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Sample records for electric resonance

  1. Designing dielectric resonators on substrates: combining magnetic and electric resonances.

    PubMed

    van de Groep, J; Polman, A

    2013-11-01

    High-performance integrated optics, solar cells, and sensors require nanoscale optical components at the surface of the device, in order to manipulate, redirect and concentrate light. High-index dielectric resonators provide the possibility to do this efficiently with low absorption losses. The resonances supported by dielectric resonators are both magnetic and electric in nature. Combined scattering from these two can be used for directional scattering. Most applications require strong coupling between the particles and the substrate in order to enhance the absorption in the substrate. However, the coupling with the substrate strongly influences the resonant behavior of the particles. Here, we systematically study the influence of particle geometry and dielectric environment on the resonant behavior of dielectric resonators in the visible to near-IR spectral range. We show the key role of retardation in the excitation of the magnetic dipole (MD) mode, as well as the limit where no MD mode is supported. Furthermore, we study the influence of particle diameter, shape and substrate index on the spectral position, width and overlap of the electric dipole (ED) and MD modes. Also, we show that the ED and MD mode can selectively be enhanced or suppressed using multi-layer substrates. And, by comparing dipole excitation and plane wave excitation, we study the influence of driving field on the scattering properties. Finally, we show that the directional radiation profiles of the ED and MD modes in resonators on a substrate are similar to those of point-dipoles close to a substrate. Altogether, this work is a guideline how to tune magnetic and electric resonances for specific applications. PMID:24216852

  2. Frequency splitting of a multi-layered electric ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. G.; Kim, K. H.; Jung, H. S.; Cho, H.; Choi, E. M.

    2011-07-01

    We present experimental results on the multilayering effects of an electric ring resonator. The electromagnetic response of the electric ring resonator is measured via a scattering matrix using a vector network analyzer at the X-band frequency. Structures of the electric ring resonator with up to four layers were tested and analyzed using commercial software. We demonstrate that, in an electric ring resonator, the electric and magnetic dipole polarization effect gives rise to resonance frequency splitting when the cell is multilayered.

  3. Electrical characteristics of a short RFQ resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Jain, A.; Wang, H. . Dept. of Physics); Lombardi, A. . Lab. Nazionale di Legnaro)

    1990-01-01

    Electrical characteristics of a short RFQ resonator of the four rod'' type have been studied by carrying out measurements on models and numerical simulations using the MAFIA codes. An empirical formula is obtained for the capacitance of vane-like electrodes in a four-rod RFQ resonator. It is shown that the electrode supports could account for a significant part of the total capacitance. This additional capacitance may change the circuit symmetry and give rise to a dipole component. This effect can be compensated by appropriate modifications of the support structure. The beam offset due to a dipole component is estimated. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Compact electrically detected magnetic resonance setup

    SciTech Connect

    Eckardt, Michael Harneit, Wolfgang; Behrends, Jan; Münter, Detlef

    2015-04-15

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) is a commonly used technique for the study of spin-dependent transport processes in semiconductor materials and electro-optical devices. Here, we present the design and implementation of a compact setup to measure EDMR, which is based on a commercially available benchtop electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer. The electrical detection part uses mostly off-the-shelf electrical components and is thus highly customizable. We present a characterization and calibration procedure for the instrument that allowed us to quantitatively reproduce results obtained on a silicon-based reference sample with a “large-scale” state-of-the-art instrument. This shows that EDMR can be used in novel contexts relevant for semiconductor device fabrication like clean room environments and even glove boxes. As an application example, we present data on a class of environment-sensitive objects new to EDMR, semiconducting organic microcrystals, and discuss similarities and differences to data obtained for thin-film devices of the same molecule.

  5. Compact electrically detected magnetic resonance setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, Michael; Behrends, Jan; Münter, Detlef; Harneit, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) is a commonly used technique for the study of spin-dependent transport processes in semiconductor materials and electro-optical devices. Here, we present the design and implementation of a compact setup to measure EDMR, which is based on a commercially available benchtop electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer. The electrical detection part uses mostly off-the-shelf electrical components and is thus highly customizable. We present a characterization and calibration procedure for the instrument that allowed us to quantitatively reproduce results obtained on a silicon-based reference sample with a "large-scale" state-of-the-art instrument. This shows that EDMR can be used in novel contexts relevant for semiconductor device fabrication like clean room environments and even glove boxes. As an application example, we present data on a class of environment-sensitive objects new to EDMR, semiconducting organic microcrystals, and discuss similarities and differences to data obtained for thin-film devices of the same molecule.

  6. Ultrafast electrical control of a resonantly driven single photon source

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Bennett, A. J. Ellis, D. J. P.; Shields, A. J.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2014-08-04

    We demonstrate generation of a pulsed stream of electrically triggered single photons in resonance fluorescence, by applying high frequency electrical pulses to a single quantum dot in a p-i-n diode under resonant laser excitation. Single photon emission was verified, with the probability of multiple photon emission reduced to 2.8%. We show that despite the presence of charge noise in the emission spectrum of the dot, resonant excitation acts as a “filter” to generate narrow bandwidth photons.

  7. Comparison of nuclear electric resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance in integer and fractional quantum Hall states

    SciTech Connect

    Tomimatsu, Toru Shirai, Shota; Hashimoto, Katsushi Sato, Ken; Hirayama, Yoshiro

    2015-08-15

    Electric-field-induced nuclear resonance (NER: nuclear electric resonance) involving quantum Hall states (QHSs) was studied at various filling factors by exploiting changes in nuclear spins polarized at quantum Hall breakdown. Distinct from the magnetic dipole interaction in nuclear magnetic resonance, the interaction of the electric-field gradient with the electric quadrupole moment plays the dominant role in the NER mechanism. The magnitude of the NER signal strongly depends on whether electronic states are localized or extended. This indicates that NER is sensitive to the screening capability of the electric field associated with QHSs.

  8. Array of piezoelectric lateral electric field excited resonators.

    PubMed

    Borodina, I A; Zaitsev, B D; Teplykh, A A; Shikhabudinov, A M; Kuznetsova, I E

    2015-09-01

    An array containing two resonators placed on X-cut lithium niobate plate has been experimentally investigated. The resonator's lateral electric field was directed along the Y-crystallographic axis. It has been shown that stable resonance exists for a longitudinal acoustic wave propagating along the X-axis in the area between the electrodes. A layer of special damping coating was deposited around the resonators and on the part of electrodes to suppress parasitic oscillations induced mainly by Lamb waves. Frequency dependences of the real and imaginary parts of electric impedance/admittance were measured for every resonator to find resonant frequency and Q-factor with series and parallel resonances. The optimal values of width of electrode coating for every resonator were revealed which provide good resonance quality. The measurements of parameter S12, which characterizes a degree of acoustical coupling between the resonators, have shown its value to be higher than 50dB in the absolute value in all the cases considered. This means that the resonators under study are entirely acoustically decoupled. Thus it has been demonstrated that the damping layer not only provides a sufficiently good quality of every resonator's resonance, but it also assures their entire acoustical decoupling. PMID:26060097

  9. Eddy-current crack detection at frequencies approaching electrical resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Robert R.; Dixon, Steve

    2014-02-01

    The effect of operating an absolute eddy-current (EC) probe at frequencies around its electrical resonance was investigated. A defect signal enhancement phenomenon was observed and characterised. Experimental tests were performed on notch defects in typical aerospace superalloys. An absolute mode EC probe was operated by sweeping through a range of frequencies, in the MHz range, encompassing the electrical resonance of the system. Resonance decoupling above defects results in a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) peak, within a band of frequencies approaching resonance, of up to 3.7 times that measured at 1MHz. This near electrical resonance signal enhancement (NERSE) phenomenon poses the possibility for a simple operational approach method for improving the sensitivity of conventional eddy-current testing.

  10. The study of piezoelectric lateral-electric-field-excited resonator.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Boris; Kuznetsova, Iren; Shikhabudinov, Alexander; Teplykh, Andrey; Borodina, Irina

    2014-01-01

    The piezoelectric lateral-electric-field-excited resonator based on an X-cut lithium niobate plate has been investigated. Two rectangular electrodes were applied on one side of the plate so that the lateral electric field components were parallel to the crystallographic Y-axis and excited the longitudinal wave in the gap between the electrodes. The region around the electrodes was covered with a special absorbing varnish to suppress the spurious oscillations. The effect of the absorbing coating width on the resonant frequency and Q-factor of the lateral field-excited resonator was studied in detail with the series and parallel resonances for different width of the gap between the electrodes. As a result, we found experimentally the parameter regions of pure resonances and the boundaries of value variation for resonance frequency, Q-factor, and effective electromechanical coupling coefficient. PMID:24402903

  11. Electric-optic resonant phase modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung (Inventor); Robinson, Deborah L. (Inventor); Hemmati, Hamid (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An electro-optic resonant cavity is used to achieve phase modulation with lower driving voltages. Laser damage thresholds are inherently higher than with previously used integrated optics due to the utilization of bulk optics. Phase modulation is achieved at higher speeds with lower driving voltages than previously obtained with non-resonant electro-optic phase modulators. The instant scheme uses a data locking dither approach as opposed to the conventional sinusoidal locking schemes. In accordance with a disclosed embodiment, a resonant cavity modulator has been designed to operate at a data rate in excess of 100 Mbps. By carefully choosing the cavity finesse and its dimension, it is possible to control the pulse switching time to within 4 ns and to limit the required switching voltage to within 10 V. Experimentally, the resonant cavity can be maintained on resonance with respect to the input laser signal by monitoring the fluctuation of output intensity as the cavity is switched. This cavity locking scheme can be applied by using only the random data sequence, and without the need of additional dithering of the cavity. Compared to waveguide modulators, the resonant cavity has a comparable modulating voltage requirement. Because of its bulk geometry, resonant cavity modulator has the potential of accommodating higher throughput power. Furthermore, mode matching into a bulk device is easier and typically can be achieved with higher efficiency. On the other hand, unlike waveguide modulators which are essentially traveling wave devices, the resonant cavity modulator requires that the cavity be maintained in resonance with respect to the incoming laser signal. An additional control loop is incorporated into the modulator to maintain the cavity on resonance.

  12. Electrical Characterization of Microelectromechanical Silicon Carbide Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Teng; Zorman, Christian

    2008-01-01

    This manuscript describes the findings of a study to investigate the performance of SiC MEMS resonators with respect to resonant frequency and quality factor under a variety of testing conditions, including various ambient pressures, AC drive voltages, bias potentials and temperatures. The sample set included both single-crystal and polycrystalline 3C-SiC lateral resonators. The experimental results show that operation at reduced pressures increases the resonant frequency as damping due to the gas-rarefaction effect becomes significant. Both DC bias and AC drive voltages result in nonlinearities, but the AC drive voltage is more sensitive to noise. The AC voltage has a voltage coefficient of 1∼4ppm/V at a DC bias of 40V. The coefficient of DC bias is about -11ppm/V to - 21ppm/V for poly-SiC, which is more than a factor of two better than a similarly designed polysilicon resonator (-54 ppm/V). The effective stiffness of the resonator decreases (softens) as the bias potential is increased, but increases (hardens) as drive voltage increase when scan is from low to high frequency. The resonant frequency decreases slightly with increasing temperature, exhibiting a temperature coefficient of -22 ppm/°C, between 22°C and 60°C. The thermal expansion mismatch between the SiC device and the Si substrate could be a reason that thermal coefficient for these SiC resonators is about twofold higher than similar polysilicon resonators. However, the Qs appear to exhibit no temperature dependence in this range.

  13. Investigating electrical resonance in eddy-current array probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R.; Fan, Y.; Dixon, S.

    2016-02-01

    The sensitivity enhancing effects of eddy-current testing at frequencies close to electrical resonance are explored. Var-ied techniques exploiting the phenomenon, dubbed near electrical resonance signal enhancement (NERSE), were experimentally investigated to evaluate its potential exploitation for other interesting applications in aerospace materials, in particular its potential for boosting the sensitivity of standard ECT measurements. Methods for setting and controlling the typically unstable resonant frequencies of such systems are discussed. This research is funded by the EPSRC, via the Research Centre for Non-Destructive Evaluation RCNDE, and Rolls-Royce plc.

  14. A composite piezoelectric resonator with a lateral electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, B. D.; Shikhabudinov, A. M.; Borodina, I. A.; Teplykh, A. A.; Kuznetsova, I. E.

    2015-11-01

    A new method of suppressing parasitic oscillations in a piezoelectric resonator with excitation of the transverse electric field is proposed. The method is based on spatial separation of the high-frequency electric field of a source and the resonating piezoelectric plate by means of an air gap. In this case, the tangential components of field in the piezoelectric plate are practically not attenuated, while the normal components are significantly reduced. The method is implemented by means of a composite resonator consisting of a glass plate with rectangular electrodes, an air gap, and a plate of lithium niobate 1of 128 Y- X cut. It is shown that there is an optimal width of the air gap that provides a good quality of series and parallel resonance in a frequency range of 3-4 MHz with a maximum quality factor of ˜15000 in both cases.

  15. Extreme harmonic generation in electrically driven spin resonance.

    PubMed

    Stehlik, J; Schroer, M D; Maialle, M Z; Degani, M H; Petta, J R

    2014-06-01

    We report the observation of multiple harmonic generation in electric dipole spin resonance in an InAs nanowire double quantum dot. The harmonics display a remarkable detuning dependence: near the interdot charge transition as many as eight harmonics are observed, while at large detunings we only observe the fundamental spin resonance condition. The detuning dependence indicates that the observed harmonics may be due to Landau-Zener transition dynamics at anticrossings in the energy level spectrum. PMID:24949787

  16. Broadband electrically detected magnetic resonance using adiabatic pulses.

    PubMed

    Hrubesch, F M; Braunbeck, G; Voss, A; Stutzmann, M; Brandt, M S

    2015-05-01

    We present a broadband microwave setup for electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) based on microwave antennae with the ability to apply arbitrarily shaped pulses for the excitation of electron spin resonance (ESR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of spin ensembles. This setup uses non-resonant stripline structures for on-chip microwave delivery and is demonstrated to work in the frequency range from 4 MHz to 18 GHz. π pulse times of 50 ns and 70 μs for ESR and NMR transitions, respectively, are achieved with as little as 100 mW of microwave or radiofrequency power. The use of adiabatic pulses fully compensates for the microwave magnetic field inhomogeneity of the stripline antennae, as demonstrated with the help of BIR4 unitary rotation pulses driving the ESR transition of neutral phosphorus donors in silicon and the NMR transitions of ionized phosphorus donors as detected by electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR). PMID:25828243

  17. Electrically Protected Resonant Exchange Qubits in Triple Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. M.; Srinivasa, V.; Medford, J.

    2013-08-01

    We present a modulated microwave approach for quantum computing with qubits comprising three spins in a triple quantum dot. This approach includes single- and two-qubit gates that are protected against low-frequency electrical noise, due to an operating point with a narrowband response to high frequency electric fields. Furthermore, existing double quantum dot advances, including robust preparation and measurement via spin-to-charge conversion, are immediately applicable to the new qubit. Finally, the electric dipole terms implicit in the high frequency coupling enable strong coupling with superconducting microwave resonators, leading to more robust two-qubit gates.

  18. Electrically protected resonant exchange qubits in triple quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J M; Srinivasa, V; Medford, J

    2013-08-01

    We present a modulated microwave approach for quantum computing with qubits comprising three spins in a triple quantum dot. This approach includes single- and two-qubit gates that are protected against low-frequency electrical noise, due to an operating point with a narrowband response to high frequency electric fields. Furthermore, existing double quantum dot advances, including robust preparation and measurement via spin-to-charge conversion, are immediately applicable to the new qubit. Finally, the electric dipole terms implicit in the high frequency coupling enable strong coupling with superconducting microwave resonators, leading to more robust two-qubit gates. PMID:23952376

  19. 750 GeV diphoton resonance and electric dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kiwoon; Im, Sang Hui; Kim, Hyungjin; Mo, Doh Young

    2016-09-01

    We examine the implication of the recently observed 750 GeV diphoton excess for the electric dipole moments of the neutron and electron. If the excess is due to a spin zero resonance which couples to photons and gluons through the loops of massive vector-like fermions, the resulting neutron electric dipole moment can be comparable to the present experimental bound if the CP-violating angle α in the underlying new physics is of O (10-1). An electron EDM comparable to the present bound can be achieved through a mixing between the 750 GeV resonance and the Standard Model Higgs boson, if the mixing angle itself for an approximately pseudoscalar resonance, or the mixing angle times the CP-violating angle α for an approximately scalar resonance, is of O (10-3). For the case that the 750 GeV resonance corresponds to a composite pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson formed by a QCD-like hypercolor dynamics confining at ΛHC, the resulting neutron EDM can be estimated with α ∼(750 GeV /ΛHC) 2θHC, where θHC is the hypercolor vacuum angle.

  20. Testing resonating vector strength: Auditory system, electric fish, and noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo van Hemmen, J.; Longtin, André; Vollmayr, Andreas N.

    2011-12-01

    Quite often a response to some input with a specific frequency ν○ can be described through a sequence of discrete events. Here, we study the synchrony vector, whose length stands for the vector strength, and in doing so focus on neuronal response in terms of spike times. The latter are supposed to be given by experiment. Instead of singling out the stimulus frequency ν○ we study the synchrony vector as a function of the real frequency variable ν. Its length turns out to be a resonating vector strength in that it shows clear maxima in the neighborhood of ν○ and multiples thereof, hence, allowing an easy way of determining response frequencies. We study this "resonating" vector strength for two concrete but rather different cases, viz., a specific midbrain neuron in the auditory system of cat and a primary detector neuron belonging to the electric sense of the wave-type electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. We show that the resonating vector strength always performs a clear resonance correlated with the phase locking that it quantifies. We analyze the influence of noise and demonstrate how well the resonance associated with maximal vector strength indicates the dominant stimulus frequency. Furthermore, we exhibit how one can obtain a specific phase associated with, for instance, a delay in auditory analysis.

  1. Electrical resonance and membrane currents in turtle cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Art, J J; Crawford, A C; Fettiplace, R

    1986-01-01

    The electrical and mechanical properties of single hair cells from the turtle's cochlea were examined to investigate the basis of their electrical resonance. Receptor potentials were measured with intracellular micropipettes in the isolated basilar papilla. At the onset and termination of a step displacement of the ciliary bundle the receptor potential showed a damped oscillation reflecting the frequency selectivity of the cell. Resonance frequencies increased systematically from apex to base of the cochlea. Similar oscillations could be elicited by a current step injected through the recording electrode. Solitary hair cells enzymatically isolated from the papilla were investigated with the tight-seal whole-cell recording method. Cells retained their properties in response to current steps and had resonance frequencies between 10 and 350 Hz. In voltage clamp such cells displayed a large outward K+ current and an inward Ca2+ current both activated by depolarization from the resting potential. The relaxation time constant of the K+ current was inversely correlated with the resonance frequency of the cell, varying from 150 ms in the lowest frequency cells to less than 1 ms in the highest ones. It is argued that variation in the kinetics of this current is the major factor responsible for the range of resonance frequencies. In preparations of the isolated papilla a flexible glass fibre, attached to the tip of a ciliary bundle, was used to deliver constant force steps to the bundle and to monitor its displacement. Receptor potentials were simultaneously recorded. At the beginning and end of a force step towards the kinocilium, the bundle vibrated at a frequency which coincided with the electrical resonance frequency of the cell.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2426237

  2. Probing electric field control of magnetism using ferromagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ziyao; Trassin, Morgan; Gao, Ya; Gao, Yuan; Qiu, Diana; Ashraf, Khalid; Nan, Tianxiang; Yang, Xi; Bowden, S R; Pierce, D T; Stiles, M D; Unguris, J; Liu, Ming; Howe, Brandon M; Brown, Gail J; Salahuddin, S; Ramesh, R; Sun, Nian X

    2015-01-01

    Exchange coupled CoFe/BiFeO3 thin-film heterostructures show great promise for power-efficient electric field-induced 180° magnetization switching. However, the coupling mechanism and precise qualification of the exchange coupling in CoFe/BiFeO3 heterostructures have been elusive. Here we show direct evidence for electric field control of the magnetic state in exchange coupled CoFe/BiFeO3 through electric field-dependent ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy and nanoscale spatially resolved magnetic imaging. Scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis images reveal the coupling of the magnetization in the CoFe layer to the canted moment in the BiFeO3 layer. Electric field-dependent ferromagnetic resonance measurements quantify the exchange coupling strength and reveal that the CoFe magnetization is directly and reversibly modulated by the applied electric field through a ~180° switching of the canted moment in BiFeO3. This constitutes an important step towards robust repeatable and non-volatile voltage-induced 180° magnetization switching in thin-film multiferroic heterostructures and tunable RF/microwave devices. PMID:25631924

  3. Analysis of the line shape of electrically detected ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, M.; Cao, Z. X.; Gui, Y. S.; Fan, X. L.; Hu, C.-M.

    2011-08-01

    This work reviews and examines two particular issues related with the new technique of electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR). This powerful technique has been broadly applied for studying magnetization and spin dynamics over the past ten years. The first issue is the relation and distinction between different mechanisms that give rise to a photovoltage via FMR in spintronic devices, and the second is the proper analysis of the FMR line shape, which has become the “Achilles heel” in interpreting experimental results, especially for either studying the spin pumping effect or quantifying spin Hall angles via the electrically detected FMR.

  4. Fano Resonance in an Electrically Driven Plasmonic Device.

    PubMed

    Vardi, Yuval; Cohen-Hoshen, Eyal; Shalem, Guy; Bar-Joseph, Israel

    2016-01-13

    We present an electrically driven plasmonic device consisting of a gold nanoparticle trapped in a gap between two electrodes. The tunneling current in the device generates plasmons, which decay radiatively. The emitted spectrum extends up to an energy that depends on the applied voltage. Characterization of the electrical conductance at low temperatures allows us to extract the voltage drop on each tunnel barrier and the corresponding emitted spectrum. In several devices we find a pronounced sharp asymmetrical dip in the spectrum, which we identify as a Fano resonance. Finite-difference time-domain calculations reveal that this resonance is due to interference between the nanoparticle and electrodes dipolar fields and can be conveniently controlled by the structural parameters. PMID:26717292

  5. Three-phase resonance bearing with an electric circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viushkov, Iu. A.

    1980-02-01

    The paper deals with a magnetically suspended bearing employing a resonance electric circuit, intended for float-type navigation instruments. The bearing provides both suspension and rotation (required in some navigation devices) of the sensitive element. The rotational moment is produced by a rotating magnetic field generated by three electromagnets (arranged at angles of 120 degrees) connected in series to a three-phase electromotive source.

  6. Fano Resonance in an Electrically Driven Plasmonic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardi, Yuval; Cohen-Hoshen, Eyal; Shalem, Guy; Bar-Joseph, Israel

    Electrically driven plasmonic devices offer unique opportunities as a research tool and for practical applications. In such devices, current that flows across a metallic tunnel junction excites a plasmon, which gives rise to light emission. This local nature of the excitation allows access into ''dark'' modes, which are not easily excited by far field illumination. We present an electrically driven plasmonic device, based on a gold nanoparticle single-electron-transistor, and investigate the light emission due to the tunneling current. The applied voltage determines the emitted spectral lineshape, enables an excellent control of the plasmonic spectrum. We show that the use of this structure allows us to characterize the electrical properties of the two tunnel barriers, and determine their role in the light emission process. Furthermore, we find a Fano resonance, resulting from interference between the nanoparticle and electrodes dipoles. This resonance is seen due to the local nature of the excitation, and is manifested as a sharp asymmetrical spectral dip. We show that the spectral position of this resonance can be conveniently controlled by the design of the structural parameters. Such devices may be a step toward the realization of an on-chip nano-optical emitters and sensors.

  7. Extreme Harmonic Generation in Electrically Driven Spin Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehlik, Jiri

    2015-03-01

    InAs nanowire double quantum dots offer a rich platform for studying single spin physics in a material with large spin-orbit (SO) coupling. The large SO coupling allows all electrical control of the electron spin through electric dipole spin resonance (EDSR). Here an oscillating electric field of frequency f displaces the electron wave function, while a magnetic field with strength B is applied. Spin rotations occur when the resonance condition hf = gμB B is met. Here g is the electron g-factor, h is Planck's constant, and μB is the Bohr magneton. We find that near zero interdot detuning efficient spin rotations also occur when hf = ngμB B , with n being an integer as large as 8 in our system. The harmonics feature a striking odd/even dependence. While the odd harmonics show an enhancement of the leakage current, the even harmonics show a reduction. In contrast, we do not observe any measurable harmonics at large detuning. We link the presence of harmonics with additional anti-crossings present in the level diagram. This implies that harmonics are the result of Landau-Zener transitions occurring at multiple anti-crossings. Recent theoretical work supports this conclusion. Research performed in collaboration with M. D. Schroer, M. Z. Maialle, M. H. Degani, and J. R. Petta. Research was supported by the Sloan and Packard Foundations, Army Research Office, DARPA QuEST and the NSF.

  8. Electrical switching of DNA monolayers investigated by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Qing; Wang, Kemin; Tan, Weihong; Yao, Jing; Li, Huimin

    2006-06-20

    The switching of DNA monolayers between a "lying" and a "standing" state initiated by applying electric field, and the subsequent DNA hybridization at different states were investigated in a contactless, label-free mode by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique. The results showed that the strength of the electric field and surface coverage could influence the switching of DNA monolayers. In addition, it was found that DNA hybridization efficiency could be enhanced or decreased when DNA probes stood straight up or lay flat on the gold surface, depending on the potential of the gold substrate. The enhancement of DNA hybridization efficiency reached the maximum when surface coverage reached 5.87 x 10(12) molecules/cm(2) and the potential of gold substrate was more negative than -0.7 V (versus ITO-coated glass). The research may be helpful for the construction of sensitive biosensors, biochips, and nanoscale electronic devices. PMID:16768490

  9. Tuning a resonant energy harvester using a generalized electrical load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammarano, A.; Burrow, S. G.; Barton, D. A. W.; Carrella, A.; Clare, L. R.

    2010-05-01

    A fundamental drawback of vibration-based energy harvesters is that they typically feature a resonant mass/spring mechanical system to amplify the small source vibrations; the limited bandwidth of the mechanical amplifier restricts the effectiveness of the energy harvester considerably. By extending the range of input frequencies over which a vibration energy harvester can generate useful power, e.g. through adaptive tuning, it is not only possible to open up a wider range of applications, such as those where the source frequency changes over time, but also possible to relax the requirements for precision manufacture or the need for mechanical adjustment in situ. In this paper, a vibration-based energy harvester connected to a generalized electrical load (containing both real and reactive impedance) is presented. It is demonstrated that the reactive component of the electrical load can be used to tune the harvester system to significantly increase the output power away from the resonant peak of the device. An analytical model of the system is developed, which includes non-ideal components arising from the physical implementation, and the results are confirmed by experiment. The - 3 dB (half-power) bandwidth of the prototype energy harvester is shown to be over three times greater when presented with an optimized load impedance compared to that for the same harvester presented with an optimized resistive only load.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Based Electrical Properties Tomography: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Liu, Jiaen

    2014-01-01

    Frequency-dependent electrical properties (EPs; conductivity and permittivity) of biological tissues provide important diagnostic information (e.g. tumor characterization), and also play an important role in quantifying radiofrequency (RF) coil induced Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) which is a major safety concern in high- and ultrahigh-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) applications. Cross-sectional imaging of EPs has been pursued for decades. Recently introduced Electrical Properties Tomography (EPT) approaches utilize the measurable RF magnetic field induced by the RF coil in an MRI system to quantitatively reconstruct the EP distribution in vivo and non-invasively with a spatial resolution of a few millimeters or less. This paper reviews the Electrical Properties Tomography approach from its basic theory in electromagnetism to the state of the art research outcomes. Emphasizing on the imaging reconstruction methods rather than experimentation techniques, we review the developed imaging algorithms, validation results in physical phantoms and biological tissues, as well as their applications in in vivo tumor detection and subject-specific SAR prediction. Challenges for future research are also discussed. PMID:24803104

  11. Direct electrical-to-optical conversion and light modulation in micro whispering-gallery-mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, Lute (Inventor); Levi, Anthony F. J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Techniques for directly converting an electrical signal into an optical signal by using a whispering gallery mode optical resonator formed of a dielectric material that allows for direct modulation of optical absorption by the electrical signal.

  12. Ion Behavior in an Electrically Compensated Ion Cyclotron Resonance Trap

    PubMed Central

    Brustkern, Adam M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    We recently described a new electrically compensated trap in FT ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and developed a means of tuning traps of this general design. Here, we describe a continuation of that research by comparing the ion transient lifetimes and the resulting mass resolving powers and signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios that are achievable in the compensated vs. uncompensated modes of this trap. Transient lifetimes are ten times longer under the same conditions of pressure, providing improved mass resolving power and S/N ratios. The mass resolving power as a function of m/z is linear (log-log plot) and nearly equal to the theoretical maximum. Importantly, the ion cyclotron frequency as a function of ion number decreases linearly in accord with theory, unlike its behavior in the uncompensated mode. This linearity should lead to better control in mass calibration and increased mass accuracy than achievable in the uncompensated mode. PMID:21499521

  13. Asymmetric resonant exchange qubit under the influence of electrical noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, Maximilian; Burkard, Guido

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the influence of electrical charge noise on a resonant exchange (RX) qubit in a triple quantum dot. This RX qubit is a variation of the exchange-only spin qubit which responds to a narrow-band resonant frequency. Our noise model includes uncorrelated charge noise in each quantum dot giving rise to two independent (noisy) bias parameters ɛ and Δ . We calculate the energy splitting of the two qubit states as a function of these two bias detuning parameters to find "sweet spots," where the qubit is least susceptible to noise. Our investigation shows that such sweet spots exist within the low-bias regime, in which the bias detuning parameters have the same magnitude as the hopping parameters. The location of the sweet spots in the (ɛ ,Δ ) plane depends on the hopping strength and asymmetry between the quantum dots. In the regime of weak charge noise, we identify a new favorable operating regime for the RX qubit based on these sweet spots.

  14. Electrical resonance with voltage-gated ion channels: perspectives from biophysical mechanisms and neural electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lin; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2016-01-01

    Electrical resonance, providing selective signal amplification at preferred frequencies, is a unique phenomenon of excitable membranes, which has been observed in the nervous system at the cellular, circuit and system levels. The mechanisms underlying electrical resonance have not been fully elucidated. Prevailing hypotheses attribute the resonance to voltage-gated ion channels on the membrane of single neurons. In this review, we follow this line of thinking to summarize and analyze the biophysical/molecular mechanisms, and also the physiological relevance of channel-mediated electrical resonance. PMID:26725736

  15. Electromagnetically induced transparency with large delay-bandwidth product induced by magnetic resonance near field coupling to electric resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hai-ming; Liu, Shao-bin Liu, Si-yuan; Zhang, Hai-feng; Bian, Bo-rui; Kong, Xiang-kun; Wang, Shen-yun

    2015-03-16

    In this paper, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)-like spectral response with magnetic resonance near field coupling to electric resonance. Six split-ring resonators and a cut wire are chosen as the bright and dark resonator, respectively. An EIT-like transmission peak located between two dips can be observed with incident magnetic field excitation. A large delay bandwidth product (0.39) is obtained, which has potential application in quantum optics and communications. The experimental results are in good agreement with simulated results.

  16. Scattering of core-shell nanowires with the interference of electric and magnetic resonances.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E; Oulton, Rupert F; Neshev, Dragomir N; Hess, Ortwin; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2013-07-15

    We study the scattering of normally incident waves by core-shell nanowires, which support both electric and magnetic resonances. Within such nanowires, for p-polarized incident waves, each electric resonance corresponds to two degenerate scattering channels while the magnetic resonance corresponds to only one channel. Consequently, when the electric dipole (ED) and magnetic dipole (MD) are tuned to overlap spectrally, the magnitude of the ED is twice that of the magnetic one, leading to a pair of angles of vanishing scattering. We further demonstrate that the scattering features of nanowires are polarization dependent, and vanishing scattering angles also can be induced by Fano resonances due to the interference of higher-order electric modes with the broad MD mode. PMID:23939129

  17. Graphene metallization of high-stress silicon nitride resonators for electrical integration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunwoo; Adiga, Vivekananda P; Barton, Robert A; van der Zande, Arend M; Lee, Gwan-Hyoung; Ilic, B Rob; Gondarenko, Alexander; Parpia, Jeevak M; Craighead, Harold G; Hone, James

    2013-09-11

    High stress stoichiometric silicon nitride resonators, whose quality factors exceed one million, have shown promise for applications in sensing, signal processing, and optomechanics. Yet, electrical integration of the insulating silicon nitride resonators has been challenging, as depositing even a thin layer of metal degrades the quality factor significantly. In this work, we show that graphene used as a conductive coating for Si3N4 membranes reduces the quality factor by less than 30% on average, which is minimal when compared to the effect of conventional metallization layers such as chromium or aluminum. The electrical integration of Si3N4-Graphene (SiNG) heterostructure resonators is demonstrated with electrical readout and electrostatic tuning of the frequency by up to 0.3% per volt. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of hybrid graphene/nitride mechanical resonators in which the electrical properties of graphene are combined with the superior mechanical performance of silicon nitride. PMID:23905749

  18. Theory of electrically controlled resonant tunneling spin devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. -Y.; Cartoixa, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    We report device concepts that exploit spin-orbit coupling for creating spin polarized current sources using nonmagnetic semiconductor resonant tunneling heterostructures, without external magnetic fields. The resonant interband tunneling psin filter exploits large valence band spin-orbit interaction to provide strong spin selectivity.

