroids, beta 3-adrenoceptor agonists]; and drugs affecting the absorption of nutrients (e.g. orlistat). To date, few drugs have produced and sustained a significant bodyweight loss. However, some drugs induce a significant short term reduction in bodyweight compared with placebo. Moreover, there is a paucity of information regarding the effectiveness of these drugs in the treatment of obesity in the elderly. Furthermore, it is even debated whether obesity should be treated with drug intervention in the elderly. Clinicians prescribing medications for obesity treatment in the elderly need to carefully consider the benefit: risk ratio, given the high prevalence of polypharmacy in elderly patients. Furthermore, physiological changes that occur with aging may affect the pharmacokinetics of administered drugs and need to be taken into consideration. PMID:9359021

  11. Brachytherapy boost and cancer-specific mortality in favorable high-risk versus other high-risk prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muralidhar, Vinayak; Xiang, Michael; Orio, Peter F.; Martin, Neil E.; Beard, Clair J.; Feng, Felix Y.; Hoffman, Karen E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent retrospective data suggest that brachytherapy (BT) boost may confer a cancer-specific survival benefit in radiation-managed high-risk prostate cancer. We sought to determine whether this survival benefit would extend to the recently defined favorable high-risk subgroup of prostate cancer patients (T1c, Gleason 4 + 4 = 8, PSA < 10 ng/ml or T1c, Gleason 6, PSA > 20 ng/ml). Material and methods We identified 45,078 patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database with cT1c-T3aN0M0 intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer diagnosed 2004-2011 treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) only or EBRT plus BT. We used multivariable competing risks regression to determine differences in the rate of prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) after EBRT + BT or EBRT alone in patients with intermediate-risk, favorable high-risk, or other high-risk disease after adjusting for demographic and clinical factors. Results EBRT + BT was not associated with an improvement in 5-year PCSM compared to EBRT alone among patients with favorable high-risk disease (1.6% vs. 1.8%; adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]: 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.21-1.52, p = 0.258), and intermediate-risk disease (0.8% vs. 1.0%, AHR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.59-1.16, p = 0.270). Others with high-risk disease had significantly lower 5-year PCSM when treated with EBRT + BT compared with EBRT alone (3.9% vs. 5.3%; AHR: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.55-0.95; p = 0.022). Conclusions Brachytherapy boost is associated with a decreased rate of PCSM in some men with high-risk prostate cancer but not among patients with favorable high-risk disease. Our results suggest that the recently-defined “favorable high-risk” category may be used to personalize therapy for men with high-risk disease. PMID:26985191

  12. Predicting the Unpredictable? Identifying High-Risk versus Low-Risk Parents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGaw, Sue; Scully, Tamara; Pritchard, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This study set out to identify risk factors affecting parents with intellectual disabilities (IDs) by determining: (i) whether perception of family support differs between parents with IDs, referring professionals, and a specialist parenting service; (ii) whether multivariate familial and demographic factors differentiates "high-risk"…

  13. Who Takes Risks in High-Risk Sports? A Typological Personality Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castanier, Carole; Le Scanff, Christine; Woodman, Tim

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the risk-taking behaviors of 302 men involved in high-risk sports (downhill skiing, mountaineering, rock climbing, paragliding, or skydiving). The sportsmen were classified using a typological approach to personality based on eight personality types, which were constructed from combinations of neuroticism, extraversion, and…

  14. Adolescents with high periodontal risk in Public Dental Service.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Leif; Adler, Lottie; Jonés, Catarina

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of adolescents with high periodontal risk and to identify factors with influence on the decision to refer a patient to a specialist clinic of Periodontology, on compliance rate and on treatment outcome. The investigation was conducted as a retrospective study on adolescents at age 13-17. In total, clinical examinations and risk evaluations according to caries- and periodontal risk were performed on 50347 adolescents in general dentistry at ages 13, 15 and 17 in 2007. Individuals with a high periodontal risk were included in the present investigation. A high periodontal risk was defined as presence of sites with periodontal pocket depths >6mm and loss of periodontal tissue support. Multiple logistic regression analyses were adopted to calculate the influence of the potential predictors on the investigated dependent variables. In total, 0.5% of the adolescents were found to have high periodontal risk. The diagnosis local periodontitis and the number of periodontal pockets with probing depths >6 mm were positively and significantly correlated to referral to a periodontist. Eighteen percent dropped out before the treatment was completed. Smokers had a significantly lower compliance than non-smokers. The success rate was significantly lower for individuals with many periodontal pockets and for those with the diagnosis local periodontitis. The prevalence of adolescents classified as having high periodontal risk was low. A large frequency of subjects dropped out before the periodontal treatment was completed, especially at the specialist clinics. PMID:24620506

  15. Identification of the high risk emergency surgical patient: Which risk prediction model should be used?

    PubMed Central

    Stonelake, Stephen; Thomson, Peter; Suggett, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction National guidance states that all patients having emergency surgery should have a mortality risk assessment calculated on admission so that the ‘high risk’ patient can receive the appropriate seniority and level of care. We aimed to assess if peri-operative risk scoring tools could accurately calculate mortality and morbidity risk. Methods Mortality risk scores for 86 consecutive emergency laparotomies, were calculated using pre-operative (ASA, Lee index) and post-operative (POSSUM, P-POSSUM and CR-POSSUM) risk calculation tools. Morbidity risk scores were calculated using the POSSUM predicted morbidity and compared against actual morbidity according to the Clavien–Dindo classification. Results The actual mortality was 10.5%. The average predicted risk scores for all laparotomies were: ASA 26.5%, Lee Index 2.5%, POSSUM 29.5%, P-POSSUM 18.5%, CR-POSSUM 10.5%. Complications occurred following 67 laparotomies (78%). The majority (51%) of complications were classified as Clavien–Dindo grade 2–3 (non-life-threatening). Patients having a POSSUM morbidity risk of greater than 50% developed significantly more life-threatening complications (CD 4–5) compared with those who predicted less than or equal to 50% morbidity risk (P = 0.01). Discussion Pre-operative risk stratification remains a challenge because the Lee Index under-predicts and ASA over-predicts mortality risk. Post-operative risk scoring using the CR-POSSUM is more accurate and we suggest can be used to identify patients who require intensive care post-operatively. Conclusions In the absence of accurate risk scoring tools that can be used on admission to hospital it is not possible to reliably audit the achievement of national standards of care for the ‘high-risk’ patient. PMID:26468369

  16. An Educational Program to Assist Clinicians in Identifying Elder Investment Fraud and Financial Exploitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Whitney L.; Roush, Robert E.; Moye, Jennifer; Kunik, Mark E.; Wilson, Nancy L.; Taffet, George E.; Naik, Aanand D.

