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Sample records for electric field forces

  1. Average Lorentz self-force from electric field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aashish, Sandeep; Haque, Asrarul

    2015-09-01

    We generalize the derivation of electromagnetic fields of a charged particle moving with a constant acceleration Singal (2011 Am. J. Phys. 79 1036) to a variable acceleration (piecewise constants) over a small finite time interval using Coulomb's law, relativistic transformations of electromagnetic fields and Thomson's construction Thomson (1904 Electricity and Matter (New York: Charles Scribners) ch 3). We derive the average Lorentz self-force for a charged particle in arbitrary non-relativistic motion via averaging the fields at retarded time.

  2. Ponderomotive force in the presence of electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Khazanov, G. V.; Krivorutsky, E. N.

    2013-02-15

    This paper presents averaged equations of particle motion in an electromagnetic wave of arbitrary frequency with its wave vector directed along the ambient magnetic field. The particle is also subjected to an E(vector sign) Multiplication-Sign B(vector sign) drift and a background electric field slowly changing in space and acting along the magnetic field line. The fields, wave amplitude, and the wave vector depend on the coordinate along the magnetic field line. The derivations of the ponderomotive forces are done by assuming that the drift velocity in the ambient magnetic field is comparable to the particle velocity. Such a scenario leads to new ponderomotive forces, dependent on the wave magnetic field intensity, and, as a result, to the additional energy exchange between the wave and the plasma particles. It is found that the parallel electric field can lead to the change of the particle-wave energy exchange rate comparable to that produced by the previously discussed ponderomotive forces.

  3. Characteristics of convection of an electrically conducting liquid in an additional external force field

    SciTech Connect

    Mikel'son, A.E.; Karklin, Ya.Kh.

    1987-07-01

    The authors analyze, theoretically and experimentally, the combined effects of gravitational and electric fields along with inertial forces on convective heat and mass transfer in liquid metals undergoing vortex flow in the presence of constant magnetic fields. The experimental data are derived for a eutectic indium-gallium-tin alloy. The flow model incorporates electrical conductivity and Hartmann number as well as other properties.

  4. Real-space phase-field simulation of piezoresponse force microscopy accounting for stray electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lun; Dayal, Kaushik

    2012-04-01

    Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is a powerful scanning-probe technique used to characterize important aspects of the microstructure in ferroelectrics. It has been widely applied to understand domain patterns, domain nucleation and the structure of domain walls. In this paper, we apply a real-space phase-field model to consistently simulate various PFM configurations. We model the PFM tip as a charged region that is external to the ferroelectric, and implement a boundary element method to efficiently and accurately account for the external stray fields that mediate the interactions between the tip and the ferroelectric. Our phase-field model and the solution method together are able to account for the electrical fields both within the specimen as well as those outside, and also consistently solve for the resulting electromechanical response with the same phase-field model. We apply this to various problems: first, the effect of crystal lattice orientation on the induced tip displacement and rotation; second, PFM scanning of a 90 domain wall that emerges at a free surface; third, the effect of closure domain microstructure on PFM response; fourth, the effect of surface modulations on PFM response; and fifth, the effect of surface charge compensation on PFM response.

  5. Force and torque on an electric dipole by spinning light fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canaguier-Durand, Antoine; Cuche, Aurlien; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W.

    2013-09-01

    We calculate the optical force and torque applied to an electric dipole by a spinning light field. We find that the dissipative part of the force depends on the orbital energy flow of the field only, because the latter is related to the phase gradient generalized for such a light field. As for the remaining spin energy flow, it gives rise to an optical torque. The resulting change in the optical force is detailed for different experimentally relevant configurations, and we show in particular how this change is critical when surface plasmon modes are involved.

  6. Study of electric fields parallel to the magnetic lines of force using artificially injected energetic electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.; Whalen, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    Electron beam experiments using rocket-borne instrumentation will be discussed. The observations indicate that reflections of energetic electrons may occur at possible electric field configurations parallel to the direction of the magnetic lines of force in an altitude range of several thousand kilometers above the ionosphere.

  7. High sensitive space electric field sensing based on micro fiber interferometer with field force driven gold nanofilm

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Tao; Zhou, Liming; Liu, Min; Zhang, Jingdong; Shi, Leilei

    2015-01-01

    The traditional electrical field sensing can be realized by utilizing electro-optic materials or liquid crystals, and has limitations of easy breakdown, free assembly and difficult measurement of low-frequency. Here, we propose a new method to realize safe measurement of spatial dynamic electric field by using a micro fiber interferometer integrated with gold nanofilm. The energy of the electric charge received through antenna forms the intrinsic electric field with two micro electrodes, one of which is the 120 nm gold film vibration beam micromachined by femtosecond lasers and integrated with the micro fiber. The change of the intrinsic electric field force due to the spatial electric field will cause the vibration of the film beam. By demodulating the output signal of the micro fiber interferometer, the electric field can be measured. We demonstrate the detectable frequency ranges from tens of Hz to tens of KHz, and the minimum electric field intensity is ~200 V/m at 1 KHz. Our electric field measurement technology combining optical fiber interference with gold nanostructures shows the advantages of security, high sensitivity, compact size, and multiplexed multi-point and remote detection. PMID:26507680

  8. High sensitive space electric field sensing based on micro fiber interferometer with field force driven gold nanofilm.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao; Zhou, Liming; Liu, Min; Zhang, Jingdong; Shi, Leilei

    2015-01-01

    The traditional electrical field sensing can be realized by utilizing electro-optic materials or liquid crystals, and has limitations of easy breakdown, free assembly and difficult measurement of low-frequency. Here, we propose a new method to realize safe measurement of spatial dynamic electric field by using a micro fiber interferometer integrated with gold nanofilm. The energy of the electric charge received through antenna forms the intrinsic electric field with two micro electrodes, one of which is the 120 nm gold film vibration beam micromachined by femtosecond lasers and integrated with the micro fiber. The change of the intrinsic electric field force due to the spatial electric field will cause the vibration of the film beam. By demodulating the output signal of the micro fiber interferometer, the electric field can be measured. We demonstrate the detectable frequency ranges from tens of Hz to tens of KHz, and the minimum electric field intensity is ~200 V/m at 1 KHz. Our electric field measurement technology combining optical fiber interference with gold nanostructures shows the advantages of security, high sensitivity, compact size, and multiplexed multi-point and remote detection. PMID:26507680

  9. High sensitive space electric field sensing based on micro fiber interferometer with field force driven gold nanofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tao; Zhou, Liming; Liu, Min; Zhang, Jingdong; Shi, Leilei

    2015-10-01

    The traditional electrical field sensing can be realized by utilizing electro-optic materials or liquid crystals, and has limitations of easy breakdown, free assembly and difficult measurement of low-frequency. Here, we propose a new method to realize safe measurement of spatial dynamic electric field by using a micro fiber interferometer integrated with gold nanofilm. The energy of the electric charge received through antenna forms the intrinsic electric field with two micro electrodes, one of which is the 120?nm gold film vibration beam micromachined by femtosecond lasers and integrated with the micro fiber. The change of the intrinsic electric field force due to the spatial electric field will cause the vibration of the film beam. By demodulating the output signal of the micro fiber interferometer, the electric field can be measured. We demonstrate the detectable frequency ranges from tens of Hz to tens of KHz, and the minimum electric field intensity is ~200?V/m at 1?KHz. Our electric field measurement technology combining optical fiber interference with gold nanostructures shows the advantages of security, high sensitivity, compact size, and multiplexed multi-point and remote detection.

  10. Electric/magnetic dipolein an electromagnetic field: force, torque and energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmetskii, Alexander; Missevitch, Oleg; Yarman, T.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we collect the relativistic expressions for the force, torque and energy of a small electric/magnetic dipole in an electromagnetic field, which we recently obtained (A.L. Kholmetskii et al., Eur. J. Phys. 33, L7 (2011), Prog. Electromagn. Res. B 45, 83 (2012), Can. J. Phys. 9, 576 (2013)) and consider a number of subtle effects, characterized the behavior of the dipole in an external field, which seem interesting from the practical viewpoint.

  11. Dielectrophoretic forces and potentials induced on pairs of cells in an electric field.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, K R; Sowers, A E

    1995-01-01

    A combined numerical/experimental study is reported of the membrane potentials and dielectrophoretically induced forces between cells, membrane pressures, and velocity of attraction of cells under the influence of an electric field. This study was designed to explore electrical and mechanical effects produced by a field on cells in close proximity or undergoing electrically induced fusion. Laplace's equation for pairs of membrane-covered spheres in close proximity was solved numerically by the boundary element method, and the electrically induced forces on the cells and between cells were obtained by evaluating the Maxwell stress tensor. The velocity of approach of erythrocyte ghosts or fused ghosts in a 60-Hz field of 6 V/mm was measured experimentally, and the data were interpreted by using Batchelor's theory for hydrodynamic interaction of hard spheres. The numerical results show clearly the origin of the dielectrophoretic pressures and forces in fused and unfused cells and the effects of a nearby cell on the induced membrane potentials. The experimental results agree well with predictions based on the simple electrical model of the cell. The analysis shows the strong effect of hydrodynamic interactions between the cells in determining their velocity of approach. PMID:8519978

  12. Effects of auroral-particle anisotropies and mirror forces on high-latitude electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Y. T.; Schulz, M.; Cornwall, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that, for most of the mechanisms for the strong electric fields that characterize the narrow regions in which there is acceleration and precipitation of ring current and/or plasma-sheet plasma, certain effects must be taken into account in simulations of auroral electric fields. The effects are those of auroral particle anisotropy, of mirror forces due to the inhomogeneous geomagnetic field, of auroral electron backscatter by the atmosphere, and of electron trapping by the combination of magnetic mirroring and electrostatic forces. What is more, the effects of the very strong perpendicular electric field must also be taken into account in a kinetic description of the Poisson equation in order to achieve a unified theory of the auroral electrostatic structure. Progress in these areas during the past few years is reviewed. It is shown that particle anisotropies and mirror forces can account for some basic electrostatic features of the quiet arc, while additional effects may be occurring in strong events in which the parallel potential drop is more than about 10 kV.

  13. Analysis of the forces acting on the saltating particles in the coupled wind-sand-electricity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianjun; Yan, Guanghu

    2009-02-01

    Based on the theoretical model describing the saltation of sand particles in the coupled wind-sand-electricity fields, the numerical simulations of the forces acting on saltating particles, such as the aerodynamic drag force, Magnus effect, Saffman force and electrostatic force, are analyzed in comparison to the gravity force of the particles in the steady windblown sand movement. Furthermore, the laws of the above forces vary with the friction velocity, the diameter of the sand particle, the initial angular velocity and the lift-off velocity are discussed.

  14. Student interpretations of electric and magnetic fields and forces on the CSEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, Marie Sanfilippo

    This study was undertaken to investigate the construct validity of ten purposefully selected items from the Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism (CSEM) (Maloney, O'Kuma, Hieggelke, & VanHeuvelen, 2001) and to probe into the mental models used by a group of post-instruction college physics students to answer the questions. The construct investigated was conceptual understanding of electric and magnetic fields and forces. The selected items assessed these topics. The investigation asked in particular if after instruction, would students choose the correct answer on these items on the multiple-choice instrument for scientifically correct reasons. The results indicate that there are some doubts as to the construct validity of some of the selected items. On each item some students chose the correct answer for reasons that were not classified as scientifically correct. Of the 1120 responses, 7.6% were classified as correct answer choice for wrong reason. Therefore, the fact that the students chose the correct answer did not necessarily mean that they had a correct conceptual understanding of the topic in question. Suggestions for addressing these issues include rewording some of the items as well as restructuring some of the items. It was also found that students seemed to use one very simple mental model to answer many of the items. The simple model "likes repel and unlikes attract" seems to be used in a universal manner across electric and magnetic domains even when its use is completely inappropriate. It is noted that rewording items on the CSEM will not alleviate this problem. The issue needs to be addressed in the classroom. The data supported previous research that found that in general students do not differentiate between electric and magnetic fields and forces. As an assessment of conceptual understanding the CSEM is a step in the right direction. Once the instrument has been revised to address the issue of construct validity of some of the items, it would be beneficial to compare results on the instrument of different classes using different curricula.

  15. Mode Transition of RNA Trap by Electric and Hydraulic Force Field in Microfluidic Taper Shape Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamura, Yuzuru; Ueno, Kunimitsu; Nagasaka, Wako; Tomizawa, Yuichi; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2007-03-01

    We have discovered a phenomenon of accumulation of DNA near the constricted position of a microfluidic chip with taper shaped channel when both hydro pressure and electric field are applied in opposite directions. However, RNA has not been able to trap so far, unlike huge and uniformly double stranded DNA molecules, RNAs are smaller in size and single stranded with complicated conformation like blocks in lysed cell solution. In this paper, we will report not only large but also small RNA (10010b) are successfully trapped in relatively large microfluidic taper shape channel (width >10um). RNA are trapped in circular motion near the constricted position of taper shape channel, and the position and shape of the trapped RNA are controlled and make mode transition by changing the hydraulic and the electric force. Using this technique, smaller size molecule can be trapped in larger micro fluidic structure compared to the trap using dielectrophoresis. This technique is expected to establish easy and practical device as a direct total RNA extraction tool from living cells or tissues.

  16. Molecular dynamics study of response of liquid N,N-dimethylformamide to externally applied electric field using a polarizable force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weimin; Niu, Haitao; Lin, Tong; Wang, Xungai; Kong, Lingxue

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of Liquid N,N-dimethylformamide subjected to a wide range of externally applied electric fields (from 0.001 V/nm to 1 V/nm) has been investigated through molecular dynamics simulation. To approach the objective the AMOEBA polarizable force field was extended to include the interaction of the external electric field with atomic partial charges and the contribution to the atomic polarization. The simulation results were evaluated with quantum mechanical calculations. The results from the present force field for the liquid at normal conditions were compared with the experimental and molecular dynamics results with non-polarizable and other polarizable force fields. The uniform external electric fields of higher than 0.01 V/nm have a significant effect on the structure of the liquid, which exhibits a variation in numerous properties, including molecular polarization, local cluster structure, rotation, alignment, energetics, and bulk thermodynamic and structural properties.

  17. Field Measurements of Heating Efficiency of Electric Forced-Air Furnaces in Six Manufactured Homes.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Bob; Palmiter, Larry S.; Siegel, Jeff

    1994-07-26

    This report presents the results of field measurements of heating efficiency for six manufactured homes in the Pacific Northwest heated with electric forced-air systems. This is the first in a series of regional and national efforts to measure in detail the heating efficiency of manufactured homes. Only six homes were included in this study because of budgetary constraints; therefore this is not a representative sample. These investigations do provide some useful information on the heating efficiency of these homes. Useful comparisons can be drawn between these study homes and site-built heating efficiencies measured with a similar protocol. The protocol used to test these homes is very similar to another Ecotope protocol used in the study conducted in 1992 and 1993 for the Bonneville Power Administration to test the heating efficiency of 24 homes. This protocol combined real-time power measurements of furnace energy usage with energy usage during co-heat periods. Accessory data such as house and duct tightness measurements and tracer gas measurements were used to describe these homes and their heating system efficiency. Ensuring that manufactured housing is constructed in an energy and resource efficient manner is of increasing concern to manufactured home builders and consumers. No comparable work has been done to measure the heating system efficiency of MCS manufactured homes, although some co-heat tests have been performed on manufactured homes heated with natural gas to validate HUD thermal standards. It is expected that later in 1994 more research of this kind will be conducted, and perhaps a less costly and less time-consuming method for testing efficiencies will be develops.

  18. Microextraction of mebendazole across supported liquid membrane forced by pH gradient and electrical field.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Mahboube; Yamini, Yadollah; Fotouhi, Lida; Seidi, Shahram

    2011-04-01

    In the present study, extraction of mebendazole across a supported-liquid membrane (SLM) was performed based on two different driving forces: (1) pH gradient over the SLM, and (2) electrical field sustained over the SLM. The extracted drug concentration was studied using reversed-phase HPLC-UV. At passive extraction conditions, mebendazole was extracted from alkaline samples (0.01 mmol L(-1) NaOH) into 1-undecanol immobilized in the pores of a porous hollow fiber of polypropylene (SLM), and then transported into 25 ?L of 100mM HCl as the acceptor solution. Under electrokinetic migration conditions, mebendazole transported under applied voltage from acidic solutions (100 mmol L(-1) HCl) through 2-nitrophenyl octyl ether (NPOE) immobilized in the pores of hollow fiber, into 25 ?L of 100 mmol L(-1) HCl as the acceptor solution. The effects of several factors including the nature of organic solvent, pH of donor and acceptor solutions, extraction time and stirring speed on the extraction efficiency of the drug were investigated and optimized. Under optimal conditions, preconcentration factors (PF) of 211 and 190 were obtained for the drug based on passive transport and electromembrane extraction (EME), respectively. Also, linear range of 0.5-1000 ?g L(-1) with estimation of coefficient higher than 0.994 was obtained for both of the proposed methods. The results showed that EME has higher speed in comparison with simple passive transport. The methods were successfully applied to extract mebendazole from plasma and urine samples and satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:21211924

  19. Reactive Force Field Study of Li/C Systems for Electrical Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Raju, Muralikrishna; Ganesh, P; Kent, Paul R C; van Duin, Adri C T

    2015-05-12

    Graphitic carbon is still the most ubiquitously used anode material in Li-ion batteries. In spite of its ubiquity, there are few theoretical studies that fully capture the energetics and kinetics of Li in graphite and related nanostructures at experimentally relevant length, time-scales, and Li-ion concentrations. In this paper, we describe the development and application of a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe Li interactions in perfect and defective carbon-based materials using atomistic simulations. We develop force field parameters for Li-C systems using van der Waals-corrected density functional theory (DFT). Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of Li intercalation in perfect graphite with this new force field not only give a voltage profile in good agreement with known experimental and DFT results but also capture the in-plane Li ordering and interlayer separations for stage I and II compounds. In defective graphite, the ratio of Li/C (i.e., the capacitance increases and voltage shifts) both in proportion to the concentration of vacancy defects and metallic lithium is observed to explain the lithium plating seen in recent experiments. We also demonstrate the robustness of the force field by simulating model carbon nanostructures (i.e., both 0D and 1D structures) that can be potentially used as battery electrode materials. Whereas a 0D defective onion-like carbon facilitates fast charging/discharging rates by surface Li adsorption, a 1D defect-free carbon nanorod requires a critical density of Li for intercalation to occur at the edges. Our force field approach opens the opportunity for studying energetics and kinetics of perfect and defective Li/C structures containing thousands of atoms as a function of intercalation. This is a key step toward modeling of realistic carbon materials for energy applications. PMID:26574418

  20. Specific features of the thermal electromotive force in Bi quantum wires in transverse magnetic and electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinyavskii, E. P.; Solovenko, V. G.

    2014-11-01

    The thermal electromotive force (emf) in Bi quantum wires has been calculated in the model of potential in the form of a paraboloid of revolution in a uniform magnetic field H, which is normal to the axis of the studied nanostructure, and in a direct-current (dc) electric field E ? H. It has been shown that, with an increase in E, the thermal emf ?xx is described by a nonmonotonic function at different values of H. A physical interpretation of this behavior of ?xx as a function of E is proposed with account for the interaction between carriers and the rough surface of the nanowire.

  1. The Electric Field of CO Tips and Its Relevance for Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ellner, Michael; Pavliček, Niko; Pou, Pablo; Schuler, Bruno; Moll, Nikolaj; Meyer, Gerhard; Gross, Leo; Peréz, Rubén

    2016-03-01

    Metal tips decorated with CO molecules have paved the way for an impressively high resolution in atomic force microscopy (AFM). Although Pauli repulsion and the associated CO tilting play a dominant role at short distances, experiments on polar and metallic systems show that electrostatic interactions are necessary to understand the complex contrast observed and its distance evolution. Attempts to describe those interactions in terms of a single electrostatic dipole replacing the tip have led to contradictory statements about its nature and strength. Here, we solve this puzzle with a comprehensive experimental and theoretical characterization of the AFM contrast on Cl vacancies. Our model, based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations, reproduces the complex evolution of the contrast between both the Na cation and Cl anion sites, and the positively charged vacancy as a function of tip height, and highlights the key contribution of electrostatic interactions for tip-sample distances larger than 500 pm. For smaller separations, Pauli repulsion and the associated CO tilting start to dominate the contrast. The electrostatic field of the CO-metal tip can be represented by the superposition of the fields from the metal tip and the CO molecule. The long-range behavior is defined by the metal tip that contributes the field of a dipole with its positive pole at the apex. At short-range, the CO exhibits an opposite field that prevails. The interplay of these fields, with opposite sign and rather different spatial extension, is crucial to describe the contrast evolution as a function of the tip height. PMID:26840626

  2. Carbohydrate force fields

    PubMed Central

    Foley, B. Lachele; Tessier, Matthew B.; Woods, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates present a special set of challenges to the generation of force fields. First, the tertiary structures of monosaccharides are complex merely by virtue of their exceptionally high number of chiral centers. In addition, their electronic characteristics lead to molecular geometries and electrostatic landscapes that can be challenging to predict and model. The monosaccharide units can also interconnect in many ways, resulting in a large number of possible oligosaccharides and polysaccharides, both linear and branched. These larger structures contain a number of rotatable bonds, meaning they potentially sample an enormous conformational space. This article briefly reviews the history of carbohydrate force fields, examining and comparing their challenges, forms, philosophies, and development strategies. Then it presents a survey of recent uses of these force fields, noting trends, strengths, deficiencies, and possible directions for future expansion. PMID:25530813

  3. Forces acting on dielectric colloidal spheres at a water/nonpolar fluid interface in an external electric field. 2. Charged particles.

    PubMed

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A

    2013-09-01

    Here, we calculate the electric forces acting on charged dielectric colloidal particles, which are attached to the interface between a nonpolar fluid (air and oil) and water in the presence of applied uniform external electric field, E0, directed normal to the interface. Electric charges are present on the particle-nonpolar fluid interface. The solution to the problem represents a superposition of the solutions of two simpler problems: (i) charged particle in the absence of external field and (ii) uncharged particle in the presence of external field. Because the external field can be directed upward or downward, it enhances or opposes the effect of the particle surface charges. As a result, the vertical (electrodipping) force vs. E0 may have a maximum or minimum and can be positive or negative depending on the particle contact angle and dielectric constant. In contrast, the lateral electric force between two identical charged floating particles is always positive (repulsive), but it can vary by many orders of magnitude with E0. This is because at a certain value of E0, the net dipolar moment of the particle becomes zero. Then, the interparticle force is governed by the octupolar moment, which leads to a much weaker and short-range repulsion. In the vicinity of this special value of E0, the interparticle repulsion is very sensitive to the variations in the external field. These effects can be used for a fine control of the lattice spacing in non-densely packed interfacial colloidal crystals of regular hexagonal packing for producing lithographic masks with various applications in nanotechnology. PMID:23759324

  4. Lattice QCD with strong external electric fields.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata

    2013-03-15

    We study particle generation by a strong electric field in lattice QCD. To avoid the sign problem of the Minkowskian electric field, we adopt the "isospin" electric charge. When a strong electric field is applied, the insulating vacuum is broken down and pairs of charged particles are produced by the Schwinger mechanism. The competition against the color confining force is also discussed. PMID:25166523

  5. Turbulent generation and mechanism analysis of forced-convective heat transfer enhancement by applying electric fields in the restricted region near the wall

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Masato; Yabe, Akira; Nariai, Hideki

    1999-07-01

    The heat transfer enhancement method of applying electric fields only near a heat transfer wall was numerically investigated. Generation of additional turbulence in the near-wall region occurs by the interaction between migrating electric charges and the turbulent flow of weakly electrically conductive fluids such as refrigerants, oils, and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) alternatives. Based on electrostatic probe experiments, the authors assumed that the current was mainly transferred by the negative charges. They solved the Navier-Stokes equation with a Coulomb force term, the conservation equation of electric current, the Poisson equation of electric potential, and the energy equation. They used the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method to represent the turbulence. The numerical analysis showed a heat transfer enhancement of 2.8 times for turbulent flow (Re = 1.8 x 10{sup 4}) when applying 5 kV to the near-wall region, 5 mm from the wall. The simulations for different distances between the coupled electrodes showed that an optimum location of the electrodes exists for achieving the lowest electric power input for a given electric field strength. They also evaluated the heat efficiency in a simple heat exchanger system using this heat transfer enhancement method. For the 5 kV/5 mm condition, where 19% of the total input power was consumed by the electric field, they achieved a heat transfer enhancement of 27 times compared to the case when an equivalent, additional amount of input power would be consumed by the pump to increase the flow rate of the heat-transfer fluid.

  6. Pulsed electric fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concept of pulsed electric fields (PEF) was first proposed in 1967 to change the behavior or microorganisms. The electric field phenomenon was identified as membrane rupture theory in the 1980s. Increasing the membrane permeability led to the application of PEF assisted extraction of cellular co...

  7. Low dimensionality of supraspinally induced force fields

    PubMed Central

    dAvella, A.; Bizzi, E.

    1998-01-01

    Recent experiments using electrical and N-methyl-d-aspartate microstimulation of the spinal cord gray matter and cutaneous stimulation of the hindlimb of spinalized frogs have provided evidence for a modular organization of the frogs spinal cord circuitry. A module is a functional unit in the spinal cord circuitry that generates a specific motor output by imposing a specific pattern of muscle activation. The output of a module can be characterized as a force field: the collection of the isometric forces generated at the ankle over different locations in the legs workspace. Different modules can be combined independently so that their force fields linearly sum. The goal of this study was to ascertain whether the force fields generated by the activation of supraspinal structures could result from combinations of a small number of modules. We recorded a set of force fields generated by the electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerve in seven frogs, and we performed a principal component analysis to study the dimensionality of this set. We found that 94% of the total variation of the data is explained by the first five principal components, a result that indicates that the dimensionality of the set of fields evoked by vestibular stimulation is low. This result is compatible with the hypothesis that vestibular fields are generated by combinations of a small number of spinal modules. PMID:9636215

  8. Formation, characterization, and dynamics of onion-like carbon structures for electrical energy storage from nanodiamonds using reactive force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, P.; Kent, P. R. C.; Mochalin, V.

    2011-10-01

    We simulate the experimentally observed graphitization of nanodiamonds into multi-shell onion-like carbon nanostructures, also called carbon onions, at different temperatures, using reactive force fields. The simulations include long-range Coulomb and van der Waals interactions. Our results suggest that long-range interactions play a crucial role in the phase-stability and the graphitization process. Graphitization is both enthalpically and entropically driven and can hence be controlled with temperature. The outer layers of the nanodiamond have a lower kinetic barrier toward graphitization irrespective of the size of the nanodiamond and graphitize within a few-hundred picoseconds, with a large volume increase. The inner core of the nanodiamonds displays a large size-dependent kinetic barrier, and graphitizes much more slowly with abrupt jumps in the internal energy. It eventually graphitizes by releasing pressure and expands once the outer shells have graphitized. The degree of transformation at a particular temperature is thereby determined by a delicate balance between the thermal energy, long-range interactions, and the entropic/enthalpic free energy gained by graphitization. Upon full graphitization, a multi-shell carbon nanostructure appears, with a shell-shell spacing of about 3.4 for all sizes. The shells are highly defective with predominantly five- and seven-membered rings to curve space. Larger nanodiamonds with a diameter of 4 nm can graphitize into spiral structures with a large (29-atom carbon ring) pore opening on the outermost shell. Such a large one-way channel is most attractive for a controlled insertion of molecules/ions such as Li ions, water, or ionic liquids, for increased electrochemical capacitor or battery electrode applications.

  9. Formation, characterization and dynamics of onion like carbon structures from nanodiamonds using reactive force-fields for electrical energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    We simulate the experimentally observed graphitization of nanodiamonds into multi-shell onion-like carbon nanostructures, also called carbon onions, at different temperatures, using reactive force fields. The simulations include long-range Coulomb and van der Waals interactions. Our results suggest that long-range interactions play a crucial role in the phase-stability and the graphitization process. Graphitization is both enthalpically and entropically driven and can hence be controlled with temperature. The outer layers of the nanodiamond have a lower kinetic barrier toward graphitization irrespective of the size of the nanodiamond and graphitize within a few-hundred picoseconds, with a large volume increase. The inner core of the nanodiamonds displays a large size-dependent kinetic barrier, and graphitizes much more slowly with abrupt jumps in the internal energy. It eventually graphitizes by releasing pressure and expands once the outer shells have graphitized. The degree of transformation at a particular temperature is thereby determined by a delicate balance between the thermal energy, long-range interactions, and the entropic/enthalpic free energy gained by graphitization. Upon full graphitization, a multi-shell carbon nanostructure appears, with a shell-shell spacing of about {approx}3.4 {angstrom} for all sizes. The shells are highly defective with predominantly five- and seven-membered rings to curve space. Larger nanodiamonds with a diameter of 4 nm can graphitize into spiral structures with a large ({approx}29-atom carbon ring) pore opening on the outermost shell. Such a large one-way channel is most attractive for a controlled insertion of molecules/ions such as Li ions, water, or ionic liquids, for increased electrochemical capacitor or battery electrode applications.

  10. Formation, characterization, and dynamics of onion-like carbon structures for electrical energy storage from nanodiamonds using reactive force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesh, P.; Kent, P. R. C.; Mochalin, V.

    2011-10-01

    We simulate the experimentally observed graphitization of nanodiamonds into multi-shell onion-like carbonnanostructures, also called carbon onions, at different temperatures, using reactive force fields. The simulations include long-range Coulomb and van der Waals interactions. Our results suggest that long-range interactions play a crucial role in the phase-stability and the graphitization process. Graphitization is both enthalpically and entropically driven and can hence be controlled with temperature. The outer layers of the nanodiamond have a lower kinetic barrier toward graphitization irrespective of the size of the nanodiamond and graphitize within a few-hundred picoseconds, with a large volume increase. The inner core of the nanodiamonds displays a large size-dependent kinetic barrier, and graphitizes much more slowly with abrupt jumps in the internal energy. It eventually graphitizes by releasing pressure and expands once the outer shells have graphitized. The degree of transformation at a particular temperature is thereby determined by a delicate balance between the thermal energy, long-range interactions, and the entropic/enthalpic free energy gained by graphitization. Upon full graphitization, a multi-shell carbonnanostructure appears, with a shell-shell spacing of about ~3.4 Å for all sizes. The shells are highly defective with predominantly five- and seven-membered rings to curve space. Larger nanodiamonds with a diameter of 4 nm can graphitize into spiral structures with a large (~29-atom carbon ring) pore opening on the outermost shell. Such a large one-way channel is most attractive for a controlled insertion of molecules/ions such as Li ions, water, or ionic liquids, for increased electrochemical capacitor or battery electrode applications.

  11. Distillation under electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, V.M.; Blankenship, K.D.; Tsouris, C.

    1997-11-01

    Distillation Is the most common separation process used in the chemical and petroleum industry. Major limitations in the applicability and efficiency of distillation come from thermodynamic equilibria, that is, vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE), and heat and mass transfer rates. In this work, electric fields are used to manipulate the VLE of mixtures. VLE experiments are performed for various binary mixtures in the presence of electric fields on the order of a few kilovolts per centimeter. The results show that the VLE is changed by electric fields, with changes in the separation factor as high as 10% being observed. Batch distillation experiments are also carried out for binary mixtures of 2-propanol and water with and without an applied electric field. Results show enhanced distillation rates and separation efficiency in the presence of an electric field but decreased separation enhancement when the electric current is increased. The latter phenomenon is caused by the formation at the surface of the liquid mixture of microdroplets that are entrained by the vapor. These observations suggest that there should be an electric field strength for each system for which the separation enhancement is maximum.

  12. Electric Field Mediated Droplet Centering

    SciTech Connect

    Bei, Z.-M.; Jones, T.B.; Tucker-Schwartz, A.; Harding, D.R.

    2010-03-12

    Double emulsion droplets subjected to a uniform ac electric field self-assemble into highly concentric structures via the dipole/dipole force if the outer droplet has a higher dielectric constant than the suspending liquid. The dielectric constant of the inner droplet has no influence. To minimize field-induced droplet distortion, the liquids must be density matched to ~0.1%. Centering of ~3 to 6 mm diameter droplets is achieved within ~60 s for field strengths of ~10^4 V_rms /m in liquids of viscosity ~10 cP. Effective centering depends strongly on frequency if the outer shell is conductive.

  13. Revisiting the Corotation Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothwell, P. L.

    2001-05-01

    The rotation of the Earth's dipole magnetic field produces a corotation electric field in the nonrotating frame of reference. A quick calculation implies that this field might arise from the relative motion of an observer in the nonrotating frame and the motion of rotating magnetic field lines. However, upon applying Faraday's Law one finds that total time rate of change of the magnetic field as seen in the nonrotating frame is zero due to the azimuthal symmetry of the dipole. Therefore, classical EM theory(1) predicts a zero corotation electric field in the nonrotating frame for a vacuum. This conundrum has been traditionally treated in the following manner(2,3). 1) Start with a vacuum state with no conductors and plasma present. The transformation between E (the electric field in the nonrotating frame) and E' (the electric field in the rotating frame)implies that in the rotating frame E' is nonzero while E = 0. 2) In the presence of a thin conducting spherical shell (the ionosphere) polarization charges form in the shell due to the magnetic force on the electrons. A polarization electric field Ep is created such that in the idealized case the shell has a uniform electric potential. This Ep has a component along the magnetic field lines outside the shell. 3) Plasma will polarize along B, thus canceling the parallel component of Ep which allows the potential on the shell to be mapped along the magnetic field lines setting E' = 0. From the transformation equation E is now nonzero. This is the electric field required in the nonrotating frame for the plasma to corotate with the dipole. The presence of the corotation electric field is not a local result, but a nonlocal effect that requires the presence of an ionosphere and a conducting plasma. (1) W.K.H. Panofsky and M. Phillips, Classical Electricity and Magnetism, Addison-Wesley, 1956. (2) H. Alfven and C.-G. Falthammar, Cosmical Electrodynamics, 2nd ed., Oxford Press, 1963. (3) E.W.Hones and J.E.Bergeson, J. Geophys. Res. , 70, 4951, 1965.

  14. Dynamic properties of force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitalini, F.; Mey, A. S. J. S.; Noé, F.; Keller, B. G.

    2015-02-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations are increasingly used to study dynamic properties of biological systems. With this development, the ability of force fields to successfully predict relaxation timescales and the associated conformational exchange processes moves into focus. We assess to what extent the dynamic properties of model peptides (Ac-A-NHMe, Ac-V-NHMe, AVAVA, A10) differ when simulated with different force fields (AMBER ff99SB-ILDN, AMBER ff03, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM27, and GROMOS43a1). The dynamic properties are extracted using Markov state models. For single-residue models (Ac-A-NHMe, Ac-V-NHMe), the slow conformational exchange processes are similar in all force fields, but the associated relaxation timescales differ by up to an order of magnitude. For the peptide systems, not only the relaxation timescales, but also the conformational exchange processes differ considerably across force fields. This finding calls the significance of dynamic interpretations of molecular-dynamics simulations into question.

  15. Charge carrier dynamics and interactions in electric force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lekkala, Swapna; Hoepker, Nikolas; Marohn, John A; Loring, Roger F

    2012-09-28

    In electric force microscopy, a charged atomic force microscope tip in vacuum senses a fluctuating electrical force generated by the sample. Such measurements can in principle probe electrical noise generated by moving charge carriers in an organic semiconductor. We present a theory of cantilever frequency fluctuations in electric force microscopy, driven by coupled charge carrier dynamics and dielectric fluctuations. The connection between observable frequency fluctuations in electric force microscopy and the Casimir-Lifshitz force is described. This classical electrodynamic calculation is based on Maxwell's equations coupled to diffusive carrier transport. The effects of carrier transport and inter-carrier interactions on the spectrum of cantilever frequency noise are elucidated. We find that a simplified model of freely diffusing carriers can overestimate cantilever frequency noise by several orders of magnitude because of the neglect of interactions. Electric force microscopy measurements on an organic field effect transistor are reported and qualitatively interpreted in terms of the suppression of electrical noise from charge carriers by Coulomb interactions. PMID:23020344

  16. Electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.; Etters, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    A number of energy momentum anomalies are described that result from the use of Abraham-Lorentz electromagnetic theory. These anomalies have in common the motion of charged bodies or current carrying conductors relative to the observer. The anomalies can be avoided by using the nonflow approach, based on internal energy of the electromagnetic field. The anomalies can also be avoided by using the flow approach, if all contributions to flow work are included. The general objective of this research is a fundamental physical understanding of electric and magnetic fields which, in turn, might promote the development of new concepts in electric space propulsion. The approach taken is to investigate quantum representations of these fields.

  17. Interaction Between Flames and Electric Fields Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Hegde, Uday

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between flames and electric fields has long been an interesting research subject that has theoretical importance as well as practical significance. Many of the reactions in a flame follow an ionic pathway: that is, positive and negative ions are formed during the intermediate steps of the reaction. When an external electric field is applied, the ions move according to the electric force (the Coulomb force) exerted on them. The motion of the ions modifies the chemistry because the reacting species are altered, it changes the velocity field of the flame, and it alters the electric field distribution. As a result, the flame will change its shape and location to meet all thermal, chemical, and electrical constraints. In normal gravity, the strong buoyant effect often makes the flame multidimensional and, thus, hinders the detailed study of the problem.

  18. Electrical Forces Determine Glomerular Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Hausmann, Ralf; Kuppe, Christoph; Egger, Herbert; Schweda, Frank; Knecht, Volker; Elger, Marlies; Menzel, Sylvia; Somers, Douglas; Braun, Gerald; Fuss, Astrid; Uhlig, Sandra; Kriz, Wilhelm; Tanner, George; Floege, Jrgen

    2010-01-01

    There is ongoing controversy about the mechanisms that determine the characteristics of the glomerular filter. Here, we tested whether flow across the glomerular filter generates extracellular electrical potential differences, which could be an important determinant of glomerular filtration. In micropuncture experiments in Necturus maculosus, we measured a potential difference across the glomerular filtration barrier that was proportional to filtration pressure (?0.045 mV/10 cm H2O). The filtration-dependent potential was generated without temporal delay and was negative within Bowman's space. Perfusion with the cationic polymer protamine abolished the potential difference. We propose a mathematical model that considers the relative contributions of diffusion, convection, and electrophoretic effects on the total flux of albumin across the filter. According to this model, potential differences of ?0.02 to ?0.05 mV can induce electrophoretic effects that significantly influence the glomerular sieving coefficient of albumin. This model of glomerular filtration has the potential to provide a mechanistic theory, based on experimental data, about the filtration characteristics of the glomerular filtration barrier. It provides a unique approach to the microanatomy of the glomerulus, renal autoregulation, and the pathogenesis of proteinuria. PMID:20947631

  19. Electrical forces determine glomerular permeability.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Ralf; Kuppe, Christoph; Egger, Herbert; Schweda, Frank; Knecht, Volker; Elger, Marlies; Menzel, Sylvia; Somers, Douglas; Braun, Gerald; Fuss, Astrid; Uhlig, Sandra; Kriz, Wilhelm; Tanner, George; Floege, Jrgen; Moeller, Marcus J

    2010-12-01

    There is ongoing controversy about the mechanisms that determine the characteristics of the glomerular filter. Here, we tested whether flow across the glomerular filter generates extracellular electrical potential differences, which could be an important determinant of glomerular filtration. In micropuncture experiments in Necturus maculosus, we measured a potential difference across the glomerular filtration barrier that was proportional to filtration pressure (-0.045 mV/10 cm H?O). The filtration-dependent potential was generated without temporal delay and was negative within Bowman's space. Perfusion with the cationic polymer protamine abolished the potential difference. We propose a mathematical model that considers the relative contributions of diffusion, convection, and electrophoretic effects on the total flux of albumin across the filter. According to this model, potential differences of -0.02 to -0.05 mV can induce electrophoretic effects that significantly influence the glomerular sieving coefficient of albumin. This model of glomerular filtration has the potential to provide a mechanistic theory, based on experimental data, about the filtration characteristics of the glomerular filtration barrier. It provides a unique approach to the microanatomy of the glomerulus, renal autoregulation, and the pathogenesis of proteinuria. PMID:20947631

  20. Overview - Electric fields. [in magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauffman, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    The electric fields session is designed to review progress in observation, theory, and modeling of magnetospheric electric fields, and to expose important new results. The present report comments on the state and prospects of electric field research, with particular emphasis on relevance to quantitative modeling of the magnetospheric processes. Attention is given to underlying theories and models. Modeling philosophy is discussed relative to explanatory models and representative models. Modeling of magnetospheric electric fields, while in its infancy, is developing rapidly on many fronts employing a variety of approaches. The general topic of magnetospheric electric fields is becoming of prime importance in understanding space plasmas.

  1. Magnetospheric electric fields and currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Zanetti, L. J.

    1987-01-01

    The progress made in the years 1983-1986 in understanding the character and operation of magnetospheric electric fields and electric currents is discussed, with emphasis placed on the connection with the interior regions. Special attention is given to determinations of global electric-field configurations, measurements of the response of magnetospheric particle populations to the electric-field configurations, and observations of the magnetospheric currents at high altitude and during northward IMF. Global simulations of current distributions are discussed, and the sources of global electric fields and currents are examined. The topics discussed in the area of impulsive and small-scale phenomena include substorm current systems, impulsive electric fields and associated currents, and field-aligned electrodynamics. A key finding of these studies is that the electric fields and currents are interrelated and cannot be viewed as separate entities.

  2. Acousto-electrical speckle pattern in Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Destrempes, Franois; Mari, Jean-Martial; Souchon, Rmi; Catheline, Stefan; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lafon, Cyril; Cloutier, Guy

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasound speckle is a granular texture pattern appearing in ultrasound imaging. It can be used to distinguish tissues and identify pathologies. Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography is an ultrasound-based medical imaging technique of the tissue electrical conductivity. It is based on the application of an ultrasound wave in a medium placed in a magnetic field and on the measurement of the induced electric current due to Lorentz force. Similarly to ultrasound imaging, we hypothesized that a speckle could be observed with Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography imaging. In this study, we first assessed the theoretical similarity between the measured signals in Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography and in ultrasound imaging modalities. We then compared experimentally the signal measured in both methods using an acoustic and electrical impedance interface. Finally, a bovine muscle sample was imaged using the two methods. Similar speckle patterns were observed. This indicates the existence of an 'acousto-electrical speckle' in the Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography with spatial characteristics driven by the acoustic parameters but due to electrical impedance inhomogeneities instead of acoustic ones as is the case of ultrasound imaging. PMID:25906432

  3. Acousto-electrical speckle pattern in Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Destrempes, François; Mari, Jean-Martial; Souchon, Rémi; Catheline, Stefan; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lafon, Cyril; Cloutier, Guy

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasound speckle is a granular texture pattern appearing in ultrasound imaging. It can be used to distinguish tissues and identify pathologies. Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography is an ultrasound-based medical imaging technique of the tissue electrical conductivity. It is based on the application of an ultrasound wave in a medium placed in a magnetic field and on the measurement of the induced electric current due to Lorentz force. Similarly to ultrasound imaging, we hypothesized that a speckle could be observed with Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography imaging. In this study, we first assessed the theoretical similarity between the measured signals in Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography and in ultrasound imaging modalities. We then compared experimentally the signal measured in both methods using an acoustic and electrical impedance interface. Finally, a bovine muscle sample was imaged using the two methods. Similar speckle patterns were observed. This indicates the existence of an ‘acousto-electrical speckle’ in the Lorentz force electrical impedance tomography with spatial characteristics driven by the acoustic parameters but due to electrical impedance inhomogeneities instead of acoustic ones as is the case of ultrasound imaging.

  4. Electric field replaces gravity in laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgolewski, S.

    For several years experiments in physical laboratories and in the fitotron have shown that one can replace gravitational field with electrical fields for plants. First obvious experiments in strong electrical fields in the MV/m regi on show that any materials and living plants respond immediately to Coulomb forces. Such fields are found in nature during thunderstorms. One has to be very careful in handling such strong fields for safety reasons. The fair weather global electrical field is about 20,000 times weaker. The coulomb forces are proportional to the square of the field strength and are thus 400 milion times weaker for a field of the order of 100 V/m.Yet it was found that some plants respond to such "weak" fields. We must remember that the electrical field is a factor of 10 38 times stronger than gravitational interaction. In plants we have dissociated in water mineral salts and the ions are subject to such ernormous forces. It was shown and published that the positive charges in the air in fields of the order of 3kV/m enhance lettuce growth by a factor of four relative to fields about 30 times weaker (100V/m). Reversal of the field polarity reverses the direction of plant growth and retards the plant's growth. Such fields overpower the gravitropism in the laboratory. More so horizontal electrical field is othogonal to gravity, now the fields do not see each other. Lettuce now growth horizontally ignoring the gravitational field. We can thus select the plants whose electrotropism even in the laboratory overwhelms gravity. This is important for the long space flights that we must grow vegetarian food for the crew. The successful harvesting of wheat in orbit does not contradict our experimental findings because wheat is not electrotropic like all plants from the grass family. The results of fitotron experiments with kV/m electrical fields are richly illustrated with colour digital photographs. We also subjected the candle flame to very strong horizontal electrical fields. The flame splits into two horizontal flames, ignoring the gravitational field in the laboratory. This result is similar to the behaviour of ions in plants which are responsible for the transport of nutrients from the roots to leaves and opposite ions to roots from the leaves. It shows that we can control the transport phenomena in the process of growth in plants as well as of combustion in space with proper electrical fields.

  5. Atom based RF electric field sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Haoquan; Kumar, Santosh; Sedlacek, Jonathon; Kbler, Harald; Karimkashi, Shaya; Shaffer, James P.

    2015-10-01

    Atom-based measurements of length, time, gravity, inertial forces and electromagnetic fields are receiving increasing attention. Atoms possess properties that suggest clear advantages as self calibrating platforms for measurements of these quantities. In this review, we describe work on a new method for measuring radio frequency (RF) electric fields based on quantum interference using either Cs or Rb atoms contained in a dielectric vapor cell. Using a bright resonance prepared within an electromagnetically induced transparency window it is possible to achieve high sensitivities, <1 ?V cm-1 Hz-1/2, and detect small RF electric fields \\lt 1 ?V cm-1 with a modest setup. Some of the limitations of the sensitivity are addressed in the review. The method can be used to image RF electric fields and can be adapted to measure the vector electric field amplitude. Extensions of Rydberg atom-based electrometry for frequencies up to the terahertz regime are described.

  6. What Are Electric and Magnetic Fields? (EMF)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Electricity is an essential part of our lives. Electricity powers all sorts of things around us, from computers ... are invisible lines of force that surround any electrical device. Power lines, electrical wiring, and electrical equipment all produce ...

  7. On Electric Fields in Stellarator Equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Beidler, Craig D.; Igitkhanov, Yuri L.; Wobig, Horst F. G.

    2004-07-15

    The paper describes the electric field in stellarator equilibria and discusses the methods of how to compute the electric potential. The momentum balance in a given magnetic field including viscous and friction forces is considered in the frame of a multifluid model. A general ambipolar condition on closed pressure surfaces is derived that is still valid if magnetic surfaces do not exist. The need for an extended model originates from the singularities of the plasma current in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic model of stellarator equilibria, where parallel current density becomes singular leading to singular parallel electric fields. Viscosity and friction forces eliminate these singularities. The paper investigates the mathematical implications of the extended plasma model and discusses the existence of solutions using the methods of functional analysis.

  8. Polarization effects in molecular mechanical force fields

    PubMed Central

    Cieplak, Piotr; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Duan, Yong; Wang, Junmei

    2014-01-01

    The focus here is on incorporating electronic polarization into classical molecular mechanical force fields used for macromolecular simulations. First, we briefly examine currently used molecular mechanical force fields and the current status of intermolecular forces as viewed by quantum mechanical approaches. Next, we demonstrate how some components of quantum mechanical energy are effectively incorporated into classical molecular mechanical force fields. Finally, we assess the modeling methods of one such energy component—polarization energy—and present an overview of polarizable force fields and their current applications. Incorporating polarization effects into current force fields paves the way to developing potentially more accurate, though more complex, parameterizations that can be used for more realistic molecular simulations. PMID:21828594

  9. Electric field induced changes in protein conformation.

    PubMed

    Bekard, Innocent; Dunstan, Dave E

    2014-01-21

    The effect of a low strength oscillating electric field on the conformation of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and Lysozyme in solution has been measured. A purpose built cell has been used to measure the real time autofluorescence and Circular Dichroism of the protein solutions exposed to electric fields of differing strength and frequency. Exposure to the electric fields results in protein unfolding for both Lysozyme and BSA. The applied field strengths are extremely small compared to the protein inter-chain intra-molecular forces. We propose a model whereby the electrophoretic motion of the proteins leads to a frictional force that results in protein unfolding. For BSA and Lysozyme in the electric fields used in this study, the shear rates at the protein surface under electrophoretic motion are of order 10(3) and 10(4) s(-1) respectively. Prolonged electric field exposure results in significant frictional energy dissipation in the proteins. The energy dissipated in the proteins results in protein unfolding, which is a critical initial step for protein aggregation and potentially amyloid fibril formation. PMID:24652412

  10. Cryosurgery with Pulsed Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Charlotte S.; Rubinsky, Boris

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that combining the minimally invasive surgical techniques of cryosurgery and pulsed electric fields will eliminate some of the major disadvantages of these techniques while retaining their advantages. Cryosurgery, tissue ablation by freezing, is a well-established minimally invasive surgical technique. One disadvantage of cryosurgery concerns the mechanism of cell death; cells at high subzero temperature on the outer rim of the frozen lesion can survive. Pulsed electric fields (PEF) are another minimally invasive surgical technique in which high strength and very rapid electric pulses are delivered across cells to permeabilize the cell membrane for applications such as gene delivery, electrochemotherapy and irreversible electroporation. The very short time scale of the electric pulses is disadvantageous because it does not facilitate real time control over the procedure. We hypothesize that applying the electric pulses during the cryosurgical procedure in such a way that the electric field vector is parallel to the heat flux vector will have the effect of confining the electric fields to the frozen/cold region of tissue, thereby ablating the cells that survive freezing while facilitating controlled use of the PEF in the cold confined region. A finite element analysis of the electric field and heat conduction equations during simultaneous tissue treatment with cryosurgery and PEF (cryosurgery/PEF) was used to study the effect of tissue freezing on electric fields. The study yielded motivating results. Because of decreased electrical conductivity in the frozen/cooled tissue, it experienced temperature induced magnified electric fields in comparison to PEF delivered to the unfrozen tissue control. This suggests that freezing/cooling confines and magnifies the electric fields to those regions; a targeting capability unattainable in traditional PEF. This analysis shows how temperature induced magnified and focused PEFs could be used to ablate cells in the high subzero freezing region of a cryosurgical lesion. PMID:22087224

  11. Lipid14: The Amber Lipid Force Field

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The AMBER lipid force field has been updated to create Lipid14, allowing tensionless simulation of a number of lipid types with the AMBER MD package. The modular nature of this force field allows numerous combinations of head and tail groups to create different lipid types, enabling the easy insertion of new lipid species. The Lennard-Jones and torsion parameters of both the head and tail groups have been revised and updated partial charges calculated. The force field has been validated by simulating bilayers of six different lipid types for a total of 0.5 ?s each without applying a surface tension; with favorable comparison to experiment for properties such as area per lipid, volume per lipid, bilayer thickness, NMR order parameters, scattering data, and lipid lateral diffusion. As the derivation of this force field is consistent with the AMBER development philosophy, Lipid14 is compatible with the AMBER protein, nucleic acid, carbohydrate, and small molecule force fields. PMID:24803855

  12. Static and dynamical Meissner force fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberger, B. R.; Lynds, L.; Hull, J. R.; Mulcahy, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    The coupling between copper-based high temperature superconductors (HTS) and magnets is represented by a force field. Zero-field cooled experiments were performed with several forms of superconductors: 1) cold-pressed sintered cylindrical disks; 2) small particles fixed in epoxy polymers; and 3) small particles suspended in hydrocarbon waxes. Using magnets with axial field symmetries, direct spatial force measurements in the range of 0.1 to 10(exp 4) dynes were performed with an analytical balance and force constants were obtained from mechanical vibrational resonances. Force constants increase dramatically with decreasing spatial displacement. The force field displays a strong temperature dependence between 20 and 90 K and decreases exponentially with increasing distance of separation. Distinct slope changes suggest the presence of B-field and temperature-activated processes that define the forces. Hysteresis measurements indicated that the magnitude of force scales roughly with the volume fraction of HTS in composite structures. Thus, the net force resulting from the field interaction appears to arise from regions as small or smaller than the grain size and does not depend on contiguous electron transport over large areas. Results of these experiments are discussed.

  13. Optical force field mapping in microdevices.

    PubMed

    Knner, Gregor; Ratnapala, Adrian; Nieminen, Timo A; Vale, Chris J; Heckenberg, Norman R; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2006-12-01

    We present a method for characterizing microscopic optical force fields. Two dimensional vector force maps are generated by measuring the optical force applied to a probe particle for a grid of particle positions. The method is used to map out the force field created by the beam from a lensed fiber inside a liquid filled microdevice. We find transverse gradient forces and axial scattering forces on the order of 2 pN per 10 mW laser power which are constant over a considerable axial range (>35 microm). These findings suggest future useful applications of lensed fibers for particle guiding/sorting. The propulsion of a small particle at a constant velocity of 200 microm s(-1) is shown. PMID:17203159

  14. Particle motion in an ac electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dazhi; Meinhart, Carl

    2001-11-01

    The movement of particles in a suspension subject to ac electric fields was determined quantitatively in both experiments and theoretical analysis. The test section consists of a wedge-shaped fluid channel with 150 micron gap between the electrode tips. The 1-micron dia. polystyrene flow-tracing particles exhibit negative dielectrophoresis. The fluid is subject to body forces due to the electrothermal effect, which results from thermally-induced gradients in the dielectric properties of the fluid. Micron-resolution Particle Image Velocimetry (micro-PIV) was used to measure experimentally the motion of nominally 1-micron dia. polystyrene particles suspended in a water/sugar solution. A multi-physics model was solved with FEMLAB software to simulate the electric strength field, temperature field, DEP force field, electrothermal force field, fluid and particle velocity fields. The results from the experiments and the numerical solutions are similar. The particles were observed to move toward the electrode tips along the centerline of the channel and then away from the tips at the electrode edges, forming a hyperbolic fixed point in the flow. This indicates the importance of the electrothermal effect.

  15. Electric field control of ultracold polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, John

    2003-05-01

    Recent work in ultracold collisions has emphasized new opportunities for artificially controlling the interactions between atoms and molecules. The most familiar example of this is a class of magnetic-field Feshbach resonances, present in certain alkali atoms, that enable experimenters to manipulate the sign and magnitude of mean-field interactions, as well as to create molecular states. In this talk I will examine instead the impact of electric fields on the interactions between ground-state polar molecules at ultralow temperatures. Electric fields have a decisive influence, and are in fact capable of changing the qualitative nature of the effective intermolecular potential. Moreover, the competition between the forces the molecules apply to each other, and the forces applied by an electric field, generates a new class of weakly-bound molecular states (avd). These ``field-linked'' states may be of great importance in interpreting and controlling cold molecular collisions, including, perhaps, chemical reactions. A. V. Avdeenkov and J. L. Bohn, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 043006 (2003).

  16. Common Force Field Thermodynamics of Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Giangreco, Francesco; Yamamoto, Eiji; Hirano, Yoshinori; di Giosia, Matteo; Zerbetto, Francesco; Yasuoka, Kenji; Narumi, Tetsu; Yasui, Masato; Hfinger, Siegfried

    2013-01-01

    Four different force fields are examined for dynamic characteristics using cholesterol as a case study. The extent to which various types of internal degrees of freedom become thermodynamically relevant is evaluated by means of principal component analysis. More complex degrees of freedom (angle bending, dihedral rotations) show a trend towards force field independence. Moreover, charge assignments for membrane-embedded compounds are revealed to be critical with significant impact on biological reasoning. PMID:24302856

  17. 49 CFR 236.758 - Lock, electric, forced drop.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lock, electric, forced drop. 236.758 Section 236.758 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 236.758 Lock, electric, forced drop. An electric lock in which the locking member is...

  18. 49 CFR 236.758 - Lock, electric, forced drop.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lock, electric, forced drop. 236.758 Section 236.758 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 236.758 Lock, electric, forced drop. An electric lock in which the locking member is...

  19. 49 CFR 236.758 - Lock, electric, forced drop.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lock, electric, forced drop. 236.758 Section 236.758 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 236.758 Lock, electric, forced drop. An electric lock in which the locking member is...

  20. 49 CFR 236.758 - Lock, electric, forced drop.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lock, electric, forced drop. 236.758 Section 236.758 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... 236.758 Lock, electric, forced drop. An electric lock in which the locking member is...

  1. 49 CFR 236.758 - Lock, electric, forced drop.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lock, electric, forced drop. 236.758 Section 236.758 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 236.758 Lock, electric, forced drop. An electric lock in which the locking member is...

  2. Assembly of LIGA using Electric Fields

    SciTech Connect

    FEDDEMA, JOHN T.; WARNE, LARRY K.; JOHNSON, WILLIAM A.; OGDEN, ALLISON J.; ARMOUR, DAVID L.

    2002-04-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a device that uses electric fields to grasp and possibly levitate LIGA parts. This non-contact form of grasping would solve many of the problems associated with grasping parts that are only a few microns in dimensions. Scaling laws show that for parts this size, electrostatic and electromagnetic forces are dominant over gravitational forces. This is why micro-parts often stick to mechanical tweezers. If these forces can be controlled under feedback control, the parts could be levitated, possibly even rotated in air. In this project, we designed, fabricated, and tested several grippers that use electrostatic and electromagnetic fields to grasp and release metal LIGA parts. The eventual use of this tool will be to assemble metal and non-metal LIGA parts into small electromechanical systems.

