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Sample records for electrical conductance studies

  1. Thermal and electrical contact conductance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vansciver, S. W.; Nilles, M.

    1985-01-01

    Prediction of electrical and thermal contact resistance for pressed, nominally flat contacts is complicated by the large number of variables which influence contact formation. This is reflected in experimental results as a wide variation in contact resistances, spanning up to six orders of magnitude. A series of experiments were performed to observe the effects of oxidation and surface roughness on contact resistance. Electrical contact resistance and thermal contact conductance from 4 to 290 K on OFHC Cu contacts are reported. Electrical contact resistance was measured with a 4-wire DC technique. Thermal contact conductance was determined by steady-state longitudinal heat flow. Corrections for the bulk contribution ot the overall measured resistance were made, with the remaining resistance due solely to the presence of the contact.

  2. Electrical Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Philip B.

    1979-01-01

    Examines Drude's classical (1900) theory of electrical conduction, details the objections to and successes of the 1900 theory, and investigates the Quantum (1928) theory of conduction, reviewing its successes and limitations. (BT)

  3. Electrical Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.; Sand, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Explains how electrical conductivity (EC) can be used to measure ion concentration in solutions. Describes instrumentation for the measurement, temperature dependence and EC, and the EC of common substances. (PR)

  4. Structural and Electrical Study of Conducting Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaktawat, Vinodini; Dixit, Manasvi; Saxena, N. S.; Sharma, Kananbala

    2010-06-01

    Pure and oxalic acid doped conducting polymers (polyaniline and polypyrrole) were chemically synthesized using ammonium persulfate (APS) as an oxidant. These samples were characterized through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), which provides information about the surface topography of polymers. I-V characteristics have been recorded at room temperature as well as in the temperature range from 313 K to 463 K. So obtained characteristic curves were found to be linear. Temperature dependence of conductivity suggests a semiconducting nature in polyaniline samples with increase in temperature, whereas oxalic acid doped polypyrrole sample suggests a transition from semiconducting to metallic nature with the increase of temperature.

  5. Electrical studies on silver based fast ion conducting glassy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, B. Appa; Kumar, E. Ramesh; Kumari, K. Rajani; Bhikshamaiah, G.

    2014-04-01

    Among all the available fast ion conductors, silver based glasses exhibit high conductivity. Further, glasses containing silver iodide enhances fast ion conducting behavior at room temperature. Glasses of various compositions of silver based fast ion conductors in the AgI-Ag2O-[(1-x)B2O3-xTeO2] (x=0 to1 mol% in steps of 0.2) glassy system have been prepared by melt quenching method. The glassy nature of the compounds has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The electrical conductivity (AC) measurements have been carried out in the frequency range of 1 KHz-3MHz by Impedance Analyzer in the temperature range 303-423K. The DC conductivity measurements were also carried out in the temperature range 300-523K. From both AC and DC conductivity studies, it is found that the conductivity increases and activation energy decreases with increasing the concentration of TeO2 as well as with temperature. The conductivity of the present glass system is found to be of the order of 10-2 S/cm at room temperature. The ionic transport number of these glasses is found to be 0.999 indicating that these glasses can be used as electrolyte in batteries.

  6. Electrical studies on silver based fast ion conducting glassy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, B. Appa Kumar, E. Ramesh Kumari, K. Rajani Bhikshamaiah, G.

    2014-04-24

    Among all the available fast ion conductors, silver based glasses exhibit high conductivity. Further, glasses containing silver iodide enhances fast ion conducting behavior at room temperature. Glasses of various compositions of silver based fast ion conductors in the AgI−Ag{sub 2}O−[(1−x)B{sub 2}O{sub 3}−xTeO{sub 2}] (x=0 to1 mol% in steps of 0.2) glassy system have been prepared by melt quenching method. The glassy nature of the compounds has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The electrical conductivity (AC) measurements have been carried out in the frequency range of 1 KHz–3MHz by Impedance Analyzer in the temperature range 303–423K. The DC conductivity measurements were also carried out in the temperature range 300–523K. From both AC and DC conductivity studies, it is found that the conductivity increases and activation energy decreases with increasing the concentration of TeO{sub 2} as well as with temperature. The conductivity of the present glass system is found to be of the order of 10{sup −2} S/cm at room temperature. The ionic transport number of these glasses is found to be 0.999 indicating that these glasses can be used as electrolyte in batteries.

  7. Conductivity and electrical studies of plasticized carboxymethyl cellulose based proton conducting solid biopolymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isa, M. I. N.; Noor, N. A. M.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a proton conducting solid biopolymer electrolytes (SBE) comprises of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as polymer host, ammonium thiocyanate (NH4SCN) as doping salt and ethylene carbonate (EC) as plasticizer has been prepared via solution casting technique. Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was carried out to study the conductivity and electrical properties of plasticized CMC-NH4SCN SBE system over a wide range of frequency between 50 Hz and 1 MHz at temperature range of 303 to 353 K. Upon addition of plasticizer into CMC-NH4SCN SBE system, the conductivity increased from 10-5 to 10-2 Scm-1. The highest conductivity was obtained by the electrolyte containing 10 wt.% of EC. The conductivity of plasticized CMC-NH4SCN SBE system by various temperatures obeyed Arrhenius law where the ionic conductivity increased as the temperature increased. The activation energy, Ea was found to decrease with enhancement of EC concentration. Dielectric studies for the highest conductivity electrolyte obeyed non-Debye behavior. The conduction mechanism for the highest conductivity electrolyte was determined by employing Jonsher's universal power law and thus, can be represented by the quantum mechanical tunneling (QMT) model.

  8. Study for Electric Device Assembly Process Using Conductive Adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, Junji

    Electric devices with semiconductors are applied to all apparatus including substation equipment, transport machines, home electronics, and cellular phones. Power modules deal large current, and high frequency/optical modules control GHz band signals. As a result, these semiconductors have more than 100 times heat density of memory or MPU chips. Pb-rich high temperature solder and expensive Au-rich solder are applied to these modules, however, thermal stress might be a problem not only for long-term reliability but also for the initial characteristics. The authors studied the assembly of these electric devices using conductive adhesive as a substitute bonding material. We proved that atmospheric aluminum oxides caused electric resistance and that power chips with long rectangle sides over 10 mm have a much larger thermal resistance than theoretical values. We found that it is effective to scratch and remove these oxides through transferred adhesive on aluminum electrodes and to diebond them onto the solder projection previously formed on the die pads.

  9. The electrical conduction of conjugated molecular CAMs studied by a conductive atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Shin-ichi; Ogawa, Kazufumi

    2006-09-01

    Monomolecular layers containing pyrrolyl groups between two parallel Pt electrodes on a glass substrate by a chemical adsorption technique using N-[11-(trichlorosilyl)undecyl] pyrrole (PNN) were studied. Polymerization with pure water by applying a DC voltage of 10 V between the two Pt electrodes was carried out, and several electric paths were formed between the two Pt electrodes were identified. Conductive probe of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to examine the electrical polymerized paths through the surface of the polypyrrolyl group in a chemically adsorbed monomolecular layer. With a measurement volume of about 0.2 nm (thickness of the monomolecular layer) × 100 μm (the average width of an electric path) × 100 μm (the distance between the Pt electrode and the Au-covered AFM tip), the resistance at room temperature of one electric path was 5 kΩ under ambient conditions. From the results conducted in an atmosphere, the conductivity of a super-long conjugated polypyrrolyl group without any dopant in a lateral direction was ohmically estimated to be at least 5.0 × 10 5 s/m.

  10. Study of AC electrical conduction mechanisms in an epoxy polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilani, Wissal; Mzabi, Nissaf; Gallot-Lavallée, Olivier; Fourati, Najla; Zerrouki, Chouki; Zerrouki, Rachida; Guermazi, Hajer

    2015-11-01

    The AC conductivity of an epoxy resin was investigated in the frequency range 10^{-1} - 106 Hz at temperatures ranging from -100 to 120 °C. The frequency dependence of σ_{ac} was described by the law: σ_{ac}=ω \\varepsilon0\\varepsilon^''_{HN}+Aωs. The study of temperature variation of the exponent (s) reveals two conduction models: the AC conduction dependence upon temperature is governed by the small polaron tunneling mechanism (SPTM) at low temperature (-100 -60 °C) and the correlated barrier hopping (CHB) model at high temperature (80-120 °C).

  11. Electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2010-05-04

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  12. 76 FR 75875 - Plan for Conduct of 2012 Electric Transmission Congestion Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... regional workshops and request for written comments in connection with the preparation of a study of electric transmission congestion pursuant to section 216(a)(1) of the Federal Power Act (76 FR 70122). This... for Conduct of 2012 Electric Transmission Congestion Study AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery...

  13. Electric field studies: TLE-induced waveforms and ground conductivity impact on electric field propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, Thomas; Garcia, Geraldine; Blanc, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    propagation of the electromagnetic waves generated by lightning has also been studied in the frequency range 1 kHz-1MHz at distances lower than 1000 km from the lightning source. A propagation model has been developed to determine the ground waves which propagate in a homogenous medium using the analytical expression given by Maclean and Wu [1993]. This approach takes into account the electric finite conductivity and the fact that the Earth is spherical, which allow us to deal with over-the-horizon propagation. We installed in 2008 four stations which were more or less aligned - the maximum distance between two stations was about 870 km. Two stations were located close to the Mediterranean Sea and the two others inside the continent, at the centre of France. This station distribution and the observation period (from August to December) allowed statistical and physical studies, such as the influence of the electric conductivity on wave propagation. Comparison of electric field spectra, measured after propagation only over sea and only over ground, showed clearly the effects of ground conductivity on propagation. Comparison between observations and modelling has been used to evaluate the ground conductivity. In the future we will implement the sky-wave inside our model and validate it with the database.

  14. Electrically conductive diamond electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Swain, Greg; Fischer, Anne ,; Bennett, Jason; Lowe, Michael

    2009-05-19

    An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

  15. Electrical Characterization and Morphological Studies of Conducting Polymer Nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinto, N. J.; Zhou, Y. X.; Freitag, M.; Johnson, A. T.; MacDiarmid, A. G.; Mueller, C. H.; Theofylaktos, N.; Robinson, D. C.; Miranda, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    Doped polyaniline blended with poly(ethylene oxide) has been electrospun in air to give fibers with diameters in the range 3 nm 200 nm. These fibers were captured on wafers of degenerately doped Si/SiO2 by placing the wafer in the path of the fiber jet formed during the electrospinning process. Individual fibers were contacted using shadow mask evaporation and were also captured on prepatterned wafers. Fibers having diameters greater than 100 nm show a slight increase in the conductivity as compared to the bulk film, while fibers with diameters less than 30 nm had lower conductivity than the bulk. Data on Scanning Conductance Microscopy along the length of individual fibers will be presented. For fibers where the diameter was not uniform, we found that below a certain diameter ( approx.15 nm) the fiber was less conducting as compared to thicker diameter fibers. Dependence of the fiber conductivity on a gate bias is underway and these results will also be presented.

  16. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOEpatents

    Clough, Roger L.; Sylwester, Alan P.

    1989-01-01

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

  17. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOEpatents

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1988-06-20

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  18. Electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Singh, J.P.; Bosak, A.L.; McPheeters, C.C.; Dees, D.W.

    1993-09-07

    An electrically conductive material is described for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO[sub 2] formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns. 8 figures.

  19. Electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Jitendra P.; Bosak, Andrea L.; McPheeters, Charles C.; Dees, Dennis W.

    1993-01-01

    An electrically conductive material for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO.sub.2 formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns.

  20. Study of electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity into neutral plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, G. Rout, R. K.

    2015-07-31

    The major portion of the bulk plasma in magnetospheric space, interplanetary plasma belts and the solar winds contain neutral particles. Evidently these neutral particles undergo binary collisions with the charged particles and among themselves so as to contribute significantly to the transport and diffusion process in a singly charged electron – ion magnetoplasma. The effects of the neutral particles collisions on various diffusion transport coefficients are studied for magnetised electron-ion plasma and appropriately modified coefficients are derived analytically. The results reveal that these coefficients increase significantly owing to the effect of the charge -neutral and neutral-neutral collisions.

  1. Electrical Conductivity in Textiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Copper is the most widely used electrical conductor. Like most metals, though, it has several drawbacks: it is heavy, expensive, and can break. Fibers that conduct electricity could be the solutions to these problems, and they are of great interest to NASA. Conductive fibers provide lightweight alternatives to heavy copper wiring in a variety of settings, including aerospace, where weight is always a chief concern. This is an area where NASA is always seeking improved materials. The fibers are also more cost-effective than metals. Expenditure is another area where NASA is always looking to make improvements. In the case of electronics that are confined to small spaces and subject to severe stress, copper is prone to breaking and losing connection over time. Flexible conductive fibers eliminate that problem. They are more supple and stronger than brittle copper and, thus, find good use in these and similar situations. While clearly a much-needed material, electrically conductive fibers are not readily available. The cost of new technology development, with all the pitfalls of troubleshooting production and the years of testing, and without the guarantee of an immediate market, is often too much of a financial hazard for companies to risk. NASA, however, saw the need for electrical fibers in its many projects and sought out a high-tech textile company that was already experimenting in this field, Syscom Technology, Inc., of Columbus, Ohio. Syscom was founded in 1993 to provide computer software engineering services and basic materials research in the areas of high-performance polymer fibers and films. In 1999, Syscom decided to focus its business and technical efforts on development of high-strength, high-performance, and electrically conductive polymer fibers. The company developed AmberStrand, an electrically conductive, low-weight, strong-yet-flexible hybrid metal-polymer YARN.

  2. Electric properties of carbon nano-onion/polyaniline composites: a combined electric modulus and ac conductivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papathanassiou, Anthony N.; Mykhailiv, Olena; Echegoyen, Luis; Sakellis, Ilias; Plonska-Brzezinska, Marta E.

    2016-07-01

    The complex electric modulus and the ac conductivity of carbon nano-onion/polyaniline composites were studied from 1 mHz to 1 MHz at isothermal conditions ranging from 15 K to room temperature. The temperature dependence of the electric modulus and the dc conductivity analyses indicate a couple of hopping mechanisms. The distinction between thermally activated processes and the determination of cross-over temperature were achieved by exploring the temperature dependence of the fractional exponent of the dispersive ac conductivity and the bifurcation of the scaled ac conductivity isotherms. The results are analyzed by combining the granular metal model (inter-grain charge tunneling of extended electron states located within mesoscopic highly conducting polyaniline grains) and a 3D Mott variable range hopping model (phonon assisted tunneling within the carbon nano-onions and clusters).

  3. A numerical study of the influence of interconnected conductive paths in electrically resistive rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandolesi, E.; Moorkamp, M.; Jones, A. G.

    2013-12-01

    Several electromagnetic (EM) geophysical methods focus on the EM properties of rocks and sediments to determine a reliable image of the subsurface, while the same electromagnetic properties are measured in the laboratory with a wide range of instruments and techniques. None of these measurements return an unequivocal result. The hypothesis related to the presence of interconnected pathways of electrically conductive materials in resistive hosts has been studied with increasing interest in recent years, and the comprehension of phenomena that scale from the microstructures of the rocks up to field electrical conductivity measurements represents the boundary that prevents the direct comparison between laboratory data and field data. In recent years some numerical approaches have been investigated to understand the effects of interconnected pathways of conductors on field measurements, usually restricting the studies to direct current (DC) sources. Bearing in mind the time-variating nature of natural electromagnetic sources that take a role in field measurements, we numerically simulated the effects of such EM sources on the conductivity measured on the surface of a three-dimensional realistic body embedded in an uniform host by using electromagnetic induction equations. Since most real rocks are poor conductors, we modeled a two-phase mixture of rock and interconnected conductive elements (representing melts, saline fluids, sulphidic, carbonitic, or metallic sediments, etc.), randomly generated within the background host. We compared the electrical conductivity measured from a sample of randomly generated models with the electrical conductivity limits predicted by Hashin-Shtrikman bounds.

  4. Electrically Conductive Porous Membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth Alan (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to an electrically conductive membrane that can be configured to be used in fuel cell systems to act as a hydrophilic water separator internal to the fuel cell, or as a water separator used with water vapor fed electrolysis cells, or as a water separator used with water vapor fed electrolysis cells, or as a capillary structure in a thin head pipe evaporator, or as a hydrophobic gas diffusion layer covering the fuel cell electrode surface in a fuel cell.

  5. Electrically conductive alternating copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Aldissi, M.; Jorgensen, B.S.

    1987-08-31

    Polymers which are soluble in common organic solvents and are electrically conductive, but which also may be synthesized in such a manner that they become nonconductive. Negative ions from the electrolyte used in the electrochemical synthesis of a polymer are incorporated into the polymer during the synthesis and serve as a dopant. A further electrochemical step may be utilized to cause the polymer to be conductive. The monomer repeat unit is comprised of two rings, a pyrrole molecule joined to a thienyl group, or a furyl group, or a phenyl group. The individual groups of the polymers are arranged in an alternating manner. For example, the backbone arrangement of poly(furylpyrrole) is -furan-pyrrole-furan-pyrrole- furan-pyrrole. An alkyl group or phenyl group may be substituted for either or both of the hydrogen atoms of the pyrrole ring.

  6. Electrical conductivity of activated carbon-metal oxide nanocomposites under compression: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Barroso-Bogeat, A; Alexandre-Franco, M; Fernández-González, C; Macías-García, A; Gómez-Serrano, V

    2014-12-01

    From a granular commercial activated carbon (AC) and six metal oxide (Al2O3, Fe2O3, SnO2, TiO2, WO3 and ZnO) precursors, two series of AC-metal oxide nanocomposites were prepared by wet impregnation, oven-drying at 120 °C, and subsequent heat treatment at 200 or 850 °C in an inert atmosphere. Here, the electrical conductivity of the resulting products was studied under moderate compression. The influence of the applied pressure, sample volume, mechanical work, and density of the hybrid materials was thoroughly investigated. The DC electrical conductivity of the compressed samples was measured at room temperature by the four-probe method. Compaction assays suggest that the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites are largely determined by the carbon matrix. Both the decrease in volume and the increase in density were relatively small and only significant at pressures lower than 100 kPa for AC and most nanocomposites. In contrast, the bulk electrical conductivity of the hybrid materials was strongly influenced by the intrinsic conductivity, mean crystallite size, content and chemical nature of the supported phases, which ultimately depend on the metal oxide precursor and heat treatment temperature. The supported nanoparticles may be considered to act as electrical switches either hindering or favouring the effective electron transport between the AC cores of neighbouring composite particles in contact under compression. Conductivity values as a rule were lower for the nanocomposites than for the raw AC, all of them falling in the range of semiconductor materials. With the increase in heat treatment temperature, the trend is toward the improvement of conductivity due to the increase in the crystallite size and, in some cases, to the formation of metals in the elemental state and even metal carbides. The patterns of variation of the electrical conductivity with pressure and mechanical work were slightly similar, thus suggesting the predominance of the pressure

  7. Electrical and Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Guglielmo; Perfetti, Mauro

    After a Sect. 1.1 devoted to electrical conductivity and a section that deals with magnetic and dielectric losses ( 1.2 ), this chapter explores the theory of thermal conduction in solids. The examined categories of solids are: metals Sect. 1.3.2 , Dielectrics Sects. 1.3.3 and 1.3.4 and Nanocomposites Sect. 1.3.5 . In Sect. 1.3.6 the problem of thermal and electrical contact between materials is considered because contact resistance occurring at conductor joints in magnets or other high power applications can lead to undesirable electrical losses. At low temperature, thermal contact is also critical in the mounting of temperature sensors, where bad contacts can lead to erroneous results, in particular when superconductivity phenomena are involved.

  8. Improving the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotube networks: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Li, Elise Y; Marzari, Nicola

    2011-12-27

    We address the issue of the low electrical conductivity observed in carbon nanotube networks using first-principles calculations of the structure, stability, and ballistic transport of different nanotube junctions. We first study covalent linkers, using the nitrene-pyrazine case as a model for conductance-preserving [2 + 1] cycloadditions, and discuss the reasons for their poor performance. We then characterize the role of transition-metal adsorbates in improving mechanical coupling and electrical tunneling between the tubes. We show that the strong hybridization between the transition-metal d orbitals with the π orbitals of the nanotube can provide an excellent electrical bridge for nanotube-nanotube junctions. This effect is maximized in the case of nitrogen-doped nanotubes, thanks to the strong mechanical coupling between the tubes mediated by a single transition metal adatom. Our results suggest effective strategies to optimize the performance of carbon nanotube networks. PMID:22059779

  9. Nanoscale electrical property studies of individual GeSi quantum rings by conductive scanning probe microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The nanoscale electrical properties of individual self-assembled GeSi quantum rings (QRs) were studied by scanning probe microscopy-based techniques. The surface potential distributions of individual GeSi QRs are obtained by scanning Kelvin microscopy (SKM). Ring-shaped work function distributions are observed, presenting that the QRs' rim has a larger work function than the QRs' central hole. By combining the SKM results with those obtained by conductive atomic force microscopy and scanning capacitance microscopy, the correlations between the surface potential, conductance, and carrier density distributions are revealed, and a possible interpretation for the QRs' conductance distributions is suggested. PMID:23194252

  10. A Study of the Preparation and Properties of Antioxidative Copper Inks with High Electrical Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Yang; Chang, Wei-Chen; Chen, Guan-Lin; Chung, Cheng-Huan; Liang, Jun-Xiang; Ma, Wei-Yang; Yang, Tsun-Neng

    2015-12-01

    Conductive ink using copper nanoparticles has attracted much attention in the printed electronics industry because of its low cost and high electrical conductivity. However, the problem of easy oxidation under heat and humidity conditions for copper material limits the wide applications. In this study, antioxidative copper inks were prepared by dispersing the nanoparticles in the solution, and then conductive copper films can be obtained after calcining the copper ink at 250 °C in nitrogen atmosphere for 30 min. A low sheet resistance of 47.6 mΩ/□ for the copper film was measured by using the four-point probe method. Importantly, we experimentally demonstrate that the electrical conductivity of copper films can be improved by increasing the calcination temperature. In addition, these highly conductive copper films can be placed in an atmospheric environment for more than 6 months without the oxidation phenomenon, which was verified by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). These observations strongly show that our conductive copper ink features high antioxidant properties and long-term stability and has a great potential for many printed electronics applications, such as flexible display systems, sensors, photovoltaic cells, and radio frequency identification. PMID:26370132

  11. Electrically conductive polymer concrete overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, J. J.; Webster, R. P.

    1984-08-01

    The use of cathodic protection to prevent the corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete structures has been well established. Application of a durable, skid-resistant electrically conductive polymer concrete overlay would advance the use of cathodic protection for the highway industry. Laboratory studies indicate that electrically conductive polymer concrete overlays using conductive fillers, such as calcined coke breeze, in conjunction with polyester or vinyl ester resins have resistivities of 1 to 10 ohm-cm. Both multiple-layer and premixed mortar-type overlays were made. Shear bond strengths of the conductive overlays to concrete substrates vary from 600 to 1300 psi, with the premixed overlays having bond strengths 50 to 100% higher than the multiple-layer overlays.

  12. Study of Electrical Conduction Mechanism of Organic Double-Layer Diode Using Electric Field Induced Optical Second Harmonic Generation Measurement.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Shohei; Taguchi, Dai; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-04-01

    By using electric field induced optical second harmonic generation (EFISHG) and current voltage (I-V) measurements, we studied the electrical transport mechanism of organic double-layer diodes with a structure of Au/N, N'-di-[(1-naphthyl)-N, N'-diphenyl]-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (a-NPD)/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/indium zinc oxide (IZO). Here the α-NPD is a carrier transport layer and the PMMA is an electrical insulating layer. The current level was very low, but the I-V characteristics showed a rectifying behavior. The EFISHG measurement selectively and directly probed the electric field across the α-NPD layer, and showed that the electric field across the a-NPD layer is completely relaxed owing to the charge accumulation at the a-NPD/PMMA interface in the region V > 0, whereas the carrier accumulation was not significant in the region V < 0. On the basis of these experimental results, we proposed a model of the rectification. Further, by coupling the I-V characteristics with the EFISHG measurement, the I-V characteristics of the diodes were well converted into the current-electric field (I-E) characteristics of the α-NPD layer and the PMMA layer. The I-E characteristics suggested the Schottky-type conduction governs the carrier transport. We conclude that the I-V measurement coupled with the EFISHG measurement is very useful to study carrier transport mechanism of the organic double-layer diodes. PMID:27451633

  13. A study of rock matrix diffusion properties by electrical conductivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlsson, Y.; Neretnieks, I.

    1999-07-01

    Traditional rock matrix diffusion experiments on crystalline rock are very time consuming due to the low porosity and extensive analysis requirements. Electrical conductivity measurements are, on the other hand, very fast and larger samples can be used than are practical in ordinary diffusion experiments. The effective diffusivity of a non-charged molecule is readily evaluated from the measurements, and influences from surface conductivity on diffusion of cations can be studied. A large number of samples of varying thickness can be measured within a short period, and the changes in transport properties with position in a rock core can be examined. In this study the formation factor of a large number of Aespoe diorite samples is determined by electrical conductivity measurements. The formation factor is a geometric factor defined as the ratio between the effective diffusivity of a non-charged molecule, to that of the same molecule in free liquid. The variation of this factor with position among a borecore and with sample length, and its coupling to the porosity of the sample is studied. Also the surface conductivity is studied. This was determined as the residual conductivity after leaching of the pore solution ions. The formation factor of most of the samples is in the range 1E-5 to 1E-4, with a mean value of about 5E-5. Even large samples (4--13 cm) give such values. The formation factor increases with increasing porosity and the change in both formation factor and porosity with position in the borecore can be large, even for samples close to each other. The surface conductivity increases with increasing formation factor for the various samples but the influence on the pore diffusion seems to be higher for samples of lower formation factor. This suggests that the relation between the pore surface area and the pore volume is larger for samples of low formation factor.

  14. Carbon nanotubes filled polymer composites: A comprehensive study on improving dispersion, network formation and electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarthi, Divya Kannan

    In this dissertation, we determine how the dispersion, network formation and alignment of carbon nanotubes in polymer nanocomposites affect the electrical properties of two different polymer composite systems: high temperature bismaleimide (BMI) and polyethylene. The knowledge gained from this study will facilitate optimization of the above mentioned parameters, which would further enhance the electrical properties of polymer nanocomposites. BMI carbon fiber composites filled with nickel-coated single walled carbon nanotubes (Ni-SWNTs) were processed using high temperature vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) to study the effect of lightning strike mitigation. Coating the SWNTs with nickel resulted in enhanced dispersions confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). An improved interface between the carbon fiber and Ni-SWNTs resulted in better surface coverage on the carbon plies. These hybrid composites were tested for Zone 2A lightning strike mitigation. The electrical resistivity of the composite system was reduced by ten orders of magnitude with the addition of 4 weight percent Ni-SWNTs (calculated with respect to the weight of a single carbon ply). The Ni-SWNTs - filled composites showed a reduced amount of damage to simulated lightning strike compared to their unfilled counterparts indicated by the minimal carbon fiber pull out. Methods to reduce the electrical resistivity of 10 weight percent SWNTs --- medium density polyethylene (MDPE) composites were studied. The composites processed by hot coagulation method were subjected to low DC electric fields (10 V) at polymer melt temperatures to study the effect of viscosity, nanotube welding, dispersion and, resultant changes in electrical resistivity. The electrical resistivity of the composites was reduced by two orders of magnitude compared to 10 wt% CNT-MDPE baseline. For effective alignment of SWNTs, a new process called Electric field Vacuum Spray was devised to

  15. Electrically Conductive Paints for Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilligan, J. E.; Wolf, R. E.; Ray, C.

    1977-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop and test electrically conductive paint coatings for spacecraft. A wide variety of organic and inorganic coatings were formulated using conductive binders, conductive pigments, and similar approaches. Z-93, IITRI's standard specification inorganic thermal control coating, exhibits good electrical properties and is a very space-stable coating system. Several coatings based on a conductive pigment (antimony-doped tin oxide) in silicone and silicate binders offer considerable promise. Paint systems using commercially available conductive polymers also appear to be of interest, but will require substantial development. Evaluations were made based on electrical conductivity, paint physical properties, and the stability of spectral reflectance in space environment testing.

  16. Biological studies and electrical conductivity of paper sheet based on PANI/PS/Ag-NPs nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Youssef, A M; Mohamed, S A; Abdel-Aziz, M S; Abdel-Aziz, M E; Turky, G; Kamel, S

    2016-08-20

    Polyaniline (PANI) with/without polystyrene (PS), was successfully manufactured in the occurrence of dispersed pulp fibers via the oxidative polymerization reaction of aniline monomer to produce conductive paper sheets containing PANI, PANI/PS composites. Additionally, sliver nitrate (Ag-NO3) was added by varied loadings to the oxidative polymerization of aniline monomer to provide sliver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) emptied into the prepared paper sheets. The prepared paper sheets were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared spectroscopy (IR), the mechanical properties of the prepared paper sheets were evaluated. Moreover, the electrical conductivity and biological studies such as cellulases assay, Microorganism & culture condition and detection of the released of Ag-NPs were evaluated. Furthermore, the prepared paper sheets were displayed good antibacterial properties contrary to gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Consequently, the prepared paper sheet may be used as novel materials for packaging applications. PMID:27178939

  17. Nitrogen-doped ZnO shells: Studies on optical transparency and electrical conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Gaikwad, Rajendra S.; Mane, Rajaram S.; Pawar, Bhagwat N.; Ambade, Rohan B.; Ahn, Hee Joon; Han, Sung-Hwan; Joo, Oh-Shim

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical spray growth of high quality zinc oxide nitrogen-doped films is explored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of nitrogen doping on crystallinity, surface morphology, and optical properties is comprehensively studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO structural properties are optimized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of nitrogen doping on a gas sensing application of ZnO is investigated. -- Abstract: Studies on optical and electrical conductivity in nitrogen (N)-doped ZnO shells are explored. On incorporating low levels of nitrogen, the (0 0 2) X-ray diffraction (XRD) peak was found to be intensified significantly. Closely packed spherical crystallites of ZnO were transformed into flat-flakes during 0.1-0.3 M nitrogen doping and finally to shells, flattered at the center and tapered at ends, at 0.4 M. Both pristine and N-doped ZnO films show hydrophilic character. It was also found that the degree of transparency and the nature of conductivity as estimated by optical absorbance and Hall measurement, respectively, were strongly influenced by the levels of N-doping. Higher nitrogen doping led to decline in electrical resistivity and mobility due to an enhancement of free charge carriers. Presence of both (N{sub 2}){sub O} donor and (N){sub O} acceptor peaks in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy could be responsible for the formation of higher carrier concentration in ZnO films.

  18. Electrically conductive anodized aluminum coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alwitt, Robert S. (Inventor); Liu, Yanming (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing anodized aluminum with enhanced electrical conductivity, comprising anodic oxidation of aluminum alloy substrate, electrolytic deposition of a small amount of metal into the pores of the anodized aluminum, and electrolytic anodic deposition of an electrically conductive oxide, including manganese dioxide, into the pores containing the metal deposit; and the product produced by the process.

  19. Laboratory studies of the electrical conductivity of silicate perovskites at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaoyuan; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1990-01-01

    The electrical conductivities of two silicate perovskites and a perovskite-magnesiowuestite assemblage, all having an atomic ratio of Mg to Fe equal to 0.88/0.12, have been measured with alternating current and direct current (dc) techniques at simultaneously high pressures and temperatures. Measurements up to pressures of 80 GPa and temperatures of 3500 K, using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell, demonstrate that the electrical conductivity of these materials remains below 10-3 S/m at lower mantle conditions. The activation energies for electrical conduction are between 0.1 and 0.4 eV from the data, and the conduction in these perovskites is ascribed to an extrinsic electronic process. The new measurements are in agreement with a bound that was previously obtained from dc measurements for the high-PT conductivity of perovskite-dominated assemblages. The results show that the electrical conductivity of (Mg/0.88/Fe/0.12)SiO3 perovskite differs significantly from that of the earth's deep mantle, as inferred from geophysical observations.

  20. Study of single-nucleotide polymorphisms by means of electrical conductance measurements

    PubMed Central

    Hihath, Joshua; Xu, Bingqian; Zhang, Peiming; Tao, Nongjian

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the complexities of DNA has been a hallmark of science for over a half century, and one of the important topics in DNA research is recognizing the occurrence of mutations in the base-stack. In this article, we present a study of SNPs by direct-contact electrical measurements to a single DNA duplex. We have used short, 11- and 12-bp dsDNA to investigate the change in conductance that occurs if a single base pair, a single base, or two separate bases in the stack are modified. All measurements are carried out in aqueous solution with the DNA chemically bound to the electrodes. These measurements demonstrate that the presence of a single base pair mismatch can be identified by the conductance of the molecule and can cause a change in the conductance of dsDNA by as much as an order of magnitude, depending on the specific details of the double helix and the single nucleotide polymorphism. PMID:16284253

  1. Conduction of Electricity through Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, J. J.; Thomson, G. P.

    2013-06-01

    1. Electrical conductivity of gases in a normal state; 2. Properties of a gas when in a conducting state; 3. Mobility of ions; 4. Mathematical theory of the conduction of electricity through a gas containing ions; 5. Effect produced by a magnetic field on the motion of the ions; 6. Determination of the ratio of the charge to the mass of an ion; 7. Determination of the charge carried by the negative ion; 8. On some physical properties of gaseous ions; 9. Ionisation by incandescent solids; 10. Ionisation in gases from flames; 11. Ionisation by light. Photo-electric effects; Name index; Subject index.

  2. Electrically Conductive Anodized Aluminum Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Trung Hung

    2006-01-01

    Anodized aluminum components can be treated to make them sufficiently electrically conductive to suppress discharges of static electricity. The treatment was conceived as a means of preventing static electric discharges on exterior satin-anodized aluminum (SAA) surfaces of spacecraft without adversely affecting the thermal-control/optical properties of the SAA and without need to apply electrically conductive paints, which eventually peel off in the harsh environment of outer space. The treatment can also be used to impart electrical conductivity to anodized housings of computers, medical electronic instruments, telephoneexchange equipment, and other terrestrial electronic equipment vulnerable to electrostatic discharge. The electrical resistivity of a typical anodized aluminum surface layer lies between 10(exp 11) and 10(exp 13) Omega-cm. To suppress electrostatic discharge, it is necessary to reduce the electrical resistivity significantly - preferably to < or = 10(exp 9) Omega-cm. The present treatment does this. The treatment is a direct electrodeposition process in which the outer anodized surface becomes covered and the pores in the surface filled with a transparent, electrically conductive metal oxide nanocomposite. Filling the pores with the nanocomposite reduces the transverse electrical resistivity and, in the original intended outer-space application, the exterior covering portion of the nanocomposite would afford the requisite electrical contact with the outer-space plasma. The electrical resistivity of the nanocomposite can be tailored to a value between 10(exp 7) and 10(exp 12) Omega-cm. Unlike electrically conductive paint, the nanocomposite becomes an integral part of the anodized aluminum substrate, without need for adhesive bonding material and without risk of subsequent peeling. The electrodeposition process is compatible with commercial anodizing production lines. At present, the electronics industry uses expensive, exotic

  3. Electrical conductivity studies on individual conjugated polymer nanowires: two-probe and four-probe results.

    PubMed

    Long, Yunze; Duvail, Jeanluc; Li, Mengmeng; Gu, Changzhi; Liu, Zongwen; Ringer, Simon P

    2009-01-01

    Two- and four-probe electrical measurements on individual conjugated polymer nanowires with different diameters ranging from 20 to 190 nm have been performed to study their conductivity and nanocontact resistance. The two-probe results reveal that all the measured polymer nanowires with different diameters are semiconducting. However, the four-probe results show that the measured polymer nanowires with diameters of 190, 95-100, 35-40 and 20-25 nm are lying in the insulating, critical, metallic and insulting regimes of metal-insulator transition, respectively. The 35-40 nm nanowire displays a metal-insulator transition at around 35 K. In addition, it was found that the nanocontact resistance is in the magnitude of 104Ω at room temperature, which is comparable to the intrinsic resistance of the nanowires. These results demonstrate that four-probe electrical measurement is necessary to explore the intrinsic electronic transport properties of isolated nanowires, especially in the case of metallic nanowires, because the metallic nature of the measured nanowires may be coved by the nanocontact resistance that cannot be excluded by a two-probe technique. PMID:20652139

  4. Electrical conduction in polymer dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotts, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    The use of polymer dielectrics with moderate resistivities could reduce or eliminate problems associated with spacecraft charging. The processes responsible for conduction and the properties of electroactive polymers are reviewed, and correlations drawn between molecular structure and electrical conductivity. These structure-property relationships led to the development of several new electroactive polymer compositions and the identification of several systems that have the requisite thermal, mechanical, environmental and electrical properties for use in spacecraft.

  5. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

  6. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  7. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, Jack J.; Elling, David; Reams, Walter

    1990-01-01

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  8. An Experimental Study of the Effects of A Rotating Magnetic Field on Electrically Conducting Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran Narayanan; Mazuruk, Konstantin

    1998-01-01

    The use of a rotating magnetic field for stirring metallic melts has been a commonly adopted practice for a fairly long period. The elegance of the technique stems from its non-intrusive nature and the intense stirring it can produce in an electrically conducting medium. A further application of the method in recent times has been in the area of crystal growth from melts (e.g. germanium). The latter experiments have been mainly research oriented in order to understand the basic physics of the process and to establish norms for optimizing such a technique for the commercial production of crystals. When adapted for crystal growth applications, the rotating magnetic field is used to induce a slow flow or rotation in the melt which in effect significantly curtails temperature field oscillations in the melt. These oscillations are known to cause dopant striations and thereby inhomogeneities in the grown crystal that essentially degrades the crystal quality. The applied field strength is typically of the order of milli-Teslas with a frequency range between 50-400 Hz. In this investigation, we report findings from experiments that explore the feasibility of applying a rotating magnetic field to aqueous salt solutions, that are characterized by conductivities that are several orders of magnitude smaller than semi-conductor melts. The aim is to study the induced magnetic field and consequently the induced flow in such in application. Detailed flow field description obtained through non-intrusive particle displacement tracking will be reported along with an analytical assessment of the results. It is anticipated that the obtained results will facilitate in establishing a parameter range over which the technique can be applied to obtain a desired flow field distribution. This method can find applicability in the growth of crystals from aqueous solutions and give an experimenter another controllable parameter towards improving the quality of the grown crystal.

  9. Electrical conductivity of Al-bearing bridgmanite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, T.; Kamada, S.; Ohtani, E.; Hirao, N.

    2015-12-01

    Electrical conductivity measurements of bridgmanite with various Al contents and constant Mg# 90 at room temperature up to 2000 K and 26-28 GPa were performed in Kawai-type multianvil apparatus using impedance spectroscopic analyses. The incorporation of Al into bridgmanite significantly raises the electrical conductivity but it is small conductivity variation with respect to the amount of Al. Synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy of recovered samples showed a significant amount of ferric iron in aluminous bridgmanite. The mobility of charge carriers in bridgmanite was calculated from the conductivity and Fe3+/ΣFe. A relation between the logarithm of electrical conductivity and reciprocal temperature is consistent with Fe2+-Fe3+ electron hopping (small polaron) as the dominant conduction mechanism at low temperatures (< 1400 K) and ionic conduction at high temperatures (> 1600 K). Taking various conduction mechanisms into account, we develop an electrical conductivity model for aluminous bridgmanite as a function of Al and Fe content. This conductivity model suggests that the electrical conductivity of aluminous bridgmanite has a maximum at around 0.13 Al per formula unit, and further increase of Al in bridgmanite reduces the conductivity. The conductivity increase observed in the uppermost lower mantle by electromagnetic studies can be explained by increases of Fe and Na content in combination with substitution of Al into bridgmanite with increasing pressure due to the gradual decomposition of majorite garnet.

  10. Electrical Conductivity in Transition Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Christopher; Vickneson, Kishanda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this "Science Note" is to describe how to test the electron-sea model to determine whether it accurately predicts relative electrical conductivity for first-row transition metals. In the electron-sea model, a metal crystal is viewed as a three-dimensional array of metal cations immersed in a sea of delocalised valence…

  11. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, Thomas E.; Spieker, David A.

    1985-03-19

    A rigid, polyurethane foam comprises about 2-10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  12. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, T.E.; Spieker, D.A.

    1983-12-08

    A rigid, moldable polyurethane foam comprises about 2 to 10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  13. Electrical conductivity studies of graphene wrapped nanocrystalline LiMnPO{sub 4} composite

    SciTech Connect

    Cheruku, Rajesh; D, Surya Bhaskaram; Govindaraj, G.; Vijayan, Lakshmi

    2015-06-24

    Nanocrystalline LiMnPO{sub 4} material was synthesized by template free sucrose assisted hydrothermal method. The material possesses the orthorhombic crystal structure with Pnma, space group having four formula units. The GO was prepared by the hummer’s method and it was reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with hydrazine hydrate in the presence of nitrogen atmosphere. LiMnPO{sub 4} material was wrapped by the rGO to increase its conductivity. The structural characterization was accomplished through X-ray diffraction, FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. Morphology was identified by the SEM, Electrical characterization was done through impedance spectroscopy and the results were reported.

  14. Electrical conductivity of ice VII

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Taku; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Yagi, Takehiko; Aoki, Katsutoshi

    2014-01-01

    It was discovered that a peak appears near a pressure of Pc = 10 GPa in the electrical conductivity of ice VII as measured through impedance spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) during the process of compression from 2 GPa to 40 GPa at room temperature. The activation energy for the conductivity measured in the cooling/heating process between 278 K and 303 K reached a minimum near Pc. Theoretical modelling and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the origin of this unique peak is the transition of the major charge carriers from the rotational defects to the ionic defects. PMID:25047728

  15. 57Fe-Mössbauer study of electrically conducting barium iron vanadate glass after heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubuki, Shiro; Sakka, Hiroshi; Tsuge, Kanako; Homonnay, Zoltán; Sinkó, Katalin; Kuzmann, Ernő; Yasumitsu, Hiroki; Nishida, Tetsuaki

    2008-07-01

    Local structure and thermal durability of semiconducting xBaO·(90 - x)V2O5 · 10Fe2O3 glasses ( x = 20, 30 and 40), NTA glass TM, before and after isothermal annealing were investigated by 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy and differential thermal analysis (DTA). An identical isomer shift (mathit{δ}) of 0.39 ± 0.01 mm s - 1 and a systematic increase in the quadrupole splitting ( Δ) were observed from 0.70 ± 0.02 to 0.80 ± 0.02 mm s - 1 with an increasing BaO content, showing an increase in the local distortion of FeIIIO4 tetrahedra. From the slope of the straight line in the T g Δ plot of NTA glass TM, it proved that FeIII plays a role of network former. Large Debye temperature ( Θ D) values of 1000 and 486 K were respectively obtained for 20BaO · 70V2O5 · 10Fe2O3 glass before and after isothermal annealing at 400°C for 60 min, respectively. This result also suggests that FeIII atoms constitute the glass network composed of tetrahedral FeO4, tetrahedral VO4 and pyramidal VO5 units. The electric conductivity of 20BaO · 70V2O5 · 10Fe2O3 glass increased from 1.6 × 10 - 5 to 5.8 × 10 - 2 S cm - 1 after isothermal annealing at 450°C for 2,000 min. These results suggest that the drastic increase in the electric conductivity caused by heat treatment is closely related to the structural relaxation of the glass network structure.

  16. Studying the Performance of Conductive Polymer Films as Textile Electrodes for Electrical Bioimpedance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunico, F. J.; Marquez, J. C.; Hilke, H.; Skrifvars, M.; Seoane, F.

    2013-04-01

    With the goal of finding novel biocompatible materials suitable to replace silver in the manufacturing of textile electrodes for medical applications of electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy, three different polymeric materials have been investigated. Films have been prepared from different polymeric materials and custom bracelets have been confectioned with them. Tetrapolar total right side electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy (EBIS) measurements have been performed with polymer and with standard gel electrodes. The performance of the polymer films was compared against the performance of the gel electrodes. The results indicated that only the polypropylene 1380 could produce EBIS measurements but remarkably tainted with high frequency artefacts. The influence of the electrode mismatch, stray capacitances and large electrode polarization impedance are unclear and they need to be clarified with further studies. If sensorized garments could be made with such biocompatible polymeric materials the burden of considering textrodes class III devices could be avoided.

  17. Electrical conductivity in sprite streamer channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.; Luque, A.

    2010-08-01

    We study the electrical conductivity of a sprite streamer channel at three different altitudes (63 km, 70 km and 80 km). We discuss the hypothesis that the electrical conductivity stays constant along the full length of a streamer channel, contrary to expectations based on scaling laws. We then apply this hypothesis and extrapolations from a numerical electrodynamical simulation to study the air plasma kinetics after the passage of a streamer. We test two possible scenarios for the physical origin of trailing sprite emissions: a single pulse and a single pulse with a delayed re-enhancement of the electric field up to the breakdown value. Our simulations show that VLF observations agree with persistent electric fields in the sprite that last several milliseconds and that associative detachment of O- ions may significantly affect the atmospheric conductivity in the presence of sprites.

  18. Electron beam induced microstructural changes and electrical conductivity in Bakelite polymer RPC detector material: A positron lifetime study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aneesh Kumar, K. V.; Ningaraju, S.; Munirathnamma, L. M.; Ravikumar, H. B.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2015-06-01

    In order to explore the structural modification induced electrical conductivity, samples of Bakelite RPC polymer detector materials were exposed to 8 MeV of electron beam with the irradiation dose from 20 kGy to 100 kGy in steps of 20 kGy. The microstructural changes upon electron beam irradiation have been studied using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy. Positron lifetime parameters viz., o-Ps lifetime and its intensity show chain scission at lower doses (20 kGy, 40 kGy) followed by cross-linking beyond 40 kGydue to the radical reactions. The reduction in electrical conductivity of Bakelite material beyond 60 kGy is correlated to the conducting pathways and cross-links in the polymer matrix. The appropriate doses of electron beam irradiation of Bakelite material may reduce the leakage current and hence improves the performance of the detector.

  19. Numerical studies of geomagnetically induced electric field on seafloor and near coastal zones incorporated with heterogeneous conductivity distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Tada-nori

    2015-12-01

    Abrupt changes of geomagnetic field can make large induced electric field and resultant electric current on the earth, which is called as geomagnetically induced current (GIC). It can yield damages to pipelines, cables, and other architectures. For understanding the phenomena and future risks of GIC, it is necessary to evaluate how the sub-surface electrical conductivity structure is important for the GIC because the heterogeneous conductivity structure in the crust and mantle affects the induced electrical current locally. The hazard prediction based on the homogeneous earth may result in the underestimation. Here, I introduce possible cases of geomagnetically induced electric field (GIE) on seafloor and near coastal areas, based on numerical forward simulations on one-, two-, and three-dimensional (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) earth's structure including the sea layer. On the 1-D case, I show the possible amplitude of GIE on the seafloor, far from the coastal area. The second case study comes from 2-D forward simulation, in which the straightly elongated coastal line is assumed, and various sub-surface and sub-seafloor conductivity structures are imposed. The numerical results suggest that the amplitude of GIE on land becomes more than two times larger than that of the homogeneous earth without the sea layer. The width of land zone with larger GIE is about 20 km from the coast. In forward modeling with a simplified 3-D bathymetry, land electric field near the bay area increases with about ten times larger than that of the inland one. The seafloor GIE near the peninsula area also indicates about four times larger value than that of the other area at the same water depth. These phenomena can be explained by the boundary charge along the coastal area. I conclude that 3-D earth's conductivity structure including the realistic bathymetry and sub-surface and sub-seafloor structures should be essential and focused for the hazard assessment of GIC.

  20. One-dimensional nonlinear instability study of a slightly viscoelastic, perfectly conducting liquid jet under a radial electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang; Yin, Xie-Yuan; Yin, Xie-Zhen

    2016-05-01

    A one-dimensional electrified viscoelastic model is built to study the nonlinear behavior of a slightly viscoelastic, perfectly conducting liquid jet under a radial electric field. The equations are solved numerically using an implicit finite difference scheme together with a boundary element method. The electrified viscoelastic jet is found to evolve into a beads-on-string structure in the presence of the radial electric field. Although the radial electric field greatly enhances the linear instability of the jet, its influence on the decay of the filament thickness is limited during the nonlinear evolution of the jet. On the other hand, the radial electric field induces axial non-uniformity of the first normal stress difference within the filament. The first normal stress difference in the center region of the filament may be greatly decreased by the radial electric field. The regions with/without satellite droplets are illuminated on the χ (the electrical Bond number)-k (the dimensionless wave number) plane. Satellite droplets may be formed for larger wave numbers at larger radial electric fields.

  1. Study on synthesis of ultrafine Cu-Ag core-shell powders with high electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yu-hsien; Yang, Chih-hao; Chen, Kuan-ting; Popuri, Srinivasa R.; Lee, Ching-Hwa; Tang, Bo-Shin

    2012-12-01

    Cu-Ag composite powders with high electrical conductivity were synthesized by electroless plating of silver sulfate, copper powders with eco-friendly sodium citrate as reducing agent, dispersant and chelating agent in an aqueous system. The influences of sodium citrate/Ag ratio on Ag coatings of Cu powders were investigated. Ag was formed a dense coating on the surface of Cu powders at a molar ratio of sodium citrate/Ag = 0.07/1. SEM showed an uniformity of Ag coatings on Cu powders. SEM-EDX also revealed that Cu cores were covered by Ag shells on the whole. The surface composition analysis by XPS indicated that without Cu or Ag atoms in the surface were oxidized. The resistivity measurements of Cu-Ag paste shows that they have closer resistivity as the pure silver paste's after 250 °C for 30 min heat-treatment (2.55 × 10-4 Ω cm) and 350 °C for 30 min heat-treatment (1.425 × 10-4 Ω cm).

  2. Study of the electrical conductivity at finite temperature in 2D Si- MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Limouny, L. Kaaouachi, A. El Tata, O.; Daoudi, E.; Errai, M.; Dlimi, S.; Idrissi, H. El; Zatni, A.

    2014-01-27

    We investigate the low temperature density dependent conductivity of two dimensional electron systems in zero magnetic field for sample Si-15 MOSFETs. The first purpose of this paper is to establish that the knee of the conductivity σ{sub 0} (σ{sub 0} is the T = 0.3 conductivity obtained by linear extrapolation of the curves of σ (T) for different values of electron density, n{sub s}) as a function of the carrier densities n{sub s} for T = 0.3 K, observed by Lai et al. and Limouny et al. in previous work for two different samples, is independent of temperature. The second aim is the determination of the critical density, n{sub c}, of the metal-insulator transition. Many methods are used in this investigation of n{sub c} which have been already used for other samples. The motivation behind this last study is the observation of many values of n{sub c} that have been obtained from different methods and that are slightly different. We will use in this study three methods with the intention to infer which one is more appropriate to obtain n{sub c}.

  3. Electrically conductive and thermally conductive materials for electronic packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zongrong

    The aim of this dissertation is to develop electrically or thermally conductive materials that are needed for electronic packaging and microelectronic cooling. These materials are in the form of coatings and are made from pastes. The research work encompasses paste formulation, studying the process of converting a paste to a conductive material, relating the processing conditions to the structure and performance, and evaluating performance attributes that are relevant to the application of these conductive materials. The research has resulted in new information that is valuable to the microelectronic industry. Work on electrically conductive materials emphasizes the development of electrical interconnection materials in the form of air-firable glass-free silver-based electrically conductive thick films, which use the Ti-Al alloy as the binder and are in contrast to conventional films that use glass as the binder. The air-firability, as enabled by minor additions of tin and zinc to the paste, is in contrast to previous glass-free films that are not firable. The recommended firing condition is 930°C in air. The organic vehicle in the paste comprises ethyl cellulose, which undergoes thermal decomposition during burnout of the paste. The ethyl cellulose is dissolved in ether, which facilitates the burnout. Excessive ethyl cellulose hinders the burnout. A higher heating rate results in more residue after burnout. The presence of silver particles facilitates drying and burnout. Firing in air gives lower resistivity than firing in oxygen. Firing in argon gives poor films. Compared to conventional films that use glass as the binder, these films, when appropriately fired, exhibit lower electrical resistivity (2.5 x 10-6 O.cm) and higher scratch resistance. Work on thermally conductive materials addresses thermal interface materials, which are materials placed at the interface between a heat sink and a heat source for the purpose of improving the thermal contact. Heat

  4. The study of electrical conductivity and diffusion behavior of water-based and ferro/ferricyanide-electrolyte-based alumina nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Lee, Hyeonseok; Chang, Ya-Huei; Feng, Shien-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Nanofluids are liquids containing suspensions of solid nanoparticles and have attracted considerable attention because they undergo substantial mass transfer and have many potential applications in energy technologies. Most studies on nanofluids have used low-ionic-strength solutions, such as water and ethanol. However, very few studies have used high-ionic-strength solutions because the aggregation and sedimentation of nanoparticles cause a stability problem. In this study, a stable water-based alumina nanofluid was prepared using stirred bead milling and exhibits a high electrical conductivity of 2420 μS/cm at 23 °C and excellent stability after five severe freezing-melting cycles. We then developed a process for mixing the water-based nanofluid with a high-ionic-strength potassium ferro/ferricyanide electrolyte and sodium dodecyl sulfate by using stirred bead milling and ultrasonication, thus forming a stable electrolyte-based nanofluid. According to the rotating disk electrode study, the electrolyte-based alumina nanofluid exhibits an unusual increase in the limiting current at high angular velocities, resulting from a combination of local percolation behavior and shear-induced diffusion. The electrolyte-based alumina nanofluid was demonstrated in a possible thermogalvanic application, since it is considered to be an alternative electrolyte for thermal energy harvesters because of the increased electrical conductivity and confined value of thermal conductivity. PMID:26866885

  5. 76 FR 70122 - Plan for Conduct of 2012 Electric Transmission Congestion Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ... diskette containing electronic files of the submission. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David Meyer, DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, (202) 586-1411, david.meyer@hq.doe.gov..., followed by a discussion among the panelists led by DOE staff. Each workshop will begin at 9 a.m. and...

  6. Dielectric and electric conductivity studies of PVA (Mowiol 10-98) doped with MWCNTs and WO3 nanocomposites films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rithin Kumar, N. B.; Crasta, Vincent; Praveen, B. M.

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we report the doping of MWCNTs and WO3 nanoparticles into the PVA matrix for fabricating a novel class of PVA nanocomposite using solvent casting method. The behavioral effect of these embedded nanoparticles in PVA matrix for different doping concentrations on microstructural, dielectric and electric properties are analyzed for possible device applications. The formation of nanocomposites and their microstructural variations for different doping concentration were inspected by x-ray diffraction studies. As the doping concentration increases from x = 0 to 7.5 wt%, the DC conductivity rises from 1.0528 × 10‑11 to 3.7764 × 10‑9 S cm‑1 and beyond the dopant concentration x > 7.5 wt% the DC conductivity was found to decrease. The frequency dependent dielectric constant decreases with an increase in dopant concentration. The values of electric modulus, AC conductivity and polarization relaxation time extracted from dielectric data spectacles an enhancement behavior in conducting property of PVA nanocomposites with increasing concentration up to x = 7.5 wt% and above x > 7.5 wt% the values found decreasing. The information regarding the surface morphology and chemical configuration of the nanocomposites are determined by using atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis of x-rays (EDS) techniques.

  7. Study on Exploding Wire Compression for Evaluating Electrical Conductivity in Warm-Dense Diamond-Like-Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Toru; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Kudo, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Takashi; Aso, Tsukasa; Harada, Nob.; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2016-03-01

    To improve a coupling efficiency for the fast ignition scheme of the inertial confinement fusion, fast electron behaviors as a function of an electrical conductivity are required. To evaluate the electrical conductivity for low-Z materials as a diamond-like-carbon (DLC), we have proposed a concept to investigate the properties of warm dense matter (WDM) by using pulsed-power discharges. The concept of the evaluation of DLC for WDM is a shock compression driven by an exploding wire discharge with confined by a rigid capillary. The qualitatively evaluation of the electrical conductivity for the WDM DLC requires a small electrical conductivity of the exploding wire. To analyze the electrical conductivity of exploding wire, we have demonstrated an exploding wire discharge in water for gold. The results indicated that the electrical conductivity of WDM gold for 5000 K of temperature has an insulator regime. It means that the shock compression driven by the exploding wire discharge with confined by the rigid capillary is applied for the evaluation of electrical conductivity for WDM DLC.

  8. Electrically-Conductive Polyaramid Cable And Fabric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orban, Ralph F.

    1988-01-01

    Tows coated with metal provide strength and conductance. Cable suitable for use underwater made of electrically conductive tows of metal-coated polyaramid filaments surrounded by electrically insulating jacket. Conductive tows used to make conductive fabrics. Tension borne by metal-coated filaments, so upon release, entire cable springs back to nearly original length without damage.

  9. Electrical Conductivity of Ferritin Proteins by Conductive AFM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Degao; Watt, Gerald D.; Harb, John N.; Davis, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Electrical conductivity measurements were performed on single apoferritin and holoferritin molecules by conductive atomic force microscopy. Conductivity of self-assembled monolayer films of ferritin molecules on gold surfaces was also measured. Holoferritin was 5-25 times more conductive than apoferritin, indicating that for holoferritin most electron-transfer goes through the ferrihydrite core. With 1 V applied, the average electrical currents through single holoferritin and apoferritin molecules were 2.6 PA and 0.19 PA, respectively.

  10. Experimental study of electrical conduction across high-Tc superconductor-graphene interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perconte, David; Cuellar, Fabian; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Dlubak, Bruno; Piquemal-Banci, Maelis; Bernard, Rozenn; Trastoy, Juan; Moreau-Luchaire, Constance; Seneor, Pierre; Villegas, Javier; Kidambi, Piran; Robertson, John; Hofmann, Stephan

    Proximity-induced superconductivity presents unusual features in graphene (i.e. specular Andreev reflection) due to its particular electronic structure. It has been theoretically discussed that, if a d-wave superconductor is put contact with graphene, the latter will sustain d-wave superconductivity, and further unusual features (such as oscillatory behavior) should be observed in the superconductor-graphene junction conductance. Motivated by these prospects, we experimentally investigate YBCO-graphene junctions. We will show differential conductance measurements as a function of temperature, magnetic field, and graphene doping. The observed behavior will be discussed in the frame of the theory developed in. Work supported by Labex Nanosaclay.

  11. Nonstoichiometric zinc oxide and indium-doped zinc oxide: Electrical conductivity and {sup 111}In-TDPAC studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, R.; Sleight, A.W.; Platzer, R.; Gardner, J.A.

    1996-02-15

    Indium-doped zinc oxide powders have been prepared which show room-temperature electrical conductivities as high as 30 {Omega}{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1}. The indium doping apparently occurs as Zn{sub 1-x}In{sub x}O,Zn{sub 1-y}In{sub y}O{sub 1+y/2}, or a combination of these. Optimum conductivity occurs for Zn{sub 1-x}In{sub x}O where the maximum value of x obtained was about 0.5 at%. The degrees of sample reduction were determined by iodimetric titration. Time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) spectroscopy on indium doped zinc oxide is consistent with indium substituting at normal zinc sites in the ZnO lattice. TDPAC studies on zinc oxide annealed under zinc vapors show a second environment for the {sup 111}In probe. In this case, there is an unusually high temperature dependence of the electric field gradient which may be caused by a nearby zinc interstitial. An important conclusion of this work is that zinc interstitials are not ionized and do not therefore contribute significantly to the increased conductivity of reduced zinc oxide.

  12. Electrically conductive fibers thermally isolate temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Waard, R.; Norton, B.

    1966-01-01

    Mounting assembly provides thermal isolation and an electrical path for an unbacked thermal sensor. The sensor is suspended in the center of a plastic mounting ring from four plastic fibers, two of which are coated with an electrically conductive material and connected to electrically conductive coatings on the ring.

  13. Preparation of Electrically Conductive Polymeric Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encinas, J. C.; Castillo-Ortega, M. M.; Rodríguez, F.; Castaño, V. M.

    2015-10-01

    Cellulose acetate porous membranes, coated with polyaniline, were chemically modified with polyelectrolytes to produce films of varying and controlled porosity and electrical conductivity. The highest electrical conductivity was obtained in membranes prepared with poly(styrene sulfonate) with large pore sizes. The electrical properties as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images are discussed.

  14. A study on the DC-electrical and thermal conductivities of epoxy/ZnO composites doped with carbon black

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juwhari, Hassan K.; Zihlif, Awwad; Elimat, Ziad; Ragosta, Giuseppe

    2014-06-01

    Thermo-electrical characterizations of hybrid polymer composites, made of epoxy matrix filled with various zinc oxide (ZnO) concentrations (0, 4.9, 9.9, 14.9, and 19.9 wt%), and reinforced with conductive carbon black (CB) nanoparticles (0.1 wt%), have been investigated as a function of ZnO concentration and temperature. Both the measured DC-electrical and thermal conductivities showed ZnO concentration and temperature dependencies. Increasing the temperature and filler concentrations were reflected in a negative temperature coefficient of resistivity and enhancement of the electrical conductivity as well. The observed increase in the DC conductivity and decrease in the determined activation energy were explained based on the concept of existing paths and connections between the ZnO particles and the conductive CB nanoparticles. Alteration of ZnO concentration with a fixed content of CB nanoparticles and/or temperature was found to be crucial in the thermal conductivity behavior. The addition of CB nanoparticles to the epoxy/ZnO matrix was found to enhance the electrical conduction resulting from the electronic and impurity contributions. Also, the thermal conductivity enhancement was mostly attributed to the heat transferred by phonons and electrons hopping to higher energy levels throughout the thermal processes. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to observe the morphology and elements' distribution in the composites. The observed thermal conductivity behavior was found to correlate well with that of the DC-electrical conductivity as a function of the ZnO content. The overall enhancements in both the measured DC- and thermal conductivities of the prepared hybrid composites are mainly produced through mutual interactions between the filling conductive particles and also from electrons tunneling in the composite's bulk as well.