    2012-01-01

    Due to age-related factors and illnesses, older adults may become vulnerable to elder investment fraud and financial exploitation (EIFFE). The authors describe the development and preliminary evaluation of an educational program to raise awareness and assist clinicians in identifying older adults at risk. Participants (n = 127) gave high ratings…

  17. Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Are Associated with Increased Risk of Dementia among the Elderly: A Nationwide Study

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chi-Hsiang; Wu, Ming-Ping; Ho, Chung-Han; Weng, Shih-Feng; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Hsieh, Wan-Ting; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Chen, Ping-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Studies show a strong association between dementia and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The aim of this study was to investigate whether LUTS are a risk factor for cognitive impairment. We enrolled 50-year-old and older subjects with LUTS (LUTS[+]) (n = 6801) and controls without LUTS (LUTS[−]) (n = 20,403) from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. LUTS, dementia, and other confounding factors are defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification Codes. Participants were recruited from 2000 to 2004 and then followed up until death or the end of 2011. The outcome was the onset of dementia, which was assessed using Poisson regression analysis, Cox hazards models, and Kaplan-Meier survival curves. The incidence of dementia was significantly higher in the LUTS[+] group than in the LUTS[−] group (124.76 versus 77.59/1000 person-years). The increased risk of dementia related to LUTS remained significant after adjustment for potential confounders (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR): 1.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.47–1.76, P < 0.0001) and higher than that related to cerebrovascular disease (AHR: 1.43, 95% CI 1.26–1.61, P < 0.0001). The outcome suggests the need for early screening and appropriate intervention to help prevent cognitive impairment of patients with LUTS. PMID:26290863

  18. Treating Patients with High-Risk Smoldering Myeloma

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III clinical trial, patients with smoldering myeloma classified as high risk for progression will be randomly assigned to undergo standard observation or six 4-week courses of treatment with the drug lenalidomide.

  19. Assessment of high cardiovascular risk profiles for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Whayne, Thomas F

    2013-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major cardiovascular (CV) risk factor. General Framingham Risk Profile (GFRP) and World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH) charts were used to assess CV risk in DM in Oman. The GFRP identified more patients with medium-risk DM; GFRP and WHO/ISH identified essentially equal numbers at very high risk. These were then used to evaluate statin usage in Oman, including economics. Google lists innumerable tools from organizations, hospitals, practitioners, magazines, societies, clinics, and medical associations. The GFRP and WHO/ISH calculations provided useful DM assessment of populations in Oman. Other major risk models are Adult Treatment Panel III, based on Framingham, and Reynolds Risk Score; the latter incorporates other factors such as family history, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and hemoglobin A(1c) (in DM). These models are useful in assessing specific populations. Individual practitioners with limited time may just evaluate patients as low, medium, and high CV risk based on general knowledge and then treat. PMID:23299171

  20. Learning Disability Characteristics of High Risk Freshmen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dikitanan, Rosefren C.

    Noting that the existence of learning disabilities after high school is considered problematical, a study determined the presence of learning disabilities among freshmen at Kean College of New Jersey and whether a specific set of learning characteristics exist which interfere with the successful completion of the college curricula. Subjects, 404…

  1. High risk groups in an oil shale workforce

    SciTech Connect

    Gratt, L.B.; Marine, W.M.; Perry, B.W.; Savitz, D.A.

    1984-04-01

    The workforce risks of a hypothetical one million barrels-per-day oil shale industry were estimated. The risks for the different workforce segments were compared and high risk groups were identified. Accidents and injuries were statistically described by rates for fatalities, for accidents with days lost from work, and for accidents with no days lost from work. Workforce diseases analyzed were cancers, silicosis, pneumoconiosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic airway obstruction, and high frequency hearing loss. A comparison of the workforce groups under different risk measures (occurrence, fatality, and life-loss expectancy) was performed. The miners represented the group with the largest fatality and the most serious accident rate, although the estimated rates were below the average industry-wide underground mining experience. Lung disease from inhalation exposure of about the nuisance dust threshold limit value presents a significant risk for future concerns.

  2. High-risk corneal allografts: A therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tian; Rajendran, Vijayalakshmi; Griffith, May; Forrester, John V; Kuffová, Lucia

    2016-03-24

    Corneal transplantation is the most common surgical procedure amongst solid organ transplants with a high survival rate of 86% at 1-year post-grafting. This high success rate has been attributed to the immune privilege of the eye. However, mechanisms originally thought to promote immune privilege, such as the lack of antigen presenting cells and vessels in the cornea, are challenged by recent studies. Nevertheless, the immunological and physiological features of the cornea promoting a relatively weak alloimmune response is likely responsible for the high survival rate in "low-risk" settings. Furthermore, although corneal graft survival in "low-risk" recipients is favourable, the prognosis in "high-risk" recipients for corneal graft is poor. In "high-risk" grafts, the process of indirect allorecognition is accelerated by the enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses due to pre-existing inflammation and neovascularization of the host bed. This leads to the irreversible rejection of the allograft and ultimately graft failure. Many therapeutic measures are being tested in pre-clinical and clinical studies to counter the immunological challenge of "high-risk" recipients. Despite the prevailing dogma, recent data suggest that tissue matching together with use of systemic immunosuppression may increase the likelihood of graft acceptance in "high-risk" recipients. However, immunosuppressive drugs are accompanied with intolerance/side effects and toxicity, and therefore, novel cell-based therapies are in development which target host immune cells and restore immune homeostasis without significant side effect of treatment. In addition, developments in regenerative medicine may be able to solve both important short comings of allotransplantation: (1) graft rejection and ultimate graft failure; and (2) the lack of suitable donor corneas. The advances in technology and research indicate that wider therapeutic choices for patients may be available to address the worldwide

  3. Comparison of risk assessment strategies for not-high-risk pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Hobohm, Lukas; Hellenkamp, Kristian; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Münzel, Thomas; Konstantinides, Stavros; Lankeit, Mareike

    2016-04-01

    We compared the prognostic performance of the 2014 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) risk stratification algorithm with the previous 2008 ESC algorithm, the Bova score and the modified FAST score (based on a positive heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) test, syncope and tachycardia, modified using high-sensitivity troponin T instead of H-FABP) in 388 normotensive pulmonary embolism patients included in a single-centre cohort study.Overall, 25 patients (6.4%) had an adverse 30-day outcome. Regardless of the score or algorithm used, the rate of an adverse outcome was highest in the intermediate-high-risk classes, while all patients classified as low-risk had a favourable outcome (no pulmonary embolism-related deaths, 0-1.4% adverse outcome). The area under the curve for predicting an adverse outcome was higher for the 2014 ESC algorithm (0.76, 95% CI 0.68-0.84) compared with the 2008 ESC algorithm (0.65, 95% CI 0.56-0.73) and highest for the modified FAST score (0.82, 95% CI 0.75-0.89). Patients classified as intermediate-high-risk by the 2014 ESC algorithm had a 8.9-fold increased risk for an adverse outcome (3.2-24.2, p<0.001 compared with intermediate-low- and low-risk patients), while the highest OR was observed for a modified FAST score ≥3 points (OR 15.9, 95% CI 5.3-47.6, p<0.001).The 2014 ESC algorithm improves risk stratification of not-high-risk pulmonary embolism compared with the 2008 ESC algorithm. All scores and algorithms accurately identified low-risk patients, while the modified FAST score appears more suitable to identify intermediate-high-risk patients. PMID:26743479