  3. Photocatalysts with internal electric fields.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Salvador, Paul A; Rohrer, Gregory S

    2014-01-01

    The photocatalytic activity of materials for water splitting is limited by the recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs as well as the back-reaction of intermediate species. This review concentrates on the use of electric fields within catalyst particles to mitigate the effects of recombination and back-reaction and to increase photochemical reactivity. Internal electric fields in photocatalysts can arise from ferroelectric phenomena, p-n junctions, polar surface terminations, and polymorph junctions. The manipulation of internal fields through the creation of charged interfaces in hierarchically structured materials is a promising strategy for the design of improved photocatalysts. PMID:24084897

  4. Electric fields and quantum wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Dalit; Freivogel, Ben; Iqbal, Nabil

    2015-09-01

    Electric fields can thread a classical Einstein-Rosen bridge. Maldacena and Susskind have recently suggested that in a theory of dynamical gravity the entanglement of ordinary perturbative quanta should be viewed as creating a quantum version of an Einstein-Rosen bridge between the particles, or a "quantum wormhole." We demonstrate within low-energy effective field theory that there is a precise sense in which electric fields can also thread such quantum wormholes. We define a nonperturbative "wormhole susceptibility" that measures the ease of passing an electric field through any sort of wormhole. The susceptibility of a quantum wormhole is suppressed by powers of the U (1 ) gauge coupling relative to that for a classical wormhole but can be made numerically equal with a sufficiently large amount of entangled matter.

  5. Electric and Magnetic Forces between Parallel-Wire Conductors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, N.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses electric and magnetic forces between parallel-wire conductors and derives, in a simple fashion, order of magnitude estimates of the ratio of the likely electrostatic and electromagnetic forces for a simple parallel-wire balance. (Author/HM)

  6. Electric fields in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    Two techniques, tracking the motions of Ba(+) clouds and measuring the differences in floating potential between symmetric double probes, were successful in: (1) demonstrating the basic convective nature of magnetospheric electric fields, (2) mapping global patterns of convection at upper ionosphere levels, and (3) revealing the physics of electric currents in the ionosphere and the importance of magnetosphere-ionosphere feedback in altering the imposed convection.

  7. Introduction to power-frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed Central

    Kaune, W T

    1993-01-01

    This paper introduces the reader to electric and magnetic fields, particularly those fields produced by electric power systems and other sources using frequencies in the power-frequency range. Electric fields are produced by electric charges; a magnetic field also is produced if these charges are in motion. Electric fields exert forces on other charges; if in motion, these charges will experience magnetic forces. Power-frequency electric and magnetic fields induce electric currents in conducting bodies such as living organisms. The current density vector is used to describe the distribution of current within a body. The surface of the human body is an excellent shield for power-frequency electric fields, but power-frequency magnetic fields penetrate without significant attenuation; the electric fields induced inside the body by either exposure are comparable in magnitude. Electric fields induced inside a human by most environmental electric and magnetic fields appear to be small in magnitude compared to levels naturally occurring in living tissues. Detection of such fields thus would seem to require the existence of unknown biological mechanisms. Complete characterization of a power-frequency field requires measurement of the magnitudes and electrical phases of the fundamental and harmonic amplitudes of its three vector components. Most available instrumentation measures only a small subset, or some weighted average, of these quantities. Hand-held survey meters have been used widely to measure power-frequency electric and magnetic fields. Automated data-acquisition systems have come into use more recently to make electric- and magnetic-field recordings, covering periods of hours to days, in residences and other environments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8206045

  8. Electric fields on quasiperiodic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, F.; Naumis, G.

    2010-03-01

    The effects of an electric field on the electronic spectrum and localization properties of quasiperiodic chains are studied. As quasiperiodic systems, we use the Harper and the Fibonacci potentials since we prove that both are closely interrelated. In the limit of a strong field, a ladder spectrum with localized states is observed. The ladder structure can be understood by using perturbation theory. Then each local isomorphism class of the quasiperiodic potential reproduces its structure in the ladder. In the case of a weak field, we observed that the singular spectrum of the quasiperiodic potential tends to be smoothed, and the gaps decrease linearly with the field. Such an effect can be understood using a variational approach, perturbation theory and a series of approximants. When the electric field and the quasiperiodic potential have the same order of magnitude, it is possible to observe a delocalization effect due to local resonances.

  9. Performance optimization in electric field gradient focusing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuefei; Farnsworth, Paul B; Tolley, H Dennis; Warnick, Karl F; Woolley, Adam T; Lee, Milton L

    2009-01-01

    Electric field gradient focusing (EFGF) is a technique used to simultaneously separate and concentrate biomacromolecules, such as proteins, based on the opposing forces of an electric field gradient and a hydrodynamic flow. Recently, we reported EFGF devices fabricated completely from copolymers functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol), which display excellent resistance to protein adsorption. However, the previous devices did not provide the predicted linear electric field gradient and stable current. To improve performance, Tris-HCl buffer that was previously doped in the hydrogel was replaced with a phosphate buffer containing a salt (i.e., potassium chloride, KCl) with high mobility ions. The new devices exhibited stable current, good reproducibility, and a linear electric field distribution in agreement with the shaped gradient region design due to improved ion transport in the hydrogel. The field gradient was calculated based on theory to be approximately 5.76 V/cm(2) for R-phycoerythrin when the applied voltage was 500 V. The effect of EFGF separation channel dimensions was also investigated; a narrower focused band was achieved in a smaller diameter channel. The relationship between the bandwidth and channel diameter is consistent with theory. Three model proteins were resolved in an EFGF channel of this design. The improved device demonstrated 14,000-fold concentration of a protein sample (from 2 ng/mL to 27 microg/mL). PMID:19081099

  10. Electric field driven optical recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, V. G.

    2010-07-01

    A physical mechanism of transformations between the amorphous and crystalline phases induced by the electric field of a laser beam is proposed. It creates needle-shaped crystal particles aligned to the beam polarization. The polarization driven orientation of particles can significantly increase the information storage capacity achievable with phase change optical recording. The nucleation and postnucleation stages of the laser field induced crystallization are discussed establishing the conditions under which the polarization aligned particles can be created.

  11. Current Status of Protein Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Pedro E.M.; Guvench, Olgun

    2015-01-01

    Summary The current status of classical force fields for proteins is reviewed. These include additive force fields as well as the latest developments in the Drude and AMOEBA polarizable force fields. Parametrization strategies developed specifically for the Drude force field are described and compared with the additive CHARMM36 force field. Results from molecular simulations of proteins and small peptides are summarized to illustrate the performance of the Drude and AMOEBA force fields. PMID:25330958

  12. Electric field divertor plasma pump

    DOEpatents

    Schaffer, M.J.

    1994-10-04

    An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak, or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode, which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum or other duct near the electrode includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode is insulated laterally with insulators, one of which is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode and a vacuum vessel wall, with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E [times] B/B[sup 2] drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable. 11 figs.

  13. Electric field divertor plasma pump

    DOEpatents

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode (56) positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak (20), or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix (40) of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode (56), which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum (54) or other duct near the electrode (56) includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode (56) is insulated laterally with insulators (63,64), one of which (64) is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode (56) and a vacuum vessel wall (22), with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E.times.B/B.sup.2 drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable.

  14. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Nordholt, Jane E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field.

  15. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  16. Electric Field Induced Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardone, Marco; Karpov, Victor

    2012-02-01

    A novel theory of phase transitions that are driven by strong, symmetry-breaking electric fields is presented. The underlying mechanism is based on the formation of needle-shaped, metallic embryos that acquire strong dipole moments in the applied field. It is shown that the electrostatic contribution to the free energy can be so significant that it dominates the nucleation process and elongated metallic particles can form even in cases where they would be otherwise unstable in the bulk. As such, the theory predicts that any insulator will eventually form metallic inclusions when immersed in a sufficient electric field. Materials can thus be synthesized by the controlled application of a dc or laser field. In this work, the general mechanism is described and closed form expressions are presented for the field-dependent nucleation barrier and the effective field range as functions of material parameters. Overall, the theory presents a new parameter space to explore phase transitions and opens the venue of Field Induced Materials Synthesis (FIMS). As a provocative example, the potential for FIMS of metallic hydrogen at standard pressure is discussed; the effective field range is estimated to be 10^7 < E10^9 V/cm (laser intensity 10^12< I 10^16 W/cm^2).

  17. Electrospinning and electrically forced jets. I. Stability theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohman, Moses M.; Shin, Michael; Rutledge, Gregory; Brenner, Michael P.

    2001-08-01

    Electrospinning is a process in which solid fibers are produced from a polymeric fluid stream (solution or melt) delivered through a millimeter-scale nozzle. The solid fibers are notable for their very small diameters (<1 ?m). Recent experiments demonstrate that an essential mechanism of electrospinning is a rapidly whipping fluid jet. This series of papers analyzes the mechanics of this whipping jet by studying the instability of an electrically forced fluid jet with increasing field strength. An asymptotic approximation of the equations of electrohydrodynamics is developed so that quantitative comparisons with experiments can be carried out. The approximation governs both long wavelength axisymmetric distortions of the jet, as well as long wavelength oscillations of the centerline of the jet. Three different instabilities are identified: the classical (axisymmetric) Rayleigh instability, and electric field induced axisymmetric and whipping instabilities. At increasing field strengths, the electrical instabilities are enhanced whereas the Rayleigh instability is suppressed. Which instability dominates depends strongly on the surface charge density and radius of the jet. The physical mechanisms for the instability are discussed in the various possible limits.

  18. Apparatuses and methods for generating electric fields

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R; Tremblay, Paul L

    2013-08-06

    Apparatuses and methods relating to generating an electric field are disclosed. An electric field generator may include a semiconductive material configured in a physical shape substantially different from a shape of an electric field to be generated thereby. The electric field is generated when a voltage drop exists across the semiconductive material. A method for generating an electric field may include applying a voltage to a shaped semiconductive material to generate a complex, substantially nonlinear electric field. The shape of the complex, substantially nonlinear electric field may be configured for directing charged particles to a desired location. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed.

  19. Electric Field Induced Surface Modification of Au

    SciTech Connect

    Erchak, A.A.; Franklin, G.F.; Houston, J.E.; Mayer, T.M.; Michalske, T.A.

    1999-02-15

    We discuss the role of localized high electric fields in the modification of Au surfaces with a W probe using the Interfacial Force Microscope. Upon bringing a probe close to a Au surface, we measure both the interfacial force and the field emission current as a function of separation with a constant potential of 100 V between tip and sample. The current initially increases exponentially as the separation decreases. However, at a distance of less than {approximately} 500{angstrom} the current rises sharply as the surface begins to distort and rapidly close the gap. Retraction of the tip before contact is made reveals the formation of a mound on the surface. We propose a simple model, in which the localized high electric field under the tip assists the production of mobile Au adatoms by detachment from surface steps, and a radial field gradient causes a net flux of atoms toward the tip by surface diffusion. These processes give rise to an unstable surface deformation which, if left unchecked, results in a destructive mechanical contact. We discuss our findings with respect to earlier work using voltage pulses in the STM as a means of nanofabrication.

  20. Speed, Acceleration, and Velocity: Level II, Unit 9, Lesson 1; Force, Mass, and Distance: Lesson 2; Types of Motion and Rest: Lesson 3; Electricity and Magnetism: Lesson 4; Electrical, Magnetic, and Gravitational Fields: Lesson 5; The Conservation and Conversion of Matter and Energy: Lesson 6; Simple Machines and Work: Lesson 7; Gas Laws: Lesson 8; Principles of Heat Engines: Lesson 9; Sound and Sound Waves: Lesson 10; Light Waves and Particles: Lesson 11; Program. A High.....

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Job Corps.

    This self-study program for high-school level contains lessons on: Speed, Acceleration, and Velocity; Force, Mass, and Distance; Types of Motion and Rest; Electricity and Magnetism; Electrical, Magnetic, and Gravitational Fields; The Conservation and Conversion of Matter and Energy; Simple Machines and Work; Gas Laws; Principles of Heat Engines;…

  1. Harmonic force field for nitro compounds.

    PubMed

    Bellido, Edson P; Seminario, Jorge M

    2012-06-01

    Molecular simulations leading to sensors for the detection of explosive compounds require force field parameters that can reproduce the mechanical and vibrational properties of energetic materials. We developed precise harmonic force fields for alanine polypeptides and glycine oligopeptides using the FUERZA procedure that uses the Hessian tensor (obtained from ab initio calculations) to calculate precise parameters. In this work, we used the same procedure to calculate generalized force field parameters of several nitro compounds. We found a linear relationship between force constant and bond distance. The average angle in the nitro compounds was 116, excluding the 90 angle of the carbon atoms in the octanitrocubane. The calculated parameters permitted the accurate molecular modeling of nitro compounds containing many functional groups. Results were acceptable when compared with others obtained using methods that are specific for one type of molecule, and much better than others obtained using methods that are too general (these ignore the chemical effects of surrounding atoms on the bonding and therefore the bond strength, which affects the mechanical and vibrational properties of the whole molecule). PMID:22119786

  2. General Multiobjective Force Field Optimization Framework, with Application to Reactive Force Fields for Silicon Carbide.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Naserifar, Saber; Goddard, William A

    2014-04-01

    First-principles-based force fields prepared from large quantum mechanical data sets are now the norm in predictive molecular dynamics simulations for complex chemical processes, as opposed to force fields fitted solely from phenomenological data. In principle, the former allow improved accuracy and transferability over a wider range of molecular compositions, interactions, and environmental conditions unexplored by experiments. That is, assuming they have been optimally prepared from a diverse training set. The trade-off has been force field engines that are functionally complex, with a large number of nonbonded and bonded analytical forms that give rise to rather large parameter search spaces. To address this problem, we have developed GARFfield (genetic algorithm-based reactive force field optimizer method), a hybrid multiobjective Pareto-optimal parameter development scheme based on genetic algorithms, hill-climbing routines and conjugate-gradient minimization. To demonstrate the capabilities of GARFfield we use it to develop two very different force fields: (1) the ReaxFF reactive force field for modeling the adiabatic reactive dynamics of silicon carbide growth from an methyltrichlorosilane precursor and (2) the SiC electron force field with effective core pseudopotentials for modeling nonadiabatic dynamic phenomena with highly excited electronic states. The flexible and open architecture of GARFfield enables efficient and fast parallel optimization of parameters from quantum mechanical data sets for demanding applications like ReaxFF, electronic fast forward (or electron force field), and others including atomistic reactive charge-optimized many-body interatomic potentials, Morse, and coarse-grain force fields. PMID:26580361

  3. Measuring electric fields from surface contaminants with neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Obrecht, J. M.; Wild, R. J.; Cornell, E. A.

    2007-06-15

    In this paper we demonstrate a technique of utilizing magnetically trapped neutral {sup 87}Rb atoms to measure the magnitude and direction of stray electric fields emanating from surface contaminants. We apply an alternating external electric field that adds to (or subtracts from) the stray field in such a way as to resonantly drive the trapped atoms into a mechanical dipole oscillation. The growth rate of the oscillation's amplitude provides information about the magnitude and sign of the stray field gradient. Using this measurement technique, we are able to reconstruct the vector electric field produced by surface contaminants. In addition, we can accurately measure the electric fields generated from adsorbed atoms purposely placed onto the surface and account for their systematic effects, which can plague a precision surface-force measurement. We show that baking the substrate can reduce the electric fields emanating from adsorbate and that the mechanism for reduction is likely surface diffusion, not desorption.

  4. Gage measures electrical connector pin retention force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The retention force of a female connector pin is measured by observing the action of a calibrated spring in a gage consisting of housing, a plunger terminating in a male subminiature connector pin, and the tension spring.

  5. GROUNDWATER AND SOIL REMEDIATION USING ELECTRICAL FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enhancements of contaminants removal and degradation in low permeability soils by electrical fields are achieved by the processes of electrical heating, electrokinetics, and electrochemical reactions. Electrical heating increases soil temperature resulting in the increase of cont...

  6. Pulsed electric field increases reproduction.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J

    2016-02-01

    Purpose To study the effect of pulsed electric field - applied in corona discharge photography - on Drosophila melanogaster reproduction, possible induction of DNA fragmentation, and morphological alterations in the gonads. Materials and methods Animals were exposed to different field intensities (100, 200, 300, and 400 kV/m) during the first 2-5 days of their adult lives, and the effect on reproductive capacity was assessed. DNA fragmentation during early- and mid-oogenesis was investigated by application of the TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling) assay. Sections of follicles after fixation and embedding in resins were observed for possible morphological/developmental abnormalities. Results The field increased reproduction by up to 30% by increasing reproductive capacity in both sexes. The effect increased with increasing field intensities. The rate of increase diminished at the strongest intensities. Slight induction of DNA fragmentation was observed exclusively in the nurse (predominantly) and follicle cells, and exclusively at the two most sensitive developmental stages, i.e., germarium and predominantly stage 7-8. Sections of follicles from exposed females at stages of early and mid-oogennesis other than germarium and stages 7-8 did not reveal abnormalities. Conclusions (1) The specific type of electric field may represent a mild stress factor, inducing DNA fragmentation and cell death in a small percentage of gametes, triggering the reaction of the animal's reproductive system to increase the rate of gametogenesis in order to compensate the loss of a small number of gametes. (2) The nurse cells are the most sensitive from all three types of egg chamber cells. (3) The mid-oogenesis checkpoint (stage 7-8) is more sensitive to this field than the early oogenesis one (germarium) in contrast to microwave exposure. (4) Possible therapeutic applications, or applications in increasing fertility, should be investigated. PMID:26651869

  7. Energy buildup in sheared force-free magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, Richard; Low, Boon C.

    1992-01-01

    Photospheric displacement of the footpoints of solar magnetic field lines results in shearing and twisting of the field, and consequently in the buildup of electric currents and magnetic free energy in the corona. The sudden release of this free energy may be the origin of eruptive events like coronal mass ejections, prominence eruptions, and flares. An important question is whether such an energy release may be accompanied by the opening of magnetic field lines that were previously closed, for such open field lines can provide a route for matter frozen into the field to escape the sun altogether. This paper presents the results of numerical calculations showing that opening of the magnetic field is permitted energetically, in that it is possible to build up more free energy in a sheared, closed, force-free magnetic field than is in a related magnetic configuration having both closed and open field lines. Whether or not the closed force-free field attains enough energy to become partially open depends on the form of the shear profile; the results presented compare the energy buildup for different shear profiles. Implications for solar activity are discussed briefly.

  8. Pumping of water through carbon nanotubes by rotating electric field and rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Peng; Kong, Gao-Pan; Zhang, Xing; He, Guo-Wei

    2013-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate pumping of water through a carbon nanotube by applying the combination of a rotating electric field and a rotating magnetic field. The driving force is a Lorentz force generated from the motion of charges in the magnetic field, and the motion is caused by the rotation of the electric field. We find that there exits a linear relationship between the average pumping velocity v and magnetic field strength B, which can be used to control the flux of the continuous unidirectional water flow. This approach is expected to be used in liquid circulation without a pressure gradient.

  9. Forces on a spherical conducting particle in E B fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patacchini, Leonardo; Hutchinson, Ian H.

    2011-06-01

    The forces acting on a spherical conducting particle in a transversely flowing magnetized plasma are calculated in the entire range of magnetization and Debye length, using the particle code SCEPTIC3D (Patacchini and Hutchinson 2010 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 52 035005, 2011 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 53 025005). In short Debye length (i.e. high density) plasmas, both the ion-drag and Lorentz force arising from currents circulating inside the dust show strong components antiparallel to the convective electric field, suggesting that a free dust particle should gyrate faster than what predicted by its Larmor frequency. In intermediate to large Debye length conditions, by a downstream depletion effect already reported in unmagnetized strongly collisional regimes, the ion-drag in the direction of transverse flow can become negative. The internal Lorentz force, however, remains in the flow direction, and large enough in magnitude so that no spontaneous dust motion should occur.

  10. A compact high field magnetic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haibiao; Wang, Ze; Hou, Yubin; Lu, Qingyou

    2014-12-01

    We present the design and performance of a simple and compact magnetic force microscope (MFM), whose tip-sample coarse approach is implemented by the piezoelectric tube scanner (PTS) itself. In brief, a square rod shaft is axially spring-clamped on the inner wall of a metal tube which is glued inside the free end of the PTS. The shaft can thus be driven by the PTS to realize image scan and inertial stepping coarse approach. To enhance the inertial force, each of the four outer electrodes of the PTS is driven by an independent port of the controller. The MFM scan head is so compact that it can easily fit into the 52mm low temperature bore of a 20T superconducting magnet. The performance of the MFM is demonstrated by imaging a manganite thin film at low temperature and in magnetic fields up to 15T. PMID:25189114

  11. Cell separation using electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangano, Joseph (Inventor); Eppich, Henry (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention involves methods and devices which enable discrete objects having a conducting inner core, surrounded by a dielectric membrane to be selectively inactivated by electric fields via irreversible breakdown of their dielectric membrane. One important application of the invention is in the selection, purification, and/or purging of desired or undesired biological cells from cell suspensions. According to the invention, electric fields can be utilized to selectively inactivate and render non-viable particular subpopulations of cells in a suspension, while not adversely affecting other desired subpopulations. According to the inventive methods, the cells can be selected on the basis of intrinsic or induced differences in a characteristic electroporation threshold, which can depend, for example, on a difference in cell size and/or critical dielectric membrane breakdown voltage. The invention enables effective cell separation without the need to employ undesirable exogenous agents, such as toxins or antibodies. The inventive method also enables relatively rapid cell separation involving a relatively low degree of trauma or modification to the selected, desired cells. The inventive method has a variety of potential applications in clinical medicine, research, etc., with two of the more important foreseeable applications being stem cell enrichment/isolation, and cancer cell purging.

  12. Cell separation using electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangano, Joseph A. (Inventor); Eppich, Henry M. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention involves methods and devices which enable discrete objects having a conducting inner core, surrounded by a dielectric membrane to be selectively inactivated by electric fields via irreversible breakdown of their dielectric membrane. One important application of the invention is in the selection, purification, and/or purging of desired or undesired biological cells from cell suspensions. According to the invention, electric fields can be utilized to selectively inactivate and render non-viable particular subpopulations of cells in a suspension, while not adversely affecting other desired subpopulations. According to the inventive methods, the cells can be selected on the basis of intrinsic or induced differences in a characteristic electroporation threshold, which can depend, for example, on a difference in cell size and/or critical dielectric membrane breakdown voltage. The invention enables effective cell separation without the need to employ undesirable exogenous agents, such as toxins or antibodies. The inventive method also enables relatively rapid cell separation involving a relatively low degree of trauma or modification to the selected, desired cells. The inventive method has a variety of potential applications in clinical medicine, research, etc., with two of the more important foreseeable applications being stem cell enrichment/isolation, and cancer cell purging.

  13. Force field dependence of riboswitch dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Christian A; Gohlke, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Riboswitches are noncoding regulatory elements that control gene expression in response to the presence of metabolites, which bind to the aptamer domain. Metabolite binding appears to occur through a combination of conformational selection and induced fit mechanism. This demands to characterize the structural dynamics of the apo state of aptamer domains. In principle, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can give insights at the atomistic level into the dynamics of the aptamer domain. However, it is unclear to what extent contemporary force fields can bias such insights. Here, we show that the Amber force field ff99 yields the best agreement with detailed experimental observations on differences in the structural dynamics of wild type and mutant aptamer domains of the guanine-sensing riboswitch (Gsw), including a pronounced influence of Mg2+. In contrast, applying ff99 with parmbsc0 and parm?OL modifications (denoted ff10) results in strongly damped motions and overly stable tertiary loop-loop interactions. These results are based on 58 MD simulations with an aggregate simulation time>11 ?s, careful modeling of Mg2+ ions, and thorough statistical testing. Our results suggest that the moderate stabilization of the ?-anti region in ff10 can have an unwanted damping effect on functionally relevant structural dynamics of marginally stable RNA systems. This suggestion is supported by crystal structure analyses of Gsw aptamer domains that reveal ? torsions with high-anti values in the most mobile regions. We expect that future RNA force field development will benefit from considering marginally stable RNA systems and optimization toward good representations of dynamics in addition to structural characteristics. PMID:25726465

  14. ELECTRIC-FIELD-ENHANCED FABRIC FILTRATION OF ELECTRICALLY CHARGED FLYASH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes measurements in which both external electric field (applied by electrodes at the fabric surface) and flyash electrical charge (controlled by an upstream corona precharger) are independent variables in a factorial performance experiment carried out in a labora...

  15. Particle energization in a chaotic force-free magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaocan; Li, Gang; Dasgupta, Brahmananda

    2015-04-01

    A force-free field (FFF) is believed to be a reasonable description of the solar corona and in general a good approximation for low-beta plasma. The equations describing the magnetic field of FFF is similar to the ABC fluid equations which has been demonstrated to be chaotic. This implies that charged particles will experience chaotic magnetic field in the corona. Here, we study particle energization in a time-dependent FFF using a test particle approach. An inductive electric field is introduced by turbulent motions of plasma parcels. We find efficient particle acceleration with power-law like particle energy spectra. The power-law indices depend on the amplitude of plasma parcel velocity field and the spatial scales of the magnetic field fluctuation. The spectra are similar for different particle species. This model provide a possible mechanism for seed population generation for particle acceleration by, e.g., CME-driven shocks. Generalization of our results to certain non-force-free-field (NFFF) is straightforward as the sum of two or multiple FFFs naturally yield NFFF.

  16. Conformal field theory of critical Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emig, Thorsten; Bimonte, Giuseppe; Kardar, Mehran

    2015-03-01

    Thermal fluctuations of a critical system induce long-ranged Casimir forces between objects that couple to the underlying field. For two dimensional conformal field theories (CFT) we derive exact results for the Casimir interaction for a deformed strip and for two compact objects of arbitrary shape in terms of the free energy of a standard region (circular ring or flat strip) whose dimension is determined by the mutual capacitance of two conductors with the objects' shape; and a purely geometric energy that is proportional to conformal charge of the CFT, but otherwise super-universal in that it depends only on the shapes and is independent of boundary conditions and other details. The effect of inhomogenous boundary conditions is also discussed.

  17. Electromechanical analysis of tapered piezoelectric bimorph at high electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattaraj, Nilanjan; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2015-04-01

    Piezoelectric bimorph laminar actuator of tapered width exhibits better performance for out-of-plane deflection compared to the rectangular surface area, while consuming equal surface area. This paper contains electromechanical analysis and modeling of a tapered width piezoelectric bimorph laminar actuator at high electric field in static state. The analysis is based on the second order constitutive equations of piezoelectric material, assuming small strain and large electric field to capture its behavior at high electric field. Analytical expressions are developed for block force, output strain energy, output energy density, input electrical energy, capacitance and energy efficiency at high electric field. The analytical expressions show that for fixed length, thickness, and surface area of the actuator, how the block force and output strain energy gets improved in a tapered surface actuator compared to a rectangular surface. Constant thickness, constant length and constant surface area of the actuator ensure constant mass, and constant electrical capacitance. We consider high electric field in both series and parallel electrical connection for the analysis. Part of the analytical results is validated with the experimental results, which are reported in earlier literature.

  18. Computer Enhanced Electrics Fields Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, James E.; Manley, Richard J.; Elston, Stuart B.; Breinig, Marianne

    1999-11-01

    A new quantitative experiment is described for plotting electric fields using a computer data acquisition system and an X-Y digitizing tablet. The experiment measures the equipotential points on a sheet of conductive paper on which electrodes have been placed with silver paint. Voltages are measured with a digital-to-analog converter and X-Y coordinates are determined with a commercial X-Y digitizing tablet. The X-Y coordinates can be determined with the conducting sheet randomly oriented on the X-Y digitizing tablet. Data are recorded and plotted in a spreadsheet for analysis. A control and measurement program written in VisualBasic for Windows controls and facilitates the acquisition, recording, and analysis of data. The apparatus and experiment will be described and demonstrated.

  19. Lorentz force sigmometry: a novel technique for measuring the electrical conductivity of solid and liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhalil, Shatha; Kolesnikov, Yurii; Thess, André

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a novel method to measure the electrical conductivity of solid and molten metals is described. We term the method ‘Lorentz force sigmometry’, where the term ‘sigmometry’ refers to the letter sigma σ, often used to denote the electrical conductivity. The Lorentz force sigmometry method is based on the phenomenon of eddy currents generation in a moving conductor exposed to a magnetic field. Based on Ampere’s law, the eddy currents in turn generate a secondary magnetic field; as a result, the Lorentz force acts to brake the conductor. Owing to Newton’s third law, a measurable force, which is equal to the Lorentz force and is directly proportional to the electrical conductivity of the conductive fluid or solid, acts on the magnet. We present the results of the measurements performed on solids along with the initial measurements on fluids with a eutectic alloy composition of Ga67In20.5Sn12.5; detailed measurements on molten metals are still in progress and will be published in the future. We conducted a series of experiments and measured the properties of known electrical conductive metals, including aluminum and copper, to compute the calibration factor of the device, and then used the same calibration factor to estimate the unknown electrical conductivity of a brass bar. The predicted electrical conductivity of the brass bar was compared with the conductivity measured with a commercial device called ‘SigmaTest’ the observed error was less than 0.5%.

  20. Mechanical action of infrared light on atoms and molecules through a rectification of the electric force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yaoquan; Costa Felicssimo, Viviane; Fernandes Guimares, Freddy; gren, Hans; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2009-11-01

    We report the mechanical action of infrared light on atoms and molecules based on the rectification of the electric force. This mechanism is qualitatively different from the conventional ways of controlling photochemistry. The rectification of the electric force originates from the synchronous charge transfer induced by the laser field. This brings about an opportunity to produce a site selective light-induced action, controlled by the tailored intense laser field, on atoms in molecules and clusters. The concept is illustrated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of the water hexamer.

  1. Electric Field Controlled Self-Assembly of Hierarchically Ordered Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Velichko, Yuri S.; Mantei, Jason R.; Bitton, Ronit; Carvajal, Daniel; Shull, Kenneth R.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2012-01-01

    Self-assembly in the presence of external forces is an adaptive, directed organization of molecular components under nonequilibrium conditions. While forces may be generated as a result of spontaneous interactions among components of a system, intervention with external forces can significantly alter the final outcome of self-assembly. Superimposing these intrinsic and extrinsic forces provides greater degrees of freedom to control the structure and function of self-assembling materials. In this work we investigate the role of electric fields during the dynamic self-assembly of a negatively charged polyelectrolyte and a positively charged peptide amphiphile in water leading to the formation of an ordered membrane. In the absence of electric fields, contact between the two solutions of oppositely charged molecules triggers the growth of closed membranes with vertically oriented fibrils that encapsulate the polyelectrolyte solution. This process of self-assembly is intrinsically driven by excess osmotic pressure of counterions, and the electric field is found to modify the kinetics of membrane formation, and also its morphology and properties. Depending on the strength and orientation of the field we observe a significant increase or decrease of up to nearly 100% in membrane thickness, as well as the controlled rotation of nanofiber growth direction by 90 degrees, resulting in a significant increase in mechanical stiffness. These results suggest the possibility of using electric fields to control structure in self-assembly processes involving diffusion of oppositely charged molecules. PMID:23166533

  2. Charged Hadron Properties in Background Electric Fields

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian C. Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2010-02-01

    We report on a lattice calculation demonstrating a novel new method to extract the electric polarizability of charged pseudo-scalar mesons by analyzing two point correlation functions computed in classical background electric fields.

  3. CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF): A force field for drug-like molecules compatible with the CHARMM all-atom additive biological force fields

    PubMed Central

    Vanommeslaeghe, K.; Hatcher, E.; Acharya, C.; Kundu, S.; Zhong, S.; Shim, J.; Darian, E.; Guvench, O.; Lopes, P.; Vorobyov, I.; MacKerell, A. D.

    2010-01-01

    The widely used CHARMM additive all-atom force field includes parameters for proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and carbohydrates. In the present paper an extension of the CHARMM force field to drug-like molecules is presented. The resulting CHARMM General Force Field (CGenFF) covers a wide range of chemical groups present in biomolecules and drug-like molecules, including a large number of heterocyclic scaffolds. The parametrization philosophy behind the force field focuses on quality at the expense of transferability, with the implementation concentrating on an extensible force field. Statistics related to the quality of the parametrization with a focus on experimental validation are presented. Additionally, the parametrization procedure, described fully in the present paper in the context of the model systems, pyrrolidine, and 3-phenoxymethylpyrrolidine will allow users to readily extend the force field to chemical groups that are not explicitly covered in the force field as well as add functional groups to and link together molecules already available in the force field. CGenFF thus makes it possible to perform all-CHARMM simulations on drug-target interactions thereby extending the utility of CHARMM force fields to medicinally relevant systems. PMID:19575467

  4. Electric-field guiding of magnetic skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyaya, Pramey; Yu, Guoqiang; Amiri, Pedram Khalili; Wang, Kang L.

    2015-10-01

    We theoretically study equilibrium and dynamic properties of nanosized magnetic skyrmions in thin magnetic films with broken inversion symmetry, where an electric field couples to magnetization via spin-orbit coupling. Based on a symmetry-based phenomenology and micromagnetic simulations we show that this electric-field coupling, via renormalizing the micromagnetic energy, modifies the equilibrium properties of the skyrmion. This change, in turn, results in a significant alteration of the current-induced skyrmion motion. Particularly, the speed and direction of the skyrmion can be manipulated by designing a desired energy landscape electrically, which we describe within Thiele's analytical model and demonstrate in micromagnetic simulations including electric-field-controlled magnetic anisotropy. We additionally use this electric-field control to construct gates for controlling skyrmion motion exhibiting a transistorlike and multiplexerlike function. The proposed electric-field effect can thus provide a low-energy electrical knob to extend the reach of information processing with skyrmions.

  5. Migration of amoeba cells in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guido, Isabella; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2015-03-01

    Exogenous and endogenous electric fields play a role in cell physiology as a guiding mechanism for the orientation and migration of cells. Electrotaxis of living cells has been observed for several cell types, e.g. neurons, fibroblasts, leukocytes, neural crest cells, cancer cells. Dictyostelium discoideum (Dd), an intensively investigated chemotactic model organism, also exhibits a strong electrotactic behavior moving toward the cathode under the influence of electric fields. Here we report experiments on the effects of DC electric fields on the directional migration of Dd cells. We apply the electric field to cells seeded into microfluidic devices equipped with agar bridges to avoid any harmful effects of the electric field on the cells (ions formation, pH changes, etc.) and a constant flow to prevent the build-up of chemical gradient that elicits chemotaxis. Our results show that the cells linearly increase their speed over time when a constant electric field is applied for a prolonged duration (2 hours). This novel phenomenon cannot be attributed to mechanotaxis as the drag force of the electroosmotic flow is too small to produce shear forces that can reorient cells. It is independent of the cellular developmental stage and to our knowledge, it was not observed in chemotaxis. This work is supported by MaxSynBio project of the Max Planck Society.

  6. Behavior of Ultra Fine Particles in Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Shibata, J; Murayama, N

    2015-03-01

    The behavior of ultra fine particles in an electric field was measured in order to apply it to classification of fine particles. The sample particles used are spherical polystyrene particles with the average size of 0.03, 0.1, 1.0, 4.3 and 9.6 m. The forces acting the particles in an electric field are considered to be electrical force, friction force and some other forces like the asymmetric effect and electrophoretic retardation effect which appear in ionic behavior. We found that the moving velocity of particles depends on the particle size. When the particle size is less than 1 m, the velocity increases with increasing the particle size. On the other hand, the velocity deceases with an increase in the particle size, when the particle size is larger than 1 m. We can apply the behavior to classification of fine particles. The phenomena could be explained by various forces acting the fine particles in the electric field. PMID:26413708

  7. Compact Electric- And Magnetic-Field Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winterhalter, Daniel; Smith, Edward

    1994-01-01

    Compact sensor measures both electric and magnetic fields. Includes both short electric-field dipole and search-coil magnetometer. Three mounted orthogonally providing triaxial measurements of electromagnetic field at frequencies ranging from near 0 to about 10 kHz.

  8. Electric Field Analysis of Breast Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sree, V. Gowri; Udayakumar, K.; Sundararajan, R.

    2011-01-01

    An attractive alternative treatment for malignant tumors that are refractive to conventional therapies, such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, is electrical-pulse-mediated drug delivery. Electric field distribution of tissue/tumor is important for effective treatment of tissues. This paper deals with the electric field distribution study of a tissue model using MAXWELL 3D Simulator. Our results indicate that tumor tissue had lower electric field strength compared to normal cells, which makes them susceptible to electrical-pulse-mediated drug delivery. This difference could be due to the altered properties of tumor cells compared to normal cells, and our results corroborate this. PMID:22295214

  9. Entanglement generation by electric field background

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadi, Zahra Mirza, Behrouz

    2014-12-15

    The quantum vacuum is unstable under the influence of an external electric field and decays into pairs of charged particles, a process which is known as the Schwinger pair production. We propose and demonstrate that this electric field can generate entanglement. Using the Schwinger pair production for constant and pulsed electric fields, we study entanglement for scalar particles with zero spins and Dirac fermions. One can observe the variation of the entanglement produced for bosonic and fermionic modes with respect to different parameters.

  10. Electric field soundings through thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Thomas C.; Rust, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    Twelve balloon soundings of the electric field in thunderstorms are reported. The maximum magnitude of E in the storms averaged 96 +/-28 kV/m, with the largest being 146 kV/m. The maximum was usually observed between vertically adjacent regions of opposite charge. Using a 1D approximation to Gauss' law, four to ten charge regions in the storms are inferred. The magnitude of the density in the charge regions varied between 0.2 and 13 nC/cu m. The vertical extent of the charge regions ranged from 130 to 2100 m. None of the present 12 storms had charge distributions that fit the long-accepted model of Simpson et al. (1937, 1941) of a lower positive charge, a main negative charge, and an upper positive charge. In addition to regions similar to the Simpson model, the present storms had screening layers at the upper and lower cloud boundaries and extra charge regions, usually in the lower part of the cloud.

  11. Electric fields in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchhoff, V. W. J. H.

    1975-01-01

    F-region drift velocities, measured by incoherent-scatter radar were analyzed in terms of diurnal, seasonal, magnetic activity, and solar cycle effects. A comprehensive electric field model was developed that includes the effects of the E and F-region dynamos, magnetospheric sources, and ionospheric conductivities, for both the local and conjugate regions. The E-region dynamo dominates during the day but at night the F-region and convection are more important. This model provides much better agreement with observations of the F-region drifts than previous models. Results indicate that larger magnitudes occur at night, and that daily variation is dominated by the diurnal mode. Seasonal variations in conductivities and thermospheric winds indicate a reversal in direction in the early morning during winter from south to northward. On magnetic perturbed days and the drifts deviate rather strongly from the quiet days average, especially around 13 L.T. for the northward and 18 L.T. for the westward component.

  12. Ionospheric electric fields, currents, and resulting magnetic fields variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Junhu

    This thesis uses an equivalent circuit model to calculate ionospheric electric fields, current densities and introduced magnetic fields variations on the ground. The role of the field aligned current is examined. Using different wind models, we studied the electric field variations with altitude, season and solar activity. The ionospheric eastward electric field changes very little within the whole ionosphere. The southward (equatorward) electric field is large and changes quickly with height in the E region although it is nearly constant in the F region. The prereversal enhancement of the eastward electric field is produced by the F region dynamo. We conclude that the Forbes and Gillette tidal wind can reproduce most features of the Jicamarca experiment and the AE-E and DE-2 satellite observations of the electric fields. The HWM90 empirical wind model failed to produce the observed electric field and it seems the semidiurnal wind in HWM90 is too strong. The field aligned current is located mainly in the E and low F region. The non-coincidence of the geomagnetic and geographic equators has a strong effect on the field aligned current in the equatorial zone. The field aligned currents driven by Forbes' winds for March equinox and December solstice flow mainly from the southern to northern hemisphere in the morning and vice versa in the afternoon at F region heights. The observed magnetic field variations on the ground are well reproduced in our simulations. The field aligned current is the main contributor to the eastward magnetic field component in the equatorial zone. The longitudinal inequality of the northward magnetic field is introduced mainly by the variations of the local magnetic field intensity. The electric field variations have only a minor effect. The northward magnetic field variations with the solar activity are introduced by changes of the E region equatorward electric field and the Hall conductivity.

  13. Enhanced Fair-Weather Electric Fields Soon After Sunrise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, T. C.; Rust, W. D.; Stolzenburg, M.; Roeder, W.; Krehbiel, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    The typical fair weather electric field at the ground is between -100 and -300 V/m. At the NASA Kennedy Space Center and US Air Force Cape Canaveral Air Station (KSC) the electric field at the ground sometimes reaches -400 to -1200 V/m within an hour or two after sunrise on days that otherwise seem to be fair weather. We refer to the enhanced negative electric fields as the "sunrise enhancement." To investigate the sunrise enhancement at KSC we measured the electric field (E) in the first few hundred meters above the ground before and during several sunrise enhancements. From these E soundings we can infer the presence of charge layers and determine their thickness and charge density.

  14. Recent Developments and Applications of the CHARMM force fields

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao; Lopes, Pedro E.M.; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2011-01-01

    Empirical force fields commonly used to describe the condensed phase properties of complex systems such as biological macromolecules are continuously being updated. Improvements in quantum mechanical (QM) methods used to generate target data, availability of new experimental target data, incorporation of new classes of compounds and new theoretical developments (eg. polarizable methods) make force-field development a dynamic domain of research. Accordingly, a number of improvements and extensions of the CHARMM force fields have occurred over the years. The objective of the present review is to provide an up-to-date overview of the CHARMM force fields. A limited presentation on the historical aspects of force fields will be given, including underlying methodologies and principles, along with a brief description of the strategies used for parameter development. This is followed by information on the CHARMM additive and polarizable force fields, including examples of recent applications of those force fields. PMID:23066428

  15. Kilohertz magnetic field focusing and force enhancement using a metallic loop array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dede, Ercan M.; Lee, Jaewook; Guo, Yuanbo; Qin Zhou, Li; Zhang, Minjuan; Banerjee, Debasish

    2012-07-01

    We present a device capable of focusing a kilohertz magnetic field and enhancing the associated magnetic force. The device comprises a two-by-two array of electrically conductive metallic loops embedded in a base substrate. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations verify that the induced electrical current in the loop structure influences the magnetic field distribution thus leading to magnetic force enhancement. Experimental measurements of the magnetic force generated by the device operating at one kilohertz are compared with measurements of a control sample without loops. Such devices have logical applications in electromechanical actuators and transducers.

  16. The Energetics of Motivated Cognition: A Force-Field Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruglanski, Arie W.; Belanger, Jocelyn J.; Chen, Xiaoyan; Kopetz, Catalina; Pierro, Antonio; Mannetti, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    A force-field theory of motivated cognition is presented and applied to a broad variety of phenomena in social judgment and self-regulation. Purposeful cognitive activity is assumed to be propelled by a "driving force" and opposed by a "restraining force". "Potential" driving force represents the maximal amount of energy an individual is prepared…

  17. The Energetics of Motivated Cognition: A Force-Field Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruglanski, Arie W.; Belanger, Jocelyn J.; Chen, Xiaoyan; Kopetz, Catalina; Pierro, Antonio; Mannetti, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    A force-field theory of motivated cognition is presented and applied to a broad variety of phenomena in social judgment and self-regulation. Purposeful cognitive activity is assumed to be propelled by a "driving force" and opposed by a "restraining force". "Potential" driving force represents the maximal amount of energy an individual is prepared

  18. Force-Field Analysis: Incorporating Critical Thinking in Goal Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hustedde, Ron; Score, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Force field analysis encourages members to examine the probability of reaching agreed-upon goals. It can help groups avoid working toward goals that are unlikely to be reached. In every situation are three forces: forces that encourage maintenance of the status quo or change; driving or helping forces that push toward change; and restraining…

  19. Efficient forced vibration reanalysis method for rotating electric machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Akira; Suzuki, Hiromitsu; Kuroishi, Masakatsu; Nakai, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Rotating electric machines are subject to forced vibration by magnetic force excitation with wide-band frequency spectrum that are dependent on the operating conditions. Therefore, when designing the electric machines, it is inevitable to compute the vibration response of the machines at various operating conditions efficiently and accurately. This paper presents an efficient frequency-domain vibration analysis method for the electric machines. The method enables the efficient re-analysis of the vibration response of electric machines at various operating conditions without the necessity to re-compute the harmonic response by finite element analyses. Theoretical background of the proposed method is provided, which is based on the modal reduction of the magnetic force excitation by a set of amplitude-modulated standing-waves. The method is applied to the forced response vibration of the interior permanent magnet motor at a fixed operating condition. The results computed by the proposed method agree very well with those computed by the conventional harmonic response analysis by the FEA. The proposed method is then applied to the spin-up test condition to demonstrate its applicability to various operating conditions. It is observed that the proposed method can successfully be applied to the spin-up test conditions, and the measured dominant frequency peaks in the frequency response can be well captured by the proposed approach.

  20. Reactive Force Fields via Explicit Valency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, Seyit

    Computational simulations are invaluable in elucidating the dynamics of biological macromolecules. Unfortunately, reactions present a fundamental challenge. Calculations based on quantum mechanics can predict bond formation and rupture; however they suffer from severe length- and time-limitations. At the other extreme, classical approaches provide orders of magnitude faster simulations; however they regard chemical bonds as immutable entities. A few exceptions exist, but these are not always trivial to adopt for routine use. We bridge this gap by providing a novel, pseudo-classical approach, based on explicit valency. We unpack molecules into valence electron pairs and atomic cores. Particles bear ionic charges and interact via pairwise-only potentials. The potentials are informed of quantum effects in the short-range and obey dissociation limits in the long-range. They are trained against a small set of isolated species, including geometries and thermodynamics of small hydrides and of dimers formed by them. The resulting force field captures the essentials of reactivity, polarizability and flexibility in a simple, seamless setting. We call this model LEWIS, after the chemical theory that inspired the use of valence pairs. Following the introduction in Chapter 1, we initially focus on the properties of water. Chapter 2 considers gas phase clusters. To transition to the liquid phase, Chapter 3 describes a novel pairwise long-range compensation that performs comparably to infinite lattice summations. The approach is suited to ionic solutions in general. In Chapters 4 and 5, LEWIS is shown to correctly predict the dipolar and quadrupolar response in bulk liquid, and can accommodate proton transfers in both acid and base. Efficiency permits the study of proton defects at dilutions not accessible to experiment or quantum mechanics. Chapter 6 discusses explicit valency approaches in other hydrides, forming the basis of a reactive organic force field. Examples of simple proton transfer and more complex reactions are discussed. Chapter 7 provides a framework for variable electron spread. This addition resolves some of the inherent limitations of the former model which implicitly assumed that electron spread was not affected by the environment. A brief summary is provided in Chapter 8.

  1. Measuring q/m for Water Drops--An Introduction to the Effects of Electrical Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Francis X.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses an experiment which introduces students to the effects of electrical forces on the motion of macroscopic objects. Included are the proecedures of measuring the charge-to-mass ratio from deflections of charged water drops in horizontal fields and the overall charges delivered in a Faraday cup. (CC)

  2. Electric-field-induced crack patterns: Experiments and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatun, Tajkera; Choudhury, Moutushi Dutta; Dutta, Tapati; Tarafdar, Sujata

    2012-07-01

    We report a study of crack patterns formed in laponite gel drying in an electric field. The sample dries in a circular petri dish and the field is radial, acting inward or outward. A system of radial cracks forms in the setup with the center terminal positive, while predominantly cross-radial cracks form when the center is at a negative potential. The laponite accumulates near the negative terminal making the layer thicker at this end. A spring model on a square lattice is used to simulate the desiccation crack formation, with an additional radial force acting due to the electric field. With the radial force acting outward, radial cracks form and for the reversed field cross-radial cracks form. This conforms to the observation that laponite platelets become effectively positive due to overcharging and are attracted towards the negative terminal.

  3. Formation of Organized Protein Thin Films with External Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ceclia Fabiana da G; Camargo, Paulo C; Benelli, Elaine M

    2015-10-01

    The effect of an external electric field on the formation of protein GlnB-Hs films and on its buffer solution on siliconized glass slides has been analyzed by current versus electric field curves and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Herbaspirillum seropedicae GlnB protein (GlnB-Hs) is a globular, soluble homotrimer (36 kDa) with its 3-D structure previously determined. Concentrations of 10 nM native denatured GlnB-Hs protein were deposited on siliconized glass slides under ambient conditions. Immediately after solution deposition a maximum electric field of 30 kV/m was applied with rates of 3 V/s. The measured currents were surface currents and were analyzed as transport current. Electric current started to flow only after a minimum electric field (critical value) for the systems analyzed. The AFM images showed films with a high degree of directional organization only when the proteins were present in the solution. These results showed that the applied electric field favored directional organization of the protein GlnB-Hs films and may contribute to understand the formation of protein films under applied electric fields. PMID:26322628

  4. The Introduction of Fields in Relation to Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunt, Marjorie; Brunt, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of force at age 14-16 years is considered, starting with elementary student experiments using magnetic force fields. The meaningless use of terms such as "action" and "reaction", or "agent" and "receiver" is discussed. (Contains 6 figures.)

  5. Substorm electric fields at nightside low latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, K. K.; Kikuchi, T.; Tomizawa, I.; Nagatsuma, T.

    2014-12-01

    The convection electric field penetrates from the polar ionosphere to low latitude and drives the DP2 currents in the global ionosphere with an intensified equatorial electrojet (EEJ). The electric field often reverses its direction, that is, the overshielding occurs and causes the equatorial counterelectrojet (CEJ) during storm and substorms. In this paper we report that the overshielding electric field is detected by the HF Doppler sounders at low latitude on the nightside. We analyzed the Doppler frequency of the HF radio signals propagated over 120 km in Japan at frequencies of 5 and 8 MHz and compared with the equatorial EEJ/CEJ during the substorm expansion phase. We found that the overshielding electric field reaches around 2 mV/m during major substorms (AL <-1800 nT). Taking the geometrical attenuation into account, we estimate the equatorial electric field to be about 1.5 mV/m. We also found that the correlation coefficient was 0.94 between the overshielding electric field and eastward equatorial electrojet at YAP on the night side. The electric field drives the eastward electrojets in the equatorial ionosphere on the night side. It is to be noted that the overshielding electric field is observed on the nightside at low latitude during the major substorms, while the convection electric field is dominant during smaller size substorms, as the CEJ flows on the dayside. These results suggest that the overshielding electric field associated with the Region-2 field-aligned currents becomes dominant during substorms at low latitude on the nightside as well as on the dayside.

  6. Electric-field sensing using single diamond spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolde, F.; Fedder, H.; Doherty, M. W.; Nöbauer, T.; Rempp, F.; Balasubramanian, G.; Wolf, T.; Reinhard, F.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.; Jelezko, F.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2011-06-01

    The ability to sensitively detect individual charges under ambient conditions would benefit a wide range of applications across disciplines. However, most current techniques are limited to low-temperature methods such as single-electron transistors, single-electron electrostatic force microscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy. Here we introduce a quantum-metrology technique demonstrating precision three-dimensional electric-field measurement using a single nitrogen-vacancy defect centre spin in diamond. An a.c. electric-field sensitivity reaching 202+/-6Vcm-1Hz-1/2 has been achieved. This corresponds to the electric field produced by a single elementary charge located at a distance of ~150nm from our spin sensor with averaging for one second. The analysis of the electronic structure of the defect centre reveals how an applied magnetic field influences the electric-field-sensing properties. We also demonstrate that diamond-defect-centre spins can be switched between electric- and magnetic-field sensing modes and identify suitable parameter ranges for both detector schemes. By combining magnetic- and electric-field sensitivity, nanoscale detection and ambient operation, our study should open up new frontiers in imaging and sensing applications ranging from materials science to bioimaging.

  7. Electric field generation in martian dust devils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Erika L.; Farrell, William M.; Rafkin, Scot C. R.

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial dust devils are known to generate electric fields from the vertical separation of charged dust particles. The particles present within the dust devils on Mars may also be subject to similar charging processes and so likely contribute to electric field generation there as well. However, to date, no Mars in situ instrumentation has been deployed to measure electric field strength. In order to explore the electric environment of dust devils on Mars, the triboelectric dust charging physics from the Macroscopic Triboelectric Simulation (MTS) code has been coupled to the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS). Using this model, we examine how macroscopic electric fields are generated within martian dust disturbances and attempt to quantify the time evolution of the electrodynamical system. Electric fields peak for several minutes within the dust devil simulations. The magnitude of the electric field is a strong function of the size of the particles present, the average charge on the particles and the number of particles lifted. Varying these parameters results in peak electric fields between tens of millivolts per meter and tens of kilovolts per meter.

  8. Horizontal electric fields from lightning return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, E. M.; Medelius, P. J.; Rubinstein, M.; Uman, M. A.; Johnson, J.

    1988-01-01

    An experiment to measure simultaneously the wideband horizontal and vertical electric fields from lightning return strokes is described. Typical wave shapes of the measured horizontal and vertical fields are presented, and the horizontal fields are characterized. The measured horizontal fields are compared with calculated horizontal fields obtained by applying the wavetilt formula to the vertical fields. The limitations and sources of error in the measurement technique are discussed.

  9. Dislocation core fields and forces in FCC metals

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Hoagland, Richard G.

    2004-04-01

    Atomistic models were used to obtain dislocation core fields for edge, screw, and mixed dislocations in Al and Cu using EAM. Core fields are analyzed using a line force dipole representation, with dilatant and dipole terms. The core field contribution to the force between dislocations is shown to be significant for interactions within 50b.

  10. Nanomechanical electric and electromagnetic field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis George; Lavrik, Nickolay

    2015-03-24

    The present invention provides a system for detecting and analyzing at least one of an electric field and an electromagnetic field. The system includes a micro/nanomechanical oscillator which oscillates in the presence of at least one of the electric field and the electromagnetic field. The micro/nanomechanical oscillator includes a dense array of cantilevers mounted to a substrate. A charge localized on a tip of each cantilever interacts with and oscillates in the presence of the electric and/or electromagnetic field. The system further includes a subsystem for recording the movement of the cantilever to extract information from the electric and/or electromagnetic field. The system further includes a means of adjusting a stiffness of the cantilever to heterodyne tune an operating frequency of the system over a frequency range.

  11. Aligned Immobilization of Proteins Using AC Electric Fields.

    PubMed

    Laux, Eva-Maria; Knigge, Xenia; Bier, Frank F; Wenger, Christian; Hölzel, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    Protein molecules are aligned and immobilized from solution by AC electric fields. In a single-step experiment, the enhanced green fluorescent proteins are immobilized on the surface as well as at the edges of planar nanoelectrodes. Alignment is found to follow the molecules' geometrical shape with their longitudinal axes parallel to the electric field. Simultaneous dielectrophoretic attraction and AC electroosmotic flow are identified as the dominant forces causing protein movement and alignment. Molecular orientation is determined by fluorescence microscopy based on polarized excitation of the proteins' chromophores. The chromophores' orientation with respect to the whole molecule supports X-ray crystal data. PMID:26779699

  12. Brief: Field measurements of casing tension forces

    SciTech Connect

    Quigley, M.S.; Lewis, D.B.; Boswell, R.S.

    1995-02-01

    Tension forces acting on individual casing joints were accurately measured during installation of 10,158 ft of 9 5/8-in. {times} 47-lbm/ft casing and 11,960 ft of 11 7/8-in. {times} 71.8-lbm/ft casing. A unique casing load table (CLT) weighed the casing string after the addition of each casing joint. Strain gauges attached inside the pin ends of instrumented casing joints (ICJ`s) directly measured tension force on those joints. A high-speed computer data-acquisition system (DAS) automatically recorded data from all the sensors. Several casing joints were intentionally subjected to extreme deceleration to determine upper limits for dynamic tension forces. Data from these tests clearly show effects of wellbore friction and casing handling conditions. In every case, tension forces in the casing during maximum deceleration were considerably less than expected. In some cases, the highest tension forces occurred when the casing lifted out of the slips. Peak tension forces caused by setting the casing slips were typically no more than 5% greater than tension forces in the casing at rest. This dynamic amplification was far less than the 60% value used in the previous casing design method. Reducing the safety factor for installation loads has permitted use of lighter, less-expensive casing than dictated by older design criteria.

  13. A novel high-sensitivity electrostatic biased electric field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing'ao; Wu, Xiaoming; Wang, Xiaohong; Yan, Xiaojun; Lin, Liwei

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, an electric field sensor (EFS) with high sensitivity is proposed for low-frequency weak-strength ac electric field (E-field) measurements. The EFS is based on a piezoelectric cantilever biased by a strong electrostatic field. The electrostatic bias can enhance the electric field force of a weak ac E-field, thus the cantilever can oscillate in a weak ac E-field and the device sensitivity improves. Theoretical analyses have been established and suggest that a stronger strength of electrostatic field bias would produce a higher sensitivity improvement. In the experiment, a demonstrated sensor consisting of a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) piezoelectric cantilever and a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) electret was built and tested. Instead of extra voltage sources, the PTFE electret was charged to provide the electrostatic field, allowing the EFS a low energy consumption and a simple electric circuit design. The experiment results show good agreement with the simulation. The sensitivity of the cantilever E-field sensor reached 0.84 mV (kV/m)-1 when the surface potential of the electret was??-770?V.

  14. Flute stabilization due to ponderomotive force created by an rf field with a variable gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Yasaka, Y.; Itatani, R.