  15. A numerical study of MHD generalized Couette flow and heat transfer with variable viscosity and electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makinde, O. D.; Onyejekwe, O. O.

    2011-11-01

    The steady flow and heat transfer of an electrically conducting fluid with variable viscosity and electrical conductivity between two parallel plates in the presence of a transverse magnetic field is investigated. It is assumed that the flow is driven by combined action of axial pressure gradient and uniform motion of the upper plate. The governing nonlinear equations of momentum and energy transport are solved numerically using a shooting iteration technique together with a sixth-order Runge-Kutta integration algorithm. Solutions are presented in graphical form and given in terms of fluid velocity, fluid temperature, skin friction and heat transfer rate for various parametric values. Our results reveal that the combined effect of magnetic field, viscosity, exponents of variable properties, various fluid and heat transfer dimensionless quantities and the electrical conductivity variation, have significant impact on the hydromagnetic and electrical properties of the fluid.

  16. Study on the Effects of Adipic Acid on Properties of Dicyandiamide-Cured Electrically Conductive Adhesive and the Interaction Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Wan, Chao; Fu, Yonggao; Chen, Hongtao; Liu, Xiaojian; Li, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    A small quantity of adipic acid was found to improve the performance of dicyandiamide-cured electrically conductive adhesive (ECA) by enhancing its electrical conductivity and mechanical properties. The mechanism of action of the adipic acid and its effects on the ECA were examined. The results indicated that adipic acid replaced the electrically insulating lubricant on the surface of the silver flakes, which significantly improved the electrical conductivity. Specifically, one of the acidic functional groups in adipic acid reacted with the silver flakes, and an amidation reaction occurred between the other acidic functional group in adipic acid and the dicyandiamide, which participated in the curing reaction. Therefore, adipic acid may act as a coupling agent to improve the overall ECA performance.

  17. Study on low temperature DC electrical conductivity of SnO{sub 2} nanomaterial synthesized by simple gel combustion method

    SciTech Connect

    P, Rajeeva M.; S, Naveen C.; Lamani, Ashok R.; Jayanna, H. S.; Bothla, V Prasad

    2015-06-24

    Nanocrystalline tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) material of different particle size was synthesized using gel combustion method by varying oxidizer (HNO{sub 3}) and keeping fuel as a constant. The prepared samples were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Analysis X-ray Spectroscope (EDAX). The effect of oxidizer in the gel combustion method was investigated by inspecting the particle size of nano SnO{sub 2} powder. The particle size was found to be increases with the increase of oxidizer from 8 to 12 moles. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the calcined product showed the formation of high purity tetragonal tin (IV) oxide with the particle size in the range of 17 to 31 nm which was calculated by Scherer’s formula. The particles and temperature dependence of direct (DC) electrical conductivity of SnO{sub 2} nanomaterial was studied using Keithley source meter. The DC electrical conductivity of SnO{sub 2} nanomaterial increases with the temperature from 80 to 300K and decrease with the particle size at constant temperature.

  18. Qualification of black electrically conductive paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. J.; Clatterbuck, C. H.

    1979-01-01

    A paint having low electrical resistance has been developed. Using a low outgassing polyurethane resin, specific amounts of conductive carbon particles were added to produce paint compositions having a range of electrical resistance. Methods of testing for electrical resistance are discussed. The adhesion of these paints has been tested successfully over the temperature range from liquid nitrogen temperature up to 80 C (176 F).

  19. Electrically conductive connection for an electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Hornack, Thomas R.; Chilko, Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    An electrically conductive connection for an electrode assembly of an electrolyte cell in which aluminum is produced by electrolysis in a molten salt is described. The electrode assembly comprises an electrode flask and a conductor rod. The flask has a collar above an area of minimum flask diameter. The electrically conductive connection comprises the electrode flask, the conductor rod and a structure bearing against the collar and the conductor rod for pulling the conductor rod into compressive and electrical contact with the flask.

  20. Damage Detection in Electrically Conductive Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Todd A.

    2002-12-01

    High-technology systems are in need of structures that perform with increased functionality and a reduction in weight, while simultaneously maintaining a high level of performance and reliability. To accomplish this, structural elements must be designed more efficiently and with increased functionality, thereby creating multifunctional structures (MFS). Through the addition of carbon fibers, nanotubes, or particles, composite structures can be made electrically conductive while simultaneously increasing their strength and stiffness to weight ratios. Using the electrical properties of these structures for the purpose of damage detection and location for health and usage monitoring is of particular interest for aerospace structures. One such method for doing this is Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). With EIT, an electric current is applied through a pair of electrodes and the electric potential is recorded at other monitoring electrodes around the area of study. An inverse solution of the governing Maxwell equations is then required to determine the conductivities of discrete areas within the region of interest. However, this method is nearly ill-posed and computationally intensive as it focuses on imaging small changes in conductivity within the region of interest. For locating damage in a medium with an otherwise homogeneous conductivity, an alternative approach is to search for parameters such as the damage location and size. Towards those ends, this study develops an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to determine the state of an electrically conductive region based on applied reference current and electrical potentials at electrodes around the periphery of the region. A significant benefit of the ANN approach is that once trained, the solution of an inverse problem does not require costly computations of the inverse problem. This method also takes advantage of the pattern recognition abilities of neural networks and is a robust solution method in the presence

  1. Inductive Measurement of Plasma Jet Electrical Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Matthew W.; Hawk, Clark W.; Litchford, Ron J.

    2005-01-01

    An inductive probing scheme, originally developed for shock tube studies, has been adapted to measure explosive plasma jet conductivities. In this method, the perturbation of an applied magnetic field by a plasma jet induces a voltage in a search coil, which, in turn, can be used to infer electrical conductivity through the inversion of a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. A 1-inch diameter probe was designed and constructed, and calibration was accomplished by firing an aluminum slug through the probe using a light-gas gun. Exploratory laboratory experiments were carried out using plasma jets expelled from 15-gram high explosive shaped charges. Measured conductivities were in the range of 3 kS/m for unseeded octol charges and 20 kS/m for seeded octol charges containing 2% potassium carbonate by mass.

  2. Electrically conductive polyimides containing silver trifluoroacetylacetonate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rancourt, James D. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Caplan, Maggie L. (Inventor); St. Clair, Anne K. (Inventor); Taylor, Larry T. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Polyimides with enhanced electrical conductivity are produced by adding a silver ion-containing additive to the polyamic acid resin formed by the condensation of an aromatic dianhydride with an aromatic diamine. After thermal treatment the resulting polyimides had surface conductivities in the range of 1.7.times.10.sup.-3 4.5 .OMEGA..sup.-1 making them useful in low the electronics industry as flexible, electrically conductive polymeric films and coatings.

  3. Calibration-free electrical conductivity measurements for highly conductive slags

    SciTech Connect

    MACDONALD,CHRISTOPHER J.; GAO,HUANG; PAL,UDAY B.; VAN DEN AVYLE,JAMES A.; MELGAARD,DAVID K.

    2000-05-01

    This research involves the measurement of the electrical conductivity (K) for the ESR (electroslag remelting) slag (60 wt.% CaF{sub 2} - 20 wt.% CaO - 20 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) used in the decontamination of radioactive stainless steel. The electrical conductivity is measured with an improved high-accuracy-height-differential technique that requires no calibration. This method consists of making continuous AC impedance measurements over several successive depth increments of the coaxial cylindrical electrodes in the ESR slag. The electrical conductivity is then calculated from the slope of the plot of inverse impedance versus the depth of the electrodes in the slag. The improvements on the existing technique include an increased electrochemical cell geometry and the capability of measuring high precision depth increments and the associated impedances. These improvements allow this technique to be used for measuring the electrical conductivity of highly conductive slags such as the ESR slag. The volatilization rate and the volatile species of the ESR slag measured through thermogravimetric (TG) and mass spectroscopy analysis, respectively, reveal that the ESR slag composition essentially remains the same throughout the electrical conductivity experiments.

  4. Electrically conducting polymers for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Gaier, James R.; Good, Brian S.; Sharp, G. R.; Meador, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Current research on electrically conducting polymers from 1974 to the present is reviewed focusing on the development of materials for aeronautic and space applications. Problems discussed include extended pi-systems, pyrolytic polymers, charge-transfer systems, conductive matrix resins for composite materials, and prospects for the use of conducting polymers in space photovoltaics.

  5. Electrically Conductive Polyimide Films Containing Gold Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caplan, Maggie L.; Stoakley, Diane M.; St. Clair, Anne K.

    1994-01-01

    Polyimide films exhibiting high thermo-oxidative stability and including electrically conductive surface layers containing gold made by casting process. Many variations of basic process conditions, ingredients, and sequence of operations possible, and not all resulting versions of process yield electrically conductive films. Gold-containing layer formed on film surface during cure. These metallic gold-containing polyimides used in film and coating applications requiring electrical conductivity, high reflectivity, exceptional thermal stability, and/or mechanical integrity. They also find commercial potential in areas ranging from thin films for satellite antennas to decorative coatings and packaging.

  6. Electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Faussurier, G. Blancard, C.; Combis, P.; Videau, L.

    2014-09-15

    Expressions for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas are derived combining the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation. The infrared divergence is removed assuming a Drude-like behaviour. An analytical expression is obtained for the Lorenz number that interpolates between the cold solid-state and the hot plasma phases. An expression for the electrical resistivity is proposed using the Ziman-Evans formula, from which the thermal conductivity can be deduced using the analytical expression for the Lorenz number. The present method can be used to estimate electrical and thermal conductivities of mixtures. Comparisons with experiment and quantum molecular dynamics simulations are done.

  7. Electrically conductive proppant and methods for detecting, locating and characterizing the electrically conductive proppant

    DOEpatents

    Cannan, Chad; Bartel, Lewis; Palisch, Terrence; Aldridge, David

    2015-01-13

    Electrically conductive proppants and methods for detecting, locating, and characterizing same are provided. The electrically conductive proppant can include a substantially uniform coating of an electrically conductive material having a thickness of at least 500 nm. The method can include injecting a hydraulic fluid into a wellbore extending into a subterranean formation at a rate and pressure sufficient to open a fracture therein, injecting into the fracture a fluid containing the electrically conductive proppant, electrically energizing the earth at or near the fracture, and measuring three dimensional (x, y, and z) components of electric and magnetic field responses at a surface of the earth or in an adjacent wellbore.

  8. Electrically Conductive Metal Nanowire Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaoxiong

    This thesis investigates electrically conductive polymer nanocomposites formulated with metal nanowires for electrostatic discharge and electromagnetic interference shielding. Copper nanowires (CuNWs) of an average length of 1.98 mum and diameter of 25 +/- 4 nm were synthesized. The oxidation reaction of the CuNWs in air can be divided into two stages at weight of 111.2% on TGA curves. The isoconversional activation energies determined by Starink method were used to fit the different master plots. Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation gave the best fit. The surface atoms of the CuNWs are the sites for the random nucleation and the crystallite strain in the CuNWs is the driving force for the growth of nuclei mechanism during the oxidation process. To improve the anti-oxidation properties of the CuNWs, silver was coated onto the surface of the CuNWs in Ag-amine solution. The prepared silver coated CuNWs (AgCuNWs) with silver content of 66.52 wt. %, diameter of 28--33 nm exhibited improved anti-oxidation behavior. The electrical resistivity of the AgCuNW/low density polyethylene (LDPE) nanocomposites is lower than that of the CuNW/LDPE nanocomposites with the same volume percentage of fillers. The nanocomposites formulated with CuNWs and polyethylenes (PEs) were compared to study the different interaction between the CuNWs and the different types of PE matrices. The electrical conductivity of the different PE matrices filled with the same concentrations of CuNWs correlated well with the level of the CuNW dispersion. The intermolecular force and entanglement resulting from the different macromolecular structures such as molecular weight and branching played an important role in the dispersion, electrical properties and rheological behaviour of the CuNW/PE nanocomposites. Ferromagnetic polycrystalline nickel nanowires (NiNWs) were synthesized with uniform diameter of ca. 38 nm and an average length of 2.68 mum. The NiNW linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE

  9. Electric analysis of a conducting hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mimi X.; Yang, Fuqian

    2016-05-01

    Using Legendre polynomials, the boundary value problem of a charged, conducting hemisphere in an infinite space was reduced to the solution of an infinite system of linear, algebraic equations. Analytical solutions of electric charge and electric stress on the surface of the hemisphere were obtained. The numerical analysis revealed non-uniform distributions of the electric charge and electric stress over the surface of the hemisphere with local singularities at the edge of the hemisphere. Both the electric charge and electric stress distributions were expressed in terms of the power function with respect to the distance to the nearest hemisphere edge. The power index for the flat surface is larger than that corresponding to the spherical surface. Numerical result of the capacitance of the conducting hemisphere is the same as the result reported in the literature. There is no net force acting on the hemisphere.

  10. Universal thermal and electrical conductivity from holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sachin

    2010-11-01

    It is known from earlier work of Iqbal, Liu [1] that the boundary transport coefficients such as electrical conductivity (at vanishing chemical potential), shear viscosity etc. at low frequency and finite temperature can be expressed in terms of geometrical quantities evaluated at the horizon. In the case of electrical conductivity, at zero chemical potential gauge field fluctuation and metric fluctuation decouples, resulting in a trivial flow from horizon to boundary. In the presence of chemical potential, the story becomes complicated due to the fact that gauge field and metric fluctuation can no longer be decoupled. This results in a nontrivial flow from horizon to boundary. Though horizon conductivity can be expressed in terms of geometrical quantities evaluated at the horizon, there exist no such neat result for electrical conductivity at the boundary. In this paper we propose an expression for boundary conductivity expressed in terms of geometrical quantities evaluated at the horizon and thermodynamic quantities. We also consider the theory at finite cutoff recently constructed in [2], at radius r c outside the horizon and give an expression for cutoff dependent electrical conductivity ( σ( r c )), which interpolates smoothly between horizon conductivity σ H ( r c → r h ) and boundary conductivity σ B ( r c → ∞). Using the results about the conductivity we gain much insight into the universality of thermal conductivity to viscosity ratio proposed in [3].

  11. Electrical conductivity and rheology of carbon black composites under elongation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starý, Zdeněk

    2015-04-01

    Electrical properties of conductive polymer composites are governed by filler particle structures which are formed in the material during the mixing. Therefore, knowledge of the behavior of conductive particle structures under defined conditions of deformation is necessary to produce materials with balanced electrical and rheological properties. Whereas the electrical conductivity evolution under shear can be nowadays studied even with the commercial rheometers, the investigations under elongation were not performed up to now. In this work simultaneous electrical and rheological measurements in elongation on polystyrene/carbon black composites are introduced. Such kind of experiment can help in understanding the relationships between processing conditions and properties of conductive polymer composites.

  12. Contactless electrical conductivity measurement of metallic submicron-grain material: Application to the study of aluminum with severe plastic deformation.

    PubMed

    Mito, M; Matsui, H; Yoshida, T; Anami, T; Tsuruta, K; Deguchi, H; Iwamoto, T; Terada, D; Miyajima, Y; Tsuji, N

    2016-05-01

    We measured the electrical conductivity σ of aluminum specimen consisting of submicron-grains by observing the AC magnetic susceptibility resulting from the eddy current. By using a commercial platform for magnetic measurement, contactless measurement of the relative electrical conductivity σn of a nonmagnetic metal is possible over a wide temperature (T) range. By referring to σ at room temperature, obtained by the four-terminal method, σn(T) was transformed into σ(T). This approach is useful for cylinder specimens, in which the estimation of the radius and/or volume is difficult. An experiment in which aluminum underwent accumulative roll bonding, which is a severe plastic deformation process, validated this method of evaluating σ as a function of the fraction of high-angle grain boundaries. PMID:27250440

  13. The electrical conductivity of eclogite in Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Y.; Wang, D.

    2011-12-01

    Qinghai-Tibet Plateau is known as its huge crust and complicated plateau plate tectonics. To understand the geodynamics of this plateau, a variety of geology surveys and geophysical observations were carried out. MT results reveal that the high conductivity zones widely present both in the crust and the mantle. These conductivity anomalies were interpreted as the presence of melt by many researchers. The eclogite is considered as one of candidate rock constituting the lower crust and uppermost mantle. Thus, the electrical conductivity eclogite may provide available information to understand the electrical structure of the crust and the mantle beneath Tibet. The starting material is natural eclogite collected from Pianshishan area, which is located in the middle of Qiangtang. The electrical conductivity of eclogite was measured by using the impedance spectrum method at 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 GPa and 372 ~ 803 K. Oxygen fugacity was controlled by the Mo-MoO2 buffer, The sample temperatures were monitored by a NiCr-NiAl thermocouple. The results show that the pressure weakly affect the electrical conductivity of eclogite. The electrical conductivity of eclogite varies from -5.5 S / m to -1.75 S / m with the temperature increased. The electrical conductivity curves change the slope and alter the conduction mechanism at various pressures. The low-temperature activation enthalpy at 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 GP are 0.380, 0.405, 0.446 eV, whereas high-temperature activation enthalpy are 0.986, 0.986, 1.023 eV, respectively. This results were entrapped to Earth's interior and compared with the magnetotelluric(MT) observations, our model is consistent with one of the electrical conductivity structures derived from geophysical observations.

  14. Study on AC-DC Electrical Conductivities in Warm Dense Matter Generated by Pulsed-power Discharge with Isochoric Vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Toru; Ohuchi, Takumi; Takahashi, Takuya; Kawaguchi, Yoshinari; Saito, Hirotaka; Miki, Yasutoshi; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Kikuchi, Takashi; Aso, Tsukasa; Harada, Nob.

    2016-03-01

    To observe AC and DC electrical conductivity in warm dense matter (WDM), we have demonstrated to apply the spectroscopic ellipsometry for a pulsed-power discharge with isochoric vessel. At 10 μs from the beginning of discharge, the generated parameters by using pulsed-power discharge with isochoric vessel are 0.1 ρ s (ρ s: solid density) of density and 4000 K of temperature, respectively. The DC electrical conductivity for above parameters is estimated to be 104 S/m. In order to measure the AC electrical conductivity, we have developed a four-detector spectroscopic ellipsometer with a multichannel spectrometer. The multichannel spectrometer, in which consists of a 16-channel photodiode array, a two-stages voltage adder, and a flat diffraction grating, has 10 MHz of the frequency response with covered visible spectrum. For applying the four-detector spectroscopic ellipsometer, we observe the each observation signal evolves the polarized behavior compared to the ratio as I 1/I 2.

  15. Electrically conductive connection for an electrode

    DOEpatents

    Hornack, T.R.; Chilko, R.J.

    1986-09-02

    An electrically conductive connection for an electrode assembly of an electrolyte cell in which aluminum is produced by electrolysis in a molten salt is described. The electrode assembly comprises an electrode flask and a conductor rod. The flask has a collar above an area of minimum flask diameter. The electrically conductive connection comprises the electrode flask, the conductor rod and a structure bearing against the collar and the conductor rod for pulling the conductor rod into compressive and electrical contact with the flask. 2 figs.

  16. Making Complex Electrically Conductive Patterns on Cloth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Andrew; Fink, Patrick W.; Dobbins, Justin A.; Lin, Greg Y.; Scully, Robert C.; Trevino, Robert

    2008-01-01

    A method for automated fabrication of flexible, electrically conductive patterns on cloth substrates has been demonstrated. Products developed using this method, or related prior methods, are instances of a technology known as 'e-textiles,' in which electrically conductive patterns ar formed in, and on, textiles. For many applications, including high-speed digital circuits, antennas, and radio frequency (RF) circuits, an e-textile method should be capable of providing high surface conductivity, tight tolerances for control of characteristic impedances, and geometrically complex conductive patterns. Unlike prior methods, the present method satisfies all three of these criteria. Typical patterns can include such circuit structures as RF transmission lines, antennas, filters, and other conductive patterns equivalent to those of conventional printed circuits. The present method overcomes the limitations of the prior methods for forming the equivalent of printed circuits on cloth. A typical fabrication process according to the present method involves selecting the appropriate conductive and non-conductive fabric layers to build the e-textile circuit. The present method uses commercially available woven conductive cloth with established surface conductivity specifications. Dielectric constant, loss tangent, and thickness are some of the parameters to be considered for the non-conductive fabric layers. The circuit design of the conductive woven fabric is secured onto a non-conductive fabric layer using sewing, embroidery, and/or adhesive means. The portion of the conductive fabric that is not part of the circuit is next cut from the desired circuit using an automated machine such as a printed-circuit-board milling machine or a laser cutting machine. Fiducials can be used to align the circuit and the cutting machine. Multilayer circuits can be built starting with the inner layer and using conductive thread to make electrical connections between layers.

  17. Anisotropy of electrical conductivity in dry olivine

    SciTech Connect

    Du Frane, W L; Roberts, J J; Toffelmier, D A; Tyburczy, J A

    2005-04-13

    [1] The electrical conductivity ({sigma}) was measured for a single crystal of San Carlos olivine (Fo{sub 89.1}) for all three principal orientations over oxygen fugacities 10{sup -7} < fO{sub 2} < 10{sup 1} Pa at 1100, 1200, and 1300 C. Fe-doped Pt electrodes were used in conjunction with a conservative range of fO{sub 2}, T, and time to reduce Fe loss resulting in data that is {approx}0.15 log units higher in conductivity than previous studies. At 1200 C and fO{sub 2} = 10{sup -1} Pa, {sigma}{sub [100]} = 10{sup -2.27} S/m, {sigma}{sub [010]} = 10{sup -2.49} S/m, {sigma}{sub [001]} = 10{sup -2.40} S/m. The dependences of {sigma} on T and fO{sub 2} have been simultaneously modeled with undifferentiated mixed conduction of small polarons and Mg vacancies to obtain steady-state fO{sub 2}-independent activation energies: Ea{sub [100]} = 0.32 eV, Ea{sub [010]} = 0.56 eV, Ea{sub [001]} = 0.71 eV. A single crystal of dry olivine would provide a maximum of {approx}10{sup 0.4} S/m azimuthal {sigma} contrast for T < 1500 C. The anisotropic results are combined to create an isotropic model with Ea = 0.53 eV.

  18. Electrically conductive containment vessel for molten aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Scott, D.G.

    1984-06-25

    The present invention is directed to a containment vessel which is particularly useful in melting aluminum. The vessel of the present invention is a multilayered vessel characterized by being electrically conductive, essentially nonwettable by and nonreactive with molten aluminum. The vessel is formed by coating a tantalum substrate of a suitable configuration with a mixture of yttria and particulate metal 10 borides. The yttria in the coating inhibits the wetting of the coating while the boride particulate material provides the electrical conductivity through the vessel. The vessel of the present invention is particularly suitable for use in melting aluminum by ion bombardment.

  19. Electrically conductive containment vessel for molten aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Scott, Donald G.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a containment vessel which is particularly useful in melting aluminum. The vessel of the present invention is a multilayered vessel characterized by being electrically conductive, essentially nonwettable by and nonreactive with molten aluminum. The vessel is formed by coating a tantalum substrate of a suitable configuration with a mixture of yttria and particulate metal borides. The yttria in the coating inhibits the wetting of the coating while the boride particulate material provides the electrical conductivity through the vessel. The vessel of the present invention is particularly suitable for use in melting aluminum by ion bombardment.

  20. Electrical Conduction in Transition-Metal Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grado-Caffaro, M. A.; Grado-Caffaro, M.

    2016-04-01

    We predict that a given transition-metal salt as, for example, a K2CuCl4·2H2O-type compound, can behave as an electrical conductor in the paramagnetic case. In fact, we determine the electrical conductance in a salt of this type. This conductance is found to be quantised in agreement with previous well-known results. Related mathematical expressions in the context of superexchange interaction are obtained. In addition, we determine the corresponding (macroscopically viewed) current density and the associated electron wave functions.

  1. Electrical conductivity in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baym, Gordon; Heiselberg, Henning

    1997-10-01

    We calculate the electrical conductivity in the early universe at temperatures below as well as above the electroweak vacuum scale, Tc~=100 GeV. Debye and dynamical screening of electric and magnetic interactions leads to a finite conductivity, σel~T/α ln(1/α), at temperatures well below Tc. At temperatures above, W+/- charge-exchange processes-analogous to color exchange through gluons in QCD-effectively stop left-handed charged leptons. However, right-handed leptons can carry current, resulting in σel/T being only a factor ~cos4 θW smaller than at temperatures below Tc.

  2. Electrical conductivity studies in (Ag3AsS3)x(As2S3)1-x superionic glasses and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenyak, I. P.; Neimet, Yu. Yu.; Kranjčec, M.; Solomon, A. M.; Orliukas, A. F.; Kežionis, A.; Kazakevičius, E.; Šalkus, T.

    2014-01-01

    Compositional, frequency, and temperature studies of impedance and electrical conductivity in (Ag3AsS3)x(As2S3)1-x superionic glasses and composites were performed. Frequency range from 10 Hz to 3 × 109 Hz and temperature interval 300-400 K were used for the measurements. Compositional dependences of electrical conductivity and activation energy are analyzed; the most substantial changes are observed with the transition from (Ag3AsS3)0.4(As2S3)0.6 glass to (Ag3AsS3)0.5(As2S3)0.5 composite. With increase of Ag3AsS3 content, the investigated materials are found to have crystalline inclusions and show the two-phase composite nature. Addition of Ag3AsS3 leads to the increase of electrical conductivity whereas the activation energy decreases.

  3. Percolation-tunneling modeling for the study of the electric conductivity in LiFePO 4 based Li-ion battery cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awarke, Ali; Lauer, Sven; Pischinger, Stefan; Wittler, Michael

    In this work a percolation-tunneling based model is developed and used to study the electrical conductivity of LiFePO 4 composite Li-ion battery cathodes. The active and conductive additive particles are explicitly represented using a random hybrid geometric-mechanical packing algorithm, while the inter-particle electric transport is achieved by including electron tunneling effects. The model is adjusted to the experimental data of a PVDF/C composite with different mixing ratios. The performed study aims to capture the variation of the conductivity of the LiFePO 4 cathode with particle sizes, carbon black particles wt.% and carbon coating wt.%. It is found that ultra fine carbon-free nanosized particles (∼50 nm), which are favorable for improved diffusion, would require a relatively high amount of carbon black (15 wt.%) putting at risk the gravimetric capacity of the cell. On the other hand, particles with 1 wt.% continuous carbon coating delivers already sufficient conductivity for all particle sizes without any additives. The further addition of conductive phases is at the risk of redundancy in view of conductivity enhancements. Although continuous carbon coating with loading as low as 1 wt.% is thought to be the most efficient way to achieve electric conductivity, its manufacturability and effect on Li ion diffusion remain to be assessed.

  4. Sintering, Microstructure, and Electrical Conductivity of Zirconia-Molybdenum Cermet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanling; Tang, Lei; Zhang, Jieyu

    2015-08-01

    Monolithic zirconia-molybdenum ( m-ZrO2/Mo) cermets of different compositions (5-40 vol.% Mo) and different initial Mo particles sizes (0.08-13 μm) were prepared by traditional powder metallurgy process. The influences of metal content and initial particle sizes on the densification behavior, microstructure, and electrical conductivity of the cermets were studied. A percolation threshold value was obtained about 17.1 vol.% molybdenum fraction, above which a sharp increase in the electrical conductivity was observed. The temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity of cermets was studied. The cermet containing 5 vol.% Mo showed the ionic nature of the conductivity, while the metallic nature was observed in the samples of Mo fraction up to 16 vol.%. The activation of conductivity for ionic type of conductivity and the temperature coefficient of resistivity as well as the effect of porosity on electronic type conductivity are discussed.

  5. Electric conductivity of plasma in solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertkov, A. D.

    1995-01-01

    One of the most important parameters in MHD description of the solar wind is the electric conductivity of plasma. There exist now two quite different approaches to the evaluation of this parameter. In the first one a value of conductivity taken from the most elaborated current theory of plasma should be used in calculations. The second one deals with the empirical, phenomenological value of conductivity. E.g.: configuration of interplanetary magnetic field, stretched by the expanding corona, depends on the magnitude of electrical conductivity of plasma in the solar wind. Knowing the main empirical features of the field configuration, one may estimate the apparent phenomenological value of resistance. The estimations show that the electrical conductivity should be approximately 10(exp 13) times smaller than that calculated by Spitzer. It must be noted that the empirical value should be treated with caution. Due to the method of its obtaining it may be used only for 'large-scale' description of slow processes like coronal expansion. It cannot be valid for 'quick' processes, changing the state of plasma, like collisions with obstacles, e.g., planets and vehicles. The second approach is well known in large-scale planetary hydrodynamics, stemming from the ideas of phenomenological thermodynamics. It could formulate real problems which should be solved by modern plasma physics, oriented to be adequate for complicated processes in space.

  6. Temperature dependent DC electrical conductivity studies of ZnO nanoparticle thick films prepared by simple solution combustion method

    SciTech Connect

    Naveen, C. S. Jayanna, H. S. Lamani, Ashok R. Rajeeva, M. P.

    2014-04-24

    ZnO nanoparticles of different size were prepared by varying the molar ratio of glycine and zinc nitrate hexahydrate as fuel and oxidizer (F/O = 0.8, 1.11, 1.7) by simple solution combustion method. Powder samples were characterized by UV-Visible spectrophotometer, X-ray diffractometer, Scanning electron microscope (SEM). DC electrical conductivity measurements at room temperature and in the temperature range of 313-673K were carried out for the prepared thick films and it was found to increase with increase of temperature which confirms the semiconducting nature of the samples. Activation energies were calculated and it was found that, F/O molar ratio 1.7 has low E{sub AL} (Low temperature activation energy) and high E{sub AH} (High temperature activation energy) compared to other samples.

  7. Experimental and theoretical study of AC electrical conduction mechanisms of Organic-inorganic hybrid compound Bis (4-acetylanilinium) tetrachlorocadmiate (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jellibi, A.; Chaabane, I.; Guidara, K.

    2016-06-01

    A new organic-inorganic bis (4-acetylaniline) tetrachlorocadmate [C8H10NO]2[CdCl4] can be obtained by slow evaporation at room temperature and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. It crystallized in an orthorhombic system (Cmca space group). The material electrical properties were characterized by impedance spectroscopy technique in the frequency range from 209 Hz-5 MHz and temperature 413 to 460 K. Besides, the impedance plots show semicircle arcs at different temperatures and an electrical equivalent circuit has been proposed to interpret the impedance results. The circuits consist of the parallel combination of a resistance (R), capacitance (C) and fractal capacitance (CPE). The variation of the exponent s as a function of temperature suggested that the conduction mechanism in Bis (4-acetylanilinium) tetrachlorocadmiate compound is governed by two processes which can be ascribed to a hopping transport mechanism: correlated barrier hopping (CBH) model below 443 K and the small polaron tunneling (SPT) model above 443 K.

  8. Dislocation electrical conductivity of synthetic diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Samsonenko, S. N. Samsonenko, N. D.

    2009-05-15

    A relationship between the electric resistance of single-crystal homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films and their internal structure has been investigated. It is established that the electrical conductivity of undoped homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films is directly related to the dislocation density in them. A relation linking the resistivity {rho} ({approx}10{sup 13}-10{sup 15} {omega} cm) with the dislocation density {gamma} ({approx}10{sup 14}-4 x 10{sup 16} m{sup -2}) is obtained. The character of this correlation is similar for both groups of homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films. Thin ({approx}1-8 {mu}m) homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films with small-angle dislocation boundaries between mosaic blocks exhibit dislocation conductivity. The activation energy of dislocation acceptor centers was calculated from the temperature dependence of the conductivity and was found to be {approx}0.3 eV. The conduction of thick diamond films (h > 10 {mu}m) with the resistivity {rho} {approx} 10{sup 8} {omega} cm is determined by the conduction of intercrystallite boundaries, which have a nondiamond hydrogenated structure. The electronic properties of the diamond films are compared with those of natural semiconductor diamonds of types IIb and Ic, in which dislocation acceptor centers have activation energies in the range 0.2-0.35 eV and are responsible for hole conduction.

  9. Electrical conductivity of acidic sulfate solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majima, Hiroshi; Peters, Ernest; Awakura, Yasuhiro; Park, Sung Kook

    1987-03-01

    The electrical conductivities of the aqueous solution system of H2SO4-MSO4 (involving ZnSO4, MgSO4, Na2SO4, and (NH4)2SO4), reported by Tozawa et al., were examined in terms of a (H2O) and H+ ion concentration. The equations to compute the concentrations of various species in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions containing metal sulfates were derived for a typical example of the H2SO4-ZnSO4-MgSO4-(Na2SO4)-H2O system. It was found that the H+ ion concentrations in concentrated sulfuric acid solutions corresponding to practical zinc electrowinning solutions are very high and remain almost constant with or without the addition of metal sulfates. The addition of metal sulfates to aqueous sulfuric acid solution causes a decrease in electrical conductivity, and this phenomenon is attributed to a decrease in water activity, which reflects a decrease in the amount of free water. The relationship between conductivity and water activity at a constant H+ ion concentration is independent of the kind of sulfates added. On the other hand, any increase in H+ ion concentration results in an increase in electrical conductivity. A novel method for the prediction of electrical conductivity of acidic sulfate solution is proposed that uses the calculated data of water activity and the calculated H+ ion concentration. Also, the authors examined an extension of the Robinson-Bower equation to calculate water activity in quarternary solutions based on molarity instead of molality, and found that such calculated values are in satisfactory agreement with those determined experimentally by a transpiration method.

  10. Electrically conductive palladium containing polyimide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. T.; St.clair, A. K.; Carver, V. C.; Furtsch, T. A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Lightweight, high temperature resistant, electrically conductive, palladium containing polyimide films and methods for their preparation are described. A palladium (II) ion-containing polyamic acid solution is prepared by reacting an aromatic dianhydride with an equimolar quantity of a palladium II ion-containing salt or complex and the reactant product is cast as a thin film onto a surface and cured at approximately 300 C to produce a flexible electrically conductive cyclic palladium containing polyimide. The source of palladium ions is selected from the group of palladium II compounds consisting of LiPdCl4, PdS(CH3)2Cl2Na2PdCl4, and PdCl2. The films have application to aerodynamic and space structures and in particular to the relieving of space charging effects.

  11. Electrically conducting superhydrophobic microtextured carbon nanotube nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffrey, Paul O.; Gupta, Mool C.

    2014-09-01

    We report a simple and inexpensive method of producing an electrically conductive superhydrophobic polymer surface by adding multiwall carbon nanotubes directly into the polymer poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) matrix and replicating micro/nanotexture using a replication master prepared by ultrafast-laser microtexturing process. No additional coatings on conducting PDMS are required to achieve water contact angles greater than 161°. The conductivity can be controlled by changing the percent MWCNT added to PDMS and at a bulk loading of 4.4 wt% we report a conductivity improvement over pure PDMS by a factor of more than 1011 with electrical resistivity ρ = 761 Ω cm. This combined behavior of a conductive, superhydrophobic nanocomposite has exciting applications for allowing a new class of enclosures providing EMI shielding, water repellency and sensing to provide built-in temperature feedback. The effect of temperature on the nanocomposite was investigated and a negative temperature coefficient of resistance (-0.037 Ω/K) similar to that of a thermistor was observed.

  12. Electrically conducting polyimide film containing tin complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, Anne K. (Inventor); Ezzell, Stephen A. (Inventor); Taylor, Larry T. (Inventor); Boston, Harold G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a thermally-stable SnO.sub.2 -surfaced polyimide film wherein the electrical conductivity of the SnO.sub.2 surface is within the range of about 3.0.times.10.sup.-3 to about 1.times.10.sup.-2 ohms.sup.-1,. Also disclosed is a method of preparing this film from a solution containing a polyamic acid and SnCl.sub.4 (DMSO).sub.2.

  13. The effect of water on the electrical conductivity of olivine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Duojun; Mookherjee, Mainak; Xu, Yousheng; Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2006-10-26

    It is well known that water (as a source of hydrogen) affects the physical and chemical properties of minerals--for example, plastic deformation and melting temperature--and accordingly plays an important role in the dynamics and geochemical evolution of the Earth. Estimating the water content of the Earth's mantle by direct sampling provides only a limited data set from shallow regions (<200 km depth). Geophysical observations such as electrical conductivity are considered to be sensitive to water content, but there has been no experimental study to determine the effect of water on the electrical conductivity of olivine, the most abundant mineral in the Earth's mantle. Here we report a laboratory study of the dependence of the electrical conductivity of olivine aggregates on water content at high temperature and pressure. The electrical conductivity of synthetic polycrystalline olivine was determined from a.c. impedance measurements at a pressure of 4 GPa for a temperature range of 873-1,273 K for water contents of 0.01-0.08 wt%. The results show that the electrical conductivity is strongly dependent on water content but depends only modestly on temperature. The water content dependence of conductivity is best explained by a model in which electrical conduction is due to the motion of free protons. A comparison of the laboratory data with geophysical observations suggests that the typical oceanic asthenosphere contains approximately 10(-2) wt% water, whereas the water content in the continental upper mantle is less than approximately 10(-3) wt%. PMID:17066032

  14. The electrical conductivity of sodium polysulfide melts

    SciTech Connect

    Meihui Wang

    1992-06-01

    The sodium polysulfide melt has been described by a macroscopic model. This model considers the melt to be composed of sodium cations, monosulfide anions, and neutral sulfur solvent. The transport equations of concentrated-solution theory are used to derived the governing equations for this binaryelectrolyte melt model. These equations relate measurable transport properties to fundamental transport parameters. The focus of this research is to measure the electrical conductivity of sodium polysulfide melts and calculate one of fundamental transport parameters from the experimental data. The conductance cells used in the conductivity measurements are axisymmetric cylindrical cells with a microelectrode. The electrode effects, including double-layer capacity, charge transfer resistance, and concentration overpotential, were minimized by the use of the alternating current at an adequately high frequency. The high cell constants of the conductance cells not only enhanced the experimental accuracy but also made the electrode effects negligible. The electrical conductivities of sodium polysulfide Na{sub 2}S{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}S{sub 5} were measured as a function of temperature (range: 300 to 360{degree}C). Variations between experiments were only up to 2%. The values of the Arrhenius activation energy derived from the experimental data are about 33 kJ/mol. The fundamental transport parameter which quantifies the interaction within sodium cations and monosulfide anions are of interest and expected to be positive. Values of it were calculated from the experimental conductivity data and most of them are positive. Some negative values were obtained probably due to the experimental errors of transference number, diffusion coefficient, density or conductivity data.

  15. Electrical Conductivity Study of Polymer Electrolyte Magnetic Nanocomposite Based Poly(Vinyl) Alcohol (PVA) Doping Lithium and Nickel Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aji, Mahardika Prasetya; Rahmawati, Silvia, Bijaksana, Satria; Khairurrijal, Abdullah, Mikrajuddin

    2010-10-01

    Composite polymer electrolyte magnetic systems composed of poly(vinyl) alcohol (PVA) as the host polymer, lithium and nickel salt as dopant were studied. The effect upon addition of lithium ions in polimer PVA had been enhanced conductivity with the increase of lithium concentration. The conductivity values were 1.19x10-6, 1.25x10-5, 4.89x-5, 1.88x10-4, and 1.33x10-3 Sṡcm-1 for pure PVA and 1%, 3%, 5% and 7% LiOH complexed PVA, respectively. Meanwhile, the addition nickel salt into polymer electrolyte PVA-LiOH does not significantly change of conductivity value, on order 10-3 Sṡcm-1. The ionic transport is dominantly regarded by Li+ ions present in polymer electrolyte magnetic because the atomic mass Li+ is smaller than Ni2+. The absence of external magnetic field in polimer electrolyte magnetic causes the existence Ni2+ ions not significantly affected of conductivity.

  16. Electrical conductivity of rocks at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkhomenko, E. I.; Bondarenko, A. T.

    1986-01-01

    The results of studies of the electrical conductivity in the most widely distributed types of igneous rocks, at temperatures of up to 1200 C, at atmospheric pressure, and also at temperatures of up to 700 C and at pressures of up to 20,000 kg/sq cm are described. The figures of electrical conductivity, of activaation energy and of the preexponential coefficient are presented and the dependence of these parameters on the petrochemical parameters of the rocks are reviewed. The possible electrical conductivities for the depository, granite and basalt layers of the Earth's crust and of the upper mantle are presented, as well as the electrical conductivity distribution to the depth of 200 to 240 km for different geological structures.

  17. [The electrical conductivity of triggered lightning channel].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua-ming; Yuan, Ping; Su, Mao-gen; Lü, Shi-hua

    2007-10-01

    Spectra of return strokes for artificial triggered lightning were obtained by optical multi-channel analyzer (OMA) in Shandong region. Compared with previous spectra of natural lightning, additional lines of ArI 602.5 nm and ArII 666.5 nm were observed. Under the model of local thermodynamic equilibrium, electronic temperatures of the lightning channel plasma were obtained according to the relative line intensities. Meanwhile, with semi-empirical method the electron density was obtained by Halpha line Stark broadening. In combination with plasma theory, electrical conductivity of the lightning channel has been calculated for the first time, and the characteristic of conductivity for lightning channel was also discussed. The relation between the electrical conductivity of channel and the return stroke current was analyzed, providing reference data for further work on computing return stroke current. Results show that the lightning channel is a good conductor, and electrons are the main carrier of channel current. The brightness of artificial triggered lightning channel is usually higher than that of natural lightning, and its current is smaller than that of the natural lightning. PMID:18306764

  18. Electrostatic Discharge Sensitivity and Electrical Conductivity of Composite Energetic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Daniels; Daniel J. Prentice; Chelsea Weir; Michelle L. Pantoya; Gautham Ramachandran; Tim Dallas

    2013-02-01

    Composite energetic material response to electrical stimuli was investigated and a correlation between electrical conductivity and ignition sensitivity was examined. The composites consisted of micrometer particle aluminum combined with another metal, metal oxide, or fluoropolymer. Of the nine tested mixtures, aluminum with copper oxide was the only mixture to ignite by electrostatic discharge with minimum ignition energy (MIE) of 25 mJ and an electrical conductivity of 1246.25 nS; two orders of magnitude higher than the next composite. This study showed a similar trend in MIE for ignition triggered by a discharged spark compared with a thermal hot wire source.

  19. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, thermal analysis and electrical conductivity studies of Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) vitamin B2 complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refat, Moamen S.; Moussa, Mohamed A. A.; Mohamed, Soha F.

    2011-05-01

    Riboflavin (RF) complexes of Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) were successfully synthesized. Structures of metal complexes obtained were confirmed and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, and infrared spectra. DC electrical conductivity measurements indicated that the alkaline earth metal (II) complexes of RF ligand are non-electrolytes. Elemental analysis of chelates suggest that the metal(II) ligand ratio is 1:2 with structure formula as [M(RF) 2( X) 2]· nH 2O. Infrared assignments clearly show that RF ligand coordinated as a bidentate feature through azomethine nitrogen of pyrazine ring and C dbnd O of pyrimidine-2,4-dione. Thermal analyses of Mg(II), Ca(II), Sr(II) and Ba(II) complexes were investigated using (TG/DSC) under atmospheric nitrogen between 30 and 800 °C. The surface morphology of the complexes was studied by SEM. The electrical conductivities of RF and its metal complexes were also measured with DC electrical conductivity in the temperature range from room to 483 K.

  20. Electrical Conductivity of the Lower-Mantle Ferropericlase

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, J F; Weir, S T; Jackson, D D; Evans, W J; Vohra, Y K; Qiu, W; Yoo, C S

    2007-04-19

    Electrical conductivity of the lower-mantle ferropericlase-(Mg{sub 0.75},Fe{sub 0.25})O has been studied using designer diamond anvils to pressures over one megabar and temperatures up to 500 K. The electrical conductivity of (Mg{sub 0.75},Fe{sub 0.25})O gradually rises by an order of magnitude up to 50 GPa but decreases by a factor of approximately three between 50 to 70 GPa. This decrease in the electrical conductivity is attributed to the electronic high-spin to low-spin transition of iron in ferropericlase. That is, the electronic spin transition of iron results in a decrease in the mobility and/or density of the charge transfer carriers in the low-spin ferropericlase. The activation energy of the low-spin ferropericlase is 0.27 eV at 101 GPa, similar to that of the high-spin ferropericlase at relatively low temperatures. Our results indicate that low-spin ferropericlase exhibits lower electrical conductivity than high-spin ferropericlase, which needs to be considered in future geomagnetic models for the lower mantle. The extrapolated electrical conductivity of the low-spin ferropericlase, together with that of silicate perovskite, at the lower mantle pressure-temperature conditions is consistent with the model electrical conductivity profile of the lower mantle.

  1. Numerical recovery of certain discontinuous electrical conductivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Kurt

    1991-01-01

    The inverse problem of recovering an electrical conductivity of the form Gamma(x) = 1 + (k-1)(sub Chi(D)) (Chi(D) is the characteristic function of D) on a region omega is a subset of 2-dimensional Euclid space from boundary data is considered, where D is a subset of omega and k is some positive constant. A linearization of the forward problem is formed and used in a least squares output method for approximately solving the inverse problem. Convergence results are proved and some numerical results presented.

  2. Electrical Conductivity Calculations from the Purgatorio Code

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S B; Isaacs, W A; Sterne, P A; Wilson, B G; Sonnad, V; Young, D A

    2006-01-09

    The Purgatorio code [Wilson et al., JQSRT 99, 658-679 (2006)] is a new implementation of the Inferno model describing a spherically symmetric average atom embedded in a uniform plasma. Bound and continuum electrons are treated using a fully relativistic quantum mechanical description, giving the electron-thermal contribution to the equation of state (EOS). The free-electron density of states can also be used to calculate scattering cross sections for electron transport. Using the extended Ziman formulation, electrical conductivities are then obtained by convolving these transport cross sections with externally-imposed ion-ion structure factors.

  3. Electrically conductive polyurethanes for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Charles M.; Nash, M. A.; Poole-Warren, Laura A.

    2005-02-01

    Electrical interfacing with neural tissue poses significant problems due to host response to the material. This response generally leads to fibrous encapsulation and increased impedance across the electrode. In neural electrodes such as cochlear implants, an elastomeric material like silicone is used as an insulator for the metal electrode. This project ultimately aims to produce a polymer electrode with elastomeric mechanical properties, metal like conductivity and capability. The approach taken was to produce a nanocomposite elastomeric material based on polyurethane (PU) and carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are ideal due to their high aspect ratio as well as being a ballistic conductor. The choice of PU is based on its elastomeric properties, processability and biocompatibility. Multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs) were dispersed ultrasonically in various dispersive solutions before being added at up to 20wt% to a 5wt% PU (Pellethane80A) in Dimethylacetamide (DMAc). Films were then solvent cast in a vacuum oven overnight. The resulting films were tested for conductivity using a two-probe technique and mechanically tested using an Instron tensiometer. The percolation threshold (p) of the PU/MWNT films occurred at loadings of between 7 and 10 wt% in this polymer system. Conductivity of the films (above p) was comparable to those for similar systems reported in the literature at up to approximately 7x10-2 Scm-1. Although PU stiffness increased with increased %loading of nanotubes, all composites were highly flexible and maintained elastomeric properties. From these preliminary results we have demonstrated electrical conductivity. So far it is evident that a superior percolation threshold is dependent on the degree of dispersion of the nanotubes. This has prompted work into investigating other preparations of the films, including melt-processing and electrospinning.

  4. Study of pressure induced polyamorphic transition in Ce-based ternary BMG using in situ x-ray scattering and electrical conductivity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Ma, C.; Tang, R.; Li, L.; Liu, H.; Gao, C.; Yang, W.

    2015-12-01

    In situ high energy x-ray scattering and electrical conductivity measurements on Ce70Al10Cu20 bulk metallic glass have been conducted using a diamond anvil cell (DAC) in conjunction with synchrotron x-rays or a laboratory electrical measurement system. The relative volumetric change (V/V0) as a function of pressure is inferred using the first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP) and the universal fractional noncubic power law[1]. The result indicates a pressure-induced polyamorphic transition at about 4 GPa in the ternary system. While the observed pressure of such polyamorphic transition in the Ce-base binary BMG is not very sensitive to its composition based on some of the previous studies[2, 3], this study indicates that such transition pressure increases considerably when a new component is added to the system. In the electrical conductivity measurement, a significant resistance change was observed in the pressure range coupled to polyamorphic transition. More discussions will be given regarding the electrical conductivity behavior of this system under high pressure to illustrate the delocalization of 4f electrons as the origin of the observed polyamorphic transition. References: 1. Zeng Q, Kono Y, Lin Y, Zeng Z, Wang J, Sinogeikin SV, Park C, Meng Y, Yang W, Mao H-K (2014) Universal fractional noncubic power law for density of metallic glasses. Physical Review Letters 112: 185502-185502 2. Zeng Q-S, Ding Y, Mao WL, Yang W, Sinogeikin SV, Shu J, Mao H-K, Jiang JZ (2010) Origin of pressure-induced polyamorphism in Ce75Al25 metallic glass. Physical Review Letters 104: 105702-105702 3. Sheng HW, Liu HZ, Cheng YQ, Wen J, Lee PL, Luo WK, Shastri SD, Ma E (2007) Polyamorphism in a metallic glass. Nature Materials DOI: 10.1038/nmat1839.

  5. Conductive network formation of carbon nanotubes in elastic polymer microfibers and its effect on the electrical conductance: Experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyun Woo; Kim, Sang Won; Kim, Jeongmin; Kim, Un Jeong; Im, Kyuhyun; Park, Jong-Jin; Sung, Bong June

    2016-05-01

    We investigate how the electrical conductance of microfibers (made of polymers and conductive nanofillers) decreases upon uniaxial deformation by performing both experiments and simulations. Even though various elastic conductors have been developed due to promising applications for deformable electronic devices, the mechanism at a molecular level for electrical conductance change has remained elusive. Previous studies proposed that the decrease in electrical conductance would result from changes in either distances or contact numbers between conductive fillers. In this work, we prepare microfibers of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)/polyvinyl alcohol composites and investigate the electrical conductance and the orientation of SWCNTs upon uniaxial deformation. We also perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations, which reproduce experimental results for the relative decrease in conductance and the SWCNTs orientation. We investigate the electrical networks of SWCNTs in microfibers and find that the decrease in the electrical conductance upon uniaxial deformation should be attributed to a subtle change in the topological structure of the electrical network.

  6. Conductive network formation of carbon nanotubes in elastic polymer microfibers and its effect on the electrical conductance: Experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun Woo; Kim, Sang Won; Kim, Jeongmin; Kim, Un Jeong; Im, Kyuhyun; Park, Jong-Jin; Sung, Bong June

    2016-05-21

    We investigate how the electrical conductance of microfibers (made of polymers and conductive nanofillers) decreases upon uniaxial deformation by performing both experiments and simulations. Even though various elastic conductors have been developed due to promising applications for deformable electronic devices, the mechanism at a molecular level for electrical conductance change has remained elusive. Previous studies proposed that the decrease in electrical conductance would result from changes in either distances or contact numbers between conductive fillers. In this work, we prepare microfibers of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)/polyvinyl alcohol composites and investigate the electrical conductance and the orientation of SWCNTs upon uniaxial deformation. We also perform extensive Monte Carlo simulations, which reproduce experimental results for the relative decrease in conductance and the SWCNTs orientation. We investigate the electrical networks of SWCNTs in microfibers and find that the decrease in the electrical conductance upon uniaxial deformation should be attributed to a subtle change in the topological structure of the electrical network. PMID:27208970

  7. Electrical conduction by interface states in semiconductor heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Yacoubi, M.; Evrard, R.; Nguyen, N. D.; Schmeits, M.

    2000-04-01

    Electrical conduction in semiconductor heterojunctions containing defect states in the interface region is studied. As the classical drift-diffusion mechanism cannot in any case explain electrical conduction in semiconductor heterojunctions, tunnelling involving interface states is often considered as a possible conduction path. A theoretical treatment is made where defect states in the interface region with a continuous energy distribution are included. Electrical conduction through this defect band then allows the transit of electrons from the conduction band of one semiconductor to the valence band of the second component. The analysis is initiated by electrical measurements on n-CdS/p-CdTe heterojunctions obtained by chemical vapour deposition of CdS on (111) oriented CdTe single crystals, for which current-voltage and capacitance-frequency results are shown. The theoretical analysis is based on the numerical resolution of Poisson's equation and the continuity equations of electrons, holes and defect states, where a current component corresponding to the defect band conduction is explicitly included. Comparison with the experimental curves shows that this formalism yields an efficient tool to model the conduction process through the interface region. It also allows us to determine critical values of the physical parameters when a particular step in the conduction mechanism becomes dominant.

  8. Carbon Fibers Conductivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. Y.; Butkus, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the process of electrical conduction in polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers, calculations were carried out on cluster models of the fiber consisting of carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen atoms using the modified intermediate neglect of differential overlap (MINDO) molecular orbital (MO) method. The models were developed based on the assumption that PAN carbon fibers obtained with heat treatment temperatures (HTT) below 1000 C retain nitrogen in a graphite-like lattice. For clusters modeling an edge nitrogen site, analysis of the occupied MO's indicated an electron distribution similar to that of graphite. A similar analysis for the somewhat less stable interior nitrogen site revealed a partially localized II electron distribution around the nitrogen atom. The differences in bonding trends and structural stability between edge and interior nitrogen clusters led to a two-step process proposed for nitrogen evolution with increasing HTT.

  9. Computational analysis of electrical conduction in hybrid nanomaterials with embedded non-penetrating conductive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jizhe; Naraghi, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a comprehensive multi-resolution two-dimensional (2D) resistor network model is proposed to analyze the electrical conductivity of hybrid nanomaterials made of insulating matrix with conductive particles such as CNT reinforced nanocomposites and thick film resistors. Unlike existing approaches, our model takes into account the impenetrability of the particles and their random placement within the matrix. Moreover, our model presents a detailed description of intra-particle conductivity via finite element analysis, which to the authors’ best knowledge has not been addressed before. The inter-particle conductivity is assumed to be primarily due to electron tunneling. The model is then used to predict the electrical conductivity of electrospun carbon nanofibers as a function of microstructural parameters such as turbostratic domain alignment and aspect ratio. To simulate the microstructure of single CNF, randomly positioned nucleation sites were seeded and grown as turbostratic particles with anisotropic growth rates. Particle growth was in steps and growth of each particle in each direction was stopped upon contact with other particles. The study points to the significant contribution of both intra-particle and inter-particle conductivity to the overall conductivity of hybrid composites. Influence of particle alignment and anisotropic growth rate ratio on electrical conductivity is also discussed. The results show that partial alignment in contrast to complete alignment can result in maximum electrical conductivity of whole CNF. High degrees of alignment can adversely affect conductivity by lowering the probability of the formation of a conductive path. The results demonstrate approaches to enhance electrical conductivity of hybrid materials through controlling their microstructure which is applicable not only to carbon nanofibers, but also many other types of hybrid composites such as thick film resistors.

  10. Cross Kelvin force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy studies of organic bulk heterojunction blends for local morphology and electrical behavior analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Villeneuve-Faure, C.; Le Borgne, D.; Bedel-Pereira, E.; Séguy, I.; Moineau Chane-Ching, K. I.; Hernandez-Maldonado, D.

    2015-02-07

    Bulk Heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaic devices performances depend on the relative organization and physical properties of the electron-donor and -acceptor materials. In this paper, BHJs of poly(3-hexyl-thiophene) (P3HT) associated with an electron acceptor material, 1-(3-methoxycarbonyl)-propyl-1-phenyl[6,6]C6 (PCBM) or [Ni(4dodpedt){sub 2}], are studied in terms of morphology, ordering, and electrical properties. First, comparison between the two BHJs performed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Raman characterizations shows that P3HT structuration is improved by blending with [Ni(4dodpedt){sub 2}]. Then, the relationship between charges trapping, electrical properties, and film morphology is investigated using conductive AFM and Kelvin Force Microscopy. Measurements in dark condition and under solar cell simulator provide complementary information on electrical phenomena in these organic nanostructures. Finally, time dependent measurement highlights the influence of charges stacking on conduction. Specifically, we demonstrate that charge accumulation initiated by illumination remains valid after switching off the light, and induces the modification in current versus voltage characteristic of P3HT: PCBM blend. Finally, we observe a current increasing which can be attributed to the energy barrier decreasing due to charges trapping in PCBM.

  11. An electrical conductivity model for fractal porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Cai, Jianchao; Hu, Xiangyun; Han, Qi

    2015-06-01

    Archie's equation is an empirical electrical conductivity-porosity model that has been used to predict the formation factor of porous rock for more than 70 years. However, the physical interpretation of its parameters, e.g., the cementation exponent m, remains questionable. In this study, a theoretical electrical conductivity equation is derived based on the fractal characteristics of porous media. The proposed model is expressed in terms of the tortuosity fractal dimension (DT), the pore fractal dimension (Df), the electrical conductivity of the pore liquid, and the porosity. The empirical parameter m is then determined from physically based parameters, such as DT and Df. Furthermore, a distinct interrelationship between DT and Df is obtained. We find a reasonably good match between the predicted formation factor by our model and experimental data.

  12. Electrical conductivity measurements on silicate melts using the loop technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waff, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    A new method is described for measurement of the electrical conductivity of silicate melts under controlled oxygen partial pressure at temperatures to 1550 C. The melt samples are suspended as droplets on platinum-rhodium loops, minimizing iron loss from the melt due to alloying with platinum, and providing maximum surface exposure of the melt to the oxygen-buffering gas atmosphere. The latter provides extremely rapid equilibration of the melt with the imposed oxygen partial pressure. The loop technique involves a minimum of setup time and cost, provides reproducible results to within + or - 5% and is well suited to electrical conductivity studies on silicate melts containing redox cations.

  13. Study on XRDK Optical and Electrical performance of Transparent Conducting ZnO:Al(ZAO) Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lu; Cheng-hai, Xu; Li-shi, Wen

    2011-02-01

    The ZAO (ZnO: Al) thin films were prepared by DC reactive magnetron sputtering technique. The XRD electrical and optical properties of films are particular investigated. The results show that ZAO films are polycrystalline hexagonal wurtzite structure, and we are not find Al2O3 crystal phase. At the same time, we gained the high quality ZAO films with the minimum resistivuty of 4.5×10-4 Ω · cm, the transmittance in visible region above 80% and the reflectivity in IR region above 70%.

  14. Photovoltaic device having light transmitting electrically conductive stacked films

    DOEpatents

    Weber, Michael F.; Tran, Nang T.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Gilbert, James R.; Aspen, Frank E.

    1990-07-10

    A light transmitting electrically conductive stacked film, useful as a light transmitting electrode, including a first light transmitting electrically conductive layer, having a first optical thickness, a second light transmitting layer, having a second optical thickness different from the optical thickness of the first layer, and an electrically conductive metallic layer interposed between and in initimate contact with the first and second layers.

  15. Thermal and Electrical Conductivities of Porous Si Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagino, Harutoshi; Tanaka, Saburo; Tanimura, Naoki; Miyazaki, Koji

    2015-11-01

    The microstructure of materials affects thermal and electrical transport as well as the physical properties. The effects of the microstructure on both thermal and electrical transport in silicon membranes with periodic microporous structures produced from silicon-on-insulator wafers using microfabrication processes were studied. The in-plane thermal and electrical conductivities of the Si membranes were measured simultaneously by using a self-heating method. The measured thermal conductivity was compared with the result from the periodically laser-heating method. The thermal and electrical conductivities were much lower in the porous membranes than in the non-porous membrane. The measured thermal conductivity was much lower than expected based on values determined using classical models. A significant phonon size effect was observed even in microsized structures, and the mean free path for phonons was very long. It was concluded that phonon transport is quasi-ballistic and electron transport is diffuse in microporous Si structures. It was suggested that the microstructure had a different effect on thermal and electrical transport.

  16. Chapter A6. Section 6.3. Specific Electrical Conductance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radtke, Dean B.; Davis, Jerri V.; Wilde, Franceska D.

    2005-01-01

    Electrical conductance is a measure of the capacity of a substance to conduct an electrical current. The specific electrical conductance (conductivity) of water is a function of the types and quantities of dissolved substances it contains, normalized to a unit length and unit cross section at a specified temperature. This section of the National Field Manual (NFM) describes U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) guidance and protocols for measurement of conductivity in ground and surface waters.

  17. Magnetic flowmeter for electrically conductive liquid

    DOEpatents

    Skladzien, Stanley B.; Raue, Donald J.

    1982-01-01

    A magnetic flowmeter includes first and second tube sections each having ls of non-magnetic material. The first tube is suitably connected to a process for passing a flow of an electrically conductive fluid to be measured. The second tube is established as a reference containing a still medium and is maintained at the same temperature as the first tube. A rotatable magnet assembly is disposed between the two tubes with at least two magnets attached to radially extending arms from a central shaft. Each magnet includes an air gap suitably sized to pass astraddle the diameter along a portion of the length of each of the two tubes. The magnets are provided in matched pairs spaced 180.degree. apart such that signals will be simultaneously generated in signal leads attached to each of the two tubes. By comparing the signals from the two tubes and varying the rotating speed of the magnet assembly until the signals are equal, or attain a maximum, the flow velocity of the fluid within the first tube can be determined. Through temperature monitoring and appropriate heaters, the two tubes are maintained at the same temperature.

  18. Magnetic flowmeter for electrically conductive liquid

    DOEpatents

    Skladzien, S.B.; Raue, D.J.

    1980-08-18

    A magnetic flowmeter includes first and second tube sections each having walls of non-magnetic material. The first tube is suitably connected to a process for passing a flow of an electrically conductive fluid to be measured. The second tube is established as a reference containing a still medium and is maintained at the same temperature as the first tube. A rotatable magnet assembly is disposed between the two tubes with at least two magnets attached to radially extending arms from a central shaft. Each magnet includes an air gap suitably sized to pass astraddle the diameter along a portion of the length of each of the two tubes. Two magnets are provided in matched pairs spaced 180/sup 0/ apart such that signals will be simultaneously generated in signal leads attached to each of the two tubes. By comparing the signals from the two tubes and varying the rotating speed of the magnet assembly until the signals are equal, or attain a maximum, the flow velocity of the fluid within the first tube can be determined. Through temperature monitoring and appropriate heaters, the two tubes are maintained at the same temperature.