  4. Eating competence of elderly Spanish adults is associated with a healthy diet and a favorable cardiovascular disease risk profile.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Barbara; Psota, Tricia; Estruch, Ramón; Zazpe, Itziar; Sorli, José V; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Serra, Mercè; Krall, Jodi Stotts; Márquez, Fabiola; Ros, Emilio

    2010-07-01

    Eating competence (EC), a bio-psychosocial model for intrapersonal approaches to eating and food-related behaviors, is associated with less weight dissatisfaction, lower BMI, and increased HDL-cholesterol in small U.S. studies, but its relationship to nutrient quality and overall cardiovascular risk have not been examined. Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea (PREDIMED) is a 5-y controlled clinical trial evaluating Mediterranean diet efficacy on the primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in Spain. In a cross-sectional study, 638 PREDIMED participants (62% women, mean age 67 y) well phenotyped for cardiovascular risk factors were assessed for food intake and EC using validated questionnaires. Overall, 45.6% were eating-competent. EC was associated with being male and energy intake (P < 0.01). After gender and energy adjustment, participants with EC compared with those without showed higher fruit intake and greater adherence to the Mediterranean diet (P < 0.05) and tended to consume more fish (P = 0.076) and fewer dairy products (P = 0.054). EC participants tended to have a lower BMI (P = 0.057) and had a lower fasting blood glucose concentration and serum LDL-:HDL-cholesterol ratio (P < 0.05) and a higher HDL-cholesterol concentration (P = 0.025) after gender adjustment. EC participants had lower odds ratios (OR) of having a blood glucose concentration >5.6 mmol/L (0.71; 95% CI 0.51-0.98) and HDL-cholesterol <1.0 mmol/L (0.70; 95% CI 0.68-1.00). The OR of actively smoking, being obese, or having a serum LDL-cholesterol concentration > or =3.4 mmol/L were <1.0, but the 95% CI included the 1.0 (P > 0.1). Our findings support further examination of EC as a strategy for enhancing diet quality and CVD prevention. PMID:20505016

  5. Outcomes of parental investment in high-risk children.

    PubMed

    Bugental, Daphne Blunt; Corpuz, Randy; Samec, Rachel

    2013-09-01

    This study assesses the combined effects of children's early medical risk (e.g., preterm status) and parental investment levels (time spent in provision of care to target children as opposed to other family members) on children's response to novel, potentially distressing stimuli. While engaged in play activities, children were exposed to stimuli that were either neutral (a speaker on television with a calm voice) or threatening (a speaker with an angry voice). A significant interaction between children's risk status and parental investment was found only for threatening stimuli. High-risk children with high-investing parents showed high visual engagement with potentially threatening responses, whereas high-risk children with low-investing parents were more likely to show visual avoidance. No comparable effects were found for low-risk children. Findings were interpreted as showing that high-risk children with a history of high parental investment are more likely to attend to potentially threatening events, an adaptive response in the presence of reliable support. PMID:23465334

  6. Zoonotic disease risks for immunocompromised and other high-risk clients and staff: promoting safe pet ownership and contact.

    PubMed

    Stull, Jason W; Stevenson, Kurt B

    2015-03-01

    Pets can be a source of disease (zoonoses) for humans. The disease risks associated with pet contact are highest among young children, the elderly, pregnant women, and immunocompromised hosts. These individuals and household members display limited knowledge of pet-associated disease, rarely recall receipt of pet-associated disease information, and report pet ownership practices that are often at odds with established disease prevention recommendations. Veterinary staff are in a key position to promote safe pet ownership and contact practices. Encouraging and safeguarding client disclosure of immunocompromising health conditions and promoting veterinarian-physician communications are critical for effectively providing this service. PMID:25534535

  7. Polypharmacy, the Elderly, and Deprescribing.

    PubMed

    Jetha, Shirin

    2015-09-01

    The risks of polypharmacy are heightened in the elderly because of a number of factors including age-related physiologic changes and the presence of comorbid conditions. Polypharmacy is a strong predictor of potentially inappropriate medication (PIM) use in the elderly in which harm may outweigh potential benefits. Despite available lists and criteria of PIMs from expert panels regarding inappropriate use of medications for older adults, prescribing of PIMs continues to be reported. Empowering clinicians with evidence-based guidance to safely and effectively discontinue PIMs by "deprescribing" is the subject of current research. Pharmacists can play an important role as part of the circle of care for the elderly. The acronym "MINDFUL" serves as a reminder of steps commonly used by pharmacists to assess appropriateness of medications and optimize health outcomes for their senior patients. PMID:26350893

  8. The association between the prevalence, treatment and control of hypertension and the risk of mild cognitive impairment in an elderly urban population in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lei; He, Yao; Jiang, Bin; Liu, Miao; Wang, Jianhua; Yang, Shanshan; Wang, Yiyan

    2016-01-01

    It remains unclear whether lowering the blood pressure effectively prevents cognitive impairment. The aim of the current study was to explore the association between the prevalence, treatment and control of hypertension and the risk of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) among elderly Chinese people. This is a cross-sectional study conducted in Beijing, China. A two-stage stratified clustering sampling method was used, and 2065 participants, aged ⩾60 years, were included in the analysis. The Mini-Mental State Examination was used to assess participants' cognitive function. The prevalence of MCI was higher in hypertensive (16.5%) than in normotensive individuals (13.1% P=0.043). Furthermore, in those hypertensive patients, the prevalence of MCI was lower in those treated (14.9%) than in those not treated (19.9% P=0.019) and lower in those controlled (13.4%) than in those uncontrolled (17.9% P=0.042). The adjusted odds ratio (OR; 95% confidence interval (CI)) of having MCI was 1.59 (1.07–2.35) in those with hypertension compared with those normotensive individuals. The assessment of the hypertensive patients revealed the adjusted OR (95% CI) of having MCI in those with treated hypertension was 0.60 (0.42–0.86) compared with those untreated hypertension, and in those with controlled hypertension was 0.64 (0.43–0.93) compared with those non-controlled hypertension (regardless of treatment). However, among the treated hypertensive patients, there was no difference in the prevalence of MCI between the patients who reached and those who did not reach their treatment goal. We suggest that improved diagnoses and optimal therapeutics are needed to achieve the aim of cognitive decline prevention. PMID:26739869

  9. The association between the prevalence, treatment and control of hypertension and the risk of mild cognitive impairment in an elderly urban population in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; He, Yao; Jiang, Bin; Liu, Miao; Wang, Jianhua; Yang, Shanshan; Wang, Yiyan