    1986-06-30

    An rf-stabilization experiment was performed in the axisymmetric single-mirror device HIEI by controlling the radial-gradient scale length of the rf field with the aid of an azimuthally phased antenna array. The flute stability depends sensitively on the scale length of the perpendicular rf electric field, which shows that rf stabilization is caused by the ponderomotive force for ions.

  15. Nucleation of metals by strong electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardone, M.; Karpov, V. G.

    2012-04-01

    Recent work on phase transitions in chalcogenides (underlying phase change memory) led to a theory of symmetry-breaking field effects, predicting needle-shaped metallic nuclei and exponentially accelerated nucleation rates. Here, we predict that, in general, any insulator will eventually form metallic inclusions if immersed in a sufficient electric field. These phase transitions are driven, not simply enhanced, by an electric field. Hence, metals can be formed under conditions where they would be otherwise unexpected. This opens the venue of field induced materials synthesis. As a technologically important example, we consider the field driven synthesis of metallic hydrogen at normal pressure.

  16. Dipole relaxation in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Richard M.

    1980-07-01

    From Boltzmann's equation, S=k lnΩ, an expression for the orientational entropy, S of a rigid rod (electric dipole) is derived. The free energy of the dipole in an electric field is then calculated as a function of both the dipole's average orientation and the field strength. Application of the equilibrium criterion to the free energy yields the field dependence of the entropy of the dipole. Irreversible thermodynamics is used to derive the general form of the equation of motion of the dipole's average orientation. Subsequent application of Newton's second law of motion produces Debye's classical expression for the relaxation of an electric dipole in a viscous medium.

  17. Drag and propulsive forces in electric sails with negative polarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Torres, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    An electric solar sail (E-sail) is a recent propellantless propulsion concept for a direct exploration of the Solar System. An E-sail consists of a set of bare, conductive tethers at high positive/negative bias, prone to extract solar wind momentum by Coulomb deflection of protons. Additionally, a negatively biased E-sail has been proposed as a concept for de-orbiting space debris with drag forces produced in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The present work focuses on the negative-bias case with a sheath that must be correctly modeled for a flowing plasma ambient. Ion scattering within the sheath and the resulting force are determined for several plasma conditions. Since the plasma flow does reduce the effective range for the ion scattering within the sheath, the resulting force is then reduced. Tethers at very high negative bias should be required for extremely high plasma flow.

  18. Control of magnetism by electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukura, Fumihiro; Tokura, Yoshinori; Ohno, Hideo

    2015-03-01

    The electrical manipulation of magnetism and magnetic properties has been achieved across a number of different material systems. For example, applying an electric field to a ferromagnetic material through an insulator alters its charge-carrier population. In the case of thin films of ferromagnetic semiconductors, this change in carrier density in turn affects the magnetic exchange interaction and magnetic anisotropy; in ferromagnetic metals, it instead changes the Fermi level position at the interface that governs the magnetic anisotropy of the metal. In multiferroics, an applied electric field couples with the magnetization through electrical polarization. This Review summarizes the experimental progress made in the electrical manipulation of magnetization in such materials, discusses our current understanding of the mechanisms, and finally presents the future prospects of the field.

  19. Dynamic electrostatic force microscopy technique for the study of electrical properties with improved spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Maragliano, C; Heskes, D; Stefancich, M; Chiesa, M; Souier, T

    2013-06-01

    The need to resolve the electrical properties of confined structures (CNTs, quantum dots, nanorods, etc) is becoming increasingly important in the field of electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here we propose an approach based on amplitude modulated electrostatic force microscopy to obtain measurements at small tip-sample distances, where highly nonlinear forces are present. We discuss how this improves the lateral resolution of the technique and allows probing of the electrical and surface properties. The complete force field at different tip biases is employed to derive the local work function difference. Then, by appropriately biasing the tip-sample system, short-range forces are reconstructed. The short-range component is then separated from the generic tip-sample force in order to recover the pure electrostatic contribution. This data can be employed to derive the tip-sample capacitance curve and the sample dielectric constant. After presenting a theoretical model that justifies the need for probing the electrical properties of the sample in the vicinity of the surface, the methodology is presented in detail and verified experimentally. PMID:23635384

  20. Nonlinear cell response to strong electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardos, D. C.; Thompson, C. J.; Yang, Y. S.; Joyner, K. H.

    2000-07-01

    The response of living cells to externally applied electric fields is of widespread interest. In particular, the intensification of electric fields across cell membranes is believed to be responsible, through membrane rupture and reversible membrane breakdown processes, for certain types of tissue damage in electrical trauma cases which cannot be attributed to Joule heating. Large elongated cells such as skeletal muscle fibres are particularly vulnerable to such damage. Previous theoretical studies of field intensification across cell membranes in such cells have assumed the membrane current to be linear in the applied field (Ohmic membrane conductivity) and were limited to sinusoidal applied fields. In this paper, we investigate a simple model of a long cylindrical cell, corresponding to nerve or skeletal muscle cells. Employing the electroquasistatic approximation, a system of coupled first-order differential equations for the membrane electric field is derived which incorporates arbitrary time dependence in the external field and nonlinear membrane response (non-Ohmic conductivity). The behaviour of this model is investigated for a variety of applied fields in both the linear and highly nonlinear regimes. We find that peak membrane fields predicted by the nonlinear model are approximately twice as intense, for low-frequency electrical trauma conditions, as those of the linear theory.

  1. Note: Electrical resolution during conductive atomic force microscopy measurements under different environmental conditions and contact forces

    SciTech Connect

    Lanza, M.; Porti, M.; Nafria, M.; Aymerich, X.; Whittaker, E.; Hamilton, B.

    2010-10-15

    Conductive atomic force microscopy experiments on gate dielectrics in air, nitrogen, and UHV have been compared to evaluate the impact of the environment on topography and electrical measurements. In current images, an increase of the lateral resolution and a reduction of the conductivity were observed in N{sub 2} and, especially, in UHV (where current depends also on the contact force). Both effects were related to the reduction/elimination of the water layer between the tip and the sample in N{sub 2}/UHV. Therefore, since current measurements are very sensitive to environmental conditions, these factors must be taken into consideration when comparisons between several experiments are performed.

  2. Electric field induced hydrogenation of silicene.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weichang; Ao, Zhimin; Wang, Tao; Li, Changming; Li, Sean

    2014-08-21

    An alternative approach for hydrogenation of silicene is proposed through applying an external electric field in order to reduce the reaction energy barrier based on density functional theory calculations. It is found that a positive perpendicular electric field F can act as a catalyst to reduce the energy barrier of H2 dissociative adsorption on silicene, which facilitates the hydrogenation of silicene. In addition, it is found that the barrier decreases as F increases, and when F is above 0.05 a.u. (1 a.u. = 5.14 10(11) V m(-1)), the barrier is quite low and hydrogenation of silicene can take place efficiently at room temperature. The catalytic effect of the electric field on hydrogenation of silicene is induced by the redistribution of atomic charge under the electric field, which would change the chemical activity of silicene significantly. PMID:24988182

  3. Collapse of DNA under alternating electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chunda; Riehn, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that double-stranded DNA can collapse in the presence of a strong electric field. Here we provide an in-depth study of the collapse of DNA under weak confinement in microchannels as a function of buffer strength, driving frequency, applied electric-field strength, and molecule size. We find that the critical electric field at which DNA molecules collapse (tens of kV/m) is strongly dependent on driving frequency (100-800 Hz) and molecular size (20-160 kbp), and weakly dependent on the ionic strength (8-60 mM). We argue that an apparent stretching at very high electric fields is an artifact of the finite frame time of video microscopy.

  4. Electric field guidance system for automated vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Houskamp, R.W.

    1987-04-07

    An automated vehicle guidance system is described having one or more self-propelled vehicles adapted to follow a predetermined guidepath having path signal generating means for generating signals and the guidepath. Each of the vehicles includes guidepath sensing means for sensing the position of the guidepath with respect to the vehicle. A signal generating means is connected to the sensing means for generating an intelligence signal representative of the position of the vehicle with respect to the guidepath. The improvement is described wherein: the path signal generating means comprises means for exciting the guidepath with an AC voltage signal referenced to an earth ground; the guidepath sensing means comprises electric field sensing means for sensing the strength of the electric field resulting from the voltage signal; and the signal generating means is connected to the electric field sensing means and is responsive to the sensed strength of the electric field for generating the intelligence signal.

  5. Lorentz Body Force Induced by Traveling Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2003-01-01

    The Lorentz force induced by a traveling magnetic field (TMF) in a cylindrical container has been calculated. The force can be used to control flow in dectrically conducting melts and the direction of the magnetic field and resulting flow can be reversed. A TMF can be used to partially cancel flow driven by buoyancy. The penetration of the field into the cylinder decreases as the frequency increases, and there exists an optimal value of frequency for which the resulting force is a maximum. Expressions for the Lorentz force in the limiting cases of low frequency and infinite cylinder are also given and compared to the numerical calculations.

  6. Electric/magnetic field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Schill, Jr., Robert A.; Popek, Marc [Las Vegas, NV

    2009-01-27

    A UNLV novel electric/magnetic dot sensor includes a loop of conductor having two ends to the loop, a first end and a second end; the first end of the conductor seamlessly secured to a first conductor within a first sheath; the second end of the conductor seamlessly secured to a second conductor within a second sheath; and the first sheath and the second sheath positioned adjacent each other. The UNLV novel sensor can be made by removing outer layers in a segment of coaxial cable, leaving a continuous link of essentially uncovered conductor between two coaxial cable legs.

  7. Generation of the magnetospheric electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    The potential electric field in the magnetosphere satisfies two boundary conditions, the outer boundary being the magnetosphere/solar-wind interface (magnetopause) and the inner boundary being the magnetosphere/atmosphere interface (ionosphere). The distribution of the imposed potential between the two boundaries affects, and is affected by, the configuration and motion of plasma in the magnetosphere. The paper surveys various mechanisms that are suspected of playing a role in the establishment of the boundary conditions on the magnetospheric electric field.

  8. Electric field control of the magnetocaloric effect.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Dun-Hui; Cao, Qing-Qi; Liu, En-Ke; Liu, Jian; Du, You-Wei

    2015-02-01

    Through strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling, it is demonstrated that the magnetocaloric effect of a ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy can be controlled by an electric field. Large hysteresis and the limited operating temperature region are effectively overcome by applying an electric field on a laminate comprising a piezoelectric and the alloy. Accordingly, a model for an active magnetic refrigerator with high efficiency is proposed in principle. PMID:25522356

  9. Dimensional crossover driven by an electric field.

    PubMed

    Aron, Camille; Kotliar, Gabriel; Weber, Cedric

    2012-02-24

    We study the steady-state dynamics of the Hubbard model driven out of equilibrium by a constant electric field and coupled to a dissipative heat bath. For a very strong field, we find a dimensional reduction: the system behaves as an equilibrium Hubbard model in lower dimensions. We derive steady-state equations for the dynamical mean-field theory in the presence of dissipation. We discuss how the electric field induced dimensional crossover affects the momentum resolved and integrated spectral functions, the energy distribution function, as well as the steady current in the nonlinear regime. PMID:22463546

  10. Nonlinear piezoelectric behavior of ceramic bending mode actuators under strong electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing-Ming; Zhang, Qiming; Xu, Baomin; Liu, Ruibin; Cross, L. Eric

    1999-09-01

    The nonlinear electromechanical behavior of cantilevered piezoelectric ceramic bimorph, unimorph, and reduced and internally biased oxide wafer actuators is studied in a wide electric field and frequency range. It is found that under quasistatic condition, linear relationships between actuator tip displacement-electric field, and blocking force-electric field are only valid under weak field driving. With increasing the driving field, electromechanical nonlinearity begins to contribute significantly to the actuator performance because of ferroelectric hysteresis behavior associated with piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-type ceramic materials. The bending resonance frequencies of all these actuators vary with the magnitude of the electric field. The decrease of resonance frequency with electric field is explained by the increase of elastic compliance of PZT ceramic due to elastic nonlinearity. Mechanical quality factors of the actuators also depend on the magnitude of electric field strength. No significant temperature increase is observed when actuators are driven near resonance frequency under high electric field.

  11. Fusion of Plant Protoplasts by Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Bates, George W.; Gaynor, John J.; Shekhawat, Narpat S.

    1983-01-01

    The electrical fusion technique of Zimmermann and Scheurich (1981 Planta 151: 26-32) has been used to fuse mesophyll protoplasts of Avena, Zea, Vigna, Petunia, and Amaranthus. Electrical fusion proves to be a simple, effective, and general fusion technique that can be controlled to form either dikaryons or large multinucleate fusion bodies. In addition, we show that Vigna mesophyll protoplasts that are subjected to the electrical fields used in this technique are viable in culture. The construction of the fusion chambers, necessary electrical equipment, and the fusion protocol are described in sufficient detail for reproduction of the technique. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16663128

  12. Crystal growth under external electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Uda, Satoshi; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Nozawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Kozo

    2014-10-06

    This is a review article concerning the crystal growth under external electric fields that has been studied in our lab for the past 10 years. An external field is applied electrostatically either through an electrically insulating phase or a direct injection of an electric current to the solid-interface-liquid. The former changes the chemical potential of both solid and liquid and controls the phase relationship while the latter modifies the transport and partitioning of ionic solutes in the oxide melt during crystallization and changes the solute distribution in the crystal.

  13. Crystal growth under external electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uda, Satoshi; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Nozawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Kozo

    2014-10-01

    This is a review article concerning the crystal growth under external electric fields that has been studied in our lab for the past 10 years. An external field is applied electrostaticallyeither through an electrically insulating phase or a direct injection of an electric current to the solid-interface-liquid. The former changes the chemical potential of both solid and liquid and controls the phase relationship while the latter modifies the transport and partitioning of ionic solutes in the oxide melt during crystallization and changes the solute distribution in the crystal.

  14. Full 180 Magnetization Reversal with Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J. J.; Hu, J. M.; Ma, J.; Zhang, J. X.; Chen, L. Q.; Nan, C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Achieving 180 magnetization reversal with an electric field rather than a current or magnetic field is a fundamental challenge and represents a technological breakthrough towards new memory cell designs. Here we propose a mesoscale morphological engineering approach to accomplishing full 180 magnetization reversals with electric fields by utilizing both the in-plane piezostrains and magnetic shape anisotropy of a multiferroic heterostructure. Using phase-field simulations, we examined a patterned single-domain nanomagnet with four-fold magnetic axis on a ferroelectric layer with electric-field-induced uniaxial strains. We demonstrated that the uniaxial piezostrains, if non-collinear to the magnetic easy axis of the nanomagnet at certain angles, induce two successive, deterministic 90 magnetization rotations, thereby leading to full 180 magnetization reversals. PMID:25512070

  15. Towards a force field based on density fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Cisneros, G. Andrs; Reinhardt, Peter; Gresh, Nohad; Darden, Thomas A.

    2006-03-01

    Total intermolecular interaction energies are determined with a first version of the Gaussian electrostatic model (GEM-0), a force field based on a density fitting approach using s-type Gaussian functions. The total interaction energy is computed in the spirit of the sum of interacting fragment ab initio (SIBFA) force field by separately evaluating each one of its components: electrostatic (Coulomb), exchange repulsion, polarization, and charge transfer intermolecular interaction energies, in order to reproduce reference constrained space orbital variation (CSOV) energy decomposition calculations at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level. The use of an auxiliary basis set restricted to spherical Gaussian functions facilitates the rotation of the fitted densities of rigid fragments and enables a fast and accurate density fitting evaluation of Coulomb and exchange-repulsion energy, the latter using the overlap model introduced by Wheatley and Price [Mol. Phys. 69, 50718 (1990)]. The SIBFA energy scheme for polarization and charge transfer has been implemented using the electric fields and electrostatic potentials generated by the fitted densities. GEM-0 has been tested on ten stationary points of the water dimer potential energy surface and on three water clusters (n=16,20,64). The results show very good agreement with density functional theory calculations, reproducing the individual CSOV energy contributions for a given interaction as well as the B3LYP total interaction energies with errors below kBT at room temperature. Preliminary results for Coulomb and exchange-repulsion energies of metal cation complexes and coupled cluster singles doubles electron densities are discussed.

  16. Research of optical electric field probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wan; Li, Bin; Chen, Jingyao; Wang, Jifeng; Lu, Guizhen

    2012-10-01

    As an important modern measurement equipment of the electromagnetic field, electric field probe can measure the industrial, scientific and medical aspects of the leakage field. In the Electro Magnetic Compatibility (EMC) experiment, it can also check the high-frequency-sensitive parts of the devices and the parasitic radiations due to the mechanical movement. Especially in the field of Electromagnetic Compatibility, electric field probe is one of the most important test equipment. This paper introduces a type of optical electric field probe. In the system, a kind of antenna, which could provide a response nearly isotropic for all polarizations of the incident field, is used for receiving the signal of the electric field. The high-frequency signal received by the antenna then is detected by Schottky barrier diode detector. This low-frequency or Direct Current (DC) signal can be modulated to the band of light by the Electro-Absorption-Distributed Feed Back (EA-DFB) modulator, thus the probe can provide a wild band responds. Through the optical fiber, the optical signal is sent to the photoelectric detector. Based on the optical power value, the field intensity can be calculated. In this system, compared with traditional transmission line, optical fiber can minimize the electromagnetic interference and transmission-line attenuation. In addition to this, the system also has high test sensitivity and wide measurement bandwidth. Furthermore, the whole system has a simple structure and low manufacturing cost.

  17. Electric field-induced magnetization switching in epitaxial columnar nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zavaliche, F; Zheng, H; Mohaddes-Ardabili, L; Yang, S Y; Zhan, Q; Shafer, P; Reilly, E; Chopdekar, R; Jia, Y; Wright, P; Schlom, D G; Suzuki, Y; Ramesh, R

    2005-09-01

    We present direct evidence for room-temperature magnetization reversal induced by an electric field in epitaxial ferroelectric BiFeO3-ferrimagnetic CoFe2O4 columnar nanostructures. Piezoelectric force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy were used to locally image the coupled piezoelectric-magnetic switching. Quantitative analyses give a perpendicular magnetoelectric susceptibility of approximately 1.0 x 10(-2) G cm/V. The observed effect is due to the strong elastic coupling between the two ferric constituents as the result of the three-dimensional heteroepitaxy. PMID:16159226

  18. Nanoparticle Near-Surface Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Chkhartishvili, Levan

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical studies show that surface reconstruction in some crystals involves splitting the surface atomic layer into two-upper and lower-sublayers consisting of atoms with only positive or only negative effective electric charges, respectively. In a macroscopic crystal with an almost infinite surface, the electric field induced by such a surface-dipole is practically totally concentrated between the sublayers. However, when the material is powdered and its particles are of sufficiently small sizes, an electric field of a significant magnitude can be induced outside the sublayers as well. We have calculated the distribution of the electric field and its potential induced at the surface of a disc-shaped particle. The suggested novel nanoscale effect explains the increase in physical reactivity of nanopowders with decreasing particle sizes. PMID:26831686

  19. Nanoparticle Near-Surface Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chkhartishvili, Levan

    2016-02-01

    Theoretical studies show that surface reconstruction in some crystals involves splitting the surface atomic layer into two—upper and lower—sublayers consisting of atoms with only positive or only negative effective electric charges, respectively. In a macroscopic crystal with an almost infinite surface, the electric field induced by such a surface-dipole is practically totally concentrated between the sublayers. However, when the material is powdered and its particles are of sufficiently small sizes, an electric field of a significant magnitude can be induced outside the sublayers as well. We have calculated the distribution of the electric field and its potential induced at the surface of a disc-shaped particle. The suggested novel nanoscale effect explains the increase in physical reactivity of nanopowders with decreasing particle sizes.

  20. Stability of Spherical Vesicles in Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The stability of spherical vesicles in alternating (ac) electric fields is studied theoretically for asymmetric conductivity conditions across their membranes. The vesicle deformation is obtained from a balance between the curvature elastic energies and the work done by the Maxwell stresses. The present theory describes and clarifies the mechanisms for the four types of morphological transitions observed experimentally on vesicles exposed to ac fields in the frequency range from 500 to 2 107 Hz. The displacement currents across the membranes redirect the electric fields toward the membrane normal to accumulate electric charges by the Maxwell?Wagner mechanism. These accumulated electric charges provide the underlying molecular mechanism for the morphological transitions of vesicles as observed on the micrometer scale. PMID:20575588

  1. Electric field induced spin-polarized current

    DOEpatents

    Murakami, Shuichi; Nagaosa, Naoto; Zhang, Shoucheng

    2006-05-02

    A device and a method for generating an electric-field-induced spin current are disclosed. A highly spin-polarized electric current is generated using a semiconductor structure and an applied electric field across the semiconductor structure. The semiconductor structure can be a hole-doped semiconductor having finite or zero bandgap or an undoped semiconductor of zero bandgap. In one embodiment, a device for injecting spin-polarized current into a current output terminal includes a semiconductor structure including first and second electrodes, along a first axis, receiving an applied electric field and a third electrode, along a direction perpendicular to the first axis, providing the spin-polarized current. The semiconductor structure includes a semiconductor material whose spin orbit coupling energy is greater than room temperature (300 Kelvin) times the Boltzmann constant. In one embodiment, the semiconductor structure is a hole-doped semiconductor structure, such as a p-type GaAs semiconductor layer.

  2. Electroemulsification in a Uniform Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Karyappa, Rahul B; Naik, Ankita V; Thaokar, Rochish M

    2016-01-12

    Emulsification using electric fields is an easy alternative to flow-induced drop breakup, and the former is reported to be more effective and economical than the latter, especially when the medium phase is poorly conducting and highly viscous. The emulsification of a coarse water-in-oil emulsion in a uniform electric field is studied. We perform a detailed experimental analysis of the effect of applied electric field strength and the duration of applied electric field on the drop size distribution. The average diameter as well as the time for emulsification decreases with an increase in the intensity of the electric field. Moreover, a narrow size distribution is observed. An average size of a few microns of the dispersed phase could be achieved. New breakup mechanisms at play in the emulsification process are discussed. Identified mechanisms involve charged lobe disintegration, charged drop breakup, chain formation in which several water droplets are interconnected by thin water bridges, electrospraying and charge transfer, and coalescence. The study shows that charged drop disintegration could be the key mechanism of fine emulsification of an initially electrically neutral coarse emulsion. PMID:26618556

  3. Rotationally Vibrating Electric-Field Mill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, Harold

    2008-01-01

    A proposed instrument for measuring a static electric field would be based partly on a conventional rotating-split-cylinder or rotating-split-sphere electric-field mill. However, the design of the proposed instrument would overcome the difficulty, encountered in conventional rotational field mills, of transferring measurement signals and power via either electrical or fiber-optic rotary couplings that must be aligned and installed in conjunction with rotary bearings. Instead of being made to rotate in one direction at a steady speed as in a conventional rotational field mill, a split-cylinder or split-sphere electrode assembly in the proposed instrument would be set into rotational vibration like that of a metronome. The rotational vibration, synchronized with appropriate rapid electronic switching of electrical connections between electric-current-measuring circuitry and the split-cylinder or split-sphere electrodes, would result in an electrical measurement effect equivalent to that of a conventional rotational field mill. A version of the proposed instrument is described.

  4. Spinmotive force due to motion of magnetic bubble arrays driven by magnetic field gradient

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Yuta; Hemmatiyan, Shayan; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Sinova, Jairo

    2014-01-01

    Interaction between local magnetization and conduction electrons is responsible for a variety of phenomena in magnetic materials. It has been recently shown that spin current and associated electric voltage can be induced by magnetization that depends on both time and space. This effect, called spinmotive force, provides for a powerful tool for exploring the dynamics and the nature of magnetic textures, as well as a new source for electromotive force. Here we theoretically demonstrate the generation of electric voltages in magnetic bubble array systems subjected to a magnetic field gradient. It is shown by deriving expressions for the electric voltages that the present system offers a direct measure of phenomenological parameter ? that describes non-adiabaticity in the current induced magnetization dynamics. This spinmotive force opens a door for new types of spintronic devices that exploit the field-gradient. PMID:25365971

  5. Spinmotive force due to motion of magnetic bubble arrays driven by magnetic field gradient.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Yuta; Hemmatiyan, Shayan; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Sinova, Jairo

    2014-01-01

    Interaction between local magnetization and conduction electrons is responsible for a variety of phenomena in magnetic materials. It has been recently shown that spin current and associated electric voltage can be induced by magnetization that depends on both time and space. This effect, called spinmotive force, provides for a powerful tool for exploring the dynamics and the nature of magnetic textures, as well as a new source for electromotive force. Here we theoretically demonstrate the generation of electric voltages in magnetic bubble array systems subjected to a magnetic field gradient. It is shown by deriving expressions for the electric voltages that the present system offers a direct measure of phenomenological parameter ? that describes non-adiabaticity in the current induced magnetization dynamics. This spinmotive force opens a door for new types of spintronic devices that exploit the field-gradient. PMID:25365971

  6. Spinmotive force due to motion of magnetic bubble arrays driven by magnetic field gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Yuta; Hemmatiyan, Shayan; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Sinova, Jairo

    2014-11-01

    Interaction between local magnetization and conduction electrons is responsible for a variety of phenomena in magnetic materials. It has been recently shown that spin current and associated electric voltage can be induced by magnetization that depends on both time and space. This effect, called spinmotive force, provides for a powerful tool for exploring the dynamics and the nature of magnetic textures, as well as a new source for electromotive force. Here we theoretically demonstrate the generation of electric voltages in magnetic bubble array systems subjected to a magnetic field gradient. It is shown by deriving expressions for the electric voltages that the present system offers a direct measure of phenomenological parameter ? that describes non-adiabaticity in the current induced magnetization dynamics. This spinmotive force opens a door for new types of spintronic devices that exploit the field-gradient.

  7. Additional electric field in real trench MOS barrier Schottky diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, R. K.; Aslanova, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    In real trench MOS barrier Schottky diode (TMBS diode) additional electric field (AEF) the whole is formed in the near contact region of the semiconductor and its propagation space is limited with the barrier metal and the metallic electrodes of MOS structures. Effective potential barrier height TMBS diode is formed via resulting electric field of superposition AEF and electric field of space charge region (SCR) semiconductor. The dependence of the resulting electric field intensity of the distance towards the inside the semiconductor is nonlinear and characterized by a peak at a certain distance from the interface. The thickness of the SCR in TMBS diode becomes equal to the trench depth. Force and energy parameters of the AEF, and thus resulting electric field in the SCR region, become dependent on the geometric design parameters TMBS diode. The forward I-V characteristic TMBS diode is described by the thermionic emission theory as in conventional flat Scottky diode, and in the reverse bias, current is virtually absent at initial voltage, appears abruptly at a certain critical voltage.

  8. Optical fiber sensor for electric field and electric charge using low-coherence, Fabry-Perot interferometry.

    PubMed

    Priest, T S; Scelsi, G B; Woolsey, G A

    1997-07-01

    An optical fiber sensor for electric field and electric charge, based on the deflection of a small cantilever, has been developed. When the sensor head is placed in an electric field, induced charging produces deflection of the cantilever, which is measured using low-coherence, Fabry-Perot interferometry. The sensor has been used to measure the electric field in the vicinity of a Van de Graaff generator, in the range 135-650 V/cm. The measured deflections are in good agreement with the predictions of a simple model equating the electrostatic and mechanical forces acting on the cantilever. PMID:18259242

  9. Magnetic field and electric current structure in the chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dravins, D.

    1974-01-01

    The three-dimensional vector magnetic field structure in the chromosphere above an active region is deduced by using high-resolution H-alpha filtergrams together with a simultaneous digital magnetogram. An analog model of the field is made with 400 metal wires representing field lines that outline the H-alpha structure. The height extent of the field is determined from vertical field-gradient observations around sunspots, from observed fibril heights, and from an assumption that the sources of the field are largely local. The computed electric currents (typically 10 mA/sq m) are found to flow in patterns not similar to observed features and not parallel to magnetic fields. Force structures correspond to observed solar features; the dynamics to be expected include: downward motion in bipolar areas in the lower chromosphere, an outflow of the outer chromosphere into the corona with radially outward flow above bipolar plage regions, and motion of arch filament systems.

  10. Magnetospheric electric field measurements during sudden commencements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggson, T. L.; Skillman, T. L.

    1973-01-01

    Direction measurements of electric fields were made in the outer magnetosphere during two sudden commencements in 1972. These measurements were observed with the double floating probe experiment carried aboard the IMP 6 satellite. The initial variations of the measured electric field consisted of an increase from a background of about 1 mv/meter to some 10 mv/meter at about 7 rE (earth radi) and to some 4 mv/meter at 3 rE. These initial electric field disturbances were longitudinal, oriented counter clockwise about an axis pointed north. A solution of Maxwell's third equation is derived for these measurements using a quasi-static version of Mead's model of the magnetosphere B (t). This solution seems to describe well the magnitude and direction of the initial perturbation of the electric field vectors observed during these two sudden commencements. After the initial increase, the measured electric field rings several times with periods of the order of minutes. This observed oscillatory behavior correlates with magnetic observatory records taken near the foot of the magetic field line passing through the satellite.

  11. Calculations of the Electric Fields in Liquid Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Stephen D.; Wang, Lee-Ping; Boxer, Steven G.; Ren, Pengyu; Pande, Vijay S.

    2014-01-01

    The electric field created by a condensed phase environment is a powerful and convenient descriptor for intermolecular interactions. Not only does it provide a unifying language to compare many different types of interactions, but it also possesses clear connections to experimental observables, such as vibrational Stark effects. We calculate here the electric fields experienced by a vibrational chromophore (the carbonyl group of acetophenone) in an array of solvents of diverse polarities using molecular dynamics simulations with the AMOEBA polarizable force field. The mean and variance of the calculated electric fields correlate well with solvent-induced frequency shifts and band broadening, suggesting Stark effects as the underlying mechanism of these key solution phase spectral effects. Compared to fixed-charge and continuum models, AMOEBA was the only model examined that could describe non-polar, polar, and hydrogen bonding environments in a consistent fashion. Nevertheless, we found that fixed-charge force fields and continuum models were able to replicate some results of the polarizable simulations accurately, allowing us to clearly identify which properties and situations require explicit polarization and/or atomistic representations to be modeled properly, and for which properties and situations simpler models are sufficient. We also discuss the ramifications of these results for modeling electrostatics in complex environments, such as proteins. PMID:24304155

  12. Calculations of the electric fields in liquid solutions.

    PubMed

    Fried, Stephen D; Wang, Lee-Ping; Boxer, Steven G; Ren, Pengyu; Pande, Vijay S

    2013-12-19

    The electric field created by a condensed-phase environment is a powerful and convenient descriptor for intermolecular interactions. Not only does it provide a unifying language to compare many different types of interactions, but it also possesses clear connections to experimental observables, such as vibrational Stark effects. We calculate here the electric fields experienced by a vibrational chromophore (the carbonyl group of acetophenone) in an array of solvents of diverse polarities using molecular dynamics simulations with the AMOEBA polarizable force field. The mean and variance of the calculated electric fields correlate well with solvent-induced frequency shifts and band broadening, suggesting Stark effects as the underlying mechanism of these key solution-phase spectral effects. Compared to fixed-charge and continuum models, AMOEBA was the only model examined that could describe nonpolar, polar, and hydrogen bonding environments in a consistent fashion. Nevertheless, we found that fixed-charge force fields and continuum models were able to replicate some results of the polarizable simulations accurately, allowing us to clearly identify which properties and situations require explicit polarization and/or atomistic representations to be modeled properly, and to identify for which properties and situations simpler models are sufficient. We also discuss the ramifications of these results for modeling electrostatics in complex environments, such as proteins. PMID:24304155

  13. A model for polar cap electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dangelo, N.

    1976-01-01

    A model is proposed relating polar cap ionospheric electric fields to the parameters of the solar wind near the orbit of the earth. The model ignores the notion of field line merging. An essential feature is the role played by velocity shear instabilities in regions of the outer magnetosphere, in which mapping of the magnetosheath electric field would produce sunward convection. The anomalous resistivity which arises from velocity shear turbulence, suffices to essentially disconnect the magnetosphere from the magnetosheath, at any place where that resistivity is large enough. The magnetosheath-magnetosphere system, as a consequence, acts as a kind of diode or rectifier for the magnetosheath electric fields. Predictions of the model are compared with several observations related to polar cap convection.

  14. Electric fields associated with dipolarization fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei-Jie; Fu, Suiyan; Parks, George K.; Pu, Zuyin; Zong, Qiu-Gang; Liu, Jiang; Yao, Zhonghua; Fu, Huishan; Shi, Quanqi

    2014-07-01

    Electric fields associated with dipolarization fronts (DFs) have been investigated in the magnetotail plasma sheet using Cluster observations. We have studied each term in the generalized Ohm's law using data obtained from the multispacecraft Cluster. Our results show that in the plasma flow frame, electric fields are directed normal to the DF in the magnetic dip region ahead of the DF as well as in the DF layer but in opposite directions. Case and statistical studies show that the Hall electric field is important while the electron pressure gradient term is much smaller. The ions decouple from the magnetic field in the DF layer and dip region (E + ViB ? 0), whereas electrons remain frozen-in (E + VeB=?pe/nee).

  15. Horizontal electric fields from lightning return strokes

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, E.M.; Uman, M.A.; Johnson, J.; Stone, J.W.; Medelius, P.; Rubenstein, M.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements are presented of simultaneous horizontal and vertical electric fields from both close and distant lightning return strokes. The data were obtained during summer 1984 at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, using an electrically isolated spherical antenna having a system bandwidth of 3 Hz to 5 MHz. Lightning signals were obtained from flashes at distances from a few to 100 kilometers. Since the horizontal electric field is in part determined by the local ground conductivity, that parameter was measured as a function of depth. The horizontal fields from lightning return strokes had typically 1/50 the peak amplitude of the vertical fields and waveshapes which were consistant with available theory, as expressed by the ''wavetilt'' formula.

  16. Electric Field Measurement in a Microwave Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolic, Milka; Popovic, Svetozar; Vuskovic, Leposava; Herring, Gregory C.

    2013-09-01

    We have developed a simple technique to infer electric field in a polarized microwave beam. The method is based on the measurement of breakdown at the surface of a conducting sphere facing the direction of the field. The concept is based on two approximate relations, the field on the sphere is threefold the ambient field, and the breakdown field increases linearly with pressure. The enhancement of the electric field at the sphere is strictly valid for the electrostatic field but is also applicable for the polarized microwave beam when the diameter of the sphere is smaller than the wavelength. It was readily utilized in a number of experiments. The second relation is satisfied when the field frequency is negligible in comparison to the electron collision frequency. We demonstrate the technique by the measurement of axial distribution of the electric field in the beam emitted from a rectangular horn antenna at sub-atmospheric pressure. Measured field distribution is in accordance to the calculation. This technique can be used for free-space beam diagnostics and beam power reduction measurement in the presence of surface plasma at the aperture of the horn.

  17. Locating source regions of precursory seismo-electric fields and the mechanism generating electric field variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kozo; Fujinawa, Yukio

    1993-04-01

    Electrodes consisting of a steel pipe in a deep borehole and a grounded wire surrounding the borehole were constructed to measure vertical electric fields, whereas conventional electrodes measure horizontal fields. Three years of monitoring showed that the anomalous variations in vertical underground electric fields preceding earthquakes and volcanic eruptions are much clearer than the variations in horizontal fields. The data also showed that there is much less man-made noise in the vertical fields. To determine whether these observed anomalies are forerunners of seismic disturbance, a system developed to locate precisely the source regions of underground vertical electric fields or volcanic tremors has been continuously operated. The system uses three or more time lags calculated by cross-correlating the electric fields or volcanic tremors recorded at four, or more, monitoring stations. If this system reveals the intensity distributions of the sources, prediction of imminent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions will become possible. To explain the mechanisms by which precursory electric field variations are generated, a model is proposed in which the electric field variations are generated by Earth current variations caused by increased electric conductivity in source regions before an earthquake. The conductivity is increased by free electrons and positive holes created on the fresh fracture surfaces caused by microcracks that occur before rock failure in the Earth's crust. The model can explain precursory electrical phenomena which are observed not only in the field before an earthquake but also in the laboratory before rock failure.

  18. Comparison of Cellulose I? Simulations with Three Carbohydrate Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Matthews, James F; Beckham, Gregg T; Bergenstrhle-Wohlert, Malin; Brady, John W; Himmel, Michael E; Crowley, Michael F

    2012-02-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of cellulose have recently become more prevalent due to increased interest in renewable energy applications, and many atomistic and coarse-grained force fields exist that can be applied to cellulose. However, to date no systematic comparison between carbohydrate force fields has been conducted for this important system. To that end, we present a molecular dynamics simulation study of hydrated, 36-chain cellulose I? microfibrils at room temperature with three carbohydrate force fields (CHARMM35, GLYCAM06, and Gromos 45a4) up to the near-microsecond time scale. Our results indicate that each of these simulated microfibrils diverge from the cellulose I? crystal structure to varying degrees under the conditions tested. The CHARMM35 and GLYCAM06 force fields eventually result in structures similar to those observed at 500 K with the same force fields, which are consistent with the experimentally observed high-temperature behavior of cellulose I. The third force field, Gromos 45a4, produces behavior significantly different from experiment, from the other two force fields, and from previously reported simulations with this force field using shorter simulation times and constrained periodic boundary conditions. For the GLYCAM06 force field, initial hydrogen-bond conformations and choice of electrostatic scaling factors significantly affect the rate of structural divergence. Our results suggest dramatically different time scales for convergence of properties of interest, which is important in the design of computational studies and comparisons to experimental data. This study highlights that further experimental and theoretical work is required to understand the structure of small diameter cellulose microfibrils typical of plant cellulose. PMID:26596620

  19. Electric field profiles in obstructed helium discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendel, Peter; Ganguly, Biswa; Bletzinger, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Axial and radial variations of electric field have been measured in dielectric shielded 25 mm diameter parallel plate electrode for 2 mA, 2250 V helium dc discharge at 1.75 Torr with 6.5 mm gap. The axial and radial electric field profiles have been measured from the polarization dependent Stark splitting of 21S --> 11 1P transition through collision induced fluorescence from 43D --> 23P. The electric field values showed a strong radial variation peaking up to 5 kV/cm near the cathode radial boundary, and decreasing to about 1 kV/cm near the anode, suggesting the formation of an obstructed discharge for this low Pd condition. Also, the on-axis electric field was nearly constant across the gap indicating a radially non-uniform current density. In order to obtain information about the space charge distribution in this obstructed discharge, it was modeled using the 2-d axisymmetric Poisson solver with COMSOL finite element modeling program. The model discharge dimensions were selected to match the experimental dimensions. The best fit to the measured electric field distribution was obtained with a space charge variation of ρ(r) =ρ0 (r/r0)3 , where ρ(r) is the local space charge density, ρ0 is the maximum space-charge density, r the local radial value and r0 the radius of the electrode.

  20. Approximate photochemical dynamics of azobenzene with reactive force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Hartke, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    We have fitted reactive force fields of the ReaxFF type to the ground and first excited electronic states of azobenzene, using global parameter optimization by genetic algorithms. Upon coupling with a simple energy-gap transition probability model, this setup allows for completely force-field-based simulations of photochemical cis?trans- and trans?cis-isomerizations of azobenzene, with qualitatively acceptable quantum yields. This paves the way towards large-scale dynamics simulations of molecular machines, including bond breaking and formation (via the reactive force field) as well as photochemical engines (presented in this work).

  1. Approximate photochemical dynamics of azobenzene with reactive force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Hartke, Bernd

    2013-12-14

    We have fitted reactive force fields of the ReaxFF type to the ground and first excited electronic states of azobenzene, using global parameter optimization by genetic algorithms. Upon coupling with a simple energy-gap transition probability model, this setup allows for completely force-field-based simulations of photochemical cis?trans- and trans?cis-isomerizations of azobenzene, with qualitatively acceptable quantum yields. This paves the way towards large-scale dynamics simulations of molecular machines, including bond breaking and formation (via the reactive force field) as well as photochemical engines (presented in this work)

  2. New-generation amber united-atom force field.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lijiang; Tan, Chun-Hu; Hsieh, Meng-Juei; Wang, Junmei; Duan, Yong; Cieplak, Piotr; Caldwell, James; Kollman, Peter A; Luo, Ray

    2006-07-01

    We have developed a new-generation Amber united-atom force field for simulations involving highly demanding conformational sampling such as protein folding and protein-protein binding. In the new united-atom force field, all hydrogens on aliphatic carbons in all amino acids are united with carbons except those on Calpha. Our choice of explicit representation of all protein backbone atoms aims at minimizing perturbation to protein backbone conformational distributions and to simplify development of backbone torsion terms. Tests with dipeptides and solvated proteins show that our goal is achieved quite successfully. The new united-atom force field uses the same new RESP charging scheme based on B3LYP/cc-pVTZ//HF/6-31g** quantum mechanical calculations in the PCM continuum solvent as that in the Duan et al. force field. van der Waals parameters are empirically refitted starting from published values with respect to experimental solvation free energies of amino acid side-chain analogues. The suitability of mixing new point charges and van der Waals parameters with existing Amber covalent terms is tested on alanine dipeptide and is found to be reasonable. Parameters for all new torsion terms are refitted based on the new point charges and the van der Waals parameters. Molecular dynamics simulations of three small globular proteins in the explicit TIP3P solvent are performed to test the overall stability and accuracy of the new united-atom force field. Good agreements between the united-atom force field and the Duan et al. all-atom force field for both backbone and side-chain conformations are observed. In addition, the per-step efficiency of the new united-atom force field is demonstrated for simulations in the implicit generalized Born solvent. A speedup around two is observed over the Duan et al. all-atom force field for the three tested small proteins. Finally, the efficiency gain of the new united-atom force field in conformational sampling is further demonstrated with a well-known toy protein folding system, an 18 residue polyalanine in distance-dependent dielectric. The new united-atom force field is at least a factor of 200 more efficient than the Duan et al. all-atom force field for ab initio folding of the tested peptide. PMID:16805629

  3. Magnetic field sensor based on the Ampere's force using dual-polarization DBR fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shuang; Zhang, Yang; Guan, Baiou

    2015-08-01

    A novel magnetic field sensor using distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) fiber laser by Ampere's force effect is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The key sensing element, that is the dual-polarization DBR fiber laser, is fixed on the middle part of two copper plates which carry the current. Ampere's force is applied onto the coppers due to an external magnetic field generated by a DC solenoid. Thus, the lateral force from the coppers is converted to a corresponding beat frequency signal shift produced by the DBR laser. The electric current sensing is also realized by the same configuration and same principle simultaneously in an intuitive manner. Good agreement between the theory calculation and the experimental results is obtained, which shows a good linearity. This sensor's sensitivity to the magnetic field and to the electric current finally reaches ~258.92 kHz/mT and ~1.08727 MHz/A, respectively.

  4. Vibrational spectrum and force field of dimethyldimethoxysilane

    SciTech Connect

    Tenisheva, T.F.; Lazarev, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental data is presented on the spectra of (CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/Si(OCH/sub 3/)/sub 2/ (I), (CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/Si(OCD/sub 3/)/sub 2/ (II), and (CD/sub 3/)/sub 2/Si(OCH/sub 3/)/sub 2/ (III). The results of the determination of the force constants on the basis of the optimization of the solution of the inverse mechanical problem of the theory of molecular vibrations with consideration of all the internal degrees of freedom with the exception of the coordinates corresponding to internal rotations are discussed. Raman spectra of I, II, and III in the liquid phase is shown and the IR spectra of amorphous films of I, II, and III are illustrated.

  5. Prediction of Mechanical Properties of Polymers With Various Force Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Clancy, Thomas C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of force field type on the predicted elastic properties of a polyimide is examined using a multiscale modeling technique. Molecular Dynamics simulations are used to predict the atomic structure and elastic properties of the polymer by subjecting a representative volume element of the material to bulk and shear finite deformations. The elastic properties of the polyimide are determined using three force fields: AMBER, OPLS-AA, and MM3. The predicted values of Young s modulus and shear modulus of the polyimide are compared with experimental values. The results indicate that the mechanical properties of the polyimide predicted with the OPLS-AA force field most closely matched those from experiment. The results also indicate that while the complexity of the force field does not have a significant effect on the accuracy of predicted properties, small differences in the force constants and the functional form of individual terms in the force fields determine the accuracy of the force field in predicting the elastic properties of the polyimide.

  6. On focused fields with maximum electric field components and images of electric dipoles.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, R; Urbach, H P; Pereira, S F

    2011-05-01

    We study focused fields which, for a given total power and a given numerical aperture, have maximum electric field amplitude in some direction in the focal point and are linearly polarized along this direction. It is shown that the optimum field is identical to the image of an electric dipole with unit magnification. In particular, the field which is the image of an electric dipole whose dipole vector is parallel to the optical axis, is identical to the field whose longitudinal component is maximum at the image point. PMID:21643170

  7. Enhanced momentum delivery by electric force to ions due to collisions of ions with neutrals

    SciTech Connect

    Makrinich, G.; Fruchtman, A.

    2013-04-15

    Ions in partially ionized argon, nitrogen, and helium gas discharges are accelerated across a magnetic field by an applied electric field, colliding with neutrals during the acceleration. The momentum delivered by the electric force to the ions, which is equal to the momentum carried by the mixed ion-neutral flow, is found by measuring the force exerted on a balance force meter by that flow exiting the discharge. The power deposited in the ions is calculated by measuring the ion flux and the accelerating voltage. The ratio of force over power is found for the three gases, while the gas flow rates and magnetic field intensities are varied over a wide range of values, resulting in a wide range of gas pressures and applied voltages. The measurements for the three different gases confirm our previous suggestion [G. Makrinich and A. Fruchtman, Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 181504 (2009)] that the momentum delivered to the ions for a given power is enhanced by ion-neutral collisions during the acceleration and that this enhancement is proportional to the square root of the number of ion-neutral collisions.

  8. Forced Magnetic Reconnection and Field Penetration of an Externally Applied Rotating Helical Magnetic Field in the TEXTOR Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Y.; Finken, K. H.; Jakubowski, M.; Koslowski, H. R.; Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Lehnen, M.; Liang, Y.; Reiser, D.; Wolf, R. C.; Zimmermann, O.; Bock, M. F. M. de; Jaspers, R.; Matsunaga, G.

    2006-08-25

    The magnetic field penetration process into a magnetized plasma is of basic interest both for plasma physics and astrophysics. In this context special measurements on the field penetration and field amplification are performed by a Hall probe on the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) on the TEXTOR tokamak and the data are interpreted by a two-fluid plasma model. It is observed that the growth of the forced magnetic reconnection by the rotating DED field is accompanied by a change of the plasma fluid rotation. The differential rotation frequency between the DED field and the plasma plays an important role in the process of the excitation of tearing modes. The momentum input from the rotating DED field to the plasma is interpreted by both a ponderomotive force at the rational surface and a radial electric field modified by an edge ergodization.

  9. Computational Investigation of Helical Traveling Wave Tube Transverse RF Field Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Dayton, James A.

    1998-01-01

    In a previous study using a fully three-dimensional (3D) helical slow-wave circuit cold- test model it was found, contrary to classical helical circuit analyses, that transverse FF electric fields have significant amplitudes compared with the longitudinal component. The RF fields obtained using this helical cold-test model have been scaled to correspond to those of an actual TWT. At the output of the tube, RF field forces reach 61%, 26% and 132% for radial, azimuthal and longitudinal components, respectively, compared to radial space charge forces indicating the importance of considering them in the design of electron beam focusing.

  10. Novel concepts in near-field optics: from magnetic near-field to optical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Honghua

    Driven by the progress in nanotechnology, imaging and spectroscopy tools with nanometer spatial resolution are needed for in situ material characterizations. Near-field optics provides a unique way to selectively excite and detect elementary electronic and vibrational interactions at the nanometer scale, through interactions of light with matter in the near-field region. This dissertation discusses the development and applications of near-field optical imaging techniques, including plasmonic material characterization, optical spectral nano-imaging and magnetic field detection using scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM), and exploring new modalities of optical spectroscopy based on optical gradient force detection. Firstly, the optical dielectric functions of one of the most common plasmonic materials---silver is measured with ellipsometry, and analyzed with the Drude model over a broad spectral range from visible to mid-infrared. This work was motivated by the conflicting results of previous measurements, and the need for accurate values for a wide range of applications of silver in plasmonics, optical antennas, and metamaterials. This measurement provides a reference for dielectric functions of silver used in metamaterials, plasmonics, and nanophotonics. Secondly, I implemented an infrared s-SNOM instrument for spectroscopic nano-imaging at both room temperature and low temperature. As one of the first cryogenic s-SNOM instruments, the novel design concept and key specifications are discussed. Initial low-temperature and high-temperature performances of the instrument are examined by imaging of optical conductivity of vanadium oxides (VO2 and V2O 3) across their phase transitions. The spectroscopic imaging capability is demonstrated on chemical vibrational resonances of Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and other samples. The third part of this dissertation explores imaging of optical magnetic fields. As a proof-of-principle, the magnetic near-field response of a linear rod antenna is studied with Babinet's principle. Babinet's principle connects the magnetic field of a structure to the electric field of its complement structure. Using combined far- and near-field spectroscopy, imaging, and theory, I identify magnetic dipole and higher order bright and dark magnetic resonances at mid-infrared frequencies. From resonant length scaling and spatial field distributions, I confirm that the theoretical requirement of Babinet's principle for a structure to be infinitely thin and perfectly conducting is still fulfilled to a good approximation in the mid-infrared. Thus Babinet's principle provides access to spatial and spectral magnetic field properties, leading to targeted design and control of magnetic optical antennas. Lastly, a novel form of nanoscale optical spectroscopy based on mechanical detection of optical gradient force is explored. It is to measure the optical gradient force between induced dipole moments of a sample and an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. My study provides the theoretical basis in terms of spectral behavior, resonant enhancement, and distance dependence of the optical gradient force from numerical simulations for a coupled nanoparticle model geometry. I show that the optical gradient force is dispersive for local electronic and vibrational resonances, yet can be absorptive for collective polaronic excitations. This spectral behavior together with the distance dependence scaling provides the key characteristics for its measurement and distinction from competing processes such as thermal expansion. Furthermore, I provide a perspective for resonant enhancement and control of optical forces in general.

  11. An electric force facilitator in descending vortex tornadogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Forest S.; Bothun, Gregory D.; Sessions, Sharon L.

    2008-04-01

    We present a novel explanation of the physical processes behind one type of cloud and ground-level tornadogenesis within a supercell. We point out that the charge separation naturally found in these large thunderstorms can potentially serve to contract the preexisting angular momentum through the additional process of the electric force. On the basis of this, we present a plausible geometry that explains why many tornado vortices begin at storm midlevel and build downward into ground-level tornadoes. A simple model based on this geometry is used to demonstrate the strength of the electric force compared to the required centripetal acceleration to maintain cloud midlevel tornado vortices measurable as tornado vortex signatures (TVSs). Furthermore, a model based on this geometry is used to get a time estimate for tornado vortex formation. From this we are able to identify a plausible value for the threshold charge density that would lead to tornadogenesis and tornado maintenance on the timescale of a few minutes. We show that the proposed geometry can explain the observations that ground-level tornadoes thrive in regions with high shear and large convective available potential energy (CAPE) and are able to make some predictions of specific measurable quantities.

  12. Electric field controlled emulsion phase contactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A system for contacting liquid phases comprising a column for transporting a liquid phase contacting system, the column having upper and lower regions. The upper region has a nozzle for introducing a dispersed phase and means for applying thereto a vertically oriented high intensity pulsed electric field. This electric field allows improved flow rates while shattering the dispersed phase into many micro-droplets upon exiting the nozzle to form a dispersion within a continuous phase. The lower region employs means for applying to the dispersed phase a horizontally oriented high intensity pulsed electric field so that the dispersed phase undergoes continuous coalescence and redispersion while being urged from side to side as it progresses through the system, increasing greatly the mass transfer opportunity.

  13. Electric field controlled emulsion phase contactor

    DOEpatents

    Scott, T.C.

    1995-01-31

    A system is described for contacting liquid phases comprising a column for transporting a liquid phase contacting system, the column having upper and lower regions. The upper region has a nozzle for introducing a dispersed phase and means for applying thereto a vertically oriented high intensity pulsed electric field. This electric field allows improved flow rates while shattering the dispersed phase into many micro-droplets upon exiting the nozzle to form a dispersion within a continuous phase. The lower region employs means for applying to the dispersed phase a horizontally oriented high intensity pulsed electric field so that the dispersed phase undergoes continuous coalescence and redispersion while being urged from side to side as it progresses through the system, increasing greatly the mass transfer opportunity. 5 figs.

  14. Microfluidic Screening of Electric Fields for Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo A; Ge, Zhifei; Moran, Jeffrey L; Buie, Cullen R

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation is commonly used to deliver molecules such as drugs, proteins, and/or DNA into cells, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. In this work a rapid microfluidic assay was developed to determine the critical electric field threshold required for inducing bacterial electroporation. The microfluidic device was designed to have a bilaterally converging channel to amplify the electric field to magnitudes sufficient to induce electroporation. The bacterial cells are introduced into the channel in the presence of SYTOX(), which fluorescently labels cells with compromised membranes. Upon delivery of an electric pulse, the cells fluoresce due to transmembrane influx of SYTOX() after disruption of the cell membranes. We calculate the critical electric field by capturing the location within the channel of the increase in fluorescence intensity after electroporation. Bacterial strains with industrial and therapeutic relevance such as Escherichia coli BL21 (3.65??0.09?kV/cm), Corynebacterium glutamicum (5.20??0.20?kV/cm), and Mycobacterium smegmatis (5.56??0.08?kV/cm) have been successfully characterized. Determining the critical electric field for electroporation facilitates the development of electroporation protocols that minimize Joule heating and maximize cell viability. This assay will ultimately enable the genetic transformation of bacteria and archaea considered intractable and difficult-to-transfect, while facilitating fundamental genetic studies on numerous diverse microbes. PMID:26893024

  15. Microfluidic Screening of Electric Fields for Electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Ge, Zhifei; Moran, Jeffrey L.; Buie, Cullen R.

    2016-02-01

    Electroporation is commonly used to deliver molecules such as drugs, proteins, and/or DNA into cells, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. In this work a rapid microfluidic assay was developed to determine the critical electric field threshold required for inducing bacterial electroporation. The microfluidic device was designed to have a bilaterally converging channel to amplify the electric field to magnitudes sufficient to induce electroporation. The bacterial cells are introduced into the channel in the presence of SYTOX®, which fluorescently labels cells with compromised membranes. Upon delivery of an electric pulse, the cells fluoresce due to transmembrane influx of SYTOX® after disruption of the cell membranes. We calculate the critical electric field by capturing the location within the channel of the increase in fluorescence intensity after electroporation. Bacterial strains with industrial and therapeutic relevance such as Escherichia coli BL21 (3.65 ± 0.09 kV/cm), Corynebacterium glutamicum (5.20 ± 0.20 kV/cm), and Mycobacterium smegmatis (5.56 ± 0.08 kV/cm) have been successfully characterized. Determining the critical electric field for electroporation facilitates the development of electroporation protocols that minimize Joule heating and maximize cell viability. This assay will ultimately enable the genetic transformation of bacteria and archaea considered intractable and difficult-to-transfect, while facilitating fundamental genetic studies on numerous diverse microbes.

  16. Microfluidic Screening of Electric Fields for Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Ge, Zhifei; Moran, Jeffrey L.; Buie, Cullen R.

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation is commonly used to deliver molecules such as drugs, proteins, and/or DNA into cells, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. In this work a rapid microfluidic assay was developed to determine the critical electric field threshold required for inducing bacterial electroporation. The microfluidic device was designed to have a bilaterally converging channel to amplify the electric field to magnitudes sufficient to induce electroporation. The bacterial cells are introduced into the channel in the presence of SYTOX®, which fluorescently labels cells with compromised membranes. Upon delivery of an electric pulse, the cells fluoresce due to transmembrane influx of SYTOX® after disruption of the cell membranes. We calculate the critical electric field by capturing the location within the channel of the increase in fluorescence intensity after electroporation. Bacterial strains with industrial and therapeutic relevance such as Escherichia coli BL21 (3.65 ± 0.09 kV/cm), Corynebacterium glutamicum (5.20 ± 0.20 kV/cm), and Mycobacterium smegmatis (5.56 ± 0.08 kV/cm) have been successfully characterized. Determining the critical electric field for electroporation facilitates the development of electroporation protocols that minimize Joule heating and maximize cell viability. This assay will ultimately enable the genetic transformation of bacteria and archaea considered intractable and difficult-to-transfect, while facilitating fundamental genetic studies on numerous diverse microbes. PMID:26893024

  17. Field-aligned currents and large scale magnetospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dangelo, N.

    1980-01-01

    D'Angelo's model of polar cap electric fields (1977) was used to visualize how high-latitude field-aligned currents are driven by the solar wind generator. The region 1 and region 2 currents of Iijima and Potemra (1976) and the cusp field-aligned currents of Wilhjelm et al. (1978) and McDiarmid et al. (1978) are apparently driven by different generators, although in both cases the solar wind is their ultimate source.

  18. Electrons under the dominant action of shock-electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahr, Hans J.; Verscharen, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    We consider a fast magnetosonic multifluid shock as a representation of the solar-wind termination shock. We assume the action of the transition happens in a three-step process: In the first step, the upstream supersonic solar-wind plasma is subject to a strong electric field that flashes up on a small distance scale Δz ≃ U1/ Ωe (first part of the transition layer), where Ωe is the electron gyro-frequency and U1 is the upstream speed. This electric field both decelerates the supersonic ion flow and accelerates the electrons up to high velocities. In this part of the transition region, the electric forces connected with the deceleration of the ion flow strongly dominate over the Lorentz forces. We, therefore, call this part the demagnetization region. In the second phase, Lorentz forces due to convected magnetic fields compete with the electric field, and the highly anisotropic and energetic electron distribution function is converted into a shell distribution with energetic shell electrons storing about 3/4 of the upstream ion kinetic energy. In the third phase, the plasma particles thermalize due to the relaxation of free energy by plasma instabilities. The first part of the transition region opens up a new thermodynamic degree of freedom never before taken into account for the electrons, since the electrons are usually considered to be enslaved to follow the behavior of the protons in all velocity moments like density, bulk velocity, and temperature. We show that electrons may be the downstream plasma fluid that dominates the downstream plasma pressure.