  19. New method for electrical conductivity temperature compensation.

    PubMed

    McCleskey, R Blaine

    2013-09-01

    Electrical conductivity (κ) measurements of natural waters are typically referenced to 25 °C (κ25) using standard temperature compensation factors (α). For acidic waters (pH < 4), this can result in a large κ25 error (δκ25). The more the sample temperature departs from 25 °C, the larger the potential δκ25. For pH < 4, the hydrogen ion transport number becomes substantial and its mode of transport is different from most other ions resulting in a different α. A new method for determining α as a function of pH and temperature is presented. Samples with varying amounts of H2SO4 and NaCl were used to develop the new α, which was then applied to 65 natural water samples including acid mine waters, geothermal waters, seawater, and stream waters. For each sample, the κ and pH were measured at several temperatures from 5 to 90 °C and κ25 was calculated. The δκ25 ranged from -11 to 9% for the new method as compared to -42 to 25% and -53 to 27% for the constant α (0.019) and ISO-7888 methods, respectively. The new method for determining α is a substantial improvement for acidic waters and performs as well as or better than the standard methods for circumneutral waters. PMID:23895179

  20. Temporal stability of electrical conductivity in a sandy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrera-Parrilla, Aura; Brevik, Eric C.; Giráldez, Juan V.; Vanderlinden, Karl

    2016-07-01

    Understanding of soil spatial variability is needed to delimit areas for precision agriculture. Electromagnetic induction sensors which measure the soil apparent electrical conductivity reflect soil spatial variability. The objectives of this work were to see if a temporally stable component could be found in electrical conductivity, and to see if temporal stability information acquired from several electrical conductivity surveys could be used to better interpret the results of concurrent surveys of electrical conductivity and soil water content. The experimental work was performed in a commercial rainfed olive grove of 6.7 ha in the `La Manga' catchment in SW Spain. Several soil surveys provided gravimetric soil water content and electrical conductivity data. Soil electrical conductivity values were used to spatially delimit three areas in the grove, based on the first principal component, which represented the time-stable dominant spatial electrical conductivity pattern and explained 86% of the total electrical conductivity variance. Significant differences in clay, stone and soil water contents were detected between the three areas. Relationships between electrical conductivity and soil water content were modelled with an exponential model. Parameters from the model showed a strong effect of the first principal component on the relationship between soil water content and electrical conductivity. Overall temporal stability of electrical conductivity reflects soil properties and manifests itself in spatial patterns of soil water content.

  1. An association between phantom limb sensations and stump skin conductance during transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) applied to the contralateral leg: a case study.

    PubMed

    Katz, J; France, C; Melzack, R

    1989-03-01

    This report describes a placebo-controlled study of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) applied to the contralateral lower leg and outer ears of an amputee with non-painful phantom sensations. The subject received TENS or placebo stimulation on separate sessions in which baseline periods of no stimulation alternated with periods of TENS (or placebo). Throughout the two sessions, continuous measures of stump skin conductance, surface skin temperature and phantom intensity were obtained. The results showed that TENS applied to the contralateral leg was significantly more effective than a placebo in decreasing the intensity of phantom sensations, whereas stimulation of the outer ears led to a non-significant increase. The pattern of electrodermal activity on the TENS session was consistently linear during baseline periods, indicating a progressive increase in sympathetic sudomotor activity. In contrast, during periods of electrical stimulation the pattern of electrodermal activity was consistently curvilinear indicating an initial decrease followed by an increase in sudomotor responses. Changes in stump skin conductance correlated significantly with changes in phantom sensations both in TENS and placebo sessions suggesting a relationship between sympathetic activity at the stump and paresthesias referred to the phantom. Two hypotheses are presented to account for these findings. PMID:2785260

  2. A study of the properties of beryllium doped silicon with particular emphasis on diffusion mechanisms: Profiles of depth dependent conductivity as determined by electrical surface probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franks, R. K.; Robertson, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Very large diffusion coefficients were encountered and required the determination of impurity profiles for samples approximately 1 cm thick. Since conductivity values are readily converted into concentrations of electrically active impurities, the major problem became that of accurately determining the conductivity profiles of beryllium diffused silicon samples. Four-point probe measurements on samples having depth conductivities are interpreted in terms of conductivity profiles, based on an exact solution of the problem of exponentially depth dependent conductivity. Applications include surface conductivity determination where the form of the conductivity profile is known, and conductivity profile determination from probe measurements taken as the sample surface is progressively lapped away. The application is limited to samples having conductivity monotonically decreasing with depth from the probed surface.

  3. VLF waves at satellite altitude to investigate Earth electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leye, P. O.; Tarits, P.

    2015-03-01

    At and near the Earth surface, electromagnetic (EM) fields radiated from VLF transmitters are commonly used in geological exploration to determine the shallow Earth conductivity structure. Onboard satellites such as DEMETER, the electric and magnetic sensors detect the VLF signal in altitude. While we know for surface measurement that the VLF EM field recorded at some distance from the transmitter is a function of the ground conductivity, we do not know how this relationship changes when the field is measured at satellite altitude. Here we study the electromagnetic field radiated by a vertical electric dipole located on the Earth surface in the VLF range and measured at satellite altitude in a free space. We investigate the EM field as function of distance from the source, the height above the Earth surface, and the electrical conductivity of the Earth. The mathematical solution in altitude has more severe numerical complications than the well-known solutions at or near the Earth surface. We test most of the solutions developed for the latter case and found that direct summation was best at several hundred kilometers above the Earth. The numerical modeling of the EM field in altitude shows that the field remains a function of Earth conductivity. The dependence weakens with altitude and distance from the transmitter. It remains more important for the electric radial component.

  4. Geo-electrical investigation of near surface conductive structures suitable for groundwater accumulation in a resistive crystalline basement environment: A case study of Isuada, southwestern Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayode, J. S.; Adelusi, A. O.; Nawawi, M. N. M.; Bawallah, M.; Olowolafe, T. S.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a geophysical surveying for groundwater identification in a resistive crystalline basement hard rock in Isuada area, Southwestern Nigeria. Very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic and electrical resistivity geophysical techniques combined with well log were used to characterize the concealed near surface conductive structures suitable for groundwater accumulation. Prior to this work; little was known about the groundwater potential of this area. Qualitative and semi-quantitative interpretations of the data collected along eight traverses at 20 m spacing discovered conductive zones suspected to be fractures, faults, and cracks which were further mapped using Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) technique. Forty VES stations were utilized using Schlumberger configurations with AB/2 varying from 1 to 100 m. Four layers i.e. the top soil, the weathered layer, the partially weathered/fractured basement and the fresh basement were delineated from the interpreted resistivity curves. The weathered layers constitute the major aquifer unit in the area and are characterized by moderately low resistivity values which ranged between about 52 Ωm and 270 Ωm while the thickness varied from 1 to 35 m. The depth to the basement and the permeable nature of the weathered layer obtained from both the borehole and the hand-dug wells was used to categorize the groundwater potential of the study area into high, medium and low ratings. The groundwater potential map revealed that about 45% of the study area falls within the low groundwater potential rating while about 10% constitutes the medium groundwater potential and the remaining 45% constitutes high groundwater potential. The low resistivity, thick overburden, and fractured bedrock constitute the aquifer units and the series of basement depressions identified from the geoelectric sections as potential conductive zones appropriate for groundwater development.

  5. Electrical conductivity and dielectric property of fly ash geopolymer pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanjitsuwan, Sakonwan; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Pimraksa, Kedsarin

    2011-02-01

    The electrical conductivity and dielectric property of fly ash geopolymer pastes in a frequency range of 100 Hz-10 MHz were studied. The effects of the liquid alkali solution to ash ratios (L/A) were analyzed. The mineralogical compositions and microstructures of fly ash geopolymer materials were also investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The 10 mol sodium hydroxide solution and sodium silicate solution at a sodium silicate-to-sodium hydroxide ratio of 1.0 were used in making geopolymer pastes. The pastes were cured at 40°C. It is found that the electrical conductivity and dielectric constant are dependent on the frequency range and L/A ratios. The conductivity increases but the dielectric constant decreases with increasing frequency.

  6. Copper-Filled Electrically Conductive Adhesives with Enhanced Shear Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Li-Ngee; Nishikawa, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    In this study, the effects of diethyl carbitol (diluent) and tertiary amines on the electrical, mechanical, and rheological properties of the Cu-filled polyurethane-based electrically conductive adhesives (ECAs) were investigated. Significant difference could be observed in the electrical resistivity and shear strength of ECA prepared with different amount of diethyl carbitol. Reduced electrical resistivity was found in ECAs prepared with addition of tertiary amines, but no obvious change was observed in the shear strength of the ECA joint. Rheological property of the ECA paste was investigated in order to understand the correlation of the viscosity of ECA paste and electrical resistivity and shear strength of ECA joint. Results revealed that decrease in viscosity of the ECA paste reduced electrical resistivity and enhanced shear strength of ECA joint. A Cu-filled polyurethane-based ECA with considerably low electrical resistivity at the magnitude order range of 10-3 Ω cm, and significantly high shear strength (above 17 MPa) could be achieved.

  7. Synthesis and electrical conductivity of multilayer silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, P. E-mail: bruno.grandidier@isen.iemn.univ-lille1.fr; Bruhn, T.; Capiod, P.; Berthe, M.; Grandidier, B. E-mail: bruno.grandidier@isen.iemn.univ-lille1.fr; Resta, A.; De Padova, P.; Le Lay, G.

    2014-01-13

    The epitaxial growth and the electrical resistance of multilayer silicene on the Ag(111) surface has been investigated. We show that the atomic structure of the first silicene layer differs from the next layers and that the adsorption of Si induces the formation of extended silicene terraces surrounded by step bunching. Thanks to the controlled contact formation between the tips of a multiple probe scanning tunneling microscope and these extended terraces, a low sheet resistance, albeit much higher than the electrical resistance of the underlying silver substrate, has been measured, advocating for the electrical viability of multilayer silicene.

  8. Effective electrical and thermal conductivity of multifilament twisted superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechetkin, V. R.

    2013-06-01

    The effective electrical and thermal conductivity of composite wire with twisted superconducting filaments embedded into normal metal matrix is calculated using the extension of Bruggeman method. The resistive conductivity of superconducting filaments is described in terms of symmetric tensor, whereas the conductivity of a matrix is assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous. The dependence of the resistive electrical conductivity of superconducting filaments on temperature, magnetic field, and current density is implied to be parametric. The resulting effective conductivity tensor proved to be non-diagonal and symmetric. The non-diagonal transverse-longitudinal components of effective electrical conductivity tensor are responsible for the redistribution of current between filaments. In the limits of high and low electrical conductivity of filaments the transverse effective conductivity tends to that of obtained previously by Carr. The effective thermal conductivity of composite wires is non-diagonal and radius-dependent even for the isotropic and homogeneous thermal conductivities of matrix and filaments.

  9. A comprehensive study of the electrically conducting water based CuO and Al2O3 nanoparticles over coupled nanofluid-sheet interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, R.

    2016-02-01

    Many studies on nanofluid flow over a permeable/impermeable sheet prescribe the kinematics of the sheet and disregard the sheet’s mechanics. However, the current study is one of the infrequent contributions that anticipate the mechanics of both the electrically conducting nanofluid (a homogeneous mixture of nanoparticles and base fluid) and the sheet. Two types of nanoparticles, alumina and copper, with water as a base fluid over the sheet are considered. With the help of the similarity transformations, the corresponding partial differential equations for the coupled nanofluid-sheet interface are transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations. The simulations are done by using the experimentally verified results from the previous studies for viscosity and thermal conductivity. Self-similar solutions are attained by considering both analytical and numerical techniques. Dual skin friction coefficients are attained with different copper and alumina nanoparticles over both the stretching and viscous sheets. The influence of the Eckert number, magnetic and mass suction/blowing parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, skin friction and heat transfer rates over the nanofluid-sheet interface are presented graphically as well as numerically. The obtained results are of potential benefit for studying nanofluid flow over various soft surfaces such as synthetic plastics, soft silicone sheet and soft synthetic rubber sheet. These surfaces are easily deformed by thermal fluctuations.

  10. Electrically conducting novel polymer films containing pi-stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Robert Gang

    1997-12-01

    The primary focus of this thesis is to expand our knowledge of ion radicals of π-dimers and π- stacks in solutions and apply these insights in the development and understanding of new electrically conducting polymers. Two types of the conducting polymers were investigated. The first is the conducting polymer composites embedded with π-stacks of ion radicals. Flexible and air stable n-typed conducting thin films were prepared from imide/poly(vinyl alcohol) aqueous solutions. Conducting thin films of terthiophene/poly(methyl methacrylate) were cast from hexafluoro-2-propanol. Effects of casting conditions on the morphology and conductivity of the films were investigated. These films were fully characterized by UV- vis, NIR, IR, XRD, SEM and ESR. In the second type of conducting polymer system, PAMAM dendrimers generation 1 through 5 were peripherally modified with cationically substituted naphthalene diimide anion radicals. NMR, UV, IR, CV and Elemental Analysis were used to characterize modified dendrimers. Reduction with sodium dithionite in solution showed anion radicals were aggregated into π-dimers and π- stacks. Formamide was used to cast conducting dendrimer films. ESCA, SEM and optical microscope were used to study the composition and the morphology of the films. XRD showed complete amorphous nature of these films. NIR revealed that the π-stack aggregation depend strongly on the casting temperature and the degree of reduction. Four- probe co-liner conductivity of the films is on the order of 10-2 to 10-1/ S/ cm-1. ESR and conductivity measurements also revealed the isotropic nature of the conductivity. Conductivity/humidity relationship was discovered by accidental breathing over the films. Using a home-made controlled humidity device and PACERTM hygrometer, the conductivity of the films can be varied quickly and reversibly within two orders of a magnitude. This phenomenon was probed with NIR, XRD and quartz crystal microbalance techniques. These

  11. Durable Microstructured Surfaces: Combining Electrical Conductivity with Superoleophobicity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zihe; Wang, Tianchang; Sun, Shaofan; Zhao, Boxin

    2016-01-27

    In this study, electrically conductive and superoleophobic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has been fabricated through embedding Ag flakes (SFs) and Ag nanowires (SNWs) into microstructures of the trichloroperfluorooctylsilane (FDTS)-blended PDMS elastomer. Microstructured PDMS surfaces became conductive at the percolation surface coverage of 3.0 × 10(-2) mg/mm(2) for SFs; the highest conductivity was 1.12 × 10(5) S/m at the SFs surface coverage of 6.0 × 10(-2) mg/mm(2). A significant improvement of the conductivity (increased 3 times at the SNWs fraction of 11%) was achieved by using SNWs to replace some SFs because of the conductive pathways from the formed SNWs networks and its connections with SFs. These conductive fillers bonded strongly with microstructured FDTS-blended PDMS and retained surface properties under the sliding preload of 8.0 N. Stretching tests indicated that the resistance increased with the increasing strains and returned to its original state when the strain was released, showing highly stretchable and reversible electrical properties. Compared with SFs embedded surfaces, the resistances of SFs/SNWs embedded surfaces were less dependent on the strain because of bridging effect of SNWs. The superoleophobicity was achieved by the synergetic effect of surface modification through blending FDTS and the microstructures transferred from sand papers. The research findings demonstrate a simple approach to make the insulating elastomer to have the desired surface oleophobicity and electrical conductivity and help meet the needs for the development of conductive devices with microstructures and multifunctional properties. PMID:26714207

  12. Spatial Variability of Electrical Conductivity in North Mississippi Loamy Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twombly, J. E.; Fancher, C. W.; Sleep, M. D.; Aufman, M. S.; Holland, J. V.; Holt, R. M.; Kuszmaul, J. S.

    2004-05-01

    The use of non-contact electrical geophysical methods, such as electromagnetic induction (EM), to characterize and quantify spatial and temporal variations in soil properties is appealing due to low operational costs, rapid measurements, and device mobility. These methods are sensitive to soil electrical conductivity, which can vary with soil moisture, clay content, soil salinity, and the presence of electrically conductive minerals. We conducted a preliminary study to evaluate the controls on EM response in loamy soils present at the University of Mississippi (UM) Soil Moisture Observatory (SMO). The 5 acre SMO is located in a former agricultural field at the UM Biological Field Station, a 740 acre tract of land located 11 miles from the UM campus in Oxford, Mississippi. EM responses were surveyed along two intersecting transects using a Geonics EM38. The apparent electrical conductivity (EC) of the soil was determined in both a vertical and horizontal dipole position, which correspond to deep (~1m) and shallow (~0.5) measurements, respectively. Continuous soil samples were recovered from the transect points and analyzed for soil properties. Except for a weak negative correlation with moisture content, we found little direct correlation between EC and measured soil properties. EC variograms from surveys conducted on different dates consistently show a similar structure. Following a week of rain, three EM 38 surveys were conducted, each a week apart. During this survey period, a nearby meteorological station reported no significant precipitation, and the soils were drying. All EC variograms show similar spatial structures but decreasing amounts of variability consistent with drying and redistribution of soil moisture. These results suggest that soil physical properties, not soil moisture, control the spatial distribution of EC. Temporal variations in the variograms indicate a complex relationship between soil moisture and EC.

  13. Optimization and Testing of Electrically Conductive Spacecraft Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mell, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report discussing work done for the Space Environmental Effects (SEE) program in the Materials and Processes Laboratory, on electrically conductive thermal control coatings. These thermal control coatings are being developed to have several orders of magnitude lower electrical resistivity than most available thermal control coatings. Extensive research has taken place over the last few years to develop a variety of spacecraft coatings with the unique property of being able to conduct surface charge to a substrate or grounding system. The ability to conduct surface charge to a safe point, while maintaining optical properties and performance, is highly advantageous in maintaining operational space based systems. Without this mechanism the surface of a spacecraft can accumulate charge to the point that a catastrophic electrical breakdown can occur, resulting in damage to or failure of the spacecraft. Ultimately, use of this type of coating will help mitigate many of the concerns that NASA and the space industry still have for their space based systems. The unique coatings studied here fall into two specific categories: 1) broadband absorber and 2) selective absorber. These coatings have controllable solar absorptance and electrical surface resistivity values over the designated ranges. These coatings were developed under an SBIR program which focused on the development of such constituents and coatings. This project focused on simulated space environmental effects testing with the intent of using this data to help optimize the stability and initial properties of these coatings.

  14. In vivo electrical conductivity measurements during and after tumor electroporation: conductivity changes reflect the treatment outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivorra, Antoni; Al-Sakere, Bassim; Rubinsky, Boris; Mir, Lluis M.

    2009-10-01

    Electroporation is the phenomenon in which cell membrane permeability is increased by exposing the cell to short high-electric-field pulses. Reversible electroporation treatments are used in vivo for gene therapy and drug therapy while irreversible electroporation is used for tissue ablation. Tissue conductivity changes induced by electroporation could provide real-time feedback of the treatment outcome. Here we describe the results from a study in which fibrosarcomas (n = 39) inoculated in mice were treated according to different electroporation protocols, some of them known to cause irreversible damage. Conductivity was measured before, within the pulses, in between the pulses and for up to 30 min after treatment. Conductivity increased pulse after pulse. Depending on the applied electroporation protocol, the conductivity increase after treatment ranged from 10% to 180%. The most significant conclusion from this study is the fact that post-treatment conductivity seems to be correlated with treatment outcome in terms of reversibility.

  15. Method of forming an electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2011-11-22

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  16. The Estimation of Hydraulic Conductivity Using Pumping Test Data and Vertical Electrical Sounding Measurements - A Case Study of Taiwan's Choshuihsi Alluvial Fan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, J.; Chang, P.; Chen, Y.; Chang, L.; Chiang, C.; Wang, Y.; Huang, C. C.; Chen, J.; Lin, H.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic conductivity (K) is an important aquifer parameter and is usually obtained using conventional pumping test. However, only a limited amount of data can be collected, because pumping tests are time consuming and expensive. In recent years, some studies estimated K by using pumping test data and surface electrical resistivity surveys. These studies cost less because less pumping tests are required. Linear regression is then applied to model the relationship between K and the formation factors. The problem is that most of these studies do not consider the effects caused by layers of clay. In fact, clay layers are commonly distributed in middle and distal fan. Therefore, this study divides the Zhuoshui River Alluvial Fan into several zones based on the sediment distribution. A linear regression equation is derived from the pumping test data and formation factors for each zone. This study applies these equations to develop the distribution of K in the shallow aquifer of the major fan. The result shows that the shallow aquifer of Zhuoshui River's major fan can be divided into two zones: top and non-top fan. The regression results show a good correlation between K and the formation factors in each zone. These regression equations are then used to estimate K in the study area. The estimation error is between 11m/day and 58m/day, which is in an acceptable range. The results of this study can be further applied to other analyses such as groundwater modeling or fluctuation methods.

  17. Compensation Effect in Electrical Conduction Process: Effect of Substituent Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Bani; Misra, T. N.

    1987-05-01

    The semiconductive properties of Vitamin A acid (Retinoic Acid), a long chain conjugated polyene, were studied as a function of the adsorption of different vapours. A compensation effect was observed in the electrical conduction process; unlike that in Vitamin A alcohol and Vitamin A acetate the compensation temperature was observed on the lower side of the experimental temperature (T0≈285 K). It is concluded that the terminal \\diagdown\\diagupC=0 group conjugated to the polyene chain plays an important role in the manifestation of the compensation effect. Various conduction parameters have been evaluated.

  18. Electrical conductivity of aqueous solutions of aluminum salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, J.; Rilo, E.; Segade, L.; Cabeza, O.; Varela, L. M.

    2005-03-01

    We present experimental measurements of the specific electrical conductivity (σ) in aqueous solutions of aluminum salts at different temperatures, covering all salt concentrations from saturation to infinite dilution. The salts employed were AlCl3 , AlBr3 , AlI3 , and Al(NO3)3 , which present a 1:3 relationship between the electrical charges of anion and cation. In addition, we have measured the density in all ranges of concentrations of the four aqueous electrolyte solutions at 298.15K . The measured densities show an almost linear behavior with concentration, and we have fitted it to a second order polynomial with very high degree of approximation. The measurement of the specific conductivity at constant temperature reveals the existence of maxima in the conductivity vs concentration curves at molar concentrations around 1.5M for the three halide solutions studied, and at approximately 2M for the nitrate. We present a theoretical foundation for the existence of these maxima, based on the classical Debye-Hückel-Onsager hydrodynamic mean-field framework for electrical transport and its high concentration extensions, and also a brief consideration of ionic frictional coefficients using mode-coupling theory. We also found that the calculated values of the equivalent conductance vary in an approximately linear way with the square root of the concentration at concentrations as high as those where the maximum of σ appears. Finally, and for completeness, we have measured the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity at selected concentrations from 283to353K , and performed a fit to an exponential equation of the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman type. The values of the calculated temperatures of null mobility of the four salts are reported.

  19. Non-Contact Electrical Conductivity Measurement Technique for Molten Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Ishikawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    A non-contact technique of measuring the electrical conductivity (or resistivity) of conducting liquids while they are levitated by the high temperature electrostatic levitator in a high vacuum is reported.

  20. Electric Field Dependence of the Electrical Conductivity of VOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, N.

    1985-01-01

    We have observed non-ohmic behavior in the resistivity of VOx for very small electric fields. In an attempt to explain these results several models are considered. We suggest that the sharpening of the transition to the insulating state with applied electric field is due to a reduction of the length of time during which regions of the sample fluctuate into the insulating state.

  1. Electrically Conductive Chitosan/Carbon Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this work, carbon nanofibers were used as doping material to develop a highly conductive chitosan-based composite. Scaffolds based on chitosan only and chitosan/carbon composites were prepared by precipitation. Carbon nanofibers were homogeneously dispersed throughout the chitosan matrix, and the composite scaffold was highly porous with fully interconnected pores. Chitosan/carbon scaffolds had an elastic modulus of 28.1 ± 3.3 KPa, similar to that measured for rat myocardium, and excellent electrical properties, with a conductivity of 0.25 ± 0.09 S/m. The scaffolds were seeded with neonatal rat heart cells and cultured for up to 14 days, without electrical stimulation. After 14 days of culture, the scaffold pores throughout the construct volume were filled with cells. The metabolic activity of cells in chitosan/carbon constructs was significantly higher as compared to cells in chitosan scaffolds. The incorporation of carbon nanofibers also led to increased expression of cardiac-specific genes involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling. This study demonstrates that the incorporation of carbon nanofibers into porous chitosan scaffolds improved the properties of cardiac tissue constructs, presumably through enhanced transmission of electrical signals between the cells. PMID:24417502

  2. Electrically conductive chitosan/carbon scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Martins, Ana M; Eng, George; Caridade, Sofia G; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-02-10

    In this work, carbon nanofibers were used as doping material to develop a highly conductive chitosan-based composite. Scaffolds based on chitosan only and chitosan/carbon composites were prepared by precipitation. Carbon nanofibers were homogeneously dispersed throughout the chitosan matrix, and the composite scaffold was highly porous with fully interconnected pores. Chitosan/carbon scaffolds had an elastic modulus of 28.1 ± 3.3 KPa, similar to that measured for rat myocardium, and excellent electrical properties, with a conductivity of 0.25 ± 0.09 S/m. The scaffolds were seeded with neonatal rat heart cells and cultured for up to 14 days, without electrical stimulation. After 14 days of culture, the scaffold pores throughout the construct volume were filled with cells. The metabolic activity of cells in chitosan/carbon constructs was significantly higher as compared to cells in chitosan scaffolds. The incorporation of carbon nanofibers also led to increased expression of cardiac-specific genes involved in muscle contraction and electrical coupling. This study demonstrates that the incorporation of carbon nanofibers into porous chitosan scaffolds improved the properties of cardiac tissue constructs, presumably through enhanced transmission of electrical signals between the cells. PMID:24417502

  3. Ionic surface electrical conductivity in sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Paul W. J.; Meredith, Philip G.; Sammonds, Peter R.; Murrell, Stanley A. F.

    1994-11-01

    Recent analyses of complex conductivity measurements have indicated that high-frequency dispersions encountered in rocks saturated with low-salinity fluids are due to ionic surface conduction and that the form of these dispersions may be dependent upon the nature of the pore and crack surfaces within the rock (Ruffet et al., 1991). Unfortunately, the mechanisms of surface conduction are not well understood, and no model based on rigorous physical principles exists. This paper is split into two parts: an experimental section followed by the development of a theoretical description of adsorption of ions onto mineral surfaces. We have made complex conductivity measurements upon samples of sandstone saturated with a range of different types and concentrations of aqueous solution with a frequency range of 20 Hz to 1 MHz. The frequency dependence of complex conductivity was analyzed using the empirical model of Cole and Cole (1941). The 'fractal' surface models of Le Mehaute and Crepy (1983), Po Zen Wong (1987), the Ruffet el at. (1991) were used to calculate apparent fractal pore surface dimensions for samples saturated with different solution types and concentrations. These showed a pronounced decrease of apparent fractal surface dimension with decreasing electrolyte concentration and a decrease of apparent fractal dimension with increasing relative ionic radius of the dominant cation in solution. A model for ionic surface concentration (ISCOM I) has been developed as the first step in producing a rigorous physicochemical model of surface conduction in quartz-dominated rocks. The results from ISCOM I show that quartz surfaces are overwhelmingly dominated by adsorbed Na(+) when saturated with NaCl solutions of salinities and pH found in actual geological situations. ISCOM I also shows that the concentration threshold for dominance of surface conduction over bulk conduction is aided by depletion of ions from the bulk fluid as a result of their adsorption onto the mineral

  4. Electrical conductivity of Cs2CuCl4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, N. I.

    2016-05-01

    The electrical conductivity of Cs2CuCl4 single crystals, synthesized by crystallization from aqueous solutions in the CsCl-CuCl2-H2O system, has been investigated. The temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity of crystals in a temperature range of 338-584 K exhibits no anomalies. The electrical transfer activation enthalpy is Δ H σ = 0.72 ± 0.05 eV and the conductivity is σ = 3 × 10-4 S/cm at 584 K. The most likely carriers in Cs2CuCl4 are Cs+ cations, which transfer electric charge according to the vacancy mechanism.

  5. Polyelectrolyte multilayers impart healability to highly electrically conductive films.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Chen, Shanshan; Wu, Mengchun; Sun, Junqi

    2012-08-28

    Healable, electrically conductive films are fabricated by depositing Ag nanowires on water-enabled healable polyelectrolyte multilayers. The easily achieved healability of the polyelectrolyte multilayers is successfully imparted to the Ag nanowire layer. These films conveniently restore electrical conductivity lost as a result of damage by cuts several tens of micrometers wide when water is dropped on the cuts. PMID:22807199

  6. Electrically conducting ternary amorphous fully oxidized materials and their application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giauque, Pierre (Inventor); Nicolet, Marc (Inventor); Gasser, Stefan M. (Inventor); Kolawa, Elzbieta A. (Inventor); Cherry, Hillary (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Electrically active devices are formed using a special conducting material of the form Tm--Ox mixed with SiO2 where the materials are immiscible. The immiscible materials are forced together by using high energy process to form an amorphous phase of the two materials. The amorphous combination of the two materials is electrically conducting but forms an effective barrier.

  7. Electrical Conductivity Relaxation and Melt Viscosity of Fluorosilicate Glasses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuning

    1995-01-01

    Although silicate glasses have been studied extensively, relatively little attention has been paid to the effects of fluorine on silicate glass networks. Recently, however, the potential for treating fluoride-containing radioactive waste by vitrification using joule-heated melting has made the properties of such glass systems of considerable technological importance. The presence of fluorine produces a melt of much lower viscosity and higher electrical conductivity than the more typical non-fluorine glass melts. From a simple glass structure perspective, fluorine (mono-valent) replaces oxygen (di-valent) in the glass network and thereby reduces the degree of connectivity. This can be used to motivate simple models for the effect of this replacement on properties such as the viscosity and the electrical conductivity. However, studies of the electrical conductivity relaxation of fluorosilicate glasses in the solid state revealed that other basic processes had to be introduced in order to explain the observed results. The experimental data suggest very different mechanisms for the fluorine effects in the solid and molten states. In order to investigate the effects of fluorine on the glass network, electrical conductivity relaxation measurements were made on a group of simple alkali-fluorosilicate glasses (Si, Na, O, F) in both the solid and molten states. In the molten state, the shear viscosities were also measured. The experimental results were found in good agreement with computer simulations performed on the random conductor network and cluster models. In these models, fluorine was assumed to randomly break the silica tetrahedra above the glass liquidus temperature (decreasing the melt viscosity and favoring ionic conduction), and to form alkali fluoride crystals with certain probabilities below the liquidus temperature (increasing the viscosity and reducing the conductivity). The existence of such crystals was later confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The conclusions

  8. Dielectric properties and study of AC electrical conduction mechanisms by non-overlapping small polaron tunneling model in Bis(4-acetylanilinium) tetrachlorocuprate(II) compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkari, A.; Chaabane, I.; Guidara, K.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, the synthesis and characterization of the Bis(4-acetylanilinium) tetrachlorocuprate(II) compound are presented. The structure of this compound is analyzed by X-ray diffraction which confirms the formation of single phase and is in good agreement the literature. Indeed, the Thermo gravimetric Analysis (TGA) shows that the decomposition of the compound is observed in the range of 420-520 K. However, the differential thermal analysis (DTA) indicates the presence of a phase transition at T=363 k. Furthermore, the dielectric properties and AC conductivity were studied over a temperature range (338-413 K) and frequency range (200 Hz-5 MHz) using complex impedance spectroscopy. Dielectric measurements confirmed such thermal analyses by exhibiting the presence of an anomaly in the temperature range of 358-373 K. The complex impedance plots are analyzed by an electrical equivalent circuit consisting of resistance, constant phase element (CPE) and capacitance. The activation energy values of two distinct regions are obtained from log σT vs 1000/T plot and are found to be E=1.27 eV (T<363 K) and E=1.09 eV (363 Kconductivity, σac, has been analyzed by Jonscher's universal power law σ(ω)=σdc+Aωs. The value of s is to be temperature-dependent, which has a tendency to increase with temperature and the non-overlapping small polaron tunneling (NSPT) model is the most applicable conduction mechanism in the title compound. Complex impedance spectra of [C8H10NO]2CuCl4 at different temperatures.

  9. Estimation of electrical conductivity of a layered spherical head model using electrical impedance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Corazza, M.; von-Ellenrieder, N.; Muravchik, C. H.

    2011-12-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive method that aims to create an electrical conductivity map of a volume. In particular, it can be applied to study the human head. The method consists on the injection of an unperceptive and known current through two electrodes attached to the scalp, and the measurement of the resulting electric potential distribution at an array of sensors also placed on the scalp. In this work, we propose a parametric estimation of the brain, scalp and skull conductivities using EIT over an spherical model of the head. The forward problem involves the computation of the electric potential on the surface, for given the conductivities and the injection electrode positions, while the inverse problem consists on estimating the conductivities given the sensor measurements. In this study, the analytical solution to the forward problem based on a three layer spherical model is first described. Then, some measurements are simulated adding white noise to the solutions and the inverse problem is solved in order to estimate the brain, skull and scalp conductivity relations. This is done with a least squares approach and the Nelder-Mead multidimensional unconstrained nonlinear minimization method.

  10. The electrical conductivity of CO2-bearing pore waters at elevated pressure and temperature: a laboratory study and its implications in CO2 storage monitoring and leakage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Jana H.; Herdegen, Volker; Repke, Jens-Uwe; Spitzer, Klaus

    2015-11-01

    The electrical rock conductivity is a sensitive indicator for carbon dioxide (CO2) injection and migration processes. For a reliable balancing of the free CO2 in pore space with petrophysical models such as Archie's law or for the detection of migrating CO2, detailed knowledge of the pore water conductivity during interaction with CO2 is essential but not available yet. Contrary to common assumptions, pore water conductivity cannot be assumed constant since CO2 is a reactive gas that dissolves into the pore water in large amounts and provides additional charge carriers due to the dissociation of carbonic acid. We consequently carried out systematic laboratory experiments to quantify and analyse the changes in saline pore water conductivity caused by CO2 at thermodynamic equilibrium. Electrical conductivity is measured on pore water samples for pressures up to 30 MPa and temperatures up to 80 °C. The parameter range covers the gaseous, liquid and supercritical state of the CO2 involved. Pore water salinities from 0.006 up to 57.27 g L-1 sodium chloride were investigated as well as selective other ion species. At the same time, the CO2 concentration in the salt solution was determined by a wet-chemical procedure. A two-regime behaviour appears: for small salinities, we observe an increase of up to more than factor 3 in the electrical pore water conductivity, which strongly depends on the solution salinity (low-salinity regime). This is an expected behaviour, since the additional ions originating from the dissociation of carbonic acid positively contribute to the solution conductivity. However, when increasing salinities are considered this effect is completely diminished. For highly saline solutions, the increased mutual impeding causes the mobility of all ions to decrease, which may result in a significant reduction of conductivity by up to 15 per cent despite the added CO2 (high-salinity regime). We present the data set covering the pressure, temperature, salinity

  11. A Kinetics Study on Electrical Resistivity Transition of In Situ Polymer Aging Sensors Based on Carbon-Black-Filled Epoxy Conductive Polymeric Composites (CPCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qizhen; Nyugen, Mark T.; Moon, Kyoung-Sik; Watkins, Ken; Morato, Lilian T.; Wong, Ching Ping

    2013-06-01

    Sensors based on carbon-black-filled bisphenol A-type epoxy conductive polymeric composites (CPCs) have been prepared and applied to monitor thermal oxidation aging of polymeric materials. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) is applied to characterize weight loss of epoxy resin in the aging process. By using a mathematical model based on the Boltzmann equation, a relationship between the electrical resistivity of the sensors based on epoxy/carbon black composites and aging time is established, making it possible to monitor and estimate the aging status of polymeric components in situ based on a fast and convenient electrical resistance measurement.

  12. Synthesis of novel electrically conducting polymers: Potential conducting Langmuir-Blodgett films and conducting polymers on defined surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmer, Hans

    1993-01-01

    Based on previous results involving thiophene derived electrically conducting polymers in which it was shown that thiophene, 3-substituted thiophenes, furans, and certain oligomers of these compounds showed electrical conductivity after polymerization. The conductivity was in the order of up to 500 S/cm. In addition, these polymers showed conductivity without being doped and most of all they were practically inert toward ambient conditions. They even could be used in aqueous media. With these findings as a guide, a number of 3-long-chain-substituted thiophenes and 1-substituted-3-long-chain substituted pyrrols were synthesized as monomers for potential polymeric electrically conducting Langmuir-Blodgett films.

  13. Electrical conductivity of chlorite at high pressures and high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eymard, I.; Mibe, K.; Reynard, B.

    2012-12-01

    In the mantle wedge of subduction zones, high electrical-conductivity bodies have been observed. In order to understand the cause of high-conductivity body in subduction zones, we measured the electrical conductivity of polycrystalline chlorite, at pressures from 2 to 4 GPa and at high temperatures up to 850K using complex impedance spectroscopy in a multi-anvil high-pressure apparatus. The electrical conductivity increased slightly with increasing pressure. The obtained electrical conductivity values are higher than serpentine and talc (Reynard et al., 2011; Guo et al., 2011) and are slightly lower than brucite (Fujita et al., 2007). Although the obtained values are higher compared to serpentine, the presence of chlorite alone is not high enough to explain high-conductivity bodies in subduction-zones. Instead, the presence of some amount of saline fluids is inferred.

  14. Electrical conduction phenomena in coked industrial reforming catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Daveau, S.; Bonanos, N.

    1997-02-01

    Industrial Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reforming catalysts containing up to 26 wt% of carbon have been studied by admittance spectroscopy. Spectra obtained on heating in nitrogen in the range 200--500 C displayed low frequency relaxations, which were interpreted in terms of a network of carbon islands linked by surface ionic conduction. During subsequent cooling, these features disappeared, suggesting that they were generated by dissociation of strongly bound water. Isothermal ac measurements in nitrogen showed that the conductance was determined by the carbon content. Similar measurements made in dilute oxygen showed that the conductance decreased with burn-off of carbon. Analysis of gases evolved on heating revealed aqueous and chloride species, originating from acid sites on the catalyst support. The results suggest that electrical techniques could be used to characterize coked reforming catalysts.

  15. Electrical conductivity changes during irreversible electroporation treatment of brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo A; Rossmeisl, John H; Davalos, Rafael V

    2011-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a new minimally invasive technique to kill tumors and other undesirable tissue in a non-thermal manner. During an IRE treatment, a series of short and intense electric pulses are delivered to the region of interest to destabilize the cell membranes in the tissue and achieve spontaneous cell death. The alteration of the cellular membrane results in a dramatic increase in electrical conductivity during IRE as in other electroporation-based-therapies. In this study, we performed the planning and execution of an IRE brain cancer treatment using MRI reconstructions of the tumor and a multichannel array that served as a stereotactic fiducial and electrode guide. Using the tumor reconstructions within our numerical simulations, we developed equations relating the increase in tumor conductivity to calculated currents and volumes of tumor treated with IRE. We also correlated the experimental current measured during the procedure to an increase in tumor conductivity ranging between 3.42-3.67 times the baseline conductivity, confirming the physical phenomenon that has been detected in other tissues undergoing similar electroporation-based treatments. PMID:22254416

  16. Strong and electrically conductive nanopaper from cellulose nanofibers and polypyrrole.

    PubMed

    Lay, Makara; Méndez, J Alberto; Delgado-Aguilar, Marc; Bun, Kim Ngun; Vilaseca, Fabiola

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we prepare cellulose nanopapers of high mechanical performance and with the electrical conductivity of a semiconductor. Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) from bleached softwood pulp were coated with polypyrrole (PPy) via in situ chemical polymerization, in presence of iron chloride (III) as oxidant agent. The structure and morphology of nanopapers were studied, as well as their thermal, mechanical and conductive properties. Nanopaper from pure CNF exhibited a very high tensile response (224MPa tensile strength and 14.5GPa elastic modulus). The addition of up to maximum 20% of polypyrrole gave CNF/PPy nanopapers of high flexibility and still good mechanical properties (94MPa strength and 8.8GPa modulus). The electrical conductivity of the resulting CNF/PPy nanopaper was of 5.2 10(-2)Scm(-1), with a specific capacitance of 7.4Fg(-1). The final materials are strong and conductive nanopapers that can find application as biodegradable flexible thin-film transistor (TFT) or as flexible biosensor. PMID:27516283

  17. Temperature dependence of electrical conductivity and lunar temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olhoeft, G. R.; Strangway, D. W.; Sharpe, H.; Frisillo, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    Metallic conduction mechanicsms are probably not important in lunar materials because of the small amounts of free metal and metallic oxides present. This is confirmed by the extremely low conductivities measured to date and the fact that the conductivity increases with temperature. The major conduction mechanicsm appears to be ionic. This conduction mechanism is very strongly controlled by temperature, by deviations from stoichiometry, by electric field strengths, and by oxygen fugacity.

  18. Assembly for electrical conductivity measurements in the piston cylinder device

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Heather Christine; Roberts, Jeffrey James

    2012-06-05

    An assembly apparatus for measurement of electrical conductivity or other properties of a sample in a piston cylinder device wherein pressure and heat are applied to the sample by the piston cylinder device. The assembly apparatus includes a body, a first electrode in the body, the first electrode operatively connected to the sample, a first electrical conductor connected to the first electrode, a washer constructed of a hard conducting material, the washer surrounding the first electrical conductor in the body, a second electrode in the body, the second electrode operatively connected to the sample, and a second electrical conductor connected to the second electrode.

  19. Electrically conductive and redox electroactive organic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.R.; Balanda, P.B.; Sotzing, G.A.

    1995-12-01

    We describe new fully conjugated bis(pyrrol-2-yl)arylene and bis(3,4-dioxyethylenethiophene)arylene monomers which electropolymerize at low potentials avoiding degradative side reactions to yield highly stable redox switchable polymers. We outline the properties of DOET polymers which exhibit low electronic band gaps allowing for the formation of conducting complexes with a high degree of optical transmission of visible light and show their electrochromic properties. Finally, we discuss the properties of polymers containing electron donor molecules as an integral part of the polymer backbone and as pendant substituents. These donor molecules have been chosen due to their propensity to form metallic, and in some instances superconducting, crystalline complexes and suggest these properties can be extended to highly processible organic polymers.

  20. Electrical conductivity of zirconia stabilized with scandia and yttria

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Hiroyuki; Jin, Fuxue; Taimatsu, Hitoshi . Dept. of Materials Engineering and Applied Chemistry); Kusakabe, Hirotatsu . Tsukuba Research Lab.)

    1993-03-01

    Electrical conductivity of zirconia stabilized with scandia and yttria (Sc[sub 2]O[sub 3] + Y[sub 2]O[sub 3] = 8 mol%) has been measured by the complex impedance method in the temperature range 573 to 1,173 K. With increasing Sc[sub 2]O[sub 3] concentration, electrical conductivity increases at temperatures above 640K, but it decreases below this temperature. Electrical conductivity in the electrolytes examined is a result of two processes: an activation energy of 59 to 79 kJ/mol predominant at high temperatures and an activation energy of 109 to 125 kJ/mol predominant at low temperatures.

  1. Electrical conduction in chalcogenide glasses of phase change memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardone, M.; Simon, M.; Karpov, I. V.; Karpov, V. G.

    2012-10-01

    Amorphous chalcogenides have been extensively studied over the last half century due to their application in rewritable optical data storage and in non-volatile phase change memory devices. Yet, the nature of the observed non-ohmic conduction in these glasses is still under debate. In this review, we consolidate and expand the current state of knowledge related to dc conduction in these materials. An overview of the pertinent experimental data is followed by a review of the physics of localized states that are peculiar to chalcogenide glasses. We then describe and evaluate twelve relevant transport mechanisms with conductivities that depend exponentially on the electric field. The discussed mechanisms include various forms of Poole-Frenkel ionization, Schottky emission, hopping conduction, field-induced delocalization of tail states, space-charge-limited current, field emission, percolation band conduction, and transport through crystalline inclusions. Most of the candidates provide more or less satisfactory fits of the observed non-linear IV data. Our analysis calls upon additional studies that would enable one to discriminate between the various alternative models.

  2. Electrical Modulation of the Local Conduction at Oxide Tubular Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Ying-Hui; Strelcov, Evgheni; Jia-Ming, Liou; Chia-Ying, Shen; Yi-Chun, Chen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Ying-Hao, Chu

    2013-01-01

    Hetero-interfaces between complex oxides have sparked considerable interest due to their fascinating physical properties and offer new possibilities for next-generation electronic devices. The key to realize practical applications is the control through external stimulus. In this study, we take the self-assembled BiFeO3-CoFe2O4 hetero-interface as a model system to demonstrate the non-volatile electric control of the local conduction at the complex oxide tubular interface. The fundamental mechanism behind this modulation was explored based on static and dynamic conducting atomic force microscopy. We found the movement of oxygen vacancies in the BiFeO3-CoFe2O4 heterostructure is the key to drive this intriguing behavior. This study delivers a possibility of designing new device for next-generation electronic devices.

  3. Phase transformation, thermal expansion and electrical conductivity of lanthanum chromite

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sapna; Mahapatra, Manoj K.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Orthorhombic and rhombohedral phases co-exist at ≥260 °C and cubic above 1000 °C. • Polymorphic changes with temperature in air and Ar–3%H{sub 2} are observed. • Lattice volume change in Ar–3%H{sub 2} atmosphere corresponds to Cr{sup 4+} → Cr{sup 3+} transition. • Change in valence state of Cr{sup 4+} to Cr{sup 3+} results in lower electrical conductivity. • Experimental evidence is provided for poor densification of LaCrO{sub 3} in air. - Abstract: This paper addresses discrepancies pertaining to structural, thermal and electrical properties of lanthanum chromite. Experimental evidence is provided to support the hypothesis for poor densification in air as well as reduction in electrical conductivity in reducing atmosphere. Sintering condition for the synthesis of LaCrO{sub 3} was optimized to 1450 °C and 10 h. Thermo-analytical (differential scanning calorimetry – DSC) and high temperature X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD) studies show that orthorhombic lanthanum chromite transforms into rhombohedral structure at ∼260 °C and cubic structure above 1000 °C. Co-existence of the structural phases and the variation in each polymorph with temperature in both air and 3%H{sub 2}–Ar atmosphere is reported. Presence and absence of Cr-rich phase at inter-particle neck are observed in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres respectively. The linear thermal expansion co-efficient was calculated to be 10.8 ± 0.2 × 10{sup −6} °C{sup −1} in the temperature range of RT–1400 °C. Electrical conductivity of lanthanum chromite was found to be 0.11 S/cm in air. A decrease in electrical conductivity (0.02 S/cm at 800 °C) of LaCrO{sub 3}, as observed in reducing atmosphere (3%H{sub 2}–Ar), corresponds to lattice volume change as indicated by peak shift in HT-XRD results.

  4. Conductivity and electric field variations with altitude in the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzworth, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    Data regarding electric field, derived current density, and conductivity are presented for two balloons from the Electrodynamics of the Middle Atmosphere experiment which underwent the longest period of daily altitude variation. The magnetic L values range from 4.3 to 9.5 for the 18 days of Southern Hemisphere statistics, and the average conductivity and vertical electric fields are given. Simultaneous measurements of the average conductivity scale height and the vertical electric-field scale height indicate that vertical current density does not vary with altitude in the 10-28-km range. The measured conductivity varies significantly at a given altitude on a particular day, and some conductivity data sets are similar to other measurements between 10 and 30 km. Comparisons of the measured data to predictions from models of stratospheric conductivity demonstrate significant discrepancies.

  5. Using electrical impedance tomography to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, James G.; Daily, William D.; Ramirez, Abelardo L.; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2000-01-01

    The use of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity. EIT can be used to map hydraulic conductivity in the subsurface where measurements of both amplitude and phase are made. Hydraulic conductivity depends on at least two parameters: porosity and a length scale parameter. Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) measures and maps electrical conductivity (which can be related to porosity) in three dimensions. By introducing phase measurements along with amplitude, the desired additional measurement of a pertinent length scale can be achieved. Hydraulic conductivity controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the surface. Thus inexpensive maps of hydraulic conductivity would improve planning strategies for subsequent remediation efforts. Fluid permeability is also of importance for oil field exploitation and thus detailed knowledge of fluid permeability distribution in three-dimension (3-D) would be a great boon to petroleum reservoir analysts.

  6. Electrically conductive nano graphite-filled bacterial cellulose composites.

    PubMed

    Erbas Kiziltas, Esra; Kiziltas, Alper; Rhodes, Kevin; Emanetoglu, Nuri W; Blumentritt, Melanie; Gardner, Douglas J

    2016-01-20

    A unique three dimensional (3D) porous structured bacterial cellulose (BC) can act as a supporting material to deposit the nanofillers in order to create advanced BC-based functional nanomaterials for various technological applications. In this study, novel nanocomposites comprised of BC with exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP) incorporated into the BC matrix were prepared using a simple particle impregnation strategy to enhance the thermal properties and electrical conductivity of the BC. The flake-shaped xGnP particles were well dispersed and formed a continuous network throughout the BC matrix. The temperature at 10% weight loss, thermal stability and residual ash content of the nanocomposites increased at higher xGnP loadings. The electrical conductivity of the composites increased with increasing xGnP loading (attaining values 0.75 S/cm with the addition of 2 wt.% of xGnP). The enhanced conductive and thermal properties of the BC-xGnP nanocomposites will broaden applications (biosensors, tissue engineering, etc.) of BC and xGnP. PMID:26572457

  7. The bedrock electrical conductivity structure of Northern Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beamish, David

    2013-08-01

    An airborne geophysical survey of the whole of Northern Ireland has provided over 4.8 M estimates of the bedrock conductivity over the wide range of geological formations present. This study investigates how such data can be used to provide additional knowledge in relation to existing digital geological map information. A by-product of the analysis is a simplification of the spatially aggregated information obtained in such surveys. The methodology used is a GIS-based attribution of the conductivity estimates using a lithological classification of the bedrock formations. A 1:250k geological classification of the data is performed leading to a 56 unit lithological and geostatistical analysis of the conductivity information. The central moments (medians) of the classified data are used to provide a new digital bedrock conductivity map of Northern Ireland with values ranging from 0.32 to 41.36 mS m-1. This baseline map of conductivities displays a strong correspondence with an existing 4 quadrant, chrono-geological description of Northern Ireland. Once defined, the baseline conductivity map allows departures from the norm to be assessed across each specific lithological unit. Bulk electrical conductivity is controlled by a number of petrophysical parameters and it is their variation that is assessed by the procedures employed. The igneous rocks are found to display the largest variability in conductivity values and many of the statistical distributions are multi-modal. A sequence of low-value modes in these data are associated with intrusives within volcanic complexes. These and much older Neoproterzoic rocks appear to represent very low porosity formations that may be the product of rapid cooling during emplacement. By way of contrast, extensive flood basalts (the Antrim lavas) record a well-defined and much higher median value (12.24 mS m-1) although they display complex spatial behaviour in detail. Sedimentary rocks appear to follow the broad behaviours anticipated

  8. Electrical Switchability and Dry-Wash Durability of Conductive Textiles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bangting; Zhang, Bowu; Wu, Jingxia; Wang, Ziqiang; Ma, Hongjuan; Yu, Ming; Li, Linfan; Li, Jingye

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in the area of conductive textiles in the scientific and industrial community. Herein, we successfully prepared a conductive textile via covalently grafting polyaniline (PANI) onto cotton by a multi-step treatment process. The conductivity of the resultant fabric could be tuned by immersing in water having different pH values. The conductive and insulating properties of the textile could be conveniently switched by alternately immersing in acidic and alkaline bath solutions. Most importantly, the resultant conductive fabrics were able to withstand 40 simulated dry-wash cycles, with almost no decay in the electrical conductivity, indicating their excellent dry-wash durability. The present strategy for fabricating conductive fabrics with excellent switchability of electrical properties and dry-wash durability is expected to provide inspiration for the production of multifunctional conductive textiles for use in hash or sensitive conditions. PMID:26066704

  9. Measurement of electrical conductivity for a biomass fire.

    PubMed

    Mphale, Kgakgamatso; Heron, Mal

    2008-08-01

    A controlled fire burner was constructed where various natural vegetation species could be used as fuel. The burner was equipped with thermocouples to measure fuel surface temperature and used as a cavity for microwaves with a laboratory quality 2-port vector network analyzer to determine electrical conductivity from S-parameters. Electrical conductivity for vegetation material flames is important for numerical prediction of flashover in high voltage power transmission faults research. Vegetation fires that burn under high voltage transmission lines reduce flashover voltage by increasing air electrical conductivity and temperature. Analyzer determined electrical conductivity ranged from 0.0058 - 0.0079 mho/m for a fire with a maximum temperature of 1240 K. PMID:19325812

  10. Electrical Circuit Analogues of Thermal Conduction and Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlin, D. H.; Fullarton, G. K.

    1978-01-01

    After briefly reviewing equations of conduction and diffusion, and voltage and charge in electrical circuits, a simple experiment is given that allows students practical experience in a theoretical realm of physics. (MDR)

  11. Temperature-dependent electrical conductivity of soda-lime glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunnell, L. Roy; Vertrees, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this educational exercise was to demonstrate the difference between the electrical conductivity of metals and ceramics. A list of the equipment and supplies and the procedure for the experiment are presented.

  12. Measurement of Electrical Conductivity for a Biomass Fire

    PubMed Central

    Mphale, Kgakgamatso; Heron, Mal

    2008-01-01

    A controlled fire burner was constructed where various natural vegetation species could be used as fuel. The burner was equipped with thermocouples to measure fuel surface temperature and used as a cavity for microwaves with a laboratory quality 2-port vector network analyzer to determine electrical conductivity from S-parameters. Electrical conductivity for vegetation material flames is important for numerical prediction of flashover in high voltage power transmission faults research. Vegetation fires that burn under high voltage transmission lines reduce flashover voltage by increasing air electrical conductivity and temperature. Analyzer determined electrical conductivity ranged from 0.0058 - 0.0079 mho/m for a fire with a maximum temperature of 1240 K. PMID:19325812

  13. Metallization and electrical conductivity of hydrogen in Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Nellis, W J; Weir, S T; Mitchell, A C

    1996-08-16

    Electrical conductivities of molecular hydrogen in Jupiter were calculated by scaling electrical conductivities measured at shock pressures in the range of 10 to 180 gigapascals (0.1 to 1.8 megabars) and temperatures to 4000 kelvin, representative of conditions inside Jupiter. Jupiter's magnetic field is caused by convective dynamo motion of electrically conducting fluid hydrogen. The data imply that Jupiter should become metallic at 140 gigapascals in the fluid, and the electrical conductivity in the jovian molecular envelope at pressures up to metallization is about an order of magnitude larger than expected previously. The large magnetic field is produced in the molecular envelope closer to the surface than previously thought. PMID:8688072

  14. Software optimization for electrical conductivity imaging in polycrystalline diamond cutters

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, G.; Ludwig, R.; Wiggins, J.; Bertagnolli, K.

    2014-02-18

    We previously reported on an electrical conductivity imaging instrument developed for measurements on polycrystalline diamond cutters. These cylindrical cutters for oil and gas drilling feature a thick polycrystalline diamond layer on a tungsten carbide substrate. The instrument uses electrical impedance tomography to profile the conductivity in the diamond table. Conductivity images must be acquired quickly, on the order of 5 sec per cutter, to be useful in the manufacturing process. This paper reports on successful efforts to optimize the conductivity reconstruction routine, porting major portions of it to NVIDIA GPUs, including a custom CUDA kernel for Jacobian computation.

  15. Cardiac fibrillation risks with TASER conducted electrical weapons.

    PubMed

    Panescu, Dorin; Kroll, Mark; Brave, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The TASER(®) conducted electrical weapon (CEW) delivers electrical pulses that can temporarily incapacitate subjects. We analyzed the cardiac fibrillation risk with TASER CEWs. Our risk model accounted for realistic body mass index distributions, used a new model of effects of partial or oblique dart penetration and used recent epidemiological CEW statics. PMID:26736265

  16. The electrical conductivity of weakly ionized plasma containing dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Wu, Jian; Yuan, Chengxun; Zhou, Zhongxiang

    2016-07-01

    The effect of charged dust particle on the electrical conductivity of weakly ionized dusty plasma is investigated. It is shown that the additional collision provided by charged dust particles can significantly alter the electrical conductivity of electron-ion plasma. The numerical results indicated that these effects are mainly determined by dust radius, density as well as the charge numbers on dust surface. The obtained results will support an enhanced understanding of the electromagnetic wave propagation processes in dusty plasma.

  17. Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Measurements of CDA 510 Phosphor Bronze

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, James E.; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Many cryogenic systems use electrical cables containing phosphor bronze wire. While phosphor bronze's electrical and thermal conductivity values have been published, there is significant variation among different phosphor bronze formulations. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will use several phosphor bronze wire harnesses containing a specific formulation (CDA 510, annealed temper). The heat conducted into the JWST instrument stage is dominated by these harnesses, and approximately half of the harness conductance is due to the phosphor bronze wires. Since the JWST radiators are expected to just keep the instruments at their operating temperature with limited cooling margin, it is important to know the thermal conductivity of the actual alloy being used. We describe an experiment which measured the electrical and thermal conductivity of this material between 4 and 295 Kelvin.

  18. Electrical conductivity model of Al-bearing bridgmanite with implications for the electrical structure of the Earth's lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Takashi; Kamada, Seiji; Zhao, Chengcheng; Ohtani, Eiji; Hirao, Naohisa

    2016-01-01

    Electrical conductivity measurements of bridgmanite with various Al contents and a constant Mg# of 90 were performed at temperatures ranging from room temperature up to 2000 K at pressures of 26-28 GPa in a Kawai-type multianvil apparatus by impedance spectroscopy analysis. The incorporation of Al into bridgmanite raises its electrical conductivity significantly, but it is a small conductivity variation with respect to the quantity of Al. Synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy of recovered samples showed significant amounts of ferric iron in aluminous bridgmanite. The mobility of the charge carriers in bridgmanite was calculated based on the conductivity and the Fe3+/ΣFe ratio. The relationship between the logarithm of the electrical conductivity and the reciprocal temperature is consistent with Fe2+-Fe3+ electron hopping (small polarons) as the dominant conduction mechanism at low temperatures (<1400 K) and ionic conduction at higher temperatures (>1600 K). By taking various conduction mechanisms into account, we develop an electrical conductivity model for aluminous bridgmanite as a function of the Al and Fe contents. The small polaron conduction model indicates that the electrical conductivity of aluminous bridgmanite has a maximum at around 0.06 Al atoms per formula unit, and any further increase in the Al content in bridgmanite reduces the conductivity. In contrast, the ionic conduction model indicates that the electrical conductivity simply increases with increasing Al content. The resulting conductivity of Al-bearing bridgmanite first increases up to 0.06 Al atoms per formula unit and then remains constant or increases with increasing Al content at higher temperatures. The increase in conductivity observed in the uppermost part of the lower mantle by electromagnetic studies can be explained by the gradual decomposition of majorite garnet. The deeper lower mantle conductivity would be controlled by small polaron conduction because of the large positive

  19. Electrically conductive resinous bond and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Snowden, Jr., Thomas M.; Wells, Barbara J.

    1987-01-01

    A method of bonding elements together with a bond of high strength and good electrical conductivity which comprises: applying an unfilled polyimide resin between surfaces of the elements to be bonded, heat treating said unfilled polyimide resin in stages between a temperature range of about 40.degree. to 365.degree. C. to form a strong adhesive bond between said elements, applying a metal-filled polyimide resin overcoat between said elements so as to provide electrical connection therebetween, and heat treating said metal-filled polyimide resin with substantially the same temperature profile as the unfilled polyimide resin. The present invention is also concerned with an adhesive, resilient, substantially void free bonding combination for providing a high strength, electrically conductive adhesive attachment between electrically conductive elements which comprises a major amount of an unfilled polyimide resin and a minor amount of a metal-filled polyimide resin.

  20. Electrically conductive resinous bond and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Snowden, T.M. Jr.; Wells, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    A method of bonding elements together with a bond of high strength and good electrical conductivity which comprises: applying an unfilled polyimide resin between surfaces of the elements to be bonded, heat treating said unfilled polyimide resin in stages between a temperature range of about 40 to 365/sup 0/C to form a strong adhesive bond between said elements, applying a metal-filled polyimide resin overcoat between said elements so as to provide electrical connection therebetween, and heat treating said metal-filled polyimide resin with substantially the same temperature profile as the unfilled polyimide resin. The present invention is also concerned with an adhesive, resilient, substantially void free bonding combination for providing a high strength, electrically conductive adhesive attachment between electrically conductive elements which comprises a major amount of an unfilled polyimide resin and a minor amount of a metal-filled polyimide resin.

  1. ION AND TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF ELECTRICAL CONDUCTANCE FOR NATURAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four empirical equations describing the temperature dependence of electrical conductance of aqueous solutions are compared for the case of single electrolytes. The best method uses a modified Walden product where the log of the ratio between the conductances at two temperatures i...

  2. Mechanically stiff, electrically conductive composites of polymers and carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Kucheyev, Sergei O.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Hamza, Alex V.

    2015-07-21

    Using SWNT-CA as scaffolds to fabricate stiff, highly conductive polymer (PDMS) composites. The SWNT-CA is immersing in a polymer resin to produce a SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin. The SWNT-CA infiltrated with a polymer resin is cured to produce the stiff and electrically conductive composite of carbon nanotube aerogel and polymer.

  3. Mantle electrical conductivity profile of Niger delta region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obiora, Daniel N.; Okeke, Francisca N.; Yumoto, K.; Agha, Stan O.