  19. Fabry-Perot resonance enhanced electrically pumped random lasing from ZnO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, P. N.; Shan, C. X.; Wang, S. P.; Lu, Y. J.; Li, B. H.; Shen, D. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Fabry-Perot (F-P) resonance has been introduced into Au/MgO/ZnO structure in order to improve the performance of electrically pumped random lasing in this structure. It is found that the lasing threshold of this structure is significantly reduced by introducing the F-P resonance due to the better optical confinement. Meanwhile, this structure shows improved random lasing output characteristics with less random lasing modes and strong dominant output mode due to the gain competition process. The results demonstrate that introducing F-P resonance into the random media provides an effective strategy towards controllable, high performance electrically pumped random lasers.

  20. Electrically tunable Fano-type resonance of an asymmetric metal wire pair.

    PubMed

    Fu, Quanhong; Zhang, Fuli; Fan, Yuancheng; He, Xuan; Qiao, Tong; Kong, Botao

    2016-05-30

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the electrically tunable Fano-type resonance of asymmetric metal wire pair loaded with varactor diodes. It is illustrated that Fano-type transmission spectrum with high quality factor Q appears as a result of interference between the dipole and quadrupole modes. The ohmic loss of series resistance in varactor diode makes major contribution to absorption. At the Fano-type resonance frequency, both the two metal wires exhibit the strongest electric resonance simultaneously, and the Fano-type resonance manifests a large group delay. As the bias voltage ranges from 0 V to 8 V, the Fano-type resonance frequency exhibits a prominent blueshift of 0.16 GHz and the transmission experiences a modulation with a modulation depth of 97%. PMID:27410096

  1. Composite modulation of Fano resonance in plasmonic microstructures by electric-field and microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Wu, Chenyun; Yang, Hong; Hu, Xiaoyong Gong, Qihuang

    2014-11-03

    Composite modulation of Fano resonance by using electric-field and microcavity simultaneously is realized in a plasmonic microstructure, which consists of a gold nanowire grating inserted into a Fabry-Perot microcavity composited of a liquid crystal layer sandwiched between two indium tin oxide layers. The Fano resonance wavelength varies with the applied voltage and the microcavity resonance. A large shift of 48 nm in the Fano resonance wavelength is achieved when the applied voltage is 20 V. This may provide a new way for the study of multi-functional integrated photonic circuits and chips based on plasmonic microstructures.

  2. Effects of combined apertures on the magnitudes of electric coupling coefficients of combline resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pholele, T. M.; Chuma, J. M.

    2014-10-01

    The effects of differently positioned and combined apertures on the magnitudes of electric coupling coefficients of two identical combline resonators are analysed. Coupling coefficient, k-vertical symmetry provides greater negative coupling for apertures less than 50 % opening on the common wall. Combined apertures do not enhance electric coupling. The Γ aperture annihilates electric coupling, whereas T shaped aperture provides reduced negative coupling coefficients compared to single apertures that make up the combination.

  3. Electrical noise modulates perception of electrical pulses in humans: sensation enhancement via stochastic resonance.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulos, Fivos; Nierhaus, Till; Villringer, Arno

    2014-03-01

    Although noise is usually considered to be harmful for signal detection and information transmission, stochastic resonance (SR) describes the counterintuitive phenomenon of noise enhancing the detection and transmission of weak input signals. In mammalian sensory systems, SR-related phenomena may arise both in the peripheral and the central nervous system. Here, we investigate behavioral SR effects of subliminal electrical noise stimulation on the perception of somatosensory stimuli in humans. We compare the likelihood to detect near-threshold pulses of different intensities applied on the left index finger during presence vs. absence of subliminal noise on the same or an adjacent finger. We show that (low-pass) noise can enhance signal detection when applied on the same finger. This enhancement is strong for near-threshold pulses below the 50% detection threshold and becomes stronger when near-threshold pulses are applied as brief trains. The effect reverses at pulse intensities above threshold, especially when noise is replaced by subliminal sinusoidal stimulation, arguing for a peripheral direct current addition. Unfiltered noise applied on longer pulses enhances detection of all pulse intensities. Noise applied to an adjacent finger has two opposing effects: an inhibiting effect (presumably due to lateral inhibition) and an enhancing effect (most likely due to SR in the central nervous system). In summary, we demonstrate that subliminal noise can significantly modulate detection performance of near-threshold stimuli. Our results indicate SR effects in the peripheral and central nervous system. PMID:24353303

  4. Thermo-optically tuned photonic resonators with concurrent electrical connection and thermal isolation

    DOEpatents

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Kekatpure, Rohan Deodatta; Zortman, William A.; Savignon, Daniel J.

    2016-06-14

    A photonic resonator system is designed to use thermal tuning to adjust the resonant wavelength of each resonator in the system, with a separate tuning circuit associated with each resonator so that individual adjustments may be made. The common electrical ground connection between the tuning circuits is particularly formed to provide thermal isolation between adjacent resonators by including a capacitor along each return path to ground, where the presence of the capacitor's dielectric material provides the thermal isolation. The use of capacitively coupling necessarily requires the use of an AC current as an input to the heater element (conductor/resistor) of each resonator, where the RMS value of the AC signal is indicative of the amount of heat that is generated along the element and the degree of wavelength tuning that is obtained.

  5. Emulation of quantum mechanical billiards by electrical resonance circuits.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Olof; Larsson, Johan; Berggren, Karl-Fredrik

    2005-05-01

    We propose that a two-dimensional electric network may be used for fundamental studies of wave function properties, transport, and related statistics. Using Kirchhoff's current law and the j omega method we find that the network is analogous to a discretized Schrödinger equation for quantum billiards and dots. Thus complex electric potentials play the role of quantum mechanical wave functions. Ways of realizing the electric network are discussed briefly. The role of symmetries is outlined, and a direct way of selecting states with a given symmetry is presented. PMID:16089633

  6. Electrically tunable Dicke effect in a double-ring resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Cetin, A. E.; Muestecaplioglu, Oe. E.

    2010-04-15

    We study the finite-element method analysis of the Dicke effect using numerical simulations in an all-optical system of an optical waveguide side-coupled to two interacting ring resonators in a liquid crystal environment. The system is shown to exhibit all the signatures of the Dicke effect under active and reversible control by an applied voltage.

  7. Physics of a novel magnetic resonance and electrical impedance combination for breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallergi, Maria; Heine, John J.; Wollin, Ernest

    2015-03-01

    A new technique is proposed and experimentally validated for breast cancer detection and diagnosis. The technique combines magnetic resonance with electrical impedance measurements and has the potential to increase the specificity of magnetic resonance mammography (MRM) thereby reducing false positive biopsy rates. The new magnetic resonance electrical impedance mammography (MREIM) adds a time varying electric field during a supplementary sequence to a standard MRM examination with an apparatus that is "invisible" to the patient. The applied electric field produces a current that creates an additional magnetic field with a component aligned with the bore magnetic field that can alter the native signal in areas of higher electrical conductivity. The justification for adding the electric field is that the electrical conductivity of cancerous breast tissue is approximately 3-40 times higher than normal breast tissue and, hence, conductivity of malignant tissue represents a known clinical disease biomarker. In a pilot study with custom-made phantoms and experimental protocols, it was demonstrated that MREIM can produce, as theoretically predicted, a detectable differential signal in areas of higher electrical conductivity (tumor surrogate regions); the evidence indicates that the differential signal is produced by the confluence of two different effects at full image resolution without gadolinium chelate contrast agent injection, without extraneous reconstruction techniques, and without cumbersome multi-positioned patient electrode configurations. This paper describes the theoretical model that predicts and explains the observed experimental results that were also confirmed by simulation studies.

  8. Auxiliary quasi-resonant dc tank electrical power converter

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Fang Z.

    2006-10-24

    An auxiliary quasi-resonant dc tank (AQRDCT) power converter with fast current charging, voltage balancing (or charging), and voltage clamping circuits is provided for achieving soft-switched power conversion. The present invention is an improvement of the invention taught in U.S. Pat. No. 6,111,770, herein incorporated by reference. The present invention provides faster current charging to the resonant inductor, thus minimizing delay time of the pulse width modulation (PWM) due to the soft-switching process. The new AQRDCT converter includes three tank capacitors or power supplies to achieve the faster current charging and minimize the soft-switching time delay. The new AQRDCT converter further includes a voltage balancing circuit to charge and discharge the three tank capacitors so that additional isolated power supplies from the utility line are not needed. A voltage clamping circuit is also included for clamping voltage surge due to the reverse recovery of diodes.

  9. Measurement of a high electrical quality factor in a niobium resonator for a gravitational radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Moody, M. V.; Richard, J.-P.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical and electrical quality factors of a 10-g niobium resonator were measured at 4.4 K and were found to be 8.1 x 10 to the 6th, and 3.8 x 10 to the 6th, respectively. The value for the electrical quality factor is high enough for a system operating at 50 mK at a sensitivity level of one phonon. The resonator's low damping properties make it suitable for use as a transducer for a cryogenic three-mode gravitational radiation detector. A practical design is given for the mounting of the resonator on a 2400-kg aluminum-bar detector. Projections are made for the sensitivity of a 2400-kg bar instrumented as a three-mode system with this resonator inductively coupled to a SQUID.

  10. Electrically detected magnetic resonance in a W-band microwave cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, V.; Lo, C. C.; George, R. E.; Lyon, S. A.; Bokor, J.; Schenkel, T.; Ardavan, A.; Morton, J. J. L.

    2011-01-14

    We describe a low-temperature sample probe for the electrical detection of magnetic resonance in a resonant W-band (94 GHz) microwave cavity. The advantages of this approach are demonstrated by experiments on silicon field-effect transistors. A comparison with conventional low-frequency measurements at X-band (9.7 GHz) on the same devices reveals an up to 100-fold enhancement of the signal intensity. In addition, resonance lines that are unresolved at X-band are clearly separated in the W-band measurements. Electrically detected magnetic resonance at high magnetic fields and high microwave frequencies is therefore a very sensitive technique for studying electron spins with an enhanced spectral resolution and sensitivity.

  11. Resonance Method of Electric-Dipole-Moment Measurements in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, Yuri F.; Morse, William M.; Semertzidis, Yannis K.

    2006-06-02

    A 'resonance method' of measuring the electric dipole moment (EDM) of nuclei in storage rings is described, based on two new ideas: (1) Oscillating particles' velocities in resonance with spin precession, and (2) alternately producing two sub-beams with different betatron tunes--one sub-beam to amplify and thus make it easier to correct ring imperfections that produce false signals imitating EDM signals, and the other to make the EDM measurement.

  12. RESONANCE METHOD OF ELECTRIC-DIPOLE-MOMENT MEASUREMENTS IN STORAGE RINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    ORLOV, Y.F.; MORSE, W.M.; SEMERTZIDIS, Y.K.

    2006-05-10

    A ''resonance method'' of measuring the electric dipole moment (EDM) of nuclei in storage rings is described, based on two new ideas: (1) Oscillating particles velocities in resonance with spin precession, and (2) alternately producing two sub-beams with different betatron tunes--one sub-beam to amplify and thus make it easier to correct ring imperfections that produce false signals imitating EDM signals, and the other to make the EDM measurement.

  13. Liquid sensor based on a piezoelectric lateral electric field-excited resonator.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Boris D; Shikhabudinov, Alexander M; Teplykh, Andrey A; Kuznetsova, Iren E

    2015-12-01

    The influence of viscous and conducting liquid on the characteristics of a piezoelectric lateral electric field-excited resonator based on the X-cut lithium niobate plate has been investigated. It has been found that the contact of a free surface of such resonator with conducting or viscous liquid leads to the substantial variation of its electrical impedance/admittance. The analysis has shown the modulus of electrical impedance or admittance at any frequency near the parallel or series resonance to be a parameter unambiguously associated with the conductivity or the viscosity. This parameter is more sensitive to the variation of the liquid conductivity or viscosity as compared to the widely used for this purpose resonant frequency whose variation area is essentially smaller. By this means the liquid conductivity and viscosity affects unambiguously on the change of electrical impedance and admittance modulus whose measurement at a fixed frequency should present no problem in practice. Consequently, the lateral field excited resonator we have described may be employed as a liquid conductivity and viscosity meter with an appropriate graduation. PMID:26216121

  14. Rashba coupling in three-dimensional wurtzite structure electron gas at electric-dipole spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungier, W.

    2014-05-01

    Theoretical description of Rashba effects in three-dimensional electron gas at electric-dipole spin resonance conditions is presented in the frame of conductivity tensor formalism. The details due to anisotropy of the effective mass tensor, as well as the Lande factor, are considered. The absorbed power is calculated for arbitrary orientation of the sample with respect to external fields: constant magnetic field and rf electric field. The differences between resonance signals in two- and three-dimensional electron gas are pointed out.

  15. Heat dissipation due to ferromagnetic resonance in a ferromagnetic metal monitored by electrical resistance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanoi, Kazuto; Yokotani, Yuki; Kimura, Takashi

    2015-11-02

    The heat dissipation due to the resonant precessional motion of the magnetization in a ferromagnetic metal has been investigated. We demonstrated that the temperature during the ferromagnetic resonance can be simply detected by the electrical resistance measurement of the Cu strip line in contact with the ferromagnetic metal. The temperature change of the Cu strip due to the ferromagnetic resonance was found to exceed 10 K, which significantly affects the spin-current transport. The influence of the thermal conductivity of the substrate on the heating was also investigated.

  16. Resonant tunneling of interacting electrons in an AC electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Elesin, V. F.

    2013-11-15

    The problem of the effect of electron-electron interaction on the static and dynamic properties of a double-barrier nanostructure (resonant tunneling diode (RTD)) is studied in terms of a coherent tunneling model, which includes a set of Schrödinger and Poisson equations with open boundary conditions. Explicit analytical expressions are derived for dc and ac potentials and reduced (active and reactive) currents in the quasi-classical approximation over a wide frequency range. These expressions are used to analyze the frequency characteristics of RTD. It is shown that the interaction can radically change the form of these expressions, especially in the case of a hysteretic I-V characteristic. In this case, the active current and the ac potentials can increase sharply at both low and high frequencies. For this increase to occur, it is necessary to meet quantum regime conditions and to choose a proper working point in the I-V characteristic of RTD. The possibility of appearance of specific plasma oscillations, which can improve the high-frequency characteristics of RTD, is predicted. It is found that the active current can be comparable with the resonant dc current of RTD.

  17. Giant electric field enhancement in split ring resonators featuring nanometer-sized gaps.

    PubMed

    Bagiante, S; Enderli, F; Fabiańska, J; Sigg, H; Feurer, T

    2015-01-01

    Today's pulsed THz sources enable us to excite, probe, and coherently control the vibrational or rotational dynamics of organic and inorganic materials on ultrafast time scales. Driven by standard laser sources THz electric field strengths of up to several MVm(-1) have been reported and in order to reach even higher electric field strengths the use of dedicated electric field enhancement structures has been proposed. Here, we demonstrate resonant electric field enhancement structures, which concentrate the incident electric field in sub-diffraction size volumes and show an electric field enhancement as high as ~14,000 at 50 GHz. These values have been confirmed through a combination of near-field imaging experiments and electromagnetic simulations. PMID:25623373

  18. Oscillations emerging from noise-driven steady state in networks with electrical synapses and subthreshold resonance

    PubMed Central

    Tchumatchenko, Tatjana; Clopath, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Oscillations play a critical role in cognitive phenomena and have been observed in many brain regions. Experimental evidence indicates that classes of neurons exhibit properties that could promote oscillations, such as subthreshold resonance and electrical gap junctions. Typically, these two properties are studied separately but it is not clear which is the dominant determinant of global network rhythms. Our aim is to provide an analytical understanding of how these two effects destabilize the fluctuation-driven state, in which neurons fire irregularly, and lead to an emergence of global synchronous oscillations. Here we show how the oscillation frequency is shaped by single neuron resonance, electrical and chemical synapses.The presence of both gap junctions and subthreshold resonance are necessary for the emergence of oscillations. Our results are in agreement with several experimental observations such as network responses to oscillatory inputs and offer a much-needed conceptual link connecting a collection of disparate effects observed in networks. PMID:25405458

  19. Real-time analysis of mechanical and electrical resonances with open-source sound card software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makan, G.; Kopasz, K.; Gingl, Z.

    2014-01-01

    We present an easily reproducible, open-source, sound card based experimental set-up to support transfer function measurement. Our system is able to visualize the signals of mechanical and electrical resonances and their spectra in real time. We give a brief description of the system, and show some examples of electrical and mechanical resonance experiments that are supported by the system. The theoretical background, experimental set-up, component selection and digital signal processing are all discussed, and more detailed information (building instructions, software download) is provided on a dedicated web page (www.noise.inf.u-szeged.hu/edudev/RealTimeAnalysisOfResonances/). The experimental set-up can support the undergraduate and graduate education of students of physics, physics education and engineering by means of experimental demonstrations and laboratory exercises. The very low cost, high efficiency and transparent system provides a scalable experimental environment that can be easily built in several instances.

  20. Gradient-based Magnetic Resonance Electrical Properties Imaging of Brain Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiaen; Zhang, Xiaotong; Schmitter, Sebastian; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; He, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Electrical properties tomography (EPT) holds promise for noninvasively mapping at high spatial resolution the electrical conductivity and permittivity of biological tissues in vivo using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. In the present study, we developed a novel gradient-based EPT approach with greatly improved tissue boundary reconstruction and largely elevated robustness against measurement noise compared to existing techniques. Using a 7 Tesla MRI system, we report high-quality in vivo human brain electrical property images with refined structural details, which can potentially merit clinical diagnosis (such as cancer detection) and high-field MRI applications (local SAR quantification) in the future. PMID:25571378

  1. Resonant transport and electrostatic effects in single-molecule electrical junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, Carly; Vezzoli, Andrea; Higgins, Simon J.; Zotti, Linda A.; Palacios, J. J.; Nichols, Richard J.

    2015-05-01

    In this contribution we demonstrate structural control over a transport resonance in HS (CH2)n[1 ,4 -C6H4] (CH2)nSH (n =1 , 3, 4, 6) metal-molecule-metal junctions, fabricated and tested using the scanning tunneling microscopy-based I (z ) method. The Breit-Wigner resonance originates from one of the arene π -bonding orbitals, which sharpens and moves closer to the contact Fermi energy as n increases. Varying the number of methylene groups thus leads to a very shallow decay of the conductance with the length of the molecule. We demonstrate that the electrical behavior observed here can be straightforwardly rationalized by analyzing the effects caused by the electrostatic balance created at the metal-molecule interface. Such resonances offer future prospects in molecular electronics in terms of controlling charge transport over longer distances, and also in single-molecule conductance switching if the resonances can be externally gated.

  2. Biological sensor based on a lateral electric field-excited resonator.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Boris D; Kuznetsova, Iren E; Shikhabudinov, Alexander M; Ignatov, Oleg V; Guliy, Olga I

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes a biological sensor based on a lateral electric field-excited resonator using an X-cut lithium niobate plate. Its potential was shown through the example of biological interaction between bacterial cells and specific bacteriophages. The detection was based on the analysis of the measured real and imaginary parts of electrical impedance for a resonator loaded by the biological suspension under study. It has been shown that the sensor is sensitive to specific interactions between bacterial cells and specific bacteriophages in a pure state as well as in the presence of extraneous microflora. The degree of electrical impedance variation resulting from the biological interaction depends on the numbers of phage particles and bacteria cells. The sensor may be used not only for the qualitative analysis of bacteria but also for their quantitative detection. PMID:22622981

  3. Noninvasive Imaging of Head-Brain Conductivity Profiles Using Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Yan, Dandan; Zhu, Shanan; He, Bin

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a recently introduced non-invasive conductivity imaging modality, which combines the magnetic resonance current density imaging (CDI) and the traditional electrical impedance tomography (EIT) techniques. MREIT is aimed at providing high spatial resolution images of electrical conductivity, by avoiding solving the well-known ill-posed problem in the traditional EIT. In this paper, we review our research activities in MREIT imaging of head-brain tissue conductivity profiles. We have developed several imaging algorithms and conducted a series of computer simulations for MREIT imaging of the head and brain tissues. Our work suggests MREIT brain imaging may become a useful tool in imaging conductivity distributions of the brain and head. PMID:18799394

  4. High resolution in-operando microimaging of solar cells with pulsed electrically-detected magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Katz, Itai; Fehr, Matthias; Schnegg, Alexander; Lips, Klaus; Blank, Aharon

    2015-02-01

    The in-operando detection and high resolution spatial imaging of paramagnetic defects, impurities, and states becomes increasingly important for understanding loss mechanisms in solid-state electronic devices. Electron spin resonance (ESR), commonly employed for observing these species, cannot meet this challenge since it suffers from limited sensitivity and spatial resolution. An alternative and much more sensitive method, called electrically-detected magnetic resonance (EDMR), detects the species through their magnetic fingerprint, which can be traced in the device's electrical current. However, until now it could not obtain high resolution images in operating electronic devices. In this work, the first spatially-resolved electrically-detected magnetic resonance images (EDMRI) of paramagnetic states in an operating real-world electronic device are provided. The presented method is based on a novel microwave pulse sequence allowing for the coherent electrical detection of spin echoes in combination with powerful pulsed magnetic-field gradients. The applicability of the method is demonstrated on a device-grade 1-μm-thick amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cell and an identical device that was degraded locally by an electron beam. The degraded areas with increased concentrations of paramagnetic defects lead to a local increase in recombination that is mapped by EDMRI with ∼20-μm-scale pixel resolution. The novel approach presented here can be widely used in the nondestructive in-operando three-dimensional characterization of solid-state electronic devices with a resolution potential of less than 100 nm. PMID:25557860

  5. High resolution in-operando microimaging of solar cells with pulsed electrically-detected magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Itai; Fehr, Matthias; Schnegg, Alexander; Lips, Klaus; Blank, Aharon

    2015-02-01

    The in-operando detection and high resolution spatial imaging of paramagnetic defects, impurities, and states becomes increasingly important for understanding loss mechanisms in solid-state electronic devices. Electron spin resonance (ESR), commonly employed for observing these species, cannot meet this challenge since it suffers from limited sensitivity and spatial resolution. An alternative and much more sensitive method, called electrically-detected magnetic resonance (EDMR), detects the species through their magnetic fingerprint, which can be traced in the device's electrical current. However, until now it could not obtain high resolution images in operating electronic devices. In this work, the first spatially-resolved electrically-detected magnetic resonance images (EDMRI) of paramagnetic states in an operating real-world electronic device are provided. The presented method is based on a novel microwave pulse sequence allowing for the coherent electrical detection of spin echoes in combination with powerful pulsed magnetic-field gradients. The applicability of the method is demonstrated on a device-grade 1-μm-thick amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cell and an identical device that was degraded locally by an electron beam. The degraded areas with increased concentrations of paramagnetic defects lead to a local increase in recombination that is mapped by EDMRI with ∼20-μm-scale pixel resolution. The novel approach presented here can be widely used in the nondestructive in-operando three-dimensional characterization of solid-state electronic devices with a resolution potential of less than 100 nm.

  6. Bipolaron formation in organic solar cells observed by pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Behrends, J; Schnegg, A; Lips, K; Thomsen, E A; Pandey, A K; Samuel, I D W; Keeble, D J

    2010-10-22

    We report the observation of a spin-dependent dark transport current, exhibiting spin coherence at room temperature, in a π-conjugated polymer-fullerene blend using pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance. The resonance at g = 2.0028(3) is due to polarons in the polymer, and exhibits spin locking at high microwave fields. The presence of an excess of fullerene, and the operating voltage (1 V) used, suppresses negative polaron formation in the polymer. It is concluded that spin-dependent transport is due to the formation of positive bipolarons. PMID:21231063

  7. A study of the optimum draft of multiple resonance power buoys for maximizing electric power production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweon, Hyuck-Min; Cho, Hong-Yeon; Cho-Hyoung, ii

    2014-12-01

    To maximize electric power production using wave energy extractions from resonance power buoys, the maximum motion displacement spectra of the buoys can primarily be obtained under a given wave condition. In this study, wave spectra observed in shoaling water were formulated. Target resonance frequencies were established from the arithmetic means of modal frequency bands and the peak frequencies. The motion characteristics of the circular cylindrical power buoys with corresponding drafts were then calculated using numerical models without considering PTO damping force. Results showed that the heave motions of the power buoys in shoaling waters with insufficient drafts produced greater amplification effects than those in deep seas with sufficient drafts.

  8. Optimization of a Tunable Piezoelectric Resonator Using Phononic Crystals with Periodic Electrical Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponge, Marie-Fraise; Dubus, Bertrand; Granger, Christian; Vasseur, Jérôme; Thi, Mai Pham; Hladky-Hennion, Anne-Christine

    Piezoelectric phononic crystals with periodic short-circuit conditions exhibit Bragg band gaps. They are used to design a Fabry-Perot cavity. The design of the device enables a modification of cavity length by a spatial shift of electrical boundary conditions. The resonator is thus tunable and a frequency shift is obtained. An analytical model based on a transfer matrix formalism is used to model longitudinal wave propagation inside the structure. Cavity length, phononic crystal and transducer position are optimized to increase resonance and antiresonance frequency shifts as well as coupling coefficient. Numerical and experimental results are presented and discussed.

  9. Electrically detected magnetic resonance signal from iron contaminated Czochralski silicon crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mchedlidze, T.; Matsumoto, K.

    1998-04-01

    The electrical detection of magnetic resonance (EDMR) measurement, a detection method for the spin-dependent recombination, was applied to characterize iron contaminated silicon samples grown by the Czochralski method. The observed signal was different than previously reported electron paramagnetic resonance signals from defects in silicon. In addition, as the signal was not detected from similarly contaminated samples prepared from floating zone grown silicon crystal, we propose that the signal originates from defects containing iron and oxygen, namely, from iron decorated oxide precipitates. The dependency of EDMR signal on different experimental conditions (microwave power, illumination intensity, and temperature) were studied.

  10. Hyperfine interaction mediated electric-dipole spin resonance: the role of frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui

    2016-05-01

    The electron spin in a semiconductor quantum dot can be coherently controlled by an external electric field, an effect called electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR). Several mechanisms can give rise to the EDSR effect, among which there is a hyperfine mechanism, where the spin-electric coupling is mediated by the electron–nucleus hyperfine interaction. Here, we investigate the influence of frequency modulation (FM) on the spin-flip efficiency. Our results reveal that FM plays an important role in the hyperfine mechanism. Without FM, the electric field almost cannot flip the electron spin the spin-flip probability is only about 20%. While under FM, the spin-flip probability can be improved to approximately 70%. In particular, we find that the modulation amplitude has a lower bound, which is related to the width of the fluctuated hyperfine field.

  11. Spin transport, magnetoresistance, and electrically detected magnetic resonance in amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutch, Michael J.; Lenahan, Patrick M.; King, Sean W.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a study of spin transport via electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) and near-zero field magnetoresistance (MR) in silicon nitride films. Silicon nitrides have long been important materials in solid state electronics. Although electronic transport in these materials is not well understood, electron paramagnetic resonance studies have identified a single dominating paramagnetic defect and have also provided physical and chemical descriptions of the defects, called K centers. Our EDMR and MR measurements clearly link the near-zero field MR response to the K centers and also indicate that K center energy levels are approximately 3.1 eV above the a-SiN:H valence band edge. In addition, our results suggest an approach for the study of defect mediated spin-transport in inorganic amorphous insulators via variable electric field and variable frequency EDMR and MR which may be widely applicable.

  12. Spectroscopic Observation of Resonant Electric Dipole-Dipole Interactions between Cold Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrousheh, K.; Bohlouli-Zanjani, P.; Vagale, D.; Mugford, A.; Fedorov, M.; Martin, J. D.

    2004-11-01

    Resonant electric dipole-dipole interactions between cold Rydberg atoms were observed using microwave spectroscopy. Laser-cooled 85Rb atoms in a magneto-optical trap were optically excited to 45d5/2 Rydberg states using a pulsed laser. A microwave pulse transferred a fraction of these Rydberg atoms to the 46p3/2 state. A second microwave pulse then drove atoms in the 45d5/2 state to the 46d5/2 state, and was used as a probe of interatomic interactions. The spectral width of this two-photon probe transition was found to depend on the presence of the 46p3/2 atoms, and is due to the resonant electric dipole-dipole interaction between 45d5/2 and 46p3/2 Rydberg atoms.

  13. Dephasing due to Nuclear Spins in Large-Amplitude Electric Dipole Spin Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesi, Stefano; Yang, Li-Ping; Loss, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    We analyze effects of the hyperfine interaction on electric dipole spin resonance when the amplitude of the quantum-dot motion becomes comparable or larger than the quantum dot's size. Away from the well-known small-drive regime, the important role played by transverse nuclear fluctuations leads to a Gaussian decay with characteristic dependence on drive strength and detuning. A characterization of spin-flip gate fidelity, in the presence of such additional drive-dependent dephasing, shows that vanishingly small errors can still be achieved at sufficiently large amplitudes. Based on our theory, we analyze recent electric dipole spin resonance experiments relying on spin-orbit interactions or the slanting field of a micromagnet. We find that such experiments are already in a regime with significant effects of transverse nuclear fluctuations and the form of decay of the Rabi oscillations can be reproduced well by our theory.

  14. Electrically driven flexural resonant modes in symmetrically electroded X-cut and Z-cut quartz discs.

    PubMed

    Chen, P J

    1988-01-01

    While it is well known that flexural mechanical resonant modes can be electrically driven in specimens of quartz and other piezoelectric materials by the judicious choice of electrode patterns, specific experimental data, based on simultaneous interferometric observations of opposite surface points, are presented to show that symmetrically electroded X-cut and Z-cut quartz discs exhibit flexural resonant modes of quite large amplitudes. These resonances are not accompanied by detectable electrical disturbances in the AC-drive circuits. The existence of these modes is demonstrated for an X-cut quartz disc, and specific resonant modes of a Z-cut quartz disc are characterized in detail. PMID:18290131

  15. Dark and bright mode hybridization: From electric to magnetic Fano resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaro, S.; De Angelis, F.; Toma, A.

    2016-01-01

    The excitation of plasmonic Fano resonances leads to a dual advantage in nano-photonics, in terms of local field enhancement and far-field spectral selectivity. Nevertheless, a remarkable challenge related to the hybridization between bright and dark plasmonic modes, i.e. between the two elements cooperating to the Fano resonance generation, consists in the sub-wavelength activation of dark modes via near-field channel. In this regard, strongly coupled plasmonic nano-assemblies are ideal systems providing a highly efficient way towards their excitation. Here, we analyze two trimer nano-architectures supporting respectively electric and magnetic Fano resonances. The different approaches employed for describing the two systems highlighted the role that the near-field coupling and the LSPs de-phasing separately play in the Fano hybridization phenomena.

  16. Electrically tunable Dirac-point resonance induced by a nanomagnet absorbed on the topological insulator surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-Qiang; Sheng, L.; Yang, M.; Wang, Baigeng; Xing, D. Y.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the effect of spin-inelastic scattering of Dirac electrons off a high-spin nanomagnet adsorbed on a topological insulator (TI) surface, in which transitions of the nanomagnet between its internal magnetic levels are taken into account, beyond the classic spin theory. It is found that the presence of magnetic anisotropy of nanomagnets can result in a Dirac-point resonance peak in local density of states. It can significantly modify the topologically protected Dirac surface-state spectrum at the Dirac point, quite different from previously reported low-energy resonances. Furthermore, we propose to tune electrically the appearance of the Dirac-point resonance peak and its height by use of the spin-flip torque effect. This provides an approach to engineer the Dirac cone and tune the Dirac electron properties on the TI surface in the absence of an external magnetic field.

  17. On the electrically detected cyclotron resonance of holes in silicon nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Bagraev, N. T. Gets, D. S.; Danilovsky, E. Yu.; Klyachkin, L. E.; Malyarenko, A. M.

    2013-04-15

    The cyclotron resonance in semiconductor nanostructures is electrically detected for the first time without an external cavity, a source, and a detector of microwave radiation. An ultranarrow p-Si quantum well on an n-Si (100) surface confined by superconducting heavily boron-doped {delta}-shaped barriers is used as the object of investigation and provides microwave generation within the framework of the nonstationary Josephson effect. The cyclotron resonance is detected upon the presence of a microcavity, which is incorporated into the quantum-well plane, by measuring the longitudinal magnetoresistance under conditions of stabilization of the source-drain current. The cyclotron-resonance spectra and their angular dependences measured in a low magnetic field identify small values of the effective mass of light and heavy holes in various 2D subbands due to the presence of edge channels with a high mobility of carriers.

  18. General model with experimental validation of electrical resonant frequency tuning of electromagnetic vibration energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dibin; Roberts, Stephen; Mouille, Thomas; Tudor, Michael J.; Beeby, Stephen P.