    2016-05-01

    It remains unclear whether lowering the blood pressure effectively prevents cognitive impairment. The aim of the current study was to explore the association between the prevalence, treatment and control of hypertension and the risk of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) among elderly Chinese people. This is a cross-sectional study conducted in Beijing, China. A two-stage stratified clustering sampling method was used, and 2065 participants, aged ⩾60 years, were included in the analysis. The Mini-Mental State Examination was used to assess participants' cognitive function. The prevalence of MCI was higher in hypertensive (16.5%) than in normotensive individuals (13.1%; P=0.043). Furthermore, in those hypertensive patients, the prevalence of MCI was lower in those treated (14.9%) than in those not treated (19.9%; P=0.019) and lower in those controlled (13.4%) than in those uncontrolled (17.9%; P=0.042). The adjusted odds ratio (OR; 95% confidence interval (CI)) of having MCI was 1.59 (1.07-2.35) in those with hypertension compared with those normotensive individuals. The assessment of the hypertensive patients revealed the adjusted OR (95% CI) of having MCI in those with treated hypertension was 0.60 (0.42-0.86) compared with those untreated hypertension, and in those with controlled hypertension was 0.64 (0.43-0.93) compared with those non-controlled hypertension (regardless of treatment). However, among the treated hypertensive patients, there was no difference in the prevalence of MCI between the patients who reached and those who did not reach their treatment goal. We suggest that improved diagnoses and optimal therapeutics are needed to achieve the aim of cognitive decline prevention. PMID:26739869

  10. WHEN AND WHY OPERATE ELDERLY OBESE

    PubMed Central

    NASSIF, Paulo Afonso Nunes; MALAFAIA, Osvaldo; RIBAS-FILHO, Jurandir Marcondes; CZECZKO, Nicolau Gregori; GARCIA, Rodrigo Ferreira; ARIEDE, Bruno Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Concurrently with the pandemic obesity is observed global aging phenomenon, with a significant increase of obesity in the elderly population. Aim : To review the indications for bariatric surgery for the elderly, mainly focusing on the morbidity and mortality of procedures. Method : Review of the literature in PubMed/Medline and Scielo focusing on the relationship of risk factors with different techniques of bariatric surgery in the elderly. The following descriptors were crossed in the form of AND/OR: Obesity; Bariatric surgery; Complications; Elderly. Conclusion : In people older than 60 years bariatric procedures represent acceptable and effective treatment option. The elderly should be treated in specialized centers with experience in major surgical procedures and low morbimortality. Going in this way, they experience the benefits of bariatric surgery with acceptable morbidity and mortality. However, age alone should not be considered as an absolute impediment for surgical indication. PMID:26537282

  11. Neutrophil adhesion in the elderly: inhibitory effects of plasma from elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Damtew, B; Spagnuolo, P J; Goldsmith, G G; Marino, J A

    1990-02-01

    Neutrophil (PMN) adherence is a critical component of host defense against infection. We questioned whether abnormalities of PMN adherence may be responsible, in part, for the increased susceptibility to infection in the elderly. We examined the adherence of 51Cr-labeled PMN from 18 elderly (65-95 years) and 18 younger subjects (18-40 years) to gelatin-coated plastic (gel) and bovine aortic endothelial monolayers (BAEC). There was no difference in unstimulated or baseline adherence of elderly or control PMN to either gel or BAEC substrates. N-Formyl-methionyleucylphenylalanine (FMLP), phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), and calcium ionophore A23187 (CI) significantly increased adherence of elderly PMN to gel and BAEC by 204 and 140% for FMLP, 271 and 263% for PMA, and 211 and 150% for CI, respectively. No differences were observed in the increment in stimulated adherence between young and elderly PMN. In contrast, in 5 of 18 subjects, incubation of elderly or young PMN with 10% elderly plasma resulted in greater than 25% inhibition in baseline adherence to BAEC compared to their sex-matched controls. The effect of elderly plasma was specific for BAEC and not seen with the gel substrate and was also demonstrated using human venous endothelium. When the adherence assay was repeated with varying ratios of elderly and young plasma, PMN adherence to BAEC correlated inversely with the proportion of elderly plasma in the assay. With greater than 70% elderly plasma, adherence was depressed below that observed in the absence of plasma. These data suggest the presence of a factor(s) in elderly plasma which may diminish adherence to endothelium. This factor(s) may be important in the increased risk of infection in a segment of the elderly population. PMID:2295155

  12. A study of Minnesota's high-risk health insurance pool.

    PubMed

    Zellner, B B; Haugen, D K; Dowd, B

    1993-01-01

    This is a report of a study of Minnesota's high-risk health insurance pool for "medically uninsurable" persons. The study consisted of a survey of current and past enrollees carried out in the Spring of 1990 and an analysis of the claims and membership files for 1988 and 1989. The main policy conclusion we reached is that Minnesota's high-risk pool is an adequate approach to the problem raised by risk segmentation on the basis of health status, providing that enrollment remains a small fraction of the population. The recent high, enrollment growth rates the Minnesota risk pool has experienced raise the possibility that basic structural reforms of the nongroup and small-group health insurance markets are needed. PMID:8314605

  13. Acute Kidney Injury in Elderly Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: Do Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors Carry a Risk?

    PubMed

    Chaumont, Martin; Pourcelet, Aline; van Nuffelen, Marc; Racapé, Judith; Leeman, Marc; Hougardy, Jean-Michel

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), mainly excreted by the liver, the dosage of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, cleared by the kidney, must be adapted to account for renal clearance in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to avoid acute kidney injury (AKI). Community-acquired AKI and the use of ACE inhibitors or ARBs in the emergency department were retrospectively assessed in 324 patients with baseline stage 3 or higher CKD. After stepwise regression analysis, the use of ACE inhibitors (odds ratio [OR], 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-3.1; P=.02) and the presence of dehydration (OR, 30.8; 95% CI, 3.9-239.1) were associated with AKI. A total of 45% of patients using ACE inhibitors experienced overdosing, which causes most of the excess risk of AKI. These results suggest that dosage adjustment of ACE inhibitors to renal function or substitution of ACE inhibitors with ARBs could reduce the incidence of AKI. Moreover, ACE inhibitors and ARBs should be stopped in cases of dehydration. PMID:27080620

  14. Assessing the Probability of Abuse of the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwalek, Melanie; And Others

    Investigators and service providers have indicated the need for a tool to identify elderly victims of abuse and neglect. Identifying factors related to the risk of elder abuse/neglect can be useful in planning services and targeting limited resources for preventing future problems. A 93-item Risk Assessment Tool was created and over 100 risk…

