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Sample records for electrical neuroimaging evidence

  1. Ventral and dorsal visual pathways support auditory motion processing in the blind: evidence from electrical neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Lewald, Jörg; Getzmann, Stephan

    2013-10-01

    Blindness induces processes of neural plasticity, resulting in recruitment of the deafferentated visual areas for non-visual sensory functions. These processes are related to superior abilities of blind compared with sighted individuals for specific auditory and tactile tasks. Recently, an exceptional performance of the blind has been demonstrated for auditory motion perception, with a minimum audible movement angle that was half that of sighted controls (J. Lewald (2013) Neuropsychologia, 51, 181-186). The present study revealed an electrophysiological correlate of this finding by analysing the so-called motion-onset response, a prominent auditory-evoked potential to the onset of motion. The cN1 component of this response, appearing about 170 ms after motion onset, was two times higher in amplitude for blind compared with matched sighted control subjects. At the time of the cN1, electrical neuroimaging using sLORETA revealed stronger activation in blind than sighted subjects primarily in ventral visual areas (V1v, V2v, VP, V4v) of the right occipital lobe. Activation was also obtained in middle temporal area V5. These findings suggest that blindness results in stronger involvement of both non-motion areas of the ventral visual stream and motion areas of the dorsal visual stream in processing of auditory motion at the same point in time after motion onset. This argues against the view that visual motion areas, such as area V5, are preferentially recruited for auditory motion analysis in the blind. Rather, cross-modal reorganization of cortical areas induced by blindness seems to be largely independent of the specific visual functions of the same areas in sighted persons. PMID:23859484

  2. Understanding the impact of TV commercials: electrical neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Vecchiato, Giovanni; Kong, Wanzeng; Maglione, Anton Giulio; Wei, Daming

    2012-01-01

    Today, there is a greater interest in the marketing world in using neuroimaging tools to evaluate the efficacy of TV commercials. This field of research is known as neuromarketing. In this article, we illustrate some applications of electrical neuroimaging, a discipline that uses electroencephalography (EEG) and intensive signal processing techniques for the evaluation of marketing stimuli. We also show how the proper usage of these methodologies can provide information related to memorization and attention while people are watching marketing-relevant stimuli. We note that temporal and frequency patterns of EEG signals are able to provide possible descriptors that convey information about the cognitive process in subjects observing commercial advertisements (ads). Such information could be unobtainable through common tools used in standard marketing research. Evidence of this research shows how EEG methodologies could be employed to better design new products that marketers are going to promote and to analyze the global impact of video commercials already broadcast on TV. PMID:22678840

  3. Linking Essential Tremor to the Cerebellum-Neuroimaging Evidence.

    PubMed

    Cerasa, Antonio; Quattrone, Aldo

    2016-06-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is the most common pathological tremor disorder in the world, and post-mortem evidence has shown that the cerebellum is the most consistent area of pathology in ET. In the last few years, advanced neuroimaging has tried to confirm this evidence. The aim of the present review is to discuss to what extent the evidence provided by this field of study may be generalised. We performed a systematic literature search combining the terms ET with the following keywords: MRI, VBM, MRS, DTI, fMRI, PET and SPECT. We summarised and discussed each study and placed the results in the context of existing knowledge regarding the cerebellar involvement in ET. A total of 51 neuroimaging studies met our search criteria, roughly divided into 19 structural and 32 functional studies. Despite clinical and methodological differences, both functional and structural imaging studies showed similar findings but without defining a clear topography of neurodegeneration. Indeed, the vast majority of studies found functional and structural abnormalities in several parts of the anterior and posterior cerebellar lobules, but it remains to be established to what degree these neural changes contribute to clinical symptoms of ET. Currently, advanced neuroimaging has confirmed the involvement of the cerebellum in pathophysiological processes of ET, although a high variability in results persists. For this reason, the translation of this knowledge into daily clinical practice is again partially limited, although new advanced multivariate neuroimaging approaches (machine-learning) are proving interesting changes of perspective. PMID:26626626

  4. A cognitive neurobiological account of deception: evidence from functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Sean A; Hunter, Mike D; Farrow, Tom F D; Green, Russell D; Leung, David H; Hughes, Catherine J; Ganesan, Venkatasubramanian

    2004-01-01

    An organism may use misinformation, knowingly (through deception) or unknowingly (as in the case of camouflage), to gain advantage in a competitive environment. From an evolutionary perspective, greater tactical deception occurs among primates closer to humans, with larger neocortices. In humans, the onset of deceptive behaviours in childhood exhibits a developmental trajectory, which may be regarded as 'normal' in the majority and deficient among a minority with certain neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g. autism). In the human adult, deception and lying exhibit features consistent with their use of 'higher' or 'executive' brain systems. Accurate detection of deception in humans may be of particular importance in forensic practice, while an understanding of its cognitive neurobiology may have implications for models of 'theory of mind' and social cognition, and societal notions of responsibility, guilt and mitigation. In recent years, functional neuroimaging techniques (especially functional magnetic resonance imaging) have been used to study deception. Though few in number, and using very different experimental protocols, studies published in the peer-reviewed literature exhibit certain consistencies. Attempted deception is associated with activation of executive brain regions (particularly prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices), while truthful responding has not been shown to be associated with any areas of increased activation (relative to deception). Hence, truthful responding may comprise a relative 'baseline' in human cognition and communication. The subject who lies may necessarily engage 'higher' brain centres, consistent with a purpose or intention (to deceive). While the principle of executive control during deception remains plausible, its precise anatomy awaits elucidation. PMID:15590616

  5. The Human Amygdala and Pain: Evidence from Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Laura; Moulton, Eric A.; Linnman, Clas; Carpino, Elizabeth; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2014-01-01

    The amygdala, a small deep brain structure involved in behavioral processing through interactions with other brain regions, has garnered increased attention in recent years in relation to pain processing. As pain is a multidimensional experience that encompasses physical sensation, affect, and cognition, the amygdala is well suited to play a part in this process. Multiple neuroimaging studies of pain in humans have reported activation in the amygdala. Here we summarize these studies by performing a coordinate-based meta-analysis within experimentally induced and clinical pain studies using an activation likelihood estimate analysis. The results are presented in relation to locations of peak activation within and outside of amygdala subregions. The majority of studies identified coordinates consistent with human amygdala cytoarchitecture indicating reproducibility in neuroanatomical labeling across labs, analysis methods, and imaging modalities. Differences were noted between healthy and clinical pain studies: in clinical pain studies, peak activation was located in the laterobasal region, suggestive of the cognitive-affective overlay present among individuals suffering from chronic pain; while the less understood superficial region of the amygdala was prominent among experimental pain studies. Taken together, these findings suggest several important directions for further research exploring the amygdala’s role in pain processing. PMID:23097300

  6. The human amygdala and pain: evidence from neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Simons, Laura E; Moulton, Eric A; Linnman, Clas; Carpino, Elizabeth; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2014-02-01

    The amygdala, a small deep brain structure involved in behavioral processing through interactions with other brain regions, has garnered increased attention in recent years in relation to pain processing. As pain is a multidimensional experience that encompasses physical sensation, affect, and cognition, the amygdala is well suited to play a part in this process. Multiple neuroimaging studies of pain in humans have reported activation in the amygdala. Here, we summarize these studies by performing a coordinate-based meta-analysis within experimentally induced and clinical pain studies using an activation likelihood estimate analysis. The results are presented in relation to locations of peak activation within and outside of amygdala subregions. The majority of studies identified coordinates consistent with human amygdala cytoarchitecture indicating reproducibility in neuroanatomical labeling across labs, analysis methods, and imaging modalities. Differences were noted between healthy and clinical pain studies: in clinical pain studies, peak activation was located in the laterobasal region, suggestive of the cognitive-affective overlay present among individuals suffering from chronic pain; while the less understood superficial region of the amygdala was prominent among experimental pain studies. Taken together, these findings suggest several important directions for further research exploring the amygdala's role in pain processing. PMID:23097300

  7. Gene X Environment Interactions in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: Evidence from Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Geoffroy, Pierre Alexis; Etain, Bruno; Houenou, Josselin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Schizophrenia (SZ) and Bipolar disorder (BD) are considered as severe multifactorial diseases, stemming from genetic and environmental influences. Growing evidence supports gene x environment (GxE) interactions in these disorders and neuroimaging studies can help us to understand how those factors mechanistically interact. No reviews synthesized the existing data of neuroimaging studies in these issues. Methods: We conduct a systematic review on the neuroimaging studies exploring GxE interactions relative to SZ or BD in PubMed. Results: First results of the influence of genetic and environmental risks on brain structures came from monozygotic twin pairs concordant and discordant for SZ or BD. Few structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) studies have explored the GxE interactions. No other imaging methods were found. Two main GxE interactions on brain volumes have arisen. First, an interaction between genetic liability to SZ and obstetric complications on gray matter, cerebrospinal fluid, and hippocampal volumes. Second, cannabis use and genetic liability interaction effects on cortical thickness and white matter volumes. Conclusion: Combining GxE interactions and neuroimaging domains is a promising approach. Genetic risk and environmental exposures such as cannabis or obstetrical complications seem to interact leading to specific neuroimaging cerebral alterations in SZ. They are suggestive of GxE interactions that confer phenotypic abnormalities in SZ and possibly BD. We need further, larger neuroimaging studies of GxE interactions for which we may propose a framework focusing on GxE interactions data already known to have a clinical effect such as infections, early stress, urbanicity, and substance abuse. PMID:24133464

  8. State dependency of inhibitory control performance: an electrical neuroimaging study.

    PubMed

    De Pretto, Michael; Sallard, Etienne; Spierer, Lucas

    2016-07-01

    Behavioral and brain responses to stimuli not only depend on their physical features but also on the individuals' neurocognitive states before stimuli onsets. While the influence of pre-stimulus fluctuations in brain activity on low-level perceptive processes is well established, the state dependency of high-order executive processes remains unclear. Using a classical inhibitory control Go/NoGo task, we examined whether and how fluctuations in the brain activity during the period preceding the stimuli triggering inhibition influenced inhibitory control performance. Seventeen participants completed the Go/NoGo task while 64-channel electroencephalogram was recorded. We compared the event-related potentials preceding the onset of the NoGo stimuli associated with inhibition failures false alarms (FA) vs. successful inhibition correct rejections (CR) with data-driven statistical analyses of global measures of the topography and strength of the scalp electric field. Distributed electrical source estimations were used to localize the origin of the event-related potentials modulations. We observed differences in the global field power of the event-related potentials (FA > CR) without concomitant topographic modulations over the 40 ms period immediately preceding NoGo stimuli. This result indicates that the same brain networks were engaged in the two conditions, but more strongly before FA than CR. Source estimations revealed that this effect followed from a higher activity before FA than CR within bilateral inferior frontal gyri and the right inferior parietal lobule. These findings suggest that uncontrolled quantitative variations in pre-stimulus activity within attentional and control brain networks influence inhibition performance. The present data thereby demonstrate the state dependency of cognitive processes of up to high-order executive levels. PMID:27116703

  9. Neuroimaging evidence of deficient axon myelination in Wolfram syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lugar, Heather M.; Koller, Jonathan M.; Rutlin, Jerrel; Marshall, Bess A.; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Urano, Fumihiko; Bischoff, Allison N.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Hershey, Tamara; Austin, P.; Beato, B.; Bihun, E.; Doty, T.; Earhart, G.; Eisenstein, S.; Hoekel, J.; Karzon, R.; Licis, A.; Manwaring, L.; Paciorkowski, A. R.; Pepino de Gruev, Y.; Permutt, A.; Pickett, K.; Ranck, S.; Reiersen, A.; Tychsen, L.; Viehoever, A.; Wasson, J.; White, N. H.

    2016-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease characterized by insulin dependent diabetes and vision, hearing and brain abnormalities which generally emerge in childhood. Mutations in the WFS1 gene predispose cells to endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis and may induce myelin degradation in neuronal cell models. However, in vivo evidence of this phenomenon in humans is lacking. White matter microstructure and regional volumes were measured using magnetic resonance imaging in children and young adults with Wolfram syndrome (n = 21) and healthy and diabetic controls (n = 50). Wolfram patients had lower fractional anisotropy and higher radial diffusivity in major white matter tracts and lower volume in the basilar (ventral) pons, cerebellar white matter and visual cortex. Correlations were found between key brain findings and overall neurological symptoms. This pattern of findings suggests that reduction in myelin is a primary neuropathological feature of Wolfram syndrome. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-related dysfunction in Wolfram syndrome may interact with the development of myelin or promote degeneration of myelin during the progression of the disease. These measures may provide objective indices of Wolfram syndrome pathophysiology that will be useful in unraveling the underlying mechanisms and in testing the impact of treatments on the brain. PMID:26888576

  10. Neuroimaging evidence of deficient axon myelination in Wolfram syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lugar, Heather M; Koller, Jonathan M; Rutlin, Jerrel; Marshall, Bess A; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Urano, Fumihiko; Bischoff, Allison N; Shimony, Joshua S; Hershey, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease characterized by insulin dependent diabetes and vision, hearing and brain abnormalities which generally emerge in childhood. Mutations in the WFS1 gene predispose cells to endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis and may induce myelin degradation in neuronal cell models. However, in vivo evidence of this phenomenon in humans is lacking. White matter microstructure and regional volumes were measured using magnetic resonance imaging in children and young adults with Wolfram syndrome (n = 21) and healthy and diabetic controls (n = 50). Wolfram patients had lower fractional anisotropy and higher radial diffusivity in major white matter tracts and lower volume in the basilar (ventral) pons, cerebellar white matter and visual cortex. Correlations were found between key brain findings and overall neurological symptoms. This pattern of findings suggests that reduction in myelin is a primary neuropathological feature of Wolfram syndrome. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-related dysfunction in Wolfram syndrome may interact with the development of myelin or promote degeneration of myelin during the progression of the disease. These measures may provide objective indices of Wolfram syndrome pathophysiology that will be useful in unraveling the underlying mechanisms and in testing the impact of treatments on the brain. PMID:26888576

  11. Learning-induced plasticity in auditory spatial representations revealed by electrical neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Spierer, Lucas; Tardif, Eric; Sperdin, Holger; Murray, Micah M; Clarke, Stephanie

    2007-05-16

    Auditory spatial representations are likely encoded at a population level within human auditory cortices. We investigated learning-induced plasticity of spatial discrimination in healthy subjects using auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs) and electrical neuroimaging analyses. Stimuli were 100 ms white-noise bursts lateralized with varying interaural time differences. In three experiments, plasticity was induced with 40 min of discrimination training. During training, accuracy significantly improved from near-chance levels to approximately 75%. Before and after training, AEPs were recorded to stimuli presented passively with a more medial sound lateralization outnumbering a more lateral one (7:1). In experiment 1, the same lateralizations were used for training and AEP sessions. Significant AEP modulations to the different lateralizations were evident only after training, indicative of a learning-induced mismatch negativity (MMN). More precisely, this MMN at 195-250 ms after stimulus onset followed from differences in the AEP topography to each stimulus position, indicative of changes in the underlying brain network. In experiment 2, mirror-symmetric locations were used for training and AEP sessions; no training-related AEP modulations or MMN were observed. In experiment 3, the discrimination of trained plus equidistant untrained separations was tested psychophysically before and 0, 6, 24, and 48 h after training. Learning-induced plasticity lasted <6 h, did not generalize to untrained lateralizations, and was not the simple result of strengthening the representation of the trained lateralizations. Thus, learning-induced plasticity of auditory spatial discrimination relies on spatial comparisons, rather than a spatial anchor or a general comparator. Furthermore, cortical auditory representations of space are dynamic and subject to rapid reorganization. PMID:17507569

  12. Sensory gain control (amplification) as a mechanism of selective attention: electrophysiological and neuroimaging evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Hillyard, S A; Vogel, E K; Luck, S J

    1998-01-01

    Both physiological and behavioral studies have suggested that stimulus-driven neural activity in the sensory pathways can be modulated in amplitude during selective attention. Recordings of event-related brain potentials indicate that such sensory gain control or amplification processes play an important role in visual-spatial attention. Combined event-related brain potential and neuroimaging experiments provide strong evidence that attentional gain control operates at an early stage of visual processing in extrastriate cortical areas. These data support early selection theories of attention and provide a basis for distinguishing between separate mechanisms of attentional suppression (of unattended inputs) and attentional facilitation (of attended inputs). PMID:9770220

  13. Executive Control of Language in the Bilingual Brain: Integrating the Evidence from Neuroimaging to Neuropsychology

    PubMed Central

    Hervais-Adelman, Alexis Georges; Moser-Mercer, Barbara; Golestani, Narly

    2011-01-01

    In this review we will focus on delineating the neural substrates of the executive control of language in the bilingual brain, based on the existing neuroimaging, intracranial, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and neuropsychological evidence. We will also offer insights from ongoing brain-imaging studies into the development of expertise in multilingual language control. We will concentrate specifically on evidence regarding how the brain selects and controls languages for comprehension and production. This question has been addressed in a number of ways and using various tasks, including language switching during production or perception, translation, and interpretation. We will attempt to synthesize existing evidence in order to bring to light the neural substrates that are crucial to executive control of language. PMID:21954391

  14. Language and thought are not the same thing: evidence from neuroimaging and neurological patients.

    PubMed

    Fedorenko, Evelina; Varley, Rosemary

    2016-04-01

    Is thought possible without language? Individuals with global aphasia, who have almost no ability to understand or produce language, provide a powerful opportunity to find out. Surprisingly, despite their near-total loss of language, these individuals are nonetheless able to add and subtract, solve logic problems, think about another person's thoughts, appreciate music, and successfully navigate their environments. Further, neuroimaging studies show that healthy adults strongly engage the brain's language areas when they understand a sentence, but not when they perform other nonlinguistic tasks such as arithmetic, storing information in working memory, inhibiting prepotent responses, or listening to music. Together, these two complementary lines of evidence provide a clear answer: many aspects of thought engage distinct brain regions from, and do not depend on, language. PMID:27096882

  15. Clocking the social mind by identifying mental processes in the IAT with electrical neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Bastian; Gianotti, Lorena R R; Baumgartner, Thomas; Nash, Kyle; Koenig, Thomas; Knoch, Daria

    2016-03-01

    Why do people take longer to associate the word "love" with outgroup words (incongruent condition) than with ingroup words (congruent condition)? Despite the widespread use of the implicit association test (IAT), it has remained unclear whether this IAT effect is due to additional mental processes in the incongruent condition, or due to longer duration of the same processes. Here, we addressed this previously insoluble issue by assessing the spatiotemporal evolution of brain electrical activity in 83 participants. From stimulus presentation until response production, we identified seven processes. Crucially, all seven processes occurred in the same temporal sequence in both conditions, but participants needed more time to perform one early occurring process (perceptual processing) and one late occurring process (implementing cognitive control to select the motor response) in the incongruent compared with the congruent condition. We also found that the latter process contributed to individual differences in implicit bias. These results advance understanding of the neural mechanics of response time differences in the IAT: They speak against theories that explain the IAT effect as due to additional processes in the incongruent condition and speak in favor of theories that assume a longer duration of specific processes in the incongruent condition. More broadly, our data analysis approach illustrates the potential of electrical neuroimaging to illuminate the temporal organization of mental processes involved in social cognition. PMID:26903643

  16. Neurogenetic and Neuroimaging Evidence for a Conceptual Model of Dopaminergic Contributions to Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Stanfill, Ansley Grimes; Conley, Yvette; Cashion, Ann; Thompson, Carol; Homayouni, Ramin; Cowan, Patricia; Hathaway, Donna

    2015-01-01

    As the incidence of obesity continues to rise, clinicians and researchers alike are seeking explanations for why some people become obese while others do not. While caloric intake and physical activity most certainly play a role, some individuals continue to gain weight despite careful attention to these factors. Increasing evidence suggests that genetics may play a role, with one potential explanation being genetic variability in genes within the neurotransmitter dopamine pathway. This variability can lead to a disordered experience with the rewarding properties of food. This review of literature examines the extant knowledge about the relationship between obesity and the dopaminergic reward pathways in the brain, with particularly strong evidence provided from neuroimaging and neurogenetic data. Pubmed, Google Scholar, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature searches were conducted with the search terms dopamine, obesity, weight gain, food addiction, brain regions relevant to the mesocortical and mesolimbic (reward) pathways, and relevant dopaminergic genes and receptors. These terms returned over 200 articles. Other than a few sentinel articles, articles were published between 1993 and 2013. These data suggest a conceptual model for obesity that emphasizes dopaminergic genetic contributions as well as more traditional risk factors for obesity, such as demographics (age, race, and gender), physical activity, diet, and medications. A greater understanding of variables contributing to weight gain and obesity is imperative for effective clinical treatment. PMID:25576324

  17. MEDIAL TEMPORAL LOBE CONTRIBUTIONS TO FUTURE THINKING: EVIDENCE FROM NEUROIMAGING AND AMNESIA

    PubMed Central

    Verfaellie, Mieke; Race, Elizabeth; Keane, Margaret M.

    2013-01-01

    Following early amnesic case reports, there is now considerable evidence suggesting a link between remembering the past and envisioning the future. This link is evident in the overlap in neural substrates as well as cognitive processes involved in both kinds of tasks. While constructing a future narrative requires multiple processes, neuroimaging and lesion data converge on a critical role for the medial temporal lobes (MTL) in retrieving and recombining details from memory in the service of novel simulations. Deficient detail retrieval and recombination may lead to impairments not only in episodic, but also in semantic prospection. MTL contributions to scene construction and mental time travel may further compound impairments in amnesia on tasks that pose additional demands on these processes, but are unlikely to form the core deficit underlying amnesics’ cross-domain future thinking impairment. Future studies exploring the role of episodic memory in other forms of self-projection or future-oriented behaviour may elucidate further the adaptive role of memory. PMID:23447709

  18. Neurogenetic and Neuroimaging Evidence for a Conceptual Model of Dopaminergic Contributions to Obesity.

    PubMed

    Stanfill, Ansley Grimes; Conley, Yvette; Cashion, Ann; Thompson, Carol; Homayouni, Ramin; Cowan, Patricia; Hathaway, Donna

    2015-07-01

    As the incidence of obesity continues to rise, clinicians and researchers alike are seeking explanations for why some people become obese while others do not. While caloric intake and physical activity most certainly play a role, some individuals continue to gain weight despite careful attention to these factors. Increasing evidence suggests that genetics may play a role, with one potential explanation being genetic variability in genes within the neurotransmitter dopamine pathway. This variability can lead to a disordered experience with the rewarding properties of food. This review of literature examines the extant knowledge about the relationship between obesity and the dopaminergic reward pathways in the brain, with particularly strong evidence provided from neuroimaging and neurogenetic data. Pubmed, Google Scholar, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature searches were conducted with the search terms dopamine, obesity, weight gain, food addiction, brain regions relevant to the mesocortical and mesolimbic (reward) pathways, and relevant dopaminergic genes and receptors. These terms returned over 200 articles. Other than a few sentinel articles, articles were published between 1993 and 2013. These data suggest a conceptual model for obesity that emphasizes dopaminergic genetic contributions as well as more traditional risk factors for obesity, such as demographics (age, race, and gender), physical activity, diet, and medications. A greater understanding of variables contributing to weight gain and obesity is imperative for effective clinical treatment. PMID:25576324

  19. Effects of Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies on Brain Development: Evidence From Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lenroot, Rhoshel K.; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Giedd, Jay N.

    2010-01-01

    Variation in the number of sex chromosomes is a relatively common genetic condition, affecting as many as 1/400 individuals. The sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) are associated with characteristic behavioral and cognitive phenotypes, although the degree to which specific individuals are affected can fall within a wide range. Understanding the effects of different dosages of sex chromosome genes on brain development may help to understand the basis for functional differences in affected individuals. It may also be informative regarding how sex chromosomes contribute to typical sexual differentiation. Studies of 47,XXY males make up the bulk of the current literature of neuroimaging studies in individuals with supernumerary sex chromosomes, with a few small studies or case reports of the other SCAs. Findings in 47,XXY males typically include decreased gray and white matter volumes, with most pronounced effects in the frontal and temporal lobes. Functional studies have shown evidence of decreased lateralization. Although the hypogonadism typically found in 47,XXY males may contribute to the decreased brain volume, the observation that 47,XXX females also show decreased brain volume in the presence of normal pubertal maturation suggests a possible direct dosage effect of X chromosome genes. Additional X chromosomes, such as in 49,XXXXY males, are associated with more markedly decreased brain volume and increased incidence of white matter hyperintensities. The limited data regarding effects of having two Y chromosomes (47,XYY) do not find significant differences in brain volume, although there are some reports of increased head size. PMID:20014372

  20. Effects of sex chromosome aneuploidies on brain development: evidence from neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Lenroot, Rhoshel K; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Giedd, Jay N

    2009-01-01

    Variation in the number of sex chromosomes is a relatively common genetic condition, affecting as many as 1/400 individuals. The sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) are associated with characteristic behavioral and cognitive phenotypes, although the degree to which specific individuals are affected can fall within a wide range. Understanding the effects of different dosages of sex chromosome genes on brain development may help to understand the basis for functional differences in affected individuals. It may also be informative regarding how sex chromosomes contribute to typical sexual differentiation. Studies of 47,XXY males make up the bulk of the current literature of neuroimaging studies in individuals with supernumerary sex chromosomes, with a few small studies or case reports of the other SCAs. Findings in 47,XXY males typically include decreased gray and white matter volumes, with most pronounced effects in the frontal and temporal lobes. Functional studies have shown evidence of decreased lateralization. Although the hypogonadism typically found in 47,XXY males may contribute to the decreased brain volume, the observation that 47,XXX females also show decreased brain volume in the presence of normal pubertal maturation suggests a possible direct dosage effect of X chromosome genes. Additional X chromosomes, such as in 49,XXXXY males, are associated with more markedly decreased brain volume and increased incidence of white matter hyperintensities. The limited data regarding effects of having two Y chromosomes (47,XYY) do not find significant differences in brain volume, although there are some reports of increased head size. PMID:20014372

  1. Dreaming as mind wandering: evidence from functional neuroimaging and first-person content reports

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Kieran C. R.; Nijeboer, Savannah; Solomonova, Elizaveta; Domhoff, G. William; Christoff, Kalina

    2013-01-01

    Isolated reports have long suggested a similarity in content and thought processes across mind wandering (MW) during waking, and dream mentation during sleep. This overlap has encouraged speculation that both “daydreaming” and dreaming may engage similar brain mechanisms. To explore this possibility, we systematically examined published first-person experiential reports of MW and dreaming and found many similarities: in both states, content is largely audiovisual and emotional, follows loose narratives tinged with fantasy, is strongly related to current concerns, draws on long-term memory, and simulates social interactions. Both states are also characterized by a relative lack of meta-awareness. To relate first-person reports to neural evidence, we compared meta-analytic data from numerous functional neuroimaging (PET, fMRI) studies of the default mode network (DMN, with high chances of MW) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (with high chances of dreaming). Our findings show large overlaps in activation patterns of cortical regions: similar to MW/DMN activity, dreaming and REM sleep activate regions implicated in self-referential thought and memory, including medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), medial temporal lobe structures, and posterior cingulate. Conversely, in REM sleep numerous PFC executive regions are deactivated, even beyond levels seen during waking MW. We argue that dreaming can be understood as an “intensified” version of waking MW: though the two share many similarities, dreams tend to be longer, more visual and immersive, and to more strongly recruit numerous key hubs of the DMN. Further, whereas MW recruits fewer PFC regions than goal-directed thought, dreaming appears to be characterized by an even deeper quiescence of PFC regions involved in cognitive control and metacognition, with a corresponding lack of insight and meta-awareness. We suggest, then, that dreaming amplifies the same features that distinguish MW from goal-directed waking

  2. Effect of mind on brain activity: evidence from neuroimaging studies of psychotherapy and placebo effect.

    PubMed

    Beauregard, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Mentalistic variables must be considered to reach a correct understanding of the neurophysiological basis of behavior in humans. Confusion regarding the relative importance of neurophysiological and mentalistic variables can lead to important misconceptions about causes and effects in the study of human behavior. In this article, we review neuroimaging studies of the effect of psychotherapy in patients suffering from diverse forms of psychopathology (obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, unipolar major depressive disorder, spider phobia). We also review neuroimaging studies of the placebo effect in healthy individuals (placebo analgesia, psychostimulant expectation) and patients with Parkinson's disease or unipolar major depressive disorder. Mental functions and processes involved in diverse forms of psychotherapy exert a significant influence on brain activity. With regard to the placebo effect, beliefs and expectations can markedly modulate neurophysiological and neurochemical activity in brain regions involved in perception, movement, pain and various aspects of emotion processing. The findings of the neuroimaging studies reviewed here strongly support the view that the subjective nature and the intentional content of mental processes significantly influence the various levels of brain functioning (e.g. molecular, cellular, neural circuit) and brain plasticity. PMID:19023697

  3. Clinical neuroimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains chapters on neuroimaging. Included are the following chapters: diagnostic neuroimaging in stroke, position emission tomography in cerebrovascular disease: clinical applications, and neuroradiologic work-up of brain tumors.

  4. The cognitive and neural time course of empathy and sympathy: an electrical neuroimaging study on self-other interaction.

    PubMed

    Thirioux, B; Mercier, M R; Blanke, O; Berthoz, A

    2014-05-16

    Although extensively investigated in socio-cognitive neuroscience, empathy is difficult to study. The first difficulty originates in its multifaceted nature. According to the multidimensional model, empathy combines emotional, automatic (simulation), cognitive (mentalizing) and regulatory (executive functions) processes. Substantial functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data demonstrated that co-activations in the mirror neuron system (MNS) and mentalizing network (MENT) sustain this co-recruitment of so-called first- and second-person-like processes. Because of the poor temporal resolution of fMRI techniques, we currently lack evidence about the precise timing of the MNS-MENT combination. An important challenge is, thus, to disentangle how MNS and MENT dynamically work together along time in empathy. Moreover, the role of the executive functions in the MNS-MENT combination time course is still unknown. Second, empathy - feeling into - is closely related to sympathy - feeling with - and both phenomena are often conflated in experimental studies on intersubjectivity. In this electrical neuroimaging (EEG) pilot-study, we tested whether the egocentered vs. heterocentered visuo-spatial mechanisms respectively associated with sympathy and empathy differentially modulate the dynamic combination of the MNS-MENT activations in their respective neural time course. For that, we employed our newly developed behavioral paradigm assessing the visuo-spatial - but not emotional - features of empathy and sympathy. Using a data-driven approach, we report that empathy and sympathy are underlied by sequential activations in the MNS from the insula to the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) between 63ms and 424ms. However, at 333-424ms, empathy triggered greater co-activations in the right IFG and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) (executive functions). Linking together our present and prior (Thirioux et al., 2010) findings from the same dataset, we suggest that this greater

  5. Neuroimaging and treatment evidence for clinical staging in psychotic disorders: from the at-risk mental state to chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Wood, Stephen J; Yung, Alison R; McGorry, Patrick D; Pantelis, Christos

    2011-10-01

    A new approach to understanding severe mental disorders such as schizophrenia is to adopt a clinical staging model. Such a model defines the extent of the illness such that earlier and milder phenomena are distinguished from later, more impairing features. Specifically, a clinical staging model makes three key predictions. First, pathologic measures should be more abnormal in more severe stages. Second, patients who progress between the stages should show change in these same pathologic measures. Finally, treatment should be more effective in the earlier stages, as well as more benign. In this article, we review the evidence for these three predictions from studies of psychotic disorders, with a focus on neuroimaging data. For all three, the balance of evidence supports the predictions of the staging model. However, there are a number of alternative explanations for these findings, including the effects of medication and symptom heterogeneity. PMID:21762875

  6. Overlapping neurobehavioral circuits in ADHD, obesity, and binge eating: evidence from neuroimaging research.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Karen E; Reinblatt, Shauna P; Benson, Leora; Carnell, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conditions involving excessive eating (eg, obesity, binge/loss of control eating) are increasingly prevalent within pediatric populations, and correlational and some longitudinal studies have suggested inter-relationships between these disorders. In addition, a number of common neural correlates are emerging across conditions, eg, functional abnormalities within circuits subserving reward processing and executive functioning. To explore this potential cross-condition overlap in neurobehavioral underpinnings, we selectively review relevant functional neuroimaging literature, specifically focusing on studies probing (i) reward processing, (ii) response inhibition, and (iii) emotional processing and regulation, and we outline 3 specific shared neurobehavioral circuits. Based on our review, we also identify gaps within the literature that would benefit from further research. PMID:26098969

  7. Three key regions for supervisory attentional control: Evidence from neuroimaging meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Cieslik, Edna C.; Mueller, Veronika I.; Eickhoff, Claudia R.; Langner, Robert; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2014-01-01

    The supervisory attentional system has been proposed to mediate non-routine, goal-oriented behaviour by guiding the selection and maintenance of the goal-relevant task schema. Here, we aimed to delineate the brain regions that mediate these high-level control processes via neuroimaging meta-analysis. In particular, we investigated the core neural correlates of a wide range of tasks requiring supervisory control for the suppression of a routine action in favour of another, non-routine one. Our sample comprised n = 173 experiments employing go/no-go, stop-signal, Stroop or spatial interference tasks. Consistent convergence across all four paradigm classes was restricted to right anterior insula and inferior frontal junction, with anterior midcingulate cortex and pre-supplementary motor area being consistently involved in all but the go/no-go task. Taken together with lesion studies in patients, our findings suggest that the controlled activation and maintenance of adequate task schemata relies, across paradigms, on a right-dominant midcingulo-insular-inferior frontal core network. This also implies that the role of other prefrontal and parietal regions may be less domain-general than previously thought. PMID:25446951

  8. Sensing, assessing, and augmenting threat detection: behavioral, neuroimaging, and brain stimulation evidence for the critical role of attention

    PubMed Central

    Parasuraman, Raja; Galster, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly identifying the potentially threatening movements of other people and objects—biological motion perception and action understanding—is critical to maintaining security in many civilian and military settings. A key approach to improving threat detection in these environments is to sense when less than ideal conditions exist for the human observer, assess that condition relative to an expected standard, and if necessary use tools to augment human performance. Action perception is typically viewed as a relatively “primitive,” automatic function immune to top-down effects. However, recent research shows that attention is a top-down factor that has a critical influence on the identification of threat-related targets. In this paper we show that detection of motion-based threats is attention sensitive when surveillance images are obscured by other movements, when they are visually degraded, when other stimuli or tasks compete for attention, or when low-probability threats must be watched for over long periods of time—all features typical of operational security settings. Neuroimaging studies reveal that action understanding recruits a distributed network of brain regions, including the superior temporal cortex, intraparietal cortex, and inferior frontal cortex. Within this network, attention modulates activation of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) and middle temporal gyrus. The dorsal frontoparietal network may provide the source of attention-modulation signals to action representation areas. Stimulation of this attention network should therefore enhance threat detection. We show that transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) at 2 mA accelerates perceptual learning of participants performing a challenging threat-detection task. Together, cognitive, neuroimaging, and brain stimulation studies provide converging evidence for the critical role of attention in the detection and understanding of threat-related intentional actions. PMID:23781194

  9. Evidence against functionalism from neuroimaging of the alien colour effect in synaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Gray, Jeffrey A; Parslow, David M; Brammer, Michael J; Chopping, Susan; Vythelingum, Goparlen N; ffytche, Dominic H

    2006-02-01

    Coloured hearing synaesthetes experience colours to heard words, as confirmed by reliability of self-report, psychophysical testing and functional neuroimaging data. Some also describe the 'alien colour effect' (ACE): in response to colour names, they experience colours different from those named. We have previously reported that the ACE slows colour naming in a Stroop task, reflecting cognitive interference from synaesthetically induced colours, which depends upon their being consciously experienced. It has been proposed that the hippocampus mediates such consciously experienced conflict. Consistent with this hypothesis, we now report that, in functional magnetic resonance imaging of the Stroop task, hippocampal activation differentiates synaesthetes with the ACE from those without it and from non-synaesthete controls. These findings confirm the reality of coloured hearing synaesthesia and the ACE, phenomena which pose major challenges to the dominant contemporary account of mental states, functionalism. Reductive functionalism identifies types of mental states with causal roles: relations to inputs, outputs and other states. However, conscious mental states, such as experiences of colour, are distinguished by their qualitative properties or qualia. If functionalism is applied to conscious mental states, it identifies the qualitative type of an experience with its causal role or function. This entails both that experiences with disparate qualitative properties cannot have the same functional properties, and that experiences with disparate functional properties cannot have the same qualitative properties. Challenges to functionalism have often denied the first entailment. Here, we challenge the second entailment on empirical grounds. In coloured hearing synaesthesia, colour qualia are associated with both hearing words and seeing surfaces; and, in the ACE, these two functions act in opposition to one another. Whatever its merits as an account of other mental states

  10. The Semantic Variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia: Clinical and Neuroimaging Evidence in Single Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Iaccarino, Leonardo; Crespi, Chiara; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Catricalà, Eleonora; Guidi, Lucia; Marcone, Alessandra; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Magnani, Giuseppe; Cappa, Stefano F.; Perani, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim We present a clinical-neuroimaging study in a series of patients with a clinical diagnosis of semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), with the aim to provide clinical-functional correlations of the cognitive and behavioral manifestations at the single-subject level. Methods We performed neuropsychological investigations, 18F-FDG-PET single-subject and group analysis, with an optimized SPM voxel-based approach, and correlation analyses. A measurement of white matter integrity by means of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was also available for a subgroup of patients. Results Cognitive assessment confirmed the presence of typical semantic memory deficits in all patients, with a relative sparing of executive, attentional, visuo-constructional, and episodic memory domains. 18F-FDG-PET showed a consistent pattern of cerebral hypometabolism across all patients, which correlated with performance in semantic memory tasks. In addition, a majority of patients also presented with behavioral disturbances associated with metabolic dysfunction in limbic structures. In a subgroup of cases the DTI analysis showed FA abnormalities in the inferior longitudinal and uncinate fasciculi. Discussion Each svPPA individual had functional derangement involving an extended, connected system within the left temporal lobe, a crucial part of the verbal semantic network, as well as an involvement of limbic structures. The latter was associated with behavioral manifestations and extended beyond the area of atrophy shown by CT scan. Conclusion Single-subject 18F-FDG-PET analysis can account for both cognitive and behavioral alterations in svPPA. This provides useful support to the clinical diagnosis. PMID:25756991

  11. Dynamic spatiotemporal brain analyses using high-performance electrical neuroimaging, Part II: A step-by-step tutorial.