  19. Electric field controlled columnar and planar patterning of cholesteric colloids.

    PubMed

    D'Adamo, G; Marenduzzo, D; Micheletti, C; Orlandini, E

    2015-05-01

    We study how dispersions of colloidal particles in a cholesteric liquid crystal behave under a time-dependent electric field. By controlling the amplitude and shape of the applied field wave, we show that the system can be reproducibly driven out of equilibrium through different kinetic pathways and navigated through a glassylike free energy landscape encompassing many competing metastable equilibria. Such states range from simple Saturn rings to complex structures featuring amorphous defect networks, or stacks of disclination loops. A nonequilibrium electric field can also trigger the alignment of particles into columnar arrays, through defect-mediated force impulses, or their repositioning within a plane. Our results are promising in terms of providing new avenues towards controlled patterning and self-assembly of soft colloid-liquid crystal composite materials. PMID:25978263

  20. Electric Field Controlled Columnar and Planar Patterning of Cholesteric Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Adamo, G.; Marenduzzo, D.; Micheletti, C.; Orlandini, E.

    2015-05-01

    We study how dispersions of colloidal particles in a cholesteric liquid crystal behave under a time-dependent electric field. By controlling the amplitude and shape of the applied field wave, we show that the system can be reproducibly driven out of equilibrium through different kinetic pathways and navigated through a glassylike free energy landscape encompassing many competing metastable equilibria. Such states range from simple Saturn rings to complex structures featuring amorphous defect networks, or stacks of disclination loops. A nonequilibrium electric field can also trigger the alignment of particles into columnar arrays, through defect-mediated force impulses, or their repositioning within a plane. Our results are promising in terms of providing new avenues towards controlled patterning and self-assembly of soft colloid-liquid crystal composite materials.

  1. Science in a Box. Magnets III: Force Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents ideas to help elementary school educators teach their students about magnetic force fields by observing how iron filings line up around magnets. The article lists materials needed and offers a student page with suggested student activities. (SM)

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of methane hydrate using polarizable force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, H.N.; Jordan, K.D.; Taylor, C.E.

    2007-06-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of methane hydrate have been carried out using the polarizable AMOEBA and COS/G2 force fields. Properties calculated include the temperature dependence of the lattice constant, the OC and OO radial distribution functions, and the vibrational spectra. Both the AMOEBA and COS/G2 force fields are found to successfully account for the available experimental data, with overall somewhat better agreement with experiment being found for the AMOEBA model. Comparison is made with previous results obtained using TIP4P and SPC/E effective two-body force fields and the polarizable TIP4P-FQ force field, which allows for in-plane polarization only. Significant differences are found between the properties calculated using the TIP4P-FQ model and those obtained using the other models, indicating an inadequacy of restricting explicit polarization to in-plane onl

  3. Electric field distribution in irradiated silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaldini, A.; Cavallini, A.; Polenta, L.; Nava, F.; Canali, C.

    2002-01-01

    Particle irradiation causes dramatic changes in bulk properties of p +-n-n + silicon structures operating as particle detectors. Several attempts to model and justify such variations have been proposed in the last few years. The main unsolved problem remains in the determination of the electric field and depletion layer distributions as key-parameters to estimate the collection efficiency of the detector. By using optical beam induced current (OBIC) and surface potential (SP) measurements we determined the behavior of the electric field and confirmed the existence of a double-junction structure appearing after irradiation.

  4. Electric Field Effects in RUS Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, Timothy W; Ten Cate, James A; Allured, Bradley; Carpenter, Michael A

    2009-09-21

    Much of the power of the Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) technique is the ability to make mechanical resonance measurements while the environment of the sample is changed. Temperature and magnetic field are important examples. Due to the common use of piezoelectric transducers near the sample, applied electric fields introduce complications, but many materials have technologically interesting responses to applied static and RF electric fields. Non-contact optical, buffered, or shielded transducers permit the application of charge and externally applied electric fields while making RUS measurements. For conducting samples, in vacuum, charging produces a small negative pressure in the volume of the material - a state rarely explored. At very high charges we influence the electron density near the surface so the propagation of surface waves and their resonances may give us a handle on the relationship of electron density to bond strength and elasticity. Our preliminary results indicate a charge sign dependent effect, but we are studying a number of possible other effects induced by charging. In dielectric materials, external electric fields influence the strain response, particularly in ferroelectrics. Experiments to study this connection at phase transformations are planned. The fact that many geological samples contain single crystal quartz suggests a possible use of the piezoelectric response to drive vibrations using applied RF fields. In polycrystals, averaging of strains in randomly oriented crystals implies using the 'statistical residual' strain as the drive. The ability to excite vibrations in quartzite polycrystals and arenites is explored. We present results of experimental and theoretical approaches to electric field effects using RUS methods.

  5. Fabrication of a nanoscale electric field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yun; King, Todd; Stewart, Daniel; Getty, Stephanie

    2009-05-01

    A new nanoscale electric field sensor was developed for studying triboelectric charging in terrestrial and Martian dust devils. The sensor was fabricated using MEMS techniques, integrated at the system level, and deployed during a dust devil field campaign. The two-terminal piezoresistive sensor consists of a micron-scale network of suspended singlewalled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) that are mechanically coupled to a free-standing electrically conductor. Electrostatic coupling of the conductor to the electric field is expected to produce a deflection of the conductor and a corresponding change in nanotube device resistance, based on the known piezoresistive properties of SWCNTs. The projected device performance will allow measurement of the large electric fields for large dust devils without saturation. With dimensions on the 100 μm scale and power consumption of only tens of nW, the sensor features dramatically reduced mass, power, and footprint. Recent field testing of the sensor demonstrated the robustness of suspended SWCNT devices to temperature fluctuations, mechanical shock, dust, and other environmental factors.

  6. Electric fields and double layers in plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Thiemann, H.; Schunk, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Various mechanisms for driving double layers in plasmas are briefly described, including applied potential drops, currents, contact potentials, and plasma expansions. Some dynamical features of the double layers are discussed. These features, as seen in simulations, laboratory experiments, and theory, indicate that double layers and the currents through them undergo slow oscillations which are determined by the ion transit time across an effective length of the system in which double layers form. It is shown that a localized potential dip forms at the low potential end of a double layer, which interrupts the electron current through it according to the Langmuir criterion, whenever the ion flux into the double is disrupted. The generation of electric fields perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field by contact potentials is also discussed. Two different situations were considered; in one, a low-density hot plasma is sandwiched between high-density cold plasmas, while in the other a high-density current sheet permeates a low-density background plasma. Perpendicular electric fields develop near the contact surfaces. In the case of the current sheet, the creation of parallel electric fields and the formation of double layers are also discussed when the current sheet thickness is varied. Finally, the generation of electric fields and double layers in an expanding plasma is discussed.

  7. Parallel electric fields from ionospheric winds

    SciTech Connect

    Nakada, M.P. )

    1987-10-01

    The possible production of electric fields parallel to the magnetic field by dynamo winds in the E region is examined, using a jet stream wind model. Current return paths through the F region above the stream are examined as well as return paths through the conjugate ionosphere. The Wulf geometry with horizontal winds moving in opposite directions one above the other is also examined. Parallel electric fields are found to depend strongly on the width of current sheets at the edges of the jet stream. If these are narrow enough, appreciable parallel electric fields are produced. These appear to be sufficient to heat the electrons which reduces the conductivity and produces further increases in parallel electric fields and temperatures. Calculations indicate that high enough temperatures for optical emission can be produced in less than 0.3 s. Some properties of auroras that might be produced by dynamo winds are examined; one property is a time delay in brightening at higher and lower altitudes.

  8. DC Electric Fields at the Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, H. E.; Escoubet, C. P.; Masson, A.

    2014-12-01

    In order to understand the transfer of energy, momentum and mass through the magnetopause one needs to know several plasma and field parameters including the DC electric field which is known to be challenging to measure in tenuous plasma regions, e.g. in the inner side of the magnetopause where the density drops below 1/cc. However, each of the Cluster spacecraft carries five different experiments that can provide information about DC electric fields, i.e. double probe antenna (EFW) and electron drift meter (EDI) as well as electron and ion spectrometers (PEACE, CIS-HIA, CIS-CODIF). Each technique is very different and has its own strengths and limitations. Therefore it is important to compare all available measurements before making a judgement on DC electric field variation at the magnetopause; note that only very rarely all five measurements are available at the same time. Although the full-resolution observations in the Cluster archive are calibrated, they can still contain various errors. However, when two experiments show the same field, it is quite likely that this is the right field because the different measurements are based on so complimentary techniques and the field varies so much when the spacecraft moves from the magnetosheath through the magnetopause into the magnetosphere, or vice versa. In this presentation we present several cases of the magnetopause crossings and how the different measurements agree and disagree around the magnetopause region.

  9. Mitigated-force carriage for high magnetic field environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Ludtka, Gail M.; Wilgen, John B.; Murphy, Bart L.

    2015-05-19

    A carriage for high magnetic field environments includes a plurality of work-piece separators disposed in an operable relationship with a work-piece processing magnet having a magnetic field strength of at least 1 Tesla for supporting and separating a plurality of work-pieces by a preselected, essentially equal spacing, so that, as a first work-piece is inserted into the magnetic field, a second work-piece is simultaneously withdrawn from the magnetic field, so that an attractive magnetic force imparted on the first work-piece offsets a resistive magnetic force imparted on the second work-piece.

  10. Electric force microscopy of semiconductors: Theory of cantilever frequency fluctuations and noncontact friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekkala, Swapna; Marohn, John A.; Loring, Roger F.

    2013-11-01

    An electric force microscope employs a charged atomic force microscope probe in vacuum to measure fluctuating electric forces above the sample surface generated by dynamics of molecules and charge carriers. We present a theoretical description of two observables in electric force microscopy of a semiconductor: the spectral density of cantilever frequency fluctuations (jitter), which are associated with low-frequency dynamics in the sample, and the coefficient of noncontact friction, induced by higher-frequency motions. The treatment is classical-mechanical, based on linear response theory and classical electrodynamics of diffusing charges in a dielectric continuum. Calculations of frequency jitter explain the absence of contributions from carrier dynamics to previous measurements of an organic field effect transistor. Calculations of noncontact friction predict decreasing friction with increasing carrier density through the suppression of carrier density fluctuations by intercarrier Coulomb interactions. The predicted carrier density dependence of the friction coefficient is consistent with measurements of the dopant density dependence of noncontact friction over Si. Our calculations predict that in contrast to the measurement of cantilever frequency jitter, a noncontact friction measurement over an organic semiconductor could show appreciable contributions from charge carriers.

  11. Electric force microscopy of semiconductors: Theory of cantilever frequency fluctuations and noncontact friction

    SciTech Connect

    Lekkala, Swapna; Marohn, John A.; Loring, Roger F.

    2013-11-14

    An electric force microscope employs a charged atomic force microscope probe in vacuum to measure fluctuating electric forces above the sample surface generated by dynamics of molecules and charge carriers. We present a theoretical description of two observables in electric force microscopy of a semiconductor: the spectral density of cantilever frequency fluctuations (jitter), which are associated with low-frequency dynamics in the sample, and the coefficient of noncontact friction, induced by higher-frequency motions. The treatment is classical-mechanical, based on linear response theory and classical electrodynamics of diffusing charges in a dielectric continuum. Calculations of frequency jitter explain the absence of contributions from carrier dynamics to previous measurements of an organic field effect transistor. Calculations of noncontact friction predict decreasing friction with increasing carrier density through the suppression of carrier density fluctuations by intercarrier Coulomb interactions. The predicted carrier density dependence of the friction coefficient is consistent with measurements of the dopant density dependence of noncontact friction over Si. Our calculations predict that in contrast to the measurement of cantilever frequency jitter, a noncontact friction measurement over an organic semiconductor could show appreciable contributions from charge carriers.

  12. Models of the earth's electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D.

    1974-01-01

    Detailed models of the electric field of the magnetosphere are derived in several stages. For all, the conductivity along field lines is assumed to be high enough to ensure the vanishing of E B everywhere except in the ionosphere. At first the rotation of the earth is ignored completely and a simple model is constructed which fits certain observed properties. Next, the rotation of the earth is taken into account, but the field is assumed to be that of a magnetic dipole rotating around its symmetry axis. This allows the concept of the electric potential to be retained, which permits the derivation of interesting properties including the use of a conjugate potential which paces the drift of charged particles in the field. Finally, the general case involving asymmetrical rotation is briefly discussed.

  13. Atomic emission spectroscopy in high electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.E.; Filuk, A.B.; Carlson, A.L.

    1995-12-31

    Pulsed-power driven ion diodes generating quasi-static, {approximately}10 MV/cm, 1-cm scale-length electric fields are used to accelerate lithium ion beams for inertial confinement fusion applications. Atomic emission spectroscopy measurements contribute to understanding the acceleration gap physics, in particular by combining time- and space-resolved measurements of the electric field with the Poisson equation to determine the charged particle distributions. This unique high-field configuration also offers the possibility to advance basic atomic physics, for example by testing calculations of the Stark-shifted emission pattern, by measuring field ionization rates for tightly-bound low-principal-quantum-number levels, and by measuring transition-probability quenching.

  14. A transferable ab initio based force field for aqueous ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazi, Sami; Molina, John J.; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Turq, Pierre; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Salanne, Mathieu

    2012-03-01

    We present a new polarizable force field for aqueous ions (Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+, Mg2 +, Ca2 +, Sr2 +, and Cl-) derived from condensed phase ab initio calculations. We use maximally localized Wannier functions together with a generalized force and dipole-matching procedure to determine the whole set of parameters. Experimental data are then used only for validation purposes and a good agreement is obtained for structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties. The same procedure applied to crystalline phases allows to parametrize the interaction between cations and the chloride anion. Finally, we illustrate the good transferability of the force field to other thermodynamic conditions by investigating concentrated solutions.

  15. Critical electric field strengths of onion tissues treated by pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Asavasanti, Suvaluk; Ersus, Seda; Ristenpart, William; Stroeve, Pieter; Barrett, Diane M

    2010-09-01

    The impact of pulsed electric fields (PEF) on cellular integrity and texture of Ranchero and Sabroso onions (Allium cepa L.) was investigated. Electrical properties, ion leakage rate, texture, and amount of enzymatically formed pyruvate were measured before and after PEF treatment for a range of applied field strengths and number of pulses. Critical electric field strengths or thresholds (E(c)) necessary to initiate membrane rupture were different because dissimilar properties were measured. Measurement of electrical characteristics was the most sensitive method and was used to detect the early stage of plasma membrane breakdown, while pyruvate formation by the enzyme alliinase was used to identify tonoplast membrane breakdown. Our results for 100-μs pulses indicate that breakdown of the plasma membrane occurs above E(c)= 67 V/cm for 10 pulses, but breakdown of the tonoplast membrane is above either E(c)= 200 V/cm for 10 pulses or 133 V/cm for 100 pulses. This disparity in field strength suggests there may be 2 critical electrical field strengths: a lower field strength for plasma membrane breakdown and a higher field strength for tonoplast membrane breakdown. Both critical electric field strengths depended on the number of pulses applied. Application of a single pulse at an electric field up to 333 V/cm had no observable effect on any measured properties, while significant differences were observed for n≥10. The minimum electric field strength required to cause a measurable property change decreased with the number of pulses. The results also suggest that PEF treatment may be more efficient if a higher electric field strength is applied for a fewer pulses. PMID:21535537

  16. Tunable Casimir forces by means of the external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jing; Zhang Xiangdong; Pei Shouyong; Liu Dahe

    2006-04-15

    We have theoretically investigated the tuning of Casimir forces by means of an external magnetic field. We have found that the Casimir force between two homogeneous slabs can be tuned by the external field in two ways. One is to add cap layers to the two dielectric slabs. The other is to insert a new dielectric layer into the cavity made of the two slabs. Since the dielectric constants of the materials used as the cap layers or the inserted layers depend on the external magnetic field, the Casimir force can be modified significantly by the external magnetic field. Our results show that it is possible to control the Casimir interaction in the fabrication of materials by an external field.

  17. Health of workers exposed to electric fields.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, D E; Broadbent, M H; Male, J C; Jones, M R

    1985-02-01

    The results of health questionnaire interviews with 390 electrical power transmission and distribution workers, together with long term estimates of their exposure to 50 Hz electric fields, and short term measurements of the actual exposure for 287 of them are reported. Twenty eight workers received measurable exposures, averaging about 30 kVm-1h over the two week measurement period. Estimated exposure rates were considerably greater, but showed fair correlation with the measurements. Although the general level of health was higher than we have found in manual workers in other industries, there were significant differences in the health measures between different categories of job, different parts of the country, and in association with factors such as overtime, working alone, or frequently changing shift. After allowing for the effects of job and location, however, we found no significant correlations of health with either measured or estimated exposure to electric fields. PMID:3970875

  18. Health of workers exposed to electric fields.

    PubMed Central

    Broadbent, D E; Broadbent, M H; Male, J C; Jones, M R

    1985-01-01

    The results of health questionnaire interviews with 390 electrical power transmission and distribution workers, together with long term estimates of their exposure to 50 Hz electric fields, and short term measurements of the actual exposure for 287 of them are reported. Twenty eight workers received measurable exposures, averaging about 30 kVm-1h over the two week measurement period. Estimated exposure rates were considerably greater, but showed fair correlation with the measurements. Although the general level of health was higher than we have found in manual workers in other industries, there were significant differences in the health measures between different categories of job, different parts of the country, and in association with factors such as overtime, working alone, or frequently changing shift. After allowing for the effects of job and location, however, we found no significant correlations of health with either measured or estimated exposure to electric fields. PMID:3970875

  19. Non-intrusive electric field sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, S. M.; Selfridge, R.; Chadderdon, S.; Perry, D.; Stan, N.

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of non-intrusive electric field sensing. The non-intrusive nature is attained by creating a sensor that is entirely dielectric, has a small cross-sectional area, and has the interrogation electronics a long distance away from the system under test. One non-intrusive electric field sensing technology is the slab coupled optical fiber sensor (SCOS). The SCOS consists of an electro-optic crystal attached to the surface of a D-shaped optical fiber. It is entirely dielectric and has a cross-sectional area down to 0.3mm by 0.3mm. The SCOS device functions as an electric field sensor through use of resonant mode coupling between the crystal waveguide and the core of a D-shaped optical fiber. The resonant mode coupling of a SCOS device occurs at specific wavelengths whose spectral locations are determined in part by the effective refractive index of the modes in the slab. An electric field changes the refractive index of the slab causing a shift in the spectral position of the resonant modes. This paper describes an overview of the SCOS technology including the theory, fabrication, and operation. The effect of crystal orientation and crystal type are explained with respect to directional sensitivity and frequency response.

  20. PHASE EQUILIBRIA MODIFICATION BY ELECTRIC FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary focus of this program is to obtain a fundamental understanding of the effects of electric fields on polar and nonpolar mixtures in gas and liquid phases, with the ultimate goal of using this understanding in devising novel means to dramatically improve existing enviro...

  1. Nonthermal processing by radio frequency electric fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Radio frequency electric fields (RFEF) processing is relatively new and has been shown to inactivate bacteria in apple juice, orange juice and apple cider at moderately low temperatures. Key equipment components of the process include a radio frequency power supply and a treatment chamber that is ca...

  2. Force Field Parameter Estimation of Functional Perfluoropolyether Lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.; Chung, P.S.; Steckel, J; Jhon, M.S.; Biegler, L.T.

    2011-01-01

    The head disk interface in a hard disk drive can be considered to be one of the hierarchical multiscale systems, which require the hybridization of multiscale modeling methods with coarse-graining procedure. However, the fundamental force field parameters are required to enable the coarse-graining procedure from atomistic/molecular scale to mesoscale models. In this paper, we investigate beyond molecular level and perform ab initio calculations to obtain the force field parameters. Intramolecular force field parameters for Zdol and Ztetraol were evaluated with truncated PFPE molecules to allow for feasible quantum calculations while still maintaining the characteristic chemical structure of the end groups. Using the harmonic approximation to the bond and angle potentials, the parameters were derived from the Hessian matrix, and the dihedral force constants are fit to the torsional energy profiles generated by a series of constrained molecular geometry optimization.

  3. Force Field Parameter Estimation of Functional Perfluoropolyether Lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.; Chung, P.S.; Steckel, J; Jhon, M.S.; Biegler, L.T.

    2011-01-01

    The head disk interface in hard disk drive can be considered one of the hierarchical multiscale systems, which require the hybridization of multiscale modeling methods with coarse-graining procedure. However, the fundamental force field parameters are required to enable the coarse-graining procedure from atomistic/molecular scale to mesoscale models .In this paper, we investigate beyond molecular level and perform ab-initio calculations to obtain the force field parameters. Intramolecular force field parameters for the Zdol and Ztetraol were evaluated with truncated PFPE molecules to allow for feasible quantum calculations while still maintaining the characteristic chemical structure of the end groups. Using the harmonic approximation to the bond and angle potentials, the parameters were derived from the Hessian matrix, and the dihedral force constants are fit to the torsional energy profiles generated by a series of constrained molecular geometry optimization.

  4. Force Field Parameter Estimation of Functional Perfluoropolyether Lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R; Chung, P S; Steckel, J A; Jhon, M S; Biegler, L T

    2011-01-01

    The head disk interface in hard disk drive can be considered one of the hierarchical multiscale systems, which require the hybridization of multiscale modeling methods with coarse-graining procedure. However, the fundamental force field parameters are required to enable the coarse-graining procedure from atomistic/molecular scale to mesoscale models .In this paper, we investigate beyond molecular level and perform ab-initio calculations to obtain the force field parameters. Intramolecular force field parameters for the Zdol and Ztetraolwere evaluated with truncated PFPE molecules to allow for feasible quantum calculations while still maintaining the characteristic chemical structure of the end groups. Using the harmonic approximation to the bond and angle potentials, the parameters were derived from the Hessian matrix, and the dihedral force constants are fit to the torsional energy profiles generated by a series of constrained molecular geometry optimization.

  5. Force field parameter estimation of functional perfluoropolyether lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert; Seung Chung, Pil; Steckel, Janice A.; Jhon, Myung S.; Biegler, Lorenz T.

    2011-01-01

    The head disk interface in a hard disk drive can be considered to be one of the hierarchical multiscale systems, which require the hybridization of multiscale modeling methods with coarse-graining procedure. However, the fundamental force field parameters are required to enable the coarse-graining procedure from atomistic/molecular scale to mesoscale models. In this paper, we investigate beyond molecular level and perform ab initio calculations to obtain the force field parameters. Intramolecular force field parameters for Zdol and Ztetraol were evaluated with truncated PFPE molecules to allow for feasible quantum calculations while still maintaining the characteristic chemical structure of the end groups. Using the harmonic approximation to the bond and angle potentials, the parameters were derived from the Hessian matrix, and the dihedral force constants are fit to the torsional energy profiles generated by a series of constrained molecular geometry optimization.

  6. Alternating Magnetic Field Forces for Satellite Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Nurge, Mark A.; Starr, Stnaley O.

    2012-01-01

    Selected future space missions, such as large aperture telescopes and multi-component interferometers, will require the precise positioning of a number of isolated satellites, yet many of the suggested approaches for providing satellites positioning forces have serious limitations. In this paper we propose a new approach, capable of providing both position and orientation forces, that resolves or alleviates many of these problems. We show that by using alternating fields and currents that finely-controlled forces can be induced on the satellites, which can be individually selected through frequency allocation. We also show, through analysis and experiment, that near field operation is feasible and can provide sufficient force and the necessary degrees of freedom to accurately position and orient small satellites relative to one another. In particular, the case of a telescope with a large number of free mirrors is developed to provide an example of the concept. We. also discuss the far field extension of this concept.

  7. Induced electric field by ion cyclotron wave heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Nong; Cary, John R.

    2012-03-01

    Ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) heating has been widely used to heat ions in fusion devices. As the ion cyclotron wave passes the (lower hybrid or hybrid) resonance, the incident electromagnetic wave converts to an electrostatic wave and the wave amplitude reaches its maximum. Meanwhile, the parametric decay may be triggered for a sufficiently large input power. Thus,the wave amplitude forms a peak near the resonance with a width of a few tens of ion gyro-radius. For typical ICRF heating parameters, it is found that the ponderomotive force induced is very significant. As a result, the ions are expelled from the region while the electrons are pulled in. Therefore an ambipolar electric field is produced. Our 1D PIC simulations show that the electric field induced could be of order of 10kV/m, comparable to the typically observed radial electric field. It is believed that the resulted electric field should be important to particle transport and plasma rotation.

  8. Systematic validation of protein force fields against experimental data.

    PubMed

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Maragakis, Paul; Piana, Stefano; Eastwood, Michael P; Dror, Ron O; Shaw, David E

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations provide a vehicle for capturing the structures, motions, and interactions of biological macromolecules in full atomic detail. The accuracy of such simulations, however, is critically dependent on the force field--the mathematical model used to approximate the atomic-level forces acting on the simulated molecular system. Here we present a systematic and extensive evaluation of eight different protein force fields based on comparisons of experimental data with molecular dynamics simulations that reach a previously inaccessible timescale. First, through extensive comparisons with experimental NMR data, we examined the force fields' abilities to describe the structure and fluctuations of folded proteins. Second, we quantified potential biases towards different secondary structure types by comparing experimental and simulation data for small peptides that preferentially populate either helical or sheet-like structures. Third, we tested the force fields' abilities to fold two small proteins--one ?-helical, the other with ?-sheet structure. The results suggest that force fields have improved over time, and that the most recent versions, while not perfect, provide an accurate description of many structural and dynamical properties of proteins. PMID:22384157

  9. Electric field distribution on knife-edge field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ryan; Lau, Yue Ying; Booske, John

    2007-11-01

    Of critical importance to advanced High Power Microwave (HPM) generators is the development and understanding of robust cold cathodes with low turn-on electric fields. Recent interesting candidates include ridged metallic cathodes fabricated by either laser ablation or other microfabrication methods [1]. We use conformal mapping to calculate the electric field on a knife-edge cathode. We find that the field enhancement factor scales approximately as the square root of the height-width ratio of the knife-edge [2]. An analytic approximation for the divergent electric field in the immediate vicinity of the sharp edge is derived. A smaller knife-edge placed on top of a larger one demonstrates that the composite field enhancement factor is approximately equal to the product of the field enhancement factor of the individual knife-edges. This proves the conjecture [3] on multiplication of field enhancement factors for one special case. This work was supported by AFOSR/MURI and by AFRL. [1] M.C. Jones, et al, Rev .Sci.Instrum.,75, 2976 (2004) [2] R. Miller, Y. Y. Lau, J. H. Booske, Appl. Phys. Lett., (to be published) [3] W. Schottky, Z. Physik, 14, 63 (1923).

  10. The electromagnetic force field, fluid flow field and temperature profiles in levitated metal droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Kaddah, N.; Szekely, J.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical representation was developed for the electromagnetic force field, the flow field, the temperature field (and for transport controlled kinetics), in a levitation melted metal droplet. The technique of mutual inductances was employed for the calculation of the electromagnetic force field, while the turbulent Navier - Stokes equations and the turbulent convective transport equations were used to represent the fluid flow field, the temperature field and the concentration field. The governing differential equations, written in spherical coordinates, were solved numerically. The computed results were in good agreement with measurements, regarding the lifting force, and the average temperature of the specimen and carburization rates, which were transport controlled.

  11. Lipid nanotube formation using space-regulated electric field above interdigitated electrodes.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hongmei; Fu, Dingguo; Wang, Lei; Han, Xiaojun

    2014-04-22

    Lipid nanotubes have great potential in biology and nanotechnology. Here we demonstrate a method to form lipid nanotubes using space-regulated AC electric fields above coplanar interdigitated electrodes. The AC electric field distribution can be regulated by solution height above the electrodes. The ratio of field component in x axis (Ex) to field component in z axis (Ez) increases dramatically at solution height below 50 ?m; therefore, at lower solution height, the force from Ex predominantly drives lipids to form lipid nanotubes along with the electric field direction. The forces exerted on the lipid nanotube during its formation were analyzed in detail, and an equation was obtained to describe the relationship among nanotube length and field frequency, amplitude, and time. We believe that the presented approach opens a way to design and prepare nanoscale materials with unique structural and functional properties using space-regulated electric fields. PMID:24669822

  12. Turbulent relaxation to a force-free field-reversed state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlburg, J. P.; Montgomery, D.; Doolen, G. D.; Turner, L.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of nonequilibrium initial conditions of an incompressible magnetohydrodynamic Z pinch is described by a three-dimensional, pseudospectral numerical code. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence develops in the resistive, nonviscous magnetofluid, resulting in the selective decay of the energy relative to the magnetic helicity, at Lundquist numbers of only a few hundred. An interior force-free region grows with time and achieves spontaneous reversal of the toroidal magnetic field at the wall, without the necessity of an external electric field.

  13. Electric field effects in multicomponent fluid lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, J.T.; Boxer, S.G.; McConnell, H.M.

    2000-01-13

    A thermodynamic model of multicomponent fluid membranes under the influence of lateral forces is described. Membrane components are characterized by their effective molecular areas, molecular charges, and the set of critical demixing coefficients (differential interaction energies) between each of the different species present. This model is useful in the analysis of electric field induced concentration gradients in supported lipid bilayer membranes. It has been employed to determine the critical temperature for spontaneous lateral phase separation of a mixture of cardiolipin and phosphatidylcholine from field-induced concentration profiles of a fluorescent probe. More generally, it provides a convenient way of interpreting critical demixing effects in multicomponent membranes and exploring the way these influence the response of a membrane to lateral forces.

  14. MAGNETIC EXPLOSIONS: ROLE OF THE INDUCTIVE ELECTRIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Melrose, D. B.

    2012-04-10

    Inclusion of the inductive electric field, E{sub ind}, due to the temporally changing B, in magnetic explosions is discussed, with emphasis on solar flares. Several roles played by E{sub ind} are identified: on a global scale, E{sub ind} produces the electromotive force that drives the explosion; the associated E{sub ind} Multiplication-Sign B drift is identified with the inflow of magnetic field lines into a reconnection region; the polarization current, associated with {partial_derivative}E{sub ind}/{partial_derivative}t, implies a J Multiplication-Sign B force that accelerates this inflow; and the component of E{sub ind} parallel to B accelerates the energetic electrons that cause hard X-ray emission and type III radio bursts. Some simple models that describe these effects are presented. A resolution of the long-standing 'number problem' in solar flares is suggested.

  15. Swarm equatorial electric field chain: First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alken, P.; Maus, S.; Chulliat, A.; Vigneron, P.; Sirol, O.; Hulot, G.

    2015-02-01

    The eastward equatorial electric field (EEF) in the E region ionosphere drives many important phenomena at low latitudes. We developed a method of estimating the EEF from magnetometer measurements of near-polar orbiting satellites as they cross the magnetic equator, by recovering a clean signal of the equatorial electrojet current and modeling the observed current to determine the electric field present during the satellite pass. This algorithm is now implemented as an official Level-2 Swarm product. Here we present first results of EEF estimates from nearly a year of Swarm data. We find excellent agreement with independent measurements from the ground-based coherent scatter radar at Jicamarca, Peru, as well as horizontal field measurements from the West African Magnetometer Network magnetic observatory chain. We also calculate longitudinal gradients of EEF measurements made by the A and C lower satellite pair and find gradients up to about 0.05 mV/m/deg with significant longitudinal variability.

  16. Tikekar superdense stars in electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komathiraj, K.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2007-04-01

    We present exact solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell system of equations with a specified form of the electric field intensity by assuming that the hypersurface {t=constant} are spheroidal. The solution of the Einstein-Maxwell system is reduced to a recurrence relation with variable rational coefficients which can be solved in general using mathematical induction. New classes of solutions of linearly independent functions are obtained by restricting the spheroidal parameter K and the electric field intensity parameter ?. Consequently, it is possible to find exact solutions in terms of elementary functions, namely, polynomials and algebraic functions. Our result contains models found previously including the superdense Tikekar neutron star model [J. Math. Phys. 31, 2454 (1990)] when K=-7 and ?=0. Our class of charged spheroidal models generalize the uncharged isotropic Maharaj and Leach solutions [J. Math. Phys. 37, 430 (1996)]. In particular, we find an explicit relationship directly relating the spheroidal parameter K to the electromagnetic field.

  17. Visualization of Force Fields in Protein Structure Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Clark; Kreylos, Oliver; Hamann, Bernd; Crivelli, Silvia

    2005-04-26

    The force fields used in molecular computational biology are not mathematically defined in such a way that their mathematical representation would facilitate the straightforward application of volume visualization techniques. To visualize energy, it is necessary to define a spatial mapping for these fields. Equipped with such a mapping, we can generate volume renderings of the internal energy states in a molecule. We describe our force field, the spatial mapping that we used for energy, and the visualizations that we produced from this mapping. We provide images and animations that offer insight into the computational behavior of the energy optimization algorithms that we employ.

  18. Gravitational self-force in nonvacuum spacetimes: An effective field theory derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Peter

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we investigate the motion of small compact objects in nonvacuum spacetimes using methods from effective field theory in curved spacetime. Although a vacuum formulation is sufficient in many astrophysical contexts, there are applications such as the role of the self-force in enforcing cosmic censorship in the context of the overcharging problem, which necessitate an extension into the nonvacuum regime. The defining feature of the self-force problem in nonvacuum spacetimes is the coupling between gravitational and nongravitational field perturbations. The formulation of the self-force problem for nonvacuum spacetimes was recently provided in simultaneous papers by Zimmerman and Poisson [Gravitational self-force in nonvacuum spacetimes, Phys. Rev. D 90, 084030 (2014)] and Linz, Friedmann, and Wiseman [Combined gravitational and electromagnetic self-force on charged particles in electrovac spacetimes, Phys. Rev. D 90, 084031 (2014)]. Here we distinguish ourselves by working with the effective action rather than the field equations. The formalism utilizes the multi-index notation developed by Zimmerman and Poisson [Gravitational self-force in nonvacuum spacetimes, Phys. Rev. D 90, 084030 (2014) to accommodate the coupling between the different fields. Using dimensional regularization, we arrive at a finite expression for the local self-force expressed in terms of multi-index quantities evaluated in the background spacetime. We then apply the formalism to compute the coupled gravitational self-force in two explicit cases. First, we calculate the self-force on a massive particle possessing scalar charge and moving in a scalarvac spacetime. We then derive an expression for the self-force on an electrically charged, massive particle moving in an electrovac spacetime. In both cases, the force is expressed as a sum of local terms involving tensors defined in the background spacetime and evaluated at the current position of the particle, as well as tail integrals that depend on the past history of the particle.

  19. Role of inductive electric fields in substorm development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heikkila, Walter J.

    1992-01-01

    A study discussing and investigating the role of inductive electric fields in substorm development is presented. It is common to use the scalar potential phi to calculate the electrostatic field E(sup ES)-(inverted Delta)(phi). However, vector potential A has not been extensively used to analyze results by the relation for the inductive electric field E(sup IND)-delta A/delta t. Because of the weak dependence in distance (1/r) these potentials show the effect of distant sources, unlike MHD (Magnetohydrodynamic) theory which is strictly local. The two can be separated by the choice of the Coulomb (transverse) gauge. It is proper to consider that the plasma polarizes to counteract the activation of the inductive electric field; this is a matter of cause and effect. However, such polarization produces a curl free electrostatic field and thus cannot alter the electromotive force due to induction. This idea has some interesting consequences for plasma physics, including violations of MHD theory, creation of the substorm current diversion, and a fresh look at dayside merging via plasma transfer events.

  20. Electric and magnetic field measurements in a high voltage center.

    PubMed

    Safigianni, Anastasia S; Spyridopoulos, Anastasios I; Kanas, Vasilis L

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the electric and magnetic fields inside a large high voltage center constituted both of 400/150 and 150/20 kV substation areas. Results of previous field measurements and calculations in substations, made by the authors of this paper or other researchers, are presented first. The basic data distinguishing the examined center from previously examined substations follow. The main results of the field measurements in the areas of the above-mentioned center are presented in relevant diagrams. General conclusions arising from the comparison of the measured field values with relevant reference levels in force for safe public and occupational exposure as well as with the results of previous research are finally given. PMID:21917821

  1. Analog of electric and magnetic fields in stationary gravitational systems

    SciTech Connect

    Embacher, F.

    1984-08-01

    Newtonian and Machian aspects of the stationary gravitational field are brought into formal analogy with a stationry electromagnetic field. The electromagnetic vector potential equals (up to a factor) the timelike Killing vector field. The current density is given by the contraction of the Killing vector with the Ricci tensor. A coordinate-dependent split in electric and magnetic field vectors is given, and some results of classical electrodynamics are used to illustrate the analogy. In the linearized theory, the usual Maxwell equations are obtained. The analogy also holds from the point of view of particle motion. The geodesic equation is brought into a special form that exhibits an analog to the Lorentz force. Two examples (which have played an important role in the theoretical discovery of Machian effects) are considered.

  2. Benchmarking of Force Fields for Molecule-Membrane Interactions.

    PubMed

    Paloncov, Markta; Fabre, Gabin; DeVane, Russell H; Trouillas, Patrick; Berka, Karel; Otyepka, Michal

    2014-09-01

    Studies of drug-membrane interactions witness an ever-growing interest, as penetration, accumulation, and positioning of drugs play a crucial role in drug delivery and metabolism in human body. Molecular dynamics simulations complement nicely experimental measurements and provide us with new insight into drug-membrane interactions; however, the quality of the theoretical data dramatically depends on the quality of the force field used. We calculated the free energy profiles of 11 molecules through a model dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membrane bilayer using five force fields, namely Berger, Slipids, CHARMM36, GAFFlipids, and GROMOS 43A1-S3. For the sake of comparison, we also employed the semicontinuous tool COSMOmic. High correlation was observed between theoretical and experimental partition coefficients (log K). Partition coefficients calculated by all-atomic force fields (Slipids, CHARMM36, and GAFFlipids) and COSMOmic differed by less than 0.75 log units from the experiment and Slipids emerged as the best performing force field. This work provides the following recommendations (i) for a global, systematic and high throughput thermodynamic evaluations (e.g., log K) of drugs COSMOmic is a tool of choice due to low computational costs; (ii) for studies of the hydrophilic molecules CHARMM36 should be considered; and (iii) for studies of more complex systems, taking into account all pros and cons, Slipids is the force field of choice. PMID:26588554

  3. Force field-dependent solution properties of glycine oligomers.

    PubMed

    Drake, Justin A; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2015-06-30

    Molecular simulations can be used to study disordered polypeptide systems and to generate hypotheses on the underlying structural and thermodynamic mechanisms that govern their function. As the number of disordered protein systems investigated with simulations increase, it is important to understand how particular force fields affect the structural properties of disordered polypeptides in solution. To this end, we performed a comparative structural analysis of Gly(3) and Gly(10) in aqueous solution from all atom, microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the CHARMM 27 (C27), CHARMM 36 (C36), and Amber ff12SB force fields. For each force field, Gly(3) and Gly(10) were simulated for at least 300 ns and 1 μs, respectively. Simulating oligoglycines of two different lengths allows us to evaluate how force field effects depend on polypeptide length. Using a variety of structural metrics (e.g., end-to-end distance, radius of gyration, dihedral angle distributions), we characterize the distribution of oligoglycine conformers for each force field and show that each sample conformation space differently, yielding considerably different structural tendencies of the same oligoglycine model in solution. Notably, we find that C36 samples more extended oligoglycine structures than both C27 and ff12SB. PMID:25952623

  4. Dynamics of the structure of electric currents and electrodynamic forces in current sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A. G.; Satunin, S. N.

    2011-10-15

    Specific features of the spatial distributions of the electric current and electrodynamic forces in current sheets are examined by studying the magnetic fields in them. It is shown that the j Multiplication-Sign B forces should lead to a gradual increase in the kinetic energy of the plasma accelerated along the current sheet surface. Excitation of currents directed oppositely to the main current in the central part of the sheet is observed for the first time, and the time evolution of the forward and reverse currents is investigated. Generation of reversed currents is a manifestation of the dynamic effects caused by the motion of plasma flows in the magnetic field and leading to a change in the magnetic structure of the current sheet.

  5. Electric-field-mediated fabrication of nano/microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yong J.; Andrews, Mike K.; Arnold, W. M.; Marlow, Barry K.

    2003-04-01

    Notable recent developments toward the realization of electronic nanocomputers have assembled logic circuits from semiconductor nanowires and individual carbon nanotube molecules. In spite of the broadly based and encouraging recent progress, a set of technical challenges still must be overcome to make a robust, commercially viable computer integrated on the molecular scale. The assembly of colloidal particles under an electric field offers many opportunities for the fabrication of ordered arrays, nanostructured films and microwires. We describe a method for the fabrication of gold nano/microstructures such as wires and dendrites on a lithographically patterned aluminium electrode with electric-field-induced assembly. The simple fabrication process will make these structures suitable for the miniaturisation of electronic circuits that can find application in sensors, actuators, and lab-on-a-chip devices. Our approach to electric-field-mediated fabrication exposes colloidal gold particles to the high electric field that can be generated between electrodes only 200 mm apart. We introduce an electric field of 100 Hz to 10 MHz by application of an alternating voltage of 5 to 10 V to the lithographically patterned microelectrodes. A suspension of gold nanoparticles of diameter 2.5 nm is added. We observe three types of fabrication, represented by three zones due to the different dielectophoretic force and convection effects. Some fibres grow through the liquid from one electrode toward the other, as could be seen in-situ by inverse optical microscopy. Dielectrophoretic-force-mediated fabrication, which is very flexible depending on the magnitudes of electric-field strength and frequency applied, has produced a notable advance in making mechanically flexible nano/microelectronic devices and led to a new understanding of the factors controlling the growth of nano/microstructures. When drops of suspension are patterned on the faces of components, three-dimensional structures can be generated. This type of system indicates how functional, self-assembling nano/microelectronic systems may be made. It provides a faster way of making devices, and the process can be very economical.

  6. Nonequilibrium forces between neutral atoms mediated by a quantum field

    SciTech Connect

    Behunin, Ryan O.; Hu, Bei-Lok

    2010-08-15

    We study forces between two neutral atoms, modeled as three-dimensional harmonic oscillators, arising from mutual influences mediated by an electromagnetic field but not from their direct interactions. We allow as dynamical variables the center-of-mass motion of the atom, its internal degrees of freedom, and the quantum field treated relativistically. We adopt the method of nonequilibrium quantum field theory which can provide a first-principles, systematic, and unified description including the intrinsic and induced dipole fluctuations. The inclusion of self-consistent back-actions makes possible a fully dynamical description of these forces valid for general atom motion. In thermal equilibrium we recover the known forces--London, van der Waals, and Casimir-Polder--between neutral atoms in the long-time limit. We also reproduce a recently reported force between atoms when the system is out of thermal equilibrium at late times. More noteworthy is the discovery of the existence of a type of (or identification of the source of some known) interatomic force which we call the ''entanglement force,'' originating from the quantum correlations of the internal degrees of freedom of entangled atoms.

  7. Electric Field and Humidity Trigger Contact Electrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanzhen; Phtz, Thomas; Liu, Yonghong; Wang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Rui; Shen, Yang; Ji, Renjie; Cai, Baoping

    2015-01-01

    Here, we study the old problem of why identical insulators can charge one another on contact. We perform several experiments showing that, if driven by a preexisting electric field, charge is transferred between contacting insulators. This transfer happens because the insulator surfaces adsorb small amounts of water from a humid atmosphere. We believe the electric field then separates positively from negatively charged ions prevailing within the water, which we believe to be hydronium and hydroxide ions, such that at the point of contact, positive ions of one insulator neutralize negative ions of the other one, charging both of them. This mechanism can explain for the first time the observation made four decades ago that wind-blown sand discharges in sparks if and only if a thunderstorm is nearby.

  8. Polyoxymethylene: The Hessian biased force field for molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, S.; Goddard, W.A. III ); Smith, K.A. )

    1993-10-21

    A vibrationally accurate force field (MSXX) is developed for molecular dynamics simulations of polyoxymethylene polymers (-(-OCH[sub 2]-)-). This force field is developed using the biased Hessian with singular value decomposition method (BH/SVD) applied to dimethyl ether and dimethoxymethane. The resultant force field contains parameters that are needed for molecular dynamics simulations of polyoxymethylene. Charges are derived using the electrostatic potential derived point charge calculations. The full ab initio (HF/6-31g**) torsional potential energy surface is fit using a Fourier series expansion to accommodate the [open quotes]anomeric[close quotes] effect in dimethoxymethane. The forcefield was applied to studies of tri- and tetramethoxymethane and is being applied to studies of the polymers. 31 refs., 6 figs., 18 tabs.

  9. Interaction Forces Between Multiple Bodies in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joffe, Benjamin

    1996-01-01

    Some of the results from experiments to determine the interaction forces between multiple bodies in a magnetic field are presented in this paper. It is shown how the force values and the force directions depend on the configuration of the bodies, their relative positions to each other, and the vector of the primary magnetic field. A number of efficient new automatic loading and assembly machines, as well as manipulators and robots, have been created based on the relationship between bodies and magnetic fields. A few of these patented magnetic devices are presented. The concepts involved open a new way to design universal grippers for robot and other kinds of mechanisms for the manipulation of objects. Some of these concepts can be used for space applications.

  10. An implicit divalent counterion force field for RNA molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Henke, Paul S; Mak, Chi H

    2016-03-14

    How to properly account for polyvalent counterions in a molecular dynamics simulation of polyelectrolytes such as nucleic acids remains an open question. Not only do counterions such as Mg(2+) screen electrostatic interactions, they also produce attractive intrachain interactions that stabilize secondary and tertiary structures. Here, we show how a simple force field derived from a recently reported implicit counterion model can be integrated into a molecular dynamics simulation for RNAs to realistically reproduce key structural details of both single-stranded and base-paired RNA constructs. This divalent counterion model is computationally efficient. It works with existing atomistic force fields, or coarse-grained models may be tuned to work with it. We provide optimized parameters for a coarse-grained RNA model that takes advantage of this new counterion force field. Using the new model, we illustrate how the structural flexibility of RNA two-way junctions is modified under different salt conditions. PMID:26979708

  11. Additive CHARMM force field for naturally occurring modified ribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Xu, You; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Aleksandrov, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D; Nilsson, Lennart

    2016-04-15

    More than 100 naturally occurring modified nucleotides have been found in RNA molecules, in particular in tRNAs. We have determined molecular mechanics force field parameters compatible with the CHARMM36 all-atom additive force field for all these modifications using the CHARMM force field parametrization strategy. Emphasis was placed on fine tuning of the partial atomic charges and torsion angle parameters. Quantum mechanics calculations on model compounds provided the initial set of target data, and extensive molecular dynamics simulations of nucleotides and oligonucleotides in aqueous solutions were used for further refinement against experimental data. The presented parameters will allow for computational studies of a wide range of RNAs containing modified nucleotides, including the ribosome and transfer RNAs. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26841080

  12. Toroidal linear force-free magnetic fields with axial symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandas, M.; Romashets, E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Interplanetary magnetic flux ropes are often described as linear force-free fields. To account for their curvature, toroidal configurations must be used. The aim is to find an analytic description of a linear force-free magnetic field of the toroidal geometry in which the cross section of flux ropes can be controlled. Methods: The solution is found as a superposition of fields given by linear force-free cylinders tangential to a generating toroid. The cylindrical field is expressed in a series of terms that are not all cylindrically symmetric. Results: We found the general form of a toroidal linear force-free magnetic field. The field is azimuthally symmetric with respect to the torus axis. It depends on a set of coefficients that enables controlling the flux rope shape (cross section) to some extent. By varying the coefficients, flux ropes with circular and elliptic cross sections were constructed. Numerical comparison suggests that the simple analytic formula for calculating the helicity in toroidal flux ropes of the circular cross section can be used for flux ropes with elliptic cross sections if the minor radius in the formula is set to the geometric mean of the semi-axes of the elliptic cross section.

  13. Force-free field model of ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, K. H.

    2001-03-01

    Due to the nature that the force-free magnetic field, whose current carried by the conducting plasma is everywhere parallel to the magnetic field it generates, is the minimum energy configuration under the constraint of magnetic helicity conservation, ball lightning is considered as a self-organized phenomenon with a plasma fireball immersed in a spherical force-free magnetic field. Since this field does not exert force on the plasma, the plasma pressure, by itself, is in equilibrium with the surrounding environment, and the force-free magnetic field can take on any value without affecting the plasma. Due to this second feature, singular solutions of the magnetic field that are otherwise excluded are allowed, which enable a large amount of energy to be stored to sustain the ball lightning. The singularity is truncated only by the physical limit of current density that a plasma can carry. Scaling the customary soccer-size fireball to larger dimensions could account for day and night sightings of luminous objects in the sky.

  14. Numerical simulation of bubble dynamics in a micro-channel under a nonuniform electric field.

    PubMed

    Jing, Luo; Dan, Guo; Jianbin, Luo; Guoxin, Xie

    2011-02-01

    A numerical method is used to simulate the motion and coalescence of air bubbles in a micro-channel under a nonuniform electric field. The channel is equipped with arrays of electrodes embedded in its wall and voltages are applied on the electrodes to generate a specified electric field gradient in the longitudinal direction. In the study, the Navier-Stokes equations are solved by using the level set method handling the deformable/moving interfaces between the bubbles and the ambient liquid. Both the polarization Coulomb force and the dielectrophoresis force are considered as the force source of the Navier-Stokes equations by solving the Maxwell's equations. The flow field equations and the electric field equations are coupled and solved by using the finite element method. The electric field characteristics and the dynamic behavior of a bubble are analyzed by studying the distributions of the electric field and the force, the deformation and the moving velocity of the air bubble. The result suggests that the model of dispersed drops suspended in the immiscible dielectric liquid and driven by a nonuniform electric field is an effective method for the transportation and coalescence of micro-drops. PMID:21259283

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Tri-n-Butyl-Phophate Liquid: A Force Field Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Shengting; de Almeida, Valmor F; Hay, Benjamin; Ye, Xianggui; Khomami, Bamin

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted to compare the performance of four force fields in predicting thermophysical properties of tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP) in the liquid phase. The intramolecular force parameters used were from the Assisted Model Building with Energy Refinement (AMBER) force field model. The van der Waals parameters were based on either the AMBER or the Optimized Potential for Liquid Simulation (OPLS) force fields. The atomic partial charges were either assigned by performing quantum chemistry calculations or utilized previously published data, and were scaled to approximate the average experimental value of the electric dipole moment. Canonical ensemble computations based on the aforementioned parameters were performed near the atmospheric pressure and temperature to obtain the electric dipole moment, mass density, and self-diffusion coefficient. In addition, the microscopic structure of the liquid was characterized via pair correlation functions between selected atoms. It has been demonstrated that the electric dipole moment can be approximated within 1% of the average experimental value by virtue of scaled atomic partial charges. The liquid mass density can be predicted within 0.5-1% of its experimentally determined value when using the corresponding charge scaling. However, in all cases the predicted self- diffusion coefficient is significantly smaller than a commonly quoted experimental measurement; this result is qualified by the fact that the uncertainty of the experimental value was not available.

  16. Using impedance measurements for detecting pathogens trapped in an electric field

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.

    2004-07-20

    Impedance measurements between the electrodes in an electric field is utilized to detect the presence of pathogens trapped in the electric field. Since particles trapped in a field using the dielectiphoretic force changes the impedance between the electrodes by changing the dielectric material between the electrodes, the degree of particle trapping can be determined by measuring the impedance. This measurement is used to determine if sufficient pathogen have been collected to analyze further or potentially to identify the pathogen.

  17. A New Force-Matched Reactive Force Field for Bulk Water Under Extreme Thermodynamic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Laurence; Koziol, Lucas

    2015-06-01

    A many-body classical force field is presented for water under dissociative thermodynamic conditions. The force field is optimized by force-matching to ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations calculated with Density Functional Theory (DFT). The force field contains short-ranged central and many-body over-coordination terms, and long-range Ewald electrostatics. It is optimized and tested on water at density 1.5 g/mL and 2000 K, which is approximately 10% dissociated according to DFT. Molecular dynamics simulations closely reproduce DFT radial distribution functions, as well as the distribution of wat and dissociation products. The calculated atomic self-diffusion constants appear about 50% lower than in DFT, although precise comparison is impossible due to the short timescale accessible to AIMD (about 20 ps). The force field is also compared to ReaxFF using the CHO parameter set of Chenowith et al. ReaxFF structural and dynamical properties are in overall fair agreement with DFT, although ReaxFF water is not dissociative at these conditions. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Tunable control of antibody immobilization using electric field

    PubMed Central

    Emaminejad, Sam; Javanmard, Mehdi; Gupta, Chaitanya; Chang, Shuai; Davis, Ronald W.; Howe, Roger T.

    2015-01-01

    The controlled immobilization of proteins on solid-state surfaces can play an important role in enhancing the sensitivity of both affinity-based biosensors and probe-free sensing platforms. Typical methods of controlling the orientation of probe proteins on a sensor surface involve surface chemistry-based techniques. Here, we present a method of tunably controlling the immobilization of proteins on a solid-state surface using electric field. We study the ability to orient molecules by immobilizing IgG molecules in microchannels while applying lateral fields. We use atomic force microscopy to both qualitatively and quantitatively study the orientation of antibodies on glass surfaces. We apply this ability for controlled orientation to enhance the performance of affinity-based assays. As a proof of concept, we use fluorescence detection to indirectly verify the modulation of the orientation of proteins bound to the surface. We studied the interaction of fluorescently tagged anti-IgG with surface immobilized IgG controlled by electric field. Our study demonstrates that the use of electric field can result in more than 100% enhancement in signal-to-noise ratio compared with normal physical adsorption. PMID:25650429

  19. Electric field quench, equilibration, and universal behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri-Sharifi, S.; Ali-Akbari, M.; Sepangi, H. R.

    2015-06-01

    We study electric field quench in N =2 strongly coupled gauge theory, using the AdS/CFT correspondence. To do so, we consider the aforementioned system which is subjected to a time-dependent electric field indicating an out of equilibrium system. Defining the equilibration time teq , at which the system relaxes to its final equilibrium state after injecting the energy, we find that the rescaled equilibration time k-1teq decreases as the transition time k increases. Therefore, we expect that for sufficiently large transition time, k ??, the relaxation of the system to its final equilibrium can be an adiabatic process. On the other hand, we observe a universal behavior for the fast quenches, k ?1 , meaning that the rescaled equilibration time does not depend on the final value of the time-dependent electric field. Our calculations generalized to systems in various dimensions also confirm the universalization process which seems to be a typical feature of all strongly coupled gauge theories that admit a gravitational dual.

  20. An information theoretic approach to macromolecular modeling: II. Force fields.

    PubMed

    Aynechi, Tiba; Kuntz, Irwin D

    2005-11-01

    In this article, we explore the information content of molecular force-field calculations. We make use of exhaustive lattice models of molecular conformations and reduced alphabet sequences to determine the relative resolving power of pairwise interaction-based force fields. We find that sequence-specific interactions that operate over longer distances offer greater amounts of information than nearest-neighbor or non-sequence-specific interactions. In a companion article in this issue, we explored the information content of sequence alignment procedures and the calculation of gap penalties. Both articles have implications for protein and nucleic-acid computations. PMID:16254390

  1. Aircraft electric field measurements: Calibration and ambient field retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Bailey, Jeff; Christian, Hugh J.; Mach, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    An aircraft locally distorts the ambient thundercloud electric field. In order to determine the field in the absence of the aircraft, an aircraft calibration is required. In this work a matrix inversion method is introduced for calibrating an aircraft equipped with four or more electric field sensors and a high-voltage corona point that is capable of charging the aircraft. An analytic, closed form solution for the estimate of a (3 x 3) aircraft calibration matrix is derived, and an absolute calibration experiment is used to improve the relative magnitudes of the elements of this matrix. To demonstrate the calibration procedure, we analyze actual calibration date derived from a Lear jet 28/29 that was equipped with five shutter-type field mill sensors (each with sensitivities of better than 1 V/m) located on the top, bottom, port, starboard, and aft positions. As a test of the calibration method, we analyze computer-simulated calibration data (derived from known aircraft and ambient fields) and explicitly determine the errors involved in deriving the variety of calibration matrices. We extend our formalism to arrive at an analytic solution for the ambient field, and again carry all errors explicitly.