  15. Candidate Risks Indicators for Bipolar Disorder: Early Intervention Opportunities in High-Risk Youth

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Steven; Goodday, Sarah; Bentall, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Psychiatric illnesses like bipolar disorder are increasingly understood to be neurodevelopmental disorders with clinical, psychological, and biological indicators recognizable long before the emergence of the full-blown syndromes. Methods: This paper is a selective review of findings from studies of high-risk children of affected parents that inform the knowledge of illness risk and development markers of bipolar disorder. We specifically focus on candidate clinical, biological, and psychological risk indicators that could serve as targets for future early intervention and prevention studies. Results: There is convergent evidence from prospective studies that bipolar disorder typically debuts as depressive episodes after puberty. In some high-risk children, sleep and anxiety disorders precede mood disorders by several years and reflect an increased vulnerability. An association between early exposure to adversity (eg, exposure to parental illness, neglect from mother) and increased risk of psychopathology may be mediated through increased stress reactivity evident at both behavioral and biological levels. Inter-related psychological processes including reward sensitivity, unstable self-esteem, rumination, and positive self-appraisal are risk factors for mood disorders. Disturbances in circadian rhythm and immune dysfunction are associated with mood disorders and may be vulnerability markers influenced by these other risk factors. Conclusions: There is accruing evidence of a number of measurable and potentially modifiable markers of vulnerability and developing illness in youth at familial risk for bipolar disorder. Longitudinal studies of multiple biological and psychological risk processes in high-risk offspring, both individually and together, will improve our understanding of illness onset and lead to the development of specific early interventions. PMID:26116493

  16. Double-Balloon Enteroscopy in Elderly Patients: Is It Safe and Useful?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dae Han; Kim, Hyun Gun; Lee, Tae Hee; Lee, Woong Cheul; Kang, Byung Soo; Cho, Jun-Hyung; Jung, Yunho; Kim, Wan Jung; Ko, Bong Min; Cho, Joo Young; Lee, Joon Seong; Lee, Moon Sung

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Providers may be hesitant to perform double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) in the elderly because the increased number of co-morbidities in this population poses a greater risk of complications resulting from sedation. There are limited data on the use of DBE in the elderly. Here, we assessed the safety and efficacy of DBE in the elderly compared to those in younger patients. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 158 patients who underwent 218 DBEs. Patients were divided into an elderly group (age ≥65 years; mean 71.4±5.4; n=34; 41 DBEs) and a younger group (age <65 years; mean 39.5±13.5; n=124; 177 DBEs). Results In both groups, the most common indication for DBE was obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Mucosal lesions (33.3% vs. 60.9%; P=0.002) were the most common finding in both groups, followed by tumors (30.8% vs. 14.1%; P=0.036). The elderly were more likely to receive interventional therapy (51.3% vs. 23.5%; P=0.001). The diagnostic yield of DBE was slightly higher in the elderly group (92.3% vs. 86.5%; P=0.422), but was not statistically significant. The therapeutic success rate of DBE was 100% in the elderly group compared to 87.5% in the younger group (P=0.536). The overall DBE complication rate was 1.8% overall, and this rate did not differ significantly between the groups (2.6% vs. 1.7%; P=0.548). Conclusions DBE is safe and effective in the elderly, and has a high diagnostic yield and high therapeutic success rate. PMID:25374498

  17. Quality of diet and potential renal acid load as risk factors for reduced bone density in elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Pedone, Claudio; Napoli, Nicola; Lauretani, Fulvio; Pozzilli, Paolo; Ferrucci, Luigi; Antonelli-Incalzi, Raffaele

    2010-01-01

    Background Bone mass density (BMD) may be influenced by the general dietary pattern and the potential renal acid load (PRAL). Objective To evaluate the association between PRAL and BMD. Methods We evaluated BMD using computed tomography and dietary intake using the EPIC questionnaire in 543 community-living women aged 60 years and older. We grouped the participants according to tertiles of total, trabecular and cortical BMD, and compared demographic, anthropometric and nutritional characteristics across groups. Analyses were repeated using tertiles of BMD variation over a 6-years follow-up. Results Total BMD was inversely associated with age, time since menopause, and creatinine clearance. The intake of PUFAs was slightly higher among women with the highest total BMD, none of the other nutrients taken into account nor PRAL was associated with total BMD. Similar results were found for trabecular BMD, with the exception that alcohol intake was associated with lower bone density. Cortical BMD was associated with vitamin D intake (1.6, 1.8, and 1.8 mcg/day in first, second and third tertile, respectively) and serum 25-OH vitamin D (38.8, 43.2, and 49.5 nmol/L in the first, second, and third tertile, respectively). In the longitudinal analysis, a lower BMI was associated with greater loss of total BMD, while lower serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D at baseline was associated with smaller loss of cortical BMD. Conclusions We found no relationship between dietary acid load and BMD. We also confirmed the role of well recognized risk factor for osteoporosis and found a possible protective effect of PUFA intake on BMD. PMID:20005315

  18. Rates of and Risk factors for trabecular and cortical BMD loss in middle-aged and elderly African Ancestry men

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Yahtyng; Bunker, Clareann H.; Jonnalagadda, Pallavi; Cvejkus, Ryan K.; Patrick, Allen L.; Wheeler, Victor W.; Gordon, Christopher L.; Zmuda, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Low trabecular (Tb) and cortical (Ct) volumetric BMD (vBMD) are related to increased fracture risk, but little is known about the patterns and correlates of Tb and Ct vBMD loss with aging. We examined the rates of change in total, Tb.vBMD and Ct.vBMD at the radius and tibia, and identified factors associated with vBMD loss among 1,569 men of African descent aged 40 years and older. Quantitative computed tomography was used to measure vBMD 6 years apart. The annualized rate of loss in Tb.vBMD was significant at the radius (−0.047%/yr, p=0.016) but not tibia. At the radius, a significant loss of Tb.vBMD was observed in men aged 40-49 that appeared to be attenuated and not statistically significant among older age men. In contrast, the decline in Ct.vBMD was similar at both skeletal sites (−0.254 to −0.264%/yr, p<0.0001) and was consistent across all age groups. Positive associations were found for vBMD changes with body weight (all but radius Ct.vBMD) and diabetes (Ct.vBMD only), while negative associations were found with hypertension (all but radius Tb.vBMD), smoking (Ct.vBMD only), and androgen deprivation therapy (cortical vBMD only). Trabecular and cortical vBMD loss appears to follow different patterns among middle- and older-aged men of African ancestry. Factors associated with the decline in vBMD also varied by compartment and anatomical site. Additional studies are needed to better understand the physiological mechanisms underlying early BMD loss among African ancestry men. PMID:25213918

  19. Clinical Risk Prediction by Exploring High-Order Feature Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Hu, Jianying

    2014-01-01

    Clinical risk prediction is one important problem in medical informatics, and logistic regression is one of the most widely used approaches for clinical risk prediction. In many cases, the number of potential risk factors is fairly large and the actual set of factors that contribute to the risk is small. Therefore sparse logistic regression is proposed, which can not only predict the clinical risk but also identify the set of relevant risk factors. The inputs of logistic regression and sparse logistic regression are required to be in vector form. This limits the applicability of these models in the problems when the data cannot be naturally represented vectors (e.g., medical images are two-dimensional matrices). To handle the cases when the data are in the form of multi-dimensional arrays, we propose HOSLR: High-Order Sparse Logistic Regression, which can be viewed as a high order extension of sparse logistic regression. Instead of solving one classification vector as in conventional logistic regression, we solve for K classification vectors in HOSLR (K is the number of modes in the data). A block proximal descent approach is proposed to solve the problem and its convergence is guaranteed. Finally we validate the effectiveness of HOSLR on predicting the onset risk of patients with Alzheimer’s disease and heart failure. PMID:25954428