    PubMed

    Cacioppo, Stephanie; Cacioppo, John T

    2015-12-30

    Our recently published analytic toolbox (Cacioppo et al., 2014), running under MATLAB environment and Brainstorm, offered a theoretical framework and set of validation studies for the automatic detection of event-related changes in the global pattern and global field power of electrical brain activity. Here, we provide a step-by-step tutorial of this toolbox along with a detailed description of analytical plans (aka the Chicago Electrical Neuroimaging Analytics, CENA) for the statistical analysis of brain microstate configuration and global field power in within and between-subject designs. Available CENA functions include: (1) a difference wave function; (2) a high-performance microsegmentation suite (HPMS), which consists of three specific analytic tools: (i) a root mean square error (RMSE) metric for identifying stable states and transition states across discrete event-related brain microstates; (ii) a similarity metric based on cosine distance in n dimensional sensor space to determine whether template maps for successive brain microstates differ in configuration of brain activity, and (iii) global field power (GFP) metrics for identifying changes in the overall level of activation of the brain; (3) a bootstrapping function for assessing the extent to which the solutions identified in the HPMS are robust (reliable, generalizable) and for empirically deriving additional experimental hypotheses; and (4) step-by-step procedures for performing a priori contrasts for data analysis. CENA is freely available for brain data spatiotemporal analyses at https://hpenlaboratory.uchicago.edu/page/cena, with sample data, user tutorial videos, and documentation. PMID:26363189

  12. Differential Diagnosis of Dysgraphia, Dyslexia, and OWL LD: Behavioral and Neuroimaging Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berninger, Virginia W.; Richards, Todd L.; Abbott, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    In Study 1, children in grades 4-9 (N = 88, 29 females and 59 males) with persisting reading and/or writing disabilities, despite considerable prior specialized instruction in and out of school, were given an evidence-based comprehensive assessment battery at the university while parents completed questionnaires regarding past and current history…

  13. Towards Validation of a New Computerised Test of Goal Neglect: Preliminary Evidence from Clinical and Neuroimaging Pilot Studies

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Breda; Brennan, David; Manly, Tom; Evans, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Goal neglect is a significant problem following brain injury, and is a target for rehabilitation. It is not yet known how neural activation might change to reflect rehabilitation gains. We developed a computerised multiple elements test (CMET), suitable for use in neuroimaging paradigms. Design Pilot correlational study and event-related fMRI study. Methods In Study 1, 18 adults with acquired brain injury were assessed using the CMET, other tests of goal neglect (Hotel Test; Modified Six Elements Test) and tests of reasoning. In Study 2, 12 healthy adults underwent fMRI, during which the CMET was administered under two conditions: self-generated switching and experimenter-prompted switching. Results Among the clinical sample, CMET performance was positively correlated with both the Hotel Test (r = 0.675, p = 0.003) and the Modified Six Elements Test (r = 0.568, p = 0.014), but not with other clinical or demographic measures. In the healthy sample, fMRI demonstrated significant activation in rostro-lateral prefrontal cortex in the self-generated condition compared with the prompted condition (peak 40, 44, 4; ZE = 4.25, p(FWEcorr) = 0.026). Conclusions These pilot studies provide preliminary evidence towards the validation of the CMET as a measure of goal neglect. Future studies will aim to further establish its psychometric properties, and determine optimum pre- and post-rehabilitation fMRI paradigms. PMID:26824704

  14. Imaging evidence and recommendations for traumatic brain injury: conventional neuroimaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Wintermark, Max; Sanelli, Pina C; Anzai, Yoshimi; Tsiouris, A John; Whitlow, Christopher T

    2015-02-01

    Imaging plays an essential role in identifying intracranial injury in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The goals of imaging include (1) detecting injuries that may require immediate surgical or procedural intervention, (2) detecting injuries that may benefit from early medical therapy or vigilant neurologic supervision, and (3) determining the prognosis of patients to tailor rehabilitative therapy or help with family counseling and discharge planning. In this article, the authors perform a review of the evidence on the utility of various imaging techniques in patients presenting with TBI to provide guidance for evidence-based, clinical imaging protocols. The intent of this article is to suggest practical imaging recommendations for patients presenting with TBI across different practice settings and to simultaneously provide the rationale and background evidence supporting their use. These recommendations should ultimately assist referring physicians faced with the task of ordering appropriate imaging tests in particular patients with TBI for whom they are providing care. These recommendations should also help radiologists advise their clinical colleagues on appropriate imaging utilization for patients with TBI. PMID:25456317

  15. Through a scanner darkly: functional neuroimaging as evidence of a criminal defendant's past mental states.

    PubMed

    Brown, Teneille; Murphy, Emily

    2010-04-01

    As with phrenology and the polygraph, society is again confronted with a device that the media claims is capable of reading our minds. Functional magnetic resonance imaging ("fMRI"), along with other types of functional brain imaging technologies, is currently being introduced at various stages of a criminal trial as evidence of a defendant's past mental state. This Article demonstrates that functional brain images should not currently be admitted as evidence into courts for this purpose. Using the analytical framework provided by Federal Rule of Evidence 403 as a threshold to a Daubert/Frye analysis, we demonstrate that, when fMRI methodology is properly understood, brain images are only minimally probative of a defendant's past mental states and are almost certainly more unfairly prejudicial than probative on balance. Careful and detailed explanation of the underlying science separates this Article from others, which have tended to paint fMRI with a gloss of credibility and certainty for all courtroom-relevant applications. Instead, we argue that this technology may present a particularly strong form of unfair prejudice in addition to its potential to mislead jurors and waste the court's resources. Finally, since fMRI methodology may one day improve such that its probative value is no longer eclipsed by its extreme potential for unfair prejudice, we offer a nonexhaustive checklist that judges and counsel can use to authenticate functional brain images and assess the weight these images are to be accorded by fact finders. PMID:20429137

  16. Immunity factor contributes to altered brain functional networks in individuals at risk for Alzheimer's disease: Neuroimaging-genetic evidence.

    PubMed

    Bai, Feng; Shi, Yongmei; Yuan, Yonggui; Xie, Chunming; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-08-01

    Clusterin (CLU) is recognized as a secreted protein that is related to the processes of inflammation and immunity in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The effects of the risk variant of the C allele at the rs11136000 locus of the CLU gene are associated with variations in the brain structure and function. However, the relationship of the CLU-C allele to architectural disruptions in resting-state networks in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) subjects (i.e., individuals with elevated risk of AD) remains relatively unknown. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and an imaging genetic approach, this study investigated whether individual brain functional networks, i.e., the default mode network (DMN) and the task-positive network, were modulated by the CLU-C allele (rs11136000) in 50 elderly participants, including 26 aMCI subjects and 24 healthy controls. CLU-by-aMCI interactions were associated with the information-bridging regions between resting-state networks rather than with the DMN itself, especially in cortical midline regions. Interestingly, the complex communications between resting-state networks were enhanced in aMCI subjects with the CLU rs11136000 CC genotype and were modulated by the degree of memory impairment, suggesting a reconstructed balance of the resting-state networks in these individuals with an elevated risk of AD. The neuroimaging-genetic evidence indicates that immunity factors may contribute to alterations in brain functional networks in aMCI. These findings add to the evidence that the CLU gene may represent a potential therapeutic target for slowing disease progression in AD. PMID:26899953

  17. Evolving Evidence for the Value of Neuroimaging Methods and Biological Markers in Subjects Categorized with Subjective Cognitive Decline.

    PubMed

    Lista, Simone; Molinuevo, Jose L; Cavedo, Enrica; Rami, Lorena; Amouyel, Philippe; Teipel, Stefan J; Garaci, Francesco; Toschi, Nicola; Habert, Marie-Odile; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; O'Bryant, Sid E; Johnson, Leigh; Galluzzi, Samantha; Bokde, Arun L W; Broich, Karl; Herholz, Karl; Bakardjian, Hovagim; Dubois, Bruno; Jessen, Frank; Carrillo, Maria C; Aisen, Paul S; Hampel, Harald

    2015-09-24

    There is evolving evidence that individuals categorized with subjective cognitive decline (SCD) are potentially at higher risk for developing objective and progressive cognitive impairment compared to cognitively healthy individuals without apparent subjective complaints. Interestingly, SCD, during advancing preclinical Alzheimer's disease (AD), may denote very early, subtle cognitive decline that cannot be identified using established standardized tests of cognitive performance. The substantial heterogeneity of existing SCD-related research data has led the Subjective Cognitive Decline Initiative (SCD-I) to accomplish an international consensus on the definition of a conceptual research framework on SCD in preclinical AD. In the area of biological markers, the cerebrospinal fluid signature of AD has been reported to be more prevalent in subjects with SCD compared to healthy controls; moreover, there is a pronounced atrophy, as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging, and an increased hypometabolism, as revealed by positron emission tomography, in characteristic brain regions affected by AD. In addition, SCD individuals carrying an apolipoprotein ɛ4 allele are more likely to display AD-phenotypic alterations. The urgent requirement to detect and diagnose AD as early as possible has led to the critical examination of the diagnostic power of biological markers, neurophysiology, and neuroimaging methods for AD-related risk and clinical progression in individuals defined with SCD. Observational studies on the predictive value of SCD for developing AD may potentially be of practical value, and an evidence-based, validated, qualified, and fully operationalized concept may inform clinical diagnostic practice and guide earlier designs in future therapy trials. PMID:26402088

  18. Neuroimaging Evidence for 2 Types of Plasticity in Association with Visual Perceptual Learning.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Kazuhisa; Sasaki, Yuka; Kawato, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Takeo

    2016-09-01

    Visual perceptual learning (VPL) is long-term performance improvement as a result of perceptual experience. It is unclear whether VPL is associated with refinement in representations of the trained feature (feature-based plasticity), improvement in processing of the trained task (task-based plasticity), or both. Here, we provide empirical evidence that VPL of motion detection is associated with both types of plasticity which occur predominantly in different brain areas. Before and after training on a motion detection task, subjects' neural responses to the trained motion stimuli were measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. In V3A, significant response changes after training were observed specifically to the trained motion stimulus but independently of whether subjects performed the trained task. This suggests that the response changes in V3A represent feature-based plasticity in VPL of motion detection. In V1 and the intraparietal sulcus, significant response changes were found only when subjects performed the trained task on the trained motion stimulus. This suggests that the response changes in these areas reflect task-based plasticity. These results collectively suggest that VPL of motion detection is associated with the 2 types of plasticity, which occur in different areas and therefore have separate mechanisms at least to some degree. PMID:27298301

  19. Neuroimaging Evidence for 2 Types of Plasticity in Association with Visual Perceptual Learning

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Kazuhisa; Sasaki, Yuka; Kawato, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    Visual perceptual learning (VPL) is long-term performance improvement as a result of perceptual experience. It is unclear whether VPL is associated with refinement in representations of the trained feature (feature-based plasticity), improvement in processing of the trained task (task-based plasticity), or both. Here, we provide empirical evidence that VPL of motion detection is associated with both types of plasticity which occur predominantly in different brain areas. Before and after training on a motion detection task, subjects' neural responses to the trained motion stimuli were measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. In V3A, significant response changes after training were observed specifically to the trained motion stimulus but independently of whether subjects performed the trained task. This suggests that the response changes in V3A represent feature-based plasticity in VPL of motion detection. In V1 and the intraparietal sulcus, significant response changes were found only when subjects performed the trained task on the trained motion stimulus. This suggests that the response changes in these areas reflect task-based plasticity. These results collectively suggest that VPL of motion detection is associated with the 2 types of plasticity, which occur in different areas and therefore have separate mechanisms at least to some degree. PMID:27298301

  20. Motor Inhibition during Overt and Covert Actions: An Electrical Neuroimaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Monica; Calbi, Marta; Ferrari, Annachiara; Sbriscia-Fioretti, Beatrice; Franca, Michele; Gallese, Vittorio; Umiltà, Maria Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Given ample evidence for shared cortical structures involved in encoding actions, whether or not subsequently executed, a still unsolved problem is the identification of neural mechanisms of motor inhibition, preventing “covert actions” as motor imagery from being performed, in spite of the activation of the motor system. The principal aims of the present study were the evaluation of: 1) the presence in covert actions as motor imagery of putative motor inhibitory mechanisms; 2) their underlying cerebral sources; 3) their differences or similarities with respect to cerebral networks underpinning the inhibition of overt actions during a Go/NoGo task. For these purposes, we performed a high density EEG study evaluating the cerebral microstates and their related sources elicited during two types of Go/NoGo tasks, requiring the execution or withholding of an overt or a covert imagined action, respectively. Our results show for the first time the engagement during motor imagery of key nodes of a putative inhibitory network (including pre-supplementary motor area and right inferior frontal gyrus) partially overlapping with those activated for the inhibition of an overt action during the overt NoGo condition. At the same time, different patterns of temporal recruitment in these shared neural inhibitory substrates are shown, in accord with the intended overt or covert modality of action performance. The evidence that apparently divergent mechanisms such as controlled inhibition of overt actions and contingent automatic inhibition of covert actions do indeed share partially overlapping neural substrates, further challenges the rigid dichotomy between conscious, explicit, flexible and unconscious, implicit, inflexible forms of motor behavioral control. PMID:26000451

  1. Neuroimaging evidence for top-down maturation of selective auditory attention.

    PubMed

    Herdman, Anthony T

    2011-10-01

    This study investigated maturational differences of selective auditory attention effects on transient evoked responses and 40-Hz auditory steady-state responses between children and adults. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) was recorded from children and adults performing a task where they attended to 40-Hz amplitude-modulated (AM) tones of 1,200 Hz while ignoring 40-Hz AM tones of 800 Hz. By using standard dipole-modeling procedures, the N1m of the transient evoked fields and the 40-Hz ASSRs were localized to secondary and primary auditory cortices, respectively. Source waveforms for the transient evoked fields and ASSRs were reconstructed at these locations and compared between attended and unattended tones. Source waveforms revealed attention enhances the sustained negativity of the transient evoked responses in both adults and children around 250 and 400 ms. ASSRs were also found to be enhanced within this time range but only for adults. The results provide evidence for a limited role of attention modification of the 40-Hz ASSRs in children around the age of 12 years old. Because ASSRs are generated in a lower auditory processing stage as compared to the transient auditory evoked responses, findings from the present study could indicate that the maturation of attention progresses in top-to-bottom manner. These findings fit with the notion that as a person gains sensory experience selective gating of relevant from irrelevant information likely occurs at earlier and earlier processing levels in order to become more automatic and efficient. PMID:21499933

  2. Early neuroimaging diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jianling; Liu, Timon C.; Li, Yan; Liu, Songhao

    2002-04-01

    Neuroimaging has played an important role in evaluating the Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, and its uses are growing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may show the presence of cerebral infarcts and white matter disease. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), which visualize such cerebral functions as glucose metabolism and blood flow, may provide positive evidence to support the diagnosis of AD. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a recently developed technique which enables the internal impedance of an object to be imaged noninvasively.

  3. Neuroimaging evidence of altered fronto-cortical and striatal function after prolonged cocaine self-administration in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gozzi, Alessandro; Tessari, Michela; Dacome, Lisa; Agosta, Federica; Lepore, Stefano; Lanzoni, Anna; Cristofori, Patrizia; Pich, Emilio M; Corsi, Mauro; Bifone, Angelo

    2011-11-01

    Cocaine addiction is often modeled in experimental paradigms where rodents learn to self-administer (SA) the drug. However, the extent to which these models replicate the functional alterations observed in clinical neuroimaging studies of cocaine addiction remains unknown. We used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess basal and evoked brain function in rats subjected to a prolonged, extended-access cocaine SA scheme. Specifically, we measured basal cerebral blood volume (bCBV), an established correlate of basal metabolism, and assessed the reactivity of the dopaminergic system by mapping the pharmacological MRI (phMRI) response evoked by the dopamine-releaser amphetamine. Cocaine-exposed subjects exhibited reduced bCBV in fronto-cortical areas, nucleus accumbens, ventral hippocampus, and thalamus. The cocaine group also showed an attenuated functional response to amphetamine in ventrostriatal areas, an effect that was significantly correlated with total cocaine intake. An inverse relationship between bCBV in the reticular thalamus and the frontal response elicited by amphetamine was found in control subjects but not in the cocaine group, suggesting that the inhibitory interplay within this attentional circuit may be compromised by the drug. Importantly, histopathological analysis did not reveal significant alterations of the microvascular bed in the brain of cocaine-exposed subjects, suggesting that the imaging findings cannot be merely ascribed to cocaine-induced vascular damage. These results document that chronic, extended-access cocaine SA in the rat produces focal fronto-cortical and striatal alterations that serve as plausible neurobiological substrate for the behavioral expression of compulsive drug intake in laboratory animals. PMID:21775976

  4. Spatio-temporal dynamics of kind versus hostile intentions in the human brain: An electrical neuroimaging study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwen; Huang, Liang; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Zhen; Cacioppo, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Neuroscience research suggests that inferring neutral intentions of other people recruits a specific brain network within the inferior fronto-parietal action observation network as well as a putative social network including brain areas subserving theory of mind, such as the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), and also the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Recent studies on harmful intentions have refined this network by showing the specific involvement of the ACC, amygdala, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in early stages (within 200 ms) of information processing. However, the functional dynamics for kind intentions within and among these networks remains unclear. To address this question, we measured electrical brain activity from 18 healthy adult participants while they were performing an intention inference task with three different types of intentions: kind, hostile and non-interactive. Electrophysiological results revealed that kind intentions were characterized by significantly larger peak amplitudes of N2 over the frontal sites than those for hostile and non-interactive intentions. On the other hand, there were no significant differences between hostile and non-interactive intentions at N2. The source analysis suggested that the vicinity of the left cingulate gyrus contributed to the N2 effect by subtracting the kindness condition from the non-interactive condition within 250-350 ms. At a later stage (i.e., during the 270-500 ms epoch), the peak amplitude of the P3 over the parietal sites and the right hemisphere was significantly larger for hostile intentions compared to the kind and non-interactive intentions. No significant differences were observed at P3 between kind and non-interactive intentions. The source analysis showed that the vicinity of the left anterior cingulate cortex contributed to the P3 effect by subtracting the hostility condition from the non-interactive condition within 450-550 ms

  5. Visual Attention and the Neuroimage Bias

    PubMed Central

    Baker, D. A.; Schweitzer, N. J.; Risko, Evan F.; Ware, Jillian M.

    2013-01-01

    Several highly-cited experiments have presented evidence suggesting that neuroimages may unduly bias laypeople’s judgments of scientific research. This finding has been especially worrisome to the legal community in which neuroimage techniques may be used to produce evidence of a person’s mental state. However, a more recent body of work that has looked directly at the independent impact of neuroimages on layperson decision-making (both in legal and more general arenas), and has failed to find evidence of bias. To help resolve these conflicting findings, this research uses eye tracking technology to provide a measure of attention to different visual representations of neuroscientific data. Finding an effect of neuroimages on the distribution of attention would provide a potential mechanism for the influence of neuroimages on higher-level decisions. In the present experiment, a sample of laypeople viewed a vignette that briefly described a court case in which the defendant’s actions might have been explained by a neurological defect. Accompanying these vignettes was either an MRI image of the defendant’s brain, or a bar graph depicting levels of brain activity–two competing visualizations that have been the focus of much of the previous research on the neuroimage bias. We found that, while laypeople differentially attended to neuroimagery relative to the bar graph, this did not translate into differential judgments in a way that would support the idea of a neuroimage bias. PMID:24040251

  6. Neuromarketing: the hope and hype of neuroimaging in business.

    PubMed

    Ariely, Dan; Berns, Gregory S

    2010-04-01

    The application of neuroimaging methods to product marketing - neuromarketing - has recently gained considerable popularity. We propose that there are two main reasons for this trend. First, the possibility that neuroimaging will become cheaper and faster than other marketing methods; and second, the hope that neuroimaging will provide marketers with information that is not obtainable through conventional marketing methods. Although neuroimaging is unlikely to be cheaper than other tools in the near future, there is growing evidence that it may provide hidden information about the consumer experience. The most promising application of neuroimaging methods to marketing may come before a product is even released - when it is just an idea being developed. PMID:20197790

  7. Where do bright ideas occur in our brain? Meta-analytic evidence from neuroimaging studies of domain-specific creativity.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Maddalena; Piccardi, Laura; Palermo, Liana; Nori, Raffaella; Palmiero, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have assessed the neural underpinnings of creativity, failing to find a clear anatomical localization. We aimed to provide evidence for a multi-componential neural system for creativity. We applied a general activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis to 45 fMRI studies. Three individual ALE analyses were performed to assess creativity in different cognitive domains (Musical, Verbal, and Visuo-spatial). The general ALE revealed that creativity relies on clusters of activations in the bilateral occipital, parietal, frontal, and temporal lobes. The individual ALE revealed different maximal activation in different domains. Musical creativity yields activations in the bilateral medial frontal gyrus, in the left cingulate gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, and inferior parietal lobule and in the right postcentral and fusiform gyri. Verbal creativity yields activations mainly located in the left hemisphere, in the prefrontal cortex, middle and superior temporal gyri, inferior parietal lobule, postcentral and supramarginal gyri, middle occipital gyrus, and insula. The right inferior frontal gyrus and the lingual gyrus were also activated. Visuo-spatial creativity activates the right middle and inferior frontal gyri, the bilateral thalamus and the left precentral gyrus. This evidence suggests that creativity relies on multi-componential neural networks and that different creativity domains depend on different brain regions. PMID:26322002

  8. Where do bright ideas occur in our brain? Meta-analytic evidence from neuroimaging studies of domain-specific creativity

    PubMed Central

    Boccia, Maddalena; Piccardi, Laura; Palermo, Liana; Nori, Raffaella; Palmiero, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have assessed the neural underpinnings of creativity, failing to find a clear anatomical localization. We aimed to provide evidence for a multi-componential neural system for creativity. We applied a general activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis to 45 fMRI studies. Three individual ALE analyses were performed to assess creativity in different cognitive domains (Musical, Verbal, and Visuo-spatial). The general ALE revealed that creativity relies on clusters of activations in the bilateral occipital, parietal, frontal, and temporal lobes. The individual ALE revealed different maximal activation in different domains. Musical creativity yields activations in the bilateral medial frontal gyrus, in the left cingulate gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, and inferior parietal lobule and in the right postcentral and fusiform gyri. Verbal creativity yields activations mainly located in the left hemisphere, in the prefrontal cortex, middle and superior temporal gyri, inferior parietal lobule, postcentral and supramarginal gyri, middle occipital gyrus, and insula. The right inferior frontal gyrus and the lingual gyrus were also activated. Visuo-spatial creativity activates the right middle and inferior frontal gyri, the bilateral thalamus and the left precentral gyrus. This evidence suggests that creativity relies on multi-componential neural networks and that different creativity domains depend on different brain regions. PMID:26322002

  9. Behavioral and multimodal neuroimaging evidence for a deficit in brain timing networks in stuttering: a hypothesis and theory

    PubMed Central

    Etchell, Andrew C.; Johnson, Blake W.; Sowman, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    The fluent production of speech requires accurately timed movements. In this article, we propose that a deficit in brain timing networks is one of the core neurophysiological deficits in stuttering. We first discuss the experimental evidence supporting the involvement of the basal ganglia and supplementary motor area (SMA) in stuttering and the involvement of the cerebellum as a possible mechanism for compensating for the neural deficits that underlie stuttering. Next, we outline the involvement of the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) as another putative compensatory locus in stuttering and suggest a role for this structure in an expanded core timing-network. Subsequently, we review behavioral studies of timing in people who stutter and examine their behavioral performance as compared to people who do not stutter. Finally, we highlight challenges to existing research and provide avenues for future research with specific hypotheses. PMID:25009487

  10. Neuroimaging in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Jain, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculous meningitis is a serious infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Early diagnosis is the key to success of treatment. Neuroimaging plays a crucial role in the early and accurate diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis and its disabling complications. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered superior to computed tomography. Neuroimaging characteristics include leptomeningeal and basal cisternal enhancement, hydrocephalus, periventricular infarcts, and tuberculoma. Partially treated pyogenic meningitis, cryptococcal meningitis, viral encephalitis, carcinomatous, and lymphomatous meningitis may have many similar neuroimaging characteristics, and differentiation from tuberculous meningitis at times on the basis of neuroimaging characteristics becomes difficult. PMID:26954796

  11. The Brain Basis of Positive and Negative Affect: Evidence from a Meta-Analysis of the Human Neuroimaging Literature.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Kristen A; Satpute, Ajay B; Wager, Tor D; Weber, Jochen; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2016-05-01

    The ability to experience pleasant or unpleasant feelings or to represent objects as "positive" or "negative" is known as representing hedonic "valence." Although scientists overwhelmingly agree that valence is a basic psychological phenomenon, debate continues about how to best conceptualize it scientifically. We used a meta-analysis of 397 functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography studies (containing 914 experimental contrasts and 6827 participants) to test 3 competing hypotheses about the brain basis of valence: the bipolarity hypothesis that positive and negative affect are supported by a brain system that monotonically increases and/or decreases along the valence dimension, the bivalent hypothesis that positive and negative affect are supported by independent brain systems, and the affective workspace hypothesis that positive and negative affect are supported by a flexible set of valence-general regions. We found little evidence for the bipolar or bivalent hypotheses. Findings instead supported the hypothesis that, at the level of brain activity measurable by fMRI, valence is flexibly implemented across instances by a set of valence-general limbic and paralimbic brain regions. PMID:25631056

  12. Schizophrenia, neuroimaging and connectomics.

    PubMed

    Fornito, Alex; Zalesky, Andrew; Pantelis, Christos; Bullmore, Edward T

    2012-10-01

    Schizophrenia is frequently characterized as a disorder of brain connectivity. Neuroimaging has played a central role in supporting this view, with nearly two decades of research providing abundant evidence of structural and functional connectivity abnormalities in the disorder. In recent years, our understanding of how schizophrenia affects brain networks has been greatly advanced by attempts to map the complete set of inter-regional interactions comprising the brain's intricate web of connectivity; i.e., the human connectome. Imaging connectomics refers to the use of neuroimaging techniques to generate these maps which, combined with the application of graph theoretic methods, has enabled relatively comprehensive mapping of brain network connectivity and topology in unprecedented detail. Here, we review the application of these techniques to the study of schizophrenia, focusing principally on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) research, while drawing attention to key methodological issues in the field. The published findings suggest that schizophrenia is associated with a widespread and possibly context-independent functional connectivity deficit, upon which are superimposed more circumscribed, context-dependent alterations associated with transient states of hyper- and/or hypo-connectivity. In some cases, these changes in inter-regional functional coupling dynamics can be related to measures of intra-regional dysfunction. Topological disturbances of functional brain networks in schizophrenia point to reduced local network connectivity and modular structure, as well as increased global integration and network robustness. Some, but not all, of these functional abnormalities appear to have an anatomical basis, though the relationship between the two is complex. By comprehensively mapping connectomic disturbances in patients with schizophrenia across the entire brain, this work has provided important insights into the highly distributed character of neural

  13. Specific disgust processing in the left insula: New evidence from direct electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Papagno, Costanza; Pisoni, Alberto; Mattavelli, Giulia; Casarotti, Alessandra; Comi, Alessandro; Fumagalli, Francesca; Vernice, Mirta; Fava, Enrica; Riva, Marco; Bello, Lorenzo

    2016-04-01

    Neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies yielded controversial results concerning the specific role of the insula in recognizing the facial expression of disgust. To verify whether the insula has a selective role in facial disgust processing, emotion recognition was studied in thirteen patients during intraoperative stimulation of the insula in awake surgery performed for removal of a glioma close to this structure. Direct electrical stimulation of the left insula produced a general decrease in emotion recognition but only in the case of disgust there was a statistically significant detrimental effect (p=0.004). Happiness and anger were the best and the worst recognized emotion, respectively. The worst baseline performance with anger and, partly, fear could be explained with the involvement of the left temporal regions, striatum, and the connection between the striatum and the frontal lobe, as suggested in previous studies. Therefore, upon these intra-operative evidences, we argue for a selective role of the left insula in disgust recognition, although a (non significant) decrease in the recognition of other negative emotions was found. However, additional networks can develop, as demonstrated by the fact that disgust recognition was not impaired after surgery even in patients with insular resection in the current as in previous studies. PMID:26836143

  14. Electrical Neuroimaging with Irrotational Sources

    PubMed Central

    Grave de Peralta Menendez, Rolando; Gonzalez Andino, Sara

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses theoretical aspects of the modeling of the sources of the EEG (i.e., the bioelectromagnetic inverse problem or source localization problem). Using the Helmholtz decomposition (HD) of the current density vector (CDV) of the primary current into an irrotational (I) and a solenoidal (S) part we show that only the irrotational part can contribute to the EEG measurements. In particular we present for the first time the HD of a dipole and of a pure irrotational source. We show that, for both kinds of sources, I extends all over the space independently of whether the source is spatially concentrated (as the dipole) or not. However, the divergence remains confined to a region coinciding with the expected location of the sources, confirming that it is the divergence rather than the CDV that really defines the spatial extension of the generators, from where it follows that an irrotational source model (ELECTRA) is always physiologically meaningful as long as the divergence remains confined to the brain. Finally we show that the irrotational source model remains valid for the most general electrodynamics model of the EEG in inhomogeneous anisotropic dispersive media and thus far beyond the (quasi) static approximation. PMID:26113873

  15. Ethics of neuroimaging after serious brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient outcome after serious brain injury is highly variable. Following a period of coma, some patients recover while others progress into a vegetative state (unresponsive wakefulness syndrome) or minimally conscious state. In both cases, assessment is difficult and misdiagnosis may be as high as 43%. Recent advances in neuroimaging suggest a solution. Both functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography have been used to detect residual cognitive function in vegetative and minimally conscious patients. Neuroimaging may improve diagnosis and prognostication. These techniques are beginning to be applied to comatose patients soon after injury. Evidence of preserved cognitive function may predict recovery, and this information would help families and health providers. Complex ethical issues arise due to the vulnerability of patients and families, difficulties interpreting negative results, restriction of communication to “yes” or “no” answers, and cost. We seek to investigate ethical issues in the use of neuroimaging in behaviorally nonresponsive patients who have suffered serious brain injury. The objectives of this research are to: (1) create an approach to capacity assessment using neuroimaging; (2) develop an ethics of welfare framework to guide considerations of quality of life; (3) explore the impact of neuroimaging on families; and, (4) analyze the ethics of the use of neuroimaging in comatose patients. Methods/Design Our research program encompasses four projects and uses a mixed methods approach. Project 1 asks whether decision making capacity can be assessed in behaviorally nonresponsive patients. We will specify cognitive functions required for capacity and detail their assessment. Further, we will develop and pilot a series of scenarios and questions suitable for assessing capacity. Project 2 examines the ethics of welfare as a guide for neuroimaging. It grounds an obligation to explore patients’ interests, and we

  16. Neuroimaging of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Cendes, Fernando; Theodore, William H; Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Sulc, Vlastimil; Cascino, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is pivotal in the evaluation and management of patients with seizure disorders. Elegant structural neuroimaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may assist in determining the etiology of focal epilepsy and demonstrating the anatomical changes associated with seizure activity. The high diagnostic yield of MRI to identify the common pathological findings in individuals with focal seizures including mesial temporal sclerosis, vascular anomalies, low-grade glial neoplasms and malformations of cortical development has been demonstrated. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the most commonly performed interictal functional neuroimaging technique that may reveal a focal hypometabolic region concordant with seizure onset. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies may assist performance of ictal neuroimaging in patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy being considered for neurosurgical treatment. This chapter highlights neuroimaging developments and innovations, and provides a comprehensive overview of the imaging strategies used to improve the care and management of people with epilepsy. PMID:27430454

  17. Functional neuroimaging in psychiatry.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, C H; McGuire, P K

    1999-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging is one of the most powerful means available for investigating the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. In this review, we shall focus on the different ways that it can be employed to this end, describing the major findings in the field in the context of different methodological approaches. We will also discuss practical issues that are particular to studying psychiatric disorders and the potential contribution of functional neuroimaging to future psychiatric research. PMID:10466156

  18. Childhood-Onset Schizophrenia: Insights from Neuroimaging Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gogtay, Nitin; Rapoport, Judith L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of longitudinal neuroimaging to study the developmental perspectives of brain pathology in children with childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS) is described. Structural neuroimaging is capable of providing evidence of neurobiological specificity of COS to distinguish it from other brain abnormalities seen in neuropsychiatric illnesses like…

  19. Turner Syndrome: Neuroimaging Findings--Structural and Functional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullaney, Ronan; Murphy, Declan

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of Turner syndrome can advance our understanding of the X chromosome in brain development, and the modulatory influence of endocrine factors. There is increasing evidence from neuroimaging studies that TX individuals have significant differences in the anatomy, function, and metabolism of a number of brain regions; including…

  20. Neuroimaging of neurocutaneous diseases.

    PubMed

    Nandigam, Kaveer; Mechtler, Laszlo L; Smirniotopoulos, James G

    2014-02-01

    An in-depth knowledge of the imaging characteristics of the common neurocutaneous diseases (NCD) described in this article will help neurologists understand the screening imaging modalities in these patients. The future of neuroimaging is geared towards developing and refining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. The detection of tumors in NCD has greatly improved with availability of high-field strength 3T MRI machines. Neuroimaging will remain at the heart and soul of the multidisciplinary care of such complex diagnoses to guide early detection and monitor treatment. PMID:24287389

  1. Neuroimaging and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Pliszka, Steve R.

    2005-01-01

    This review presents the most recent research concerning neuroimaging in developmental disabilities. Changes in structure and activation have been found in children with ADHD and learning disabilities, following intervention. For the children with learning disabilities changes in activation have been found following intensive behavioral and…

  2. Introduction to neuroimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Orrison, W.W.

    1989-01-01

    The author focuses on neuroradiology with emphasis on the current imaging modalities. There are chapters on angiography, myelography, nuclear medicine, ultrasonography, computer tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The other chapters are dedicated to the spine, skull, head and neck, and pediatric neuroimaging.