    2014-06-01

    The mantle electrical conductivity-depth profile of the Niger delta region in Nigeria has been determined using solar quiet day ionospheric current (Sq). The magnetometer data obtained in 2010 from geomagnetic stations installed in Lagos by magnetic dataset (MAGDAS) in 2008 and data from magnetometers installed in some parts of Niger delta by Center for Basic Space Science, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, were employed in this study. Gauss spherical harmonic analysis (SHA) method was used to separate the internal and external field contributions to Sq current system. The result depicted that the conductivity profile rose steadily from about 0.032 S/m at a depth of 89 km to 0.041 S/m at 100 km and 0.09 S/m at 221 km. This high conductivity region agreed with the global seismic low velocity region, the asthenosphere. The conductivity profile continued increasing downward until it got to 0.157 S/m at a depth of about 373 km (close to the base of upper mantle), 0.201 S/m at 784 km and reached 0.243 S/m at a depth of 1179 km at the lower mantle.

  4. Electric pulp tester conductance through various interface media.

    PubMed

    Mickel, André K; Lindquist, Kimberly A D; Chogle, Sami; Jones, Jefferson J; Curd, Francis

    2006-12-01

    A conducting media is necessary when using an electric pulp tester (EPT). The objective of this study was to observe differences in conductance through various media. We hypothesized that variations in current conductance through different media exist. The pulp chamber of a freshly extracted premolar was exposed, and the cathode of a voltmeter was inserted into the pulpal tissue. The anode was coupled to the EPT handpiece. The measurement taken during dry (no interface media) EPT tip-to-tooth contact was 0 V, which served as negative control. EPT tip directly touching the cathode measured 3.9V and served as positive control. A number of media readily available in the dental office were tested. Data was analyzed using single factor ANOVA. Listerine (3.3) conducted the most voltage (p<0.5). Of nonliquids, K-Y Brand UltraGel and Crest Baking Soda & Peroxide Whitening Tartar Control toothpaste recorded significantly (p<0.05) higher voltage readings (1.4 V). PMID:17174677

  5. UV-induced surface electrical conductivity jump of polymer nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Guangxin; Miyauchi, Masahiro; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2008-05-19

    A method of improving the electrical conductivity of polymer nanocomposites under UV irradiation was described. An anatase TiO{sub 2}-grafted carbon nanotube could function as a conductive filler and a photocatalyst when it compounds with a poly(L-lactide) to produce a composite. After UV irradiation, the decomposition of the polymer only occurred on the surface of a poly(L-lactide)/TiO{sub 2} grafted carbon nanotube composite and not on bulk, resulting in an electrical conductivity jump as high as six orders of magnitude.

  6. Measuring the local electrical conductivity of human brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtari, M.; Emin, D.; Ellingson, B. M.; Woodworth, D.; Frew, A.; Mathern, G. W.

    2016-02-01

    The electrical conductivities of freshly excised brain tissues from 24 patients were measured. The diffusion-MRI of the hydrogen nuclei of water molecules from regions that were subsequently excised was also measured. Analysis of these measurements indicates that differences between samples' conductivities are primarily due to differences of their densities of solvated sodium cations. Concomitantly, the sample-to-sample variations of their diffusion constants are relatively small. This finding suggests that non-invasive in-vivo measurements of brain tissues' local sodium-cation density can be utilized to estimate its local electrical conductivity.

  7. A Structural Electrical Conductivity Model for Oxide Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibodeau, Eric; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-02-01

    A structural electrical conductivity model for oxide melts was developed based on the Nernst-Einstein relationship of ionic conductivity. In the description of ionic conductivity, the effective diffusivities of cations in oxide slags were described as a function of the polymerization of the melt. The polymerization of oxide melts was calculated from the Modified Quasichemical Model, taking into account the short-range ordering in slags. The parameters of this conductivity model were fixed to reproduce the electrical conductivity data in unary and binary melts, and the model can well predict the conductivity data in ternary and higher order system without any additional model parameters. The model is successfully applied to the CaO-MgO-MnO-PbO-Al2O3-SiO2 system.

  8. Electrical conduction in macroscopically oriented deoxyribonucleic and hyaluronic acid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutnjak, Zdravko; Lahajnar, Gojmir; Filipič, Cene; Podgornik, Rudolf; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Korolev, Nikolay; Rupprecht, Allan

    2005-04-01

    Measurements of the quasistatic and frequency dependent electrical conductivity below 1 MHz were carried out on wet-spun, macroscopically oriented, calf thymus deoxyribonucleic (DNA) and umbilical cord hyaluronic acid (HA) bulk samples. The frequency dependence of the electrical conductivity in the frequency range of approximately 10-3-106Hz of both materials is surprisingly rather similar. Temperature dependence of the quasistatic electrical conductivity above the low temperature saturation plateau can be well described by the activated Arrhenius law with the activation energy of ≈0.8eV for both DNA and HA. We discuss the meaning of these findings for the possible conduction mechanism in these particular charged polyelectrolytes.

  9. Synthesis and applications of electrically conducting polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Bon-Cheol

    This research focuses on the synthesis and applications of electrically conducting polymer nanocomposites through molecular self-assembly. Two different classes of polymers, polyaniline (PANI) and polyacetylenes have been synthesized by biomimetic catalysis and spontaneous polymerization method. For gas barrier materials, commercially available polymers, poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly (acrylic acid) (PAA), have also been used and thermally cross-linked. The morphological, optical and electrical properties of amphiphilic polyacetylenes have been studied. Furthermore, barrier properties, permselectivity, pervaporation properties of polyacetylenes/aluminosilicate nanocomposites have been investigated. For processability and electrical properties of carbon nanotube and conducting polymers, substituted ionic polyacetylenes (SIPA) have been covalently incorporated onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) using the "grafting-from" technique. In the first study, a nanocomposite film catalyst has been prepared by electrostatic layer-by-layer (ELBL) self-assembly of a polyelectrolyte and a biomimetic catalyst for synthesis of polyaniline. Poly(dimethyl diallylammonium chloride) (PDAC) and hematin have been used as polycation and counter anions, respectively. The absorption spectra by UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy showed that conductive form polyaniline was formed not only as a coating on the surface of the ELBL composites but was also formed in solution. Furthermore, it was found that the reaction rate was affected by pH and concentration of hematin in the multilayers. The feasibility of controlled desorption of hematin molecules from the LBL assembly was explored and demonstrated by changing the pH and hematin concentration. The polymerization rate of aniline in solution was enhanced with decreasing pH of the solutions due to increased desorption of hematin nanoparticles from the multilayers. These ELBL hematin assemblies demonstrated both a way to functionalize

  10. Detection of temperature distribution via recovering electrical conductivity in MREIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In Oh, Tong; Kim, Hyung Joong; Jeong, Woo Chul; Chauhan, Munish; In Kwon, Oh; Woo, Eung Je

    2013-04-01

    In radiofrequency (RF) ablation or hyperthermia, internal temperature measurements and tissue property imaging are important to control their outputs and assess the treatment effect. Recently, magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT), as a non-invasive imaging method of internal conductivity distribution using an MR scanner, has been developed. Its reconstruction algorithm uses measured magnetic flux density induced by injected currents. The MREIT technique has the potential to visualize electrical conductivity of tissue with high spatial resolution and measure relative conductivity variation according to the internal temperature change based on the fact that the electrical conductivity of biological tissues is sensitive to the internal temperature distribution. In this paper, we propose a method to provide a non-invasive alternative to monitor the internal temperature distribution by recovering the electrical conductivity distribution using the MREIT technique. To validate the proposed method, we design a phantom with saline solution and a thin transparency film in a form of a hollow cylinder with holes to create anomalies with different electrical and thermal conductivities controlled by morphological structure. We first prove the temperature maps with respect to spatial and time resolution by solving the thermal conductivity partial differential equation with the real phantom experimental environment. The measured magnetic flux density and the reconstructed conductivity distributions using the phantom experiments were compared to the simulated temperature distribution. The relative temperature variation of two testing objects with respect to the background saline was determined by the relative conductivity contrast ratio (rCCR,%). The relation between the temperature and conductivity measurements using MREIT was approximately linear with better accuracy than 0.22 °C.

  11. Electric and thermal conductivities of quenched neutron star crusts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogata, Shuji; Ichimaru, Setsuo

    1990-01-01

    The electric and thermal conductivities in the outer crustal matter of a neutron star quenched into a solid state by cooling are estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation of freezing transition for dense plasmas. The conductivities are calculated by the precise evaluation of the scattering integrals, using the procedure of Ichimaru et al. (1983) and Iyetomi and Ichimaru (1983). The results predict the conductivities lower, by a factor of about 3, than those with the single-phonon approximation.

  12. Measurements of the vertical atmospheric electric field and of the electrical conductivity with stratospheric balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iversen, I. B.; Madsen, M. M.; Dangelo, N.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the atmospheric (vertical) electric field with balloons in the stratosphere are reported. The atmospheric electrical conductivity is also measured and the current density inferred. The average vertical current shows the expected variation with universal time and is also seen to be influenced by external (magnetospheric) electric fields.

  13. Electrical Conductivity of HgTe at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Su, C.-H.; Scripa, R. N.

    2004-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of HgTe was measured using a rotating magnetic field method from 300 K to the melting point (943 K). A microscopic theory for electrical conduction was used to calculate the expected temperature dependence of the HgTe conductivity. A comparison between the measured and calculated conductivities was used to obtain the estimates of the temperature dependence of Gamma(sub 6)-Gamma(sub 8) energy gap from 300 K to 943 K. The estimated temperature coefficient for the energy gap was comparable to the previous results at lower temperatures (less than or equal to 300 K). A rapid increase in the conductivity just above 300 K and a subsequent decrease at 500 K is attributed to band crossover effects. This paper describes the experimental approach and some of the theoretical calculation details.

  14. Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C. Y.; Fortini, A.

    1971-01-01

    Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials, including 304L stainless steel Rigimesh, 304L stainless steel sintered spherical powders, and OFHC sintered spherical powders at different porosities and temperatures are reported and correlated. It was found that the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity can be related to the solid material properties and the porosity of the porous matrix regardless of the matrix structure. It was also found that the Wiedermann-Franz-Lorenz relationship is valid for the porous materials under consideration. For high conductivity materials, the Lorenz constant and the lattice component of conductivity depend on the material and are independent of the porosity. For low conductivity, the lattice component depends on the porosity as well.

  15. Phase transitions in U3O8- z: II. Electrical conductivity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Keiji; Tsuji, Toshihide; Ohya, Fumiaki

    1983-02-01

    Phase transition in U3O8- z was studied by means of electrical conductivity measurement and X-ray diffraction technique in the temperature range from room temperature to 1073 K. It was found that the break in a linear relation between the electrical conductivity and the reciprocal temperature which corresponds to the phase transition varies with the O/U ratio, the heat treatment of the sample and the heating rate during the electrical conductivity measurement. From the electrical conductivity and X-ray diffraction studies, phase transition in ` U3O8- z is concluded to be an order-disorder type based on the configurational change of U(V) and U(VI) ions with structural changes from orthorhombic to hexagonal. A phase diagram in U3O8- z was proposed from the electrical conductivity, X-ray diffraction and heat capacity data.

  16. Impurity effects on electrical conductivity of doped bilayer graphene in the presence of a bias voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E, Lotfi; H, Rezania; B, Arghavaninia; M, Yarmohammadi

    2016-07-01

    We address the electrical conductivity of bilayer graphene as a function of temperature, impurity concentration, and scattering strength in the presence of a finite bias voltage at finite doping, beginning with a description of the tight-binding model using the linear response theory and Green’s function approach. Our results show a linear behavior at high doping for the case of high bias voltage. The effects of electron doping on the electrical conductivity have been studied via changing the electronic chemical potential. We also discuss and analyze how the bias voltage affects the temperature behavior of the electrical conductivity. Finally, we study the behavior of the electrical conductivity as a function of the impurity concentration and scattering strength for different bias voltages and chemical potentials respectively. The electrical conductivity is found to be monotonically decreasing with impurity scattering strength due to the increased scattering among electrons at higher impurity scattering strength.

  17. Fabrication of highly conductive carbon nanotube fibers for electrical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fengmei; Li, Can; Wei, Jinquan; Xu, Ruiqiao; Zhang, Zelin; Cui, Xian; Wang, Kunlin; Wu, Dehai

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have great potential for use as electrical wires because of their outstanding electrical and mechanical properties. Here, we fabricate lightweight CNT fibers with electrical conductivity as high as that of stainless steel from macroscopic CNT films by drawing them through diamond wire-drawing dies. The entangled CNT bundles are straightened by suffering tension, which improves the alignment of the fibers. The loose fibers are squeezed by the diamond wire-drawing dies, which reduces the intertube space and contact resistance. The CNT fibers prepared by drawing have an electrical conductivity as high as 1.6 × 106 s m-1. The fibers are very stable when kept in the air and under cyclic tensile test. A prototype of CNT motor is demonstrated by replacing the copper wires with the CNT fibers.

  18. Electrical conductivity of carbonbearing granulite at raised temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Paul W. J.; Vine, F. J.

    1992-12-01

    IT has long been recognized that the electrical conductivity of the lower continental crust is anomalously high. Both pore-saturating brines1-5 and conducting films of carbon at grain boundaries6-10 have been proposed to explain this, but the evidence remains inconclusive. Here we report measurements of electrical conductivity at high temperatures and pressures11-13 on samples of carbon-bearing and carbon-free granulites with a range of electrolyte saturations. The application of pressure to nominally dry carbon-free samples reduces the electrical conductivity as a result of a progressive reduction in pore connectivity, whereas the carbon-bearing samples show an increase in conductivity under the same conditions-an effect that we ascribe to reconnection of carbon conduction pathways during compaction. Moreover, we find a greater increase in conductivity with temperature for the carbon-bearing samples. In the light of work indicating that the abundance of carbon in high-grade rocks has been underestimated in the past7,8, our results provide strong evidence for the role of carbon in lower-crustal conductivity.

  19. Shear induced electrical behaviour of conductive polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starý, Zdeněk; Krückel, Johannes; Schubert, Dirk W.

    2013-04-01

    The time-dependent electrical resistance of polymethylmethacrylate containing carbon black was measured under oscillatory shear in the molten state. The electrical signal was oscillating exactly at the doubled frequency of the oscillatory shear deformation. Moreover, the experimental results gave a hint to the development of conductive structures in polymer melts under shear deformation. It was shown that the flow induced destruction of conductive paths dominates over the flow induced build-up in the beginning of the shear deformations. However, for longer times both competitive effects reach a dynamic equilibrium and only the thermally induced build-up of pathways influences the changes in the composite resistance during the shear. Furthermore, the oscillating electrical response depends clearly on the deformation amplitude applied. A simple physical model describing the behaviour of conductive pathways under shear deformation was derived and utilized for the description of the experimental data.

  20. Multi-rate flowing Wellbore electric conductivity logging method

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Doughty, Christine

    2003-04-22

    The flowing wellbore electric conductivity logging method involves the replacement of wellbore water by de-ionized or constant-salinity water, followed by constant pumping with rate Q, during which a series of fluid electric conductivity logs are taken. The logs can be analyzed to identify depth locations of inflow, and evaluate the transmissivity and electric conductivity (salinity) of the fluid at each inflow point. The present paper proposes the use of the method with two or more pumping rates. In particular it is recommended that the method be applied three times with pumping rates Q, Q /2, and 2Q. Then a combined analysis of the multi-rate data allows an efficient means of determining transmissivity and salinity values of all inflow points along a well with a confidence measure, as well as their inherent or far-field pressure heads. The method is illustrated by a practical example.

  1. Control of electrical conduction in DNA using hole doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hea-Yeon; Taniguchi, Masateru; Yoo, K. H.; Otsuka, Youichi; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kawai, Tomoji

    2002-03-01

    Control of electrical conduction in DNA using hole doping H.Y.Lee1, M.Taniguchi1, K.H.Yoo2, Y.Otsuka1 H.Tanaka1 and T.Kawai1 1The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research(ISIR), Osaka University, Osaka, Japan. 2Department of Physics, Younsei University, Seoul, Korea Possible applications of DNA molecules in electronic devices and biosensors were suggested almost ten years ago A DNA structure containing a single type of base pair appears to be a good candidate for conduction along the \\x81E-electron clouds of the stacked bases. There have been lots of investigations on conduction mechanisms of the DNA molecules. However, it is not still clear whether the observed conductions of some DNA molecules come from motions of either ionic charges or other carriers. Although the basic mechanism for DNA-mediated charge transport should be understood for electronic applications, there have been divergent reports on its nature. And I will be present the research for the charge carrier conduction of DNA film under oxygen and iodine gas by using 10¡V100 nm gap. The doping studies using oxygen and iodine gas can provide a definite answer for the carrier conduction mechanism and also a possible method to control the carrier concentration in DNA molecules. Using oxygen and iodine adsorption experiments on the poly (dG)-poly (dC) DNA molecules, we will show that their conductance becomes increased easily by several orders of magnitudes due to the hole doping, which is a characteristic behavior of a p-type semiconductor. On the other hand, we will also show that the poly (dA) - poly (dT) DNA molecules behave as an n-type semiconductor. Our works indicate that the concentration and the type of carriers in the DNA molecules could be controlled using proper doping methods. We expect that this would be a major breakthrough in DNA-based nano-electronics, similar to the fact that the doped conductive has polyacetylene opened up a new field of electronics with exciting implications

  2. Rubber-like electrically conductive polymeric materials with shape memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, H. P.; Song, C. L.; Huang, W. M.; Wang, C. C.; Zhao, Y.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a heating-responsive shape memory polymeric material, which is not only rubber-like at room temperature and above its shape recovery temperature, but also electrically conductive. This polymeric material is made of silicone, melting glue (MG), and carbon black (CB). The influence of volume fractions of MG and CB on the elasticity, electrical resistivity, and shape memory effect of the polymeric material is systematically investigated. The feasibility of Joule heating for shape recovery is experimentally demonstrated with an electric power of 31 V.

  3. Lunar magnetic permeability, magnetic fields, and electrical conductivity temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkin, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    In the time period 1969-1972 a total of five magnetometers were deployed on the lunar surface during four Apollo missions. Data from these instruments, along with simultaneous measurements from other experiments on the moon and in lunar orbit, were used to study properties of the lunar interior and the lunar environment. The principal scientific results from analyses of the magnetic field data are discussed. The results are presented in the following main categories: (1) lunar electrical conductivity, temperature, and structure; (2) lunar magnetic permeability, iron abundance, and core size limits; (3) the local remnant magnetic fields, their interaction with the solar wind, and a thermoelectric generator model for their origin. Relevant publications and presented papers are listed.

  4. Corrosion-protective coatings from electrically conducting polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Wrobleski, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    In a joint research effort involving the Kennedy Space Center and the Los Alamos National Laboratory, electrically conductive polymer coatings have been developed as corrosion-protective coatings for metal surfaces. At the Kennedy Space Center, the launch environment consists of marine, severe solar, and intermittent high acid/elevated temperature conditions. Electrically conductive polymer coatings have been developed which impart corrosion resistance to mild steel when exposed to saline and acidic environments. Such coatings also seem to promote corrosion resistance in areas of mild steel where scratches exist in the protective coating. Such coatings appear promising for many commercial applications.

  5. Corrosion-protective coatings from electrically conducting polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Karen Gebert; Bryan, Coleman J.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Wrobleski, Debra A.

    1991-01-01

    In a joint effort between NASA Kennedy and LANL, electrically conductive polymer coatings were developed as corrosion protective coatings for metal surfaces. At NASA Kennedy, the launch environment consist of marine, severe solar, and intermittent high acid and/or elevated temperature conditions. Electrically conductive polymer coatings were developed which impart corrosion resistance to mild steel when exposed to saline and acidic environments. Such coatings also seem to promote corrosion resistance in areas of mild steel where scratches exist in the protective coating. Such coatings appear promising for many commercial applications.

  6. Electrically conductive doped block copolymer of polyacetylene and polyisoprene

    DOEpatents

    Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1985-01-01

    An electrically conductive block copolymer of polyisoprene and polyacetyl and a method of making the same are disclosed. The polymer is prepared by first polymerizing isoprene with n-butyllithium in a toluene solution to form an active isoprenyllithium polymer. The active polymer is reacted with an equimolar amount of titanium butoxide and subsequently exposed to gaseous acetylene. A block copolymer of polyisoprene and polyacetylene is formed. The copolymer is soluble in common solvents and may be doped with I.sub.2 to give it an electrical conductivity in the metallic regime.

  7. Contamination from electrically conductive silicone tubing during aerosol chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yong; Alexander, M. L.; Perraud, Veronique; Bruns, Emily; Johnson, Stan; Ezell, Michael J.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2009-06-01

    Electrically conductive silicone tubing is used to minimize losses in sampling lines during the analysis of airborne particle size distributions and number concentrations. We report contamination from this tubing using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of filter-collected samples as well as by particle mass spectrometry. Comparison of electrically conductive silicone and stainless steel tubing showed elevated siloxanes only for the silicone tubing. The extent of contamination increased with length of tubing to which the sample was exposed, and decreased with increasing relative humidity.

  8. Electrically conducting porphyrin and porphyrin-fullerene electropolymers

    DOEpatents

    Gust, Jr., John Devens; Liddell, Paul Anthony; Gervaldo, Miguel Andres; Bridgewater, James Ward; Brennan, Bradley James; Moore, Thomas Andrew; Moore, Ana Lorenzelli

    2014-03-11

    Compounds with aryl ring(s) at porphyrin meso position(s) bearing an amino group in position 4 relative to the porphyrin macrocycle, and at least one unsubstituted 5 (hydrogen-bearing) meso position with the 10-, 15-, and/or 20-relationship to the aryl ring bearing the amino group, and metal complexes thereof, feature broad spectral absorption throughout the visible region. These compounds are electropolymerized to form electrically conducting porphyrin and porphyrin-fullerene polymers that are useful in photovoltaic applications. The structure of one such electrically conducting porphyrin polymer is shown below. ##STR00001##

  9. High performance heat curing copper-silver powders filled electrically conductive adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hui-Wang; Jiu, Jin-Ting; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Uchida, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    In this study, high performance electrically conductive adhesives were fabricated from a vinyl ester resin, a thermal initiator, silver coated copper powders, and pure silver powders, without using any other coupling agent, dispersing agent, and reducing agent. The heat cured copper-silver powders filled electrically conductive adhesives presented low bulk resistivity (e.g., 4.53 × 10-5 Ω·cm) due to the silver powders that had given high electrical conductivity to the adhesives, and high shear strength (e.g., 16.22 MPa) provided by the crosslinked structures of vinyl ester resin. These high performance copper-silver powders filled electrically conductive adhesives have lower cost than those filled by pure silver powders, which can be well used in the electronic packaging and can enlarge the application prospects of electrically conductive adhesives. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Experiment of electrical conductivity at low temperature (preliminary measurement)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Wang, H.

    1998-07-01

    A muon collider needs very large amount of RF power, how to reduce the RF power consumption is of major concern. Thus the application of liquid nitrogen cooling has been proposed. However, it is known that the electrical conductivity depends on many factors and the data from different sources vary in a wide range, especially the data of conductivity of beryllium has no demonstration in a real application. Therefore it is important to know the conductivity of materials, which are commercially available, and at a specified frequency. Here, the results of the preliminary measurement on the electrical conductivity of copper at liquid nitrogen temperature are summarized. Addressed also are the data fitting method and the linear expansion of copper.

  11. Electrically Joining Mixed Conducting Oxides for High Temperature Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Hardy, John S.

    2003-01-06

    Mixed conducting oxides such as lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite are currently being investigated for potential use as electrochemically active electrodes and catalytic membranes in a number of high temperature devices, including oxygen generators and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). However to take full advantage of the unique properties of these materials, reliable joining techniques need to be developed. What complicates joining in these applications is the requirement that the ceramic-to-metal junction be electrically conductive, so that current can either be drawn from the mixed conducting oxide, in the case of SOFC applications, or be carried to the oxide to initate ionic conduction, as required for oxygen separation and electrocatalysis. This paper outlines a new technique that is being developed to electrically join an oxide conductor to a metal current collector for high temperature electrochemical application.

  12. Carbonatite melts and electrical conductivity in the asthenosphere.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Malki, Mohammed; Iacono-Marziano, Giada; Pichavant, Michel; Scaillet, Bruno

    2008-11-28

    Electrically conductive regions in Earth's mantle have been interpreted to reflect the presence of either silicate melt or water dissolved in olivine. On the basis of laboratory measurements, we show that molten carbonates have electrical conductivities that are three orders of magnitude higher than those of molten silicate and five orders of magnitude higher than those of hydrated olivine. High conductivities in the asthenosphere probably indicate the presence of small amounts of carbonate melt in peridotite and can therefore be interpreted in terms of carbon concentration in the upper mantle. We show that the conductivity of the oceanic asthenosphere can be explained by 0.1 volume percent of carbonatite melts on average, which agrees with the carbon dioxide content of mid-ocean ridge basalts. PMID:19039132

  13. Preparation and properties of electrically conducting ceramics based on indium oxide-rare earth oxides-hafnium oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Marchant, D.D.; Bates, J.L.

    1983-09-01

    Electrically conducting refractory oxides based on adding indium oxide to rare earth-stabilized hafnium oxide are being studied for use in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generators, fuel cells, and thermoelectric generators. The use of indium oxide generally increases the electrical conductivity. The results of measurements of the electrical conductivity and data on corrosion resistance in molten salts are presented.

  14. Electrical Conductivity of Thick Films Made from Silver Methylcarbamate Paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianguo; Jiang, Min; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2013-10-01

    We have explored the electrical conductivity of thick films made from silver methylcarbamate paste using metallic silver as the electrically conductive phase. The paste was composed of 30 wt.% to 90 wt.% organic vehicle and 10 wt.% to 70 wt.% functional phase precursor (silver methylcarbamate). After the paste was sintered, films with thickness of 4.50 μm to 12.70 μm were obtained, in which the elemental percentage of silver varied from about 5 wt.% to above 99 wt.%. Experiments showed that both the electrical conductivity and the elemental percentage were mainly affected by the initial silver content in the paste and the parameters of the sintering process. For given sintering conditions, higher initial silver content led to higher elemental percentage of silver, improving the electrical conductivity of the thick film. The conditions of the sintering process had a significant influence on the evaporation and decomposition rates of the paste components, the elemental percentage of silver, and the microstructure of the thick film. Higher temperatures, longer times, lower heating rates, and more oxygen-rich sintering atmospheres were found to accelerate the evaporation and decomposition and increase the elemental percentage of silver, both of which served to enhance the electrical conductivity. For initial silver contents less than about 10 wt.%, the lowest electrical resistivity of the thick film only reached the order of 10-4 Ω cm, irrespective of the sintering conditions. For contents between 10 wt.% and 25 wt.%, it was possible to attain lowest resistivity values on the order of 10-5 Ω cm. Above 25 wt.%, the lowest resistivity could reach 10-6 Ω cm, comparable to that of bulk silver.

  15. Electrical conductivity of albite melts at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, H.; Keppler, H.

    2009-12-01

    High electrical conductivity observed from magnetotelluric/geomagnetic depth sounding is probably associated with the presence of silicate melts. We investigated electrical conductivity of albite melts, both anhydrous and hydrous with 2.0-5.4 wt% H2O, at 300-1500°C and 0.9-1.8 GPa in a piston-cylinder apparatus. Anhydrous glass was synthesized by fusing oxides and carbonates in 1-bar furnace, and hydrous glasses were prepared by fusing the mixture of glass powder and water in a TZM vessel. A glass cylinder was enclosed between a platinum rod as inner electrode and a Pt-Rh capsule as outer electrode. Platinum wires were used to connect both electrodes to a Solartron 1260 impedance analyzer for conductivity measurements at 3M to 3 HZ. A type-S thermocouple, which was separated from the conductivity circuit, was used to monitor temperature. Furthermore, a Mo foil was employed to reduce the interference from heating circuit. Experimental results demonstrate that the electrical conductivity of albite melt follows an Arrhenius relationship in both glass (<700°C) and liquid (>1100°C) region. In both cases, electrical conductivity increases with water content but decreases with pressure. In the glass region, electrical conductivity can be modelled as logσ = 3.5734 + 0.25534C - (4264+160.43P)/T, where σ is conductivity in S/m, C is water content in wt%, P is pressure in GPa, and T is temperature in K. The above expression implies an activation energy of 82 kJ/mol and an activation volume of 3.1 cc/mol. In the liquid region, electrical conductivity can be modelled as logσ = 2.6906 + 0.065915C - (2339+371.97P)/T, which implies an activation energy of 45 kJ/mol and an activation volume of 7.1 cc/mol. The dominating conduction mechanism in albite melts is suggested to be the motion of sodium cation.

  16. Electrical Conductivity, Thermal Behavior, and Seebeck Coefficient of Conductive Films for Printed Thermoelectric Energy Harvesting Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankireddy, Krishnamraju; Menon, Akanksha K.; Iezzi, Brian; Yee, Shannon K.; Losego, Mark D.; Jur, Jesse S.

    2016-07-01

    Printed electronics is being explored as a rapid, facile means for manufacturing thermoelectric generators (TEGs) that can recover useful electrical energy from waste heat. This work examines the relevant electrical conductivity, thermal resistance, thermovoltage, and Seebeck coefficient of printed films for use in such printed flexible TEGs. The thermoelectric performance of TEGs printed using commercially relevant nickel, silver, and carbon inks is evaluated. The microstructure of the printed films is investigated to better understand why the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient are degraded. Thermal conduction is shown to be relatively insensitive to the type of metalized coating and nearly equivalent to that of an uncoated polymer substrate. Of the commercially available conductive ink materials examined, carbon-nickel TEGs are shown to exhibit the highest thermovoltage, with a value of 10.3 μV/K. However, silver-nickel TEGs produced the highest power generation of 14.6 μW [from 31 junctions with temperature difference (ΔT) of 113°C] due to their low electrical resistance. The voltage generated from the silver-nickel TEG was stable under continuous operation at 275°C for 3 h. We have also demonstrated that, after a year of storage in ambient conditions, these devices retain their performance. Notably, the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measured for individual materials were consistent with those measured from actual printed TEG device structures, validating the need for further fundamental materials characterization to accelerate flexible TEG device optimization.

  17. Tuning Electrical Conductivity of Inorganic Minerals with Carbon Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Anton A; Tour, James M

    2015-12-01

    Conductive powders based on Barite or calcium carbonate with chemically converted graphene (CCG) were successfully synthesized by adsorption of graphene oxide (GO) or graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONRs) onto the mineral surfaces and subsequent chemical reduction with hydrazine. The efficient adsorption of GO or GONRs on the surface of Barite and calcium carbonate-based mineral particles results in graphene-wrapped hybrid materials that demonstrate a concentration dependent electrical conductivity that increases with the GO or GONR loading. PMID:26544547

  18. Development of Tailorable Electrically Conductive Thermal Control Material Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. S.; Harada, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The optical characteristics of surfaces on spacecraft are fundamental parameters in controlling its temperature. Passive thermal control coatings with designed solar absorptance and infrared emittance properties have been developed and have been in use for some time. In this total space environment, the coating must be stable and maintain its desired optical properties as well as mechanical properties for the course of the mission lifetime. The mission lifetimes are increasing and in our quest to save weight, newer substrates are being integrated which limit electrical grounding schemes. All of this has added to already existing concerns about spacecraft charging and related spacecraft failures or operational failures. The concern is even greater for thermal control surfaces that are very large. One way of alleviating such concerns is to design new thermal control material systems (TCMS) that can help to mitigate charging via providing charge leakage paths. The objective of this program was to develop two types of passive electrically conductive TCMS. The first was a highly absorbing/emitting black surface and the second was a low (alpha(sub s)/epsilon(sub N)) type white surface. The surface resistance goals for the black absorber was 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 9) Omega/square, and for the white surfaces it was 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 10) Omega/square. Several material system concepts were suggested and evaluated for space environment stability and electrical performance characterization. Our efforts in designing and evaluating these material systems have resulted in several developments. New concepts, pigments and binders have been developed to provide new engineering quality TCMS. Some of these have already found application on space hardware, some are waiting to be recognized by thermal designers, and some require further detailed studies to become state-of-the-art for future space hardware and space structures. Our studies on baseline state-of-the-art materials and

  19. SOIL ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY AS A MANAGEMENT TOOL IN PRECISION FORESTRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) is a useful measurement and indicator of relative productivity of agronomic crops on some soil types. In non-saline soils, spatial variation in soil ECa is strongly related to texture, topsoil depth and profile variations; factors which spatially correlate...

  20. Electrically conductive polycrystalline diamond and particulate metal based electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Swain, Greg M.; Wang, Jian

    2005-04-26

    An electrically conducting and dimensionally stable diamond (12, 14) and metal particle (13) electrode produced by electrodepositing the metal on the diamond is described. The electrode is particularly useful in harsh chemical environments and at high current densities and potentials. The electrode is particularly useful for generating hydrogen, and for reducing oxygen and oxidizing methanol in reactions which are of importance in fuel cells.

  1. Estimating depth to argillic soil horizons using apparent electrical conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maps of apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) of the soil profile are widely used in precision agriculture practice and research. A number of ECa sensors are commercially available, each with a unique response function (i.e., the relative contribution of soil at each depth to the integrated ECa rea...

  2. Soil water sensor response to bulk electrical conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water monitoring using electromagnetic (EM) sensors can facilitate observations of water content at high temporal and spatial resolutions. These sensors measure soil dielectric permittivity (Ka) which is largely a function of volumetric water content. However, bulk electrical conductivity BEC c...

  3. INCREASING INFORMATION WITH MULTIPLE SOIL ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY DATASETS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maps of apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) of the soil profile are widely used in precision agriculture practice and research. Because ECa is often strongly related to clay content, soil water holding capacity, and other soil physical properties that also relate to crop productivity, ECa maps ca...

  4. Dynamic electrical conduction in p-type CuIn3Se5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essaleh, L.; Marín, G.; Wasim, S. M.; Alimoussa, A.; Bourial, A.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, ac electrical conductivity measurements were studied for the first time in p type bulk ternary semiconductor compound CuIn3Se5. The dynamic electrical conductivity is analyzed in the frequency range 20 Hz to 1 MHz and temperature from 308 K to 500 K. The relaxation times for the grain and grain boundaries were studied from the second derivative of electric modulus versus frequency at various temperatures. The relaxation time is found to decrease with increasing temperature and to obey the Arrhenius relationship. The values of activation energies for conduction and relaxation times are obtained.

  5. Porosity effect on the electrical conductivity of sintered powder compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, J. M.; Cuevas, F. G.; Cintas, J.

    2008-08-01

    A new equation for calculating the electrical conductivity of sintered powder compacts is proposed. In this equation, the effective resistivity of porous compacts is a function of the fully dense material conductivity, the porosity of the compact and the tap porosity of the starting powder. The new equation is applicable to powder sintered compacts from zero porosity to tap porosity. A connection between this equation and the percolation conduction theory is stated. The proposed equation has been experimentally validated with sintered compacts of six different metallic powders. Results confirm very good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  6. Predicting permeability and electrical conductivity of sedimentary rocks from microgeometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, E.M.; Cook, N.G.W. California Univ., Berkeley, CA . Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering); Zimmerman, R.W.; Witherspoon, P.A. )

    1991-02-01

    The determination of hydrologic parameters that characterize fluid flow through rock masses on a large scale (e.g., hydraulic conductivity, capillary pressure, and relative permeability) is crucial to activities such as the planning and control of enhanced oil recovery operations, and the design of nuclear waste repositories. Hydraulic permeability and electrical conductivity of sedimentary rocks are predicted from the microscopic geometry of the pore space. The cross-sectional areas and perimeters of the individual pores are estimated from two-dimensional scanning electron micrographs of rock sections. The hydraulic and electrical conductivities of the individual pores are determined from these geometrical parameters, using Darcy's law and Ohm's law. Account is taken of the fact that the cross-sections are randomly oriented with respect to the channel axes, and for possible variation of cross-sectional area along the length of the pores. The effective medium theory from solid-state physics is then used to determine an effective average conductance of each pore. Finally, the pores are assumed to be arranged on a cubic lattice, which allows the calculation of overall macroscopic values for the permeability and the electrical conductivity. Preliminary results using Berea, Boise, Massilon and Saint-Gilles sandstones show reasonably close agreement between the predicted and measured transport properties. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Composite yarns of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with metallic electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Randeniya, Lakshman K; Bendavid, Avi; Martin, Philip J; Tran, Canh-Dung

    2010-08-16

    Unique macrostructures known as spun carbon-nanotube fibers (CNT yarns) can be manufactured from vertically aligned forests of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). These yarns behave as semiconductors with room-temperature conductivities of about 5 x 10(2) S cm(-1). Their potential use as, for example, microelectrodes in medical implants, wires in microelectronics, or lightweight conductors in the aviation industry has hitherto been hampered by their insufficient electrical conductivity. In this Full Paper, the synthesis of metal-CNT composite yarns, which combine the unique properties of CNT yarns and nanocrystalline metals to obtain a new class of materials with enhanced electrical conductivity, is presented. The synthesis is achieved using a new technique, self-fuelled electrodeposition (SFED), which combines a metal reducing agent and an external circuit for transfer of electrons to the CNT surface, where the deposition of metal nanoparticles takes place. In particular, the Cu-CNT and Au-CNT composite yarns prepared by this method have metal-like electrical conductivities (2-3 x 10(5) S cm(-1)) and are mechanically robust against stringent tape tests. However, the tensile strengths of the composite yarns are 30-50% smaller than that of the unmodified CNT yarn. The SFED technique described here can also be used as a convenient means for the deposition of metal nanoparticles on solid electrode supports, such as conducting glass or carbon black, for catalytic applications. PMID:20665629

  8. Consequences of electrical conductivity in an orb spider's capture web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollrath, Fritz; Edmonds, Donald

    2013-12-01

    The glue-coated and wet capture spiral of the orb web of the garden cross spider Araneus diadematus is suspended between the dry silk radial and web frame threads. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the capture spiral is electrically conductive because of necks of liquid connecting the droplets even if the thread is stretched. We examine how this conductivity of the capture spiral may lead to entrapment of charged airborne particles such as pollen, spray droplets and even insects. We further describe and model how the conducting spiral will also locally distort the Earth's ambient electric field. Finally, we examine the hypothesis that such distortion could be used by potential prey to detect the presence of a web but conclude that any effect would probably be too small to allow an insect to take evasive action.

  9. Electric field in the vicinity of long thin conducting rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezinkina, M. M.; Rezinkin, O. L.; Svetlichnaya, E. E.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the results of numerical and analytical calculations of distributions of potentials and electric fields in the vicinity of thin conducting rods that model the leader channel of lightning and lightning rods. We consider rods represented in the form of a uniformly charged filament, a conducting ellipsoid with a free charge on its surface, as well an ellipsoid or a cylinder in a uniform external electric field. The effect of parameters of conducting rods modeling the leader channel of lightning and lightning rods, as well as the region containing a space charge around the tip of the leader channel, on the distribution of potentials and field strengths are analyzed. The conditions for the propagation of the counter leader from the lightning rod are specified.

  10. Electrical conductivity in two mixed-valence liquids.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wenzhi; Kelley, Steven P; Rogers, Robin D; Vaid, Thomas P

    2015-06-01

    Two different room-temperature liquid systems were investigated, both of which conduct a DC electrical current without decomposition or net chemical transformation. DC electrical conductivity is possible in both cases because of the presence of two different oxidation states of a redox-active species. One system is a 1 : 1 molar mixture of n-butylferrocene (BuFc) and its cation bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide salt, [BuFc(+)][NTf2(-)], while the other is a 1 : 1 molar mixture of TEMPO and its cation bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide salt, [TEMPO(+)][NTf2(-)]. The TEMPO-[TEMPO(+)][NTf2(-)] system is notable in that it is an electrically conducting liquid in which the conductivity originates from an organic molecule in two different oxidation states, with no metals present. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction of [TEMPO(+)][NTf2(-)] revealed a complex structure with structurally different cation-anion interactions for cis- and trans [NTf2(-)] conformers. The electron transfer self-exchange rate constant for BuFc/BuFc(+) in CD3CN was determined by (1)H NMR spectroscopy to be 5.4 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). The rate constant allowed calculation of an estimated electrical conductivity of 7.6 × 10(-5)Ω(-1) cm(-1) for BuFc-[BuFc(+)][NTf2(-)], twice the measured value of 3.8 × 10(-5)Ω(-1) cm(-1). Similarly, a previously reported self-exchange rate constant for TEMPO/TEMPO(+) in CH3CN led to an estimated conductivity of 1.3 × 10(-4)Ω(-1) cm(-1) for TEMPO-[TEMPO(+)][NTf2(-)], a factor of about 3 higher than the measured value of 4.3 × 10(-5)Ω(-1) cm(-1). PMID:25960288

  11. Evaluation of DC electric field distribution of PPLP specimen based on the measurement of electrical conductivity in LN2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jae-Sang; Seong, Jae-Kyu; Shin, Woo-Ju; Lee, Jong-Geon; Cho, Jeon-Wook; Ryoo, Hee-Suk; Lee, Bang-Wook

    2013-11-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) cable has been paid much attention due to its high efficiency and high current transportation capability, and it is also regarded as eco-friendly power cable for the next generation. Especially for DC HTS cable, it has more sustainable and stable properties compared to AC HTS cable due to the absence of AC loss in DC HTS cable. Recently, DC HTS cable has been investigated competitively all over the world, and one of the key components of DC HTS cable to be developed is a cable joint box considering HVDC environment. In order to achieve the optimum insulation design of the joint box, analysis of DC electric field distribution of the joint box is a fundamental process to develop DC HTS cable. Generally, AC electric field distribution depends on relative permittivity of dielectric materials but in case of DC, electrical conductivity of dielectric material is a dominant factor which determines electric field distribution. In this study, in order to evaluate DC electric field characteristics of the joint box for DC HTS cable, polypropylene laminated paper (PPLP) specimen has been prepared and its DC electric field distribution was analyzed based on the measurement of electrical conductivity of PPLP in liquid nitrogen (LN2). Electrical conductivity of PPLP in LN2 has not been reported yet but it should be measured for DC electric field analysis. The experimental works for measuring electrical conductivity of PPLP in LN2 were presented in this paper. Based on the experimental works, DC electric field distribution of PPLP specimen was fully analyzed considering the steady state and the transient state of DC. Consequently, it was possible to determine the electric field distribution characteristics considering different DC applying stages including DC switching on, DC switching off and polarity reversal conditions.

  12. Investigation of thermal conductivity, viscosity, and electrical conductivity of graphene based nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kole, Madhusree; Dey, T. K.

    2013-02-01

    Stable and well dispersed functionalized graphene-ethylene glycol (EG) + distilled water nanofluids having graphene nano-sheets (GnS) volume concentration between 0.041 and 0.395 vol. % are prepared without any surfactant. Graphene nano-sheets are prepared from high purity graphite powder by Hummers method followed by exfoliation and reduction by hydrogen gas. Thus, obtained hydrogen exfoliated graphene (HEG) is then functionalized using acid. The graphene nano-sheets are characterized using XRD, TEM, Raman spectroscopy, and FTIR spectroscopy. Thermal conductivity and viscosity measurements are performed both as a function of graphene loading and temperature between 10 and 70 °C. Thermal conductivity enhancement of ˜15% for a loading of 0.395 vol. % f-HEG is observed at room temperature. The measured nanofluid's thermal conductivity is explained well in terms of the expression derived by Nan et al. (J. Appl. Phys. 81, 6692 (1997)), which considers matrix-additive interface contact resistance of mis-oriented ellipsoidal particles. The viscosity of the prepared f-HEG nanofluids and the base fluid (EG + distilled water) displays non-Newtonian behaviour with the appearance of shear thinning and nearly 100% enhancement compared to the base fluid (EG + DI water) with f-HEG loading of 0.395 vol. %. Known theoretical models for nanofluid's viscosity fail to explain the observed f-HEG volume concentration dependence of the nanofluid's viscosity. Temperature dependence of the studied nanofluid between 10 and 70 °C is explained well by the correlations proposed earlier for nanofluids with spherical nanoparticles. Electrical conductivity of the f-HEG nanofluids shows significant enhancement of ˜8620% for 0.395 vol. % loading of f-HEG in a base fluid of 70:30 mixture of EG and distilled water.

  13. Synthesis of Conductive Nanofillers/Nanofibers and Electrical Properties of their Conductive Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvi, Ali

    Thanks to their corrosion resistance, light weight, low cost, and ease of processing, electrically conducting polymer composites (CPCs) have received significant attention for the replacement of metals and inorganic materials for sensors, actuators, supercapacitors, and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shields. In this PhD thesis, high aspect ratio conductive nanofillers namely copper nanowires (CuNWs) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were coated with polyaniline (PANi) using solution mixing and in-situ polymerization method, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed a smooth polyaniline nano-coating between 5--18 nm in thickness on the nanofillers' surface. The coating thickness and; consequently, electrical conductivity was controlled and tuned by polyaniline/aniline concentration in solution. Composites with tunable conductivity may be used as chemisensors, electronic pressure sensors and switches. Coated nanofillers demonstrated better dispersion in polystyrene (PS) and provided lower electrical percolation threshold. Dispersion of nanofillers in PS was investigated using rheological measurements and confirmed with electron micrographs and nano-scale images of CPCs. Polyaniline (PANi), when used as a coating layer, was able to attenuate electromagnetic (EM) waves via absorption and store electrical charges though pseudocapacitance mechanism. The dielectric measurements of MWCNT-PANi/PS composites showed one order of magnitude increase in real electrical permittivity compared to that of MWCNT/PS composites making them suitable for charge storage purposes. Incorporation of PANi also brought a new insight into conductive network formation mechanism in electrospun mats where the orientation of conductive high aspect ratio nanofillers is a major problem. Conductive nanofibers of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) filled with coated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were fabricated using electrospinning. These highly oriented PVDF

  14. Spatial-decomposition analysis of electrical conductivity in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Tu, Kai-Min; Ishizuka, Ryosuke; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2014-12-28

    The electrical conductivity of room temperature ionic liquid (IL) is investigated with molecular dynamics simulation. A trajectory of 1 μs in total is analyzed for the ionic liquid [C4mim][NTf2] (1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, and the anion is also called TFSI or TFSA), and the ion motions are examined in direct connection to the conductivity within the framework formulated previously [K.-M. Tu, R. Ishizuka, and N. Matubayasi, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 044126 (2014)]. As a transport coefficient, the computed electrical conductivity is in fair agreement with the experiment. The conductivity is then decomposed into the autocorrelation term of Nernst-Einstein form and the cross-correlation term describing the two-body motions of ions, and the cross-correlation term is further decomposed spatially to incorporate the structural insights on ion configurations into the dynamic picture. It is observed that the ion-pair contribution to the conductivity is not spatially localized and extends beyond the first coordination shell. The extent of localization of the cross-correlation effect in the conductivity is in correspondence to that of the spatial correlation represented by radial distribution function, which persists over nanometer scale. PMID:25554167

  15. Nanostructured Cu-Cr alloy with high strength and electrical conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Islamgaliev, R. K. Nesterov, K. M.; Bourgon, J.; Champion, Y.; Valiev, R. Z.

    2014-05-21

    The influence of nanostructuring by high pressure torsion (HPT) on strength and electrical conductivity in the Cu-Cr alloy has been investigated. Microstructure of HPT samples was studied by transmission electron microscopy with special attention on precipitation of small chromium particles after various treatments. Effect of dynamic precipitation leading to enhancement of strength and electrical conductivity was observed. It is shown that nanostructuring leads to combination of high ultimate tensile strength of 790–840 MPa, enhanced electrical conductivity of 81%–85% IACS and thermal stability up to 500 °C. The contributions of grain refinement and precipitation to enhanced properties of nanostructured alloy are discussed.

  16. Effect of gamma irradiation on DC electrical conductivity of ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Swaroop, K.; Somashekarappa, H. M.; Naveen, C. S.; Jayanna, H. S.

    2015-06-24

    The temperature dependent dc electrical conductivity of gamma irradiated Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles is presented in this paper. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern shows hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) confirms Zn-O stretching vibrations. UV-Visible spectroscopy studies show that the energy band gap (E{sub g}) of the prepared ZnO nanoparticles increases with respect to gamma irradiation dose, which can be related to room temperature dc electrical conductivity. The result shows significant variation in the high temperature dc electrical conductivity of ZnO nanoparticles due to gamma irradiation.

  17. High performance electrically conductive adhesives (ECAs) for leadfree interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi

    Electrically conductive adhesives (ECAs) are one of the lead-free interconnect materials with the advantages of environmental friendliness, mild processing conditions, fewer processing steps, low stress on the substrates, and fine pitch interconnect capability. However, some challenging issues still exist for the currently available ECAs, including lower electrical conductivity, conductivity fatigue in reliability tests, limited current-carrying capability, poor impact strength, etc. The interfacial properties is one of the major considerations when resolving these challenges and developing high performance conductive adhesives. Surface functionalization and interface modification are the major approaches used in this thesis. Fundamental understanding and analysis of the interaction between various types of interface modifiers and ECA materials and substrates are the key for the development of high performance ECA for lead-free interconnects. The results of this thesis provide the guideline for the enhancement of interfacial properties of metal-metal and metal-polymer interactions. Systematic investigation of various types of ECAs contributes to a better understanding of materials requirements for different applications, such as surface mount technology (SMT), flip chip applications, flat panel display modules with high resolution, etc. Improvement of the electrical, thermal and reliability of different ECAs make them a potentially ideal candidate for high power and fine pitch microelectronics packaging option.

  18. Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe for Phoenix Mars Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander will assess how heat and electricity move through Martian soil from one spike or needle to another of a four-spike electronic fork that will be pushed into the soil at different stages of digging by the lander's Robotic Arm.

    The four-spike tool, called the thermal and electrical conductivity probe, is in the middle-right of this photo, mounted near the end of the arm near the lander's scoop (upper left).

    In one type of experiment with this tool, a pulse of heat will be put into one spike, and the rate at which the temperature rises on the nearby spike will be recorded, along with the rate at which the heated spike cools. A little bit of ice can make a big difference in how well soil conducts heat. Similarly, soil's electrical conductivity -- also tested with this tool -- is a sensitive

    indicator of moisture in the soil. This device adapts technology used in soil-moisture gauges for irrigation-control systems. The conductivity probe has an additional role besides soil analysis. It will serve as a hunidity sensor when held in the air.

  19. EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON ELECTRICALLY CONDUCTING POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, M.; Clark, E.; Lascola, R.

    2009-12-16

    Effects of beta (tritium) and gamma irradiation on the surface electrical conductivity of two types of conducting polymer films are documented to determine their potential use as a sensing and surveillance device for the tritium facility. It was shown that surface conductivity was significantly reduced by irradiation with both gamma and tritium gas. In order to compare the results from the two radiation sources, an approximate dose equivalence was calculated. The materials were also sensitive to small radiation doses (<10{sup 5} rad), showing that there is a measurable response to relatively small total doses of tritium gas. Spectroscopy was also used to confirm the mechanism by which this sensing device would operate in order to calibrate this sensor for potential use. It was determined that one material (polyaniline) was very sensitive to oxidation while the other material (PEDOT-PSS) was not. However, polyaniline provided the best response as a sensing material, and it is suggested that an oxygen-impermeable, radiation-transparent coating be applied to this material for future device prototype fabrication. A great deal of interest has developed in recent years in the area of conducting polymers due to the high levels of conductivity that can be achieved, some comparable to that of metals [Gerard 2002]. Additionally, the desirable physical and chemical properties of a polymer are retained and can be exploited for various applications, including light emitting diodes (LED), anti-static packaging, electronic coatings, and sensors. The electron transfer mechanism is generally accepted as one of electron 'hopping' through delocalized electrons in the conjugated backbone, although other mechanisms have been proposed based on the type of polymer and dopant [Inzelt 2000, Gerard 2002]. The conducting polymer polyaniline (PANi) is of particular interest because there are extensive studies on the modulation of the conductivity by changing either the oxidation state of the

  20. Jump in the electrical conductivity of shock-compressed glassy carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molodets, A. M.; Golyshev, A. A.; Emel'yanov, A. N.; Shul'ga, Yu. M.; Fortov, V. E.

    2014-04-01

    The effect of high dynamic pressures on the electrical conductivity of the amorphous conducting carbon phase (glassy carbon) has been studied. The electrical conductivity of glassy carbon samples has been measured under the condition of shock compression and subsequent release wave. The history of the shock loading of glassy carbon has been calculated with the developed semiempirical equations of state. It has been shown the electrical conductivity of glassy carbon samples in the compression phase at a pressure of 45(5) GPa decreases abruptly by two orders of magnitude. In the relief phase, partially reversible change in the electrical conductivity of an amorphous carbon sample occurs. The recorded effect has been treated as a result of a partially reversible physicochemical transformation of shock-compressed amorphous carbon.

  1. Rearrangement of 1D conducting nanomaterials towards highly electrically conducting nanocomposite fibres for electronic textiles.

    PubMed

    Han, Joong Tark; Choi, Sua; Jang, Jeong In; Seol, Seung Kwon; Woo, Jong Seok; Jeong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung Yol; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2015-01-01

    Nanocarbon-based conducting fibres have been produced using solution- or dry-spinning techniques. Highly conductive polymer-composite fibres containing large amounts of conducting nanomaterials have not been produced without dispersants, however, because of the severe aggregation of conducting materials in high-concentration colloidal solutions. Here we show that highly conductive (electrical conductivity ~1.5 × 10(5) S m(-1)) polymer-composite fibres containing carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires can be fabricated via a conventional solution-spinning process without any other treatment. Spinning dopes were fabricated by a simple mixing of a polyvinyl alcohol solution in dimethylsulfoxide with a paste of long multi-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in organic solvents, assisted by quadruple hydrogen-bonding networks and an aqueous silver nanowire dispersion. The high electrical conductivity of the fibre was achieved by rearrangement of silver nanowires towards the fibre skin during coagulation because of the selective favourable interaction between the silver nanowires and coagulation solvents. The prepared conducting fibres provide applications in electronic textiles such as a textile interconnector of light emitting diodes, flexible textile heaters, and touch gloves for capacitive touch sensors. PMID:25792333

  2. Rearrangement of 1D Conducting Nanomaterials towards Highly Electrically Conducting Nanocomposite Fibres for Electronic Textiles

    PubMed Central

    Han, Joong Tark; Choi, Sua; Jang, Jeong In; Seol, Seung Kwon; Woo, Jong Seok; Jeong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung Yol; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2015-01-01

    Nanocarbon-based conducting fibres have been produced using solution- or dry-spinning techniques. Highly conductive polymer-composite fibres containing large amounts of conducting nanomaterials have not been produced without dispersants, however, because of the severe aggregation of conducting materials in high-concentration colloidal solutions. Here we show that highly conductive (electrical conductivity ~1.5 × 105 S m−1) polymer-composite fibres containing carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires can be fabricated via a conventional solution-spinning process without any other treatment. Spinning dopes were fabricated by a simple mixing of a polyvinyl alcohol solution in dimethylsulfoxide with a paste of long multi-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in organic solvents, assisted by quadruple hydrogen-bonding networks and an aqueous silver nanowire dispersion. The high electrical conductivity of the fibre was achieved by rearrangement of silver nanowires towards the fibre skin during coagulation because of the selective favourable interaction between the silver nanowires and coagulation solvents. The prepared conducting fibres provide applications in electronic textiles such as a textile interconnector of light emitting diodes, flexible textile heaters, and touch gloves for capacitive touch sensors. PMID:25792333

  3. Rearrangement of 1D Conducting Nanomaterials towards Highly Electrically Conducting Nanocomposite Fibres for Electronic Textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Joong Tark; Choi, Sua; Jang, Jeong In; Seol, Seung Kwon; Woo, Jong Seok; Jeong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung Yol; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2015-03-01

    Nanocarbon-based conducting fibres have been produced using solution- or dry-spinning techniques. Highly conductive polymer-composite fibres containing large amounts of conducting nanomaterials have not been produced without dispersants, however, because of the severe aggregation of conducting materials in high-concentration colloidal solutions. Here we show that highly conductive (electrical conductivity ~1.5 × 105 S m-1) polymer-composite fibres containing carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires can be fabricated via a conventional solution-spinning process without any other treatment. Spinning dopes were fabricated by a simple mixing of a polyvinyl alcohol solution in dimethylsulfoxide with a paste of long multi-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in organic solvents, assisted by quadruple hydrogen-bonding networks and an aqueous silver nanowire dispersion. The high electrical conductivity of the fibre was achieved by rearrangement of silver nanowires towards the fibre skin during coagulation because of the selective favourable interaction between the silver nanowires and coagulation solvents. The prepared conducting fibres provide applications in electronic textiles such as a textile interconnector of light emitting diodes, flexible textile heaters, and touch gloves for capacitive touch sensors.

  4. Inflow and outflow signatures in flowing wellbore electrical conductivity logs

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, Christine; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2002-08-28

    Flowing wellbore electrical-conductivity logging provides a means to determine hydrologic properties of fractures, fracture zones, or other permeable layers intersecting a borehole in saturated rock. The method involves analyzing the time-evolution of fluid electrical-conductivity logs obtained while the well is being pumped and yields information on the location, hydraulic transmissivity, and salinity of permeable layers, as well as their initial (or ambient) pressure head. Earlier analysis methods were restricted to the case in which flows from the permeable layers or fractures were directed into the borehole. More recently, a numerical model for simulating flowing-conductivity logging was adapted to permit treatment of both inflow and outflow, including analysis of natural regional flow in the permeable layer. However, determining the fracture properties with the numerical model by optimizing the match to the conductivity logs is a laborious trial-and-error procedure. In this paper, we identify the signatures of various inflow and outflow features in the conductivity logs to expedite this procedure and to provide physical insight for the analysis of these logs. Generally, inflow points are found to produce a distinctive signature on the conductivity logs themselves, enabling the determination of location, inflow rate, and ion concentration in a straightforward manner. Identifying outflow locations and flow rates, on the other hand, can be done with a more complicated integral method. Running a set of several conductivity logs with different pumping rates (e.g., half and double the original pumping rate) provides further information on the nature of the feed points. In addition to enabling the estimation of flow parameters from conductivity logs, an understanding of the conductivity log signatures can aid in the design of follow-up logging activities.

  5. Improvement of thermal conductivity of nano MgO/epoxy composites for electrical insulation materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Kawakib Jassim

    2013-12-01

    In the present study the dielectric and thermal properties of nano and micro MgO / Epoxy composites were studied with different weight percentage ratios, aiming at the development of electrical insulating materials with high thermal conductivity, this can be achieved by adding a low concentration of thermally conducting but electrically insulating nanofillers such as MgO nanoparticles, the results are discussed by determining the relative permittivity, tan delta and the thermal conductivity of the tested specimens. The obtained results showed improvement in the thermal conductivity values without deteriorating the dielectric properties.

  6. Conducting Simulation Studies in Psychometrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Richard A.; Rubright, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Simulation studies are fundamental to psychometric discourse and play a crucial role in operational and academic research. Yet, resources for psychometricians interested in conducting simulations are scarce. This Instructional Topics in Educational Measurement Series (ITEMS) module is meant to address this deficiency by providing a comprehensive…

  7. Predicting saturated hydraulic conductivity in a sandy grassland using proximally sensed apparent electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Meisam; Saey, Timothy; Seuntjens, Piet; Joris, Ingeborg; Boënne, Wesley; Van Meirvenne, Marc; Cornelis, Wim

    2016-03-01

    Finding a correspondence between soil hydraulic properties, such as saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) and apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) as an easily measurable parameter, may be a way forward to estimate the spatial distribution of hydraulic properties at the field scale. In this study, the spatial distributions of Ks, of soil ECa measured by a DUALEM-21S sensor and of soil physical properties were investigated in a sandy grassland. To predict field scale Ks, the statistical relationship between co-located soil Ks, and EMI-ECa was evaluated. Results demonstrated the large spatial variability of all studied properties with Ks being the most variable one (CV = 86.21%) followed by ECa (CV ≥ 53.77%). A significant negative correlation was found between ln-transformed Ks and ECa (r = 0.83; P ≤ 0.01) at two depths of exploration (0-50 and 0-100 cm). This site-specific relation between ln Ks and ECa was used to predict saturated hydraulic conductivity over 0-50 cm depth for the whole field. The empirical relation was validated using an independent dataset of measured Ks. The statistical results demonstrate the robustness of this empirical relation with mean estimation error MEE = 0.46 (cm h- 1), root-mean-square estimation errors RMSEE = 0.74 (cm h- 1), coefficient of determination r2 = 0.67 and coefficient of model efficiency Ce = 0.64. The relationship was then used to produce a detailed map of Ks for the whole field. The result will allow model predictions of spatially distributed water content in view of irrigation management.

  8. Nonideal ultrathin mantle cloak for electrically large conducting cylinders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuo; Zhang, Hao Chi; Xu, He-Xiu; Cui, Tie Jun

    2014-09-01

    Based on the concept of the scattering cancellation technique, we propose a nonideal ultrathin mantle cloak that can efficiently suppress the total scattering cross sections of an electrically large conducting cylinder (over one free-space wavelength). The cloaking mechanism is investigated in depth based on the Mie scattering theory and is simultaneously interpreted from the perspective of far-field bistatic scattering and near-field distributions. We remark that, unlike the perfect transformation-optics-based cloak, this nonideal cloaking technique is mainly designed to minimize simultaneously several scattering multipoles of a relatively large geometry around considerably broad bandwidth. Numerical simulations and experimental results show that the antiscattering ability of the metasurface gives rise to excellent total scattering reduction of the electrically large cylinder and remarkable electric-field restoration around the cloak. The outstanding cloaking performance together with the good features of and ultralow profile, flexibility, and easy fabrication predict promising applications in the microwave frequencies. PMID:25401449

  9. Effect of orientation anisotropy on calculating effective electrical conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myles, Timothy D.; Peracchio, Aldo A.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2014-05-01

    This paper develops an analytical effective medium theory (EMT) equation for calculating the effective conductivity of a mixture based on Maxwell's and Maxwell-Garnett's theories, extended to higher volume fractions using Bruggeman's unsymmetrical treatment (BUT), with a long term goal of extending the treatment to mixtures more representative of real materials in order to calculate their effective electrical conductivity. The development accounts for spheroid shaped inclusions of varying degrees of anisotropic orientation. The orientation is described by the introduction of a distribution function. Two methodologies valid for the inclusion dilute limit were used to evaluate the effective conductivity: one based on Maxwell's far field approach, and the other based on the Maxwell-Garnett in the matrix approach. It was found that while the dilute limit equations for the effective conductivity were different, the final EMT equations derived by applying BUT collapsed to the same formula which was generalized for anisotropic orientation based on the distribution function presented.