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a general model and its experimental validation for electrically tunable electromagnetic energy harvesters. Electrical tuning relies on the adjustment of the electrical load so that the maximum output power of the energy harvester occurs at a frequency which is different from the mechanical resonant frequency of the energy harvester. Theoretical analysis shows that for this approach to be feasible the electromagnetic vibration energy harvester’s coupling factor must be maximized so that its resonant frequency can be tuned with the minimum decrease of output power. Two different-sized electromagnetic energy harvesters were built and tested to validate the model. Experimentally, the micro-scale energy harvester has a coupling factor of 0.0035 and an untuned resonant frequency of 70.05 Hz. When excited at 30 mg, it was tuned by 0.23 Hz by changing its capacitive load from 0 to 4000 nF its effective tuning range is 0.15 Hz for a capacitive load variation from 0 to 1500 nF. The macro-scale energy harvester has a coupling factor of 552.25 and an untuned resonant frequency of 95.1 Hz and 95.5 Hz when excited at 10 mg and 25 mg, respectively. When excited at 10 mg, it was tuned by 3.8 Hz by changing its capacitive load from 0 to 1400 nF it has an effective tuning range of 3.5 Hz for a capacitive load variation from 0 to 1200 nF. When excited at 25 mg, its resonant frequency was tuned by 4.2 Hz by changing its capacitive load from 0 to 1400 nF it has an effective tuning range of about 5 Hz. Experimental results were found to agree with the theoretical analysis to within 10%.

  19. Optical resonances in electrically charged particles and their relation to the Drude model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Kundracik, František; Videen, Gorden; Yuffa, Alex J.; Klačka, Jozef

    2016-07-01

    The Drude model is conventionally used to explain the average motion of electrons in typical material. In this paper, we analyze the individual terms of the Drude model in order to uncover their influence on the scattering properties of small particles. Namely, a query on whether resonance enhancement is due to optical effects or the conductivity model. This query arose from our earlier theoretical and numerical experiments and still remains unresolved today. We show that certain resonance features are caused primarily by the interaction of the electromagnetic wave with the excess electric charge on the particles. Furthermore, we show that the role of a conductivity model is limited to only establishing the relative importance of the inertial moment of the carriers and the viscous drag forces. For frequencies ω ≤kB T / ℏ , the viscous forces only cause minor damping effects and the change in the peak resonance (along with its amplitude) are caused by the electric and inertial forces. These forces dominate because the viscous forces quickly decay with decreasing temperature. In order to demonstrate the optical behavior of charged water droplets, we construct a Mie-series solution with modified boundary conditions that properly account for the excess electric charge on the droplets. Our solution explains the weak scattering enhancement for frequencies far beyond the resonance, and it also predicts an absorption resonance edge in the long-wavelength limit. Our findings are not only useful to theoreticians who focus on the individual parameters such as the viscous term in the Drude model and/or search for better surface conductivity models, but also to experimentalists who gather as much data as possible in order to ascertain how the numerically determined optical properties compare with the experimental measurements.

  20. Electrically-detected magnetic resonance in semiconductor nanostructures inserted in microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagraev, Nikolay; Danilovskii, Eduard; Gehlhoff, Wolfgang; Gets, Dmitrii; Klyachkin, Leonid; Kudryavtsev, Andrey; Kuzmin, Roman; Malyarenko, Anna; Mashkov, Vladimir; Romanov, Vladimir

    2013-12-01

    We present the first findings of the new electrically-detected electron spin resonance technique (EDESR), which reveal the point defects in the ultra-narrow silicon quantum wells (Si-QW) confined by the superconductor δ-barriers. This technique allows the ESR identification without application of an external cavity, as well as a high frequency source and recorder, and with measuring the only response of the magnetoresistance caused by the microcavities embedded in the Si-QW plane.

  1. Development of Short Electrical Pulses in a Schottky Line Periodically Loaded with Resonant Tunneling Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essimbi, B. Z.; Jäger, D.

    2012-06-01

    The characteristics of a Schottky line periodically loaded with resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) are discussed for the development of short electrical pulses. RTDs act as electronic switches and exhibit a pronounced N-shaped I-V characteristic even at millimetre wave frequencies. The dynamics of the line is reduced to an extended KdV equation. These dynamics are considered both within the method of perturbation and the numerical integration of the transmission equation of the line.

  2. Electrical short pulses generation using a resonant tunneling diode nonlinear transmission line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essimbi, B. Z.; Jäger, D.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, the generation of short electrical pulses based on nonlinear active wave propagation effects along the resonant tunneling diode transmission line is studied. The principle of operation is discussed and it is shown by computer experiments that an input rectangular pulse as well as a sinusoidal input signal can be converted into a set of output spikes, suitable for A/D conversion at millimeter wave frequencies.

  3. Numerical Model of Lateral Electric Field Excited Resonator on Piezoelectric Plate Bordered with Viscous and Conductive Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplykh, Andrey; Zaitsev, Boris; Kuznetsova, Iren

    The numerical method of calculation of characteristics of lateral electric field excited resonator contacting with viscous and conducting liquid and results of these calculations are described. The method based on finite element analysis allows to find the distribution of mechanical and electrical fields in piezoelectric plate and liquid and to calculate the frequency dependencies of electrical impedance and admittance of resonator. It has been shown that values of real parts of impedance and admittance on resonant frequencies unambiguously correspond to viscosity and conductivity of liquid.

  4. Electrical actuation and readout in a nanoelectromechanical resonator based on a laterally suspended zinc oxide nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaderbad, Mrunal A.; Choi, Youngjin; Hiralal, Pritesh; Aziz, Atif; Wang, Nan; Durkan, Colm; Thiruvenkatanathan, Pradyumna; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.; Ramgopal Rao, V.; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present experimental results describing enhanced readout of the vibratory response of a doubly clamped zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowire employing a purely electrical actuation and detection scheme. The measured response suggests that the piezoelectric and semiconducting properties of ZnO effectively enhance the motional current for electromechanical transduction. For a doubly clamped ZnO nanowire resonator with radius ˜10 nm and length ˜1.91 µm, a resonant frequency around 21.4 MHz is observed with a quality factor (Q) of ˜358 in vacuum. A comparison with the Q obtained in air (˜242) shows that these nano-scale devices may be operated in fluid as viscous damping is less significant at these length scales. Additionally, the suspended nanowire bridges show field effect transistor (FET) characteristics when the underlying silicon substrate is used as a gate electrode or using a lithographically patterned in-plane gate electrode. Moreover, the Young’s modulus of ZnO nanowires is extracted from a static bending test performed on a nanowire cantilever using an AFM and the value is compared to that obtained from resonant frequency measurements of electrically addressed clamped-clamped beam nanowire resonators.

  5. The importance of multi-level Rydberg interaction in electric field tuned Förster resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Jorge; Booth, Donald; Gonçalves, Luis; Shaffer, James; Marcassa, Luis

    2016-05-01

    Many-body physics has been investigated in ultracold Rydberg atom systems, mainly because important parameters, such as density and interaction strength, can be controlled. Several puzzling experimental observations on Förster resonances have been associated to many-body effects, usually by comparison to complex theoretical models. In this work, we investigate the dc electric field dependence of 2 Förster resonant processes in ultracold 85 Rb, 37D5 / 2 + 37D5 / 2 --> 35 L(L = O , Q) + 39P3 / 2 , as a function of the atomic density in an optical dipole trap. At low densities, the 39 P yield as a function of electric field exhibits resonances. With increasing density, the linewidths increase until the peaks merge. Even under these extreme conditions, where many-body effects were expected to play a role, the 39 P population depends quadratically on the total Rydberg atom population. In order to explain our results, we implement a theoretical model which takes into account the multi-level character of the interactions and Rydberg atom blockade process using only atom pair interactions. The comparison between the experimental data and the model is very good, suggesting that the Förster resonant processes are dominated by 2-body interactions. This work is supported by FAPESP, AFOSR, NSF, INCT-IQ and CNPq.

  6. Electro-optic ring resonators in integrated optics for miniature electric field sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruege, Alexander Charles

    This dissertation addresses two important aspects regarding the sensing of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields using integrated optical ring resonator devices. The first topic involves the theoretical design, fabrication and demonstration of a new field sensor based on electro-optically (EO) active integrated optical ring resonators. The second topic addresses the problem of enhancing the response from a single-mode ring resonator of a given ring waveguide loss through modifications in the device geometry. The miniature integrated optical EO ring resonator sensor consists of low-dielectric constant polymers, is metal-free and is supported by a thin, flexible substrate. The low-invasive platform is achieved through the development of a new fabrication process. The waveguide cores of the devices are constructed of polycarbonate doped with the EO chromophore Disperse Red 1 and are poled using the contact poling method. The measured loaded quality factors of the poled EO rings are between 15,600 and 18,900. The fields emanating from a microstrip resonator circuit at 3.9 GHz are measured. It is determined that the measured modulation from the four-ring linear array is largest when the optical wavelength is biased on the steep slopes of the resonance lineshapes as theoretically predicted. Using electric field values obtained from electromagnetic simulations of the microstrip circuit, the EO coefficient is 0.72 pm/V. The sensitivity for electric fields in free-space field is 142.2 V / (m Hz0.5). The sensitivity is obtained for an off-resonance optical power of -9 dBm at an optical wavelength near 1550 nm, a photoreceiver conversion gain of 900 V/W, and a system impedance of 50 ohm. Also, sensing from asymmetric lineshapes due to the bistable effect in the ring resonators is also demonstrated. This EO field sensing demonstration is the first reported using EO ring resonator sensors built on a metal-free flexible integrated optics platform. The second part of this

  7. A Tuning Method for Electrically Compensated Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Traps

    PubMed Central

    Brustkern, Adam M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a method for tuning electrically compensated ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) traps by tracking the observed cyclotron frequency of an ion cloud at different oscillation mode amplitudes. Although we have used this method to tune the compensation voltages of a custom-built electrically compensated trap, the approach is applicable to other designs that incorporate electrical compensation. To evaluate the effectiveness of tuning, we examined the frequency shift as a function of cyclotron orbit size at different z-mode oscillation amplitudes. The cyclotron frequencies varied by ~ 12 ppm for ions with low z-mode oscillation amplitudes compared to those with high z-mode amplitudes. This frequency difference decreased to ~1 ppm by one iteration of trap tuning. PMID:20060743

  8. Electric field effect on optical harmonic generation at the exciton resonances in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunne, D.; Lafrentz, M.; Pavlov, V. V.; Pisarev, R. V.; Rodina, A. V.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Bayer, M.

    2015-08-01

    An electric field applied to a semiconductor reduces its crystal symmetry and modifies its electronic structure which is expected to result in changes of the linear and nonlinear response to optical excitation. In GaAs, we observe experimentally strong electric field effects on the optical second (SHG) and third (THG) harmonic generation. The SHG signal for the laser-light k vector parallel to the [001] crystal axis is symmetry forbidden in the electric-dipole approximation, but can be induced by an applied electric field in the vicinity of the 1 s exciton energy. Surprisingly, the THG signal, which is allowed in this geometry, is considerably reduced by the electric field. We develop a theory which provides good agreement with the experimental data. In particular, it shows that the optical nonlinearities for the 1 s exciton resonance are modified in an electric field by the Stark effect, which mixes the 1 s and 2 p exciton states of opposite parity. This mixing acts in opposite way on the SHG and THG processes, as it leads to the appearance of forbidden SHG in (001)-oriented GaAs and decreases the crystallographic THG.

  9. Electrostatic Generation of Bulk Acoustic Waves and Electrical Parameters of Si-MEMS Resonators.

    PubMed

    Dulmet, Bernard; Ivan, Mihaela Eugenia; Ballandras, Sylvain

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes an analytical approach to model the generation of bulk acoustic waves in an electrostatically excited silicon MEMS structure, as well as its electromechanical response in terms of static and dynamic displacements, electromechanical coupling, and motional current. The analysis pertains to the single-port electrostatic drive of trapped-energy thickness-extensional (TE) modes in thin plates. Both asymmetric single-side and symmetric double-side electrostatic gap configurations are modeled. Green's function is used to describe the characteristic of the static displacement of the driven surface of the structure versus the dc bias voltage, which allows us to determine the electrical response of the resonator. Optical and electrical characterizations have been performed on resonator samples operating at 10.3 MHz on the fundamental of TE mode under single-side electrostatic excitation. The various figures of merit depend on the dc bias voltage. Typical values of 9000 for the Q-factor, and of 10(-5) for the electromechanical coupling factor k(2) have been obtained with [Formula: see text] for [Formula: see text]-thick gaps. Here-considered modes have a typical temperature coefficients of frequency (TCF) close to -30 ppm/(°)C. We conclude that the practical usability of such electrostatically excited bulk acoustic waves (BAW) resonators essentially depends on the efficiency of the compensation of feed-through capacitance. PMID:26642450

  10. Electrically detected magnetic resonance modeling and fitting: An equivalent circuit approach

    SciTech Connect

    Leite, D. M. G.; Batagin-Neto, A.; Nunes-Neto, O.; Gómez, J. A.; Graeff, C. F. O.

    2014-01-21

    The physics of electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) quadrature spectra is investigated. An equivalent circuit model is proposed in order to retrieve crucial information in a variety of different situations. This model allows the discrimination and determination of spectroscopic parameters associated to distinct resonant spin lines responsible for the total signal. The model considers not just the electrical response of the sample but also features of the measuring circuit and their influence on the resulting spectral lines. As a consequence, from our model, it is possible to separate different regimes, which depend basically on the modulation frequency and the RC constant of the circuit. In what is called the high frequency regime, it is shown that the sign of the signal can be determined. Recent EDMR spectra from Alq{sub 3} based organic light emitting diodes, as well as from a-Si:H reported in the literature, were successfully fitted by the model. Accurate values of g-factor and linewidth of the resonant lines were obtained.

  11. Guided resonances on lithium niobate for extremely small electric field detection investigated by accurate sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wentao; Ndao, Abdoulaye; Lu, Huihui; Bernal, Maria-Pilar; Baida, Fadi Issam

    2016-09-01

    We present a theoretical study of guided resonances (GR) on a thin film lithium niobate rectangular lattice photonic crystal by band diagram calculations and 3D Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) transmission investigations which cover a broad range of parameters. A photonic crystal with an active zone as small as 13μm×13μm×0.7μm can be easily designed to obtain a resonance Q value in the order of 1000. These resonances are then employed in electric field (E-field) sensing applications exploiting the electro optic (EO) effect of lithium niobate. A local field factor that is calculated locally for each FDTD cell is proposed to accurately estimate the sensitivity of GR based E-field sensor. The local field factor allows well agreement between simulations and reported experimental data therefore providing a valuable method in optimizing the GR structure to obtain high sensitivities. When these resonances are associated with sub-picometer optical spectrum analyzer and high field enhancement antenna design, an E-field probe with a sensitivity of 50 μV/m could be achieved. The results of our simulations could be also exploited in other EO based applications such as EEG (Electroencephalography) or ECG (Electrocardiography) probe and E-field frequency detector with an 'invisible' probe to the field being detected etc. PMID:27607627

  12. Reconstruction of apparent orthotropic conductivity tensor image using magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Ji Eun; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography visualizes current density and/or conductivity distributions inside an electrically conductive object. Injecting currents into the imaging object along at least two different directions, induced magnetic flux density data can be measured using a magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Without rotating the object inside the scanner, we can measure only one component of the magnetic flux density denoted as Bz. Since the biological tissues such as skeletal muscle and brain white matter show strong anisotropic properties, the reconstruction of anisotropic conductivity tensor is indispensable for the accurate observations in the biological systems. In this paper, we propose a direct method to reconstruct an axial apparent orthotropic conductivity tensor by using multiple Bz data subject to multiple injection currents. To investigate the anisotropic conductivity properties, we first recover the internal current density from the measured Bz data. From the recovered internal current density and the curl-free condition of the electric field, we derive an over-determined matrix system for determining the internal absolute orthotropic conductivity tensor. The over-determined matrix system is designed to use a combination of two loops around each pixel. Numerical simulations and phantom experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm stably determines the orthotropic conductivity tensor.

  13. Reconstruction of apparent orthotropic conductivity tensor image using magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Ji Eun; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kim, Hyung Joong; Woo, Eung Je; Kwon, Oh In

    2015-03-14

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography visualizes current density and/or conductivity distributions inside an electrically conductive object. Injecting currents into the imaging object along at least two different directions, induced magnetic flux density data can be measured using a magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Without rotating the object inside the scanner, we can measure only one component of the magnetic flux density denoted as B{sub z}. Since the biological tissues such as skeletal muscle and brain white matter show strong anisotropic properties, the reconstruction of anisotropic conductivity tensor is indispensable for the accurate observations in the biological systems. In this paper, we propose a direct method to reconstruct an axial apparent orthotropic conductivity tensor by using multiple B{sub z} data subject to multiple injection currents. To investigate the anisotropic conductivity properties, we first recover the internal current density from the measured B{sub z} data. From the recovered internal current density and the curl-free condition of the electric field, we derive an over-determined matrix system for determining the internal absolute orthotropic conductivity tensor. The over-determined matrix system is designed to use a combination of two loops around each pixel. Numerical simulations and phantom experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm stably determines the orthotropic conductivity tensor.

  14. Dynamics of firing patterns, synchronization and resonances in neuronal electrical activities: experiments and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qishao; Gu, Huaguang; Yang, Zhuoqin; Shi, Xia; Duan, Lixia; Zheng, Yanhong

    2008-12-01

    Recent advances in the experimental and theoretical study of dynamics of neuronal electrical firing activities are reviewed. Firstly, some experimental phenomena of neuronal irregular firing patterns, especially chaotic and stochastic firing patterns, are presented, and practical nonlinear time analysis methods are introduced to distinguish deterministic and stochastic mechanism in time series. Secondly, the dynamics of electrical firing activities in a single neuron is concerned, namely, fast-slow dynamics analysis for classification and mechanism of various bursting patterns, one- or two-parameter bifurcation analysis for transitions of firing patterns, and stochastic dynamics of firing activities (stochastic and coherence resonances, integer multiple and other firing patterns induced by noise, etc.). Thirdly, different types of synchronization of coupled neurons with electrical and chemical synapses are discussed. As noise and time delay are inevitable in nervous systems, it is found that noise and time delay may induce or enhance synchronization and change firing patterns of coupled neurons. Noise-induced resonance and spatiotemporal patterns in coupled neuronal networks are also demonstrated. Finally, some prospects are presented for future research. In consequence, the idea and methods of nonlinear dynamics are of great significance in exploration of dynamic processes and physiological functions of nervous systems.

  15. Hyperfine interaction mediated electric-dipole spin resonance: The role of the frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui

    The electron spin in semiconductor quantum dot can be coherently controlled by an external electric field, an effect called electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR). There are several mechanisms underlie the EDSR, among which there is a hyperfine mechanism, where the spin-electric coupling is mediated by the electron-nucleus hyperfine interaction. Here, we investigate the influence of the frequency modulation (FM) to the driving electric field on the spin-flip efficiency. Our results reveal that FM plays an important role in the hyperfine mechanism. Without FM, the electric field almost cannot flip the electron spin, the spin-flip probability is only about 20%. While under the FM, the spin-flip probability can be improved approximately to 70%. Especially, we find there is a lower bound on the modulation amplitude, which is related to the width of the hyperfine field fluctuation of the nuclear spins. This work is supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China Grant No. 11404020 and Postdoctoral Science Foundation of China Grant No. 2014M560039.

  16. Resonant electric dipole-dipole interactions between cold Rydberg atoms in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrousheh, Kourosh; Bohlouli-Zanjani, Parisa; Carter, Jeffery; Mugford, Ashton; Martin, James D. D.

    2006-05-01

    Laser cooled Rb atoms were optically excited to 46d5/2 Rydberg states. A microwave pulse transferred a fraction of the atoms to the 47p3/2 Rydberg state. The resonant electric dipole-dipole interactions between atoms in these two states were probed using the linewidth of the two-photon microwave transitions 46d5/2 -- 47d5/2. The presence of a weak magnetic field (roughly 1 G) reduced the observed line broadening, indicating that the interaction is suppressed by the field. The field removes some of the energy degeneracies responsible foe the resonant interaction, and this is the basis for a quantitative model of the resulting suppression. A technique for the calibration of magnetic field strengths using the 34s1/2 -- 34p1/2 one-photon transition is also presented.

  17. Resonant electric dipole-dipole interactions between cold Rydberg atoms in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrousheh, K.; Bohlouli-Zanjani, P.; Carter, J. D.; Mugford, A.; Martin, J. D. D.

    2006-06-01

    Laser-cooled Rb85 atoms were optically excited to 46d5/2 Rydberg states. A microwave pulse transferred a fraction of the atoms to the 47p3/2 Rydberg state. The resonant electric dipole-dipole interactions between atoms in these two states were probed using the linewidth of the two-photon microwave transition 46d5/2-47d5/2 . The presence of a weak magnetic field ≈0.5G reduced the observed line broadening, indicating that the interaction is suppressed by the field. The field removes some of the energy degeneracies responsible for the resonant interaction, and this is the basis for a quantitative model of the resulting suppression. A technique for the calibration of magnetic field strengths using the 34s1/2-34p1/2 one-photon transition is also presented.

  18. Mode jumping of split-ring resonator metamaterials controlled by high-permittivity BST and incident electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojian; Zeng, Xinxi; Cui, Tie Jun; Lan, Chuwen; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the resonant modes of split-ring resonator (SRR) metamaterials that contain high-permittivity BST block numerically and experimentally. We observe interesting mode-jumping phenomena from the BST-included SRR absorber structure as the excitation wave is incident perpendicularly to the SRR plane. Specifically, when the electric field is parallel to the SRR gap, the BST block in the gap will induce a mode jumping from the LC resonance to plasmonic resonance (horizontal electric-dipole mode), because the displacement current excited by the Mie resonance in the dielectric block acts as a current channel in the gap. When the electric field is perpendicular to the gap side, the plasmonic resonance mode (vertical electric-dipole mode) in SRR changes to two joint modes contributed simultaneously by the back layer, SRR and BST block, as a result of connected back layer and SRR layer by the displacement current in the BST dielectric block. Based on the mode jumping effect as well as temperature and electric-field dependent dielectric constant, the BST-included SRR metamaterials may have great potentials for the applications in electromagnetic switches and widely tunable metamaterial devices.

  19. Mode jumping of split-ring resonator metamaterials controlled by high-permittivity BST and incident electric fields.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaojian; Zeng, Xinxi; Cui, Tie Jun; Lan, Chuwen; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the resonant modes of split-ring resonator (SRR) metamaterials that contain high-permittivity BST block numerically and experimentally. We observe interesting mode-jumping phenomena from the BST-included SRR absorber structure as the excitation wave is incident perpendicularly to the SRR plane. Specifically, when the electric field is parallel to the SRR gap, the BST block in the gap will induce a mode jumping from the LC resonance to plasmonic resonance (horizontal electric-dipole mode), because the displacement current excited by the Mie resonance in the dielectric block acts as a current channel in the gap. When the electric field is perpendicular to the gap side, the plasmonic resonance mode (vertical electric-dipole mode) in SRR changes to two joint modes contributed simultaneously by the back layer, SRR and BST block, as a result of connected back layer and SRR layer by the displacement current in the BST dielectric block. Based on the mode jumping effect as well as temperature and electric-field dependent dielectric constant, the BST-included SRR metamaterials may have great potentials for the applications in electromagnetic switches and widely tunable metamaterial devices. PMID:27502844

  20. Mode jumping of split-ring resonator metamaterials controlled by high-permittivity BST and incident electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaojian; Zeng, Xinxi; Cui, Tie Jun; Lan, Chuwen; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the resonant modes of split-ring resonator (SRR) metamaterials that contain high-permittivity BST block numerically and experimentally. We observe interesting mode-jumping phenomena from the BST-included SRR absorber structure as the excitation wave is incident perpendicularly to the SRR plane. Specifically, when the electric field is parallel to the SRR gap, the BST block in the gap will induce a mode jumping from the LC resonance to plasmonic resonance (horizontal electric-dipole mode), because the displacement current excited by the Mie resonance in the dielectric block acts as a current channel in the gap. When the electric field is perpendicular to the gap side, the plasmonic resonance mode (vertical electric-dipole mode) in SRR changes to two joint modes contributed simultaneously by the back layer, SRR and BST block, as a result of connected back layer and SRR layer by the displacement current in the BST dielectric block. Based on the mode jumping effect as well as temperature and electric-field dependent dielectric constant, the BST-included SRR metamaterials may have great potentials for the applications in electromagnetic switches and widely tunable metamaterial devices. PMID:27502844

  1. Advances in series resonant inverter technology and its effect on spacecraft employing electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robson, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The efficiency of transistorized Series Resonant Inverters (SRIs), which is higher than that of silicon-controlled rectifier alternatives, reduces spacecraft radiator requirements by 40% and may eliminate the need for heat pipes on 30-cm ion thruster systems. Recently developed 10- and 25-kW inverters have potential applications in gas thrusters, and represent the first spaceborne SRI designs for such power levels. Attention is given to the design and control system approaches employed in these inverter designs to improve efficiency and reduce weight, along with the impact of such improved parameters on electric propulsion systems.

  2. Sub-millimeter resolution electrical conductivity images of brain tissues using magnetic resonance-based electrical impedance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyun Bum; Jeong, Woo Chul; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kyung, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2015-07-01

    Recent magnetic resonance (MR)-based electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) of in vivo animal and human subjects enabled the imaging of electromagnetic properties, such as conductivity and permittivity, on tissue structure and function with a few millimeter pixel size. At those resolutions, the conductivity contrast might be sufficient to distinguish different tissue type for certain applications. Since the precise measurement of electrical conductivity under the tissue levels can provide alternative information in a wide range of biomedical applications, it is necessary to develop high-resolution MREIT technique to enhance its availability. In this study, we provide the experimental evaluation of sub-millimeter resolution conductivity imaging method using a 3T MR scanner combined with a multi-echo MR pulse sequence, multi-channel RF coil, and phase optimization method. From the phantom and animal imaging results, sub-millimeter resolution exhibited similar signal-to-noise ratio of MR magnitude and noise levels in magnetic flux density comparing to the existing millimeter resolution. The reconstructed conductivity images at sub-millimeter resolution can distinguish different brain tissues with a pixel size as small as 350 μm.

  3. Sub-millimeter resolution electrical conductivity images of brain tissues using magnetic resonance-based electrical impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Tong In; Jeong, Woo Chul; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong Woo, Eung Je; Kim, Hyun Bum; Kyung, Eun Jung; Kwon, Oh In

    2015-07-13

    Recent magnetic resonance (MR)-based electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) of in vivo animal and human subjects enabled the imaging of electromagnetic properties, such as conductivity and permittivity, on tissue structure and function with a few millimeter pixel size. At those resolutions, the conductivity contrast might be sufficient to distinguish different tissue type for certain applications. Since the precise measurement of electrical conductivity under the tissue levels can provide alternative information in a wide range of biomedical applications, it is necessary to develop high-resolution MREIT technique to enhance its availability. In this study, we provide the experimental evaluation of sub-millimeter resolution conductivity imaging method using a 3T MR scanner combined with a multi-echo MR pulse sequence, multi-channel RF coil, and phase optimization method. From the phantom and animal imaging results, sub-millimeter resolution exhibited similar signal-to-noise ratio of MR magnitude and noise levels in magnetic flux density comparing to the existing millimeter resolution. The reconstructed conductivity images at sub-millimeter resolution can distinguish different brain tissues with a pixel size as small as 350 μm.

  4. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT): conductivity and current density imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jin Keun; Kwon, Ohin; Woo, Eung Je

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the latest impedance imaging technique called Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) providing information on electrical conductivity and current density distributions inside an electrically conducting domain such as the human body. The motivation for this research is explained by discussing conductivity changes related with physiological and pathological events, electromagnetic source imaging and electromagnetic stimulations. We briefly summarize the related technique of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) that deals with cross-sectional image reconstructions of conductivity distributions from boundary measurements of current-voltage data. Noting that EIT suffers from the ill-posed nature of the corresponding inverse problem, we introduce MREIT as a new conductivity imaging modality providing images with better spatial resolution and accuracy. MREIT utilizes internal information on the induced magnetic field in addition to the boundary current-voltage measurements to produce three-dimensional images of conductivity and current density distributions. Mathematical theory, algorithms, and experimental methods of current MREIT research are described. With numerous potential applications in mind, future research directions in MREIT are proposed.

  5. Jumping Mechanism for Asteroid Rover with the Use of Resonance and Electrical Stiffness Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Yoshiki; Mizuguchi, Kou; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki

    It is not easy for asteroid rover with wheels to move on the surface of asteroids because such an astral body has two special features. One feature is that there is no air and it induces vacuum metalizing of metal slide components. The other feature is that their quite small gravity induces bad controllability of rover with wheels which requires enough frictional force between ground and wheels. Therefore, it is preferable for rover to use jumping mechanism without metal slide component and with low energy consumption. In this paper, a jumping mechanism is proposed and the mechanism uses a energy which is stored by resonance of flexible part. However, simply giving resonance results in low height of jumping. Therefore, electrical stiffness switching system is implemented to realize a effective jumping. Electrical stiffness switching is realized by piezoelectric element and external capacitor which is connected to them. Two method of stiffness switching are introduced. One is stiffness hardening and the other is stiffness softening which solve the problem of stiffness hardening. To validate the proposed mechanisms, numerical analyses are carried out and feasibilities of application for asteroid rover are studied.

  6. Defect chemistry and electronic transport in low-κ dielectrics studied with electrically detected magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutch, Michael J.; Lenahan, Patrick M.; King, Sean W.

    2016-03-01

    Defect mediated electronic transport phenomena in low-κ dielectric films are of great technological interest for state-of-the-art and next generation microprocessors. At the present time, the leading low-κ interlayer dielectrics and etch-stop layers are based upon a-SiOC:H and a-SiCN:H, respectively. In this study, we utilize electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR), a derivative of electron paramagnetic resonance, to provide physical insight into electronic transport, as well as the nature and origin of defects in dense and porous a-SiOC:H and dense a-SiCN:H films. Resonance measurements are performed before and after the removal of sacrificial porogens via UV treatments to understand the role of specific defect centers in electronic transport in a-SiOC:H systems, and the nature of defects created by UV treatments. Unfortunately, a-SiOC:H and a-SiCN:H EDMR spectra are relatively broad and featureless. These featureless spectra are consistent with fairly complex a-SiOC:H and a-SiCN:H systems. We argue that physical insight may be gleaned from featureless spectra via multiple frequency EDMR. Baseline multiple frequency EDMR measurements are performed in a-Si:H and a-C:H to illustrate the nature of line broadening mechanisms of silicon and carbon related defects.

  7. Transient electrically detected magnetic resonance spectroscopy applied to organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kraffert, Felix; Steyrleuthner, Robert; Meier, Christoph; Bittl, Robert; Behrends, Jan

    2015-07-27

    The influence of light-induced paramagnetic states on the photocurrent generated by polymer:fullerene solar cells is studied using spin-sensitive techniques in combination with laser-flash excitation. For this purpose, we developed a setup that allows for simultaneous detection of transient electron paramagnetic resonance as well as transient electrically detected magnetic resonance (trEDMR) signals from fully processed and encapsulated solar cells. Combining both techniques provides a direct link between photoinduced triplet excitons, charge transfer states, and free charge carriers as well as their influence on the photocurrent generated by organic photovoltaic devices. Our results obtained from solar cells based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) as electron donor and a fullerene-based electron acceptor show that the resonant signals observed in low-temperature (T = 80 K) trEDMR spectra can be attributed to positive polarons in the polymer as well as negative polarons in the fullerene phase, indicating that both centers are involved in spin-dependent processes that directly influence the photocurrent.

  8. All-electrical nonlinear fano resonance in coupled quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shiran

    This thesis is motivated by recent interest in the Fano resonance (FR). As a wave-interference phenomenon, this resonance is of increasing importance in optics, plasmon-ics, and metamaterials, where its ability to cause rapid signal modulations under variation of some suitable parameter makes it desirable for a variety of applications. In this thesis, I focus on a novel manifestation of this resonance in systems of coupled quantum point contacts (QPCs). The major finding of this work is that the FR in this system may be ma-nipulated by applying a nonlinear DC bias to the system. Under such conditions, we are able to induce significant distortions of resonance lineshape, providing a pathway to all-electrical manipulation of the FR. To interpret this behavior we apply a recently-developed model for a three-path FR, involving an additional "intruder" continuum. We have previously used this model to account for the magnetic-field induced distortions of the FR observed in coupled QPCs, and show here that this model also provides a frame-work for understanding the observed nonlinear behavior. Our work therefore reveals a new manifestation of the FR that can be sensitively tailored by external control, a finding that may eventually allow the application of this feature to nanoelectronics. Since the in-terference scheme involves in this thesis is a completely general one, it should be broadly applicable across a variety of different wave-based systems, including those in both pho-tonics and electronics and opening up the possibility of new applications in areas such as chemical and biological sensing and secure communications.