  3. Neuromarketing: the hope and hype of neuroimaging in business

    PubMed Central

    Ariely, Dan; Berns, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    The application of neuroimaging methods to product marketing — neuromarketing — has recently gained considerable popularity. We propose that there are two main reasons for this trend. First, the possibility that neuroimaging will become cheaper and faster than other marketing methods; and second, the hope that neuroimaging will provide marketers with information that is not obtainable through conventional marketing methods. Although neuroimaging is unlikely to be cheaper than other tools in the near future, there is growing evidence that it may provide hidden information about the consumer experience. The most promising application of neuroimaging methods to marketing may come before a product is even released — when it is just an idea being developed. PMID:20197790

  4. Neuroimaging and plasticity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Tost, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a frequent and highly heritable brain disorder that typically manifests around or after puberty and has a fluctuating course. Multiple lines of evidence point to a neurodevelopmental origin of the illness and suggest that its (post) pubertal manifestation is related to genetic and environmental risk factors that interfere with the structural and functional reorganization of neural networks at this time. Longitudinal structural neuroimaging studies point to a progressive reduction in gray matter volume in many brain regions in schizophrenia. It has been proposed that these neuroimaging observations reflect an enduring disturbance of experience-dependent synaptic plasticity arising from developmental abnormalities in key neural circuits implicated in schizophrenia, including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampal formation. Recent work has identified genetic variants linked to neural plasticity that are associated with changes in these circuits. Furthermore, non-invasive interventions such as transcranial magnetic stimulation have been shown to impact some of these systems-level intermediate phenotypes, suggesting a modifiability of these core pathophysiological processes of schizophrenia that may be exploited by therapy. PMID:23902983

  5. [Functional neuroimaging of addiction].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2015-09-01

    Positron emission tomography studies investigating dopamine release by drug or reward demonstrated blunted dopamine release in relation to addiction to psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. However, recent studies reported that nicotine and gambling addiction showed opposite results. Several factors such as illness stage or neurotoxicity of substances could be considered for this discrepancy. Behavioral addiction such as gambling disorder is a good target of neuroimaging because it is free from overt neurotoxicity. However, even in gambling disorder, the results of fMRI studies investigating neural response to reward are mixed. Neuroimaging together with taking the various backgrounds of patients into account should contribute not only to a better understanding of the neurobiology of addiction but also to the development of more effective and individually tailored treatment strategies for addiction. PMID:26394506

  6. Functional neuroimaging of autobiographical memory.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Roberto; St Jacques, Peggy

    2007-05-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies of autobiographical memory have grown dramatically in recent years. These studies are important because they can investigate the neural correlates of processes that are difficult to study using laboratory stimuli, including: (i) complex constructive processes, (ii) recollective qualities of emotion and vividness, and (iii) remote memory retrieval. Constructing autobiographical memories involves search, monitoring and self-referential processes that are associated with activity in separable prefrontal regions. The contributions of emotion and vividness have been linked to the amygdala and visual cortex respectively. Finally, there is evidence that recent and remote autobiographical memories might activate the hippocampus equally, which has implications for memory-consolidation theories. The rapid development of innovative methods for eliciting personal memories in the scanner provides the opportunity to delve into the functional neuroanatomy of our personal past. PMID:17382578

  7. A review of neuroimaging studies of stressor-evoked blood pressure reactivity: Emerging evidence for a brain-body pathway to coronary heart disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Gianaros, Peter J.; Sheu, Lei K.

    2009-01-01

    An individual's tendency to show exaggerated or otherwise dysregulated cardiovascular reactions to acute stressors has long been associated with increased risk for clinical and preclinical endpoints of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, the ‘brain-body’ pathways that link stressor-evoked cardiovascular reactions to CHD risk remain uncertain. This review summarizes emerging neuroimaging research indicating that individual differences in stressor-evoked blood pressure reactivity (a particular form of cardiovascular reactivity) are associated with activation patterns in corticolimbic brain areas that are jointly involved in processing stressors and regulating the cardiovascular system. As supported empirically by activation likelihood estimates derived from a meta-analysis, these corticolimbic areas include divisions of the cingulate cortex, insula, and amygdala—as well as networked cortical and subcortical areas involved in mobilizing hemodynamic and metabolic support for stress-related behavioral responding. Contextually, the research reviewed here illustrates how behavioral medicine and health neuroscience methods can be integrated to help characterize the ‘brain-body’ pathways that mechanistically link stressful experiences with CHD risk. PMID:19410652

  8. Neuroimaging resilience to stress: a review

    PubMed Central

    van der Werff, S. J. A.; van den Berg, S. M.; Pannekoek, J. N.; Elzinga, B. M.; van der Wee, N. J. A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a high degree of intra-individual variation in how individuals respond to stress. This becomes evident when exploring the development of posttraumatic symptoms or stress-related disorders after exposure to trauma. Whether or not an individual develops posttraumatic symptoms after experiencing a traumatic event is partly dependent on a person's resilience. Resilience can be broadly defined as the dynamic process encompassing positive adaptation within the context of significant adversity. Even though research into the neurobiological basis of resilience is still in its early stages, these insights can have important implications for the prevention and treatment of stress-related disorders. Neuroimaging studies contribute to our knowledge of intra-individual variability in resilience and the development of posttraumatic symptoms or other stress-related disorders. This review provides an overview of neuroimaging findings related to resilience. Structural, resting-state, and task-related neuroimaging results associated with resilience are discussed. There are a limited number of studies available and neuroimaging research of resilience is still in its infancy. The available studies point at brain circuitries involved in stress and emotion regulation, with more efficient processing and regulation associated with resilience. PMID:23675330

  9. Systematic Redaction for Neuroimage Data

    PubMed Central

    Matlock, Matt; Schimke, Nakeisha; Kong, Liang; Macke, Stephen; Hale, John

    2013-01-01

    In neuroscience, collaboration and data sharing are undermined by concerns over the management of protected health information (PHI) and personal identifying information (PII) in neuroimage datasets. The HIPAA Privacy Rule mandates measures for the preservation of subject privacy in neuroimaging studies. Unfortunately for the researcher, the management of information privacy is a burdensome task. Wide scale data sharing of neuroimages is challenging for three primary reasons: (i) A dearth of tools to systematically expunge PHI/PII from neuroimage data sets, (ii) a facility for tracking patient identities in redacted datasets has not been produced, and (iii) a sanitization workflow remains conspicuously absent. This article describes the XNAT Redaction Toolkit—an integrated redaction workflow which extends a popular neuroimage data management toolkit to remove PHI/PII from neuroimages. Quickshear defacing is also presented as a complementary technique for deidentifying the image data itself. Together, these tools improve subject privacy through systematic removal of PII/PHI. PMID:24179597

  10. A case study in electricity regulation: Theory, evidence, and policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luk, Stephen Kai Ming

    This research provides a thorough empirical analysis of the problem of excess capacity found in the electricity supply industry in Hong Kong. I utilize a cost-function based temporary equilibrium framework to investigate empirically whether the current regulatory scheme encourages the two utilities to overinvest in capital, and how much consumers would have saved if the underutilized capacity is eliminated. The research is divided into two main parts. The first section attempts to find any evidence of over-investment in capital. As a point of departure from traditional analysis, I treat physical capital as quasi-fixed, which implies a restricted cost function to represent the firm's short-run cost structure. Under such specification, the firm minimizes the cost of employing variable factor inputs subject to predetermined levels of quasi-fixed factors. Using a transcendental logarithmic restricted cost function, I estimate the cost-side equivalent of marginal product of capital, or commonly referred to as "shadow values" of capital. The estimation results suggest that the two electric utilities consistently over-invest in generation capacity. The second part of this research focuses on the economies of capital utilization, and the estimation of distortion cost in capital investment. Again, I utilize a translog specification of the cost function to estimate the actual cost of the excess capacity, and to find out how much consumers could have saved if the underutilized generation capacity were brought closer to the international standard. Estimation results indicate that an increase in the utilization rate can significantly reduce the costs of both utilities. And if the current excess capacity were reduced to the international standard, the combined savings in costs for both firms will reach 4.4 billion. This amount of savings, if redistributed to all consumers evenly, will translate into a 650 rebate per capita. Finally, two policy recommendations: a more stringent

  11. Neuroimaging of Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging, particularly that based upon functional magnetic resonance (fMRI), has become a dominant tool in cognitive neuroscience. This review provides a personal and selective perspective on its past, present, and future. Two trends currently characterize the field that broadly reflect a pursuit of “where”- and “how”-type questions. The latter addresses basic mechanisms related to the expression of task-induced neural activity and is likely to be an increasingly important theme in the future. This trend entails an enhanced symbiosis among investigators pursuing similar questions in fields such as computational and theoretical neuroscience as well as through the detailed analysis of microcircuitry. PMID:18995825

  12. Demand Response in U.S. Electricity Markets: Empirical Evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Kathan, David

    2009-06-01

    Empirical evidence concerning demand response (DR) resources is needed in order to establish baseline conditions, develop standardized methods to assess DR availability and performance, and to build confidence among policymakers, utilities, system operators, and stakeholders that DR resources do offer a viable, cost-effective alternative to supply-side investments. This paper summarizes the existing contribution of DR resources in U.S. electric power markets. In 2008, customers enrolled in existing wholesale and retail DR programs were capable of providing ~;;38,000 MW of potential peak load reductions in the United States. Participants in organized wholesale market DR programs, though, have historically overestimated their likely performance during declared curtailments events, but appear to be getting better as they and their agents gain experience. In places with less developed organized wholesale market DR programs, utilities are learning how to create more flexible DR resources by adapting legacy load management programs to fit into existing wholesale market constructs. Overall, the development of open and organized wholesale markets coupled with direct policy support by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has facilitated new entry by curtailment service providers, which has likely expanded the demand response industry and led to product and service innovation.

  13. Data sharing in neuroimaging research

    PubMed Central

    Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Breeze, Janis L.; Ghosh, Satrajit; Gorgolewski, Krzysztof; Halchenko, Yaroslav O.; Hanke, Michael; Haselgrove, Christian; Helmer, Karl G.; Keator, David B.; Marcus, Daniel S.; Poldrack, Russell A.; Schwartz, Yannick; Ashburner, John; Kennedy, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Significant resources around the world have been invested in neuroimaging studies of brain function and disease. Easier access to this large body of work should have profound impact on research in cognitive neuroscience and psychiatry, leading to advances in the diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric and neurological disease. A trend toward increased sharing of neuroimaging data has emerged in recent years. Nevertheless, a number of barriers continue to impede momentum. Many researchers and institutions remain uncertain about how to share data or lack the tools and expertise to participate in data sharing. The use of electronic data capture (EDC) methods for neuroimaging greatly simplifies the task of data collection and has the potential to help standardize many aspects of data sharing. We review here the motivations for sharing neuroimaging data, the current data sharing landscape, and the sociological or technical barriers that still need to be addressed. The INCF Task Force on Neuroimaging Datasharing, in conjunction with several collaborative groups around the world, has started work on several tools to ease and eventually automate the practice of data sharing. It is hoped that such tools will allow researchers to easily share raw, processed, and derived neuroimaging data, with appropriate metadata and provenance records, and will improve the reproducibility of neuroimaging studies. By providing seamless integration of data sharing and analysis tools within a commodity research environment, the Task Force seeks to identify and minimize barriers to data sharing in the field of neuroimaging. PMID:22493576

  14. Neuroimaging distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders†

    PubMed Central

    Crossley, Nicolas A.; Scott, Jessica; Ellison-Wright, Ian; Mechelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background It is unclear to what extent the traditional distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders reflects biological differences. Aims To examine neuroimaging evidence for the distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders. Method We performed an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis on voxel-based morphometry studies reporting decreased grey matter in 14 neurological and 10 psychiatric disorders, and compared the regional and network-level alterations for these two classes of disease. In addition, we estimated neuroanatomical heterogeneity within and between the two classes. Results Basal ganglia, insula, sensorimotor and temporal cortex showed greater impairment in neurological disorders; whereas cingulate, medial frontal, superior frontal and occipital cortex showed greater impairment in psychiatric disorders. The two classes of disorders affected distinct functional networks. Similarity within classes was higher than between classes; furthermore, similarity within class was higher for neurological than psychiatric disorders. Conclusions From a neuroimaging perspective, neurological and psychiatric disorders represent two distinct classes of disorders. PMID:26045351

  15. Neuroimaging of Graves' orbitopathy.

    PubMed

    Müller-Forell, Wibke; Kahaly, George J

    2012-06-01

    Neuroimaging of Graves' orbitopathy (GO) plays an important role in the differential diagnosis and interdisciplinary management of patients with GO. Orbital imaging is required in unclear or asymmetric proptosis, in suspected optic neuropathy and prior to decompression surgery. Especially computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging show the actual objective morphological findings, quantitative MR imaging giving additional information concerning the acuteness or chronicity of the disease. Major morphological diagnostic criteria include a spindle like spreading of the rectus muscles without involvement of the tendon, a compression of the optic nerve in the orbital apex (crowded orbital apex syndrome) and the absence of any space occupying intraorbital process. A longer lasting course of the disease may lead to a corresponding impression of the lamina papyracae, the normally parallel configured medial wall of the orbit, similar to a spontaneous decompression. PMID:22632363

  16. Provenance in neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie-Graham, Allan J; Van Horn, John D; Woods, Roger P; Crawford, Karen L; Toga, Arthur W

    2008-08-01

    Provenance, the description of the history of a set of data, has grown more important with the proliferation of research consortia-related efforts in neuroimaging. Knowledge about the origin and history of an image is crucial for establishing data and results quality; detailed information about how it was processed, including the specific software routines and operating systems that were used, is necessary for proper interpretation, high fidelity replication and re-use. We have drafted a mechanism for describing provenance in a simple and easy to use environment, alleviating the burden of documentation from the user while still providing a rich description of an image's provenance. This combination of ease of use and highly descriptive metadata should greatly facilitate the collection of provenance and subsequent sharing of data. PMID:18519166

  17. Neuroimaging in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, James D.; Hashemi, Nafiseh; Gelman, Rachel; Lee, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    In the past three decades, there have been countless advances in imaging modalities that have revolutionized evaluation, management, and treatment of neuro-ophthalmic disorders. Non-invasive approaches for early detection and monitoring of treatments have decreased morbidity and mortality. Understanding of basic methods of imaging techniques and choice of imaging modalities in cases encountered in neuro-ophthalmology clinic is critical for proper evaluation of patients. Two main imaging modalities that are often used are computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, variations of these modalities and appropriate location of imaging must be considered in each clinical scenario. In this article, we review and summarize the best neuroimaging studies for specific neuro-ophthalmic indications and the diagnostic radiographic findings for important clinical entities. PMID:23961025

  18. Neuroimaging: beginning to appreciate its complexities.

    PubMed

    Parens, Erik; Johnston, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    For over a century, scientists have sought to see through the protective shield of the human skull and into the living brain. Today, an array of technologies allows researchers and clinicians to create astonishingly detailed images of our brain's structure as well as colorful depictions of the electrical and physiological changes that occur within it when we see, hear, think and feel. These technologies-and the images they generate-are an increasingly important tool in medicine and science. Given the role that neuroimaging technologies now play in biomedical research, both neuroscientists and nonexperts should aim to be as clear as possible about how neuroimages are made and what they can-and cannot-tell us. Add to this that neuroimages have begun to be used in courtrooms at both the determination of guilt and sentencing stages, that they are being employed by marketers to refine advertisements and develop new products, that they are being sold to consumers for the diagnosis of mental disorders and for the detection of lies, and that they are being employed in arguments about the nature (or absence) of powerful concepts like free will and personhood, and the need for citizens to have a basic understanding of how this technology works and what it can and cannot tell us becomes even more pressing. PMID:24634082

  19. Neuroimaging findings in treatment-resistant schizophrenia: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Shinichiro; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Plitman, Eric; Fervaha, Gagan; Gerretsen, Philip; Caravaggio, Fernando; Chung, Jun Ku; Iwata, Yusuke; Remington, Gary; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent developments in neuroimaging have advanced understanding biological mechanisms underlying schizophrenia. However, neuroimaging correlates of treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS) and superior effects of clozapine on TRS remain unclear. Methods Systematic search was performed to identify neuroimaging characteristics unique to TRS and ultra-resistant schizophrenia (i.e. clozapine-resistant [URS]), and clozapine's efficacy in TRS using Embase, Medline, and PsychInfo. Search terms included (schizophreni*) and (resistan* OR refractory OR clozapine) and (ASL OR CT OR DTI OR FMRI OR MRI OR MRS OR NIRS OR PET OR SPECT). Results 25 neuroimaging studies have investigated TRS and effects of clozapine. Only 5 studies have compared TRS and non-TRS, collectively providing no replicated neuroimaging finding specific to TRS. Studies comparing TRS and healthy controls suggest hypometabolism in the prefrontal cortex, hypermetabolism in the basal ganglia, and structural anomalies in the corpus callosum contribute to TRS. Clozapine may increase prefrontal hypoactivation in TRS although this was not related to clinical improvement; in contrast, evidence has suggested a link between clozapine efficacy and decreased metabolism in the basal ganglia and thalamus. Conclusion Existing literature does not elucidate neuroimaging correlates specific to TRS or URS, which, if present, might also shed light on clozapine's efficacy in TRS. This said, leads from other lines of investigation, including the glutamatergic system can prove useful in guiding future neuroimaging studies focused on, in particular, the frontocortical-basal ganglia-thalamic circuits. Critical to the success of this work will be precise subtyping of study subjects based on treatment response/nonresponse and the use of multimodal neuroimaging. PMID:25684554

  20. Can structural neuroimaging be used to define phenotypes and course of schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Kerns, John G; Lauriello, John

    2012-09-01

    This article examines whether structural neuroimaging measures have been found to predict outcome in schizophrenia and whether changes in neuroimaging measures have been found to correlate with poor outcome in the disorder. Overall, there is little compelling evidence that structural neuroimaging measures in either first-episode or chronic patients predict future outcome. Progressive brain changes might reflect a neuroimaging phenotype associated with a worse course of the disorder. At the same time, there are many fruitful avenues that future research could take in an attempt to better predict future outcome or to identify specific imaging phenotypes associated with outcome. PMID:22929870

  1. Effects of the South American psychoactive beverage ayahuasca on regional brain electrical activity in humans: a functional neuroimaging study using low-resolution electromagnetic tomography.

    PubMed

    Riba, Jordi; Anderer, Peter; Jané, Francesc; Saletu, Bernd; Barbanoj, Manel J

    2004-01-01

    Ayahuasca, a South American psychotropic plant tea obtained from Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis, combines monoamine oxidase-inhibiting beta-carboline alkaloids with N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), a psychedelic agent showing 5-HT(2A) agonist activity. In a clinical research setting, ayahuasca has demonstrated a combined stimulatory and psychedelic effect profile, as measured by subjective effect self-assessment instruments and dose-dependent changes in spontaneous brain electrical activity, which parallel the time course of subjective effects. In the present study, the spatial distribution of ayahuasca-induced changes in brain electrical activity was investigated by means of low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA). Electroencephalography recordings were obtained from 18 volunteers after the administration of a dose of encapsulated freeze-dried ayahuasca containing 0.85 mg DMT/kg body weight and placebo. The intracerebral power density distribution was computed with LORETA from spectrally analyzed data, and subjective effects were measured by means of the Hallucinogen Rating Scale (HRS). Statistically significant differences compared to placebo were observed for LORETA power 60 and 90 min after dosing, together with increases in all six scales of the HRS. Ayahuasca decreased power density in the alpha-2, delta, theta and beta-1 frequency bands. Power decreases in the delta, alpha-2 and beta-1 bands were found predominantly over the temporo-parieto-occipital junction, whereas theta power was reduced in the temporomedial cortex and in frontomedial regions. The present results suggest the involvement of unimodal and heteromodal association cortex and limbic structures in the psychological effects elicited by ayahuasca. PMID:15179026

  2. Neuroimaging features of tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sobri, M; Merican, J S; Nordiyana, M; Valarmathi, S; Ai-Edrus, S A

    2006-03-01

    Tuberculous meningitis leads to a high mortality rate. However, it responds well to chemotherapy if the treatment is started early. Neuroimaging is one of the most important initial investigations. There were 42 patients diagnosed with tuberculous meningitis in Kuala Lumpur Hospital based on clinical criteria, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and response to anti-tuberculous treatment over a 7 year period. Relevant information was obtained from patients' medical case notes and neuroimaging findings were evaluated. Male to female ratio was 3:1. The three major ethnics and the immigrant groups in Malaysia were represented in this study. The majority of the cases involved the Malays followed by immigrants, Chinese and Indians. The patients' age ranged from 18 to 62 years old with the mean age of 34.4 years. There were 95.2% (n = 40) of patients who presented with various neuroimaging abnormalities and only 2 (4.8%) patients had normal neuroimaging findings. Hydrocephalus and meningeal enhancement were the two commonest neuroimaging features. Other features include infarction, enhancing lesion, tuberculoma, abcess, oedema and calcification. Contrasted CT scan is an adequate neuroimaging tool to unmask abnormal findings in tuberculous meningitis. PMID:16708732

  3. Neuroimaging in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Fredrikson, Mats; Faria, Vanda

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to evaluate neurofunctional and neurochemical alterations related to the generation and control of affect in patients with anxiety disorders are reviewed. We performed a meta-analysis of symptom provocation studies, where neural activity was measured using fMRI, PET or SPECT to test the hypothesis that prefrontal regions modulate amygdala activity. Data revealed that reactivity in the amygdala was enhanced in patients with phobia as well as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The dorsal anterior cingulate cortex was activated in concert with the amygdala, both in PTSD and in phobic states, suggesting a role in fear expression, rather than emotional control. Activity in emotion-regulating areas in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex including the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex and the medial orbitofrontal cortex was compromised in the symptomatic state in PTSD and phobic disorders, respectively. Increased amygdala reactivity was restored with psychological treatment. Treatment effects across different modalities including pharmacological and psychological interventions as well as with placebo regimens support that reduction of neural activity in the amygdala may be a final common pathway for successful therapeutic interventions irrespective of method, thereby linking neurotransmission to plasticity in a pivotal node of the core fear network of the brain. PMID:25225017

  4. Neuroimaging of spine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Nandor K; Pfiffner, Thomas J; Mechtler, Laszlo L

    2016-01-01

    Intramedullary, intradural/extramedullary, and extradural spine tumors comprise a wide range of neoplasms with an even wider range of clinical symptoms and prognostic features. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), commonly used to evaluate the spine in patients presenting with pain, can further characterize lesions that may be encountered on other imaging studies, such as bone scintigraphy or computed tomography (CT). The advantage of the MRI is its multiplane capabilities, superior contrast agent resolution, and flexible protocols that play an important role in assessing tumor location, extent in directing biopsy, in planning proper therapy, and in evaluating therapeutic results. A multimodality approach can be used to fully characterize the lesion and the combination of information obtained from the different modalities usually narrows the diagnostic possibilities significantly. The diagnosis of spinal tumors is based on patient age, topographic features of the tumor, and lesion pattern, as seen at CT and MRI. The shift to high-end imaging incorporating diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, whole-body short tau inversion recovery, positron emission tomography, intraoperative and high-field MRI as part of the mainstream clinical imaging protocol has provided neurologists, neuro-oncologists, and neurosurgeons a window of opportunity to assess the biologic behavior of spine neoplasms. This chapter reviews neuroimaging of spine tumors, primary and secondary, discussing routine and newer modalities that can reduce the significant morbidity associated with these neoplasms. PMID:27430436

  5. Electric field evidence for tailward flow at substorm onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishida, A.; Tulunay, Y. K.; Mozer, F. S.; Cattell, C. A.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Birn, J.

    1983-01-01

    Electric field observations made near the neutral sheet of the magnetotail provide additional support for the view that reconnection occurs in the near-earth region of the tail. Southward turnings of the magnetic field that start at, or shortly after, substorm onsets are accompanied by enhancements in the dawn-to-dusk electric field, resulting in a tailward E x B drift velocity. Both the magnetic and the electric fields in the tailward-flowing plasma are nonuniform and vary with inferred spatial scales of several earth radii in the events examined in this paper. These nonuniformities may be the consequence of the tearing-mode process. The E x B flow was also towards the neutral sheet and away from midnight in the events studied.

  6. Evidence for Subauroral Electric Fields from IMAGE EUV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor); Gallagher, D.; Adrian, M.; Goldstein, J.; Sandel, B.

    2002-01-01

    The IMAGE Mission Extreme Ultraviolet Imager routinely provides global snapshots of the plasmasphere from high latitude. In these 10-minute images, intensity edges have been identified with the plasmapause and other strong gradients in plasmaspheric density. In addition to the classic sunward directed convection tail and its entrainment in corotation during storm-time recovery, the plasmapause boundary reveals a wide variety of structures thought to result from penetration of the solar wind induced convection electric field to subauroral latitudes. The so-called shoulder feature has most prominently been discussed in the context of under shielding in response to changes in the convection electric field strength. It is not yet clear whether all of the observed surface structures on the plasmasphere can be explained in this manner. The types of structures observed and their frequency of occurrence will be presented. A statistical view of these structures and associated solar wind conditions will also be presented.

  7. Electric field exposure and evidence of stress in mice

    SciTech Connect

    De Bruyn, L.; De Jager, L. )

    1994-04-01

    The effect of stress induced by an electric field on the adrenal gland cortex of mice was examined by means of corticosterone serum assay and evaluation of the lipid profile of the different zones of the cortex. Six generations of experimental mice were exposed to a 10 kV/m electric field from conception and corresponding control groups were sham exposed. Mice were sacrificed at 35 days (n = 10), as adults (n = 20) and at 18 months (old mice) (n = 10). Blinded lipid estimates were performed on histological preparations of the adrenals, serum corticosterone levels were determined, and the results were statistically analyzed. The mean lipid volume in the zona glomerulosa of the exposed adult male group was significantly higher than that of the control group (P = 0.004). The median daytime corticosterone level of the exposed male mice was also significantly higher than that in the controls (P = 0.02). The lipid profiles and corticosterone values in the other subgroups did not differ significantly. As chronic stress increases the lipid volume of all the zones of the adrenal cortex and stimulates the zona glomerulosa to corticosterone secretion, the data suggest that the electric field acted as a chronic stressor in the adult male mice. 21 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Neuroimaging, culture, and forensic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Neil K

    2009-01-01

    The spread of neuroimaging technologies around the world has led to diverse practices of forensic psychiatry and the emergence of neuroethics and neurolaw. This article surveys the neuroethics and neurolegal literature on the use of forensic neuroimaging within the courtroom. Next, the related literature within medical anthropology and science and technology studies is reviewed to show how debates about forensic neuroimaging reflect cultural tensions about attitudes regarding the self, mental illness, and medical expertise. Finally, recommendations are offered on how forensic psychiatrists can add to this research, given their professional interface between law and medicine. At stake are the fundamental concerns that surround changing conceptions of the self, sickness, and expectations of medicine. PMID:19535562

  9. Recent Advances in Neuroimaging Biomarkers in Geriatric Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Khandai, Abhisek C.; Aizenstein, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging, both structural and functional, serve as useful adjuncts to clinical assessment, and can provide objective, reliable means of assessing disease presence and process in the aging population. In the following review we briefly explain current imaging methodologies. Then, we analyze recent developments in developing neuroimaging biomarkers for two highly prevalent disorders in the elderly population- Alzheimer's disease (AD) and late-life depression (LLD). In AD, efforts are focused on early diagnosis through in vivo visualization of disease pathophysiology. In LLD, recent imaging evidence supports the role of white matter ischemic changes in the pathogenesis of depression in the elderly, the “vascular hypothesis.” Finally, we discuss potential roles for neuroimaging biomarkers in geriatric psychiatry in the future. PMID:23636984

  10. Graphical neuroimaging informatics: application to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Bowman, Ian; Joshi, Shantanu H; Greer, Vaughan

    2014-06-01

    The Informatics Visualization for Neuroimaging (INVIZIAN) framework allows one to graphically display image and meta-data information from sizeable collections of neuroimaging data as a whole using a dynamic and compelling user interface. Users can fluidly interact with an entire collection of cortical surfaces using only their mouse. In addition, users can cluster and group brains according in multiple ways for subsequent comparison using graphical data mining tools. In this article, we illustrate the utility of INVIZIAN for simultaneous exploration and mining a large collection of extracted cortical surface data arising in clinical neuroimaging studies of patients with Alzheimer's Disease, mild cognitive impairment, as well as healthy control subjects. Alzheimer's Disease is particularly interesting due to the wide-spread effects on cortical architecture and alterations of volume in specific brain areas associated with memory. We demonstrate INVIZIAN's ability to render multiple brain surfaces from multiple diagnostic groups of subjects, showcase the interactivity of the system, and showcase how INVIZIAN can be employed to generate hypotheses about the collection of data which would be suitable for direct access to the underlying raw data and subsequent formal statistical analysis. Specifically, we use INVIZIAN show how cortical thickness and hippocampal volume differences between group are evident even in the absence of more formal hypothesis testing. In the context of neurological diseases linked to brain aging such as AD, INVIZIAN provides a unique means for considering the entirety of whole brain datasets, look for interesting relationships among them, and thereby derive new ideas for further research and study. PMID:24203652

  11. Electric Properties of Obsidian: Evidence for Positive Hole Charge Carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordvik, R.; Freund, F. T.