  10. Orbital dynamics of two electrically charged conducting spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmeister, Brent K.; Meyer, Deseree A.; Atkins, Brad M.; Franks, Gavin A.; Fuchs, Joshua T.; Li, Lulu; Sliger, Chase W.; Thompson, Jennifer E.

    2010-10-01

    The similar forms of Coulomb's law of electrostatics and Newton's law of gravitation suggest that two oppositely charged spheres can orbit each other by means of the electrostatic force. We demonstrate electrostatic binary orbits using two oppositely charged graphite coated Styrofoam® spheres. The experiment was conducted on the NASA aircraft Weightless Wonder which simulates weightless conditions. Videos of 23 orbital attempts were analyzed to investigate the dynamics and orbital stability of the two sphere system. The results support predictions of a recently developed theory that establishes criteria for stable orbits between two conducting, electrically charged spheres.

  11. Electrical conductivity of tissue at frequencies below 1 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, C.; Peyman, A.; Grant, E. H.

    2009-08-01

    A two-pronged approach, review and measurement, has been adopted to characterize the conductivity of tissues at frequencies below 1 MHz. The review covers data published in the last decade and earlier data not included in recent reviews. The measurements were carried out on pig tissue, in vivo, and pig body fluids in vitro. Conductivity data have been obtained for skeletal and myocardial muscle, liver, skull, fat, lung and body fluids (blood, bile, CSF and urine). A critical analysis of the data highlights their usefulness and limitations and enables suggestions to be made for measuring the electrical properties of tissues.

  12. Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for Phoenix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Cobos, Doug R.; Campbell, Gaylon S.; Campbell, Colin S.; Cardell, Greg; Foote, Marc C.; Wood, Stephen E.; Mehta, Manish

    2009-03-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) is a component of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) payload on the Phoenix Lander. TECP will measure the temperature, thermal conductivity, and volumetric heat capacity of the regolith. It will also detect and quantify the population of mobile H2O molecules in the regolith, if any, throughout the polar summer, by measuring the electrical conductivity of the regolith as well as the dielectric permittivity. In the vapor phase, TECP is capable of measuring the atmospheric H2O vapor abundance as well as augmenting the wind velocity measurements from the meteorology instrumentation. TECP is mounted near the end of the 2.3 m Robotic Arm and can be placed either in the regolith material or held aloft in the atmosphere. This paper describes the development and calibration of the TECP. In addition, substantial characterization of the instrument has been conducted to identify behavioral characteristics that might affect landed surface operations. The greatest potential issue identified in characterization tests is the extraordinary sensitivity of the TECP to placement. Small gaps alter the contact between the TECP and regolith, complicating data interpretation. Testing with the Phoenix Robotic Arm identified mitigation techniques that will be implemented during flight. A flight model of the instrument was also field tested in the Antarctic Dry Valleys during the 2007-2008 International Polar Year.

  13. The Thermal Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for Phoenix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Cobos, Doug R.; Campbell, Gaylon S.; Campbell, Colin S.; Cardell, Greg; Foote, Marc C.; Wood, Stephen E.; Mehta, Manish

    2009-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) is a component of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) payload on the Phoenix Lander. TECP will measure the temperature, thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of the regolith. It will also detect and quantify the population of mobile H2O molecules in the regolith, if any, throughout the polar summer, by measuring the electrical conductivity of the regolith, as well as the dielectric permittivity. In the vapor phase, TECP is capable of measuring the atmospheric H2O vapor abundance, as well as augment the wind velocity measurements from the meteorology instrumentation. TECP is mounted near the end of the 2.3 m Robotic Arm, and can be placed either in the regolith material or held aloft in the atmosphere. This paper describes the development and calibration of the TECP. In addition, substantial characterization of the instrument has been conducted to identify behavioral characteristics that might affect landed surface operations. The greatest potential issue identified in characterization tests is the extraordinary sensitivity of the TECP to placement. Small gaps alter the contact between the TECP and regolith, complicating data interpretation. Testing with the Phoenix Robotic Arm identified mitigation techniques that will be implemented during flight. A flight model of the instrument was also field tested in the Antarctic Dry Valleys during the 2007-2008 International Polar year. 2

  14. Electrical conductivity of electrolytes applicable to natural waters from 0 to 100 degrees C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCleskey, R. Blaine

    2011-01-01

    The electrical conductivities of 34 electrolyte solutions found in natural waters ranging from (10-4 to 1) mol•kg-1 in concentration and from (5 to 90) °C have been determined. High-quality electrical conductivity data for numerous electrolytes exist in the scientific literature, but the data do not span the concentration or temperature ranges of many electrolytes in natural waters. Methods for calculating the electrical conductivities of natural waters have incorporated these data from the literature, and as a result these methods cannot be used to reliably calculate the electrical conductivity over a large enough range of temperature and concentration. For the single-electrolyte solutions, empirical equations were developed that relate electrical conductivity to temperature and molality. For the 942 molar conductivity determinations for single electrolytes from this study, the mean relative difference between the calculated and measured values was 0.1 %. The calculated molar conductivity was compared to literature data, and the mean relative difference for 1978 measurements was 0.2 %. These data provide an improved basis for calculating electrical conductivity for most natural waters.

  15. Method for electrically isolating an electrically conductive member from another such member

    DOEpatents

    Tsang, K.L.; Chen, Y.

    1984-02-09

    The invention relates to methods for electrically isolating a first electrically conductive member from another such member by means of an electrically insulating medium. In accordance with the invention, the insulating medium is provided in the form of MgO which contains a dopant selected from lithium, copper, cobalt, sodium, silver, gold and hydrogen. The dopant is present in the MgO in an amount effective to suppress dielectric breakdown of the MgO, even at elevated temperatures and in the presence of electrical fields.

  16. On the electrical conductivity of Ti-implanted alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Cattani, M.; Nikolaev, A.; Savkin, K. P.; Oks, E. M.; Park, H.-K.; Phillips, L.; Yu, K. M.; Brown, I. G.

    2012-03-15

    Ion implantation of metal species into insulators provides a tool for the formation of thin, electrically conducting, surface layers with experimenter-controlled resistivity. High energy implantation of Pt and Ti into alumina accelerator components has been successfully employed to control high voltage surface breakdown in a number of cases. In the work described here we have carried out some basic investigations related to the origin of this phenomenon. By comparison of the results of alumina implanted with Ti at 75 keV with the results of prior investigations of polymers implanted with Pt at 49 eV and Au at 67 eV, we describe a physical model of the effect based on percolation theory and estimate the percolation parameters for the Ti-alumina composite. We estimate that the percolation dose threshold is about 4 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} and the maximum dose for which the system remains an insulator-conductor composite is about 10 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}. The saturation electrical conductivity is estimated to be about 50 S/m. We conclude that the observed electrical conductivity properties of Ti-implanted alumina can be satisfactorily described by percolation theory.

  17. Electrical Conductivity Mapping of the South Nation River, Eastern Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsley, J. E.; Robin, M. J.

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this project is to provide information on small-scale variability of groundwater seepage / leakage at the scale of a small basin. Direct measurement of seepage / leakage is very labour-intensive, and is therefore not feasible at the scale of a basin. An alternative method, which was used in this study, infers groundwater seepage from Electrical Conductivity and Temperature (EC&T) of water at the bottom of the river, based on the assumption that there is a contrast between the incoming groundwater and the river water. These measurements can be made very quickly by dragging an EC&T probe from a boat at a slow speed. This method was used to conduct a pilot survey of EC&T of the main branch of the South Nation River in Eastern Ontario, Canada. The mean EC values were relatively high, indicating relatively poor water quality. Several anomalies were detected along the river as sharp peaks above or below the mean EC value. Some of the peaks were later confirmed zones of seepage, by direct seepage measurements. A very important finding from this data is that areas of groundwater seepage in the SNR are very localized in areas of less than a few tens of meters, indicating that the deep recharge patterns may be the result of fracture flow in the bedrock. Several other anomalies were of anthropogenic origin. Water budget estimates were made from direct seepage measurements in conjunction with the survey results, along with precipitation, runoff, and evapotranspiration. The estimates were compared to the results of traditional hydrograph separation techniques.

  18. Electrical Conductivity of Molten CdCl2 at Temperatures as High as 1474 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salyulev, Alexander B.; Potapov, Alexei M.

    2016-07-01

    The electrical conductivity of molten CdCl2 was measured across a wide temperature range (ΔT=628 K), from 846 K to as high as 1474 K, i.e. 241° above the normal boiling point of the salt. In previous studies, a maximum temperature of 1201 K was reached, this being 273° lower than in the present work. The activation energy of electrical conductivity was calculated.

  19. Electrical and thermal conductivities of reduced graphene oxide/polystyrene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Wonjun; Hu, Jiuning; Jauregui, Luis A.; Ruan, Xiulin; Chen, Yong P.

    2014-03-01

    The author reports an experimental study of electrical and thermal transport in reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/polystyrene (PS) composites. The electrical conductivity (σ) of RGO/PS composites with different RGO concentrations at room temperature shows a percolation behavior with the percolation threshold of ˜0.25 vol. %. Their temperature-dependent electrical conductivity follows Efros-Shklovskii variable range hopping conduction in the temperature range of 30-300 K. The thermal conductivity (κ) of composites is enhanced by ˜90% as the concentration is increased from 0 to 10 vol. %. The thermal conductivity of composites approximately linearly increases with increasing temperature from 150 to 300 K. Composites with a higher concentration show a stronger temperature dependence in the thermal conductivity.

  20. “SIGMELTS”: A web portal for electrical conductivity calculations in geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommier, A.; Le-Trong, E.

    2011-09-01

    Electrical conductivity measurements in the laboratory are critical for interpreting geoelectric and magnetotelluric profiles of the Earth's crust and mantle. In order to facilitate access to the current database on electrical conductivity of geomaterials, we have developed a freely available web application (SIGMELTS) dedicated to the calculation of electrical properties. Based on a compilation of previous studies, SIGMELTS computes the electrical conductivity of silicate melts, carbonatites, minerals, fluids, and mantle materials as a function of different parameters, such as composition, temperature, pressure, water content, and oxygen fugacity. Calculations on two-phase mixtures are also implemented using existing mixing models for different geometries. An illustration of the use of SIGMELTS is provided, in which calculations are applied to the subduction zone-related volcanic zone in the Central Andes. Along with petrological considerations, field and laboratory electrical data allow discrimination between the different hypotheses regarding the formation and rise from depth of melts and fluids and quantification of their storage conditions.

  1. Electrical conductivity of magnetite-bearing serpentinite during shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Seiya; Yoshino, Takashi; Katayama, Ikuo

    2012-10-01

    Electrical conductivity of serpentinite with various amounts of magnetite was measured during shear deformation at high pressure and temperatures (P = 1.0 GPa, T = 750 K) corresponding to mantle wedge conditions to evaluate the contribution of aligned magnetite to the bulk conductivity of serpentinite. Under hydrostatic conditions, the sample conductivity considerably increases when the magnetite volume fraction exceeds 25% in volume, suggesting the presence of the percolation threshold for magnetite interconnection. During shear deformation, the conductivity for the samples with less than 25 vol.% magnetite increased by an order of magnitude or higher with increasing shear strain up to 9, which is likely a result of the clustering or realignment of magnetite grains in the serpentinites. However, activation enthalpy was nearly constant before and after deformation experiments, suggesting that shear deformation is unlikely to enhance establishment of interconnection of magnetite. Consequently, more than 25 vol.% magnetite is needed to establish connectivity of magnetite in serpentinite. On the other hand, the conductivity of serpentinite with low volume fraction of magnetite (5%), which is typical concentration of natural serpentinites, is almost similar to that of magnetite-free serpentinites. The present results show that the interconnection of magnetite in serpentinites by shear deformation is not expected as an origin of the high conductivity anomaly occasionally observed at the slab interface in the mantle wedge. The origin of high conductivity, therefore, indicates the presence of aqueous fluid with high salinity rather than the magnetite interconnection.

  2. Bioconversion study conducted by JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J.

    1978-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) of Caltech conducted a study of bioconversion as a means of identifying the role of biomass for meeting the national energy fuel and chemical requirements and the role and means for JPL-Caltech involvement in bioconversion. The bioconversion study included the following categories; biomass sources, chemicals from biomass, thermochemical conversion of biomass to fuels, biological conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals, and basic bioconversion sciences. A detailed review is included of the bioconversion fields cited with specific conclusions and recommendations given for future research and development and overall biomass system engineering and economic studies.

  3. Proton Conductivity Studies on Biopolymer Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Harun, N. I.; Sabri, N. S.; Rosli, N. H. A.; Taib, M. F. M.; Saaid, S. I. Y.; Kudin, T. I. T.; Ali, A. M. M.; Yahya, M. Z. A.

    2010-07-07

    Proton conducting solid biopolymer electrolyte membranes consisting of methyl cellulose (MC) and different wt.% of ammonium nitrate (NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}) were prepared by solution cast technique. Impedance spectroscopy was carried out to study electrical characteristics of bulk materials. The ionic conductivity of the prepared samples was calculated using the bulk resistance (R{sub b}) obtained from impedance spectroscopy plot. The highest ionic conductivity obtained was 1.17x10{sup -4} Scm{sup -1} for the sample with composition ratio of MC(50): NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}(50). To enhance the ionic conductivity, propylene carbonate (PC) and ethylene carbonate (EC) plasticizers were introduced. It was found that the ionic conductivity of polymer electrolyte membranes increased with the increase in plasticizers concentration. The ionic conductivities of solid polymer electrolytes based on MC-NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}-PC was enhanced up to 4.91x10{sup -3} Scm{sup -1} while for the MC-NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}-EC system, the highest conductivity was 1.74x10{sup -2} Scm{sup -1}. The addition of more plasticizer however decreases in mechanical stability of the membranes.

  4. High temperature electrically conducting ceramic heating element and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbach, C. R.; Page, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Improvements were made in both electrode technology and ceramic conductor quality to increase significantly the lifetime and thermal cycling capability of electrically conducting ceramic heater elements. These elements were operated in vacuum, inert and reducing environments as well as oxidizing atmospheres adding to the versatility of the conducting ceramic as an ohmic heater. Using stabilized zirconia conducting ceramic heater elements, a furnace was fabricated and demonstrated to have excellent thermal response and cycling capability. The furnace was used to melt platinum-20% rhodium alloy (melting point 1904 C) with an isothermal ceramic heating element having a nominal working cavity size of 2.5 cm diameter by 10.0 cm long. The furnace was operated to 1940 C with the isothermal ceramic heating element. The same furnace structure was fitted with a pair of main heater elements to provide axial gradient temperature control over a working cavity length of 17.8 cm.

  5. Study by electrical conductivity measurements of semiconductive and redox properties of M-doped NiO (M = Li, Mg, Al, Ga, Ti, Nb) catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Ionel; Heracleous, Eleni; Skoufa, Zinovia; Lemonidou, Angeliki; Marcu, Ioan-Cezar

    2014-03-14

    Pure and M-doped nickel oxides with M = Li, Mg, Al, Ga, Ti, Nb, catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane into ethylene, were characterized by in situ electrical conductivity measurements. Their electrical conductivity was studied as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure and was followed with time during sequential exposures to air, an ethane-air mixture (reaction mixture) and pure ethane under conditions similar to those of catalysis. All the materials appeared to be p-type semiconductors under air with positive holes as the main charge carriers and their electrical conductivity decreased in the following order: Li-NiO > NiO > Mg-NiO > Nb-NiO > Ga-NiO > Al-NiO > Ti-NiO. All the catalysts remained p-type semiconductors in the reaction mixture at 400 °C. Correlations between the p-type semiconductivity and the catalytic properties have been evidenced. The reaction mechanism involves surface lattice O(-) species and can be assimilated to a Mars and van Krevelen mechanism. PMID:24477867

  6. Testing and Optimization of Electrically Conductive Spacecraft Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mell, R. J.; Wertz, G. E.; Edwards, D. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report discussing the work done for the Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program. It discusses test chamber design, coating research, and test results on electrically thermal control coatings. These thermal control coatings are being developed to have several orders of magnitude higher electrical conductivity than most available thermal control coatings. Most current coatings tend to have a range in surface resistivity from 1,011 to 1,013 ohms/sq. Historically, spacecraft have had thermal control surfaces composed of dielectric materials of either polymers (paints and metalized films) or glasses (ceramic paints and optical solar reflectors). Very seldom has the thermal control surface of a spacecraft been a metal where the surface would be intrinsically electrically conductive. The poor thermal optical properties of most metals have, in most cases, stopped them from being used as a thermal control surface. Metals low infrared emittance (generally considered poor for thermal control surfaces) and/or solar absorptance, have resulted in the use of various dielectric coatings or films being applied over the substrate materials in order to obtain the required optical properties.

  7. How Well Does Zone Sampling Based On Soil Electrical Conductivity Maps Represent Soil Variability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    How Well Does Zone Sampling Based On Soil Electrical Conductivity Maps Represent Soil Variability. Dale L. Shaner A study was conducted determined if ECa-directed zone sampling could predict soil texture and soil organic matter (SOM) patterns of samples taken by a more intensive grid sample method...

  8. Phase Diagrams of Electric-Fduced Aggregation in Conducting Colloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khusid, B.; Acrivos, A.

    1999-01-01

    Under the application of a sufficiently strong electric field, a suspension may undergo reversible phase transitions from a homogeneous random arrangement of particles into a variety of ordered aggregation patterns. The surprising fact about electric-field driven phase transitions is that the aggregation patterns, that are observed in very diverse systems of colloids, display a number of common structural features and modes of evolution thereby implying that a universal mechanism may exist to account for these phenomena. It is now generally believed that this mechanism emanates from the presence of the long-range anisotropic interactions between colloidal particles due to their polarization in an applied field. But, in spite of numerous applications of the electric-field-driven phenomena in biotechnology, separation, materials engineering, chemical analysis, etc. our understanding of these phenomena is far from complete. Thus, it is the purpose of the proposed research to develop a theory and then test experimentally, under normal- and low-gravity conditions, the accuracy of the theoretical predictions regarding the effect of the synergism of the interparticle electric and hydrodynamic interactions on the phase diagram of a suspension. The main results from our theoretical studies performed to-date enable one to trace how the variations of the electrical properties of the constituent materials influence the topology of the suspension phase diagram and then, by using an appropriate phase diagram, to evaluate how the electric-field-induced transformations will depend on the frequency and the strength of the applied field.

  9. Electrical conductivity studies of Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Li{sub 2}O-ZnO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, Shashidhar; Rahman, Syed

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ac conductivity measurements and its analysis has been performed on Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Li{sub 2}O-ZnO-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses in the temperature range 30-300 Degree-Sign C and a frequency range of 100 Hz to 1 MHz. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dc conductivity increased and the activation energy decreased with lithium content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The frequency dependent conductivity has been analyzed employing conductivity and modulus formalisms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The onset of conductivity relaxation shifts towards higher frequencies with temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Almond-West conductivity formalism is used to explain the scaling behavior, and the relaxation mechanism is independent of temperature. -- Abstract: Ac conductivity measurements and its analysis has been performed on xBi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-(65-x)Li{sub 2}O-20ZnO-15B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0 {<=} x {<=} 20) glasses in the temperature range 30-300 Degree-Sign C and a frequency range of 100 Hz to 1 MHz. The dc conductivity increased and the activation energy decreased with lithium content. The frequency dependent conductivity has been analyzed employing conductivity and modulus formalisms. The onset of conductivity relaxation shifts towards higher frequencies with temperature. The Almond-West conductivity formalism is used to explain the scaling behavior, and the relaxation mechanism is independent of temperature.

  10. Transparent electrical conducting films by activated reactive evaporation

    DOEpatents

    Bunshah, Rointan; Nath, Prem

    1982-01-01

    Process and apparatus for producing transparent electrical conducting thin films by activated reactive evaporation. Thin films of low melting point metals and alloys, such as indium oxide and indium oxide doped with tin, are produced by physical vapor deposition. The metal or alloy is vaporized by electrical resistance heating in a vacuum chamber, oxygen and an inert gas such as argon are introduced into the chamber, and vapor and gas are ionized by a beam of low energy electrons in a reaction zone between the resistance heater and the substrate. There is a reaction between the ionized oxygen and the metal vapor resulting in the metal oxide which deposits on the substrate as a thin film which is ready for use without requiring post deposition heat treatment.

  11. Electrical Properties of Conductive Nylon66/Graphene Oxide Composite Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Nirmala, R; Navamathavan, R; Kim, Hak Yong; Park, Soo-Jin

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the structural and electrical properties of graphene oxide (GO) incorporated Nylon66 (N66) composite nanofibers prepared via electrospinning technique. Different types of composite nanofibers were electrospun by varying the weight percentage of GO in the polymer solution. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, as well as current-voltage (I-V) measurements were used to characterize the N66/GO composite nanofibers. The morphology of the N66/GO composite nanofibers exhibited densely arranged mesh-like ultrafine nanofibers which were strongly bound in between the main fibers. The I-V characteristics of the N66/GO composite nanofibers demonstrated that the blending of GO in to N66 nanofibers led to a dramatic improvement of the electrical conduction compared to that of pristine N66 nanofibers which can be utilized for the various technological applications. PMID:26369144

  12. Development of Tailorable Electrically Conductive Thermal Control Material Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. S.; Harada, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The optical characteristics of surfaces on spacecraft are fundamental parameters in controlling its temperature. Passive thermal control coatings with designed solar absorptance and infrared emittance properties have been developed and been in use for some time. In this total space environment, the coating must be stable and maintain its desired optical properties for the course of the mission lifetime. The mission lifetimes are increasing and in our quest to save weight, newer substrates are being integrated which limit electrical grounding schemes. All of this has already added to the existing concerns about spacecraft charging and related spacecraft failures or operational failures. The concern is even greater for thermal control surfaces that are very large. One way of alleviating such concerns is to design new thermal control material systems (TCMS) that can help to mitigate charging via providing charge leakage paths. The object of this program was to develop two types of passive electrically conductive TCMS.

  13. Transparent electrical conducting films by activated reactive evaporation

    DOEpatents

    Bunshah, R.; Nath, P.

    1982-06-22

    Process and apparatus for producing transparent electrical conducting thin films by activated reactive evaporation is disclosed. Thin films of low melting point metals and alloys, such as indium oxide and indium oxide doped with tin, are produced by physical vapor deposition. The metal or alloy is vaporized by electrical resistance heating in a vacuum chamber, oxygen and an inert gas such as argon are introduced into the chamber, and vapor and gas are ionized by a beam of low energy electrons in a reaction zone between the resistance heater and the substrate. There is a reaction between the ionized oxygen and the metal vapor resulting in the metal oxide which deposits on the substrate as a thin film which is ready for use without requiring post deposition heat treatment. 1 fig.

  14. Nerve conduction and electromyography studies.

    PubMed

    Kane, N M; Oware, A

    2012-07-01

    Nerve conduction studies (NCS) and electromyography (EMG), often shortened to 'EMGs', are a useful adjunct to clinical examination of the peripheral nervous system and striated skeletal muscle. NCS provide an efficient and rapid method of quantifying nerve conduction velocity (CV) and the amplitude of both sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) and compound motor action potentials (cMAPs). The CV reflects speed of propagation of action potentials, by saltatory conduction, along large myelinated axons in a peripheral nerve. The amplitude of SNAPs is in part determined by the number of axons in a sensory nerve, whilst amplitude of cMAPs reflects integrated function of the motor axons, neuromuscular junction and striated muscle. Repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) can identify defects of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) transmission, pre- or post-synaptic. Needle EMG examination can detect myopathic changes in muscle and signs of denervation. Combinations of these procedures can establish if motor and/or sensory nerve cell bodies or peripheral nerves are damaged (e.g. motor neuronopathy, sensory ganglionopathy or neuropathy), and also indicate if the primary target is the axon or the myelin sheath (i.e. axonal or demyelinating neuropathies). The distribution of nerve damage can be determined as either generalised, multifocal (mononeuropathy multiplex) or focal. The latter often due to compression at the common entrapment sites (such as the carpal tunnel, Guyon's canal, cubital tunnel, radial groove, fibular head and tarsal tunnel, to name but a few of the reported hundred or so 'entrapment neuropathies'). PMID:22614870

  15. Miniatuization of the flowing fluid electric conductivity loggingtec hnique

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Grace W.; Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Cook, Paul J.; Shipp, William

    2005-10-19

    An understanding of both the hydraulic properties of the aquifer and the depth distribution of salts is critical for evaluating the potential of groundwater for conjunctive water use and for maintaining suitable groundwater quality in agricultural regions where groundwater is used extensively for irrigation and drinking water. The electrical conductivity profiles recorded in a well using the flowing fluid electric conductivity logging (FEC logging) method can be analyzed to estimate interval specific hydraulic conductivity and estimates of the salinity concentration with depth. However, irrigation wells that are common in agricultural regions have limited access into them because these wells are still in operation, and the traditional equipment used for FEC logging cannot fit through the small access pipe intersecting the well. A modified, miniaturized FEC logging technique was developed such that this logging method could be used in wells with limited access. In addition, a new method for injecting water over the entire screened interval of the well was developed to reduce the time required to perform FEC logging. Results of FEC logging using the new methodology and miniaturized system in two irrigation wells are also summarized.

  16. Lunar electrical conductivity, permeability and temperature from Apollo magnetometer experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.; Daily, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetometers were deployed at four Apollo sites on the moon to measure remanent and induced lunar magnetic fields. Measurements from this network of instruments were used to calculate the electrical conductivity, temperature, magnetic permeability, and iron abundance of the lunar interior. The measured lunar remanent fields range from 3 gammas minimum at the Apollo 15 site to 327 gammas maximum at the Apollo 16 site. Simultaneous magnetic field and solar plasma pressure measurements show that the remanent fields at the Apollo 12 and 16 sites interact with, and are compressed by, the solar wind. Remanent fields at Apollo 12 and Apollo 16 are increased 16 gammas and 32 gammas, respectively, by a solar plasma bulk pressure increase of 1.5 X 10 to the -7th power dynes/sq cm. Global lunar fields due to eddy currents, induced in the lunar interior by magnetic transients, were analyzed to calculate an electrical conductivity profile for the moon. From nightside magnetometer data in the solar wind it was found that deeper than 170 km into the moon the conductivity rises from .0003 mhos/m to .10 mhos/m at 100 km depth. Recent analysis of data obtained in the geomagnetic tail, in regions free of complicating plasma effects, yields results consistent with nightside values.

  17. Conductivity affects nanosecond electrical pulse induced pressure transient formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes, Ronald A.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Beier, Hope T.; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoporation occurs in cells exposed to high amplitude short duration (< 1μs) electrical pulses. The biophysical mechanism(s) responsible for nanoporation is unknown although several theories exist. Current theories focus exclusively on the electrical field, citing electrostriction, water dipole alignment and/or electrodeformation as the primary mechanisms for pore formation. Our group has shown that mechanical forces of substantial magnitude are also generated during nsEP exposures. We hypothesize that these mechanical forces may contribute to pore formation. In this paper, we report that alteration of the conductivity of the exposure solution also altered the level of mechanical forces generated during a nsEP exposure. By reducing the conductivity of the exposure solutions, we found that we could completely eliminate any pressure transients normally created by nsEP exposure. The data collected for this proceeding does not definitively show that the pressure transients previously identified contribute to nanoporation; however; it indicates that conductivity influences both survival and pressure transient formation.

  18. Solid State Physics View of Liquid State Chemistry III. Electrical Conductance of Pure and Impure Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binbin, Jie; Chihtang, Sah

    2014-04-01

    The ‘abnormally’ high electrical conductivity of pure water was recently studied by us using our protonic bond, trap and energy band model, with five host particles: the positive and negative protons, and the amphoteric protonic trap in three charge states, positive, neutral and negative. Our second report described the electrical charge storage capacitance of pure and impure water. This third report presents the theory of particle density and electrical conductance of pure and impure water, including the impuritons, which consist of an impurity ion bonded to a proton, proton-hole or proton trap and which significantly affect impure waters' properties.

  19. Electrical Conductivity of Mantle Minerals: A Laboratory View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankland, T. J.

    2002-12-01

    Since the work of Lahiri and Price (1939) geophysicists have attempted to interpret electrical conductivity profiles of Earth's mantle. As we now know, the basic materials are olivines, pyroxenes, spinels, garnets, and their high-pressure, high-temperature polymorphs. However, beginning in the late 1940s researchers plunged in by measuring conductivities in ultramafic rocks. As inconsistencies appeared over the next couple of decades, it was necessary to define minerals in terms of condensed matter physics\\--an approach needed for extrapolation to extremes of mantle conditions not then available in the laboratory. By these standards mantle minerals are insulators, and for insulators electrical transport properties are difficult to measure reliably. Achieving chemical buffering (principally of oxygen fugacity by Duba and colleagues) in the early 1970s had two big effects: (1) it threw into doubt most of the previous quarter-century of work, and (2) it introduced nearly unprecedented reproducibility. Improved laboratory measurements permitted the role of iron in charge transfer to be defined and interpreted in terms of oxygen-sensitive defect populations. For mantle olivine (~10% fayalite content) there was actually general agreement among several groups for measurements at mantle temperatures. [In both field and laboratory conductivity measurements half an order of magnitude appears to be the level at which disagreements become academic.] Other advances, measurements of mineral conductivity in multi-anvil devices and diamond anvil cells have become possible at mantle pressures and/or temperatures, and the role of crystallographic phase transitions was elucidated. Attention to chemical buffering has led to other advances. For instance, "water" in its various chemical species appears to enhance conductivity, at least in the uppermost mantle. Elemental carbon could also play a role. Finally, an unusual agreement with geophysical observations has been achieved. However

  20. Gas-Tolerant Device Senses Electrical Conductivity of Liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Edward W.

    2005-01-01

    The figure depicts a device for measuring the electrical conductivity of a flowing liquid. Unlike prior such devices, this one does not trap gas bubbles entrained in the liquid. Usually, the electrical conductivity of a liquid is measured by use of two electrodes immersed in the liquid. A typical prior device based on this concept contains large cavities that can trap gas. Any gas present between or near the electrodes causes a significant offset in the conductivity reading and, if the gas becomes trapped, then the offset persists. Extensive tests on two-phase (liquid/ gas) flow have shown that in the case of liquid flowing along a section of tubing, gas entrained in the liquid is not trapped in the section as long as the inner wall of the section is smooth and continuous, and the section is the narrowest tubing section along the flow path. The design of the device is based on the foregoing observation: The electrodes and the insulators separating the electrodes constitute adjacent parts of the walls of a tube. The bore of the tube is machined to make the wall smooth and to provide a straight flow path from the inlet to the outlet. The diameter of the electrode/insulator tube assembly is less than the diameter of the inlet or outlet tubing. An outer shell contains the electrodes and insulators and constitutes a leak and pressure barrier. Any gas bubble flowing through this device causes only a momentary conductivity offset that is filtered out by software used to process the conductivity readings.

  1. Measurements of middle-atmosphere electric fields and associated electrical conductivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, L. C.; Croskey, C. L.; Mitchell, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    A simple antenna for measuring the vertical electric field in the 'middle atmosphere' has been flown on a number of rocket-launched parachute-borne payloads. The data from the first nine such flights, launched under a variety of geophysical conditions, are presented, along with electrical conductivities measured simultaneously. The data include indications of layered peaks of several volts per meter in the mesospheric field at high and low latitudes in situations of relatively low conductivity. During an auroral 'REP' event the electric field reversed direction in the lower stratosphere, accompanied by a substantial enhancement in conductivity. The data generally do not confirm speculations based only on the extension of the thunderstorm circuit from below or the mapping of ionospheric and magnetospheric fields from above, but seem to require, in addition, internal generation processes in the middle atmosphere.

  2. NOAA's hydrolab conducts reef studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This summer, scuba-diving scientists operating from Hydrolab, NOAA's undersea laboratory, are carrying out four experiments aimed at producing better management of coral reefs and their fishery resources. Hydrolab is located at a depth of 50 feet, near the mouth of the Salt River, off St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. The lab houses four scientists for up to 2 weeks at a time, permitting them to swim out into the water to conduct research. The projects make use of both the natural coral reef near Hydrolab and the nearby artificial reef constructed for comparison studies.

  3. Pore connectivity, electrical conductivity, and partial water saturation: Network simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Tang, Y. B.; Bernabé, Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Li, X. F.; Bai, X. Y.; Zhang, L. H.

    2015-06-01

    The electrical conductivity of brine-saturated rock is predominantly dependent on the geometry and topology of the pore space. When a resistive second phase (e.g., air in the vadose zone and oil/gas in hydrocarbon reservoirs) displaces the brine, the geometry and topology of the pore space occupied by the electrically conductive phase are changed. We investigated the effect of these changes on the electrical conductivity of rock partially saturated with brine. We simulated drainage and imbibition as invasion and bond percolation processes, respectively, in pipe networks assumed to be perfectly water-wet. The simulations included the formation of a water film in the pipes invaded by the nonwetting fluid. During simulated drainage/imbibition, we measured the changes in resistivity index as well as a number of relevant microstructural parameters describing the portion of the pore space saturated with water. Except Euler topological number, all quantities considered here showed a significant level of "universality," i.e., insensitivity to the type of lattice used (simple cubic, body-centered cubic, or face-centered cubic). Hence, the coordination number of the pore network appears to be a more effective measure of connectivity than Euler number. In general, the simulated resistivity index did not obey Archie's simple power law. In log-log scale, the resistivity index curves displayed a substantial downward or upward curvature depending on the presence or absence of a water film. Our network simulations compared relatively well with experimental data sets, which were obtained using experimental conditions and procedures consistent with the simulations. Finally, we verified that the connectivity/heterogeneity model proposed by Bernabé et al. (2011) could be extended to the partial brine saturation case when water films were not present.

  4. Electrical Conductivity Imaging Using Controlled Source Electromagnetics for Subsurface Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. R.; Routh, P. S.; Donaldson, P. R.

    2004-05-01

    Controlled Source Audio-Frequency Magnetotellurics (CSAMT) is a frequency domain electromagnetic (EM) sounding technique. CSAMT typically uses a grounded horizontal electric dipole approximately one to two kilometers in length as a source. Measurements of electric and magnetic field components are made at stations located ideally at least four skin depths away from the transmitter to approximate plane wave characteristics of the source. Data are acquired in a broad band frequency range that is sampled logarithmically from 0.1 Hz to 10 kHz. The usefulness of CSAMT soundings is to detect and map resistivity contrasts in the top two to three km of the Earth's surface. Some practical applications that CSAMT soundings have been used for include mapping ground water resources; mineral/precious metals exploration; geothermal reservoir mapping and monitoring; petroleum exploration; and geotechnical investigations. Higher frequency data can be used to image shallow features and lower frequency data are sensitive to deeper structures. We have a 3D CSAMT data set consisting of phase and amplitude measurements of the Ex and Hy components of the electric and magnetic fields respectively. The survey area is approximately 3 X 5 km. Receiver stations are situated 50 meters apart along a total of 13 lines with 8 lines bearing approximately N60E and the remainder of the lines oriented orthogonal to these 8 lines. We use an unconstrained Gauss-Newton method with positivity to invert the data. Inversion results will consist of conductivity versus depth profiles beneath each receiver station. These 1D profiles will be combined into a 3D subsurface conductivity image. We will include our interpretation of the subsurface conductivity structure and quantify the uncertainties associated with this interpretation.

  5. The Wilkes subglacial basin eastern margin electrical conductivity anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzello, Daniele; Armadillo, Egidio; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Caneva, Giorgio

    2014-05-01

    We have analyzed the deep conductivity structure at the transition between the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) and the eastern margin of the WSB in NVL, by means of the GDS (Geomagnetic Deep Sounding) technique, in order to constrain the geodynamical interpretation of this antarctic sector. The TAM form the uplifted flank of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic West Antarctic Rift System. Structure of the TAM rift flank has been partially investigated with different geophysical approaches.The Wilkes Subglacial Basin is a broad depression over 400 km wide at the George V Coast and 1200 km long. Geology, lithospheric structure and tectonics of the Basin are only partially known because the Basin is buried beneath the East Antarctic Ice Sheet and is located in a remote region which makes geophysical exploration logistically challenging. Different authors have proposed contrasting hypothesis regarding the origin of the WSB: it could represent a region of rifted continental crust, or it may have a flexural origin or might represent an "extended terrane". Recently aerogeophysical investigations have demonstrated a strong structural control on the margin. Magnetovariational studies carried out at high geomagnetic latitudes are often hampered by source effects, mainly due to the closeness to the Polar Electrojet currents systems (PEJ). Its presence, in fact, makes the uniform magnetic field assumption, on which the magnetovariational methods are based on, often invalid, which outcome is a bias in the GDS transfer functions and to compromise the reliability of the inverted models. Data from the aforementioned campaigns have been then processed under the ISEE project (Ice Sheet Electromagnetic Experiment), aimed at evaluate and mitigate the bias effect of the PEJ on geomagnetic an magnetotelluric transfer functions at high geomagnetic latitudes, by means of suitable processing algorithms, developed upon a statistical analysis study on PEJ effects (Rizzello et al. 2013). Recent results

  6. Electrical and thermal conductivity of beta-BN

    SciTech Connect

    Shipilo, V.B.; GUSEVA, i.p.; Leushkina, G.V.; Makovetskaya, L.A.; Popel'nyuk, G.P.

    1986-08-01

    This investigation deals with the influence of selenium impurity and thermal annealing on the properties of beta-BN. It is shown that as a result of annealing of cubic boron nitride, undoped or doped with selenium, both electrical and thermal conductivity are increased, depending also on the defects in the beta-BN crystals. The concentration of selenium in boron nitride was obtained by x-ray luminescence methods. To excite the x-ray radiation of selenium, a Cd 109 radioisotope source was used with an integrated activity of approximately 1 MBq.

  7. Dehydration of chlorite explains anomalously high electrical conductivity in the mantle wedges.

    PubMed

    Manthilake, Geeth; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Novella, Davide; Mookherjee, Mainak; Andrault, Denis

    2016-05-01

    Mantle wedge regions in subduction zone settings show anomalously high electrical conductivity (~1 S/m) that has often been attributed to the presence of aqueous fluids released by slab dehydration. Laboratory-based measurements of the electrical conductivity of hydrous phases and aqueous fluids are significantly lower and cannot readily explain the geophysically observed anomalously high electrical conductivity. The released aqueous fluid also rehydrates the mantle wedge and stabilizes a suite of hydrous phases, including serpentine and chlorite. In this present study, we have measured the electrical conductivity of a natural chlorite at pressures and temperatures relevant for the subduction zone setting. In our experiment, we observe two distinct conductivity enhancements when chlorite is heated to temperatures beyond its thermodynamic stability field. The initial increase in electrical conductivity to ~3 × 10(-3) S/m can be attributed to chlorite dehydration and the release of aqueous fluids. This is followed by a unique, subsequent enhancement of electrical conductivity of up to 7 × 10(-1) S/m. This is related to the growth of an interconnected network of a highly conductive and chemically impure magnetite mineral phase. Thus, the dehydration of chlorite and associated processes are likely to be crucial in explaining the anomalously high electrical conductivity observed in mantle wedges. Chlorite dehydration in the mantle wedge provides an additional source of aqueous fluid above the slab and could also be responsible for the fixed depth (120 ± 40 km) of melting at the top of the subducting slab beneath the subduction-related volcanic arc front. PMID:27386526

  8. Dehydration of chlorite explains anomalously high electrical conductivity in the mantle wedges

    PubMed Central

    Manthilake, Geeth; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Novella, Davide; Mookherjee, Mainak; Andrault, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Mantle wedge regions in subduction zone settings show anomalously high electrical conductivity (~1 S/m) that has often been attributed to the presence of aqueous fluids released by slab dehydration. Laboratory-based measurements of the electrical conductivity of hydrous phases and aqueous fluids are significantly lower and cannot readily explain the geophysically observed anomalously high electrical conductivity. The released aqueous fluid also rehydrates the mantle wedge and stabilizes a suite of hydrous phases, including serpentine and chlorite. In this present study, we have measured the electrical conductivity of a natural chlorite at pressures and temperatures relevant for the subduction zone setting. In our experiment, we observe two distinct conductivity enhancements when chlorite is heated to temperatures beyond its thermodynamic stability field. The initial increase in electrical conductivity to ~3 × 10−3 S/m can be attributed to chlorite dehydration and the release of aqueous fluids. This is followed by a unique, subsequent enhancement of electrical conductivity of up to 7 × 10−1 S/m. This is related to the growth of an interconnected network of a highly conductive and chemically impure magnetite mineral phase. Thus, the dehydration of chlorite and associated processes are likely to be crucial in explaining the anomalously high electrical conductivity observed in mantle wedges. Chlorite dehydration in the mantle wedge provides an additional source of aqueous fluid above the slab and could also be responsible for the fixed depth (120 ± 40 km) of melting at the top of the subducting slab beneath the subduction-related volcanic arc front. PMID:27386526

  9. Electrical conductivity of condensed molecular hydrogen in the giant planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoluchowski, R.

    1972-01-01

    Theoretical interpretation of several phenomena concerning Jupiter and Saturn depends upon the electrical conductivity of molecular hydrogen which, according to present models, forms the outermost layer of both planets. The layer starts at the transition pressure between the metallic and the molecular form of hydrogen, that is around 1 Mbar, and extends to the outside limits of the atmosphere. Whether at the highest pressures (and temperatures) this layer is a solid or a dense fluid is not certain. In any case, the fluid is in supercritical condition so that there is only a gradual transition from dense liquid to a gaseous form. The two theories which require specific values of the conductivity of the condensed molecular hydrogen are those pertaining to the generation of a magnetic field in the liquid hydrogen rather than in the deep metallic interior (HIDE, 1967), and those concerned with the electromagnetic coupling and exchange of angular momentum between the liquid core and the solid molecular hydrogen mantle.

  10. Electrical conduction in nanodomains in congruent lithium tantalate single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yasuo

    2014-01-27

    The electrical current flow behavior was investigated for nanodomains formed in a thin congruent lithium tantalate (LiTaO{sub 3}) single-crystal plate. When the nanodomains were relatively large, with diameters of about 100 nm, current flow was detected along the domain wall. However, when they were about 40 nm or smaller, the current flowed through the entire nanodomain. Schottky-like rectifying behavior was observed. Unlike the case of LiNbO{sub 3}, optical illumination was not required for current conduction in LiTaO{sub 3}. A clear temperature dependence of the current was found indicating that the conduction mechanism for nanodomains in LiTaO{sub 3} may involve thermally activated carrier hopping.

  11. Ultrahigh electrical conductivity in solution-sheared polymeric transparent films

    PubMed Central

    Worfolk, Brian J.; Andrews, Sean C.; Park, Steve; Reinspach, Julia; Liu, Nan; Toney, Michael F.; Mannsfeld, Stefan C. B.; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-01-01

    With consumer electronics transitioning toward flexible products, there is a growing need for high-performance, mechanically robust, and inexpensive transparent conductors (TCs) for optoelectronic device integration. Herein, we report the scalable fabrication of highly conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) thin films via solution shearing. Specific control over deposition conditions allows for tunable phase separation and preferential PEDOT backbone alignment, resulting in record-high electrical conductivities of 4,600 ± 100 S/cm while maintaining high optical transparency. High-performance solution-sheared TC PEDOT:PSS films were used as patterned electrodes in capacitive touch sensors and organic photovoltaics to demonstrate practical viability in optoelectronic applications. PMID:26515096

  12. Electrical Conductivity of Parylene F at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaham, S.; Bechara, M.; Locatelli, M.-L.; Tenailleau, C.

    2011-03-01

    The electrical conductivity of both as-deposited and annealed poly(α,α,α',α'-tetrafluoro- p-xylylene) (PA-F) films has been investigated up to 400°C. The static conductivity ( σ DC) values of PA-F measured between 200°C and 340°C appear to be ˜2.5 orders of magnitude lower for annealed films than for as-deposited ones. This change is attributed to a strong increase in the crystallinity of the material occurring above 340°C. After annealing at 400°C in N2, the σ DC value measured at 300°C, for instance, decreased from 3.8 × 10-12 Ω-1 cm-1 to 7.5 × 10-15 Ω-1 cm-1. Physical interpretations of such an improvement are offered.

  13. Interplanetary double-shock ensembles with anomalous electrical conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, M.

    1972-01-01

    Similarity theory is applied to the case of constant velocity, piston-driven, shock waves. This family of solutions, incorporating the interplanetary magnetic field for the case of infinite electric conductivity, represents one class of experimentally observed, flare-generated shock waves. This paper discusses the theoretical extension to flows with finite conductivity (presumably caused by unspecified modes of wave-particle interactions). Solutions, including reverse shocks, are found for a wide range of magnetic Reynolds numbers from one to infinity. Consideration of a zero and nonzero ambient flowing solar wind (together with removal of magnetic considerations) enables the recovery of earlier similarity solutions as well as numerical simulations. A limited comparison with observations suggests that flare energetics can be reasonably estimated once the shock velocity, ambient solar wind velocity and density, and ambient azimuthal Alfven Mach number are known.

  14. Electrical conductivity of quasi-two-dimensional foams.

    PubMed

    Yazhgur, Pavel; Honorez, Clément; Drenckhan, Wiebke; Langevin, Dominique; Salonen, Anniina

    2015-04-01

    Quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D) foams consist of monolayers of bubbles squeezed between two narrowly spaced plates. These simplified foams have served successfully in the past to shed light on numerous issues in foam physics. Here we consider the electrical conductivity of such model foams. We compare experiments to a model which we propose, and which successfully relates the structural and the conductive properties of the foam over the full range of the investigated liquid content. We show in particular that in the case of quasi-2D foams the liquid in the nodes needs to be taken into account even at low liquid content. We think that these results may provide different approaches for the characterization of foam properties and for the in situ characterization of the liquid content of foams in confining geometries, such as microfluidics. PMID:25974485

  15. Thermophysical Properties of Liquid Te: Density, Electrical Conductivity, and Viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Su, C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Scripa, R. N.; Ban, H.; Lin, B.

    2004-01-01

    The thermophysical properties of liquid Te, namely, density, electrical conductivity, and viscosity, were determined using the pycnometric and transient torque methods from the melting point of Te (723 K) to approximately 1150 K. A maximum was observed in the density of liquid Te as the temperature was increased. The electrical conductivity of liquid Te increased to a constant value of 2.89 x 10(exp 5 OMEGA-1m-1) as the temperature was raised above 1000 K. The viscosity decreased rapidly upon heating the liquid to elevated temperatures. The anomalous behaviors of the measured properties are explained as caused by the structural transitions in the liquid and discussed in terms of Eyring's and Bachiskii's predicted behaviors for homogeneous liquids. The Properties were also measured as a function of time after the liquid was coded from approximately 1173 or 1123 to 823 K. No relaxation phenomena were observed in the properties after the temperature of liquid Te was decreased to 823 K, in contrast to the relaxation behavior observed for some of the Te compounds.

  16. Magnetoresistance, electrical conductivity, and Hall effect of glassy carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.F.

    1983-02-01

    These properties of glassy carbon heat treated for three hours between 1200 and 2700/sup 0/C were measured from 3 to 300/sup 0/K in magnetic fields up to 5 tesla. The magnetoresistance was generally negative and saturated with reciprocal temperature, but still increased as a function of magnetic field. The maximum negative magnetoresistance measured was 2.2% for 2700/sup 0/C material. Several models based on the negative magnetoresistance being proportional to the square of the magnetic moment were attempted; the best fit was obtained for the simplest model combining Curie and Pauli paramagnetism for heat treatments above 1600/sup 0/C. Positive magnetoresistance was found only in less than 1600/sup 0/C treated glassy carbon. The electrical conductivity, of the order of 200 (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at room temperature, can be empirically written as sigma = A + Bexp(-CT/sup -1/4) - DT/sup -1/2. The Hall coefficient was independent of magnetic field, insensitive to temperature, but was a strong function of heat treatment temperature, crossing over from negative to positive at about 1700/sup 0/C and ranging from -0.048 to 0.126 cm/sup 3//coul. The idea of one-dimensional filaments in glassy carbon suggested by the electrical conductivity is compatible with the present consensus view of the microstructure.

  17. Stationary cylindrical vortex in a viscous electrically conducting fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikin, A. N.; Golovin, S. V.

    2013-07-01

    An exact solution of the magnetohydrodynamic equations is constructed which describes steady vortex flow in a stationary cylinder on the axis of which a conductor carrying a known current is located. The solution is obtained under the assumption that the fluid is viscous and has finite electrical conductivity and that the magnetic field has only the axial and azimuthal components in a cylindrical coordinate system. It is found that the action of the Lorentz force is compensated by changing the pressure. Fluid flow occurs from the periphery to the axis of the cylinder under a pressure gradient, with flow rotation and swirling. The fluid flow causes a concentration of the magnetic lines near the axis of the cylinder, providing an exponential decrease in the magnetic field strength with distance from the axis. This flow can be considered as a model of a local increase in the magnetic field strength due to the transfer of its force lines by the flow of the electrically conducting fluid.

  18. Parametric electric motor study

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; Stahura, D.

    1995-04-30

    Technology for the axial gap motor was developed by DOE with an investment of approximately $15 million. This development effort is for motor technologies of high power density and high efficiency. Such motors that are also small and light-weight are not available on the commercial market because high-power motors have typically been used in large industrial applications where small size and light weight are not requirements. AC Delco has been developing motors since 1918 and is interested in leveraging its research and development dollars to produce an array of motor systems for vehicles and to develop a future line of propulsion products. The DOE focus of the study was applied to machining applications. The most attractive feature of this motor is the axial air gap, which may make possible the removal of the motor`s stationary component from a total enclosure of the remainder of the machine if the power characteristics are adequate. The objectives of this project were to evaluate alternative electric drive systems for machine tools and automotive electric drive systems and to select a best machine type for each of those applications. A major challenge of this project was to produce a small, light-weight, highly efficient motor at a cost-effective price. The project developed machine and machine drive systems and design criteria for the range of applications. The final results included the creation of a baseline for developing electric vehicle powertrain system designs, conventional vehicle engine support system designs, and advanced machine tool configurations. In addition, an axial gap permanent magnet motor was built and tested, and gave, said one engineer involved, a sterling performance. This effort will commercialize advanced motor technology and extend knowledge and design capability in the most efficient electric machine design known today.

  19. Influence of NaCl Concentrations on Coagulation, Temperature, and Electrical Conductivity Using a Perfusion Radiofrequency Ablation System: An Ex Vivo Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Aube, Christophe Schmidt, Diethard; Brieger, Jens; Schenk, Martin; Kroeber, Stefan; Vielle, Bruno; Claussen, Claus D.; Goldberg, S. Nahum; Pereira, Philippe L.

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. To determine, by means of an ex vivo study, the effect of different NaCl concentrations on the extent of coagulation obtained during radiofrequency (RF) ablation performed using a digitally controlled perfusion device. Method. Twenty-eight RF ablations were performed with 40 W for 10 min using continuous NaCl infusion in fresh excised bovine liver. For perfusion, NaCl concentrations ranging from 0 (demineralized water) to 25% were used. Temperature, the amount of energy, and the dimensions of thermal-induced white coagulation were assessed for each ablation. These parameters were compared using the nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. Correlations were calculated according to the Spearman test. Results. RF ablation performed with 0.9% to 25% concentrations of NaCl produced a mean volume of coagulation of 30.7 {+-} 3.8 cm{sup 3}, with a mean short-axis diameter of 3.6 {+-} 0.2 cm. The mean amount of energy was 21,895 {+-} 1,674 W and the mean temperature was 85.4 {+-} 12.8 deg. C. Volume of coagulation, short-axis diameter, and amount of energy did not differ significantly among NaCl concentrations (p > 0.5). A correlation was found between the NaCl concentration and the short-axis diameter of coagulation (r = 0.64) and between the NaCl concentration and the mean temperature (r = 0.67), but not between the NaCl concentration and volume of coagulation. Conclusion. In an ex vivo model, continuous perfusion with high NaCl concentrations does not significantly improve the volume of thermal-induced coagulation. This may be because the use of a low-power generator cannot sufficiently exploit the potential advantage of better tissue conductivity provided by NaCl perfusion.

  20. Electrical conductivity of Icelandic deep geothermal reservoirs: insight from HT-HP laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nono, Franck; Gibert, Benoit; Loggia, Didier; Parat, Fleurice; Azais, Pierre; Cichy, Sarah

    2016-04-01

    Although the Icelandic geothermal system has been intensively investigated over the years, targeting increasingly deeper reservoirs (i.e. under supercritical conditions) requires a good knowledge of the behaviour of physical properties of the host rock in order to better interpret large scale geophysical observations. In particular, the interpretation of deep electrical soundings remains controversial as only few studies have investigated the influence of altered minerals and pore fluid properties on electrical properties of rocks at high temperature and pressure. In this study, we investigate the electrical conductivity of drilled samples from different Icelandic geothermal fields at elevated temperature, confining pressure and pore pressure conditions (100°C < T < 600°C, confining pressure up to 100 MPa and pore pressure up to 35 MPa). The investigated rocks are composed of hyaloclastites, dolerites and basalts taken from depths of about 800 m for the hyaloclastites, to almost 2500 m for the dolerites. They display different porosity structures, from vuggy and intra-granular to micro-cracked porosities, and have been hydrothermally alterated in the chlorite to amphibolite facies. Electrical conductivity measurements are first determined at ambient conditions as a function of pore fluid conductivity in order to establish their relationships with lithology and pore space topology, prior to the high pressure and temperature measurements. Cementation factor varies from 1.5 for the dolerites to 2.83 for the basalt, reflecting changes in the shape of the conductive channels. The surface conductivities, measured at very low fluid conductivity, increases with the porosity and is correlated with the cation exchange capacity. At high pressure and temperature, we used the two guard-ring electrodes system. Measurements have been performed in dry and saturated conditions as a function of temperature and pore pressure. The supercritical conditions have been investigated and

  1. Effect of strain on the electrical conductivity of a styrene-butadiene rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Hee; Lim, Jee Young; Jose, Jobin; Kim, Jae Young; Lee, Gi-Bbeum; Gent, Alan N.; Nah, Changwoon

    2010-04-01

    When the carbon black-filled rubbers are stretched, the electrical resistivity increases at lower extension ranges, and then it decreases with further extension. This complex behavior is attributed to the morphology changes of carbon black particles during extension, i.e., breaking and forming conducting paths. In this study, highly conductive carbon blacks were compounded with high styrene content SBR matrix with contents varying from 5phr, 10phr, 15phr and 20phr. All the compounds measured the electrical resistance at room temp., 40°C, 80°C, respectively. The electrical resistances are decreased as the conductive carbon blacks are higher and temperature is increased. The electrical resistivity and tensile behaviors were investigated as a function of stretching at 80°C. The conductive carbon black-filled a styrene-butadiene rubber vulcanizate showed much higher conductivity and the electrical resistivity is more stable by increase of contents. In tensile behaviors, as the contents of conductive carbon blacks increase, it shows the increase of strength.

  2. Electrical conductivity of lawsonite and dehydrating fluids at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manthilake, Geeth; Mookherjee, Mainak; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Andrault, Denis

    2015-09-01

    Lawsonite is a calcium-aluminum bearing hydrous silicate mineral with CaAl2Si2O7(OH)2.H2O stoichiometry. It is thermodynamically stable in the hydrated oceanic crust. Low-velocity anomalies observed in the cold subducted slabs have been related to the unusual shear wave velocities of lawsonite eclogite. However, electrical conductivity of lawsonite at high pressure and temperature remains unknown. In this study, we measured the electrical conductivity of lawsonite at 7 GPa, and temperatures ranging from 298 K-1320 K. At 1173 K, the electrical conductivity of lawsonite is around 10-1 S/m. A sharp increase of electrical conductivity is observed at temperatures exceeding the dehydration ~1258 K. The high electrical conductivity up to 101 S/m observed in our experiments is due to the presence of highly conductive fluid and could explain the low resistivity observed at 150-250 km depths in subduction zone settings such as NE Japan, northern, and central Chile.

  3. Gellan gum-graft-polyaniline--An electrical conducting biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Karthika, J S; Vishalakshi, B; Naik, Jagadish

    2016-01-01

    Grafting of polyaniline (PANI) on to gellan gum (GG) was carried out in the presence of catalytic amount of ammonium peroxydisulfate (APS) as oxidant/initiator under mild acidic conditions by microwave irradiation technique. The grafting condition was optimized by varying the microwave power, exposure time and the composition of the reaction mixture. The graft copolymer GG-g-PANI was characterized by FTIR, TGA, UV/vis, (1)H NMR and SEM techniques. The characteristic peaks at 1506, 1462, 1070 and 830 cm(-1) in the IR spectrum and signals at 7.3, 7.2, 7.1 and 4.0 δ in the (1)H NMR spectrum confirms the grafting process. The TGA data reveals GG-g-PANI to be thermally less stable than GG. The optimum grafting was observed when the reaction mixture containing 0.066 mmol APS, 0.1M aniline, 1M hydrochloric acid and 0.1g/dL GG was exposed to 80 W microwave power for 40s. The DC and AC conductivity of the GG-g-PANI were measured using the 'Two-point probe' method based on which the dielectric properties were evaluated. GG-g-PANI exhibited appreciable electrical conductivity, which increased with the extent of grafting. The results indicate threefold increase in DC conductivity of graft copolymer as compared to GG. PMID:26526174

  4. Nerve Conduction Block Using Combined Thermoelectric Cooling and High Frequency Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, D. Michael; Foldes, Emily L.; Bhadra, Niloy; Kilgore, Kevin L.

    2010-01-01

    Conduction block of peripheral nerves is an important technique for many basic and applied neurophysiology studies. To date, there has not been a technique which provides a quickly initiated and reversible “on-demand” conduction block which is both sustainable for long periods of time and does not generate activity in the nerve at the onset of the conduction block. In this study we evaluated the feasibility of a combined method of nerve block which utilizes two well established nerve blocking techniques in a rat and cat model: nerve cooling and electrical block using high frequency alternating currents (HFAC). This combined method effectively makes use of the contrasting features of both nerve cooling and electrical block using HFAC. The conduction block was initiated using nerve cooling, a technique which does not produce nerve “onset response” firing, a prohibitive drawback of HFAC electrical block. The conduction block was then readily transitioned into an electrical block. A long-term electrical block is likely preferential to a long-term nerve cooling block because nerve cooling block generates large amounts of exhaust heat, does not allow for fiber diameter selectivity and is known to be unsafe for prolonged delivery. PMID:20705099

  5. Electrical conductance of directly compressible materials under pressure.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, R P; Lordi, N G

    1979-02-01

    An electrometer that allowed direct recording of resistance changes during compression was used to measure the conductances of sodium chloride, potassium chloride, ammonium chloride, and sodium citrate. The effects of initial particle size, lubricant level, moisture content, and compaction pressure were determined. Direct compression tableting diluents also studied were dextrose, sucrose, lactose, microcrystalline cellulose, and dibasic calcium phosphate. Distinctive conductance patterns were observed and are rationalized in terms of previously proposed bondign machanisms. PMID:423096

  6. Electrically Conductive Multiphase Polymer Blend Carbon-Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigandi, Paul James

    The use of multiphase polymer blends provides unique morphologies and properties to reduce the percolation concentration and increase conductivity of carbon-based polymer composites. These systems offer improved conductivity, temperature stability and selective distribution of the conductive filler through unique morphologies at significantly lower conductive filler concentration. In this work, the kinetic and thermodynamic effects on a series of multiphase conductive polymer composites were investigated. The polymer blend phase morphology, filler distribution, electrical conductivity, and rheological properties of CB-filled PP/PMMA/EAA conductive polymer composites were determined. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were found to influence the morphology development and final composite properties. The morphology and CB distribution were found to be kinetically driven when annealed for a short period of time following the shear-intensive mixing process, whereas the three-phase polymer blend morphology is driven by thermodynamics when given sufficient time under high temperature annealing conditions in the melt state. At short annealing times, the CB distribution was influenced by the compounding sequence where the CB was added after being premixed with one of the polymer phases or directly added to the three phase polymer melt, but again was thermodynamically driven at longer annealing times with the CB migrating to the EAA phase. The resistivity was found to decrease by a statistically significant amount to similar levels for all of the composite systems with increasing annealing time, providing evidence of gradual phase coalescence to a tri-continuous morphology and CB migration. The addition of CB via the PP and EAA masterbatch results in significantly faster percolation and lower resistivity compared to when added direct to the system during compounding after 30 minutes annealing by a statistically significant amount. Dynamic oscillatory shear rheology using

  7. Electrical conduction of Ti/TiOx/Ti structures at low temperatures and high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batkova, Marianna; Batko, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    We present results of electrical conduction studies of Ti/TiOx/Ti planar structures prepared by tip-induced local anodic oxidation (LAO) of titanium thin films. The prepared structures have shown almost linear I-V curves at temperatures between 300 K and 30 K, and only slight deviation from linear behaviour at lower temperatures. Electrical conductance of the structures can be adequately explained by a two-channel model where variable range hopping channels and metallic ones coexist in parallel, while a crossover from Mott to Efros-Shklovskii variable-range-hopping conductivity has been observed at decreasing temperature. The magnetoresistance of the studied structures is very small even in magnetic fields up to 9 T. The reported electrical properties of the structures indicate their promising applications as very low heat capacity temperature sensors for cryogenic region and high magnetic fields.