  9. Optically resonant magneto-electric cubic nanoantennas for ultra-directional light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sikdar, Debabrata Premaratne, Malin; Cheng, Wenlong

    2015-02-28

    Cubic dielectric nanoparticles are promising candidates for futuristic low-loss, ultra-compact, nanophotonic applications owing to their larger optical coefficients, greater packing density, and relative ease of fabrication as compared to spherical nanoparticles; besides possessing negligible heating at nanoscale in contrast to their metallic counterparts. Here, we present the first theoretical demonstration of azimuthally symmetric, ultra-directional Kerker's-type scattering of simple dielectric nanocubes in visible and near-infrared regions via simultaneous excitation and interference of optically induced electric- and magnetic-resonances up to quadrupolar modes. Unidirectional forward-scattering by individual nanocubes is observed at the first generalized-Kerker's condition for backward-scattering suppression, having equal electric- and magnetic-dipolar responses. Both directionality and magnitude of these unidirectional-scattering patterns get enhanced where matching electric- and magnetic-quadrupolar responses spectrally overlap. While preserving azimuthal-symmetry and backscattering suppression, a nanocube homodimer provides further directionality improvement for increasing interparticle gap, but with reduced main-lobe magnitude due to emergence of side-scattering lobes from diffraction-grating effect. We thoroughly investigate the influence of interparticle gap on scattering patterns and propose optimal range of gap for minimizing side-scattering lobes. Besides suppressing undesired side-lobes, significant enhancement in scattering magnitude and directionality is attained with increasing number of nanocubes forming a linear chain. Optimal directionality, i.e., the narrowest main-scattering lobe, is found at the wavelength of interfering quadrupolar resonances; whereas the largest main-lobe magnitude is observed at the wavelength satisfying the first Kerker's condition. These unique optical properties of dielectric nanocubes thus can revolutionize their

  10. Optically resonant magneto-electric cubic nanoantennas for ultra-directional light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikdar, Debabrata; Cheng, Wenlong; Premaratne, Malin

    2015-02-01

    Cubic dielectric nanoparticles are promising candidates for futuristic low-loss, ultra-compact, nanophotonic applications owing to their larger optical coefficients, greater packing density, and relative ease of fabrication as compared to spherical nanoparticles; besides possessing negligible heating at nanoscale in contrast to their metallic counterparts. Here, we present the first theoretical demonstration of azimuthally symmetric, ultra-directional Kerker's-type scattering of simple dielectric nanocubes in visible and near-infrared regions via simultaneous excitation and interference of optically induced electric- and magnetic-resonances up to quadrupolar modes. Unidirectional forward-scattering by individual nanocubes is observed at the first generalized-Kerker's condition for backward-scattering suppression, having equal electric- and magnetic-dipolar responses. Both directionality and magnitude of these unidirectional-scattering patterns get enhanced where matching electric- and magnetic-quadrupolar responses spectrally overlap. While preserving azimuthal-symmetry and backscattering suppression, a nanocube homodimer provides further directionality improvement for increasing interparticle gap, but with reduced main-lobe magnitude due to emergence of side-scattering lobes from diffraction-grating effect. We thoroughly investigate the influence of interparticle gap on scattering patterns and propose optimal range of gap for minimizing side-scattering lobes. Besides suppressing undesired side-lobes, significant enhancement in scattering magnitude and directionality is attained with increasing number of nanocubes forming a linear chain. Optimal directionality, i.e., the narrowest main-scattering lobe, is found at the wavelength of interfering quadrupolar resonances; whereas the largest main-lobe magnitude is observed at the wavelength satisfying the first Kerker's condition. These unique optical properties of dielectric nanocubes thus can revolutionize their

  11. Electrical details of the ICRH resonant double loop matching sections of ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durodié, F.; Bosia, G.; Lamalle, Ph.

    1997-04-01

    The use of short sections with very low characteristic impedance between the radiating part and the (matching) end-sections with sliding shorts of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Resonant Double Loop (RDL) allows a design for this RDL which appears to be compatible with the expected mechanical loads during disruptions. In order to minimize the electric fields in these low impedance sections (which are at the high voltage parts of the RDL) a rounded rectangular cross-section can be used. It can further be dimensioned such as to modulate the parallel and perpendicular electric field components to common experience operating values: i.e. E⊥˜2×E∥ and E∥ less than 20 kV/cm. The paper reports expected electric fields and voltages in these low impedance sections. Corrections due to 3D-effects on the dimensions of all the sections as well as their influence on the current distribution in the sliding shorts in operating conditions when the shorts are nearest to such low impedance sections are shown to be negligible.

  12. The calculation of electrical parameters of AT-cut quartz crystal resonators with the consideration of material viscosity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji; Zhao, Wenhua; Du, Jianke; Hu, Yuantai

    2011-01-01

    Electrical parameters like resistance and quality factor of a quartz crystal resonator cannot be determined through vibration analysis without considering the presence of material dissipation. In this study, we use the first-order Mindlin plate equations of piezoelectric plates for thickness-shear vibrations of a simple resonator model with partial electrodes. We derive the expressions of electrical parameters with emphasis on the resistance that is related to the imaginary part of complex elastic constants, or the viscosity, of quartz crystal. Since all electrical parameters are frequency dependent, this procedure provides the chance to study the frequency behavior of crystal resonators with a direct formulation. We understand that the electrical parameters are strongly affected by the manufacturing process, with the plating techniques in particular, but the theoretical approach we presented here will be the first step for the precise estimation of such parameters and their further applications in the analysis of nonlinear behavior of resonators. We calculated the parameters from our simple resonator model of AT-cut quartz crystal with the first-order Mindlin plate theory to demonstrate the procedure and show that the numerical results are consistent with earlier measurements. PMID:20594568

  13. Measurement of electrical current density distribution in a simple head phantom with magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamba, Humberto R.; Bayford, Richard; Holder, David

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge of the influence of the human skull on the electrical current (d.c.) distribution within the brain tissue could prove useful in measuring impedance changes inside the human head. These changes can be related to physiological functions. The studies presented in this paper examine the current density distribution in a simple phantom consisting of a saline filled tank (to simulate scalp and brain) and a ring made of dental grade plaster of Paris (to simulate the human skull). Images of the distribution of the d.c. density of the phantom with and without the plaster of Paris ring were produced using a magnetic resonance imaging technique. These images indicate that the skull is likely to produce a more uniform d.c. density within the brain.

  14. Change of electrical conductivity of Ar welding arc under resonant absorption of laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozakov, R.; Emde, B.; Pipa, A. V.; Huse, M.; Uhrlandt, D.; Hermsdorf, J.; Wesling, V.

    2015-03-01

    Experimental investigations of the impact of resonant laser absorption by a tungsten inert gas welding arc in argon are presented. The intensity increase of the arc’s radiation between the laser entrance height and the anode are observed, as well as the variation of arc voltage due to the presence of the laser beam. High-speed camera recordings from different directions combined with absolutely calibrated spectroscopic measurements allow the reconstruction of the three-dimensional emission coefficient profiles without the assumption of axial symmetry. The obtained data are evaluated within the framework of local thermodynamic equilibrium. The local increase in the temperature and conductivity due to the influence of the laser is determined. Changes in the electrical conductivity obtained from the optical measurements coincide well with the measured voltage drop, and show significant redistribution of the current density profile near the anode in particular.

  15. High-frequency performance of electric field sensors aboard the RESONANCE satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampl, M.; Macher, W.; Gruber, C.; Oswald, T.; Kapper, M.; Rucker, H. O.; Mogilevsky, M.

    2015-05-01

    We present the high-frequency properties of the eight electric field sensors as proposed to be launched on the spacecraft "RESONANCE" in the near future. Due to the close proximity of the conducting spacecraft body, the sensors (antennas) have complex receiving features and need to be well understood for an optimal mission and spacecraft design. An optimal configuration and precise understanding of the sensor and antenna characteristics is also vital for the proper performance of spaceborne scientific instrumentation and the corresponding data analysis. The provided results are particularly interesting with regard to the planned mutual impedance experiment for measuring plasma parameters. Our computational results describe the extreme dependency of the sensor system with regard to wave incident direction and frequency, and provides the full description of the sensor system as a multi-port scatterer. In particular, goniopolarimetry techniques like polarization analysis and direction finding depend crucially on the presented antenna characteristics.

  16. Electrical activation and electron spin resonance measurements of arsenic implanted in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Masahiro; Ono, Yukinori; Uematsu, Masashi; Fujiwara, Akira

    2015-04-06

    The electrical activation of arsenic (As) implanted in Si is investigated with electron spin resonance (ESR), spreading resistance (SR), and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The As ions were implanted with a dose of 1 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} and subsequently annealed at various temperatures in the range of 500–1100 °C. The ESR measurements at 10 K show that the density of the As donor electrons for all the annealing temperatures is less than 10% of the As atom concentration measured by SIMS. The SR data indicate that the density of conduction band electrons is several times larger than that of the As donor electrons. These results strongly suggest that most of the As donor electrons are ESR inactive at low temperatures.

  17. Coherent control of magnetization precession in electrically detected time domain ferromagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Wid, O.; Wahler, M.; Homonnay, N.; Richter, T.; Schmidt, G.

    2015-11-15

    We demonstrate coherent control of time domain ferromagnetic resonance by all electrical excitation and detection. Using two ultrashort magnetic field steps with variable time delay we control the induction decay in yttrium iron garnet (YIG). By setting suitable delay times between the two steps the precession of the magnetization can either be enhanced or completely stopped. The method allows for a determination of the precession frequency within a few precession periods and with an accuracy much higher than can be achieved using fast fourier transformation. Moreover it holds the promise to massively increase precession amplitudes in pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry (PIMM) using low amplitude finite pulse trains. Our experiments are supported by micromagnetic simulations which nicely confirm the experimental results.

  18. Resonant snubber based soft-switching inverters for electric propulsion drives

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, J.S.

    1996-05-01

    This paper summarizes recently developed soft-switching inverters and proposes two alternative options for electric propulsion drives. The newly developed soft-switching inverter employs an auxiliary switch and a resonant inductor per phase to produce a zero voltage across the main switch so that the main switch can turn on at the zero-voltage condition. Both the auxiliary switch and the resonant inductor are operating at a fractional duty, and thus are small in size as compared to the main inverter circuit components. Operation modes in a complete zero-voltage switching cycle for the single-phase soft-switching inverter are described in detail with graphical explanations. The circuit operation was first verified by a computer simulation and then tested with an 1-kW single-phase and an 100-kW three-phase inverters. Experimental results are presented to show the superior performance in efficiency improvement, EMI reduction, and dv/dt reduction of the proposed soft-switching inverters.

  19. Miniaturized sharp band-pass filter based on complementary electric-LC resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torabi, Yalda; Dadashzadeh, Golamreza; Oraizi, Homayoon

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a novel application of complementary electric-LC (CELC) resonator as a basic element to synthesize miniaturized sharp band-pass filters is introduced. The proposed metamaterial band-pass filter is a three-stage CELC-based device, where two shunt short-circuited stubs are employed in the input and output stages and a series gap is etched in the middle stage. By these means, a high-selectivity prototype band-pass filter with 2 % fractional bandwidth in S band is designed and fabricated. The out-of-band attenuation is better than 40 dB, and the upper and lower transition bands are also quite sharp due to the presence of two transmission zeros (nearly 60 and 30 dB fall in 0.2 GHz at lower and upper edges, respectively). Moreover, the filter is substantially miniaturized with a size of effective region of 1.3 cm × 1 cm at 2.9 GHz, which is quite smaller relative to conventional designs with the same performance. The fabrication and measurement of the proposed filter configuration attest to its expected desirable features. Therefore, the application of CELC resonator is proposed for super-compact sharp band-pass filters.

  20. A new resonance-frequency based electrical impedance spectroscopy and its application in biomedical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhurjaty, Sreeram; Qiu, Yuchen; Tan, Maxine; Zheng, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) has shown promising results for differentiating between malignant and benign tumors, which exhibit different dielectric properties. However, the performance of current EIS systems has been inadequate and unacceptable in clinical practice. In the last several years, we have been developing and testing a new EIS approach using resonance frequencies for detection and classification of suspicious tumors. From this experience, we identified several limitations of current technologies and designed a new EIS system with a number of new characteristics that include (1) an increased A/D (analog-to-digital) sampling frequency, 24 bits, and a frequency resolution of 100 Hz, to increase detection sensitivity (2) automated calibration to monitor and correct variations in electronic components within the system, (3) temperature sensing and compensation algorithms to minimize impact of environmental change during testing, and (4) multiple inductor-switching to select optimum resonance frequencies. We performed a theoretical simulation to analyze the impact of adding these new functions for improving performance of the system. This system was also tested using phantoms filled with variety of liquids. The theoretical and experimental test results are consistent with each other. The experimental results demonstrated that this new EIS device possesses the improved sensitivity and/or signal detection resolution for detecting small impedance or capacitance variations. This provides the potential of applying this new EIS technology to different cancer detection and diagnosis tasks in the future.

  1. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Herman

    2016-09-01

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3 / 2 , 5 / 2 , 7 / 2, and 9 / 2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  2. Dependence of nuclear quadrupole resonance transitions on the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for nuclides with half-integer spins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cho, Herman

    2016-02-28

    Allowed transition energies and eigenstate expansions have been calculated and tabulated in numerical form as functions of the electric field gradient asymmetry parameter for the zero field Hamiltonian of quadrupolar nuclides with I = 3/2,5/2,7/2, and 9/2. These results are essential to interpret nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectra and extract accurate values of the electric field gradient tensors. Furthermore, applications of NQR methods to studies of electronic structure in heavy element systems are proposed.

  3. Tissue electrical property mapping from zero echo-time magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Kyun; Bulumulla, Selaka; Wiesinger, Florian; Sacolick, Laura; Sun, Wei; Hancu, Ileana

    2015-02-01

    The capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to produce spatially resolved estimation of tissue electrical properties (EPs) in vivo has been a subject of much recent interest. In this work we introduce a method to map tissue EPs from low-flip-angle, zero-echo-time (ZTE) imaging. It is based on a new theoretical formalism that allows calculation of EPs from the product of transmit and receive radio-frequency (RF) field maps. Compared to conventional methods requiring separation of the transmit RF field (B(1)(+)) from acquired MR images, the proposed method has such advantages as: 1) reduced theoretical error, 2) higher acquisition speed, and 3) flexibility in choice of different transmit and receive RF coils. The method is demonstrated in electrical conductivity and relative permittivity mapping in a salt water phantom, as well as in vivo measurement of brain conductivity in healthy volunteers. The phantom results show the validity and scan-time efficiency of the proposed method applied to a piece-wise homogeneous object. Quality of in vivo EP results was limited by reconstruction errors near tissue boundaries, which highlights need for image segmentation in EP mapping in a heterogeneous medium. Our results show the feasibility of rapid EP mapping from MRI without B(1)(+) mapping. PMID:25312919

  4. Tailoring the multiple electrically resonant transparency through bi-layered metamaterial-induced coupling oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiaxin; Han, Song; Lin, Hai; Yang, Helin

    2015-11-01

    Metamaterials (MMs) can be tailored to support electromagnetic interference, which is the kernel for the material-based electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) phenomena, alternatively transparency based on electric interference can be deemed as electrically resonant transparency (ERT). Here, we experimentally and theoretically demonstrate two kinds of bi-layered MMs. The C3-C6 hybrid MM exhibits triple-mode ERT with transmission peaks of 0.84 at 9.6 GHz, 0.92 at 10.4 GHz, and 0.93 at 11.5 GHz for the horizontally polarized wave, and dual-mode ERT with transmission peaks of 0.84 at 8.8 GHz and 0.91 at 10.2 GHz for the vertically polarized wave. However, the C4-C8 hybrid MM, with two stable transparent peaks of 0.92 and 0.88 at 10.46 GHz and 11.61 GHz, is proven to be polarization independent. The measured results show excellent agreement with numerical simulations. A coupled oscillator model is employed to theoretically study the near field interference between the induced dipoles on the transmission properties. The results presented here will find their application value for multi-mode slow light devices, filters and attenuators, and so on.

  5. DNA-Assembled Nanoparticle Rings Exhibit Electric and Magnetic Resonances at Visible Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Metallic nanostructures can be used to manipulate light on the subwavelength scale to create tailored optical material properties. Next to electric responses, artificial optical magnetism is of particular interest but difficult to achieve at visible wavelengths. DNA-self-assembly has proved to serve as a viable method to template plasmonic materials with nanometer precision and to produce large quantities of metallic objects with high yields. We present here the fabrication of self-assembled ring-shaped plasmonic metamolecules that are composed of four to eight single metal nanoparticles with full stoichiometric and geometric control. Scattering spectra of single rings as well as absorption spectra of solutions containing the metamolecules are used to examine the unique plasmonic features, which are compared to computational simulations. We demonstrate that the electric and magnetic plasmon resonance modes strongly correlate with the exact shape of the structures. In particular, our computations reveal the magnetic plasmons only for particle rings of broken symmetries, which is consistent with our experimental data. We stress the feasibility of DNA self-assembly as a method to create bulk plasmonic materials and metamolecules that may be applied as building blocks in plasmonic devices. PMID:25611357

  6. DNA-assembled nanoparticle rings exhibit electric and magnetic resonances at visible frequencies.

    PubMed

    Roller, Eva-Maria; Khorashad, Larousse Khosravi; Fedoruk, Michael; Schreiber, Robert; Govorov, Alexander O; Liedl, Tim

    2015-02-11

    Metallic nanostructures can be used to manipulate light on the subwavelength scale to create tailored optical material properties. Next to electric responses, artificial optical magnetism is of particular interest but difficult to achieve at visible wavelengths. DNA-self-assembly has proved to serve as a viable method to template plasmonic materials with nanometer precision and to produce large quantities of metallic objects with high yields. We present here the fabrication of self-assembled ring-shaped plasmonic metamolecules that are composed of four to eight single metal nanoparticles with full stoichiometric and geometric control. Scattering spectra of single rings as well as absorption spectra of solutions containing the metamolecules are used to examine the unique plasmonic features, which are compared to computational simulations. We demonstrate that the electric and magnetic plasmon resonance modes strongly correlate with the exact shape of the structures. In particular, our computations reveal the magnetic plasmons only for particle rings of broken symmetries, which is consistent with our experimental data. We stress the feasibility of DNA self-assembly as a method to create bulk plasmonic materials and metamolecules that may be applied as building blocks in plasmonic devices. PMID:25611357

  7. Electric dipole spin resonance in systems with a valley-dependent g factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rančić, Marko J.; Burkard, Guido

    2016-05-01

    In this theoretical study we qualitatively and quantitatively investigate the electric dipole spin resonance (EDSR) in a single Si/SiGe quantum dot in the presence of a magnetic field gradient, e.g., produced by a ferromagnet. We model a situation in which the control of electron spin states is achieved by applying an oscillatory electric field, inducing real-space oscillations of the electron inside the quantum dot. One of the goals of our study is to present a microscopic theory of valley-dependent g factors in Si/SiGe quantum dots and investigate how valley relaxation combined with a valley-dependent g factor leads to a novel electron spin dephasing mechanism. Furthermore, we discuss the interplay of spin and valley relaxations in Si/SiGe quantum dots. Our findings suggest that the electron spin dephases due to valley relaxation, and are in agreement with recent experimental studies [Nat. Nanotechnol. 9, 666 (2014), 10.1038/nnano.2014.153].

  8. Tuning Localized Transverse Surface Plasmon Resonance in Electricity-Selected Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes by Electrochemical Doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Toru; Kawai, Hideki; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Cuong, Nguyen Thanh; Okada, Susumu; Pichler, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Localized surface-plasmon resonance affects the optical absorption and scattering of nanosized materials. The intensities and peak energies of the surface plasmons strongly depend on the carrier density; thus, the optical absorption peaks originating from the surface-plasmon resonance can be manipulated by the density of injected carriers. In single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), the correct identification of surface-plasmon resonance modes is of great interest due to their emerging plasmonic and optoelectronic applications. Here, we demonstrate that high-carrier injection by electric double layers can induce a transverse surface-plasmon peak in aggregated, electricity-selected SWCNTs. In contrast to the well-discussed surface-plasmon resonance mode, whose polarization is parallel to the axis and whose resonance frequency is located in the THz region, our identified mode, which was normal to the axis, was located in the near-infrared range. In addition, our mode's peak position and intensities were tunable by carrier injections, indicating a route to control plasmonic optical processes by electric double-layer carrier injections using ionic liquid.

  9. Conductance and resonant tunneling in multi-channel double barrier structures under transverse and longitudinal electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Pereyra, Pedro Mendoza-Figueroa, M. G.

    2015-03-21

    Transport properties of electrons through biased double barrier semiconductor structures with finite transverse width w{sub y}, in the presence of a channel-mixing transverse electric field E{sub T} (along the y-axis), were studied. We solve the multichannel Schrödinger equation using the transfer matrix method and transport properties, like the conductance G and the transmission coefficients T{sub ij} have been evaluated as functions of the electrons' energy E and the transverse and longitudinal (bias) electric forces, f{sub T} and f{sub b}. We show that peak-suppression effects appear, due to the applied bias. Similarly, coherent interference of wave-guide states induced by the transverse field is obtained. We show also that the coherent interference of resonant wave-guide states gives rise to resonant conductance, which can be tuned to produce broad resonant peaks, implying operation frequencies of the order of 10 THz or larger.

  10. Theory and experimental verifications of the resonator Q and equivalent electrical parameters due to viscoelastic and mounting supports losses.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yook-Kong; Patel, Mihir S; Tanaka, Masako

    2010-08-01

    A novel analytical/numerical method for calculating the resonator Q and its equivalent electrical parameters due to viscoelastic, conductivity, and mounting supports losses is presented. The method presented will be quite useful for designing new resonators and reducing the time and costs of prototyping. There was also a necessity for better and more realistic modeling of the resonators because of miniaturization and the rapid advances in the frequency ranges of telecommunication. We present new 3-D finite elements models of quartz resonators with viscoelasticity, conductivity, and mounting support losses. The losses at the mounting supports were modeled by perfectly matched layers (PMLs). A previously published theory for dissipative anisotropic piezoelectric solids was formulated in a weak form for finite element (FE) applications. PMLs were placed at the base of the mounting supports to simulate the energy losses to a semi-infinite base substrate. FE simulations were carried out for free vibrations and forced vibrations of quartz tuning fork and AT-cut resonators. Results for quartz tuning fork and thickness shear AT-cut resonators were presented and compared with experimental data. Results for the resonator Q and the equivalent electrical parameters were compared with their measured values. Good equivalences were found. Results for both low- and high-Q AT-cut quartz resonators compared well with their experimental values. A method for estimating the Q directly from the frequency spectrum obtained for free vibrations was also presented. An important determinant of the quality factor Q of a quartz resonator is the loss of energy from the electrode area to the base via the mountings. The acoustical characteristics of the plate resonator are changed when the plate is mounted onto a base substrate. The base affects the frequency spectra of the plate resonator. A resonator with a high Q may not have a similarly high Q when mounted on a base. Hence, the base is an

  11. Generation of terahertz radiation in the interaction of coherent electromagnetic wave with a resonant medium in a constant external electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basharov, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    The paper shows that it is sufficient to place a resonance medium in an external dc electric field for the generation of low-frequency radiation at the resonant interaction of the medium and a coherent wave with carrier frequency of the optical range. Under certain conditions the carrier frequency of the generated radiation equals the Rabi frequency of the resonant interaction.

  12. Electric-field-induced spin resonance in antiferromagnetic insulators: Inverse process of the dynamical chiral magnetic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Akihiko; Chiba, Takahiro

    2016-06-01

    We propose a realization of the electric-field-induced antiferromagnetic resonance. We consider three-dimensional antiferromagnetic insulators with spin-orbit coupling characterized by the existence of a topological term called the θ term. By solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in the presence of the θ term, we show that, in contrast to conventional methods using ac magnetic fields, the antiferromagnetic resonance state is realized by ac electric fields along with static magnetic fields. This mechanism can be understood as the inverse process of the dynamical chiral magnetic effect, an alternating current generation by magnetic fields. In other words, we propose a way to electrically induce the dynamical axion field in condensed matter. We discuss a possible experiment to observe our proposal, which utilizes the spin pumping from the antiferromagnetic insulator into a heavy metal contact.

  13. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozzi, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A resonance in CELESTIAL MECHANICS occurs when some of the quantities characterizing the motion of two or more celestial bodies can be considered as commensurable, i.e. their ratio is close to an integer fraction. In a simplified form, this can be expressed as ...

  14. Classification of thyroid nodules using a resonance-frequency-based electrical impedance spectroscopy: progress assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bin; Tublin, Mitchell E.; Lederman, Dror; Klym, Amy H.; Brown, Erica D.; Gur, David

    2012-02-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer is rising faster than other malignancies and has nearly doubled in the United States (U.S.) in the last 30 years. However, classifying between malignant and benign thyroid nodules is often difficult. Although ultrasound guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy (FNAB) is considered an excellent tool for triaging patients, up to 25% of FNABs are inconclusive. As a result, definitive diagnosis requires an exploratory surgery and a large number of these are performed in the U.S. annually. It would be extremely beneficial to develop a non-invasive tool or procedure that could assist in assessing the likelihood of malignancy of otherwise indeterminate thyroid nodules, thereby reducing the number of exploratory thyroidectomies that are performed under general anesthesia. In this preliminary study we demonstrate a unique hand-held Resonance-frequency based Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (REIS) device with six pairs of detection probes to detect and classify thyroid nodules using multi-channel EIS output signal sweeps. Under an Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved case collection protocol, this REIS device is being tested in our clinical facility and we have been collecting an initial patient data set since March of this year. Between March and August of 2011, 65 EIS tests were conducted on 65 patients. Among these cases, six depicted pathology-verified malignant cells. Our initial assessment indicates the feasibility of easily applying this REIS device and measurement approach in a very busy clinical setting. The measured resonance frequency differences between malignant and benign nodules could potentially make it possible to accurately classify indeterminate thyroid nodules.

  15. Design of electric-field assisted surface plasmon resonance system for the detection of heavy metal ions in water

    SciTech Connect

    Kyaw, Htet Htet; Boonruang, Sakoolkan E-mail: waleed.m@bu.ac.th; Mohammed, Waleed S. E-mail: waleed.m@bu.ac.th; Dutta, Joydeep

    2015-10-15

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensors are widely used in diverse applications. For detecting heavy metal ions in water, surface functionalization of the metal surface is typically used to adsorb target molecules, where the ionic concentration is detected via a resonance shift (resonance angle, resonance wavelength or intensity). This paper studies the potential of a possible alternative approach that could eliminate the need of using surface functionalization by the application of an external electric field in the flow channel. The exerted electrical force on the ions pushes them against the surface for enhanced adsorption; hence it is referred to as “Electric-Field assisted SPR system”. High system sensitivity is achieved by monitoring the time dynamics of the signal shift. The ion deposition dynamics are discussed using a derived theoretical model based on ion mobility in water. On the application of an appropriate force, the target ions stack onto the sensor surface depending on the ionic concentration of target solution, ion mass, and flow rate. In the experimental part, a broad detection range of target cadmium ions (Cd{sup 2+}) in water from several parts per million (ppm) down to a few parts per billion (ppb) can be detected.

  16. Design of electric-field assisted surface plasmon resonance system for the detection of heavy metal ions in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyaw, Htet Htet; Boonruang, Sakoolkan; Mohammed, Waleed S.; Dutta, Joydeep

    2015-10-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) sensors are widely used in diverse applications. For detecting heavy metal ions in water, surface functionalization of the metal surface is typically used to adsorb target molecules, where the ionic concentration is detected via a resonance shift (resonance angle, resonance wavelength or intensity). This paper studies the potential of a possible alternative approach that could eliminate the need of using surface functionalization by the application of an external electric field in the flow channel. The exerted electrical force on the ions pushes them against the surface for enhanced adsorption; hence it is referred to as "Electric-Field assisted SPR system". High system sensitivity is achieved by monitoring the time dynamics of the signal shift. The ion deposition dynamics are discussed using a derived theoretical model based on ion mobility in water. On the application of an appropriate force, the target ions stack onto the sensor surface depending on the ionic concentration of target solution, ion mass, and flow rate. In the experimental part, a broad detection range of target cadmium ions (Cd2+) in water from several parts per million (ppm) down to a few parts per billion (ppb) can be detected.

  17. Assessing risk of thyroid cancer using resonance-frequency based electrical impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bin; Tublin, Mitchell E.; Lederman, Dror; Klym, Amy H.; Brown, Erica D.; Gur, David

    2011-03-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has risen faster than many malignancies and has nearly doubled in the USA over the past 30 years. Palpable nodules and subclinical nodules detected by imaging are found in a large percentage of the USA population. Most of these (.>95%) are fortunately benign. This vast reservoir of nodules makes the detection and diagnosis of thyroid cancer a diagnostic dilemma. Ultrasound guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy (FNAB) is excellent for triaging patients but up to 25% of FNABs are inconclusive. As a result, definitive diagnosis is often only possible with a diagnostic lobectomy; many thousands of these are performed in the USA annually for ultimately benign disease. It would be extremely beneficial if we could develop a non-invasive procedure that could assist the diagnostician in reliably predicting the likelihood of malignancy of otherwise indeterminate thyroid nodules, thereby reducing the number of these "exploratory/diagnostic" lobectomies performed under general anesthesia. Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was considered as a possible approach to address this problem. However, the diagnostic accuracy of EIS is too low for routine clinical use to date. In our group, we developed a substantially modified technology termed Resonance-frequency Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (REIS), which yields usable information for classifying risk of having breast abnormalities. We preliminarily applied REIS to measure signals on participants having thyroid nodules aiming to assess whether we can assist in improving diagnosis of indeterminate thyroid nodules. In this study we present a new multi-probe based REIS device specifically designed for the assessment of indeterminate thyroid nodules. Our preliminary assessment presented here demonstrates the feasibility of using this proposed REIS device in a busy tertiary care center.

  18. Fano-like resonance emerging from magnetic and electric plasmon mode coupling in small arrays of gold particles.

    PubMed

    Bakhti, Saïd; Tishchenko, Alexandre V; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Bonod, Nicolas; Dhuey, Scott D; Schuck, P James; Cabrini, Stefano; Alayoglu, Selim; Destouches, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    In this work we theoretically and experimentally analyze the resonant behavior of individual 3 × 3 gold particle oligomers illuminated under normal and oblique incidence. While this structure hosts both dipolar and quadrupolar electric and magnetic delocalized modes, only dipolar electric and quadrupolar magnetic modes remain at normal incidence. These modes couple into a strongly asymmetric spectral response typical of a Fano-like resonance. In the basis of the coupled mode theory, an analytical representation of the optical extinction in terms of singular functions is used to identify the hybrid modes emerging from the electric and magnetic mode coupling and to interpret the asymmetric line profiles. Especially, we demonstrate that the characteristic Fano line shape results from the spectral interference of a broad hybrid mode with a sharp one. This structure presents a special feature in which the electric field intensity is confined on different lines of the oligomer depending on the illumination wavelength relative to the Fano dip. This Fano-type resonance is experimentally observed performing extinction cross section measurements on arrays of gold nano-disks. The vanishing of the Fano dip when increasing the incidence angle is also experimentally observed in accordance with numerical simulations. PMID:27580515

  19. Fano-like resonance emerging from magnetic and electric plasmon mode coupling in small arrays of gold particles

    PubMed Central

    Bakhti, Saïd; Tishchenko, Alexandre V.; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Bonod, Nicolas; Dhuey, Scott D.; Schuck, P. James; Cabrini, Stefano; Alayoglu, Selim; Destouches, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    In this work we theoretically and experimentally analyze the resonant behavior of individual 3 × 3 gold particle oligomers illuminated under normal and oblique incidence. While this structure hosts both dipolar and quadrupolar electric and magnetic delocalized modes, only dipolar electric and quadrupolar magnetic modes remain at normal incidence. These modes couple into a strongly asymmetric spectral response typical of a Fano-like resonance. In the basis of the coupled mode theory, an analytical representation of the optical extinction in terms of singular functions is used to identify the hybrid modes emerging from the electric and magnetic mode coupling and to interpret the asymmetric line profiles. Especially, we demonstrate that the characteristic Fano line shape results from the spectral interference of a broad hybrid mode with a sharp one. This structure presents a special feature in which the electric field intensity is confined on different lines of the oligomer depending on the illumination wavelength relative to the Fano dip. This Fano-type resonance is experimentally observed performing extinction cross section measurements on arrays of gold nano-disks. The vanishing of the Fano dip when increasing the incidence angle is also experimentally observed in accordance with numerical simulations. PMID:27580515

  20. Investigation of the Influence of the Clearance of Linear Alternator on Thermo-acoustic Electricity Generator without Resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yufang; Li, Zhengyu; Li, Qing

    This paper proposes a thermo-acoustic electricity generator without resonator, which is realized by a looped-tube traveling-wave thermo-acoustic engine coupled with two linear alternators. A linear alternator is the resonating element of the thermo-acoustic engine, so its impedance determines the operating status and the clearance exerts a direct influence on it. A test bed is set to measure the clearance. An exact formula is determined after the analysis of data processing. This conclusion is used in the simulation of the influence of clearance and damping based on DeltaEC. At last, a series of experiments have been done to compare with the simulation.

  1. Electric field signatures of the IAR and Schumann resonance in the upper ionosphere detected by Chibis-M microsatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkin, D.; Pilipenko, V.; Korepanov, V.; Klimov, S.; Holzworth, R.

    2014-09-01

    We tried to find with the ULF/ELF electric field sensor onboard Chibis-M microsatellite signatures of the IAR (Ionospheric Alfvén Resonator) and Schumann resonance (SR) in the upper ionosphere. Whereas observations of the IAR and SR multi-band emissions with ground magnetometers are ubiquitous, in-situ satellite observations of their signatures are very rare. ULF events detected by the Chibis-M show a possibility of triggered excitation of IAR. In contrast to dominating view, IAR has been found to be effectively excited on the dayside, too. Chibis-M observations also supported the possibility of the SR leakage into the upper ionosphere.