  2. Reversible shear thickening at low shear rates of electrorheological fluids under electric fields.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Zhang, Minliang; Jiang, Jile; Pesika, Noshir; Zeng, Hongbo; Israelachvili, Jacob; Meng, Yonggang; Wen, Shizhu

    2011-01-01

    By shearing electrorheological (ER) fluids between two concentric cylinders, we show a reversible shear thickening of ER fluids above a low critical shear rate (<1?s(-1)) and a high critical electric field strength (>100 V/mm), which can be characterized by a critical apparent viscosity. Shear thickening and electrostatic particle interaction-induced interparticle friction forces are considered to play an important role in the origin of lateral shear resistance of ER fluids, while the applied electric field controls the extent of shear thickening. The electric-field-controlled reversible shear thickening has implications for high-performance electrorheological-magnetorheological fluid design, clutch fluids with high friction forces triggered by applying a local electric field, other field-responsive materials, and intelligent systems. PMID:21405692

  3. Electric Eels Concentrate Their Electric Field to Induce Involuntary Fatigue in Struggling Prey.

    PubMed

    Catania, Kenneth C

    2015-11-16

    Nature is replete with predator venoms that immobilize prey by targeting ion channels. Electric eels (Electrophorus electricus) take a different tactic to accomplish the same end. Striking eels emit electricity in volleys of 1 ms, high-voltage pulses. Each pulse is capable of activating prey motor neuron efferents, and hence muscles. In a typical attack, eel discharges cause brief, immobilizing tetanus, allowing eels to swallow small prey almost immediately. Here I show that when eels struggle with large prey or fish held precariously, they commonly curl to bring their own tail to the opposite side of prey, sandwiching it between the two poles of their powerful electric organ. They then deliver volleys of high-voltage pulses. Shortly thereafter, eels juggle prey into a favorable position for swallowing. Recordings from electrodes placed within prey items show that this curling behavior at least doubles the field strength within shocked prey, most likely ensuring reliable activation of the majority of prey motor neurons. Simulated pulse trains, or pulses from an eel-triggered stimulator, applied to a prey muscle preparations result in profound muscle fatigue and loss of contractile force. Consistent with this result, video recordings show that formerly struggling prey are temporarily immobile after this form of attack, allowing the manipulation of prey that might otherwise escape. These results reveal a unique use of electric organs to a unique end; eels superimpose electric fields from two poles, ensuring maximal remote activation of prey efferents that blocks subsequent prey movement by inducing involuntary muscle fatigue. PMID:26521183

  4. Effects of electric charges on hydrophobic forces. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulone, D.; Martorana, V.; San Biagio, P. L.; Palma-Vittorelli, M. B.

    2000-11-01

    We study by molecular-dynamics simulations the effect of electric charges of either sign on hydrophobic interactions and on the dynamics of hydration water, using explicit water and very simplified solutes. Results show that the presence of a charged solute can disrupt the ``hydrophobic contact bond'' between two apolar solutes nearby, by forcing them towards a different configuration. As a consequence of different structural changes of the solvent caused by charges of opposite sign, the effect is markedly charge-sign-dependent. Analogous weaker effects appear to be induced by the presence of one additional apolar element. The dynamics of hydration water around each solute is also seen to be strongly influenced by the presence of other (charged or uncharged) nearby solutes. Comparison between our results on hydration water dynamics around charged solutes and available experimental data allows sorting out the effects of solute charge sign and size. Our results also offer a plain interpretation of the equivalence of the effects on water structure due to solute ions and to high pressures. These results reflect at a basic paradigmatic level the immensely more complex cases of well-known phenomena such as salting-in and salting-out, and of protein conformational changes caused, e.g., by the arrival of a charged or of an apolar group (phosphorilation or methylation). As it will be discussed, they help in the direction of Delbruck's desirable ``progress towards a radical physical explanation'' for this class of phenomena.

  5. Extremely low frequency electric fields and cancer: assessing the evidence.

    PubMed

    Kheifets, Leeka; Renew, David; Sias, Glenn; Swanson, John

    2010-02-01

    Much of the research and reviews on extremely low frequency (ELF) electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) have focused on magnetic rather than electric fields. Some have considered such focus to be inappropriate and have argued that electric fields should be part of both epidemiologic and laboratory work. This paper fills the gap by systematically and critically reviewing electric-fields literature and by comparing overall strength of evidence for electric versus magnetic fields. The review of possible mechanisms does not provide any specific basis for focusing on electric fields. While laboratory studies of electric fields are few, they do not indicate that electric fields should be the exposure of interest. The existing epidemiology on residential electric-field exposures and appliance use does not support the conclusion of adverse health effects from electric-field exposure. Workers in close proximity to high-voltage transmission lines or substation equipment can be exposed to high electric fields. While there are sporadic reports of increase in cancer in some occupational studies, these are inconsistent and fraught with methodologic problems. Overall, there seems little basis to suppose there might be a risk for electric fields, and, in contrast to magnetic fields, and with a possible exception of occupational epidemiology, there seems little basis for continued research into electric fields. PMID:19650076

  6. Mitigated-force carriage for high magnetic field environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Murphy, Bart L

    2014-05-20

    A carriage for high magnetic field environments includes a first work-piece holding means for holding a first work-piece, the first work-piece holding means being disposed in an operable relationship with a work-piece processing magnet having a magnetic field strength of at least 1 Tesla. The first work-piece holding means is further disposed in operable connection with a second work-piece holding means for holding a second work-piece so that, as the first work-piece is inserted into the magnetic field, the second work-piece is simultaneously withdrawn from the magnetic field, so that an attractive magnetic force imparted on the first work-piece offsets a resistive magnetic force imparted on the second work-piece.

  7. Manipulation of nano-entities in suspension by electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Donglei

    Nanoscale entities, including nanospheres, nanodisks, nanorings, nanowires and nanotubes are potential building blocks for nanoscale devices. Among them, nanowires is an important type of nanoparticles, due to the potential application in microelectronics and bio-diagnosis. Manipulation of nanowires in suspension has been a formidable problem. As described in this thesis, using AC electric fields applied to strategically designed microelectrodes, nanowires in suspension can be driven to align, to chain, to accelerate in directions parallel and perpendicular to its orientation, to concentrate onto designated places, and to disperse in a controlled manner with high efficiency despite an extremely low Reynolds number at the level of 10-5. Randomly oriented nanowires in suspension can be rapidly assembled into extended nonlinear structures within seconds. We show that both the electric field and its gradient play the essential roles of aligning and transporting the nanowires into scaffolds according to the electric field distributions inherent to the geometry of the microelectrodes. The assembling efficiency depends strongly on the frequency of the applied AC voltages and varies as square of the voltage. Furthermore, nanowires have been rotated by AC electric fields applied to strategically designed electrodes. The rotation of the nanowires can be instantly switched on or off with precisely controlled rotation speed (to at least 25000 rpm), definite chirality, and total angle of rotation. This new method has been used to controllably rotate magnetic and non-magnetic nanowires as well as multi-wall carbon nanotubes. We have also produced a micromotor using a rotating nanowire that can drive particles into circular motion. This has application to microfluidic devices, micro-stirrers, and micro electromechanical systems (MEMS). To move and place nanowires onto designated locations with high precision, electrophoretic force has been combined with dielectrophoretic force to transport charged Au nanowires with length longer than 4 mum. The surface of Au nanowires has been chemical functionalized by either positive or negative charges. High frequency AC electric field has been applied to align and fix the orientation of the charged nanowires, though not to induce any motions, whereas a small DC voltage causes linear motion. The velocity of nanowires increases linearly with the DC electric field. The moving direction can be either parallel or perpendicular to the orientation of nanowires. Nanowires modified with different charges behave differently due to the electroosmosis flow induced by the DC electric field on the negatively charged quartz substrate. The zeta potential of quartz surface and the ratio of Stokes coefficients for longitudinal nano-entities suspended in a low Reynolds number regime (< 10-5) has been determined. Due to the small size of the nanowires, the nanowires suspended in liquids such as DI water are in extremely low Reynolds number regime (< 10-5). Manipulation due to DEP and EP forces are versatile and precise. Nanowires have been set into motion with prescribed tracks, such as squares and zigzags. The manipulation is also so precise that oppositely charged nanowires with radius of 150 nm have been moved to contact and connected end to end. A nanowire clipper have been assembled by this technique and set into oscillation. This method is not only applicable to nanowires, it has been successfully applied to multiwall carbon nanotubes as well. To demonstrate the complete control and flexibility of manipulating nanoparticles by E field, we have programmed nanowires to dance with music by Mozart with regard to clearly demonstrating the versatility of manipulating small entities of metallic, semiconductor, and biological materials. This work has been conducted under the guidance of the author's thesis advisors, Prof. Robert C. Cammarata, chair of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering of the Johns Hopkins University, and Prof. Chia-Ling Chien in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the director of Materials Research Science and Engineering Center of the Johns Hopkins University.

  8. Frequency-dependent local field factors in dielectric liquids by a polarizable force field and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davari, Nazanin; Haghdani, Shokouh; strand, Per-Olof

    2015-12-01

    A force field model for calculating local field factors, i.e. the linear response of the local electric field for example at a nucleus in a molecule with respect to an applied electric field, is discussed. It is based on a combined charge-transfer and point-dipole interaction model for the polarizability, and thereby it includes two physically distinct terms for describing electronic polarization: changes in atomic charges arising from transfer of charge between the atoms and atomic induced dipole moments. A time dependence is included both for the atomic charges and the atomic dipole moments and if they are assumed to oscillate with the same frequency as the applied electric field, a model for frequency-dependent properties are obtained. Furthermore, if a life-time of excited states are included, a model for the complex frequency-dependent polariability is obtained including also information about excited states and the absorption spectrum. We thus present a model for the frequency-dependent local field factors through the first molecular excitation energy. It is combined with molecular dynamics simulations of liquids where a large set of configurations are sampled and for which local field factors are calculated. We are normally not interested in the average of the local field factor but rather in configurations where it is as high as possible. In electrical insulation, we would like to avoid high local field factors to reduce the risk for electrical breakdown, whereas for example in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, high local field factors are desired to give dramatically increased intensities.

  9. Einstein's osmotic equilibrium of colloidal suspensions in conservative force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jinxin; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Predicted by Einstein in his 1905 paper on Brownian motion, colloidal particles in suspension reach osmotic equilibrium under gravity. The idea was demonstrated by J.B. Perrin to win Nobel Prize in Physics in 1926. We show Einstein's equation for osmotic equilibrium can be applied to colloids in a conservative force field generated by optical gradient forces. We measure the osmotic equation of state of 100nm Polystyrene latex particles in the presence of KCl salt and PEG polymer. We also obtain the osmotic compressibility, which is important for determining colloidal stability and the internal chemical potential, which is useful for predicting the phase transition of colloidal systems. This generalization allows for the use of any conservative force fields for systems ranging from colloidal systems to macromolecular solutions.

  10. Electron distribution functions in electric field environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, Terence H.

    1991-01-01

    The amount of current carried by an electric discharge in its early stages of growth is strongly dependent on its geometrical shape. Discharges with a large number of branches, each funnelling current to a common stem, tend to carry more current than those with fewer branches. The fractal character of typical discharges was simulated using stochastic models based on solutions of the Laplace equation. Extension of these models requires the use of electron distribution functions to describe the behavior of electrons in the undisturbed medium ahead of the discharge. These electrons, interacting with the electric field, determine the propagation of branches in the discharge and the way in which further branching occurs. The first phase in the extension of the referenced models , the calculation of simple electron distribution functions in an air/electric field medium, is discussed. Two techniques are investigated: (1) the solution of the Boltzmann equation in homogeneous, steady state environments, and (2) the use of Monte Carlo simulations. Distribution functions calculated from both techniques are illustrated. Advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed.

  11. Analytic expressions for electrical energy and electrical force of two spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo-Tau; Hsu, Jyh-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the electrical force and the electrical energy of two spheres immersed in a symmetric electrolyte solution are derived under conditions of constant surface potential and constant surface charge. Previous analysis under Debye-Huckel condition (linear case) is extended to the corresponding nonlinear case; because the level of the surface potential is arbitrary the results obtained have much wider applications. In general, the performance of the analytical formulas derived is satisfactory, and better than that of the available results in literature. For the case of constant surface potential, the analytic formulas obtained are most accurate for large particles, and for the case of constant surface charge, they are most accurate for small particles.

  12. Spontaneous electric fields in solid carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Lasne, Jrme; Rosu-Finsen, Alexander; Cassidy, Andrew; McCoustra, Martin R S; Field, David

    2015-11-28

    Reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) is shown to provide a means of observing the spontelectric phase of matter, the defining characteristic of which is the occurrence of a spontaneous and powerful static electric field within a film of material. The presence of such a field is demonstrated here through the study of longitudinal-transverse optical splitting in RAIR spectra in films of carbon monoxide, based upon the deposition temperature dependence of this splitting. Analysis of spectral data, in terms of the vibrational Stark effect, allows the measurement of the polarization of spontelectric films, showing for example that solid carbon monoxide at 20 K may maintain a spontelectric field of 3.78 10(7) V m(-1), representing a polarization of 3.34 10(-4) cm(-2). We comment on the astrophysical implications of polarized carbon monoxide ices, on the surface of cosmic grains in star-forming regions. PMID:26419192

  13. Comparison of different force fields for the study of disaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eighteen empirical force fields and the semi-empirical quantum method PM3CARB-1 were compared for studying ß-cellobiose, a-maltose, and a-galabiose [a-D-Galp-(1'4)-a-D-Galp]. For each disaccharide, the energies of 54 conformers with differing hydroxymethyl, hydroxyl and glycosidic linkage orientatio...

  14. Frequency-dependent force fields for QMMM calculations.

    PubMed

    Harczuk, Ignat; Vahtras, Olav; Ågren, Hans

    2015-03-28

    We outline the construction of frequency-dependent polarizable force fields. The force fields are derived from analytic response theory for different frequencies using a generalization of the LoProp algorithm giving a decomposition of a molecular dynamical polarizability to localized atomic dynamical polarizabilities. These force fields can enter in a variety of applications - we focus on two such applications in this work: firstly, they can be incorporated in a physical, straightforward, way for current existing methods that use polarizable embeddings, and we can show, for the first time, the effect of the frequency dispersion within the classical environment of a quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QMMM) method. Our methodology is here evaluated for some test cases comprising water clusters and organic residues. Secondly, together with a modified Silberstein-Applequist procedure for interacting inducible point-dipoles, these frequency-dependent polarizable force fields can be used for a classical determination of frequency-dependent cluster polarizabilities. We evaluate this methodology by comparing with the corresponding results obtained from quantum mechanics or QMMM where the absolute mean [small alpha, Greek, macron] is determined with respect to the size of the QM and MM parts of the total system. PMID:25714984

  15. On Woltjer's variational principle for force-free fields

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, P. University of Milano, Dipartamento di Matematica, Via Saldini 50, Milano, Italy 20133 ); Avellaneda, M. )

    1991-05-01

    The existence of minimizers for Woltjer's variational principle is established and that the minimizers are force-free fields. This method has the nature of a constructive implicit function theorem and handles successfully the nonconvex constraint of constant total helicity. Domains of arbitrary connectivity are allowed as well as nonhomogeneous boundary conditions and periods.

  16. Force-Field Analysis: A Functional Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Stanley G.

    1977-01-01

    Force field analysis combines the advantages of the basic organization, objectivity, and science of systems theory and systems methods, with a simplicity and clarity that allows its mastery by policy-makers and administrators who are not specialists in engineering, data processing, or programming. (Author/IRT)

  17. On the electric and magnetic field generation in expanding plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielen, Herman Johannes Gertrudis

    A general method that decomposes each of the forces terms in Ohm's law in a component that induces a charge separation in the plasma and a component that can drive current is given. This decomposition is unambiguous and depends on the boundary conditions for the electric potential. It is shown that in calculating the electromagnetic field quantities in a plasma that is located in the vicinity of a boundary that imposes constraints on the electric potential. Ohm's law should be analyzed instead of the so-called induction equation. Experiments on a magnetized argon plasma expanding from a cascaded arc are described. Spectrometric techniques were used to determine the electron density, ion temperature, and the rotation velocity profiles of the ion gas. Using the Zeeman effect, the magnetic field generated by the plasma was measured. Depending on the channel diameter of the nozzle of the cascaded arc, self-generated magnetic fields with axial components of the order of 1 percent of the externally applied magnetic field are observed. From the measured ion rotation it is concluded that this self-generated magnetic field is mainly generated by azimuthal electron currents. The corresponding azimuthal current density is of the order of 15 percent of the axial current density. The observed ion rotation is a consequence of the electron-ion friction.

  18. Electrical Grounding - a Field for Geophysicists and Electrical Engineers Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, P. F.; Pane, E.; Guaraldo, N.

    2012-12-01

    Technology for designing ground electrodes for high-voltage direct current transmission systems (HVDC) has being using in the last years, deep soil models based on a wide range of geophysical methods. These models shall include detailed representation of shallow soil, down to 100 meters, in order to allow the evaluation of the soil conditions where the ground electrodes will be buried. Also deep soil models are needed, to be used for the interference studies, which shall represent a soil volume of about 15 km deep and a surface area of about 15 to 30 km radius. Large facilities for power plants (hydroelectric and wind farms, for example) and industrial complexes (such as petrochemical plants) has become usual at the current stage of Brazil industrialization. Grounding mats for these facilities are made of a buried cooper mesh, interconnected to a wide variety of metallic masses, such as steel reinforced concrete foundations, ducts in general etc. These grounding systems may present dimensions with the order of hundreds of meters, and, at least in Brazil, are usually calculated by using electrical resistivity soil models, based on short spacing Wenner measurements (with maximum spacing of about 64 m.). The soil model shall be the best possible representation of the environment in which the grounding electrodes are immersed, for the purpose of calculation of resistance or for digital simulation. The model to be obtained is limited by the amount and quality of soil resistivity measurements are available, and the resources to be used in the calculations and simulations. Geophysics uses a wide range of technologies for exploring subsoil, ranging from surface measurements to wells logging - seismic, gravimetric, magnetic, electrical, electromagnetic and radiometric. The electrical and electromagnetic methods includes various measurement techniques (Wenner, Schlumberger, TDEM, Magneto-telluric etc.), which together allow the development of complex resistivity soil models, layered stratified or showing lateral variations, ranging down to several tens of kilometers deep, reaching the crust-mantle interface (typically with the order of 30-40 km). This work aims to analyze the constraints of the current soil models being used for grounding electrodes design, and suggests the need of a soil modeling methodology compatible with large grounding systems. Concerning the aspects related to soil modeling, electrical engineers need to get aware of geophysics resources, such as: - geophysical techniques for soil electrical resistivity prospection (down to about 15 kilometers deep); and - techniques for converting field measured data, from many different geophysical techniques, into adequate soil models for grounding grid simulation. It is also important to equalize the basic knowledge for the professionals that are working together for the specific purpose of soil modeling for electrical grounding studies. The authors have experienced the situation of electrical engineers working with geophysicists, but it was not clear for the latter the effective need of the electrical engineers, and for the engineers it was unknown the available geophysical resources, and also, what to do convert the large amount of soil resistivity data into a reliable soil model.

  19. Electron transport in argon in crossed electric and magnetic fields

    PubMed

    Ness; Makabe

    2000-09-01

    An investigation of electron transport in argon in the presence of crossed electric and magnetic fields is carried out over a wide range of values of electric and magnetic field strengths. Values of mean energy, ionization rate, drift velocity, and diffusion tensor are reported here. Two unexpected phenomena arise; for certain values of electric and magnetic field we find regions where the swarm mean energy decreases with increasing electric fields for a fixed magnetic field and regions where swarm mean energy increases with increasing magnetic field for a fixed electric field. PMID:11088933

  20. The effect of dissipation on the torque and force experienced by nanoparticles in an AC field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claro, F.; Fuchs, R.; Robles, P.; Rojas, R.

    2015-09-01

    We discuss the force and torque acting on spherical particles in an ensemble in the presence of a uniform AC electric field. We show that for a torque causing particle rotation to appear the particle must be absorptive. Our proof includes all electromagnetic excitations, which in the case of two or more particles gives rise to one or more resonances in the spectrum of force and torque depending on interparticle distance. Several peaks are found in the force and torque between two spheres at small interparticle distances, which coalesce to just one as the separation grows beyond three particle radii. We also show that in the presence of dissipation the force on each particle is nonconservative and may not be derived from the classical interaction potential energy as has been done in the past.

  1. GLYCAM06: A Generalizable Biomolecular Force Field. Carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    KIRSCHNER, KARL N.; YONGYE, AUSTIN B.; TSCHAMPEL, SARAH M.; GONZLEZ-OUTEIRIO, JORGE; DANIELS, CHARLISA R.; FOLEY, B. LACHELE; WOODS, ROBERT J.

    2015-01-01

    A new derivation of the GLYCAM06 force field, which removes its previous specificity for carbohydrates, and its dependency on the AMBER force field and parameters, is presented. All pertinent force field terms have been explicitly specified and so no default or generic parameters are employed. The new GLYCAM is no longer limited to any particular class of biomolecules, but is extendible to all molecular classes in the spirit of a small-molecule force field. The torsion terms in the present work were all derived from quantum mechanical data from a collection of minimal molecular fragments and related small molecules. For carbohydrates, there is now a single parameter set applicable to both ?- and ?-anomers and to all monosaccharide ring sizes and conformations. We demonstrate that deriving dihedral parameters by fitting to QM data for internal rotational energy curves for representative small molecules generally leads to correct rotamer populations in molecular dynamics simulations, and that this approach removes the need for phase corrections in the dihedral terms. However, we note that there are cases where this approach is inadequate. Reported here are the basic components of the new force field as well as an illustration of its extension to carbohydrates. In addition to reproducing the gas-phase properties of an array of small test molecules, condensed-phase simulations employing GLYCAM06 are shown to reproduce rotamer populations for key small molecules and representative biopolymer building blocks in explicit water, as well as crystalline lattice properties, such as unit cell dimensions, and vibrational frequencies. PMID:17849372

  2. Radial-Electric-Field Piezoelectric Diaphragm Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G.; Working, Dennis C.; Mossi, Karla; Castro, Nicholas D.; Mane, Pooma

    2009-01-01

    In a recently invented class of piezoelectric diaphragm pumps, the electrode patterns on the piezoelectric diaphragms are configured so that the electric fields in the diaphragms have symmetrical radial (along-the-surface) components in addition to through-the-thickness components. Previously, it was accepted in the piezoelectric-transducer art that in order to produce the out-of-plane bending displacement of a diaphragm needed for pumping, one must make the electric field asymmetrical through the thickness, typically by means of electrodes placed on only one side of the piezoelectric material. In the present invention, electrodes are placed on both sides and patterned so as to produce substantial radial as well as through-the-thickness components. Moreover, unlike in the prior art, the electric field can be symmetrical through the thickness. Tests have shown in a given diaphragm that an electrode configuration according to this invention produces more displacement than does a conventional one-sided electrode pattern. The invention admits of numerous variations characterized by various degrees of complexity. Figure 1 is a simplified depiction of a basic version. As in other piezoelectric diaphragm pumps of similar basic design, the prime mover is a piezoelectric diaphragm. Application of a suitable voltage to the electrodes on the diaphragm causes it to undergo out-of-plane bending. The bending displacement pushes a fluid out of, or pulls the fluid into, a chamber bounded partly by the diaphragm. Also as in other diaphragm pumps in general, check valves ensure that the fluid flows only in through one port and only out through another port.

  3. Electric field-free gas breakdown in explosively driven generators

    SciTech Connect

    Shkuratov, Sergey I.; Baird, Jason; Talantsev, Evgueni F.; Altgilbers, Larry L.

    2010-07-15

    All known types of gas discharges require an electric field to initiate them. We are reporting on a unique type of gas breakdown in explosively driven generators that does not require an electric field.

  4. Force field evolution during human blood platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Schwarz Henriques, Sarah; Sandmann, Rabea; Strate, Alexander; Kster, Sarah

    2012-08-15

    Contraction at the cellular level is vital for living organisms. The most prominent type of contractile cells are heart muscle cells, a less-well-known example is blood platelets. Blood platelets activate and interlink at injured blood vessel sites, finally contracting to form a compact blood clot. They are ideal model cells to study the mechanisms of cellular contraction, as they are simple, having no nucleus, and their activation can be triggered and synchronized by the addition of thrombin. We have studied contraction using human blood platelets, employing traction force microscopy, a single-cell technique that enables time-resolved measurements of cellular forces on soft substrates with elasticities in the physiological range (?4 kPa). We found that platelet contraction reaches a steady state after 25 min with total forces of ?34 nN. These forces are considerably larger than what was previously reported for platelets in aggregates, demonstrating the importance of a single-cell approach for studies of platelet contraction. Compared with other contractile cells, we find that platelets are unique, because force fields are nearly isotropic, with forces pointing toward the center of the cell area. PMID:22582082

  5. Dynamics of drop formation in an electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Notz, P.K.; Basaran, O.A.

    1999-05-01

    The effect of an electric field on the formation of a drop of an inviscid, perfectly conducting liquid from a capillary which protrudes from the top plate of a parallel-plate capacitor into a surrounding dynamically inactive, insulating gas is studied computationally. This free boundary problem which is comprised of the surface Bernoulli equation for the transient drop shape and the Laplace equation for the velocity potential inside the drop and the electrostatic potential outside the drop is solved by a method of lines incorporating the finite element method for spatial discretization. The finite element algorithm employed relies on judicious use of remeshing and element addition to a two-region adaptive mesh to accommodate large domain deformations, and allows the computations to proceed until the thickness of the neck connecting an about to form drop to the rest of the liquid in the capillary is less than 0.1% of the capillary radius. The accuracy of the computations is demonstrated by showing that in the absence of an electric field predictions made with the new algorithm are in excellent agreement with boundary integral calculations and experimental measurements on water drops. Computational predictions of the primary drop volume and drop length at breakup are reported over a wide range of values of the ratios of electrical gravitational, and inertial forces to surface tension force. When the magnitude of the step change in field strength is small, the results of the new transient calculations accord well with those of an earlier stability analysis and thereby provide yet another testament to the accuracy of the new algorithm.

  6. A novel dehumidification technique using electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Arif-uz-Zaman, M.; Khan, M.R.; Islam, A.K.M.S.; Khan, M.F.

    1996-01-01

    A completely new concept of dehumidification is presented. The polar nature of the electronic bond structure between oxygen and hydrogen atoms in a water molecule is utilized to attract them using an electric field. It is possible to single out and remove the water molecules from the air inside a room to make the room dehumidified. A theoretical formulation is developed and a simple experiment was performed to validate the theory. Unlike the conventional dehumidification process, this process does not involve any condensation of the moisture and hence requires a very small amount of power. The technique can also be very useful for air-conditioning as well.

  7. Perturbative renormalization of the electric field correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, C.; Laine, M.

    2016-04-01

    The momentum diffusion coefficient of a heavy quark in a hot QCD plasma can be extracted as a transport coefficient related to the correlator of two colour-electric fields dressing a Polyakov loop. We determine the perturbative renormalization factor for a particular lattice discretization of this correlator within Wilson's SU(3) gauge theory, finding a ∼ 12% NLO correction for values of the bare coupling used in the current generation of simulations. The impact of this result on existing lattice determinations is commented upon, and a possibility for non-perturbative renormalization through the gradient flow is pointed out.

  8. Permeability of Soft Particles at Electrical Fields.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Martin, B; Maldonado-Valdivia, A; de Las Nieves, F J; Fernndez-Barbero, A

    2015-05-01

    The influence of the charge on the permeability of microgel particles is studied in the presence of electric fields. Electrophoresis experiments performed on pH-ionizable pNIPAM-AA microgels show that particles behave as permeable spheres when the network is ionized. However, they keep non-permeable in the absence of charge. The ionic nature of the network thus controls the permeability of the soft particles. A salt-dependent local viscosity explains these permeability changes. This is confirmed by NMR as alternative independent technique. Strongly hydrated counterions located around fixed charges on the network are considered responsible for the local viscosity variations. PMID:26504980

  9. Impact of electric fields on honey bees

    SciTech Connect

    Bindokas, V.P.

    1985-01-01

    Biological effects in honey bee colonies under a 765-kV, 60-Hz transmission line (electric (E) field = 7 kV/m) were confirmed using controlled dosimetry and treatment reversal to replicate findings within the same season. Hives in the same environment but shielded from E field are normal, suggesting effects are caused by interaction of E field with the hive. Bees flying through the ambient E field are not demonstrably affected. Different thresholds and severity of effects were found in colonies exposed to 7, 5.5, 4.1, 1.8, and 0.65 to 0.85 kV/m at incremental distances from the line. Most colonies exposed at 7 kV/m failed in 8 weeks and failed to overwinter at greater than or equal to4.1 kV/m. Data suggest the limit of a biological effects corridor lies between 15 and 27 m (4.1 and 1.8 kV/m) beyond the outer phase of the transmission line. Mechanisms to explain colony disturbance fall into two categories, direct perception of enhanced in-hive E fields, and perception of shock from induced currents. The same effects induced in colonies with total-hive E-field exposure can be reproduced with shock or E-field exposure of worker bees in extended hive entranceways (= porches). Full-scale experiments demonstrate bee exposure to E fields including 100 kV/m under moisture-free conditions within a non-conductive porch causes no detectable effect on colony behavior. Exposure of bees on a conductive (e.g. wet) substrate produces been disturbance, increased mortality, abnormal propolization, and possible impairment of colony growth. Thresholds for effects caused by step-potential-induced currents are: 275-350 nA - disturbance of single bees; 600 nA - onset of abnormal propolization; and 900 nA - sting.

  10. 49 CFR 236.10 - Electric locks, force drop type; where required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electric locks, force drop type; where required... INSTALLATION, INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems General 236.10 Electric locks, force drop type; where...

  11. 49 CFR 236.10 - Electric locks, force drop type; where required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electric locks, force drop type; where required... INSTALLATION, INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems General 236.10 Electric locks, force drop type; where...

  12. 49 CFR 236.10 - Electric locks, force drop type; where required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electric locks, force drop type; where required... INSTALLATION, INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems General 236.10 Electric locks, force drop type; where...

  13. 49 CFR 236.10 - Electric locks, force drop type; where required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electric locks, force drop type; where required... INSTALLATION, INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Rules and Instructions: All Systems General 236.10 Electric locks, force drop type; where...

  14. Brownian dipole rotator in alternating electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenbaum, V. M.; Vovchenko, O. Ye.; Korochkova, T. Ye.

    2008-06-01

    The study addresses the azimuthal jumping motion of an adsorbed polar molecule in a periodic n -well potential under the action of an external alternating electric field. Starting from the perturbation theory of the Pauli equation with respect to the weak field intensity, explicit analytical expressions have been derived for the time dependence of the average dipole moment as well as the frequency dependences of polarizability and the average angular velocity, the three quantities exhibiting conspicuous stochastic resonance. As shown, unidirectional rotation can arise only provided simultaneous modulation of the minima and maxima of the potential by an external alternating field. For a symmetric potential of hindered rotation, the average angular velocity, if calculated by the second-order perturbation theory with respect to the field intensity, has a nonzero value only at n=2 , i.e., when two azimuthal wells specify a selected axis in the system. Particular consideration is given to the effect caused by the asymmetry of the two-well potential on the dielectric loss spectrum and other Brownian motion parameters. When the asymmetric potential in a system of dipole rotators arises from the average local fields induced by an orientational phase transition, the characteristics concerned show certain peculiarities which enable detection of the phase transition and determination of its parameters.

  15. Brownian dipole rotator in alternating electric field.

    PubMed

    Rozenbaum, V M; Vovchenko, O Ye; Korochkova, T Ye

    2008-06-01

    The study addresses the azimuthal jumping motion of an adsorbed polar molecule in a periodic n -well potential under the action of an external alternating electric field. Starting from the perturbation theory of the Pauli equation with respect to the weak field intensity, explicit analytical expressions have been derived for the time dependence of the average dipole moment as well as the frequency dependences of polarizability and the average angular velocity, the three quantities exhibiting conspicuous stochastic resonance. As shown, unidirectional rotation can arise only provided simultaneous modulation of the minima and maxima of the potential by an external alternating field. For a symmetric potential of hindered rotation, the average angular velocity, if calculated by the second-order perturbation theory with respect to the field intensity, has a nonzero value only at n=2 , i.e., when two azimuthal wells specify a selected axis in the system. Particular consideration is given to the effect caused by the asymmetry of the two-well potential on the dielectric loss spectrum and other Brownian motion parameters. When the asymmetric potential in a system of dipole rotators arises from the average local fields induced by an orientational phase transition, the characteristics concerned show certain peculiarities which enable detection of the phase transition and determination of its parameters. PMID:18643221

  16. Electric field induced Lyman-? emission of a hydrogen beam for electric field measurements.

    PubMed

    Chrigier-Kovacic, L; Strm, P; Lejeune, A; Doveil, F

    2015-06-01

    Electric field induced Lyman-? emission is a new way of measuring weak electric fields in vacuum and in a plasma. It is based on the emission of Lyman-? radiation (121.6 nm) by a low-energy metastable H atom beam due to Stark-quenching of the 2s level induced by the field. In this paper, we describe the technique in detail. Test measurements have been performed in vacuum between two plates polarized at a controlled voltage. The intensity of emitted radiation, proportional to the square of the field modulus, has been recorded by a lock-in technique, which gives an excellent signal to noise ratio. These measurements provide an in situ calibration that can be used to obtain the absolute value of the electric field. A diagnostic of this type can help to address a long standing challenge in plasma physics, namely, the problem of measuring electric fields without disturbing the equilibrium of the system that is being studied. PMID:26133836

  17. Electric field induced Lyman-? emission of a hydrogen beam for electric field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrigier-Kovacic, L.; Strm, P.; Lejeune, A.; Doveil, F.

    2015-06-01

    Electric field induced Lyman-? emission is a new way of measuring weak electric fields in vacuum and in a plasma. It is based on the emission of Lyman-? radiation (121.6 nm) by a low-energy metastable H atom beam due to Stark-quenching of the 2s level induced by the field. In this paper, we describe the technique in detail. Test measurements have been performed in vacuum between two plates polarized at a controlled voltage. The intensity of emitted radiation, proportional to the square of the field modulus, has been recorded by a lock-in technique, which gives an excellent signal to noise ratio. These measurements provide an in situ calibration that can be used to obtain the absolute value of the electric field. A diagnostic of this type can help to address a long standing challenge in plasma physics, namely, the problem of measuring electric fields without disturbing the equilibrium of the system that is being studied.

  18. Atomistic force field for alumina fit to density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sarsam, Joanne; Thomas Young Centre, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ ; Finnis, Michael W.; Tangney, Paul; Thomas Young Centre, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ; Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ

    2013-11-28

    We present a force field for bulk alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), which has been parametrized by fitting the energies, forces, and stresses of a large database of reference configurations to those calculated with density functional theory (DFT). We use a functional form that is simpler and computationally more efficient than some existing models of alumina parametrized by a similar technique. Nevertheless, we demonstrate an accuracy of our potential that is comparable to those existing models and to DFT. We present calculations of crystal structures and energies, elastic constants, phonon spectra, thermal expansion, and point defect formation energies.

  19. Vectorial electric field measurement using isotropic electro-optic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gaborit, G.; Coutaz, J.-L.; Duvillaret, L.

    2007-06-11

    The authors present a two-component electric field measurement using a single electro-optic crystal and a single laser probe beam. This vectorial electric field measurement based on polarization state modulation is possible using isotropic electro-optic crystals for which directions of the eigendielectric axes are directly linked to the direction of the applied electric field. The proposed method can be used either for continuous wave or single shot measurements as the two electric field components are measured simultaneously.

  20. Phosphate vibrations probe local electric fields and hydration in biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Levinson, Nicholas M; Bolte, Erin E; Miller, Carrie S; Corcelli, Steven A; Boxer, Steven G

    2011-08-31

    The role of electric fields in important biological processes such as binding and catalysis has been studied almost exclusively by computational methods. Experimental measurements of the local electric field in macromolecules are possible using suitably calibrated vibrational probes. Here we demonstrate that the vibrational transitions of phosphate groups are highly sensitive to an electric field and show how that sensitivity can be quantified, allowing electric field measurements to be made in phosphate-containing biological systems without chemical modification. PMID:21809829

  1. Phosphate vibrations probe local electric fields and hydration in biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Nicholas M.; Bolte, Erin E.; Miller, Carrie S.

    2011-01-01

    The role of electric fields in important biological processes like binding and catalysis has been studied almost exclusively by computational methods. Experimental measurements of the local electric field in macromolecules are possible using suitably calibrated vibrational probes. Here we demonstrate that the vibrational transitions of phosphate groups are highly sensitive to an electric field and quantify that sensitivity, allowing local electric field measurements to be made in phosphate-containing biological systems without chemical modification. PMID:21809829

  2. The effect of electromotive-force generation on electrical properties of thin samarium sulfide films

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminskii, V. V. Kazanin, M. M.; Solov'ev, S. M.; Sharenkova, N. V.; Volodin, N. M.

    2006-06-15

    Electrical properties of thin SmS polycrystalline films with various values of the lattice constant at T = 300-580 K are studied. Specific features of the temperature dependences of electrical conductivity at T > 450 K are revealed. The effect of generation of the electromotive force with magnitude as large as 1.3 V at T = 440-470 K is observed when the films were subjected to the pressure of a spherical indenter. It is shown that it is possible to transform SmS films into a high-resistivity state (with the difference in the resistivity by three orders of magnitude) by applying an electric field with the strength higher than 100 V/cm. All the results obtained are accounted for using a model of the phenomenon of the electromotive-force generation in SmS under uniform heating of the sample and can also be attributed to the variable valence of samarium ions with respect to the lattice defects.

  3. Design and development of scanning eddy current force microscopy for characterization of electrical, magnetic and ferroelectric properties with nanometer resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalladega, Vijayaraghava

    This dissertation describes the design and development of a new high-resolution electrical conductivity imaging technique combining the basic principles of eddy currents and atomic force microscopy (AFM). An electromagnetic coil is used to generate eddy currents in an electrically conducting material. The eddy currents induced in the sample are detected and measured with a magnetic tip attached to the AFM cantilever. The interaction of eddy currents with the magnetic tip-cantilever is theoretically modeled. The model is then used to estimate the eddy current forces generated in a typical metallic material placed in induced current field. The magnitude of the eddy current force is directly proportional to the electrical conductivity of the sample. The theoretical eddy current forces are used to design a magnetic tip-cantilever system with appropriate magnetic field and spring constant to facilitate the development of a high-resolution, high sensitivity electrical conductivity imaging technique. The technique is used to experimentally measure eddy current forces in metals of different conductivities and compared with theoretical and finite element models. The experimental results show that the technique is capable of measuring pN range eddy current forces. The experimental eddy current forces are used to determine the electrical resistivity of a thin copper wire and the experimental value agrees with the bulk resistivity of copper reported in literature. The imaging capabilities of the new technique are demonstrated by imaging the electrical conductivity variations in a composite sample and a dual-phase titanium alloy in lift mode AFM. The results indicate that this technique can be used to detect very small variations in electrical conductivity. The spatial resolution of the technique is determined to be about 25 nm by imaging carbon nanofibers reinforced in polymer matrix. Since AFM is extensively used to characterize nanomaterials, the newly developed technique is used to characterize metallic nanoparticles. The results showed for the first time that it is possible to image helicons in nanometallic particles at low electromagnetic frequencies using an AFM. The theoretical analysis of the helicons in nanostructured materials is presented using the concept of effective mass of electrons. The primary objective of the research work reported in this dissertation is to develop a high-resolution electrical conductivity imaging system. However, the interaction of induced currents with different materials gives rise to different interaction forces. If an appropriate probe and an imaging mode are used, different material properties can be characterized using the same experimental setup. Therefore, in this study, magneto-acoustic, magnetic and dielectric properties of materials placed in induced current fields are studied. The modifications necessary to image these properties are discussed in detail. The advantages, limitations and applications of the new methodology are discussed.

  4. ON THE FORCE-FREE NATURE OF PHOTOSPHERIC SUNSPOT MAGNETIC FIELDS AS OBSERVED FROM HINODE (SOT/SP)

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar

    2012-01-01

    A magnetic field is force-free if there is no interaction between it and the plasma in the surrounding atmosphere, i.e., electric currents are aligned with the magnetic field, giving rise to zero Lorentz force. The computation of various magnetic parameters, such as magnetic energy (using the virial theorem), gradient of twist of sunspot magnetic fields (computed from the force-free parameter {alpha}), and any kind of extrapolation, heavily hinges on the force-free approximation of the photospheric sunspot magnetic fields. Thus, it is of vital importance to inspect the force-free behavior of sunspot magnetic fields. The force-free nature of sunspot magnetic fields has been examined earlier by some researchers, ending with incoherent results. Accurate photospheric vector field measurements with high spatial resolution are required to inspect the force-free nature of sunspots. For this purpose, we use several vector magnetograms of high spatial resolution obtained from the Solar Optical Telescope/Spectro-Polarimeter on board Hinode. Both the necessary and sufficient conditions for force-free nature are examined by checking the global and local nature of equilibrium magnetic forces over sunspots. We find that sunspot magnetic fields are not very far from the force-free configuration, although they are not completely force-free on the photosphere. The umbral and inner penumbral fields are more force-free than the middle and outer penumbral fields. During their evolution, sunspot magnetic fields are found to maintain their proximity to force-free field behavior. Although a dependence of net Lorentz force components is seen on the evolutionary stages of the sunspots, we do not find a systematic relationship between the nature of sunspot magnetic fields and the associated flare activity. Further, we examine whether the fields at the photosphere follow linear or nonlinear force-free conditions. After examining this in various complex and simple sunspots, we conclude that, in either case, photospheric sunspot magnetic fields are closer to satisfying the nonlinear force-free field approximation.

  5. Electric fields and double layers in plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Thiemann, H.; Schunk, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Various mechanisms for driving double layers (DLs) in plasmas are described, including applied potential drops, currents, contact potentials, and plasma expansions. Somne dynamic features of the DLs are discussed; and it is demonstrated that DLs and the currents through them undergo slow oscillations, determined by the ion transit time across an effective length of the system in which the DLs form. It is shown that a localized potential dip forms at the low potential end of a DL, which interrupts the electron current through it according to the Langmuir criterion whenever the ion flux into the DL is disrupted. Also considered is the generation of electric fields perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field by contact potentials.

  6. Controlling Positronium Annihilation with Electric Fields.

    PubMed

    Alonso, A M; Cooper, B S; Deller, A; Hogan, S D; Cassidy, D B

    2015-10-30

    We show that the annihilation dynamics of excited positronium (Ps) atoms can be controlled using parallel electric and magnetic fields. To achieve this, Ps atoms were optically excited to n=2 sublevels in fields that were adjusted to control the amount of short-lived and long-lived character of the resulting mixed states. Inclusion of the former offers a practical approach to detection via annihilation radiation, whereas the increased lifetimes due to the latter can be exploited to optimize resonance-enhanced two-photon excitation processes (e.g., 1^{3}S?2^{3}P?nS/nD), either by minimizing losses through intermediate state decay, or by making it possible to separate the excitation laser pulses in time. In addition, photoexcitation of mixed states with a 2^{3}S_{1} component represents an efficient route to producing long-lived pure 2^{3}S_{1} atoms via single-photon excitation. PMID:26565466

  7. Soil Identification using Field Electrical Resistivity Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Rosli, S.; Chitral, W. D.; Fauziah, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Aziman, M.; Ismail, B.

    2015-06-01

    Geotechnical site investigation with particular reference to soil identification was important in civil engineering works since it reports the soil condition in order to relate the design and construction of the proposed works. In the past, electrical resistivity method (ERM) has widely being used in soil characterization but experienced several black boxes which related to its results and interpretations. Hence, this study performed a field electrical resistivity method (ERM) using ABEM SAS (4000) at two different types of soils (Gravelly SAND and Silty SAND) in order to discover the behavior of electrical resistivity values (ERV) with type of soils studied. Soil basic physical properties was determine thru density (p), moisture content (w) and particle size distribution (d) in order to verify the ERV obtained from each type of soil investigated. It was found that the ERV of Gravelly SAND (278 Ωm & 285 Ωm) was slightly higher than SiltySAND (223 Ωm & 199 Ωm) due to the uncertainties nature of soils. This finding has showed that the results obtained from ERM need to be interpreted based on strong supported findings such as using direct test from soil laboratory data. Furthermore, this study was able to prove that the ERM can be established as an alternative tool in soil identification provided it was being verified thru other relevance information such as using geotechnical properties.

  8. Field measurement of basal forces generated by erosive debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, S. W.; Tucker, G. E.; Kean, J. W.; Coe, J. A.

    2013-06-01

    It has been proposed that debris flows cut bedrock valleys in steeplands worldwide, but field measurements needed to constrain mechanistic models of this process remain sparse due to the difficulty of instrumenting natural flows. Here we present and analyze measurements made using an automated sensor network, erosion bolts, and a 15.24 cm by 15.24 cm force plate installed in the bedrock channel floor of a steep catchment. These measurements allow us to quantify the distribution of basal forces from natural debris-flow events that incised bedrock. Over the 4 year monitoring period, 11 debris-flow events scoured the bedrock channel floor. No clear water flows were observed. Measurements of erosion bolts at the beginning and end of the study indicated that the bedrock channel floor was lowered by 36 to 64 mm. The basal force during these erosive debris-flow events had a large-magnitude (up to 21 kN, which was approximately 50 times larger than the concurrent time-averaged mean force), high-frequency (greater than 1 Hz) fluctuating component. We interpret these fluctuations as flow particles impacting the bed. The resulting variability in force magnitude increased linearly with the time-averaged mean basal force. Probability density functions of basal normal forces were consistent with a generalized Pareto distribution, rather than the exponential distribution that is commonly found in experimental and simulated monodispersed granular flows and which has a lower probability of large forces. When the bed sediment thickness covering the force plate was greater than ˜ 20 times the median bed sediment grain size, no significant fluctuations about the time-averaged mean force were measured, indicating that a thin layer of sediment (˜ 5 cm in the monitored cases) can effectively shield the subjacent bed from erosive impacts. Coarse-grained granular surges and water-rich, intersurge flow had very similar basal force distributions despite differences in appearance and bulk-flow density. These results demonstrate that debris flows can have strong control on rates of steepland evolution and contribute to a foundation needed for modeling debris-flow incision stochastically.

  9. Field measurement of basal forces generated by erosive debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCoy, S.W.; Tucker, G.E.; Kean, J.W.; Coe, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been proposed that debris flows cut bedrock valleys in steeplands worldwide, but field measurements needed to constrain mechanistic models of this process remain sparse due to the difficulty of instrumenting natural flows. Here we present and analyze measurements made using an automated sensor network, erosion bolts, and a 15.24 cm by 15.24 cm force plate installed in the bedrock channel floor of a steep catchment. These measurements allow us to quantify the distribution of basal forces from natural debris‒flow events that incised bedrock. Over the 4 year monitoring period, 11 debris‒flow events scoured the bedrock channel floor. No clear water flows were observed. Measurements of erosion bolts at the beginning and end of the study indicated that the bedrock channel floor was lowered by 36 to 64 mm. The basal force during these erosive debris‒flow events had a large‒magnitude (up to 21 kN, which was approximately 50 times larger than the concurrent time‒averaged mean force), high‒frequency (greater than 1 Hz) fluctuating component. We interpret these fluctuations as flow particles impacting the bed. The resulting variability in force magnitude increased linearly with the time‒averaged mean basal force. Probability density functions of basal normal forces were consistent with a generalized Pareto distribution, rather than the exponential distribution that is commonly found in experimental and simulated monodispersed granular flows and which has a lower probability of large forces. When the bed sediment thickness covering the force plate was greater than ~ 20 times the median bed sediment grain size, no significant fluctuations about the time‒averaged mean force were measured, indicating that a thin layer of sediment (~ 5 cm in the monitored cases) can effectively shield the subjacent bed from erosive impacts. Coarse‒grained granular surges and water‒rich, intersurge flow had very similar basal force distributions despite differences in appearance and bulk‒flow density. These results demonstrate that debris flows can have strong control on rates of steepland evolution and contribute to a foundation needed for modeling debris‒flow incision stochastically.

  10. Manipulating nanoscale contact electrification by an applied electric field.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu Sheng; Wang, Sihong; Yang, Ya; Zhu, Guang; Niu, Simiao; Lin, Zong-Hong; Liu, Ying; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-03-12

    Contact electrification is about the charge transfer between the surfaces of two materials in a contact-separation process. This effect has been widely utilized in particle separation and energy harvesting, where the charge transfer is preferred to be maximized. However, this effect is always undesirable in some areas such as electronic circuit systems due to the damage from the accumulated electrostatic charges. Herein, we introduced an approach to purposely manipulate the contact electrification process both in polarity and magnitude of the charge transfer through an applied electric field between two materials. Theoretical modeling and the corresponding experiments for controlling the charge transfer between a Pt coated atomic force microscopy tip and Parylene film have been demonstrated. The modulation effect of the electric field on contact electrification is enhanced for a thinner dielectric layer. This work can potentially be utilized to enhance the output performance of energy harvesting devices or nullify contact electric charge transfer in applications where this effect is undesirable. PMID:24479730

  11. Electrohydrodynamic Model of Vesicle Deformation in Alternating Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Vlahovska, Petia M.; Gracià, Rubèn Serral; Aranda-Espinoza, Said; Dimova, Rumiana

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We develop an analytical theory to explain the experimentally observed morphological transitions of quasispherical giant vesicles induced by alternating electric fields. The model treats the inner and suspending media as lossy dielectrics, and the membrane as an impermeable flexible incompressible–fluid sheet. The vesicle shape is obtained by balancing electric, hydrodynamic, bending, and tension stresses exerted on the membrane. Our approach, which is based on force balance, also allows us to describe the time evolution of the vesicle deformation, in contrast to earlier works based on energy minimization, which are able to predict only stationary shapes. Our theoretical predictions for vesicle deformation are consistent with experiment. If the inner fluid is more conducting than the suspending medium, the vesicle always adopts a prolate shape. In the opposite case, the vesicle undergoes a transition from a prolate to oblate ellipsoid at a critical frequency, which the theory identifies with the inverse membrane charging time. At frequencies higher than the inverse Maxwell-Wagner polarization time, the electrohydrodynamic stresses become too small to alter the vesicle's quasispherical rest shape. The model can be used to rationalize the transient and steady deformation of biological cells in electric fields. PMID:19527639

  12. Extracting Nucleon Magnetic Moments and Electric Polarizabilities from Lattice QCD in Background Electric Fields

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2010-03-01

    Nucleon properties are investigated in background electric fields. As the magnetic moments of baryons affect their relativistic propagation in constant electric fields, electric polarizabilities cannot be determined without knowledge of magnetic moments. We devise combinations of baryon two-point functions in external electric fields to isolate both observables. Using an ensemble of anisotropic gauge configurations with dynamical clover fermions, we demonstrate how magnetic moments and electric polarizabilities can be determined from lattice QCD simulations in background electric fields. We obtain results for both the neutron and proton. Our study is currently limited to electrically neutral sea quarks.

  13. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, C.

    2000-01-01

    The research carried out in the Heat Transfer Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins University was motivated by previous studies indicating that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50 when compared to values obtained for the same system without electric fields. Imposing an external electric field holds the promise to improve pool boiling heat transfer in low gravity, since a phase separation force other than gravity is introduced. The influence of electric fields on bubble formation has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically.

  14. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography for determining electric field distribution during electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranjc, Matej; Bajd, Franci; Sera, Igor; Miklav?i?, Damijan

    2013-04-01

    Electroporation is a phenomenon caused by externally applied electric field to cells that results in an increase of cell membrane permeability to various molecules. Accurate coverage of the tissue with a sufficiently large electric field presents one of the most important conditions for successful membrane permeabilization. Applications based on electroporation would greatly benefit with a method for monitoring the electric field, especially if it could be done in situ. As the membrane electroporation is a consequence of an induced transmembrane potential, which is directly proportional to the local electric field, we have been investigating current density imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography techniques to determine the electric field distribution during electroporation. In this paper, we present comparison of current density and electric field distribution in an agar phantom and in a liver tissue exposed to electroporation pulses. As expected, a region of increased electrical conductivity was observed in the liver tissue exposed to sufficiently high electric field but not in agar phantom.

  15. Selective and directed growth of silicon nanowires by tip-enhanced local electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Sang-gil; Kim, Eunpa; Hwang, David J.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2015-10-01

    We present a method to trigger highly selective and directed growth of individual silicon nanowires based on an electrically biased atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The biased tip affects the nanowire growth behavior right from the initial stage. In particular, the locally intensified electric field at the AFM tip apex assists the dissociation of the precursor gas molecules and exerts augmented electrostatic force on the catalyst/NW assembly. Therefore, the electrically biased tip can be a candidate tool for the direct synthesis/integration of semiconductor nanomaterials on temperature-sensitive substrates.

  16. Efficient parametrization of complex molecule-surface force fields.

    PubMed

    Gao, David Z; Federici Canova, Filippo; Watkins, Matthew B; Shluger, Alexander L

    2015-06-15

    We present an efficient scheme for parametrizing complex molecule-surface force fields from ab initio data. The cost of producing a sufficient fitting library is mitigated using a 2D periodic embedded slab model made possible by the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics scheme in CP2K. These results were then used in conjunction with genetic algorithm (GA) methods to optimize the large parameter sets needed to describe such systems. The derived potentials are able to well reproduce adsorption geometries and adsorption energies calculated using density functional theory. Finally, we discuss the challenges in creating a sufficient fitting library, determining whether or not the GA optimization has completed, and the transferability of such force fields to similar molecules. PMID:25891018

  17. Direct computation of parameters for accurate polarizable force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Verstraelen, Toon Vandenbrande, Steven; Ayers, Paul W.

    2014-11-21

    We present an improved electronic linear response model to incorporate polarization and charge-transfer effects in polarizable force fields. This model is a generalization of the Atom-Condensed Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (DFT), approximated to second order (ACKS2): it can now be defined with any underlying variational theory (next to KS-DFT) and it can include atomic multipoles and off-center basis functions. Parameters in this model are computed efficiently as expectation values of an electronic wavefunction, obviating the need for their calibration, regularization, and manual tuning. In the limit of a complete density and potential basis set in the ACKS2 model, the linear response properties of the underlying theory for a given molecular geometry are reproduced exactly. A numerical validation with a test set of 110 molecules shows that very accurate models can already be obtained with fluctuating charges and dipoles. These features greatly facilitate the development of polarizable force fields.

  18. A Maximum-Likelihood Approach to Force-Field Calibration.

    PubMed

    Zaborowski, Bart?omiej; Jagie?a, Dawid; Czaplewski, Cezary; Ha?abis, Anna; Lewandowska, Agnieszka; ?mudzi?ska, Wioletta; O?dziej, Stanis?aw; Karczy?ska, Agnieszka; Omieczynski, Christian; Wirecki, Tomasz; Liwo, Adam

    2015-09-28

    A new approach to the calibration of the force fields is proposed, in which the force-field parameters are obtained by maximum-likelihood fitting of the calculated conformational ensembles to the experimental ensembles of training system(s). The maximum-likelihood function is composed of logarithms of the Boltzmann probabilities of the experimental conformations, calculated with the current energy function. Because the theoretical distribution is given in the form of the simulated conformations only, the contributions from all of the simulated conformations, with Gaussian weights in the distances from a given experimental conformation, are added to give the contribution to the target function from this conformation. In contrast to earlier methods for force-field calibration, the approach does not suffer from the arbitrariness of dividing the decoy set into native-like and non-native structures; however, if such a division is made instead of using Gaussian weights, application of the maximum-likelihood method results in the well-known energy-gap maximization. The computational procedure consists of cycles of decoy generation and maximum-likelihood-function optimization, which are iterated until convergence is reached. The method was tested with Gaussian distributions and then applied to the physics-based coarse-grained UNRES force field for proteins. The NMR structures of the tryptophan cage, a small ?-helical protein, determined at three temperatures (T = 280, 305, and 313 K) by Ha?abis et al. ( J. Phys. Chem. B 2012 , 116 , 6898 - 6907 ), were used. Multiplexed replica-exchange molecular dynamics was used to generate the decoys. The iterative procedure exhibited steady convergence. Three variants of optimization were tried: optimization of the energy-term weights alone and use of the experimental ensemble of the folded protein only at T = 280 K (run 1); optimization of the energy-term weights and use of experimental ensembles at all three temperatures (run 2); and optimization of the energy-term weights and the coefficients of the torsional and multibody energy terms and use of experimental ensembles at all three temperatures (run 3). The force fields were subsequently tested with a set of 14 ?-helical and two ? + ? proteins. Optimization run 1 resulted in better agreement with the experimental ensemble at T = 280 K compared with optimization run 2 and in comparable performance on the test set but poorer agreement of the calculated folding temperature with the experimental folding temperature. Optimization run 3 resulted in the best fit of the calculated ensembles to the experimental ones for the tryptophan cage but in much poorer performance on the training set, suggesting that use of a small ?-helical protein for extensive force-field calibration resulted in overfitting of the data for this protein at the expense of transferability. The optimized force field resulting from run 2 was found to fold 13 of the 14 tested ?-helical proteins and one small ? + ? protein with the correct topologies; the average structures of 10 of them were predicted with accuracies of about 5 C(?) root-mean-square deviation or better. Test simulations with an additional set of 12 ?-helical proteins demonstrated that this force field performed better on ?-helical proteins than the previous parametrizations of UNRES. The proposed approach is applicable to any problem of maximum-likelihood parameter estimation when the contributions to the maximum-likelihood function cannot be evaluated at the experimental points and the dimension of the configurational space is too high to construct histograms of the experimental distributions. PMID:26263302

  19. A Transferable Force Field for Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Alkanolamines.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Gustavo A; Lachet, Vronique; Nieto-Draghi, Carlos; Mackie, Allan D

    2013-04-01

    Due to the importance of alkanolamines as solvents in several industrial processes and the absence of a dedicated transferable force field for them, we have developed an anisotropic united-atom (AUA4) force field for primary, secondary, and tertiary alkanolamines. In addition to correctly reproducing the experimental densities, additional properties for six different molecules have been verified at different temperatures including vaporization enthalpies, vapor pressures, normal boiling points, critical temperatures, and critical densities. A qualitative analysis of the radial distribution function of pure monoethanolamine has also been carried out. Furthermore, the viscosity coefficients were also calculated as a function of temperature and found to be in good agreement with experimental data. Finally, and perhaps most strikingly, the prediction of the excess enthalpies of alkanolamines in aqueous solutions has been found to be in excellent qualitative agreement with experimental data. PMID:26583556

  20. Field measurements of interactions between furnaces and forced-air distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, I.S.; Modera, M.P.