    2012-12-01

    The blackness of obsidian is due to the presence of oxygen anions in the valence state 1-, creating broad energy levels at the upper edge of the valence band, which absorb visible light over a wide spectral range. These energy states are associated with defect electrons in the oxygen anion sublattice, well-known from "smoky quartz", where Al substituting for Si captures a defect electron in the oxygen anion sublattice for charge compensation [1]. Such defect electrons, also known as positive holes, are responsible for the increase in electrical conductivity in igneous rocks when uniaxial stresses are applied, causing the break-up of pre-existing peroxy defects, Si-OO-Si [2]. Peroxy defects in obsidian cannot be so easily activated by mechanical stress because the glassy matrix will break before sufficiently high stress levels can be reached. If peroxy defects do exist, however, they can be studied by activating them thermally [3]. We describe experiments with rectangular slabs of obsidian with Au electrodes at both ends. Upon heating one end, we observe (i) a thermopotential and (ii) a thermocurrent developing at distinct temperatures around 250°C and 450°C, marking the 2-step break-up of peroxy bonds. [1] Schnadt, R., and Schneider, J.: The electronic structure of the trapped-hole center in smoky quartz, Zeitschrift Physik B Condensed Matter 11, 19-42, 1970. [2] Freund, F. T., Takeuchi, A., and Lau, B. W.: Electric currents streaming out of stressed igneous rocks - A step towards understanding pre-earthquake low frequency EM emissions, Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, 31, 389-396, 2006. [3] Freund, F., and Masuda, M. M.: Highly mobile oxygen hole-type charge carriers in fused silica, Journal Material Research, 8, 1619-1622, 1991.

  12. Neuroimaging of child abuse: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Heledd; Rubia, Katya

    2012-01-01

    Childhood maltreatment is a stressor that can lead to the development of behavior problems and affect brain structure and function. This review summarizes the current evidence for the effects of childhood maltreatment on behavior, cognition and the brain in adults and children. Neuropsychological studies suggest an association between child abuse and deficits in IQ, memory, working memory, attention, response inhibition and emotion discrimination. Structural neuroimaging studies provide evidence for deficits in brain volume, gray and white matter of several regions, most prominently the dorsolateral and ventromedial prefrontal cortex but also hippocampus, amygdala, and corpus callosum (CC). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies show evidence for deficits in structural interregional connectivity between these areas, suggesting neural network abnormalities. Functional imaging studies support this evidence by reporting atypical activation in the same brain regions during response inhibition, working memory, and emotion processing. There are, however, several limitations of the abuse research literature which are discussed, most prominently the lack of control for co-morbid psychiatric disorders, which make it difficult to disentangle which of the above effects are due to maltreatment, the associated psychiatric conditions or a combination or interaction between both. Overall, the better controlled studies that show a direct correlation between childhood abuse and brain measures suggest that the most prominent deficits associated with early childhood abuse are in the function and structure of lateral and ventromedial fronto-limbic brain areas and networks that mediate behavioral and affect control. Future, large scale multimodal neuroimaging studies in medication-naïve subjects, however, are needed that control for psychiatric co-morbidities in order to elucidate the structural and functional brain sequelae that are associated with early environmental adversity

  13. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation: Mechanisms, Clinical Application and Evidence

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-invasive, inexpensive, self-administered technique to relieve pain.There are few side effects and no potential for overdose so patients can titrate the treatment as required.TENS techniques include conventional TENS, acupuncture-like TENS and intense TENS. In general, conventional TENS is used in the first instance.The purpose of conventional TENS is to selectively activate large diameter non-noxious afferents (A-beta) to reduce nociceptor cell activity and sensitization at a segmental level in the central nervous system.Pain relief with conventional TENS is rapid in onset and offset and is maximal when the patient experiences a strong but non-painful paraesthesia beneath the electrodes. Therefore, patients may need to administer TENS throughout the day.Clinical experience suggests that TENS may be beneficial as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy for acute pain although systematic reviews are conflicting. Clinical experience and systematic reviews suggest that TENS is beneficial for chronic pain. PMID:26526976

  14. The structural neuroimaging of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Emsell, Louise; McDonald, Colm

    2009-01-01

    There is an increasing body of literature fuelled by advances in high-resolution structural MRI acquisition and image processing techniques which implicates subtle neuroanatomical abnormalities in the aetiopathogenesis of bipolar disorder. This account reviews the main findings from structural neuroimaging research into regional brain abnormalities, the impact of genetic liability and mood stabilizing medication on brain structure in bipolar disorder, and the overlapping structural deviations found in the allied disorders of schizophrenia and depression. The manifold challenges extant within neuroimaging research are highlighted with accompanying recommendations for future studies. The most consistent findings include preservation of total cerebral volume with regional grey and white matter structural changes in prefrontal, midline and anterior limbic networks, non-contingent ventriculomegaly and increased rates of white matter hyperintensities, with more pronounced deficits in juveniles suffering from the illness. There is increasing evidence that medication has observable effects on brain structure, whereby lithium status is associated with volumetric increase in the medial temporal lobe and anterior cingulate gyrus. However, research continues to be confounded by the use of highly heterogeneous methodology and clinical populations, in studies employing small scale, low-powered, cross-sectional designs. Future work should investigate larger, clinically homogenous groups of patients and unaffected relatives, combining both categorical and dimensional approaches to illness classification in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs in order to elucidate trait versus state mechanisms, genetic effects and medication/illness progression effects over time. PMID:20374145

  15. Application of fuzzy evidence theory in a photo-electric measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jianxun; Xiong, Maotao; Zhang, Jin; Wu, Qinzhang

    2009-05-01

    The photo-electric measurement system is a kind of high-precision measurement system for trajectory parameters and object identity parameters, and it can acquire the image information of flying objects by CCD camera. Due to subject to some kinds of reasons, the feature information of image is not integrated and imprecise, and it has uncertainty and fuzzy in some degree. The Dempster-Shafer evidence theory is an important approach of uncertainty reasoning. With evidences fused, the uncertainty of the feature information of the object is declined gradually by Dempster combination rule, so it can achieve the aim of object detection and object recognition. The conception of fuzzy mass is expanded in the way of the relation of absolute membership on the basis of normal mass conception. The fuzzy theory is very suitable for the description and processing of uncertainty to evidences in D-S evidence theory, so the Basic Probability Assignment Function (BPAF) of D-S evidence theory can be acquired according to fuzzy theory, and it resolves crucial problem in D-S evidence theory. It is shown that data fusion method of fuzzy evidence theory can deal with uncertainty and the fuzzy of photo-electric measurement system according to the analysis of theory and the result of experimentation, and it has a bright future in photo-electric measurement systems.

  16. Neuroimaging for psychotherapy research: Current trends

    PubMed Central

    WEINGARTEN, CAROL P.; STRAUMAN, TIMOTHY J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This article reviews neuroimaging studies that inform psychotherapy research. An introduction to neuroimaging methods is provided as background for the increasingly sophisticated breadth of methods and findings appearing in psychotherapy research. Method We compiled and assessed a comprehensive list of neuroimaging studies of psychotherapy outcome, along with selected examples of other types of studies that also are relevant to psychotherapy research. We emphasized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since it is the dominant neuroimaging modality in psychological research. Results We summarize findings from neuroimaging studies of psychotherapy outcome, including treatment for depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and schizophrenia. Conclusions The increasing use of neuroimaging methods in the study of psychotherapy continues to refine our understanding of both outcome and process. We suggest possible directions for future neuroimaging studies in psychotherapy research. PMID:24527694

  17. FUNCTIONAL NEUROIMAGING IN GERIATRIC DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Gunning, Faith M.; Smith, Gwenn S.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Abnormalities in specific cerebral networks likely confer vulnerability that increases the susceptibility for development of geriatric depression and impact the course of symptoms. Functional neuroimaging enables the in vivo identification of alterations in cerebral function that not only characterize disease vulnerability, but also may contribute to variability in depressive symptoms and antidepressant response. Judicious use of functional neuroimaging tools can advance pathophysiological models of geriatric depression. Furthermore, due to the age-related vulnerability of specific brain systems that have been implicated in mood disorders, geriatric depression provides a logical context within which to study the role of specific functional abnormalities in both antidepressant response and key behavioral and cognitive abnormalities of mood disorders. PMID:21536165

  18. Computational Modeling and Neuroimaging Techniques for Targeting during Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Jennifer A.; Pace, Jonathan; Girgis, Fady; Miller, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate surgical localization of the varied targets for deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a process undergoing constant evolution, with increasingly sophisticated techniques to allow for highly precise targeting. However, despite the fastidious placement of electrodes into specific structures within the brain, there is increasing evidence to suggest that the clinical effects of DBS are likely due to the activation of widespread neuronal networks directly and indirectly influenced by the stimulation of a given target. Selective activation of these complex and inter-connected pathways may further improve the outcomes of currently treated diseases by targeting specific fiber tracts responsible for a particular symptom in a patient-specific manner. Moreover, the delivery of such focused stimulation may aid in the discovery of new targets for electrical stimulation to treat additional neurological, psychiatric, and even cognitive disorders. As such, advancements in surgical targeting, computational modeling, engineering designs, and neuroimaging techniques play a critical role in this process. This article reviews the progress of these applications, discussing the importance of target localization for DBS, and the role of computational modeling and novel neuroimaging in improving our understanding of the pathophysiology of diseases, and thus paving the way for improved selective target localization using DBS. PMID:27445709

  19. Neuroimaging in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zivadinov, Robert; Cox, Jennifer L

    2007-01-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has routinely been used to improve the accuracy of multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and prognosis. Metrics derived from conventional MRI are now routinely used to detect therapeutic effects and extend clinical observations. However, conventional MRI measures, such as the use of lesion volume and count of gadolinium-enhancing and T2 lesions, have insufficient sensitivity and specificity to reveal the true degree of pathological changes occurring in MS. They cannot distinguish between inflammation, edema, demyelination, Wallerian degeneration, and axonal loss. In addition, they do not show a reliable correlation with clinical measures of disability and do not provide a complete assessment of therapeutic outcomes. Recent neuropathologic studies of typical chronic MS brains reveal macroscopic demyelination in cortical and deep gray matter (GM) that cannot be detected by currently available MRI techniques. Therefore, there is a pressing need for the development of newer MRI techniques to detect these lesions. Newer metrics of MRI analysis, including T1-weighted hypointense lesions, central nervous system atrophy measures, magnetization transfer imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and diffusion tensor imaging, are able to capture a more global picture of the range of tissue alterations caused by inflammation and neurodegeneration. At this time, they provide the only proof--albeit indirect--that important occult pathology is occurring in the GM. However, evidence is increasing that these nonconventional MRI measures correlate better with both existing and developing neurological impairment and disability when compared to conventional metrics. PMID:17531854

  20. How Is Pain Influenced by Cognition? Neuroimaging Weighs In

    PubMed Central

    Wager, Tor D.; Atlas, Lauren Y.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging can inform cognitive theories to the extent that particular patterns of brain activity are sensitively and specifically associated with particular types of cognitive processes. We illustrate the utility of neuroimaging data in one specific case: understanding cognitive influences on pain. We first argue that pain self-reports are often inadequate to fully characterize pain experience and the processes that underlie it. Then, we describe how neuroimaging measures have been used to corroborate the effects of psychological manipulations on pain by focusing on placebo treatments and demonstrating effects on the best available correlates of pain experience. In addition, using placebo analgesia as an example, we argue that brain evidence is useful for building psychological theories likely to yield valid and generalizable predictions, because biologically informed theories are grounded in the constraints inherent in the relevant physiological systems. Finally, we suggest that neuroimaging findings will become increasingly useful for constraining psychological inference as brain patterns diagnostic of particular types of mental events are identified and characterized. In our view, the relationships between biological findings and cognitive theory are empirically based and must develop through an iterative process of synthesis across studies, topics, and methods. PMID:24761154

  1. Neuroimaging of Aggressive and Violent Behaviour in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Sterzer, Philipp; Stadler, Christina

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, a number of functional and structural neuroimaging studies have investigated the neural bases of aggressive and violent behaviour in children and adolescents. Most functional neuroimaging studies have persued the hypothesis that pathological aggression is a consequence of deficits in the neural circuits involved in emotion processing. There is converging evidence for abnormal neural responses to emotional stimuli in youths with a propensity towards aggressive behaviour. In addition, recent neuroimaging work has suggested that aggressive behaviour is also associated with abnormalities in neural processes that subserve both the inhibitory control of behaviour and the flexible adaptation of behaviour in accord with reinforcement information. Structural neuroimaging studies in children and adolescents with conduct problems are still scarce, but point to deficits in brain structures in volved in the processing of social information and in the regulation of social and goal-directed behaviour. The indisputable progress that this research field has made in recent years notwithstanding, the overall picture is still rather patchy and there are inconsistencies between studies that await clarification. Despite this, we attempt to provide an integrated view on the neural abnormalities that may contribute to various forms of juvenile aggression and violence, and discuss research strategies that may help to provide a more profound understanding of these important issues in the future. PMID:19862349

  2. Delirium and hypovitaminosis D: neuroimaging findings.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, James A; Hategan, Ana; Ford, Jennifer; Tisi, Daniel K; Xiong, Glen L

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the frequency of neuroimaging findings of cortical atrophy and/or cerebrovascular disease in patients with delirium with hypovitaminosis D and normal vitamin D levels. Of 32 patients with delirium with hypovitaminosis D who were neuroimaged, 91.4% had neuroimaging findings, despite only five cases having a comorbid diagnosis of dementia. Similar frequencies of cortical atrophy and/or cerebrovascular disease were found in patients with delirium with normal vitamin D levels. Further research with a larger sample size is needed to compare neuroimaging findings between normal patients and patients with hypovitaminosis D with delirium. PMID:25111282

  3. Neuroimaging Week: A Novel, Engaging, and Effective Curriculum for Teaching Neuroimaging to Junior Psychiatric Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downar, Jonathan; Krizova, Adriana; Ghaffar, Omar; Zaretsky, Ari

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Neuroimaging techniques are increasingly important in psychiatric research and clinical practice, but few postgraduate psychiatry programs offer formal training in neuroimaging. To address this need, the authors developed a course to prepare psychiatric residents to use neuroimaging techniques effectively in independent practice.…

  4. Electric field driven fractal growth in polymer electrolyte composites: Experimental evidence of theoretical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawar, Anit; Chandra, Amita

    2012-11-01

    The influence of electric field on the diffusion limited aggregation has been observed experimentally. The observation provides experimental confirmation of the theoretical model proposed by Zhi-Jie Tan et al. [Phys. Lett. A 268 (2000) 112]. Most strikingly, a transition from a disordered ramified pattern to an ordered pattern (chain-like growth) has been observed. The growth is governed by diffusion, convection and migration in an electric field which give rise to the different patterns. This Letter can also be considered as an experimental evidence of computer simulated fractal growth given by Huang and Hibbert [Physica A 233 (1996) 888].

  5. Tinnitus: perspectives from human neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Langguth, Berthold; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2015-10-01

    Tinnitus is the perception of phantom sound in the absence of a corresponding external source. It is a highly prevalent disorder, and most cases are caused by cochlear injury that leads to peripheral deafferentation, which results in adaptive changes in the CNS. In this article we critically assess the recent neuroimaging studies in individuals with tinnitus that suggest that the disorder is accompanied by functional and structural brain abnormalities in distributed auditory and non-auditory brain regions. Moreover, we consider how the identification of the neuronal mechanisms underlying the different forms of tinnitus would benefit from larger studies, replication and comprehensive clinical assessment of patients. PMID:26373470

  6. Neuroimaging of scoliosis in childhood.

    PubMed

    Kim, F M; Poussaint, T Y; Barnes, P D

    1999-02-01

    A curvature abnormality may be the initial or major presenting feature in a child with disease of the spinal column or spinal neuraxis. A simplified classification of common spinal curvature abnormalities of childhood include idiopathic, congenital/dysraphic, skeletal dysplasia, neurofibromatosis, and painful. The great majority of childhood scoliosis falls into the idiopathic category. Atypical clinical or radiographic features in a presumed idiopathic scoliosis may indicate an otherwise occult tumor or hydrosyringomyelia, or may be a consequence of increasing curvature with disk protrusion, nerve impingement, or cord attenuation. Neuroimaging beyond plain films is commonly necessary for atypical idiopathic scoliosis and for the other categories of scoliosis listed. PMID:9974506

  7. Neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Pope, Whitney B; Djoukhadar, Ibrahim; Jackson, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is integral to the management of patients with brain tumors. Conventional structural imaging provides exquisite anatomic detail but remains limited in the evaluation of molecular characteristics of intracranial neoplasms. Quantitative and physiologic biomarkers derived from advanced imaging techniques have been increasingly utilized as problem-solving tools to identify glioma grade and assess response to therapy. This chapter provides a comprehensive overview of the imaging strategies used in the clinical assessment of patients with gliomas and describes how novel imaging biomarkers have the potential to improve patient management. PMID:26948347

  8. Evidence for deterministic chaos as the origin of electrical tree breakdown structures in polymeric insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, S. J.; Dissado, L. A.; Champion, J. V.; Alison, J. M.

    1995-12-01

    Electrical discharges were measured during the propagation stage of electrical tree breakdown in an epoxy resin. An analysis of their number sequence provides strong evidence for the existence of an underlying deterministic chaotic mechanism. The fractal dimension of the tree and that of the reconstructed attractor and Lyapunov exponent were found to be related. The higher fractal dimension tree (dt~1.9) is associated with an attractor dimension df~3.1 and Lyapunov exponent λ~0.008 bit/s. The lower fractal dimension tree (dt~1.5) is associated with values of df~3.56 and λ~0.028 bit/s. No evidence for the presence of random stochastic processes, an essential ingredient of the dielectric breakdown model, has been found.

  9. Neuroimaging of Freezing of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Alfonso; Herman, Talia; Tessitore, Alessandro; Strafella, Antonio P.; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Functional brain imaging techniques appear ideally suited to explore the pathophysiology of freezing of gait (FOG). In the last two decades, techniques based on magnetic resonance or nuclear medicine imaging have found a number of structural changes and functional disconnections between subcortical and cortical regions of the locomotor network in patients with FOG. FOG seems to be related in part to disruptions in the “executive-attention” network along with regional tissue loss including the premotor area, inferior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, the parietal and occipital areas involved in visuospatial functions of the right hemisphere. Several subcortical structures have been also involved in the etiology of FOG, principally the caudate nucleus and the locomotor centers in the brainstem. Maladaptive neural compensation may present transiently in the presence of acute conflicting motor, cognitive or emotional stimulus processing, thus causing acute network overload and resulting in episodic impairment of stepping. In this review we will summarize the state of the art of neuroimaging research for FOG. We will also discuss the limitations of current approaches and delineate the next steps of neuroimaging research to unravel the pathophysiology of this mysterious motor phenomenon. PMID:25757831

  10. What's new in neuroimaging methods?

    PubMed Central

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid advancement of neuroimaging methodology and availability has transformed neuroscience research. The answers to many questions that we ask about how the brain is organized depend on the quality of data that we are able to obtain about the locations, dynamics, fluctuations, magnitudes, and types of brain activity and structural changes. In this review, an attempt is made to take a snapshot of the cutting edge of a small component of the very rapidly evolving field of neuroimaging. For each area covered, a brief context is provided along with a summary of a few of the current developments and issues. Then, several outstanding papers, published in the past year or so, are described, providing an example of the directions in which each area is progressing. The areas covered include functional MRI (fMRI), voxel based morphometry (VBM), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG), optical imaging, and positron emission tomography (PET). More detail is included on fMRI, as subsections include: functional MRI interpretation, new functional MRI contrasts, MRI technology, MRI paradigms and processing, and endogenous oscillations in functional MRI. PMID:19338512

  11. [Network analyses in neuroimaging studies].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Shigeki; Yamada, Makiko

    2013-06-01

    Neurons are anatomically and physiologically connected to each other, and these connections are involved in various neuronal functions. Multiple important neural networks involved in neurodegenerative diseases can be detected using network analyses in functional neuroimaging. First, the basic methods and theories of voxel-based network analyses, such as principal component analysis, independent component analysis, and seed-based analysis, are described. Disease- and symptom-specific brain networks have been identified using glucose metabolism images in patients with Parkinson's disease. These networks enable us to objectively evaluate individual patients and serve as diagnostic tools as well as biomarkers for therapeutic interventions. Many functional MRI studies have shown that "hub" brain regions, such as the posterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, are deactivated by externally driven cognitive tasks; such brain regions form the "default mode network." Recent studies have shown that this default mode network is disrupted from the preclinical phase of Alzheimer's disease and is associated with amyloid deposition in the brain. Some recent studies have shown that the default mode network is also impaired in Parkinson's disease, whereas other studies have shown inconsistent results. These incongruent results could be due to the heterogeneous pharmacological status, differences in mesocortical dopaminergic impairment status, and concomitant amyloid deposition. Future neuroimaging network analysis studies will reveal novel and interesting findings that will uncover the pathomechanisms of neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:23735528

  12. Neuroimaging in repetitive brain trauma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sports-related concussions are one of the major causes of mild traumatic brain injury. Although most patients recover completely within days to weeks, those who experience repetitive brain trauma (RBT) may be at risk for developing a condition known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). While this condition is most commonly observed in athletes who experience repetitive concussive and/or subconcussive blows to the head, such as boxers, football players, or hockey players, CTE may also affect soldiers on active duty. Currently, the only means by which to diagnose CTE is by the presence of phosphorylated tau aggregations post-mortem. Non-invasive neuroimaging, however, may allow early diagnosis as well as improve our understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of RBT. The purpose of this article is to review advanced neuroimaging methods used to investigate RBT, including diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, functional magnetic resonance imaging, susceptibility weighted imaging, and positron emission tomography. While there is a considerable literature using these methods in brain injury in general, the focus of this review is on RBT and those subject populations currently known to be susceptible to RBT, namely athletes and soldiers. Further, while direct detection of CTE in vivo has not yet been achieved, all of the methods described in this review provide insight into RBT and will likely lead to a better characterization (diagnosis), in vivo, of CTE than measures of self-report. PMID:25031630

  13. Smoking and Neuroimaging: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kober, Hedy; DeLeone, Cameron M.

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a significant public health concern, often resulting in nicotine dependence, a chronic-relapsing psychiatric diagnosis that is responsible for up to 10% of the global cardiovascular disease burden. Due to its significantly deleterious effects on health, much research has been dedicated to elucidating the underlying neurobiology of smoking. This brief article is intended to provide a digestible synopsis of the considerable research being conducted on the underlying neural bases of cigarette smoking and nicotine dependence, especially for cardiologists who are often at the front lines of treating nicotine dependence. To this end, we first review some of the most common neuroimaging methodologies used in the study of smoking, as well as the most recent findings from this exciting area of research. Then, we focus on several fundamental topics including the acute pharmacological effects, acute neurocognitive effects, and the long-term neurobiological effects associated with smoking. We finally review recent findings regarding the neuropsychological processes associated with smoking cessation, including cue-induced craving and regulation of craving. Research in this field beginning to uncover how some of these neuropsychological processes are similar across clinical disorders which cardiologists also encounter frequently, such as craving for food resulting in overeating. We conclude with recommendations for future neuroimaging work on these topics. PMID:24432182

  14. Neuroimaging of Cognitive Load in Instructional Multimedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews research literature on cognitive load measurement in learning and neuroimaging, and describes a mapping between the main elements of cognitive load theory and findings in functional neuroanatomy. It is argued that these findings may lead to the improved measurement of cognitive load using neuroimaging. The paper describes how…

  15. Neuroimaging and Research into Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabourin, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Neuroimaging techniques are becoming not only more and more sophisticated but are also coming to be increasingly accessible to researchers. One thing that one should take note of is the potential of neuroimaging research within second language acquisition (SLA) to contribute to issues pertaining to the plasticity of the adult brain and to general…

  16. Mechanisms underlying sporadic cerebral small vessel disease: insights from neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, JM; Smith, C; Dichgans, M

    2013-01-01

    The term “cerebral small vessel disease” (SVD) describes a range of neuroimaging, pathological and associated clinical features. The latter range from none, to discrete focal neurological symptoms (stroke), to insidious global neurological dysfunction and dementia. The public health burden is considerable. The pathogenesis is largely unknown. Although associated with vascular risk factors, and generally considered to result from an intrinsic cerebral arteriolar occlusive disease, the pathological processes leading to the arteriolar disease, how these result in brain disease, how SVD lesions contribute to neurological or cognitive symptoms and the relationship to risk factors, have been the subject of much speculation. Pathology often reflects end-stage disease making determination of the earliest stages difficult. Neuroimaging provides considerable insights: the small vessels are not easily seen themselves, but the effects of their malfunction on the brain can be tracked on detailed brain imaging. We review the growing evidence for the most likely mechanisms. PMID:23602162

  17. FAST Observations of Acceleration Processes in the Cusp--Evidence for Parallel Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.. Jr.; Carlson, C.; McFadden, J.; Ergun, R.; Clemmons, J.; Klumpar D.; Strangeway, R.

    1999-01-01

    The existence of precipitating keV ions in the Earth's cusp originating at the magnetosheath provide unique means to test our understanding of particle acceleration and parallel electric fields in the lower altitude acceleration region. On numerous occasions, the FAST (The Fast Auroral Snapshot) spacecraft has encountered the Earth's cusp regions near its apogee of 4175 km which are characterized by their signatures of dispersed keV ion injections. The FAST instruments also reveal a complex microphysics inherent to many, but not all, of the cusp regions encountered by the spacecraft, that include upgoing ion beams and conics, inverted-V electrons, upgoing electron beams, and spikey DC-coupled electric fields and plasma waves. Detailed inspection of the FAST data often show clear modulation of the precipitating magnetosheath ions that indicate that they are affected by local electric potentials. For example, the magnetosheath ion precipitation is sometimes abruptly shut off precisely in regions where downgoing localized inverted-V electrons are observed. Such observations support the existence of a localized process, such as parallel electric fields, above the spacecraft which accelerate the electrons downward and consequently impede the precipitating ion precipitation. Other acceleration events in the cusp are sometimes organized with an apparent cellular structure that suggests Alfven waves or other large-scale phenomena are controlling the localized potentials. We examine several cusp encounters by the FAST satellite where the modulation of energetic session on acceleration particle populations reveals evidence of localized acceleration, most likely by parallel electric fields.

  18. Worldwide Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Maria C; Bain, Lisa J; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Weiner, Michael W

    2012-07-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) was launched in 2003 to speed drug development by validating imaging and blood/cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease clinical treatment trials. ADNI is a naturalistic (nontreatment) multisite longitudinal study. A true public-private partnership, the first phase of ADNI (ADNI 1) set a new standard for data sharing without embargo. In addition, it has been extended to 2017 by additional funding (North American-ADNI Grand Opportunities and ADNI 2) as well as multiple projects around the world, collectively known as Worldwide ADNI (WW-ADNI). The goal of WW-ADNI is to harmonize projects and results across different geographical sites and to encourage and harmonize data management and availability to investigators around the world. WW-ADNI projects are currently underway in North America, Europe, Japan, Australia, Korea, Taiwan, and Argentina, with a nascent program in China and a possible future program in Brazil. PMID:22748939

  19. Integrating Genetic, Psychopharmacological and Neuroimaging Studies: A Converging Methods Approach to Understanding the Neurobiology of ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durston, Sarah; Konrad, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to illustrate how combining multiple approaches can inform us about the neurobiology of ADHD. Converging evidence from genetic, psychopharmacological and functional neuroimaging studies has implicated dopaminergic fronto-striatal circuitry in ADHD. However, while the observation of converging evidence from multiple vantage points…

  20. Neuroimaging studies of word reading

    PubMed Central

    Fiez, Julie A.; Petersen, Steven E.

    1998-01-01

    This review discusses how neuroimaging can contribute to our understanding of a fundamental aspect of skilled reading: the ability to pronounce a visually presented word. One contribution of neuroimaging is that it provides a tool for localizing brain regions that are active during word reading. To assess the extent to which similar results are obtained across studies, a quantitative review of nine neuroimaging investigations of word reading was conducted. Across these studies, the results converge to reveal a set of areas active during word reading, including left-lateralized regions in occipital and occipitotemporal cortex, the left frontal operculum, bilateral regions within the cerebellum, primary motor cortex, and the superior and middle temporal cortex, and medial regions in the supplementary motor area and anterior cingulate. Beyond localization, the challenge is to use neuroimaging as a tool for understanding how reading is accomplished. Central to this challenge will be the integration of neuroimaging results with information from other methodologies. To illustrate this point, this review will highlight the importance of spelling-to-sound consistency in the transformation from orthographic (word form) to phonological (word sound) representations, and then explore results from three neuroimaging studies in which the spelling-to-sound consistency of the stimuli was deliberately varied. Emphasis is placed on the pattern of activation observed within the left frontal cortex, because the results provide an example of the issues and benefits involved in relating neuroimaging results to behavioral results in normal and brain damaged subjects, and to theoretical models of reading. PMID:9448259

  1. Direct Evidence for Daily Plasticity of Electrical Coupling between Rod Photoreceptors in the Mammalian Retina

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Nan Ge

    2016-01-01

    Rod photoreceptors are electrically coupled through gap junctions. Coupling is a key determinant of their light response properties, but whether rod electrical coupling is dynamically regulated remains elusive and controversial. Here, we have obtained direct measurements of the conductance between adjacent rods in mouse retina and present evidence that rod electrical coupling strength is dependent on the time of day, the lighting conditions, and the mouse strain. Specifically, we show in CBA/Ca mice that under circadian conditions, the rod junctional conductance has a median value of 98 pS during the subjective day and of 493 pS during the subjective night. In C57BL/6 mice, the median junctional conductance between dark-adapted rods is ∼140 pS, regardless of the time in the circadian cycle. Adaptation to bright light decreases the rod junctional conductance to ∼0 pS, regardless of the time of day or the mouse strain. Together, these results establish the high degree of plasticity of rod electrical coupling over the course of the day. Estimates of the rod coupling strength will provide a foundation for further investigations of rod interactions and the role of rod coupling in the ability of the visual system to anticipate, assimilate, and respond to the daily changes in ambient light intensity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many cells in the CNS communicate via gap junctions, or electrical synapses, the regulation of which remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the strength of electrical coupling between rod photoreceptors of the retina is regulated by the time of day and the lighting conditions. This mechanism may help us understand some key aspects of day and night vision as well as some visual malfunctions. PMID:26740659

  2. Defining the neurocircuitry of borderline personality disorder: functional neuroimaging approaches.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Gary R; Stern, Emily; Silbersweig, David A

    2005-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging recently has been used to localize brain dysfunction in borderline personality disorder (BPD). Initial studies have examined baseline activity or emotional reactivity, and our group has investigated what we consider to be a crucial interaction between negative emotion and behavioral (dys)control. This research is beginning to identify abnormal frontolimbic circuitry likely underlying core clinical features of this condition. We review the evidence for dysfunction in specific frontolimbic regions, leading to a mechanistic model of symptom formation in BPD. In addition, we offer an integration of these neuroimaging findings with developmental perspectives on the emergence of borderline psychopathology, focusing on the ways in which early psychosocial experience may interact with developing brain systems. We also consider possible mechanisms of psychotherapeutic change at the neural systems level in BPD. Finally, we propose that future neuroimaging studies of BPD should integrate multiple levels of observation (structural, functional, neurochemical, genetic, and clinical) in a model-driven fashion to further understand the dynamic relationship between biological and psychological factors in the development and treatment of this difficult condition. PMID:16613437

  3. Neurochemistry of schizophrenia: the contribution of neuroimaging postmortem pathology and neurochemistry in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Dean, B

    2012-01-01

    The advent of molecular neuroimaging has greatly impacted on understanding the neurochemical changes occurring in the CNS from subjects with psychiatric disorders, especially schizophrenia. This review focuses on the outcomes from studies using positron emission tomography and single photon emission computer tomography that have measure levels of neurotransmitter receptors and transporters in the CNS from subjects with schizophrenia. One outcome from such studies is the confirmation of a number of findings using postmortem tissue, but in the case of neuroimaging, using drug na�ve and drug free subjects. These findings add weight to the argument that findings from postmortem studies are not an artifact of tissue processing or a simple drug effect. However, there are some important unique findings from studies using neuroimaging studies. These include evidence to suggest that in schizophrenia there are alterations in dopamine synthesis and release, which are not accompanied by an appropriate down-regulation of dopamine D2 receptors. There are also data that would support the notion that decreased levels of serotonin 2A receptors may be an early marker of the onset of schizophrenia. Whilst there is a clear need for on-going development of neuroimaging ligands to expand the number of targets that can be studied and to increase cohort sizes in neuroimaging studies to give power to the analyses of the resulting data, current studies show that existing neuroimaging studies have already extended our understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID:23279177

  4. Neuroimaging Biomarkers of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Risacher, Shannon L.; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders leading to dementia are common diseases that affect many older and some young adults. Neuroimaging methods are important tools for assessing and monitoring pathological brain changes associated with progressive neurodegenerative conditions. In this review, the authors describe key findings from neuroimaging studies (magnetic resonance imaging and radionucleotide imaging) in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and prodromal stages, familial and atypical AD syndromes, frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with and without dementia, Parkinson’s disease with and without dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, and prion protein associated diseases (i.e., Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease). The authors focus on neuroimaging findings of in vivo pathology in these disorders, as well as the potential for neuroimaging to provide useful information for differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24234359

  5. Neuroimaging of the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Elliott, Mark A.; Ruparel, Kosha; Loughead, James; Prabhakaran, Karthik; Calkins, Monica E.; Hopson, Ryan; Jackson, Chad; Keefe, Jack; Riley, Marisa; Mensh, Frank D.; Sleiman, Patrick; Verma, Ragini; Davatzikos, Christos; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2013-01-01

    The Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort (PNC) is a large-scale, NIMH funded initiative to understand how brain maturation mediates cognitive development and vulnerability to psychiatric illness, and understand how genetics impacts this process. As part of this study, 1,445 adolescents ages 8–21 at enrollment underwent multimodal neuroimaging. Here, we highlight the conceptual basis for the effort, the study design, and measures available in the dataset. We focus on neuroimaging measures obtained, including T1-weighted structural neuroimaging, diffusion tensor imaging, perfusion neuroimaging using arterial spin labeling, functional imaging tasks of working memory and emotion identification, and resting state imaging of functional connectivity. Furthermore, we provide characteristics regarding the final sample acquired. Finally, we describe mechanisms in place for data sharing that will allow the PNC to become a freely available public resource to advance our understanding of normal and pathological brain development. PMID:23921101

  6. Developments in functional neuroimaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Aine, C.J.

    1995-03-01

    A recent review of neuroimaging techniques indicates that new developments have primarily occurred in the area of data acquisition hardware/software technology. For example, new pulse sequences on standard clinical imagers and high-powered, rapidly oscillating magnetic field gradients used in echo planar imaging (EPI) have advanced MRI into the functional imaging arena. Significant developments in tomograph design have also been achieved for monitoring the distribution of positron-emitting radioactive tracers in the body (PET). Detector sizes, which pose a limit on spatial resolution, have become smaller (e.g., 3--5 mm wide) and a new emphasis on volumetric imaging has emerged which affords greater sensitivity for determining locations of positron annihilations and permits smaller doses to be utilized. Electromagnetic techniques have also witnessed growth in the ability to acquire data from the whole head simultaneously. EEG techniques have increased their electrode coverage (e.g., 128 channels rather than 16 or 32) and new whole-head systems are now in use for MEG. But the real challenge now is in the design and implementation of more sophisticated analyses to effectively handle the tremendous amount of physiological/anatomical data that can be acquired. Furthermore, such analyses will be necessary for integrating data across techniques in order to provide a truly comprehensive understanding of the functional organization of the human brain.