  2. Design of Hybrid Electrochromic Materials with Large Electrical Modulation of Plasmonic Resonances.

    PubMed

    Ledin, Petr A; Jeon, Ju-Won; Geldmeier, Jeffrey A; Ponder, James F; Mahmoud, Mahmoud A; El-Sayed, Mostafa; Reynolds, John R; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2016-05-25

    We present a rational approach to fabricating plasmonically active hybrid polymer-metal nanomaterials with electrochemical tunability of the localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) of noble metal nanostructures embedded in an electroactive polymer matrix. The key requirement for being able to significantly modulate the LSPR band position is a close overlap between the refractive index change [Δn(λ)] of a stimuli-responsive polymeric matrix and the intrinsic LSPR bands. For this purpose, gold nanorods with a controlled aspect ratio, synthesized to provide high refractive index sensitivity while maintaining good oxidative stability, were combined with a solution-processable electroactive and electrochromic polymer (ECP): alkoxy-substituted poly(3,4-propylenedioxythiophene) [PProDOT(CH2OEtHx)2]. Spectral characteristics of the ECP, in particular the Δn(λ) variation, were evaluated as the material was switched between oxidized and reduced states. We fabricated ultrathin plasmonic electrochromic hybrid films consisting of gold nanorods and ECP that exhibited a large, stable, and reversible LSPR modulation of up to 25-30 nm with an applied electrical potential. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations confirm a good match between the experimentally measured refractive index change in the ECP and the plasmonic response during electrochemical modulations. PMID:27145297

  3. Magnetic resonance and electrical properties of p-toluene sulphonic acid doped polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Manju; Arya, S. K.; Barala, Sunil Kumar; Saini, Parveen

    2013-06-01

    p-Toluene Sulphonic Acid (PTSA) doped polyaniline (PANI) analogues were synthesized by oxidative chemical polymerization method and characterized by TGA FTIR and EPR spectroscopic techniques. FTIR spectra indicates the formation of PTSA doped PANI and also revealed the dopant ions mediated interactions between polymeric chain through weak hydrogen bonding. TGA plots revealed that there is systematic variation in the weight loss at ˜300 °C from ˜4% to ˜38% with increase in dopant concentration from 0.01 N to 1.0 N. Magnetic resonance spectra of polaron charge carriers exhibit the single Lorentzian line signal with the Dysonian contribution indicating formation of metal-like domains. The polarons are localized in these domains by strong interaction between the neighboring conducting chains, in which the charge is transferred by quasi-three-dimensional (Q3D) delocalized electron. In higher concentration analogue some of polarons merge into diamagnetic bipolarons and this reduces intensity of EPR signal. The electrical conductivity of the 1.0 N PTSA doped sample was ˜4.5 S/cm which satisfies the EMI shielding criteri.

  4. Assembling a prototype resonance electrical impedance spectroscopy system for breast tissue signal detection: preliminary assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumkin, Jules; Zheng, Bin; Gruss, Michelle; Drescher, John; Leader, Joseph; Good, Walter; Lu, Amy; Cohen, Cathy; Shah, Ratan; Zuley, Margarita; Gur, David

    2008-03-01

    Using electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technology to detect breast abnormalities in general and cancer in particular has been attracting research interests for decades. Large clinical tests suggest that current EIS systems can achieve high specificity (>= 90%) at a relatively low sensitivity ranging from 15% to 35%. In this study, we explore a new resonance frequency based electrical impedance spectroscopy (REIS) technology to measure breast tissue EIS signals in vivo, which aims to be more sensitive to small tissue changes. Through collaboration between our imaging research group and a commercial company, a unique prototype REIS system has been assembled and preliminary signal acquisition has commenced. This REIS system has two detection probes mounted in the two ends of a Y-shape support device with probe separation of 60 mm. During REIS measurement, one probe touches the nipple and the other touches to an outer point of the breast. The electronic system continuously generates sweeps of multi-frequency electrical pulses ranging from 100 to 4100 kHz. The maximum electric voltage and the current applied to the probes are 1.5V and 30mA, respectively. Once a "record" command is entered, multi-frequency sweeps are recorded every 12 seconds until the program receives a "stop recording" command. In our imaging center, we have collected REIS measurements from 150 women under an IRB approved protocol. The database includes 58 biopsy cases, 78 screening negative cases, and other "recalled" cases (for additional imaging procedures). We measured eight signal features from the effective REIS sweep of each breast. We applied a multi-feature based artificial neural network (ANN) to classify between "biopsy" and normal "non-biopsy" breasts. The ANN performance is evaluated using a leave-one-out validation method and ROC analysis. We conducted two experiments. The first experiment attempted to classify 58 "biopsy" breasts and 58 "non-biopsy" breasts acquired on 58 women

  5. Schumann Resonance on Mars: A Tool for the Investigation of the Electrical Properties of the Martian Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozakiewicz, Joanna; Kulak, Andrzej; Mlynarczyk, Janusz

    2013-04-01

    Schumann resonances (SR) are global resonances of electromagnetic waves in the range of extremely low frequencies (ELF) propagating in a planetary cavity. This spherical waveguide is formed by the ground and the lower ionosphere. SR are supposed to occur on Mars, although many electrical properties of the Martian environment are still not well-determined. One of the most important problems in the SR modeling on Mars is to estimate electrical properties of the Martian ground and their influence on ELF waves propagation. In our previous study we have developed an analytical model of the ground-ionosphere waveguide based on the characteristic electric and magnetic complex altitudes' formalism, which has allowed us to take into consideration the Martian two-layered ground. In this work we have carried out simulations in order to determine the influence of the electrical properties of the Martian cavity on ELF waves propagation. We obtained results for several cases in which different electrical properties associated with the Martian atmosphere and ground were considered. Particularly we discussed the SR spectra obtained for the cases of low-conductive surface layers, and high-conductive subsurface layers of various depth. In addition we estimated the threshold value for the volumetric size of hypothetic groundwater reservoirs above which they could be detected using the SR phenomenon. The results point out the importance of studying SR on Mars and the need for the in situ research on propagation of ELF waves in the Martian environment. The measurement of the resonance field on Mars is associated with a necessity to locate an ELF receiving system at the planetary surface. The heaviest part of such equipment are two orthogonal magnetic antennas of an adequately high sensitivity. We have discussed the issue of sending such instruments to Mars. We also proposed an uncomplicated way to measure the electrical properties of the Martian cavity.

  6. Considerations on the Design of a Molecular Frequency Standard Based on the Molecular Beam Electric Resonance Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Vernon W.

    1959-01-01

    The use of a rotational state transition as observed by the molecular beam electric resonance method is discussed as a possible frequency standard particularly in the millimeter wavelength range. As a promising example the 100 kMc transition between the J = 0 and J = 1 rotational states of Li 6F19 is considered. The relative insensitivity of the transition frequency to external electric and magnetic fields and the low microwave power requirements appear favorable; the small fraction of the molecular beam that is in a single rotational state is a limiting factor.

  7. A dynamically tunable terahertz metamaterial absorber based on an electrostatic MEMS actuator and electrical dipole resonator array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fangrong; Xu, Ningning; Wang, Weiming; Wang, Yue'e.; Zhang, Wentao; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2016-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a dynamically tunable terahertz (THz) metamaterial absorber based on an electrostatic microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuator and electrical dipole resonator array. The absorption of the THz wave is mainly a result of the electrical dipole resonance, which shows a tunable performance on demand. By preforming the finite integral technique, we discovered that the central absorption frequency and the amplitude can be simultaneously tuned by the applied voltage U. Characterized by a white light interferometer and a THz time domain spectroscopy system, our THz absorber is measured to show a modulation of the central frequency and the amplitude to about 10% and 20%, respectively. The experimental results show good agreement with the simulation. This dynamically tunable absorber has potential applications on THz filters, modulators and controllers.

  8. Selective Tuning of a Particular Chemical Reaction on Surfaces through Electrical Resonance: An ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Masood; Shin, Dongbin; Ruoff, Rodney; Park, Noejung

    2015-12-17

    We used ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) to investigate the effect of a monochromatic oscillating electric field in resonance with a particular molecular vibration on surfaces. As a case study, AIMD simulations were carried out for hydroxyl functional groups on graphene. When the frequency of the applied field matches with the C-OH vibration frequency, the amplitude is monotonically amplified, leading to a complete desorption from the surface, overcoming the substantial barrier. This suggests the possibility of activating a particular bond without damaging the remaining surface. We extended this work to the case of the amination of sp(2)-bonded carbon surfaces and discussed the general perspective that, in general, an unfavorable chemical process can be activated by applying an external electric field with an appropriate resonance frequency. PMID:26634785

  9. Experimental verification of isotropic radiation from a coherent dipole source via electric-field-driven LC resonator metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Tichit, Paul-Henri; Burokur, Shah Nawaz; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; de Lustrac, André

    2013-09-27

    It has long been conjectured that isotropic radiation by a simple coherent source is impossible due to changes in polarization. Though hypothetical, the isotropic source is usually taken as the reference for determining a radiator's gain and directivity. Here, we demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that an isotropic radiator can be made of a simple and finite source surrounded by electric-field-driven LC resonator metamaterials designed by space manipulation. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we show the first isotropic source with omnidirectional radiation from a dipole source (applicable to all distributed sources), which can open up several possibilities in axion electrodynamics, optical illusion, novel transformation-optic devices, wireless communication, and antenna engineering. Owing to the electric- field-driven LC resonator realization scheme, this principle can be readily applied to higher frequency regimes where magnetism is usually not present. PMID:24116780

  10. Conductor disc used to suppress spurious mode and enhance electric coupling in a dielectric loaded combline resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pholele, T. M.; Chuma, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    The effects of conductor disc in a dielectric loaded combline resonator on its spurious performance, unloaded quality factor (Qu), and coupling coefficients are analysed using a commercial electromagnetic software package CST Microwave Studio (CST MWS). The disc improves the spurious free band but simultaneously deteriorates the Qu. The presence of the disc substantially improves the electric coupling by a factor of 1.891 for an aperture opening of 12 mm, while it has insignificant effect on the magnetic coupling.

  11. Radial electric field generated by resonant trapped electron pinch with radio frequency injection in a tokamak plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Zhe; Fisch, N. J.; Qin Hong

    2011-08-15

    Radial electric fields in tokamaks can be generated by charge accumulation due to a resonant trapped electron pinch effect. The radial field can then drive a toroidal flow. This resonant pinch effect was evaluated for the current-drive scheme that diffused electrons in the direction parallel to the toroidal field. It was found that, for typical tokamak parameters, to generate a radial electric field on the order of 100 kV/m, an rf power density on the order of kW/m{sup 3} is required. This power, absorbed by trapped electrons, is a small fraction of rf power density for current drive which is absorbed by passing electrons. However, according to the Landau resonant mechanism, the fraction of the momentum to trapped electrons decays exponentially with the square of the parallel phase velocity of the wave; therefore, the power absorbed at lower resonant velocities is the key. On the other hand, the redistribution of the current profile, due to rf current, decreases the local poloidal field and may reduce the particle transport significantly. It can relax the requirement of momentum deposited to trapped electrons, and, at the same time, contribute to explain the strongly correlation between the rotation and the driven current observed in experiments.

  12. Multitarget, quantitative nanoplasmonic electrical field-enhanced resonating device (NE2RD) for diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Inci, Fatih; Filippini, Chiara; Baday, Murat; Ozen, Mehmet Ozgun; Calamak, Semih; Durmus, Naside Gozde; Wang, ShuQi; Hanhauser, Emily; Hobbs, Kristen S; Juillard, Franceline; Kuang, Ping Ping; Vetter, Michael L; Carocci, Margot; Yamamoto, Hidemi S; Takagi, Yuko; Yildiz, Umit Hakan; Akin, Demir; Wesemann, Duane R; Singhal, Amit; Yang, Priscilla L; Nibert, Max L; Fichorova, Raina N; Lau, Daryl T-Y; Henrich, Timothy J; Kaye, Kenneth M; Schachter, Steven C; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Steinmetz, Lars M; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Davis, Ronald W; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-08-11

    Recent advances in biosensing technologies present great potential for medical diagnostics, thus improving clinical decisions. However, creating a label-free general sensing platform capable of detecting multiple biotargets in various clinical specimens over a wide dynamic range, without lengthy sample-processing steps, remains a considerable challenge. In practice, these barriers prevent broad applications in clinics and at patients' homes. Here, we demonstrate the nanoplasmonic electrical field-enhanced resonating device (NE(2)RD), which addresses all these impediments on a single platform. The NE(2)RD employs an immunodetection assay to capture biotargets, and precisely measures spectral color changes by their wavelength and extinction intensity shifts in nanoparticles without prior sample labeling or preprocessing. We present through multiple examples, a label-free, quantitative, portable, multitarget platform by rapidly detecting various protein biomarkers, drugs, protein allergens, bacteria, eukaryotic cells, and distinct viruses. The linear dynamic range of NE(2)RD is five orders of magnitude broader than ELISA, with a sensitivity down to 400 fg/mL This range and sensitivity are achieved by self-assembling gold nanoparticles to generate hot spots on a 3D-oriented substrate for ultrasensitive measurements. We demonstrate that this precise platform handles multiple clinical samples such as whole blood, serum, and saliva without sample preprocessing under diverse conditions of temperature, pH, and ionic strength. The NE(2)RD's broad dynamic range, detection limit, and portability integrated with a disposable fluidic chip have broad applications, potentially enabling the transition toward precision medicine at the point-of-care or primary care settings and at patients' homes. PMID:26195743

  13. Electrically compensated Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance cell for complex mixture mass analysis.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Nathan K; Savory, Joshua J; McKenna, Amy M; Quinn, John P; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Marshall, Alan G

    2011-09-01

    Complex natural organic mixtures such as petroleum require ultrahigh mass spectral resolution to separate and identify thousands of elemental compositions. Here, we incorporate a custom-built, voltage-compensated ICR cell for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS), based on a prior design by Tolmachev to produce optimal mass resolution. The compensated ICR cell installed in a custom-built 9.4 T FTICR mass spectrometer consists of seven cylindrical segments with axial proportions designed to generate a dc trapping potential that approaches an ideal three-dimensional axial quadrupolar potential. However, the empirically optimized compensation voltages do not correspond to the most quadrupolar trapping field. The compensation electrodes minimize variation in the reduced cyclotron frequency by balancing imperfections in the magnetic and electric field. The optimized voltages applied to compensation electrodes preserve ion cloud coherence for longer transient duration by approximately a factor of 2, enabling separation and identification of isobaric species (compounds with the same nominal mass but different exact mass) common in petroleum, such as C(3) vs SH(4) (separated by 3.4 mDa) and SH(3)(13)C vs (12)C(4) (separated by 1.1 mDa). The improved performance of the ICR cell provides more symmetric peak shape and better mass measurement accuracy. A positive ion atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) petroleum spectrum yields more than 26,000 assigned peaks, Fourier-limited resolving power of 800,000 at m/z 500 (6.6 s transient duration), and 124 part per billion root mean square (rms) error. The tunability of the compensation electrodes is critical for optimal performance. PMID:21838231

  14. Multitarget, quantitative nanoplasmonic electrical field-enhanced resonating device (NE2RD) for diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Inci, Fatih; Filippini, Chiara; Ozen, Mehmet Ozgun; Calamak, Semih; Durmus, Naside Gozde; Wang, ShuQi; Hanhauser, Emily; Hobbs, Kristen S.; Juillard, Franceline; Kuang, Ping Ping; Vetter, Michael L.; Carocci, Margot; Yamamoto, Hidemi S.; Takagi, Yuko; Yildiz, Umit Hakan; Akin, Demir; Wesemann, Duane R.; Singhal, Amit; Yang, Priscilla L.; Nibert, Max L.; Fichorova, Raina N.; Lau, Daryl T.-Y.; Henrich, Timothy J.; Kaye, Kenneth M.; Schachter, Steven C.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Davis, Ronald W.; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in biosensing technologies present great potential for medical diagnostics, thus improving clinical decisions. However, creating a label-free general sensing platform capable of detecting multiple biotargets in various clinical specimens over a wide dynamic range, without lengthy sample-processing steps, remains a considerable challenge. In practice, these barriers prevent broad applications in clinics and at patients’ homes. Here, we demonstrate the nanoplasmonic electrical field-enhanced resonating device (NE2RD), which addresses all these impediments on a single platform. The NE2RD employs an immunodetection assay to capture biotargets, and precisely measures spectral color changes by their wavelength and extinction intensity shifts in nanoparticles without prior sample labeling or preprocessing. We present through multiple examples, a label-free, quantitative, portable, multitarget platform by rapidly detecting various protein biomarkers, drugs, protein allergens, bacteria, eukaryotic cells, and distinct viruses. The linear dynamic range of NE2RD is five orders of magnitude broader than ELISA, with a sensitivity down to 400 fg/mL This range and sensitivity are achieved by self-assembling gold nanoparticles to generate hot spots on a 3D-oriented substrate for ultrasensitive measurements. We demonstrate that this precise platform handles multiple clinical samples such as whole blood, serum, and saliva without sample preprocessing under diverse conditions of temperature, pH, and ionic strength. The NE2RD’s broad dynamic range, detection limit, and portability integrated with a disposable fluidic chip have broad applications, potentially enabling the transition toward precision medicine at the point-of-care or primary care settings and at patients’ homes. PMID:26195743

  15. Coherent dipole-dipole coupling between two single Rydberg atoms at an electrically-tuned Förster resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravets, Sylvain; Labuhn, Henning; Barredo, Daniel; Béguin, Lucas; Lahaye, Thierry; Browaeys, Antoine

    2014-12-01

    Resonant energy transfers, the non-radiative redistribution of an electronic excitation between two particles coupled by the dipole-dipole interaction, lie at the heart of a variety of phenomena, notably photosynthesis. In 1948, Förster established the theory of fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) between broadband, nearly-resonant donors and acceptors. The 1/R6 scaling of the energy transfer rate, where R is the distance between particles, enabled widespread use of FRET as a `spectroscopic ruler’ for determining nanometric distances in biomolecules. The underlying mechanism is a coherent dipolar coupling between particles, as recognized in the early days of quantum mechanics, but this coherence has not been directly observed so far. Here we study, spectroscopically and in the time domain, the coherent, dipolar-induced exchange of excitations between two Rydberg atoms separated by up to 15 μm, and brought into resonance by applying an electric field. Coherent oscillation of the system between two degenerate pair states then occurs at a frequency scaling as 1/R3, the hallmark of resonant dipole-dipole interactions. Our results not only demonstrate, at the fundamental level of two atoms, the basic mechanism underlying FRET, but also open exciting prospects for active tuning of strong, coherent interactions in quantum many-body systems.

  16. Toward single atom qubits on a surface: Pump-probe spectroscopy and electrically-driven spin resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, William

    We will discuss the characterization of spin dynamics by pump-probe spectroscopy and the use of gigahertz-frequency electric fields to drive spin resonance of a Fe atom on a MgO/Ag(001) surface. In the spirit of this session, the technical challenges in applying a precise voltage to the tip sample junction across a wide radio-frequency bandwidth will be described. The energy relaxation time, T1, of single spins on surfaces can be measured by spin-polarized pump-probe STM (scanning tunneling microscopy). To date, the relaxation times reported for Fe-Cu dimers on Cu2N insulating films have been of the order ~100 ns. A three-order-of-magnitude enhancement of lifetime, to ~200 μs, was recently demonstrated for Co on a single-monolayer of MgO. Here, we report on the tailoring of the T1 lifetime of single Fe atoms on single- and multi- layer MgO films grown on Ag(001). Next, we demonstrate electron spin resonance of an individual single Fe atom, driven by a gigahertz-frequency electric field applied across the tip-sample junction, and detected by a spin-polarized tunneling current. The principle parameters of the spin resonance experiment, namely the phase coherence time T2 and the Rabi rate, are characterized for Fe atoms adsorbed to the monolayer MgO film.

  17. Quantum well micro-resonator optical modulator based on electrically controlled coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Taylor, Geoff W.

    2013-09-01

    Micro-resonator optical modulators fabricated with Si/SiO2 planar waveguides have been reported for the optical interconnect application and the modulation is achieved by control of the resonant frequency through resonator index change. In these devices, thermal control is used to adjust/stabilize the resonant frequency and the input coupling constant. In this paper, an III-V based micro-resonator is described in which the modulation is achieved through voltage control of the input coupling parameter and the resonator frequency is adjusted/stabilized through control of the resonator index. This approach offers significant advantages for integrated circuit based optical connectivity. The modulator performance is analyzed via FDTD simulation with refractive index profiles based on measured absorption parameters. The performance is confirmed via MATLAB and a circuit based model for HSPICE is developed and run in a transient simulator to confirm the modulator speed and eye diagram characteristics yielding an extinction ratio of 10.7 dB, a bandwidth of 31 GHz and a energy consumption <2.5 fJ/bit for device dimensions of 28×4 µm2.

  18. A model for electrical resonance and frequency tuning in saccular hair cells of the bull-frog, Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Hudspeth, A J; Lewis, R S

    1988-06-01

    1. Electrical resonance in solitary hair cells was examined under several experimental conditions using the tight-seal recording technique in the whole-cell current-clamp mode. 2. Resonance was characterized by the frequency and quality factor of oscillations in membrane potential evoked by depolarizing current pulses. Oscillation frequency increased with depolarization, from about 90 Hz at the resting potential to a limiting value of about 250 Hz. The quality factor of the oscillations was a bell-shaped function of membrane potential that reached a maximum of up to 12.6 at a potential slightly positive to the resting potential. 3. Pharmacological experiments were performed to assess which of three ionic currents participate in electrical resonance. Reduction of the voltage-gated Ca2+ current (ICa) and the Ca2+-activated K+ current (IK(Ca)) by lowering the extracellular Ca2+ concentration, or reduction of IK(Ca) with tetraethylammonium ion (TEA) degraded the resonance. In contrast, blockade of the transient K+ current (IA) with 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) had no significant effect. 4. To test the sufficiency of the Ca2+ and the Ca2+-activated K+ currents to account for resonance, we developed a model using mathematical descriptions of the two currents derived in the preceding paper (Hudspeth & Lewis, 1988), with additional terms for leakage conductance and membrane capacitance. The model correctly predicts the oscillatory responses to applied current pulses, including the non-linear dependences of oscillation frequency and quality factor on membrane potential. 5. Simulations of current-clamp experiments in the presence of a reduced extracellular Ca2+ concentration or of TEA were generated respectively by decreasing the model's values for the maximal Ca2+ or Ca2+-activated K+ conductances. The model's predictions of membrane-potential oscillations under these conditions agree qualitatively with experimental results, providing further support for the model as a

  19. Electric field variations due to resonance between ground velocity and ions motion in the Earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, M.; Honkura, Y.; Kuriki, M.; Ogawa, Y.

    2011-12-01

    We have so far observed clear electric field variations coincident with the passage of seismic waves. Circular polarization of electric field is the distinguishing feature in this phenomenon which can be interpreted in terms of the so-called seismic dynamo effect proposed by Honkura et al. (2009). That is, circularly polarized electric field is caused by resonance-like motion of ion in groundwater under the Earth's magnetic field. Therefore, left-handed and right-handed circular polarizations, if seen towards the direction of the magnetic field, are associated with anions with negative charge and cations with positive charge, respectively. Such polarization may be inconsistent with seismoelectric signals due to the electrokinetic mechanism, because they are mainly found in the direction of transmission of seismic compressional waves, as pointed out by Strahser et al. (2007) who examined polarization of seismoelectric signals by recording the three components of electric field. However, even such circular polarization of electric field is somehow interpreted in terms of the electrokinetic mechanism. Therefore, further convincing evidence is required to support the seismic dynamo effect. On 25-26 July 2011, an experiment for studies of crustal seismic structure was made in central Japan. We carried out simultaneous observations of ground velocity and electric field on this occasion at three sites near a blasting point using 50 kg of dynamite; about 280 m east-southeast, about 190 m east, and about 360 m northwest from the blasting point. Taking into account typical frequencies of ground velocity for artificial earthquakes by blasting higher than those for natural earthquakes, we used data loggers with sampling rate of 1 kHz and could obtain the waveforms of ground velocity and electric field very clearly. We show characteristics of electric field variations, their dependence of azimuth angle with respect to the blasting point, and frequency response functions.

  20. Interface defects in SiC power MOSFETs - An electrically detected magnetic resonance study based on spin dependent recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, Gernot; Hadley, Peter; Koch, Markus; Peters, Dethard; Aichinger, Thomas

    2014-02-21

    This study presents electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) measurements on a silicon carbide (SiC) MOSFET having the structure of a double-diffused silicon MOSFET (DMOS). The resonance pattern of a SiC DMOS was measured by monitoring the change of the recombination current between the source/body and the drain. The amplitude of the response has a maximum when the device is biased in depletion due to the equal concentrations of electrons and holes at the interface resulting in the most efficient recombination. The measured anisotropic g-tensor has axial symmetry with g{sub ∥} = 2.0051(4) (B ‖ c-axis), and g{sub ⊥} = 2.0029(4) (B⊥ c-axis) and the pattern shows several hyperfine (HF) peaks. We tentatively identify the observed defect as a silicon vacancy located directly at the interface.

  1. Analysis of symmetry breaking configurations in metal nanocavities: Identification of resonances for generating high-order magnetic modes and multiple tunable magnetic-electric Fano resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liancheng; Liu, Zhiqiang; Yi, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yiyun; Li, Hongjian; Li, Jinmin; Wang, Guohong

    2016-05-01

    A systematic investigation of the effects of symmetry breaking and the generation of Fano resonances in metal nanocavities is still lacking. In this work, we investigate the plasmonic properties of ring/disk silver nanocavities of various symmetry-breaking configurations. We find that multiple higher-order magnetic modes can be excited and that the quadrupole (Q) mode can even become dominant in a weakly asymmetric split ring. Magnetic-electric Fano resonances in weakly split-ring/disk nanocavities can be adjusted by tuning geometric parameters, such as the angle of the split, the width of the ring, the diameter of the ring, the center offset, and the number of superradiant antenna disks. The potential use of these multiple modes of ring/disk-based nanocavities in biosensing is evaluated by calculating the figure of merit and the contrast ratio. Our results correlate the various symmetry-breaking configurations with their plasmonic properties. The results will aid in the design of metal nanocavities for plasmonic applications.

  2. Electrical detection of surface plasmon resonance phenomena by a photoelectronic device integrated with gold nanoparticle plasmon antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Fukunishi, Yurie; Zheng, Bin; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji

    2013-02-01

    We have proposed a concept of a photoelectronic hybrid device utilizing gold nanoparticles (GNPs), which are supposed to function not only as the plasmon antenna but also as the sensing part. The photocurrent in the fabricated device, consisting of a transparent Nb-doped TiO2 channel and Au electrodes, was enhanced more than eight times at a specific wavelength with GNP arrays located between the electrodes, indicating that surface plasmon resonance was electrically detected with the hybrid device. This result will open new doors for ultra-small biosensor chips integrated with multi-functional solid-state devices.

  3. Electrically tunable liquid crystal laser using a nanoimprinted indium-tin-oxide electrode as a distributed feedback resonator.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kyung Won; Ha, Na Young

    2016-01-11

    We demonstrated electrical tunability of a liquid crystal (LC) laser using a nanoimprinted indium-tin-oxide (ITO) film as a distributed feedback (DFB) resonator, a transparent electrode, and an alignment layer for LCs. From the field-induced reorientation of LCs and changes in effective refractive indices of guided laser modes, lasing emission is tuned by 6 nm at low applied voltage of 8.0 V. This is because the LC laser with the nanoimprinted ITO electrode has no additional insulating layers for lasing performance. The present system is based on the functional electrode and its active control provides various applications and advances in laser technology. PMID:26832281

  4. Electrical and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy characterization of Mn-doped nanostructured TiO2 for capacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez-Reina, Rafael; Chao, Sheng; Petrovsky, Vladimir; Dogan, Fatih; Greenbaum, Steven

    2012-07-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 has shown promise as a dielectric material for high energy density ceramic capacitors because of its high dielectric breakdown strength and dielectric constant. Strategies to increase the insulation resistance or to reduce the leakage current of TiO2 include doping with transition metal ions. It is shown that Mn doping followed by an appropriate thermal treatment increases the grain boundary resistivity significantly and lowers the dielectric loss. Electrical measurements along with electron paramagnetic resonance and scanning electron microscopy of Mn-doped nanoscopic TiO2 demonstrate that sintering at 900 °C leads to optimal electrical properties that are correlated with a non-uniform distribution of dopant ions, concentrated at the grain boundaries. Nanostructured TiO2 dielectrics with improved insulation resistance are promising for the development of higher energy density capacitors.

  5. Experimental evaluation of electrical conductivity imaging of anisotropic brain tissues using a combination of diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kyung, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyun Bum; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2016-06-01

    Anisotropy of biological tissues is a low-frequency phenomenon that is associated with the function and structure of cell membranes. Imaging of anisotropic conductivity has potential for the analysis of interactions between electromagnetic fields and biological systems, such as the prediction of current pathways in electrical stimulation therapy. To improve application to the clinical environment, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subjected to the stimulated currents. In this study, we experimentally evaluate the anisotropic conductivity tensor distribution of canine brain tissues, using a recently developed diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography method. At low frequency, electrical conductivity of the biological tissues can be expressed as a product of the mobility and concentration of ions in the extracellular space. From diffusion tensor images of the brain, we can obtain directional information on diffusive movements of water molecules, which correspond to the mobility of ions. The position dependent scale factor, which provides information on ion concentration, was successfully calculated from the magnetic flux density, to obtain the equivalent conductivity tensor. By combining the information from both techniques, we can finally reconstruct the anisotropic conductivity tensor images of brain tissues. The reconstructed conductivity images better demonstrate the enhanced signal intensity in strongly anisotropic brain regions, compared with those resulting from previous methods using a global scale factor.

  6. Sensor Applications of Soft Magnetic Materials Based on Magneto-Impedance, Magneto-Elastic Resonance and Magneto-Electricity

    PubMed Central

    García-Arribas, Alfredo; Gutiérrez, Jon; Kurlyandskaya, Galina V.; Barandiarán, José M.; Svalov, Andrey; Fernández, Eduardo; Lasheras, Andoni; de Cos, David; Bravo-Imaz, Iñaki

    2014-01-01

    The outstanding properties of selected soft magnetic materials make them successful candidates for building high performance sensors. In this paper we present our recent work regarding different sensing technologies based on the coupling of the magnetic properties of soft magnetic materials with their electric or elastic properties. In first place we report the influence on the magneto-impedance response of the thickness of Permalloy films in multilayer-sandwiched structures. An impedance change of 270% was found in the best conditions upon the application of magnetic field, with a low field sensitivity of 140%/Oe. Second, the magneto-elastic resonance of amorphous ribbons is used to demonstrate the possibility of sensitively measuring the viscosity of fluids, aimed to develop an on-line and real-time sensor capable of assessing the state of degradation of lubricant oils in machinery. A novel analysis method is shown to sensitively reveal the changes of the damping parameter of the magnetoelastic oscillations at the resonance as a function of the oil viscosity. Finally, the properties and performance of magneto-electric laminated composites of amorphous magnetic ribbons and piezoelectric polymer films are investigated, demonstrating magnetic field detection capabilities below 2.7 nT. PMID:24776934

  7. Integrated architecture for the electrical detection of plasmonic resonances based on high electron mobility photo-transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammito, Davide; de Salvador, Davide; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Biasiol, Giorgio; Ongarello, Tommaso; Massari, Michele; Ruffato, Gianluca; Morpurgo, Margherita; Silvestri, Davide; Maggioni, Gianluigi; Bovo, Gianluca; Gaio, Michele; Romanato, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    We report the design of an integrated platform for on-chip electrical transduction of the surface plasmon resonance supported by a nanostructured metal grating. The latter is fabricated on the active area of a GaAs/AlGaAs photo-HEMT and simultaneously works as the electronic gate of the device. The gold plasmonic crystal has a V-groove profile and has been designed by numerical optical simulations. By showing that the numerical models accurately reproduce the phototransistors experimental response, we demonstrate that the proposed architecture is suitable for the development of a new class of compact and scalable SPR sensors.We report the design of an integrated platform for on-chip electrical transduction of the surface plasmon resonance supported by a nanostructured metal grating. The latter is fabricated on the active area of a GaAs/AlGaAs photo-HEMT and simultaneously works as the electronic gate of the device. The gold plasmonic crystal has a V-groove profile and has been designed by numerical optical simulations. By showing that the numerical models accurately reproduce the phototransistors experimental response, we demonstrate that the proposed architecture is suitable for the development of a new class of compact and scalable SPR sensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: HEMTs optical response, device fabrication flow chart, estimate of device resolution based on numerical simulations, synthesis of thiolated biotin, biotin functionalization and avidin binding procedure. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr04666d

  8. Sensor applications of soft magnetic materials based on magneto-impedance, magneto-elastic resonance and magneto-electricity.

    PubMed

    García-Arribas, Alfredo; Gutiérrez, Jon; Kurlyandskaya, Galina V; Barandiarán, José M; Svalov, Andrey; Fernández, Eduardo; Lasheras, Andoni; de Cos, David; Bravo-Imaz, Iñaki

    2014-01-01

    The outstanding properties of selected soft magnetic materials make them successful candidates for building high performance sensors. In this paper we present our recent work regarding different sensing technologies based on the coupling of the magnetic properties of soft magnetic materials with their electric or elastic properties. In first place we report the influence on the magneto-impedance response of the thickness of Permalloy films in multilayer-sandwiched structures. An impedance change of 270% was found in the best conditions upon the application of magnetic field, with a low field sensitivity of 140%/Oe. Second, the magneto-elastic resonance of amorphous ribbons is used to demonstrate the possibility of sensitively measuring the viscosity of fluids, aimed to develop an on-line and real-time sensor capable of assessing the state of degradation of lubricant oils in machinery. A novel analysis method is shown to sensitively reveal the changes of the damping parameter of the magnetoelastic oscillations at the resonance as a function of the oil viscosity. Finally, the properties and performance of magneto-electric laminated composites of amorphous magnetic ribbons and piezoelectric polymer films are investigated, demonstrating magnetic field detection capabilities below 2.7 nT. PMID:24776934

  9. Spoof surface plasmons resonance effect and tunable electric response of improved metamaterial in the terahertz regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Zhang, Li-Ying; Mei, Jin-Shuo; Zhang, Wen-Chao; Tong, Yi-Jing

    2015-12-01

    We propose an improved design and numerical study of an optimized tunable plasmonics artificial material resonator in the terahertz regime. We demonstrate that tunability can be realized with a transmission intensity as much as ˜61% in the lower frequency resonance, which is implemented through the effect of photoconductive switching under photoexcitation. In the higher frequency resonance, we show that spoof surface plasmons along the interface of metal/dielectric provide new types of electromagnetic resonances. Our approach opens up possibilities for the interface of metamaterial and plasmonics to be applied to optically tunable THz switching. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61201075), the Natural Science Foundation of Heilongjiang Province, China (Grant No. F2015039), the Young Scholar Project of Heilongjiang Provincial Education Bureau, China (Grant No. 1254G021), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2012M511507), and the Science Funds for the Young Innovative Talents of Harbin University of Science and Technology, China (Grant No. 201302).