    1998-10-01

    Measurements on three gas and two electric furnaces have been made to examine the field performance of these furnaces and their interactions with their forced-air distribution systems. The distribution systems were retrofitted as part of this study, and the impact of retrofitting on furnace performance is discussed. In addition to field measurements, this paper discusses how forced-air furnace systems are treated in proposed ASHRAE Standard 152P and applies the resulting equations to the systems tested in the field. The distribution system calculations in Standard 152P are compared to the current methods employed in the Furnaces chapter of the 1996 ASHRAE Handbook--HVAC Systems and Equipment, showing how distribution system efficiencies calculated using Standard 152P can be incorporated into the Handbook.

  1. The mechanical transduction of physiological strength electric fields.

    PubMed

    Hart, Francis X

    2008-09-01

    In this article it is proposed that electric fields of physiological strength (approximately 100 V/m) are transduced by the mechanical torque they exert on glycoproteins. The resulting mechanical signal is then transmitted to the cytoskeleton and propagated throughout the cell interior. This mechanical coupling is analyzed for transmembrane glycoproteins, such as integrins and the glycocalyx, and for glycoproteins in the extracellular matrix of cartilage. The applied torque is opposed by viscous fluid drag and restoring forces exerted by adjacent molecules in the membrane or cartilage. The resulting system represents a damped, driven harmonic oscillator. The amplitude of oscillation is constant at low frequencies, but falls off rapidly in the range 1-1000 Hz. The transition frequency depends on parameters such as the viscosity of the surrounding fluid and the restoring force exerted by the surrounding structure. The amplitude increases as the fourth power of the length of the transmembrane glycoproteins and as the square of the applied field. This process may operate in concert with other transduction mechanisms, such as the opening of voltage-gated channels and electrodiffusion/osmosis for DC fields. PMID:18381594

  2. Inhibition of brain tumor cell proliferation by alternating electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hyesun; Oh, Seung-ick; Hong, Sunghoi E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr; Sung, Jiwon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Yoon, Myonggeun E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr; Koh, Eui Kwan

    2014-11-17

    This study was designed to investigate the mechanism by which electric fields affect cell function, and to determine the optimal conditions for electric field inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Low-intensity (<2 V/cm) and intermediate-frequency (100–300 kHz) alternating electric fields were applied to glioblastoma cell lines. These electric fields inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and abnormal mitosis due to the malformation of microtubules. These effects were significantly dependent on the intensity and frequency of applied electric fields.

  3. Dielectric force microscopy: imaging charge carriers in nanomaterials without electrical contacts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Lu, Wei; Li, Yize Stephanie; Cai, Jinhua; Chen, Liwei

    2015-07-21

    Nanomaterials are increasingly used in electronic, optoelectronic, bioelectronic, sensing, and energy nanodevices. Characterization of electrical properties at nanometer scales thus becomes not only a pursuit in basic science but also of widespread practical need. The conventional field-effect transistor (FET) approach involves making electrical contacts to individual nanomaterials. This approach faces serious challenges in routine characterization due to the small size and the intrinsic heterogeneity of nanomaterials, as well as the difficulties in forming Ohmic contact with nanomaterials. Since the charge carrier polarization in semiconducting and metallic materials dominates their dielectric response to external fields, detecting dielectric polarization is an alternative approach in probing the carrier properties and electrical conductivity in nanomaterials. This Account reviews the challenges in the electrical conductivity characterization of nanomaterials and demonstrates that dielectric force microscopy (DFM) is a powerful tool to address the challenges. DFM measures the dielectric polarization via its force interaction with charges on the DFM tip and thus eliminates the need to make electrical contacts with nanomaterials. Furthermore, DFM imaging provides nanometer-scaled spatial resolution. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and ZnO nanowires are used as model systems. The transverse dielectric permittivity of SWNTs is quantitatively measured to be ?10, and the differences in longitudinal dielectric polarization are exploited to distinguish metallic SWNTs from semiconducting SWNTs. By application of a gate voltage at the DFM tip, the local carrier concentration underneath the tip can be accumulated or depleted, depending on charge carrier type and the density of states near the Fermi level. This effect is exploited to identify the conductivity type and carrier type in nanomaterials. By making comparison between DFM and FET measurements on the exact same SWNTs, it is found that the DFM gate modulation ratio, which is the ratio of DFM signal strengths at different gate voltage, is linearly proportional to the logarithm of FET device on/off ratio. A Drude-level model is established to explain the semilogarithmic correlation between DFM gate modulation ration and FET device on/off ratio and simulate the dependence of DFM force on charge carrier concentration and mobility. Future developments towards DFM imaging of charge carrier concentration or mobility in nanomaterials and nanodevices can thus be expected. PMID:26061707

  4. Electric field effect in ultrathin black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Steven P.; Doganov, Rostislav A.; Schmidt, Hennrik; Castro Neto, A. H.; zyilmaz, Barbaros

    2014-03-01

    Black phosphorus exhibits a layered structure similar to graphene, allowing mechanical exfoliation of ultrathin single crystals. Here, we demonstrate few-layer black phosphorus field effect devices on Si/SiO2 and measure charge carrier mobility in a four-probe configuration as well as drain current modulation in a two-point configuration. We find room-temperature mobilities of up to 300 cm2/Vs and drain current modulation of over 103. At low temperatures, the on-off ratio exceeds 105, and the device exhibits both electron and hole conduction. Using atomic force microscopy, we observe significant surface roughening of thin black phosphorus crystals over the course of 1 h after exfoliation.

  5. Electric field effect in ultrathin black phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Steven P.; Schmidt, Hennrik; Doganov, Rostislav A.; Castro Neto, A. H.; Özyilmaz, Barbaros

    2014-03-10

    Black phosphorus exhibits a layered structure similar to graphene, allowing mechanical exfoliation of ultrathin single crystals. Here, we demonstrate few-layer black phosphorus field effect devices on Si/SiO{sub 2} and measure charge carrier mobility in a four-probe configuration as well as drain current modulation in a two-point configuration. We find room-temperature mobilities of up to 300 cm{sup 2}/Vs and drain current modulation of over 10{sup 3}. At low temperatures, the on-off ratio exceeds 10{sup 5}, and the device exhibits both electron and hole conduction. Using atomic force microscopy, we observe significant surface roughening of thin black phosphorus crystals over the course of 1 h after exfoliation.

  6. Parmbsc1: a refined force field for DNA simulations.

    PubMed

    Ivani, Ivan; Dans, Pablo D; Noy, Agnes; Pérez, Alberto; Faustino, Ignacio; Hospital, Adam; Walther, Jürgen; Andrio, Pau; Goñi, Ramon; Balaceanu, Alexandra; Portella, Guillem; Battistini, Federica; Gelpí, Josep Lluis; González, Carlos; Vendruscolo, Michele; Laughton, Charles A; Harris, Sarah A; Case, David A; Orozco, Modesto

    2016-01-01

    We present parmbsc1, a force field for DNA atomistic simulation, which has been parameterized from high-level quantum mechanical data and tested for nearly 100 systems (representing a total simulation time of ∼140 μs) covering most of DNA structural space. Parmbsc1 provides high-quality results in diverse systems. Parameters and trajectories are available at http://mmb.irbbarcelona.org/ParmBSC1/. PMID:26569599

  7. Force Field Calculation with a Top Desk Calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Jafar H.; Shanshal, Muthanna

    1981-04-01

    A modified "Consistent Force Field " method is described in which the energy minimization is carried out according to the Murtagh-Sargent method rather than the Newton-Raphson method and the number of non-bonded interactions is reduced to interactions between atoms separated by three bonds at the most. The smaller number of interaction terms allowed the programming of the method for a desk top calculator (HP-9810). Calculations are reported for a number of aliphatic molecules

  8. Quantum mechanical force field for water with explicit electronic polarization

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jaebeom; Mazack, Michael J. M.; Zhang, Peng; Truhlar, Donald G.; Gao, Jiali

    2013-01-01

    A quantum mechanical force field (QMFF) for water is described. Unlike traditional approaches that use quantum mechanical results and experimental data to parameterize empirical potential energy functions, the present QMFF uses a quantum mechanical framework to represent intramolecular and intermolecular interactions in an entire condensed-phase system. In particular, the internal energy terms used in molecular mechanics are replaced by a quantum mechanical formalism that naturally includes electronic polarization due to intermolecular interactions and its effects on the force constants of the intramolecular force field. As a quantum mechanical force field, both intermolecular interactions and the Hamiltonian describing the individual molecular fragments can be parameterized to strive for accuracy and computational efficiency. In this work, we introduce a polarizable molecular orbital model Hamiltonian for water and for oxygen- and hydrogen-containing compounds, whereas the electrostatic potential responsible for intermolecular interactions in the liquid and in solution is modeled by a three-point charge representation that realistically reproduces the total molecular dipole moment and the local hybridization contributions. The present QMFF for water, which is called the XP3P (explicit polarization with three-point-charge potential) model, is suitable for modeling both gas-phase clusters and liquid water. The paper demonstrates the performance of the XP3P model for water and proton clusters and the properties of the pure liquid from about 900 106 self-consistent-field calculations on a periodic system consisting of 267 water molecules. The unusual dipole derivative behavior of water, which is incorrectly modeled in molecular mechanics, is naturally reproduced as a result of an electronic structural treatment of chemical bonding by XP3P. We anticipate that the XP3P model will be useful for studying proton transport in solution and solid phases as well as across biological ion channels through membranes. PMID:23927266

  9. Tuning the mass of chameleon fields in Casimir force experiments.

    PubMed

    Brax, Ph; van de Bruck, C; Davis, A C; Shaw, D J; Iannuzzi, D

    2010-06-18

    We have calculated the chameleon pressure between two parallel plates in the presence of an intervening medium that affects the mass of the chameleon field. As intuitively expected, the gas in the gap weakens the chameleon interaction mechanism with a screening effect that increases with the plate separation and with the density of the intervening medium. This phenomenon might open up new directions in the search of chameleon particles with future long-range Casimir force experiments. PMID:20867290

  10. Four-nucleon force in chiral effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Evgeny Epelbaum

    2005-10-25

    We derive the leading contribution to the four--nucleon force within the framework of chiral effective field theory. It is governed by the exchange of pions and the lowest--order nucleon--nucleon contact interaction and includes effects due to the nonlinear pion--nucleon couplings and the pion self interactions constrained by the chiral symmetry of QCD. The resulting 4NF does not contain any unknown parameters and can be tested in future few--and many--nucleon studies.

  11. Saturation of the Electric Field Transmitted to the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyatsky, Wladislaw; Khazanov, George V.; Slavin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    We reexamined the processes leading to saturation of the electric field, transmitted into the Earth's ionosphere from the solar wind, incorporating features of the coupled system previously ignored. We took into account that the electric field is transmitted into the ionosphere through a region of open field lines, and that the ionospheric conductivity in the polar cap and auroral zone may be different. Penetration of the electric field into the magnetosphere is linked with the generation of the Alfven wave, going out from the ionosphere into the solar wind and being coupled with the field-aligned currents at the boundary of the open field limes. The electric field of the outgoing Alfven wave reduces the original electric field and provides the saturation effect in the electric field and currents during strong geomagnetic disturbances, associated with increasing ionospheric conductivity. The electric field and field-aligned currents of this Alfven wave are dependent on the ionospheric and solar wind parameters and may significantly affect the electric field and field-aligned currents, generated in the polar ionosphere. Estimating the magnitude of the saturation effect in the electric field and field-aligned currents allows us to improve the correlation between solar wind parameters and resulting disturbances in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  12. Theoretical and experimental study of inclusion removal from molten metal under an alternating electromagnetic force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ashish D.

    One of the emerging technologies for the production of clean metals is electromagnetic filtration. This dissertation describes the work done on the theory of electromagnetic separation in alternating electromagnetic fields together with the experimental results obtained on the removal of silica particles from molten aluminum from an induced current separator. Analytical expressions have been developed for describing the electric and magnetic fields, and the separation force for a spherical particle in an infinite conducting medium subjected to an alternating magnetic field. It was found that the magnitude and direction of the separation force depends on the ratio of electrical conductivity of the fluid and the sphere as well as the frequency of the applied field. Analytical expressions were also developed for the MHD flow in and around the particle. The solutions revealed two characteristic secondary flows; one is driven by the distortion of the electric current around the particle, while the other is driven by forces resulting from the interaction of the current and the applied magnetic field. The results of the experimental study on removal of silica particles from aluminum showed complete removal of the particles from the melt, and the rate of inclusion removal was found to depend on the applied magnetic field strength and the particle size. A mathematical model has been developed for describing the rate of inclusion removal from the metal in the induced current separator. The model was found to accurately predict the measured removal rates. The effects of the processing parameters on time for complete removal of inclusions in induced current separators are discussed.

  13. Nonlinear response of electric fields at a neutral point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovsky, Mikhail; Dufty, James W.; Calisti, Annette; Stamm, Roland; Talin, Bernard

    1995-05-01

    The complex dynamics of electric fields at a neutral point in a plasma is studied via a model of noninteracting ``quasiparticles.'' The simplicity of the model allows the reduction of the many-body problem to an effective single-particle analysis-all properties of interest can be reduced to quadratures. Still, the final calculations to extract a quantitative or even qualitative understanding of the field dynamics can be difficult. Attention here is focused on the dynamics of the conditional electric field: the field value at time t for a given initial value of the field. In addition to the relevant linear response function (electric field time correlation function), this property provides the complete nonlinear response of the electric field to arbitrary initial field perturbations. The static properties (distribution of electric fields and field time derivatives) and the electric field time correlation function have been known for some time for this model. We compare these results and the present result for the conditional electric field with molecular dynamics simulations including interactions. The comparisons suggest that the model provides a quantitative representation of electric field dynamics in real plasmas, except at strong coupling. The exact theoretical results are compared also with those obtained by modeling the electric field as a stochastic variable obeying a kangaroo process. The latter can be constructed to yield both the exact stationary distribution and the exact electric field time correlation function. However, we find that the conditional field is never well approximated by this process. An alternative representation of the joint distribution for electric fields, consistent with the exact stationary distribution, field correlation function, and conditional electric field, is suggested.

  14. Current Status of the AMOEBA Polarizable Force Field

    PubMed Central

    Ponder, Jay W.; Wu, Chuanjie; Ren, Pengyu; Pande, Vijay S.; Chodera, John D.; Schnieders, Michael J.; Haque, Imran; Mobley, David L.; Lambrecht, Daniel S.; DiStasio, Robert A.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Clark, Gary N. I.; Johnson, Margaret E.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular force fields have been approaching a generational transition over the past several years, moving away from well-established and well-tuned, but intrinsically limited, fixed point charge models towards more intricate and expensive polarizable models that should allow more accurate description of molecular properties. The recently introduced AMOEBA force field is a leading publicly available example of this next generation of theoretical model, but to date has only received relatively limited validation, which we address here. We show that the AMOEBA force field is in fact a significant improvement over fixed charge models for small molecule structural and thermodynamic observables in particular, although further fine-tuning is necessary to describe solvation free energies of drug-like small molecules, dynamical properties away from ambient conditions, and possible improvements in aromatic interactions. State of the art electronic structure calculations reveal generally very good agreement with AMOEBA for demanding problems such as relative conformational energies of the alanine tetrapeptide and isomers of water sulfate complexes. AMOEBA is shown to be especially successful on protein-ligand binding and computational X-ray crystallography where polarization and accurate electrostatics are critical. PMID:20136072

  15. Effects of electric fields on the rheological properties of emulsions of drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Arturo

    2007-11-01

    The results of fully three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of the effects of electric fields on emulsions of drops will be presented. The examination of the rheological properties of these systems is performed by imposing a simple- shear flow between two plates where the drops are immersed. An electric potential difference is applied perpendicular to the plates. The resulting electric field leads to two effects: a polarization of the drops and a viscous fluid motion on the interface between the drops and the suspending fluid. The direction and intensity of the viscous fluid motion depends on the electrical properties of the fluids. The numerical simulations show that the response of the emulsions is governed by the competition between the electric attraction and the fluid shear. The former leads to the aggregation of the drops in chains parallel to the electric field, while the latter tries to break-up the aggregated chains. The results are presented as a function of the Mason number and the electric capillary numbers. These non-dimensional numbers quantify the strength of the electric forces versus the fluid shear and the capillary forces, respectively. The significance of the electrical field on the viscosity and the normal stress differences will be discussed.

  16. Convolutional Virtual Electric Field for Image Segmentation Using Active Contours

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanquan; Zhu, Ce; Zhang, Jiawan; Jian, Yuden

    2014-01-01

    Gradient vector flow (GVF) is an effective external force for active contours; however, it suffers from heavy computation load. The virtual electric field (VEF) model, which can be implemented in real time using fast Fourier transform (FFT), has been proposed later as a remedy for the GVF model. In this work, we present an extension of the VEF model, which is referred to as CONvolutional Virtual Electric Field, CONVEF for short. This proposed CONVEF model takes the VEF model as a convolution operation and employs a modified distance in the convolution kernel. The CONVEF model is also closely related to the vector field convolution (VFC) model. Compared with the GVF, VEF and VFC models, the CONVEF model possesses not only some desirable properties of these models, such as enlarged capture range, u-shape concavity convergence, subject contour convergence and initialization insensitivity, but also some other interesting properties such as G-shape concavity convergence, neighboring objects separation, and noise suppression and simultaneously weak edge preserving. Meanwhile, the CONVEF model can also be implemented in real-time by using FFT. Experimental results illustrate these advantages of the CONVEF model on both synthetic and natural images. PMID:25360586

  17. The electrically detected magnetic resonance microscope: combining conductive atomic force microscopy with electrically detected magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Klein, Konrad; Hauer, Benedikt; Stoib, Benedikt; Trautwein, Markus; Matich, Sonja; Huebl, Hans; Astakhov, Oleksandr; Finger, Friedhelm; Bittl, Robert; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S

    2013-10-01

    We present the design and implementation of a scanning probe microscope, which combines electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) and (photo-)conductive atomic force microscopy ((p)cAFM). The integration of a 3-loop 2-gap X-band microwave resonator into an AFM allows the use of conductive AFM tips as a movable contact for EDMR experiments. The optical readout of the AFM cantilever is based on an infrared laser to avoid disturbances of current measurements by absorption of straylight of the detection laser. Using amorphous silicon thin film samples with varying defect densities, the capability to detect a spatial EDMR contrast is demonstrated. Resonant current changes as low as 20 fA can be detected, allowing the method to realize a spin sensitivity of 810(6)spins/?Hz at room temperature. PMID:24182133

  18. Liquid methanol under a static electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Cassone, Giuseppe; Giaquinta, Paolo V.; Saija, Franz; Saitta, A. Marco

    2015-02-07

    We report on an ab initio molecular dynamics study of liquid methanol under the effect of a static electric field. We found that the hydrogen-bond structure of methanol is more robust and persistent for field intensities below the molecular dissociation threshold whose value (≈0.31 V/Å) turns out to be moderately larger than the corresponding estimate obtained for liquid water. A sustained ionic current, with ohmic current-voltage behavior, flows in this material for field intensities above 0.36 V/Å, as is also the case of water, but the resulting ionic conductivity (≈0.40 S cm{sup −1}) is at least one order of magnitude lower than that of water, a circumstance that evidences a lower efficiency of proton transfer processes. We surmise that this study may be relevant for the understanding of the properties and functioning of technological materials which exploit ionic conduction, such as direct-methanol fuel cells and Nafion membranes.

  19. Empirical models of high latitude electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    Model cross sections of the high latitude dawn-dusk electric field based on OGO-6 data are presented for the signature profiles, most frequently encountered for both + and -Y orientations of the interplanetary magnetic field. Line integrals give a total potential of 76 keV in each case. To illustrate extremes, examples of model cross-sections with total potentials of 23 keV and 140 keV are also given. Model convection patterns are also presented utilizing OGO-6 data on boundary locations at other magnetic local times. When this information is combined with characteristic field geometries in the region of the Harang discontinuity, and is supplemented by data from Ba+ cloud motions in the polar cap, it becomes possible to construct realistic convection patterns on the nightside which deviate from the usual sun-aligned patterns. The observational models presented are of limited applicability as a consequence of the variability of observed distributions. These limitations are emphasized with particular attention given to several types of recurrent deviations which have not previously been discussed.

  20. The oscillations of cylindrical drop under the influence of a nonuniform alternating electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alabuzhev, A. A.; Kashina, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    The forced oscillations of incompressible fluid drop under the alternating electric field are considered. In equilibrium, the drop has the form of a cylinder bounded axially parallel solid planes and contact angle is right. The drop is surrounded by an incompressible fluid with another density. The external nonuniform electric field acts as an external force that causes motion of the contact line. In order to describe this contact line motion the modified Hocking boundary condition is applied: the velocity of the contact line is proportional to the deviation of the contact angle and the speed of the fast relaxation processes, which frequency is proportional

  1. Large Electric FieldEnhancedHardness Effect in a SiO2 Film

    PubMed Central

    Revilla, Reynier I.; Li, Xiao-Jun; Yang, Yan-Lian; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Silicon dioxide films are extensively used in nano and microelectromechanical systems. Here we studied the influence of an external electric field on the mechanical properties of a SiO2 film by using nanoindentation technique of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and friction force microscopy (FFM). A giant augmentation of the relative elastic modulus was observed by increasing the localized electric field. A slight decrease in friction coefficients was also clearly observed by using FFM with the increase of applied tip voltage. The reduction of the friction coefficients is consistent with the great enhancement of sample hardness by considering the indentationinduced deformation during the friction measurements. PMID:24681517

  2. Large Electric Field-Enhanced-Hardness Effect in a SiO2 Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revilla, Reynier I.; Li, Xiao-Jun; Yang, Yan-Lian; Wang, Chen

    2014-03-01

    Silicon dioxide films are extensively used in nano and micro-electromechanical systems. Here we studied the influence of an external electric field on the mechanical properties of a SiO2 film by using nanoindentation technique of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and friction force microscopy (FFM). A giant augmentation of the relative elastic modulus was observed by increasing the localized electric field. A slight decrease in friction coefficients was also clearly observed by using FFM with the increase of applied tip voltage. The reduction of the friction coefficients is consistent with the great enhancement of sample hardness by considering the indentation-induced deformation during the friction measurements.

  3. Force-free magnetic fields - Generating functions and footpoint displacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, Richard; Verma, Ritu

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents analytic and numerical calculations that explore equilibrium sequences of bipolar force-free magnetic fields in relation to displacments of their magnetic footpoints. It is shown that the appearance of magnetic islands - sometimes interpreted as marking the loss of equilibrium in models of the solar atmosphere - is likely associated only with physically unrealistic footpoint displacements such as infinite separation or 'tearing' of the model photosphere. The work suggests that the loss of equilibrium in bipolar configurations, sometimes proposed as a mechanism for eruptive solar events, probably requires either fully three-dimensional field configurations or nonzero plasma pressure. The results apply only to fields that are strictly bipolar, and do not rule out equilibrium loss in more complex structures such as quadrupolar fields.

  4. Levitation forces of a bulk YBCO superconductor in gradient varying magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Gong, Y. M.; Wang, G.; Zhou, D. J.; Zhao, L. F.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, Y.

    2015-09-01

    The levitation forces of a bulk YBCO superconductor in gradient varying high and low magnetic fields generated from a superconducting magnet were investigated. The magnetic field intensity of the superconducting magnet was measured when the exciting current was 90 A. The magnetic field gradient and magnetic force field were both calculated. The YBCO bulk was cooled by liquid nitrogen in field-cooling (FC) and zero-field-cooling (ZFC) condition. The results showed that the levitation forces increased with increasing the magnetic field intensity. Moreover, the levitation forces were more dependent on magnetic field gradient and magnetic force field than magnetic field intensity.

  5. Electropumping of water with rotating electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, Sergio; Todd, B. D.; Hansen, J. S.; Daivis, Peter J.

    2013-04-01

    Pumping of fluids confined to nanometer dimension spaces is a technically challenging yet vitally important technological application with far reaching consequences for lab-on-a-chip devices, biomimetic nanoscale reactors, nanoscale filtration devices and the like. All current pumping mechanisms require some sort of direct intrusion into the nanofluidic system, and involve mechanical or electronic components. In this paper, we present the first nonequilibrium molecular dynamics results to demonstrate that non-intrusive electropumping of liquid water on the nanoscale can be performed by subtly exploiting the coupling of spin angular momentum to linear streaming momentum. A spatially uniform rotating electric field is applied to water molecules, which couples to their permanent electric dipole moments. The resulting molecular rotational momentum is converted into linear streaming momentum of the fluid. By selectively tuning the degree of hydrophobicity of the solid walls one can generate a net unidirectional flow. Our results for the linear streaming and angular velocities of the confined water are in general agreement with the extended hydrodynamical theory for this process, though also suggest refinements to the theory are required. These numerical experiments confirm that this new concept for pumping of polar nanofluids can be employed under laboratory conditions, opening up significant new technological possibilities.

  6. Secondary structure of rat and human amylin across force fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.; Paci, Emanuele

    2015-07-29

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, α-helices, and β-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin wasmore » determined as a function of α-helix and β-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards β-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly α-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient states enable dynamic pathways that facilitate the formation of aggregates and, eventually, amyloid fibrils.« less

  7. Secondary structure of rat and human amylin across force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.; Paci, Emanuele

    2015-07-29

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, α-helices, and β-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin was determined as a function of α-helix and β-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards β-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly α-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient states enable dynamic pathways that facilitate the formation of aggregates and, eventually, amyloid fibrils.

  8. Secondary Structure of Rat and Human Amylin across Force Fields

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, ?-helices, and ?-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin was determined as a function of ?-helix and ?-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards ?-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly ?-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient states enable dynamic pathways that facilitate the formation of aggregates and, eventually, amyloid fibrils. PMID:26221949

  9. Determination of deformation fields by atomic force acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendjus, Beatrice; Khler, Bernd; Heuer, Henning; Rabe, Ute; Striegler, Andr

    2006-03-01

    Advanced Scanning Probe Microscopy techniques combine Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) with ultrasound. Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy (AFAM) and Ultrasonic Force Microscopy (UFM) become increasingly powerful tools for the determination of material properties on nanoscale. AFAM is mainly applied to the analysis of materials with elastic properties locally varying on micro- and nanoscale. Deformation fields and buried structures can be visualized. In AFAM, flexural and torsional cantilever vibrations are excited by out-of-plane and in-plane sample surface vibrations. The ultrasound is transmitted from the sample into the cantilever while forces act between sensor tip and sample. The sample surface is scanned by the sensor, and an ultrasonic image is acquired simultaneously to the topography image. The contrast comprehended in the ultrasonic image depends on surface topography and on the local elastic and adhesive properties of the sample. Voids, inclusions, or cracks, which build up regions of different elastic constants in the interior of the material, are sensed by the local elastic response of the tip. As a consequence, information on hidden structures can be derived from the acoustic images. Usually, this subsurface information is overlaid by additional topographic information, also contained in the ultrasonic image. Here, an AFAM set up is combined with tensile and bending modules. This approach allows generation of static deformation fields on surfaces and in-situ imaging and analysis of these fields in the AFM or AFAM. A software module for micro deformation analysis by means of correlation based algorithms (MicroDAC) is used to determine the local surface deformation quantitatively.

  10. Advancement of polarizable force field and its use for molecular modeling and design.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peijun; Wang, Jinguang; Xu, Yong; Chu, Huiying; Liu, Jiahui; Zhao, Meixia; Zhang, Depeng; Mao, Yingchen; Li, Beibei; Ding, Yang; Li, Guohui

    2015-01-01

    The most important requirement of biomolecular modeling is to deal with electrostatic energies. The electrostatic polarizability is an important part of electrostatic interaction for simulation systems. However, AMBER, CHARMM, OPLS, GROMOS, MMFF force fields etc. used in the past mostly apply fixed atomic center point charge to describe electrostatic energies, and are not sufficient for considering the influence of the electrostatic polarization. The emergence of polarizable force fields has solved this problem. In recent years, quickly developed polarizable force fields have involved a lot of fields. The chapter relating to polarizable force fields spread over several aspects. Firstly, we reviewed the history of the classical force fields and compared with polarizable force fields to elucidate the advancements of polarizable force fields. Secondly, it is introduced that the application of polarizable force fields to small molecules and biological macromolecules simulation, including molecular design. Finally, a brief development trend and perspective is given on rapidly growing polarizable force fields. PMID:25387957

  11. A phenomenological model that predicts forces generated when electrical stimulation is superimposed on submaximal volitional contractions

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Ramu; Wexler, Anthony S.; Kesar, Trisha M.; Jancosko, Angela; Laufer, Yocheved

    2010-01-01

    Superimposition of electrical stimulation during voluntary contractions is used to produce functional movements in individuals with central nervous system impairment, to evaluate the ability to activate a muscle, to characterize the nature of fatigue, and to improve muscle strength during postsurgical rehabilitation. Currently, the manner in which voluntary contractions and electrically elicited forces summate is not well understood. The objective of the present study is to develop a model that predicts the forces obtained when electrical stimulation is superimposed on a volitional contraction. Quadriceps femoris muscles of 12 able-bodied subjects were tested. Our results showed that the total force produced when electrical stimulation was superimposed during a volitional contraction could be modeled by the equation T = V + S[(MaxForce ? V)/MaxForce]N, where T is the total force produced, V is the force in response to volitional contraction alone, S is the force response to the electrical stimulation alone, MaxForce is the maximum force-generating ability of the muscle, and N is a parameter that we posit depends on the differences in the motor unit recruitment order and firing rates between volitional and electrically elicited contractions. In addition, our results showed that the model predicted accurately (intraclass correlation coefficient ?0.97) the total force in response to a wide range of stimulation intensities and frequencies superimposed on a wide range of volitional contraction levels. Thus the model will be helpful to clinicians and scientists to predict the amount of stimulation needed to produce the targeted force levels in individuals with partial paralysis. PMID:20299613

  12. Weber's gravitational force as static weak field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiandho, Yuant

    2016-02-01

    Weber's gravitational force (WGF) is one of gravitational model that can accommodate a non-static system because it depends not only on the distance but also on the velocity and the acceleration. Unlike Newton's law of gravitation, WGF can predict the anomalous of Mercury and gravitational bending of light near massive object very well. Then, some researchers use WGF as an alternative model of gravitation and propose a new mechanics theory namely the relational mechanics theory. However, currently we have known that the theory of general relativity which proposed by Einstein can explain gravity with very accurate. Through the static weak field approximation for the non-relativistic object, we also have known that the theory of general relativity will reduce to Newton's law of gravity. In this work, we expand the static weak field approximation that compatible with relativistic object and we obtain a force equation which correspond to WGF. Therefore, WGF is more precise than Newton's gravitational law. The static-weak gravitational field that we used is a solution of the Einstein's equation in the vacuum that satisfy the linear field approximation. The expression of WGF with ξ = 1 and satisfy the requirement of energy conservation are obtained after resolving the geodesic equation. By this result, we can conclude that WGF can be derived from the general relativity.

  13. Difficulties in Learning the Concept of Electric Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furio, C.; Guisasola, J.

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes students' main difficulties in learning the concept of electric field. Briefly describes the main conceptual profiles within which electric interactions can be interpreted and concludes that most students have difficulty using the idea of electric field. Contains 28 references. (DDR)

  14. The influence of antagonist muscle electrical stimulation on maximal hip adduction force

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Sota; Wada, Chikamune

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine whether electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata muscle decreases voluntary maximum resistance to passive abduction motion in participants without disease of the central nervous system. [Subjects] The participants were 16 healthy men. [Methods] The hip joint was moved from 10° adduction to 0° adduction with an angular velocity of 7°/s. During the passive leg motion, the subject was asked to resist the motion with maximum force. Two experimental conditions were prepared: (1) electrical stimulation provided to the tensor fascia lata muscle during the passive motion; and (2) no electrical stimulation provided. [Results] The force was 10.2 ± 3.5 kgf with electrical stimulation and 12.2 ± 3.8 kgf without electrical stimulation. [Conclusion] The results suggested that the maximum hip adduction force decreased in participants because of electrical stimulation of the tensor fascia lata muscle.

  15. Casimir force for a scalar field in warped brane worlds

    SciTech Connect

    Linares, Roman; Morales-Tecotl, Hugo A.; Pedraza, Omar

    2008-03-15

    In looking for imprints of extra dimensions in braneworld models one usually builds these so that they are compatible with known low energy physics and thus focuses on high energy effects. Nevertheless, just as submillimeter Newton's law tests probe the mode structure of gravity other low energy tests might apply to matter. As a model example, in this work we determine the 4D Casimir force corresponding to a scalar field subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions on two parallel planes lying within the single brane of a Randall-Sundrum scenario extended by one compact extra dimension. Using the Green's function method such a force picks the contribution of each field mode as if it acted individually but with a weight given by the square of the mode wave functions on the brane. In the low energy regime one regains the standard 4D Casimir force that is associated to a zero mode in the massless case or to a quasilocalized or resonant mode in the massive one while the effect of the extra dimensions gets encoded as an additional term.

  16. Electric contributions to magnetic force microscopy response from graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lu Hua Chen, Ying

    2014-12-07

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) signals have recently been detected from whole pieces of mechanically exfoliated graphene and molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) nanosheets, and magnetism of the two nanomaterials was claimed based on these observations. However, non-magnetic interactions or artefacts are commonly associated with MFM signals, which make the interpretation of MFM signals not straightforward. A systematic investigation has been done to examine possible sources of the MFM signals from graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets and whether the MFM signals can be correlated with magnetism. It is found that the MFM signals have significant non-magnetic contributions due to capacitive and electrostatic interactions between the nanosheets and conductive cantilever tip, as demonstrated by electric force microscopy and scanning Kevin probe microscopy analyses. In addition, the MFM signals of graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets are not responsive to reversed magnetic field of the magnetic cantilever tip. Therefore, the observed MFM response is mainly from electric artefacts and not compelling enough to correlate with magnetism of graphene and MoS{sub 2} nanosheets.

  17. Role of random electric fields in relaxors

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Daniel; Stock, Christopher; Rodriguez-Rivera, Jose A.; Chi, Songxue; Leo, Juscelino; Long, Xifa; Xie, Yujuan; Bokov, Alexei A.; Ye, Zuo-Guang; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Gehring, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    PbZr1xTixO3 (PZT) and Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)1xTixO3 (PMN-xPT) are complex lead-oxide perovskites that display exceptional piezoelectric properties for pseudorhombohedral compositions near a tetragonal phase boundary. In PZT these compositions are ferroelectrics, but in PMN-xPT they are relaxors because the dielectric permittivity is frequency dependent and exhibits non-Arrhenius behavior. We show that the nanoscale structure unique to PMN-xPT and other lead-oxide perovskite relaxors is absent in PZT and correlates with a greater than 100% enhancement of the longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient in PMN-xPT relative to that in PZT. By comparing dielectric, structural, lattice dynamical, and piezoelectric measurements on PZT and PMN-xPT, two nearly identical compounds that represent weak and strong random electric field limits, we show that quenched (static) random fields establish the relaxor phase and identify the order parameter. PMID:24449912

  18. Role of random electric fields in relaxors.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Daniel; Stock, Christopher; Rodriguez-Rivera, Jose A; Chi, Songxue; Leo, Juscelino; Long, Xifa; Xie, Yujuan; Bokov, Alexei A; Ye, Zuo-Guang; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Gehring, Peter M

    2014-02-01

    PbZr(1-x)Ti(x)O3 (PZT) and Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)(1-x)Ti(x)O3 (PMN-xPT) are complex lead-oxide perovskites that display exceptional piezoelectric properties for pseudorhombohedral compositions near a tetragonal phase boundary. In PZT these compositions are ferroelectrics, but in PMN-xPT they are relaxors because the dielectric permittivity is frequency dependent and exhibits non-Arrhenius behavior. We show that the nanoscale structure unique to PMN-xPT and other lead-oxide perovskite relaxors is absent in PZT and correlates with a greater than 100% enhancement of the longitudinal piezoelectric coefficient in PMN-xPT relative to that in PZT. By comparing dielectric, structural, lattice dynamical, and piezoelectric measurements on PZT and PMN-xPT, two nearly identical compounds that represent weak and strong random electric field limits, we show that quenched (static) random fields establish the relaxor phase and identify the order parameter. PMID:24449912

  19. Controlling Positronium Annihilation with Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, A. M.; Cooper, B. S.; Deller, A.; Hogan, S. D.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2015-10-01

    We show that the annihilation dynamics of excited positronium (Ps) atoms can be controlled using parallel electric and magnetic fields. To achieve this, Ps atoms were optically excited to n =2 sublevels in fields that were adjusted to control the amount of short-lived and long-lived character of the resulting mixed states. Inclusion of the former offers a practical approach to detection via annihilation radiation, whereas the increased lifetimes due to the latter can be exploited to optimize resonance-enhanced two-photon excitation processes (e.g., 1 S 3 ?2 P 3 ?n S /n D ), either by minimizing losses through intermediate state decay, or by making it possible to separate the excitation laser pulses in time. In addition, photoexcitation of mixed states with a 2 S1 3 component represents an efficient route to producing long-lived pure 2 S1 3 atoms via single-photon excitation.

  20. Interfacial Force Field Characterization in a Constrained Vapor Bubble Thermosyphon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DasGupta, Sunando; Plawsky, Joel L.; Wayner, Peter C., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Isothermal profiles of the extended meniscus in a quartz cuvette were measured in the earth's gravitational field using an image-analyzing interferometer that is based on computer-enhanced video microscopy of the naturally occurring interference fringes. These profiles are a function of the stress field. Experimentally, the augmented Young-Laplace equation is an excellent model for the force field at the solid-liquid-vapor interfaces for heptane and pentane menisci on quartz and tetradecane on SFL6. The effects of refractive indices of the solid and liquid on the measurement techniques were demonstrated. Experimentally obtained values of the disjoining pressure and dispersion constants were compared to those predicted from the Dzyaloshinskii - Lifshitz - Pilaevskii theory for an ideal surface and reasonable agreements were obtained. A parameter introduced gives a quantitative measurement of the closeness of the system to equilibrium. The nonequilibrium behavior of this parameter is also presented

  1. Sodium Chloride, NaCl/ϵ: New Force Field.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Azcatl, Raúl; Barbosa, Marcia C

    2016-03-10

    A new computational model for sodium chloride, the NaCl/ϵ, is proposed. The force field employed for the description of the NaCl is based on a set of radial particle-particle pair potentials involving Lennard-Jones (LJ) and Coulombic forces. The parametrization is obtained by fitting the density of the crystal and the density and the dielectric constant of the mixture of the salt with water at a diluted solution. Our model shows good agreement with the experimental values for the density and for the surface tension of the pure system, and for the density, the viscosity, the diffusion, and the dielectric constant for the mixture with water at various molal concentrations. The NaCl/ϵ together with the water TIP4P/ϵ models provide a good approximation for studying electrolyte solutions. PMID:26890321

  2. Pairwise-additive force fields for selected aqueous monovalent ions from adaptive force matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jicun; Wang, Feng

    2015-11-01

    Simple non-polarizable potentials were developed for Na+, K+, Cl-, and Br- using the adaptive force matching (AFM) method with ab initio MP2 method as reference. Our MP2-AFM force field predicts the solvation free energies of the four salts formed by the ions with an error of no more than 5%. Other properties such as the ion-water radial distribution functions, first solvation shell water tilt angle distributions, ion diffusion constants, concentration dependent diffusion constant of water, and concentration dependent surface tension of the solutions were calculated with this potential. Very good agreement was achieved for these properties. In particular, the diffusion constants of the ions are within 6% of experimental measurements. The model predicts bromide to be enriched at the interface in the 1.6M KBr solution but predicts the ion to be repelled for the surface at lower concentration.

  3. Silica microwire-based interferometric electric field sensor.

    PubMed

    Han, Chunyang; Lv, Fangxing; Sun, Chen; Ding, Hui

    2015-08-15

    Silica microwire, as an optical waveguide whose diameter is close to or smaller than the wavelength of the guided light, is of great interest because it exhibits a number of excellent properties such as tight confinement, large evanescent fields, and great configurability. Here, we report a silica microwire-based compact photonic sensor for real-time detection of high electric field. This device contains an interferometer with propylene carbonate cladding. Based on the Kerr electro-optic effect of propylene carbonate, the applied intensive transient electric field can change the refractive index of propylene carbonate, which shifts the interferometric fringe. Therefore, the electric field could be demodulated by monitoring the fringe shift. The sensor was successfully used to detect alternating electric field with frequency of 50Hz and impulse electric field with duration time of 200?s. This work lays a foundation for future applications in electric field sensing. PMID:26274634

  4. An electrohydraulic actuated ankle foot orthosis to generate force fields and to test proprioceptive reflexes during human walking.

    PubMed

    Nol, Martin; Cantin, Benoit; Lambert, Sbastien; Gosselin, Clment M; Bouyer, Laurent J

    2008-08-01

    The control of human walking can be temporarily modified by applying forces to the leg. To study the neural mechanisms underlying this adaptive capacity, a device delivering controlled forces and high-velocity displacements to the ankle was designed. A new solution, involving a closed circuit hydraulic system composed of two cylinders (master-slave) mutually connected by hoses and controlled by an electric motor was preferred over classical mechanical/electrical approaches. The slave cylinder delivers desired torques to the ankle using a light weight, custom-designed ankle-foot orthosis. This electrohydraulic orthosis (EHO) can produce several types of force fields during walking, including constant, position-dependent, and phase-dependent. With phase-dependent force fields, active torque cancellation maintains low-residual torques ( < or = 1.85 Nm root mean square) outside of the zone of force application for walking speeds ranging from 0.2 to 4.5 km/h. Rapid ankle stretches/unloads ( > 200 degrees/s) can also be produced alone or during force field application, and elicited proprioceptive reflexes in ankle muscles. In conclusion, the EHO is capable of delivering controlled force fields and of activating proprioceptive reflexes during human walking. It will provide the flexibility needed to test the adaptability of healthy and pathological gait control, and to address some of its underlying neural mechanisms. PMID:18701385

  5. Coastal Downscaling Experiments: Can CESM Fields Successfully Force Regional Coastal Ocean Simulations with Strong Freshwater Forcing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacCready, P.; Bryan, F.; Tseng, Y. H.; Whitney, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    The coastal ocean accounts for about half of the global fish harvest, but is poorly resolved in global climate models (a one-degree grid barely sees the continental shelf). Moreover, coastal ocean circulation is strongly modified by river freshwater sources, often coming from estuarine systems that are completely unresolved in the coarse grid. River freshwater input in CESM is added in a practical but ad hoc way, by imposing a surface salinity sink over a region of the ocean approximating the plume area of a given river. Here we present results from a series of model experiments using a high-resolution (1.5 km) ROMS model of the NE Pacific, including the Columbia River and the inland waters of Puget Sound. The base model does multi-year hindcasts using the best available sources of atmospheric (MM5/WRF), ocean (NCOM), river (USGS), and tidal forcing. It has been heavily validated against observations of all sorts, and performs well, so it is an ideal test bed for downscaling experiments. The model framework also does biogeochemistry, including oxygen, and carbon chemistry is being added to make forecasts of Ocean Acidification.This high-resolution ROMS model is systematically run in downscaling experiments for the year 2005 with combinations of CESM forcing (CAM, POP, and rivers) swapped in. Skill is calculated using observations. It is found that the runs with CESM forcing generally retain much of the skill of the base model. A compact metric of response to freshwater forcing is used, which is the mechanical energy required to destratify a shallow coastal volume. This, along with the average temperature and salinity of the volume, are used to characterize and compare runs, including the original CESM-POP fields. Finally the model is run with projected CESM simulation forcing at the end of 21st century based on a set of RCP scenarios, and the compact metrics are used to quantify differences from 2005.

  6. Evaluation of Electromagnetic Force and Magnetic Laval Nozzle Acceleration in an Applied-Field MPD Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobari, Hiroyuki; Sato, Ryuichi; Harata, Kenji; Hattori, Kunihiko; Ando, Akira; Inutake, Masaaki

    2003-10-01

    A magneto-plasma-dynamic thruster (MPDT) is expected as one of the promising electric propulsion systems owing to features of a relatively large thrust, high specific impulse that is unattainable by conventional chemical or nuclear propulsion required for space missions such as a manned Mars mission. To clarify the electromagnetic acceleration mechanism of a plasma flow in an applied-field MPDT, detailed flow field and electromagnetic force field are evaluated experimentally with spectroscopic technique and magnetic probe array. It is found that an axial drag force generated by an interaction between azimuthal plasma current and radial magnetic field cancels an acceleration force in a uniform magnetic field. A thermal energy component is much larger than a flow energy component in Bernoulli's equation and ion acoustic Mach number is limited less than unity in the muzzle region of MPD arcjet. In order to convert the thermal energy to the flow energy, magnetic Laval nozzle acceleration with a local magnetic coil is attempted. The ion Mach number after passing through the nozzle throat exceeds unity and a production of supersonic plasma flow is achieved. An optimum magnetic nozzle configuration is discussed with the experimental results.

  7. Gene delivery in conjunction with gold nanoparticle and tumor treating electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Pawan K.; Soo Lee, Yeon

    2013-08-01

    The advances in electrotherapy to treat the diseased biological cell instigate its extension in gene therapy through the delivery of gene into the nucleus. The objective of this study is to investigate the application of moderate intensity alternating electric field, also known as tumor treating electric field on a carrier system consisting of a charged gene complex conjugated to the surface of a gold nanoparticle. The gene delivery mechanism relies on the magnitude and direction of the induced electric field inside the cytoplasm in presence of carrier system. The induced electric field strength is significant in breaking the gene complex-gold nanoparticle bonding, and exerting an electric force pushing the charged gene into the nucleus. The electric force orientation is dependent on the aspect ratio (AR) of the gold nanoparticle and a relationship between them is studied via Maxwell two-dimensional (2D) finite element simulation analyzer. The development of charge density on the surface of carrier system and the required electric field strength to break the bonding are investigated utilizing the Gouy-Chapman-Grahame-Stern (GCGS) theoretical model. A carrier system having the aspect ratio of the gold nanoparticle in the range 1 < AR ? 5 and AR = 1 are substantial delivering cationic and anionic genes into the nucleus, respectively.

  8. Temperature gradient and electric field driven electrostatic instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, P. J.; Ionson, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The stability of electrostatic waves to thermodynamic and electric potential gradients was investigated. It is shown that thermodynamic gradients drive instabilities even when the internal electric field vanishes. Skewing of the distribution function is not included in the dielectric.

  9. Observations of field-aligned currents, waves, and electric fields at substorm onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, D. P.; Hughes, W. J.; Cattell, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    Substorm onsets, identified Pi 2 pulsations observed on the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory Magnetometer Network, are studied using magnetometer and electric field data from ISEE 1 as well as magnetometer data from the geosynchronous satellites GOES 2 and 3. The mid-latitude magnetometer data provides the means of both timing and locating the substorm onset so that the spacecraft locations with respect to the substorm current systems are known. During two intervals, each containing several onsets or intensifications, ISEE 1 observed field-aligned current signatures beginning simultaneously with the mid-latitude Pi 2 pulsation. Close to the earth broadband bursts of wave noise were observed in the electric field data whenever field-aligned currents were detected. One onset occurred when ISEE 1 and GOES 2 were on the same field line but in opposite hemispheres. During this onset ISEE 1 and GOES 2 saw magnetic signatures which appear to be due to conjugate field-aligned currents flowing out of the western end of the westward auroral electrojets. The ISEE 1 signature is of a line current moving westward past the spacecraft. During the other interval, ISEE 1 was in the near-tail region near the midnight meridian. Plasma data confirms that the plasma sheet thinned and subsequently expanded at onset. Electric field data shows that the plasma moved in the opposite direction to the plasma sheet boundary as the boundary expanded which implies that there must have been an abundant source of hot plasma present. The plasma motion was towards the center of the plasma sheet and earthwards and consisted of a series of pulses rather than a steady flow.

  10. Force-detected magnetic resonance without field gradients.

    PubMed

    Leskowitz, G M; Madsen, L A; Weitekamp, D P

    1998-03-01

    A novel method of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is described which promises to be preferable to known general methods at sample length scales below approximately 100 microm. Its advantages stem from the seemingly paradoxical combination of a homogeneous static magnetic field and detection of a mechanical force between a spin-bearing sample and a magnet assembly. In contrast to other methods of force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (FDNMR), the method is characterized by better observation of magnetization, enhanced resolution, and no gradient (BOOMERANG), and it is generally applicable with respect to sample composition, pulse sequence, and magnetic field strength. Further advantages of portability and low cost stem from the small instrument volume and mass and promise to extend the use of NMR to new applications and environments. A sensitivity analysis, relevant to spectroscopy or imaging, quantifies the advantage of BOOMERANG relative to magnetic induction using microcoils and to FDNMR methods that rely on large gradients of the magnetic field at the sample. PMID:9650792

  11. Nonlinear gravitational self-force: Field outside a small body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Adam

    2012-10-01

    A small extended body moving through an external spacetime g?? creates a metric perturbation h??, which forces the body away from geodesic motion in g??. The foundations of this effect, called the gravitational self-force, are now well established, but concrete results have mostly been limited to linear order. Accurately modeling the dynamics of compact binaries requires proceeding to nonlinear orders. To that end, I show how to obtain the metric perturbation outside the body at all orders in a class of generalized wave gauges. In a small buffer region surrounding the body, the form of the perturbation can be found analytically as an expansion for small distances r from a representative worldline. Given only a specification of the bodys multipole moments, the field obtained in the buffer region suffices to find the metric everywhere outside the body via a numerical puncture scheme. Following this procedure at first and second order, I calculate the field in the buffer region around an arbitrarily structured compact body at sufficiently high order in r to numerically implement a second-order puncture scheme, including effects of the bodys spin. I also define nth-order (local) generalizations of the Detweiler-Whiting singular and regular fields and show that in a certain sense, the body can be viewed as a skeleton of multipole moments.

  12. Rapid parameterization of small molecules using the Force Field Toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Mayne, Christopher G.; Saam, Jan; Schulten, Klaus; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Gumbart, James C.

    2013-01-01

    The inability to rapidly generate accurate and robust parameters for novel chemical matter continues to severely limit the application of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to many biological systems of interest, especially in fields such as drug discovery. Although the release of generalized versions of common classical force fields, e.g., GAFF and CGenFF, have posited guidelines for parameterization of small molecules, many technical challenges remain that have hampered their wide-scale extension. The Force Field Toolkit (ffTK), described herein, minimizes common barriers to ligand parameterization through algorithm and method development, automation of tedious and error-prone tasks, and graphical user interface design. Distributed as a VMD plugin, ffTK facilitates the traversal of a clear and organized workflow resulting in a complete set of CHARMM-compatible parameters. A variety of tools are provided to generate quantum mechanical target data, set up multidimensional optimization routines, and analyze parameter performance. Parameters developed for a small test set of molecules using ffTK were comparable to existing CGenFF parameters in their ability to reproduce experimentally measured values for pure-solvent properties (<15% error from experiment) and free energy of solvation (±0.5 kcal/mol from experiment). PMID:24000174

  13. Multi-parameter Hopf-bifurcation in HHM Model Exposed to ELF Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wang; Yanqiu, Che; Xiangyang, Fei; Feng, Dong

    2005-01-01

    The variation of cell trans-membrane voltage exposed to extremely low frequency (ELF) electric field is analyzed; a modified Hodgkin-Huxley model of muscle (HHM) is established by introducing a new parameter denoting the effect of external electric field, and the bifurcation caused by the new parameter as well as leakage conductance and sodium ions anti-electromotive force is studied. The algebra criterion in high dimension equations is employed to perform the analysis of multi-parameter dynamical bifurcation. The results are of biological significance and suggest that the aberration of dynamics in bio-systems may be accounted for diseases caused by electric exposure. PMID:17281276

  14. Field ion microscopy characterized tips in noncontact atomic force microscopy: Quantification of long-range force interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falter, J.; Langewisch, G.; Hlscher, H.; Fuchs, H.; Schirmeisen, A.

    2013-03-01

    Direct comparison of tip-sample forces obtained by dynamic force spectroscopy experiments with theoretical simulations is extremely difficult, since the precise tip shape and chemical identity of the apex atoms of the force sensing tip remain unknown in most experiments. Here, we present force curves measured with a tungsten tip on a Ag(111) surface obtained in a low-temperature atomic force microscope using tips that were analyzed by field ion microscopy down to atomic levels. The resulting van der Waals and electrostatic forces were found to be in quantitative agreement with analytical models, if the tip shape parameters from the field ion microscopy analysis were used. Furthermore, our analysis shows an additional long-range force interaction at tip-sample distances above 1.3 nm. We suggest that this unexpected force is related to patch charges arising from the inhomogeneous work function distribution on the surface of highly faceted sharp tips.

  15. Continuum Polarizable Force Field within the Poisson-Boltzmann Framework

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yu-Hong; Tan, Chunhu; Wang, Junmei; Luo, Ray

    2008-01-01

    We have developed and tested a complete set of nonbonded parameters for a continuum polarizable force field. Our analysis shows that the new continuum polarizable model is consistent with B3LYP/cc-pVTZ in modeling electronic response upon variation of dielectric environment. Comparison with experiment also shows that the new continuum polarizable model is reasonable, with similar accuracy as B3LYP/cc-pVTZ in reproduction of dipole moments of selected organic molecules in the gas phase. We have further tested the validity to interchange the Amber van der Waals parameters between the explicit and continuum polarizable force fields with a series of dimers. It can be found that the continuum polarizable model agrees well with MP2/cc-pVTZ, with deviations in dimer binding energies less than 0.9 kcal/mol in the aqueous dielectric environment. Finally we have optimized atomic cavity radii with respect to experimental solvation free energies of 177 training molecules. To validate the optimized cavity radii, we have tested these parameters against 176 test molecules. It is found that the optimized PB atomic cavity radii transfer well from the training set to the test set, with an overall root-mean-squared deviation of 1.30 kcal/mol, unsigned average error of 1.07 kacl/mol, and correlation coefficient of 92% for all 353 molecules in both the training and test sets. Given the development documented here, the next natural step is the construction of a full protein/nucleic acid force field within the new continuum polarization framework. PMID:18507452

  16. Tailoring viscoelastic response of carbon nanotubes cellular structure using electric field.

    PubMed

    Misra, Abha; Kumar, Praveen

    2014-11-21

    Cellular structures of carbon nanotubes (CNT) are novel engineering materials, which are finding applications due to their remarkable structural and functional properties. Here, we report the effects of electric field, one of the most frequently used stimulants for harnessing the functional properties of CNT, on the viscoelastic response, an important design consideration for the structural applications of a cellular CNT sample. The application of an electric field results in electrostriction induced large actuation in freestanding CNT samples; however, if the CNT are prohibited to expand, an electric field dependent force is exerted by the sample on the constraining platens. In addition, the above force monotonically decreases with the pre-compressive strain imposed onto the sample. The viscoelastic recovery reveals a decrease in the stress relaxation with an increase in the pre-compressive strain in both the presence and absence of the electric field; however, the stress relaxation was significantly higher in the presence of the electric field. A model, based on a simple linear viscoelastic solid incorporating electric field, is developed to understand the experimental observations. PMID:25277155

  17. Bubble Detachment in Variable Gravity Under the Influence of a Non-Uniform Electric Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Shinan; Herman, Cila; Iacona, Estelle

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the study reported in this paper is to investigate the effects of variable, reduced gravity on the formation and detachment behavior of individual air bubbles under the influence of a non-uniform electric field. For this purpose, variable gravity experiments were carried out in parabolic nights. The non-uniform electric field was generated by a spherical electrode and a plate electrode. The effect of the magnitude of the non-uniform electric field and gravity level on bubble formation, development and detachment at an orifice was investigated. An image processing code was developed that allows the measurement of bubble volume, dimensions and contact angle at detachment. The results of this research can be used to explore the possibility of enhancing boiling heat transfer in the variable and low gravity environments by substituting the buoyancy force with a force induced by the electric field. The results of experiments and measurements indicate that the level of gravity significantly affects bubble shape, size and frequency. The electric field magnitude also influences bubble detachment, however, its impact is not as profound as that of variable gravity for the range of electric field magnitudes investigated in the present study.