  7. Structural and electric evidence of ferrielectric state in Pb₂MnWO₆ double perovskite system.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, Fabio; Righi, Lara; Cabassi, Riccardo; Delmonte, Davide; Pernechele, Chiara; Bolzoni, Fulvio; Mezzadri, Francesco; Solzi, Massimo; Merlini, Marco; Calestani, Gianluca

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we describe the new ferri-electric compound Pb2MnWO6 (PMW), a double perovskite that can be considered as a novel structural prototype showing complex nuclear structure and interesting electric properties. According to single-crystal synchrotron data, PMW crystallizes in the noncentrosymmetric polar group Pmc21, in which the two symmetry-independent lead atoms give rise to a ferrielectric arrangement. The accurate crystallographic characterization indicates the presence of a complex distortion of the perovskite lattice driven by the local instability induced by the 6s(2) lone pair of the lead atoms. These peculiar structural features are confirmed by the complete electrical characterization of the system. Dielectric and transport measurements indicate an insulating character of the sample, while pyroelectric measurements point out a ferrielectric state characterized by different contributions. The magnetic transition at 45 K is accompanied by a magnetostrictive effect indicating a probable spin-lattice coupling. The characterizations carried out on PMW, showing the evidence of a coexistence of antiferromagnetism and ferrielectricity at low temperature, could lead to the definition of a new class of multiferroic materials. PMID:25197959

  8. Neuroimaging of schizophrenia: structural abnormalities and pathophysiological implications

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Peter F

    2005-01-01

    Schizophrenia, once considered a psychological malady devoid of any organic brain substrate, has been the focus of intense neuroimaging research. Findings reveal mild but generalized tissue loss as well as more selective focal loss. It is unclear whether these abnormalities reflect neurodevelopmental or neurodegenerative processes, or some combination of each; current evidence favors a preponderance of neurodevelopmental abnormalities. The pattern of brain abnormalities is also influenced by environmental and genetic risk factors, as well as by the course (and possibly even treatment) of this illness. These findings are described in this article. PMID:18568069

  9. Neuroimaging of Central Sensitivity Syndromes: Key Insights from the Scientific Literature.

    PubMed

    Walitt, Brian; Ceko, Marta; Gracely, John L; Gracely, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    Central sensitivity syndromes are characterized by distressing symptoms, such as pain and fatigue, in the absence of clinically obvious pathology. The scientific underpinnings of these disorders are not currently known. Modern neuroimaging techniques promise new insights into mechanisms mediating these postulated syndromes. We review the results of neuroimaging applied to five central sensitivity syndromes: fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular joint disorder, and vulvodynia syndrome. Neuroimaging studies of basal metabolism, anatomic constitution, molecular constituents, evoked neural activity, and treatment effect are compared across all of these syndromes. Evoked sensory paradigms reveal sensory augmentation to both painful and nonpainful stimulation. This is a transformative observation for these syndromes, which were historically considered to be completely of hysterical or feigned in origin. However, whether sensory augmentation represents the cause of these syndromes, a predisposing factor, an endophenotype, or an epiphenomenon cannot be discerned from the current literature. Further, the result from cross-sectional neuroimaging studies of basal activity, anatomy, and molecular constituency are extremely heterogeneous within and between the syndromes. A defining neuroimaging "signature" cannot be discerned for any of the particular syndromes or for an over-arching central sensitization mechanism common to all of the syndromes. Several issues confound initial attempts to meaningfully measure treatment effects in these syndromes. At this time, the existence of "central sensitivity syndromes" is based more soundly on clinical and epidemiological evidence. A coherent picture of a "central sensitization" mechanism that bridges across all of these syndromes does not emerge from the existing scientific evidence. PMID:26717948

  10. Molecular neuroimaging in degenerative dementias.

    PubMed

    Jiménez Bonilla, J F; Carril Carril, J M

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the limitations of structural imaging, brain perfusion and metabolism using SPECT and PET have provided relevant information for the study of cognitive decline. The introduction of the radiotracers for cerebral amyloid imaging has changed the diagnostic strategy regarding Alzheimer's disease, which is currently considered to be a "continuum." According to this new paradigm, the increasing amyloid load would be associated to the preclinical phase and mild cognitive impairment. It has been possible to observe "in vivo" images using 11C-PIB and PET scans. The characteristics of the 11C-PIB image include specific high brain cortical area retention in the positive cases with typical distribution pattern and no retention in the negative cases. This, in combination with 18F-FDG PET, is the basis of molecular neuroimaging as a biomarker. At present, its prognostic value is being evaluated in longitudinal studies. 11C-PIB-PET has become the reference radiotracer to evaluate the presence of cerebral amyloid. However, its availability is limited due to the need for a nearby cyclotron. Therefore, 18F labeled radiotracers are being introduced. Our experience in the last two years with 11C-PIB, first in the research phase and then as being clinically applied, has shown the utility of the technique in the clinical field, either alone or in combination with FDG. Thus, amyloid image is a useful tool for the differential diagnosis of dementia and it is a potentially useful method for early diagnosis and evaluation of future treatments. PMID:23933381

  11. Evidence for parallel electric field particle acceleration in the dayside auroral oval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torbert, R. B.; Carlson, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    Electron and ion energy spectra and electron pitch angle distributions are presented for two sounding rocket flights in the dayside auroral zone. At times, effects of dc electric fields parallel to the magnetic field are evident in that: (1) within precipitation features, protons are decelerated by an amount of energy consistent with that which electrons gain and (2) electrons are sometimes aligned to within 3 deg (full width at half maximum) of the magnetic field. A maximum altitude for the accelerating region of several thousand kilometers is deduced from the narrow width of the pitch angle distribution and also from time-of-flight delays between the observation of accelerated electrons and decelerated protons.

  12. Functional Electrical Stimulation in Spinal Cord Injury: Clinical Evidence Versus Daily Practice.

    PubMed

    Bersch, Ines; Tesini, Stefani; Bersch, Ulf; Frotzler, Angela

    2015-10-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) has clinical evidence in the rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord injury as indicated by several studies. Both inpatients and outpatients benefit from the therapeutic effect of the FES. The application areas are multifaceted and can be customized on the need for patients. This is represented by the individuality of the programmability of the stimulators and the variety of stimulation schedules that are based on the knowledge about the effects of FES on structural and functional level. Nevertheless, looking into daily clinical practice, the use of FES is rather poor. Expenditure of time, complexity of technical equipment, and compliance and acceptance of therapists and patients should be taken into account as limiting factors. PMID:26471135

  13. Miniaturized optical neuroimaging in unrestrained animals.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hang; Senarathna, Janaka; Tyler, Betty M; Thakor, Nitish V; Pathak, Arvind P

    2015-06-01

    The confluence of technological advances in optics, miniaturized electronic components and the availability of ever increasing and affordable computational power have ushered in a new era in functional neuroimaging, namely, an era in which neuroimaging of cortical function in unrestrained and unanesthetized rodents has become a reality. Traditional optical neuroimaging required animals to be anesthetized and restrained. This greatly limited the kinds of experiments that could be performed in vivo. Now one can assess blood flow and oxygenation changes resulting from functional activity and image functional response in disease models such as stroke and seizure, and even conduct long-term imaging of tumor physiology, all without the confounding effects of anesthetics or animal restraints. These advances are shedding new light on mammalian brain organization and function, and helping to elucidate loss of this organization or 'dysfunction' in a wide array of central nervous system disease models. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the fabrication, characterization and application of miniaturized head-mounted optical neuroimaging systems pioneered by innovative investigators from a wide array of disciplines. We broadly classify these systems into those based on exogenous contrast agents, such as single- and two-photon microscopy systems; and those based on endogenous contrast mechanisms, such as multispectral or laser speckle contrast imaging systems. Finally, we conclude with a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches along with a perspective on the future of this exciting new frontier in neuroimaging. PMID:25791782

  14. Prenatal Cerebellar Disruptions: Neuroimaging Spectrum of Findings in Correlation with Likely Mechanisms and Etiologies of Injury.

    PubMed

    Poretti, Andrea; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that the cerebellum is susceptible to prenatal infections and hemorrhages and that congenital morphologic anomalies of the cerebellum may be caused by disruptive (acquired) causes. Starting from the neuroimaging pattern, this report describes a spectrum of prenatal cerebellar disruptions including cerebellar agenesis, unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia, cerebellar cleft, global cerebellar hypoplasia, and vanishing cerebellum in Chiari type II malformation. The neuroimaging findings, possible causative disruptive events, and clinical features of each disruption are discussed. Recognition of cerebellar disruptions and their differentiation from cerebellar malformations is important in terms of diagnosis, prognosis, and genetic counselling. PMID:27423799

  15. Neuroimaging auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia: from neuroanatomy to neurochemistry and beyond.

    PubMed

    Allen, Paul; Modinos, Gemma; Hubl, Daniela; Shields, Gregory; Cachia, Arnaud; Jardri, Renaud; Thomas, Pierre; Woodward, Todd; Shotbolt, Paul; Plaze, Marion; Hoffman, Ralph

    2012-06-01

    Despite more than 2 decades of neuroimaging investigations, there is currently insufficient evidence to fully understand the neurobiological substrate of auditory hallucinations (AH). However, some progress has been made with imaging studies in patients with AH consistently reporting altered structure and function in speech and language, sensory, and nonsensory regions. This report provides an update of neuroimaging studies of AH with a particular emphasis on more recent anatomical, physiological, and neurochemical imaging studies. Specifically, we provide (1) a review of findings in schizophrenia and nonschizophrenia voice hearers, (2) a discussion regarding key issues that have interfered with progress, and (3) practical recommendations for future studies. PMID:22535906

  16. Neuroimaging Auditory Hallucinations in Schizophrenia: From Neuroanatomy to Neurochemistry and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Paul; Modinos, Gemma; Hubl, Daniela; Shields, Gregory; Cachia, Arnaud; Jardri, Renaud; Thomas, Pierre; Woodward, Todd; Shotbolt, Paul; Plaze, Marion; Hoffman, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Despite more than 2 decades of neuroimaging investigations, there is currently insufficient evidence to fully understand the neurobiological substrate of auditory hallucinations (AH). However, some progress has been made with imaging studies in patients with AH consistently reporting altered structure and function in speech and language, sensory, and nonsensory regions. This report provides an update of neuroimaging studies of AH with a particular emphasis on more recent anatomical, physiological, and neurochemical imaging studies. Specifically, we provide (1) a review of findings in schizophrenia and nonschizophrenia voice hearers, (2) a discussion regarding key issues that have interfered with progress, and (3) practical recommendations for future studies. PMID:22535906

  17. Does social approval stimulate prosocial behavior? Evidence from a field experiment in the residential electricity market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoeli, Erez

    At least since Veblen (1899), economists have proposed that people do good because they desire "social approval" and want to look good in front of others. Evidence from the laboratory supports this claim, but is difficult to generalize due to the unrealistic degree of scrutiny in a laboratory environment. I administer a field experiment to test the potency of social approval in a realistic and policy relevant setting. In the experiment I solicit 7893 customers of a large electric utility for a program that helps prevent blackouts. I vary whether their decision to participate in the program is revealed to their neighbors. Customers whose decision is revealed are 1.5% more likely to sign up than those whose decision is anonymous when their decision is framed as a contribution to a public good. Social approval increases participation more than offering subjects a $25 incentive, and its effect is large relative to the mean sign-up rate of 4.1%. I explore whether social approval contributes to crowding out and conditionally cooperative behavior, but the evidence is inconclusive.

  18. Neuroimaging in moderate MDMA use: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mueller, F; Lenz, C; Steiner, M; Dolder, P C; Walter, M; Lang, U E; Liechti, M E; Borgwardt, S

    2016-03-01

    MDMA ("ecstasy") is widely used as a recreational drug, although there has been some debate about its neurotoxic effects in humans. However, most studies have investigated subjects with heavy use patterns, and the effects of transient MDMA use are unclear. In this review, we therefore focus on subjects with moderate use patterns, in order to assess the evidence for harmful effects. We searched for studies applying neuroimaging techniques in man. Studies were included if they provided at least one group with an average of <50 lifetime episodes of ecstasy use or an average lifetime consumption of <100 ecstasy tablets. All studies published before July 2015 were included. Of the 250 studies identified in the database search, 19 were included. There is no convincing evidence that moderate MDMA use is associated with structural or functional brain alterations in neuroimaging measures. The lack of significant results was associated with high methodological heterogeneity in terms of dosages and co-consumption of other drugs, low quality of studies and small sample sizes. PMID:26746590

  19. Methodological Approaches in Developmental Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Beatriz; Velanova, Katerina; Geier, Charles F.

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric neuroimaging is increasingly providing insights into the neural basis of cognitive development. Indeed, we have now arrived at a stage where we can begin to identify optimal methodological and statistical approaches to the acquisition and analysis of developmental imaging data. In this article, we describe a number of these approaches and how their selection impacts the ability to examine and interpret developmental effects. We describe preferred approaches to task selection, definition of age groups, selection of fMRI designs, definition of regions of interest (ROI), optimal baseline measures, and treatment of timecourse data. Consideration of these aspects of developmental neuroimaging reveals that unlike single-group neuroimaging studies, developmental studies pose unique challenges that impact study planning, task design, data analysis, and the interpretation of findings. PMID:20496377

  20. Neuroimaging Coordination Dynamics in the Sport Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Jantzen, Kelly J.; Oullier, Olivier; Kelso, J.A. Scott

    2008-01-01

    Key methodological issues for designing, analyzing, and interpreting neuroimaging experiments are presented from the perspective of the framework of Coordination Dynamics. To this end, a brief overview of Coordination Dynamics is introduced, including the main concepts of control parameters and collective variables, theoretical modeling, novel experimental paradigms, and cardinal empirical findings. Basic conceptual and methodological issues for the design and implementation of coordination experiments in the context of neuroimaging are discussed. The paper concludes with a presentation of neuroimaging findings central to understanding the neural basis of coordination and addresses their relevance for the sport sciences. The latter include but are not restricted to learning and practice-related issues, the role of mental imagery, and the recovery of function following brain injury. PMID:18602998

  1. Verb generation in patients with focal frontal lesions: A neuropsychological test of neuroimaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.; Swick, Diane; Farah, Martha J.; D’Esposito, Mark; Kan, Irene P.; Knight, Robert T.

    1998-01-01

    What are the neural bases of semantic memory? Traditional beliefs that the temporal lobes subserve the retrieval of semantic knowledge, arising from lesion studies, have been recently called into question by functional neuroimaging studies finding correlations between semantic retrieval and activity in left prefrontal cortex. Has neuroimaging taught us something new about the neural bases of cognition that older methods could not reveal or has it merely identified brain activity that is correlated with but not causally related to the process of semantic retrieval? We examined the ability of patients with focal frontal lesions to perform a task commonly used in neuroimaging experiments, the generation of semantically appropriate action words for concrete nouns, and found evidence of the necessity of the left inferior frontal gyrus for certain components of the verb generation task. Notably, these components did not include semantic retrieval per se. PMID:9861060

  2. Activity-dependent plasticity of electrical synapses: increasing evidence for its presence and functional roles in the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Haas, Julie S; Greenwald, Corey M; Pereda, Alberto E

    2016-01-01

    Gap junctions mediate electrical synaptic transmission between neurons. While the actions of neurotransmitter modulators on the conductance of gap junctions have been extensively documented, increasing evidence indicates they can also be influenced by the ongoing activity of neural networks, in most cases via local interactions with nearby glutamatergic synapses. We review here early evidence for the existence of activity-dependent regulatory mechanisms as well recent examples reported in mammalian brain. The ubiquitous distribution of both neuronal connexins and the molecules involved suggest this phenomenon is widespread and represents a property of electrical transmission in general. PMID:27230776

  3. Graphical Neuroimaging Informatics: Application to Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Ian; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Greer, Vaughan

    2013-01-01

    The Informatics Visualization for Neuroimaging (INVIZIAN) framework allows one to graphically display image and meta-data information from sizeable collections of neuroimaging data as a whole using a dynamic and compelling user interface. Users can fluidly interact with an entire collection of cortical surfaces using only their mouse. In addition, users can cluster and group brains according in multiple ways for subsequent comparison using graphical data mining tools. In this article, we illustrate the utility of INVIZIAN for simultaneous exploration and mining a large collection of extracted cortical surface data arising in clinical neuroimaging studies of patients with Alzheimer’s Disease, mild cognitive impairment, as well as healthy control subjects. Alzheimer’s Disease is particularly interesting due to the wide-spread effects on cortical architecture and alterations of volume in specific brain areas associated with memory. We demonstrate INVIZIAN’s ability to render multiple brain surfaces from multiple diagnostic groups of subjects, showcase the interactivity of the system, and showcase how INVIZIAN can be employed to generate hypotheses about the collection of data which would be suitable for direct access to the underlying raw data and subsequent formal statistical analysis. Specifically, we use INVIZIAN show how cortical thickness and hippocampal volume differences between group are evident even in the absence of more formal hypothesis testing. In the context of neurological diseases linked to brain aging such as AD, INVIZIAN provides a unique means for considering the entirety of whole brain datasets, look for interesting relationships among them, and thereby derive new ideas for further research and study. PMID:24203652

  4. Structural neuroimaging in schizophrenia from methods to insights to treatments

    PubMed Central

    Shenton, Martha E.; Whitford, Thomas J.; Kubicki, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Historically, Kraepelin speculated that dementia praecox resulted from damage to the cerebral cortex, most notably the frontal and temporal cortices. It is only recently, however, that tools have been available to test this hypothesis. Now, more than a century later, we know that schizophrenia is a brain disorder. This knowledge comes from critical advances in imaging technology- including computerized axial tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and diffusion imaging - all of which provide an unprecedented view of neuroanatomical structures, in vivo. Here, we review evidence for structural neuroimaging abnormalities, beginning with evidence for focal brain abnormalities, primarily in gray matter, and proceeding to the quest to identify abnormalities in brain systems and circuits by focusing on damage to white matter connections in the brain. We then review future prospects that need to be explored and pursued in order to translate our current knowledge into an understanding of the neurobiology of schizophrenia, which can then be translated into novel treatments. PMID:20954428

  5. Structural neuroimaging in schizophrenia: from methods to insights to treatments.

    PubMed

    Shenton, Martha E; Whitford, Thomas J; Kubicki, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Historically, Kraepelin speculated that dementia praecox resulted from damage to the cerebral cortex, most notably the frontal and temporal cortices. It is only recently, however, that tools have been available to test this hypothesis. Now, more than a century later, we know that schizophrenia is a brain disorder. This knowledge comes from critical advances in imaging technology--including computerized axial tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and diffusion imaging--all of which provide an unprecedented view of neuroanatomical structures, in vivo. Here, we review evidence for structural neuroimaging abnormalities, beginning with evidence for focal brain abnormalities, primarily in gray matter, and proceeding to the quest to identify abnormalities in brain systems and circuits by focusing on damage to white matter connections in the brain. We then review future prospects that need to be explored and pursued in order to translate our current knowledge into an understanding of the neurobiology of schizophrenia, which can then be translated into novel treatments. PMID:20954428

  6. Electrical Stimulation and Cutaneous Wound Healing: A Review of Clinical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Ud-Din, Sara; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2014-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) has been shown to have beneficial effects in wound healing. It is important to assess the effects of ES on cutaneous wound healing in order to ensure optimization for clinical practice. Several different applications as well as modalities of ES have been described, including direct current (DC), alternating current (AC), high-voltage pulsed current (HVPC), low-intensity direct current (LIDC) and electrobiofeedback ES. However, no one method has been advocated as the most optimal for the treatment of cutaneous wound healing. Therefore, this review aims to examine the level of evidence (LOE) for the application of different types of ES to enhance cutaneous wound healing in the skin. An extensive search was conducted to identify relevant clinical studies utilising ES for cutaneous wound healing since 1980 using PubMed, Medline and EMBASE. A total of 48 studies were evaluated and assigned LOE. All types of ES demonstrated positive effects on cutaneous wound healing in the majority of studies. However, the reported studies demonstrate contrasting differences in the parameters and types of ES application, leading to an inability to generate sufficient evidence to support any one standard therapeutic approach. Despite variations in the type of current, duration, and dosing of ES, the majority of studies showed a significant improvement in wound area reduction or accelerated wound healing compared to the standard of care or sham therapy as well as improved local perfusion. The limited number of LOE-1 trials for investigating the effects of ES in wound healing make critical evaluation and assessment somewhat difficult. Further, better-designed clinical trials are needed to improve our understanding of the optimal dosing, timing and type of ES to be used.

  7. Functional Neuroimaging Studies of Written Sentence Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, David

    2004-01-01

    Sentences convey relationships between the meanings of words, such as who is accomplishing an action or receiving it. Functional neuroimaging based on positron-emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance imaging has been used to identify areas of the brain involved in structuring sentences and determining aspects of meaning associated…

  8. Neuroimaging in childhood headache: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, George A; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2013-07-01

    Headache is a common complaint in children, one that gives rise to considerable parental concern and fear of the presence of a space-occupying lesion. The evaluation and diagnosis of headache is very challenging for paediatricians, and neuroimaging by means of CT or MRI is often requested as part of the investigation. CT exposes children to radiation, while MRI is costly and sometimes requires sedation or general anaesthesia, especially in children younger than 6 years. This review of the literature on the value of neuroimaging in children with headache showed that the rate of pathological findings is generally low. Imaging findings that led to a change in patient management were in almost all cases reported in children with abnormal signs on neurological examination. Neuroimaging should be limited to children with a suspicious clinical history, abnormal neurological findings or other physical signs suggestive of intracranial pathology. Well-designed prospective studies are needed to better define the clinical findings that warrant neuroimaging in children with headache. PMID:23700196

  9. Functional neuroimaging: technical, logical, and social perspectives.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Geoffrey K

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscientists have long sought to study the dynamic activity of the human brain-what's happening in the brain, that is, while people are thinking, feeling, and acting. Ideally, an inside look at brain function would simultaneously and continuously measure the biochemical state of every cell in the central nervous system. While such a miraculous method is science fiction, a century of progress in neuroimaging technologies has made such simultaneous and continuous measurement a plausible fiction. Despite this progress, practitioners of modern neuroimaging struggle with two kinds of limitations: those that attend the particular neuroimaging methods we have today and those that would limit any method of imaging neural activity, no matter how powerful. In this essay, I consider the liabilities and potential of techniques that measure human brain activity. I am concerned here only with methods that measure relevant physiologic states of the central nervous system and relate those measures to particular mental states. I will consider in particular the preeminent method of functional neuroimaging: BOLD fMRI. While there are several practical limits on the biological information that current technologies can measure, these limits-as important as they are-are minor in comparison to the fundamental logical restraints on the conclusions that can be drawn from brain imaging studies. PMID:24634086

  10. Neuroimaging and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Andria L.; Crocker, Nicole; Mattson, Sarah N.; Riley, Edward P.

    2009-01-01

    The detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing brain include structural brain anomalies as well as cognitive and behavioral deficits. Initial neuroimaging studies of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed previous autopsy reports of overall reduction in brain volume and…

  11. Neuroimaging studies of social cognition in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hironobu; Yassin, Walid; Murai, Toshiya

    2015-05-01

    Impaired social cognition is considered a core contributor to unfavorable psychosocial functioning in schizophrenia. Rather than being a unitary process, social cognition is a collection of multifaceted processes that recruit multiple brain structures, thus structural and functional neuroimaging techniques are ideal methodologies for revealing the underlying pathophysiology of impaired social cognition. Many neuroimaging studies have suggested that in addition to white-matter deficits, schizophrenia is associated with decreased gray-matter volume in multiple brain areas, especially fronto-temporal and limbic regions. However, few schizophrenia studies have examined associations between brain abnormalities and social cognitive disabilities. During the last decade, we have investigated structural brain abnormalities in schizophrenia using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, and our findings have been confirmed by us and others. By assessing different types of social cognitive abilities, structural abnormalities in multiple brain regions have been found to be associated with disabilities in social cognition, such as recognition of facial emotion, theory of mind, and empathy. These structural deficits have also been associated with alexithymia and quality of life in ways that are closely related to the social cognitive disabilities found in schizophrenia. Here, we overview a series of neuroimaging studies from our laboratory that exemplify current research into this topic, and discuss how it can be further tackled using recent advances in neuroimaging technology. PMID:25418865

  12. Neuroimaging of amblyopia and binocular vision: a review

    PubMed Central

    Joly, Olivier; Frankó, Edit

    2014-01-01

    Amblyopia is a cerebral visual impairment considered to derive from abnormal visual experience (e.g., strabismus, anisometropia). Amblyopia, first considered as a monocular disorder, is now often seen as a primarily binocular disorder resulting in more and more studies examining the binocular deficits in the patients. The neural mechanisms of amblyopia are not completely understood even though they have been investigated with electrophysiological recordings in animal models and more recently with neuroimaging techniques in humans. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the brain regions that underlie the visual deficits associated with amblyopia with a focus on binocular vision using functional magnetic resonance imaging. The first studies focused on abnormal responses in the primary and secondary visual areas whereas recent evidence shows that there are also deficits at higher levels of the visual pathways within the parieto-occipital and temporal cortices. These higher level areas are part of the cortical network involved in 3D vision from binocular cues. Therefore, reduced responses in these areas could be related to the impaired binocular vision in amblyopic patients. Promising new binocular treatments might at least partially correct the activation in these areas. Future neuroimaging experiments could help to characterize the brain response changes associated with these treatments and help devise them. PMID:25147511

  13. Structural neuroimaging in Altheimer's disease: do white matter hyperintensities matter?

    PubMed

    Brickman, Adam M; Muraskin, Jordan; Zimmerman, Molly E

    2009-01-01

    The targeted brain dysfunction that accompanies aging can have a devastating effect on cognitive and intellectual abilities. A significant proportion of older adults experience precipitous cognitive decline that negatively impacts functional activities. Such individuals meet clinical diagnostic criteria for dementia, which is commonly attributed to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Structural neuroimaging, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), has contributed significantly to our understanding of the morphological and pathology-related changes that may underlie normal and disease-associated cognitive change in aging. White matter hyperintensities (WMH), which are distributed patches of increased hyperintense signal on T2-weighted MRI, are among the most common structural neuroimaging findings in older adults. In recent years, WMH have emerged as robust radiological correlates of cognitive decline. Studies suggest that WMH distributed in anterior brain regions are related to decline in executive abilities that is typical of normal aging, whereas WMH distributed in more posterior brain regions are common in AD. Although epidemiological, observational, and pathological studies suggest that WMH may be ischemic in origin and caused by consistent or variable hypoperfusion, there is emerging evidence that they may also reflect vascular deposition of beta-amyloid, particularly when they are distributed in posterior areas and are present in patients with AD. Findings from the literature highlight the potential contribution of small-vessel cerebrovascular disease to the pathogenesis of AD, and suggest a mechanistic interaction, but future longitudinal studies using multiple imaging modalities are required to fully understand the complex role of WMH in AD. PMID:19585953

  14. Neuroimaging of Mobility in Aging: A Targeted Review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Noah; Mahoney, Jeannette R.; Izzetoglu, Meltem; Blumen, Helena M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The relationship between mobility and cognition in aging is well established, but the relationship between mobility and the structure and function of the aging brain is relatively unknown. This, in part, is attributed to the technological limitations of most neuroimaging procedures, which require the individual to be immobile or in a supine position. Herein, we provide a targeted review of neuroimaging studies of mobility in aging to promote (i) a better understanding of this relationship, (ii) future research in this area, and (iii) development of applications for improving mobility. Methods. A systematic search of peer-reviewed studies was performed using PubMed. Search terms included (i) aging, older adults, or elderly; (ii) gait, walking, balance, or mobility; and (iii) magnetic resonance imaging, voxel-based morphometry, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, diffusion tensor imaging, positron emission tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalography, event-related potential, and functional near-infrared spectroscopy. Results. Poor mobility outcomes were reliably associated with reduced gray and white matter volume. Fewer studies examined the relationship between changes in task-related brain activation and mobility performance. Extant findings, however, showed that activation patterns in the cerebellum, basal ganglia, parietal and frontal cortices were related to mobility. Increased involvement of the prefrontal cortex was evident in both imagined walking conditions and conditions where the cognitive demands of locomotion were increased. Conclusions. Cortical control of gait in aging is bilateral, widespread, and dependent on the integrity of both gray and white matter. PMID:24739495

  15. Deep learning for neuroimaging: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Plis, Sergey M; Hjelm, Devon R; Salakhutdinov, Ruslan; Allen, Elena A; Bockholt, Henry J; Long, Jeffrey D; Johnson, Hans J; Paulsen, Jane S; Turner, Jessica A; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-01-01

    Deep learning methods have recently made notable advances in the tasks of classification and representation learning. These tasks are important for brain imaging and neuroscience discovery, making the methods attractive for porting to a neuroimager's toolbox. Success of these methods is, in part, explained by the flexibility of deep learning models. However, this flexibility makes the process of porting to new areas a difficult parameter optimization problem. In this work we demonstrate our results (and feasible parameter ranges) in application of deep learning methods to structural and functional brain imaging data. These methods include deep belief networks and their building block the restricted Boltzmann machine. We also describe a novel constraint-based approach to visualizing high dimensional data. We use it to analyze the effect of parameter choices on data transformations. Our results show that deep learning methods are able to learn physiologically important representations and detect latent relations in neuroimaging data. PMID:25191215

  16. Deep learning for neuroimaging: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Plis, Sergey M.; Hjelm, Devon R.; Salakhutdinov, Ruslan; Allen, Elena A.; Bockholt, Henry J.; Long, Jeffrey D.; Johnson, Hans J.; Paulsen, Jane S.; Turner, Jessica A.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2014-01-01

    Deep learning methods have recently made notable advances in the tasks of classification and representation learning. These tasks are important for brain imaging and neuroscience discovery, making the methods attractive for porting to a neuroimager's toolbox. Success of these methods is, in part, explained by the flexibility of deep learning models. However, this flexibility makes the process of porting to new areas a difficult parameter optimization problem. In this work we demonstrate our results (and feasible parameter ranges) in application of deep learning methods to structural and functional brain imaging data. These methods include deep belief networks and their building block the restricted Boltzmann machine. We also describe a novel constraint-based approach to visualizing high dimensional data. We use it to analyze the effect of parameter choices on data transformations. Our results show that deep learning methods are able to learn physiologically important representations and detect latent relations in neuroimaging data. PMID:25191215

  17. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Recent Neuroimaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Moore, Eileen M; Migliorini, Robyn; Infante, M Alejandra; Riley, Edward P

    2014-09-01

    Since the identification of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome over 40 years ago, much has been learned about the detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing brain. This review highlights recent neuroimaging studies, within the context of previous work. Structural magnetic resonance imaging has described morphological differences in the brain and their relationships to cognitive deficits and measures of facial dysmorphology. Diffusion tensor imaging has elaborated on the relationship between white matter microstructure and behavior. Atypical neuromaturation across childhood and adolescence has been observed in longitudinal neuroimaging studies. Functional imaging has revealed differences in neural activation patterns underlying sensory processing, cognition and behavioral deficits. A recent functional connectivity analysis demonstrates reductions in global network efficiency. Despite this progress much remains unknown about the impact of prenatal alcohol exposure on the brain, and continued research efforts are essential. PMID:25346882

  18. Causal interpretation rules for encoding and decoding models in neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Weichwald, Sebastian; Meyer, Timm; Özdenizci, Ozan; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Ball, Tonio; Grosse-Wentrup, Moritz

    2015-04-15

    Causal terminology is often introduced in the interpretation of encoding and decoding models trained on neuroimaging data. In this article, we investigate which causal statements are warranted and which ones are not supported by empirical evidence. We argue that the distinction between encoding and decoding models is not sufficient for this purpose: relevant features in encoding and decoding models carry a different meaning in stimulus- and in response-based experimental paradigms.We show that only encoding models in the stimulus-based setting support unambiguous causal interpretations. By combining encoding and decoding models trained on the same data, however, we obtain insights into causal relations beyond those that are implied by each individual model type. We illustrate the empirical relevance of our theoretical findings on EEG data recorded during a visuo-motor learning task. PMID:25623501

  19. Neuroimaging in human MDMA (Ecstasy) users.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Ronald L; Roberts, Deanne M; Joers, James M

    2008-10-01

    MDMA (3,4 methylenedioxymethamphetamine) has been used by millions of people worldwide as a recreational drug. The terms "MDMA" and "Ecstasy" are often used synonymously, but it is important to note that the purity of Ecstasy sold as MDMA is not certain. MDMA use is of public health concern, not so much because MDMA produces a common or severe dependence syndrome, but rather because rodent and nonhuman primate studies have indicated that MDMA (when administered at certain dosages and intervals) can cause long-lasting reductions in markers of brain serotonin (5-HT) that appear specific to fine-diameter axons arising largely from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR). Given the popularity of MDMA, the potential for the drug to produce long-lasting or permanent 5-HT axon damage or loss, and the widespread role of 5-HT function in the brain, there is a great need for a better understanding of brain function in human users of this drug. To this end, neuropsychological, neuroendocrine, and neuroimaging studies have all suggested that human MDMA users may have long-lasting changes in brain function consistent with 5-HT toxicity. Data from animal models leads to testable hypotheses regarding MDMA's effects on the human brain. Because neuropsychological and neuroimaging findings have focused on the neocortex, a cortical model is developed to provide a context for designing and interpreting neuroimaging studies in MDMA users. Aspects of the model are supported by the available neuroimaging data, but there are controversial findings in some areas and most findings have not been replicated across different laboratories and using different modalities. This paper reviews existing findings in the context of a cortical model and suggests directions for future research. PMID:18991874

  20. Evidence that dirty electricity is causing the worldwide epidemics of obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Milham, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    The epidemics of obesity and diabetes most apparent in recent years had their origins with Thomas Edison's development of distributed electricity in New York City in 1882. His original direct current (DC) generators suffered serious commutator brush arcing which is a major source of high-frequency voltage transients (dirty electricity). From the onset of the electrical grid, electrified populations have been exposed to dirty electricity. Diesel generator sets are a major source of dirty electricity today and are used almost universally to electrify small islands and places unreachable by the conventional electric grid. This accounts for the fact that diabetes prevalence, fasting plasma glucose and obesity are highest on small islands and other places electrified by generator sets and lowest in places with low levels of electrification like sub-Saharan Africa and east and Southeast Asia. PMID:23781992

  1. Advanced Neuroimaging in Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Edlow, Brian L.; Wu, Ona

    2013-01-01

    Advances in structural and functional neuroimaging have occurred at a rapid pace over the past two decades. Novel techniques for measuring cerebral blood flow, metabolism, white matter connectivity, and neural network activation have great potential to improve the accuracy of diagnosis and prognosis for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), while also providing biomarkers to guide the development of new therapies. Several of these advanced imaging modalities are currently being implemented into clinical practice, whereas others require further development and validation. Ultimately, for advanced neuroimaging techniques to reach their full potential and improve clinical care for the many civilians and military personnel affected by TBI, it is critical for clinicians to understand the applications and methodological limitations of each technique. In this review, we examine recent advances in structural and functional neuroimaging and the potential applications of these techniques to the clinical care of patients with TBI. We also discuss pitfalls and confounders that should be considered when interpreting data from each technique. Finally, given the vast amounts of advanced imaging data that will soon be available to clinicians, we discuss strategies for optimizing data integration, visualization and interpretation. PMID:23361483

  2. Testable Hypotheses for Unbalanced Neuroimaging Data

    PubMed Central

    McFarquhar, Martyn

    2016-01-01

    Unbalanced group-level models are common in neuroimaging. Typically, data for these models come from factorial experiments. As such, analyses typically take the form of an analysis of variance (ANOVA) within the framework of the general linear model (GLM). Although ANOVA theory is well established for the balanced case, in unbalanced designs there are multiple ways of decomposing the sums-of-squares of the data. This leads to several methods of forming test statistics when the model contains multiple factors and interactions. Although the Type I–III sums of squares have a long history of debate in the statistical literature, there has seemingly been no consideration of this aspect of the GLM in neuroimaging. In this paper we present an exposition of these different forms of hypotheses for the neuroimaging researcher, discussing their derivation as estimable functions of ANOVA models, and discussing the relative merits of each. Finally, we demonstrate how the different hypothesis tests can be implemented using contrasts in analysis software, presenting examples in SPM and FSL. PMID:27378839

  3. Traumatic brain injury, neuroimaging, and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bigler, Erin D.

    2012-01-01

    Depending on severity, traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces immediate neuropathological effects that in the mildest form may be transient but as severity increases results in neural damage and degeneration. The first phase of neural degeneration is explainable by the primary acute and secondary neuropathological effects initiated by the injury; however, neuroimaging studies demonstrate a prolonged period of pathological changes that progressively occur even during the chronic phase. This review examines how neuroimaging may be used in TBI to understand (1) the dynamic changes that occur in brain development relevant to understanding the effects of TBI and how these relate to developmental stage when the brain is injured, (2) how TBI interferes with age-typical brain development and the effects of aging thereafter, and (3) how TBI results in greater frontotemporolimbic damage, results in cerebral atrophy, and is more disruptive to white matter neural connectivity. Neuroimaging quantification in TBI demonstrates degenerative effects from brain injury over time. An adverse synergistic influence of TBI with aging may predispose the brain injured individual for the development of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders long after surviving the brain injury. PMID:23964217

  4. [Neuroimaging of psychiatric and pedopsychiatric disorders].