  8. Polymeric salt bridges for conducting electric current in microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Tichenor, Mark S.; Artau, Alexander

    2009-11-17

    A "cast-in-place" monolithic microporous polymer salt bridge for conducting electrical current in microfluidic devices, and methods for manufacture thereof is disclosed. Polymeric salt bridges are formed in place in capillaries or microchannels. Formulations are prepared with monomer, suitable cross-linkers, solvent, and a thermal or radiation responsive initiator. The formulation is placed in a desired location and then suitable radiation such as UV light is used to polymerize the salt bridge within a desired structural location. Embodiments are provided wherein the polymeric salt bridges have sufficient porosity to allow ionic migration without bulk flow of solvents therethrough. The salt bridges form barriers that seal against fluid pressures in excess of 5000 pounds per square inch. The salt bridges can be formulated for carriage of suitable amperage at a desired voltage, and thus microfluidic devices using such salt bridges can be specifically constructed to meet selected analytical requirements.

  9. Formulation of electrically conductive thermal-control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shai, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    The development and formulation of electrically conductive thermal control coating was undertaken for use on the International Sun Earth Explorer spacecraft. The primary effort was to develop a coating with a bulk resistivity of less than 100,000 ohm/sqm, an optical absorptance of approximately 0.55, and a normal emittance of 0.90. The required stability in space called for a bulk resistivity of less than 100,000 ohm/sq m, an absorptance of less than 0.67, and a normal emittance of 0.90 after exposure to approximately 4 x 10 to the 16th proton/sq cm of solar-wind particles and 5300 equivalent sun-hours. These exposures represent 2 years of ISEE flight conditions. Both the unsuccessful formulation efforts and the successful use of oxide pigments fired at 1448 K are described. Problems relative to the reactivity of specific coating vehicles exposed to high humidity are discussed.

  10. Facile synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and improved electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongjun; Luo, Lijie; Zhou, Longchang; Mo, Libin; Tong, Zhangfa

    2010-02-01

    A layer of catalyst film on substrate is usually required during the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth of one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials. In this work, however, a novel approach for synthesizing high-purity bamboo-like boron nitride (BN) nanotubes directly on commercial stainless steel foils was demonstrated. Synthesis was realized by heating boron and zinc oxide (ZnO) powders at 1200 degrees C under a mixture gas flow of nitrogen and hydrogen. The stainless steel foils played an additional role of catalyst besides the substrate during the VLS growth of the nanotubes. In addition, the electrical conductivity of the BN nanotubes was efficiently improved in a simple way by coating with Au and Pd nanoparticles. The decorated BN nanotubes may find potential applications in catalysts, sensors and nanoelectronics. PMID:20352730

  11. Electric field-induced chemical locomotion of conducting objects.

    PubMed

    Loget, Gabriel; Kuhn, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Externally triggered motion of small objects has potential in applications ranging from micromachines, to drug delivery, and self-assembly of superstructures. Here we present a new concept for the controlled propulsion of conducting objects with sizes ranging from centimetres to hundreds of micrometres. It is based on their polarization, induced by an electric field, which triggers spatially separated oxidation and reduction reactions involving asymmetric gas bubble formation. This in turn leads to a directional motion of the objects. Depending on the implied redox chemistry and the device design, the speed can be controlled and the motion can be switched from linear to rotational. This type of chemical locomotion is an alternative to existing approaches based on other principles. PMID:22086336

  12. System and method for determining velocity of electrically conductive fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A. (Inventor); Korman, Valentin (Inventor); Markusic, Thomas E. (Inventor); Stanojev, Boris Johann (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A flowing electrically-conductive fluid is controlled between an upstream and downstream location thereof to insure that a convection timescale of the flowing fluid is less than a thermal diffusion timescale of the flowing fluid. First and second nodes of a current-carrying circuit are coupled to the fluid at the upstream location. A current pulse is applied to the current-carrying circuit so that the current pulse travels through the flowing fluid to thereby generate a thermal feature therein at the upstream location. The thermal feature is convected to the downstream location where it is monitored to detect a peak associated with the thermal feature so-convected. The velocity of the fluid flow is determined using a time-of-flight analysis.

  13. Thermal effects of electrically conductive deposits in melter

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, I.G.; Bickford, D.F.; Carter, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    The radioactive waste processed by the Defense Waste Processing Facility melter at the Savannah river Site contains noble metal fission-products. Operation of waste-glass melters treating commercial power reactor wastes indicates that accumulation of noble metals on melter floors can lead to distortion of electric heating patterns, loss of power, and possible electrode damage. Changes in melter geometry have been developed in Japan and Germany to minimize these effects. The two existing melters for the US Department of Energy's Defense Waste Processing Facility were designed in 1982, before this effect was known or had been characterized. Modeling and pilot scale tests are being conducted in the Integrated DWPF melter system to determine if the effect is significant for melters processing defense wastes, and if the effect can be diagnosed and corrected without significant damage or changes to the melter design. This document provides a discussion of these tests.

  14. Thermal effects of electrically conductive deposits in melter

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, I.G.; Bickford, D.F.; Carter, J.T.

    1992-07-01

    The radioactive waste processed by the Defense Waste Processing Facility melter at the Savannah river Site contains noble metal fission-products. Operation of waste-glass melters treating commercial power reactor wastes indicates that accumulation of noble metals on melter floors can lead to distortion of electric heating patterns, loss of power, and possible electrode damage. Changes in melter geometry have been developed in Japan and Germany to minimize these effects. The two existing melters for the US Department of Energy`s Defense Waste Processing Facility were designed in 1982, before this effect was known or had been characterized. Modeling and pilot scale tests are being conducted in the Integrated DWPF melter system to determine if the effect is significant for melters processing defense wastes, and if the effect can be diagnosed and corrected without significant damage or changes to the melter design. This document provides a discussion of these tests.

  15. Electrically conductive, optically transparent polymer/carbon nanotube composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the effective dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into polymer matrices. The nanocomposites are prepared using polymer matrices and exhibit a unique combination of properties, most notably, high retention of optical transparency in the visible range (i.e., 400-800 nm), electrical conductivity, and high thermal stability. By appropriate selection of the matrix resin, additional properties such as vacuum ultraviolet radiation resistance, atomic oxygen resistance, high glass transition (T.sub.g) temperatures, and excellent toughness can be attained. The resulting nanocomposites can be used to fabricate or formulate a variety of articles such as coatings on a variety of substrates, films, foams, fibers, threads, adhesives and fiber coated prepreg. The properties of the nanocomposites can be adjusted by selection of the polymer matrix and CNT to fabricate articles that possess high optical transparency and antistatic behavior.

  16. A Chemically Polymerized Electrically Conducting Composite of Polypyrrole Nanoparticles and Polyurethane for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Broda, Christopher R.; Lee, Jae Y.; Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Schmidt, Christine E.; Harrison, Benjamin S.

    2011-01-01

    A variety of cell types respond to electrical stimuli, accordingly many conducting polymers (CPs) have been used as tissue engineering (TE) scaffolds, one such CP is polypyrrole (PPy). PPy is a well studied biomaterial with potential TE applications due to its electrical conductivity and many other beneficial properties. Combining its characteristics with an elastomeric material, such as polyurethane (PU), may yield a hybrid scaffold with electrical activity and significant mechanical resilience. Pyrrole was in situ polymerized within a PU emulsion mixture in weight ratios of 1:100, 1:20, 1:10 and 1:5, respectively. Morphology, electrical conductivity, mechanical properties and cytocompatibility with C2C12 myoblast cells were characterized. The polymerization resulted in a composite with a principle base of PU interspersed with an electrically percolating network of PPy nanoparticles. As the mass ratio of PPy to PU increased so did electrical conductivity of the composites. In addition, as the mass ratio of PPy to PU increased, stiffness of the composite increased while maximum elongation length decreased. Ultimate tensile strength was reduced by approximately 47% across all samples with the addition of PPy to the PU base. Cytocompatibility assay data indicated no significant cytotoxic effect from the composites. Static cellular seeding of C2C12 cells and subsequent differentiation showed myotube formation on the composite materials. PMID:21681943

  17. Electrical conductivity of carbonaceous chondrites and electric heating of meteorite parent bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duba, AL

    1987-01-01

    Electromagnetic heating of rock-forming materials most probably was an important process in the early history of the solar system. Electrical conductivity experiments of representative materials such as carbonaceous chondrites are necessary to obtain data for use in electromagnetic heating models. With the assumption that carbon was present at grain boundaries in the material that comprised the meteorite parent bodies, the electrical heating of such bodies was calculated as a function of body size and solar distance using the T-Tauri model of Sonett and Herbert (1977). The results are discussed.

  18. High Temperature Characteristic in Electrical Breakdown and Electrical Conduction of Epoxy/Boron-nitride Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Yutaka; Kurimoto, Muneaki; Murakami, Yoshinobu; Nagao, Masayuki

    The power module for the electrical vehicle needs electrical insulation material with high thermal conductivity. Recently, the epoxy insulating material filled with boron-nitride particles (epoxy/boron-nitride composite) is focused as an effective solution. However, the insulation performance of epoxy/boron-nitride composite was not investigated enough especially at the high temperature in which the power module was used, i.e. more than 100°C. In this paper, we investigated high temperature characteristics in electrical breakdown and conduction current of epoxy/boron-nitride composite. Breakdown test under the application of DC lamp voltage and impulse voltage clarified that the epoxy/boron-nitride composite had the constant breakdown strength even in the high temperature. Comparison of the epoxy/boron-nitride composite with previous material, which was epoxy/alumina composite, indicated that the breakdown voltage of the epoxy/boron-nitride composite in the high temperature was found to be higher than that of epoxy/alumina composite under the same thermal-transfer quantity among them. Furthermore, conduction current measurement of epoxy/boron-nitride composite in the high temperature suggested the possibility of the ionic conduction mechanism.

  19. The electrical conductivities of candidate beam-waveguide antenna shroud materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Franco, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    The shroud on the beam-waveguide (BWG) antenna at DSS 13 is made from highly magnetic American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) A36 steel. Measurements at 8.42 GHz showed that this material (with paint) has a very poor electrical conductivity that is 600 times worse than aluminum. In cases where the BWG mirrors might be slightly misaligned, unintentional illumination and poor electrical conductivity of the shroud walls can cause system noise temperature to be increased significantly. This potential increase of noise temperature contribution can be reduced through the use of better conductivity materials for the shroud walls. An alternative is to attempt to improve the conductivity of the currently used ASTM A36 steel by means of some type of plating, surface treatment, or high-conductivity paints. This article presents the results of a study made to find improved materials for future shrouds and mirror supports.

  20. Surface electrical conductivity of single crystal spinel in cesium vapor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, P.; Ing, J.L.

    1995-04-02

    The operation of a thermionic fuel element (TFE) requires the maintenance of good electrical resistance between the anode and cathode, and between the electrodes and the TFE body. A program of research was established as part of the TOPAZ International Program (TIP) with the purpose of investigating the degradation of TFE electrical insulators. The major emphasis of this research has been on the interactions of oxide ceramics with cesium (Cs) vapor, and the resurfacing decrease of surface resistivity. Previous work has studied the surface electrical conductivity of sapphire exposed to Cs. In this report the authors describe the results of an experimental investigation of the surface electrical conductivity of single crystal magnesium aluminate spinel at temperatures ranging from 573K to 923K, in the presence of cesium vapor at pressures up to 1 Torr. The interest in spinel has arisen in view of its apparent resistance to radiation damage.

  1. Electrically conductive PEDOT coating with self-healing superhydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dandan; Lu, Xuemin; Lu, Qinghua

    2014-04-29

    A self-healing electrically conductive superhydrophobic poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) coating has been prepared by chemical vapor deposition of a fluoroalkylsilane (POTS) onto a PEDOT film, which was obtained by electrochemical deposition. The coating not only maintained high conductivity with a low resistivity of 3.2 × 10(-4) Ω·m, but also displayed a water contact angle larger than 156° and a sliding angle smaller than 10°. After being etched with O2 plasma, the coating showed an excellent self-healing ability, spontaneously regaining its superhydrophobicity when left under ambient conditions for 20 h. This superhydrophobicity recovery process was found to be humidity-dependent, and could be accelerated and completed within 2 h under a high humidity of 84%. The coating also exhibited good superhydrophobicity recovering ability after being corroded by strong acid solution at pH 1 or strong base solution at pH 14 for 3 h. PMID:24702588

  2. Peculiarities of high electric field conduction in p-type diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortet, V.; Trémouilles, D.; Bulíř, J.; Hubík, P.; Heller, L.; Bedel-Pereira, E.; Soltani, A.

    2016-04-01

    The electrical properties of chemical vapour deposited p-type epitaxial diamond layers are studied in high electric field conditions. The quasi-static current-voltage characteristics have been measured using transmission-line pulse method with 100 ns pulses. Reproducible impurity impact ionization avalanche breakdown occurs at a critical electrical field in the range of 100-200 kV cm-1 depending on the acceptor concentration and temperature, leading to complete ionisation of neutral impurities. The current-voltage characteristics exhibit an S-shape with the bi-stable conduction characteristic of impurity impact ionisation.

  3. Electrical perturbations of ultrathin bilayers: role of ionic conductive layer.

    PubMed

    Nazaripoor, Hadi; Koch, Charles R; Bhattacharjee, Subir

    2014-12-16

    The effect of electrostatic force on the dynamics, morphological evolution, and drainage time of ultrathin liquid bilayers (<100 nm) are investigated for perfect dielectric-perfect dielectric (PD-PD) and ionic liquid-perfect dielectric (IL-PD) bilayers. The weakly nonlinear "thin film" equation is solved numerically to obtain spatiotemporal evolution of the liquid-liquid interface responses to transverse electric field. In order to predict the electrostatic component of conjoining/disjoining pressure acting on the interface for IL-PD bilayers, an analytical model is developed using the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation. It is found that IL-PD bilayers with electric permittivity ratio of layers (lower to top), εr, greater than one remain stable under an applied electric field. An extensive numerical study is carried out to generate a map based on εr and the initial mean thickness of the lower layer. This map is used to predict the formation of various structures on PD-PD bilayer interface and provides a baseline for unstable IL-PD bilayers. The use of an ionic liquid (IL) layer is found to reduce the size of the structures, but results in polydispersed and disordered pillars spread over the domain. The numerical predictions follow similar trend of experimental observation of Lau and Russel. (Lau, C. Y.; Russel, W. B. Fundamental Limitations on Ordered Electrohydrodynamic Patterning; Macromolecules 2011, 44, 7746-7751). PMID:25419880

  4. In vivo measurements of electrical conductivity of porcine organs at low frequency: new method of measurement.

    PubMed

    Spottorno, J; Multigner, M; Rivero, G; Alvarez, L; de la Venta, J; Santos, M

    2012-10-01

    Calculations of the induced currents created in the human body by external electromagnetic fields would be more accurate provided that more realistic experimental values of the electrical properties of the body were available. The purpose of this work is to experimentally obtain values for the conductivity of living organs in conditions close to the real situation. Two-electrode in vivo measurements of the bioimpedance of some porcine organs have been performed. From these measurements and taking into account geometrical considerations, the electrical conductivity for the kidney, liver, heart, and spinal cord has been obtained and were found to be higher than the values reported in the literature. Furthermore, a new experimental procedure is proposed where the conductivity is determined from the values of the electrical potential and currents that are induced by an external electromagnetic field created by a coil placed close to the organ under study. PMID:22430866

  5. Modeling electric conduction in composite materials based on polypropylene and carbon black

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepashkina, A. S.; Tsobkallo, E. S.; Moskalyuk, O. A.; Aleshin, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    We have created a composite material based on polypropylene (PP) with carbon black as the filler. The dependence of the electric resistivity of the composite on the filler mass fraction has been experimentally studied. It is established that this dependence has a threshold character and the material retains dielectric properties at filler concentrations below the percolation threshold. Above the threshold, the resistivity drops by from eight to ten orders of magnitude. A theoretical description of the electric conduction of the composite is proposed, and it is shown that theoretical values of the conductivity quite satisfactorily coincide with experimental data. The process of electric conduction of the composite material has been simulated in order to determine the percolation threshold by the Monte Carlo method.

  6. Electrical conductivity of MgCO 3 at high pressures and high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mibe, Kenji; Ono, S.

    2011-05-01

    The electrical conductivity of polycrystalline magnesite (MgCO 3) was measured at 3-6 GPa at high temperatures using complex impedance spectroscopy in a multi-anvil high-pressure apparatus. The electrical conductivity increased with increasing pressure. The activation enthalpy calculated in the temperature range 650-1000 K also increased with increasing pressure. The effect of pressure was interpreted as being the activation volume in the Arrhenius equation, and the fitted data gave an activation energy and volume of 1.76±0.03 eV and -3.95±0.78 cm 3/mole, respectively. The negative activation volume and relatively large activation energy observed in this study suggests that the hopping of large polarons is the dominant mechanism for the electrical conductivity over the pressure and temperature range investigated.

  7. Thermal and electrical conductivity of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, Monica; Davies, Chris; Gubbins, David; Alfè, Dario

    2012-05-17

    The Earth acts as a gigantic heat engine driven by the decay of radiogenic isotopes and slow cooling, which gives rise to plate tectonics, volcanoes and mountain building. Another key product is the geomagnetic field, generated in the liquid iron core by a dynamo running on heat released by cooling and freezing (as the solid inner core grows), and on chemical convection (due to light elements expelled from the liquid on freezing). The power supplied to the geodynamo, measured by the heat flux across the core-mantle boundary (CMB), places constraints on Earth's evolution. Estimates of CMB heat flux depend on properties of iron mixtures under the extreme pressure and temperature conditions in the core, most critically on the thermal and electrical conductivities. These quantities remain poorly known because of inherent experimental and theoretical difficulties. Here we use density functional theory to compute these conductivities in liquid iron mixtures at core conditions from first principles--unlike previous estimates, which relied on extrapolations. The mixtures of iron, oxygen, sulphur and silicon are taken from earlier work and fit the seismologically determined core density and inner-core boundary density jump. We find both conductivities to be two to three times higher than estimates in current use. The changes are so large that core thermal histories and power requirements need to be reassessed. New estimates indicate that the adiabatic heat flux is 15 to 16 terawatts at the CMB, higher than present estimates of CMB heat flux based on mantle convection; the top of the core must be thermally stratified and any convection in the upper core must be driven by chemical convection against the adverse thermal buoyancy or lateral variations in CMB heat flow. Power for the geodynamo is greatly restricted, and future models of mantle evolution will need to incorporate a high CMB heat flux and explain the recent formation of the inner core. PMID:22495307

  8. Effect of twist and porosity on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanofiber yarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, S.; Naraghi, M.; Davoudi, A.

    2013-06-01

    This study focuses on the effect of twist and porosity on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanofiber (CNF) yarns. The process of fabrication of CNF yarns included the synthesis of aligned ribbons of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers via electrospinning. The PAN ribbons were twisted into yarns with twist levels ranging from zero twist to high twists of 1300 turn per meter (tpm). The twist imposed on the ribbons substantially improved the interactions between nanofibers and reduced the porosity. The PAN yarns were subsequently stabilized in air, and then carbonized in nitrogen at 1100 ° C for 1 h. Compressive stresses developed between the PAN nanofibers as a result of twist promoted interfusion between neighboring nanofibers, which was accelerated by heating the yarns during stabilization to temperatures above the glass transition of PAN. The electrical conductivity of the yarns was measured with a four point probe measurement technique. Although increasing the twist promotes electrical conductivity between nanofibers by forming junctions between them, our results indicate that the electrical conductivity does not continuously increase with increasing twist, but reaches a threshold value after which it starts to decrease. The causes for this behavior were studied through experimental techniques and further explored using a yarn-equivalent electrical circuit model.

  9. Investigation on magnetoacoustic signal generation with magnetic induction and its application to electrical conductivity reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingyu; He, Bin

    2007-08-21

    A theoretical study on the magnetoacoustic signal generation with magnetic induction and its applications to electrical conductivity reconstruction is conducted. An object with a concentric cylindrical geometry is located in a static magnetic field and a pulsed magnetic field. Driven by Lorentz force generated by the static magnetic field, the magnetically induced eddy current produces acoustic vibration and the propagated sound wave is received by a transducer around the object to reconstruct the corresponding electrical conductivity distribution of the object. A theory on the magnetoacoustic waveform generation for a circular symmetric model is provided as a forward problem. The explicit formulae and quantitative algorithm for the electrical conductivity reconstruction are then presented as an inverse problem. Computer simulations were conducted to test the proposed theory and assess the performance of the inverse algorithms for a multi-layer cylindrical model. The present simulation results confirm the validity of the proposed theory and suggest the feasibility of reconstructing electrical conductivity distribution based on the proposed theory on the magnetoacoustic signal generation with magnetic induction. PMID:17671355

  10. Reinforced carbon nanotubes as electrically conducting and flexible films for space applications.

    PubMed

    Atar, Nurit; Grossman, Eitan; Gouzman, Irina; Bolker, Asaf; Hanein, Yael

    2014-11-26

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown entangled carbon nanotube (CNT) sheets are characterized by high electrical conductivity and durability to bending and folding. However, since freestanding CNT sheets are mechanically weak, they cannot be used as stand-alone flexible films. In this work, polyimide (PI) infiltration into entangled cup-stacked CNT (CSCNT) sheets was studied to form electrically conducting, robust, and flexible films for space applications. The infiltration process preserved CNTs' advantageous properties (i.e., conductivity and flexibility), prevented CNT agglomeration, and enabled CNT patterning. In particular, the CNT-PI films exhibited ohmic electrical conductance in both the lateral and vertical directions, with a sheet resistivity as low as 122 Ω/□, similar to that of as-grown CNT sheets, with minimal effect of the insulating matrix. Moreover, this high conductivity was preserved under mechanical and thermal manipulations. These properties make the reported CNT-PI films excellent candidates for applications where flexibility, thermal stability, and electrical conductivity are required. Particularly, the developed CNT-PI films were found to be durable in space environment hazards such as high vacuum, thermal cycling, and ionizing radiation, and hence they are suggested as an alternative for the electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection layer in spacecraft thermal blankets. PMID:25366559

  11. Analysis of variance on thickness and electrical conductivity measurements of carbon nanotube thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min-Yang; Yang, Mingchia; Vargas, Emily; Neff, Kyle; Vanli, Arda; Liang, Richard

    2016-09-01

    One of the major challenges towards controlling the transfer of electrical and mechanical properties of nanotubes into nanocomposites is the lack of adequate measurement systems to quantify the variations in bulk properties while the nanotubes were used as the reinforcement material. In this study, we conducted one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) on thickness and conductivity measurements. By analyzing the data collected from both experienced and inexperienced operators, we found some operation details users might overlook that resulted in variations, since conductivity measurements of CNT thin films are very sensitive to thickness measurements. In addition, we demonstrated how issues in measurements damaged samples and limited the number of replications resulting in large variations in the electrical conductivity measurement results. Based on this study, we proposed a faster, more reliable approach to measure the thickness of CNT thin films that operators can follow to make these measurement processes less dependent on operator skills.

  12. Locating groundwater discharge in large lakes using bottom sediment electrical conductivity mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, F. Edwin; Lee, David R.; Rudolph, David L.; Frape, Shaun K.

    1997-11-01

    Groundwater-surface water studies that use conventional near-shore piezometers and /or seepage meters are impractical in larger, areal extensive lakes, as they require exorbitant numbers of instruments to quantify groundwater discharge zones. In smaller lakes an electrical conductivity mapping method has proven useful in mapping groundwater discharge zones. The technique identifies groundwater discharge by measuring variations in sediment pore water electrical conductivity and reduces the number of instruments necessary to quantify inflow, thereby lowering instrumentation costs and increasing a study's efficiency. This study sought to determine the technique's applicability in larger lakes. Thus the method was tested within the Hamilton Harbour, at the western end of Lake Ontario. This study found systematic variations between nearshore and offshore sediments and identified three anomalous zones that were thought to represent groundwater inflow. Onshore and offshore piezometers were used to verify the presence of upward gradients and elevated electrical conductivities. The sediment probe survey provided qualitative maps of areas of elevated electrical conductivity indicative of groundwater discharge and allowed a fairly extensive shoreline to be mapped quickly and economically. Survey results guided the installation of nearshore piezometers to discharge zones, eliminating the inefficiency of more conventional "hit or miss" point source installation approaches. This research demonstrated that the sediment probe was a valuable tool for studying groundwater inputs into large lakes.

  13. Electrically-conductive proppant and methods for making and using same

    DOEpatents

    Cannan, Chad; Roper, Todd; Savoy, Steve; Mitchell, Daniel R.

    2016-09-06

    Electrically-conductive sintered, substantially round and spherical particles and methods for producing such electrically-conductive sintered, substantially round and spherical particles from an alumina-containing raw material. Methods for using such electrically-conductive sintered, substantially round and spherical particles in hydraulic fracturing operations.

  14. Detection of Wheat Kernels with Hidden Insect Infestations Using an Electrically Conductive Roller Mill

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory roller mill system was modified to measure and analyze the electrical conductance of wheat as it was crushed. The electrical conductance of normal wheat kernels is normally low and fairly constant. In contrast, the electrical conductance of wheat kernels infested with live insects is su...

  15. Serotonin Regulates Electrical Coupling via Modulation of Extrajunctional Conductance: H-current

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Theresa M.; Caplan, Jonathan S.; Zoran, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Synaptic strength can be highly variable from animal to animal within a species or over time within an individual. The process of synaptic plasticity induced by neuromodulatory agents might be unpredictable when the underlying circuits subject to modulation are themselves inherently variable. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptomine; 5HT) and serotonergic signaling pathways are important regulators of animal behavior and are pharmacological targets in a wide range of neurological disorders. We have examined the effect of 5HT on electrical synapses possessing variable coupling strengths. While 5HT decreased electrical coupling at synapses with weak electrical connectivity, synapses with strong electrical coupling were less affected by 5HT treatment, as follows from the equations used for calculating coupling coefficients. The fact that the modulatory effect of 5HT on electrical connections was negatively correlated with the strength of electrical coupling suggests that the degree of electrical coupling within a neural network impacts subsequent neuromodulation of those synapses. Biophysical studies indicated that these effects were primarily due to 5HT-induced modulation of membrane currents that indirectly affect junctional coupling at synaptic contacts. In support of these experimental analyses, we created a simple model of coupled neurons to demonstrate that modulation of electrical coupling could be due solely to 5HT effects on H-channel conductance. Therefore, variability in the strength of electrical coupling in neural circuits can determine the pharmacological effect of this neuromodulatory agent. PMID:20599836

  16. Serotonin regulates electrical coupling via modulation of extrajunctional conductance: H-current.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Theresa M; Caplan, Jonathan S; Zoran, Mark J

    2010-08-19

    Synaptic strength can be highly variable from animal to animal within a species or over time within an individual. The process of synaptic plasticity induced by neuromodulatory agents might be unpredictable when the underlying circuits subject to modulation are themselves inherently variable. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptomine; 5HT) and serotonergic signaling pathways are important regulators of animal behavior and are pharmacological targets in a wide range of neurological disorders. We have examined the effect of 5HT on electrical synapses possessing variable coupling strengths. While 5HT decreased electrical coupling at synapses with weak electrical connectivity, synapses with strong electrical coupling were less affected by 5HT treatment, as follows from the equations used for calculating coupling coefficients. The fact that the modulatory effect of 5HT on electrical connections was negatively correlated with the strength of electrical coupling suggests that the degree of electrical coupling within a neural network impacts subsequent neuromodulation of those synapses. Biophysical studies indicated that these effects were primarily due to 5HT-induced modulation of membrane currents that indirectly affect junctional coupling at synaptic contacts. In support of these experimental analyses, we created a simple model of coupled neurons to demonstrate that modulation of electrical coupling could be due solely to 5HT effects on H-channel conductance. Therefore, variability in the strength of electrical coupling in neural circuits can determine the pharmacological effect of this neuromodulatory agent. PMID:20599836

  17. Electrical conduction and deep levels in polycrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonon, P.; Deneuville, A.; Fontaine, F.; Gheeraert, E.

    1995-12-01

    We have studied the dark conductivity (field, temperature, and frequency dependence), and the photoconductivity in undoped polycrystalline diamond films. Detailed analysis reveals that either of two alternative models can be invoked to explain all the observed features of the dark conductivity. The first model is a Hill-type hopping conduction involving the presence of discrete acceptor states located at 0.91 eV above the valence band with a density around 1017 cm-3. The second model involves the presence of a band-tail of acceptor states extending about 1 eV above the valence band. In this case, variable range hopping conduction dominates at low fields with a density of states at the Fermi level around 5×1015 cm-3 eV-1, while space charge limited currents dominate at high fields. The states controlling the dark conductivity give rise to photoconduction with a threshold around 0.85 eV and a peak at 1.1 eV. The shape of the photoconductivity spectrum suggests that lattice relaxation (with a Franck-Condon shift around 0.08 eV) occurs at these states. Peaks in the photoconductivity at 1.4 eV and at 1.9 eV give evidence for the presence of deeper states in these films.

  18. Novel electrically conducting 2-hydroxyethylcellulose/polyaniline nanocomposite cryogels: Synthesis and application in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Petar; Mokreva, Pavlina; Kostov, Ivan; Uzunova, Veselina; Tzoneva, Rumiana

    2016-04-20

    Novel electrically conducting 2-hydroxyethylcellulose/polyaniline (HEC/PANI) nanocomposite cryogels were fabricated via the combination of cryogenic treatment and photochemical crosslinking. PANI nanofillers (one-dimentional tubes and three-dimentional particles) were synthesized via oxidative polymerization of aniline in aqueous media and, then, embedded in the HEC matrix. The effect of PANI content and morphology on the gel fraction yield and electrical conductivity of material was studied. Nanocomposite cryogels of high gel fraction yield (65-95%) and rather high electrical conductivity (0.02-0.1S/m) were obtained by using a relatively small amount (0.5-3wt.% to HEC) of pre-formed PANI nanofillers. The behavior of L929 cells adhered on HEC/PANI cryogels in the presence of electric field were also investigated. Cytotoxicity test showed very good survival and proliferation of cells on cryogels, while the electrical stimulation triggered changes in cell morphology as well as a specific alignment of cells in parallel to the electrical field. PMID:26876861

  19. How Well Does Zone Sampling Based On Soil Electrical Conductivity Maps Represent Soil Variability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zone soil sampling is a method in which a field sampling is based on identifying homogenous areas using an easy to measure ancillary attribute such as apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa). This study determined if ECa-directed zone sampling in two fields in northeastern Colorado could correc...

  20. Comparison of electrical and thermal conductivities for soils from five states

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arrangement of soil particles, particle size, mineralogy, solute concentration, and bulk density affect electrical (EC) and thermal (TC) conductivities. The purpose of this study was to compare how EC and TC change as a function of water content, for soils under different vegetation and with differe...

  1. Asymptotic regimes for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Faussurier, G. Blancard, C.

    2015-04-15

    We study the asymptotic regimes for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas obtained by combining the Chester–Thellung–Kubo–Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation [Faussurier et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 092706 (2014)]. Non-degenerate and degenerate situations are considered. The Wiedemann–Franz law is obtained in the degenerate case.

  2. Asymptotic regimes for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, G.; Blancard, C.

    2015-04-01

    We study the asymptotic regimes for the electrical and thermal conductivities in dense plasmas obtained by combining the Chester-Thellung-Kubo-Greenwood approach and the Kramers approximation [Faussurier et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 092706 (2014)]. Non-degenerate and degenerate situations are considered. The Wiedemann-Franz law is obtained in the degenerate case.

  3. Unusually high electrical conductivity of phlogopite: the possible role of fluorine and geophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Yang, Xiaozhi; Yu, Jin-Hai; Cai, Yuan-Feng

    2016-04-01

    Phlogopite is an accessory mineral often found in mantle samples from various tectonic settings of continental regions. Considerable effort has been expended on the effect of phlogopite on some key chemical and petrological processes of the upper mantle, such as the recycling of K, F and H2O and the generation of K-rich fluids/melts; in contrast, less attention has been devoted to its physical properties. In this study, the orientation-related electrical conductivities of phlogopite single crystals have been experimentally determined at 1 GPa and 200-900 °C with an end-loaded piston cylinder press and a Solartron-1260 Impedance/Gain-Phase Analyzer in the frequency range of 106-0.1 Hz. The results demonstrate that phlogopite can have unusually high conductivity, >0.01 S/m above ~600 °C and ~1 S/m at ~900 °C, significant electrical anisotropy, by a factor of >6 above ~900 °C, and large activation enthalpies, ~134-204 kJ/mol along different directions. The main charge carriers are probably K+ and F-, and fluorine may play a critical role in electrical conduction. The regional enrichment of K- and F-rich phlogopite, above subduction zones or in normal shields for example, could result in remarkable anomalies of electrical conductivity. This provides a new mechanism for explaining some locally resolved electrical anomalies in the continental upper mantle.

  4. Electrical conductivity measurement of MgCO3 up to 6 GPa and 1000 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mibe, K.; Ono, S.

    2012-04-01

    Magnesite, MgCO3, is a naturally occurring carbonate mineral and is stable over a wide range of pressure and temperature. It is known that magnesite is one of the important host phases of carbon in the Earth's deep interior. A knowledge of how magnesite's electrical properties vary as a function of pressure and temperature will be important in interpreting the observed electrical conductivity map of the Earth's interior. We, therefore, measured the electrical conductivity of polycrystalline magnesite at pressures 3-6 GPa at high temperatures using complex impedance spectroscopy in a multi-anvil high-pressure apparatus. Synthetic powdered magnesite (MgCO3)(purity > 99.5%) was used as the starting material. The measured electrical conductivity increased with increasing pressure. The activation enthalpy calculated in the temperature range 650-1000 K also increased with increasing pressure. The effect of pressure was interpreted as being the activation volume in the Arrhenius equation, and the fitted data gave an activation energy and volume of 1.76 ± 0.03 eV and -3.95 ± 0.78 cm3/mole, respectively. The negative activation volume and relatively large activation energy observed in this study suggests that the hopping of large polarons is the dominant mechanism for the electrical conductivity over the pressure and temperature range investigated.

  5. Design of electrically and thermally conductive polymer composites for electronic packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo-Jin

    1998-09-01

    In designing electrically and thermally conductive polymer composites, one must know the fundamental knowledge of their macroproperty-microstructure relations. The macroproperties of interest in this study are the effective electrical and thermal conductivities. The key microstructural factors include filler shape, size, size distribution and geometric arrangement of fillers. The main tasks consist of processing, characterization and analytical modeling of silver flake/polymer matrix composites. Polymer composites are processed in various silver flake concentrations. Characterization includes the cure analysis, the microstucture examination, and the measurement of electrical and thermal conductivities. Four analytical models are constructed for predicting the effective electrical and thermal conductivities; (1) three-dimensional percolation model, (2) three-dimensional electrical resistor network model, (3) two-dimensional bond percolation model, and (4) three-dimensional thermal resistor network model. A three-dimensional percolation model predicts the threshold volume fraction of flake in terms of flake aspect ratio. A three-dimensional resistor network model is developed for the effective electrical resistivity, based on percolation and microscopic conduction mechanisms. It is found that flakes with larger aspect ratio, smaller mean value in size and broader size distribution yield smaller threshold volume fraction. The analytical predictions reasonably agree with the experimental results of silver flake/polymer matrix composites. A two-dimensional bond percolation model predicts the effect of filler arrangement on the composite resistivity. A composite with segregated distribution of conducting particles yields much smaller threshold volume fraction, comparing with random distribution. The analytical predictions are well matched with measured results of SiC particle/Sisb3Nsb4 composites. A three-dimensional thermal resistor network model is developed for the

  6. Electrical and thermal conduction in ultra-thin freestanding atomic layer deposited W nanobridges.

    PubMed

    Eigenfeld, Nathan T; Gertsch, Jonas C; Skidmore, George D; George, Steven M; Bright, Victor M

    2015-11-14

    Work presented here measures and interprets the electrical and thermal conductivities of atomic layer deposited (ALD) free-standing single film and periodic tungsten and aluminum oxide nanobridges with thicknesses from ∼5-20 nm and ∼3-13 nm, respectively. Electrical conductivity of the W films is reduced by up to 99% from bulk, while thermal conductivity is reduced by up to 91%. Results indicate phonon contribution to thermal conductivity is dominant in these ALD films and may be substantially reduced by the incorporation of periodicity in the ALD W/Al2O3 nanolaminates. Additionally, thin film conduction modeling demonstrates nano-structured grain features largely dictate electron and phonon conduction in ALD W. New fabrication methods have allowed for the development of free-standing ultra-thin structures with layers on the order of several nanometers utilizing ALD. While the literature contains diverse studies of the physical properties of thin films prepared by traditional micro-fabrication sputtering or chemical vapor deposition techniques, there remains little data on freestanding structures containing ALD generated materials. Specifically, knowledge of the electrical and thermal conductivity of ALD generated materials will aid in the future development of ultra-thin nano-devices. PMID:26463738

  7. Effects of Extremity Elevation and Health Factors On Soft Tissue Electrical Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldkamp, J. R.; Heller, J.

    2009-01-01

    Two clinical studies were completed using an auto-tuned induction coil conductivity sensor (ICCS) to determine the effects of a variety of factors on the electrical conductivity of soft tissue. In addition to fifteen "subject variables" such as blood pressure and others, we have specifically focused on considering the role of such factors as gender, age, BMI, smoking and elevation of extremities. Measurements were made at seven sites on either side of the body for a total of fourteen. Higher conductivities were obtained for women than men at all sites. At five sites, where age was a significant factor, conductivity was found to decline with increased age. Interestingly, smokers as a group tended to have reduced conductivity, suggesting that aging and smoking have similar effects on the microvasculature of soft tissue. Generally speaking, electrical conductivity is observed to increase in response to increased elevation at sites located on extremities. Considering just healthy adults, a definite pattern of elevation-induced electrical conductivity displacement emerges when subjects are flagged according to high, low or moderate blood pressure. We suggest that violations of this pattern may provide a method for identifying those individuals in an early stage of peripheral vascular disease.

  8. In situ determination of slurry nutrient content by electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Provolo, G; Martínez-Suller, L

    2007-12-01

    Land application of animal slurries has both agronomic and environmental implications. It can be supported by the quantification of available nutrients in the field. A prototype device for indirect measurement of the nutrient content of slurry based on electrical conductivity (EC) was calibrated on manure samples collected from farms with different livestock typologies. The resulting correlations between EC and nutrient contents of slurries from laboratory analyses have shown good agreement (r(2) from 0.73 to 0.95) with total and ammoniacal nitrogen and, with some exception, Potassium, but failed to demonstrate any significant relationship with total phosphorous. The mean errors obtained using the device in field conditions for nitrogen content were always lower or equal to 10%, while the standard deviations were 12-13% for pig and calf slurries, and 20-21% for dairy cow slurry. The results obtained suggest that the equipment, provided the regression line used to convert EC readings to nutrient contents is related to the livestock typology under observation, can provide good support to practical slurry spreading, even though it does not reach an accuracy comparable to laboratory methods and does not give reliable information on phosphorus. PMID:16919932

  9. Electrically Conductive Diamond Membrane for Electrochemical Separation Processes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fang; Nebel, Christoph E

    2016-07-20

    Electrochemically switchable selective membranes play an important role in selective filtration processes such as water desalination, industrial waste treatment, and hemodialysis. Currently, membranes for these purposes need to be optimized in terms of electrical conductivity and stability against fouling and corrosion. In this paper, we report the fabrication of boron-doped diamond membrane by template diamond growth on quartz fiber filters. The morphology and quality of the diamond coating are characterized via SEM and Raman spectroscopy. The membrane is heavily boron doped (>10(21) cm(-3)) with >3 V potential window in aqueous electrolyte. By applying a membrane potential against the electrolyte, the redox active species can be removed via flow-through electrolysis. Compared to planar diamond electrodes, the ∼250 times surface enlargement provided by such a membrane ensures an effective removal of target chemicals from the input electrolyte. The high stability of diamond enables the membrane to not only work at high membrane bias but also to be self-cleaning via in situ electrochemical oxidation. Therefore, we believe that the diamond membrane presented in this paper will provide a solution to future selective filtration applications especially in extreme conditions. PMID:27396448

  10. Guar gum based biodegradable, antibacterial and electrically conductive hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Kaith, Balbir S; Sharma, Reena; Kalia, Susheel

    2015-04-01

    Guar gum-polyacrylic acid-polyaniline based biodegradable electrically conductive interpenetrating network (IPN) structures were prepared through a two-step aqueous polymerization. Hexamine and ammonium persulfate (APS) were used as a cross linker-initiator system to crosslink the poly(AA) chains on Guar gum (Ggum) backbone. Optimum reaction conditions for maximum percentage swelling (7470.23%) were time (min) = 60; vacuum (mmHg) = 450; pH = 7.0; solvent (mL) = 27.5; [APS] (mol L(-1)) = 0.306 × 10(-1); [AA] (mol L(-1)) = 0.291 × 10(-3) and [hexamine] (mol L(-1))=0.356 × 10(-1). The semi-interpenetrating networks (semi-IPNs) were converted into IPNs through impregnation of polyaniline chains under acidic and neutral conditions. Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques were used to characterize the semi-IPNs and IPNs. Synthesized semi-IPNs and IPNs were further evaluated for moisture retention in different soils, antibacterial and biodegradation behavior. PMID:25660656

  11. Highly Electrically Conducting Glass-Graphene Nanoplatelets Hybrid Coatings.

    PubMed

    Garcia, E; Nistal, A; Khalifa, A; Essa, Y; Martín de la Escalera, F; Osendi, M I; Miranzo, P

    2015-08-19

    Hybrid coatings consisting of a heat resistant Y2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 (YAS) glass containing 2.3 wt % of graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were developed by flame spraying homogeneous ceramic powders-GNP granules. Around 40% of the GNPs survived the high spraying temperatures and were distributed along the splat-interfaces, forming a percolated network. These YAS-GNP coatings are potentially interesting in thermal protection systems and electromagnetic interference shields for aerospace applications; therefore silicon carbide (SiC) materials at the forefront of those applications were employed as substrates. Whereas the YAS coatings are nonconductive, the YAS-GNP coatings showed in-plane electrical conductivity (∼10(2) S·m(-1)) for which a low percolation limit (below 3.6 vol %) is inferred. Indentation tests revealed the formation of a highly damaged indentation zone showing multiple shear displacements between adjacent splats probably favored by the graphene sheets location. The indentation radial cracks typically found in brittle glass coatings are not detected in the hybrid coatings that are also more compliant. PMID:26222837

  12. Inductive Measurement of Plasma Jet Electrical Conductivity (MSFC Center Director's discretionary Fund). Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. W.; Hawk, C. W.; Litchford, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Measurement of plasma jet electrical conductivity has utility in the development of explosively driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy converters as well as magnetic flux compression reaction chambers for nuclear/chemical pulse propulsion and power. Within these types of reactors, the physical parameter of critical importance to underlying MHD processes is the magnetic Reynolds number, the value of which depends upon the product of plasma electrical conductivity and velocity. Therefore, a thorough understanding of MHD phenomena at high magnetic Reynolds number is essential, and methods are needed for the accurate and reliable measurement of electrical conductivity in high-speed plasma jets. It is well known that direct measurements using electrodes suffer from large surface resistance, and an electrodeless technique is desired. To address this need, an inductive probing scheme, originally developed for shock tube studies, has been adapted. In this method, the perturbation of an applied magnetic field by a plasma jet induces a voltage in a search coil, which, in turn, can be used to infer electrical conductivity through the inversion of a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. A 1-in.-diameter probe using a light-gas gun. Exploratory laboratory experiments were carried out using plasma jets expelled from 15-g shaped charges. Measured conductivities were in the range of 4 kS/m for unseeded octol charges and 26 kS/m for seeded octol charges containing 2-percent potassium carbonate by mass.

  13. Electrical conductivity of orthopyroxene: Implications for the water content of the asthenosphere

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Lidong; Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Electrical conductivity of minerals is sensitive to water content and hence can be used to infer the water content in the mantle. However, previous studies to infer the water content in the upper mantle were based on pure olivine model of the upper mantle. Influence of other minerals particularly that of orthopyroxene needs to be included to obtain a better estimate of water content in view of the high water solubility in this mineral. Here we report new results of electrical conductivity measurements on orthopyroxene, and apply these results to estimate the water content of the upper mantle of Earth. We found that the electrical conductivity of orthopyroxene is enhanced by the addition of water in a similar way as other minerals such as olivine and pyrope garnet. Using these new results, we calculate the electrical conductivity of pyrolite mantle as a function of water content and temperature incorporating the temperature and water fugacity-dependent hydrogen partitioning. Reported values of asthenosphere conductivity of 4 × 10−2−10−1 S/m corresponds to the water content of 0.01–0.04 wt%, a result in good agreement with the petrological model of the upper mantle. PMID:20009379

  14. Electrical conductivity of orthopyroxene: implications for the water content of the asthenosphere.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lidong; Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Electrical conductivity of minerals is sensitive to water content and hence can be used to infer the water content in the mantle. However, previous studies to infer the water content in the upper mantle were based on pure olivine model of the upper mantle. Influence of other minerals particularly that of orthopyroxene needs to be included to obtain a better estimate of water content in view of the high water solubility in this mineral. Here we report new results of electrical conductivity measurements on orthopyroxene, and apply these results to estimate the water content of the upper mantle of Earth. We found that the electrical conductivity of orthopyroxene is enhanced by the addition of water in a similar way as other minerals such as olivine and pyrope garnet. Using these new results, we calculate the electrical conductivity of pyrolite mantle as a function of water content and temperature incorporating the temperature and water fugacity-dependent hydrogen partitioning. Reported values of asthenosphere conductivity of 4x10(-2)-10(-1) S/m corresponds to the water content of 0.01-0.04 wt%, a result in good agreement with the petrological model of the upper mantle. PMID:20009379

  15. Water chemistry and electrical conductivity database for rivers in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clor, Laura E.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Huebner, Mark A.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Heasler, Henry P.; Mahony, Dan L.; Maloney, Tim; Evans, William C.

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to quantify relations between solute concentrations (especially chloride) and electrical conductivity for several rivers in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), by using automated samplers and conductivity meters. Norton and Friedman (1985) found that chloride concentrations and electrical conductivity have a good correlation in the Falls, Snake, Madison, and Yellowstone Rivers. However, their results are based on limited sampling and hydrologic conditions and their relation with other solutes was not determined. Once the correlations are established, conductivity measurements can then be used as a proxy for chloride concentrations, thereby enabling continuous heat-flow estimation on a much finer timescale and at lower cost than is currently possible with direct sampling. This publication serves as a repository for all data collected during the course of the study from May 2010 through July 2011, but it does not include correlations between solutes and conductivity or recommendations for quantification of chloride through continuous electrical conductivity measurements. This will be the object of a future document.

  16. Model simulations of strong atmospheric conductivity disturbances and induced responses of the Global Electric Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgaertner, A. J.; Lehto, E.; Neely, R. R.; English, J. M.; Zhu, Y.; Lucas, G.; Thayer, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Electrical conductivity in the troposphere and stratosphere is an important quantity that determines the distribution of currents in the GEC (Global Electric Circuit), as well as the potential difference between the Earth and the ionosphere. Recently, progress in modeling atmospheric conductivity has been achieved by integrating the conductivity calculation into an AC-GCM (atmospheric chemistry general circulation model), which provides all relevant data. In this study, WACCM (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model) is used for conductivity calculations and an analysis of the effects of strong disturbances on the GEC. This includes volcanic eruptions of Pinatubo in 1991 and the super volcano Toba, polar stratospheric clouds, radioactive releases, and the recent strong galactic cosmic ray maximum. In general, there is a decrease in conductivity from enhanced aerosol number densities, resulting from volcanic eruptions or polar stratospheric clouds. Conductivity is increased by additional ionization sources such as radioactive releases, or galactic cosmic ray increases such as during the last solar minimum. The effects of such events on conductivity, column and total resistance, and estimate effects on current distribution and the earth-ionosphere potential difference will be quantified. Percentage change in conductivity at 20 km altitude two months after the Toba volcanic eruption (WACCM model simulation). The enhanced aerosol concentrations lead to a "conductivity hole" between 30°S and 45° N.

  17. Electrical conductivity anisotropy of partially molten peridotite under shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Yoshino, T.; Yamazaki, D.; Manthilake, G. M.; Katsura, T.

    2013-12-01

    Recent ocean bottom magnetotelluric investigations have revealed a high-conductivity layer (HCL) with high anisotropy characterized by higher conductivity values in the direction parallel to the plate motion beneath the southern East Pacific Rise (Evans et al., 2005) and beneath the edge of the Cocos plate at the Middle America trench offshore of Nicaragua (Naif et al., 2013). These geophysical observations have been attributed to either hydration (water) of mantle minerals or the presence of partial melt. Currently, aligned partial melt has been regarded as the most preferable candidate for explaining the conductivity anisotropy because of the implausibility of proton conduction (Yoshino et al., 2006). In this study, we report development of the conductivity anisotropy between parallel and normal to shear direction on the shear plane in partial molten peridotite as a function of time and shear strain. Starting samples were pre-synthesized partial molten peridotite, showing homogeneous melt distribution. The partially molten peridotite samples were deformed in simple shear geometry at 1 GPa and 1723 K in a DIA-type apparatus with uniaxial deformation facility. Conductivity difference between parallel and normal to shear direction reached one order, which is equivalent to that observed beneath asthenosphere. In contrast, such anisotropic behavior was not found in the melt-free samples, suggesting that development of the conductivity anisotropy was generated under shear stress. Microstructure of the deformed partial molten peridotite shows partial melt tends to preferentially locate grain boundaries parallel to shear direction, and forms continuously thin melt layer sub-parallel to the shear direction, whereas apparently isolated distribution was observed on the section perpendicular to the shear direction. The resultant melt morphology can be approximated by tube like geometry parallel to the shear direction. This observation suggests that the development of

  18. A novel approach to model hydraulic and electrical conductivity in fractal porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbarian, B.; Daigle, H.; Sahimi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate prediction of conductivity in partially-saturated porous media has broad applications in various phenomena in porous media, and has been studied intensively since the 1940s by petroleum, chemical and civil engineers, and hydrologists. Many of the models developed in the past are based on the bundle of capillary tubes. In addition, pore network models have also been developed for simulating multiphase fluid flow in porous media and computing the conductivity in unsaturated porous media. In this study, we propose a novel approach using concepts from the effective-medium approximation (EMA) and percolation theory to model hydraulic and electrical conductivity in fractal porous media whose pore-size distributions exhibit power-law scaling. In our approach, the EMA, originally developed for predicting electrical conductivity of composite materials, is used to predict the effective conductivity, from complete saturation to some intermediate water content that represents a crossover point. Below the crossover water content, but still above a critical saturation (percolation threshold), a universal scaling predicted by percolation theory, a power law that expresses the dependence of the conductivity on the water content (less a critical water saturation) with an exponent of 2, is invoked to describe the effective conductivity. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the approach, experimental data were used from the literature. The predicted hydraulic conductivities for most cases are in excellent agreement with the data. In a few cases the theory underestimates the hydraulic conductivities, which correspond to porous media with very broad pore-size distribution in which the largest pore radius is more than 7 orders of magnitude greater than the smallest one. The approach is also used to predict the saturation dependence of the electrical conductivity for experiments in which capillary pressure data are available. The results indicate that the universal scaling of

  19. Electrical Conductivity of H2O-CO2 rich-Melt at mantle conditions: interpretation of the LAB using petrology-based 1D conductivity profiles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sifre, D.; Gaillard, F.; Hashim, L.; Massuyeau, M.; Gardés, E.; Hier-Majumder, S.

    2014-12-01

    Electromagnetic data images mantle regions more conductive than that of dry olivine. There is no doubt that melt is thermodynamically stable and present in the LAB, but how they can impact on mantle electrical conductivity remains debated. In addition, gravitational segregation and fast melt upwelling, being expected if melt fraction exceeds 2 vol. %, is thought to seriously restrict the role of partial melting at the level of the LAB. Petrological studies realized some 30 years ago have shown that peridotites exposed at the P-T-fO2 conditions of the LAB produced H2O and CO2 rich-melts. The segregation of such melts is not expected since they constitute only about 0.5 vol. % of the peridotite, but electrical conductivities of these melts are poorly known. Therefore, electrical conductivity experiments have been performed in piston cylinder on H2O-CO2 rich melts. Different melt compositions have been explored, from carbonated melts to basalts. The effects of chemical compositions and volatiles on these melts have been determined. The electrical conductivity measurements have shown that hydrous carbonated melts are very conductive, and the incorporation of basalt decreases the conductivity. With these new data, a semi-empirical law predicting the conductivity as a function of H2O and CO2 contents has been produced. Based on this law and the electrical conductivity of olivine, 1D conductivity profiles were constructed. With these profiles, the effect of volatiles content (partitioned between the melt and in the solids), melt fractions (mixing law and interconnection of the melt) and different temperature regimes on conductivity are discussed. These calculations are conducted on oceanic and continental settings with different ages. The electrical conductivities of the mantle is thus a powerful tool to track the fundamental process of mantle incipient melting, which is in turn narrowly associated to the cycling of H2O and CO2 in the upper mantle.

  20. Photoinduced extrinsic electrical conduction of nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedov, O. V.; Krivoschekov, V. A.

    1996-05-01

    During recent years the interest in media with strong nonlinear response is growing. These media allow the user to observe different nonlinear optic effects using small intensities of light. It is well known that liquid crystals are rather promising media for this research. This paper is devoted to the experimental research of the photoinduced conduction of a mixture of a nematic liquid crystal and a dye. Dependence of the conduction on the intensity of light was studied for different concentrations of a dye added to the nematic crystal. Also the problem of the optimum type of a dye for observing the photorefractive nonlinearity using Ar+- ion laser was considered. We made the experiments using the following available laser dyes: rhodamine '6G,' rhodamine 'G,' rhodamine 'C' and two ocsasine-type dyes also. The mixture of the nematic crystal 5CB and a dye was placed in a cell of 100 micrometer width, with the plates filmed with the transparent electrodes of SnO2. The dc voltage on the order of magnitude 1 V was applied to decrease the influence of the cell capacity on the conduction measurements of the samples. We used the light of two wavelengths: lambda1 equals 488 nm, lambda2 equals 514.5 nm. The best dyes for these wavelengths were the rhodamine- type dyes. Taking the other two dyes we observed much smaller effect of influence of the laser radiation on conduction of the samples. Maybe the reason was that the pump wavelength of ocsasine dyes is too far way from the wavelength of the radiation used. So the optimum dye must have the wavelength of the pump near to the wavelength used. Using rhodamine 'C' we obtained the dependencies of the induced conduction on laser light intensity for three different concentrations of the dye.

  1. Conducting and Reporting Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Merilyn; Taylor, Satomi Izumi

    Issues and elements of case study research are explored and illustrated with the example of a case study of a kindergarten in a suburb of Tokyo (Japan). Case study research is a type of qualitative research that concentrates on a single unit or entity, with boundaries established by the researcher. The case is an example drawn from a larger class,…

  2. Developmental condition and technical problems on electric insulation for super-conducting electric power machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoyama, H.

    1989-05-01

    The present situations of superconducting electric power machines in the world and studied problems were investigated from viewpoint of the electric insulation. 50MVA generator (CRIE/Hitachi) or 120MVA generator (KWU/Siemens) where the dc superconducting technique was applied on field windings, are developed. As to Superconducting transformer, 220KVA transformer is trially manufactured and the conceptual design of 1,000MVA transformer is made by W.H. or Alstom. Future problems are the study of protecting method for the overvoltage to superconducting electric power machines and the study to prevent the quench for superconducting windings. The respective insulating characteristics of solid and liquid insulators become clear gradually under the cryogenic condition but a large part of insulating characteristics of composite insulator prepared by combination of both insulators are not clear, so that these problems must be clarified.

  3. Electrical conductivity and permeability of partially molten mantle rocks: results from digital rock physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K.; Montesi, L.; Zhu, W.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of overall melt content beneath mid-ocean ridges inferred from magnetotelluric tomography (MT) studies vary widely between 1 and 10 vol. %. Much of this variation may arise from a lack of understanding about how melt geometry influences the bulk electrical conductivity of partially molten mantle rock, especially at low melt fraction. We present results from experiments in which we numerically calculate the electrical conductivity and permeability using high-resolution, three-dimensional melt geometries of olivine-basalt systems obtained via synchrotron X-ray microtomography (SXμT). Starting materials consist of San Carlos olivine and Fo90 basalt mixed in various proportions to achieve nominal melt fraction of 0.02 to 0.20 when melted. Samples were prepared by isostatically pressing samples at 1.5GPa and 1350°C for a minimum of 1 week (Zhu et al., 2011; Science) and then quenched, turning the melt to basaltic glass. Samples were imaged using SXμT at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Labs to obtain three-dimensional, 700 nm-per-pixel digital reconstructions. Grayscale data was segmented using Avizo® software (Miller et al., 2014; EPSL), and binary images were used as computational domains in numerical experiments to determine bulk electrical conductivity and permeability. Numerical experiments were carried out on several statistically representative subvolumes per sample using finite difference techniques. Olivine and melt are treated as conductive and insulative phases, respectively. To calculate conductivity, Laplace's equation is solved for the electric potential, assuming zero electric flux across phase boundaries. Ohm's Law yields the bulk conductivity of the sample. To calculate permeability, Stokes' equations are solved using the artificial compressibility method on a staggered grid. Darcy's law then gives the permeability of the subvolume. We fit permeability and electrical conductivity values to power laws in order to establish

  4. Conducting pilot and feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Cope, Diane G

    2015-03-01

    Planning a well-designed research study can be tedious and laborious work. However, this process is critical and ultimately can produce valid, reliable study findings. Designing a large-scale randomized, controlled trial (RCT)-the gold standard in quantitative research-can be even more challenging. Even the most well-planned study potentially can result in issues with research procedures and design, such as recruitment, retention, or methodology. One strategy that may facilitate sound study design is the completion of a pilot or feasibility study prior to the initiation of a larger-scale trial. This article will discuss pilot and feasibility studies, their advantages and disadvantages, and implications for oncology nursing research. 
. PMID:25806886

  5. New contactless eddy current non-destructive methodology for electric conductivity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchala, T.; Abdelhadi, B.; Benoudjit, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new method of contactless electric conductivity measurement is developed. This method is essentially based on the association of the coupled electric field forward model, which we have recently developed, with a simple and efficient research algorithm. The proposed method is very fast because 1.3 s are sufficient to calculate electric conductivity, in a CPU of 2 GHz and RAM of 3 GB, for a starting research interval of 1.72-17.2 %IACS and tolerance of 1.72 × 10- 5 %IACS. The study of the calculation time according to mesh density and starting interval width has showed that an optimal choice has to be made in order to improve the rapidity while preserving its precision. Considering its rapidity and its simplicity of implementation, this method is more adapted, in comparison to direct current techniques using Van der Pauw geometry, for automated applications.

  6. Influence Of The Redox State On The Electrical Conductivity Of Basaltic Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommier, A.; Gaillard, F.; Pichavant, M.

    2007-12-01

    The electrical conductivity is an efficient probe of mass transfer processes within silicate melts and magmas. Previous studies have established that the electrical conductivity is sensitive to parameters such as temperature, melt composition and pressure. In contrast to what is known for Fe-bearing minerals, little attention has been given to the influence of redox state on the electrical conductivity of melts. Experiments were performed on tephritic and basaltic compositions respectively from Mt. Vesuvius and Pu'u 'O'o. Measurements were carried out on cylindrical glass samples (OD: 6 mm, ID: 1 mm, L: 8 mm) drilled from glass obtained by fusing each rock sample at 1400°C in air. A two-electrode configuration was adopted, with the electrical impedance being radially measured. A Pt wire was used as the internal electrode whereas a Pt tube served as the external electrode. Experiments were conducted at 1 atm in a vertical furnace between 1200°C and 1300°C, both in air and in a CO-CO2 atmosphere at a fO2 corresponding to NNO+1. Both reduction and oxidation experiments were performed. In reduction experiments (pure CO2 then CO-CO2 gas mixture), electrical conductivities progressively increase with time. The reverse is observed in oxidation experiments (CO-CO2 gas mixture then pure CO2). These variations of electrical conductivities are correlated with modifications of the Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio in the melt, and are consistent with the respective structural roles of Fe2+ and Fe3+. In both types of experiments, a minimum of about 400 mn is necessary before a plateau is reached, interpreted to reflect the kinetics of attainment of the equilibrium Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio in the melt. Differences between plateau and initial values are typically of a few ohms, much higher than the sensitivity of our measurements (better than 0.1 ohm). When increasing temperature, the time required for reaching plateau values decreases. At NNO+1, the electrical activation energy (Ea) was determined for

  7. Effect of repetitive laser pulses on the electrical conductivity of intervertebral disc tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Omel'chenko, A I; Sobol', E N

    2009-03-31

    The thermomechanical effect of 1.56-{mu}m fibre laser pulses on intervertebral disc cartilage has been studied using ac conductivity measurements with coaxial electrodes integrated with an optical fibre for laser radiation delivery to the tissue. The observed time dependences of tissue conductivity can be interpreted in terms of hydraulic effects and thermomechanical changes in tissue structure. The laserinduced changes in the electrical parameters of the tissue are shown to correlate with the structural changes, which were visualised using shadowgraph imaging. Local ac conductivity measurements in the bulk of tissue can be used to develop a diagnostic/monitoring system for laser regeneration of intervertebral discs. (laser biology and medicine)

  8. Electrical conductivity of the quark-gluon plasma across the deconfinement transition.

    PubMed

    Amato, Alessandro; Aarts, Gert; Allton, Chris; Giudice, Pietro; Hands, Simon; Skullerud, Jon-Ivar

    2013-10-25

    A lattice calculation is presented for the electrical conductivity σ of the QCD plasma with 2+1 dynamical flavors at nonzero temperature. We employ the conserved lattice current on anisotropic lattices using a tadpole-improved clover action and study the behavior of the conductivity over a wide range of temperatures, both below and above the deconfining transition. The conductivity is extracted from a spectral-function analysis using the maximal entropy method, and a discussion of its systematics is provided. We find an increase of σ/T across the transition. PMID:24206478

  9. Microstructural Inhomogeneity of Electrical Conductivity in Subcutaneous Fat Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kruglikov, Ilja L.