  18. Static electric field detection and behavioural avoidance in cockroaches.

    PubMed

    Newland, Philip L; Hunt, Edmund; Sharkh, Suleiman M; Hama, Noriyuki; Takahata, Masakazu; Jackson, Christopher W

    2008-12-01

    Electric fields are pervasively present in the environment and occur both as a result of man-made activities and through natural occurrence. We have analysed the behaviour of cockroaches to static electric fields and determined the physiological mechanisms that underlie their behavioural responses. The behaviour of animals in response to electric fields was tested using a Y-choice chamber with an electric field generated in one arm of the chamber. Locomotory behaviour and avoidance were affected by the magnitude of the electric fields with up to 85% of individuals avoiding the charged arm when the static electric field at the entrance to the arm was above 8-10 kV m(-1). Electric fields were found to cause a deflection of the antennae but when the antennae were surgically ablated, the ability of cockroaches to avoid electric fields was abolished. Fixation of various joints of the antennae indicated that hair plate sensory receptors at the base of the scape were primarily responsible for the detection of electric fields, and when antennal movements about the head-scape joint were prevented cockroaches failed to avoid electric fields. To overcome the technical problem of not being able to carry out electrophysiological analysis in the presence of electric fields, we developed a procedure using magnetic fields combined with the application of iron particles to the antennae to deflect the antennae and analyse the role of thoracic interneurones in signalling this deflection. The avoidance of electric fields in the context of high voltage power lines is discussed. PMID:19011207

  19. Local plasma membrane permeabilization of living cells by nanosecond electric pulses using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Gary; Payne, Jason A.; Roth, Caleb C.; Wilmink, Gerald J.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2011-03-01

    Numerous studies provide evidence that nanosecond electric pulses (nsEPs) can trigger the formation of nanopores in the plasma membranes of cells. However, the biophysical mechanism responsible for nanopore formation is not well understood. In this study, we hypothesize that membrane damage induced by nsEPs is primarily dependent on the local molecular composition and mechanical strength of the plasma membrane. To test this hypothesis, we positioned metal-coated, nanoscale cantilever tips using an atomic force microscope (AFM) to deliver nsEPs to localized areas on the surface of the plasma membrane. We conducted computational modeling simulations to verify that the electric field provided by the nsEP is concentrated between the tip and the plasma membrane. The results show that we could effectively deliver nsEPs using the AFM tips at very low voltages. Using scanning electron microscopy we analyzed the tips after applying 10V over 5 seconds duration and found no damage to the tip or loss of platinum coating. As a proof of concept, we applied a 1 and 10V, 5 second pulse to HeLa cells causing large morphological changes. We also applied both a mechanical indention and 600ns electrical pulse stimulus and measured positive propidium ion uptake into the cytoplasm suggesting formation of membrane pores. In future studies, we plan to elucidate the effect that specific, local molecular structures and compositions have on efficacy of electroporation using the newly constructed nano-electrode system.

  20. Flow-Driven Cell Migration under External Electric Fields.

    PubMed

    Li, Yizeng; Mori, Yoichiro; Sun, Sean X

    2015-12-31

    Electric fields influence many aspects of cell physiology, including various forms of cell migration. Many cells are sensitive to electric fields, and they can migrate toward a cathode or an anode, depending on the cell type. In this Letter, we examine an actomyosin-independent mode of cell migration under electrical fields. Our theory considers a one-dimensional cell with water and ionic fluxes at the cell boundary. Water fluxes through the membrane are governed by the osmotic pressure difference across the cell membrane. Fluxes of cations and anions across the cell membrane are determined by the properties of the ion channels as well as the external electric field. Results show that without actin polymerization and myosin contraction, electric fields can also drive cell migration, even when the cell is not polarized. The direction of migration with respect to the electric field direction is influenced by the properties of ion channels, and are cell-type dependent. PMID:26765031

  1. Flow-Driven Cell Migration under External Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yizeng; Mori, Yoichiro; Sun, Sean X.

    2015-12-01

    Electric fields influence many aspects of cell physiology, including various forms of cell migration. Many cells are sensitive to electric fields, and they can migrate toward a cathode or an anode, depending on the cell type. In this Letter, we examine an actomyosin-independent mode of cell migration under electrical fields. Our theory considers a one-dimensional cell with water and ionic fluxes at the cell boundary. Water fluxes through the membrane are governed by the osmotic pressure difference across the cell membrane. Fluxes of cations and anions across the cell membrane are determined by the properties of the ion channels as well as the external electric field. Results show that without actin polymerization and myosin contraction, electric fields can also drive cell migration, even when the cell is not polarized. The direction of migration with respect to the electric field direction is influenced by the properties of ion channels, and are cell-type dependent.

  2. Computation of induced electric field for the sacral nerve activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Hattori, Junya; Laakso, Ilkka; Takagi, Airi; Shimada, Takuo

    2013-11-01

    The induced electric field/current in the sacral nerve by stimulation devices for the treatment of bladder overactivity is investigated. Implanted and transcutaneous electrode configurations are considered. The electric field induced in the sacral nerve by the implanted electrode is largely affected by its surrounding tissues, which is attributable to the variation in the input impedance of the electrode. In contrast, the electric field induced by the transcutaneous electrode is affected by the tissue conductivity and anatomical composition of the body. In addition, the electric field induced in the subcutaneous fat in close proximity of the electrode is comparable with the estimated threshold electric field for pain. These computational findings explain the clinically observed weakness and side effect of each configuration. For the transcutaneous stimulator, we suggest that the electrode contact area be increased to reduce the induced electric field in the subcutaneous fat.

  3. Electric field induced bacterial flocculation of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli 042

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Aloke; Mortensen, Ninell P; Mukherjee, Partha P; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2011-01-01

    A response of the aggregation dynamics of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli under low magnitude steady and oscillating electric fields is presented. The presence of uniform electric fields hampered microbial adhesion and biofilm formation on a transverse glass surface, but instead promoted the formation of flocs. Extremely heterogeneous distribution of live and dead cells was observed among the flocs. Moreover, floc formation was largely observed to be independent of the frequency of alternating electric fields.

  4. Electric field induced bacterial flocculation of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli 042

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Aloke; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Mukherjee, Partha P.; Retterer, Scott T.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.

    2011-06-01

    A response of the aggregation dynamics of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli under low magnitude steady and oscillating electric fields is presented. The presence of uniform electric fields hampered microbial adhesion and biofilm formation on a transverse glass surface, but instead promoted the formation of flocs. Extremely heterogenous distribution of live and dead cells was observed among the flocs. Moreover, floc formation was largely observed to be independent of the frequency of alternating electric fields.

  5. Electric field breakdown in single molecule junctions.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Su, Timothy A; Zhang, Vivian; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin; Venkataraman, Latha

    2015-04-22

    Here we study the stability and rupture of molecular junctions under high voltage bias at the single molecule/single bond level using the scanning tunneling microscope-based break-junction technique. We synthesize carbon-, silicon-, and germanium-based molecular wires terminated by aurophilic linker groups and study how the molecular backbone and linker group affect the probability of voltage-induced junction rupture. First, we find that junctions formed with covalent S-Au bonds are robust under high voltage and their rupture does not demonstrate bias dependence within our bias range. In contrast, junctions formed through donor-acceptor bonds rupture more frequently, and their rupture probability demonstrates a strong bias dependence. Moreover, we find that the junction rupture probability increases significantly above ∼1 V in junctions formed from methylthiol-terminated disilanes and digermanes, indicating a voltage-induced rupture of individual Si-Si and Ge-Ge bonds. Finally, we compare the rupture probabilities of the thiol-terminated silane derivatives containing Si-Si, Si-C, and Si-O bonds and find that Si-C backbones have higher probabilities of sustaining the highest voltage. These results establish a new method for studying electric field breakdown phenomena at the single molecule level. PMID:25675085

  6. Evidences of seismo-generated electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. G.

    2009-12-01

    The global ionospheric map (GIM) is used to observe variations in the total electron content (TEC) of the global positioning system (GPS) associated with the 21 September 21 1999 M7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake, 26 December 2004 M9.3 Sumatra Earthquake, and 12 May 2008 M7.9 Wenchuan Earthquake. Spatial distributions of the TEC anomalies associated with the three earthquakes reveal remarkable conjugate signatures. The electron density profiles probed by six micro satellites of FORMOSAT3/COSMIC (F3/C) are further employed to simultaneously observe seismo-ionospheric anomalies during the Wenchuan earthquake. It is found that the ionospheric F2-peak electron density NmF2 and height hmF2 over the epicenter and its conjugate point significantly decreases approximately 40% and descends about 50-80km, respectively, when the GPS TEC anomalously reduces, while the NmF2 at the geomagnetic remarkable enhanced. This is an alternative evidence of the seismo-generated electric field being observed.

  7. Dust particles under the influence of crossed electric and magnetic fields in the sheath of an rf discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puttscher, M.; Melzer, A.

    2014-12-01

    Experimental studies on the interaction of micron-sized dust particles in plasmas with external magnetic fields are presented. The particles are levitated in the sheath region of an rf discharge by gravity and electric field force under the presence of a horizontal magnetic field of up to 50 mT. It is observed that the dust particles are pushed either in the E → × B → - or in the opposite direction depending on magnetic field strength, particle properties, and discharge conditions. This transport behavior is described by a competition between horizontal ambipolar electric field force and ion and neutral drag.

  8. Dust particles under the influence of crossed electric and magnetic fields in the sheath of an rf discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Puttscher, M. Melzer, A.

    2014-12-15

    Experimental studies on the interaction of micron-sized dust particles in plasmas with external magnetic fields are presented. The particles are levitated in the sheath region of an rf discharge by gravity and electric field force under the presence of a horizontal magnetic field of up to 50 mT. It is observed that the dust particles are pushed either in the E{sup →}×B{sup →}- or in the opposite direction depending on magnetic field strength, particle properties, and discharge conditions. This transport behavior is described by a competition between horizontal ambipolar electric field force and ion and neutral drag.

  9. Relationship between the ion drag and electric forces in dense dust clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroshenko, V. V.; Khrapak, S. A.; Morfill, G. E.

    2013-04-15

    It is shown that the relation between the ion drag and electric forces is strongly dependent on the dust number density in complex plasmas. The effect of the particle size and discharge parameters on the force balance is investigated. Examples are given for realistic complex plasma parameters and comparison with microgravity experiments is presented.

  10. Linear electric field time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Feldman, William C.

    2008-06-10

    A linear electric field ion mass spectrometer having an evacuated enclosure with means for generating a linear electric field located in the evacuated enclosure and means for injecting a sample material into the linear electric field. A source of pulsed ionizing radiation injects ionizing radiation into the linear electric field to ionize atoms or molecules of the sample material, and timing means determine the time elapsed between ionization of atoms or molecules and arrival of an ion out of the ionized atoms or molecules at a predetermined position.

  11. High electric field measurement using slab-coupled optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Stan, Nikola; Seng, Frederick; Shumway, LeGrand; King, Rex; Selfridge, Richard; Schultz, Stephen

    2016-01-20

    A fiber-optic electric field sensor was developed to measure electric field up to 18 MV/m. The sensor uses resonant coupling between an optical fiber and a nonlinear electro-optical crystal. The sensing system uses high dielectric strength materials to eliminate dielectric breakdown. A postprocessing nonlinear calibration method is developed that maps voltage change to wavelength shift and then converts the wavelength shift to electric field using the transmission spectrum. The nonlinear calibration method is compared against the linear method with electric field pulses having magnitudes from 1.5 to 18 MV/m. PMID:26835936

  12. Neutral winds and electric fields in the dusk auroral oval. I - Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikkelsen, I. S.; Jorgensen, T. S.; Kelley, M. C.; Larsen, M. F.; Pereira, E.; Vickrey, J.

    1981-01-01

    Two rockets carrying an upleg and downleg trimethyl aluminum chemical trail release and three barium cannisters were launched from Poker Flat, Alaska on Feb. 28, 1978 and Mar. 2, 1978 in order to study neutral winds and electric fields in the dusk auroral oval. Electric field measurements were also made with a radar system to supplement the barium cloud data. The barium cloud drifts on both days showed intense poleward electric fields in the subauroral region. The drifts were nearly latitude-independent and were equivalent to electric fields of 60 mV/m of February 2 and 40 mV/m on March 2. The data indicate that the Lorentz force and Joule heating had a strong influence on the observed neutral winds.

  13. Reactive force field potential for carbon deposition on silicon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Briquet, Ludovic G V; Jana, Arindam; Mether, Lotta; Nordlund, Kai; Henrion, Grard; Philipp, Patrick; Wirtz, Tom

    2012-10-01

    In this paper a new interatomic potential based on the Kieffer force field and designed to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of carbon deposition on silicon surfaces is implemented. This potential is a third-order reactive force field that includes a dynamic charge transfer and allows for the formation and breaking of bonds. The parameters for Si-C and C-C interactions are optimized using a genetic algorithm. The quality of the potential is tested on its ability to model silicon carbide and diamond physical properties as well as the formation energies of point defects. Furthermore, MD simulations of carbon deposition on reconstructed (100) silicon surfaces are carried out and compared to similar simulations using a Tersoff-like bond order potential. Simulations with both potentials produce similar results showing the ability to extend the use of the Kieffer potential to deposition studies. The investigation reveals the presence of a channelling effect when depositing the carbon at 45 incidence angle. This effect is due to channels running in directions symmetrically equivalent to the (110) direction. The channelling is observed to a lesser extent for carbon atoms with 30 and 60 incidence angles relative to the surface normal. On a pristine silicon surface, sticking coefficients were found to vary between 100 and 73%, depending on deposition conditions. PMID:22914286

  14. Coarse graining of force fields for metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Drholt, Johannes P; Galvelis, Raimondas; Schmid, Rochus

    2016-03-01

    We have adapted our genetic algorithm based optimization approach, originally developed to generate force field parameters from quantum mechanic reference data, to derive a first coarse grained force field for a MOF, taking the atomistic MOF-FF as a reference. On the example of the copper paddle-wheel based HKUST-1, a maximally coarse grained model, using a single bead for each three and four coordinated vertex, was developed as a proof of concept. By adding non-bonded interactions with a modified Buckingham potential, the resulting MOF-FF-CGNB is able to predict local deformation energies of the building blocks as well as bulk properties like the tbovs.pto energy difference or elastic constants in a semi-quantitative way. As expected, the negative thermal expansion of HKUST-1 is not reproduced by the maximally coarse grained model. At the expense of atomic resolution, substantially larger systems (up to tens of nanometers in size) can be simulated with respect to structural and mechanical properties, bridging the gap to the mesoscale. As an example the deformation of the [111] surface of HKUST-1 by a "tip" could be computed without artifacts from periodic images. PMID:26732756

  15. Injury by electrical forces: pathophysiology, manifestations, and therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, R C

    1997-09-01

    The pathogenesis and pathophysiologic features of electrical injury are more complex than once thought. The relative contributions of thermal and pure electrical damage depend on the duration of electric current passage, the orientation of the cells in the current path, their location, and other factors. If the contact time is brief, nonthermal mechanisms of cell damage will be most important and the damage is relatively restricted to the cell membrane. When contact time is much longer, however, heat damage predominates and the whole cell is affected directly. These parameters also determine the anatomic tissue distribution of injury. Damage by Joule heating is not known to be dependent on cell size, whereas larger cells are more vulnerable to membrane breakdown by electroporation. Cells do survive transient plasma membrane rupture under appropriate circumstances or if therapy is instituted quickly. If membrane permeabilization is the primary cellular pathologic condition, then injured tissue may be salvageable and the challenge for the future is to identify a technique to reseal the damaged membranes promptly. Present standards of care for electrical injury require a fully staffed and well-equipped intensive care unit, available operating suites, and the availability of the full range of medical specialists. Major teaching hospitals with burn centers may be the ideal setting for the treatment of an electrical trauma victim. After the initial resuscitation, efforts are directed primarily towards preventing additional tissue loss mediated through the compartment syndrome, compressive neuropathies, or the presence of necrotic tissue. Renal and cardiac failure caused by the release of intracellular muscle contents into the circulation must be prevented. Attention can then be directed towards maximizing tissue salvage and preventing late skeletal and neuromuscular complications. Reconstructive procedures that transfer healthy tissue from a distance are necessary to optimize the functional value of the remaining tissue. Finally, unless the patient is rehabilitated psychologically, the real benefit from other sophisticated care will not be fully realized. These goals are important throughout the acute care of the patient. In the future, new guidelines for treating electrical trauma will be based on a clearer understanding of the relevant pathophysiologic features. These strategies will rely on improved diagnostic imaging and on reversing the fundamental problem of cell membrane damage. Moreover, complex biochemical and organ system pathophysiologic interactions will require careful management. If successful, research efforts presently underway should improve the prognosis of victims after electrical trauma. PMID:9365421

  16. [Effects of frequency on muscular force induced by electric stimulation].

    PubMed

    Ferry, B; Poumarat, G

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the effect of low frequency current (L) versus medium frequency current (M) in order to generate a different force level on soleus and gastrocnemius muscles. The experiment was conducted on 10 healthy, male volunteer subjects aged from 19 to 21 who provided informed consent to participate in the experiment. None of the subjects had experienced electrostimulation (ES) procedures before. The subjects were seated with vertical legs and horizontal thighs. Isometric force of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles was measured using a strain gage dynamometer (100 daN). The transducer was adjusted on the knee, along the vertical axis of the leg. For the conditions of ES, a bi-phasic, symmetrical square wave signal was applied at each of five low frequencies: 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 Hz and at each of six medium frequencies (2222 Hz) modulated or not, to yield 20, 40, 60, 80, 100 bursts of pulses. Maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) was also recorded. The phase duration was constant throughout 180 microseconds. The current level was set individually for each subject at the maximum that could be tolerated and applied during 10 s. Each contractile condition was randomly chosen. The forces produced by the different regimen of ES used are significantly different (P < 0.001). For each type of stimulation we got tetanic contractions. After an initial ramp, a nearly flat curve corresponding to tetanus was reached. For a 60 hz low frequency current, the force production reached 76% of MVC for a mean intensity of 58 mA, corresponding to a charge of 1253 microC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7894037

  17. DC Electric Fields and Associated Plasma Drifts Observed with the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Rowland, D.

    2009-01-01

    Initial DC electric field observations and associated plasma drifts are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite. We present statistical averages of the vector fields for the first year of operations that include both the zonal and radial components of the resulting E x B plasma flows at low latitudes. Magnetic field data from the VEFI science magnetometer are used to compute the plasma flows. The DC electric field detector reveals zonal and radial electric fields that undergo strong diurnal variations, typically displaying eastward and outward-directed fields during the day and westward and downward-directed fields at night. There is considerable variation in the large scale DC electric field data, in both the daytime and nighttime cases, with enhanced structures typically observed at night. In general, the measured zonal DC electric field amplitudes include excursions that extend within the 0.4 - 2 m V/m range, corresponding to E x B drifts of the order of 30-150 m/s. The average vertical or radial electric fields may exceed the zonal fields in amplitude by a factor of 1.5 to 2. Although the data compare well, in a general sense, with previous satellite observations and statistical patterns of vertical ion drifts, the E x B drifts we report from C/NOFS rarely show a pronounced pre-reversal enhancement after sunset. We attribute this to a combination of extreme solar minimum conditions and the fact that the C/NOFS orbit of 401 by 867 km carries the probes essentially above the lower altitude regions where the wind-driven dynamo might be expected to create enhanced upwards drifts in the early evening. Evidence for wavenumber 4 tidal effects and other longitudinal signatures have been detected and will be presented. We also discuss off-equatorial electric fields and their relation to the ambient plasma density.

  18. Magnetic Field Confinement in the Solar Corona. I. Force-free Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flyer, N.; Fornberg, B.; Thomas, S.; Low, B. C.

    2004-05-01

    Axisymmetric force-free magnetic fields external to a unit sphere are studied as solutions to boundary value problems in an unbounded domain posed by the equilibrium equations. It is well known from virial considerations that stringent global constraints apply for a force-free field to be confined in equilibrium against expansion into the unbounded space. This property as a basic mechanism for solar coronal mass ejections is explored by examining several sequences of axisymmetric force-free fields of an increasing total azimuthal flux with a power-law distribution over the poloidal field. Particular attention is paid to the formation of an azimuthal rope of twisted magnetic field embedded within the global field, and to the energy storage properties associated with such a structure. These sequences of solutions demonstrate (1) the formation of self-similar regions in the far global field where details of the inner boundary conditions are mathematically irrelevant, and (2) the possibility that there is a maximum to the amount of azimuthal magnetic flux confined by a poloidal field of a fixed flux anchored rigidly to the inner boundary. The nonlinear elliptic boundary value problems we treat are mathematically interesting and challenging, requiring a specially designed solver, which is described in the Appendix.

  19. Surface electric fields for North America during historical geomagnetic storms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, Lisa H.; Homeier, Nichole; Gannon, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the impact of geomagnetic disturbances on the electric grid, we recreate surface electric fields from two historical geomagnetic storms—the 1989 “Quebec” storm and the 2003 “Halloween” storms. Using the Spherical Elementary Current Systems method, we interpolate sparsely distributed magnetometer data across North America. We find good agreement between the measured and interpolated data, with larger RMS deviations at higher latitudes corresponding to larger magnetic field variations. The interpolated magnetic field data are combined with surface impedances for 25 unique physiographic regions from the United States Geological Survey and literature to estimate the horizontal, orthogonal surface electric fields in 1 min time steps. The induced horizontal electric field strongly depends on the local surface impedance, resulting in surprisingly strong electric field amplitudes along the Atlantic and Gulf Coast. The relative peak electric field amplitude of each physiographic region, normalized to the value in the Interior Plains region, varies by a factor of 2 for different input magnetic field time series. The order of peak electric field amplitudes (largest to smallest), however, does not depend much on the input. These results suggest that regions at lower magnetic latitudes with high ground resistivities are also at risk from the effect of geomagnetically induced currents. The historical electric field time series are useful for estimating the flow of the induced currents through long transmission lines to study power flow and grid stability during geomagnetic disturbances.

  20. Surface electric fields for North America during historical geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lisa H.; Homeier, Nicole; Gannon, Jennifer L.

    2013-08-01

    To better understand the impact of geomagnetic disturbances on the electric grid, we recreate surface electric fields from two historical geomagnetic stormsthe 1989 "Quebec" storm and the 2003 "Halloween" storms. Using the Spherical Elementary Current Systems method, we interpolate sparsely distributed magnetometer data across North America. We find good agreement between the measured and interpolated data, with larger RMS deviations at higher latitudes corresponding to larger magnetic field variations. The interpolated magnetic field data are combined with surface impedances for 25 unique physiographic regions from the United States Geological Survey and literature to estimate the horizontal, orthogonal surface electric fields in 1 min time steps. The induced horizontal electric field strongly depends on the local surface impedance, resulting in surprisingly strong electric field amplitudes along the Atlantic and Gulf Coast. The relative peak electric field amplitude of each physiographic region, normalized to the value in the Interior Plains region, varies by a factor of 2 for different input magnetic field time series. The order of peak electric field amplitudes (largest to smallest), however, does not depend much on the input. These results suggest that regions at lower magnetic latitudes with high ground resistivities are also at risk from the effect of geomagnetically induced currents. The historical electric field time series are useful for estimating the flow of the induced currents through long transmission lines to study power flow and grid stability during geomagnetic disturbances.

  1. Silicone oil contamination and electrical contact resistance degradation of low-force gold contacts.

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, Michael Thomas; Dickrell, Daniel John, III

    2006-02-01

    Hot-switched low-force gold electrical contact testing was performed using a nanomechanical test apparatus to ascertain the sensitivity of simulated microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) contact to silicone oil contamination. The observed cyclic contact resistance degradation was dependent on both closure rate and noncontact applied voltage. The decomposition of silicone oil from electrical arcing was hypothesized as the degradation mechanism.

  2. Numerical studies of forced electrical axial-symmetrical oscillations of an ideally conductive extended solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyshiko, A. L.; Konyukhova, N. B.

    1995-05-01

    The article examines the characteristics of the radiation of an open spherical resonator excited by an electrical dipole set on its axis of rotation and oriented along this axis or by point electrical forces uniformly distributed in parallel. Special attention is given to the resonance properties of a strongly extended spheroid modelling a whip antenna.

  3. A bidirectional brain-machine interface algorithm that approximates arbitrary force-fields.

    PubMed

    Vato, Alessandro; Szymanski, Francois D; Semprini, Marianna; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A; Panzeri, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    We examine bidirectional brain-machine interfaces that control external devices in a closed loop by decoding motor cortical activity to command the device and by encoding the state of the device by delivering electrical stimuli to sensory areas. Although it is possible to design this artificial sensory-motor interaction while maintaining two independent channels of communication, here we propose a rule that closes the loop between flows of sensory and motor information in a way that approximates a desired dynamical policy expressed as a field of forces acting upon the controlled external device. We previously developed a first implementation of this approach based on linear decoding of neural activity recorded from the motor cortex into a set of forces (a force field) applied to a point mass, and on encoding of position of the point mass into patterns of electrical stimuli delivered to somatosensory areas. However, this previous algorithm had the limitation that it only worked in situations when the position-to-force map to be implemented is invertible. Here we overcome this limitation by developing a new non-linear form of the bidirectional interface that can approximate a virtually unlimited family of continuous fields. The new algorithm bases both the encoding of position information and the decoding of motor cortical activity on an explicit map between spike trains and the state space of the device computed with Multi-Dimensional-Scaling. We present a detailed computational analysis of the performance of the interface and a validation of its robustness by using synthetic neural responses in a simulated sensory-motor loop. PMID:24626393

  4. A Bidirectional Brain-Machine Interface Algorithm That Approximates Arbitrary Force-Fields

    PubMed Central

    Semprini, Marianna; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A.; Panzeri, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    We examine bidirectional brain-machine interfaces that control external devices in a closed loop by decoding motor cortical activity to command the device and by encoding the state of the device by delivering electrical stimuli to sensory areas. Although it is possible to design this artificial sensory-motor interaction while maintaining two independent channels of communication, here we propose a rule that closes the loop between flows of sensory and motor information in a way that approximates a desired dynamical policy expressed as a field of forces acting upon the controlled external device. We previously developed a first implementation of this approach based on linear decoding of neural activity recorded from the motor cortex into a set of forces (a force field) applied to a point mass, and on encoding of position of the point mass into patterns of electrical stimuli delivered to somatosensory areas. However, this previous algorithm had the limitation that it only worked in situations when the position-to-force map to be implemented is invertible. Here we overcome this limitation by developing a new non-linear form of the bidirectional interface that can approximate a virtually unlimited family of continuous fields. The new algorithm bases both the encoding of position information and the decoding of motor cortical activity on an explicit map between spike trains and the state space of the device computed with Multi-Dimensional-Scaling. We present a detailed computational analysis of the performance of the interface and a validation of its robustness by using synthetic neural responses in a simulated sensory-motor loop. PMID:24626393

  5. Unified Field Theory and Force Formulas of Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tian; Wang, Shouhong

    2013-04-01

    The main objective of this talk is to drive a unified field model coupling four interactions, based on the principle of interaction dynamics (PID) and the principle of representation invariance (PID). Intuitively, PID takes the variation of the action functional under energy-momentum conservation constraint. PRI requires that physical laws be independent of representations of the gauge groups. One important outcome of this unified field model is a natural duality between the interacting fields (g, A, W^a, S^k), corresponding to graviton, photon, intermediate vector bosons W^ and Z and gluons, and the adjoint bosonic fields (?,, ^aw, ^ks). This duality predicts two Higgs particles of similar mass with one due to weak interaction and the other due to strong interaction. PID and PRI can be applied directly to individual interactions, leading to 1) modified Einstein equations, giving rise to a unified theory for dark matter and dark energy, 2) three levels of strong interaction potentials for quark, nucleon/hadron, and atom respectively, and 3) a weak interaction potential. These potential/force formulas offer a clear mechanism for both quark confinement and asymptotic freedom.

  6. Planetary Magnetic Fields and Solar Forcing: Implications for Atmospheric Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, Rickard; Lammer, Helmut; Ribas, Ignasi

    2007-03-01

    The solar wind and the solar XUV/EUV radiation constitute a permanent forcing of the upper atmosphere of the planets in our solar system, thereby affecting the habitability and chances for life to emerge on a planet. The forcing is essentially inversely proportional to the square of the distance to the Sun and, therefore, is most important for the innermost planets in our solar systemthe Earth-like planets. The effect of these two forcing terms is to ionize, heat, chemically modify, and slowly erode the upper atmosphere throughout the lifetime of a planet. The closer to the Sun, the more efficient are these process. Atmospheric erosion is due to thermal and non-thermal escape. Gravity constitutes the major protection mechanism for thermal escape, while the non-thermal escape caused by the ionizing X-rays and EUV radiation and the solar wind require other means of protection. Ionospheric plasma energization and ion pickup represent two categories of non-thermal escape processes that may bring matter up to high velocities, well beyond escape velocity. These energization processes have now been studied by a number of plasma instruments orbiting Earth, Mars, and Venus for decades. Plasma measurement results therefore constitute the most useful empirical data basis for the subject under discussion. This does not imply that ionospheric plasma energization and ion pickup are the main processes for the atmospheric escape, but they remain processes that can be most easily tested against empirical data. Shielding the upper atmosphere of a planet against solar XUV, EUV, and solar wind forcing requires strong gravity and a strong intrinsic dipole magnetic field. For instance, the strong dipole magnetic field of the Earth provides a magnetic umbrella, fending of the solar wind at a distance of 10 Earth radii. Conversely, the lack of a strong intrinsic magnetic field at Mars and Venus means that the solar wind has more direct access to their topside atmosphere, the reason that Mars and Venus, planets lacking strong intrinsic magnetic fields, have so much less water than the Earth? Climatologic and atmospheric loss process over evolutionary timescales of planetary atmospheres can only be understood if one considers the fact that the radiation and plasma environment of the Sun has changed substantially with time. Standard stellar evolutionary models indicate that the Sun after its arrival at the Zero-Age Main Sequence (ZAMS) 4.5 Gyr ago had a total luminosity of ?70% of the present Sun. This should have led to a much cooler Earth in the past, while geological and fossil evidence indicate otherwise. In addition, observations by various satellites and studies of solar proxies (Sun-like stars with different age) indicate that the young Sun was rotating more than 10 times its present rate and had correspondingly strong dynamo-driven high-energy emissions which resulted in strong X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) emissions, up to several 100 times stronger than the present Sun. Further, evidence of a much denser early solar wind and the mass loss rate of the young Sun can be determined from collision of ionized stellar winds of the solar proxies, with the partially ionized gas in the interstellar medium. Empirical correlations of stellar mass loss rates with X-ray surface flux values allows one to estimate the solar wind mass flux at earlier times, when the solar wind may have been more than 1000 times more massive. The main conclusions drawn on basis of the Sun-in-time-, and a time-dependent model of plasma energization/escape is that: 1. Solar forcing is effective in removing volatiles, primarily water, from planets,

  7. Extracting nucleon magnetic moments and electric polarizabilities from lattice QCD in background electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Detmold, W.; Tiburzi, B. C.; Walker-Loud, A.

    2010-03-01

    Nucleon properties are investigated in background electric fields. As the magnetic moments of baryons affect their relativistic propagation in constant electric fields, electric polarizabilities cannot be determined without knowledge of magnetic moments. This is analogous to the experimental situation, for which determination of polarizabilities from the Compton amplitude requires subtraction of Born terms. With the background field method, we devise combinations of nucleon correlation functions in constant electric fields that isolate magnetic moments and electric polarizabilities. Using an ensemble of anisotropic gauge configurations with dynamical clover fermions, we demonstrate how both observables can be determined from lattice QCD simulations in background electric fields. We obtain results for the neutron and proton, however, our study is currently limited to electrically neutral sea quarks. The value we extract for the nucleon isovector magnetic moment is comparable to those obtained from measuring lattice three-point functions at similar pion masses.

  8. High-frequency electric field measurement using a toroidal antenna

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha (Lafayette, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A simple and compact method and apparatus for detecting high frequency electric fields, particularly in the frequency range of 1 MHz to 100 MHz, uses a compact toroidal antenna. For typical geophysical applications the sensor will be used to detect electric fields for a wide range of spectrum starting from about 1 MHz, in particular in the frequency range between 1 to 100 MHz, to detect small objects in the upper few meters of the ground. Time-varying magnetic fields associated with time-varying electric fields induce an emf (voltage) in a toroidal coil. The electric field at the center of (and perpendicular to the plane of) the toroid is shown to be linearly related to this induced voltage. By measuring the voltage across a toroidal coil one can easily and accurately determine the electric field.

  9. Middle atmospheric electric fields over thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzworth, Robert H.

    1992-01-01

    This grant has supported a variety of investigations all having to do with the external electrodynamics of thunderstorms. The grant was a continuation of work begun while the PI was at the Aerospace Corporation (under NASA Grant NAS6-3109) and the general line of investigation continues today under NASA Grants NAG5-685 and NAG6-111. This report will briefly identify the subject areas of the research and associated results. The period actually covered by the grant NAG5-604 included the following analysis and flights: (1) analysis of five successful balloon flights in 1980 and 1981 (under the predecessor NASA grant) in the stratosphere over thunderstorms; (2) development and flight of the Hy-wire tethered balloon system for direct measurement of the atmospheric potential to 250 kV (this involved multiple tethered balloon flight periods from 1981 through 1986 from several locations including Wallops Island, VA, Poker Flat and Ft. Greely, AK and Holloman AFB, NM.); (3) balloon flights in the stratosphere over thunderstorms to measure vector electric fields and associated parameters in 1986 (2 flights), 1987 (4 flights), and 1988 (2 flights); and (4) rocket-borne optical lightning flash detectors on two rocket flights (1987 and 1988) (the same detector design that was used for the balloon flights listed under #3). In summary this grant supported 8 stratospheric zero-pressure balloon flights, tethered aerostat flights every year between 1982-1985, instruments on 2 rockets, and analysis of data from 6 stratospheric flights in 1980/81.

  10. Simultaneous electric-field measurements on nearby balloons.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozer, F. S.

    1972-01-01

    Electric-field payloads were flown simultaneously on two balloons from Great Whale River, Canada, on September 21, 1971, to provide data at two points in the upper atmosphere that differed in altitude by more than one atmospheric density scale height and in horizontal position by 30-140 km. The altitude dependences in the two sets of data prove conclusively that the vertical electric field at balloon altitudes stems from fair-weather atmospheric electricity sources and that the horizontal fields are mapped down ionospheric fields, since the weather-associated horizontal fields were smaller than 2 mV/m.

  11. The polarization electric field and its effects in an anisotropic rotating magnetospheric plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. S.; Birmingham, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    Spatial variations of density and temperature along a magnetic field line are evaluated for a plasma undergoing adiabatic motion in a rotating magnetosphere. The effects of centrifugal and gravitational forces are accounted for, as is anisotropy in the pitch angle distribution functions of individual species. A polarization electric field is invoked to eliminate the net electric charge density resulting from the aforementioned mass dependent forces and different anisotropies. The position of maximum density in a two-component, electron-ion plasma is determined both in the absence and in the presence of the polarization effect and compared. A scale height, generalized to include anisotropies, is derived for the density fall-off. The polarization electric field is also included in the parallel guiding center equation; equilibrium points are determined and compared in both individual and average senses with the position of density maximum. Finally a transverse (to magnetic field lines) electric component is deduced as a consequence of dissimilar charge neutralization on adjacent field lines. The E x B velocity resultant from such a 'fringing' electric field is calculated and compared with the magnitude of other drifts.

  12. Dipole Relaxation in an Electric Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Richard M.

    1980-01-01

    Derives an expression for the orientational entropy of a rigid rod (electric dipole) from Boltzmann's equation. Subsequent application of Newton's second law of motion produces Debye's classical expression for the relaxation of an electric dipole in a viscous medium. (Author/GS)

  13. Exposure assessment for power frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Bracken, T D

    1993-04-01

    Over the past decade considerable data have been collected on electric and magnetic fields in occupational environments. These data have taken the form of area measurements, source characterizations, and personal exposure measurements. Occupational EMF levels are highly variable in space and time. Exposures associated with these fields exhibit similar large variations during a day, between days, and between individuals within a group. The distribution of exposure measures is skewed over several decades with only a few values occurring at the maximum field levels. The skewness of exposure measures implies that large sample sizes may be required for assessments and that multiple statistical descriptors are preferred to describe individual and group exposures. Except for the relatively few occupational settings where high voltage sources are prevalent, electric fields encountered in the workplace are probably similar to residential exposures. Consequently, high electric field exposures are essentially limited to utility environments and occupations. Within the electric utility industry, it is definitely possible to identify occupations with high electric field exposures relative to those of office workers or other groups. The highly exposed utility occupations are linemen, substation operators, and utility electricians. The distribution of electric field exposures in the utility worker population is very skewed even within a given occupation. As with electric fields, magnetic fields in the workplace appear to be comparable with residential levels, unless a clearly defined high-current source is present. Since high-current sources are more prevalent than high-voltage sources, environments with relatively high magnetic field exposures encompass a more diverse set of occupations than do those with high electric fields. Within the electric utility industry, it is possible to identify occupational environments with high magnetic field exposure relative to the office environment. Utility job categories with the highest exposures are generation facility workers, substation operators, utility linemen, and utility electricians. There are also higher exposures among traditional "electrical worker" job categories. Outside the electrical utility industry, potential sources of high occupational magnetic field exposures at ELF are induction furnaces, welding machines, electrical transportation systems, and electrical distribution vaults. However, the use of low power electrical equipment such as small motors in close proximity to workers and possibly for long periods of time could also lead to high exposure situations. Handheld survey instruments are available to perform area measurements of electric and magnetic fields at power frequencies but not aat all frequencies within the ELF range. Sophisticated personal computer-based instruments are available to characterize areas and sources across the entire frequency range.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8480632

  14. Reception and learning of electric fields in bees.

    PubMed

    Greggers, Uwe; Koch, Gesche; Schmidt, Viola; Drr, Aron; Floriou-Servou, Amalia; Piepenbrock, David; Gpfert, Martin C; Menzel, Randolf

    2013-05-22

    Honeybees, like other insects, accumulate electric charge in flight, and when their body parts are moved or rubbed together. We report that bees emit constant and modulated electric fields when flying, landing, walking and during the waggle dance. The electric fields emitted by dancing bees consist of low- and high-frequency components. Both components induce passive antennal movements in stationary bees according to Coulomb's law. Bees learn both the constant and the modulated electric field components in the context of appetitive proboscis extension response conditioning. Using this paradigm, we identify mechanoreceptors in both joints of the antennae as sensors. Other mechanoreceptors on the bee body are potentially involved but are less sensitive. Using laser vibrometry, we show that the electrically charged flagellum is moved by constant and modulated electric fields and more strongly so if sound and electric fields interact. Recordings from axons of the Johnston organ document its sensitivity to electric field stimuli. Our analyses identify electric fields emanating from the surface charge of bees as stimuli for mechanoreceptors, and as biologically relevant stimuli, which may play a role in social communication. PMID:23536603

  15. Reception and learning of electric fields in bees

    PubMed Central

    Greggers, Uwe; Koch, Gesche; Schmidt, Viola; Dürr, Aron; Floriou-Servou, Amalia; Piepenbrock, David; Göpfert, Martin C.; Menzel, Randolf

    2013-01-01

    Honeybees, like other insects, accumulate electric charge in flight, and when their body parts are moved or rubbed together. We report that bees emit constant and modulated electric fields when flying, landing, walking and during the waggle dance. The electric fields emitted by dancing bees consist of low- and high-frequency components. Both components induce passive antennal movements in stationary bees according to Coulomb's law. Bees learn both the constant and the modulated electric field components in the context of appetitive proboscis extension response conditioning. Using this paradigm, we identify mechanoreceptors in both joints of the antennae as sensors. Other mechanoreceptors on the bee body are potentially involved but are less sensitive. Using laser vibrometry, we show that the electrically charged flagellum is moved by constant and modulated electric fields and more strongly so if sound and electric fields interact. Recordings from axons of the Johnston organ document its sensitivity to electric field stimuli. Our analyses identify electric fields emanating from the surface charge of bees as stimuli for mechanoreceptors, and as biologically relevant stimuli, which may play a role in social communication. PMID:23536603

  16. Validating empirical force fields for molecular-level simulation of cellulose dissolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The calculations presented here, which include dynamics simulations using analytical force fields and first principles studies, indicate that the COMPASS force field is preferred over the Dreiding and Universal force fields for studying dissolution of large cellulose structures. The validity of thes...

  17. A Database of Force-Field Parameters, Dynamics, and Properties of Antimicrobial Compounds.

    PubMed

    Malloci, Giuliano; Vargiu, Attilio Vittorio; Serra, Giovanni; Bosin, Andrea; Ruggerone, Paolo; Ceccarelli, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    We present an on-line database of all-atom force-field parameters and molecular properties of compounds with antimicrobial activity (mostly antibiotics and some beta-lactamase inhibitors). For each compound, we provide the General Amber Force Field parameters for the major species at physiological pH, together with an analysis of properties of interest as extracted from s-long molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water solution. The properties include number and population of structural clusters, molecular flexibility, hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecular surfaces, the statistics of intraand inter-molecular H-bonds, as well as structural and dynamical properties of solvent molecules within first and second solvation shells. In addition, the database contains several key molecular parameters, such as energy of the frontier molecular orbitals, vibrational properties, rotational constants, atomic partial charges and electric dipole moment, computed by Density Functional Theory. The present database (to our knowledge the first extensive one including dynamical properties) is part of a wider project aiming to build-up a database containing structural, physico-chemical and dynamical properties of medicinal compounds using different force-field parameters with increasing level of complexity and reliability. The database is freely accessible at http://www.dsf.unica.it/translocation/db/. PMID:26247924

  18. Fetal exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cech, R.; Leitgeb, N.; Pediaditis, M.

    2007-02-01

    To investigate the interaction of low frequency electric and magnetic fields with pregnant women and in particular with the fetus, an anatomical voxel model of an 89 kg woman at week 30 of pregnancy was developed. Intracorporal electric current density distributions due to exposure to homogeneous 50 Hz electric and magnetic fields were calculated and results were compared with basic restrictions recommended by ICNIRP guidelines. It could be shown that the basic restriction is met within the central nervous system (CNS) of the mother at exposure to reference level of either electric or magnetic fields. However, within the fetus the basic restriction is considerably exceeded. Revision of reference levels might be necessary.

  19. Rocket borne instrument to measure electric fields inside electrified clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruhnke, L. H. (inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the electric field in the atmosphere which includes a pair of sensors carried on a rocket for sensing the voltages in the atmosphere being measured is described. One of the sensors is an elongated probe with a fine point which causes a corona current to be produced as it passes through the electric field. An electric circuit is coupled between the probe and the other sensor and includes a high ohm resistor which linearizes the relationship between the corona current and the electric field being measured. A relaxation oscillator and transmitter are provided for generating and transmitting an electric signal having a frequency corresponding to the magnitude of the electric field.

  20. EFFECT OF ELECTRIC FIELD INDUCED PERTURBATION OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF IONS NEAR THE CELL SURFACE ON MIGRATION OF CHARGED MEMBRANE COMPONENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has demonstrated that an externally applied electric field perturbs the distribution of some of the macromolecules in biological membranes. Various electrostatic, hydrodynamic and structural forces resulting from the external field influence the movement of intramembraneous pa...

  1. Application of polarizable ellipsoidal force field model to pnicogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Du, Likai; Gao, Jun; Wang, Lili; Song, Bo; Liu, Chengbu

    2015-03-15

    Noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonds and halogen bonds, are frequently used in drug designing and crystal engineering. Recently, a novel noncovalent pnicogen bonds have been identified as an important driving force in crystal structures with similar bonding mechanisms as hydrogen bond and halogen bond. Although the pnicogen bond is highly anisotropic, the pnicogen bond angles range from 160 to 180 due to the complicated substituent effects. To understand the anisotropic characters of pnicogen bond, a modification of the polarizable ellipsoidal force field (PEff) model previously used to define halogen bonds was proposed in this work. The potential energy surfaces (PESs) of mono- and polysubstituted PH3 -NH3 complexes were calculated at CCSD(T), MP2, and density functional theory levels and were used to examine the modified PEff model. The results indicate that the modified PEff model can precisely characterize pnicogen bond. The root mean squared error of PES obtained with PEff model is less than 0.5 kcal/mol, compared with MP2 results. In addition, the modified PEff model may be applied to other noncovalent bond interactions, which is important to understand the role of intermolecular interactions in the self-assembly structures. PMID:25565043

  2. Effects of Radial Electric Fields on ICRF Waves

    SciTech Connect

    C.K. Phillips; J.C. Hosea; M. Ono; J.R. Wilson

    2001-06-18

    Equilibrium considerations infer that large localized radial electric fields are associated with internal transport barrier structures in tokamaks and other toroidal magnetic confinement configurations. In this paper, the effects of an equilibrium electric field on fast magnetosonic wave propagation are considered in the context of a cold plasma model.

  3. INACTIVATION OF SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE USING RADIO FREQUENCY ELECTRIC FIELDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The application of radio frequency (RF) electric fields was investigated as a nonthermal alternative to thermal inactivation of microorganisms in liquids. A novel RF system was developed and produced frequencies in the range of 20 kHz to 60 kHz. Electric field strengths of 20 kV/cm and 30 kV/cm we...

  4. PULSED ELECTRIC FIELD PROCESSING FACT SHEET FOR FOOD PROCESSORS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pulsed Electric Fields (PEF) apply intensive, high voltage electric field pulses to biological materials and cause cell membrane, primarily lipid bi-layers, to breakdown. PEF may be used to pasteurize fluid and pumpable foods. The benefit of PEF is the retention of product quality and freshness. A p...

  5. Reconfigurable assemblies of Janus rods in AC electric fields.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Kundan; Juárez, Jaime J; Chen, Qian; Granick, Steve; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the electric field-induced assembly of Janus colloids composed of silica rods patterned with gold patches in both side- and tip-coated motifs. These shape and chemically anisotropic particles assemble into reconfigurable chains, whose structure depends on patch location, AC electric field strength, and frequency. PMID:24652478

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Nitrobenzene Dioxygenase Using AMBER Force Field

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation of the oxygenase component of nitrobenzene dioxygenase (NBDO) system, a member of the naphthalene family of Rieske nonheme iron dioxygenases, has been carried out using the AMBER force field combined with a new set of parameters for the description of the mononuclear nonheme iron center and ironsulfur Rieske cluster. Simulation results provide information on the structure and dynamics of nitrobenzene dioxygenase in an aqueous environment and shed light on specific interactions that occur in its catalytic center. The results suggest that the architecture of the active site is stabilized by key hydrogen bonds, and Asn258 positions the substrate for oxidation. Analysis of proteinwater interactions reveal the presence of a network of solvent molecules at the entrance to the active site, which could be of potential catalytic importance. PMID:24955078

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Nitrobenzene Dioxygenase Using AMBER Force Field.

    PubMed

    Pabis, Anna; Geronimo, Inacrist; York, Darrin M; Paneth, Piotr

    2014-06-10

    Molecular dynamics simulation of the oxygenase component of nitrobenzene dioxygenase (NBDO) system, a member of the naphthalene family of Rieske nonheme iron dioxygenases, has been carried out using the AMBER force field combined with a new set of parameters for the description of the mononuclear nonheme iron center and iron-sulfur Rieske cluster. Simulation results provide information on the structure and dynamics of nitrobenzene dioxygenase in an aqueous environment and shed light on specific interactions that occur in its catalytic center. The results suggest that the architecture of the active site is stabilized by key hydrogen bonds, and Asn258 positions the substrate for oxidation. Analysis of protein-water interactions reveal the presence of a network of solvent molecules at the entrance to the active site, which could be of potential catalytic importance. PMID:24955078

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of methane hydrate using polarizable force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, H.N.; Jordan, K.D.; Taylor, C.E.

    2007-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of methane hydrate have been carried out using the AMOEBA and COS/G2 polarizable force fields. Properties examined include the temperature dependence of the lattice constant, the OC and OO radial distribution functions and the vibrational spectra. Both the AMOEBA and COS/G2 models are found to successfully account for the available experimental data, with overall slightly better agreement with experiment being found for the AMOEBA model. Several properties calculated using the AMOEBA and COS/G2 models differ appreciable from the corresponding results obtained previously using the polarizable TIP4P-FQ model. This appears to be due to the inadequacy of the treatment of polarization, especially, the restriction of polarization to in-plane only, in the TIP4P-FQ model.

  9. A quantum mechanical polarizable force field for biomolecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Donchev, A. G.; Ozrin, V. D.; Subbotin, M. V.; Tarasov, O. V.; Tarasov, V. I.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a quantum mechanical polarizable force field (QMPFF) fitted solely to QM data at the MP2/aTZ(-hp) level. Atomic charge density is modeled by point-charge nuclei and floating exponentially shaped electron clouds. The functional form of interaction energy parallels quantum mechanics by including electrostatic, exchange, induction, and dispersion terms. Separate fitting of each term to the counterpart calculated from high-quality QM data ensures high transferability of QMPFF parameters to different molecular environments, as well as accurate fit to a broad range of experimental data in both gas and liquid phases. QMPFF, which is much more efficient than ab initio QM, is optimized for the accurate simulation of biomolecular systems and the design of drugs. PMID:15911753

  10. On the Use of Quartic Force Fields in Variational Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Huang, Xinchuan; Yachmenev, Andrey; Thiel, Walter; Lee, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    The use of quartic force fields (QFFs) has been shown to be one of the most effective ways to efficiently compute vibrational frequencies for small molecules. In this paper we outline and discuss how the simple-internal or bond-length bond-angle (BLBA) coordinates can be transformed into Morse-cosine(-sine) coordinates which produce potential energy surfaces from QFFs that possess proper limiting behavior and can effectively describe the vibrational (or rovibrational) energy levels of an arbitrary molecular system. We investigate parameter scaling in the Morse coordinate, symmetry considerations, and examples of transformed QFFs making use of the MULTIMODE, TROVE, and VTET variational vibrational methods. Cases are referenced where variational computations coupled with transformed QFFs produce accuracies compared to experiment for fundamental frequencies on the order of 5 cm(exp -1) and often as good as 1 cm(exp -1).

  11. Parametrization of a reactive force field for aluminum hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Ojwang, J. G. O.; Santen, Rutger A. van; Kramer, Gert Jan; Duin, Adri C. T. van; Goddard, William A. III

    2009-07-28

    A reactive force field, REAXFF, for aluminum hydride has been developed based on density functional theory (DFT) derived data. REAXFF{sub AlH{sub 3}} is used to study the dynamics governing hydrogen desorption in AlH{sub 3}. During the abstraction process of surface molecular hydrogen charge transfer is found to be well described by REAXFF{sub AlH{sub 3}}. Results on heat of desorption versus cluster size show that there is a strong dependence of the heat of desorption on the particle size, which implies that nanostructuring enhances desorption process. In the gas phase, it was observed that small alane clusters agglomerated into a bigger cluster. After agglomeration molecular hydrogen was desorbed from the structure. This thermodynamically driven spontaneous agglomeration followed by desorption of molecular hydrogen provides a mechanism on how mobile alane clusters can facilitate the mass transport of aluminum atoms during the thermal decomposition of NaAlH{sub 4}.

  12. Derivation of a Molecular Mechanics Force Field for Cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Cournia, Zoe; Vaiana, Andrea C.; Smith, Jeremy C.; Ullmann, G. Matthias M.

    2004-01-01

    As a necessary step toward realistic cholesterol:biomembrane simulations, we have derived CHARMM molecular mechanics force-field parameters for cholesterol. For the parametrization we use an automated method that involves fitting the molecular mechanics potential to both vibrational frequencies and eigenvector projections derived from quantum chemical calculations. Results for another polycyclic molecule, rhodamine 6G, are also given. The usefulness of the method is thus demonstrated by the use of reference data from two molecules at different levels of theory. The frequency-matching plots for both cholesterol and rhodamine 6G show overall agreement between the CHARMM and quantum chemical normal modes, with frequency matching for both molecules within the error range found in previous benchmark studies.

  13. An accurate ab initio quartic force field for ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. M. L.; Lee, Timothy J.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1992-01-01

    The quartic force field of ammonia is computed using basis sets of spdf/spd and spdfg/spdf quality and an augmented coupled cluster method. After correcting for Fermi resonance, the computed fundamentals and nu 4 overtones agree on average to better than 3/cm with the experimental ones except for nu 2. The discrepancy for nu 2 is principally due to higher-order anharmonicity effects. The computed omega 1, omega 3, and omega 4 confirm the recent experimental determination by Lehmann and Coy (1988) but are associated with smaller error bars. The discrepancy between the computed and experimental omega 2 is far outside the expected error range, which is also attributed to higher-order anharmonicity effects not accounted for in the experimental determination. Spectroscopic constants are predicted for a number of symmetric and asymmetric top isotopomers of NH3.

  14. Electric and Magnetic Field Detection in Elasmobranch Fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmijn, Ad. J.

    1982-11-01

    Sharks, skates, and rays receive electrical information about the positions of their prey, the drift of ocean currents, and their magnetic compass headings. At sea, dogfish and blue sharks were observed to execute apparent feeding responses to dipole electric fields designed to mimic prey. In training experiments, stingrays showed the ability to orient relative to uniform electric fields similar to those produced by ocean currents. Voltage gradients of only 5 nanovolts per centimeter would elicit either behavior.

  15. Probing university students' understanding of electromotive force in electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzn, Isabel; De Cock, Mieke; Zuza, Kristina; van Kampen, Paul; Guisasola, Jenaro

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study is to identify students' difficulties with learning the concepts of electromotive force (emf) and potential difference in the context of transitory currents and resistive direct-current circuits. To investigate these difficulties, we developed a questionnaire based on an analysis of the theoretical and epistemological framework of physics, which was then administered to first-year engineering and physics students at universities in Spain, Colombia, and Belgium. The results of the study show that student difficulties seem to be strongly linked to the absence of an analysis of the energy balance within the circuit and that most university students do not clearly understand the usefulness of and the difference between the concepts of potential difference and emf.

  16. Enthalpy of formation and anharmonic force field of diacetylene.

    PubMed

    Simmonett, Andrew C; Schaefer, Henry F; Allen, Wesley D

    2009-01-28

    The enthalpy of formation of diacetylene (C4H2) is pinpointed using state-of-the-art theoretical methods, accounting for high-order electron correlation, relativistic effects, non-Born-Oppenheimer corrections, and vibrational anharmonicity. Molecular energies are determined from coupled cluster theory with single and double excitations (CCSD), perturbative triples [CCSD(T)], full triples (CCSDT), and perturbative quadruples [CCSDT(Q)], in concert with correlation-consistent basis sets (cc-pVXZ, X=D, T, Q, 5, 6) that facilitate extrapolations to the complete basis set limit. The first full quartic force field of diacetylene is determined at the highly accurate all-electron CCSD(T) level with a cc-pCVQZ basis, which includes tight functions for core correlation. Application of second-order vibrational perturbation theory to our anharmonic force field yields fundamental frequencies with a mean absolute difference of only 3.9 cm(-1) relative to the experimental band origins, without the use of any empirical scale factors. By a focal point approach, we converge on an enthalpy change for the isogyric reaction 2 H-C[triple bond]C-H-->H-C[triple bond]C-C[triple bond]C-H+H2 of (+0.03, +0.81) kcal mol(-1) at (0, 298.15) K. With the precisely established fHdegrees of acetylene, we thus obtain DeltafHdegrees(C4H2)=(109.4,109.7)+/-0.3 kcal mol(-1) at (0, 298.15) K. Previous estimates of the diacetylene enthalpy of formation range from 102 to 120 kcal mol(-1). PMID:19191379

  17. Magnetic phase diagram of graphene nanorings in an electric field.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Aiping; Sheng, Weidong

    2015-10-14

    Magnetic properties of graphene nanorings are investigated in the presence of an electric field. Within the formalism of Hubbard model, the graphene nanorings of various geometric configurations are found to exhibit rich phase diagram. For a nanoring system which has degenerate states at the Fermi level, the system is shown to undergo an abrupt phase transition from the antiferromagnetic to a nonmagnetic state in an electric field applied cross its zigzag edges. However, the nanoring is found to always stay in the antiferromagnetic state when the electric field is applied cross its armchair edges. For the other nanoring system with a finite single-particle gap, the magnetic moments of its antiferromagnetic ground state is seen to decrease gradually to zero with the electric field applied cross the zigzag edges. When the electric field is applied cross the armchair edges, the nanoring is shown to undergo several magnetic phase transitions before settling itself in a nonmagnetic ordering. PMID:26401952

  18. Nonlinear piezoelectricity in epitaxial ferroelectrics at high electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Alexei; Sichel, Rebecca; Lee, Ho Nyung; Landahl, Eric C.; Adams, Bernhard; Dufresne, Eric M.; Evans, Paul G.

    2008-01-01

    Non-linear effects in the coupling of polarization with elastic strain have been predicted to occur in ferroelectric materials subjected to high electric fields. Such predictions are tested here for a Pb(Zr0.2,Ti0.8)O3 ferroelectric thin film at electric fields in the range of several MV/cm. Thermal runaway and subsequent low-frequency dielectric breakdown are overcome by using nanosecond electrical pulses to apply high electric fields, which made the probing of the film's structure possible at piezoelectric strains reaching up to 2.7%. The piezoelectric strain exceeds predictions based on constant piezoelectric coefficients at electric fields from 2 to 4 MV/cm, which is consistent with a non-linear effect predicted to occur at concomitant piezoelectric distortions. At higher fields, the piezoelectric response decreases, suggesting that elastic interactions between atoms enter a new regime.

  19. Electric Field Distribution of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT)

    SciTech Connect

    Yang,G.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; James, R.B.

    2009-08-02

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is attracting increasing interest with its promise as a room-temperature nuclear-radiation-detector material. The distribution of the electric field in CZT detectors substantially affects their detection performance. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we employed a synchrotron X-Ray mapping technique and a Pockels-effect measurement system to investigate this distribution in different detectors. Here, we report our latest experimental results with three detectors of different width/height ratios. A decrease in this ratio aggravates the non-uniform distribution of electric field, and focuses it on the central volume. Raising the bias voltage effectively can minimize such non-uniformity of the electric field distribution. The position of the maximum electric field is independent of the bias voltage; the difference between its maximum- and minimum-intensity of electric field increases with the applied bias voltage.

  20. Satellite measurements of high latitude convection electric fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauffman, D. P.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    This paper reviews the first results of satellite experiments to measure magnetospheric convection electric fields using the double-probe technique. The earliest successful measurements were made with the low-altitude (680-2530 km) polar orbiting Injun-5 spacecraft. The Injun-5 results are compared with the initial findings of the electric field experiment on the polar orbiting OGO-6 satellite. Electric field measurements from the OGO-6 satellite have substantiated many of the initial Injun-5 observations with improved accuracy and sensitivity. The OGO-6 detector revealed the persistent occurrence of anti-sunward convection across the polar cap region at velocities not generally detectable with the Injun-5 experiment. The OGO-6 observations also provided information indicating that the location of the electric field reversal shifts equatorward during periods of increased magnetic activity. The implications of the electric field measurements for magnetospheric and auroral structure are summarized, and a list of specific recommendations for improving future experiments is presented.