    PubMed

    Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mana, Stéphanie

    2011-01-01

    Over the last two decades, imaging techniques have allowed to establish the cerebral neurophysiologic correlates of psychiatric disorders and have highlighted the impact of psychopathologic events, therapeutic drugs, addictions, on the growth and plasticity of brain. In this review, we intend to illustrate how neuroimaging has improved our knowledge of such alterations in brain maturation (schizophrenia, autistic disorders), fronto-limbic (depressive syndromes) or fronto-striatal (compulsive disorders) regions in psychiatric illnesses, but also in psychopharmacology, or pedopsychiatry. Statistically significant alterations in the structure and/or function of brain are detected in all psychiatric disorders and these are often detectable already during childhood or teenage. Furthermore, neuroimaging has allowed to underline the importance of cerebral networks specific to each disorder, but also to uncover those which are common to different diseases provided that they share common clinical or cognitive features. Besides their value in basic research, neuroimaging findings have been key in changing the perception that society has of these diseases which contributed to their therapeutic approach. PMID:21718649

  5. Neuroimaging of Central Sensitivity Syndromes: Key Insights from the Scientific Literature

    PubMed Central

    Walitt, Brian; Čeko, Marta; Gracely, John L.; Gracely, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Central sensitivity syndromes are characterized by distressing symptoms, such as pain and fatigue, in the absence of clinically obvious pathology. The scientific underpinnings of these disorders are not currently known. Modern neuroimaging techniques promise new insights into mechanisms mediating these postulated syndromes. We review the results of neuroimaging applied to five central sensitivity syndromes: fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular joint disorder, and vulvodynia syndrome. Neuroimaging studies of basal metabolism, anatomic constitution, molecular constituents, evoked neural activity, and treatment effect are compared across all of these syndromes. Evoked sensory paradigms reveal sensory augmentation to both painful and non-painful stimulation. This is a transformative observation for these syndromes, which were historically considered to be completely of hysterical or feigned in origin. However, whether sensory augmentation represents the cause of these syndromes, a predisposing factor, an endophenotype, or an epiphenomenon cannot be discerned from the current literature. Further, the result from cross-sectional neuroimaging studies of basal activity, anatomy, and molecular constituency are extremely heterogeneous within and between the syndromes. A defining neuroimaging “signature” cannot be discerned for any of the particular syndromes or for an over-arching central sensitization mechanism common to all of the syndromes. Several issues confound initial attempts to meaningfully measure treatment effects in these syndromes. At this time, the existence of “central sensitivity syndromes” is based more soundly on clinical and epidemiological evidence. A coherent picture of a “central sensitization” mechanism that bridges across all of these syndromes does not emerge from the existing scientific evidence. PMID:26717948

  6. Neuropsychiatric deep brain stimulation for translational neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Höflich, Anna; Savli, Markus; Comasco, Erika; Moser, Ulrike; Novak, Klaus; Kasper, Siegfried; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2013-10-01

    From a neuroimaging point of view, deep brain stimulation (DBS) in psychiatric disorders represents a unique source of information to probe results gained in functional, structural and molecular neuroimaging studies in vivo. However, the implementation has, up to now, been restricted by the heterogeneity of the data reported in DBS studies. The aim of the present study was therefore to provide a comprehensive and standardized database of currently used DBS targets in selected psychiatric disorders (obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), treatment-resistant depression (TRD), Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS)) to enable topological comparisons between neuroimaging results and stimulation areas. A systematic literature research was performed and all peer-reviewed publications until the year 2012 were included. Literature research yielded a total of 84 peer-reviewed studies including about 296 psychiatric patients. The individual stimulation data of 37 of these studies meeting the inclusion criteria which included a total of 202 patients (63 OCD, 89 TRD, 50 GTS) was translated into MNI stereotactic space with respect to AC origin in order to identify key targets. The created database can be used to compare DBS target areas in MNI stereotactic coordinates with: 1) activation patterns in functional brain imaging (fMRI, phfMRI, PET, MET, EEG); 2) brain connectivity data (e.g., MR-based DTI/tractography, functional and effective connectivity); 3) quantitative molecular distribution data (e.g., neuroreceptor PET, post-mortem neuroreceptor mapping); 4) structural data (e.g., VBM for neuroplastic changes). Vice versa, the structural, functional and molecular data may provide a rationale to define new DBS targets and adjust/fine-tune currently used targets in DBS based on this overview in stereotactic coordinates. Furthermore, the availability of DBS data in stereotactic space may facilitate the investigation and interpretation of treatment effects and side effect of DBS by

  7. Emerging neuroimaging contribution to the diagnosis and management of the ring chromosome 20 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vaudano, Anna Elisabetta; Ruggieri, Andrea; Vignoli, Aglaia; Canevini, Maria Paola; Meletti, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Ring chromosome 20 [r(20)] syndrome is an underdiagnosed chromosomal anomaly characterized by severe epilepsy, behavioral problems, and mild-to-moderate cognitive deficits. Since the cognitive and behavioral decline follows seizure onset, this syndrome has been proposed as an epileptic encephalopathy (EE). The recent overwhelming development of advanced neuroimaging techniques has opened a new era in the investigation of the brain networks subserving the EEs. In particular, functional neuroimaging tools are well suited to show alterations related to epileptiform discharges at the network level and to build hypotheses about the mechanisms underlying the cognitive disruption observed in these conditions. This paper reviews the brain circuits and their disruption as revealed by functional neuroimaging studies in patients with [r(20)] syndrome. It discusses the clinical consequences of the neuroimaging findings on the management of patients with [r(20)] syndrome, including their impact to an earlier diagnosis of this disorder. Based on the available lines of evidences, [r(20)] syndrome is characterized by interictal and ictal dysfunctions within basal ganglia-prefrontal lobe networks and by long-lasting effects of the peculiar theta-delta rhythm, which represents an EEG marker of the syndrome on integrated brain networks that subserve cognitive functions. PMID:25843339

  8. Cultured Construction: Global Evidence of the Impact of National Values on Renewable Electricity Infrastructure Choice.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, Jessica A

    2016-02-16

    Renewable electricity is an important tool in the fight against climate change, but globally these technologies are still in the early stages of diffusion. To contribute to our understanding of the factors driving this diffusion, I study relationships between national values (measured by Hofstede's cultural dimensions) and renewable electricity adoption at the national level. Existing data for 66 nations (representing an equal number of developed and developing economies) are used to fuel the analysis. Somewhat dependent on limited available data on controls for grid reliability and the cost of electricity, I discover that three of Hofstede's dimensions (high uncertainty avoidance, low masculinity-femininity, and high individualism-collectivism) have significant exponential relationships with renewable electricity adoption. The dimension of uncertainty avoidance appears particularly appropriate for practical application. Projects or organizations implementing renewable electricity policy, designs, or construction should particularly attend to this cultural dimension. In particular, as the data imply that renewable technologies are being used to manage risk in electricity supply, geographies with unreliable grids are particularly likely to be open to renewable electricity technologies. PMID:26735210

  9. “Can It Read My Mind?” – What Do the Public and Experts Think of the Current (Mis)Uses of Neuroimaging?

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, Joanna M.; O'Connell, Garret; Shuler, Kirsten; DeWilde, Janet; Haley, Jane; Escobar, Oliver; Murray, Shaun; Rae, Robert; Jarvie, Donald; Sandercock, Peter; Schafer, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    Emerging applications of neuroimaging outside medicine and science have received intense public exposure through the media. Media misrepresentations can create a gulf between public and scientific understanding of the capabilities of neuroimaging and raise false expectations. To determine the extent of this effect and determine public opinions on acceptable uses and the need for regulation, we designed an electronic survey to obtain anonymous opinions from as wide a range of members of the public and neuroimaging experts as possible. The surveys ran from 1st June to 30 September 2010, asked 10 and 21 questions, respectively, about uses of neuroimaging outside traditional medical diagnosis, data storage, science communication and potential methods of regulation. We analysed the responses using descriptive statistics; 660 individuals responded to the public and 303 individuals responded to the expert survey. We found evidence of public skepticism about the use of neuroimaging for applications such as lie detection or to determine consumer preferences and considerable disquiet about use by employers or government and about how their data would be stored and used. While also somewhat skeptical about new applications of neuroimaging, experts grossly underestimated how often neuroimaging had been used as evidence in court. Although both the public and the experts rated highly the importance of a better informed public in limiting the inappropriate uses to which neuroimaging might be put, opinions differed on the need for, and mechanism of, actual regulation. Neuroscientists recognized the risks of inaccurate reporting of neuroimaging capabilities in the media but showed little motivation to engage with the public. The present study also emphasizes the need for better frameworks for scientific engagement with media and public education. PMID:21991367

  10. EVIDENCE FOR MICROBIAL ENHANCED ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY IN HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrical conductivity of sediments during microbial mineralization of diesel was investigated in a mesoscale column experiment consisting of biotic contaminated and uncontaminated columns. Microbial population numbers increased with a clear pattern of depth zonation within the ...

  11. Medical-Legal Inferences From Functional Neuroimaging Evidence.

    PubMed

    Mayberg

    1996-07-01

    Positron emission (PET) and single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) are validated functional imaging techniques for the in vivo measurement of many neuro-phsyiological and neurochemical parameters. Research studies of patients with a broad range of neurological and psychiatric illness have been published. Reproducible and specific patterns of altered cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism, however, have been demonstrated and confirmed for only a limited number of specific illnesses. The association of functional scan patterns with specific deficits is less conclusive. Correlations of regional abnormalities with clinical symptoms such as motor weakness, aphasia, and visual spatial dysfunction are the most reproducible but are more poorly localized than lesion-deficit studies would suggest. Findings are even less consistent for nonlocalizing behavioral symptoms such as memory difficulties, poor concentration, irritability, or chronic pain, and no reliable patterns have been demonstrated. In a forensic context, homicidal and sadistic tendencies, aberrant sexual drive, violent impulsivity, psychopathic and sociopathic personality traits, as well as impaired judgement and poor insight, have no known PET or SPECT patterns, and their presence in an individual with any PET or SPECT scan finding cannot be inferred or concluded. Furthermore, the reliable prediction of any specific neurological, psychiatric, or behavioral deficits from specific scan findings has not been demonstrated. Unambiguous results from experiments designed to specifically examine the causative relationships between regional brain dysfunction and these types of complex behaviors are needed before any introduction of functional scans into the courts can be considered scientifically justified or legally admissible. PMID:10320420

  12. The Representation of Object Distance: Evidence from Neuroimaging and Neuropsychology

    PubMed Central

    Berryhill, Marian E.; Olson, Ingrid R.

    2009-01-01

    Perceived distance in two-dimensional (2D) images relies on monocular distance cues. Here, we examined the representation of perceived object distance using a continuous carry-over adaptation design for fMRI. The task was to look at photographs of objects and make a judgment as to whether or not the item belonged in the kitchen. Importantly, this task was orthogonal to the variable of interest: the object's perceived distance from the viewer. In Experiment 1, whole brain group analyses identified bilateral clusters in the superior occipital gyrus (approximately area V3/V3A) that showed parametric adaptation to relative changes in perceived distance. In Experiment 2, retinotopic analyses confirmed that area V3A/B reflected the greatest magnitude of response to monocular changes in perceived distance. In Experiment 3, we report that the functional activations overlap with the occipito-parietal lesions in a patient with impaired distance perception, showing that the same regions monitor implied (2D) and actual (three-dimensional) distance. These data suggest that distance information is automatically processed even when it is task-irrelevant and that this process relies on superior occipital areas in and around area V3A. PMID:19949468

  13. Methods for identifying subject-specific abnormalities in neuroimaging data.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Andrew R; Bedrick, Edward J; Ling, Josef M; Toulouse, Trent; Dodd, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Algorithms that are capable of capturing subject-specific abnormalities (SSA) in neuroimaging data have long been an area of focus for diverse neuropsychiatric conditions such as multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia, and traumatic brain injury. Several algorithms have been proposed that define SSA in patients (i.e., comparison group) relative to image intensity levels derived from healthy controls (HC) (i.e., reference group) based on extreme values. However, the assumptions underlying these approaches have not always been fully validated, and may be dependent on the statistical distributions of the transformed data. The current study evaluated variations of two commonly used techniques ("pothole" method and standardization with an independent reference group) for identifying SSA using simulated data (derived from normal, t and chi-square distributions) and fractional anisotropy maps derived from 50 HC. Results indicated substantial group-wise bias in the estimation of extreme data points using the pothole method, with the degree of bias being inversely related to sample size. Statistical theory was utilized to develop a distribution-corrected z-score (DisCo-Z) threshold, with additional simulations demonstrating elimination of the bias and a more consistent estimation of extremes based on expected distributional properties. Data from previously published studies examining SSA in mild traumatic brain injury were then re-analyzed using the DisCo-Z method, with results confirming the evidence of group-wise bias. We conclude that the benefits of identifying SSA in neuropsychiatric research are substantial, but that proposed SSA approaches require careful implementation under the different distributional properties that characterize neuroimaging data. PMID:24931496

  14. Advances in neuroimaging in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Elizabeth; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Fox, Nick C

    2016-08-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinically and neuroanatomically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder with multiple underlying genetic and pathological causes. Whilst initial neuroimaging studies highlighted the presence of frontal and temporal lobe atrophy or hypometabolism as the unifying feature in patients with FTD, more detailed studies have revealed diverse patterns across individuals, with variable frontal or temporal predominance, differing degrees of asymmetry, and the involvement of other cortical areas including the insula and cingulate, as well as subcortical structures such as the basal ganglia and thalamus. Recent advances in novel imaging modalities including diffusion tensor imaging, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and molecular positron emission tomography imaging allow the possibility of investigating alterations in structural and functional connectivity and the visualisation of pathological protein deposition. This review will cover the major imaging modalities currently used in research and clinical practice, focusing on the key insights they have provided into FTD, including the onset and evolution of pathological changes and also importantly their utility as biomarkers for disease detection and staging, differential diagnosis and measurement of disease progression. Validating neuroimaging biomarkers that are able to accomplish these tasks will be crucial for the ultimate goal of powering upcoming clinical trials by correctly stratifying patient enrolment and providing sensitive markers for evaluating the effects and efficacy of disease-modifying therapies. This review describes the key insights provided by research into the major neuroimaging modalities currently used in research and clinical practice, including what they tell us about the onset and evolution of FTD and how they may be used as biomarkers for disease detection and staging, differential diagnosis and measurement of disease progression. This article is

  15. LSTGEE: longitudinal analysis of neuroimaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yimei; Zhu, Hongtu; Chen, Yasheng; An, Hongyu; Gilmore, John; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2009-02-01

    Longitudinal imaging studies are essential to understanding the neural development of neuropsychiatric disorders, substance use disorders, and normal brain. Using appropriate image processing and statistical tools to analyze the imaging, behavioral, and clinical data is critical for optimally exploring and interpreting the findings from those imaging studies. However, the existing imaging processing and statistical methods for analyzing imaging longitudinal measures are primarily developed for cross-sectional neuroimaging studies. The simple use of these cross-sectional tools to longitudinal imaging studies will significantly decrease the statistical power of longitudinal studies in detecting subtle changes of imaging measures and the causal role of time-dependent covariate in disease process. The main objective of this paper is to develop longitudinal statistics toolbox, called LSTGEE, for the analysis of neuroimaging data from longitudinal studies. We develop generalized estimating equations for jointly modeling imaging measures with behavioral and clinical variables from longitudinal studies. We develop a test procedure based on a score test statistic and a resampling method to test linear hypotheses of unknown parameters, such as associations between brain structure and function and covariates of interest, such as IQ, age, gene, diagnostic groups, and severity of disease. We demonstrate the application of our statistical methods to the detection of the changes of the fractional anisotropy across time in a longitudinal neonate study. Particularly, our results demonstrate that the use of longitudinal statistics can dramatically increase the statistical power in detecting the changes of neuroimaging measures. The proposed approach can be applied to longitudinal data with multiple outcomes and accommodate incomplete and unbalanced data, i.e., subjects with different number of measurements.

  16. REX: response exploration for neuroimaging datasets.

    PubMed

    Duff, Eugene P; Cunnington, Ross; Egan, Gary F

    2007-01-01

    Neuroimaging technologies produce large and complex datasets. The challenge of comprehensively analysing the recorded dynamics remains an important field of research. The whole-brain linear modelling of hypothesised response dynamics and experimental effects must utilise simple basis sets, which may not detect unexpected or complex signal effects. These unmodelled effects can influence statistical mapping results, and provide important additional clues to the underlying neural dynamics. They can be detected via exploration of the raw signal, however this can be difficult. Specialised visualisation tools are required to manage the huge number of voxels, events and scans. Many effects can be occluded by noise in individual voxel time-series. This paper describes a visualisation framework developed for the assessment of entire neuroimaging datasets. While currently available tools tend to be tied to a specific model of experimental effects, this framework includes a novel metadata schema that enables the rapid selection and processing of responses based on easily-adjusted classifications of scans, brain regions, and events. Flexible event-related averaging and process pipelining capabilities enable users to investigate the effects of preprocessing algorithms and to visualise power spectra and other transformations of the data. The framework has been implemented as a MATLAB package, REX (Response Exploration), which has been utilised within our lab and is now publicly available for download. Its interface enables the real-time control of data selection and processing, for very rapid visualisation. The concepts outlined in this paper have general applicability, and could provide significant further functionality to neuroimaging databasing and process pipeline environments. PMID:17985253

  17. The Extensible Neuroimaging Archive Toolkit: an informatics platform for managing, exploring, and sharing neuroimaging data.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Daniel S; Olsen, Timothy R; Ramaratnam, Mohana; Buckner, Randy L

    2007-01-01

    The Extensible Neuroimaging Archive Toolkit (XNAT) is a software platform designed to facilitate common management and productivity tasks for neuroimaging and associated data. In particular, XNAT enables qualitycontrol procedures and provides secure access to and storage of data. XNAT follows a threetiered architecture that includes a data archive, user interface, and middleware engine. Data can be entered into the archive as XML or through data entry forms. Newly added data are stored in a virtual quarantine until an authorized user has validated it. XNAT subsequently maintains a history profile to track all changes made to the managed data. User access to the archive is provided by a secure web application. The web application provides a number of quality control and productivity features, including data entry forms, data-type-specific searches, searches that combine across data types, detailed reports, and listings of experimental data, upload/download tools, access to standard laboratory workflows, and administration and security tools. XNAT also includes an online image viewer that supports a number of common neuroimaging formats, including DICOM and Analyze. The viewer can be extended to support additional formats and to generate custom displays. By managing data with XNAT, laboratories are prepared to better maintain the long-term integrity of their data, to explore emergent relations across data types, and to share their data with the broader neuroimaging community. PMID:17426351

  18. Practical management of heterogeneous neuroimaging metadata by global neuroimaging data repositories.

    PubMed

    Neu, Scott C; Crawford, Karen L; Toga, Arthur W

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly evolving neuroimaging techniques are producing unprecedented quantities of digital data at the same time that many research studies are evolving into global, multi-disciplinary collaborations between geographically distributed scientists. While networked computers have made it almost trivial to transmit data across long distances, collecting and analyzing this data requires extensive metadata if the data is to be maximally shared. Though it is typically straightforward to encode text and numerical values into files and send content between different locations, it is often difficult to attach context and implicit assumptions to the content. As the number of and geographic separation between data contributors grows to national and global scales, the heterogeneity of the collected metadata increases and conformance to a single standardization becomes implausible. Neuroimaging data repositories must then not only accumulate data but must also consolidate disparate metadata into an integrated view. In this article, using specific examples from our experiences, we demonstrate how standardization alone cannot achieve full integration of neuroimaging data from multiple heterogeneous sources and why a fundamental change in the architecture of neuroimaging data repositories is needed instead. PMID:22470336

  19. Practical management of heterogeneous neuroimaging metadata by global neuroimaging data repositories

    PubMed Central

    Neu, Scott C.; Crawford, Karen L.; Toga, Arthur W.

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly evolving neuroimaging techniques are producing unprecedented quantities of digital data at the same time that many research studies are evolving into global, multi-disciplinary collaborations between geographically distributed scientists. While networked computers have made it almost trivial to transmit data across long distances, collecting and analyzing this data requires extensive metadata if the data is to be maximally shared. Though it is typically straightforward to encode text and numerical values into files and send content between different locations, it is often difficult to attach context and implicit assumptions to the content. As the number of and geographic separation between data contributors grows to national and global scales, the heterogeneity of the collected metadata increases and conformance to a single standardization becomes implausible. Neuroimaging data repositories must then not only accumulate data but must also consolidate disparate metadata into an integrated view. In this article, using specific examples from our experiences, we demonstrate how standardization alone cannot achieve full integration of neuroimaging data from multiple heterogeneous sources and why a fundamental change in the architecture of neuroimaging data repositories is needed instead. PMID:22470336

  20. Neuroimaging for patient selection for medial temporal lobe epilepsy surgery: Part 1 Structural neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Stylianou, Petros; Hoffmann, Chen; Blat, Ilan; Harnof, Sagi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of part one of this review is to present the structural neuroimaging techniques that are currently used to evaluate patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and to discuss their potential to define patient eligibility for medial temporal lobe surgery. A PubMed query, using Medline and Embase, and subsequent review, was performed for all English language studies published after 1990, reporting neuroimaging methods for the evaluation of patients with TLE. The extracted data included demographic variables, population and study design, imaging methods, gold standard methods, imaging findings, surgical outcomes and conclusions. Overall, 56 papers were reviewed, including a total of 1517 patients. This review highlights the following structural neuroimaging techniques: MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging, tractography, electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography. The developments in neuroimaging during the last decades have led to remarkable improvements in surgical precision, postsurgical outcome, prognosis, and the rate of seizure control in patients with TLE. The use of multiple imaging methods provides improved outcomes, and further improvements will be possible with future studies of larger patient cohorts. PMID:26362835

  1. Vitamin D and Risk of Neuroimaging Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Littlejohns, Thomas J; Kos, Katarina; Henley, William E; Lang, Iain A; Annweiler, Cedric; Beauchet, Olivier; Chaves, Paulo H M; Kestenbaum, Bryan R; Kuller, Lewis H; Langa, Kenneth M; Lopez, Oscar L; Llewellyn, David J

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been linked with an increased risk of incident all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease. The aim of the current study was to explore the potential mechanisms underlying these associations by determining whether low vitamin D concentrations are associated with the development of incident cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative neuroimaging abnormalities. The population consisted of 1,658 participants aged ≥65 years from the US-based Cardiovascular Health Study who were free from prevalent cardiovascular disease, stroke and dementia at baseline in 1992-93. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry from blood samples collected at baseline. The first MRI scan was conducted between 1991-1994 and the second MRI scan was conducted between 1997-1999. Change in white matter grade, ventricular grade and presence of infarcts between MRI scan one and two were used to define neuroimaging abnormalities. During a mean follow-up of 5.0 years, serum 25(OH)D status was not significantly associated with the development of any neuroimaging abnormalities. Using logistic regression models, the multivariate adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for worsening white matter grade in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient (<25 nmol/L) and deficient (≥25-50 nmol/L) were 0.76 (0.35-1.66) and 1.09 (0.76-1.55) compared to participants with sufficient concentrations (≥50 nmol/L). The multivariate adjusted odds ratios for ventricular grade in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient and deficient were 0.49 (0.20-1.19) and 1.12 (0.79-1.59) compared to those sufficient. The multivariate adjusted odds ratios for incident infarcts in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient and deficient were 1.95 (0.84-4.54) and 0.73 (0.47-1.95) compared to those sufficient. Overall, serum vitamin D concentrations could not be shown to be associated with the development of

  2. Hybrid MR-PET in Neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Bisdas, S; Lá Fougere, C; Ernemann, U

    2015-10-01

    Hybrid magnetic resonance (MR)-positron emission tomography (MR-PET) is a novel technology with advantages over sequential MR and PET imaging, allowing maintain full individual diagnostic performance with negligible mutual interference between the two hardware settings. Obvious synergies between MR and PET in acquisition of anatomical, functional, and molecular information for neurological diseases into one single image pave the way for establishing clear clinical indications for hybrid MR-PET as well as addressing unmet neuroimaging needs in future clinics and research. Further developments in attenuation correction, quantification, workflow, and effective MR-PET data management might unfold the full potential of integrated multimodality imaging. PMID:26227618

  3. Computational neuroimaging and population receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Wandell, Brian A; Winawer, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) noninvasively measures human brain activity at millimeter resolution. Scientists use different approaches to take advantage of the remarkable opportunities presented by fMRI. Here, we describe progress using the computational neuroimaging approach in human visual cortex, which aims to build models that predict the neural responses from the stimulus and task. We focus on a particularly active area of research, the use of population receptive field (pRF) models to characterize human visual cortex responses to a range of stimuli, in a variety of tasks and different subject populations. PMID:25850730

  4. Atypical neuroimaging in Wilson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Patell, Rushad; Dosi, Rupal; Joshi, Harshal K; Storz, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Wilson's disease is a rare metabolic disease involving copper metabolism. Neuroimaging plays an important part in evaluation of patients with a neuropsychiatric presentation. We present a case of a 14-year-old girl with atypical confluent white matter disease and cystic degeneration on MRI, with a rapidly progressive course, who succumbed to complications despite treatment with trientine. Wilson's disease should be considered as a differential for leucoencephalopathy in young patients with progressive neurological disease for its early recognition and optimum outcome. PMID:24907221

  5. Vitamin D and Risk of Neuroimaging Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Littlejohns, Thomas J.; Kos, Katarina; Henley, William E.; Lang, Iain A.; Annweiler, Cedric; Beauchet, Olivier; Chaves, Paulo H. M.; Kestenbaum, Bryan R.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Langa, Kenneth M.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Llewellyn, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been linked with an increased risk of incident all-cause dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. The aim of the current study was to explore the potential mechanisms underlying these associations by determining whether low vitamin D concentrations are associated with the development of incident cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative neuroimaging abnormalities. The population consisted of 1,658 participants aged ≥65 years from the US-based Cardiovascular Health Study who were free from prevalent cardiovascular disease, stroke and dementia at baseline in 1992–93. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry from blood samples collected at baseline. The first MRI scan was conducted between 1991–1994 and the second MRI scan was conducted between 1997–1999. Change in white matter grade, ventricular grade and presence of infarcts between MRI scan one and two were used to define neuroimaging abnormalities. During a mean follow-up of 5.0 years, serum 25(OH)D status was not significantly associated with the development of any neuroimaging abnormalities. Using logistic regression models, the multivariate adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for worsening white matter grade in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient (<25 nmol/L) and deficient (≥25–50 nmol/L) were 0.76 (0.35–1.66) and 1.09 (0.76–1.55) compared to participants with sufficient concentrations (≥50 nmol/L). The multivariate adjusted odds ratios for ventricular grade in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient and deficient were 0.49 (0.20–1.19) and 1.12 (0.79–1.59) compared to those sufficient. The multivariate adjusted odds ratios for incident infarcts in participants who were severely 25(OH)D deficient and deficient were 1.95 (0.84–4.54) and 0.73 (0.47–1.95) compared to those sufficient. Overall, serum vitamin D concentrations could not be shown to be associated with

  6. Neuroimaging Features of San Luis Valley Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Matthew T.; Lee, Bonmyong

    2015-01-01

    A 14-month-old Hispanic female with a history of double-outlet right ventricle and developmental delay in the setting of recombinant chromosome 8 syndrome was referred for neurologic imaging. Brain MR revealed multiple abnormalities primarily affecting midline structures, including commissural dysgenesis, vermian and brainstem hypoplasia/dysplasia, an interhypothalamic adhesion, and an epidermoid between the frontal lobes that enlarged over time. Spine MR demonstrated hypoplastic C1 and C2 posterior elements, scoliosis, and a borderline low conus medullaris position. Presented herein is the first illustration of neuroimaging findings from a patient with San Luis Valley syndrome. PMID:26425383

  7. Language context modulates reading route: an electrical neuroimaging study

    PubMed Central

    Buetler, Karin A.; de León Rodríguez, Diego; Laganaro, Marina; Müri, René; Spierer, Lucas; Annoni, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The orthographic depth hypothesis (Katz and Feldman, 1983) posits that different reading routes are engaged depending on the type of grapheme/phoneme correspondence of the language being read. Shallow orthographies with consistent grapheme/phoneme correspondences favor encoding via non-lexical pathways, where each grapheme is sequentially mapped to its corresponding phoneme. In contrast, deep orthographies with inconsistent grapheme/phoneme correspondences favor lexical pathways, where phonemes are retrieved from specialized memory structures. This hypothesis, however, lacks compelling empirical support. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of orthographic depth on reading route selection using a within-subject design. Method: We presented the same pseudowords (PWs) to highly proficient bilinguals and manipulated the orthographic depth of PW reading by embedding them among two separated German or French language contexts, implicating respectively, shallow or deep orthography. High density electroencephalography was recorded during the task. Results: The topography of the ERPs to identical PWs differed 300–360 ms post-stimulus onset when the PWs were read in different orthographic depth context, indicating distinct brain networks engaged in reading during this time window. The brain sources underlying these topographic effects were located within left inferior frontal (German > French), parietal (French > German) and cingular areas (German > French). Conclusion: Reading in a shallow context favors non-lexical pathways, reflected in a stronger engagement of frontal phonological areas in the shallow versus the deep orthographic context. In contrast, reading PW in a deep orthographic context recruits less routine non-lexical pathways, reflected in a stronger engagement of visuo-attentional parietal areas in the deep versus shallow orthographic context. These collective results support a modulation of reading route by orthographic depth. PMID:24600377

  8. Evidence for Non-neutral Evolution in a Sodium Channel Gene in African Weakly Electric Fish (Campylomormyrus, Mormyridae).