  10. Ferromagnetic resonance shifts from electric fields: Field-enhanced screening charge in ferromagnet/ferroelectric multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawan, V.; Stamps, R. L.

    2012-03-01

    We calculate standing spin wave frequencies in a multilayer which unit cell is a trilayer comprised of a ferromagnet, a ferroelectric, and a normal metal. An applied voltage enhances the polarization of the ferroelectric and increases the magnetic moment at one interface through spin polarization and charge transfer. We show that the induced surface magnetism results in shifts of resonance and standing spin wave mode frequencies. A new resonance peak is predicted, associated with a strongly localized surface moment. Estimates are provided using parameters appropriate to the ferroelectric BaTiO3 and four different ferromagnetic metals, including a Heusler alloy (Fe, CrO2, permalloy, and Co2MnGe). The calculations use an entire-cell effective-medium approximation that takes into account the polarization profile in the ferroelectric. The metallic ferromagnetic electrode is treated as a real metal, and the depolarization field is included in the determination of polarization in the ferroelectric.

  11. Neutron resonance spin flippers: Static coils manufactured by electrical discharge machining

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, N.; Kredler, L.; Häußler, W.; Wagner, J. N.; Dogu, M.; Fuchs, C.; Böni, P.

    2014-07-15

    Radiofrequency spin flippers (RFSF) are key elements of Neutron Resonance Spin Echo (NRSE) spectrometers, which allow performing controlled manipulations of the beam polarization. We report on the design and test of a new type of RFSF which originality lies in the new manufacturing technique for the static coil. The largely automated procedure ensures reproducible construction as well as an excellent homogeneity of the neutron magnetic resonance condition over the coil volume. Two salient features of this concept are the large neutron window and the closure of the coil by a μ-metal yoke which prevents field leakage outside of the coil volume. These properties are essential for working with large beams and enable new applications with coils tilted with respect to the beam axis such as neutron Larmor diffraction or the study of dispersive excitations by inelastic NRSE.

  12. Electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance in single layers of permalloy: Evidence of magnonic charge pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, A.; Cunha, R. O.; Estrada, F.; Alves Santos, O.; Mendes, J. B. S.; Vilela-Leão, L. H.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Rezende, S. M.

    2015-07-01

    The generation of a DC voltage in single layers of permalloy (Ni81Fe19 ) when the magnetization is undergoing ferromagnetic resonance is investigated in a series of samples with thickness varying from 4.0 to 150 nm. By sweeping the external field at a fixed microwave frequency, we measure a DC voltage at the ends of the layer as a function of the in-plane angle for each sample. The asymmetric voltage signal generated at the resonance field is a superposition of symmetric Lorentzian and antisymmetric Lorentzian derivative line shapes. The in-plane dependence of both symmetric and antisymmetric signals cannot be explained as due to spin rectification (SRE) only. The results are well explained by a model that takes into account in addition to the SRE the contribution of the recent discovered effect of magnonic charge pumping that converts magnetization dynamics into charge current by means of the spin orbit coupling.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of morphological and functional changes of the uterus induced by sacral surface electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Takahide; Murakami, Takashi; Ozawa, Yuka; Seki, Kazunori; Handa, Yasunobu

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the morphological and kinematical changes of the uterus induced by electrical stimulation applied to the skin just above the second and fourth posterior sacral foramens (sacral surface electrical stimulation [ssES]) in 26 healthy subjects. Out of them, eight subjects who had severe pain subjectively during every menstruation received ssES just in menstruation. Morphological and functional changes of the uterus were examined by using T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and T1-weighted MR cinematography, respectively. Cyclic electrical stimulation for 15 min with 5 sec ON and 5 sec OFF was applied just before MR scanning. A decrease in thickness of the muscular layer of the uterus was observed in every subject after ssES for 15 min and was significant as compared with the thickness before ssES. Periodic uterine movement during menstruation was observed in the subjects with severe menstrual pain in MR cine and the power spectrum analysis of the movement showed a marked decrease in peak power and frequency after ssES treatment. We conclude that ssES causes a reduction of static muscle tension of the uterus in all menstrual cycle periods and suppression of uterine peristalsis during menstruation in the subjects with severe menstrual pain. Possible neural mechanisms for these static and dynamic effects of ssES on the uterus at spinal level are discussed. PMID:16340175

  14. Electron cyclotron resonant multicusp magnetic field microwave plasma source for electric propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Dahimene, M.; Mahoney, L.; Asmussen, J.

    1987-05-01

    The development of electrodeless microwave ion and plasma sources has been a recent, very active research project at Michigan State University. The results are efficient, compact microwave discharge configurations that operate at low pressures (0.5 mtorr to 100 mtorr) and efficiently produce low energy ions and free radicals and broad ion beams for oxidation, deposition, and etching experiments. The microwave discharge technology developed for these applications may be useful for application in electric propulsion. This paper reviews this microwave applicator technology and indicates how it may be extended to higher power levels and applied to electric propulsion systems. 12 references.

  15. Resonant phase jump with enhanced electric field caused by surface phonon polariton in terahertz region.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takanori; Nagai, Masaya; Tanaka, Koichiro

    2008-04-14

    We investigated surface phonon polariton in cesium iodide with terahertz time-domain attenuated total reflection method in Otto configuration, which gives us both information on amplitude and phase of surface electromagnetic mode directly. Systematic experiments with precise control of the distance between a prism and an active material show that the abrupt change of pi-phase jump appears sensitively under polariton picture satisfied when the local electric field at the interface becomes a maximum. This demonstration will open the novel phase-detection terahertz sensor using the active medium causing the strong enhancement of terahertz electric field. PMID:18542668

  16. Some nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the effect of electric field on lipid dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Peter Damien

    1997-11-01

    A method has been developed for studying, by NMR spectroscopy, the effect of pulsed electric fields on lipid aggregate structures such as bilayers and inverted hexagonal tubules as well as on the lipid conformation. Sample conductivity and ohmic heating caused the lipid to dehydrate under some test conditions and led to the use of glycerol as a substitute for water in membrane dispersions. It was found possible to produce aligned lipid multilayers which appeared very similar in spectral character to those obtained using water and lipid. Such membranes were more stable and possessed low ionic conduction. Additionally, it was possible to use the temperature dependence of chemical shifts in the NMR spectra to measure the ohmic heating effects resulting from the application of electric field to a lipid multilayer stack. The effect of electric fields on several lipids were investigated, including: egg yolk phosphatidylcholine, dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine; together with mixtures of these lipids. Additionally lipids in which the voltage dependent ionophore alamethicin was included were tested. It was observed that electric fields below 16 MV/m had little direct effect on the conformation of lipid molecules, although slight changes were observed in the lipid headgroup region of lipid-glycerol multilayers. However, alterations in the long range order were observed including the rotation of lipid tubules in the inverted hexagonal phase; a lowering of the lamellar to inverted hexagonal phase transition temperature, and alteration of the spectra from aligned lipid multilayers of mixed lipids to spectra consistent with a viscous isotropic phase. Analyses were carried out to predict the effect of electric field on lipid dispersions. These included a model for the dielectrophoretic reorientation of elongated structures. This model was tested using dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine in the inverted hexagonal phase

  17. Comparison of birefringent electric split-ring resonator and meanderline structures as quarter-wave plates at terahertz frequencies.

    PubMed

    Strikwerda, Andrew C; Fan, Kebin; Tao, Hu; Pilon, Daniel V; Zhang, Xin; Averitt, Richard D

    2009-01-01

    We have fabricated a quarter-wave plate from a single layer of birefringent electric split-ring resonators (ELC). For comparison, an appropriately scaled double layer meanderline structure was fabricated. At the design frequency of 639 GHz, the ELC structure achieves 99.9% circular polarization while the meanderline achieves 99.6%. The me-anderline displays a larger bandwidth of operation, attaining over 99% circular polarization from 615 - 743 GHz, while the ELC achieves 99% from 626 - 660 GHz. However, both are broad enough for use with CW sources making ELCs a more attractive choice due to the ease of fabrication. Both samples are free standing with a total thickness of 70 microm for the meanderline structure and a mere 20 microm for the ELC highlighting the large degree of birefringence exhibited with metamaterial structures. PMID:19129881

  18. On the Modeling of Electrical Response of SAW Resonator-based Sensors Versus Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballandras, S.; Laroche, T.; Courjon, E.; Daniau, W.; Baron, T.; Garcia, J.; Alzuaga, S.

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators built on Langasite (LGS) are capable to withstand temperature in excess of 900∘ C and demonstration of wireless interrogation of packaged sensors up to 700∘ C has been achieved for several tens of hours. These promising results emphasize the need for an accurate characterization of the raw material in order to design SAW resonators with a high level of confidence in the prediction, particularly concerning the temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF). Several data set have been published for LGS, offering prediction capabilities but also a significant level of data dispersion. Therefore, the evaluation of the effective thermal properties of SAW under periodic gratings turns out less robust than expected. Based also on published data and on measurements achieved within the SAWHOT project, harmonic admittance calculations have been achieved for deriving the evolution of mixed matrix parameters allowing for accurate SAW device simulation at any temperature. Adjusting the temperature coefficients then yield improved sets of material coefficients for design purpose. Using these data, we have demonstrated the possibility to develop a differential temperature sensor operating at temperature up to 600°C.

  19. Physical stress testing of bovine jugular veins using magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography and electrical velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Boethig, Dietmar; Ernst, Franziska; Sarikouch, Samir; Norozi, Kambiz; Lotz, Joachim; Opherk, Jan Patrick; Meister, Maren; Breymann, Thomas

    2010-06-01

    Bovine jugular veins (BJVs) (Contegra) are valve-bearing pulmonary artery substitutes. Their valves have higher profiles than human pulmonary valves; this might result in less optimal performance. Therefore, we investigated the impact of stress and undersizing on conduit performance with ergometry, echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Between April 2007 and June 2008, 20 BJV recipients (age 7.9-19.6 years) underwent spiroergometry and subsequent echocardiography; after due rest, ergometry was repeated and followed by MRI during recovery. A year later, exams were repeated. Data was evaluated as follows: comparison of stress related maximal individual valve performance changes (magnetic resonance: exercise induced average stroke volume changes by 61+/-49%; mean insufficiency increased by 2% in patients with <1% rest insufficiency and by 8% after rest insufficiency of >10%; the average rest gradient of 24+/-11 mmHg rose to 40+/-20 mmHg), and stratification of pooled observations by regurgitation fraction, insufficiency grades and z-values (insufficiency rose with increasing heart rate and decreasing stroke volume; undersizing increased gradients during recovery by 7+/-0.7 mmHg/z-value). Contegras high-profile valves tolerate stress without performance drop. Stress induced changes of insufficiency and gradient were clinically not significant, but sufficient to distort examination results; therefore, constant examination conditions are indispensable for a correct follow-up. PMID:20479070

  20. Enhancement of Rydberg-mediated single-photon nonlinearities by electrically tuned Förster resonances

    PubMed Central

    Gorniaczyk, H.; Tresp, C.; Bienias, P.; Paris-Mandoki, A.; Li, W.; Mirgorodskiy, I.; Büchler, H. P.; Lesanovsky, I.; Hofferberth, S.

    2016-01-01

    Mapping the strong interaction between Rydberg atoms onto single photons via electromagnetically induced transparency enables manipulation of light at the single-photon level and few-photon devices such as all-optical switches and transistors operated by individual photons. Here we demonstrate experimentally that Stark-tuned Förster resonances can substantially increase this effective interaction between individual photons. This technique boosts the gain of a single-photon transistor to over 100, enhances the non-destructive detection of single Rydberg atoms to a fidelity beyond 0.8, and enables high-precision spectroscopy on Rydberg pair states. On top, we achieve a gain larger than 2 with gate photon read-out after the transistor operation. Theory models for Rydberg polariton propagation on Förster resonance and for the projection of the stored spin-wave yield excellent agreement to our data and successfully identify the main decoherence mechanism of the Rydberg transistor, paving the way towards photonic quantum gates. PMID:27515278

  1. Enhancement of Rydberg-mediated single-photon nonlinearities by electrically tuned Förster resonances.

    PubMed

    Gorniaczyk, H; Tresp, C; Bienias, P; Paris-Mandoki, A; Li, W; Mirgorodskiy, I; Büchler, H P; Lesanovsky, I; Hofferberth, S

    2016-01-01

    Mapping the strong interaction between Rydberg atoms onto single photons via electromagnetically induced transparency enables manipulation of light at the single-photon level and few-photon devices such as all-optical switches and transistors operated by individual photons. Here we demonstrate experimentally that Stark-tuned Förster resonances can substantially increase this effective interaction between individual photons. This technique boosts the gain of a single-photon transistor to over 100, enhances the non-destructive detection of single Rydberg atoms to a fidelity beyond 0.8, and enables high-precision spectroscopy on Rydberg pair states. On top, we achieve a gain larger than 2 with gate photon read-out after the transistor operation. Theory models for Rydberg polariton propagation on Förster resonance and for the projection of the stored spin-wave yield excellent agreement to our data and successfully identify the main decoherence mechanism of the Rydberg transistor, paving the way towards photonic quantum gates. PMID:27515278

  2. CW and pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 263GHz/12T on operating amorphous silicon solar cells.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, W; Schnegg, A; Veber, S; Meier, C; Fehr, M; Lips, K

    2015-08-01

    Here we describe a new high frequency/high field continuous wave and pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance (CW EDMR and pEDMR) setup, operating at 263GHz and resonance fields between 0 and 12T. Spin dependent transport in illuminated hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cells at 5K and 90K was studied by in operando 263GHz CW and pEDMR alongside complementary X-band CW EDMR. Benefiting from the superior resolution at 263GHz, we were able to better resolve EDMR signals originating from spin dependent hopping and recombination processes. 5K EDMR spectra were found to be dominated by conduction and valence band tail states involved in spin dependent hopping, with additional contributions from triplet exciton states. 90K EDMR spectra could be assigned to spin pair recombination involving conduction band tail states and dangling bonds as the dominating spin dependent transport process, with additional contributions from valence band tail and triplet exciton states. PMID:26112328

  3. Impact of nanomechanical resonances on lasing from electrically pumped quantum dot micropillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerniuk, T.; Tepper, J.; Akimov, A. V.; Unsleber, S.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Bayer, M.

    2015-01-01

    We use a picosecond acoustics technique to modulate the laser output of electrically pumped GaAs/AlAs micropillar lasers with InGaAs quantum dots. The modulation of the emission wavelength takes place on the frequencies of the nanomechanical extensional and breathing (radial) modes of the micropillars. The amplitude of the modulation for various nanomechanical modes is different for every micropillar which is explained by a various elastic contact between the micropillar walls and polymer environment.

  4. Noise-induced resonance-like phenomena in InP crystals embedded in fluctuating electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persano Adorno, D.; Pizzolato, N.; Spagnolo, B.

    2016-05-01

    We explore and discuss the complex electron dynamics inside a low-doped n-type InP bulk embedded in a sub-THz electric field, fluctuating for the superimposition of an external source of Gaussian correlated noise. The results presented in this study derive from numerical simulations obtained by means of a multi-valley Monte Carlo approach to simulate the nonlinear transport of electrons inside the semiconductor crystal. The electronic noise characteristics are statistically investigated by calculating the correlation function of the velocity fluctuations, its spectral density and the integrated spectral density, i.e. the total noise power, for different values of both amplitude and frequency of the driving oscillating electric field and for different correlation times of the field fluctuations. Our results show that the nonlinear response of electrons is strongly affected by the field fluctuations. In particular, crucially depending on the relationship between the correlation times of the external Gaussian noise and the timescales of complex phenomena involved in the electron dynamical behavior: (i) electrons self-organize among different valleys, giving rise to intrinsic noise suppression; (ii) this cooperative behavior causes the appearance of a resonance-like phenomenon in the noise spectra.

  5. Ferromagnetic Resonance Spin Pumping and Electrical Spin Injection in Silicon-Based Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Y.; Odenthal, P. M.; Adur, R.; Beardsley, J.; Swartz, A. G.; Pelekhov, D. V.; Flatté, M. E.; Kawakami, R. K.; Pelz, J.; Hammel, P. C.; Johnston-Halperin, E.

    2015-12-01

    We present the measurement of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR-)driven spin pumping and three-terminal electrical spin injection within the same silicon-based device. Both effects manifest in a dc spin accumulation voltage Vs that is suppressed as an applied field is rotated to the out-of-plane direction, i.e., the oblique Hanle geometry. Comparison of Vs between these two spin injection mechanisms reveals an anomalously strong suppression of FMR-driven spin pumping with increasing out-of-plane field Happz . We propose that the presence of the large ac component to the spin current generated by the spin pumping approach, expected to exceed the dc value by 2 orders of magnitude, is the origin of this discrepancy through its influence on the spin dynamics at the oxide-silicon interface. This convolution, wherein the dynamics of both the injector and the interface play a significant role in the spin accumulation, represents a new regime for spin injection that is not well described by existing models of either FMR-driven spin pumping or electrical spin injection.

  6. Ferromagnetic Resonance Spin Pumping and Electrical Spin Injection in Silicon-Based Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Pu, Y; Odenthal, P M; Adur, R; Beardsley, J; Swartz, A G; Pelekhov, D V; Flatté, M E; Kawakami, R K; Pelz, J; Hammel, P C; Johnston-Halperin, E

    2015-12-11

    We present the measurement of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR-)driven spin pumping and three-terminal electrical spin injection within the same silicon-based device. Both effects manifest in a dc spin accumulation voltage V_{s} that is suppressed as an applied field is rotated to the out-of-plane direction, i.e., the oblique Hanle geometry. Comparison of V_{s} between these two spin injection mechanisms reveals an anomalously strong suppression of FMR-driven spin pumping with increasing out-of-plane field H_{app}^{z}. We propose that the presence of the large ac component to the spin current generated by the spin pumping approach, expected to exceed the dc value by 2 orders of magnitude, is the origin of this discrepancy through its influence on the spin dynamics at the oxide-silicon interface. This convolution, wherein the dynamics of both the injector and the interface play a significant role in the spin accumulation, represents a new regime for spin injection that is not well described by existing models of either FMR-driven spin pumping or electrical spin injection. PMID:26705647

  7. A theoretical resonant-tunnelling approach to electric-field effects in quasiperiodic Fibonacci GaAs-(Ga,Al)As semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Gómez, E.; Perdomo-Leiva, C. A.; Oliveira, L. E.; de Dios-Leyva, M.

    1998-04-01

    A theoretical resonant-tunnelling approach is used in a detailed study of the electronic and transmission properties of quasiperiodic Fibonacci GaAs-(Ga,Al)As semiconductor superlattices, under applied electric fields. The theoretical scheme is based upon an exact solution of the corresponding Schroedinger equations in different wells and barriers, through the use of Airy functions, and a transfer-matrix technique. The calculated quasibound resonant energies agree quite well with previous theoretical parameter-based results within a tight-binding scheme, in the particular case of isolated Fibonacci building blocks. Theoretical resonant-tunnelling results for 0953-8984/10/16/009/img6 and 0953-8984/10/16/009/img7 generations of the quasiperiodic Fibonacci superlattice reveal the occurrence of anticrossings of the resonant levels with applied electric fields, together with the conduction- and valence-level wave function localization properties and electric-field-induced migration to specific regions of the semiconductor quasiperiodic heterostructure. Finally, theoretical resonant-tunnelling calculations for the interband transition energies are shown to be in quite good quantitative agreement with previously reported experimental photocurrent measurements.

  8. Electrical detection of ferromagnetic resonance in ferromagnet/n-GaAs heterostructures by tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Boyko, Y.; Geppert, C. C.; Christie, K. D.; Stecklein, G.; Crowell, P. A.; Patel, S. J.; Palmstrøm, C. J.

    2014-11-24

    We observe a dc voltage peak at ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in samples consisting of a single ferromagnetic (FM) layer grown epitaxially on the n-GaAs (001) surface. The FMR peak is detected as an interfacial voltage with a symmetric line shape and is present in samples based on various FM/n-GaAs heterostructures, including Co{sub 2}MnSi/n-GaAs, Co{sub 2}FeSi/n-GaAs, and Fe/n-GaAs. We show that the interface bias voltage dependence of the FMR signal is identical to that of the tunneling anisotropic magnetoresistance (TAMR) over most of the bias range. Furthermore, we show how the precessing magnetization yields a dc FMR signal through the TAMR effect and how the TAMR phenomenon can be used to predict the angular dependence of the FMR signal. This TAMR-induced FMR peak can be observed under conditions where no spin accumulation is present and no spin-polarized current flows in the semiconductor.

  9. Tunable surface plasmon resonance and enhanced electrical conductivity of In doped ZnO colloidal nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sirshendu; Saha, Manas; de, S. K.

    2014-05-01

    We report a new synthesis process of colloidal indium (In) doped zinc oxide (ZIO) nanocrystals by a hot injection technique. By fine tuning the synthesis we reached the same nucleation temperature for indium oxide and zinc oxide which helped us to study a dopant precursor dependent In incorporation into the ZnO matrix by using different In sources. The dopant induced shape evolution changes the hexagonal pyramid structured ZnO to a platelet like structure upon 8% In doping. The introduction of trivalent In3+ into the ZnO lattice and consequent substitution of divalent Zn2+ generates free electrons in the conduction band which produces a plasmonic resonance in the infrared region. The electron concentration controls plasmon frequency as well as the band gap of host ZnO. The variation of the band gap and the modification of the conduction band have been explained by the Burstein-Moss effect and Mie's theory respectively. The In dopant changes the defect chemistry of pure ZnO nanocrystals which has been studied by photoluminescence and other spectroscopic measurements. The nanocrystals are highly stable in the organic medium and can be deposited as a crack free thin film on different substrates. Careful ligand exchange and thermal annealing of the spin cast film lead to a good conductive film (720 Ω per square to 120 Ω per square) with stable inherent plasmonic absorption in the infrared and 90% transmittance in the visible region. A temperature induced metal-semiconductor transition was found for doped ZnO nanocrystals. The transition temperature shifts to a lower temperature with increase of the doping concentration.We report a new synthesis process of colloidal indium (In) doped zinc oxide (ZIO) nanocrystals by a hot injection technique. By fine tuning the synthesis we reached the same nucleation temperature for indium oxide and zinc oxide which helped us to study a dopant precursor dependent In incorporation into the ZnO matrix by using different In sources. The

  10. On Planning and Exploiting Schumann Resonance Measurements for Monitoring the Electrical Productivity of Global Lightning Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtak, V. C.; Williams, E.

    2010-12-01

    The spatial-temporal behavior of world-wide lightning activity can be effectively used as an indicator of various geophysical processes, the global climate change being of a special interest among them. Since it has been reliably established that the lightning activity presents a major source of natural electromagnetic background in the Schumann resonance (SR) frequency range (5 to 40 Hz), SR measurements provide a continuous flow of information about this globally distributed source, thus forming an informative basis for monitoring its behavior via an inversion of observations into the source’s properties. To have such an inversion procedure effective, there is a series of prerequisites to comply with when planning and realizing it: (a) a proper choice of observable parameters to be used in the inversion; (b) a proper choice of a forward propagation model that would be accurate enough to take into consideration the major propagation effects occurring between a source and observer; (c) a proper choice of a method for inverting the sensitivity matrix. While the prerequisite (a) is quite naturally fulfilled by considering the SR resonance characteristics (modal frequencies, intensities, and quality factors), the compliance with prerequisites (b) and (c) has benefitted greatly from earlier seminal work on geophysical inversion by T.R. Madden. Since it has been found that the electrodynamic non-uniformities of the Earth-ionosphere waveguide, primarily the day/night, play an essential role in low-frequency propagation, use has been made of theory for the two-dimensional telegraph equation (TDTE; Kirillov, 2002) developed on the basis of the innovative suggestion by Madden and Thompson (1965) to consider the waveguide, both physically and mathematically, by analogy with a two-dimensional transmission line. Because of the iterative nature of the inversion procedure and the complicated, non-analytical character of the propagation theory, a special, fast-running TDTE

  11. Tunable surface plasmon resonance and enhanced electrical conductivity of In doped ZnO colloidal nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sirshendu; Saha, Manas; De, S K

    2014-06-21

    We report a new synthesis process of colloidal indium (In) doped zinc oxide (ZIO) nanocrystals by a hot injection technique. By fine tuning the synthesis we reached the same nucleation temperature for indium oxide and zinc oxide which helped us to study a dopant precursor dependent In incorporation into the ZnO matrix by using different In sources. The dopant induced shape evolution changes the hexagonal pyramid structured ZnO to a platelet like structure upon 8% In doping. The introduction of trivalent In(3+) into the ZnO lattice and consequent substitution of divalent Zn(2+) generates free electrons in the conduction band which produces a plasmonic resonance in the infrared region. The electron concentration controls plasmon frequency as well as the band gap of host ZnO. The variation of the band gap and the modification of the conduction band have been explained by the Burstein-Moss effect and Mie's theory respectively. The In dopant changes the defect chemistry of pure ZnO nanocrystals which has been studied by photoluminescence and other spectroscopic measurements. The nanocrystals are highly stable in the organic medium and can be deposited as a crack free thin film on different substrates. Careful ligand exchange and thermal annealing of the spin cast film lead to a good conductive film (720 Ω per square to 120 Ω per square) with stable inherent plasmonic absorption in the infrared and 90% transmittance in the visible region. A temperature induced metal-semiconductor transition was found for doped ZnO nanocrystals. The transition temperature shifts to a lower temperature with increase of the doping concentration. PMID:24842309

  12. Noise analysis in fast magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) based on spoiled multi gradient echo (SPMGE) pulse sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In Oh, Tong; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kim, Ji Eun; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong; In Kwon, Oh; Woo, Eung Je

    2014-08-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a promising non-invasive method to visualize a static cross-sectional conductivity and/or current density image by injecting low frequency currents. MREIT measures one component of the magnetic flux density caused by the injected current using a magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. For practical in vivo implementations of MREIT, especially for soft biological tissues where the MR signal rapidly decays, it is crucial to develop a technique for optimizing the magnetic flux density signal by the injected current while maintaining spatial-resolution and contrast. We design an MREIT pulse sequence by applying a spoiled multi-gradient-echo pulse sequence (SPMGE) to the injected current nonlinear encoding (ICNE), which fully injects the current at the end of the read-out gradient. The applied ICNE-SPMGE pulse sequence maximizes the duration of injected current almost up to a repetition time by measuring multiple magnetic flux density data. We analyze the noise level of measured magnetic flux density with respect to the pulse width of injection current and T_{2}^{*} relaxation time. In due consideration of the ICNE-SPMGE pulse sequence, using a reference information of T_{2}^{*} values in a local region of interest by a short pre-scan data, we predict the noise level of magnetic flux density to be measured for arbitrary repetition time TR. Results from phantom experiment demonstrate that the proposed method can predict the noise level of magnetic flux density for an appropriate TR = 40 ms using a reference scan for TR = 75 ms. The predicted noise level was compared with the noise level of directly measured magnetic flux density data.

  13. Simulations and phantom evaluations of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) for breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadleir, Rosalind J.; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2013-05-01

    MREIT is a new imaging modality that can be used to reconstruct high-resolution conductivity images of the human body. Since conductivity values of cancerous tissues in the breast are significantly higher than those of surrounding normal tissues, breast imaging using MREIT may provide a new noninvasive way of detecting early stage of cancer. In this paper, we present results of experimental and numerical simulation studies of breast MREIT. We built a realistic three-dimensional model of the human breast connected to a simplified model of the chest including the heart and evaluated the ability of MREIT to detect cancerous anomalies in a background material with similar electrical properties to breast tissue. We performed numerical simulations of various scenarios in breast MREIT including assessment of the effects of fat inclusions and effects related to noise levels, such as changing the amplitude of injected currents, effect of added noise and number of averages. Phantom results showed straightforward detection of cancerous anomalies in a background was possible with low currents and few averages. The simulation results showed it should be possible to detect a cancerous anomaly in the breast, while restricting the maximal current density in the heart below published levels for nerve excitation.

  14. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrical and Optogenetic Deep Brain Stimulation at the Rat Nucleus Accumbens.

    PubMed

    Albaugh, Daniel L; Salzwedel, Andrew; Van Den Berge, Nathalie; Gao, Wei; Stuber, Garret D; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens (NAc-DBS) is an emerging therapy for diverse, refractory neuropsychiatric diseases. Although DBS therapy is broadly hypothesized to work through large-scale neural modulation, little is known regarding the neural circuits and networks affected by NAc-DBS. Using a healthy, sedated rat model of NAc-DBS, we employed both evoked- and functional connectivity (fc) MRI to examine the functional circuit and network changes achieved by electrical NAc stimulation. Optogenetic-fMRI experiments were also undertaken to evaluate the circuit modulation profile achieved by selective stimulation of NAc neurons. NAc-DBS directly modulated neural activity within prefrontal cortex and a large number of subcortical limbic areas (e.g., amygdala, lateral hypothalamus), and influenced functional connectivity among sensorimotor, executive, and limbic networks. The pattern and extent of circuit modulation measured by evoked-fMRI was relatively insensitive to DBS frequency. Optogenetic stimulation of NAc cell bodies induced a positive fMRI signal in the NAc, but no other detectable downstream responses, indicating that therapeutic NAc-DBS might exert its effect through antidromic stimulation. Our study provides a comprehensive mapping of circuit and network-level neuromodulation by NAc-DBS, which should facilitate our developing understanding of its therapeutic mechanisms of action. PMID:27601003

  15. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrical and Optogenetic Deep Brain Stimulation at the Rat Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Albaugh, Daniel L.; Salzwedel, Andrew; Van Den Berge, Nathalie; Gao, Wei; Stuber, Garret D.; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens (NAc-DBS) is an emerging therapy for diverse, refractory neuropsychiatric diseases. Although DBS therapy is broadly hypothesized to work through large-scale neural modulation, little is known regarding the neural circuits and networks affected by NAc-DBS. Using a healthy, sedated rat model of NAc-DBS, we employed both evoked- and functional connectivity (fc) MRI to examine the functional circuit and network changes achieved by electrical NAc stimulation. Optogenetic-fMRI experiments were also undertaken to evaluate the circuit modulation profile achieved by selective stimulation of NAc neurons. NAc-DBS directly modulated neural activity within prefrontal cortex and a large number of subcortical limbic areas (e.g., amygdala, lateral hypothalamus), and influenced functional connectivity among sensorimotor, executive, and limbic networks. The pattern and extent of circuit modulation measured by evoked-fMRI was relatively insensitive to DBS frequency. Optogenetic stimulation of NAc cell bodies induced a positive fMRI signal in the NAc, but no other detectable downstream responses, indicating that therapeutic NAc-DBS might exert its effect through antidromic stimulation. Our study provides a comprehensive mapping of circuit and network-level neuromodulation by NAc-DBS, which should facilitate our developing understanding of its therapeutic mechanisms of action. PMID:27601003

  16. Electron spin resonance and electrical transport in films of poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrenesulphonate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Keun; You, Seunghun; Jeon, Sunam; Ryu, Na-Hyun; Park, Ki Hun; Myung-Hoon, Kim; Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Sun Hee; Schiff, Eric A.

    2015-07-01

    We report electron spin resonance (ESR) and electrical transport measurements in pristine poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrenesulphonate) (PEDOT:PSS) films and ethylene glycol (EG)-treated PEDOT:PSS films. Based on the assumption that ESR from PEDOT:PSS is mainly due to hole polarons, we estimated the polaron mobility in the PEDOT:PSS films as μ p ≈ 0.1 - 1 cm2 V-1 s-1. We also estimated that bipolaron mobilities are in the range of approximately 10-100 cm2 V-1 s-1, assuming that the initial hole density is unaffected by bipolaron formation. We measured transient currents following application of voltage bias in several films, which had the features of space-charge limited currents despite being measured with coplanar electrodes. The relative nominal mobilities obtained for hole polarons in PEDOT:PSS and for bipolarons in EG-PEDOT:PSS were not inconsistent with the results obtained from the ESR and conductivity measurements. However, although the inferred mobility was voltage-independent for untreated samples with hole polarons, the inferred mobility increased steeply with the applied voltage, consistent with exp ( √{ V } ) behavior, for EG-treated samples.

  17. Recombination centers in 4H-SiC investigated by electrically detected magnetic resonance and ab initio modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottom, J.; Gruber, G.; Hadley, P.; Koch, M.; Pobegen, G.; Aichinger, T.; Shluger, A.