  1. Manipulation of a neutral and nonpolar nanoparticle in water using a nonuniform electric field.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Wang, Chunlei; Sheng, Nan; Hu, Guohui; Zhou, Zhewei; Fang, Haiping

    2016-01-01

    The manipulation of nanoparticles in water is of essential importance in chemical physics, nanotechnology, medical technology, and biotechnology applications. Generally, a particle with net charges or charge polarity can be driven by an electric field. However, many practical particles only have weak and even negligible charge and polarity, which hinders the electric field to exert a force large enough to drive these nanoparticles directly. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to show that a neutral and nonpolar nanoparticle in liquid water can be driven directionally by an external electric field. The directed motion benefits from a nonuniform water environment produced by a nonuniform external electric field, since lower water energies exist under a higher intensity electric field. The nanoparticle spontaneously moves toward locations with a weaker electric field intensity to minimize the energy of the whole system. Considering that the distance between adjacent regions of nonuniform field intensity can reach the micrometer scale, this finding provides a new mechanism of manipulating nanoparticles from the nanoscale to the microscale. PMID:26747801

  2. Manipulation of a neutral and nonpolar nanoparticle in water using a nonuniform electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhen; Wang, Chunlei; Sheng, Nan; Hu, Guohui; Zhou, Zhewei; Fang, Haiping

    2016-01-01

    The manipulation of nanoparticles in water is of essential importance in chemical physics, nanotechnology, medical technology, and biotechnology applications. Generally, a particle with net charges or charge polarity can be driven by an electric field. However, many practical particles only have weak and even negligible charge and polarity, which hinders the electric field to exert a force large enough to drive these nanoparticles directly. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to show that a neutral and nonpolar nanoparticle in liquid water can be driven directionally by an external electric field. The directed motion benefits from a nonuniform water environment produced by a nonuniform external electric field, since lower water energies exist under a higher intensity electric field. The nanoparticle spontaneously moves toward locations with a weaker electric field intensity to minimize the energy of the whole system. Considering that the distance between adjacent regions of nonuniform field intensity can reach the micrometer scale, this finding provides a new mechanism of manipulating nanoparticles from the nanoscale to the microscale.

  3. ForceFit: a code to fit classical force fields to ab-initio potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, Neil Jon; Waldher, Benjamin; Kuta, Jadwiga; Clark, Aurora; Clark, Aurora E

    2009-01-01

    The ForceFit program package has been developed for fitting classical force field parameters based upon a force matching algorithm to quantum mechanical gradients of configurations that span the potential energy surface of the system. The program, which runs under Unix and is written in C++, is an easy to use, nonproprietary platform that enables gradient fitting of a wide variety of functional force field forms to quantum mechanical information obtained from an array of common electronic structure codes. All aspects of the fitting process are run from a graphical user interface, from the parsing of quantum mechanical data, assembling of a potential energy surface database, setting the force field and variables to be optimized, choosing a molecular mechanics code for comparison to the reference data, and finally, the initiation of a least squares minimization algorithm. Furthermore, the code is based on a modular templated code design that enables the facile addition of new functionality to the program.

  4. Self-force on an electric dipole in the spacetime of a cosmic string

    SciTech Connect

    Muniz, C.R.; Bezerra, V.B.

    2014-01-15

    We calculate the electrostatic self-force on an electric dipole in the spacetime generated by a static, thin, infinite and straight cosmic string. The electric dipole is held fixed in different configurations, namely, parallel, perpendicular to the cosmic string and oriented along the azimuthal direction around this topological defect, which is stretched along the z axis. We show that the self-force is equivalent to an interaction of the electric dipole with an effective dipole moment which depends on the linear mass density of the cosmic string and on the configuration. The plots of the self-forces as functions of the parameter which determines the angular deficit of the cosmic string are shown for those different configurations. -- Highlights: Review of regularized Greens function applied to the problem. Self-force on an electric dipole in the string spacetime for some orientations. Representation via graphs of the self-forces versus angular parameter of the cosmic string. Self-force induced by the string seen as an interaction between two dipoles. Discussion about the superposition principle in this non-trivial background.

  5. Electric field effects on the reactivity of heme model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Biase, Pablo M.; Doctorovich, Fabio; Murgida, Daniel H.; Estrin, Dario A.

    2007-01-01

    Proteins integrated or transiently bound to membranes are subject to strong electric fields. However, the role of these fields on tuning the reactivity of redox proteins is still an open issue. High electric fields are also present in protein-based electrochemical devices. In this work we report DFT calculations of the electric field effects on ligand binding and on the redox potentials of porphyrin models representing the active sites of typical heme proteins such as cytochrome c, cytochrome c oxidase, cytochrome c peroxidase and cytochrome P450.

  6. Charge and current reservoirs for electric and magnetic field enhancement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongxing; Yang, Tian; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2010-05-10

    Two optical antenna designs incorporating structures termed charge and current reservoirs are proposed to realize localized high electric and magnetic field enhancement, respectively. Simulation results show that the fan-rod electric antenna design combines the advantages of the rod antenna and the bowtie antenna, and has higher field enhancement than either. The performance of a loop shaped magnetic antenna consisting of a pair of metallic strips with offsets is also verified numerically, with high magnetic field enhancement being observed in the simulation. In both of the designs, the concepts of charge and current reservoirs contribute to high electric and magnetic field enhancement. PMID:20588894

  7. Radial electric fields in the vicinity of locked magnetic islands

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, S.; Itoh, K.; Ida, K.; Yagi, M.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2010-12-15

    The radial electric field in the vicinity of magnetic islands locked by resonant magnetic perturbations (static error fields) is numerically studied using a set of reduced two-fluid equations. The asymmetric radial electric fields across locked magnetic islands are observed, which are due to the symmetry breaking effects such as the cylindrical geometry and inhomogeneous electron diamagnetic drift. It is found that the magnitude of the difference (between maximum and minimum radial electric fields around O-point) is proportional to the averaged electron diamagnetic drift frequency inside magnetic islands and the square of the island width, but inversely proportional to the square root of the ion viscosity.

  8. Electric Fields, Cloud Microphysics, and Reflectivity in Anvils of Florida Thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, J. E.; Bateman, M. G.; Christian, H. J.; Grainger, C. A.; Hall, W. D.; Krider, E. P.; Lewis, S. A.; Mach, D. M.; Merceret, F. J.; Willett, J. C.; Willis, P. T.

    2006-01-01

    A coordinated aircraft - radar project that investigated the electric fields, cloud microphysics and radar reflectivity of thunderstorm anvils near Kennedy Space Center is described. Measurements from two cases illustrate the extensive nature of the microphysics and electric field observations. As the aircraft flew from the edges of anvils into the interior, electric fields very frequently increased abruptly from approx.1 to >10 kV/m even though the particle concentrations and radar reflectivity increased smoothly. The abrupt increase in field usually occurred when the aircraft entered regions with a reflectivity of 10 to 15 dBZ. It is suggested that the abrupt increase in electric field may be because the charge advection from the storm core did not occur across the entire breadth of the anvil and was not constant in time. Screening layers were not detected near the edges of the anvils. Some long-lived anvils showed subsequent enhancement of electric field and reflectivity and growth of particles, which if localized, might be a factor in explaining the abrupt change of field in some cases. Comparisons of electric field magnitude with particle concentration or reflectivity for a combined data set that included all anvil measurements showed a threshold behavior. When the average reflectivity, such as in a 3-km cube, was less than approximately 5 dBZ, the electric field magnitude was <3 kV/m. Based on these findings, the Volume Averaged Height Integrated Radar Reflectivity (VAHIRR) is now being used by NASA, the Air Force and Federal Aviation Administration in new Lightning Launch Commit Criteria as a diagnostic for high electric fields in anvils.

  9. Electric Fields, Cloud Microphysics, and Reflectivity in Anvils of Florida Thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, J. E.; Bateman, M. G.; Christian, H. J.; Defer, E.; Grainger, C. A.; Hall, W. D.; Krider, E. P.; Lewis, S. A.; Mach, D. M.; Merceret, F. J.; Willett, J. C.; Willis, P. T.

    2007-01-01

    A coordinated aircraft - radar project that investigated the electric fields, cloud microphysics and radar reflectivity of thunderstorm anvils near Kennedy Space Center is described. Measurements from two cases illustrate the extensive nature of the microphysics and electric field observations. As the aircraft flew from the edges of anvils into the interior, electric fields very frequently increased abruptly from approximately 1 to more than 10 kV m(exp -1) even though the particle concentration and radar reflectivity increased smoothly. The abrupt increase in field usually occurred when the aircraft entered regions with a reflectivity of 10 to 15 dBZ. It is suggested that the abrupt increase in electric field may be because the charge advection from the storm core did not occur across the entire breadth of the anvil and was not constant in time. Screening layers were not detected near the edges of the anvils. Some long-lived anvils showed subsequent enhancement of electric field and reflectivity and growth of particles, which if localized, might be a factor in explaining the abrupt change of field in some cases. Comparisons of electric field magnitude with particle concentration or reflectivity for a combined data set that included all anvil measurements showed a threshold behavior. When the average reflectivity, such as in a 3-km cube, was less than approximately 5 dBZ, the electric field magnitude was les than kV m(exp -1). Based on these findings, the Volume Averaged Height Integrated Radar Reflectivity (VAHIRR) is now being used by NASA, the Air Force and Federal Aviation Administration in new Lightning Launch Commit Criteria as a diagnostic for high electric fields in anvils.

  10. A dipole probe for electric field measurements in the LVPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, P. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Ravi, G.; Kumar, Sunil; Mattoo, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design, construction, and calibration of an electric dipole probe and demonstrates its capability by presenting results on the measurement of electric field excited by a ring electrode in the Large Volume Plasma Device (LVPD). It measures the electric field in vacuum and plasma conditions in a frequency range lying between 1-10 \\text{MHz} . The results show that it measures electric field ?slant 2 mV cm?1 for frequency ?slant 10 \\text{MHz} . The developed dipole probe works on the principle of amplitude modulation. The probe signal is transmitted through a carrier of 418 MHz, a much higher frequency than the available sources of noise present in the surrounding environment. The amplitude modulation concept of signal transmission is used to make the measurement; it is qualitatively better and less corrupted as it is not affected by the errors introduced by ac pickups. The probe is capable of measuring a variety of electric fields, namely (1) space charge field, (2) time varying field, (3) inductive field and (4) a mixed field containing both space charge and inductive fields. This makes it a useful tool for measuring electric fields in laboratory plasma devices.

  11. Electric field measurements during the MAC/EPSILON campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croskey, C. L.; Hale, L. C.; Mitchell, J. D.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Hoppe, U.-P.

    1990-01-01

    The MAC/EPSILON observational campaign in northern Norway involved the taking of three-axis electric field measurements of the middle atmosphere by means of five rocketborne payloads during October and November, 1987. Simultaneous horizontal electric field measurements made by two of the rocket flights were in general agreement in their limited overlap region. The more extensive horizontal E-field measurements exhibited a decreasing mapping function with decreasing altitude, thereby indicating the presence of fields from a local auroral patch. Small-scale variations in the horizontal fields of the lights were similar to observed wavelike variations in the neutral wind field.

  12. Evaluation of Contact Separation Force Testing as a Screening Methodology for Electrical Socket Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Chris; Greenwell, Chris; Brusse, jay; Krus, Dennis; Leidecker, Henning

    2009-01-01

    During system level testing intermittent and permanent open circuit failures of mated, crimp removable, electrical contact pairs were experienced. The root cause of the failures was determined to be low (but not zero) contact forces applied by the socket contact tines against the engaging pin. The low contact force reduces the effectiveness of the wiping action of the socket tines against the pin. The observed failure mode may be produced when insufficient wiping during mate, demate and small relative movement in use allows for the accumulation of debris or insulating films that electrically separate the contact pair. The investigation identified at least three manufacturing process control problems associated with the socket contacts that enabled shipment of contacts susceptible to developing low contact forces: (1) Improper heat treatment of the socket tines resulting in plastic rather than elastic behavior; (2) Overly thinned socket tines at their base resulting in reduced pin retention forces; (3) insufficient screening tests to identify parts susceptible to the aforementioned failure mechanisms. The results from an extensive screening program of socket contacts utilizing the industry standard contact separation force test procedures are described herein. The investigation shows this method to be capable of identifying initially weak sockets. However, sockets whose contact retention forces may degrade during use may not be screened out by pin retention testing alone. Further investigations are required to correlate low contact retention forces with increased electrical contact resistance in the presence of insulating films that may accumulate in the use environment.

  13. Enhanced Translational Dynamics of Water under Electric Field

    SciTech Connect

    Omar Diallo, Souleymane; Mamontov, Eugene; Wada, Nobuo; Inagaki, S; Fukushima, Y

    2012-01-01

    High resolution quasielastic neutron scattering measurements have been used to study the effects of applied electric field on the dynamics of water molecules confined in the pores of folded silica sheet material FSM-12 with an average pore diameter (apd) of 16 Angstroms. In the absence of field, there is a significant slowing down of the water molecule diffusion as the temperature is lowered, in agreement with previous observations. The application of a moderate electric field of 2.5 kV/mm remarkably enhances the translational diffusion of water molecules. We interpret this as being due to a disruption of the hydrogen bonding by the electric field. This new observation suggests that existing theories valid at large electric field strengths may have to be corrected at moderate fields.

  14. Computed modeling of alternating electric fields therapy for recurrent glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lok, Edwin; Hua, Van; Wong, Eric T

    2015-01-01

    Tumor treating fields (TTFields) are alternating electric fields frequency tuned to 200kHz for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma. We report a patient treated with TTFields and determined the distribution of TTFields intracranially by computerized simulation using co-registered postgadolinium T1-weighted, T2, and MP RAGE images together with pre-specified conductivity and relative permittivity values for various cerebral structures. The distribution of the electric fields within the brain is inhomogeneous. Higher field intensities were aggregated near the ventricles, particularly at the frontal and occipital horns. The recurred tumor was found distant from the primary glioblastoma and it was located at a site of relatively lower electric field intensity. Future improvement in TTFields treatment may need to take into account the inhomogeneity of the electric field distribution within the brain. PMID:26311253

  15. Comparison of Nonlinear Force-Free Field and Potential Field in the Quiet Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Zhang, H. Q.; Su, J. T.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, a potential field extrapolation and three nonlinear force-free (NLFF) field extrapolations (optimization, direct boundary integral (DBIE), and approximate vertical integration (AVI) methods) are used to study the spatial configuration of magnetic field in the quiet Sun. It is found that differences in the computed field strengths among the three NLFF and potential fields exist in the low layers. However, they tend to disappear as the height increases, and the differences are of the order of 0.1 gauss when the height exceeds ? 2000 km above the photosphere. The difference in azimuth angles between each NLFF field model and the potential field is as follows: for the optimization field, it decreases evidently as the height increases; for the DBIE field, it almost stays constant and shows no significant change as the height increases; for the AVI field, it increases slowly as the height increases. Our analysis shows that the reconstructed NLFF fields deviate significantly from the potential field in the quiet Sun.

  16. Evolution Of Electric Field In Dielectic Barrier Discharge In Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obradovic, M. B.

    2010-07-01

    In this paper the diffuse dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in helium was investigated using electrical measurements and time-space resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The electric field strength, in the cathode sheath of the DBD is determined using Stark splitting of He I 447.15 nm and He I 492.19 nm lines polarized in the electric field direction. The electric field is calculated using spectral distance between forbidden and allowed components and results are compared with those obtained using forbidden/allowed intensity ratio (Obradovic et al. 2008). For comparison of lengths of the cathode fall regions we DBD was operated at 200 and 800 mbar pressures. Distributions of the electric field, obtained for both pressures, are typical for the Townsend-like or subnormal-like discharge (Mangolini et al. 2004). These discharge types have a low electric field in the positive column dissimilar to glow-like DBDs (Massines et al. 1998). For measurements of the electric field evolution, we have increased time resolution ten times, and in 0.1 ?s steps obtained the electric field distributions using, a more intensive He I 492.19 nm line (Ivkovic et al. 2009). During the development of the discharge, the length of the cathode fall region reduces at all times and even in the falling phase of the discharge current. In the period of current decrease, the electric field at the cathode decreases, whereas the maximum of the electric field distribution moves from the cathode showing the accumulation of negative charge near the cathode surface.

  17. Variations in Gravitational Field, Tidal Force, Electromagnetic Waves and Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, Valentino

    2010-12-01

    This paper is the report on an experiment carried out between the month of December 2009 and the month of April 2010 between the Venetian Lagoon and the Northern Apennines in Italy, to check on a potential relationship between earthquakes and variations in the local gravitational field, the effect on the tide exercised by the interaction between the moon and the Sun, the appearance of anomalous light effects in the atmosphere ("Earth lights"), and the emission of radio waves caused by stresses in the Earth's crust. The cases studied show that there is indeed some concomitance between the periodic rising and falling of the sea level and the terrestrial tide effect, due to the gravitational attraction of the moon and sun on the Earth. In fact, changes in the local force of gravity coincided with the cycle of high and low tides and, in certain cases, with a variation in the electromagnetic field that preceded the occurrence of a seismic event by just a few hours. The o! bservations in the article are limited to the magnitude range discussed in the paper.

  18. Critical Casimir forces in the presence of random surface fields.

    PubMed

    Macio?ek, A; Vasilyev, O; Dotsenko, V; Dietrich, S

    2015-03-01

    We study critical Casimir forces (CCFs) fC for films of thickness L which in the three-dimensional bulk belong to the Ising universality class and which are exposed to random surface fields (RSFs) on both surfaces. We consider the case in which, in the absence of RSFs, the surfaces of the film belong to the surface universality class of the so-called ordinary transition. We carry out a finite-size scaling analysis and show that for weak disorder, CCFs still exhibit scaling, acquiring a random field scaling variable w that is zero for pure systems. We confirm these analytic predictions by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Moreover, our MC data show that fC varies as fC(w?0)-fC(w=0)?w2. Asymptotically, for large L, w scales as w?L-0.26?0, indicating that this type of disorder is an irrelevant perturbation of the ordinary surface universality class. However, for thin films such that w?1, we find that the presence of RSFs with vanishing mean value increases significantly the strength of CCFs, as compared to systems without them, and it shifts the extremum of the scaling function of fC toward lower temperatures. But fC remains attractive. PMID:25871124

  19. Effects of an electric field on white sharks: in situ testing of an electric deterrent.

    PubMed

    Huveneers, Charlie; Rogers, Paul J; Semmens, Jayson M; Beckmann, Crystal; Kock, Alison A; Page, Brad; Goldsworthy, Simon D

    2013-01-01

    Elasmobranchs can detect minute electromagnetic fields, <1 nV cm(-1), using their ampullae of Lorenzini. Behavioural responses to electric fields have been investigated in various species, sometimes with the aim to develop shark deterrents to improve human safety. The present study tested the effects of the Shark Shield Freedom7 electric deterrent on (1) the behaviour of 18 white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) near a static bait, and (2) the rates of attacks on a towed seal decoy. In the first experiment, 116 trials using a static bait were performed at the Neptune Islands, South Australia. The proportion of baits taken during static bait trials was not affected by the electric field. The electric field, however, increased the time it took them to consume the bait, the number of interactions per approach, and decreased the proportion of interactions within two metres of the field source. The effect of the electric field was not uniform across all sharks. In the second experiment, 189 tows using a seal decoy were conducted near Seal Island, South Africa. No breaches and only two surface interactions were observed during the tows when the electric field was activated, compared with 16 breaches and 27 surface interactions without the electric field. The present study suggests that the behavioural response of white sharks and the level of risk reduction resulting from the electric field is contextually specific, and depends on the motivational state of sharks. PMID:23658766

  20. Effects of an Electric Field on White Sharks: In Situ Testing of an Electric Deterrent

    PubMed Central

    Huveneers, Charlie; Rogers, Paul J.; Semmens, Jayson M.; Beckmann, Crystal; Kock, Alison A.; Page, Brad; Goldsworthy, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Elasmobranchs can detect minute electromagnetic fields, <1 nVcm–1, using their ampullae of Lorenzini. Behavioural responses to electric fields have been investigated in various species, sometimes with the aim to develop shark deterrents to improve human safety. The present study tested the effects of the Shark Shield Freedom7™ electric deterrent on (1) the behaviour of 18 white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) near a static bait, and (2) the rates of attacks on a towed seal decoy. In the first experiment, 116 trials using a static bait were performed at the Neptune Islands, South Australia. The proportion of baits taken during static bait trials was not affected by the electric field. The electric field, however, increased the time it took them to consume the bait, the number of interactions per approach, and decreased the proportion of interactions within two metres of the field source. The effect of the electric field was not uniform across all sharks. In the second experiment, 189 tows using a seal decoy were conducted near Seal Island, South Africa. No breaches and only two surface interactions were observed during the tows when the electric field was activated, compared with 16 breaches and 27 surface interactions without the electric field. The present study suggests that the behavioural response of white sharks and the level of risk reduction resulting from the electric field is contextually specific, and depends on the motivational state of sharks. PMID:23658766

  1. Electric field in 3D gravity with torsion

    SciTech Connect

    Blagojevic, M.; Cvetkovic, B.

    2008-08-15

    It is shown that in static and spherically symmetric configurations of the system of Maxwell field coupled to 3D gravity with torsion, at least one of the Maxwell field components has to vanish. Restricting our attention to the electric sector of the theory, we find an interesting exact solution, corresponding to the azimuthal electric field. Its geometric structure is to a large extent influenced by the values of two different central charges, associated to the asymptotic AdS structure of spacetime.

  2. IMF changes and polar-cap electric fields and currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.; Heelis, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The polar cap, defined as the region of the auroral oval, is magnetically connected to the solar wind; currents may flow easily between the two regions, and polar cap electric fields and currents respond sensitively to variations in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). In the present paper, the response of polar cap electric field and currents to variations in IMF x, y, and z components is discussed.

  3. Electric Field-Mediated Processing of Polymers. Appendix 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wnek, G. E.; Bowlin, G. L.; Haas, T. W.

    2000-01-01

    Significant opportunities exist for the processing of polymers (homopolymers and blends) using electric fields. We suggest that a broad range of properties can be achieved using a relatively small number of polymers, with electric fields providing the ability to tailor properties via the control of shape, morphology, and orientation. Specific attention is given to electrospinning, but we note that electroaerosol formation and field-modulated film casting represent additional processing options.

  4. Beyond Orientation: The Impact of Electric Fields on Block Copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Liedel, Clemens; Boker, A.; Pester, Christian; Ruppel, Markus A; Urban, Volker S

    2012-01-01

    Since the first report on electric field-induced alignment of block copolymers (BCPs) in 1991, electric fields have been shown not only to direct the orientation of BCP nanostructures in bulk, solution, and thin films, but also to reversibly induce order-order transitions, affect the order-disorder transition temperature, and control morphologies' dimensions with nanometer precision. Theoretical and experimental results of the past years in this very interesting field of research are summarized and future perspectives are outlined.

  5. Dynamics of ultracold molecules in confined geometry and electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Quemener, Goulven; Bohn, John L.

    2011-01-15

    We present a time-independent quantum formalism to describe the dynamics of molecules with permanent electric dipole moments in a two-dimensional confined geometry such as a one-dimensional optical lattice, in the presence of an electric field. Bose versus Fermi statistics and selection rules play a crucial role in the dynamics. As examples, we compare the dynamics of confined fermionic and bosonic polar KRb molecules under different confinements and electric fields. We show how chemical reactions can be suppressed, either by a 'statistical suppression' which applies for fermions at small electric fields and confinements, or by a 'potential energy suppression', which applies for both fermions and bosons at high electric fields and confinements. We also explore collisions that transfer molecules from one state of the confining potential to another. Although these collisions can be significant, we show that they do not play a role in the loss of the total number of molecules in the gas.

  6. Adhesive Emulsion Bilayers under an Electric Field: From Unzipping to Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiam, Abdou R.; Bremond, Nicolas; Bibette, Jrme

    2011-08-01

    Water-in-oil emulsion drops are formed and stabilized with phospholipids which can adhere and form a bilayer. Using microfluidics, adhesive drop pairs are then trapped and submitted to an ac electric field. We observe three distinct states as a function of the adhesion energy and the electric field intensity. The pair can be either stable, though slightly deformed, or unzip and separate, or coalesce. The frontiers between the different states directly reflect vesicle detachment forces and electroporation theories. The experimental approach that we propose for probing liquid interface wetting between monolayers allows us to finely tuned the tension in the bilayer and gives access to bilayer unzipping.

  7. Adhesive emulsion bilayers under an electric field: from unzipping to fusion.

    PubMed

    Thiam, Abdou R; Bremond, Nicolas; Bibette, Jrme

    2011-08-01

    Water-in-oil emulsion drops are formed and stabilized with phospholipids which can adhere and form a bilayer. Using microfluidics, adhesive drop pairs are then trapped and submitted to an ac electric field. We observe three distinct states as a function of the adhesion energy and the electric field intensity. The pair can be either stable, though slightly deformed, or unzip and separate, or coalesce. The frontiers between the different states directly reflect vesicle detachment forces and electroporation theories. The experimental approach that we propose for probing liquid interface wetting between monolayers allows us to finely tuned the tension in the bilayer and gives access to bilayer unzipping. PMID:21902373

  8. Effects of a multichannel dynamic functional electrical stimulation system on hemiplegic gait and muscle forces

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jing-guang; Rong, Ke; Qian, Zhenyun; Wen, Chen; Zhang, Songning

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to design and implement a multichannel dynamic functional electrical stimulation system and investigate acute effects of functional electrical stimulation of the tibialis anterior and rectus femoris on ankle and knee sagittal-plane kinematics and related muscle forces of hemiplegic gait. [Subjects and Methods] A multichannel dynamic electrical stimulation system was developed with 8-channel low frequency current generators. Eight male hemiplegic patients were trained for 4 weeks with electric stimulation of the tibia anterior and rectus femoris muscles during walking, which was coupled with active contraction. Kinematic data were collected, and muscle forces of the tibialis anterior and rectus femoris of the affected limbs were analyzed using a musculoskelatal modeling approach before and after training. A paired sample t-test was used to detect the differences between before and after training. [Results] The step length of the affected limb significantly increased after the stimulation was applied. The maximum dorsiflexion angle and maximum knee flexion angle of the affected limb were both increased significantly during stimulation. The maximum muscle forces of both the tibia anterior and rectus femoris increased significantly during stimulation compared with before functional electrical stimulation was applied. [Conclusion] This study established a functional electrical stimulation strategy based on hemiplegic gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. The multichannel functional electrical stimulation system successfully corrected foot drop and altered circumduction hemiplegic gait pattern. PMID:26696734

  9. Effects of a multichannel dynamic functional electrical stimulation system on hemiplegic gait and muscle forces.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jing-Guang; Rong, Ke; Qian, Zhenyun; Wen, Chen; Zhang, Songning

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to design and implement a multichannel dynamic functional electrical stimulation system and investigate acute effects of functional electrical stimulation of the tibialis anterior and rectus femoris on ankle and knee sagittal-plane kinematics and related muscle forces of hemiplegic gait. [Subjects and Methods] A multichannel dynamic electrical stimulation system was developed with 8-channel low frequency current generators. Eight male hemiplegic patients were trained for 4 weeks with electric stimulation of the tibia anterior and rectus femoris muscles during walking, which was coupled with active contraction. Kinematic data were collected, and muscle forces of the tibialis anterior and rectus femoris of the affected limbs were analyzed using a musculoskelatal modeling approach before and after training. A paired sample t-test was used to detect the differences between before and after training. [Results] The step length of the affected limb significantly increased after the stimulation was applied. The maximum dorsiflexion angle and maximum knee flexion angle of the affected limb were both increased significantly during stimulation. The maximum muscle forces of both the tibia anterior and rectus femoris increased significantly during stimulation compared with before functional electrical stimulation was applied. [Conclusion] This study established a functional electrical stimulation strategy based on hemiplegic gait analysis and musculoskeletal modeling. The multichannel functional electrical stimulation system successfully corrected foot drop and altered circumduction hemiplegic gait pattern. PMID:26696734

  10. A novel miniature fiber optic magnetic field sensor based on Ampere force and dual-polarization fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhenzhen; Cheng, Linghao; Han, Jianlei; Guan, Bai-Ou; Jin, Long; Chen, Bin; Lin, Xiao-Hui

    2013-09-01

    A dual-polarization fiber grating laser is proposed to sense a magnetic field by attaching the fiber laser to a copper wire. When an electrical current is injected into the copper wire and a perpendicular magnetic field is applied, the current generates Ampere force to squeeze the fiber laser and change the birefringence inside the laser cavity, resulting in beat note frequency change. The magnetic field induced beat note frequency change can be discriminated from environment disturbances by applying an alternating current, which therefore demonstrates a novel miniature fiber-optic magnetic field sensor with high sensitivity and inherent immunity to disturbances.

  11. Influence of extremely low-frequency electric fields on the growth of Vigna radiata seedlings.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Evelina

    2011-10-01

    The biological effects of extremely low-frequency electric fields (ELF) on living organisms have been explored in many studies, but the results are controversial and only a few studies investigated the influence of the intensity of the applied field on seedling growth. Here we assess the effects of a 50 Hz sinusoidal electric field on the early growth of Vigna radiata seedlings while varying the field intensity. Experiments performed in a dark, constant-climate chamber on several thousands of seedlings show that the field produces an inhibitory effect at a low field intensity and an enhancing one at a higher intensity. The maximum negative effect occurs at about 450 V/m, which is an intensity much lower than the exposure limits currently in force in the safety regulations. PMID:21416477

  12. Semiconductor crystal growth in crossed electric and magnetic fields: Center Director's Discretionary Fund

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    1996-01-01

    A unique growth cell was designed in which crossed electric and magnetic fields could be separately or simultaneously applied during semiconductor crystal growth. A thermocouple was inserted into an InSb melt inside the growth cell to examine the temperature response of the fluid to applied electromagnetic fields. A static magnetic field suppressed time-dependent convection when a destabilizing thermal field was applied. The simultaneous application of electric and magnetic fields resulted in forced convection in the melt. The InSb ingots grown in the cell were polycrystalline. An InGaSb crystal, 0.5 cm in diameter and 23-cm long, was grown without electromagnetic fields applied. The axial composition results indicated that complete mixing in the melt occurred for this large aspect ratio.

  13. Effect of electric fields on the behavior of Drosophila melanogaster Meig.

    PubMed

    Chernyshev, V B; Afonina, V M

    1978-01-01

    A constant and alternating electric field causes in fruit flies (Drosophila), placed between the plates of a capacitor, a cessation of movements. The percent of fruit flies reacting to the field is directly proportional to the field strength and inversely proportional to the humidity and, apparently, to the infrasonic background, is maximum at a frequency of variations of the field of 10 Hz, and does not depend on the polarity of the capacitor plates, contact of the fruit flies with them, ionization and electrical conductivity of the air, atmospheric discharges, atmospheric pressure or disturbance of the geomagnetic field. The reaction is absent in the winter. It is suggested that the fruit flies perceive the mechanical forces occurring when the body's charge interacts with the external field. PMID:113039

  14. The hydrogen atom in plasmas with an external electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2014-09-15

    We numerically solve the Schrödinger equation, using a more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential with an electric field, in order to investigate the screening and weak external electric field effects on the hydrogen atom in plasmas. The MGECSC potential is examined for four different cases, corresponding to different screening parameters of the potential and the external electric field. The influences of the different screening parameters and the weak external electric field on the energy eigenvalues are determined by solving the corresponding equations using the asymptotic iteration method (AIM). It is found that the corresponding energy values shift when a weak external electric field is applied to the hydrogen atom in a plasma. This study shows that a more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential allows the influence of an applied, weak, external electric field on the hydrogen atom to be investigated in detail, for both Debye and quantum plasmas simultaneously. This suggests that such a potential would be useful in modeling similar effects in other applications of plasma physics, and that AIM is an appropriate method for solving the Schrödinger equation, the solution of which becomes more complex due to the use of the MGECSC potential with an applied external electric field.

  15. Effects of an electric field on interaction of aromatic systems.

    PubMed

    Youn, Il Seung; Cho, Woo Jong; Kim, Kwang S

    2016-04-30

    The effect of uniform external electric field on the interactions between small aromatic compounds and an argon atom is investigated using post-HF (MP2, SCS-MP2, and CCSD(T)) and density functional (PBE0-D3, PBE0-TS, and vdW-DF2) methods. The electric field effect is quantified by the difference of interaction energy calculated in the presence and absence of the electric field. All the post-HF methods describe electric field effects accurately although the interaction energy itself is overestimated by MP2. The electric field effect is explained by classical electrostatic models, where the permanent dipole moment from mutual polarization mainly determines its sign. The size of π-conjugated system does not have significant effect on the electric field dependence. We found out that PBE0-based methods give reasonable interaction energies and electric field response in every case, while vdW-DF2 sometimes shows spurious artifact owing to its sensitivity toward the real space electron density. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26696236

  16. Formation of magnetic discontinuities through superposition of force-free magnetic fields: Periodic boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Dinesh; Bhattacharyya, R.; Smolarkiewicz, P. K.

    2013-11-15

    In ideal magnetohydrodynamics characterized by an infinite electrical conductivity, the magnetic flux across an arbitrary fluid surface is conserved in time. The magnetofluid then can be partitioned into contiguous subvolumes of fluid, each of which entraps its own subsystem of magnetic flux. During dynamical evolution of the magnetofluid, these subvolumes press into each other; and in the process, two such subvolumes may come into direct contact while ejecting a third interstitial subvolume. Depending on the orientations of magnetic fields of the two interacting subvolumes, the magnetic field at the common surface of interaction may become discontinuous and a current sheet is formed there. This process of current sheet formation and their subsequent decay is believed to be a plausible mechanism for coronal heating and may also be responsible for various eruptive phenomena at the solar corona. In this work, we explore this theoretical concept through numerical simulations of a viscous, incompressible magnetofluid characterized by infinite electrical conductivity. In particular, we show that if the initial magnetic field is prescribed by superposition of two linear force-free fields with different torsion coefficients, then formation of current sheets are numerically realizable in the neighborhood of magnetic nulls.

  17. Electric fields in tumors exposed to external voltage sources: implication for electric field-mediated drug and gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Mossop, Brian J; Barr, Roger C; Henshaw, Joshua W; Zaharoff, David A; Yuan, Fan

    2006-10-01

    The intratumoral field, which determines the efficiency of electric field-mediated drug and gene delivery, can differ significantly from the applied field. Therefore, we investigated the distribution of the electric field in mouse tumors and tissue phantoms exposed to a large range of electric stimuli, and quantified the resistances of tumor, skin, and electrode-tissue interface. The samples used in the study included 4T1 and B16.F10 tumors, mouse skin, and tissue phantoms constructed with 1% agarose gel with or without 4T1 cells. When pulsed electric fields were applied to samples using a pair of parallel-plate electrodes, we determined the electric field and resistances in each sample as well as the resistance at the electrode-tissue interface. The electric fields in the center region of tissue phantoms and tumor slices ex vivo were macroscopically uniform and unidirectional between two parallel-plate electrodes. The field strengths in tumor tissues were significantly lower than the applied field under both ex vivo and in vivo conditions. During in vivo stimulation, the ratio of intratumoral versus applied fields was approximately either 20% or 55%, depending on the applied field. Meanwhile, the total resistance of skin and electrode-tissue interface was decreased by approximately 70% and the electric resistance at the center of both tumor models was minimally changed when the applied field was increased from 50 to 400 V/cm. These results may be useful for improving electric field-mediated drug and gene delivery in solid tumors. PMID:16917743

  18. Plasma rotation by electric and magnetic fields in a discharge cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, H. E.; Hong, S. H.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical model for an electric discharge consisting of a spatially diverging plasma sustained electrically between a small ring cathode and a larger ring anode in a cylindrical chamber with an axial magnetic field is developed to study the rotation of the discharge plasma in the crossed electric and magnetic fields. The associated boundary-value problem for the coupled partial differential equations which describe the electric potential and the plasma velocity fields is solved in closed form. The electric field, current density, and velocity distributions are discussed in terms of the Hartmann number and the Hall coefficient. As a result of Lorentz forces, the plasma rotates with speeds as high as 1 million cm/sec around its axis of symmetry at typical conditions. As an application, it is noted that rotating discharges of this type could be used to develop a high-density plasma-ultracentrifuge driven by j x B forces, in which the lighter (heavier) ion and atom components would be enriched in (off) the center of the discharge cylinder.

  19. Water response to intense electric fields: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Marracino, Paolo; Liberti, Micaela; d'Inzeo, Guglielmo; Apollonio, Francesca

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigated polarization properties of water molecules in close proximity to an ionic charge in the presence of external electric fields by using an approach based on simulations at the atomic level. We chose sodium and chloride ions in water as examples of dilute ionic solutions and used molecular dynamics simulations to systematically investigate the influence of an external static electric field on structural, dipolar, and polarization properties of water near charged ions. Results showed that a threshold electric field higher than 10(8) V/m is needed to affect water polarization and increase mean dipole moment of water molecules close to the ion. A similar threshold holds for water permittivity profiles, although a field 10 higher is needed to ensure that water permittivity is almost constant independently of the position close to the ion. Electric fields of such intensities can greatly enhance polarizability of water in hydration shells around ions. PMID:25877041

  20. Galvanotactic behavior of Tetrahymena pyriformis under electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dal Hyung; Kim, Paul Seung Soo; Lee, Kyoungwoo; Kim, JinSeok; Kim, Min Jun

    2013-12-01

    Tetrahymena pyriformis, a eukaryotic ciliate, swims toward a cathode in straight or cross-shaped microchannels under an applied electric field, a behavioral response called cathodal galvanotaxis. In straight channel experiments, a one-dimensional electric field was applied, and the galvanotactic swimming behavior of Tetrahymena pyriformis was observed and described in detail while the polarity of this field is switched. In most individual cases, the cell would immediately switch its direction toward the cathode; however, exceptional cases have been observed where cells exhibit a turning delay or do not turn after a polarity switch. In cross-channel experiments, feedback control using vision-based tracking was used to steer a cell in the microchannel intersection using a two-dimensional electric field generated by four electrodes placed at four ends of the cross channel. The motivation for this work is to study the swimming behavior of Tetrahymena pyriformis as a microrobot under the control of electric fields.

  1. Molecular-scale measurements of electric fields at electrochemical interfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, Carl C.; Farrow, Roger L.

    2011-01-01

    Spatially resolved measurements of electric fields at electrochemical interfaces would be a critical step toward further understanding and modeling the detailed structure of electric double layers. The goal of this project was to perform proof-of-principle experiments to demonstrate the use of field-sensitive dyes for optical measurements of fields in electrochemical systems. A confocal microscope was developed that provides sensitive detection of the lifetime and high resolution spectra of excited fluorescence for dyes tethered to electrically conductive surfaces. Excited state lifetimes for the dyes were measured and found to be relatively unquenched when linked to indium tin oxide, but strongly quenched on gold surfaces. However, our fluorescence detection is sufficiently sensitive to measure spectra of submonolayer dye coatings even when the fluorescence was strongly quenched. Further work to create dye labeled interfaces on flat, uniform and durable substrates is necessary to make electric field measurements at interfaces using field sensitive dyes.

  2. Generation of strong electric fields in an ice film capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sunghwan; Kim, Youngsoon; Moon, Eui-seong; Lee, Du Hyeong; Kang, Hani; Kang, Heon

    2013-08-01

    We present a capacitor-type device that can generate strong electrostatic field in condensed phase. The device comprises an ice film grown on a cold metal substrate in vacuum, and the film is charged by trapping Cs+ ions on the ice surface with thermodynamic surface energy. Electric field within the charged film was monitored through measuring the film voltage using a Kelvin work function probe and the vibrational Stark effect of acetonitrile using IR spectroscopy. These measurements show that the electric field can be increased to 4 108 V m-1, higher than that achievable by conventional metal plate capacitors. In addition, the present device may provide several advantages in studying the effects of electric field on molecules in condensed phase, such as the ability to control the sample composition and structure at molecular scale and the spectroscopic monitoring of the sample under electric field.

  3. Electric field induced selective disordering in lamellar block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Ruppel, Markus; Pester, Christian W; Langner, Karol M; Sevink, Geert J A; Schoberth, Heiko G; Schmidt, Kristin; Urban, Volker S; Mays, Jimmy W; Bker, Alexander

    2013-05-28

    External electric fields align nanostructured block copolymers by either rotation of grains or nucleation and growth depending on how strongly the chemically distinct block copolymer components are segregated. In close vicinity to the order-disorder transition, theory and simulations suggest a third mechanism: selective disordering. We present a time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering study that demonstrates how an electric field can indeed selectively disintegrate ill-aligned lamellae in a lyotropic block copolymer solution, while lamellae with interfaces oriented parallel to the applied field prevail. The present study adds an additional mechanism to the experimentally corroborated suite of mechanistic pathways, by which nanostructured block copolymers can align with an electric field. Our results further unveil the benefit of electric field assisted annealing for mitigating orientational disorder and topological defects in block copolymer mesophases, both in close vicinity to the order-disorder transition and well below it. PMID:23573901

  4. Membrane tubulation from giant lipid vesicles in alternating electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, K.; Vitkova, V.; Meyer, C.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the formation of tubular membrane protrusions from giant unilamellar vesicles in alternating electric fields. The construction of the experimental chamber permitted the application of external AC fields with strength of dozens of V/mm and kHz frequency during relatively long time periods (several minutes). Besides the vesicle electrodeformation from quasispherical to prolate ellipsoidal shape, the formation of long tubular membrane protrusions with length of up to several vesicle diameters, arising from the vesicular surface in the field direction, was registered and analyzed. The threshold electric field at which the electro-induced protrusions appeared was lower than the field strengths inducing membrane electroporation.

  5. Giant and tunable electric field enhancement in the terahertz regime.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoyuan; Wan, Rengang; Wang, Guoxi; Zhang, Tongyi; Zhang, Wenfu

    2014-11-01

    A novel array of slits design combining the nano-slit grating and dielectric-metal is proposed to obtain giant and tunable electric field enhancement in the terahertz regime. The maximum amplitude of electric field is more than 6000 times larger than that of the incident electric field. It is found that the enhancement depends primarily on the stripe and nano-slits width of grating, as well as the thickness of spacer layer. This property is particularly beneficial for the realization of ultra-sensitive nanoparticles detection and nonlinear optics in the terahertz range, such as the second harmonic generation (SHG). PMID:25401850

  6. The use of electric fields in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The use of electric fields for measuring cell and tissue properties has a long history. However, the exploration of the use of electric fields in tissue engineering is only very recent. A review is given of the various methods by which electric fields may be used in tissue engineering, concentrating on the assembly of artificial tissues from its component cells using electrokinetics. A comparison is made of electrokinetic techniques with other physical cell manipulation techniques which can be used in the construction of artificial tissues. PMID:19279709

  7. [Mechanism of ablation with nanosecond pulsed electric field].

    PubMed

    Cen, Chao; Chen, Xin-hua; Zheng, Shu-sen

    2015-11-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric field ablation has been widely applied in clinical cancer treatment, while its molecular mechanism is still unclear. Researchers have revealed that nanosecond pulsed electric field generates nanopores in plasma membrane, leading to a rapid influx of Ca²⁺; it has specific effect on intracellular organelle membranes, resulting in endoplasmic reticulum injuries and mitochondrial membrane potential changes. In addition, it may also change cellular morphology through damage of cytoskeleton. This article reviews the recent research advances on the molecular mechanism of cell membrane and organelle changes induced by nanosecond pulsed electric field ablation. PMID:26822052

  8. The source of the electric field in the nightside magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    In the open magnetosphere model magnetic field lines from the polar caps connect to the interplanetary magnetic field and conduct an electric field from interplanetary space to the polar ionosphere. By examining the magnetic flux involved it is concluded that only slightly more than half of the magnetic flux in the polar caps belongs to open field lines and that such field lines enter or leave the magnetosphere through narrow elongated windows stretching the tail. These window regions are identified with the tail's boundary region and shift their position with changes in the interplanetary magnetic field, in particular when a change of interplanetary magnetic sector occurs. The circuit providing electric current in the magnetopause and the plasma sheet is extended across those windows; thus energy is drained from the interplanetary electric field and an electric potential drop is produced across the plasma sheet. The polar cap receives its electric field from interplanetary space on the day side from open magnetic field lines and on the night side from closed field lines leading to the plasma sheet. The theory described provides improved understanding of magnetic flux bookkeeping, of the origin of Birkeland currents, and of the boundary layer of the geomagnetic tail.

  9. Exposure of workers in the electric power industry to electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Lindh, T; Andersson, L I

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 50 Hz electric and magnetic fields in the electric power industry has distinguished differences in exposure among the employees making it possible to compare health effects as a function of exposure. The workers that were most exposed to electric and magnetic fields were linemen and substation personnel who worked on facilities at operating voltages above 20 kV. On average, they were exposed to an electric field strength above 30 V/m for approximately 1.5 to 3 hours per day and to a magnetic flux density of around 1 to 2 microT. The least exposed group were linemen working in the 0.4 to 20 kV part of the network with exposure to a magnetic field of 0.10 microT. The electric field seldom exceeded 30 V/m. PMID:8047670

  10. Variations of electric field and electric resistivity of air caused by dust motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seran, E.; Godefroy, M.; Renno, N.; Elliott, H.

    2013-08-01

    report results of a field campaign conducted in the Nevada desert with a suite of electric field instruments consisting of a field mill (FM) and a short dipole antenna (SDA). Furthermore, we show that a combination of the measurements of these two instruments allows the estimation of the electric resistivity of air, an important quantity that is extremely difficult to measure near the Earth's surface. The electric resistivity of air is found to vary between 1.5 1013 and 6 1013 ? m and to correlate with changes in electric field. Vertical DC electric fields with amplitudes up to 6 kV m-1 were observed to correspond to clouds of dust blowing through the measurement site. Enhanced DC and AC electric fields are measured during periods when horizontal wind speed exceeds 7 m s-1, or around twice the background value. We suggest that low-frequency emissions, below ~200 Hz, are generated by the motion of electrically charged particles in the vicinity of the SDA electrode and propose a simple model to reproduce the observed spectra. According to this model, the spectral response is controlled by three parameters, (i) the speed of the charged particles, (ii) the charge concentration, and (iii) the minimum distance between the particle and the electrode. In order to explain the electric fields measured with the FM sensors at different heights, we developed a multilayer model that relates the electric field to the charge distribution. For example, a nonlinear variation of the electric field observed by the FM sensors below 50 cm is simulated by a near-surface layer of tens of centimeters that is filled with electrically charged particles that carry a predominantly negative charge in the vicinity of the soil. The charge concentration inside this layer is estimated to vary between 1012 and 5 1013 electrons m-3.

  11. Ab initio parameterization of an all-atom polarizable and dissociable force field for water.

    PubMed

    Pinilla, Carlos; Irani, Amir H; Seriani, Nicola; Scandolo, Sandro

    2012-03-21

    A novel all-atom, dissociative, and polarizable force field for water is presented. The force field is parameterized based on forces, stresses, and energies obtained form ab initio calculations of liquid water at ambient conditions. The accuracy of the force field is tested by calculating structural and dynamical properties of liquid water and the energetics of small water clusters. The transferability of the force field to dissociated states is studied by considering the solvation of a proton and the ionization of water at extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. In the case of the solvated proton, the force field properly describes the presence of both Eigen and Zundel configurations. In the case of the pressure-induced ice VIII/ice X transition and the temperature-induced transition to a superionic phase, the force field is found to describe accurately the proton symmetrization and the melting of the proton sublattice, respectively. PMID:22443781

  12. Structured DC Electric Fields With and Without Associated Plasma Density Gradients Observed with the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Liebrecht, C.; Roddy, P.; Hunton, D.

    2009-01-01

    DC electric field observations and associated plasma drifts gathered with the Vector Electric Field Investigation on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite typically reveal considerable variation at large scales (approximately 100's of km), in both daytime and nighttime cases, with enhanced structures usually confined to the nightside. Although such electric field structures are typically associated with plasma density depletions and structures, as observed by the Planar Langmuir Probe on C/NOFS, what is surprising is the number of cases in which large amplitude, structured DC electric fields are observed without a significant plasma density counterpart structure, including their appearance at times when the ambient plasma density appears relatively quiescent. We investigate the relationship of such structured DC electric fields and the ambient plasma density in the C/NOFS satellite measurements observed thus far, taking into account both plasma density depletions and enhancements. We investigate the mapping of the electric fields along magnetic field lines from distant altitudes and latitudes to locations where the density structures, which presumably formed the original seat of the electric fields, are no longer discernible in the observations. In some cases, the electric field structures and spectral characteristics appear to mimic those associated with equatorial spread-F processes, providing important clues to their origins. We examine altitude, seasonal, and longitudinal effects in an effort to establish the origin of such structured DC electric fields observed both with, and without, associated plasma density gradients

  13. Electric field effects on the dynamics of bubble detachment from an inclined surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Marco, P.; Morganti, N.; Saccone, G.

    2015-11-01

    An experimental apparatus to study bubble detachment from an inclined surface under the action of electric forces is described. It consists of a container filled with FC72 at room temperature and pressure where a train of gas bubbles is injected from an orifice. An electrostatic field can be imposed around the bubble, while the cell can be tilted from 0 to 90°. It is possible to study interface growth with the aid of high-speed cinematography. Since the interface is asymmetrical, a mirror system allowed to acquire, in the same frame, two images at 90° of the bubble. Different inclinations, injection rates and voltages were tested in order to couple the effects of shear gravity and electric field. Curvature and contact angles have been derived with appropriate interpolation methods of the profile. Force balances on the bubble were checked, finding an electric force, which, at first pulls the bubbles from the orifice, then pushes it against the surface. The motion of the center of gravity confirms this behaviour. A power balance has been developed to determine the energy contributions, revealing that surface growth incorporates both the effects of inlet power and electric field.

  14. Vertical Electric Field Measurements with Copper Plates by Sounding Balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Shao-Chun; Chiu, Cheng-Hsiu; Bing-Chih Chen, Alfred; Hsu, Rue-Ron; Su, Han-Tzong

    2015-04-01

    The vertical electric field plays an important role in driving the circulation of the global electric circuit, and crucial to the formation of the transient luminous events (TLEs). The in-situ measurement of the electric field in the upper atmosphere, especially from cloud top to the bottom of the ionosphere is very challenging but essential. Limited by the flight vehicle, the measurements of the electric field in and above cloud, especiall thundercloud, is rare up to now. A light-weight electric field meter was developed independently and sent to 30 km height by small meteorological balloons successfully. Other than the existing long-spaced, spherical probe design, an improved electric field meter has been built and tested carefully. A new circuit with ultra high input impedance and a high voltage amplifier is implemented to reduce the AC noise induced by the voltage divider. Two copper plates are used to replace the double spherical probes which is spaced by a long fiberglass boom. The in-lab calibration and tests show that this new model is superior to the existing design and very sensitive to the variation of the DC electric field. In this poster, the design and the in-lab tests will be presented, and preliminary results of the flight experiments are also discussed.

  15. Enhancement of methane conversion using electric fields. Quarterly report, December 1994--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Mallinson, R.G.; Lobban, L.L.

    1995-04-01

    The goal of this project is the development of novel, economical, processes for the conversion of natural gas to more valuable projects such as methanol, ethylene and other organic oxygenates or higher hydrocarbons. The methodologies of the project are to investigate and develop low temperature electric discharges and electric field-enhanced catalysis for carrying out these conversions. In the case of low temperature discharges, the conversion is carried out at ambient temperature which in effect trades high temperature thermal energy for electric energy as the driving force for conversion. The low operating temperature relax and thermodynamic constraints on the product distribution found at high temperature and also removes the requirements of large thermal masses required for current technologies. With the electric field-enhanced conversion, the operating temperatures are expected to be below those currently required for such processes as oxidative coupling, thereby allowing for a higher degree of catalytic selectivity while maintaining high activity.

  16. Enhancement of methane conversion using electric fields. Quarterly report, July--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Mallinson, R.G.; Lobban, L.L.

    1995-11-01

    The goal of this project is the development of novel, economical, processes for the conversion of natural gas to more valuable projects such as methanol, ethylene and other organic oxygenates or higher hydrocarbons. The methodologies of the project are to investigate and develop low temperature electric discharges and electric field-enhanced catalysis for carrying out these conversions. In the case of low temperature discharges, the conversion is carried out at ambient temperature which in effect trades high temperature thermal energy for electric energy as the driving force for conversion. The low operating temperatures relax the thermodynamic constraints on the product distribution found at high temperature and also removes the requirements of large thermal masses required for current technologies. With the electric field-enhanced conversion, the operating temperatures are expected to be below those currently required for such processes as oxidative coupling, thereby allowing for a higher degree of catalytic selectivity while maintaining high activity.

  17. Force Field Independent Metal Parameters Using a Nonbonded Dummy Model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cationic dummy atom approach provides a powerful nonbonded description for a range of alkaline-earth and transition-metal centers, capturing both structural and electrostatic effects. In this work we refine existing literature parameters for octahedrally coordinated Mn2+, Zn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+, as well as providing new parameters for Ni2+, Co2+, and Fe2+. In all the cases, we are able to reproduce both M2+–O distances and experimental solvation free energies, which has not been achieved to date for transition metals using any other model. The parameters have also been tested using two different water models and show consistent performance. Therefore, our parameters are easily transferable to any force field that describes nonbonded interactions using Coulomb and Lennard-Jones potentials. Finally, we demonstrate the stability of our parameters in both the human and Escherichia coli variants of the enzyme glyoxalase I as showcase systems, as both enzymes are active with a range of transition metals. The parameters presented in this work provide a valuable resource for the molecular simulation community, as they extend the range of metal ions that can be studied using classical approaches, while also providing a starting point for subsequent parametrization of new metal centers. PMID:24670003

  18. Force field independent metal parameters using a nonbonded dummy model.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Fernanda; Bauer, Paul; Barrozo, Alexandre; Amrein, Beat Anton; Purg, Miha; Aqvist, Johan; Kamerlin, Shina Caroline Lynn

    2014-04-24

    The cationic dummy atom approach provides a powerful nonbonded description for a range of alkaline-earth and transition-metal centers, capturing both structural and electrostatic effects. In this work we refine existing literature parameters for octahedrally coordinated Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+), as well as providing new parameters for Ni(2+), Co(2+), and Fe(2+). In all the cases, we are able to reproduce both M(2+)-O distances and experimental solvation free energies, which has not been achieved to date for transition metals using any other model. The parameters have also been tested using two different water models and show consistent performance. Therefore, our parameters are easily transferable to any force field that describes nonbonded interactions using Coulomb and Lennard-Jones potentials. Finally, we demonstrate the stability of our parameters in both the human and Escherichia coli variants of the enzyme glyoxalase I as showcase systems, as both enzymes are active with a range of transition metals. The parameters presented in this work provide a valuable resource for the molecular simulation community, as they extend the range of metal ions that can be studied using classical approaches, while also providing a starting point for subsequent parametrization of new metal centers. PMID:24670003

  19. Force Field Model of Periodic Trends in Biomolecular Halogen Bonds.

    PubMed

    Scholfield, Matthew R; Ford, Melissa Coates; Vander Zanden, Crystal M; Billman, M Marie; Ho, P Shing; Rapp, Anthony K

    2015-07-23

    The study of the noncovalent interaction now defined as a halogen bond (X-bond) has become one of the fastest growing areas in experimental and theoretical chemistry--its applications as a design tool are highly extensive. The significance of the interaction in biology has only recently been recognized, but has now become important in medicinal chemistry. We had previously derived a set of empirical potential energy functions to model the structure-energy relationships for bromines in biomolecular X-bonds (BXBs). Here, we have extended this force field for BXBs (ffBXB) to the halogens (Cl, Br, and I) that are commonly seen to form stable X-bonds. The ffBXB calculated energies show a remarkable one-to-one linear relationship to explicit BXB energies determined from an experimental DNA junction system, thereby validating the approach and the model. The resulting parameters allow us to interpret the stabilizing effects of BXBs in terms of well-defined physical properties of the halogen atoms, including their size, shape, and charge, showing periodic trends that are predictable along the Group VII column of elements. Consequently, we have established the ffBXB as an accurate computational tool that can be applied, for example, for the design of new therapeutic compounds against clinically important targets and new biomolecular-based materials. PMID:25338128

  20. Fast docking using the CHARMM force field with EADock DSS.

    PubMed

    Grosdidier, Aurlien; Zoete, Vincent; Michielin, Olivier

    2011-07-30

    The prediction of binding modes (BMs) occurring between a small molecule and a target protein of biological interest has become of great importance for drug development. The overwhelming diversity of needs leaves room for docking approaches addressing specific problems. Nowadays, the universe of docking software ranges from fast and user friendly programs to algorithmically flexible and accurate approaches. EADock2 is an example of the latter. Its multiobjective scoring function was designed around the CHARMM22 force field and the FACTS solvation model. However, the major drawback of such a software design lies in its computational cost. EADock dihedral space sampling (DSS) is built on the most efficient features of EADock2, namely its hybrid sampling engine and multiobjective scoring function. Its performance is equivalent to that of EADock2 for drug-like ligands, while the CPU time required has been reduced by several orders of magnitude. This huge improvement was achieved through a combination of several innovative features including an automatic bias of the sampling toward putative binding sites, and a very efficient tree-based DSS algorithm. When the top-scoring prediction is considered, 57% of BMs of a test set of 251 complexes were reproduced within 2 RMSD to the crystal structure. Up to 70% were reproduced when considering the five top scoring predictions. The success rate is lower in cross-docking assays but remains comparable with that of the latest version of AutoDock that accounts for the protein flexibility. PMID:21541955