    PubMed

    Paul, Christiane; Kirschbaum, Frank; Mamonekene, Victor; Tiedemann, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels, Nav1, play a crucial role in the generation and propagation of action potentials and substantially contribute to the shape of their rising phase. The electric organ discharge (EOD) of African weakly electric fish (Mormyroidea) is the sum of action potentials fired from all electrocytes of the electric organ at the same time and hence voltage-gated sodium channels are one factor-together with the electrocyte's morphology and innervation pattern-that determines the properties of these EODs. Due to the fish-specific genome duplication, teleost fish possess eight copies of sodium channel genes (SCN), which encode for Nav1 channels. In mormyroids, SCN4aa is solely expressed in the electrocytes of the adult electric organ. In this study, we compared entire SCN4aa sequences of six species of the genus Campylomormyrus and identified nonsynonymous substitutions among them. SCN4aa in Campylomormyrus exhibits a much higher evolutionary rate compared to its paralog SCN4ab, whose expression is not restricted to the electric organ. We also found evidence for strong positive selection on the SCN4aa gene within Mormyridae and along the lineage ancestral to the Mormyridae. We have identified sites at which all nonelectric teleosts are monomorphic in their amino acid, but mormyrids have different amino acids. Our findings confirm the crucial role of SCN4aa in EOD evolution among mormyrid weakly electric fish. The inferred positive selection within Mormyridae makes this gene a prime candidate for further investigation of the divergent evolution of pulse-type EODs among closely related species. PMID:27481396

  9. Off-Grid Electricity Access and its Impact on Micro-Enterprises: Evidence from Rural Uganda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhoro, Peter N.

    The history of development shows convincingly that no country has substantially reduced poverty without massively increasing the use of electricity. The development of micro-enterprises in rural areas of Uganda is linked with increased access and use of electricity services. In this study, I combine quantitative and qualitative methods, including informal surveys, intra-business energy allocation studies and historical analysis, to analyze off-grid electricity access among micro-enterprises in rural western Uganda. I explore the linkages between of grid electricity access and the influence it has on micro- enterprises. Data is obtained from 56 micro-enterprises located in 11 village-towns within 3 districts in Uganda. In studying the micro-enterprises. the focus is on the services that are provided by electricity from modern energy carriers. The type of equipment used, forms of transportation, technical support, level of understanding and education of the entrepreneur, financing for energy equipment, and the role of donors are discussed in this thesis. Qualitative methods are used to allow for new insights and prioritization of concepts to emerge from the field rattier than from theory. Micro-enterprises in rural Uganda create income for the poor; they are resources for poverty reduction. With price adjustments, it becomes possible for those who live below the poverty line, nominally less than $1 a day, to afford the products and services and therefore mitigating the vicious cycle of poverty. Energy consumption among the micro-enterprises is at an average of 0.13kWh/day. The cost of accessing this amount of electricity attributes to about 50% of total revenue. I find that the "practices" used in off-grid electricity access lead to situations where the entrepreneurs have to evaluate pricing and output of products and services to generate higher profits. Such numbers indicate the need for appropriate technologies and profitable policies to be implemented. The data

  10. Reproducibility of neuroimaging analyses across operating systems

    PubMed Central

    Glatard, Tristan; Lewis, Lindsay B.; Ferreira da Silva, Rafael; Adalat, Reza; Beck, Natacha; Lepage, Claude; Rioux, Pierre; Rousseau, Marc-Etienne; Sherif, Tarek; Deelman, Ewa; Khalili-Mahani, Najmeh; Evans, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging pipelines are known to generate different results depending on the computing platform where they are compiled and executed. We quantify these differences for brain tissue classification, fMRI analysis, and cortical thickness (CT) extraction, using three of the main neuroimaging packages (FSL, Freesurfer and CIVET) and different versions of GNU/Linux. We also identify some causes of these differences using library and system call interception. We find that these packages use mathematical functions based on single-precision floating-point arithmetic whose implementations in operating systems continue to evolve. While these differences have little or no impact on simple analysis pipelines such as brain extraction and cortical tissue classification, their accumulation creates important differences in longer pipelines such as subcortical tissue classification, fMRI analysis, and cortical thickness extraction. With FSL, most Dice coefficients between subcortical classifications obtained on different operating systems remain above 0.9, but values as low as 0.59 are observed. Independent component analyses (ICA) of fMRI data differ between operating systems in one third of the tested subjects, due to differences in motion correction. With Freesurfer and CIVET, in some brain regions we find an effect of build or operating system on cortical thickness. A first step to correct these reproducibility issues would be to use more precise representations of floating-point numbers in the critical sections of the pipelines. The numerical stability of pipelines should also be reviewed. PMID:25964757

  11. Experimental evidence of tunable space-charge-layer-induced electrical properties of nanocrystalline ceria thin films.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Ryul; Lee, Jong-Ho; Yoo, Han-Ill

    2013-10-01

    Fully dense nanocrystalline ceria films were successfully deposited on a MgO single crystal by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The electrical conductivity of the nanocrystalline thin film was 20 times higher than that of the bulk sample. The activation energy of bulk ceria was 2.3 eV, whereas the activation energy of the nanocrystalline sample was only 1.2 eV. After post-annealing at 1273 K in which the grain size of the nanocrystalline thin film increased to ~400 nm, the electrical conductivity and activation energy of the film were changed similar to those of bulk. These unique electrical properties of the nano-crystalline thin-film can be attributed to the grain size effect, or more specifically, to the space charge layer (SCL) effect. Furthermore, the electrical conductivity of the nanocrystalline thin film became similar to that of the bulk in an extremely reducing atmosphere because of the unusual dependence of the SCL effect on the oxygen partial pressure. PMID:23942424

  12. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation on Swallowing and Neural Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Heather; Lazarus, Cathy; Arvedson, Joan; Schooling, Tracy; Frymark, Tobi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically review the literature examining the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on swallowing and neural activation. The review was conducted as part of a series examining the effects of oral motor exercises (OMEs) on speech, swallowing, and neural activation. Method: A systematic search was conducted to…

  13. Evidence of a noon-to-midnight electric field in Saturn's inner magnetosphere, using microsignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriopoulou, M.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Paranicas, C.; Thomsen, M.; Krimigis, S.; Dougherty, M. K.; Glassmeier, K.-H.

    2012-04-01

    Using electron data of the MIMI-LEMMS detector that is onboard the Cassini spacecraft, we have created new, updated catalogues of energetic electron microsignature events caused by the Kronian moons Tethys and Dione. We studied the deviations of the moon's wake from the nearly circular path of the orbit of the moon-absorber and observed significant radial displacements that exhibit systematic asymmetries with respect to the local time, following a systematic trend: inward in the nightside and outward in the dayside of the inner magnetosphere. We show that these asymmetries cannot be explained by asymmetries of the magnetic field in the inner magnetosphere. We developed several methods to associate the properties of the displacements to magnetospheric electric fields. Our results are consistent with an electric field that has a noon-to-midnight orientation and amplitudes that do not exceed 1 mV/m. Such an electric field is not predicted by any theoretical model and its origin is still unknown. While several ongoing studies are in agreement with our result, the radial displacement of microsignatures is the most sensitive tracer of this electric field so we will also discuss how the microsignature dataset can be used to put tighter constraints on its properties and origin.

  14. Retrospective study on structural neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    Coentre, Ricardo; Silva-Dos-Santos, Amilcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    Background. No consensus between guidelines exists regarding neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis. The purpose of this study is to assess anomalies found in structural neuroimaging exams (brain computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) in the initial medical work-up of patients presenting first-episode psychosis. Methods. The study subjects were 32 patients aged 18-48 years (mean age: 29.6 years), consecutively admitted with first-episode psychosis diagnosis. Socio-demographic and clinical data and neuroimaging exams (CT and MRI) were retrospectively studied. Diagnostic assessments were made using the Operational Criteria Checklist +. Neuroimaging images (CT and MRI) and respective reports were analysed by an experienced consultant psychiatrist. Results. None of the patients had abnormalities in neuroimaging exams responsible for psychotic symptoms. Thirty-seven percent of patients had incidental brain findings not causally related to the psychosis (brain atrophy, arachnoid cyst, asymmetric lateral ventricles, dilated lateral ventricles, plagiocephaly and falx cerebri calcification). No further medical referral was needed for any of these patients. No significant differences regarding gender, age, diagnosis, duration of untreated psychosis, in-stay and cannabis use were found between patients who had neuroimaging abnormalities versus those without. Discussion. This study suggests that structural neuroimaging exams reveal scarce abnormalities in young patients with first-episode psychosis. Structural neuroimaging is especially useful in first-episode psychosis patients with neurological symptoms, atypical clinical picture and old age. PMID:27257547

  15. Functional neuroimaging can support causal claims about brain function

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Matthew J.; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscientists habitually deny that functional neuroimaging can furnish causal information about the relationship between brain events and behavior. However, imaging studies do provide causal information about those relationships—though not causal certainty. Although popular portrayals of functional neuroimaging tend to attribute too much inferential power to the technique, we should restrain ourselves from ascribing it too little. PMID:20201629

  16. Neuroimaging in Communication Sciences and Disorders: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plante, Elena

    2001-01-01

    This introductory article introduces papers that present examples of neuroimaging applications in the field of communication sciences and disorders. It notes that neuroimaging studies were usually an outgrowth of earlier behavioral research or clinical observations with knowledge of the disorder's behavioral characteristic critical to development…

  17. Retrospective study on structural neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Silva-dos-Santos, Amilcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    Background. No consensus between guidelines exists regarding neuroimaging in first-episode psychosis. The purpose of this study is to assess anomalies found in structural neuroimaging exams (brain computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) in the initial medical work-up of patients presenting first-episode psychosis. Methods. The study subjects were 32 patients aged 18–48 years (mean age: 29.6 years), consecutively admitted with first-episode psychosis diagnosis. Socio-demographic and clinical data and neuroimaging exams (CT and MRI) were retrospectively studied. Diagnostic assessments were made using the Operational Criteria Checklist +. Neuroimaging images (CT and MRI) and respective reports were analysed by an experienced consultant psychiatrist. Results. None of the patients had abnormalities in neuroimaging exams responsible for psychotic symptoms. Thirty-seven percent of patients had incidental brain findings not causally related to the psychosis (brain atrophy, arachnoid cyst, asymmetric lateral ventricles, dilated lateral ventricles, plagiocephaly and falx cerebri calcification). No further medical referral was needed for any of these patients. No significant differences regarding gender, age, diagnosis, duration of untreated psychosis, in-stay and cannabis use were found between patients who had neuroimaging abnormalities versus those without. Discussion. This study suggests that structural neuroimaging exams reveal scarce abnormalities in young patients with first-episode psychosis. Structural neuroimaging is especially useful in first-episode psychosis patients with neurological symptoms, atypical clinical picture and old age. PMID:27257547

  18. Cognitive Neuroimaging: Cognitive Science out of the Armchair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Zubicaray, Greig I.

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive scientists were not quick to embrace the functional neuroimaging technologies that emerged during the late 20th century. In this new century, cognitive scientists continue to question, not unreasonably, the relevance of functional neuroimaging investigations that fail to address questions of interest to cognitive science. However, some…

  19. Biochemical and neuroimaging studies in subjective cognitive decline: progress and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Yang, Fu-Chi; Lin, Ching-Po; Han, Ying

    2015-10-01

    Neurodegeneration due to Alzheimer's disease (AD) can progress over decades before dementia becomes apparent. Indeed, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) already demonstrate significant lesion loads. In most cases, MCI is preceded by subjective cognitive decline (SCD), which is applied to individuals who have self-reported memory-related complaints and has been associated with a higher risk of future cognitive decline and conversion to dementia. Based on the schema of a well-received model of biomarker dynamics in AD pathogenesis, it has been postulated that SCD symptoms may result from compensatory changes in response to β-amyloid accumulation and neurodegeneration. Although SCD is considered a prodromal stage of MCI, it is also a common manifestation in old age, independent of AD, and the predictive value of SCD for AD pathology remains controversial. Here, we provide a review focused on the contributions of cross-sectional and longitudinal analogical studies of biomarkers and neuroimaging evidence in disentangling under what conditions SCD may be attributable to AD pathology. In conclusion, there is promising evidence indicating that clinicians should be able to differentiate pre-AD SCD based on the presence of pathophysiological biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neuroimaging. However, this neuroimaging approach is still at an immature stage without an established rubric of standards. A substantial amount of work remains in terms of replicating recent findings and validating the clinical utility of identifying SCD. PMID:25864576

  20. Communicating with vegetative state patients: the role of neuroimaging in American disability law.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Dalia B

    2014-06-01

    Patients in vegetative states appear to be awake but unconscious. If they have been in a vegetative state for more than one year, they have little chance of ever recovering. Additionally, no one can communicate with them, including physicians, loved ones, and families. However, new scientific evidence has challenged our understanding of this bleak reality. In particular, recent neuroscience research has shown that a substantial number of patients in vegetative states may actually be conscious and able to communicate through the use of brain-scanning technology. This exciting development poses many difficult questions, including the one analyzed here: now that we know neuroimaging may be the only way to communicate with these patients, will health care facilities be required to provide brain-scanning equipment under American disability law? This Note argues that lawsuits seeking neuroimaging technology from hospitals have a significant chance of success. The main challenge for plaintiffs will be convincing judges that existing scientific evidence actually shows that neuroimaging can facilitate communication with patients. Ultimately, if the appropriate legal framework develops, brain-scanning technology could permit patients in vegetative states to make decisions regarding their own medical care and allow families to communicate with their loved ones. PMID:25004549

  1. Colorful brains: 14 years of display practice in functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Christen, Markus; Vitacco, Deborah A; Huber, Lara; Harboe, Julie; Fabrikant, Sara I; Brugger, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Neuroimaging results are typically graphically rendered and color-coded, which influences the process of knowledge generation within neuroscience as well as the public perception of brain research. Analyzing these issues requires empirical information on the display practice in neuroimaging. In our study we evaluated more than 9000 functional images (fMRI and PET) published between 1996 and 2009 with respect to the use of color, image structure, image production software and other factors that may determine the display practice. We demonstrate a variety of display styles despite a remarkable dominance of few image production sites and software systems, outline some tendencies of standardization, and identify shortcomings with respect to color scale explication in neuroimages. We discuss the importance of the finding for knowledge production in neuroimaging, and we make suggestions to improve the display practice in neuroimaging, especially on regimes of color coding. PMID:23403183

  2. A Review on the Bioinformatics Tools for Neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Man, Mei Yen; Ong, Mei Sin; Mohamad, Mohd Saberi; Deris, Safaai; Sulong, Ghazali; Yunus, Jasmy; Che Harun, Fauzan Khairi

    2015-12-01

    Neuroimaging is a new technique used to create images of the structure and function of the nervous system in the human brain. Currently, it is crucial in scientific fields. Neuroimaging data are becoming of more interest among the circle of neuroimaging experts. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a large amount of neuroimaging tools. This paper gives an overview of the tools that have been used to image the structure and function of the nervous system. This information can help developers, experts, and users gain insight and a better understanding of the neuroimaging tools available, enabling better decision making in choosing tools of particular research interest. Sources, links, and descriptions of the application of each tool are provided in this paper as well. Lastly, this paper presents the language implemented, system requirements, strengths, and weaknesses of the tools that have been widely used to image the structure and function of the nervous system. PMID:27006633

  3. A Review on the Bioinformatics Tools for Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    MAN, Mei Yen; ONG, Mei Sin; Mohamad, Mohd Saberi; DERIS, Safaai; SULONG, Ghazali; YUNUS, Jasmy; CHE HARUN, Fauzan Khairi

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging is a new technique used to create images of the structure and function of the nervous system in the human brain. Currently, it is crucial in scientific fields. Neuroimaging data are becoming of more interest among the circle of neuroimaging experts. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a large amount of neuroimaging tools. This paper gives an overview of the tools that have been used to image the structure and function of the nervous system. This information can help developers, experts, and users gain insight and a better understanding of the neuroimaging tools available, enabling better decision making in choosing tools of particular research interest. Sources, links, and descriptions of the application of each tool are provided in this paper as well. Lastly, this paper presents the language implemented, system requirements, strengths, and weaknesses of the tools that have been widely used to image the structure and function of the nervous system. PMID:27006633

  4. Advances in neuroimaging research of schizophrenia in China

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Dengtang; XU, Yifeng; JIANG, Kaida

    2014-01-01

    Summary Since Hounsfield’s first report about X-ray computed tomography (CT) in 1972, there has been substantial progress in the application of neuroimaging techniques to study the structure, function, and biochemistry of the brain. This review provides a summary of recent research in structural and functional neuroimaging of schizophrenia in China and four tables describing all of the relevant studies from mainland China. The first research report using neuroimaging techniques in China dates back to 1983, a study that reported encephalatrophy in 30% of individuals with schizophrenia. Functional neuroimaging research in China emerged in the 1990s and has undergone rapid development since. Recently, structural and functional brain networks has become a hot topic among China’s neuroimaging researchers. PMID:25317005

  5. Genetic and Neuroimaging Features of Personality Disorders: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guorong; Fan, Hongying; Shen, Chanchan; Wang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Personality disorders often act as a common denominator for many psychiatric problems, and studies on personality disorders contribute to the etiopathology, diagnosis, and treatment of many mental disorders. In recent years, increasing evidence from various studies has shown distinctive features of personality disorders, and that from genetic and neuroimaging studies has been especially valuable. Genetic studies primarily target the genes encoding neurotransmitters and enzymes in the serotoninergic and dopaminergic systems, and neuroimaging studies mainly focus on the frontal and temporal lobes as well as the limbic-paralimbic system in patients with personality disorders. Although some studies have suffered due to unclear diagnoses of personality disorders and some have included few patients for a given personality disorder, great opportunities remain for investigators to launch new ideas and technologies in the field. PMID:27037690

  6. Neuroimaging of Natalizumab Complications in Multiple Sclerosis: PML and Other Associated Entities

    PubMed Central

    Honce, Justin M.; Nagae, Lidia; Nyberg, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Natalizumab (Tysabri) is a monoclonal antibody (α4 integrin antagonist) approved for treatment of multiple sclerosis, both for patients who fail therapy with other disease modifying agents and for patients with aggressive disease. Natalizumab is highly effective, resulting in significant decreases in rates of both relapse and disability accumulation, as well as marked decrease in MRI evidence of disease activity. As such, utilization of natalizumab is increasing, and the presentation of its associated complications is increasing accordingly. This review focuses on the clinical and neuroimaging features of the major complications associated with natalizumab therapy, focusing on the rare but devastating progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Associated entities including PML associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (PML-IRIS) and the emerging phenomenon of rebound of MS disease activity after natalizumab discontinuation are also discussed. Early recognition of neuroimaging features associated with these processes is critical in order to facilitate prompt diagnosis, treatment, and/or modification of therapies to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26483978

  7. Aging, Neurodegenerative Disease, and Traumatic Brain Injury: The Role of Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a highly prevalent condition with significant effects on cognition and behavior. While the acute and sub-acute effects of TBI recover over time, relatively little is known about the long-term effects of TBI in relation to neurodegenerative disease. This issue has recently garnered a great deal of attention due to publicity surrounding chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in professional athletes, although CTE is but one of several neurodegenerative disorders associated with a history of TBI. Here, we review the literative on neurodegenerative disorders linked to remote TBI. We also review the evidence for neuroimaging changes associated with unhealthy brain aging in the context of remote TBI. We conclude that neuroimaging biomarkers have significant potential to increase understanding of the mechanisms of unhealthy brain aging and neurodegeneration following TBI, with potential for identifying those at risk for unhealthy brain aging prior to the clinical manifestation of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25192426

  8. Neuroimaging of Natalizumab Complications in Multiple Sclerosis: PML and Other Associated Entities.

    PubMed

    Honce, Justin M; Nagae, Lidia; Nyberg, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Natalizumab (Tysabri) is a monoclonal antibody (α4 integrin antagonist) approved for treatment of multiple sclerosis, both for patients who fail therapy with other disease modifying agents and for patients with aggressive disease. Natalizumab is highly effective, resulting in significant decreases in rates of both relapse and disability accumulation, as well as marked decrease in MRI evidence of disease activity. As such, utilization of natalizumab is increasing, and the presentation of its associated complications is increasing accordingly. This review focuses on the clinical and neuroimaging features of the major complications associated with natalizumab therapy, focusing on the rare but devastating progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Associated entities including PML associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (PML-IRIS) and the emerging phenomenon of rebound of MS disease activity after natalizumab discontinuation are also discussed. Early recognition of neuroimaging features associated with these processes is critical in order to facilitate prompt diagnosis, treatment, and/or modification of therapies to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26483978

  9. Age of Onset of Schizophrenia: Perspectives From Structural Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gogtay, Nitin; Vyas, Nora S.; Testa, Renee; Wood, Stephen J.; Pantelis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    Many of the major neuropsychiatric illnesses, including schizophrenia, have a typical age of onset in late adolescence. Late adolescence may reflect a critical period in brain development making it particularly vulnerable for the onset of psychopathology. Neuroimaging studies that focus on this age range may provide unique insights into the onset and course of psychosis. In this review, we examine the evidence from 2 unique longitudinal cohorts that span the ages from early childhood through young adulthood; a study of childhood-onset schizophrenia where patients and siblings are followed from ages 6 through to their early twenties, and an ultra-high risk study where subjects (mean age of 19 years) are studied before and after the onset of psychosis. From the available evidence, we make an argument that subtle, regionally specific, and genetically influenced alterations during developmental age windows influence the course of psychosis and the resultant brain phenotype. The importance of examining trajectories of development and the need for future combined approaches, using multimodal imaging together with molecular studies is discussed. PMID:21505117

  10. Age of onset of schizophrenia: perspectives from structural neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Gogtay, Nitin; Vyas, Nora S; Testa, Renee; Wood, Stephen J; Pantelis, Christos

    2011-05-01

    Many of the major neuropsychiatric illnesses, including schizophrenia, have a typical age of onset in late adolescence. Late adolescence may reflect a critical period in brain development making it particularly vulnerable for the onset of psychopathology. Neuroimaging studies that focus on this age range may provide unique insights into the onset and course of psychosis. In this review, we examine the evidence from 2 unique longitudinal cohorts that span the ages from early childhood through young adulthood; a study of childhood-onset schizophrenia where patients and siblings are followed from ages 6 through to their early twenties, and an ultra-high risk study where subjects (mean age of 19 years) are studied before and after the onset of psychosis. From the available evidence, we make an argument that subtle, regionally specific, and genetically influenced alterations during developmental age windows influence the course of psychosis and the resultant brain phenotype. The importance of examining trajectories of development and the need for future combined approaches, using multimodal imaging together with molecular studies is discussed. PMID:21505117

  11. The glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenia: neuroimaging and drug development.

    PubMed

    Egerton, Alice; Stone, James M

    2012-06-01

    Over the last 50 years, evidence for central involvement of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia has accumulated. Recent advances in neuroimaging technology now allow several components of glutamatergic neurotransmission to be assessed in the living human brain. Positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission tomography (SPET) in combination with select radiotracers allows visualization of glutamatergic receptors in vivo, and magnetic resonance (MR) - based techniques allow mapping of the effects of glutamatergic agents on regional brain activation, and the measurement of regional glutamate concentrations. These imaging studies have provided evidence for regional glutamatergic abnormalities in psychosis, and are beginning to describe both the evolution of these abnormalities over the course of the illness and their response to therapeutic intervention. In parallel, advances in small animal imaging and the development of animal models have provided a platform to explore the neuropathological consequences of glutamatergic abnormality, and the potential antipsychotic efficacy of novel compounds. The molecular diversity of the glutamatergic system has driven the design of several compounds targeting aspects of glutamatergic transmission, and clinical trials have yielded encouraging results. Here, we review the contribution of imaging studies to date in understanding glutamatergic abnormalities in psychosis, and discuss the potential of new glutamatergic compounds for treatment of the disorder. PMID:22283750

  12. Systems Biology, Neuroimaging, Neuropsychology, Neuroconnectivity and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bigler, Erin D.

    2016-01-01

    The patient who sustains a traumatic brain injury (TBI) typically undergoes neuroimaging studies, usually in the form of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In most cases the neuroimaging findings are clinically assessed with descriptive statements that provide qualitative information about the presence/absence of visually identifiable abnormalities; though little if any of the potential information in a scan is analyzed in any quantitative manner, except in research settings. Fortunately, major advances have been made, especially during the last decade, in regards to image quantification techniques, especially those that involve automated image analysis methods. This review argues that a systems biology approach to understanding quantitative neuroimaging findings in TBI provides an appropriate framework for better utilizing the information derived from quantitative neuroimaging and its relation with neuropsychological outcome. Different image analysis methods are reviewed in an attempt to integrate quantitative neuroimaging methods with neuropsychological outcome measures and to illustrate how different neuroimaging techniques tap different aspects of TBI-related neuropathology. Likewise, how different neuropathologies may relate to neuropsychological outcome is explored by examining how damage influences brain connectivity and neural networks. Emphasis is placed on the dynamic changes that occur following TBI and how best to capture those pathologies via different neuroimaging methods. However, traditional clinical neuropsychological techniques are not well suited for interpretation based on contemporary and advanced neuroimaging methods and network analyses. Significant improvements need to be made in the cognitive and behavioral assessment of the brain injured individual to better interface with advances in neuroimaging-based network analyses. By viewing both neuroimaging and neuropsychological processes within a systems biology

  13. Systems Biology, Neuroimaging, Neuropsychology, Neuroconnectivity and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Erin D

    2016-01-01

    The patient who sustains a traumatic brain injury (TBI) typically undergoes neuroimaging studies, usually in the form of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In most cases the neuroimaging findings are clinically assessed with descriptive statements that provide qualitative information about the presence/absence of visually identifiable abnormalities; though little if any of the potential information in a scan is analyzed in any quantitative manner, except in research settings. Fortunately, major advances have been made, especially during the last decade, in regards to image quantification techniques, especially those that involve automated image analysis methods. This review argues that a systems biology approach to understanding quantitative neuroimaging findings in TBI provides an appropriate framework for better utilizing the information derived from quantitative neuroimaging and its relation with neuropsychological outcome. Different image analysis methods are reviewed in an attempt to integrate quantitative neuroimaging methods with neuropsychological outcome measures and to illustrate how different neuroimaging techniques tap different aspects of TBI-related neuropathology. Likewise, how different neuropathologies may relate to neuropsychological outcome is explored by examining how damage influences brain connectivity and neural networks. Emphasis is placed on the dynamic changes that occur following TBI and how best to capture those pathologies via different neuroimaging methods. However, traditional clinical neuropsychological techniques are not well suited for interpretation based on contemporary and advanced neuroimaging methods and network analyses. Significant improvements need to be made in the cognitive and behavioral assessment of the brain injured individual to better interface with advances in neuroimaging-based network analyses. By viewing both neuroimaging and neuropsychological processes within a systems biology

  14. Neuroimaging for drug addiction and related behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Parvaz, Muhammad A.; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Woicik, Patricia A.; Volkow, Nora D.; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we highlight the role of neuroimaging techniques in studying the emotional and cognitive-behavioral components of the addiction syndrome by focusing on the neural substrates subserving them. The phenomenology of drug addiction can be characterized by a recurrent pattern of subjective experiences that includes drug intoxication, craving, bingeing, and withdrawal with the cycle culminating in a persistent preoccupation with obtaining, consuming, and recovering from the drug. In the past two decades, imaging studies of drug addiction have demonstrated deficits in brain circuits related to reward and impulsivity. The current review focuses on studies employing positron emission tomography (PET), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and electroencephalography (EEG) to investigate these behaviors in drug-addicted human populations. We begin with a brief account of drug addiction followed by a technical account of each of these imaging modalities. We then discuss how these techniques have uniquely contributed to a deeper understanding of addictive behaviors. PMID:22117165

  15. The Human Connectome Project's neuroimaging approach.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Matthew F; Smith, Stephen M; Marcus, Daniel S; Andersson, Jesper L R; Auerbach, Edward J; Behrens, Timothy E J; Coalson, Timothy S; Harms, Michael P; Jenkinson, Mark; Moeller, Steen; Robinson, Emma C; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Xu, Junqian; Yacoub, Essa; Ugurbil, Kamil; Van Essen, David C

    2016-08-26

    Noninvasive human neuroimaging has yielded many discoveries about the brain. Numerous methodological advances have also occurred, though inertia has slowed their adoption. This paper presents an integrated approach to data acquisition, analysis and sharing that builds upon recent advances, particularly from the Human Connectome Project (HCP). The 'HCP-style' paradigm has seven core tenets: (i) collect multimodal imaging data from many subjects; (ii) acquire data at high spatial and temporal resolution; (iii) preprocess data to minimize distortions, blurring and temporal artifacts; (iv) represent data using the natural geometry of cortical and subcortical structures; (v) accurately align corresponding brain areas across subjects and studies; (vi) analyze data using neurobiologically accurate brain parcellations; and (vii) share published data via user-friendly databases. We illustrate the HCP-style paradigm using existing HCP data sets and provide guidance for future research. Widespread adoption of this paradigm should accelerate progress in understanding the brain in health and disease. PMID:27571196

  16. The experience of art: insights from neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    The experience of art is a complex one. It emerges from the interaction of multiple cognitive and affective processes. Neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies are revealing the broadly distributed network of brain regions upon which it relies. This network can be divided into three functional components: (i) prefrontal, parietal, and temporal cortical regions support evaluative judgment, attentional processing, and memory retrieval; (ii) the reward circuit, including cortical, subcortical regions, and some of its regulators, is involved in the generation of pleasurable feelings and emotions, and the valuation and anticipation of reward; and (iii) attentional modulation of activity in low-, mid-, and high-level cortical sensory regions enhances the perceptual processing of certain features, relations, locations, or objects. Understanding how these regions act in concert to produce unique and moving art experiences and determining the impact of personal and cultural meaning and context on this network the biological foundation of the experience of art--remain future challenges. PMID:24041322

  17. Neuroimaging for drug addiction and related behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Parvaz M. A.; Parvaz, M.A.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik,P.A.; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2011-10-01

    In this review, we highlight the role of neuroimaging techniques in studying the emotional and cognitive-behavioral components of the addiction syndrome by focusing on the neural substrates subserving them. The phenomenology of drug addiction can be characterized by a recurrent pattern of subjective experiences that includes drug intoxication, craving, bingeing, and withdrawal with the cycle culminating in a persistent preoccupation with obtaining, consuming, and recovering from the drug. In the past two decades, imaging studies of drug addiction have demonstrated deficits in brain circuits related to reward and impulsivity. The current review focuses on studies employing positron emission tomography (PET), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and electroencephalography (EEG) to investigate these behaviors in drug-addicted human populations. We begin with a brief account of drug addiction followed by a technical account of each of these imaging modalities. We then discuss how these techniques have uniquely contributed to a deeper understanding of addictive behaviors.

  18. A simple tool for neuroimaging data sharing

    PubMed Central

    Haselgrove, Christian; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Kennedy, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Data sharing is becoming increasingly common, but despite encouragement and facilitation by funding agencies, journals, and some research efforts, most neuroimaging data acquired today is still not shared due to political, financial, social, and technical barriers to sharing data that remain. In particular, technical solutions are few for researchers that are not a part of larger efforts with dedicated sharing infrastructures, and social barriers such as the time commitment required to share can keep data from becoming publicly available. We present a system for sharing neuroimaging data, designed to be simple to use and to provide benefit to the data provider. The system consists of a server at the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility (INCF) and user tools for uploading data to the server. The primary design principle for the user tools is ease of use: the user identifies a directory containing Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data, provides their INCF Portal authentication, and provides identifiers for the subject and imaging session. The user tool anonymizes the data and sends it to the server. The server then runs quality control routines on the data, and the data and the quality control reports are made public. The user retains control of the data and may change the sharing policy as they need. The result is that in a few minutes of the user’s time, DICOM data can be anonymized and made publicly available, and an initial quality control assessment can be performed on the data. The system is currently functional, and user tools and access to the public image database are available at http://xnat.incf.org/. PMID:24904398

  19. Evidence of underground electric current generation during the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake: Real or instrumental?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masci, F.; Thomas, J. N.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate magnetic effects in correspondence of the Mw6.1 L'Aquila earthquake. Magnetic and seismic records are analyzed. Rapid and distinct changes and an offset can be seen in magnetic field components after the main shock. We show that these effects result from electromagnetic induction due to the movement of the sensors through the Earth's magnetic field and from a permanent displacement of the sensors from their original position caused by the passing seismic waves. A transient signal in total field data from an overhauser magnetometer apparently occurs in correspondence with the earthquake. Our analysis shows that the transient was not observed by other sensors that were operating in close proximity to the overhauser. Thus, the transient signal in the total magnetic field data, and the offset in the magnetic field components, cannot be associated with a hypothetical underground electric current generated by the earthquake, as suggested by Nenovski (2015).

  20. How much do electric customers want to pay for reliability; New evidence on an old controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, C.K. ); Pupp, R.L. ); Flaim, T.; Mango, R. )

    1991-01-01

    Electric utilities are facing competitive challenges from independent power producers, cogenerators, qualifying facilities, and customer bypass, in addition to increasing resistance to building new capacity whether it be conventional or nuclear. Utilities are meeting these challenges by offering an array of demand-side management programs and differentiated tariffs that better match utility rates and customer preferences for service reliability. Customer preferences for service reliability may be gathered by market survey, however, survey estimates are subject to various common criticisms a fact that has retarded the adoption of this approach. by using power survey design techniques and statistical methods, the authors show in this paper, how accurate customer value of service reliability data may be collected with a market survey.

  1. Evidence for room temperature electric polarization in RMn(2)O(5) multiferroics.

    PubMed

    Balédent, V; Chattopadhyay, S; Fertey, P; Lepetit, M B; Greenblatt, M; Wanklyn, B; Saouma, F O; Jang, J I; Foury-Leylekian, P

    2015-03-20

    It is established that the multiferroics RMn(2)O(5) crystallize in the centrosymmetric Pbam space group and that the magnetically induced electric polarization appearing at low temperature is accompanied by a symmetry breaking. However, both our present x-ray study-performed on compounds with R=Pr,Nd,Gd,Tb, and Dy-and first-principles calculations unambiguously rule out this picture. Based on structural refinements, geometry optimization, and physical arguments, we demonstrate in this Letter that the actual space group is likely to be Pm. This turns out to be of crucial importance for RMn(2)O(5) multiferroics since Pm is not centrosymmetric. Ferroelectricity is thus already present at room temperature, and its enhancement at low temperature is a spin-enhanced process. This result is also supported by direct observation of optical second harmonic generation. This fundamental result calls into question the actual theoretical approaches that describe the magnetoelectric coupling in this multiferroic family. PMID:25839307

  2. Functional neuroimaging studies of post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Katherine C; Shin, Lisa M

    2011-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a significant problem that can affect individuals who have been exposed to a traumatic event or events, such as combat, violent crime or childhood abuse. Over the past several years, neuroimaging studies of PTSD have focused on elucidating the brain circuits that mediate this disorder. In this article, we will briefly introduce some of the methods used in functional neuroimaging studies of PTSD. We will then review functional neuroimaging studies that have reported significant findings in the amygdala, medial prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and insula. Finally, we will suggest future directions for research. PMID:21306214

  3. Whole cell electrochemistry of electricity-producing microorganisms evidence an adaptation for optimal exocellular electron transport.