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic peculiarities stemming from a temperature increase in subcutaneous adipose tissue (sWAT) after applying a radio-frequency (RF) current, must be strongly dependent on the type of sWAT. This effect is connected with different electrical conductivities of pathways inside (triglycerides in adipocytes) and outside (extra-cellular matrix) the cells and to the different weighting of these pathways in hypertrophic and hyperplastic types of sWAT. The application of the RF current to hypertrophic sWAT, which normally has a strongly developed extracellular matrix with high concentrations of hyaluronan and collagen in a peri-cellular space of adipocytes, can produce, micro-structurally, a highly inhomogeneous temperature distribution, characterized by strong temperature gradients between the peri-cellular sheath of the extra-cellular matrix around the hypertrophic adipocytes and their volumes. In addition to normal temperature effects, which are generally considered in body contouring, these temperature gradients can produce thermo-mechanical stresses on the cells’ surfaces. Whereas these stresses are relatively small under normal conditions and cannot cause any direct fracturing or damage of the cell structure, these stresses can, under some supportive conditions, be theoretically increased by several orders of magnitude, causing the thermo-mechanical cell damage. This effect cannot be realized in sWAT of normal or hyperplastic types where the peri-cellular structures are under-developed. It is concluded that the results of RF application in body contouring procedures must be strongly dependent on the morphological structure of sWAT. PMID:25734656

  10. Electroconvection of a poorly conducting fluid under unipolar charge injection in a steady electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Il’in, V. A. Mordvinov, A. N.; Petrov, D. A.

    2015-01-15

    We study the stability of equilibrium and nonlinear regimes of a nonuniformly heated poorly conducting fluid in a horizontal capacitor in the gravity field and in a dc electric field under a unipolar charge injection. A model in which the density of charges injected from the cathode is proportional to the electric field strength in the capacitor is considered. The dependences of critical parameters on the degree of heating and charge injection are determined. The effect of the Prandtl number on the equilibrium instability boundary and on the frequency of neutral vibrations is analyzed. Nonlinear regimes of electroconvection are studied for heating from below.

  11. Electrical conductivity of SrTi1-xRuxO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, R. F.; Carrió, J. A. G.; Cuffini, S. L.; Mascarenhas, Y. P.; Faria, R. M.

    2000-10-01

    SrTi(1-x)RuxO3 perovskite oxide compound exhibits different physical properties depending on the x value and the temperature range. High electrical conductivity, ferromagnetism phenomena, piezoelectricity, and superconductivity are currently properties found in this perovskite family. In this paper we present a study of electronic conduction of this mixed perovskite in function of x and temperature by alternating conductivity technique. Pure SrTiO3 is an insulating material that progresses to a conductive one as x increases. The model used to explain this conductivity evolution is the random free energy barrier model developed to explain transport phenomena in disordered materials. Disorder in this perovskite is supported by diffraction studies that evidenced slight delocalizations of oxygen atoms in the lattice, added due to random substitutions of Ti4+ by Ru4+.

  12. The effect of temperature on the electric conductivity of poly(dimethyl siloxane) ferromagnetic gel.

    PubMed

    Kubisz, L; Skumiel, A; Hornowski, T; Szlaferek, A; Pankowski, E

    2008-05-21

    In this paper the influence of temperature on the electrical conductivity of a ferromagnetic gel is investigated. The material used was poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) gel which contained randomly distributed magnetite nanosized particles. The electrical conductivity was measured by means of the two-point dc method. During the heating of the PDMS in the temperature range of 295-460 K the electrical conductivity increased from about 2 × 10(-12) to 2 × 10(-8) S m(-1). A study of the current-temperature dependence obtained during subsequent heating runs revealed two subranges of temperature characterized by different activation energies. The presence of these subranges could be explained either by the liberation of two different types of charge carrier or by the increase in the degree of polymer cross-linking. In the upper temperature subrange (420-460 K) both types of charge carrier probably contribute to the electrical conductivity of PDMS ferromagnetic gel. PMID:21694247

  13. Application of Skin Electrical Conductance of Acupuncture Meridians for Ureteral Calculus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wu-Chou; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Xu, Jian-Ming; Chen, Der-Cherng; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lee, Chao-Te

    2011-01-01

    Renal colic is a common condition seen in the emergency department (ED). Our recent study showed that measures of electrical conductance may be used as supplementary diagnostic methods for patients with acute renal colic. Here, we describe the case of a 30-year-old male subject with a left ureteral calculus who presented with frequency and normal-looking urine. He had already visited the outpatient department, but in vain. Normal urinalysis and nonobstructive urogram were reported at that time. Two days later, he was admitted to the ED because of abdominal pain in the left lower quadrant. The urinalysis did not detect red blood cells. Ultrasonography did not indicate hydronephrosis. The meridian electrical conductance and index of sympathovagal balance were found to be abnormal. High level of electrical conductance on the left bladder meridian was found. An unenhanced helical computed tomography was scheduled to reveal a left ureterovesical stone. Ureteroscopic intervention was later uneventfully performed, and the patient's pain was relieved. The follow-up measurements showed that the meridian parameters had returned to normal one month after treatment. This case suggests that bladder meridian electrical conductance might be used as a supplemental method for ureteral calculus diagnosis. PMID:24533191

  14. Density, Electrical Conductivity and Viscosity of Hg(0.8)Cd(0.2)Te Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Scripa, R. N.; Ban, H.; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    2004-01-01

    The density, viscosity, and electrical conductivity of Hg(0.8)Cd(0.2)Te melt were measured as a function of temperature. A pycnometric method was used to measure the melt density in the temperature range of 1072 to 1122 K. The viscosity and electrical conductivity were determined using a transient torque method from 1068 to 1132 K. The density result from this study is within 0.3% of the published data. However, the current viscosity result is approximately 30% lower than the existing data. The electrical conductivity of Hg(0.8)Cd(0.2)Te melt as a function of temperature, which is not available in the literature, is also determined. The analysis of the temperature dependent electrical conductivity and the relationship between the kinematic viscosity and density indicated that the structure of the melt appeared to be homogeneous when the temperature was above 1090 K. A structural transition occurred in the Hg(0.8)Cd(0.2)Te melt as the temperature was decreased to below 1090 K

  15. Electric conductivity of the quark-gluon plasma investigated using a perturbative QCD based parton cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greif, Moritz; Bouras, Ioannis; Greiner, Carsten; Xu, Zhe

    2014-11-01

    Electric conductivity is sensitive to effective cross sections among the particles of the partonic medium. We investigate the electric conductivity of a hot plasma of quarks and gluons, solving the relativistic Boltzmann equation. In order to extract this transport coefficient, we employ the Green-Kubo formalism and, independently, a method motivated by the classical definition of electric conductivity. To this end we evaluate the static electric diffusion current upon the influence of an electric field. Both methods give identical results. For the first time, we obtain numerically the Drude electric conductivity formula for an ultrarelativistic gas of quarks and gluons employing constant isotropic binary cross sections. Furthermore, we extract the electric conductivity for a system of massless quarks and gluons including screened binary and inelastic, radiative 2 ↔3 perturbative QCD scattering. Comparing with recent lattice results, we find an agreement in the temperature dependence of the conductivity.

  16. An experimental evaluation of electrical skin conductivity changes in postmortem interval and its assessment for time of death estimation.

    PubMed

    Cantürk, İsmail; Karabiber, Fethullah; Çelik, Safa; Şahin, M Feyzi; Yağmur, Fatih; Kara, Sadık

    2016-02-01

    In forensic medicine, estimation of the time of death (ToD) is one of the most important and challenging medico-legal problems. Despite the partial accomplishments in ToD estimations to date, the error margin of ToD estimation is still too large. In this study, electrical conductivity changes were experimentally investigated in the postmortem interval in human cases. Electrical conductivity measurements give some promising clues about the postmortem interval. A living human has a natural electrical conductivity; in the postmortem interval, intracellular fluids gradually leak out of cells. These leaked fluids combine with extra-cellular fluids in tissues and since both fluids are electrolytic, intracellular fluids help increase conductivity. Thus, the level of electrical conductivity is expected to increase with increased time after death. In this study, electrical conductivity tests were applied for six hours. The electrical conductivity of the cases exponentially increased during the tested time period, indicating a positive relationship between electrical conductivity and the postmortem interval. PMID:26751404

  17. Temperature Behavior of Electric Relaxational Effects due to Ionic Conductivity in Liquid Lactones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świergiel, J.; Jadżyn, J.

    2012-05-01

    This paper concerns the studies of temperature and frequency behavior of the complex impedance, electric modulus, and electric conductivity due to an ionic current in liquid γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and γ-valerolactone (GVL). The frequency of the applied electric stimulus (500 Hz to 5 MHz) corresponds to the static dielectric regime of the lactones. The studies were performed in the temperature range of 263 K to 313 K. It was shown that in the static dielectric case, the dc ionic conductivity ( σ DC) and the static dielectric permittivity {(\\varepsilon_s)} determine the relaxational behavior of the impedance ( Z*) and the electric modulus ( M*) of the molecular liquids and both spectra are of the Debye-type characterized by the same conductivity relaxation time ( τ σ ). Both σ DC and τ σ of GBL and GVL fairly well fulfill an Arrhenius temperature dependence with very similar values of the thermal activation energy {E_{σ_DC} ≈ E_{tau_σ} ≈ 25 kJ . mol^{-1}} . The temperature dependence of the static dielectric permittivity and its temperature derivative is analyzed and interpreted in terms of the dipolar aggregation in the studied lactones.

  18. The development of electrically conductive polycaprolactone fumarate-polypyrrole composite materials for nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Runge, M Brett; Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Knight, Andrew M; Ruesink, Terry; Lazcano, Eric A; Lu, Lichun; Windebank, Anthony J; Yaszemski, Michael J

    2010-08-01

    Electrically conductive polymer composites composed of polycaprolactone fumarate and polypyrrole (PCLF-PPy) have been developed for nerve regeneration applications. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of PCLF-PPy and in vitro studies showing PCLF-PPy materials support both PC12 cell and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurite extension. PCLF-PPy composite materials were synthesized by polymerizing pyrrole in preformed PCLF scaffolds (M(n) 7,000 or 18,000 g mol(-1)) resulting in interpenetrating networks of PCLF-PPy. Chemical compositions and thermal properties were characterized by ATR-FTIR, XPS, DSC, and TGA. PCLF-PPy materials were synthesized with five different anions (naphthalene-2-sulfonic acid sodium salt (NSA), dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid sodium salt (DBSA), dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium salt (DOSS), potassium iodide (I), and lysine) to investigate effects on electrical conductivity and to optimize chemical composition for cellular compatibility. PCLF-PPy materials have variable electrical conductivity up to 6 mS cm(-1) with bulk compositions ranging from 5 to 13.5 percent polypyrrole. AFM and SEM characterization show microstructures with a root mean squared (RMS) roughness of 1195 nm and nanostructures with RMS roughness of 8 nm. In vitro studies using PC12 cells and DRG show PCLF-PPy materials synthesized with NSA or DBSA support cell attachment, proliferation, neurite extension, and are promising materials for future studies involving electrical stimulation. PMID:20483452

  19. The Development of Electrically Conductive Polycaprolactone Fumarate-Polypyrrole Composite Materials for Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Runge, M. Brett; Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Knight, Andrew M.; Ruesink, Terry; Lazcano, Eric; Lu, Lichun; Windebank, Anthony J.; Yaszemski, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Electrically conductive polymer composites composed of polycaprolactone fumarate and polypyrrole (PCLF-PPy) have been developed for nerve regeneration applications. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of PCLF-PPy and in vitro studies showing PCLF-PPy materials support both PC12 cell and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurite extension. PCLF-PPy composite materials were synthesized by polymerizing pyrrole in pre-formed PCLF scaffolds (Mn 7,000 or 18,000 g mol−1) resulting in interpenetrating networks of PCLF-PPy. Chemical compositions and thermal properties were characterized by ATR-FTIR, XPS, DSC, and TGA. PCLF-PPy materials were synthesized with five different anions (naphthalene-2-sulfonic acid sodium salt (NSA), dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid sodium salt (DBSA), dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium salt (DOSS), potassium iodide (I), and lysine) to investigate effects on electrical conductivity and to optimize chemical composition for cellular compatibility. PCLF-PPy materials have variable electrical conductivity up to 6 mS cm−1 with bulk compositions ranging from 5 to 13.5 percent polypyrrole. AFM and SEM characterization show microstructures with a root mean squared (RMS) roughness of 1195 nm and nanostructures with RMS roughness of 8 nm. In vitro studies using PC12 cells and DRG show PCLF-PPy materials synthesized with NSA or DBSA support cell attachment, proliferation, neurite extension, and are promising materials for future studies involving electrical stimulation. PMID:20483452

  20. Materials and methods for autonomous restoration of electrical conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Blaiszik, Benjamin J; Odom, Susan A; Caruso, Mary M; Jackson, Aaron C; Baginska, Marta B; Ritchey, Joshua A; Finke, Aaron D; White, Scott R; Moore, Jeffrey S; Sottos, Nancy R; Braun, Paul V; Amine, Khalil

    2014-03-25

    An autonomic conductivity restoration system includes a solid conductor and a plurality of particles. The particles include a conductive fluid, a plurality of conductive microparticles, and/or a conductive material forming agent. The solid conductor has a first end, a second end, and a first conductivity between the first and second ends. When a crack forms between the first and second ends of the conductor, the contents of at least a portion of the particles are released into the crack. The cracked conductor and the released contents of the particles form a restored conductor having a second conductivity, which may be at least 90% of the first conductivity.

  1. High thermal conductivity connector having high electrical isolation

    DOEpatents

    Nieman, Ralph C.; Gonczy, John D.; Nicol, Thomas H.

    1995-01-01

    A method and article for providing a low-thermal-resistance, high-electrical-isolation heat intercept connection. The connection method involves clamping, by thermal interference fit, an electrically isolating cylinder between an outer metallic ring and an inner metallic disk. The connection provides durable coupling of a heat sink and a heat source.

  2. Sub-millimeter resolution electrical conductivity images of brain tissues using magnetic resonance-based electrical impedance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyun Bum; Jeong, Woo Chul; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kyung, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2015-07-01

    Recent magnetic resonance (MR)-based electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) of in vivo animal and human subjects enabled the imaging of electromagnetic properties, such as conductivity and permittivity, on tissue structure and function with a few millimeter pixel size. At those resolutions, the conductivity contrast might be sufficient to distinguish different tissue type for certain applications. Since the precise measurement of electrical conductivity under the tissue levels can provide alternative information in a wide range of biomedical applications, it is necessary to develop high-resolution MREIT technique to enhance its availability. In this study, we provide the experimental evaluation of sub-millimeter resolution conductivity imaging method using a 3T MR scanner combined with a multi-echo MR pulse sequence, multi-channel RF coil, and phase optimization method. From the phantom and animal imaging results, sub-millimeter resolution exhibited similar signal-to-noise ratio of MR magnitude and noise levels in magnetic flux density comparing to the existing millimeter resolution. The reconstructed conductivity images at sub-millimeter resolution can distinguish different brain tissues with a pixel size as small as 350 μm.

  3. Sub-millimeter resolution electrical conductivity images of brain tissues using magnetic resonance-based electrical impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Tong In; Jeong, Woo Chul; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong Woo, Eung Je; Kim, Hyun Bum; Kyung, Eun Jung; Kwon, Oh In

    2015-07-13

    Recent magnetic resonance (MR)-based electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) of in vivo animal and human subjects enabled the imaging of electromagnetic properties, such as conductivity and permittivity, on tissue structure and function with a few millimeter pixel size. At those resolutions, the conductivity contrast might be sufficient to distinguish different tissue type for certain applications. Since the precise measurement of electrical conductivity under the tissue levels can provide alternative information in a wide range of biomedical applications, it is necessary to develop high-resolution MREIT technique to enhance its availability. In this study, we provide the experimental evaluation of sub-millimeter resolution conductivity imaging method using a 3T MR scanner combined with a multi-echo MR pulse sequence, multi-channel RF coil, and phase optimization method. From the phantom and animal imaging results, sub-millimeter resolution exhibited similar signal-to-noise ratio of MR magnitude and noise levels in magnetic flux density comparing to the existing millimeter resolution. The reconstructed conductivity images at sub-millimeter resolution can distinguish different brain tissues with a pixel size as small as 350 μm.

  4. Magnetoacoustic Tomography with Magnetic Induction for Electrical Conductivity based Tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariappan, Leo

    Electrical conductivity imaging of biological tissue has attracted considerable interest in recent years owing to research indicating that electrical properties, especially electrical conductivity and permittivity, are indicators of underlying physiological and pathological conditions in biological tissue. Also, the knowledge of electrical conductivity of biological tissue is of interest to researchers conducting electromagnetic source imaging and in design of devices that apply electromagnetic energy to the body such as MRI. So, the need for a non-invasive, high resolution impedance imaging method is highly desired. To address this need we have studied the magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) method. In MAT-MI, the object is placed in a static and a dynamic magnetic field giving rise to ultrasound waves. The dynamic field induces eddy currents in the object, and the static field leads to generation of acoustic vibrations from Lorentz force on the induced currents. The acoustic vibrations are at the same frequency as the dynamic magnetic field, which is chosen to match the ultrasound frequency range. These ultrasound signals can be measured by ultrasound probes and are used to reconstruct MAT-MI acoustic source images using possible ultrasound imaging approaches .The reconstructed high spatial resolution image is indicative of the object's electrical conductivity contrast. We have investigated ultrasound imaging methods to reliably reconstruct the MAT-MI image under the practical conditions of limited bandwidth and transducer geometry. The corresponding imaging algorithm, computer simulation and experiments are developed to test the feasibility of these different methods. Also, in experiments, we have developed a system with the strong static field of an MRI magnet and a strong pulsed magnetic field to evaluate MAT-MI in biological tissue imaging. It can be seen from these simulations and experiments that conductivity boundary images with

  5. Conducting a wind sensing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Signal-to-noise requirements, and how signal-to-noise determines wind velocity measurement accuracy were studied. A Nd:YAG-based system was found to be competitive with a CO2-based system. Hardware was developed for a coherent Nd:YAG LIDAR system, and is being integrated into a functioning system. A diode-pumped monolithic rod laser to be used as a reference oscillator, a high-power, single-mode ring laser, for use as a master oscillator, and a high-gain, multipass amplifier were constructed.

  6. Frequency domain electrical conductivity measurements of the passive electrical properties of human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bordi, F; Cametti, C; Rosi, A; Calcabrini, A

    1993-11-21

    An extensive set of electrical conductivity measurements of human lymphocyte suspensions has been carried out in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 100 MHz, where the surface polarization due to the Maxwell-Wagner effect occurs. The data have been analyzed according to well-established heterogeneous system theories and the passive electrical parameters of both the cytoplasmic and nuclear membranes have been obtained. Moreover, a further analysis to take into account the roughness of the membrane surface on the basis of a fractal model yields new estimates for the membrane conductivity and the membrane permittivity, independently of the surface architecture of the cell. These findings are confirmed by measurements carried out at higher frequencies, in the range from 1 MHz to 1 GHz, on lymphocytes dispersed in both hyperosmotic and hypoosmotic media, that influence the surface complexity of the membrane due to the microvillous protrusions. The surface roughness of the cell is described by a macroscopic parameter (the fractal dimension) whose variations are associated to the progressive swelling of the cell, as the osmolality of the solution is changed. PMID:8241253

  7. Comparison of electrical conductivities of various brain phantom gels: Developing a ‘Brain Gel Model’

    PubMed Central

    Kandadai, Madhuvanthi A.; Raymond, Jason L.; Shaw, George J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of conducting gels to mimic brain and other tissues is of increasing interest in the development of new medical devices. Currently, there are few such models that can be utilized at physiologic temperatures. In this work, the conductivities of agar, agarose and gelatin gels were manipulated by varying NaCl concentration from 0–1 mg/ml. The AC conductivity was measured at room and physiological temperatures (37°C) in the 100–500 Hz frequency range. Conductivity (σ) was nearly independent of frequency but increased linearly with NaCl concentration and was higher at physiological temperatures in these gels. A formula for predicting conductivity as a function of NaCl concentration was derived for each gel type. The overall goal is to develop a ‘brain gel model’, for studying low frequency electrical properties of the brain and other tissues at physiological temperatures. PMID:23139442

  8. Comparison of electrical conductivities of various brain phantom gels: Developing a 'Brain Gel Model'

    PubMed

    Kandadai, Madhuvanthi A; Raymond, Jason L; Shaw, George J

    2012-12-01

    The use of conducting gels to mimic brain and other tissues is of increasing interest in the development of new medical devices. Currently, there are few such models that can be utilized at physiologic temperatures. In this work, the conductivities of agar, agarose and gelatin gels were manipulated by varying NaCl concentration from 0-1 mg/ml. The AC conductivity was measured at room and physiological temperatures (37°C) in the 100-500 Hz frequency range. Conductivity (σ) was nearly independent of frequency but increased linearly with NaCl concentration and was higher at physiological temperatures in these gels. A formula for predicting conductivity as a function of NaCl concentration was derived for each gel type. The overall goal is to develop a 'brain gel model', for studying low frequency electrical properties of the brain and other tissues at physiological temperatures. PMID:23139442

  9. Electrical conductivity measurements of bacterial nanowires from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruthupandy, Muthusamy; Anand, Muthusamy; Maduraiveeran, Govindhan; Sait Hameedha Beevi, Akbar; Jeeva Priya, Radhakrishnan

    2015-12-01

    The extracellular appendages of bacteria (flagella) that transfer electrons to electrodes are called bacterial nanowires. This study focuses on the isolation and separation of nanowires that are attached via Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial culture. The size and roughness of separated nanowires were measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The obtained bacterial nanowires indicated a clear image of bacterial nanowires measuring 16 nm in diameter. The formation of bacterial nanowires was confirmed by microscopic studies (AFM and TEM) and the conductivity nature of bacterial nanowire was investigated by electrochemical techniques. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), which are nondestructive voltammetry techniques, suggest that bacterial nanowires could be the source of electrons—which may be used in various applications, for example, microbial fuel cells, biosensors, organic solar cells, and bioelectronic devices. Routine analysis of electron transfer between bacterial nanowires and the electrode was performed, providing insight into the extracellular electron transfer (EET) to the electrode. CV revealed the catalytic electron transferability of bacterial nanowires and electrodes and showed excellent redox activities. CV and EIS studies showed that bacterial nanowires can charge the surface by producing and storing sufficient electrons, behave as a capacitor, and have features consistent with EET. Finally, electrochemical studies confirmed the development of bacterial nanowires with EET. This study suggests that bacterial nanowires can be used to fabricate biomolecular sensors and nanoelectronic devices.

  10. Nonlinear optical and electrical conductivity properties of Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) doped in Sol-Gel matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrass, Mariana; Burshtein, Zeev; Bar, Galit; Gvishi, Raz

    2014-09-01

    Carbon-nanotubes (CNT) are fascinating compounds, exhibiting exceptional electrical, thermal conductivity, mechanical strength, and nonlinear optical (NLO) properties. Their unique structures involve large π-π* electronic clouds. The energy level schemes thus created allow many electronic transitions between the ground and the excited states. The present work involves CNT-doped hybrid organic-inorganic glass composites prepared by a Fast-sol-gel method. Such composite glasses solidify without shrinkage or crack formation, and exhibit promising properties as optical devices. In this work we have studied nonlinear optical and electrical conductivity properties. The CNT composite glasses exhibited enhanced absorption at 532 nm, and saturable absorption at 1064 nm. The enhanced absorption at 532 was attributed to 2-photon absorption; saturable absorption was attributed to depletion of the absorbing ground-state, and was analyzed using the modified Frantz-Nodvik equation. Absorption cross-sections were extracted for the saturable absorption phenomenon. Such CNT composites glasses may be used as "optical limiting" filters in lasers near 532 nm, or as saturable absorbing filters for passive laser Q-switching near 1064 nm. The CNT composites electrical conductivity was studied as a function of the CNT concentration and modeled by a percolation theory. The maximal measured conductivity was σ ≍10-3 (Ωcm)-1 for the CNT composites, representing a conductivity increase of at least 12 orders of magnitude compared to that of pure silica. A quite low percolation threshold was obtained, φc = 0.22 wt.% CNT. Electrostatic Force Microscopy (EFM) and Conductive mode Atomic Force Microscopy (C-AFM) studies revealed that the conductivity occurs at the micro-level among the CNTs dispersed in the matrix.

  11. Electrical and thermal conduction in ultra-thin freestanding atomic layer deposited W nanobridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigenfeld, Nathan T.; Gertsch, Jonas C.; Skidmore, George D.; George, Steven M.; Bright, Victor M.

    2015-10-01

    Work presented here measures and interprets the electrical and thermal conductivities of atomic layer deposited (ALD) free-standing single film and periodic tungsten and aluminum oxide nanobridges with thicknesses from ~5-20 nm and ~3-13 nm, respectively. Electrical conductivity of the W films is reduced by up to 99% from bulk, while thermal conductivity is reduced by up to 91%. Results indicate phonon contribution to thermal conductivity is dominant in these ALD films and may be substantially reduced by the incorporation of periodicity in the ALD W/Al2O3 nanolaminates. Additionally, thin film conduction modeling demonstrates nano-structured grain features largely dictate electron and phonon conduction in ALD W. New fabrication methods have allowed for the development of free-standing ultra-thin structures with layers on the order of several nanometers utilizing ALD. While the literature contains diverse studies of the physical properties of thin films prepared by traditional micro-fabrication sputtering or chemical vapor deposition techniques, there remains little data on freestanding structures containing ALD generated materials. Specifically, knowledge of the electrical and thermal conductivity of ALD generated materials will aid in the future development of ultra-thin nano-devices.Work presented here measures and interprets the electrical and thermal conductivities of atomic layer deposited (ALD) free-standing single film and periodic tungsten and aluminum oxide nanobridges with thicknesses from ~5-20 nm and ~3-13 nm, respectively. Electrical conductivity of the W films is reduced by up to 99% from bulk, while thermal conductivity is reduced by up to 91%. Results indicate phonon contribution to thermal conductivity is dominant in these ALD films and may be substantially reduced by the incorporation of periodicity in the ALD W/Al2O3 nanolaminates. Additionally, thin film conduction modeling demonstrates nano-structured grain features largely dictate electron and

  12. High frequency electrical conduction block of the pudendal nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadra, Narendra; Bhadra, Niloy; Kilgore, Kevin; Gustafson, Kenneth J.

    2006-06-01

    A reversible electrical block of the pudendal nerves may provide a valuable method for restoration of urinary voiding in individuals with bladder-sphincter dyssynergia. This study quantified the stimulus parameters and effectiveness of high frequency (HFAC) sinusoidal waveforms on the pudendal nerves to produce block of the external urethral sphincter (EUS). A proximal electrode on the pudendal nerve after its exit from the sciatic notch was used to apply low frequency stimuli to evoke EUS contractions. HFAC at frequencies from 1 to 30 kHz with amplitudes from 1 to 10 V were applied through a conforming tripolar nerve cuff electrode implanted distally. Sphincter responses were recorded with a catheter mounted micro-transducer. A fast onset and reversible motor block was obtained over this range of frequencies. The HFAC block showed three phases: a high onset response, often a period of repetitive firing and usually a steady state of complete or partial block. A complete EUS block was obtained in all animals. The block thresholds showed a linear relationship with frequency. HFAC pudendal nerve stimulation effectively produced a quickly reversible block of evoked urethral sphincter contractions. The HFAC pudendal block could be a valuable tool in the rehabilitation of bladder-sphincter dyssynergia.

  13. Evaluation of biodegradable and electrically conductive polymers based on polylactide and polypyrrole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaoxu

    This thesis studied the potential of new biodegradable and electrically conductive polymers for vascular and tissue engineering applications. Newly synthesized poly(epsilon-caprolactone/poly(ethylene glycol)/L-lactide) (PCEL) and electrically conductive biodegradable polymer composite (PPy/PDLLA) were examined both in vitro and in vivo to determine their biodegradation, biocompatibility, and electrical stability. Results show that the uniform degradation of the PCEL in simple hydrolysis was as slow as that observed with PLLA. In the presence of pancreatin, the PCEL showed heterogeneous degradation. The PCEL impregnated as a sealant in vascular prostheses induced a mild inflammation in vivo in a subcutaneous model, comparable to the reactions with other clinically used biodegradable polymers. The PPy/PDLLA composite showed sufficient electrical stability to serve as a template for electrical stimulation in a biologically relevant environment. The tissue reaction of the PPy/PDLLA composite was similar to that of the PDLLA. The PCEL and PPy/PDLLA composite therefore represent potentially important new biomaterials.

  14. Electrical and thermal conductivity of low temperature CVD graphene: the effect of disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlassiouk, Ivan; Smirnov, Sergei; Ivanov, Ilia; Fulvio, Pasquale F.; Dai, Sheng; Meyer, Harry; Chi, Miaofang; Hensley, Dale; Datskos, Panos; Lavrik, Nickolay V.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we present a study of graphene produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) under different conditions with the main emphasis on correlating the thermal and electrical properties with the degree of disorder. Graphene grown by CVD on Cu and Ni catalysts demonstrates the increasing extent of disorder at low deposition temperatures as revealed by the Raman peak ratio, IG/ID. We relate this ratio to the characteristic domain size, La, and investigate the electrical and thermal conductivity of graphene as a function of La. The electrical resistivity, ρ, measured on graphene samples transferred onto SiO2/Si substrates shows linear correlation with La - 1. The thermal conductivity, K, measured on the same graphene samples suspended on silicon pillars, on the other hand, appears to have a much weaker dependence on La, close to K ~ La1/3. It results in an apparent ρ ~ K3 correlation between them. Despite the progressively increasing structural disorder in graphene grown at lower temperatures, it shows remarkably high thermal conductivity (102-103 W K - 1 m - 1) and low electrical (103-3 × 105 Ω) resistivities suitable for various applications.

  15. Electrical and thermal conductivity of low temperature CVD graphene: the effect of disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Lavrik, Nickolay V; Datskos, Panos G; Meyer III, Harry M; Ivanov, Ilia N; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Dai, Sheng; Chi, Miaofang; Hensley, Dale K; Vlassiouk, Ivan V

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a study of graphene produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) under different conditions with the main emphasis on correlating the thermal and electrical properties with the degree of disorder. Graphene grown by CVD on Cu and Ni catalysts demonstrates the increasing extent of disorder at low deposition temperatures as revealed by the Raman peak ratio, I{sub G}/I{sub D}. We relate this ratio to the characteristic domain size, L{sub a}, and investigate the electrical and thermal conductivity of graphene as a function of L{sub a}. The electrical resistivity, {rho}, measured on graphene samples transferred onto SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates shows linear correlation with L{sub a}{sup -1}. The thermal conductivity, K, measured on the same graphene samples suspended on silicon pillars, on the other hand, appears to have a much weaker dependence on L{sub a}, close to K {approx} L{sub a}{sup 1/3}. It results in an apparent {rho} {approx} K{sup 3} correlation between them. Despite the progressively increasing structural disorder in graphene grown at lower temperatures, it shows remarkably high thermal conductivity (10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} W K{sup -1} m{sup -1}) and low electrical (10{sup 3}-3 x 10{sup 5} {Omega}) resistivities suitable for various applications.

  16. Synthesis, Characterization, Electrical Conductivity and Fluorescence Properties of Polyimine Bearing Phenylacetylene Units.

    PubMed

    Şenol, Dilek; Kolcu, Feyza; Kaya, İsmet

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a Schiff base was synthesized by the condensation reaction of 4-bromobenzaldehyde and 4-aminophenol. Then, phenylacetylene substituted Schiff base monomer (IPA) was obtained by HBr elimination reaction of IPA with phenylacetylene through Sonogashira reaction. IPA was polymerized via chemical oxidative polycondensation reaction. FT-IR and NMR measurements were used for the structural analyses of the synthesized substances. Fluorescence and UV-Vis analyses were carried out for optical characterization. Electrochemical characteristics, electrical conductivities and thermal properties were determined using cyclic voltammetry (CV), four-point probe conductometer, TG-DTA and DSC methods. The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of phenylacetylene bearing units on the properties of conjugated aromatic polyimines. The spectral analysis signified a green light emission behavior when irradiated at different wavelengths. Combined with fluorescent behavior and good thermal stability, the electrical conductivity was found to be very crucial for π-conjugated polymer. PMID:27338948

  17. Spatial relationship between the productivity of cane sugar and soil electrical conductivity measured by electromagnetic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Glecio; Silva, Jucicléia; Bezerra, Joel; Silva, Enio; Montenegro, Abelardo

    2013-04-01

    The cultivation of sugar cane in Brazil occupies a prominent place in national production chain, because the country is the main world producer of sugar and ethanol. Accordingly, studies are needed that allow an integrated production and technified, and especially that estimates of crops are consistent with the actual production of each region. The objective of this study was to determine the spatial relationship between the productivity of cane sugar and soil electrical conductivity measured by electromagnetic induction. The field experiment was conducted at an agricultural research site located in Goiana municipality, Pernambuco State, north-east of Brazil (Latitude 07 ° 34 '25 "S, Longitude 34 ° 55' 39" W). The surface of the studied field is 6.5 ha, and its mean height 8.5 m a.s.l. This site has been under sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum sp.) monoculture during the last 24 years and it was managed burning the straw each year after harvesting, renewal of plantation was performed every 7 years. Studied the field is located 10 km east from Atlantic Ocean and it is representative of the regional landscape lowlands, whose soils are affected by salinity seawater, sugarcane plantations with the main economical activity. Soil was classified an orthic the Podsol. The productivity of cane sugar and electrical conductivity were measured in 90 sampling points. The productivity of cane sugar was determined in each of the sampling points in plots of 9 m2. The Apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa, mS m-1) was measured with an electromagnetic induction device EM38-DD (Geonics Limited). The equipment consists of two units of measurement, one in a horizontal dipole (ECa-H) to provide effective measurement distance of 1.5 m approximately and other one in vertical dipole (ECa-V) with an effective measurement depth of approximately 0.75 m. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and geostatistical tools. The results showed that productivity in the study area

  18. Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) for electrical conductivity imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; He, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is a recently introduced method for imaging electrical conductivity properties of biological tissue with high spatial resolution close to sonography. In MAT-MI the sample resides in a static magnetic field and a time-varying magnetic stimulation is applied to the sample volume. Through the action of the Lorentz force, the magnetically induced eddy current in the conductive sample causes particle vibrations and generates detectable ultrasound waves. The acoustic signal is then measured around the object to reconstruct images that are related to the object electrical conductivity distribution. The feasibility to reconstruct high spatial resolution conductivity images using MAT-MI method has been demonstrated by both computer simulation and experimental studies. Though MAT-MI technique is still in its developing stage, all the pilot studies suggest that it has potential to become a noninvasive imaging modality for high spatial resolution conductivity imaging of biological tissue and merits further investigations. This paper reviews MAT-MI about its basic theory, reconstruction algorithms and experiment studies. Some technical issues and future research directions are discussed. PMID:19964795

  19. Electric conductivity for laboratory and field monitoring of induced partial saturation (IPS) in sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemiroodsari, Hadi

    Liquefaction is loss of shear strength in fully saturated loose sands caused by build-up of excess pore water pressure, during moderate to large earthquakes, leading to catastrophic failures of structures. Currently used liquefaction mitigation measures are often costly and cannot be applied at sites with existing structures. An innovative, practical, and cost effective liquefaction mitigation technique titled "Induced Partial Saturation" (IPS) was developed by researchers at Northeastern University. The IPS technique is based on injection of sodium percarbonate solution into fully saturated liquefaction susceptible sand. Sodium percarbonate dissolves in water and breaks down into sodium and carbonate ions and hydrogen peroxide which generates oxygen gas bubbles. Oxygen gas bubbles become trapped in sand pores and therefore decrease the degree of saturation of the sand, increase the compressibility of the soil, thus reduce its potential for liquefaction. The implementation of IPS required the development and validation of a monitoring and evaluation technique that would help ensure that the sands are indeed partially saturated. This dissertation focuses on this aspect of the IPS research. The monitoring system developed was based on using electric conductivity fundamentals and probes to detect the transport of chemical solution, calculate degree of saturation of sand, and determine the final zone of partial saturation created by IPS. To understand the fundamentals of electric conductivity, laboratory bench-top tests were conducted using electric conductivity probes and small specimens of Ottawa sand. Bench-top tests were used to study rate of generation of gas bubbles due to reaction of sodium percarbonate solution in sand, and to confirm a theory based on which degree of saturation were calculated. In addition to bench-top tests, electric conductivity probes were used in a relatively large sand specimen prepared in a specially manufactured glass tank. IPS was

  20. Imaging the deep electrical conductivity structure of the Rennick Graben (North Victoria Land, Antartide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armadillo, E.; Tabellario, G.; Bozzo, E.; Caneva, G.

    2003-04-01

    A preliminary interpretation of the electrical conductivity structures beneath the Rennick Graben is presented based on Geomagnetic Depth Soundings (GDS) carried out the BACKTAM expedition (1999/2000). The Rennick Graben is the most important Cenozoic tectonics structure of NVL, a region of dominating NW-SE trending dextral slip. Its formation is framed in the contest of Austalia-Antarctica spreading and its study is fundamental to understanding the recent Meso-Cenozoic tectonics. The GDS provides a view on the internal conductivity distribution, of a region of interest, from measurements of the geomagnetic transient variations at discrete geographical points. In the initial stages of data processing, an advanced robust regression technique proposed by Egbert and Booker (1986), is applied to derive transfer functions used to diagnose the lateral conductivity distribution in the study region. The presentation of the transfer functions in the form of induction arrow helps to identify regions of enhanced conductivity. In this study we have considered the shorter periods, in the range 20-170 s, that are suitable to crustal investigations. The qualitative analysis of the induction arrows reveals an approximately 2D regional electrical conductivity pattern with a clear differentation between the three Terrains crossed by the GDS transect: the Robertson Bay, the Bowers and the Wilson Terrain. For the two dimensional inversion of our data set we have adopted the efficient variant of Siripunvaraporn and Egbert (2000) of the Occam inversion approach. Two dimensional models reveal a deep electrical conductivity anomaly (approximately 20-50 km) on the east side of the Rennick. Lateral discontinuities seem to be related with the Leap Year Fault and the Lanterman Fault on the east and the Daniels Range on the west.

  1. A practical approach to lake water density from electrical conductivity and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, Santiago; Schultze, Martin; Rahn, Karsten; Boehrer, Bertram

    2016-07-01

    Density calculations are essential to study stratification, circulation patterns, internal wave formation and other aspects of hydrodynamics in lakes and reservoirs. Currently, the most common procedure is the use of CTD (conductivity, temperature and depth) profilers and the conversion of measurements of temperature and electrical conductivity into density. In limnic waters, such approaches are of limited accuracy if they do not consider lake-specific composition of solutes, as we show. A new approach is presented to correlate density and electrical conductivity, using only two specific coefficients based on the composition of solutes. First, it is necessary to evaluate the lake-specific coefficients connecting electrical conductivity with density. Once these coefficients have been obtained, density can easily be calculated based on CTD data. The new method has been tested against measured values and the most common equations used in the calculation of density in limnic and ocean conditions. The results show that our new approach can reproduce the density contribution of solutes with a relative error of less than 10 % in lake waters from very low to very high concentrations as well as in lakes of very particular water chemistry, which is better than all commonly implemented density calculations in lakes. Finally, a web link is provided for downloading the corresponding density calculator.

  2. Ac-electrical conductivity of poly(propylene) before and after X-ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaafar, M.

    2001-05-01

    Study on the ac-electrical conductivity of poly(propylene), before and after X-ray irradiation within the temperature range 300-360 K are reported. The measurements have been performed in a wide range of frequencies (from 0 to 10 5 Hz) and under the effect of different X-ray irradiation doses (from 0 to 15 Gy). Cole-Cole diagrams have been used to show the frequency dependence of the complex impedance at different temperatures. The results exhibit semicircles which are consistent with existing equivalent circuit model. Analysis of the results reveal semiconducting features based mainly on a hopping mechanism. The study shows a pronounced effect of X-ray irradiation on the electrical conductivity at zero frequency σDC. At the early stage of irradiation, σDC increased as a result of free radical formation. As the irradiation progressed, it decreased as a result of crosslinking, then it increased again due to irradiation induced degradation, which motivates the generation of mobile free radicals. The study shows that this polymer is one among other polymers which its electrical conductivity is modified by irradiation.

  3. Distribution of Dense and Current-Conducting Matter in the Discharge Channel upon Electrical Explosion of Wires in Vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Tkachenko, Svetlana; Romanova, Vera; Mingaleev, Albert; Ter-Oganesyan, Alexey; Shelkovenko, Tatiana; Pikuz, Sergey

    2009-01-21

    Distribution of dense and current-conducting matter upon electrical wire explosion using electrical, optical, and UV diagnostics was studied. Wires of 25 {mu}m diameter and 12 mm length were exploded in vacuum by 10 kA current pulse having a 50 A/ns rate of current rise.

  4. Electrical conductivity of diopside: evidence for oxygen vacancies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huebner, J.S.; Voigt, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Impedance spectra for two natural single crystals of diopside were obtained at 800 to 1300??C and 1-bar pressure over the frequency range 0.001 Hz to 100 kHz in a system closed to all components but oxygen. At both higher and lower fO2 values, no fO2 dependence of conductivity was observed, indicating the presence of different conduction mechanisms. At temperatures less than 1000??C, the activation energy is 1.3 eV, also suggesting a different conduction mechanism. Thus, at least four regimes are necessary to describe the conductivity of this diopside in T-fO2 space. The approximately -1/(7 ?? 1) value of d(log ??)/d(log fO2) in a high-temperature geologic region suggests a reaction by which oxygen vacancies control the conductivity. This relatively pure diopside is much less conducting than olivine or orthopyroxene. A second diopside with greater Fe content but otherwise similar in composition to the near-end-member diopside, is more conducting, has a smaller activation energy (1.0 eV) over the range 1050 to 1225??C, and shows only a weak negative fO2 dependence; suggesting that oxygen vacancies are present but are not the dominant defect in controlling the conductivity. -from Authors

  5. The Electrical Conductivity Of Partly Ionized Helium Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sreckovic, Vladimir A.; Ignjatovic, Ljubinko; Mihajlov, A. A.

    2007-04-23

    In this paper we analyzed atoms influence on electro conductivity, partially ionized helium plasma, in temperature region 5 000 K - 40 000 K and pressure 0.1 - 10 atm. Electro conductivity was calculated using 'Frost like' formula and Random Phase Approximation method and Semi-Classical (SC) approximation.

  6. Preparation of Electrically Conductive Polystyrene/Carbon Nanofiber Nanocomposite Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Luyi; O'Reilly, Jonathan Y.; Tien, Chi-Wei; Sue, Hung-Jue

    2008-01-01

    A simple and effective approach to prepare conductive polystyrene/carbon nanofiber (PS/CNF) nanocomposite films via a solution dispersion method is presented. Inexpensive CNF, which has a structure similar to multi-walled carbon nanotubes, is chosen as a nanofiller in this experiment to achieve conductivity in PS films. A good dispersion is…

  7. Multi-organ effects of Conducted Electrical Weapons (CEW) -- a review.

    PubMed

    Biria, Mazda; Bommana, Sudharani; Kroll, Mark; Panescu, Dorin; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya

    2010-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Conducted Electrical Weapons (CEW) several studies have been conducted and multiple reports have been published on safety of these devices from a medical point of view. Use of these devices in different situations and reported deaths attracts media attention and causes general anxiety around these devices. These devices have several limitations- such as rate of fire or maximum effective range in comparison to fire arms. Here we wish to review medical publications regarding the safety of these devices based on different systems. PMID:21095915

  8. Different clinical electrodes achieve similar electrical nerve conduction block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boger, Adam; Bhadra, Narendra; Gustafson, Kenneth J.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. We aim to evaluate the suitability of four electrodes previously used in clinical experiments for peripheral nerve electrical block applications. Approach. We evaluated peripheral nerve electrical block using three such clinical nerve cuff electrodes (the Huntington helix, the Case self-sizing Spiral and the flat interface nerve electrode) and one clinical intramuscular electrode (the Memberg electrode) in five cats. Amplitude thresholds for the block using 12 or 25 kHz voltage-controlled stimulation, onset response, and stimulation thresholds before and after block testing were determined. Main results. Complete nerve block was achieved reliably and the onset response to blocking stimulation was similar for all electrodes. Amplitude thresholds for the block were lowest for the Case Spiral electrode (4 ± 1 Vpp) and lower for the nerve cuff electrodes (7 ± 3 Vpp) than for the intramuscular electrode (26 ± 10 Vpp). A minor elevation in stimulation threshold and reduction in stimulus-evoked urethral pressure was observed during testing, but the effect was temporary and did not vary between electrodes. Significance. Multiple clinical electrodes appear suitable for neuroprostheses using peripheral nerve electrical block. The freedom to choose electrodes based on secondary criteria such as ease of implantation or cost should ease translation of electrical nerve block to clinical practice.

  9. 3D imaging of soil apparent electrical conductivity from VERIS data using a 1D spatially constrained inversion algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesús Moral García, Francisco; Rebollo Castillo, Francisco Javier; Monteiro Santos, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Maps of apparent electrical conductivity of the soil are commonly used in precision agriculture to indirectly characterize some important properties like salinity, water, and clay content. Traditionally, these studies are made through an empirical relationship between apparent electrical conductivity and properties measured in soil samples collected at a few locations in the experimental area and at a few selected depths. Recently, some authors have used not the apparent conductivity values but the soil bulk conductivity (in 2D or 3D) calculated from measured apparent electrical conductivity through the application of an inversion method. All the published works used data collected with electromagnetic (EM) instruments. We present a new software to invert the apparent electrical conductivity data collected with VERIS 3100 and 3150 (or the more recent version with three pairs of electrodes) using the 1D spatially constrained inversion method (1D SCI). The software allows the calculation of the distribution of the bulk electrical conductivity in the survey area till a depth of 1 m. The algorithm is applied to experimental data and correlations with clay and water content have been established using soil samples collected at some boreholes. Keywords: Digital soil mapping; inversion modelling; VERIS; soil apparent electrical conductivity.

  10. Effect of small additions of carbon nanotubes on the electrical conductivity of polyurethane elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, G. F.; Rabenok, E. V.; Estrin, Ya. I.; Ol'hov, Yu. A.; Badamshina, E. R.

    2014-10-01

    The effect of small (0.002-0.018 wt %) additions of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the dielectric properties and electrical conductivity of crosslinked polyurethane elastomer is studied in the temperature range of 133-453 K and the 10-3 to 105 Hz range of electric field frequencies. It is shown that the dependence of direct current conductivity σ dc on temperature deviates significantly from the Arrhenius dependence and is described by the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman equation σ dc = σ dc0exp{- DT 0/( T - T 0)}, where T 0 is the Vogel temperature and D is the strength parameter. A correlation is found between the nonmonotonic dependences of the glass transition temperature ( T g), D parameter, and σ dc and the concentration of nanotubes with earlier results for their effects on the physicomechanical characteristics (strength and Young's modulus) of these systems.

  11. Electrical conduction mechanism of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanofiber bundles at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chutia, P.; Kumar, A.

    2015-09-01

    The nature of charge transport mechanism in poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanofiber bundles has been studied as a function of temperature, magnetic field and AC electric field. High-resolution transmission electron micrographs show the formation of nanofibers with an average diameter of 14 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis depicts the enhancement of polymer chains ordering with increasing dopant concentration. Analysis of the temperature dependence of resistivity reveals a three-dimensional variable range hopping electrical conduction mechanism in the synthesized nanofibers system. A large positive magnetoresistance has been observed at low temperature, which shows a decreasing trend with increasing temperature as well as dopant concentration. The high value of positive magnetoresistance at low temperature has been explained by the wave function shrinkage model. The decrease in frequency exponent s with increasing temperature suggests that the AC conduction takes place through correlated barrier hopping mechanism.

  12. Enhancement of local electrical conductivities in SiC by femtosecond laser modification

    SciTech Connect

    Deki, Manato; Ito, Takuto; Yamamoto, Minoru; Tomita, Takuro; Matsuo, Shigeki; Hashimoto, Shuichi; Kitada, Takahiro; Isu, Toshiro; Onoda, Shinobu; Ohshima, Takeshi

    2011-03-28

    Enhancement of local electric conductivities induced by femtosecond laser modification in silicon carbide was studied. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the laser-modified regions were measured between the ion-implanted metal contacts. Interestingly, the resistance sharply decreased in the fluence range from 5.0 to 6.7 J/cm{sup 2}. The resistance at the irradiation fluence of 53 J/cm{sup 2} decreased by more than six orders of magnitude compared with the nonirradiated one. From the I-V characteristics and the scanning electron microscope observations, we conclude that the phase separation associate with the formation of classical laser induced periodic structure causes the drastic increase in electric conductivity.

  13. Mechanical tension and electrical conductivity of liquid crystal filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Oliver H.

    During the NSF funded IRES internship at the Otto-von-Geuricke Univeristy in Magdeburg, Germany, I studied the optical properties and mechanical behavior in the form of line tension of bent-core liquid crystal fiber bundles and verified previously published tension values and temperature dependent behavior. Then, carbon nanotubes were added and it as found that the tension in the fibers decreased by a factor of two instead of increasing as was hoped. A new device for pulling fibers and measuring tension by deflection due to the adhesion of glass beads was built at the LCI. The device was meant to improve upon the device used at O.v.G. Improvements included a smaller heating chamber with better insulation, temperature control, large viewing windows, more stable mounting interface, easier disassembly and the option to quickly modify the device in order to perform a variety of other experiments such as observing behavior due to acoustic driving (based on previous literature), observing optical behavior under a polarizing microscope and introducing probes to measure the electrical properties of fibers. The platform remains modular and makes the addition of new components for carrying out new experiments very simple and straightforward. The addition of carbon nanotubes has scattered results regarding the modulation of fiber tension. It seems that the addition of CNTs to BLC1571 may slightly be decreasing tension while the addition to BLC1688 may be increasing it. In both mesogens, 10wt% CNT yielded the highest tension value above the theoretical surface tension contribution. A reversal of temperature dependence was observed for fibers containing CNT; their tension increased with temperature instead of decreased. A driving rod attached to a speaker was used to acoustically drive a filament of pure BLC1571 in an attempt to replicate the tension values in a different way. The movement of the fiber and the driving rod were captured using a high-speed camera and MATLAB code

  14. The viscosity and electrical conductivity of single molten salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Yizhak

    2016-08-01

    In addition to the well-established Arrhenius-type temperature-dependence of the specific and molar conductivities of molten salts, it turns out that they also depend linearly on the molar volumes, in analogy with the behavior of their fluidities. Similar values of the molar volumes representing the immobilization of the ions result from both kinds of flow phenomena. However, the activation energy for the fluidity is some five times larger than for the conductivity.

  15. Effects of Electric Discharge Plasma Treatment on the Thermal Conductivity of Polymer-Metal Nitride/Carbide Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parali, Levent; Kurbanov, Mirza A.; Bayramov, Azad A.; Tatardar, Farida N.; Sultanakhmedova, Ramazanova I.; Xanlar, Huseynova Gulnara

    2015-11-01

    High-density polymer composites with semiconductor or dielectric fillers such as aluminum nitride (AIN), aluminum oxide (Al2O3), titanium carbide (TiC), titanium nitride (TiN), boron nitride (BN), silicon nitride (Si3N4), and titanium carbonitride (TiCN) were prepared by the hot pressing method. Each powder phase of the composites was exposed to an electric discharge plasma process before composite formation. The effects of the electric discharge plasma process and the filler content (volume fraction) on the thermal conductivity, volt-ampere characteristics, thermally stimulated depolarization current, as well as electrical and mechanical strength were investigated. The results of the study indicate that, with increasing filler volume fraction, the thermal conductivity of the samples also increased. Furthermore, the thermal conductivity, and electrophysical and mechanical properties of the high-density polyethylene + 70% BN composite modified using the electric discharge plasma showed improvement when compared with that without electric discharge plasma treatment.

  16. Effect of Samarium Oxide on the Electrical Conductivity of Plasma-Sprayed SOFC Anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panahi, S. N.; Samadi, H.; Nemati, A.

    2016-05-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are rapidly becoming recognized as a new alternative to traditional energy conversion systems because of their high energy efficiency. From an ecological perspective, this environmentally friendly technology, which produces clean energy, is likely to be implemented more frequently in the future. However, the current SOFC technology still cannot meet the demands of commercial applications due to temperature constraints and high cost. To develop a marketable SOFC, suppliers have tended to reduce the operating temperatures by a few hundred degrees. The overall trend for SOFC materials is to reduce their service temperature of electrolyte. Meanwhile, it is important that the other components perform at the same temperature. Currently, the anodes of SOFCs are being studied in depth. Research has indicated that anodes based on a perovskite structure are a more promising candidate in SOFCs than the traditional system because they possess more favorable electrical properties. Among the perovskite-type oxides, SrTiO3 is one of the most promising compositions, with studies demonstrating that SrTiO3 exhibits particularly favorable electrical properties in contrast with other perovskite-type oxides. The main purpose of this article is to describe our study of the effect of rare-earth dopants with a perovskite structure on the electrical behavior of anodes in SOFCs. Sm2O3-doped SrTiO3 synthesized by a solid-state reaction was coated on substrate by atmospheric plasma spray. To compare the effect of the dopant on the electrical conductivity of strontium titanate, different concentrations of Sm2O3 were used. The samples were then investigated by x-ray diffraction, four-point probe at various temperatures (to determine the electrical conductivity), and a scanning electron microscope. The study showed that at room temperature, nondoped samples have a higher electrical resistance than doped samples. As the temperature was increased, the electrical

  17. Estimating Electrical Conductivities of CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 Using Ion-Oxygen Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaxian; Wang, Lijun; Chou, Kuo-chih

    2016-03-01

    Electrical conductivity of molten slags is one of the most important physicochemical properties and it also has a close relationship to the structure of slag. This article focused on the basic slag system CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 and made estimations for electrical conductivity. Ion-oxygen parameter was selected to describe the relationship between electrical conductivity with compositions. Moreover, the interaction between composition and temperature was embodied in the final model formula. It was shown that increasing CaO and MgO contents enhanced the ability for electric conduction. Moreover, with a higher temperature, the change of electrical conductivity with ion-oxygen parameter was more remarkable. This model gives reasonable prediction of the electrical conductivity for the slags studied with the mean deviation of 14.3%. Thus, this model would provide a feasible tool for industry to predict and optimize the electrical conductivity of slag system.

  18. Electrical Properties of Conductive Cotton Yarn Coated with Eosin Y Functionalized Reduced Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunju; Arul, Narayanasamy Sabari; Han, Jeong In

    2016-06-01

    This study reports the fabrication and investigation of the electrical properties of two types of conductive cotton yarns coated with eosin Y or eosin B functionalized reduced graphene (RGO) and bare graphene oxide (GO) using dip-coating method. The surface morphology of the conductive cotton yarn coated with reduced graphene oxide was observed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Due to the strong electrostatic attractive forces, the negatively charged surface such as the eosin Y functionalized reduced graphene oxide or bare GO can be easily coated to the positively charged polyethyleneimine (PEI) treated cotton yarn. The maximum current for the conductive cotton yarn coated with eosin Y functionalized RGO and bare GO with 20 cycles repetition of (5D + R) process was found to be 793.8 μA and 3482.8 μA. Our results showed that the electrical conductivity of bare GO coated conductive cotton yarn increased by approximately four orders of magnitude with the increase in the dipping cycle of (5D+R) process. PMID:27427672

  19. Superior Electrical Conductivity in Hydrogenated Layered Ternary Chalcogenide Nanosheets for Flexible All-Solid-State Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Shao, Wei; Hang, Xudong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zhu, Wenguang; Xie, Yi

    2016-05-01

    As the properties of ultrathin two-dimensional (2D) crystals are strongly related to their electronic structures, more and more attempts were carried out to tune their electronic structures to meet the high standards for the construction of next-generation smart electronics. Herein, for the first time, we show that the conductive nature of layered ternary chalcogenide with formula of Cu2 WS4 can be switched from semiconducting to metallic by hydrogen incorporation, accompanied by a high increase in electrical conductivity. In detail, the room-temperature electrical conductivity of hydrogenated-Cu2 WS4 nanosheet film was almost 10(10) times higher than that of pristine bulk sample with a value of about 2.9×10(4)  S m(-1) , which is among the best values for conductive 2D nanosheets. In addition, the metallicity in the hydrogenated-Cu2 WS4 is robust and can be retained under high-temperature treatment. The fabricated all-solid-state flexible supercapacitor based on the hydrogenated-Cu2 WS4 nanosheet film shows promising electrochemical performances with capacitance of 583.3 F cm(-3) at a current density of 0.31 A cm(-3) . This work not only offers a prototype material for the study of electronic structure regulation in 2D crystals, but also paves the way in searching for highly conductive electrodes. PMID:27060363

  20. Electrical conductivity of sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) based composite membranes containing sulfonated polyhedral oligosilsesquioxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celso, Fabricio; Mikhailenko, Serguei D.; Rodrigues, Marco A. S.; Mauler, Raquel S.; Kaliaguine, Serge

    2016-02-01

    Composite proton exchange membranes (PEMs) intended for fuel cell applications were prepared by embedding of various amounts of dispersed tri-sulfonic acid ethyl POSS (S-Et-POSS) and tri-sulfonic acid butyl POSS (S-Bu-POSS) in thin films of sulfonated poly ether-ether ketone. The electrical properties of the PEMs were studied by Impedance spectroscopy and it was found that their conductivity σ changes with the filler content following a curve with a maximum. The water uptake of these PEMs showed the same dependence. The investigation of initial isolated S-POSS substances revealed the properties of typical electrolytes, which however in both cases possessed low conductivities of 1. 17 × 10-5 S cm-1 (S-Et-POSS) and 3.52 × 10-5 S cm-1 (S-Bu-POSS). At the same time, the insoluble in water S-POSS was found forming highly conductive interface layer when wetted with liquid water and hence producing a strong positive impact on the conductivity of the composite PEM. Electrical properties of the composites were analysed within the frameworks of effective medium theory and bounding models, allowing to evaluate analytically the range of possible conductivity values. It was found that these approaches produced quite good approximation of the experimental data and constituted a fair basis for interpretation of the observed relationship.

  1. Magnetoacoustic Imaging of Electrical Conductivity of Biological Tissues at a Spatial Resolution Better than 2 mm

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Gang; He, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an emerging approach for noninvasively imaging electrical impedance properties of biological tissues. The MAT-MI imaging system measures ultrasound waves generated by the Lorentz force, having been induced by magnetic stimulation, which is related to the electrical conductivity distribution in tissue samples. MAT-MI promises to provide fine spatial resolution for biological tissue imaging as compared to ultrasound resolution. In the present study, we first estimated the imaging spatial resolution by calculating the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the system point spread function (PSF). The actual spatial resolution of our MAT-MI system was experimentally determined to be 1.51 mm by a parallel-line-source phantom with Rayleigh criterion. Reconstructed images made from tissue-mimicking gel phantoms, as well as animal tissue samples, were consistent with the morphological structures of the samples. The electrical conductivity value of the samples was determined directly by a calibrated four-electrode system. It has been demonstrated that MAT-MI is able to image the electrical impedance properties of biological tissues with better than 2 mm spatial resolution. These results suggest the potential of MAT-MI for application to early detection of small-size diseased tissues (e.g. small breast cancer). PMID:21858111

  2. Doping and Field Dependent Electrical Conductivity of Angle-Resolved Twisted Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lujie; Kim, Cheol-Joo; Tsen, Adam Wei; Brown, Lola; Park, Jiwoong

    2015-03-01

    In twisted bilayer graphene (tBLG), the interlayer interaction induces additional van Hove singularities (VHS) and mini-gaps near the intersections between the Dirac cones of the two layers; this results in several electrical and optical phenomena at an energy level that monotonically increases with the twist angle θ. While there exist previous studies on the electrical and optical properties of tBLG, the electrical conductivity of tBLG and its dependence on the overall doping and interlayer potential (field) have not been measured using tBLG samples with known θ. Here, we report the electrical conductivity of θ-resolved tBLG in a dual-gate field effect transistor geometry which allows an independent control of the doping and interlayer potential. In large θ tBLG, the total conductivity is approximately proportional to the total carrier density (the sum of the carrier number densities from the top and the bottom layers), indicating that large θ tBLG acts as two independent single layers carrying the electrical current in parallel. Among tBLG samples with a small θ, however, we observe an extra resistance peak besides the Dirac point, which may correspond to the minigap near the VHS. In order to perform further experiments for this small- θ tBLG samples, we use a doubletransfer of CVD grown graphene films with a uniform lattice orientation over a large scale. This allows a direct optical characterization in the relevant IR wavelengths, a critical capability for determining and the twist angle θ.