    2016-05-01

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) is a powerful technique for the observation and categorization of paramagnetic defects within semiconductors. The interpretation of the recorded EDMR spectra has long proved to be challenging. Here, defect spectra are identified by comparing EDMR measurements with extensive ab initio calculations. The defect identification is based upon the defect symmetry and the form of the hyperfine (HF) structure. A full description is given of how an accurate spectrum can be generated from the theoretical data by considering some thousand individual HF contributions out of some billion possibilities. This approach is illustrated with a defect observed in nitrogen implanted silicon carbide (SiC). Nitrogen implantation is a high energy process that gives rise to a high defect concentration. The majority of these defects are removed during the dopant activation anneal, shifting the interstitial nitrogen to the desired substitutional lattice sites, where they act as shallow donors. EDMR shows that a deep-level defect persists after the dopant activation anneal. This defect is characterized as having a g c ∥ B = 2.0054 ( 4 ) and g c ⊥ B = 2.0006 ( 4 ) , with pronounced hyperfine shoulder peaks with a 13 G peak to peak separation. The nitrogen at a carbon site next to a silicon vacancy ( N C V Si ) center is identified as the persistent deep-level defect responsible for the observed EDMR signal and the associated dopant deactivation.

  18. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) based on the solution of the convection equation using FEM with stabilization.

    PubMed

    Oran, Omer Faruk; Ider, Yusuf Ziya

    2012-08-21

    Most algorithms for magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) concentrate on reconstructing the internal conductivity distribution of a conductive object from the Laplacian of only one component of the magnetic flux density (∇²B(z)) generated by the internal current distribution. In this study, a new algorithm is proposed to solve this ∇²B(z)-based MREIT problem which is mathematically formulated as the steady-state scalar pure convection equation. Numerical methods developed for the solution of the more general convection-diffusion equation are utilized. It is known that the solution of the pure convection equation is numerically unstable if sharp variations of the field variable (in this case conductivity) exist or if there are inconsistent boundary conditions. Various stabilization techniques, based on introducing artificial diffusion, are developed to handle such cases and in this study the streamline upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) stabilization method is incorporated into the Galerkin weighted residual finite element method (FEM) to numerically solve the MREIT problem. The proposed algorithm is tested with simulated and also experimental data from phantoms. Successful conductivity reconstructions are obtained by solving the related convection equation using the Galerkin weighted residual FEM when there are no sharp variations in the actual conductivity distribution. However, when there is noise in the magnetic flux density data or when there are sharp variations in conductivity, it is found that SUPG stabilization is beneficial. PMID:22837046

  19. Optical switching of nematic liquid crystal film arising from induced electric field of localized surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quint, Makiko T.; Delgado, Silverio; Paredes, John H.; Hirst, Linda S.; Ghosh, Sayantani

    2015-08-01

    We have developed an all-optical method to control the in- and out-of-plane spatial orientation of nematic liquid crystal (NLC) molecules by leveraging the highly localized electric fields produced in the near-field regime of gold nanoparticle (AuNP) layers. A 1-2 micron thick NLC film is deposited on a close-packed drop-cast AuNP layer, excited with tunable optical sources and the transmission of white light through it analyzed using polarization optics as a function of incident light wavelength, excitation power and sample temperature. Our findings, supported by simulations using discrete-dipole approximations, establish the optical switching effect to be repeatable, reversible, spectrally-selective, operational over a broad temperature range, including room temperature, and requiring very small on-resonance excitation intensity (0.3 W/cm2). For the case of the in-plane switching we have additionally demonstrated that controlling the incident excitation polarization can continuously vary the alignment of the NLC molecules, allowing for grayscale transmission.

  20. Use of 3-D magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography in detecting human cerebral stroke: a simulation study*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Nuo; Zhu, Shan-an; He, Bin

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a new three dimensional (3-D) conductivity imaging approach and have used it to detect human brain conductivity changes corresponding to acute cerebral stroke. The proposed Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) approach is based on the J-Substitution algorithm and is expanded to imaging 3-D subject conductivity distribution changes. Computer simulation studies have been conducted to evaluate the present MREIT imaging approach. Simulations of both types of cerebral stroke, hemorrhagic stroke and ischemic stroke, were performed on a four-sphere head model. Simulation results showed that the correlation coefficient (CC) and relative error (RE) between target and estimated conductivity distributions were 0.9245±0.0068 and 8.9997%±0.0084%, for hemorrhagic stroke, and 0.6748±0.0197 and 8.8986%±0.0089%, for ischemic stroke, when the SNR (signal-to-noise radio) of added GWN (Gaussian White Noise) was 40. The convergence characteristic was also evaluated according to the changes of CC and RE with different iteration numbers. The CC increases and RE decreases monotonously with the increasing number of iterations. The present simulation results show the feasibility of the proposed 3-D MREIT approach in hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke detection and suggest that the method may become a useful alternative in clinical diagnosis of acute cerebral stroke in humans. PMID:15822161

  1. Electrically small, near-field resonant parasitic (NFRP) antennas augmented with passive and active circuit elements to enhance their functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ning

    Metamaterials have drawn considerable attention because they can exhibit epsilon-negative (ENG) and/or mu-negative (MNG) properties, which in turn can lead to exotic physical effects that can enable interesting, practical applications. For instance, ENG and MNG properties can be engineered to yield double negative (DNG) properties, such as a negative index of refraction, which leads to flat lenses. Similarly, their extreme versions enable cloaking effects. Inspired by such metamaterial properties, a promising methodology has been developed to design electrically small antennas (ESAs). These ESAs use unit cells of metamaterials as their near-field resonant parasitic (NFRP) elements. This new metamaterial-inspired antenna miniaturization method is extended in this dissertation by augmenting the antenna designs with circuits. A rectifying circuit augmentation is used to achieve electrically small, high efficiency rectenna systems. Rectennas are the enabling components of power harvesting and wireless power transmission systems. Electrically small, integrated rectennas have become popular and in demand for several wireless applications including sensor networks and bio-implanted devices. Four global positioning system (GPS) L1 frequency (1.5754 GHz) rectenna systems were designed, fabricated and measured: three resistor-loaded and one supercapacitor-loaded. The simulated and measured results will be described; good agreement between them was obtained. The NFRP ESAs are also augmented with active, non-Foster elements in order to overcome the physical limits of the impedance bandwidth of passive ESA systems. Unlike conventional active external matching network approaches, the non-Foster components are incorporated directly into the NFRP element of the ESA. Three 300 MHz non-Foster circuit-augmented broadband, ESA systems were demonstrated: an Egyptian axe monopole (EAM) antenna, an Egyptian axe dipole (EAD) antenna, and a protractor antenna. The simulated and measured

  2. Electrical and ionic conductivity effects on magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of CuI.

    PubMed

    Yesinowski, James P; Ladouceur, Harold D; Purdy, Andrew P; Miller, Joel B

    2010-12-21

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of two different types of conductivity, electrical and ionic, upon magic-angle spinning NMR spectra. The experimental demonstration of these effects involves (63)Cu, (65)Cu, and (127)I variable temperature MAS-NMR experiments on samples of γ-CuI, a Cu(+)-ion conductor at elevated temperatures as well as a wide bandgap semiconductor. We extend previous observations that the chemical shifts depend very strongly upon the square of the spinning-speed as well as the particular sample studied and the magnetic field strength. By using the (207)Pb resonance of lead nitrate mixed with the γ-CuI as an internal chemical shift thermometer we show that frictional heating effects of the rotor do not account for the observations. Instead, we find that spinning bulk CuI, a p-type semiconductor due to Cu(+) vacancies in nonstoichiometric samples, in a magnetic field generates induced AC electric currents from the Lorentz force that can resistively heat the sample by over 200 °C. These induced currents oscillate along the rotor spinning axis at the spinning speed. Their associated heating effects are disrupted in samples containing inert filler material, indicating the existence of macroscopic current pathways between micron-sized crystallites. Accurate measurements of the temperature-dependence of the (63)Cu and (127)I chemical shifts in such diluted samples reveal that they are of similar magnitude (ca. 0.27 ppm/K) but opposite sign (being negative for (63)Cu), and appear to depend slightly upon the particular sample. This relationship is identical to the corresponding slopes of the chemical shifts versus square of the spinning speed, again consistent with sample heating as the source of the observed large shift changes. Higher drive-gas pressures are required to spin samples that have higher effective electrical conductivities, indicating the presence of a braking effect arising from the induced currents produced by

  3. Electrical and ionic conductivity effects on magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of CuI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesinowski, James P.; Ladouceur, Harold D.; Purdy, Andrew P.; Miller, Joel B.

    2010-12-01

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of two different types of conductivity, electrical and ionic, upon magic-angle spinning NMR spectra. The experimental demonstration of these effects involves 63Cu, 65Cu, and 127I variable temperature MAS-NMR experiments on samples of γ-CuI, a Cu+-ion conductor at elevated temperatures as well as a wide bandgap semiconductor. We extend previous observations that the chemical shifts depend very strongly upon the square of the spinning-speed as well as the particular sample studied and the magnetic field strength. By using the 207Pb resonance of lead nitrate mixed with the γ-CuI as an internal chemical shift thermometer we show that frictional heating effects of the rotor do not account for the observations. Instead, we find that spinning bulk CuI, a p-type semiconductor due to Cu+ vacancies in nonstoichiometric samples, in a magnetic field generates induced AC electric currents from the Lorentz force that can resistively heat the sample by over 200 °C. These induced currents oscillate along the rotor spinning axis at the spinning speed. Their associated heating effects are disrupted in samples containing inert filler material, indicating the existence of macroscopic current pathways between micron-sized crystallites. Accurate measurements of the temperature-dependence of the 63Cu and 127I chemical shifts in such diluted samples reveal that they are of similar magnitude (ca. 0.27 ppm/K) but opposite sign (being negative for 63Cu), and appear to depend slightly upon the particular sample. This relationship is identical to the corresponding slopes of the chemical shifts versus square of the spinning speed, again consistent with sample heating as the source of the observed large shift changes. Higher drive-gas pressures are required to spin samples that have higher effective electrical conductivities, indicating the presence of a braking effect arising from the induced currents produced by rotating a

  4. An electrically detected magnetic resonance study of performance limiting defects in SiC metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, C. J.; Lenahan, P. M.; Lelis, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we utilize electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) techniques and electrical measurements to study defects in SiC based metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). We compare results on a series of SiC MOSFETs prepared with significantly different processing parameters. The EDMR is detected through spin dependent recombination (SDR) in most cases. However, in some devices at a fairly high negative bias, the EDMR likely also involves spin dependent trap-assisted tunneling (SDT) between defects on both sides of the SiC/SiO2 interface. At least three different defects have been detected in the magnetic resonance measurements. The defects observed include two at the SiC/SiO2 interface or on the SiC side of the SiC/SiO2 interface: one is very likely a vacancy center with a distribution which extends into the bulk of the SiC and the other is likely a "dangling bond" defect. A third defect, located on the SiO2 side of the SiC/SiO2 interface, has a spectrum very similar to that previously reported for an oxygen deficient silicon coupled to a hydrogen atom. In nearly all cases, we observe a strong dominating single line EDMR spectrum with an isotropic g≈2.0027. In some samples, this strong central line is accompanied by two pairs of considerably weaker side peaks which we link to hyperfine interactions with nearby Si and C atoms. The pattern is physically reasonable for a silicon vacancy in SiC. We therefore tentatively assign it to a silicon vacancy or silicon vacancy associated defect in the SiC. In one set of devices with very high interface trap density we observe another dominating spectrum with g∥=2.0026 and g⊥=2.0010 with the symmetry axis coincident with the [0001] and nearly the SiC/SiO2 interface normal. We ascribe this EDMR spectrum to a "dangling bond" defect. A third EDMR spectrum shows up in some devices at a fairly large negative gate bias. The phase of this spectrum is quite consistently opposite to that of the

  5. Anomalous solute transport in saturated porous media: Relating transport model parameters to electrical and nuclear magnetic resonance properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Ryan D.; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; France, Samantha; Osterman, Gordon; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Singha, Kamini

    2015-02-01

    The advection-dispersion equation (ADE) fails to describe commonly observed non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models such as the dual-domain mass-transfer (DDMT) model. DDMT model parameters are commonly calibrated via curve fitting, providing little insight into the relation between effective parameters and physical properties of the medium. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can provide insight into the geometry and connectedness of pore spaces related to transport model parameters. Here, we consider proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), direct-current (DC) resistivity, and complex conductivity (CC) measurements for this purpose, and assess these methods using glass beads as a control and two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material that demonstrates non-Fickian transport due to intragranular porosity. We estimate DDMT parameters via calibration of a transport model to column-scale solute tracer tests, and compare NMR, DC resistivity, CC results, which reveal that grain size alone does not control transport properties and measured geophysical parameters; rather, volume and arrangement of the pore space play important roles. NMR cannot provide estimates of more-mobile and less-mobile pore volumes in the absence of tracer tests because these estimates depend critically on the selection of a material-dependent and flow-dependent cutoff time. Increased electrical connectedness from DC resistivity measurements are associated with greater mobile pore space determined from transport model calibration. CC was hypothesized to be related to length scales of mass transfer, but the CC response is unrelated to DDMT.

  6. Abnormal T2-STIR Magnetic Resonance in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy: A Marker of Advanced Disease and Electrical Myocardial Instability

    PubMed Central

    Pisciella, Lorena; Barison, Andrea; Del Franco, Annamaria; Zachara, Elisabetta; Piaggi, Paolo; Re, Federica; Pingitore, Alessandro; Emdin, Michele; Lombardi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Background Myocardial hyperintensity on T2-weighted short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) (HyT2) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images has been demonstrated in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and is considered a sign of acute damage. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between HyT2 and both a) markers of ventricular electrical instability and b) clinical and CMR parameters. Methods Sixty-five patients underwent a thorough clinical examination, consisting of 24-h ECG recording and CMR examination including functional evaluation, T2-STIR images and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). Results HyT2 was detected in 27 patients (42%), and subjects with HyT2 showed a greater left ventricle (LV) mass index (p<0.001), lower LV ejection fraction (p = 0.05) and greater extent of LGE (p<0.001) compared to those without HyT2. Twenty-two subjects (34%) presented non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) on the 24-h ECG recording, 21 (95%) of whom exhibited HyT2. Based on the logistic regression analysis, HyT2 (odds ratio [OR]: 165, 95% CI 11–2455, p<0.001) and LGE extent (1.1, 1.0–1.3, p<0.001) served as independent predictors of NSVT, while the presence of LGE was not associated with NSVT occurrence (p = 0.49). The presence of HyT2 was associated with lower heart rate variability (p = 0.006) and a higher number of arrhythmic risk factors (p<0.001). Conclusions In HCM patients, HyT2 upon CMR examination is associated with more advanced disease and increased arrhythmic burden. PMID:25356653

  7. Response of the /sup 1/P/sup 0/ resonance near n = 3 in the H/sup -/ continuum to external electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.

    1986-05-01

    The response to external electric fields of the /sup 1/P/sup 0/ resonance in the H/sup -/ photodetachment continuum below the n = 3 hydrogenic excitation threshold is investigated. Using the relativistic (..beta.. = 0.806) 650 MeV H/sup -/ beam at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) in Los Alamos, the fourth harmonic (2.66 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser is Doppler shifted to provide a continuously tunable photon beam in the rest frame of the ions. The magnetic field from pulsed Helmholtz coils, surrounding the photon-H/sup -/ interaction point provides a Lorentz-transformed barycentric electric field. Relative total photodetachment cross sections were measured as a function of photon energy and electric field. The resulting spectra were fit to a Fano line shape. 70 refs., 28 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. A High-Q Resonant Pressure Microsensor with Through-Glass Electrical Interconnections Based on Wafer-Level MEMS Vacuum Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhenyu; Chen, Deyong; Wang, Junbo; Li, Yinan; Chen, Jian

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a high-Q resonant pressure microsensor with through-glass electrical interconnections based on wafer-level MEMS vacuum packaging. An approach to maintaining high-vacuum conditions by integrating the MEMS fabrication process with getter material preparation is presented in this paper. In this device, the pressure under measurement causes a deflection of a pressure-sensitive silicon square diaphragm, which is further translated to stress build up in “H” type doubly-clamped micro resonant beams, leading to a resonance frequency shift. The device geometries were optimized using FEM simulation and a 4-inch SOI wafer was used for device fabrication, which required only three photolithographic steps. In the device fabrication, a non-evaporable metal thin film as the getter material was sputtered on a Pyrex 7740 glass wafer, which was then anodically bonded to the patterned SOI wafer for vacuum packaging. Through-glass via holes predefined in the glass wafer functioned as the electrical interconnections between the patterned SOI wafer and the surrounding electrical components. Experimental results recorded that the Q-factor of the resonant beam was beyond 22,000, with a differential sensitivity of 89.86 Hz/kPa, a device resolution of 10 Pa and a nonlinearity of 0.02% F.S with the pressure varying from 50 kPa to 100 kPa. In addition, the temperature drift coefficient was less than −0.01% F.S/°C in the range of −40 °C to 70 °C, the long-term stability error was quantified as 0.01% F.S over a 5-month period and the accuracy of the microsensor was better than 0.01% F.S. PMID:25521385

  9. Comparison of electrical velocimetry and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for the non-invasive determination of cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Trinkmann, Frederik; Berger, Manuel; Doesch, Christina; Papavassiliu, Theano; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Borggrefe, Martin; Kaden, Jens J; Saur, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    A novel algorithm of impedance cardiography referred to as electrical velocimetry (EV) has been introduced for non-invasive determination of cardiac output (CO). Previous validation studies yielded diverging results and no comparison with the non-invasive gold standard cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has been performed. We therefore aimed to prospectively assess the accuracy and reproducibility of EV compared to CMR. 152 consecutive stable patients undergoing CMR were enrolled. EV measurements were taken twice before or after CMR in supine position and averaged over 20 s (AESCULON(®), Osypka Medical, Berlin, Germany). Bland-Altman analysis showed insufficient agreement of EV and CMR with a mean bias of 1.2 ± 1.4 l/min (bias 23 ± 26 %, percentage error 51 %). Reproducibility was high with 0.0 ± 0.3 l/min (bias 0 ± 8 %, percentage error 15 %). Outlier analysis revealed gender, height, CO and stroke volume (SV) by CMR as independent predictors for larger variation. Stratification of COCMR in quintiles demonstrated a good agreement for low values (<4.4 l/min) with bias increasing significantly with quintile as high as 3.1 ± 1.1 l/min (p < 0.001). Reproducibility was not affected (p = 0.71). Subgroup analysis in patients with arrhythmias (p = 0.19), changes in thoracic fluid content (p = 0.51) or left heart failure (p = 0.47) could not detect significant differences in accuracy. EV showed insufficient agreement with CMR and good reproducibility. Gender, height and increasing CO and SV were associated with increased bias while not affecting reproducibility. Therefore, absolute values should not be used interchangeably in clinical routine. EV yet may find its place for clinical application with further investigation on its trending ability pending. PMID:26115774

  10. Magneto-electric interactions at bending resonance in an asymmetric multiferroic composite: Theory and experiment on the influence of electrode position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivasulu, G.; Qu, P.; Petrov, V. M.; Qu, Hongwei; Srinivasan, G.

    2015-05-01

    In magnetostrictive-piezoelectric bilayers the strength of mechanical strain mediated magneto-electric (ME) interactions shows a resonance enhancement at bending modes. Such composites when operating under frequency modulation at bending resonance have very high ME sensitivity and are of importance for ultrasensitive magnetometers. This report provides an avenue for further enhancement in the ME sensitivity by strategic positioning of the electrodes in the bilayer. We discuss the theory and measurements on the dependence of ME coupling on the position of electrodes in a lead zirconate titanate-permendur bilayer. Samples of effective length L with full electrodes and partial electrodes of length l = L/3 are studied. A five-fold increase in ME voltage coefficient (MEVC) at bending resonance and a 75% increase in low-frequency MEVC are measured as the partial electrode position is moved from the free-end to clamped-end of the bilayer. When the partial electrode is close to the clamped end, the low-frequency and resonance MEVC are 22% and 45% higher, respectively, than for fully electroded bilayer. According to the model discussed here these observations could be attributed to non-uniform stress along the sample length under flexural deformation. Such deformations are stronger at the free-end than at the clamped-end, thereby reducing the stress produced by applied magnetic fields and a reduction in MEVC. Estimates of MEVC are in good agreement with the data.

  11. Electron heating enhancement due to plasma series resonance in a capacitively coupled RF discharge: Electrical modeling and comparison to experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Minglu; Lu, Yijia; Cheng, Jia; Ji, Linhong

    2016-09-01

    The electron heating enhancement due to the self-excitation of the plasma series resonance in capacitively coupled plasmas is revisited by a combination of an equivalent circuit model and experiments. To improve the model accuracy, measured voltage waveforms at the powered electrode are used instead of prescribing a sinusoidal voltage supply in series with a bias capacitance. The results calculated from the electrical model are consistent with the experimental measurements performed by a Langmuir probe with verification of a microwave interferometer, at pressures of 0.2 and 0.3 Torr. High harmonics occurring in the discharge currents agree with observations in previous research. The nonlinear plasma series resonance effect is found to have a notable contribution to both ohmic and stochastic heating evaluated by the electron heating efficiencies.

  12. Giant electric field control of magnetism and narrow ferromagnetic resonance linewidth in FeCoSiB/Si/SiO2/PMN-PT multiferroic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Wang, X.; Xie, L.; Hu, Z.; Lin, H.; Zhou, Z.; Nan, T.; Yang, X.; Howe, B. M.; Jones, J. G.; Brown, G. J.; Sun, N. X.

    2016-06-01

    It has been challenging to achieve combined strong magnetoelectric coupling and narrow ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) linewidth in multiferroic heterostructures. Electric field induced large effective field of 175 Oe and narrow FMR linewidth of 40 Oe were observed in FeCoSiB/Si/SiO2/PMN-PT heterostructures with substrate clamping effect minimized through removing the Si substrate. As a comparison, FeCoSiB/PMN-PT heterostructures with FeCoSiB film directly deposited on PMN-PT showed a comparable voltage induced effective magnetic field but a significantly larger FMR linewidth of 283 Oe. These multiferroic heterostructures exhibiting combined giant magnetoelectric coupling and narrow ferromagnetic resonance linewidth offer great opportunities for integrated voltage tunable RF magnetic devices.

  13. Electrically detected double electron-electron resonance: exchange interaction of ?P donors and P? defects at the Si/SiO? interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suckert, Max; Hoehne, Felix; Dreher, Lukas; Kuenzl, Markus; Huebl, Hans; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S.

    2013-10-01

    We study the coupling of P? dangling bond defects at the Si/SiO2 interface and 31P donors in an epitaxial layer directly underneath using electrically detected double electron-electron resonance (EDDEER). An exponential decay of the EDDEER signal is observed, which is attributed to a broad distribution of exchange coupling strengths J/2π from 25 kHz to 3 MHz. Comparison of the experimental data with a numerical simulation of the exchange coupling shows that this range of coupling strengths corresponds to 31P-P? distances ranging from 14 nm to 20 nm.

  14. Coupled optical and electrical study of thin-film InGaAs photodetector integrated with surface InP Mie resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Dong; Liu, Jietao; Song, Jiakun; Yu, Hailong; Zhang, Zuyin; Wang, Wenbo; Xu, Yun; Song, Guofeng; Wei, Xin

    2016-03-01

    High-index dielectric and semiconductor nanostructures with characteristics of low absorption loss and artificially controlled scattering properties have grasped an increasing attention for improving the performance of thin-film photovoltaic devices. In this work, combined optical and electrical simulations were performed for thin-film InP/In0.53Ga0.47As/InP hetero-junction photodetector with periodically arranged InP nano-cylinders in the in-coupling configuration. It is found that the carefully designed InP nano-cylinders possess strongly substrate-coupled Mie resonances and can effectively couple incident light into the guided mode, both of which significantly increase optical absorption. Further study from the electrical aspects shows that enhancement of external quantum efficiency is as high as 82% and 83% in the configurations with the optimized nano-cylinders and the optimized period, respectively. Moreover, we demonstrate that the integration of InP nano-cylinders does not degrade the electrical performance, since the surface recombination is effectively suppressed by separating the absorber layer where carriers generate and the air/semiconductor interface. The comprehensive modeling including optical and electrical perspectives provides a more practical description for device performance than the optical-only simulation and is expected to advance the design of thin-film absorber layer based optoelectronic devices for fast response and high efficiency.

  15. Combined electrical and resonant optical excitation characterization of multi-quantum well InGaN-based light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presa, S.; Maaskant, P. P.; Kappers, M. J.; Humphreys, C. J.; Corbett, B.

    2016-07-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the emission spectra and electrical characteristics of InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well light-emitting diode (LED) structures under resonant optical pumping and varying electrical bias. A 5 quantum well LED with a thin well (1.5 nm) and a relatively thick barrier (6.6 nm) shows strong bias-dependent properties in the emission spectra, poor photovoltaic carrier escape under forward bias and an increase in effective resistance when compared with a 10 quantum well LED with a thin (4 nm) barrier. These properties are due to a strong piezoelectric field in the well and associated reduced field in the thicker barrier. We compare the voltage ideality factors for the LEDs under electrical injection, light emission with current, photovoltaic mode (PV) and photoluminescence (PL) emission. The PV and PL methods provide similar values for the ideality which are lower than for the resistance-limited electrical method. Under optical pumping the presence of an n-type InGaN underlayer in a commercial LED sample is shown to act as a second photovoltaic source reducing the photovoltage and the extracted ideality factor to less than 1. The use of photovoltaic measurements together with bias-dependent spectrally resolved luminescence is a powerful method to provide valuable insights into the dynamics of GaN LEDs.

  16. An Overview of Thunderstorm-Related Research on the Atmospheric Electric Field, Schumann Resonances, Sprites, and the Ionosphere at Sopron, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sátori, Gabriella; Rycroft, Michael; Bencze, Pál; Märcz, Ferenc; Bór, József; Barta, Veronika; Nagy, Tamás; Kovács, Károly

    2013-05-01

    This paper gives a resume of the papers written in English which (a) describe some of the recording instruments in use at the Nagycenk Observatory (NCK) since the International Geophysical Year (IGY 1957-1958) and up to the present time, (b) summarise the most important and different types of observations associated with thunderstorms which have been made there, and (c) discuss their various geophysical interpretations. The paper describes the main results which have been obtained in four areas of thunderstorm associated atmospheric and geospace science within the context of Earth system science. These relate to the following parameters of atmospheric electricity: the vertical electric potential gradient just above the Earth's surface and the air-Earth current as well as the point discharge current, Schumann resonance (SR) signals of the Earth-ionosphere cavity at 8, 14 and 20 Hz, transient luminous events (TLEs), and some aspects of the behaviour of the ionosphere. Deductions from these data sets are concerned with the global lightning activity and the conductivity of the air, with diurnal, seasonal, annual and long-term variations of the SR amplitudes and resonant frequencies in terms of migrating thunderstorm centres, with transient SR excitations and with sprites and other TLEs, and with ionospheric disturbances. The paper closes with some thoughts on future research directions based on the observations at NCK and Sopron and the results achieved since the IGY.

  17. Innovative Free-range Resonant Electrical Energy Delivery system (FREE-D System) for a ventricular assist device using wireless power.

    PubMed

    Waters, Benjamin H; Smith, Joshua R; Bonde, Pramod

    2014-01-01

    Technological innovation of a smaller, single moving part has an advantage over earlier large pulsatile ventricular assist devices (VADs) prone to mechanical failure. Drivelines limit the potential for extended patient survival durations with newer pumps and act as source for infection, increased morbidity, rehospitalizations, and reduced quality of life. The Free-range Resonant Electrical Energy Delivery (FREE-D) wireless power system uses magnetically coupled resonators to efficiently transfer power. We demonstrate the efficiency over distance of this system. The experimental setup consists of an radiofrequency amplifier and control board which drives the transmit resonator coil, and a receiver unit consisting of a resonant coil attached to a radiofrequency rectifier and power management module. The power management module supplies power to the axial pump, which was set at 9,600 rpm. To achieve a seamless wireless delivery in any room size, we introduced a third relay coil. This relay coil can be installed throughout a room, whereas a single relay coil could be built into a jacket worn by the patient, which would always be within range of the receive coil implanted in the patient's body. The power was delivered over a meter distance without interruptions or fluctuations with coil, rectifier, and regulator efficiency more than 80% and overall system efficiency of 61%. The axial pump worked well throughout the 8 hours of continuous operation. Having same setup on the opposite side can double the distance. A tether-free operation of a VAD can be achieved by FREE-D system in room-size distances. It has the potential to make the VAD therapy more acceptable from the patient perspective. PMID:24299972

  18. Influence of surface plasmon resonances of silver nanoparticles on optical and electrical properties of textured silicon solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Sardana, Sanjay K.; Chava, Venkata S. N.; Thouti, Eshwar; Chander, Nikhil; Komarala, Vamsi K.; Kumar, Sanjai; Reddy, S. R.

    2014-02-17

    Here, we report average reflectance reduction of ∼8% in wavelength range of 300–1100 nm after coupling surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) of silver nanoparticles (NPs) to textured silicon (T-Si) surface. The enhancement of photocurrent from T-Si solar cell in off-resonant SPR region observed due to better radiative efficiency of NPs leading to outflow of scattered far-field into silicon maximized power generating electrons. Improvement in series resistance, fill factor, and open-circuit voltage (insensitive NPs size and morphology) are also observed with NPs along with photocurrent enhancement (sensitive to NPs sizes), which resulted cell efficiency enhancement from 4.49% to 6.42% for large area of 12.24 cm{sup 2}.

  19. Influence of surface plasmon resonances of silver nanoparticles on optical and electrical properties of textured silicon solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardana, Sanjay K.; Chava, Venkata S. N.; Thouti, Eshwar; Chander, Nikhil; Kumar, Sanjai; Reddy, S. R.; Komarala, Vamsi K.

    2014-02-01

    Here, we report average reflectance reduction of ˜8% in wavelength range of 300-1100 nm after coupling surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) of silver nanoparticles (NPs) to textured silicon (T-Si) surface. The enhancement of photocurrent from T-Si solar cell in off-resonant SPR region observed due to better radiative efficiency of NPs leading to outflow of scattered far-field into silicon maximized power generating electrons. Improvement in series resistance, fill factor, and open-circuit voltage (insensitive NPs size and morphology) are also observed with NPs along with photocurrent enhancement (sensitive to NPs sizes), which resulted cell efficiency enhancement from 4.49% to 6.42% for large area of 12.24 cm2.

  20. Control of Ferromagnetic Resonance Frequency and Frequency Linewidth by Electrical Fields in FeCo/[Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3]0.68-[PbTiO3]0.32(011) Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuoc, Nguyen N.; Ong, C. K.

    2016-06-01

    We report our detailed investigation of the electrical tuning of the ferromagnetic resonance frequency and frequency linewidth in multiferroic heterostructures consisting of FeCo thin films grown onto [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3) O3]0.68-[PbTiO3]0.32 (PMN-PT) substrates with NiFe underlayers. Our study shows that the electrical tuning range of both ferromagnetic resonance frequency and frequency linewidth in this FeCo/PMN-PT heterostructure can be very large. Specifically, the resonance frequency can be tuned from 1.8 GHz to 10.3 GHz, and the frequency linewidth can be changed from 1.6 GHz to 7.3 GHz. The electrical tuning of these microwave properties is discussed in conjunction with the result from the static magnetic characterization and is explained based on the strain-driven magnetoelectric heterostructured effect.

  1. Gradient-based Electrical Properties Tomography (gEPT): a Robust Method for Mapping Electrical Properties of Biological Tissues In Vivo Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiaen; Zhang, Xiaotong; Schmitter, Sebastian; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; He, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop high-resolution electrical properties tomography (EPT) methods and investigate a gradient-based EPT (gEPT) approach which aims to reconstruct the electrical properties (EP), including conductivity and permittivity, of an imaged sample from experimentally measured B1 maps with improved boundary reconstruction and robustness against measurement noise. Theory and Methods Using a multi-channel transmit/receive stripline head coil, with acquired B1 maps for each coil element, by assuming negligible Bz component compared to transverse B1 components, a theory describing the relationship between B1 field, EP value and their spatial gradient has been proposed. The final EP images were obtained through spatial integration over the reconstructed EP gradient. Numerical simulation, physical phantom and in vivo human experiments at 7 T have been conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed methods. Results Reconstruction results were compared with target EP values in both simulations and phantom experiments. Human experimental results were compared with EP values in literature. Satisfactory agreement was observed with improved boundary reconstruction. Importantly, the proposed gEPT method proved to be more robust against noise when compared to previously described non-gradient-based EPT approaches. Conclusion The proposed gEPT approach holds promises to improve EP mapping quality by recovering the boundary information and enhancing robustness against noise. PMID:25213371

  2. Theory of X-ray absorption and resonant X-ray emission spectra by electric quadrupole excitation in light rare-earth systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, M.; Fukui, K.; Kotani, A.

    2003-02-01

    We have made precise theoretical calculations for both 2 p3/2→4 f X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and 4 d→2 p3/2 resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) by electric quadrupole excitations at the L3 edge of light rare-earth elements, by means of atomic model with full multiplet effects. The calculation is based on the second-order optical formula, and the effect of the incident photon polarization is taken into account. It is shown that the 4 d-4 f interaction plays a more important role in 4 d→2 p3/2 RXES than the 4 f-4 f interaction does. Moreover, the calculated results of 4 d→2 p3/2 RXES show the strong polarization dependence, and it is originated from the spin multiplicity, which is derived from the 4 d-4 f interaction, of the RXES final states.