  20. High-risk prostate cancer: the role of surgical management.

    PubMed

    Morlacco, Alessandro; Karnes, R Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    High-risk prostate cancer (HR Pca) is a highly heterogeneous disease from a biological and clinical standpoint, and it carries a significant chance of morbidity and mortality. Despite the impact of PSA screening, a significant number of men continue to present with high risk disease and need adequate management: clinical evidence shows that a considerable fraction on men with HR PCa can be actually cured with either uni- or multi-modality approaches. Surgical treatment, once considered unfeasible in this setting, is acquiring more and more diffusion in modern clinical practice. Herein we discuss the main treatment strategies for high-risk prostate cancer, providing an expert opinion on the role of surgical management and its outcomes in the most recent literature. PMID:27155934

  1. Prediction of risk for drug use in high school students.

    PubMed

    Climent, C E; de Aragon, L V; Plutchik, R

    1990-05-01

    On the basis of questionnaires administered to almost 2,000 high school students in Cali, Colombia, a subset of items was selected that deal primarily with parent--child relationships. This 53-item set, referred to as the Drug Risk Scale (DRS), was administered to two new cross-validation samples, one consisting of high school students and the other consisting of drug addicts attending drug rehabilitation centers. Significant differences in parent--child relations were found between these new groups. The DRS was also found to have reasonably high sensitivity and specificity. Its potential value as a risk-prediction instrument is discussed. PMID:2258260

  2. Prediction of risk for drug use in high school students.

    PubMed

    Climent, C E; de Aragón, L V; Plutchik, R

    1989-11-01

    On the basis of questionnaires administered to almost 2,000 high school students in Cali, Colombia, a subset of items was selected that deal primarily with parent-child relationships. This 53 item set, referred to as the Drug Risk Scale (DRS), was administered to two new cross-validation samples, one consisting of high school students and the other consisting of drug addicts attending drug rehabilitation centers. Significant differences in parent-child relations were found between these new groups. The DRS was also found to have reasonably high sensitivity and specificity. Its potential value as a risk-prediction instrument is discussed. PMID:2628355

  3. Telomerase activation by genomic rearrangements in high-risk neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Peifer, Martin; Hertwig, Falk; Roels, Frederik; Dreidax, Daniel; Gartlgruber, Moritz; Menon, Roopika; Krämer, Andrea; Roncaioli, Justin L.; Sand, Frederik; Heuckmann, Johannes M.; Ikram, Fakhera; Schmidt, Rene; Ackermann, Sandra; Engesser, Anne; Kahlert, Yvonne; Vogel, Wenzel; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Mariappan, Aruljothi; Heynck, Stefanie; Mariotti, Erika; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Glöckner, Christian; Bosco, Graziella; Leuschner, Ivo; Schweiger, Michal R.; Savelyeva, Larissa; Watkins, Simon C.; Shao, Chunxuan; Bell, Emma; Höfer, Thomas; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Theissen, Jessica; Volland, Ruth; Saadati, Maral; Eggert, Angelika; de Wilde, Bram; Berthold, Frank; Peng, Zhiyu; Zhao, Chen; Shi, Leming; Ortmann, Monika; Büttner, Reinhard; Perner, Sven; Hero, Barbara; Schramm, Alexander; Schulte, Johannes H.; Herrmann, Carl; O’Sullivan, Roderick J.; Westermann, Frank; Thomas, Roman K.; Fischer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a malignant paediatric tumour of the sympathetic nervous system1. Roughly half of these tumours regress spontaneously or are cured by limited therapy. By contrast, high-risk neuroblastomas have an unfavourable clinical course despite intensive multimodal treatment, and their molecular basis has remained largely elusive2–4. Here we have performed whole-genome sequencing of 56 neuroblastomas (high-risk, n = 39; low-risk, n = 17) and discovered recurrent genomic rearrangements affecting a chromosomal region at 5p15.33 proximal of the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT). These rearrangements occurred only in high-risk neuroblastomas (12/39, 31%) in a mutually exclusive fashion with MYCN amplifications and ATRX mutations, which are known genetic events in this tumour type1,2,5. In an extended case series (n = 217), TERT rearrangements defined a subgroup of high-risk tumours with particularly poor outcome. Despite a large structural diversity of these rearrangements, they all induced massive transcriptional upregulation of TERT. In the remaining high-risk tumours, TERT expression was also elevated in MYCN-amplified tumours, whereas alternative lengthening of telomeres was present in neuroblastomas without TERT or MYCN alterations, suggesting that telomere lengthening represents a central mechanism defining this subtype. The 5p15.33 rearrangements juxtapose the TERT coding sequence to strong enhancer elements, resulting in massive chromatin remodelling and DNA methylation of the affected region. Supporting a functional role of TERT, neuroblastoma cell lines bearing rearrangements or amplified MYCN exhibited both upregulated TERT expression and enzymatic telomerase activity. In summary, our findings show that remodelling of the genomic context abrogates transcriptional silencing of TERT in high-risk neuroblastoma and places telomerase activation in the centre of transformation in a large fraction of these tumours. PMID:26466568

  4. Telomerase activation by genomic rearrangements in high-risk neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Peifer, Martin; Hertwig, Falk; Roels, Frederik; Dreidax, Daniel; Gartlgruber, Moritz; Menon, Roopika; Krämer, Andrea; Roncaioli, Justin L; Sand, Frederik; Heuckmann, Johannes M; Ikram, Fakhera; Schmidt, Rene; Ackermann, Sandra; Engesser, Anne; Kahlert, Yvonne; Vogel, Wenzel; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Mariappan, Aruljothi; Heynck, Stefanie; Mariotti, Erika; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Gloeckner, Christian; Bosco, Graziella; Leuschner, Ivo; Schweiger, Michal R; Savelyeva, Larissa; Watkins, Simon C; Shao, Chunxuan; Bell, Emma; Höfer, Thomas; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Theissen, Jessica; Volland, Ruth; Saadati, Maral; Eggert, Angelika; de Wilde, Bram; Berthold, Frank; Peng, Zhiyu; Zhao, Chen; Shi, Leming; Ortmann, Monika; Büttner, Reinhard; Perner, Sven; Hero, Barbara; Schramm, Alexander; Schulte, Johannes H; Herrmann, Carl; O'Sullivan, Roderick J; Westermann, Frank; Thomas, Roman K; Fischer, Matthias