  3. Electrical conductivity and streaming potential coefficient in a moderately alkaline lava series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Froidefond, Thierry

    2003-05-01

    Coupled hydraulic and electrical problems are being investigated with renewed interest in geophysical applications. In this study, electrical conductivity and streaming potential coefficient (SPC) have been measured in the laboratory for crushed oceanite, hawaite, and trachyte samples from an almost complete moderately alkaline lava series from the Mururoa atoll (French Polynesia). For pH varying from 7 to 9.5 and ionic strength varying from 0.1 to 100 mmol/l, despite the closely related mineralogy of the rocks, contrasted results are obtained for the surface conductivity as defined by Revil and Glover: 0.10±0.07 mS/m, 8.3±0.2 mS/m and 1.05±0.16 mS/m for oceanite, hawaite, and trachyte, respectively, and for the inferred ζ potential: -6.6±0.3 mV, -26.3±0.5 mV, and -14.6±0.3 mV, respectively. The higher values obtained with hawaite suggest that electrical properties are controlled by secondary and accessory minerals such as clay minerals and zeolites resulting from low-temperature seawater alteration, rather than by the magmatic differentiation. Furthermore, a synthesis of results obtained with 20 rock samples indicates that signatures of the alteration process may emerge from the study of the ζ potential as a function of surface conductivity. The results with the lava series can be used to derive estimates of the scaling of basalt resistivity and associated SPC as a function of permeability. For permeability values smaller than 10 -15 m 2, the value of the SPC can be dramatically affected by the value of the surface conductivity. At least in the brittle crust, a better knowledge of the contributions of clay minerals and zeolites to surface conduction is therefore needed, both for the interpretation of electrical conductivity profiles and for the estimation of electrical variations associated with groundwater flow, as could be produced for example during volcanic or tectonic cycles.

  4. Combining Proximal and Penetrating Soil Electrical Conductivity Sensors for High Resolution Digital Soil Mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proximal ground conductivity sensors produce high spatial resolution maps that integrate the bulk electrical conductivity (ECa) of the soil profile. Variability in conductivity maps must either be inverted to profile conductivity, or be directly calibrated to profile properties for meaningful interp...

  5. Electrical conductivity of the dusty plasma in the Enceladus plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroshenko, V. V.; Lühr, H.

    2016-11-01

    The plasma conductivity is an important issue for understanding the magnetic field structure registered by Cassini in the Enceladus proximity. We have revise the conductivity mechanism to incorporate the plume nanograins as a new plasma species and take into account the relevant collisional processes including those accounting for the momentum exchange between the charged dust and co-rotating ions. It is concluded that in the Enceladus plume the dust dynamics affects the Pedersen and Hall conductivity more efficiently than the electron depletion associated with the presence of the negatively charged dust as has been suggested by Simon et al. (Simon, S., Saur, J., Kriegel, H., Neubauer, F. M., Motschmann, U., and Dougherty, U. [2011] J. Geophys. Res., 116, A04221, doi:10.1029/2010JA016338). The electron depletion remains a decisive factor for only the parallel conductivity. In the parameter regime relevant for the Enceladus plume, one finds increase of the Pedersen and decrease of the parallel components, whereas for the Hall conductivity the charged dust changes both - its value and the sign. The associated reversed Hall effect depends significantly upon the local dust-to-plasma density ratio. An onset of the reversed Hall effect appears to be restricted to outer parts of the Enceladus plume. The results obtained can significantly modify Enceladus' Alfvén wing structure and thus be useful for interpretations of the magnetic field perturbations registered by the Cassini Magnetometer during the close Enceladus flybys.

  6. Sea salt dependent electrical conduction in polar ice

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.; Paren, J. ); Oerter, H. )

    1992-12-10

    A 45 m length of ice core from Dolleman Island, Antarctic Peninsula has been dielectrically analyzed at 5 cm resolution using the dielectric profiling (DEP) technique. The core has also been chemically analyzed for major ionic impurities. A statistical analysis of the measurements shows that the LF (low frequency) conductivity is determined both by neutral salt and acid concentrations. The statistical relationships have been compared with results from laboratory experiments on ice doped with HF (hydrogen fluoride). Salts (probably dispersed throughout the ice fabric) determine the dielectric conductivity. The salt conduction mechanism is probably due to Bjerrum L defects alone, created by the incorporation of chloride ions in the lattice. Samples of ice from beneath the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf were also measured and display a similar conduction mechanism below a solubility limit of about 400 [mu]M of chloride. The temperature dependence of the neutral salt, acid and pure ice contributions to the LF conductivity of natural ice between [approximately] 70[degrees]C and 0[degrees]C is discussed. These results allow a comprehensive comparison of dielectric and chemical data from natural ice.

  7. Electrical Conductivity Of Diamond Up To 1,200 Degrees C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Jan W.; Zoltan, Leslie D.

    1993-01-01

    Report discusses measurements of electrical conductivities of two synthetic diamond films, three synthetic diamondlike films, and two natural type IIa diamonds at temperatures from ambient to 1,200 degrees C. Measurements performed to compare electrical conductivities of state-of-the-art diamond films with those of natural insulating diamond, particularly at temperatures above 700 degrees C.

  8. Sensing the water content of honey from temperature-dependent electrical conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to predict water content in honey, electrical conductivity was measured on blossom honey types of milk-vetch, jujube and yellow-locust with water content of 18%-37% between 5-40ºC. Regression models of electrical conductivity were developed as functions of water content and temperature. The...

  9. Soil permittivity response to bulk electrical conductivity for selected soil water sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bulk electrical conductivity can dominate the low frequency dielectric loss spectrum in soils, masking changes in the real permittivity and causing errors in estimated water content. We examined the dependence of measured apparent permittivity (Ka) on bulk electrical conductivity in contrasting soil...

  10. Intrinsic electrical conductivity of nanostructured metal-organic polymer chains

    PubMed Central

    Hermosa, Cristina; Vicente Álvarez, Jose; Azani, Mohammad-Reza; Gómez-García, Carlos J.; Fritz, Michelle; Soler, Jose M.; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Gómez-Navarro, Cristina; Zamora, Félix

    2013-01-01

    One-dimensional conductive polymers are attractive materials because of their potential in flexible and transparent electronics. Despite years of research, on the macro- and nano-scale, structural disorder represents the major hurdle in achieving high conductivities. Here we report measurements of highly ordered metal-organic nanoribbons, whose intrinsic (defect-free) conductivity is found to be 104 S m−1, three orders of magnitude higher than that of our macroscopic crystals. This magnitude is preserved for distances as large as 300 nm. Above this length, the presence of structural defects (~ 0.5%) gives rise to an inter-fibre-mediated charge transport similar to that of macroscopic crystals. We provide the first direct experimental evidence of the gapless electronic structure predicted for these compounds. Our results postulate metal-organic molecular wires as good metallic interconnectors in nanodevices. PMID:23591876

  11. Continental growth on Early Earth: Crustal electrical conductivity models of the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckmann, U.; Kutter, S.; De Wit, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Barberton Greenstone Belt (BGB, South Africa) is one of the few Archean remnants where the tectonic evolution of the Early Earth can be studied. The first formation of the crust is a controversially discussed topic among geoscientists. Tectonics on the Early Earth might have been similar to the plate movement and their driving forces that we observe today. However, regarding that some fundamental conditions like the thermal setting were considerably different at this time other processes like vertical mass transport might have played the governing role in tectonics. Therefore contrasting evolutionary models of the BGB exist, mainly based on a number of geological and petrological studies. However, there is only little information on its deeper architecture. For a better understanding of past processes and the character of the tectonic regime which led to the formation of the BGB, magnetotelluric (MT) surveys were carried out as a part of the German-South African Inkaba yeAfrica research initiative. At approximately 200 MT sites aligned along six profiles (approx. 80 to 110 km length) data was collected during two field experiments in 2009 and 2010. The MT method images the electrical conductivity of rocks and is particularly sensitive to imprints of tectonic processes resulting in persistent mineralization e.g. along shear planes. Against the surrounding of significantly conductive geological units like the Phanerozoic Transvaal cover, the rocks of the BGB are generally characterized by high electrical resistivities. Particularly plutons such as the Dalmein Pluton can be traced deeply into the crust. Contrary, faults of the BGB appear as zones of high conductivity down to a depth of 5 to 10 km. We will present 3D inversion results indicating an extension of the plutons of the western BGB beneath the Transvaal cover and a sharp conductivity contrast of the BGB compared to the eastern batholiths. We will discuss existing models of the evolution of the BGB in view

  12. Electrical Conductivity, Thermal Stability, and Lattice Defect Evolution During Cyclic Channel Die Compression of OFHC Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheesh Kumar, S. S.; Raghu, T.

    2015-02-01

    Oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper samples are severe plastically deformed by cyclic channel die compression (CCDC) technique at room temperature up to an effective plastic strain of 7.2. Effect of straining on variation in electrical conductivity, evolution of deformation stored energy, and recrystallization onset temperatures are studied. Deformation-induced lattice defects are quantified using three different methodologies including x-ray diffraction profile analysis employing Williamson-Hall technique, stored energy based method, and electrical resistivity-based techniques. Compared to other severe plastic deformation techniques, electrical conductivity degrades marginally from 100.6% to 96.6% IACS after three cycles of CCDC. Decrease in recrystallization onset and peak temperatures is noticed, whereas stored energy increases and saturates at around 0.95-1.1J/g after three cycles of CCDC. Although drop in recrystallization activation energy is observed with the increasing strain, superior thermal stability is revealed, which is attributed to CCDC process mechanics. Low activation energy observed in CCDC-processed OFHC copper is corroborated to synergistic influence of grain boundary characteristics and lattice defects distribution. Estimated defects concentration indicated continuous increase in dislocation density and vacancy with strain. Deformation-induced vacancy concentration is found to be significantly higher than equilibrium vacancy concentration ascribed to hydrostatic stress states experienced during CCDC.

  13. Electrically conductive gold nanoparticle-chitosan thermosensitive hydrogels for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Baei, Payam; Jalili-Firoozinezhad, Sasan; Rajabi-Zeleti, Sareh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Baharvand, Hossein; Aghdami, Nasser

    2016-06-01

    Injectable hydrogels that resemble electromechanical properties of the myocardium are crucial for cardiac tissue engineering prospects. We have developed a facile approach that uses chitosan (CS) to generate a thermosensitive conductive hydrogel with a highly porous network of interconnected pores. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were evenly dispersed throughout the CS matrix in order to provide electrical cues. The gelation response and electrical conductivity of the hydrogel were controlled by different concentrations of GNPs. The CS-GNP hydrogels were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cultivated for up to 14days in the absence of electrical stimulations. CS-GNP scaffolds supported viability, metabolism, migration and proliferation of MSCs along with the development of uniform cellular constructs. Immunohistochemistry for early and mature cardiac markers showed enhanced cardiomyogenic differentiation of MSCs within the CS-GNP compared to the CS matrix alone. The results of this study demonstrate that incorporation of nanoscale electro-conductive GNPs into CS hydrogels enhances the properties of myocardial constructs. These constructs could find utilization for regeneration of other electroactive tissues. PMID:27040204

  14. Electrically conductive epoxy nanocomposites with expanded graphite/carbon nanotube hybrid fillers prepared by direct hybridization.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lan; Kang, Hyokyung; Lim, Yun-Soo; Lee, Churl Seung; Shin, Kwonwoo; Park, Ji Sun; Han, Jong Hun

    2014-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are generally used to promote the electrical conductivity of the polymer nanocomposites. However, in spite of their superior properties, CNT's high cost has limited their commercial application, so far. Thus, the development of hybrid carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) composed of CNTs and cheaper CNMs such as carbon fibers (CFs), expanded graphites (EGs), and graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) is important in terms of reducing the cost of CNT-based fillers. In this study, we prepared EG/CNT hybrid fillers via direct CNT synthesis on the EG support using modified combustion method and thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, and investigated the electrical conductivity of the expoxy nanocomposite with EG/CNT hybrid fillers. The epoxy nanocomposites with EG/CNT hybrid fillers at 20 wt% filler loading showed 260% and 170% electrical conductivity enhancement in comparison with the EG and the simply mixed EG and CNT fillers, respectively. Our approach provides various applications including electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials, thermal interface materials (TIMs), and reinforced nanocomposites. PMID:25971025

  15. Transparent electrically conducting thin films for spacecraft temperature control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, G.; Heaney, J. B.; Toft, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    Thin transparent films of In2O3 or In2O3 + SnO2 prepared by evaporation or sputtering have been tested for use as surface layers for spacecraft temperature control coatings. The films are intended to prevent nonuniform electric charge buildup on the spacecraft exterior. Film thicknesses of 300 to 500 A were found to be optimal in terms of durability and minimum impact on the solar absorptance and the thermal emissivity of the underlayers. As a verification of their suitability for long-duration space missions, the films were subjected to simulated solar UV plus proton irradiation in a vacuum.

  16. High temperature biowaste resistojets using electrically conducting ceramic heaters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbach, C. R.; Page, R. J.; Short, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Description of the experimental characteristics of a heater for advanced biowaste resistojets, potentially operable to material temperatures of 2400 K in the presence of all of the biowaste gases, with or without oxygen, or in a vacuum. A conservative operating chamber temperature of 2000 K is being considered to ensure a lifetime of thousands of hours. In the small biowaste resistojet sized for 25-mlb (.11 N) of thrust, specific impulses of 200 sec on CO2 and 275 sec on H2O are possible. Typical characteristics for 150 watts of electrical power are 120 V AC at 1.25 A, providing direct adaptability to the space station power systems.

  17. GUIDE FOR CONDUCTING TREATABILITY STUDIES UNDER CERCLA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systematically conducted, well-documented treatability studies are an important component of the removal process, remedial investigation/ feasibility study (RI/FS) process and the remedial design/remedial action (RD/RA) process under the Comprehensive Environmental Response...

  18. Reversible temperature regulation of electrical and thermal conductivity using liquid–solid phase transitions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ruiting; Gao, Jinwei; Wang, Jianjian; Chen, Gang

    2011-01-01

    Reversible temperature tuning of electrical and thermal conductivities of materials is of interest for many applications, including seasonal regulation of building temperature, thermal storage and sensors. Here we introduce a general strategy to achieve large contrasts in electrical and thermal conductivities using first-order phase transitions in percolated composite materials. Internal stress generated during a phase transition modulates the electrical and thermal contact resistances, leading to large contrasts in the electrical and thermal conductivities at the phase transition temperature. With graphite/hexadecane suspensions, the electrical conductivity changes 2 orders of magnitude and the thermal conductivity varies up to 3.2 times near 18 °C. The generality of the approach is also demonstrated in other materials such as graphite/water and carbon nanotube/hexadecane suspensions. PMID:21505445

  19. The Influence of Vesicle Shape and Medium Conductivity on Possible Electrofusion under a Pulsed Electric Field

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Linying; Mao, Zheng; Zhang, Jianhua; Liu, Na; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-01-01

    The effects of electric field on lipid membrane and cells have been extensively studied in the last decades. The phenomena of electroporation and electrofusion are of particular interest due to their wide use in cell biology and biotechnology. However, numerical studies on the electrofusion of cells (or vesicles) with different deformed shapes are still rare. Vesicle, being of cell size, can be treated as a simple model of cell to investigate the behaviors of cell in electric field. Based on the finite element method, we investigate the effect of vesicle shape on electrofusion of contact vesicles in various medium conditions. The transmembrane voltage (TMV) and pore density induced by a pulsed field are examined to analyze the possibility of vesicle fusion. In two different medium conditions, the prolate shape is observed to have selective electroporation at the contact area of vesicles when the exterior conductivity is smaller than the interior one; selective electroporation is more inclined to be found at the poles of the oblate vesicles when the exterior conductivity is larger than the interior one. Furthermore, we find that when the exterior conductivity is lower than the internal conductivity, the pulse can induce a selective electroporation at the contact area between two vesicles regardless of the vesicle shape. Both of these two findings have important practical applications in guiding electrofusion experiments. PMID:27391692

  20. Electrical conductivity and optical properties of tellurium-rich Ge-Sb-Te films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhurkov, V.; Fefelov, S.; Arsova, D.; Nesheva, D.; Kazakova, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Ge-Sb-Te based (GST) films are intensively studied because they are suitable for reversible phase-change storage media. Ge2Sb2Te5 films are most frequently used for memory applications while Te enriched GST films are also promising but not well studied. In this work Te enriched GST films with two different compositions and various thicknesses (120 - 750 nm) were prepared by thermal evaporation of previously synthesized Ge15Sb5Te80 and Ge15Sb15Te70 glasses. Optical transmission and electrical conductivity measurements in sandwich and planar contact configuration were carried out. Temperature measurements of the planar electrical conductivity were performed in the range 77 - 300 K. Values of around 0.7 eV have been determined for the optical band gap of both compositions; the film refractive index is in the range 3.8 - 4.5. The sandwich conductivity is in the interval (2.5 - 5)×10-4 (Ω.cm)-1 while the planar conductivity is around 104 times greater. The obtained results are discussed in terms of existence of an amorphous volume part as well as a crystalline surface layer in the films.

  1. Electrically conductive bulk composites through a contact-connected aggregate.

    PubMed

    Nawroj, Ahsan I; Swensen, John P; Dollar, Aaron M

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a concept that allows the creation of low-resistance composites using a network of compliant conductive aggregate units, connected through contact, embedded within the composite. Due to the straight-forward fabrication method of the aggregate, conductive composites can be created in nearly arbitrary shapes and sizes, with a lower bound near the length scale of the conductive cell used in the aggregate. The described instantiation involves aggregate cells that are approximately spherical copper coils-of-coils within a polymeric matrix, but the concept can be implemented with a wide range of conductor elements, cell geometries, and matrix materials due to its lack of reliance on specific material chemistries. The aggregate cell network provides a conductive pathway that can have orders of magnitude lower resistance than that of the matrix material--from 10(12) ohm-cm (approx.) for pure silicone rubber to as low as 1 ohm-cm for the silicone/copper composite at room temperature for the presented example. After describing the basic concept and key factors involved in its success, three methods of implementing the aggregate into a matrix are then addressed--unjammed packing, jammed packing, and pre-stressed jammed packing--with an analysis of the tradeoffs between increased stiffness and improved resistivity. PMID:24349239

  2. Electrically-conductive Low-Permeability Pressure Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krieg, H. C.

    1982-01-01

    Metal-plated butyl rubber seal has been devised for enclosures of electronic equipment that must be maintained under dry, inert atmosphere. Seal prevents gas leakage over prolonged periods, while conductivity suppresses electromagnetic emissions from sealed equipment. Seal is formed by depositing aluminum or gold onto molded-in-place butyl rubber gasket and surrounding areas of flange.

  3. Electrically Conductive Bulk Composites through a Contact-Connected Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Nawroj, Ahsan I.; Swensen, John P.; Dollar, Aaron M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a concept that allows the creation of low-resistance composites using a network of compliant conductive aggregate units, connected through contact, embedded within the composite. Due to the straight-forward fabrication method of the aggregate, conductive composites can be created in nearly arbitrary shapes and sizes, with a lower bound near the length scale of the conductive cell used in the aggregate. The described instantiation involves aggregate cells that are approximately spherical copper coils-of-coils within a polymeric matrix, but the concept can be implemented with a wide range of conductor elements, cell geometries, and matrix materials due to its lack of reliance on specific material chemistries. The aggregate cell network provides a conductive pathway that can have orders of magnitude lower resistance than that of the matrix material - from 1012 ohm-cm (approx.) for pure silicone rubber to as low as 1 ohm-cm for the silicone/copper composite at room temperature for the presented example. After describing the basic concept and key factors involved in its success, three methods of implementing the aggregate into a matrix are then addressed – unjammed packing, jammed packing, and pre-stressed jammed packing – with an analysis of the tradeoffs between increased stiffness and improved resistivity. PMID:24349239

  4. Electrical conduction of LiF interlayers in organic diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bory, Benjamin F.; Gomes, Henrique L.; Janssen, René A. J.; de Leeuw, Dago M.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.

    2015-04-01

    An interlayer of LiF in between a metal and an organic semiconductor is commonly used to improve the electron injection. Here, we investigate the effect of moderate bias voltages on the electrical properties of Al/LiF/poly(spirofluorene)/Ba/Al diodes by systematically varying the thickness of the LiF layer (2-50 nm). Application of forward bias V below the bandgap of LiF (V < Eg ˜ 14 V) results in reversible formation of an electrical double layer at the LiF/poly(spirofluorene) hetero-junction. Electrons are trapped on the poly(spirofluorene) side of the junction, while positively charged defects accumulate in the LiF with number densities as high as 1025/m3. Optoelectronic measurements confirm the built-up of aggregated, ionized F centres in the LiF as the positive trapped charges. The charged defects result in efficient transport of electrons from the polymer across the LiF, with current densities that are practically independent of the thickness of the LiF layer.

  5. Electrical conduction of LiF interlayers in organic diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Bory, Benjamin F.; Janssen, René A. J.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Gomes, Henrique L.; Leeuw, Dago M. de

    2015-04-21

    An interlayer of LiF in between a metal and an organic semiconductor is commonly used to improve the electron injection. Here, we investigate the effect of moderate bias voltages on the electrical properties of Al/LiF/poly(spirofluorene)/Ba/Al diodes by systematically varying the thickness of the LiF layer (2-50 nm). Application of forward bias V below the bandgap of LiF (V < E{sub g} ∼ 14 V) results in reversible formation of an electrical double layer at the LiF/poly(spirofluorene) hetero-junction. Electrons are trapped on the poly(spirofluorene) side of the junction, while positively charged defects accumulate in the LiF with number densities as high as 10{sup 25}/m{sup 3}. Optoelectronic measurements confirm the built-up of aggregated, ionized F centres in the LiF as the positive trapped charges. The charged defects result in efficient transport of electrons from the polymer across the LiF, with current densities that are practically independent of the thickness of the LiF layer.

  6. Numerical Modeling of Unconsolidated Sediments to Explore Relationships Between Electrical Conductivity and Hydrogeologic Parameters at the Pore-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockett, R.; Pidlisecky, A.

    2009-12-01

    Electrical resistivity (or its inverse, electrical conductivity) is sensitive to hydrologic parameters such as pore fluid conductivity and soil porosity. There exists an empirical petrophysical relationship, Archie’s law, between these parameters and measured conductivity. Archie’s law, or variants thereof, has been used to interpret near-surface unconsolidated sediments with fresh water as a saturating fluid, despite the fact that it was originally developed for analyzing the electrical conductivity logs of clean sedimentary rock saturated with brine. Our study used numerical modeling to explore the relative importance of hydraulic conductivity, porosity, and electrical tortuosity on the measured bulk electrical conductivity of a fresh-water saturated, unconsolidated sediment pack. Simple sphere packs with dimensions of 1cm x 1 cm x 1 cm, and particle sizes ranging from 0.8mm to 1.5mm in diameter, were modeled to simulate unconsolidated core samples. Six disordered packs of various grain size distributions were modeled along with two ordered packs: a simple cubic pack and a hexagonal close pack. Using a finite volume solution to Possion’s equation, we discretized the packs with in excess of 16.5 million voxels and solved for the bulk conductivity of these packs as it would be measured in a lab experiment. By calculating the bulk electrical conductivity of the packs (assuming a fluid conductivity and negligible surface conduction), we investigated the correlation between hydraulic conductivity, porosity, electrical tortuosity, and bulk electrical conductivity. The relative independence of electrical conductivity from hydraulic conductivity was demonstrated for the ordered packs by reducing the grain size while keeping porosity constant. The relationship between porosity and electrical tortuosity was explored using the disordered packs. These packs were systematically decreased in porosity through two simple techniques: (1) a grain-growing algorithm that

  7. D-H Interdiffusion Coefficients in Olivine: Implications for Electrical Conductivity in the Upper Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Frane, W. L.; Tyburczy, J. A.; Sharp, T. G.

    2010-12-01

    Knowledge about hydrogen diffusivity in mantle minerals is critical for understanding point defects and defect dominated processes such as creep and electrical conductivity. Hydrogen chemical diffusion coefficients have been used to constrain diffusivities of small polarons and Mg vacancies (Kohlstedt and Mackwell, 1998). Furthermore chemical diffusion coefficients have been used to calculate hydrogen contribution to electrical conductivity in olivine (Karato, 1990), however hydrogen self diffusion coefficients are more appropriate. In this study we use +{2}H as a traceable species of hydrogen to simulate the process of hydrogen self diffusion. Deuterium (+{2}H, sometimes referred to as D) was interdiffused into hydrogen (+{1}H) saturated, oriented, single crystal San Carlos olivine. We measured +{2}H and +{1}H profiles across samples from each of these experiments and fit interdiffusion coefficients (D_{D-H}). For olivine between 750-900 °C at 2 GPa we measured D_{D-H, [100]} = 10+{(-5.0 +/- 1.4)}*e+{(-135 +/- 30 kJ/mol)/(RT)} m+{2}/s. This value is 1 order of magnitude lower than D_{Exch, [100]}, the chemical diffusion coefficient for +{1}H based redox exchange in San Carlos olivine (Kohlstedt and Mackwell, 1998). Activation energies for D_{Exch, [100]} and D_{D-H, [100]} are very similar. We measured D_{D-H, [001]} = 10+{-12.0 +/- 0.2} m+{2}/s at 900 °C and 2 GPa; however only upper bound estimates for D_{D-H, [010]} and for D_{D-H, [001]} at lower temperatures could be determined with D_{D-H, [010]} D_{D-H, [001]} < 10+{-13} m+{2}/s. From comparison of D_{D-H} and D_{Exch} we calculate small polaron diffusion coefficients associated with redox exchange reactions (D_{h, [100]} = 10+{(-4.9 +/- 1.4)}*e+{(-135 +/- 30 kJ/mol)/(RT)} m+{2}/s) and confirm previous estimates of metal vacancy diffusion coefficients (D_{V(Me)} = D_{Incorp}/3). These +{2}H-+{1}H interdiffusion coefficients are used with the Nernst-Einstein relation to calculate electrical conductivity in

  8. Simultaneous solution for core magnetic field and fluid flow beneath an electrically conducting mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.; Nishihama, Masahiro

    1993-01-01

    The effects of laterally homogeneous mantle electrical conductivity were included in steady, frozen-flux core surface flow estimation along with refinements in method and weighting. The refined method allows simultaneous solution for both the initial radial geomagnetic field component at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and the sub-adjacent fluid motion; it also features Gauss' method for solving the non-linear inverse problem associated with steady motional induction. The tradeoff between spatial complexity of the derived flows and misfit to the weighted Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field models (DGRF's) is studied for various mantle conductivity profiles. For simple flow and a fixed initial geomagnetic condition, a fairly high deep-mantle conductivity performs better than either insulating or weakly conducting profiles; however, a thin, very high conductivity layer at the base of the mantle performs almost as well. Simultaneous solution for both initial geomagnetic field and flow reduces the misfit per degree of freedom even more than does changing the mantle conductivity profile. Moreover, when both core field and flow are estimated, the performance of the solutions and the derived flows become insensitive to the conductivity profile.

  9. Simultaneous solution for core magnetic field and fluid flow beneath an electrically conducting mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Goerte V.; Nishihama, Masahiro

    1994-01-01

    The effects of laterally homogeneous mantle electrical conductivity have been included in steady, frozen-flux core surface flow estimation along with refinements in method and weighting. The refined method allows simultaneous solution for both the initial radial geomagnetic field component at the core-mantle boundary and the subadjacent fluid motion; it also features Gauss' method for solving the nonlinear inverse problem associated with steady motional induction. The trade-off between spatial complexity of the derived flows and misfit to the weighted Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field models is studied for various mantle conductivity profiles. For simple flow and a fixed initial geomagnetic condition a fairly high deep-mantle conductivity performs better than either insulating or weakly conducting profiles; however, a thin, very high conductivity layer at the base of the mantle performs almost as well. Simultaneous solution for both initial geomagnetic field and fluid flow reduces the misfit per degree of freedom even more than does changing the mantle conductivity profile. Moreover, when both core field and flow are estimated, the performance of the solutions and the derived flows become insensitive to the conductivity profile.

  10. Influence of sulphate ion on the electrical conductivity of lithium -boro-phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana Reddy, C.; Chakradhar, R. P. S.

    2009-07-01

    The effect of Li2SO4 on the electrical conductivity of Li2O- B2O3- P2O5 glass system prepared by melt quenching technique has been studied. Frequency and temperature dependent conductivity measurements have been carried out in the frequency range of 10 Hz to 10 MHz and a temperature range of 523 K-603 K respectively. Conductivity in these glasses is governed by the incorporation of lithium salt in the macromolecular structure. It exhibits Arrhenius behavior over the entire temperature range. Addition of Li2SO4 expands the glass network. Consequently the conductivity increases while activation energy decreases. Impedance spectra of these glasses show a single semicircle indicating one type of conduction. The nature of conductivity behavior observed can be explained using Almond-West type power law with a single exponent σ (ω) = σ (0) + A ωs. The power law exponent (s) decreases with temperature. Scaling behavior has also been carried out using the reduced plots of conductivity with frequency, which suggests the ion transport mechanism remains unaffected by temperature and composition.

  11. Simultaneous solution for core magnetic field and fluid flow beneath an electrically conducting mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorhies, Goerte V.; Nishihama, Masahiro

    1994-04-01

    The effects of laterally homogeneous mantle electrical conductivity have been included in steady, frozen-flux core surface flow estimation along with refinements in method and weighting. The refined method allows simultaneous solution for both the initial radial geomagnetic field component at the core-mantle boundary and the subadjacent fluid motion; it also features Gauss' method for solving the nonlinear inverse problem associated with steady motional induction. The trade-off between spatial complexity of the derived flows and misfit to the weighted Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field models is studied for various mantle conductivity profiles. For simple flow and a fixed initial geomagnetic condition a fairly high deep-mantle conductivity performs better than either insulating or weakly conducting profiles; however, a thin, very high conductivity layer at the base of the mantle performs almost as well. Simultaneous solution for both initial geomagnetic field and fluid flow reduces the misfit per degree of freedom even more than does changing the mantle conductivity profile. Moreover, when both core field and flow are estimated, the performance of the solutions and the derived flows become insensitive to the conductivity profile.

  12. Morphology and Electric Conductance Change Induced by Voltage Pulse Excitation in (GeTe)2/Sb2Te3 Superlattices.

    PubMed

    Bolotov, Leonid; Saito, Yuta; Tada, Tetsuya; Tominaga, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Chalcogenide superlattice (SL) phase-change memory materials are leading candidates for non-volatile, energy-efficient electric memory where the electric conductance switching is caused by the atom repositioning in the constituent layers. Here, we study the time evolution of the electric conductance in [(GeTe)2/(Sb2Te3)1]4 SLs upon the application of an external pulsed electric field by analysing the structural and electrical responses of the SL films with scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and scanning probe lithography (SPL). At a low pulse voltage (1.6-2.3 V), a conductance switching delay of a few seconds was observed in some SL areas, where the switch to the high conductance state (HCS) is accompanied with an SL expansion under the strong electric field of the SPM probe. At a high pulse voltage (2.5-3.0 V), the HCS current was unstable and decayed in a few seconds; this is ascribed to the degradation of the HCS crystal phase under excessive heating. The reversible conductance change under a pulse voltage of opposite polarity emphasised the role of the electric field in the phase-transition mechanism. PMID:27618797

  13. Differential fiber-specific block of nerve conduction in mammalian peripheral nerves using kilohertz electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Yogi A.

    2015-01-01

    Kilohertz electrical stimulation (KES) has been shown to induce repeatable and reversible nerve conduction block in animal models. In this study, we characterized the ability of KES stimuli to selectively block specific components of stimulated nerve activity using in vivo preparations of the rat sciatic and vagus nerves. KES stimuli in the frequency range of 5–70 kHz and amplitudes of 0.1–3.0 mA were applied. Compound action potentials were evoked using either electrical or sensory stimulation, and block of components was assessed through direct nerve recordings and muscle force measurements. Distinct observable components of the compound action potential had unique conduction block thresholds as a function of frequency of KES. The fast component, which includes motor activity, had a monotonically increasing block threshold as a function of the KES frequency. The slow component, which includes sensory activity, showed a nonmonotonic block threshold relationship with increasing KES frequency. The distinct trends with frequency of the two components enabled selective block of one component with an appropriate choice of frequency and amplitude. These trends in threshold of the two components were similar when studying electrical stimulation and responses of the sciatic nerve, electrical stimulation and responses of the vagus nerve, and sensorimotor stimulation and responses of the sciatic nerve. This differential blocking effect of KES on specific fibers can extend the applications of KES conduction block to selective block and stimulation of neural signals for neuromodulation as well as selective control of neural circuits underlying sensorimotor function. PMID:25878155

  14. Highly Electrically Conductive Nanocomposites Based on PolymerInfused Graphene Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuanqing; Samad, Yarjan Abdul; Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki; Alhassan, Saeed M.; Liao, Kin

    2014-01-01

    Conductive polymer composites require a threedimensional 3D network to impart electrical conductivity. A general method that is applicable to most polymers for achieving a desirable graphene 3D network is still a challenge. We have developed a facile technique to fabricate highly electrical conductive composite using vacuumassisted infusion of epoxy into graphene sponge GS scaffold. Macroscopic GSs were synthesized from graphene oxide solution by a hydrothermal method combined with freeze drying. The GSepoxy composites prepared display consistent isotropic electrical conductivity around 1Sm, and it is found to be close to that of the pristine GS. Compared with neat epoxy, GSepoxy has a 12ordersofmagnitude increase in electrical conductivity, attributed to the compactly interconnected graphene network constructed in the polymer matrix. This method can be extended to other materials to fabricate highly conductive composites for practical applications such as electronic devices, sensors, actuators, and electromagnetic shielding. PMID:24722145

  15. Doping dependence of electrical and thermal conductivity of nanoscale polyaniline thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jiezhu; Wang, Qing; Haque, M. A.

    2010-05-01

    We performed simultaneous characterization of electrical and thermal conductivity of 55 nm thick polyaniline (PANI) thin films doped with different levels of camphor sulfonic acids (CSAs). The effect of the doping level is more pronounced on electrical conductivity than on thermal conductivity of PANIs, thereby greatly affecting their ratio that determines the thermoelectric efficiency. At the 60% (the molar ratio of CSA to phenyl-N repeat unit of PANI) doping level, PANI exhibited the maximum electrical and thermal conductivity due to the formation of mostly delocalized structures. Whereas polarons are the charge carriers responsible for the electrical conduction, phonons are believed to play a dominant role in the heat conduction in nanoscale doped PANI thin films.

  16. Effect of nanocrystallization on the electrical conductivity enhancement and Moessbauer hyperfine parameters of iron based glasses

    SciTech Connect

    El-Desoky, M.M.; Ibrahim, F.A.; Mostafa, A.G.; Hassaan, M.Y.

    2010-09-15

    Selected glasses of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-PbO{sub 2}-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} system have been transformed into nanomaterials by annealing at temperature close to crystallization temperature (T{sub c}) for 1 h. The effects of the annealing of the present samples on its structural and electrical properties were studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy, transmission electron micrograph (TEM), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and dc conductivity ({sigma}). Moessbauer spectroscopy was used in order to determine the states of iron and its hyperfine structure. The effect of nanocrystalization on the Moessbauer hyperfine parameters did not exhibit significant modifications in present glasses. However, in case of glass ceramic nanocrystals show a distinct decrease in the quadrupole splitting ({Delta}) is observed, reflecting an evident decrease in the distortion of structural units like FeO{sub 4} units. In general, the Moessbauer parameters of the nano-crystalline phase exhibit tendency to increase with PbO{sub 2} content. TEM of as-quenched glasses confirm the homogeneous and essentially featureless morphology. TEM of the corresponding glass ceramic nanocrystals indicates nanocrystals embedded in the glassy matrix with average particle size of about 32 nm. The crystallization temperature (T{sub c}) was observed to decrease with PbO{sub 2} content. The glass ceramic nanocrystals obtained by annealing at T{sub c} exhibit improvement of electrical conductivity up to four orders of magnitude than the starting glasses. This considerable improvement of electrical conductivity after nanocrystallization is attributed to formation of defective, well-conducting phases 'easy conduction paths' along the glass-crystallites interfaces.

  17. Double-Wall Nanotubes and Graphene Nanoplatelets for Hybrid Conductive Adhesives with Enhanced Thermal and Electrical Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Messina, Elena; Leone, Nancy; Foti, Antonino; Di Marco, Gaetano; Riccucci, Cristina; Di Carlo, Gabriella; Di Maggio, Francesco; Cassata, Antonio; Gargano, Leonardo; D'Andrea, Cristiano; Fazio, Barbara; Maragò, Onofrio Maria; Robba, Benedetto; Vasi, Cirino; Ingo, Gabriel Maria; Gucciardi, Pietro Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Improving the electrical and thermal properties of conductive adhesives is essential for the fabrication of compact microelectronic and optoelectronic power devices. Here we report on the addition of a commercially available conductive resin with double-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoplatelets that yields simultaneously improved thermal and electrical conductivity. Using isopropanol as a common solvent for the debundling of nanotubes, exfoliation of graphene, and dispersion of the carbon nanostructures in the epoxy resin, we obtain a nanostructured conducting adhesive with thermal conductivity of ∼12 W/mK and resistivity down to 30 μΩ cm at very small loadings (1% w/w for nanotubes and 0.01% w/w for graphene). The low filler content allows one to keep almost unchanged the glass-transition temperature, the viscosity, and the curing parameters. Die shear measurements show that the nanostructured resins fulfill the MIL-STD-883 requirements when bonding gold-metalized SMD components, even after repeated thermal cycling. The same procedure has been validated on a high-conductivity resin characterized by a higher viscosity, on which we have doubled the thermal conductivity and quadrupled the electrical conductivity. Graphene yields better performances with respect to nanotubes in terms of conductivity and filler quantity needed to improve the resin. We have finally applied the nanostructured resins to bond GaN-based high-electron-mobility transistors in power-amplifier circuits. We observe a decrease of the GaN peak and average temperatures of, respectively, ∼30 °C and ∼10 °C, with respect to the pristine resin. The obtained results are important for the fabrication of advanced packaging materials in power electronic and microwave applications and fit the technological roadmap for CNTs, graphene, and hybrid systems. PMID:27538099

  18. Electrical conductivity of reconstructed Si(111) surface with sodium-doped C{sub 60} layers

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukanov, D. A. Saranin, A. A.; Ryzhkova, M. V.; Borisenko, E. A.; Zotov, A. V.

    2015-01-05

    Electrical conductance of sodium-doped C{sub 60} ultra-thin layers (1–6 monolayers) grown on the Na-adsorbed Si(111)√3 × √3-Au surface has been studied in situ by four-point probe technique, combined with low-energy electron diffraction observations. Evidence of conductance channel formation through the C{sub 60} ultrathin layer is demonstrated as a result of Na dosing of 3 and 6 monolayers thick C{sub 60} layers. The observed changes in surface conductivity can be attributed to the formation of fulleride-like NaC{sub 60} and Na{sub 2}C{sub 60} compound layers.

  19. Electrical properties and conduction mechanism of the NaMg4(PO4)3 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karray, M.; Louati, B.; Guidara, K.; Gargouri, M.

    2016-07-01

    The NaMg4(PO4)3 phosphor was prepared by the conventional high-temperature solid-state reaction. The phase formation of the compound was confirmed by the powder X-ray diffraction. Electrical properties of the compound have been studied using complex impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range 209 Hz-1 MHz and temperature range 648-712 K. The AC conductivity for grain contribution was interpreted using the universal Jonscher's power law. The temperature dependence of frequency exponent s was investigated to understand the conduction mechanism in NaMg4(PO4)3 compound. The non-overlapping small polaron tunneling model can explain the temperature dependence of the frequency exponent, and it was a closely good model to describe the dominant conduction mechanism.

  20. Effect of gases on the temperature dependence of the electric conductivity of CVD multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Buryakov, T. I. Romanenko, A. I.; Anikeeva, O. B.; Kuznetsov, V. L.; Usol'tseva, A. N.; Tkachev, E. N.

    2007-07-15

    The influence of various gaseous media on the temperature dependence of the electric conductivity {sigma} of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) synthesized using the method of catalytical chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been studied. The {sigma}(T) curves were measured in a temperature range from 4.2 to 300 K in helium and its mixtures with air, methane, oxygen, and hydrogen. The introduction of various gaseous components into a helium atmosphere leads to a significant decrease in the conductivity of MWNTs in the interval between the temperatures of condensation and melting of the corresponding gas. Upon a heating-cooling cycle, the conductivity restores on the initial level. It is concluded that a decrease in {sigma} is caused by the adsorption of gases on the surface of nanotubes.

  1. Design of electrical conductive composites: tuning the morphology to improve the electrical properties of graphene filled immiscible polymer blends.

    PubMed

    Mao, Cui; Zhu, Yutian; Jiang, Wei

    2012-10-24

    Polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) blends filled with octadecylamine-functionalized graphene (GE-ODA) have been fabricated to obtain conductive composites with a lower electrical percolation threshold according to the concept of double percolation. The dependence of the electrical properties of the composites on the morphology is examined by changing the proportion of PS and PMMA. Our results reveal that the electrical conductivity of the composites can be optimal when PS and PMMA phases form a cocontinuous structure and GE-ODA nanosheets are selectively located and percolated in the PS phase. For the PS/PMMA blend (50w/50w), the composites exhibit an extremely low electrical percolation threshold (0.5 wt %) because of the formation of a perfect double percolated structure. Moreover, the rheological properties of the composites are also measured to gain a fundamental understanding of the relationship between microstructure and electrical properties. PMID:22950786

  2. Cole-cole analysis and electrical conduction mechanism of N{sup +} implanted polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Chawla, Mahak; Shekhawat, Nidhi; Aggarwal, Sanjeev Sharma, Annu; Nair, K. G. M.

    2014-05-14

    In this paper, we present the analysis of the dielectric (dielectric constant, dielectric loss, a.c. conductivity) and electrical properties (I–V characteristics) of pristine and nitrogen ion implanted polycarbonate. The samples of polycarbonate were implanted with 100 keV N{sup +} ions with fluence ranging from 1 × 10{sup 15} to 1 × 10{sup 17} ions cm{sup −2}. The dielectric measurements of these samples were performed in the frequency range of 100 kHz to 100 MHz. It has been observed that dielectric constant decreases whereas dielectric loss and a.c. conductivity increases with increasing ion fluence. An analysis of real and imaginary parts of dielectric permittivity has been elucidated using Cole-Cole plot of the complex permittivity. With the help of Cole-Cole plot, we determined the values of static dielectric constant (ε{sub s}), optical dielectric constant (ε{sub ∞}), spreading factor (α), average relaxation time (τ{sub 0}), and molecular relaxation time (τ). The I–V characteristics were studied using Keithley (6517) electrometer. The electrical conduction behaviour of pristine and implanted polycarbonate specimens has been explained using various models of conduction.

  3. Modelling of Electrical Conductivity of a Silver Plasma at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Andre; William, Bussiere; Alain, Coulbois; Jean-Louis, Gelet; David, Rochette

    2016-08-01

    During the working of electrical fuses, inside the fuse element the silver ribbon first begins to melt, to vaporize and then a fuse arc appears between the two separated parts of the element. Second, the electrodes are struck and the burn-back phenomenon takes place. Usually, the silver ribbon is enclosed inside a cavity filled with silica sand. During the vaporization of the fuse element, one can consider that the volume is fixed so that the pressure increase appears to reach pressures higher than atmospheric pressure. Thus, in this paper two pressures, 1 atm and 10 atm, are considered. The electrical field inside the plasma can reach high values since the distance between the cathode surface and the anode surface varies with time. That is to say from zero cm to one cm order. So we consider various electrical fields: 102 V/m, 103 V/m, 5×103 V/m, 104 V/m at atmospheric pressure and 105 V/m at a pressure of 10 atm. This study is made in heavy species temperature range from 2,400 K to 10,000 K. To study the plasma created inside the electric fuse, we first need to determine some characteristics in order to justify some hypotheses. That is to say: are the classical approximations of the thermal plasmas physics justified? In other words: plasma frequency, the ideality of the plasma, the Debye-Hückel approximation and the drift velocity versus thermal velocity. These characteristics and assumptions are discussed and commented on in this paper. Then, an evaluation of non-thermal equilibrium versus considered electrical fields is given. Finally, considering the high mobility of electrons, we evaluate the electrical conductivities.

  4. Lorentz force sigmometry: a novel technique for measuring the electrical conductivity of solid and liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhalil, Shatha; Kolesnikov, Yurii; Thess, André

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a novel method to measure the electrical conductivity of solid and molten metals is described. We term the method ‘Lorentz force sigmometry’, where the term ‘sigmometry’ refers to the letter sigma σ, often used to denote the electrical conductivity. The Lorentz force sigmometry method is based on the phenomenon of eddy currents generation in a moving conductor exposed to a magnetic field. Based on Ampere’s law, the eddy currents in turn generate a secondary magnetic field; as a result, the Lorentz force acts to brake the conductor. Owing to Newton’s third law, a measurable force, which is equal to the Lorentz force and is directly proportional to the electrical conductivity of the conductive fluid or solid, acts on the magnet. We present the results of the measurements performed on solids along with the initial measurements on fluids with a eutectic alloy composition of Ga67In20.5Sn12.5; detailed measurements on molten metals are still in progress and will be published in the future. We conducted a series of experiments and measured the properties of known electrical conductive metals, including aluminum and copper, to compute the calibration factor of the device, and then used the same calibration factor to estimate the unknown electrical conductivity of a brass bar. The predicted electrical conductivity of the brass bar was compared with the conductivity measured with a commercial device called ‘SigmaTest’ the observed error was less than 0.5%.

  5. Microstructural Characterization of Base Metal Alloys with Conductive Native Oxides for Electrical Contact Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senturk, Bilge Seda

    Metallic contacts are a ubiquitous method of connecting electrical and electronic components/systems. These contacts are usually fabricated from base metals because they are inexpensive, have high bulk electrical conductivities and exhibit excellent formability. Unfortunately, such base metals oxidize in air under ambient conditions, and the characteristics of the native oxide scales leads to contact resistances orders of magnitude higher than those for mating bare metal surface. This is a critical technological issue since the development of unacceptably high contact resistances over time is now by far the most common cause of failure in electrical/electronic devices and systems. To overcome these problems, several distinct approaches are developed for alloying base metals to promote the formation of self-healing inherently conductive native oxide scales. The objective of this dissertation study is to demonstrate the viability of these approaches through analyzing the data from Cu-9La (at%) and Fe-V binary alloy systems. The Cu-9 La alloy structure consists of eutectic colonies tens of microns in diameter wherein a rod-like Cu phase lies within a Cu6La matrix phase. The thin oxide scale formed on the Cu phase was found to be Cu2O as expected while the thicker oxide scale formed on the Cu6La phase was found to be a polycrystalline La-rich Cu2O. The enhanced electrical conductivity in the native oxide scale of the Cu-9La alloy arises from heavy n-type doping of the Cu2O lattice by La3+. The Fe-V alloy structures consist of a mixture of large elongated and equiaxed grains. A thin polycrystalline Fe3O4 oxide scale formed on all of the Fe-V alloys. The electrical conductivities of the oxide scales formed on the Fe-V alloys are higher than that formed on pure Fe. It is inferred that this enhanced conductivity arises from doping of the magnetite with V+4 which promotes electron-polaron hopping. Thus, it has been demonstrated that even in simple binary alloy systems one

  6. Simple Method for Estimating the Electrical Conductivity of Oxide Melts with Optical Basicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo-Hua; Chou, Kuo-Chih

    2010-02-01

    The electrical conductivity of oxide melts is an important physicochemical property for designing the electric smelting furnaces. Although the data of many slag systems have been measured, the quantitative relationships of electrical conductivity to slag composition and temperature are still limited. In this article, a model is proposed based on the optical basicity corrected for the cations required for the charge balance of {{AlO}}_{ 4}^{ 5- } , in which Arrhenius Law is used to describe the relationship between electrical conductivity and temperature. In this model, the activation energy is expressed as a linear function of the corrected optical basicity. Successful applications to CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 and CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 systems indicate that this model can work well in the electrical conductivity estimation.

  7. Conducted electrical weapons or stun guns: a review of 46 cases examined in casualty.

    PubMed

    Becour, Bertrand

    2013-06-01

    Low-lethality weapons are intended to neutralize a person with maximum security and with minimal risk of injury or death to the user of the weapon, the person arrested, and the witnesses. Under the same circumstances, the use of a firearm is causing mortality of 50%. Marketed since 1974, the Taser X26 is currently staffing services in the French police and gendarmerie. The Taser device has 3 damaging mechanisms: the direct effect of electric current on the tissues, the conversion of electrical energy into thermal energy, and the injuries caused by the general muscle contraction and resulting fall. The study aimed to analyze the specificities of the conducted electrical weapon-related injuries treated in a emergency department on a series of 46 cases. The study population was predominantly middle-aged men. The circumstances of use of the Taser X26 were most often related to an arrest. The frequency of consultation after a shot by Taser X26 was stable. The management is essentially an outpatient because of frequent and benign lesions. The impacts of electrical impulse mainly affect the chest and abdomen. This distribution of impact zones is inhomogeneous, depending on the circumstances of use. PMID:23574872

  8. Impact of a pulsed electric field on damage of plant tissues: effects of cell size and tissue electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Ben Ammar, J; Lanoisellé, J-L; Lebovka, N I; Van Hecke, E; Vorobiev, E

    2011-01-01

    Efficiency of pulsed electric field (PEF) induced permeabilization at 293 K in selected fruit and vegetable plant tissues (apple, potato, carrot, courgette, orange, and banana) at electric field strength (E) of 400 V·cm(-1), 1000 V·cm(-1) and pulse duration (t(p)) of 1000 μs was studied experimentally. The mean cell radius (〈r〉) was within 30 to 60 μm, and the ratio of electrical conductivities of the intact and damaged tissues (σ(i)/σ(d)) was within 0.07 to 0.79 for the studied tissues. Electroporation theory predicts higher damage for tissue with larger cells; however, the direct correlation between PEF damage efficiency and size of cell was not always observed. To explain this anomaly, a theoretical Monte Carlo model was developed and checked for parameters typical for potato tissue. The model showed a strong dependence of PEF damage efficiency and power consumption (W) on σ(i)/σ(d) ratio. The optimum value of electric field strength (E(opt)) was an increasing function of σ(i)/σ(d), and plant tissues with high σ(i)/σ(d) ratio (σ(i)/σ(d) ≈ 1) required application of a rather strong field (for example, E(opt) ≈ 3000 V·cm(-1) for σ(i)/σ(d) ≈ 0.8). However, the PEF treatment at a lower field (E ≈ 400 V·cm(-1)) allowed regulation of the selectivity of damage of cells in dependence of their size. A good qualitative correspondence between experimental data and simulation results were observed. PMID:21535680

  9. Electrical signaling, stomatal conductance, ABA and Ethylene content in avocado trees in response to root hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Gurovich, Luis; Schaffer, Bruce; García, Nicolás; Iturriaga, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) trees are among the most sensitive of fruit tree species to root hypoxia as a result of flooded or poorly drained soil. Similar to drought stress, an early physiological response to root hypoxia in avocado is a reduction of stomatal conductance. It has been previously determined in avocado trees that an extracellular electrical signal between the base of stem and leaves is produced and related to reductions in stomatal conductance in response to drought stress. The current study was designed to determine if changes in the extracellular electrical potential between the base of the stem and leaves in avocado trees could also be detected in response to short-term (min) or long-term (days) root hypoxia, and if these signals could be related to stomatal conductance (gs), root and leaf ABA and ACC concentrations, ethylene emission from leaves and leaf abscission. In contrast to previous observations for drought-stressed trees, short-term or long-term root hypoxia did not stimulate an electrical potential difference between the base of the stem and leaves. Short-term hypoxia did not result in a significant decrease in gs compared with plants in the control treatment, and no differences in ABA concentration were found between plants subjected to hypoxia and control plants. Long-term hypoxia in the root zone resulted in a significant decrease in gs, increased leaf ethylene and increased leaf abscission. The results indicate that for avocado trees exposed to root hypoxia, electrical signals do not appear to be the primary root-to-shoot communication mechanism involved in signaling for stomatal closure as a result of hypoxia in the root zone. PMID:19649181

  10. Electrical conductivity of the polycrystalline films of p-terphenyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkaczyk, S. W.

    1999-04-01

    Some results of p-terphenyl thin films investigations are presented. The mechanism of DC conductivity within unordered polycrystalline structures of p-terphenyl was investigated. The measurements were carried out for p-terphenyl films' thickness varying from 2 micrometers up to 15 micrometers . During the experiment the polarization voltage and temperature were changed from 0 to 200 V and 15 to 325 K, respectively. The p-terphenyl films were supplied with gold and aluminum electrodes. The obtained results and their analysis indicate that the injection of charge from the electrodes into the area of the investigated material proceeds by field- and thermoemission. The charge transport through the material's bulk is controlled by traps (hopping mechanism and Poole- Frenkel phenomenon). The determined values of the activation energy are in the range of kT (for the hopping area at low temperatures) through 0.06 eV in the range of 100 - 200 K to about 0.6 eV in the metallic conductivity area (220 - 320 K).

  11. An emulsion polymerization process for soluble and electrically conductive polyaniline

    SciTech Connect

    Kinlen, P.J.; Ding, Y.; Graham, C.R.; Liu, J.; Remsen, E.E.

    1998-07-01

    A new emulsion process has been developed for the direct synthesis of the emeraldine salt of polyaniline (PANI) that is soluble in organic solvents. The process entails forming an emulsion composed of water, a water soluble organic solvent (e.g., 2-butoxyethanol), a water insoluble organic acid (e.g., dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid) and aniline. Aniline is protonated by the organic acid to form a salt which partitions into the organic phase. As oxidant (ammonium peroxydisulfate) is added, PANI salt forms in the organic phase and remains soluble. As the reaction proceeds, the reaction mixture changes from an emulsion to a two phase system, the soluble PANI remaining in the organic phase. With dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid (DNNSA) as the organic acid, the resulting product is truly soluble in organic solvents such as xylene and toluene (not a dispersion), of high molecular weight (M{sub w} > 22,000), film forming and miscible with many polymers such as polyurethanes, epoxies and phenoxy resins. As cast, the polyaniline film is only moderately conductive, (10{sup {minus}5} S/cm), however treatment of the film with surfactants such as benzyltriethylammonium chloride (BTEAC) or low molecular weight alcohols and ketones such as methanol and acetone increases the conductivity 2--3 orders of magnitude.

  12. Enhanced Electrical Conductivity of Aluminum by Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Dilution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stigers, Shelby; Savadelis, Alexader; Carruba, Kathryn; Johns, Kiley; Adu, Kofi

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been recognized as potential candidate for reinforcements in lightweight metals. A composite consisting of CNTs embedded in an Al-matrix might work as an ultra-low-resistive material with the potential of having a room-temperature resistivity far below Al, Cu and Ag. While several advances have been made in developing Al-CNT composites, three major challenges: (1) interfacial bond strength between CNT and the Al matrix, (2) homogeneous dispersion of the CNTs in the Al matrix and impurity (CNTs) scattering centers, continue to limit progress in Al-CNT composites. Several conventional methods including powder metallurgy, melting and solidification, thermal spray and electrochemical deposition have been used to process Al and CNT to form composites. We present preliminary results that address these challenges and demonstrate the fabrication of easily drawable Al-CNT composites into wires of diameter <= 1.0mm with ~ 18% +/- 2% reduction in the electrical resistivity of Al-CNT composite using CNT-hybrid as reinforcement and an inductive melting technique that takes advantage of the induced eddy current in the melt to provide in-situ stirring. This Work is Supported by Penn State Altoona Undergraduate Research Sponsored Program and Penn State Materials Research Institute, University Park.

  13. Complex electrical conductivity model, influence of surface conductivity and new strategies for the inversion of resistivity and induced polarization data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.; Karaoulis, M.; Jardani, A.

    2013-12-01

    I have developed a simple yet powerful model named POLARIS to explain the electrical conductivity of porous materials including the effect of polarization of the grains. I show that surface conductivity cannot be neglected even for field applications in clean (clay-free) materials but that surface conductivity can be accurately predicted from the quadrature conductivity. The model can also be used to predict reasonably well the permeability and can be used in joint inversion strategies to help hydraulic tomography. I will present the theory, laboratory data (with a variety of clayey and non-clayey rocks and soils), and field data. I will also discuss how electrical resistivity, induced polarization, and self-potential data can be used in concert to infer more information on preferential ground water flow paths. Here again several field examples will be discussed to a variety of case studies relevant to groundwater evaluation and management problems.

  14. Simultaneous measurement of electrical conductance and thermopower of single benzenedithiol molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Satoshi; Nakamura, Yuuga; Matsushita, Ryuuji; Marqués-González, Santiago; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2015-06-01

    We have developed a system for the simultaneous measurement of electrical conductance and thermopower of the single benzenedithiol (BDT) molecular junction, which was characterized by inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy, at low temperature. The simultaneous measurements revealed a negative correlation between the electrical conductance and the thermopower. Strong metal-molecule coupling at the single BDT molecular junction leads to high conductance and low thermopower because of the broadening of the conduction orbital, which explains the negative correlation. The observed fluctuation in conductance and thermopower reflects the change in the metal-molecule contact configuration and molecular orientation.

  15. Substituent effects on the electrical conductivities of the phenazine derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugimoto, A.; Furuyama, S.; Inoue, H.; Imoto, E.

    1984-01-01

    The and/or photoconductivities of 16 substituted phenazines having methoxy, hydroxy, chloro, nitro, amino or t-butyl group at 1-, 2-, 1, 6- or 2,7- positions of the phenazine ring measured by using the surface type cells. The energy gaps of the dark conductivities in the range 2.0 to 2.3 were independent of the kinds and the positions of the substituent groups, although the photo-absorption wavelength of the evaporated films changed with them. No correlation between photoconductivity and fluorescence was observed. The photocurrent was affected by the position of the substituents; namely, the photocurrents of the 1,6-di-substituted phenazines. When the substituent at 1,6-positions was hydroxy or amino group, however, the photocurrents decreased. The photocurrents decreased drastically in the presence of oxygen.

  16. Seebeck effect influence on joule heat evolution in electrically conductive silicate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiala, Lukáš; Medved, Igor; Maděra, Jiří; Černý, Robert

    2016-07-01

    In general, silicate building materials are non-conductive matters that are not able to evolve heat when they are subjected to an external voltage. However, the electrical conductivity can be increased by addition of electrically conductive admixtures in appropriate amount which leads to generation of conductive paths in materials matrix. Such enhanced materials can evolve Joule heat and are utilizable as a core of self-heating or snow-melting systems. In this paper, Joule heat evolution together with Seebeck effect in electrically conductive silicate materials was taken into consideration and the model based on heat equation with included influence of DC electric field was proposed. Besides, a modeling example of heating element was carried out on FEM basis and time development of temperature in chosen surface points was expressed in order to declare ability of such system to be applicable.

  17. In situ electrical conductivity measurements of H2O under static pressure up to 28 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bao; Gao, Yang; Han, Yonghao; Ma, Yanzhang; Gao, Chunxiao

    2016-08-01

    The in situ electrical conductivity measurements on water in both solid state and liquid state were performed under pressure up to 28 GPa and temperature from 77 K to 300 K using a microcircuit fabricated on a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Water chemically ionization mainly contributes to electrical conduction in liquid state, which is in accord with the results obtained under dynamic pressure. Energy band theory of liquid water was used to understand effect of static pressure on electrical conduction of water. The electric conductivity of H2O decreased discontinuously by four orders of magnitude at 0.7-0.96 GPa, indicating water frozen at this P-T condition. Correspondingly, the conduction of H2O in solid state is determined by arrangement and bending of H-bond in ice VI and ice VII. Based on Jaccard theory, we have concluded that the charge carriers of ice are already existing ions and Bjerrum defects.

  18. Electrically conductive strain sensing polyurethane nanocomposites with synergistic carbon nanotubes and graphene bifillers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hu; Gao, Jiachen; Huang, Wenju; Dai, Kun; Zheng, Guoqiang; Liu, Chuntai; Shen, Changyu; Yan, Xingru; Guo, Jiang; Guo, Zhanhu

    2016-07-14

    Thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) based conductive polymer composites (CPCs) with a reduced percolation threshold and tunable resistance-strain sensing behavior were obtained through the addition of synergistic carbon nanotubes (CNT) and graphene bifillers. The percolation threshold of graphene was about 0.006 vol% when the CNT content was fixed at 0.255 vol% that is below the percolation threshold of CNT/TPU nanocomposites. The synergistic effect between graphene and CNT was identified using the excluded volume theory. Graphene acted as a 'spacer' to separate the entangled CNTs from each other and the CNT bridged the broad gap between individual graphene sheets, which was beneficial for the dispersion of CNT and formation of effective conductive paths, leading to better electrical conductivity at a lower conductive filler content. Compared with the dual-peak response pattern of the CNT/TPU based strain sensors, the CPCs with hybrid conductive fillers displayed single-peak response patterns under small strain, indicating good tunability with the synergistic effect of CNT and graphene. Under larger strain, prestraining was adopted to regulate the conductive network, and better tunable single-peak response patterns were also obtained. The CPCs also showed good reversibility and reproductivity under cyclic extension. This study paves the way for the fabrication of CPC based strain sensors with good tunability. PMID:27304516

  19. Electrical conduction and photoresponses of gamma-ray-irradiated single-stranded DNA/single-walled carbon nanotube composite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, W.; Lee, E. M.; Kim, D. W.; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2015-04-01

    Effects of gamma-ray irradiation on the electrical conductivity and photoresponse have been studied for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) composite films. The temperature-dependent electrical conductivity of the ssDNA/SWNT composite films, well described by a fluctuation-induced tunneling model, indicated modification of the barrier for thermally activated conduction by the gamma-ray irradiation. Besides, the photoresponse measurements indicated modified photoexcited charge carrier generation and oxygen photodesorption in the composite systems due to the gamma-ray irradiation.

  20. Electrical conductivity of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 Perovskite and a Perovskite-dominated assemblage at lower mantle conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaoyuan; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1987-01-01

    Electrical conductivity measurements of Perovskite and a Perovskite-dominated assemblage synthesized from pyroxene and olivine demonstrate that these high-pressure phases are insulating to pressures of 82 GPa and temperatures of 4500 K. Assuming an anhydrous upper mantle composition, the result provides an upper bound of 0.01 S/m for the electrical conductivity of the lower mantle between depths of 700 and 1900 km. This is 2 to 4 orders of magnitude lower than previous estimates of lower-mantle conductivity derived from studies of geomagnetic secular variations.