  3. Dependence of electrically detected magnetic resonance signal shape from iron-contaminated silicon wafers on the thermal treatment of the samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mchedlidze, T.; Matsumoto, K.; Lin, T.-C.; Suezawa, M.

    1999-12-01

    The shape of the electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) signal from iron-contaminated Czochralski-grown silicon (CZ-Si) samples strongly depends on the thermal treatments applied to the samples before and after the contamination procedure, although the average g-value of the spectra apparently does not vary. A signal from an iron-contaminated float-zone grown silicon (FZ-Si) sample was detected employing an EDMR signal detection unit with enhanced sensitivity. For similar contamination levels, the signal from the FZ-Si sample has amplitude about {1}/{45} that of the CZ-Si signal and has specific shape. Further study of the EDMR signals from iron-contaminated Si samples will be useful for the investigation of gettering and recombination processes in Si wafers. Besides that, dependence of the EDMR spectrum shape on the thermal processes employed can help to pinpoint the process responsible for wafer contamination during semiconductor device fabrication.

  4. Nonresonant and resonant cloaking of an electrically large dielectric spherical object by a multilayer isotropic metamaterial cover.

    PubMed

    Abouelsaood, Ahmed; Afifi, Islam; Eshrah, Islam

    2015-07-20

    Mie theory and genetic algorithms are used to determine the parameters and performance of cloaks made of homogeneous isotropic metamaterials that would hide a spherical dielectric object of size comparable to the incident radiation wavelength. A single-layer (SL) cover with negative permittivity and permeability can produce a much greater reduction in the extinction efficiency than one with the permittivity and permeability of positive or opposite signs. Minimization of the extinction efficiency in the former case leads to both nonresonant and resonant solutions. Adding a second layer to the cover can lead to a significant enhancement of the bandwidth, but only to a modest reduction in the extinction efficiency at the design wavelength. In the SL case, Debye's scattering series is used to show that the nonresonant and resonant minima of the extinction efficiency correspond to scattering phase shifts approximately equal to zero and -π, respectively, and to understand the simple approximate expressions for the cloak parameters of the nonresonant solutions. The series also explains the value of the outer radius of a multilayer cloak, provides a link to a previously studied isotropic approximation to a transformation optics cloak, and indicates that a cloak consisting of an odd number of alternate double-negative and double-positive layers will probably give the best possible performance. PMID:26367849

  5. Aqueous flat-cells perpendicular to the electric field for use in electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, II: design.

    PubMed

    Sidabras, Jason W; Mett, Richard R; Hyde, James S

    2005-02-01

    This paper builds on the work of Mett and Hyde [J. Magn. Reson. 165 (2003) 137]. Various aqueous flat-cell geometries in the perpendicular orientation have been studied using Ansoft High Frequency Structure Simulator (version 9.0, Pittsburgh, PA) and Computer Simulation Technology Microwave Studio (version 5.0, Wellesley Hills, MA). The analytic theory of Mett and Hyde has been refined to predict optimum dimensions of multiple sample cell structures including the effect of the sample holder dielectric properties and the interaction of the cells with each other on EPR signal strength. From these calculations and simulations we propose a practical multiple cell sample structure for use in commercial rectangular TE102 cavities that yields 2.0-2.3 times higher sensitivity relative to a single flat-cell in the nodal orientation. We also describe a modified TE102 resonator design with square rather than cylindrical sample-access stacks that is predicted to give a factor of 2.2-2.7 enhancement in EPR signal strength of a single flat-cell in the nodal orientation. These signal enhancements are predicted with sample holders fabricated from polytetrafluoroethylene. Additional improvement in EPR signal of up to 75% can be achieved by using sample holder materials with lower dielectric constants. PMID:15649761

  6. Characterization of PMN-PT piezoelectric single crystal and PMN-PT 1-3 composite at elevated temperatures by electrical impedance resonance analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhengbin; Xi, Kui

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) piezoelectric single crystal and its 1-3 composite counterpart were characterized and analyzed under different stable temperatures using both a Simulated Annealing (SA) optimization algorithm and the commercial software PRAP (Piezoelectric Resonance Analysis Program). Electrical impedance resonance characteristics of the two material samples over the range 25-125 °C were measured. The correlation between experimental data and numerical fits derived from both SA and PRAP is considered. Calculation of the determination coefficient (R1(2)) between numerically fitted and measured results is above 95% for both methods. Furthermore, variations in the number of data values used for the fit introduced no more than 3.1% uncertainty on the calculated material parameters. It is found that the complex material parameters of PMN-PT composite are more dependent on temperature than the single crystal. The phase transition of the PMN-PT, which is close to 90 °C, has an effect on the high temperature material characteristics of both piezoelectric materials. These calculated complex material parameters can be used for the design of ultrasonic transducers for elevated temperature applications. PMID:24495996

  7. Using nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance and electric field gradient information for the study of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Iselin, L.H.

    1995-12-01

    Nitrogen-14 nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) was used in an attempt to detect the effects of ionizing radiation on organic material. Previously reported resonances for urea were detected at 2,913.32 {+-} 0.01 kHz and 2,347.88 {+-} 0.08 kHz with associated T{sub 2}* values 780 {+-} 20 {micro}s and 523 {+-} 24 {micro}s, respectively. The previously unreported {nu}{sub {minus}} line for urea-d{sup 4} was detected at 2,381 {+-} 0.04 Khz and used to determine accurately for the first time the values for the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant {chi} (3,548.74 {+-} 0.03 kHz) and the asymmetry parameter {eta} (0.31571 {+-} 0.00007) for urea-d{sup 4}. The inverse linewidth parameter T{sub 2}* for {nu}{sub +} was measured at 928 {+-} 23 {micro}s and for {nu}{sub {minus}} at 721 {+-} 12 {micro}s. Townes and Dailey analysis was performed and urea-d{sup 4} exhibits a 0.004 increase in lone pair electronic density and a slight decrease in N-H bond electronic density, as compared to urea, probably due to the mass difference. A relationship is proposed, referred to as NQR linewidth analysis, between the dynamic spin relaxation times T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* and the widths of the distributions of the NQR parameters. Linewidth analysis is presented as a tool for possible use in future NQR work in all area, not just radiation effects. This relationship is tested using sodium nitrite T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* values for {nu}{sub {minus}} and {nu}{sub {minus}} as a function of temperature.

  8. Observation of the 5 p3 /2→6 p3 /2 electric-dipole-forbidden transition in atomic rubidium using optical-optical double-resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponciano-Ojeda, F.; Hernández-Gómez, S.; López-Hernández, O.; Mojica-Casique, C.; Colín-Rodríguez, R.; Ramírez-Martínez, F.; Flores-Mijangos, J.; Sahagún, D.; Jáuregui, R.; Jiménez-Mier, J.

    2015-10-01

    Direct evidence of excitation of the 5 p3 /2→6 p3 /2 electric-dipole-forbidden transition in atomic rubidium is presented. The experiments were performed in a room-temperature rubidium cell with continuous-wave external cavity diode lasers. Optical-optical double-resonance spectroscopy with counterpropagating beams allows the detection of the nondipole transition free of Doppler broadening. The 5 p3 /2 state is prepared by excitation with a laser locked to the maximum F cyclic transition of the D2 line, and the forbidden transition is produced by excitation with a 911 nm laser. Production of the forbidden transition is monitored by detection of the 420 nm fluorescence that results from decay of the 6 p3 /2 state. Spectra with three narrow lines (≈13 MHz FWHM) with the characteristic F -1 , F , and F +1 splitting of the 6 p3 /2 hyperfine structure in both rubidium isotopes were obtained. The results are in very good agreement with a direct calculation that takes into account the 5 s →5 p3 /2 preparation dynamics, the 5 p3 /2→6 p3 /2 nondipole excitation geometry, and the 6 p3 /2→5 s1 /2 decay. The comparison also shows that the electric-dipole-forbidden transition is a very sensitive probe of the preparation dynamics.

  9. Quantitative analysis of the reconstruction errors of the currently popular algorithm of magnetic resonance electrical property tomography at the interfaces of adjacent tissues.

    PubMed

    Duan, Song; Xu, Chao; Deng, Guanhua; Wang, Jiajia; Liu, Feng; Xin, Sherman Xuegang

    2016-06-01

    This work quantitatively analyzed the reconstruction errors (REs) of electrical property (EP) images using a currently popular algorithm of magnetic resonance electrical property tomography (MREPT), which occurred along the tissue interfaces. Transmitted magnetic fields B1+ were acquired at 3 T using a birdcage coil loaded with a phantom consisting of various adjacent tissues. Homogeneous Helmholtz was employed to calculate the EP maps by Laplacian computation of central differences. The maps of absolute REs (aREs) and relative REs (rREs) were calculated. The maximum and mean rREs, in addition to rRE distributions at the interfaces, were presented. Reconstructed EP maps showed various REs along different interface boundaries. Among all the investigated tissue interfaces, the kidney-fat interface presented the maximum mean rREs for both conductivity and relative permittivity. The minimum mean rRE of conductivity was observed at the spleen-muscle interface, and the minimum mean rRE of relative permittivity was detected along the lung-heart interface. The mean rREs ranged from 0.3986 to 36.11 for conductivity and 0.2218 to 11.96 for relative permittivity. Overall, this research indicates that different REs occur at various tissue boundaries, as shown by the currently popular algorithm of MREPT. Thus, REs should be considered when applying MREPT to reconstruct the EP distributions inside the human body. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27037715

  10. Acupuncture-Related Modulation of Pain-Associated Brain Networks During Electrical Pain Stimulation: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung-Eun; Gizewski, Elke R.; Wen, Ming; Rampp, Thomas; Gasser, Thomas; Dobos, Gustav J.; Forsting, Michael; Musial, Frauke

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Findings of existing functional MRI (fMRI) studies on the neural mechanisms that mediate effects of acupuncture analgesia are inconsistent. This study analyzes the effects of manual acupuncture on pain ratings and brain activation in response to experimental, electrical pain stimuli. Design: Fourteen healthy volunteers were examined by using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. The intensity of pain stimuli was adjusted to individual pain ratings on a numeric rating scale. Baseline fMRI was performed during electrical pain stimulation in a blocked design. For the second session, manual acupuncture with repeated stimulation was performed on contralateral acupoints—large intestine 4, liver 3, and stomach 36—before imaging. After imaging, subjective pain ratings and ratings of the de qi sensation were assessed. Results: Compared with baseline, volunteers showed modulated brain activity under pain conditions in the cingulate gyrus, insula, primary somatosensory cortex, and prefrontal areas after the acupuncture session. In accordance with the literature, anterior insular and prefrontal activity seemed to be correlated with acupuncture treatment. Conclusion: This study supports the existence of analgesic acupuncture effects that outlast the needling period. Pain-associated brain areas were modulated in direct response to a preceding acupuncture treatment. PMID:25389905

  11. Anomalous Solute Transport in Saturated Porous Media: Linking Transport Model Parameters to Electrical and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, R. D.; Binley, A. M.; Keating, K.; France, S.; Osterman, G. K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.

    2013-12-01

    The advection-dispersion equation fails to describe non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models. The dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) model partitions the total porosity into mobile and less-mobile domains with solute exchange between the domains; consequently, the DDMT model can produce a better fit to breakthrough curves (BTCs) in systems defined by more- and less-mobile components. However, direct experimental estimation of DDMT model parameters such as rate of exchange and the mobile and less-mobile porosities remains elusive. Consequently, model parameters are often calculated purely as a model fitting exercise. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can offer some insight into the pore space geometrical arrangement, particularly if such techniques can be extended to the field scale. Here, we interpret static direct-current (DC) resistivity, complex resistivity (CR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) geophysical measurements in the characterization of mass transfer parameters. We use two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material shown to demonstrate solute mass transfer due to a significant intragranular porosity, along with glass beads as a control. We explore the relation between geophysical and DDMT parameters in conjunction with supporting material characterization methods. Our results reveal how these geophysical measurements can offer some insight into the pore structures controlling the observed anomalous transport behavior.

  12. Modeling of resonant magneto-electric effect in a magnetostrictive and piezoelectric laminate composite structure coupled by a bonding material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanyan, D.; Wang, Y.; Gao, J.; Li, M.; Shen, Y.; Li, J.; Viehland, D.

    2012-09-01

    The harmonic magneto-electro-elastic vibration of a thin laminated composite was considered. A theoretical model, including shear lag and vibration effects was developed for predicting the magneto-electric (ME) effect in a laminate composite consisting of magnetostrictive and piezoelectric layers. To avoid bending, we assumed that the composite was geometrically symmetric. For finite length symmetrically fabricated laminates, we derived the dynamic strain-stress field and ME coefficients, including shear lag and vibration effects for several boundary conditions. Parametric studies are presented to evaluate the influences of material properties and geometries on the strain distribution and the ME coefficient. Analytical expressions indicate that the shear lag and the vibration frequency strongly influence the strain distribution in the laminates and these effects strongly influence the ME coefficients.

  13. Electrical surface-resistivity, dielectric resonance, polarization and magnetic properties of Bi0.5Sr0.5FeO3-δ thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balamurugan, K.; Ramachandran, B.; Krishna Surendra, M.; Kumar, N. Harish; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.; Santhosh, P. N.

    2014-09-01

    Polycrystalline and highly preferred (1\\,0\\,\\bar{{2}}) orientated Bi0.5Sr0.5FeO3-δ thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on n-Si (2 0 0) and MgO (2 0 0) single crystalline substrates respectively. The thin films were inspected using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy techniques. The electrical surface-resistivity, dielectric resonance, electric polarization, and magnetic properties of the thin films were studied. At room temperature, depending on deposition conditions, the polycrystalline thin films grown on n-Si substrates were found to exhibit an electrical surface-resistivity of the order of 103-106 Ω, a piezoelectric resonance in the frequency range of about 25-26 MHz, a relaxor-type ferroelectric hysteresis with a maximum polarization of 0.015-0.055 µC cm-2 and magnetic hysteresis. Similarly, the thin films grown on MgO substrates exhibited an electrical surface-resistivity of the order of 109 Ω, multiple piezoelectric resonances in the frequency range of about 8-45 MHz, a linear variation of polarization with applied electric field and either a linearly varying magnetization or magnetic hysteresis which depends on the deposition conditions.

  14. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the rat cerebellum during electrical stimulation of the fore- and hindpaw at 7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, Ronald; Verhoye, Marleen; Vos, Bart; De Schutter, Erik; Van der Linden, Anne-Marie

    1999-05-01

    Blood oxygenation level dependent contrast (BOLD) functional MRI responses at 7T were observed in the cerebellum of alpha- chloralose anesthetized rats in response to innocuous electrical stimulation of a forepaw or hindpaw. The responses were imaged in both coronal and sagittal slices which allowed for a clear delineation and localization of the observed activations. We demonstrate the validity of our fMRI protocol by imaging the responses in somatosensory cortex to the same stimuli and by showing a high level of reproducibility of the cerebellar responses. Widespread bilateral activations were found with mainly a patchy and medio-lateral band organization, more pronounced ipsilaterally. There was no overlap between the cerebellar activations caused by forepaw or hindpaw stimulation. Most remarkable was the overall horizontal organization of these responses: for both stimulation paradigms the patches and bands of activation were roughly positioned in either a cranial or caudal plane running antero-posteriorly through the whole cerebellum. This is the first fMRI study in the cerebellum of the rat. We relate our findings to the known projection patterns found with other techniques and to human fMRI studies. The horizontal organization found wasn't observed before in other studies using other techniques.

  15. Electric-dipole moment of CaF by molecular-beam, laser-rf, double-resonance study of Stark splittings

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, W.J.; Goodman, L.S.; Nielsen, U.; Pfeufer, V.

    1984-01-01

    The electronic structure of diatomic molecules is much more complex for open-shell sytems (radicals) than for the normal closed-shell systems, and the development of an adequate theoretical understanding will require a substantial upgrading of experimental knowledge in both quality and quantity. The alkaline-earth monohalide family of radicals, with only a single electron outside closed-shell cores, would appear to be a logical starting point for such studies, and there has been a great increase in work in this area in the last few years in spite of the special difficulties of working with free radicals. As the work of measuring the vibrational and rotational structure of the electronic states has become more complete, attention has turned to study of the much weaker spin-rotation and hyperfine interactions. Within the last three years, these interactions have been studied systematically at high precision in the calcium monohalide family with the molecular-beam, laser-rf double-resonance technique. The same method has now been modified and extended to make possible measurement of the electric-dipole moments of these molecules through observation of the Stark splittings of radiofrequency transitions. It is hoped that when considered together, the several types of data will make it possible to understand the ground-state electronic wave functions of these molecules at least qualitatively. 2 figures.

  16. Effect of a weak static magnetic field on nitrogen-14 quadrupole resonance in the case of an axially symmetric electric field gradient tensor.

    PubMed

    Guendouz, Laouès; Aissani, Sarra; Marêché, Jean-François; Retournard, Alain; Marande, Pierre-Louis; Canet, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The application of a weak static B0 magnetic field (less than 1 mT) may produce a well-defined splitting of the (14)N Quadrupole Resonance line when the electric field gradient tensor at the nitrogen nucleus level is of axial symmetry. It is theoretically shown and experimentally confirmed that the actual splitting (when it exists) as well as the line-shape and the signal intensity depends on three factors: (i) the amplitude of B0, (ii) the amplitude and pulse duration of the radio-frequency field, B1, used for detecting the NQR signal, and (iii) the relative orientation of B0 and B1. For instance, when B0 is parallel to B1 and regardless of the B0 value, the signal intensity is three times larger than when B0 is perpendicular to B1. This point is of some importance in practice since NQR measurements are almost always performed in the earth field. Moreover, in the course of this study, it has been recognized that important pieces of information regarding line-shape are contained in data points at the beginning of the free induction decay (fid) which, in practice, are eliminated for avoiding spurious signals due to probe ringing. It has been found that these data points can generally be retrieved by linear prediction (LP) procedures. As a further LP benefit, the signal intensity loss (by about a factor of three) is regained. PMID:24183810

  17. Single-resonator double-negative metamaterial

    DOEpatents

    Warne, Larry K.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Langston, William L.; Johnson, William A.; Ihlefeld, Jon; Ginn, III, James C.; Clem, Paul G.; Sinclair, Michael B.

    2016-06-21

    Resonances can be tuned in dielectric resonators in order to construct single-resonator, negative-index metamaterials. For example, high-contrast inclusions in the form of metallic dipoles can be used to shift the first electric resonance down (in frequency) to the first magnetic resonance, or alternatively, air splits can be used to shift the first magnetic resonance up (in frequency) near the first electric resonance. Degenerate dielectric designs become especially useful in infrared- or visible-frequency applications where the resonator sizes associated with the lack of high-permittivity materials can become of sufficient size to enable propagation of higher-order lattice modes in the resulting medium.

  18. Resonances and resonance widths

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-05-01

    Two-dimensional betatron resonances are much more important than their simple one-dimensional counterparts and exhibit a strong dependence on the betatron phase advance per cell. A practical definition of ''width'' is expanded upon in order to display these relations in tables. A primarily pedagogical introduction is given to explain the tables, and also to encourage a wider capability for deriving resonance behavior and wider use of ''designer'' resonances.

  19. ¹⁴N Quadrupole Resonance line broadening due to the earth magnetic field, occuring only in the case of an axially symmetric electric field gradient tensor.

    PubMed

    Aissani, Sarra; Guendouz, Laouès; Marande, Pierre-Louis; Canet, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    As demonstrated before, the application of a weak static B0 magnetic field (less than 10 G) may produce definite effects on the ¹⁴N Quadrupole Resonance line when the electric field gradient tensor at the nitrogen nucleus level is of axial symmetry. Here, we address more precisely the problem of the relative orientation of the two magnetic fields (the static field and the radio-frequency field of the pure NQR experiment). For a field of 6G, the evolution of the signal intensity, as a function of this relative orientation, is in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions. There is in particular an intensity loss by a factor of three when going from the parallel configuration to the perpendicular configuration. By contrast, when dealing with a very weak magnetic field (as the earth field, around 0.5 G), this effect drops to ca. 1.5 in the case Hexamethylenetetramine (HMT).This is explained by the fact that the Zeeman shift (due to the very weak magnetic field) becomes comparable to the natural line-width. The latter can therefore be determined by accounting for this competition. Still in the case of HMT, the estimated natural line-width is half the observed line-width. The extra broadening is thus attributed to earth magnetic field. The latter constitutes therefore the main cause of the difference between the natural transverse relaxation time (T₂) and the transverse relaxation time derived from the observed line-width (T₂(⁎)). PMID:25910551

  20. Evaluation and optimization of quartz resonant-frequency retuned fork force sensors with high Q factors, and the associated electric circuits, for non-contact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Fujii, Mikihiro; Tomitori, Masahiko; Arai, Toyoko

    2016-02-01

    High-Q factor retuned fork (RTF) force sensors made from quartz tuning forks, and the electric circuits for the sensors, were evaluated and optimized to improve the performance of non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) performed under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. To exploit the high Q factor of the RTF sensor, the oscillation of the RTF sensor was excited at its resonant frequency, using a stray capacitance compensation circuit to cancel the excitation signal leaked through the stray capacitor of the sensor. To improve the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio in the detected signal, a small capacitor was inserted before the input of an operational (OP) amplifier placed in an UHV chamber, which reduced the output noise from the amplifier. A low-noise, wideband OP amplifier produced a superior S/N ratio, compared with a precision OP amplifier. The thermal vibrational density spectra of the RTF sensors were evaluated using the circuit. The RTF sensor with an effective spring constant value as low as 1000 N/m provided a lower minimum detection limit for force differentiation. A nc-AFM image of a Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was produced with atomic resolution using the RTF sensor in a constant frequency shift mode; tunneling current and energy dissipation images with atomic resolution were also simultaneously produced. The high-Q factor RTF sensor showed potential for the high sensitivity of energy dissipation as small as 1 meV/cycle and the high-resolution analysis of non-conservative force interactions. PMID:26931855

  1. Evaluation and optimization of quartz resonant-frequency retuned fork force sensors with high Q factors, and the associated electric circuits, for non-contact atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Fujii, Mikihiro; Tomitori, Masahiko; Arai, Toyoko

    2016-02-01

    High-Q factor retuned fork (RTF) force sensors made from quartz tuning forks, and the electric circuits for the sensors, were evaluated and optimized to improve the performance of non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) performed under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. To exploit the high Q factor of the RTF sensor, the oscillation of the RTF sensor was excited at its resonant frequency, using a stray capacitance compensation circuit to cancel the excitation signal leaked through the stray capacitor of the sensor. To improve the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio in the detected signal, a small capacitor was inserted before the input of an operational (OP) amplifier placed in an UHV chamber, which reduced the output noise from the amplifier. A low-noise, wideband OP amplifier produced a superior S/N ratio, compared with a precision OP amplifier. The thermal vibrational density spectra of the RTF sensors were evaluated using the circuit. The RTF sensor with an effective spring constant value as low as 1000 N/m provided a lower minimum detection limit for force differentiation. A nc-AFM image of a Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was produced with atomic resolution using the RTF sensor in a constant frequency shift mode; tunneling current and energy dissipation images with atomic resolution were also simultaneously produced. The high-Q factor RTF sensor showed potential for the high sensitivity of energy dissipation as small as 1 meV/cycle and the high-resolution analysis of non-conservative force interactions.

  2. Combined electrical resistivity tomography and magnetic resonance sounding investigation of the surface-water/groundwater interaction in the Urema Graben, Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirindja, F. J.; Dahlin, T.; Perttu, N.; Steinbruch, F.; Owen, R.

    2016-05-01

    This study focusses on the hydrogeology of Urema Graben, especially possible interactions between surface water and groundwater around Lake Urema, in Gorongosa National Park (GNP). Lake Urema is the only permanent water source for wildlife inside GNP, and there are concerns that it will disappear due to interferences in surface-water/groundwater interactions as a result of changes in the hydraulic environment. As the lake is the only permanent water source, this would be a disaster for the ecosystem of the park. The sub-surface geology in Urema Graben was investigated by 20 km of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and three magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) surveys. The average depth penetration was 60 and 100 m, respectively. The location of the ERT lines was decided based on general rift morphology and therefore orientated perpendicular to Urema Graben, from the transitional areas of the margins of the Barue platform in the west to the Cheringoma plateau escarpments in the east. ERT and MRS both indicate a second aquifer, where Urema Lake is a window of the first upper semi-confined aquifer, while the lower aquifer is confined by a clay layer 30-40 m thick. The location and depth of this aquifer suggest that it is probably linked to the Pungwe River which could be a main source of recharge during the dry season. If a dam or any other infra-structure is constructed in Pungwe River upstream of GNP, the groundwater level will decrease which could lead to drying out of Urema Lake.

  3. Measurement on electrical tunability of microstrip line resonators using YBa2Cu3O7-δ/SrTiO3/MgO multilayer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seok K.; Kim, Jeha; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kang, Kwang-Yong

    1995-09-01

    We have fabricated YBa2Cu3O7-(delta ) (YBCO) superconducting line resonator and tunable line resonator on ferroelectric Sr0.5Ba0.5TiO3 (SBTO) buffered MgO(100) substrate and discussed the frequency shift mechanism of superconductor as a function of temperature and bias voltage, respectively. The resonators were designed using superconducting YBCO epitaxial thin films. Optimized resonator shown the resonant frequency of 10 GHz at 77 K. The YBCO films were grown in situ by pulsed laser deposition technique at 750 degree(s)C and oxygen partial pressure of 200 mTorr. The resonators have linear microstrip line separated by a gap of 5 micrometers and 0.5 mm, respectively. A gap is intentionally introduced to generate mainly a capacitive series reactance. The equivalence circuit of line resonator is a II network consisted of three capacitances. As the series capacitance C12 of SBTO ferroelectric thin films was changed by a bias voltage applied on the strip conductors including the gap, resonance frequency was shifted about 20 MHz from the unbiased center frequency of 10 GHz. The variation of resonance peak could be explained by a serial capacitance model. To find a central frequency mechanism depending on temperature, we fit the raw data using f(T)/f(10 K) and simple power law model. The shifting of the resonant frequencies due to temperature was fit to a two-fluid model, BCS theory and empirical formula. Also the surface impedance of superconducting YBCO films as a function of temperature at 10 GHz has been estimated by a transmission line method.

  4. Wavelength-tunable optical ring resonators

    DOEpatents

    Watts, Michael R.; Trotter, Douglas C.; Young, Ralph W.; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2009-11-10

    Optical ring resonator devices are disclosed that can be used for optical filtering, modulation or switching, or for use as photodetectors or sensors. These devices can be formed as microdisk ring resonators, or as open-ring resonators with an optical waveguide having a width that varies adiabatically. Electrical and mechanical connections to the open-ring resonators are made near a maximum width of the optical waveguide to minimize losses and thereby provide a high resonator Q. The ring resonators can be tuned using an integral electrical heater, or an integral semiconductor junction.

  5. Wavelength-tunable optical ring resonators

    DOEpatents

    Watts, Michael R.; Trotter, Douglas C.; Young, Ralph W.; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2011-07-19

    Optical ring resonator devices are disclosed that can be used for optical filtering, modulation or switching, or for use as photodetectors or sensors. These devices can be formed as microdisk ring resonators, or as open-ring resonators with an optical waveguide having a width that varies adiabatically. Electrical and mechanical connections to the open-ring resonators are made near a maximum width of the optical waveguide to minimize losses and thereby provide a high resonator Q. The ring resonators can be tuned using an integral electrical heater, or an integral semiconductor junction.

  6. A study on prevention of an electric discharge at an extraction electrode of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source for cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kishii, Y. Kawasaki, S.; Kitagawa, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Uchida, T.

    2014-02-15

    A compact ECR ion source has utilized for carbon radiotherapy. In order to increase beam intensity with higher electric field at the extraction electrode and be better ion supply stability for long periods, electric geometry and surface conditions of an extraction electrode have been studied. Focusing attention on black deposited substances on the extraction electrode, which were observed around the extraction electrode after long-term use, the relation between black deposited substances and the electrical insulation property is investigated. The black deposited substances were inspected for the thickness of deposit, surface roughness, structural arrangement examined using Raman spectroscopy, and characteristics of electric discharge in a test bench, which was set up to simulate the ECR ion source.

  7. Measurement of the internal stress and electric field in a resonating piezoelectric transformer for high-voltage applications using the electro-optic and photoelastic effects.

    PubMed

    VanGordon, James A; Kovaleski, Scott D; Norgard, Peter; Gall, Brady B; Dale, Gregory E

    2014-02-01

    The high output voltages from piezoelectric transformers are currently being used to accelerate charged particle beams for x-ray and neutron production. Traditional methods of characterizing piezoelectric transformers (PTs) using electrical probes can decrease the voltage transformation ratio of the device due to the introduction of load impedances on the order of hundreds of kiloohms to hundreds of megaohms. Consequently, an optical diagnostic was developed that used the photoelastic and electro-optic effects present in piezoelectric materials that are transparent to a given optical wavelength to determine the internal stress and electric field. The combined effects of the piezoelectric, photoelastic, and electro-optic effects result in a time-dependent change the refractive indices of the material and produce an artificially induced, time-dependent birefringence in the piezoelectric material. This induced time-dependent birefringence results in a change in the relative phase difference between the ordinary and extraordinary wave components of a helium-neon laser beam. The change in phase difference between the wave components was measured using a set of linear polarizers. The measured change in phase difference was used to calculate the stress and electric field based on the nonlinear optical properties, the piezoelectric constitutive equations, and the boundary conditions of the PT. Maximum stresses of approximately 10 MPa and electric fields of as high as 6 kV/cm were measured with the optical diagnostic. Measured results were compared to results from both a simple one-dimensional (1D) model of the piezoelectric transformer and a three-dimensional (3D) finite element model. Measured stresses and electric fields along the length of an operating length-extensional PT for two different electrical loads were within at least 50 % of 3D finite element simulated results. Additionally, the 3D finite element results were more accurate than the results from the 1D model

  8. Measurement of the internal stress and electric field in a resonating piezoelectric transformer for high-voltage applications using the electro-optic and photoelastic effects

    SciTech Connect

    VanGordon, James A.; Kovaleski, Scott D. Norgard, Peter; Gall, Brady B.; Dale, Gregory E.

    2014-02-15

    The high output voltages from piezoelectric transformers are currently being used to accelerate charged particle beams for x-ray and neutron production. Traditional methods of characterizing piezoelectric transformers (PTs) using electrical probes can decrease the voltage transformation ratio of the device due to the introduction of load impedances on the order of hundreds of kiloohms to hundreds of megaohms. Consequently, an optical diagnostic was developed that used the photoelastic and electro-optic effects present in piezoelectric materials that are transparent to a given optical wavelength to determine the internal stress and electric field. The combined effects of the piezoelectric, photoelastic, and electro-optic effects result in a time-dependent change the refractive indices of the material and produce an artificially induced, time-dependent birefringence in the piezoelectric material. This induced time-dependent birefringence results in a change in the relative phase difference between the ordinary and extraordinary wave components of a helium-neon laser beam. The change in phase difference between the wave components was measured using a set of linear polarizers. The measured change in phase difference was used to calculate the stress and electric field based on the nonlinear optical properties, the piezoelectric constitutive equations, and the boundary conditions of the PT. Maximum stresses of approximately 10 MPa and electric fields of as high as 6 kV/cm were measured with the optical diagnostic. Measured results were compared to results from both a simple one-dimensional (1D) model of the piezoelectric transformer and a three-dimensional (3D) finite element model. Measured stresses and electric fields along the length of an operating length-extensional PT for two different electrical loads were within at least 50 % of 3D finite element simulated results. Additionally, the 3D finite element results were more accurate than the results from the 1D model

  9. On the resonances and polarizabilities of split ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-García, J.; Martín, F.; Baena, J. D.; Marqués, R.; Jelinek, L.

    2005-08-01

    In this paper, the behavior at resonance of split ring resonators (SRRs) and other related topologies, such as the nonbianisotropic SRR and the broadside-coupled SRR, are studied. It is shown that these structures exhibit a fundamental resonant mode (the quasistatic resonance) and other higher-order modes which are related to dynamic processes. The excitation of these modes by means of a properly polarized time varying magnetic and/or electric fields is discussed on the basis of resonator symmetries. To verify the electromagnetic properties of these resonators, simulations based on resonance excitation by nonuniform and uniform external fields have been performed. Inspection of the currents at resonances, inferred from particle symmetries and full-wave electromagnetic simulations, allows us to predict the first-order dipolar moments induced at the different resonators and to develop a classification of the resonances based on this concept. The experimental data, obtained in SRR-loaded waveguides, are in agreement with the theory and point out the rich phenomenology associated with these planar resonant structures.

  10. Proposal of Novel Method to Measure Young’s Modulus of Materials Using Change in Motional Capacitance of the Electrical Equivalent Circuit of Quartz-Crystal Tuning-Fork Tactile Sensor at Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hideaki Itoh,; Naoki Hatakeyama,

    2010-07-01

    We propose a novel method to measure the Young’s modulus of materials using the change in motional capacitance of the electrical equivalent circuit of a quartz-crystal tuning-fork tactile sensor at resonance before and after the sensor’s base coming into contact with materials with different Young’s moduli, such as silicon rubbers and plastics. How to measure the Young’s modulus of materials using the change in motional capacitance is investigated experimentally and theoretically. By our calculation of motional capacitance and from contact experiments on silicon rubbers and plastics, we found that there was a possibility to measure the Young’s modulus of materials using the relationship between the change in motional capacitance and their Young’s modulus.