    2015-10-29

    Neuroblastoma is a malignant paediatric tumour of the sympathetic nervous system. Roughly half of these tumours regress spontaneously or are cured by limited therapy. By contrast, high-risk neuroblastomas have an unfavourable clinical course despite intensive multimodal treatment, and their molecular basis has remained largely elusive. Here we have performed whole-genome sequencing of 56 neuroblastomas (high-risk, n = 39; low-risk, n = 17) and discovered recurrent genomic rearrangements affecting a chromosomal region at 5p15.33 proximal of the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT). These rearrangements occurred only in high-risk neuroblastomas (12/39, 31%) in a mutually exclusive fashion with MYCN amplifications and ATRX mutations, which are known genetic events in this tumour type. In an extended case series (n = 217), TERT rearrangements defined a subgroup of high-risk tumours with particularly poor outcome. Despite a large structural diversity of these rearrangements, they all induced massive transcriptional upregulation of TERT. In the remaining high-risk tumours, TERT expression was also elevated in MYCN-amplified tumours, whereas alternative lengthening of telomeres was present in neuroblastomas without TERT or MYCN alterations, suggesting that telomere lengthening represents a central mechanism defining this subtype. The 5p15.33 rearrangements juxtapose the TERT coding sequence to strong enhancer elements, resulting in massive chromatin remodelling and DNA methylation of the affected region. Supporting a functional role of TERT, neuroblastoma cell lines bearing rearrangements or amplified MYCN exhibited both upregulated TERT expression and enzymatic telomerase activity. In summary, our findings show that remodelling of the genomic context abrogates transcriptional silencing of TERT in high-risk neuroblastoma and places telomerase activation in the centre of transformation in a large fraction of these tumours. PMID:26466568

  5. Risk analysis for truck transportation of high consequence cargo.

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Robert David

    2010-09-01

    The fixed facilities control everything they can to drive down risk. They control the environment, work processes, work pace and workers. The transportation sector drive the State and US highways with high kinetic energy and less-controllable risks such as: (1) other drivers (beginners, impaired, distracted, etc.); (2) other vehicles (tankers, hazmat, super-heavies); (3) road environments (bridges/tunnels/abutments/construction); and (4) degraded weather.

  6. Best self visualization method with high-risk youth.

    PubMed

    Schussel, Lorne; Miller, Lisa

    2013-08-01

    The healing process of the Best Self Visualization Method (BSM) is described within the framework of meditation, neuroscience, and psychodynamic theory. Cases are drawn from the treatment of high-risk youth, who have histories of poverty, survival of sexual and physical abuse, and/or current risk for perpetrating abuse. Clinical use of BSM is demonstrated in two case illustrations, one of group psychotherapy and another of individual therapy. PMID:23775428

  7. Suicidal behaviour and intensity of psychiatric care in a region at high risk for suicide.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Pier Luigi; Orbitello, Barbara; Ciano, Rossana P; Angarano, Alberto; Balestrieri, Matteo

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND Suicidal behaviour represents a social and health-related issue of prime importance in both the general and psychiatric population. People with mental illness are at great risk of suicide, but indirect evidence suggests that the treatment of psychiatric disorders may prevent suicide. The aim of our study was to compare the risk of suicide in the population of psychiatric patients with that of the general population in Friuli Venezia-Giulia (FVG). METHOD We analyzed the suicide rates, based on the official statistical database, relating to the resident population in FVG during the years 1998-1999. The sucide rates (per 100 000 subjects) were standardised by sex and age. The characteristics of suicidal behaviour in subjects who had been in contact with (Community Mental Health Centres) CMHC (n=65) were compared with that of suicidal subjects not in contact (n=237). RESULTS There was an increase in the suicide phenomenon in the elderly population in FVG over the tested period. The rates were three times higher in males than in females. The rates of patients in contact with CMHC in 1998 and in 1999 were, respectively, 14 and 20 times higher than that of the general population. Most suicidal schizophrenics and 37% of the depressed patients have been previously hospitalised. CONCLUSION The population of north-eastern Italy is at high risk of suicide compared to other regions. The mortality ratio of psychiatric subjects who commit suicide in our sample is elevated. Since Italian community-oriented services rely less on hospitalisation than in other countries, the fact that about 50% of suicidal psychiatric patients have been previously admitted in a psychiatric ward may indicate that previous hospitalisation is a hierarchic factor related to suicide. PMID:24941205

  8. CAI and At-Risk Minority Urban High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Signer, Barbara R.

    1991-01-01

    The Microcomputer Adaptive Testing High-Risk-Urban Students (MATH-R-US) project made computerized assessment an integral part of remedial high school mathematics at an inner-city school with predominantly African-American students. Results suggest that the girls exhibited greater self-esteem toward using computers than did boys and that…

  9. Cumulative Experiences of Violence among High-Risk Urban Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Catherine A.; Boris, Neil W.; Heller, Sherryl Scott; Clum, Gretchen A.; Rice, Janet C.; Zeanah, Charles H.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines type-specific and cumulative experiences of violence among a vulnerable population of youth. Sixty high-risk, shelter-dwelling, urban youth were interviewed regarding their history of childhood maltreatment, exposure to community violence (ECV), and experience with intimate partner violence (IPV). Results show a high prevalence…

  10. Antenatal Care Utilisation and Content between Low-Risk and High-Risk Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Ping Ling; Hornetz, Klaus; Dahlui, Maznah

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of antenatal care is to monitor and improve the wellbeing of the mother and foetus. The World Health Organization recommends risk-oriented strategy that includes: (i) routine care to all women, (ii) additional care for women with moderately severe diseases and complications, (iii) specialised obstetrical and neonatal care for women with severe diseases and complications. Antenatal care is concerned with adequate care in order to be effective. Measurement for adequacy of antenatal care often applies indexes that assess initiation of care and number of visits. In addition, adequacy of care content should also be assessed. Results of studies in developed settings demonstrate that women without risk factors use antenatal services more frequently than recommended. Such over-utilisation is problematic for low-resourced settings. Moreover, studies show that a substantial proportion of high-risk women had utilisation or content of care below the recommended standard. Yet studies in developing countries have seldom included a comparison between low-risk and high-risk women. The purpose of the study was therefore to assess adequacy of care and pregnancy outcomes for the different risk groups. Methods A retrospective study using a multistage sampling technique, at public-funded primary health care clinics was conducted. Antenatal utilisation level was assessed using a modified Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilisation index that measures the timing for initiation of care and observed-to-expected visits ratio. Adequacy of antenatal care content assessed compliance to routine care based on the local guidelines. Results Intensive or “adequate-plus” antenatal care utilisation as defined by the modified index was noted in over half of the low-risk women. On the other hand, there were 26% of the high-risk women without the expected intensive utilisation. Primary- or non-educated high-risk women were less likely to have a higher antenatal care utilisation

  11. Prevalence of age-related macular degeneration among the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Rasoulinejad, Seyed Ahmad; Zarghami, Amin; Hosseini, Seyed Reza; Rajaee, Neda; Rasoulinejad, Seyed Elahe; Mikaniki, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of visual impairment and blindness in elderly population in the developing countries. Previous epidemiological studies revealed various potential modifiable risk factors for this disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of AMD among elderly living in Babol, North of Iran. Methods: The study population of this cross-sectional study came from the Amirkola Health and Ageing Project (AHAP), the first comprehensive cohort study of the health of people aged 60 years and over in Amirkola, North of Iran. The prevalence of AMD was estimated and its risk was determined using logistic regression analysis (LRA) with regard to variables such as smoking, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and diabetes. Results: Five hundred and five participants with mean age of 71.55±5.9 (ranged 60-89) years entered the study. The prevalence of AMD was 17.6%. There was a significant association between AMD and smoking (P<0.001) but no association was seen with AMD and age, level of education, history of hyperlipidemia, hypertension and diabetes. Multiple LRAs revealed that smoking increased AMD by odds ratio of 5.03 (95% confidence interval 2.47-10.23 p<0.001) as compared to nonsmokers Conclusion: According to our findings, the prevalence of AMD was relatively high and smoking increased the risk of AMD in the elderly population. PMID:26644880