    PubMed

    Busalmen, Juan Pablo; Esteve-Nuñez, Abraham; Feliu, Juan Miguel

    2008-04-01

    The mechanism(s) by which electricity-producing microorganisms interact with an electrode is poorly understood. Outer membrane cytochromes and conductive pili are being considered as possible players, but the available information does not concur to a consensus mechanism yet. In this work we demonstrate that Geobacter sulfurreducens cells are able to change the way in which they exchange electrons with an electrode as a response to changes in the applied electrode potential. After several hours of polarization at 0.1 V Ag/AgCl-KCl (saturated), the voltammetric signature of the attached cells showed a single redox pair with a formal redox potential of about -0.08 V as calculated from chronopotentiometric analysis. A similar signal was obtained from cells adapted to 0.4 V. However, new redox couples were detected after conditioning at 0.6 V. A large oxidation process beyond 0.5 V transferring a higher current than that obtained at 0.1 V was found to be associated with two reduction waves at 0.23 and 0.50 V. The apparent equilibrium potential of these new processes was estimated to be at about 0.48 V from programmed current potentiometric results. Importantly, when polarization was lowered again to 0.1 V for 18 additional hours, the signals obtained at 0.6 V were found to greatly diminish in amplitude, whereas those previously found at the lower conditioning potential were recovered. Results clearly show the reversibility of cell adaptation to the electrode potential and pointto the polarization potential as a key variable to optimize energy production from an electricity producing population. PMID:18504979

  4. The Current Impact of Incidental Findings Found during Neuroimaging on Neurologists’ Workloads

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Thomas C.; Boyd-Ellison, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Neuroimaging is an important diagnostic tool in the assessment of neurological disease, but often unmasks Incidental Findings (IFs). The negative impacts of IFs, such as ‘patient’ anxiety, present neurologists with management dilemmas, largely due to the limited knowledge base surrounding the medical significance of these IFs. In particular, the lack of evidence-based clinical trials investigating the efficacy of treatments for subclinical IFs makes management protocols challenging. The objective was to determine the impact IFs may have on neurologists’ workloads and healthcare budgets and to examine neurologists’ concerns regarding the clinical management of these ‘patients’. Methods Qualitative research based on constructivist grounded theory. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews of purposively sampled neurologists, coded, and concurrent comparative analysis performed. A substantive theory of the ‘IF impacts’ was developed after concept saturation. Results Neurologists managed the escalating workload caused by an increased number of referrals of ‘patients’ with IFs found during neuroimaging; however it was unclear whether this was sustainable in the future. Neurologists experienced IF management dilemmas and spent more time with ‘patients’ affected by anxiety. The lack of information provided to those undergoing neuroimaging by the referring clinician regarding the possibility of discovering IFs was highlighted. Conclusion The impact of IFs upon the neurologist, ‘patient’ and the health institution appeared considerable. Further research determining the natural history of subclinical IFs and the efficacy of intervention will help to alleviate these issues. PMID:25723558

  5. A Functional Approach to Deconvolve Dynamic Neuroimaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ci-Ren; Aston, John A. D.; Wang, Jane-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an imaging technique which can be used to investigate chemical changes in human biological processes such as cancer development or neurochemical reactions. Most dynamic PET scans are currently analyzed based on the assumption that linear first-order kinetics can be used to adequately describe the system under observation. However, there has recently been strong evidence that this is not the case. To provide an analysis of PET data which is free from this compartmental assumption, we propose a nonparametric deconvolution and analysis model for dynamic PET data based on functional principal component analysis. This yields flexibility in the possible deconvolved functions while still performing well when a linear compartmental model setup is the true data generating mechanism. As the deconvolution needs to be performed on only a relative small number of basis functions rather than voxel by voxel in the entire three-dimensional volume, the methodology is both robust to typical brain imaging noise levels while also being computationally efficient. The new methodology is investigated through simulations in both one-dimensional functions and 2D images and also applied to a neuroimaging study whose goal is the quantification of opioid receptor concentration in the brain. PMID:27226673

  6. Cerebral Microbleeds: A Review of Clinical, Genetic, and Neuroimaging Associations

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Paul A.; Villemagne, Victor L.; Ellis, Kathryn A.; Desmond, Patricia M.; Masters, Colin L.; Rowe, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (microbleeds) are small, punctuate hypointense lesions seen in T2* Gradient-Recall Echo (GRE) and Susceptibility-Weighted (SWI) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequences, corresponding to areas of hemosiderin breakdown products from prior microscopic hemorrhages. They occur in the setting of impaired small vessel integrity, commonly due to either hypertensive vasculopathy or cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Microbleeds are more prevalent in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia and in those with both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. However they are also found in asymptomatic individuals, with increasing prevalence with age, particularly in carriers of the Apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 allele. Other neuroimaging findings that have been linked with microbleeds include lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI, and increased cerebral β-amyloid burden using 11C-PiB Positron Emission Tomography. The presence of microbleeds has been suggested to confer increased risk of incident intracerebral hemorrhage – particularly in the setting of anticoagulation – and of complications of immunotherapy for AD. Prospective data regarding the natural history and sequelae of microbleeds are currently limited, however there is a growing evidence base that will serve to inform clinical decision-making in the future. PMID:24432010

  7. Functional neuroimaging of acute oculomotor deficits in concussed athletes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brian; Zhang, Kai; Hallett, Mark; Slobounov, Semyon

    2015-09-01

    In the pursuit to better understand the neural underpinnings of oculomotor deficits following concussion we performed a battery of oculomotor tests while performing simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Based on the increasing evidence that concussion can disrupt multiple brain functional networks, including the oculomotor control networks, a series of classic saccadic and smooth pursuit tasks were implemented. Nine concussed athletes were tested within seven days of injury along with nine age and sex matched healthy normal volunteers. Both behavioral and fMRI data revealed differential results between the concussed and normal volunteer groups. Concussed subjects displayed longer latency time in the saccadic tasks, worse position errors, and fewer numbers of self-paced saccades compared to normal volunteer subjects. Furthermore, the concussed group showed recruitment of additional brain regions and larger activation sites as evidenced by fMRI. As a potential diagnostic and management tool for concussion, oculomotor testing shows promise, and here we try to understand the reasons for this disrupted performance with the aide of advanced neuroimaging tools. PMID:25179246

  8. Neuroimaging the temporal dynamics of human avoidance to sustained threat.

    PubMed

    Schlund, Michael W; Hudgins, Caleb D; Magee, Sandy; Dymond, Simon

    2013-11-15

    Many forms of human psychopathology are characterized by sustained negative emotional responses to threat and chronic behavioral avoidance, implicating avoidance as a potential transdiagnostic factor. Evidence from both nonhuman neurophysiological and human neuroimaging studies suggests a distributed frontal-limbic-striatal brain network supports avoidance. However, our understanding of the temporal dynamics of the network to sustained threat that prompts sustained avoidance is limited. To address this issue, 17 adults were given extensive training on a modified free-operant avoidance task in which button pressing avoided money loss during a sustained threat period. Subsequently, subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing the avoidance task. In our regions of interest, we observed phasic, rather than sustained, activation during sustained threat in dorsolateral and inferior frontal regions, anterior and dorsal cingulate, ventral striatum and regions associated with emotion, including the amygdala, insula, substantia nigra and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis complex. Moreover, trait levels of experiential avoidance were negatively correlated with insula, hippocampal and amygdala activation. These findings suggest knowledge that one can consistently avoid aversive outcomes is not associated with decreased threat-related responses and that individuals with greater experiential avoidance exhibit reduced reactivity to initial threat. Implications for understanding brain mechanisms supporting human avoidance and psychological theories of avoidance are discussed. PMID:24095880

  9. Panic and the brainstem: clues from neuroimaging studies.

    PubMed

    Perna, Giampaolo; Guerriero, Giuseppe; Brambilla, Paolo; Caldirola, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    One of the most influential theories has conceived unexpected panic attack (PA) as a primal defensive reaction to threat within the internal milieu of the body. This theory is based on findings suggesting the involvement of dysfunctional respiratory regulation and/or abnormally sensitive central neural network of carbon dioxide (CO2)/hydrogen ion (H+) chemoreception in PA. Thus, unexpected PA may be related to phylogenetically older brain structures, including the brainstem areas, which process basic functions related to the organism's internal milieu. The brainstem represents a crucial area for homeostatic regulation, including chemoreception and cardio-respiratory control. In addition, the midbrain dorsal periaqueductal gray may be involved in the unconditioned defense reactions to proximal threats, including internal physical stimuli. Our aim was to specifically consider the potential involvement of the brainstem in panic disorder (PD) by a comprehensive review of the available neuroimaging studies. Available data are limited and potentially affected by several limitations. However, preliminary evidence of a role of the brainstem in PD can be found and, secondly, the brainstem serotonergic system seems to be involved in panic modulation with indications of both altered serotonergic receptors and 5-HT transporter bindings. In conclusion, our review suggests that the brainstem may be involved in psychopathology of PD and supports the relevant role of subcortical serotonergic system in panic pathogenesis. PMID:24923341

  10. Evidence of nonclassical plasma transport in hollow cathodes for electric propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.

    2007-03-15

    Measurements, simplified analyses, and two-dimensional numerical simulations with a fluid plasma model show that classical resistivity cannot account for the elevated electron temperatures and steep plasma potential gradients measured in a 25-27.5 A electric propulsion hollow cathode. The cathode consisted of a 1.5 cm hollow tube with an {approx}0.28 cm diameter orifice and was operated with 5.5 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP) of xenon flow using two different anode geometries: a segmented cone and a circular flat plate. The numerical simulations show that classical resistivity yields as much as four times colder electron temperatures compared to the measured values in the orifice and near-plume regions of the cathode. Classical transport and Ohm's law also predict exceedingly high electron-ion relative drift speeds compared to the electron thermal speed (>4). It is found that the addition of anomalous resistivity based on existing growth rate formulas for electron-ion streaming instabilities improves qualitatively the comparison between the numerical results and the time-averaged measurements. Simplified analyses that have been based largely on the axial measurements support the conclusion that additional resistivity is required in Ohm's law to explain the measurements. The combined results from the two-dimensional simulations and the analyses bound the range of enhanced resistivity to be 3-100 times the classical value.

  11. Inactivation of Ricin Toxin by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Including Evidences from Cell and Animal Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Gao, Shan; Ji, Bin; Zang, Yating; Su, Bo; Wang, Kaile; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is one of the most toxic and easily produced plant protein toxin extracted from the castor oil plant, and it has been classified as a chemical warfare agent. Here, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) at 30 kV/cm (pulse durations: 10 ns, 100 ns, and 300 ns) were applied to inactivating ricin up to 4.2 μg/mL. To investigate the efficacy, cells and mice were tested against the ricin treated by the nsPEFs via direct intraperitoneal injection and inhalation exposure. Results showed that nsPEFs treatments can effectively reduce the toxicity of the ricin. Without the nsPEFs treatment, 100% of mice were killed upon the 4 μg ricin injection on the first day, however 40% of the mice survived the ricin treated by the nsPEFs. Compared to injection, inhalation exposure even with higher ricin dose required longer time to observe mice fatality. Pathological observations revealed damages to heart, lung, kidney, and stomach after the ricin exposure, more pronounced for lung and kidney including severe bleeding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) and circular dichroism (CD) analyses revealed that although the primary structure of ricin was not altered, its secondary structures (beta-sheet and beta-turn) underwent transition upon the nsPEFs treatment.

  12. Inactivation of Ricin Toxin by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Including Evidences from Cell and Animal Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Gao, Shan; Ji, Bin; Zang, Yating; Su, Bo; Wang, Kaile; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is one of the most toxic and easily produced plant protein toxin extracted from the castor oil plant, and it has been classified as a chemical warfare agent. Here, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) at 30 kV/cm (pulse durations: 10 ns, 100 ns, and 300 ns) were applied to inactivating ricin up to 4.2 μg/mL. To investigate the efficacy, cells and mice were tested against the ricin treated by the nsPEFs via direct intraperitoneal injection and inhalation exposure. Results showed that nsPEFs treatments can effectively reduce the toxicity of the ricin. Without the nsPEFs treatment, 100% of mice were killed upon the 4 μg ricin injection on the first day, however 40% of the mice survived the ricin treated by the nsPEFs. Compared to injection, inhalation exposure even with higher ricin dose required longer time to observe mice fatality. Pathological observations revealed damages to heart, lung, kidney, and stomach after the ricin exposure, more pronounced for lung and kidney including severe bleeding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) and circular dichroism (CD) analyses revealed that although the primary structure of ricin was not altered, its secondary structures (beta-sheet and beta-turn) underwent transition upon the nsPEFs treatment. PMID:26728251

  13. Inactivation of Ricin Toxin by Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Fields Including Evidences from Cell and Animal Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Gao, Shan; Ji, Bin; Zang, Yating; Su, Bo; Wang, Kaile; Yao, Maosheng; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Jinglin

    2016-01-01

    Ricin is one of the most toxic and easily produced plant protein toxin extracted from the castor oil plant, and it has been classified as a chemical warfare agent. Here, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) at 30 kV/cm (pulse durations: 10 ns, 100 ns, and 300 ns) were applied to inactivating ricin up to 4.2 μg/mL. To investigate the efficacy, cells and mice were tested against the ricin treated by the nsPEFs via direct intraperitoneal injection and inhalation exposure. Results showed that nsPEFs treatments can effectively reduce the toxicity of the ricin. Without the nsPEFs treatment, 100% of mice were killed upon the 4 μg ricin injection on the first day, however 40% of the mice survived the ricin treated by the nsPEFs. Compared to injection, inhalation exposure even with higher ricin dose required longer time to observe mice fatality. Pathological observations revealed damages to heart, lung, kidney, and stomach after the ricin exposure, more pronounced for lung and kidney including severe bleeding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) and circular dichroism (CD) analyses revealed that although the primary structure of ricin was not altered, its secondary structures (beta-sheet and beta-turn) underwent transition upon the nsPEFs treatment. PMID:26728251

  14. Functional Neuroimaging Abnormalities in Psychosis Spectrum Youth

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Daniel H.; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Calkins, Monica E.; Ruparel, Kosha; Elliott, Mark A.; Hopson, Ryan D.; Jackson, Chad; Prabhakaran, Karthik; Bilker, Warren B.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2015-01-01

    Importance The continuum view of the psychosis spectrum (PS) implies that in population-based samples, PS symptoms should be associated with neural abnormalities similar to those found in help-seeking clinical-risk individuals and in schizophrenia. Functional neuroimaging has not previously been applied in large population-based PS samples, and can help understand the neural architecture of psychosis more broadly, and identify brain phenotypes beyond symptomatology that are associated with the extended psychosis phenotype. Objective To examine the categorical and dimensional relationships of PS symptoms to prefrontal hypoactivation during working memory and to amygdala hyperactivation during threat emotion processing. Design The Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort (PNC) is a genotyped prospectively accrued population-based sample of nearly 10,000 youths, who received a structured psychiatric evaluation and a computerized neurocognitive battery. A subsample of 1,445 subjects underwent neuroimaging including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) tasks examined here. Setting The PNC is a collaboration between The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Participants Youths ages 11–22 years identified through structured interview as having psychosis-spectrum features (PS, n=260), and typically developing comparison subjects without significant psychopathology (TD, n=220). Main Outcomes and Measures Two fMRI paradigms were utilized, a fractal n-back working memory task probing executive system function, and an emotion identification task probing amygdala responses to threatening faces. Results In the n-back task, PS showed reduced activation in executive control circuitry, which correlated with cognitive deficits. During emotion identification, PS demonstrated elevated amygdala responses to threatening facial expressions, which correlated with positive symptom severity. Conclusions and Relevance The pattern of

  15. The Evolution of Neuroimaging Research and Developmental Language Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Angela B.; Foundas, Anne L.; Leonard, Christiana M.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews current neuroimaging literature, including computer tomography, positron emission tomography, single photon emission spectroscopy, and magnetic resonance imaging, on individuals with developmental language disorders. The review suggests a complicated relationship between cortical morphometry and language development that is…

  16. Terminology development towards harmonizing multiple clinical neuroimaging research repositories

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jessica A.; Pasquerello, Danielle; Turner, Matthew D.; Keator, David B.; Alpert, Kathryn; King, Margaret; Landis, Drew; Calhoun, Vince D.; Potkin, Steven G.; Tallis, Marcelo; Ambite, Jose Luis; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Data sharing and mediation across disparate neuroimaging repositories requires extensive effort to ensure that the different domains of data types are referred to by commonly agreed upon terms. Within the SchizConnect project, which enables querying across decentralized databases of neuroimaging, clinical, and cognitive data from various studies of schizophrenia, we developed a model for each data domain, identified common usable terms that could be agreed upon across the repositories, and linked them to standard ontological terms where possible. We had the goal of facilitating both the current user experience in querying and future automated computations and reasoning regarding the data. We found that existing terminologies are incomplete for these purposes, even with the history of neuroimaging data sharing in the field; and we provide a model for efforts focused on querying multiple clinical neuroimaging repositories. PMID:26688838

  17. Auditory Neuroimaging with fMRI and PET

    PubMed Central

    Talavage, Thomas M.; Gonzalez-Castillo, Javier; Scott, Sophie K.

    2013-01-01

    For much of the past 30 years, investigations of auditory perception and language have been enhanced or even driven by the use of functional neuroimaging techniques that specialize in localization of central responses. Beginning with investigations using positron emission tomography (PET) and gradually shifting primarily to usage of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), auditory neuroimaging has greatly advanced our understanding of the organization and response properties of brain regions critical to the perception of and communication with the acoustic world in which we live. As the complexity of the questions being addressed has increased, the techniques, experiments and analyses applied have also become more nuanced and specialized. A brief review of the history of these investigations sets the stage for an overview and analysis of how these neuroimaging modalities are becoming ever more effective tools for understanding the auditory brain. We conclude with a brief discussion of open methodological issues as well as potential clinical applications for auditory neuroimaging. PMID:24076424

  18. [Neuroimaging findings in cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts].

    PubMed

    Herrera, Diego Alberto; Vargas, Sergio Alberto; Montoya, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts is a rare condition characterized by brain, retinal and bone anomalies, as well as a predisposition to gastrointestinal bleeding. There are few reported cases of this condition in adults, among whom the incidence is low. Neuroimaging findings are characteristic, with bilateral calcifications, leukoencephalopathy and intracranial cysts. The purpose of this article was to do a literature survey and illustrate two cases diagnosed with the aid of neuroimaging. PMID:24967922

  19. Human Neuroimaging as a “Big Data” Science

    PubMed Central

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Toga, Arthur W.

    2013-01-01

    The maturation of in vivo neuroimaging has lead to incredible quantities of digital information about the human brain. While much is made of the data deluge in science, neuroimaging represents the leading edge of this onslaught of “big data”. A range of neuroimaging databasing approaches has streamlined the transmission, storage, and dissemination of data from such brain imaging studies. Yet few, if any, common solutions exist to support the science of neuroimaging. In this article, we discuss how modern neuroimaging research represents a mutifactorial and broad ranging data challenge, involving the growing size of the data being acquired; sociologial and logistical sharing issues; infrastructural challenges for multi-site, multi-datatype archiving; and the means by which to explore and mine these data. As neuroimaging advances further, e.g. aging, genetics, and age-related disease, new vision is needed to manage and process this information while marshalling of these resources into novel results. Thus, “big data” can become “big” brain science. PMID:24113873

  20. Challenges for Molecular Neuroimaging with MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lelyveld, Victor S.; Atanasijevic, Tatjana; Jasanoff, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MRI)-based molecular imaging methods are beginning to have impact in neuroscience. A growing number of molecular imaging agents have been synthesized and tested in vitro, but so far relatively few have been validated in the brains of live animals. Here, we discuss key challenges associated with expanding the repertoire of successful molecular neuroimaging approaches. The difficulty of delivering agents past the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a particular obstacle to molecular imaging in the central nervous system. We review established and emerging techniques for trans-BBB delivery, including intracranial infusion, BBB disruption, and transporter-related methods. Improving the sensitivity with which MRI-based molecular agents can be detected is a second major challenge. Better sensitivity would in turn reduce the requirements for delivery and alleviate potential side effects. We discuss recent efforts to enhance relaxivity of conventional longitudinal relaxation time (T1) and transverse relaxation time (T2) MRI contrast agents, as well as strategies that involve amplifying molecular signals or reducing endogenous background influences. With ongoing refinement of imaging approaches and brain delivery methods, MRI-based techniques for molecular-level neuroscientific investigation will fall increasingly within reach. PMID:20808721

  1. Neuroimaging supports central pathology in familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Felicia B; Hilz, Max J; Berlin, Dena; Yau, Po Lai; Javier, David; Sweat, Victoria; Bruehl, Hannah; Convit, Antonio

    2010-02-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a hereditary peripheral and central nervous system disorder with poorly defined central neuropathology. This prospective pilot study aimed to determine if MRI would provide objective parameters of central neuropathology. There were 14 study subjects, seven FD individuals (18.6 +/- 4.2 years, 3 female) and seven controls (19.1 +/- 5.8 years, 3 female). All subjects had standardized brain MRI evaluation including quantitative regional volume measurements, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for assessment of white matter (WM) microstructural integrity by calculation of fractional anisotropy (FA), and proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) to assess neuronal health. The FD patients had significantly decreased FA in optic radiation (p = 0.009) and middle cerebellar peduncle (p = 0.004). Voxel-wise analysis identified both GM and WM microstructural damage among FD subjects as there were nine clusters of WM FA reductions and 16 clusters of GM apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) elevations. Their WM proportion was significantly decreased (p = 0.003) as was the WM proportion in the frontal region (p = 0.007). (1)H MRS showed no significant abnormalities. The findings of WM abnormalities and decreased optic radiation and middle cerebellar peduncle FA in the FD study group, suggest compromised myelination and WM micro-structural integrity in FD brains. These neuroimaging results are consistent with clinical visual abnormalities and gait disturbance. Furthermore the frontal lobe atrophy is consistent with previously reported neuropsychological deficits. PMID:19705052

  2. Early detection of Alzheimer's disease using neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, Lisa; Brys, Miroslaw; Glodzik-Sobanska, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J

    2007-01-01

    Neuroimaging is being increasingly used to complement clinical assessments in the early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and metabolic positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) are the most clinically used and promising modalities to detect brain abnormalities in individuals who might be at risk for AD but who have not yet developed symptoms. The knowledge of established risk factors for AD enabled investigators to develop enrichment strategies for longitudinal imaging studies to reduce the sample sizes and study duration. The present review focuses on the results obtained by MRI and FDG-PET studies that examined the preclinical AD stages in several at risk populations: (1) individuals from families with autosomal dominant early-onset AD (FAD), (2) patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), particularly in memory, who are at very high risk for declining to AD with an estimated decline rate of 10-30% per year, (3) normal young and middle-age subjects carriers of known susceptibility genes for late-onset AD such as the Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) E4 allele, and (4) as age is the main risk factor for AD, normal elderly individuals followed to the onset of MCI and AD. Overall, these studies show that the use of imaging for the early detection of AD is successful even in the earlier stages of disease when clinical symptoms are not fully expressed and the regional brain damage may be limited. PMID:16839732

  3. Sleep Neuroimaging and Models of Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Behrens, Marion; Laufs, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Human deep sleep is characterized by reduced sensory activity, responsiveness to stimuli, and conscious awareness. Given its ubiquity and reversible nature, it represents an attractive paradigm to study the neural changes which accompany the loss of consciousness in humans. In particular, the deepest stages of sleep can serve as an empirical test for the predictions of theoretical models relating the phenomenology of consciousness with underlying neural activity. A relatively recent shift of attention from the analysis of evoked responses toward spontaneous (or “resting state”) activity has taken place in the neuroimaging community, together with the development of tools suitable to study distributed functional interactions. In this review we focus on recent functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies of spontaneous activity during sleep and their relationship with theoretical models for human consciousness generation, considering the global workspace theory, the information integration theory, and the dynamical core hypothesis. We discuss the venues of research opened by these results, emphasizing the need to extend the analytic methodology in order to obtain a dynamical picture of how functional interactions change over time and how their evolution is modulated during different conscious states. Finally, we discuss the need to experimentally establish absent or reduced conscious content, even when studying the deepest sleep stages. PMID:23717291

  4. Neuroimaging studies in people with gender incongruence.

    PubMed

    Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C; Guillamon, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The current review gives an overview of brain studies in transgender people. First, we describe studies into the aetiology of feelings of gender incongruence, primarily addressing the sexual differentiation hypothesis: does the brain of transgender individuals resemble that of their natal sex, or that of their experienced gender? Findings from neuroimaging studies focusing on brain structure suggest that the brain phenotypes of trans women (MtF) and trans men (FtM) differ in various ways from control men and women with feminine, masculine, demasculinized and defeminized features. The brain phenotypes of people with feelings of gender incongruence may help us to figure out whether sex differentiation of the brain is atypical in these individuals, and shed light on gender identity development. Task-related imaging studies may show whether brain activation and task performance in transgender people is sex-atypical. Second, we review studies that evaluate the effects of cross-sex hormone treatment on the brain. This type of research provides knowledge on how changes in sex hormone levels may affect brain structure and function. PMID:26766406

  5. Neuroimaging assessment of early and late neurobiological sequelae of traumatic brain injury: implications for CTE

    PubMed Central

    Sundman, Mark; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Morey, Rajendra A.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been increasingly accepted as a major external risk factor for neurodegenerative morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence indicates that the resultant chronic neurobiological sequelae following head trauma may, at least in part, contribute to a pathologically distinct disease known as Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE). The clinical manifestation of CTE is variable, but the symptoms of this progressive disease include impaired memory and cognition, affective disorders (i.e., impulsivity, aggression, depression, suicidality, etc.), and diminished motor control. Notably, mounting evidence suggests that the pathology contributing to CTE may be caused by repetitive exposure to subconcussive hits to the head, even in those with no history of a clinically evident head injury. Given the millions of athletes and military personnel with potential exposure to repetitive subconcussive insults and TBI, CTE represents an important public health issue. However, the incidence rates and pathological mechanisms are still largely unknown, primarily due to the fact that there is no in vivo diagnostic tool. The primary objective of this manuscript is to address this limitation and discuss potential neuroimaging modalities that may be capable of diagnosing CTE in vivo through the detection of tau and other known pathological features. Additionally, we will discuss the challenges of TBI research, outline the known pathology of CTE (with an emphasis on Tau), review current neuroimaging modalities to assess the potential routes for in vivo diagnosis, and discuss the future directions of CTE research. PMID:26441507

  6. The human parental brain: In vivo neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Swain, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Interacting parenting thoughts and behaviors, supported by key brain circuits, critically shape human infants’ current and future behavior. Indeed, the parent–infant relationship provides infants with their first social environment, forming templates for what they can expect from others, how to interact with them and ultimately how they go on to themselves to be parents. This review concentrates on magnetic resonance imaging experiments of the human parent brain, which link brain physiology with parental thoughts and behaviors. After reviewing brain imaging techniques, certain social cognitive and affective concepts are reviewed, including empathy and trust—likely critical to parenting. Following that is a thorough study-by-study review of the state-of-the-art with respect to human neuroimaging studies of the parental brain—from parent brain responses to salient infant stimuli, including emotionally charged baby cries and brief visual stimuli to the latest structural brain studies. Taken together, this research suggests that networks of highly conserved hypothalamic–midbrain–limbic–paralimbic–cortical circuits act in concert to support parental brain responses to infants, including circuits for limbic emotion response and regulation. Thus, a model is presented in which infant stimuli activate sensory analysis brain regions, affect corticolimbic limbic circuits that regulate emotional response, motivation and reward related to their infant, ultimately organizing parenting impulses, thoughts and emotions into coordinated behaviors as a map for future studies. Finally, future directions towards integrated understanding of the brain basis of human parenting are outlined with profound implications for understanding and contributing to long term parent and infant mental health. PMID:21036196

  7. Neuroimaging characteristics of dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Mak, Elijah; Su, Li; Williams, Guy B; O'Brien, John T

    2014-01-01

    This review summarises the findings and applications from neuroimaging studies in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), highlighting key differences between DLB and other subtypes of dementia. We also discuss the increasingly important role of imaging biomarkers in differential diagnosis and outline promising areas for future research in DLB. DLB shares common clinical, neuropsychological and pathological features with Parkinson's disease dementia and other dementia subtypes, such as Alzheimer's disease. Despite the development of consensus diagnostic criteria, the sensitivity for differential diagnosis of DLB in clinical practice remains low and many DLB patients will be misdiagnosed. The importance of developing accurate imaging markers in dementia is highlighted by the potential for treatments targeting specific molecular abnormalities as well as the responsiveness to cholinesterase inhibitors and marked neuroleptic sensitivity of DLB. We review various brain imaging techniques that have been applied to investigate DLB, including the characteristic nigrostriatal degeneration in DLB using positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers. Dopamine transporter loss has proven to reliably differentiate DLB from other dementias and has been incorporated into the revised clinical diagnostic criteria for DLB. To date, this remains the 'gold standard' for diagnostic imaging of DLB. Regional cerebral blood flow, 18 F-fluorodeoxygluclose-PET and SPECT have also identified marked deficits in the occipital regions with relative sparing of the medial temporal lobe when compared to Alzheimer's disease. In addition, structural, diffusion, and functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques have shown alterations in structure, white matter integrity, and functional activity in DLB. We argue that the multimodal identification of DLB-specific biomarkers has the potential to improve ante-mortem diagnosis and contribute to our

  8. Analyzing neuroimaging data with subclasses: A shrinkage approach.

    PubMed

    Höhne, Johannes; Bartz, Daniel; Hebart, Martin N; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Blankertz, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Among the numerous methods used to analyze neuroimaging data, Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) is commonly applied for binary classification problems. LDAs popularity derives from its simplicity and its competitive classification performance, which has been reported for various types of neuroimaging data. Yet the standard LDA approach proves less than optimal for binary classification problems when additional label information (i.e. subclass labels) is present. Subclass labels allow to model structure in the data, which can be used to facilitate the classification task. In this paper, we illustrate how neuroimaging data exhibit subclass labels that may contain valuable information. We also show that the standard LDA classifier is unable to exploit subclass labels. We introduce a novel method that allows subclass labels to be incorporated efficiently into the classifier. The novel method, which we call Relevance Subclass LDA (RSLDA), computes an individual classification hyperplane for each subclass. It is based on regularized estimators of the subclass mean and uses other subclasses as regularization targets. We demonstrate the applicability and performance of our method on data drawn from two different neuroimaging modalities: (I) EEG data from brain-computer interfacing with event-related potentials, and (II) fMRI data in response to different levels of visual motion. We show that RSLDA outperforms the standard LDA approach for both types of datasets. These findings illustrate the benefits of exploiting subclass structure in neuroimaging data. Finally, we show that our classifier also outputs regularization profiles, enabling researchers to interpret the subclass structure in a meaningful way. RSLDA therefore yields increased classification accuracy as well as a better interpretation of neuroimaging data. Since both results are highly favorable, we suggest to apply RSLDA for various classification problems within neuroimaging and beyond. PMID:26407815

  9. The Co-evolution of Neuroimaging and Psychiatric Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Dyster, Timothy G; Mikell, Charles B; Sheth, Sameer A

    2016-01-01

    The role of neuroimaging in psychiatric neurosurgery has evolved significantly throughout the field's history. Psychiatric neurosurgery initially developed without the benefit of information provided by modern imaging modalities, and thus lesion targets were selected based on contemporary theories of frontal lobe dysfunction in psychiatric disease. However, by the end of the 20th century, the availability of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allowed for the development of mechanistic theories attempting to explain the anatamofunctional basis of these disorders, as well as the efficacy of stereotactic neuromodulatory treatments. Neuroimaging now plays a central and ever-expanding role in the neurosurgical management of psychiatric disorders, by influencing the determination of surgical candidates, allowing individualized surgical targeting and planning, and identifying network-level changes in the brain following surgery. In this review, we aim to describe the coevolution of psychiatric neurosurgery and neuroimaging, including ways in which neuroimaging has proved useful in elucidating the therapeutic mechanisms of neuromodulatory procedures. We focus on ablative over stimulation-based procedures given their historical precedence and the greater opportunity they afford for post-operative re-imaging, but also discuss important contributions from the deep brain stimulation (DBS) literature. We conclude with a discussion of how neuroimaging will transition the field of psychiatric neurosurgery into the era of precision medicine. PMID:27445706

  10. The Co-evolution of Neuroimaging and Psychiatric Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Dyster, Timothy G.; Mikell, Charles B.; Sheth, Sameer A.

    2016-01-01

    The role of neuroimaging in psychiatric neurosurgery has evolved significantly throughout the field’s history. Psychiatric neurosurgery initially developed without the benefit of information provided by modern imaging modalities, and thus lesion targets were selected based on contemporary theories of frontal lobe dysfunction in psychiatric disease. However, by the end of the 20th century, the availability of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allowed for the development of mechanistic theories attempting to explain the anatamofunctional basis of these disorders, as well as the efficacy of stereotactic neuromodulatory treatments. Neuroimaging now plays a central and ever-expanding role in the neurosurgical management of psychiatric disorders, by influencing the determination of surgical candidates, allowing individualized surgical targeting and planning, and identifying network-level changes in the brain following surgery. In this review, we aim to describe the coevolution of psychiatric neurosurgery and neuroimaging, including ways in which neuroimaging has proved useful in elucidating the therapeutic mechanisms of neuromodulatory procedures. We focus on ablative over stimulation-based procedures given their historical precedence and the greater opportunity they afford for post-operative re-imaging, but also discuss important contributions from the deep brain stimulation (DBS) literature. We conclude with a discussion of how neuroimaging will transition the field of psychiatric neurosurgery into the era of precision medicine. PMID:27445706