  12. Erratum to: Safety Considerations of Inhaled Corticosteroids in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Salvatore; Cardillo, Irene; Lavorini, Federico; Spatafora, Mario; Scichilone, Nicola

    2015-12-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) are widely used in the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. However, high-dose regimens and long-term use of ICSs have the potential to cause a variety of local and systemic side effects such as candidiasis, cataracts, glaucoma, and osteoporosis. The use of ICSs can also be associated with the risk of bone fractures, diabetes mellitus and pneumonia. These ICS-related side effects are of particular importance in elderly patients due to the presence of comorbidities and age-related behavioral, cognitive, and psychological problems, which can all interact with inhaled treatment. We reviewed the available literature on the clinically relevant side effects of ICSs in the elderly to provide practical measures to properly monitor and manage the risk of ICSs in the geriatric population. Inspection of the mouth, monitoring of ocular pressure, and use of bone-protective drugs may be necessary in patients on prolonged ICS therapy. Above all, the use of the lowest possible ICS dose and a careful re-assessment of the inhalation procedure should be recommended. Taken together, these observations suggest that physicians should use ICSs appropriately for those patients in whom the benefit will outweigh the risk, especially chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with previous frequent exacerbations. Given the paucity of information on the topic and the need to extrapolate the results from studies with broader age ranges, we strongly encourage the design of specifically tailored clinical studies in the elderly. PMID:26578157

  13. Evaluation of results of surgical procedures in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Linn, B S; Linn, M W; Wallen, N

    1982-01-01

    Authorities are not in full agreement in regard to risk of surgery in the elderly. One hundred eight studies of surgery in the elderly over the past 40 years were reviewed. The purpose was not merely to tabulate results, but to identify differences existing between reports with regard to data reported that could affect results independent of the surgical management itself. Sources of variance that need to be taken into account in comparing mortality rates between studies, such as whether mortality was computed by number of patients or operations, differing lengths of follow-up for recording mortality, proportions of emergency versus elective operations, and types of surgical procedures, were documented. A nine-item confidence in results scale was used to classify studies into high and low confidence groups. Surgical specialties scored substantially higher than general surgical studies. More recent studies received higher scores than earlier studies. Although mortality rates varied widely depending on methods of their calculation, there appeared to be a trend toward increases in elective, but not emergency, mortality rates in general surgery since 1941 that should be examined more closely. One thing that cannot be answered clearly from these studies is the relative risk of surgery with age. Some control of variations between studies and standardization of reporting surgical deaths are required before risk of surgery in the elderly can be assessed more accurately. PMID:7055387

  14. Safety considerations of inhaled corticosteroids in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Salvatore; Cardillo, Irene; Lavorini, Federico; Spatafora, Mario; Scichilone, Nicola

    2014-11-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) are widely used in the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. However, high-dose regimens and long-term use of ICSs have the potential to cause a variety of local and systemic side effects such as candidiasis, cataracts, glaucoma, and osteoporosis. The use of ICSs can also be associated with the risk of bone fractures, diabetes mellitus and pneumonia. These ICS-related side effects are of particular importance in elderly patients due to the presence of comorbidities and age-related behavioral, cognitive, and psychological problems, which can all interact with inhaled treatment. We reviewed the available literature on the clinically relevant side effects of ICSs in the elderly to provide practical measures to properly monitor and manage the risk of ICSs in the geriatric population. Inspection of the mouth, monitoring of ocular pressure, and use of bone-protective drugs may be necessary in patients on prolonged ICS therapy. Above all, the use of the lowest possible ICS dose and a careful re-assessment of the inhalation procedure should be recommended. Taken together, these observations suggest that physicians should use ICSs appropriately for those patients in whom the benefit will outweigh the risk, especially chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with previous frequent exacerbations. Given the paucity of information on the topic and the need to extrapolate the results from studies with broader age ranges, we strongly encourage the design of specifically tailored clinical studies in the elderly. PMID:25212953

  15. Radical treatment of localised prostate cancer in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Everaerts, Wouter; Van Rij, Simon; Reeves, Fairleigh; Costello, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    Elderly men are more likely to be diagnosed with aggressive cancer, but are often inappropriately denied curative treatment. Biological rather than chronological age should be used to decide if a patient will profit from radical treatment. Therefore, every man aged >70 years should undergo a health assessment using a validated tool before making treatment decisions. Fit elderly men with intermediate- or high-risk disease should be offered standard curative local treatment in keeping with guidelines for younger men. Vulnerable and frail elderly men warrant geriatric intervention before treatment. In the case of vulnerable patients, this intervention may render them suitable for standard care. When considering radical prostatectomy outcomes a 'bifecta' of oncological control and continence is appropriate, as erectile dysfunction (although prevalent) has a much smaller impact on quality of life than in younger patients. Radiotherapy is an alternative to radical prostatectomy in men with a life expectancy of <10 years. Primary androgen-deprivation therapy is not associated with improved survival in localised prostate cancer and should only be used for symptom palliation. Further elderly-specific research is needed to guide prostate cancer care. PMID:25810141

  16. Seating and wheeled mobility in the disabled elderly population.

    PubMed

    Redford, J B

    1993-08-01

    Elderly persons constitute the largest among the populations regularly using wheelchairs. This is a review of the few studies specifically concerned with seating for the elderly; it identifies current problems, particularly in the seating for aged people who are in long-term care facilities. This review describes ways of matching currently available seating technology with the needs of disabled elderly persons. Two major barriers to greater use of newer seating technology are (1) the high cost of durable medical equipment and (2) the failure of most clinicians and institutional administrators to recognize the importance of posture and comfort to provide functional independence in wheelchair users. This review discusses seating for four groups of elderly persons: (1) the nonmobile, dependents who may be safety risks and are without energy or ability to wheel or walk by themselves; (2) mobile nonambulatory; and (3) ambulatory, but with special wheelchair needs. Research is needed in wheeled mobility in a number of areas: better matching of mobility to function, cheaper and more effective cushions, more modular seating systems, and better lifting and transfer devices. The American National Standards Institute in cooperation with Rehabilitation Engineering Society of North America has recently recommended standards for wheelchair performance that may be legislated in the next few years. PMID:8347074

  17. Developmental Pathways to Sexual Risk Behavior in High-Risk Adolescent Boys

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Lauretta M.; Forbes, Erika; Shaw, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: