Science.gov

Sample records for electrical resistivity profiling

  1. Effective resist profile control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen-Yu; Wang, Chien-Wei; Huang, Chun-Ching; Chang, Ching-Yu; Ku, Yao-Ching

    2014-03-01

    To meet Moore's law, resist resolution improvement has become more and more important. However, it is difficult to improve resist resolution and keep vertical sidewall profile. For example, a high contrast hole resist may cause trench scum, due to very T-top profile. This paper reports several concepts for resist profile tuning without losing performance for lithographic factor , including mask error enhancement factor (MEEF), depth of focus (DOF), and critical dimension uniformity (CDU). To quantitative analysis the resist profile improvement, we define a new factor, Scum fail ratio (F/R%) for new techniques evaluation. The new techniques, including floatable additive, floatable PAG, and new monomer, are discussed. From X-SEM and CD-SEM data, former three concepts could improve resist sidewall profile quantitatively evaluated by Scum fail F/R% and keep lithographic factors. In addition, another key factor, resist residue defect, is also discussed. The high contrast resist with higher receding contact angle (RCA) easily generates more residue defect after development. With the new monomer composition, RCA of Resist E is decreased from 54 to 48 degree after development. Therefore, the residue defect is improved one order.

  2. Anatomy of the southern Cordilleran hingeline, Utah and Nevada, from deep electrical resistivity profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Wannamaker, P.E.; Stodt, J.A.; Johnston, J.M.; Booker, J.R.

    1997-07-01

    To address outstanding questions in Mesozoic-Cenozoic structure and present-day deep physicochemical state in the region of the southern Cordilleran hingeline, a detailed, east-west profile of magnetotelluric (MT) soundings 155 km in length was acquired. From these soundings, a resistivity interpretation was produced using an inversion algorithm based on a structural parameterization. In the upper ten kilometers of the transect, the interpretation shows two segments of low resistivity lying beneath allochthonous rocks of the Late Mesozoic, Sevier thrust sheet. Subsequent industry drilling motivated in part by this surveying confirms the existence and position of the eastern subthrust conductor and, more spectacularly, identifies the presence of yet deeper, autochthonous Mesozoic rocks. A simple structural interpretation is offered where one underthrust segment of low-resistivity sediments was created originally, but this segment was broken later into two major ones during higher-angle Tertiary extension. For the middle and lower crust, the MT data imply a nearly 1-D resistivity structure of remarkable uniformity across the entire transect. Pre-existing structural fabrics have had no measurable influence on localizing regions of high temperature fluids and melting in the lower crust, at least averaged over the scale of tens of kilometers. Given its uniformity over a distance of 155 km or more, the depth to the regional deep conductor does not appear related to the distribution of high-temperature geothermal resources.

  3. Mapping refuse profile in Singapore old dumping ground through electrical resistivity, S-wave velocity and geotechnical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ke; Tong, Huan Huan; Noh, Omar; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Giannis, Apostolos

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to track the refuse profile in Lorong Halus Dumping Ground, the largest landfill in Singapore, by electrical resistivity and surface wave velocity after 25 years of closure. Data were analyzed using an orthogonal set of plots by spreading 24 lines in two perpendicular geophone-orientation directions. Both geophysical techniques determined that refuse boundary depth was 13 ± 2 m. The refuse boundary revealed a certain degree of variance, mainly ascribed to the different principle of measurements, as well as the high heterogeneity of the subsurface. Discrepancy was higher in spots with greater heterogeneity. 3D analysis was further conducted detecting refuse pockets, leachate mounding and gas channels. Geotechnical monitoring (borehole) confirmed geophysical outcomes tracing different layers such as soil capping, decomposed refuse materials and inorganic wastes. Combining the geophysical methods with borehole monitoring, a comprehensive layout of the dumping site was presented showing the hot spots of interests. PMID:25427774

  4. Electrical Resistivity Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) is a geophysical method originally developed within the mining industry where it has been used for decades to explore for and characterize subsurface mineral deposits. It is one of the oldest geophysical methods with the first documented usag...

  5. Electrical resistivity probes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  6. State Electricity Profiles

    EIA Publications

    2015-01-01

    The annual report presents data tables describing the electricity industry in each State. Data include: summary statistics; the 10 largest plants by generating capacity; the top five entities ranked by sector; electric power industry generating capacity by primary energy source; electric power industry generation by primary energy source; utility delivered fuel prices for coal, petroleum, and natural gas; electric power industry emissions estimates; retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector; retail electricity sales statistics; and supply and disposition of electricity; net metering counts and capacity by technology and customer type; and advanced metering counts by customer type.

  7. Electrically Variable Resistive Memory Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Shangqing; Wu, Nai-Juan; Ignatiev, Alex; Charlson, E. J.

    2010-01-01

    Nonvolatile electronic memory devices that store data in the form of electrical- resistance values, and memory circuits based on such devices, have been invented. These devices and circuits exploit an electrically-variable-resistance phenomenon that occurs in thin films of certain oxides that exhibit the colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) effect. It is worth emphasizing that, as stated in the immediately preceding article, these devices function at room temperature and do not depend on externally applied magnetic fields. A device of this type is basically a thin film resistor: it consists of a thin film of a CMR material located between, and in contact with, two electrical conductors. The application of a short-duration, low-voltage current pulse via the terminals changes the electrical resistance of the film. The amount of the change in resistance depends on the size of the pulse. The direction of change (increase or decrease of resistance) depends on the polarity of the pulse. Hence, a datum can be written (or a prior datum overwritten) in the memory device by applying a pulse of size and polarity tailored to set the resistance at a value that represents a specific numerical value. To read the datum, one applies a smaller pulse - one that is large enough to enable accurate measurement of resistance, but small enough so as not to change the resistance. In writing, the resistance can be set to any value within the dynamic range of the CMR film. Typically, the value would be one of several discrete resistance values that represent logic levels or digits. Because the number of levels can exceed 2, a memory device of this type is not limited to binary data. Like other memory devices, devices of this type can be incorporated into a memory integrated circuit by laying them out on a substrate in rows and columns, along with row and column conductors for electrically addressing them individually or collectively.

  8. State electricity profiles, March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    Due to the role electricity plays in the Nation`s economic and social well-being, interested parties have been following the electric power industry`s transition by keeping abreast of the restructuring and deregulation events that are taking place almost daily. Much of the attention centers around the States and how they are restructuring the business of electricity supply within their respective jurisdictions. This report is designed to profile each State and the District of Columbia regarding not only their current restructuring activities, but also their electricity generation and concomitant statistics from 1986 through 1996. Included are data on a number of subject areas including generating capability, generation, revenues, fuel use, capacity factor for nuclear plants, retail sales, and pollutant emissions. Although the Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes this type of information, there is a lack of a uniform overview for each individual State. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. In addition to basic statistics in tables and graphs, a textual section is provided for each State, discussing some of the points relative to electricity production that are noteworthy in, or unique to, that particular State. Also, each State is ranked according to the place it holds, as compared to the rest of the states, in various relevant areas, such as its average price of electricity per kilowatthour, its population, and its emissions of certain atmospheric pollutants. The final chapter covers the Nation as a whole. 451 figs., 520 tabs.

  9. THE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY METER IN FISHERY INVESTIGATIONS

    E-print Network

    cited 13 #12;ABSTRACT A portable resistivity (or conductivity) meter is easily used in fishery METER IN FISHERY I^A^ESTIGATIONS INTRODUCTION An electric resistivity (or conductivity) meterTHE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY METER IN FISHERY INVESTIGATIONS I Marine Biological Laboratory! WOODS

  10. Discontinuities detection using transmission electrical resistivity imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesparre, Nolwenn; Cabrera, Justo; Boyle, Alistair; Grychtol, Bart?omiej; Adler, Andy

    2015-04-01

    In the context of nuclear waste storage, low permeability clays are investigated as potential geological barrier. Discontinuities in such formations might facilitate the radionuclide transport to the environment. The underground platform of Tournemire (Aveyron, France) presents the opportunity to perform in-situ experiments to evaluate the potential of geophysical methods to detect and characterize the presence of discontinuities in the sub-surface. In this work, we apply transmission electrical resistivity tomography to image the medium surrounding a regional fault. A specific array of electrodes were set up, adapted for the characterization of the fault. Electrodes were placed along the tunnel as well as at the surface above the tunnel on both sides of the fault. The objective of a such geometry is to acquire data in transmission across the massif in addition to classical protocol such as Schlumberger or dipole-dipole in order to better cover the sounded medium. 3D models considering the gallery geometry, the topography and the injection of current in transmission through the massif were developed for the analysis of such particular data sets. For the reconstruction of the medium electrical resistivity, the parametrization of the inverse problem was adapted to the geometry of the experience in a scope to reduce the inversion under-determination. The resulting image obtained with classical protocols and transmission current injection is compared to an image obtained using only classical protocols to better highlight the interest of a transmission experiment in terms of resolution and penetration depth. The addition of protocols in transmission allows a better coverage of the sounded medium so the resulting image presents a better resolution at higher depths than the image resulting from a single profile of electrodes. The proposed configuration of electrical resistivity measurements in transmission is then promising for hydrogeophysical studies, in particular for studies of karstic systems where natural cavities could be used for underground electrodes deployment.

  11. Vertical soil profiling using a galvanic contact resistivity scanning approach.

    PubMed

    Pan, Luan; Adamchuk, Viacheslav I; Prasher, Shiv; Gebbers, Robin; Taylor, Richard S; Dabas, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Proximal sensing of soil electromagnetic properties is widely used to map spatial land heterogeneity. The mapping instruments use galvanic contact, capacitive coupling or electromagnetic induction. Regardless of the type of instrument, the geometrical configuration between signal transmitting and receiving elements typically defines the shape of the depth response function. To assess vertical soil profiles, many modern instruments use multiple transmitter-receiver pairs. Alternatively, vertical electrical sounding can be used to measure changes in apparent soil electrical conductivity with depth at a specific location. This paper examines the possibility for the assessment of soil profiles using a dynamic surface galvanic contact resistivity scanning approach, with transmitting and receiving electrodes configured in an equatorial dipole-dipole array. An automated scanner system was developed and tested in agricultural fields with different soil profiles. While operating in the field, the distance between current injecting and measuring pairs of rolling electrodes was varied continuously from 40 to 190 cm. The preliminary evaluation included a comparison of scan results from 20 locations to shallow (less than 1.2 m deep) soil profiles and to a two-layer soil profile model defined using an electromagnetic induction instrument. PMID:25057135

  12. Vertical Soil Profiling Using a Galvanic Contact Resistivity Scanning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Luan; Adamchuk, Viacheslav I.; Prasher, Shiv; Gebbers, Robin; Taylor, Richard S.; Dabas, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Proximal sensing of soil electromagnetic properties is widely used to map spatial land heterogeneity. The mapping instruments use galvanic contact, capacitive coupling or electromagnetic induction. Regardless of the type of instrument, the geometrical configuration between signal transmitting and receiving elements typically defines the shape of the depth response function. To assess vertical soil profiles, many modern instruments use multiple transmitter-receiver pairs. Alternatively, vertical electrical sounding can be used to measure changes in apparent soil electrical conductivity with depth at a specific location. This paper examines the possibility for the assessment of soil profiles using a dynamic surface galvanic contact resistivity scanning approach, with transmitting and receiving electrodes configured in an equatorial dipole-dipole array. An automated scanner system was developed and tested in agricultural fields with different soil profiles. While operating in the field, the distance between current injecting and measuring pairs of rolling electrodes was varied continuously from 40 to 190 cm. The preliminary evaluation included a comparison of scan results from 20 locations to shallow (less than 1.2 m deep) soil profiles and to a two-layer soil profile model defined using an electromagnetic induction instrument. PMID:25057135

  13. Experiments with electrical resistive networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardo, Bruce; Earwood, John; Sazonova, Vera

    1999-11-01

    Theoretical problems involving equivalent resistances of large or infinite networks of resistors have received substantial attention. We consider two actual networks. In the first, the resistance is measured across one end of a ladder whose number of loops is incremented until the precision of the multimeter is exceeded. In the second, resistances are measured across nodes near the center of a 12 by 12 square grid of resistors. These experiments are useful in the introductory physics laboratory as interesting examples of equivalent resistance, and can be added to a standard Ohm's law experiment. The square grid apparatus also can be employed for lecture demonstrations. In addition, this apparatus offers approximate experimental confirmation of complicated theoretical calculations for the equivalent resistance between two nonadjacent nodes of an infinite square grid. These experimental results are verified numerically.

  14. Electrical Trades. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), which is one of a series of OCAPs developed to identify the skills that Ohio employers deem necessary to entering a given occupation/occupational area, lists the occupational, academic, and employability skills required of individuals entering the electrical trades. The introduction explains…

  15. Electrical resistivity of metallic thin films with rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, K. M.

    1984-07-01

    The electrical resistivity of metallic thin films due to the scattering of conduction electrons with rough surfaces and with a random distribution of static impurities within the film is calculated here quantum mechanically using Mori's formalism. The detailed profiles of the surfaces enter into our theory through the single-particle wave functions and energies, which are calculated with the help of a nonconformal coordinate transformation. A detailed analysis of the roughness contribution to the resistivity is made in the small-roughness regime and with the assumption of a Gaussian form for the surface profile autocorrelation functions. The structures of the Fermi levels are studied, and effects due to the discreteness of the levels are also investigated. Our surface-roughness resistivity does not saturate with decreasing film thickness, in agreement with experimental findings.

  16. Results of Electrical Resistivity Data Collected near the Town of Guernsey, Platte County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDougal, Robert R.; Abraham, Jared D.; Bisdorf, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a study to investigate subsurface geologic conditions as they relate to ground-water flow in an abandoned landfill near the town of Guernsey, Wyoming, geophysical direct current (DC) resistivity data were collected. Eight vertical resistivity soundings and eight horizontal resistivity profiles were made using single channel and multi-channel DC instruments. Data collected in the field were converted from apparent resistivity to inverted resistivity with depth using a numerical inversion of the data. Results of the inverted resistivity data are presented as horizontal profiles and as profiles derived from the combined horizontal profile and vertical sounding data. The data sets collected using the single-channel and multi-channel DC systems provided for the resistivity investigation to extend to greater depth. Similarity of the electrical properties of the bedrock formations made interpretation of the resistivity profiles more difficult. High resistivity anomalies seen in the profiles are interpreted as quartzite lenses and as limestone or metadolomite structures in the eastern part of the study area. Terrace gravels were mapped as resistive where dry and less resistive in the saturated zone. The DC resistivity methods used in this study illustrate that multi-electrode DC resistivity surveying and more traditional methodologies can be merged and used to efficiently map anomalies of hydrologic interest in geologically complex terrain.

  17. Electrical resistance of carbon-nanofiber concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Di; Sturm, Mariel; Mo, Y. L.

    2009-09-01

    Concrete is the most widely used construction material, and carbon nanofibers have many advantages in both mechanical and electrical properties such as high strength, high Young's modulus and high conductivity. In this paper, the mechanical and electrical properties of concrete containing carbon nanofibers (CNF) are experimentally studied. The test results indicate that the compressive strength and per cent reduction in electrical resistance while loading concrete containing CNF are much greater than those of plain concrete. Finally, a reasonable concentration of CNF is obtained for use in concrete which not only enhances compressive strength, but also improves the electrical properties required for strain monitoring, damage evaluation and self-health monitoring of concrete.

  18. Continuous resistivity profiling data from the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, V.A.; Bratton, J.F.; Worley, C.R.; Crusius, J.; Kroeger, K.D.

    2011-01-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine its importance in nutrient delivery to the Chesapeake Bay. The Corsica River Estuary represents a coastal lowland setting typical of much of the eastern bay. An interdisciplinary U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) science team conducted field operations in the lower estuary in April and May 2007. Resource managers are concerned about nutrients that are entering the estuary via SGD that may be contributing to eutrophication, harmful algal blooms, and fish kills. Techniques employed in the study included continuous resistivity profiling (CRP), piezometer sampling of submarine groundwater, and collection of a time series of radon tracer activity in surface water. A CRP system measures electrical resistivity of saturated subestuarine sediments to distinguish those bearing fresh water (high resistivity) from those with saline or brackish pore water (low resistivity). This report describes the collection and processing of CRP data and summarizes the results. Based on a grid of 67.6 kilometers of CRP data, low-salinity (high-resistivity) groundwater extended approximately 50-400 meters offshore from estuary shorelines at depths of 5 to >12 meters below the sediment surface, likely beneath a confining unit. A band of low-resistivity sediment detected along the axis of the estuary indicated the presence of a filled paleochannel containing brackish groundwater. The meandering paleochannel likely incised through the confining unit during periods of lower sea level, allowing the low-salinity groundwater plumes originating from land to mix with brackish subestuarine groundwater along the channel margins and to discharge. A better understanding of the spatial variability and geological controls of submarine groundwater flow beneath the Corsica River Estuary could lead to improved models and mitigation strategies for nutrient over-enrichment in the estuary and in other similar settings.

  19. Electrically tunable resistance of a metal.

    PubMed

    Sagmeister, M; Brossmann, U; Landgraf, S; Würschum, R

    2006-04-21

    Electric field-induced tuning of material properties is usually restricted to nonmetals such as semiconductors and piezoelectric ceramics. We show that variations of the electrical resistance of a metal (Pt) in the range of several percent can be reversibly induced at low charging voltages making use of a nanocrystallite-electrolyte composite. The charge-induced resistance variation is analyzed taking into account the modification of the charge carrier density and scattering rate by surface charging. The contribution arising from the charge-induced variation of the lattice constant is found to be small. PMID:16712180

  20. Pedotransfer functions in soil electrical resistivity estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is recognized as a powerful non-invasive soil survey and monitoring method. Relationships between ER and soil water contents that are needed to infer the spatial distribution of soil moisture from the ERT results, are known to reflect soil properties. ...

  1. On equivalent resistance of electrical circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    While the standard (introductory physics) way of computing the equivalent resistance of nontrivial electrical circuits is based on Kirchhoff's rules, there is a mathematically and conceptually simpler approach, called the method of nodal potentials, whose basic variables are the values of the electric potential at the circuit's nodes. In this paper, we review the method of nodal potentials and illustrate it using the Wheatstone bridge as an example. We then derive a closed-form expression for the equivalent resistance of a generic circuit, which we apply to a few sample circuits. The result unveils a curious interplay between electrical circuits, matrix algebra, and graph theory and its applications to computer science. The paper is written at a level accessible by undergraduate students who are familiar with matrix arithmetic. Additional proofs and technical details are provided in appendices.

  2. Release Resistant Electrical Interconnections For Mems Devices

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A. (Albuquerque, NM); Garrett, Stephen E. (Albuquerque, NM); Reber, Cathleen A. (Corrales, NM)

    2005-02-22

    A release resistant electrical interconnection comprising a gold-based electrical conductor compression bonded directly to a highly-doped polysilicon bonding pad in a MEMS, IMEMS, or MOEMS device, without using any intermediate layers of aluminum, titanium, solder, or conductive adhesive disposed in-between the conductor and polysilicon pad. After the initial compression bond has been formed, subsequent heat treatment of the joint above 363 C creates a liquid eutectic phase at the bondline comprising gold plus approximately 3 wt % silicon, which, upon re-solidification, significantly improves the bond strength by reforming and enhancing the initial bond. This type of electrical interconnection is resistant to chemical attack from acids used for releasing MEMS elements (HF, HCL), thereby enabling the use of a "package-first, release-second" sequence for fabricating MEMS devices. Likewise, the bond strength of an Au--Ge compression bond may be increased by forming a transient liquid eutectic phase comprising Au-12 wt % Ge.

  3. Electrical resistance tomography for imaging concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Buettner, M.; Ramirez, A.; Daily, W.

    1995-11-08

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) has been used to non-destructively examine the interior of reinforced concrete pillars in the laboratory during a water infiltration experiment. ERT is a technique for determining the electrical resistivity distribution within a volume from measurement of injected currents and the resulting electrical potential distribution on the surface. The transfer resistance (ratio of potential to injected current) data are inverted using an algorithm based on a finite element forward solution which is iteratively adjusted in a least squares sense until the measured and calculated transfer resistances agree to within some predetermined value. Laboratory specimens of concrete pillars, 61.0 cm (24 in) in length and 20.3 cm (8 in) on a side, were prepared with various combinations of steel reinforcing bars and voids (1.27 cm diameter) which ran along the length of the pillars. An array of electrodes was placed around the pillar to allow for injecting current and measuring the resulting potentials. After the baseline resistivity distribution was determined, water was added to a void near one comer of the pillar. ERT was used to determine the resistivity distribution of the pillar at regular time intervals as water was added. The ERT images show very clearly that the water was gradually imbibed into the concrete pillar during the course of the experiment. The resistivity decreased by nearly an order of magnitude near the point of water addition in the first hour, and by nearly two orders of magnitude by the end of the experiment. Other applications for this technology include monitoring of curing in concrete structures, detecting cracks in concrete structures, detecting rebar location and corrosion state, monitoring slope stability and the stability of footings, detecting and monitoring leaks from storage tanks, monitoring thermal processes during environmental remediation, and for detecting and monitoring contaminants in soil and groundwater.

  4. Antimicrobial resistance profiles in pathogens isolated from chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial resistance profiles are frequently studied from the perspective of epidemiology and not so often from the perspective of population genetics. The population geneticist assumes that gene flow, vertically (generation to generation), horizontally (individual to individual) or migratory (...

  5. Soil Identification using Field Electrical Resistivity Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Rosli, S.; Chitral, W. D.; Fauziah, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Aziman, M.; Ismail, B.

    2015-06-01

    Geotechnical site investigation with particular reference to soil identification was important in civil engineering works since it reports the soil condition in order to relate the design and construction of the proposed works. In the past, electrical resistivity method (ERM) has widely being used in soil characterization but experienced several black boxes which related to its results and interpretations. Hence, this study performed a field electrical resistivity method (ERM) using ABEM SAS (4000) at two different types of soils (Gravelly SAND and Silty SAND) in order to discover the behavior of electrical resistivity values (ERV) with type of soils studied. Soil basic physical properties was determine thru density (p), moisture content (w) and particle size distribution (d) in order to verify the ERV obtained from each type of soil investigated. It was found that the ERV of Gravelly SAND (278 ?m & 285 ?m) was slightly higher than SiltySAND (223 ?m & 199 ?m) due to the uncertainties nature of soils. This finding has showed that the results obtained from ERM need to be interpreted based on strong supported findings such as using direct test from soil laboratory data. Furthermore, this study was able to prove that the ERM can be established as an alternative tool in soil identification provided it was being verified thru other relevance information such as using geotechnical properties.

  6. Electrical resistance tomography from measurements inside a steel cased borehole

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Schenkel, Clifford (Walnut Creek, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2000-01-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) produced from measurements taken inside a steel cased borehole. A tomographic inversion of electrical resistance measurements made within a steel casing was then made for the purpose of imaging the electrical resistivity distribution in the formation remotely from the borehole. The ERT method involves combining electrical resistance measurements made inside a steel casing of a borehole to determine the electrical resistivity in the formation adjacent to the borehole; and the inversion of electrical resistance measurements made from a borehole not cased with an electrically conducting casing to determine the electrical resistivity distribution remotely from a borehole. It has been demonstrated that by using these combined techniques, highly accurate current injection and voltage measurements, made at appropriate points within the casing, can be tomographically inverted to yield useful information outside the borehole casing.

  7. Forecasting Hourly Electricity Load Profile Using Neural Networks

    E-print Network

    Koprinska, Irena

    Forecasting Hourly Electricity Load Profile Using Neural Networks Mashud Rana and Irena Koprinska--We present INN, a new approach for predicting the hourly electricity load profile for the next day from a time series of previous electricity loads. It uses an iterative methodology to make the predictions

  8. Complex Electrical Resistivity for Monitoring DNAPL Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen R. Brown; David Lesmes; John Fourkas

    2003-09-12

    Nearly all Department of Energy (DOE) facilities have landfills and buried waste areas. Of the various contaminants present at these sites, dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) are particularly hard to locate and remove. There is an increasing need for external or non-invasive sensing techniques to locate DNAPLs in the subsurface and to track their spread and monitor their breakdown or removal by natural or engineered means. G. Olhoeft and colleagues have published several reports based on laboratory studies using the complex resistivity method which indicate that organic solvents, notably toluene, PCE, and TCE, residing in clay-bearing soils have distinctive electrical signatures. These results have suggested to many researchers the basis of an ideal new measurement technique for geophysical characterization of DNAPL pollution. Encouraged by these results we proposed to bring the field measurement of complex resistivity as a means of pollution characterization from the conceptual stage to practice. We planned to document the detectability of clay-organic solvent interactions with geophysical measurements in the laboratory, develop further understanding of the underlying physical and chemical mechanisms, and then apply these observations to develop field techniques. As with any new research endeavor we note the extreme importance of trying to reproduce the work of previous researchers to ensure that any effects observed are due to the physical phenomena occurring in the specimen and not due to the particular experimental apparatus or method used. To this end, we independently designed and built a laboratory system, including a sample holder, electrodes, electronics, and data analysis software, for the measurement of the complex electrical resistivity properties of soil contaminated with organic solvents. The capabilities and reliability of this technique were documented. Using various standards we performed measurement accuracy, repeatability, and noise immunity tests of this system and we were able to reproduce some key complex resistivity effects quoted in the literature. We attempted numerous times to reproduce the seminal results of Olhoeft and Sadowski on the complex resistivity response of toluene-contaminated clay-rich samples. While we observe similar responses to theirs for plain clays with brine, the addition of toluene does not produce the effects they claimed. We can only produce effects of similar magnitude if we intentionally introduce a large artificial dielectric heterogeneity in the specimen. We have also performed laboratory studies to test the sensitivity of the complex resistivity method to toluene and methanol contamination in sands, clays, and rocks. Additionally, we performed 4-wire IP inversion measurements in a two-dimensional laboratory 'ant farm' to test the ability of this technique to image materials with both conductivity and dielectric heterogeneities. This work indicates, at best, a low sensitivity of the complex electrical resistivity method to organic contamination in rocks and soils. This reduces the short-term prospects of using complex resistivity as an effective technique to directly detect organic contamination. However, as noise suppression techniques improve and further understanding of electrical responses in Earth materials is achieved, the potential of the complex resistivity technique should improve. In contrast, we find that certain electrically polarizing materials, some clays for example, have responses large enough compared to sandy and silty soils to be reliably imaged through a detailed field IP survey. Thus, quantifying soil heterogeneity (which may relate to DNAPL distribution and transport) is an immediate potential application of this technique.

  9. Cone-based electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidlisecky, Adam

    Determining the 3-D spatial distribution of subsurface properties is a critical part of managing the clean-up of contaminated sites. Most standard hydrologic methods sample small regions immediately adjacent to wells or testing devices. This provides data which are not representative of the entire region of interest. Furthermore, at many contaminated sites invasive methods are not acceptable, due to the risks associated with contacting and spreading the contaminants. To address these issues, I have developed a minimally invasive technology that provides information about the 3-D distribution of electrical conductivity. This new technique, cone-based electrical resistivity tomography (C-bert), integrates the existing technologies of resistivity cone penetration testing (RCPT) with electrical resistivity tomography. Development of this tool included the creation of new software and modeling algorithms, the design of field equipment, field testing, and processing and interpretation of the resulting data. I present a 2.5-D forward modeling algorithm that incorporates an effective correction for the errors caused by boundary effects and source singularities. The algorithm includes an optimization technique for acquiring the Fourier coefficients required for the solution. A 3-D inversion algorithm is presented that has two major improvements over existing algorithms. First, it includes a 3-D version of the boundary correction/source singularity correction developed for the 2.5-D problem. Second, the algorithm can handle any type of acquisition geometry; this was a requirement for the development of C-bert. C-bert involves placing several permanent current electrodes in the subsurface and using electrodes mounted on a cone penetrometer and at the surface to measure the resultant potential field. In addition to these measurements, we obtain the standard suite of RCPT data, including high resolution resistivity logs. The RCPT data can be used to generate a realistic starting model for the inversion. Furthermore, the resistivity logs can be used as constraints in the inversion of the potential field data. Effective incorporation of resistivity logs into the inversion process, however, requires an understanding the spatial averaging that occurs during logging. I developed a forward modeling and inversion algorithm that allows us to understand and remove the averaging that is present in the logs. A successful field test of C-bert was conducted at the Kidd2 site in Richmond, British Columbia, leading me to conclude that C-bert is a promising new way to image the subsurface.

  10. Electrical Resistivity of Amorphous fe and Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziauddin Ahmed, A. Z.; Bhuiyan, G. M.; Alam, M. S.; Rana, M. M.; Rashid, R. I. M. A.

    We have calculated the electrical resistivity of amorphous transition metals Fe and Ni by using the Diffraction model as proposed by Ziman. The electron-ion interaction is described by a local model pseudopotential, and the static structure factors are taken from the experiment. The d-band effect, a characteristic of the transition metals, is accounted for through the sp-d hybridization effect. Agreement of the calculated results with the available experimental data is found to be remarkably good for both systems.

  11. Determination of electrical resistivity of dry coke beds

    SciTech Connect

    Eidem, P.A.; Tangstad, M.; Bakken, J.A.

    2008-02-15

    The electrical resistivity of the coke bed is of great importance when producing FeMn, SiMn, and FeCr in a submerged arc furnace. In these processes, a coke bed is situated below and around the electrode tip and consists of metallurgical coke, slag, gas, and metal droplets. Since the basic mechanisms determining the electrical resistivity of a coke bed is not yet fully understood, this investigation is focused on the resistivity of dry coke beds consisting of different carbonaceous materials, i.e., coke beds containing no slag or metal. A method that reliably compares the electrical bulk resistivity of different metallurgical cokes at 1500{sup o} C to 1600{sup o}C is developed. The apparatus is dimensioned for industrial sized materials, and the electrical resistivity of anthracite, charcoal, petroleum coke, and metallurgical coke has been measured. The resistivity at high temperatures of the Magnitogorsk coke, which has the highest resistivity of the metallurgical cokes investigated, is twice the resistivity of the Corus coke, which has the lowest electrical resistivity. Zdzieszowice and SSAB coke sort in between with decreasing resistivities in the respective order. The electrical resistivity of anthracite, charcoal, and petroleum coke is generally higher than the resistivity of the metallurgical cokes, ranging from about two to about eight times the resistivity of the Corus coke at 1450{sup o}C. The general trend is that the bulk resistivity of carbon materials decreases with increasing temperature and increasing particle size.

  12. The electrical resistivity method in cased boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, C.J.

    1991-05-01

    The use of downhole current sources in resistivity mapping can greatly enhance the detection and delineation of subsurface features. The purpose of this work is to examine the resistivity method for current sources in wells cased with steel. The resistivity method in cased boreholes with downhole current sources is investigated using the integral equation (IE) technique. The casing and other bodies are characterized as conductivity inhomogeneities in a half-space. For sources located along the casing axis, an axially symmetric Green's function is used to formulate the surface potential and electric field (E-field) volume integral equations. The situations involving off-axis current sources and three-dimensional (3-D) bodies is formulated using the surface potential IE method. The solution of the 3-D Green's function is presented in cylindrical and Cartesian coordinate systems. The methods of moments is used to solve the Fredholm integral equation of the second kind for the response due to the casing and other bodies. The numerical analysis revealed that the current in the casing can be approximated by its vertical component except near the source and the axial symmetric approximation of the casing is valid even for the 3-D problem. The E-field volume IE method is an effective and efficient technique to simulate the response of the casing in a half-space, whereas the surface potential approach is computationally better when multiple bodies are involved. Analyzing several configurations of the current source indicated that the casing response is influenced by four characteristic factors: conduction length, current source depth,casing depth, and casing length. 85 refs., 133 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: arsenal of resistance mechanisms, decades of changing resistance profiles, and future antimicrobial therapies.

    PubMed

    El Zowalaty, Mohamed E; Al Thani, Asmaa A; Webster, Thomas J; El Zowalaty, Ahmed E; Schweizer, Herbert P; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Marei, Hany E; Ashour, Hossam M

    2015-10-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is one of the most serious public health issues facing humans since the discovery of antimicrobial agents. The frequent, prolonged, and uncontrolled use of antimicrobial agents are major factors in the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant bacterial strains, including multidrug-resistant variants. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of nosocomial infections. The abundant data on the increased resistance to antipseudomonal agents support the need for global action. There is a paucity of new classes of antibiotics active against P. aeruginosa. Here, we discuss recent antibacterial resistance profiles and mechanisms of resistance by P. aeruginosa. We also review future potential methods for controlling antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as phage therapy, nanotechnology and antipseudomonal vaccines. PMID:26439366

  14. Soil spatial heterogeneity effect on soil electrical resistivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electrical resistivity (ER) is growing in popularity due to its ease of use and because of its non-invasive techniques, which are used to reveal and map soil heterogeneity. The objective of this work was to evaluate how differing soil properties affect the electric resistivity and to observe these e...

  15. Electrical Resistivity Imaging to Quantify Spatial Soil Heterogeneit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electrical resistivity (ER) sounding is increasingly being used as non-invasive technique to reveal and map soil heterogeneity. The objective of this work was to evaluate effects of soil properties on the electric resistivity and to observe these effects in spatial context in coarse-textured soil. T...

  16. Metamitron-resistant Chenopodium album from sugar beet: cross-resistance profile.

    PubMed

    Mechant, E; Bulcke, R

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, in several of the Belgian sugar beet growing regions, farmers have been confronted with unsatisfactory control of fat hen (Chenopodium album L.). Greenhouse bioassays conducted on reference C. album populations and on "suspected" populations from sugar beet fields where poor fat hen control had been observed, revealed that all "suspected" populations were resistant to metamitron, a key herbicide in the modern low rate weed control programs in sugar beet. These metamitron-resistant biotypes were all cross-resistant to atrazine. Since cross-resistance, particularly negative cross-resistance or reversed resistance, is known to play a major role in resistance management, other herbicides used in sugar beet and/or in rotational crops were tested to determine the cross-resistance profile of metamitron-resistant biotypes. Greenhouse bioassays were conducted using herbicides from different chemical families representing different modes of action. Cross-resistance was found for metribuzin, lenacil and chloridazon, all HRAC Group C1 herbicides that inhibit photosynthesis at PS II. The metamitron-resistant C. album populations examined showed negative cross-resistance to S-metolachlor (HRAC Group K3: inhibition of cell division), prosuifocarb (Group N: lipid synthesis, not AC-Case, inhibition), aclonifen and clomazone (both Group F3: inhibition of carotenoid biosynthesis). PMID:17390814

  17. Repeatable change in electrical resistance of Si surface by mechanical and electrical nanoprocessing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The properties of mechanically and electrically processed silicon surfaces were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Silicon specimens were processed using an electrically conductive diamond tip with and without vibration. After the electrical processing, protuberances were generated and the electric current through the silicon surface decreased because of local anodic oxidation. Grooves were formed by mechanical processing without vibration, and the electric current increased. In contrast, mechanical processing with vibration caused the surface to protuberate and the electrical resistance increased similar to that observed for electrical processing. With sequential processing, the local oxide layer formed by electrical processing can be removed by mechanical processing using the same tip without vibration. Although the electrical resistance is decreased by the mechanical processing without vibration, additional electrical processing on the mechanically processed area further increases the electrical resistance of the surface. PMID:25489276

  18. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, V.K.; Deevi, S.C.; Fleischhauer, G.S.; Hajaligol, M.R.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.

    1997-04-15

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, {<=}1% Cr and either {>=}0.05% Zr or ZrO{sub 2} stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or {>=}0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, {<=}2% Ti, {<=}2% Mo, {<=}1% Zr, {<=}1% C, {<=}0.1% B, {<=}30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {<=}1% rare earth metal, {<=}1% oxygen, {<=}3% Cu, balance Fe. 64 figs.

  19. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    1997-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  20. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  1. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    1999-01-01

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  2. Pyroclastic and Volcaniclastic Deposits Near Bishop, California: Geologic Controls on Near-Surface Electrical Resistivity and Radar Data

    E-print Network

    Stillman, David E.

    on Near- Surface Electrical Resistivity and Radar Data * McGinnis, R N (rmcginnis@swri.org) , Department-penetrating radar (GPR) profiling to identify and interpret radar signatures obtained from these three analogs). This integrated approach provides a deeper understanding of the electrical and radar properties within terrestrial

  3. Theoretical relationship between elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Sub; Yoon, Hyung-Koo

    2015-05-01

    Elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity have been commonly applied to estimate stratum structures and obtain subsurface soil design parameters. Both elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity are related to the void ratio; the objective of this study is therefore to suggest a theoretical relationship between the two physical parameters. Gassmann theory and Archie's equation are applied to propose a new theoretical equation, which relates the compressional wave velocity to shear wave velocity and electrical resistivity. The piezo disk element (PDE) and bender element (BE) are used to measure the compressional and shear wave velocities, respectively. In addition, the electrical resistivity is obtained by using the electrical resistivity probe (ERP). The elastic wave velocity and electrical resistivity are recorded in several types of soils including sand, silty sand, silty clay, silt, and clay-sand mixture. The appropriate input parameters are determined based on the error norm in order to increase the reliability of the proposed relationship. The predicted compressional wave velocities from the shear wave velocity and electrical resistivity are similar to the measured compressional velocities. This study demonstrates that the new theoretical relationship may be effectively used to predict the unknown geophysical property from the measured values.

  4. Sinkhole detection using electrical resistivity tomography in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Ahmed M.; El-Kaliouby, Hesham; Zabramawi, Yasser A.

    2012-12-01

    Karst phenomena exist in different areas in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, causing serious environmental problems that affect urban development and infrastructure (buildings, roads and highways). One of the most important problems are sinkholes, which most of the time consist of unfilled voids. These sinkholes are formed as a result of the chemical leaching of carbonate and evaporite formations by percolating water. Field investigations show that there are many surface expressions of sinkholes in the area; some appear on the ground surface and others are hidden in the subsurface. Geophysical data were collected at the study area using two-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) with different electrode spacings to delineate buried sinkholes and associated subsurface cavities. Our findings indicated that the dipole-dipole method using an electrode spacing of 1 m was successful in detecting a known subsurface sinkhole. According to the ERT method the detected sinkhole depth ranges from 2 to 4 m, its height ranges from 2 to 4 m, and its width ranges from 5 to 7 m. Field observation has verified the geophysical data, especially along the profile A-A\\. Finally, closely spaced ERT profiles were successful in determining the three-dimensional volume of the subsurface sinkhole.

  5. Mapping Contaminant Remediation with Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, J.; Power, C.; Tsourlos, P.; Karaoulis, M.; Giannopoulos, A.; Soupios, P. M.; Simyrdanis, K.

    2014-12-01

    The remediation of sites contaminated with industrial chemicals - specifically dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) like coal tar and chlorinated solvents - represents a major geoenvironmental challenge. Remediation activities would benefit from a non-destructive technique to map the evolution of DNAPL mass in space and time. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has long-standing potential in this context but has not yet become a common tool at DNAPL sites. This work evaluated the potential of time-lapse ERT for mapping DNAPL mass reduction in real time during remediation. Initially, a coupled DNAPL-ERT numerical model was developed for exploring this potential at the field scale, generating realistic DNAPL scenarios and predicting the response of an ERT survey. Also, new four-dimensional (4D) inversion algorithms were integrated for tracking DNAPL removal over time. 4D ERT applied at the surface for mapping an evolving DNAPL distribution was first demonstrated in a laboratory experiment. Independent simulation of the experiment demonstrated the reliability of the DNAPL-ERT model for simulating real systems. The model was then used to explore the 4D ERT approach at the field scale for a range of realistic DNAPL remediation scenarios. The approach showed excellent potential for mapping shallow DNAPL changes. However, remediation at depth was not as well resolved. To overcome this limitation, a new surface-to-horizontal borehole (S2HB) ERT configuration is proposed. A second laboratory experiment was conducted that demonstrated that S2HB ERT does better resolve changes in DNAPL distribution relative to surface ERT, particularly at depth. The DNAPL-ERT model was also used to demonstrate the improved mapping of S2HB ERT for field scale DNAPL scenarios. Overall, this work demonstrates that, with these innovations, ERT exhibits significant potential as a real time, non-destructive geoenvironmental remediation site monitoring tool.

  6. Electrical resistivity structure at the northern margin of the Tibetan Plateau and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Qibin; Zhao, Guoze; Dong, Zeyi

    2011-12-01

    The ENE-WSW-striking Altyn Tagh Fault (ATF) and the WNW-ESE-trending western Qilian Mountains define the northern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. New magnetotelluric data were collected along three profiles crossing the eastern section of the ATF and the southern Qilian Mountains. The basic sounding bandwidth ranged from 0.003 to 7000 s. The transverse electric and transverse magnetic mode data sets were inverted into resistivity sections using a conventional two-dimensional (2D) inversion code, and data at periods of 0.3333-5464 s were inverted using a commonly employed three-dimensional (3D) code. The 3D results constrain the interpretation of the 2D models, and the final interpretative resistivity models show that lithospheric structures are spatially variable along the ATF and across southern Qilian. In profiles across the ATF, the main fault is imaged as a vertical resistivity boundary, and the high-resistivity body in the western profile extends about 15 km deeper than the corresponding body in the eastern profile. Positive flower structures are apparent in the western profile but are only weakly visible in the eastern profile. These observations suggest that the depth of the ATF is spatially variable. Mantle resistivity images indicate a relatively cold and rigid Tarim lithosphere, which is consistent with a geodynamic model of oblique subduction of the Tarim Basin below the ATF. A high-resistivity body in the crust of southernmost Qilian indicates a huge thick-skinned structure. Low-resistivity bodies at the crust-mantle boundary south of the main ATF are presumed to form a weak layer beneath northern Tibet.

  7. Parallel electric resistivity in the TFTR tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Zarnstorff, M.C.; McGuire, K.; Bell, M.G.; Grek, B.; Johnson, D.; McCune, D.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A.; Taylor, G.

    1990-05-01

    The average parallel resistivity and the location of the q = 1 surface are found to be consistent with the predictions of neoclassical transport theory and inconsistent with classical resistivity (uncorrected for toroidal effects) for ohmic plasmas in the TFTR tokamak, both in near-equilibrium and during ramping of the plasma current. These observations are incompatible with theories predicting anomalous parallel resistivity in concert with anomalous perpendicular transport. 41 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Four-terminal electrical testing device. [initiator bridgewire resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Robert L. (inventor); Graves, Thomas J. (inventor); Hoffman, William C., III (inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The invention relates to a four-terminal electrical connector device for testing and measuring unknown resistances of initiators used for starting pyrotechnic events aboard the space shuttle. The testing device minimizes contact resistance degradation effects and so improves the reliability of resistance measurements taken with the device. Separate and independent voltage sensing and current supply circuits each include a pair of socket contacts for mating engagement with the pins of the initiator. The unknown resistance that is measured by the device is the resistance of the bridgewire of the initiator which is required to be between 0.95 and 1.15 ohms.

  9. INORGANIC PLUME DELINEATION USING SURFACE HIGH RESOLUTION ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY AT THE BC CRIBS & TRENCHES SITE HANFORD

    SciTech Connect

    BENECKE, M.W.

    2007-05-29

    A surface resistivity survey was conducted on the Hanford Site over a waste disposal trench that received a large volume of liquid inorganic waste. The objective of the survey was to map the extent of the plume that resulted from the disposal activities approximately 50 years earlier. The survey included six resistivity transects of at least 200m, where each transect provided two-dimensional profile information of subsurface electrical properties. The results of the survey indicated that a low resistivity plume resides at a depth of approximately 25-44 m below ground surface. The target depth was calibrated with borehole data of pore-water electrical conductivity. Due to the high correlation of the pore-water electrical conductivity to nitrate concentration and the high correlation of measured apparent resistivity to pore-water electrical conductivity, inferences were made that proposed the spatial distribution of the apparent resistivity was due to the distribution of nitrate. Therefore, apparent resistivities were related to nitrate, which was subsequently rendered in three dimensions to show that the nitrate likely did not reach the water table and the bounds of the highest concentrations are directly beneath the collection of waste sites.

  10. The fire resistance of profiled thin steel sheet structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leino, Tapio; Salmi, Pekka; Myllymaeki, Jukki

    1992-01-01

    Research to compare different methods of calculating the fire resistance of thin profiled metal sheet structures and to find out about any possible computer programs developed for this purpose is presented. The fire-technical material properties of thin profiled metal sheets and some special fire-technical features concerning the structures made with the thin profiled metal sheets are presented. The loads and their combinations which should be considered in case of the fire are also explained. Some analysis results are presented to give an idea about the changes of stresses and the support reactions acting at the connections of the thin metal sheet structures in the fire situation. All the analysis results were compared (when possible) with the fire test results. Some analysis tools (computer programs) were developed for calculating the fire resistance of structures. The accuracy of the analysis results depend greatly on the available material property values used in the models. The analysis tools are utilized at the design phase of the structure (or new products) to minimize the number of fire tests needed.

  11. Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An electrical resistance tomography method using steel cased boreholes as electrodes. The method enables mapping the electrical resistivity distribution in the subsurface from measurements of electrical potential caused by electrical currents injected into an array of electrodes in the subsurface. By use of current injection and potential measurement electrodes to generate data about the subsurface resistivity distribution, which data is then used in an inverse calculation, a model of the electrical resistivity distribution can be obtained. The inverse model may be constrained by independent data to better define an inverse solution. The method utilizes pairs of electrically conductive (steel) borehole casings as current injection electrodes and as potential measurement electrodes. The greater the number of steel cased boreholes in an array, the greater the amount of data is obtained. The steel cased boreholes may be utilized for either current injection or potential measurement electrodes. The subsurface model produced by this method can be 2 or 3 dimensional in resistivity depending on the detail desired in the calculated resistivity distribution and the amount of data to constain the models.

  12. Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Daily, W.D.; Ramirez, A.L.

    1999-06-22

    An electrical resistance tomography method is described which uses steel cased boreholes as electrodes. The method enables mapping the electrical resistivity distribution in the subsurface from measurements of electrical potential caused by electrical currents injected into an array of electrodes in the subsurface. By use of current injection and potential measurement electrodes to generate data about the subsurface resistivity distribution, which data is then used in an inverse calculation, a model of the electrical resistivity distribution can be obtained. The inverse model may be constrained by independent data to better define an inverse solution. The method utilizes pairs of electrically conductive (steel) borehole casings as current injection electrodes and as potential measurement electrodes. The greater the number of steel cased boreholes in an array, the greater the amount of data is obtained. The steel cased boreholes may be utilized for either current injection or potential measurement electrodes. The subsurface model produced by this method can be 2 or 3 dimensional in resistivity depending on the detail desired in the calculated resistivity distribution and the amount of data to constrain the models. 2 figs.

  13. Electrical Resistivity of Liquid Metals and Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkan, B.; Karabulut, R.; Ünal, B.

    2000-09-01

    New calculations of resistivities of liquid metals, Na, K, Rb, and alloys, Na--K, Na--Rb, K--Rb, were carried out by using a variant of the Kubo formula that explicitly contains the temperature T. The results come closer to the experiment than the previous ones that use the Ziman formula of resistivity.

  14. Influence of electrical resistivity and machining parameters on electrical discharge machining performance of engineering ceramics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Renjie; Liu, Yonghong; Diao, Ruiqiang; Xu, Chenchen; Li, Xiaopeng; Cai, Baoping; Zhang, Yanzhen

    2014-01-01

    Engineering ceramics have been widely used in modern industry for their excellent physical and mechanical properties, and they are difficult to machine owing to their high hardness and brittleness. Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is the appropriate process for machining engineering ceramics provided they are electrically conducting. However, the electrical resistivity of the popular engineering ceramics is higher, and there has been no research on the relationship between the EDM parameters and the electrical resistivity of the engineering ceramics. This paper investigates the effects of the electrical resistivity and EDM parameters such as tool polarity, pulse interval, and electrode material, on the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic's EDM performance, in terms of the material removal rate (MRR), electrode wear ratio (EWR), and surface roughness (SR). The results show that the electrical resistivity and the EDM parameters have the great influence on the EDM performance. The ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity up to 3410 ?·cm can be effectively machined by EDM with the copper electrode, the negative tool polarity, and the shorter pulse interval. Under most machining conditions, the MRR increases, and the SR decreases with the decrease of electrical resistivity. Moreover, the tool polarity, and pulse interval affect the EWR, respectively, and the electrical resistivity and electrode material have a combined effect on the EWR. Furthermore, the EDM performance of ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity higher than 687 ?·cm is obviously different from that with the electrical resistivity lower than 687 ?·cm, when the electrode material changes. The microstructure character analysis of the machined ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic surface shows that the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic is removed by melting, evaporation and thermal spalling, and the material from the working fluid and the graphite electrode can transfer to the workpiece surface during electrical discharge machining ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic. PMID:25364912

  15. Influence of Electrical Resistivity and Machining Parameters on Electrical Discharge Machining Performance of Engineering Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Renjie; Liu, Yonghong; Diao, Ruiqiang; Xu, Chenchen; Li, Xiaopeng; Cai, Baoping; Zhang, Yanzhen

    2014-01-01

    Engineering ceramics have been widely used in modern industry for their excellent physical and mechanical properties, and they are difficult to machine owing to their high hardness and brittleness. Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is the appropriate process for machining engineering ceramics provided they are electrically conducting. However, the electrical resistivity of the popular engineering ceramics is higher, and there has been no research on the relationship between the EDM parameters and the electrical resistivity of the engineering ceramics. This paper investigates the effects of the electrical resistivity and EDM parameters such as tool polarity, pulse interval, and electrode material, on the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic's EDM performance, in terms of the material removal rate (MRR), electrode wear ratio (EWR), and surface roughness (SR). The results show that the electrical resistivity and the EDM parameters have the great influence on the EDM performance. The ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity up to 3410 ?·cm can be effectively machined by EDM with the copper electrode, the negative tool polarity, and the shorter pulse interval. Under most machining conditions, the MRR increases, and the SR decreases with the decrease of electrical resistivity. Moreover, the tool polarity, and pulse interval affect the EWR, respectively, and the electrical resistivity and electrode material have a combined effect on the EWR. Furthermore, the EDM performance of ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic with the electrical resistivity higher than 687 ?·cm is obviously different from that with the electrical resistivity lower than 687 ?·cm, when the electrode material changes. The microstructure character analysis of the machined ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic surface shows that the ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic is removed by melting, evaporation and thermal spalling, and the material from the working fluid and the graphite electrode can transfer to the workpiece surface during electrical discharge machining ZnO/Al2O3 ceramic. PMID:25364912

  16. Influence of resistive internal kink on runaway current profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Huishan; Fu, Guoyong

    2015-02-01

    An extended magnetohydrodynamic model including the effect of runaway current is developed and implemented in the M3D code. Based on this model, a simulation has been carried out to investigate the linear stability and the nonlinear evolution of the n = 1 resistive kink mode in the presence of runaway current. It is found that sawteeth oscillation is suppressed in a runaway plasma. The nonlinear evolution of the n = 1 mode only leads to a single sawtooth crash before reaching a new steady state axi-symmetric equilibrium with flattened current profile in the plasma core and q(0)>1.

  17. COMPLEX ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY FOR MONITORING DNAPL CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose to develop new practical complex resistivity field measurement techniques for pollution characterization and monitoring. For this purpose we will document the detectability of clay-organic interactions with geophysical measurements in the laboratory, develop further un...

  18. Slime thickness evaluation of bored piles by electrical resistivity probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Ok-Hyun; Yoon, Hyung-Koo; Park, Min-Chul; Lee, Jong-Sub

    2014-09-01

    The bottoms of bored piles are generally stacked with soil particles, both while boreholes are being drilled, and afterward. The stacked soils are called slime, and when loads are applied on the pile, increase the pile settlement. Thus to guarantee the end bearing capacity of bored piles, the slime thickness should be precisely detected. The objective of this study is to suggest a new method for evaluating the slime thickness, using temperature compensated electrical resistivity. Laboratory studies are performed in advance, to estimate and compare the resolution of the electrical resistivity probe (ERP) and time domain reflectometry (TDR). The electrical properties of the ERP and TDR are measured using coaxial type electrodes and parallel type two-wire electrodes, respectively. Penetration tests, conducted in the fully saturated sand-clay mixtures, demonstrate that the ERP produces a better resolution of layer detection than TDR. Thus, field application tests using the ERP with a diameter of 35.7 mm are conducted for the investigation of slime thickness in large diameter bored piles. Field tests show that the slime layers are clearly identified by the ERP: the electrical resistivity dramatically increases at the interface between the slurry and slime layer. The electrical resistivity in the slurry layer inversely correlates with the amount of circulated water. This study suggests that the new electrical resistivity method may be a useful method for the investigation of the slime thickness in bored piles.

  19. Assist feature printability prediction by 3-D resist profile reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xin; Huang, Jensheng; Chin, Fook; Kazarian, Aram; Kuo, Chun-Chieh

    2012-06-01

    Sub-resolution Assist Features (SRAFs) are powerful tools to enhance the focus margin of drawn patterns. SRAFs are placed and sized so they do not print on the wafer, but the larger the SRAF, the more effective it becomes at enhancing through-focus stability. The size and location of an SRAF that will image on a wafer is highly dependent upon neighboring patterns and models of SRAF printability are, at present, unreliable. Model-based SRAF placement has been used to enhance resolution at 20nm node processes and below with stringent requirements that inserted SRAFs will not be imaged on wafer. However, despite widespread SRAF use and hard data as to SRAF effectiveness, it has been very difficult to develop a process model that accurately predicts under what process conditions an SRAF will image on a wafer. More accurate models of SRAF printing should allow model based SRAF placement to be relaxed, resulting in more effective SRAF placement and broader focus margins. One of the first problems with the concept of SRAF printability is the definition of an SRAF printing on a wafer. This is not obvious because two different states of printing exist. The first print state is when a residue is left on a wafer from the SRAF. The first state can be considered printing from the point of view that photoresist is on the wafer and the photoresist may even lift off and cause defects. However, the first state can be considered non-printing because the over etch from the etch process will generally remove the photoresist residual and the material underneath. The second state is when a pattern is formed and etched into the substrate, a state at which the pattern has clearly printed on the wafer. Of course, intermediate states may also be defined. In order to be applicable, an SRAF printability model must be able to predict both printing states. In addition, the model must be able to extrapolate to configurations beyond those used to develop the model in the first place. These model properties may then be used to optimize the printability vs. efficacy of an SRAF either prior to or during an Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) run. The process models that are used during OPC have never been able to reliably predict which SRAFs will print. This appears to be due to the fact that OPC process models are generally created using data that does not include printed subresolution patterns. An enhancement to compact modeling capability to predict Assist Features (AF) printability is developed and discussed. A hypsometric map representing 3-D resist profile was built by applying a first principle approximation to estimate the "energy loss" from the resist top to bottom. Such a 3-D resist profile is an extrapolation of a well calibrated traditional OPC model without any additional information. Assist features are detected at either top of resist (dark field) or bottom of resist (bright field). Such detection can be done by just extracting top or bottom resist models from our 3-D resist model. There is no measurement of assist features needed when we build AF but it can be included if interested but focusing on resist calibration to account for both exposure dosage and focus change sensitivities. This approach significantly increases resist model's capability for predicting printed SRAF accuracy. And we don't need to calibrate an SRAF model in addition to the OPC model. Without increase in computation time, this compact model can draw assist feature contour with real placement and size at any vertical plane. The result is compared and validated with 3-D rigorous modeling as well as SEM images. Since this method does not change any form of compact modeling, it can be integrated into current MBAF solutions without any additional work.

  20. Geo-electrical profiling over peatlands underlain by a granitic aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Moe, H.; Ferguson, A.; Flynn, R.

    2008-05-01

    Peat thickness can play an important role in the hydrogeological balance of catchments underlain by crystalline bedrock. The accurate estimation of its depth provides a more scientifically justifiable basis for locating hydrogeological investigation/monitoring points. Geophysical methods are commonly employed because they can rapidly provide wider continuous spatial coverage compared to drilling /coring. We performed surface resistivity and induced polarization (IP) measurements to estimate the depth of peat layer overlying granitic aquifer in a densely forested upland catchment in County Galway, Ireland. Seven geo-electrical tomography profiles (120 - 200 m) provided detailed information about the peat thickness and the overall depth to bedrock. Profile results, verified by selective drilling showed the peat to overlay an intermediate zone (transition zone) extending from the base of the peat base to the top of intact bedrock. IP measurements corroborated this interpretation of the resistivity data. The investigation highlights the benefits of geophysical methods as a reconnaissance tool in crystalline catchments continuing by peat.

  1. Using an Automatic Resistivity Profiler Soil Sensor On-The-Go in Precision Viticulture

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Roberta; Pollice, Alessio; Diago, Maria-Paz; Oliveira, Manuel; Millan, Borja; Bitella, Giovanni; Amato, Mariana; Tardaguila, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Spatial information on vineyard soil properties can be useful in precision viticulture. In this paper a combination of high resolution soil spatial information of soil electrical resistivity (ER) and ancillary topographic attributes, such as elevation and slope, were integrated to assess the spatial variability patterns of vegetative growth and yield of a commercial vineyard (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Tempranillo) located in the wine-producing region of La Rioja, Spain. High resolution continuous geoelectrical mapping was accomplished by an Automatic Resistivity Profiler (ARP) on-the-go sensor with an on-board GPS system; rolling electrodes enabled ER to be measured for a depth of investigation approximately up to 0.5, 1 and 2 m. Regression analysis and cluster analysis algorithm were used to jointly process soil resistivity data, landscape attributes and grapevine variables. ER showed a structured variability that matched well with trunk circumference spatial pattern and yield. Based on resistivity and a simple terrain attribute uniform management units were delineated. Once a spatial relationship to target variables is found, the integration of point measurement with continuous soil resistivity mapping is a useful technique to identify within-plots areas of vineyard with similar status. PMID:23325171

  2. Towards routine, quantitative two-dimensional carrier profiling with scanning spreading resistance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandervorst, W.; Eyben, P.; Callewaert, S.; Hantschel, T.; Duhayon, N.; Xu, M.; Trenkler, T.; Clarysse, T.

    2001-01-01

    Recent developments in scanning spreading resistance microscopy have enabled to move the technique from the laboratory phase to a commercially available method for 2D-carrier profiling. In view of the large tip consumption methods and software have been developed to arrive at a rapid collection of calibration curves and the characterization of tips. These calibration curves have been integrated in a software package for quantification such that 2D-images can be completely quantified. Scanning Spreading Resistance Spectroscopy (SSRS) has been developed whereby full I-V curves can be collected at every pixel. These developments contribute to a better understanding of the physics of the point-contact, allow to characterize in more detail the electrical behavior of various tips and provide a unique signature for junction identification.

  3. Laboratory Measurements of Electrical Resistivity of Kerogen in Organic-Rich Mudrocks 

    E-print Network

    Firdaus, Gama

    2015-08-06

    that the interpretation of electrical resistivity logs for such rocks is challenging because of the presence of highly mature kerogen and pyrite connected networks that can influence electrical resistivity measurements. However, the electrical properties of kerogen...

  4. Electrical Resistivity Measurements of Hot Dense Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benage, J. F.; Shanahan, W. R.; Murillo, M. S.

    1999-10-01

    Electrical transport properties of dense aluminum are measured in the disordered liquidlike phase using a well-tamped, thermally equilibrated, exploding wire z pinch. Direct measurements of the electrical conductivity have been made using voltage and current measurements. Our measurements span the minimum conductivity regime, at higher densities than have been produced previously. We find that some Ziman-like theoretical predictions are in fair agreement with the data and one Ziman-like theoretical approach is in good agreement, in contrast to other experiments performed in similar regimes which indicate poor agreement with such theories.

  5. Electrical Resistivity Measurements of Hot Dense Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Benage, J.F.; Shanahan, W.R.; Murillo, M.S.

    1999-10-01

    Electrical transport properties of dense aluminum are measured in the disordered liquidlike phase using a well-tamped, thermally equilibrated, exploding wire {ital z} pinch. Direct measurements of the electrical conductivity have been made using voltage and current measurements. Our measurements span the minimum conductivity regime, at higher densities than have been produced previously. We find that some Ziman-like theoretical predictions are in fair agreement with the data and one Ziman-like theoretical approach is in good agreement, in contrast to other experiments performed in similar regimes which indicate poor agreement with such theories. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society }

  6. Electrical resistivity borehole measurements: application to an urban tunnel site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis, A.; Marache, A.; Obellianne, T.; Breysse, D.

    2002-06-01

    This paper shows how it is possible to use wells drilled during geotechnical pre-investigation of a tunneling site to obtain a 2-D image of the resistivity close to a tunnel boring machine. An experimental apparatus is presented which makes it possible to perform single and borehole-to-borehole electrical measurements independent of the geological and hydrogeological context, which can be activated at any moment during the building of the tunnel. This apparatus is first demonstrated through its use on a test site. Numerical simulations and data inversion are used to analyse the experimental results. Finally, electrical resistivity tomography and single-borehole measurements on a tunneling site are presented. Experimental results show the viability of the apparatus and the efficiency of the inverse algorithm, and also highlight the limitations of the electrical resistivity tomography as a tool for geotechnical investigation in urban areas.

  7. Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Chesnut, Dwayne A. (San Francisco, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations.

  8. Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Ramirez, A.L.; Chesnut, D.A.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-09-13

    A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations. 1 fig.

  9. Modeling the Electrical Contact Resistance at Steel-Carbon Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimmo, Ayoola T.; Hassan, Mohamed I.

    2015-10-01

    In the aluminum smelting industry, electrical contact resistance at the stub-carbon (steel-carbon) interface has been recurrently reported to be of magnitudes that legitimately necessitate concern. Mitigating this via finite element modeling has been the focus of a number of investigations, with the pressure- and temperature-dependent contact resistance relation frequently cited as a factor that limits the accuracy of such models. In this study, pressure- and temperature-dependent relations are derived from the most extensively cited works that have experimentally characterized the electrical contact resistance at these contacts. These relations are applied in a validated thermo-electro-mechanical finite element model used to estimate the voltage drop across a steel-carbon laboratory setup. By comparing the models' estimate of the contact electrical resistance with experimental measurements, we deduce the applicability of the different relations over a range of temperatures. The ultimate goal of this study is to apply mathematical modeling in providing pressure- and temperature-dependent relations that best describe the steel-carbon electrical contact resistance and identify the best fit relation at specific thermodynamic conditions.

  10. Electrical resistivity of Al-Cu liquid binary alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakor, P. P.; Patel, J. J.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Jani, A. R.

    2013-06-01

    Present paper deals with the electrical resistivity (?) of liquid Al-Cu binary alloy. To describe electron-ion interaction we have used our parameter free model potential along with Faber-Ziman formulation combined with Ashcroft-Langreth (AL) partial structure factor. To see the influence of exchange and correlation effect, Hartree, Taylor and Sarkar et al local field correlation functions are used. From present results, it is seen that good agreements between present results and experimental data have been achieved. Lastly we conclude that our model potential successfully produces the data of electrical resistivity (?) of liquid Al-Cu binary alloy.

  11. Mechanism of electrical shorting failure mode in resistive switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohn, Andrew J.; Mickel, Patrick R.; Marinella, Matthew J.

    2014-07-01

    The electrical shorting failure mode in resistive switching is characterized by the inability to increase the resistance electrically and is one of the most common failures observed in these devices. We show that vacancy accumulation at the inert electrode is a likely cause of the electrical shorting failure mode. A detailed description is provided of the specific effect of injected oxygen vacancies from the reactive electrode and from the secondary reservoir that is formed at the inert electrode during an electrical shorting failure. We present quantitative theoretical and experimental analysis of the failure mechanism while suggesting approaches and conditions for prevention and recovery. The approach also provides an analytical description of sub-saturation vacancy injection during normal operation while experimentally showing the range of conditions where this behavior dominates.

  12. High electrical resistivity carbon/graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, F. L.; Forsman, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon/graphite fibers were chemically oxidized in the liquid phase to fibers of graphite oxide. Resistivity increases as high as 10,000 times were obtained, the oxidized fiber decomposed on exposure to atmosphere. A factor of 1,000 remained as a stable increment. The largest change observed was 1,000,000 times. Best results were obtained on the most highly graphitized fibers. Electrochemical oxidation yielded a lower increase--about 10 times, but provided a controllable method of synthesis and insight to the mechanism of reaction. Tensile tests indicated that the strength of the fiber on oxidation was decreased by no more than 25 percent.

  13. Control of the Electric Field Profile in the Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    A. Fruchtman; N. J. Fisch; Y. Raitses

    2000-10-05

    Control of the electric field profile in the Hall Thruster through the positioning of an additional electrode along the channel is shown theoretically to enhance the efficiency. The reduction of the potential drop near the anode by use of the additional electrode increases the plasma density there, through the increase of the electron and ion transit times, causing the ionization in the vicinity of the anode to increase. The resulting separation of the ionization and acceleration regions increases the propellant and energy utilizations. An abrupt sonic transition is forced to occur at the axial location of the additional electrode, accompanied by the generation of a large (theoretically infinite) electric field. This ability to generate a large electric field at a specific location along the channel, in addition to the ability to specify the electric potential there, allows one further control of the electric field profile in the thruster. In particular, when the electron temperature is high, a large abrupt voltage drop is induced at the vicinity of the additional electrode, a voltage drop that can comprise a significant part of the applied voltage.

  14. Influence of different illumination profiles on the on-state resistances of silicon carbide photoconductive semiconductor switches

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Langning Xun, Tao; Yang, Hanwu; Liu, Jinliang; Zhang, Yu

    2014-04-15

    Characteristics of a silicon-carbide (SiC) photoconductive switch under different illumination profiles are presented. We triggered a V-doped semi-insulated 6H-SiC switch with lateral geometry using a laser beam of 532-nm wavelength. Photoconductivity tests for different spot profiles and locations show that such switches achieve a minimum on-state resistance when the switching gap is illuminated. The differences between on-state resistances are small for various partial illuminations of the switching gap. Semiconductor modeling is used to simulate the electric field and current profiles for different partial illuminations. The simulation results show poor on-state switch performance when partially illuminated. Based on these results, a more revealing circuit model for the switch matches well with experimental results for partial illuminations.

  15. Block designs, spanning trees and resistance in electrical networks

    E-print Network

    Bailey, R. A.

    Block designs, spanning trees and resistance in electrical networks R. A. Bailey r block designs with block size two, so they can also be regarded as graphs, possibly with multiple edges. Statisticians usually rate block designs by (at least) two criteria. When the block size is two, a design is D

  16. Electrical Resistivity Changes in Saturated Rock under Stress.

    PubMed

    Brace, W F; Orange, A S

    1966-09-23

    Electrical resistivity of water-saturated crystalline rock such as granite, diabase, dunite, or quartzite changes by an order of magnitude prior to fracture of the rock in compression. The effect observed even under high confining pressure is due to formation of open cracks which first appear at one-third to two-thirds the fracture stress. PMID:17749731

  17. Resistive companion battery modeling for electric circuit simulations , R. Dougalb

    E-print Network

    Resistive companion battery modeling for electric circuit simulations B. Wua , R. Dougalb , R be achieved based on RC models. In this study, the construction of RC battery models is investigated. A general battery model and a nickel±metal hydride cell model have been built. Simulations of RC battery

  18. Electrical resistance sensors for soil water tension estimates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter, in a book to be published by the International Atomic Energy Agency/FAO Joint Division, provides detailed information on how to sense soil water tension with electrical resistance sensors. It provides insight into problems commonly encountered in using these sensors. Guidance on data r...

  19. Electrical Resistivity Imaging for Unknown Bridge Foundation Depth Determination 

    E-print Network

    Arjwech, Rungroj

    2012-02-14

    as suitable to investigate unknown bridge foundations. The objective of the present study is to apply advanced 2D electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) in order to identify depth of unknown bridge foundations. A survey procedure is carried out in mixed terrain...

  20. Letter to the Editor Molecular profiling of platinum resistant ovarian cancer: Use of the

    E-print Network

    Letter to the Editor Molecular profiling of platinum resistant ovarian cancer: Use of the model. Molecular profiling of platinum resistant ovar- ian cancer. Int J Cancer 2005;118:1963­71. 2. Thigpen T the article by Helleman et al.,1 investigating whether a gene set identified using microarrays could be used

  1. Comparison of two years of snowmelt infiltration using electrical resistivity and TDR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, H. K.; Binley, A.; Leijnse, A.

    2007-12-01

    Infiltration during snowmelt can be highly heterogeneous due to the formation of ice on the ground surface below the snow cover. In cases where snow is contaminated such as e.g. along highways and airports due to de-icing agents and other contaminants, it is important to be able to predict the zone of infiltration since this will determine the potential for retention and degradation in the unsaturated zone. The infiltration processes was monitored using time-lapse electrical resistivity measured in shallow electrodes in a glacial deposit near Oslo airport. TDR measurements were used to calibrate changes in water contents with changes in electrical resistivity values. In the first snowmelting event (April, 2006) there was hardly any ground frost, while in the second event (March, 2007) ground frost caused redistribution of meltwater and focussed infiltration. The observed infiltration pattern is supported by numerical simulation of infiltration in a 2D unsaturated profile.

  2. Temperature and volumetric water content petrophysical relationships in municipal solid waste for the interpretation of bulk electrical resistivity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilawski, Tamara; Dumont, Gaël; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2015-04-01

    Landfills pose major environmental issues including long-term methane emissions, and local pollution of soil and aquifers but can also be seen as potential energy resources and mining opportunities. Water content in landfills determine whether solid fractions can be separated and recycled, and controls the existence and efficiency of natural or enhanced biodegradation. Geophysical techniques, such as electrical and electromagnetic methods have proven successful in the detection and qualitative investigation of sanitary landfills. However, their interpretation in terms of quantitative water content estimates makes it more challenging due to the influence of parameters such as temperature, compaction, waste composition or pore fluid. To improve the confidence given to bulk electrical resistivity data and to their interpretation, we established temperature and volumetric water content petrophysical relationships that we tested on field and laboratory electrical resistivity measurements. We carried out two laboratory experiments on leachates and waste samples from a landfill located in Mont-Saint-Guibert, Belgium. We determined a first relationship between temperature and electrical resistivity with pure and diluted leachates by progressively increasing the temperature from 5°C to 65°C, and then cooling down to 5°C. The second relationship was obtained by measuring electrical resistivity on waste samples of different volumetric water contents. First, we used the correlations obtained from the experiments to compare electrical resistivity measurements performed in a landfill borehole and on reworked waste samples excavated at different depths. Electrical resistivities were measured every 20cm with an electromagnetic logging device (EM39) while a temperature profile was acquired with optic fibres. Waste samples were excavated every 2m in the same borehole. We filled experimental columns with these samples and measured electrical resistivities at laboratory temperature. We made corrections according to the temperature profile and to volumetric water contents obtained previously on undisturbed samples. Corrected values tended to be superimposed on those obtained in the field. Then, we calculated the water content of the different reworked waste samples using the correlation between volumetric water content correlation and electrical resistivity and we compared this value to the one measured at the laboratory. Both values were correlated satisfactorily. In conclusion, we show that bulk electrical resistivity measurements are very promising to quantify water content in landfills if temperature can be estimated independently. In future applications, electrical resistivity tomography coupled with distributed temperature sensing could give important estimates of water content of the waste and thus helping in dealing with problematics such as boosting biodegradation and stabilization of the waste, reducing risks of soil and aquifers pollution, landfill mining, and controlled production of methane.

  3. Modeling and analysis of direct-current electrical resistivity in the Durham Triassic basin, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, C. Erwin

    1987-01-01

    Sixty-two Schlumberger electrical soundings were made in the Durham Triassic basin in an effort to determine basin structural geometry, depth of the sedimentary layers, and spatial distribution of individual rock facies. A digital computer program was used to invert the sounding curves of apparent resistivity versus distance to apparent resistivity versus depth. The apparent-resistivity-versus-depth data from the computer-modeling program were used to construct a geoelectric model of the basin that is believed to accurately represent the subsurface geology of the basin. The largest depth to basement in the basin along a resistivity profile (geoelectric section) was determined to be 1,800 m. A resistivity decrease was observed on certain soundings from depths of 100 to 1,000 m; below a 1,000-m depth, apparent resistivity increased to the bottom of the basin. Resistivity values for basement rocks were greater than 1,000 ohm-m and less than 350 ohm-m for the sedimentary layers in the basin. The data suggest that the basin contains a system of step faults near its eastern boundary. ?? 1987.

  4. Continuous resistivity profiling data from Great South Bay, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, V.A.; Bratton, J.F.; Kroeger, K.D.; Crusius, John; Worley, C.R.

    2013-01-01

    An investigation of submarine aquifers adjacent to the Fire Island National Seashore and Long Island, New York was conducted to assess the importance of submarine groundwater discharge as a potential nonpoint source of nitrogen delivery to Great South Bay. Over 200 kilometers of continuous resistivity profiling data were collected to image the fresh-saline groundwater interface in sediments beneath the bay. In addition, groundwater sampling was performed at sites (1) along the north shore of Great South Bay, particularly in Patchogue Bay, that were representative of the developed Long Island shoreline, and (2) at sites on and adjacent to Fire Island, a 50-kilometer-long barrier island on the south side of Great South Bay. Other field activities included sediment coring, stationary electrical resistivity profiling, and surveys of in situ pore water conductivity. Results of continuous resistivity profiling surveys are described in this report. The onshore and offshore shallow hydrostratigraphy of the Great South Bay shorelines, particularly the presence and nature of submarine confining units, appears to exert primary control on the dimensions and chemistry of the submarine groundwater flow and discharge zones. Sediment coring has shown that the confining units commonly consist of drowned and buried peat layers likely deposited in salt marshes. Low-salinity groundwater extends from 10 to 100 meters offshore along much of the north and south shores of Great South Bay based on continuous resistivity profiling data, especially off the mouths of tidal creeks and beneath shallow flats to the north of Fire Island adjacent to modern salt marshes. Human modifications of much of the shoreline and nearshore areas along the north shore of the bay, including filling of salt marshes, construction of bulkheads and piers, and dredging of navigation channels, has substantially altered the natural hydrogeology of the bay's shorelines by truncating confining units and increasing recharge near the shore in filled areas. Better understanding of the nature of submarine groundwater discharge along developed and undeveloped shorelines of embayments such as this could lead to improved models and mitigation strategies for nutrient overenrichment of estuaries.

  5. Electrical Resistance Technique to Monitor SiC Composite Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Morscher, Gregory; Xia, Zhenhai

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are suitable for high temperature structural applications such as turbine airfoils and hypersonic thermal protection systems. The employment of these materials in such applications is limited by the ability to process components reliable and to accurately monitor and predict damage evolution that leads to failure under stressed-oxidation conditions. Current nondestructive methods such as ultrasound, x-ray, and thermal imaging are limited in their ability to quantify small scale, transverse, in-plane, matrix cracks developed over long-time creep and fatigue conditions. Electrical resistance of SiC/SiC composites is one technique that shows special promise towards this end. Since both the matrix and the fibers are conductive, changes in matrix or fiber properties should relate to changes in electrical conductivity along the length of a specimen or part. The effect of matrix cracking on electrical resistivity for several composite systems will be presented and some initial measurements performed at elevated temperatures under stress-rupture conditions. The implications towards electrical resistance as a technique applied to composite processing, damage detection (health monitoring), and life-modeling will be discussed.

  6. Acquisition of electrical resistivity data. Application to soil moisture content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitea, Florina

    2010-05-01

    Geophysical investigation such as detecting electrical resistivity or conductivity of soil has been applied in other to seek correlations between soil properties and soil state. There may be a lot of reasons for variation of the electrical soil apparent resistivity (bulk density, hydraulic conductivity, pore distribution, porosity), but in the same type of non polluted soil, the changes of electrical resistivity data are mainly due to the differential water retention. Detecting even small modification in soil moisture content (<5?m) it is possible if optimum acquisition and processing techniques are applied. Apparent resistivity acquisition is mainly due by using Wenner, Schlumberger or the hybrid Wenner-Schlumberger and Gradient-Dipol arrays. Investigating the same area with the different array may lead to slight different results (differences of the extent or intensity of the electrical resistivity anomalies). This is mainly a cause of the specific sensitivity functions for each of the above mentioned arrays. Comparing the sensitivity function for various array disadvantages and recommendation for using one or another in a specific site location can be outlined and it is a recommended step before starting the acquisition campaign. Other important parameter that must be considered when geoelectric measurements are designed is the distance between electrodes. Electrical prospecting in DC makes use of metal electrodes implanted into the soil. Consequently, current electrodes, as well as potential electrodes, can only approximately be described as point source electrodes. Geoelectrical measurements made on cultivated soil showed that in case of the improper choose of the distance between the electrodes (1m) small changes in the soil moisture content at shallow depths could not be delineated, resulting an higher estimation of the soil water content, as has been revealed by apparent resistivity measurements made with electrodes positioned at half distance. The results will be of high quality if the distance between electrodes is smaller, but placing too close the electrodes the point-source approximation of the injection electrodes may not accomplish. If the point-source approximation cannot be accomplished certain difficulties in the results interpretation will be encountered. In order to illustrate the difference between values computed under the assumption of a point-electrode, and values obtained under the more realistic assumption that a real electrode, of finite length, was utilized. There has been computed the potential generated in a certain point , by a current source of length , that injected a current of intensity into a homogeneous and isotropic half-space of resistivity . Analyzes made for the Schlumberger array indicates that the apparent resistivity computed in the case of a line-electrode is equal to the apparent resistivity corresponding to a point-electrode only if the distance between the current source and the point (where the electrical potential is measured) is much larger that the electrode burying-depth . The distance between the current source and the point has to be at least four times larger than the electrode burying-depth, in order to secure differences smaller than 5% between the actually computed resistivity values and values existing in the ideal case. In addition, by taking into account the circumstance that both the current electrodes, and the potential electrodes, are actually linear, the electrodes separation must be at least 5-7 times larger than their burying-depth. The latter observation is of utmost importance in carrying out resistivity tomographies for soils, when shallow depth investigation it is needed. The scientific researches were performed with financial support from the CNCSIS-UEFISCU 992/2009 and 998/2009 scientific projects.

  7. Electrical resistivity characterization of anisotropy in the Biscayne Aquifer.

    PubMed

    Yeboah-Forson, Albert; Whitman, Dean

    2014-01-01

    Electrical anisotropy occurs when electric current flow varies with azimuth. In porous media, this may correspond to anisotropy in the hydraulic conductivity resulting from sedimentary fabric, fractures, or dissolution. In this study, a 28-electrode resistivity imaging system was used to investigate electrical anisotropy at 13 sites in the Biscayne Aquifer of SE Florida using the rotated square array method. The measured coefficient of electrical anisotropy generally ranged from 1.01 to 1.12 with values as high as 1.36 found at one site. The observed electrical anisotropy was used to estimate hydraulic anisotropy (ratio of maximum to minimum hydraulic conductivity) which ranged from 1.18 to 2.83. The largest values generally were located on the Atlantic Coastal Ridge while the lowest values were in low elevation areas on the margin of the Everglades to the west. The higher values of anisotropy found on the ridge may be due to increased dissolution rates of the oolitic facies of the Miami formation limestone compared with the bryozoan facies to the west. The predominate trend of minimum resistivity and maximum hydraulic conductivity was E-W/SE-NW beneath the ridge and E-W/SW-NE farther west. The anisotropy directions are similar to the predevelopment groundwater flow direction as indicated in published studies. This suggests that the observed anisotropy is related to the paleo-groundwater flow in the Biscayne Aquifer. PMID:24033332

  8. Characterization of subsurface stratigraphy along the lower American River floodplain using electrical resistivity, Sacramento, California, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, Bethany L.; Powers, Michael H.; Ball, Lyndsay B.

    2014-01-01

    In July 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, completed a geophysical survey using electrical resistivity along an approximately 6-mile reach of the lower American River in Sacramento, California, to map near-surface lithological variations. This survey is a part of a manifold and comprehensive study of river-flow dynamics and geologic boundary-property knowledge necessary to estimate scour potential and levee erosion risk. Data were acquired on the left (south or west) bank between river mile 5 and 10.7 as well as a short section on the right bank from river mile 5.4 to 6. Thirteen direct-current resistivity profiles and approximately 8.3 miles of capacitively coupled resisistivity data were acquired along accessible areas of the floodplain between the levee and river bank. Capacitively coupled resistivity was used as a reconnaissance tool, because it allowed for greater spatial coverage of data but with lower resolution and depth of investigation than the DC resistivity method. The study area contains Pleistocene-age alluvial deposits, dominated by gravels, sands, silts, and clays, that vary in both lateral extent and depth. Several generations of lithologic logs were used to help interpret resistivity variations observed in the resistivity models.

  9. Resistivity Profiling for Mapping Gravel Layers That May Control Contaminant Migration at the Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucius, Jeffrey E.; Abraham, Jared D.; Burton, Bethany L.

    2008-01-01

    Gaseous contaminants, including CFC 113, chloroform, and tritiated compounds, move preferentially in unsaturated subsurface gravel layers away from disposal trenches at a closed low-level radioactive waste-disposal facility in the Amargosa Desert about 17 kilometers south of Beatty, Nevada. Two distinct gravel layers are involved in contaminant transport: a thin, shallow layer between about 0.5 and 2.2 meters below the surface and a layer of variable thickness between about 15 and 30 meters below land surface. From 2003 to 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey used multielectrode DC and AC resistivity surveys to map these gravel layers. Previous core sampling indicates the fine-grained sediments generally have higher water content than the gravel layers or the sediments near the surface. The relatively higher electrical resistivity of the dry gravel layers, compared to that of the surrounding finer sediments, makes the gravel readily mappable using electrical resistivity profiling. The upper gravel layer is not easily distinguished from the very dry, fine-grained deposits at the surface. Two-dimensional resistivity models, however, clearly identify the resistive lower gravel layer, which is continuous near the facility except to the southeast. Multielectrode resistivity surveys provide a practical noninvasive method to image hydrogeologic features in the arid environment of the Amargosa Desert.

  10. Electrical resistivity imaging of the near-surface structure of the Solfatara volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giulia Di Giuseppe, Maria; Troiano, Antonio; Fedele, Alessandro; Patella, Domenico; Troise, Claudia; De Natale, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    We describe the results from an high-resolution study of the near-surface electrical resistivity structures carried out in the Solfatara area, located in the central part of the Campi Flegrei (CF) composite caldera, west of Naples, Italy. This area represents the most active zone within the CF area. It has been the site of an intense hydrothermal activity since Greek times, and currently exhibits the most impressive degassing manifestations. A direct relationship has always been observed between the increase of hydrothermal activity and ground uplift in the caldera. For this reason, dynamic of the Solfatara zone is considered a direct indicator of the volcanism taking place in the CF caldera. Since 2005 a new gradual increase of the hydrothermal activity and ground uplift has been observed. A steep growth of these effects has been recorded from 2012, accompanied by seismic events with hypocentres mostly concentrated below the area of Pozzuoli at depths ranging between 1 and 3 km, and highest magnitude of 1.8. It is thought that a further increase of the activity might lead to more critical conditions, including the occurrence of phreatic explosions. The detailed recovery of the structure and features of the shallow aquifers, mainly in the largest fumarole areas, is a crucial step for interpreting the ground movements and to improve our capability to forecast future pre-eruptive scenarios. Electrical resistivity results particularly sensitive to the presence of aqueous fluids and partial melts. By electrical imaging the volume of subsurface fluids can be constrained and the rheology of the subsoil can be reconstructed. To this aim, we have carried out eight profiles for electrical resistivity imaging, crossing the fumaroles field, deducting an electric model of the structural setting of the hydrothermal system in the first 100 m depth. Six of the profiles were 250 m long, with an electrodic distance of 5 m. Two longer profiles, up to 750 m, characterised by an electrodic distance of 10 m, was also realised, that crosses the whole Solfatara crater in the N-S and NE-WSW direction, respectively. The main electric features has been reconstructed and ERT results have been utilised to the aim of detailing the outlines of the fumarolic field defined by previous ground temperature, CO2 soil degassing, seismic noise, Bouguer anomaly mapping. A further analysis of the correlation between the recorded physical parameters and the main electric discontinuities has been realised.

  11. Electrical contact resistance theory for conductive rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogut, L.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2003-09-01

    A general electrical contact resistance (ECR) theory for conductive rough surfaces was derived from first principles. The analysis is based on fractal geometry for the surface topography description, elastic-plastic deformation of contacting asperities, and size-dependent constriction resistance of microcontacts. Relations for the ECR in terms of contact load and apparent contact area are obtained for isotropic, homogeneous, conductive surfaces with known material properties and surface topography. Useful design guidelines for electrical contacts are extracted from the numerical results. A general relation between the dimensionless real contact area and the dimensionless ECR is introduced for lightly loaded contacts that depends only on the electron mean free path. Approaches for determining the surface roughness, material properties, and real contact area are discussed in the context of relatively simple ECR measurements.

  12. Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C. Y.; Fortini, A.

    1971-01-01

    Thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity of porous materials, including 304L stainless steel Rigimesh, 304L stainless steel sintered spherical powders, and OFHC sintered spherical powders at different porosities and temperatures are reported and correlated. It was found that the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity can be related to the solid material properties and the porosity of the porous matrix regardless of the matrix structure. It was also found that the Wiedermann-Franz-Lorenz relationship is valid for the porous materials under consideration. For high conductivity materials, the Lorenz constant and the lattice component of conductivity depend on the material and are independent of the porosity. For low conductivity, the lattice component depends on the porosity as well.

  13. Negative differential electrical resistance of a rotational organic nanomotor

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Hatef; Sangtarash, Sara; Al-Galiby, Qusiy; Sparks, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Summary A robust, nanoelectromechanical switch is proposed based upon an asymmetric pendant moiety anchored to an organic backbone between two C60 fullerenes, which in turn are connected to gold electrodes. Ab initio density functional calculations are used to demonstrate that an electric field induces rotation of the pendant group, leading to a nonlinear current–voltage relation. The nonlinearity is strong enough to lead to negative differential resistance at modest source–drain voltages.

  14. Electrical resistivity of amorphous simple metals at moderately low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasny, Yu. P.; Krawczyk, J.; Kovalenko, N. P.; Shvets, V. T.

    1999-09-01

    The dependence of electrical resistivity ?( T) on temperature T in a region of moderate temperatures is considered for amorphous simple metals. It is shown within the Faber-Ziman theory that the ratio [ ?( T)- ?(0)]/ T2 has a maximum in the temperature region 10 K? T?100 K The theory is illustrated by numerical calculations performed for hard-sphere models of amorphous Mg and Zn.

  15. Electrical Resistance Tomography for Subsurface Imaging. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    2000-06-01

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) noninvasively maps the 3-D resistivity field in the subsurface. It can be used on a scale from feet to kilometers. The 3-D resistivity field can be used to infer subsurface hydrogeological features and provides good resolution mapping of confining layers of various types. ERT imaging has been used for real-time monitoring and process control of remediation processes such as soil heating, pump and treat, steam injection, electrokinetics, Dynamic Underground Stripping (TechID 7), Hydrous Pyrolysis/Oxidation (TechID 1519) and more. ERT can be deployed via rapid and inexpensive installation of electrodes using a Cone Penetrometer (TechID 243). Additional applications are described under TechID 140 (Tanks) and TechID 2120 (Injected Subsurface Barriers); see also the related technology TechID 2121 (EIT).

  16. Detecting Cracks in Ceramic Matrix Composites by Electrical Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Gyekenyesi, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The majority of damage in SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites subjected to monotonic tensile loads is in the form of distributed matrix cracks. These cracks initiate near stress concentrations, such as 90o fiber tows or large matrix pores and continue to accumulate with additional stress until matrix crack saturation is achieved. Such damage is difficult to detect with conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques (immersion ultrasonics, x-ray, etc.). Monitoring a specimen.s electrical resistance change provides an indirect approach for monitoring matrix crack density. Sylramic-iBN fiber- reinforced SiC composites with a melt infiltrated (MI) matrix were tensile tested at room temperature. Results showed an increase in resistance of more than 500% prior to fracture, which can be detected either in situ or post-damage. A relationship between resistance change and matrix crack density was also determined.

  17. Detecting Damage in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Electrical Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig E.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The majority of damage in SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites subjected to monotonic tensile loads is in the form of distributed matrix cracks. These cracks initiate near stress concentrations, such as 90 deg fiber tows or large matrix pores and continue to accumulate with additional stress until matrix crack saturation is achieved. Such damage is difficult to detect with conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques (immersion ultrasonics, x-ray, etc.). Monitoring a specimen.s electrical resistance change provides an indirect approach for monitoring matrix crack density. Sylramic-iBN fiber- reinforced SiC composites with a melt infiltrated (MI) matrix were tensile tested at room temperature. Results showed an increase in resistance of more than 500% prior to fracture, which can be detected either in situ or post-damage. A relationship between resistance change and matrix crack density was also determined.

  18. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) Applied to Karst Carbonate Aquifers: Case Study from Amdoun, Northwestern Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redhaounia, Belgacem; Ilondo, Batobo Ountsche; Gabtni, Hakim; Sami, Khomsi; Bédir, Mourad

    2015-09-01

    The Amdoun region is characterized by a high degree of karstification due to the climate impact (±1500 mm year-1) and the development of fracture network. Survey using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is deployed to provide a cost-effective characterization of the subsurface karst environments. A total of seven ERT profiles with lengths of 315 m were evaluated at the Béja governorate (NW Tunisia). The area represents a small syncline of Boudabbous limestone rocks (Lower Eocene), which is covered by a thin layer of clay. In this study, an ERT survey was conducted to examine the spatial distribution and shape of underground cavities in the karst area in Jebel Sabah anticline and Aïn Sallem-Zahret Medien syncline. In this study, geological, hydro-geological and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) methods were applied to determine the geometry of the perched aquifer in the Amdoun region (NW Tunisia). The area is characterized by fractured and karstic limestone aquifer of Late Cretaceous (Abiod Fm.) and Lower Eocene (Boudabbous Fm.). The aquifers have a karstic functioning and drain aquifers of economical interest, despite some wells exploiting them. Seven resistivity profiles were conducted along the survey area at three sites. The orientation, extension and the degree of inclination of those profiles are shown in the location map. The correct resistivity data were interpreted using Earth Imager 2D software. The results of the interpreted geo-electrical sections showed that the resistivity of the carbonate aquifer varied between 2.5 to over 5794 ?m. The thickness of the perched aquifer ranged from 15 to 50 m, while its depth from the surface lies between 10 and 60 m. The ERT not only provided precise near surface information, but was also very useful for establishing the 3D geometry and the position of several potential cavities and karts. The results show the presence of small to large isolated cavities at various depths. The low resistivity of cavities in the Boudabbous Formation has been explained by the groundwater saturation. The ERT technique could be effectively used for 3D detection of underground limestone cavities.

  19. Uncertainty analysis for common Seebeck and electrical resistivity measurement systems.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Jon; Dynys, Frederick; Sehirlioglu, Alp

    2014-08-01

    This work establishes the level of uncertainty for electrical measurements commonly made on thermoelectric samples. The analysis targets measurement systems based on the four probe method. Sources of uncertainty for both electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient were identified and evaluated. Included are reasonable estimates on the magnitude of each source, and cumulative propagation of error. Uncertainty for the Seebeck coefficient includes the cold-finger effect which has been quantified with thermal finite element analysis. The cold-finger effect, which is a result of parasitic heat transfer down the thermocouple probes, leads to an asymmetric over-estimation of the Seebeck coefficient. A silicon germanium thermoelectric sample has been characterized to provide an understanding of the total measurement uncertainty. The electrical resistivity was determined to contain uncertainty of ±7.0% across any measurement temperature. The Seebeck coefficient of the system is +1.0%/-13.1% at high temperature and ±1.0% near room temperature. The power factor has a combined uncertainty of +7.3%/-27.0% at high temperature and ±7.5% near room temperature. These ranges are calculated to be typical values for a general four probe Seebeck and resistivity measurement configuration. PMID:25173324

  20. Complex electrical resistance tomography of a subsurface PCE plume

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W,; LeBrecque, D.

    1996-01-01

    A controlled experiment was conducted to evaluate the performance of complex electrical resistivity tomography (CERT) for detecting and delineating free product dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in the subsurface. One hundred ninety liters of PCE were released at a rate of 2 liters per hour from a point 0.5 m below ground surface. The spill was conducted within a double walled tank where saturated layers of sand, bentonite and a sand/bentonite mixture were installed. Complex electrical resistance measurements were performed. Data were taken before the release, several times during, and then after the PCE was released. Magnitude and phase were measured at 1 and 64 Hz. Data from before the release were compared with those during the release for the purpose of imaging the changes in conductivity resulting from the plume. Conductivity difference tomographs showed a decrease in electrical conductivity as the DNAPL penetrated the soil. A pancake-shaped anomaly developed on the top of a bentonite layer at 2 m depth. The anomaly grew in magnitude and extent during the release and borehole television surveys data confirmed the anomaly to be free-product PCE whose downward migration was stopped by the low permeability clay. The tomographs clearly delineated the plume as a resistive anomaly.

  1. Rolling resistance of electric vehicle tires from track tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dustin, M. O.; Slavik, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Special low-rolling-resistance tires were made for DOE's ETV-1 electric vehicle. Tests were conducted on these tires and on a set of standard commercial automotive tires to determine the rolling resistance as a function of time during both constant-speed tires and SAE J227a driving cycle tests. The tests were conducted on a test track at ambient temperatures that ranged from 15 to 32 C (59 to 89 F) and with tire pressures of 207 to 276 kPa (30 to 40 psi). At a contained-air temperature of 38 C (100 F) and a pressure of 207 kPa (30 psi) the rolling resistances of the electric vehicle tires and the standard commercial tires, respectively, were 0.0102 and 0.0088 kilogram per kilogram of vehicle weight. At a contained-air temperature of 38 C (100 F) and a pressure of 276 kPa (40 psi) the rolling resistances were 0.009 and 0.0074 kilogram per kilogram of vehicle weight, respectively.

  2. Metallic nanowire networks: effects of thermal annealing on electrical resistance.

    PubMed

    Langley, D P; Lagrange, M; Giusti, G; Jiménez, C; Bréchet, Y; Nguyen, N D; Bellet, D

    2014-11-21

    Metallic nanowire networks have huge potential in devices requiring transparent electrodes. This article describes how the electrical resistance of metal nanowire networks evolve under thermal annealing. Understanding the behavior of such films is crucial for the optimization of transparent electrodes which find many applications. An in-depth investigation of silver nanowire networks under different annealing conditions provides a case study demonstrating that several mechanisms, namely local sintering and desorption of organic residues, are responsible for the reduction of the systems electrical resistance. Optimization of the annealing led to specimens with transmittance of 90% (at 550 nm) and sheet resistance of 9.5 ? sq(-1). Quantized steps in resistance were observed and a model is proposed which provides good agreement with the experimental results. In terms of thermal behavior, we demonstrate that there is a maximum thermal budget that these electrodes can tolerate due to spheroidization of the nanowires. This budget is determined by two main factors: the thermal loading and the wire diameter. This result enables the fabrication and optimization of transparent metal nanowire electrodes for solar cells, organic electronics and flexible displays. PMID:25267592

  3. Utilizing Continuous Resistivity Profiling for Assessment and Characterization of Canal Seepage in El Paso's Lower Valley Irrigation Network System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. A.; Sheng, Z.

    2009-12-01

    Annually, billions of gallons of water are lost through seepage along sections of the irrigation network. To conserve water, El Paso County Water Improvement District has been assessing seepage losses and investigating measures for reducing such losses. Resistivity techniques were used to identify areas of high seepage and provide information on locations along canals that need to be structurally modified in an effort to curb water lost through seepage. Several half mile sections were selected along canals with varying seepage rates to conduct electric resistivity surveys in order generate soil profiles during the non-irrigation and irrigation seasons. Two different multiple channel resistivity meters (The“OhmMapper and the Super Sting R8”) were used, which both allow a vertical resistivity profile to be collected using a single current transmission. The results presented are preliminary and we believe that upon completion findings will serve multiple purposes. Firstly, a better understanding of seepage patterns, seepage rate and its spatial variation can be obtained. Secondly, our findings could be used to produce geological profiles associated with seepage areas which will enable the irrigation district to develop guidelines for improving delivery efficiency, especially during drought. And thirdly, our results will be transferable to other areas of the state and will have a positive impact on the environment and the overall quality of life.

  4. Electrical Resistivity in Non-stoichiometric MoO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, L. M. S.; Benaion, S. S.; Romanelli, C. M.; dos Santos, C. A. M.; da Luz, M. S.; de Lima, B. S.; Oliveira, F. S.; Machado, A. J. S.; Guedes, E. B.; Abbate, M.; Mossanek, R. J. O.

    2015-04-01

    MoO y with 1.85 ? y ? 2.20 has been studied by X-ray diffractometry and photoemission spectroscopy at room temperature and by electrical resistance as a function of temperature from 2 to 300 K. Although X-ray diffractograms are very similar to the stoichiometric MoO2 with monoclinic structure of the space group P21/c (14), the electrical properties are strongly dependent on the oxygen composition. Samples with y = 1.85 and 1.90 show anomalous behavior in electrical conductivity. Photoemission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements suggest that this anomalous behavior is related to the presence of Mo3+ ions such as in KxMoO2 compound.

  5. The `L' Array, a method to model 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez Segura, R. E.; Chavez-Hernandez, G.; Delgado, C.; Tejero-Andrade, A.

    2010-12-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a method designed to calculate the distribution of apparent electrical resistivities in the subsoil by means of a great number of observations with the aim of determining an electrical image displaying the distribution of true resistivities in the subsoil. Such process can be carried out to define 2D or 3D models of the subsurface. For a 3D ERT, usually, the electrodes are placed in a squared grid keeping the distance between adjacent electrodes constant in the x and y directions. Another design employed, consists of a series of parallel lines whose space inter-lines must be smaller or equal to four times the electrode separation. The most common electrode arrays frequently employed for this type of studies are the pole-pole, pole-dipole and dipole-dipole. Unfortunately, ERT surface sampling schemes are limited by physical conditions or obstacles, like buildings, highly populated urban zones, and geologic/topographic features, where the lines of electrodes cannot be set. However, it is always necessary to characterize the subsoil beneath such anthropogenic or natural features. The ‘L’ shaped array has the main purpose to overcome such difficulties by surrounding the study area with a square of electrode lines. The measurements are obtained by switching automatically current and potential electrodes from one line to the other. Each observation adds a level of information, from one profile to the other. Once the total levels of data are completed, the opposite ‘L’ array can be measured following the same process. The complete square is computed after the parallel profiles are observed as well. At the end, the computed resistivities are combined to form a 3D matrix of observations. Such set of data can be inverted to obtain the true resistivity distribution at depth in the form of a working cube, which can be interpreted. The method was tested with theoretical models, which included a set of two resistive cubes with different position, a fault and a tunnel. Results are quite encouraging; shapes and position of bodies are preserved. Unfortunately inverted resistivities are lower than the theoretical ones, mainly due to the array effects. Two field examples are presented, the subsurface study beneath a National Monument (The Morelia City Cathedral) to detect possible Colonial tunnels, and a fracture pattern characterization in one of the University of the City Mexico campus (Casa Libertad, Eastern campus), where such geological feature affects its infrastructure.

  6. Direct-Current Resistivity Profiling at the Pecos River Ecosystem Project Study Site near Mentone, Texas, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teeple, Andrew P.; McDonald, Alyson K.; Payne, Jason D.; Kress, Wade H.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Texas A&M University AgriLife, did a surface geophysical investigation at the Pecos River Ecosystem Project study site near Mentone in West Texas intended to determine shallow (to about 14 meters below the water [river] surface) subsurface composition (lithology) in and near treated (eradicated of all saltcedar) and control (untreated) riparian zone sites during June-August 2006. Land-based direct-current resistivity profiling was applied in a 240-meter section of the riverbank at the control site, and waterborne direct-current continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) was applied along a 2.279-kilometer reach of the river adjacent to both sites to collect shallow subsurface resistivity data. Inverse modeling was used to obtain a nonunique estimate of the true subsurface resistivity from apparent resistivity calculated from the field measurements. The land-based survey showed that the sub-surface at the control site generally is of relatively low resis-tivity down to about 4 meters below the water surface. Most of the section from about 4 to 10 meters below the water surface is of relatively high resistivity. The waterborne CRP surveys convey essentially the same electrical representation of the lithology at the control site to 10 meters below the water surface; but the CRP surveys show considerably lower resistivity than the land-based survey in the subsection from about 4 to 10 meters below the water surface. The CRP surveys along the 2.279-kilometer reach of the river adjacent to both the treated and control sites show the same relatively low resistivity zone from the riverbed to about 4 meters below the water surface evident at the control site. A slightly higher resistivity zone is observed from about 4 to 14 meters below the water surface along the upstream approximately one-half of the profile than along the downstream one-half. The variations in resistivity could not be matched to variations in lithology because sufficient rock samples were not available.

  7. Electrical resistivity tomography to delineate greenhouse soil variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, R.; Amato, M.; Bitella, G.; Bochicchio, R.

    2013-03-01

    Appropriate management of soil spatial variability is an important tool for optimizing farming inputs, with the result of yield increase and reduction of the environmental impact in field crops. Under greenhouses, several factors such as non-uniform irrigation and localized soil compaction can severely affect yield and quality. Additionally, if soil spatial variability is not taken into account, yield deficiencies are often compensated by extra-volumes of crop inputs; as a result, over-irrigation and overfertilization in some parts of the field may occur. Technology for spatially sound management of greenhouse crops is therefore needed to increase yield and quality and to address sustainability. In this experiment, 2D-electrical resistivity tomography was used as an exploratory tool to characterize greenhouse soil variability and its relations to wild rocket yield. Soil resistivity well matched biomass variation (R2=0.70), and was linked to differences in soil bulk density (R2=0.90), and clay content (R2=0.77). Electrical resistivity tomography shows a great potential in horticulture where there is a growing demand of sustainability coupled with the necessity of stabilizing yield and product quality.

  8. Cyclic electric field stress on bipolar resistive switching devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, A.; Acha, C.

    2013-12-01

    We have studied the effects of accumulating cyclic electrical pulses of increasing amplitude on the non-volatile resistance state of interfaces made by sputtering a metal (Au, Pt) on top of the surface of a cuprate superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-?. We have analyzed the influence of the number of applied pulses N on the relative amplitude of the remnant resistance change between the high (RH) and the low (RL) state [(?=(RH-RL)/RL] at different temperatures (T). We show that the critical voltage (Vc) needed to produce a resistive switching (RS, i.e., ? >0) decreases with increasing N or T. We also find a power law relation between the voltage of the pulses and the number of pulses N?0 required to produce a RS of ? =?0. This relation remains very similar to the Basquin equation used to describe the stress-fatigue lifetime curves in mechanical tests. This points out to the similarity between the physics of the RS, associated with the diffusion of oxygen vacancies induced by electrical pulses, and the propagation of defects in materials subjected to repeated mechanical stress.

  9. Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of Campylobacter jejuni Isolates from Wild Birds in Sweden†

    PubMed Central

    Waldenström, Jonas; Mevius, Dik; Veldman, Kees; Broman, Tina; Hasselquist, Dennis; Olsen, Björn

    2005-01-01

    In order to determine the occurrence and frequency of resistant strains of the bacterium Campylobacter jejuni and to establish baseline MICs in isolates from an environmental reservoir, the resistance profiles of 10 antimicrobial substances were determined for 137 C. jejuni isolates from wild birds in Sweden. Observed MICs were generally low, with only low to moderate incidence of resistance to the tested compounds. One isolate, however, was resistant to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin, indicating that quinolone-resistant genotypes of C. jejuni have the potential to spread to wild bird hosts. PMID:15870331

  10. Rainfall infiltration process in mountain headwater region using electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, M.; Yamamiya, K.; Shimada, J.

    2008-12-01

    Many researchers have studied about the hydrological process, especially rainfall-runoff process, in the headwater region using multi hydrometric methods. Since the possibility has been recognized that bedrock groundwater has important role to play in the rainfall-runoff process, it is important to comprehend the rainfall infiltration process within fluctuations of bedrock groundwater. However, we would need many hydrological instruments to understand this process precisely. So we have applied electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method to understand rainfall infiltration process in the area that is estimated the contribution of bedrock groundwater for rainfall-runoff processes. Resistivity changes with the saturation rate of the pore fluid in the subsurface material. So it is possible to estimate spatial and temporal distribution of subsurface water by using ERT. In this study, we will estimate rainfall infiltration process in mountain headwater region using resistivity method. The study area is the Mamushi-dani watershed in Shiranui, Kumamoto, Japan. We described the bedrock groundwater storage systems using resistivity method in this watershed previously. Resistivity has been observed at 2 measurement lines in slope areas of this watershed. Both measurement lines have 47m in length, 1m electrode spacing and 48 electrodes. We used the multi-electrode system, NEXT-400(Kowa Co. Ltd., Japan) for measuring apparent resistivity and the application software, E-tomo (Diaconsultant Co. Ltd., Japan) for inversion of apparent resistivity data. The observed resistivity data were compared with water head observed at borehole and specific discharge observed at foot of the watershed. Inverted resistivity profiles and observed hydrological data showed the interface between saturated and unsaturated zone. During rainfall occurs, resistivity in surface area gets lower than that before the rainfall and resistivity in some part of unsaturated area shows increasing tendency. Both variations indicate the movement of subsurface water. Thus, we could estimate spatial and temporal distribution of subsurface water using resistivity data, and understand rainfall infiltration process precisely. Acknowledgements This study was financially supported by THE FUKADA GRANTS-IN-AIDS, Japan.

  11. Global Gene Expression Profiles of Resistant and Susceptible Genotypes of Glycine tomentella During Phakopsora pachyrhizi Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean rust, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is a destructive foliar disease that occurs in many soybean-producing countries. Towards the goal of identifying genes controlling resistance to soybean rust, transcriptome profiling was conducted in resistant and susceptible Glycine tomentella genotype...

  12. Plasma resistivity profile measurement from an external radio-frequency magnetic coil

    E-print Network

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    - pressed as R / fgeom , where is the skin depth. The skin depth characterizes the depth of penetrationPlasma resistivity profile measurement from an external radio-frequency magnetic coil John T (Presented on 20 April 2004; published 7 October 2004) Plasma resistivity is obtained by measuring the change

  13. Antibiotic profiling of Clostridium difficile ribotype 176 - A multidrug resistant relative to C. difficile ribotype 027.

    PubMed

    Krutova, Marcela; Matejkova, Jana; Tkadlec, Jan; Nyc, Otakar

    2015-12-01

    Antibiotic profiling of twenty Czech Clostridium difficile PCR-ribotype 176 isolates revealed a high level of resistance to erythromycin, ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin (n = 20) and to rifampicin (n = 13). Accumulation of resistance mechanisms to multiple antibiotics highlight that PCR-ribotype 176 belong to problematic epidemic strains. PMID:26256807

  14. Monitoring water flows with time-lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomography on the Super-Sauze landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gance, J.; Sailhac, P.; Malet, J.-P.; Grandjean, G.; Supper, R.; Jochum, B.; Ottowitz, D.

    2012-04-01

    This work presents results of a permanent hydro-geophysical monitoring of an active landslide developed in clay-shales. Hydrology has been proved to be a major factor controlling the Super-Sauze earthflow behavior, but it knowledge still limited mainly because of the importance of spatial heterogeneities. The geometry of the bedrock creates internal crests and gullies that can guide waterflows or create a lock and engender an excess of pore water pressure; the soil surface characteristics plays also a large role in the surface hydraulic conductivity, and therefore, on the infiltration pattern. To understand in detail these processes, it is therefore important to monitor spatially at large scale (with high resolution) those phenomena and to overcome the monitoring difficulties inherent to a fast-moving clayey earthflow. The objectives of the survey are to identify and characterize spatially and temporarily the water flow circulation within the landslide body over a period of one year. The studied profile measures 114 m long and is surveyed with 93 electrodes spaced from 0.5, 1 or 2 meter according the soil surface cracking. Four resistivity datasets of 4300 measurements are acquired each day using a gradient array since May 2011. The monitoring is performed with the GEOMON4D system, developed by the Geological Survey of Austria. To facilitate the interpretation, humidity, conductivity, temperature, and piezometer sensors are placed along the profile. Two dGPS antenna placed upstream and downstream the profile allow to correlate the results with soil displacement. Lefranc tests and granulometry results realized on several samples have shown the important heterogeneities of the near surface. The objective of this work is to present the data processing strategy for the analysis of long periods time-lapse ERT survey of natural rain events taking into account changes through time of the position of the electrodes, changes in the soil surface state and important changes in sub-surface soil temperature. Two high-resolution optical cameras are installed on stable crests on the side of the cross-sections and time-lapse stereoscopy is used to reconstruct the displacement field to locate the electrodes in space and time (in order to take into account changes in the dipole geometry). The apparent electrical resistivity values were inverted with a time-lapse approach using an initial model constructed from statistical analysis of resistivity data and a priori knowledge on the landslide structure from a previous geotechnical model. The near surface apparent resistivity can vary of ten percent without any input of water. This shows the importance of temperature effect on the measurement. The temperature correction is handled from a complete study of the soil temperature propagation solving the heat equation with several temperature probes placed at different depths in soil and in the water table. The results are interpreted in combination to hydrological data (rain, water table level). The acquisition of 8 ERT all over the studied area, in different directions permits to create by interpolation a 3D electrical resistivity model of the area. This model shows the importance of the bedrock topography because high water content areas are visible at the theoretical hydrological network computed from the 3D geotechnical model of Travelletti and Malet (2011). Transversal waterflow circulation not predicted are also visible and permit to interpret the results taking into account the 3D structure of the landslide. A 250 m long P-wave tomography acquired on the studied profile and inversed with a quasi-Newton algorithm that uses Fresnel wavepaths and the finite bandwidth of the source signal, specially developed for the study of very heterogeneous soils, shows a very good correlation with electrical resistivity and permits to propose a geotechnical model of the profile. Spatially heterogeneous water flow patterns are identified and the presence of a deep water supply is hypothesized downstream of the investigated profile. The presentation will fo

  15. Using electrical resistance probes for moisture determination in switchgrass windrows

    SciTech Connect

    Chesser Jr., G. D.; Davis, J. D.; Purswell, J. L.; Lemus, R.

    2011-08-01

    Determining moisture levels in windrowed biomass is important for both forage producers and researchers. Energy crops such as switchgrass have been troublesome when using the standard methods set for electrical resistance meters. The objectives of this study were to i) develop the methodologies needed to measure MC in switchgrass using electrical resistance meters, ii) to determine the effects of pressure and probe orientation on MC measurement and iii) to generate MC calibration equations for electrical resistance meters using switchgrass in the senescence growth stage. Two meters (Meter 1, Farmex HT-PRO; Meter 2, Delmhorst F-2000) were selected based on commercial availability. A forage compression apparatus was designed and constructed with on-farm materials and methods to provide a simple system of applying pressure achievable by any forage producer or researcher in the field. Two trials were performed to test four levels of moisture contents (10, 20, 30, and 40%), five pressures (0, 1.68, 3.11, 4.55, 6.22 kN/m 2; 0, 35, 65, 95, 130 lb/ft 2), and two probe orientations (axial and transverse) in a 4x5x2 factorial design. Results indicated that meter accuracy increased as pressure increased. Regression models accounted for 91% and 81% of the variation for Meter 1 and Meter 2 at a pressure of 4.55 kN/m 2 (95 lb/ft 2) and a transverse probe orientation. Calibration equations were developed for both meters to improve moisture measurement accuracy for farmers and researchers in the field.

  16. Building Better Electrodes for Electrical Resistivity and Induced Polarization Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, P. L.; La Brecque, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    In the third year of a project to understand and mitigate the systematic noise in resistivity and induced polarization measurements, we put a significant effort into understanding and developing better electrodes. The simple metal electrodes commonly used for both transmitting and receiving of electrical geophysical data are likely the Achilles" heal of the resistivity method. Even stainless steel, a commonly used electrode material because of its durability, showed only average results in laboratory tests for electrode noise. Better results have been found with non-polarizing metal-metal salt electrodes, which are widely used as surface electrodes and in IP surveys. But although they produce small measurement errors, they are not durable enough for in-situ borehole resistivity surveys, and often contain compounds that are toxic to the environment. They are also very seldom used as transmitters. In laboratory studies, we are exploring other materials and configurations for low-noise compound electrodes that will be nontoxic, inexpensive, and durable and can be used as both transmitters and receivers. Testing of the electrical noise levels of electrodes is an arduous task involving repeated measurements under varying conditions at field scales. Thus it is important to find methods of sorting out likely candidates from the mass of possible electrode configurations and construction methods. Testing of electrode impedance versus current density appears to provide simple criteria for predicting the suitability of electrodes. The best electrodes show relatively low overall contact impedance, relatively small changes in impedance with increased current density, and relatively small changes in impedance with time. Furthermore it can be shown that resistivity and induced polarization performance of electrodes is strongly correlated, so that methods of finding electrodes with low impedance and good direct current performance usually provide better quality induced polarization data and vice- versa.

  17. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance bragg reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Lear, Kevin L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1996-01-01

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors.

  18. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance Bragg reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Lear, K.L.

    1996-10-22

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method are disclosed. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors. 16 figs.

  19. Sensitivity of leachate and fine contents on electrical resistivity variations of sandy soils.

    PubMed

    Yoon, G L; Park, J B

    2001-06-29

    Laboratory pilot tests were performed to investigate the relationship between electrical resistivity and contaminated soil properties. Three different sandy soils and leachate collected from one of the industrial waste landfill sites in Korea were mixed to simulate contaminated soil conditions. The values of electrical resistivity of the soils were measured using laboratory scaled resistivity cone penetrometer probe. In the experiments, electrical resistivity was observed in terms of water content, unit weight, saturation degree of the soils, and leachate concentration. The experimental results show that the electrical resistivity of the sandy soils depends largely on the water content and electrical properties of pore water rather than unit weight and types of soils. The amount of fines can have significant effect on electrical properties of soils. Direct correlation with contamination in such soils may not be valid here. The results suggest that the electrical resistivity measurement is well suited and applicable for monitoring and delineation of contaminants in the subsurface. PMID:11406303

  20. Identification of Karstic Caves by Utilizing Two-Dimensional Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uçar, Fatih; Aktürk, Özgür

    2015-04-01

    The region consisting of easily soluble rocks is generally defined as karstic terrain and it is characterized by surface collapse and small or large scale dissolution voids on rock surface. Formation and expansion of these voids may cause dangerous situation during surface/subsurface construction works. Therefore, it is important to determine the location, size and dimension of karstic caves. Geophysical investigations are very helpful in determining the boundaries of geological subsurface structures. In order to determine subsurface profile and characteristic of soil, surface geophysical methods can be successfully applied. Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI) is the most important methods among the convenient and commonly used methods to determine subsurface profile. By using this method, cavernous and weathered zones can be determined easily. Within the scope of this study, near surface profiles were determined by utilizing ERI at Akdeniz University Campus and Masa Da?? region located in the city of Antalya, Turkey. The results obtained from four different locations in the Akdeniz University campus compared only with Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) analyses. Since topographic cross-section is clearly seen in two different locations around Masa Da?? location, ERI results were superimposed with topography and also compared with VES. As a result, presences of subsurface cavities were determined and illustrated using 2D colorful images. Keywords: ERI, VES, Karstic terrain, Cave, Antalya

  1. Improvement of electrical resistivity tomography for leachate injection monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, R.; Descloitres, M.; Guenther, T.; Oxarango, L.; Morra, C.

    2010-03-15

    Leachate recirculation is a key process in the scope of operating municipal waste landfills as bioreactors, which aims to increase the moisture content to optimize the biodegradation in landfills. Given that liquid flows exhibit a complex behaviour in very heterogeneous porous media, in situ monitoring methods are required. Surface time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is usually proposed. Using numerical modelling with typical 2D and 3D injection plume patterns and 2D and 3D inversion codes, we show that wrong changes of resistivity can be calculated at depth if standard parameters are used for time-lapse ERT inversion. Major artefacts typically exhibit significant increases of resistivity (more than +30%) which can be misinterpreted as gas migration within the waste. In order to eliminate these artefacts, we tested an advanced time-lapse ERT procedure that includes (i) two advanced inversion tools and (ii) two alternative array geometries. The first advanced tool uses invariant regions in the model. The second advanced tool uses an inversion with a 'minimum length' constraint. The alternative arrays focus on (i) a pole-dipole array (2D case), and (ii) a star array (3D case). The results show that these two advanced inversion tools and the two alternative arrays remove almost completely the artefacts within +/-5% both for 2D and 3D situations. As a field application, time-lapse ERT is applied using the star array during a 3D leachate injection in a non-hazardous municipal waste landfill. To evaluate the robustness of the two advanced tools, a synthetic model including both true decrease and increase of resistivity is built. The advanced time-lapse ERT procedure eliminates unwanted artefacts, while keeping a satisfactory image of true resistivity variations. This study demonstrates that significant and robust improvements can be obtained for time-lapse ERT monitoring of leachate recirculation in waste landfills.

  2. 30 CFR 7.407 - Test for flame resistance of electric cables and cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) at an ambient temperature of 104 °F (40 °C). (8) Monitor the electric current through the power... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of electric cables... Electric Cables, Signaling Cables, and Cable Splice Kits § 7.407 Test for flame resistance of...

  3. 30 CFR 7.407 - Test for flame resistance of electric cables and cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) at an ambient temperature of 104 °F (40 °C). (8) Monitor the electric current through the power... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of electric cables... Electric Cables, Signaling Cables, and Cable Splice Kits § 7.407 Test for flame resistance of...

  4. 30 CFR 7.407 - Test for flame resistance of electric cables and cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) at an ambient temperature of 104 °F (40 °C). (8) Monitor the electric current through the power... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of electric cables... Electric Cables, Signaling Cables, and Cable Splice Kits § 7.407 Test for flame resistance of...

  5. 30 CFR 7.407 - Test for flame resistance of electric cables and cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) at an ambient temperature of 104 °F (40 °C). (8) Monitor the electric current through the power... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test for flame resistance of electric cables... Electric Cables, Signaling Cables, and Cable Splice Kits § 7.407 Test for flame resistance of...

  6. Numerical analysis for resist profile after thermal process in display manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domnenko, Vitaliy; Stock, Hans-Jürgen; Shin, Sangmin; Ryu, Jonghyoek; Choi, Sung Won; Cho, Hyunwoo; Jeong, Eun-Soo; Choi, Jung-Hoe

    2014-03-01

    The screen size growth of mobile displays is accompanied with the drastically increased resolution. A display should have high pixel resolution to meet demanding readability and legibility expectations. The manufacturing process should be advanced to meet final device requirements. One of the important process steps is the post-development hardbake, where resist reflow is used to tune the final profile which influences subsequent process steps. Moreover, 3D resist profiles become one of critical design factors for mechanical and optical properties of display pixels. The resist reflow is the main time- and temperature-dependent effect of post-development bake process step. Since the resist is in transitional state (crystalline glassy/amorphous rubbery/viscous melt) the resist profile dynamics are very complex and predictive modeling is necessary. The model presented in this paper is based on a lattice-Boltzmann method, where the resist is considered as multicomponent (polymer-solvent) and multiphase (solid-liquid-vapor) mixture. Simulated resist profile dynamics with time are analyzed in dependency of material parameters (solvent diffusivity and evaporation rate, polymer solid fraction and adhesion with substrate). Temperature-dependent parameter descriptions are used for model calibration. Validation against experimental data shows good model consistency and predictability, demonstrating the benefit of simulation in process development and optimization.

  7. Electrically resistive coating for remediation (regeneration) of a diesel particulate filter and method

    DOEpatents

    Phelps, Amanda C. (Malibu, CA); Kirby, Kevin K. (Calabasas Hills, CA); Gregoire, Daniel J. (Thousand Oaks, CA)

    2012-02-14

    A resistively heated diesel particulate filter (DPF). The resistively heated DPF includes a DPF having an inlet surface and at least one resistive coating on the inlet surface. The at least one resistive coating is configured to substantially maintain its resistance in an operating range of the DPF. The at least one resistive coating has a first terminal and a second terminal for applying electrical power to resistively heat up the at least one resistive coating in order to increase the temperature of the DPF to a regeneration temperature. The at least one resistive coating includes metal and semiconductor constituents.

  8. Electrical resistivity tomography applied to a complex lava dome: 2D and 3D models comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portal, Angélie; Fargier, Yannick; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The study of volcanic domes growth (e.g. St. Helens, Unzen, Montserrat) shows that it is often characterized by a succession of extrusion phases, dome explosions and collapse events. Lava dome eruptive activity may last from days to decades. Therefore, their internal structure, at the end of the eruption, is complex and includes massive extrusions and lava lobes, talus and pyroclastic deposits as well as hydrothermal alteration. The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method, initially developed for environmental and engineering exploration, is now commonly used for volcano structure imaging. Because a large range of resistivity values is often observed in volcanic environments, the method is well suited to study the internal structure of volcanic edifices. We performed an ERT survey on an 11ka years old trachytic lava dome, the Puy de Dôme volcano (French Massif Central). The analysis of a recent high resolution DEM (LiDAR 0.5 m), as well as other geophysical data, strongly suggest that the Puy de Dôme is a composite dome. 11 ERT profiles have been carried out, both at the scale of the entire dome (base diameter of ~2 km and height of 400 m) on the one hand, and at a smaller scale on the summit part on the other hand. Each profile is composed of 64 electrodes. Three different electrode spacing have been used depending on the study area (35 m for the entire dome, 10 m and 5 m for its summit part). Some profiles were performed with half-length roll-along acquisitions, in order to keep a good trade-off between depth of investigation and resolution. Both Wenner-alpha and Wenner-Schlumberger protocols were used. 2-D models of the electrical resistivity distribution were computed using RES2DINV software. In order to constrain inversion models interpretation, the depth of investigation (DOI) method was applied to those results. It aims to compute a sensitivity index on inversion results, illustrating how the data influence the model and constraining models interpretation. Geometry and location of ERT profiles on the Puy de Dôme volcano allow to compute 3D inversion models of the electrical resistivity distribution with a new inversion code. This code uses tetrahedrons to discretize the 3D model and uses also a conventional Gauss-Newton inversion scheme combined to an Occam regularisation to process the data. It allows to take into account all the data information and prevents the construction of 3D artefacts present in conventional 2D inversion results. Inversion results show a strong electrical resistivity heterogeneity of the entire dome. Underlying volcanic edifices are clearly identified below the lava dome. Generally speaking, the flanks of the volcano show high resistivity values, and the summit part is more conductive but also very heterogeneous.

  9. Electrical Resistivity of natural Marcasite at High-pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Gopalakrishnarao

    2013-06-01

    Marcasite is considered to be a common iron sulfide in reducing Martian sediments and may enclose microbial remains during growth and hence study of marcasite may have significance in the search for fossil life on Mars. The high-pressure phase stability investigations of marcasite are useful in understanding the sulfide mineralogy of Martian surface, affected by meteorite impacts. The sulfides were characterized by electron microprobe micro analyses (EPMA), powder X-ray diffraction, DTA, and FTIR spectroscopic measurements. The samples were powdered using a porcelain mortar and pestle. The chemical composition of the sample was determined by an electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA). High-pressure electrical resistivity measurements were carried out on natural marcasite, and marcasite rich samples (Marcasite 95 mol % pyrite 5 mol %) up to 7 GPa. Marcasite sample shows a discontinuous decrease in the electrical resistivity at 5. 2 (+/- 0.5) GPa indicating a first order phase transition. The Differential thermal analyses and the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic measurements on the pressure quenched sample shows the characteristics of pyrite, indicating the pressure induced marcasite-to -pyrite transition of the natural marcasite at 5. 2 (+/- 0.5) GPa. The observation of marcasite to pyrite phase transition may be useful in estimating the pressure experienced by shock events on the Martian surface as well as the meteorites where marcasite- pyrite phases coexist. Financial support from CSIR-SHORE-PSC0205.

  10. Monitoring Damage Accumulation in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Electrical Resistivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig E.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Xia, Zhenhai H.

    2008-01-01

    The electric resistance of woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites were measured under tensile loading conditions. The results show that the electrical resistance is closely related to damage and that real-time information about the damage state can be obtained through monitoring of the resistance. Such self-sensing capability provides the possibility of on-board/in-situ damage detection and accurate life prediction for high-temperature ceramic matrix composites. Woven silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC/SiC) ceramic matrix composites (CMC) possess unique properties such as high thermal conductivity, excellent creep resistance, improved toughness, and good environmental stability (oxidation resistance), making them particularly suitable for hot structure applications. In specific, CMCs could be applied to hot section components of gas turbines [1], aerojet engines [2], thermal protection systems [3], and hot control surfaces [4]. The benefits of implementing these materials include reduced cooling air requirements, lower weight, simpler component design, longer service life, and higher thrust [5]. It has been identified in NASA High Speed Research (HSR) program that the SiC/SiC CMC has the most promise for high temperature, high oxidation applications [6]. One of the critical issues in the successful application of CMCs is on-board or insitu assessment of the damage state and an accurate prediction of the remaining service life of a particular component. This is of great concern, since most CMC components envisioned for aerospace applications will be exposed to harsh environments and play a key role in the vehicle s safety. On-line health monitoring can enable prediction of remaining life; thus resulting in improved safety and reliability of structural components. Monitoring can also allow for appropriate corrections to be made in real time, therefore leading to the prevention of catastrophic failures. Most conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques such as ultrasonic C-scan, x-ray, thermography, and eddy current are limited since they require structural components of complex geometry to be taken out of service for a substantial length of time for post-damage inspection and assessment. Furthermore, the typical NDE techniques are useful for identifying large interlaminar flaws, but insensitive to CMC materials flaws developed perpendicular to the surface under tensile creep conditions. There are techniques such as piezoelectric sensor [7,8], and optical fiber [9,10] that could be used for on-line health monitoring of CMC structures. However, these systems involve attaching an external sensor or putting special fibers in CMC composites, which would be problematic at high temperature applications.

  11. Electromagnetic Resistivity Profiling For Locating Buried River Channels: A Case Study In Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radstake, Frank

    1992-01-01

    The Service National des Ressources en Eau (SNRE) of the Ministry of Agriculture of Haiti, in cooperation with the UNDTCD, carried out a geophysical investigation in the Northern Plain of Haiti. It included a reinterpretation of the available resistivity soundings and the realization of eight additional soundings and 11 electromagnetic profiles. The mathematical interpretation of the soundings permitted the determination of the true resistivity of different lithologies present in the area and the mapping of the thickness of the alluvial aquifer. The results of the five electromagnetic resistivity profiles in the Trou du Nord area are presented, with a total lenght of 17.4 km. They show distinctive resistivity anomalies, which are assumed to represent buried river channels filled with coarse sands and gravels. One of the anomaly zones was explored in more detail and shows clearly lateral resistivity differences at greater depths. The data interpretations have been checked through response calculations of geoelectrical layer models.

  12. Quantifying the Effect of Kerogen on Electrical Resistivity Measurements on Organic-rich Source Rocks 

    E-print Network

    Kethireddy, Nikhil Reddy

    2013-12-04

    Interpretation of electrical resistivity logs in organic-rich source rocks has been challenging for petrophysicists. Conventional resistivity-porosity-saturation models (e.g., Archie’s, Dual-Water, and Waxman-Smits equations) assume that saline...

  13. Comparative Genomics of Environmental and Clinical Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Strains with Different Antibiotic Resistance Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Youenou, Benjamin; Favre-Bonté, Sabine; Bodilis, Josselin; Brothier, Elisabeth; Dubost, Audrey; Muller, Daniel; Nazaret, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, a ubiquitous Gram-negative ?-proteobacterium, has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen responsible for nosocomial infections. A major characteristic of clinical isolates is their high intrinsic or acquired antibiotic resistance level. The aim of this study was to decipher the genetic determinism of antibiotic resistance among strains from different origins (i.e., natural environment and clinical origin) showing various antibiotic resistance profiles. To this purpose, we selected three strains isolated from soil collected in France or Burkina Faso that showed contrasting antibiotic resistance profiles. After whole-genome sequencing, the phylogenetic relationships of these 3 strains and 11 strains with available genome sequences were determined. Results showed that a strain’s phylogeny did not match their origin or antibiotic resistance profiles. Numerous antibiotic resistance coding genes and efflux pump operons were revealed by the genome analysis, with 57% of the identified genes not previously described. No major variation in the antibiotic resistance gene content was observed between strains irrespective of their origin and antibiotic resistance profiles. Although environmental strains generally carry as many multidrug resistant (MDR) efflux pumps as clinical strains, the absence of resistance–nodulation–division (RND) pumps (i.e., SmeABC) previously described to be specific to S. maltophilia was revealed in two environmental strains (BurA1 and PierC1). Furthermore the genome analysis of the environmental MDR strain BurA1 showed the absence of SmeABC but the presence of another putative MDR RND efflux pump, named EbyCAB on a genomic island probably acquired through horizontal gene transfer. PMID:26276674

  14. Antibiotic resistant bacterial profiles of anaerobic swine lagoon effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although land application of swine manure lagoon effluent is a common and effective method of disposal, the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, both pathogenic and commensal can complicate already understood issues associated with its safe disposal. To better understand this, more data is ne...

  15. Contrast in the Antibiotic Resistance Profiles of Campylobacter Isolates Originating from Different Poultry Production Facilities (Broiler Breeder Hens, Broilers, and Leghorn Hens) in the Same Geographical Region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Antimicrobial resistance of foodborne pathogens is of major concern from both human and animal health perspectives and resistance profiles of Campylobacter spp. from individual poultry facilities have been extensively studied. However, a comparison of antimicrobial resistance profile...

  16. Damage in cement-based materials, studied by electrical resistance measurement

    E-print Network

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    (CT) scanning [17]. In contrast, this paper uses electrical resistance measurement, which, the occurrence of earthquakes, exposure to wind and ocean waves, soil movement, excessive loading, temperature

  17. Resistive graphene humidity sensors with rapid and direct electrical readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Anderson D.; Elgammal, Karim; Niklaus, Frank; Delin, Anna; Fischer, Andreas C.; Vaziri, Sam; Forsberg, Fredrik; Råsander, Mikael; Hugosson, Håkan; Bergqvist, Lars; Schröder, Stephan; Kataria, Satender; Östling, Mikael; Lemme, Max C.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate humidity sensing using a change of the electrical resistance of single-layer chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene that is placed on top of a SiO2 layer on a Si wafer. To investigate the selectivity of the sensor towards the most common constituents in air, its signal response was characterized individually for water vapor (H2O), nitrogen (N2), oxygen (O2), and argon (Ar). In order to assess the humidity sensing effect for a range from 1% relative humidity (RH) to 96% RH, the devices were characterized both in a vacuum chamber and in a humidity chamber at atmospheric pressure. The measured response and recovery times of the graphene humidity sensors are on the order of several hundred milliseconds. Density functional theory simulations are employed to further investigate the sensitivity of the graphene devices towards water vapor. The interaction between the electrostatic dipole moment of the water and the impurity bands in the SiO2 substrate leads to electrostatic doping of the graphene layer. The proposed graphene sensor provides rapid response direct electrical readout and is compatible with back end of the line (BEOL) integration on top of CMOS-based integrated circuits.We demonstrate humidity sensing using a change of the electrical resistance of single-layer chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene that is placed on top of a SiO2 layer on a Si wafer. To investigate the selectivity of the sensor towards the most common constituents in air, its signal response was characterized individually for water vapor (H2O), nitrogen (N2), oxygen (O2), and argon (Ar). In order to assess the humidity sensing effect for a range from 1% relative humidity (RH) to 96% RH, the devices were characterized both in a vacuum chamber and in a humidity chamber at atmospheric pressure. The measured response and recovery times of the graphene humidity sensors are on the order of several hundred milliseconds. Density functional theory simulations are employed to further investigate the sensitivity of the graphene devices towards water vapor. The interaction between the electrostatic dipole moment of the water and the impurity bands in the SiO2 substrate leads to electrostatic doping of the graphene layer. The proposed graphene sensor provides rapid response direct electrical readout and is compatible with back end of the line (BEOL) integration on top of CMOS-based integrated circuits. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06038a

  18. Electrical resistivity characteristics of diesel oil-contaminated kaolin clay and a resistivity-based detection method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhibin; Liu, Songyu; Cai, Yi; Fang, Wei

    2015-06-01

    As the dielectric constant and conductivity of petroleum products are different from those of the pore water in soil, the electrical resistivity characteristics of oil-contaminated soil will be changed by the corresponding oil type and content. The contaminated soil specimens were manually prepared by static compaction method in the laboratory with commercial kaolin clay and diesel oil. The water content and dry density of the first group of soil specimens were controlled at 10 % and 1.58 g/cm(3). Corresponding electrical resistivities of the contaminated specimens were measured at the curing periods of 7, 14, and 28 and 90, 120, and 210 days on a modified oedometer cell with an LCR meter. Then, the electrical resistivity characteristics of diesel oil-contaminated kaolin clay were discussed. In order to realize a resistivity-based oil detection method, the other group of oil-contaminated kaolin clay specimens was also made and tested, but the initial water content, oil content, and dry density were controlled at 0~18 %, 0~18 %, 1.30~1.95 g/cm(3), respectively. Based on the test data, a resistivity-based artificial neural network (ANN) was developed. It was found that the electrical resistivity of kaolin clay decreased with the increase of oil content. Moreover, there was a good nonlinear relationship between electrical resistivity and corresponding oil content when the water content and dry density were kept constant. The decreasing velocity of the electrical resistivity of oil-contaminated kaolin clay was higher before the oil content of 12 % than after 12 %, which indicated a transition of the soil from pore water-controlled into oil-controlled electrical resistivity characteristics. Through microstructural analysis, the decrease of electrical resistivity could be explained by the increase of saturation degree together with the collapse of the electrical double layer. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) photos indicated that the diesel oil in kaolin clay normally had three kinds of effects including oil filling, coating, and bridging. Finally, a resistivity-based ANN model was established based on the database collected from the experiment data. The performance of the model was proved to be reasonably accepted, which puts forward a possible simple, economic, and effective tool to detect the oil content in contaminated clayey soils just with four basic parameters: wet density, dry density, measured moisture content, and electrical resistivity. PMID:25516255

  19. MEASUREMENTS OF SPECIFIC ELECTRICAL CONTACT RESISTANCE BETWEEN SIC AND LEAD-LITHIUM EUTECTIC ALLOY

    E-print Network

    Abdou, Mohamed

    candidate material for flow channel inserts for the dual coolant blanket concept. Here, the total electricalMEASUREMENTS OF SPECIFIC ELECTRICAL CONTACT RESISTANCE BETWEEN SIC AND LEAD-LITHIUM EUTECTIC ALLOY purposes, the electrical properties of an FCI can be based on the intrinsic electrical conductivity

  20. Electrical resistivity tomography study of Taal volcano hydrothermal system, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fikos, I.; Vargemezis, G.; Zlotnicki, J.; Puertollano, J. R.; Alanis, P. B.; Pigtain, R. C.; Villacorte, E. U.; Malipot, G. A.; Sasai, Y.

    2012-10-01

    Taal volcano (311 m in altitude) is located in The Philippines (14°N, 121°E) and since 1572 has erupted 33 times, causing more than 2,000 casualties during the most violent eruptions. In March 2010, the shallow structures in areas where present-day surface activity takes place were investigated by DC resistivity surveys. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) lines were performed above the two identified hydrothermal areas located on the northern flank of the volcano and in the Main Crater, respectively. Due to rough topography, deep valleys, and dense vegetation, most measurements were collected using a remote method based on a laboratory-made equipment. This allowed retrieval of information down to a depth of 250 m. ERTs results detail the outlines of the two geothermal fields defined by previous self-potential, CO2 soil degassing, ground temperature, and magnetic mapping (Harada et al. Japan Acad Sci 81:261-266, 2005; Zlotnicki et al. Bull Volcanol 71:29-49, 2009a, Phys Chem Earth 34:294-408, 2009b). Hydrothermal fluids originate mainly from inside the northern part of the Main Crater at a depth greater than the bottom of the Crater Lake, and flow upward to the ground surface. Furthermore, water from the Main Crater Lake infiltrates inside the surrounding geological formations. The hydrothermal fluids, outlined by gas releases and high temperatures, cross the crater rim and interact with the northern geothermal field located outside the Main Crater.

  1. Variability of Behaviour in Electricity Load Profile Clustering; Who Does Things at the

    E-print Network

    Aickelin, Uwe

    Variability of Behaviour in Electricity Load Profile Clustering; Who Does Things at the Same Time://ima.ac.uk/dent 2 The James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, UK Abstract. UK electricity market changes provide opportunities to alter households' electricity usage patterns for the benefit of the overall elec- tricity

  2. Determination of soil moisture patterns with electric Resistivity Tomography and spatial TDR technique on a sandy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeff, T.; Lück, E.; Spangenberg, U.; Schlaeger, S.; Bauer, A.; Morgner, M.; Zehe, E.

    2009-04-01

    The determination of soil moisture patterns with high spatial and temporal resolution is a well-known challenge in experimental hydrology and related applied science. Our study focuses on the observation of transient soil moisture profiles with two different geophysical methods: electric resistivity tomography (ERT) and spatial TDR (STDR), as these methods are likely to complement each other. The resulting dataset will be used later for the implementation of a physically based hydrological model. The field investigations concentrate on grassland with heterogeneous sandy soil. The observation period was in the summer months and the different patterns were investigated in time and space. The STDR technique used a reconstruction algorithm based on the telegraph equation to invert soil moisture profiles along coated three rod TDR probes. That allows the exploration of the near surface processes with a highly spatial and temporal resolution of the soil moisture profiles. The adequate quality of the inversion results was verified by different laboratory experiments. ERT method measures the apparent electrical resistivity and gives qualitative information about structures, water content and substrate changes for a given spatial extent. We used a transect with a Wenner array setup and a spacing of 15 cm between the electrodes over a total length of 11 m. Six STDR probes with rods of 60 cm length were distributed within the experimental site. The two techniques thus compliment each other well, combining high temporal resolution soil moisture profiles with larger extent information on subsurface structures and water content changes.

  3. Resistive graphene humidity sensors with rapid and direct electrical readout.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anderson D; Elgammal, Karim; Niklaus, Frank; Delin, Anna; Fischer, Andreas C; Vaziri, Sam; Forsberg, Fredrik; Råsander, Mikael; Hugosson, Håkan; Bergqvist, Lars; Schröder, Stephan; Kataria, Satender; Östling, Mikael; Lemme, Max C

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate humidity sensing using a change of the electrical resistance of single-layer chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene that is placed on top of a SiO2 layer on a Si wafer. To investigate the selectivity of the sensor towards the most common constituents in air, its signal response was characterized individually for water vapor (H2O), nitrogen (N2), oxygen (O2), and argon (Ar). In order to assess the humidity sensing effect for a range from 1% relative humidity (RH) to 96% RH, the devices were characterized both in a vacuum chamber and in a humidity chamber at atmospheric pressure. The measured response and recovery times of the graphene humidity sensors are on the order of several hundred milliseconds. Density functional theory simulations are employed to further investigate the sensitivity of the graphene devices towards water vapor. The interaction between the electrostatic dipole moment of the water and the impurity bands in the SiO2 substrate leads to electrostatic doping of the graphene layer. The proposed graphene sensor provides rapid response direct electrical readout and is compatible with back end of the line (BEOL) integration on top of CMOS-based integrated circuits. PMID:26523705

  4. Distribution and drug resistance profile of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus after orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Song, Wen Chao; Zhang, Si Sen; Gong, Yu Hong

    2015-05-01

    This paper is aimed to comprehend clinical distribution and drug-resistance situation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This study applied automatic microbe instrument Microscan W/A 96 for strain identification and drug susceptibility screening on the isolated strains. It was found that 312 MRSA strains were isolated in three years, which account for 58.1% of Staphylococcus aureus. MRSA were mainly focused in wound secretion, purulent sputum and prostatic fluid and a few of them were isolated from blood specimens; Endemic area distribution was mainly located in intensive care unit, neurosurgery, respiratory department, dermatology, orthopaedic burns and orthopaedics. MRSA strains showed high drug resistance of 82.37%~100% to most of the antibiotics including vancomycin, cotrimoxazole and rifampicin. Strain was 100% resistance towards ampicillin, amoxicillin/acid, cefalotin, cefazolin, tienam, benzylpenicillin, penicillin and tetracycline and 90% strains resisted clindamycin, cefotaxime, clarithromycin and gentamicin. PMID:26051737

  5. A geostatistically based inverse model for electrical resistivity surveys and its applications to vadose zone hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, T.-C. Jim; Liu, S.; Glass, R. J.; Baker, K.; Brainard, J. R.; Alumbaugh, D.; Labrecque, D.

    2002-12-01

    A sequential, geostatistical inverse approach was developed for electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Unlike most ERT inverse approaches, this new approach allows inclusion of our prior knowledge of general geological structures of an area and point electrical resistivity measurements to constrain the estimate of the electrical resistivity field. This approach also permits sequential inclusion of different data sets, mimicking the ERT data collection scheme commonly employed in the field survey. Furthermore, using the conditional variance concept, the inverse model quantifies uncertainty of the estimate caused by spatial variability and measurement errors. Using this approach, numerical experiments were conducted to demonstrate the effects of bedding orientation on ERT surveys and to show both the usefulness and uncertainty associated with the inverse approach for delineating the electrical resistivity distribution using down-hole ERT arrays. A statistical analysis was subsequently undertaken to explore the effects of spatial variability of the electrical resistivity-moisture relation on the interpretation of the change in water content in the vadose zone, using the change in electrical resistivity. Core samples were collected from a field site to investigate the spatial variability of the electrical resistivity-moisture relation. Numerical experiments were subsequently conducted to illustrate how the spatially varying relations affect the level of uncertainty in the interpretation of change of moisture content based on the estimated change in electrical resistivity. Other possible complications are also discussed.

  6. Defect dynamics of cement mortar under repeated loading, studied by electrical resistivity measurement

    E-print Network

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Defect dynamics of cement mortar under repeated loading, studied by electrical resistivity, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260 by electrical resistivity measurement during repeated compression of cement mortar in the elastic regime

  7. 3-D Electrical Resistivity Tomography for Cliff Stability Assessment at Pointe du Hoc in Normandy, France 

    E-print Network

    Udphuay, Suwimon

    2010-01-14

    ...................................................................... 21 Site Hydrogeology.......................................................................... 28 Cliff Instability ............................................................................... 29 III ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY SURVEY... in resistivity surveys and their geometric factors.... 37 3.3 The arrangement of electrodes for a 2?D electrical survey and the sequence of measurements used to build up a pseudosection ................... 39 3.4 The arrangement of the electrodes...

  8. Electrical Resistivity Tomography of the Karstic Aquifer of Bittit spring (Middle Atlas, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qarqori, Kh.; Rouai, M.; Moreau, F.; Saracco, G.; Hermitte, D.; Boualoul, M.; Dauteuil, O.; Biessy, G.; Sahbi, H.

    2009-04-01

    The Tabular Middle Atlas reservoir is one of the most important aquifers in northern Morocco. It is mainly a water table fractured reservoir consisting of Lias limestone and dolomite. The matrix permeability is very low and water flows essentially along open fractures and karsts. The Bittit Spring belongs to this karstic system and constitutes an important aquifer lying at the junction between the tabular reservoir and the Sais basin. Bittit spring, with an average annual discharge of about 1600 l/s, contributes largely to water supply of the big city of Meknes. Groundwater circulation is complex due to tectonics and to presence of karstic Quaternary travertine overlying Lias carbonate. In Bittit area, travertine is mostly covered by Quaternary basalt. Up to now water flow paths and the underground karst organization remain misknown, and turbidity affects the water quality after rain events. To highlight these issues, an integrated geophysical survey was performed in this area in the framework of a French-Moroccan scientific project. The geophysical imaging was carried out mainly by Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT). Resistivity data were acquired by an ABEM Terrameter SAS1000 and a multi-electrode Lund system imaging using a Wenner array configuration of 64 electrodes and 5m spacing, reaching a depth of about 50m. Topographic corrections and 2D inversion models were performed using Res2Dinv software package. Seven 2D resistivity high resolution images have been obtained allowing to detect, delineate important fractures and also to hydrogeological characterization of the underground karst. A borehole of 100m depth was drilled in order to correlate and calibrate geophysical data and proposed models. Two sub-vertical fracture families have been identified with NE-SW and NW-SE directions respectively. These results correlate well with fracture data analysis gathered from remote sensing Spot images at large scale, and from local field fracture scanline surveys. A 3D picture of the fracture system has been drawn showing a mini-graben structure. Geophysical scans and interpreted fractures were displayed with Gocad software leading to geometric construction of aquifer units and to 3D modelling of subsurface architecture. Several horizontal electrical resistivity profiles and electromagnetic VLF profiles were also performed in order to discriminate between dry and favourable hydrological fractures. ERT appears to be an appropriate geophysical method in this issue, especially by improving understanding of fracture geometry. This study initiates a hydrogeophysical research in the Middle Atlas karst in order to improve water resources management and reducing aquifer vulnerability in the region.

  9. Mapping a Pristine Glaciofluvial Aquifer on the Canadian Shield Using Ground-Penetrating Radar and Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, L. W.; Shirokova, V.; Bank, C.

    2013-12-01

    Our study aims to construct a 3D structural model of an unconfined pristine aquifer in Laurentian Hills, Ontario, Canada. The stratigraphy of the study site, which covers about 5400 square meters, features reworked glaciofluvial sands and glacial till on top of Canadian Shield bedrock. A network of 25 existing piezometers provides ground-truth. We used two types of geophysical surveys to map the water table and the aquifer basin. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) collected 40 profiles over distances up to 140 meters using 200MHz and 400MHz antennas with a survey wheel. The collected radargrams show a distinct reflective layer, which can be mapped to outcrops of glacial till within the area. This impermeable interface forms the aquitard. Depths of the subsurface features were calculated using hyperbolic fits on the radargrams in Matlab by determining wave velocity then converting measured two-way-time to depth. Electrical resistivity was used to determine the water table elevations because the unconfined water table did not reflect the radar waves. 20 resistivity profiles were collected in the same area using Wenner-Alpha and dipole-dipole arrays with both 24 and 48 electrodes and for 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 2.0 meter spacing. The inverted resistivity models show low resistivity values (<1000 Ohm.m) below 2 to 5 meter depths and higher resistivity values (2000-6000 Ohm.m) above 1 to 2 meter depths. These contrasting resistivity values correspond to saturated and wet sand (lower resistivity) to dry sand (higher resistivity); a correlation we could verify with several bore-hole logs. The water table is marked on the resistivity profiles as a steep resistivity gradient, and the depth can be added to the comprehensive 3D model. This model also incorporates hydrogeological characteristics and geochemical anomalies found within the aquifer. Ongoing seasonal and annual monitoring of the aquifer using geophysical methods will bring a fourth dimension to our understanding of this dynamic system. GPR Profile with Glacial Till Interface.

  10. The effect of the resistive properties of bone on neural excitation and electric fields in cochlear implant models.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, T K; Hanekom, T; Hanekom, J J

    2015-09-01

    The resistivity of bone is the most variable of all the tissues in the human body, ranging from 312 ? cm to 84,745 ? cm. Volume conduction models of cochlear implants have generally used a resistivity value of 641 ? cm for the bone surrounding the cochlea. This study investigated the effect that bone resistivity has on modelled neural thresholds and intracochlear potentials using user-specific volume conduction models of implanted cochleae applying monopolar stimulation. The complexity of the description of the head volume enveloping the cochlea was varied between a simple infinite bone volume and a detailed skull containing a brain volume, scalp and accurate return electrode position. It was found that, depending on the structure of the head model and implementation of the return electrode, different bone resistivity values are necessary to match model predictions to data from literature. Modelled forward-masked spatial tuning curve (fmSTC) widths and slopes and intracochlear electric field profile length constants were obtained for a range of bone resistivity values for the various head models. The predictions were compared to measurements found in literature. It was concluded that, depending on the head model, a bone resistivity value between 3500 ? cm and 10,500 ? cm allows prediction of neural and electrical responses that match measured data. A general recommendation is made to use a resistivity value of approximately 10,000 ? cm for bone volumes in conduction models of the implanted cochlea when neural excitation is predicted and a value of approximately 6500 ? cm when predicting electric fields inside the cochlear duct. PMID:26074305

  11. Immersion Scatterometry for Improved Feature Resolution and High Speed Acquisition of Resist Profiles

    E-print Network

    Terry, Fred L.

    Immersion Scatterometry for Improved Feature Resolution and High Speed Acquisition of Resist the results of a simulation study on the use of scatterometry in an immersion mode both to improve resolution profiles vs. time and a rigorous couple wave algorithm (RCWA) simulator (modified to include the immersion

  12. Use of electrical resistivity to detect underground mine voids in Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheets, Rodney A.

    2002-01-01

    Electrical resistivity surveys were completed at two sites along State Route 32 in Jackson and Vinton Counties, Ohio. The surveys were done to determine whether the electrical resistivity method could identify areas where coal was mined, leaving air- or water-filled voids. These voids can be local sources of potable water or acid mine drainage. They could also result in potentially dangerous collapse of roads or buildings that overlie the voids. The resistivity response of air- or water-filled voids compared to the surrounding bedrock may allow electrical resistivity surveys to delineate areas underlain by such voids. Surface deformation along State Route 32 in Jackson County led to a site investigation, which included electrical resistivity surveys. Several highly resistive areas were identified using axial dipole-dipole and Wenner resistivity surveys. Subsequent drilling and excavation led to the discovery of several air-filled abandoned underground mine tunnels. A site along State Route 32 in Vinton County, Ohio, was drilled as part of a mining permit application process. A mine void under the highway was instrumented with a pressure transducer to monitor water levels. During a period of high water level, electrical resistivity surveys were completed. The electrical response was dominated by a thin, low-resistivity layer of iron ore above where the coal was mined out. Nearby overhead powerlines also affected the results.

  13. The use of electrical resistivity techniques to detect an underground conduit in the karst regions of the Inner Bluegrass

    SciTech Connect

    Bonita, J.; Sendlein, L.V.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Electrical resistivity studies conducted within the Inner Bluegrass Karst Region have been employed to map the presence of a fracture controlled solution that drains the royal Spring Basin. Exist theories by authors such as Thrailkill (1982) suggest that the Inner Bluegrass Karst Region is divided into basin and interbasin areas, with the zone of active meteoric water circulation at deep depths below the surface in basin areas and flow within a few meters of the surface in interbasin areas. Initial resistivity soundings were performed along various traverses to access information on the underlying lexington Limestone. Sounding curves calculated form the modeling program RESIX indicate that low resistivity zones occur at two distinctly different depth intervals, denoting the boundary between the basin and interbasin areas. Information from electric resistivity profiles within this now defined basin area indicate resistivity anomalies trending in linear segments of N45W and N40E. Fracture and joint orientation measurements at roadcuts and on topographic maps and air photographs also indicate a preferential orientation parallel to the orientation of the linear segments of the conduit.

  14. Plume and lithologic profiling with surface resistivity and seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, David B; Doll, William E.; Gamey, Jeff; Sheehan, Jacob R; Jardine, Philip M

    2005-03-01

    Improved surface-based geophysical technologies that are commercially available provide a new level of detail that can be used to guide ground water remediation. Surface-based multielectrode resistivity methods and tomographic seismic refraction techniques were used to image to a depth of approximately 30 m below the surface at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the research center on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to conduct in situ field-scale studies on bioremediation of metals and radionuclides. Bioremediation studies are being conducted on the saprolite, shale bedrock, and ground water at the site that have been contaminated with nitrate, uranium, technetium, tetrachloroethylene, and other contaminants (U.S. DOE 1997). Geophysical methods were effective in imaging the high-ionic strength plume and in defining the transition zone between saprolite and bedrock zones that appears to have a significant influence on contaminant transport. The geophysical data were used to help select the location and depth of investigation for field research plots. Drilling, borehole geophysics, and ground water sampling were used to verify the surface geophysical studies.

  15. Polyphenolic Profile of Pear Leaves with Different Resistance to Pear Psylla (Cacopsylla pyri).

    PubMed

    Fotiri? Akši?, Milica M; Dabi?, Dragana ?; Gaši?, Uroš M; Zec, Gordan N; Vuli?, Todor B; Teši?, Živoslav Lj; Nati?, Maja M

    2015-09-01

    The European pear psylla, Cacopsylla pyri L. (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is one of the most serious arthropod pests of pear. Since proper control of this pest is essential, better understanding of the complex plant-pest relationship is mandatory. This research deals with constitutive polyphenolic profiles in leaves of 22 pear cultivars of diverse origin (P. communis, P. pyrifolia, and P. pyrifolia × P. communis) and different resistance to psylla. The study was designed to show which differences in the polyphenolic profile of leaves from resistant and susceptible pear cultivars could be utilized as information in subsequent breeding programs. The results demonstrated that the leaves of Oriental pear cultivars contained much higher amounts of p-hydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, aesculin, and naringin, that, together with detected 3-O-(6?-O-p-coumaroyl)-hexoside, apigenin, apigenin 7-O-rutinoside, and hispidulin, indicated a clear difference between the species and might represent phenolics responsible for psylla resistance. PMID:26278376

  16. From spatial-continuous electrical resistivity measurements to the soil hydric functioning at the field scale: a case study in a small field area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, I.; Besson, A.; Pasquier, C.; Giot, G.; Courtemanche, P.; Le Lay, C.; Nicoullaud, B.; Bourennane, H.; Richard, G.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to discuss the hydric functioning of a small field area by using measurements of the soil electrical resistivity. We made the hypothesis that the difference in electrical resistivity data recorded at different dates in the field were only due to differences in water content: indeed, the data were corrected for temperature by the Keller & Frischknecht equation (1966) and ancillary laboratory experiments showed that the influence of the electrical conductivity of the soil solution did not influence significantly the soil electrical resistivity. As The studied 2 ha field area comprised several soil units developed either in white calcareous or in cryoturbated calcareous. A pedological prospection by auger holes enabled to determine the real soil depth in each soil unit. The spatial soil electrical resistivity was recorded at a high resolution on a 2 ha area by the MuCEP device -MultiContinuous Electrical Profiling- (Panissod et al., 1997) at two dates. The MuCEP enabled the measurements of electrical resistivity at three pseudo-depth, due to interelectrode spacings equal to 0.5m, 1m and 2m. The interpretation of the electrical resistivity measurements was analysed in four steps: - firstly, the apparent electrical resistivity measurements were interpreted in terms of local electrical resistivity by 1D inverse modelling; - secondly, the interpreted electrical values were translated in soil volumetric water content by using an empirical law, that was independently demonstrated in the field by a temporal monitoring of both electrical resistivity and water content; - thirdly, the soil volumetric water content were transformed into soil water potential values by using the water retention curve of the studied soil (the latter was independently determined on undisturbed samples in the laboratory). The interpretation of both the water content and matric potential maps demonstrated that these two state variables are not constant in a given soil unit. Some soil hydric processes, like lateral overland flow, could occur in some soils of the studied zone. They would never have been detected by local measurements of soil characteristics or by the use of the soil map. As a consequence, this study demonstrated the interest of spatial electrical resistivity at high resolution to interpret the soil spatial hydric functioning, and will be achieved and improved in the Digisoil project.

  17. Resistance profile and risk factors of drug resistant tuberculosis in the Baltic countries.

    PubMed

    Ignatyeva, Olga; Balabanova, Yanina; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Koshkarova, Ekaterina; Radiulyte, Birute; Davidaviciene, Edita; Riekstina, Vija; Jaama, Kadri; Danilovits, Manfred; Popa, Cristina M; Drobniewski, Francis A

    2015-09-01

    The rates of multi- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (X/MDRTB) in the Baltic countries are the highest within the European Union hampering recent achievements of national TB control programmes. We included all consecutive culture-confirmed X/MDRTB patients registered for treatment in 2009 in Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia into this multicenter case-control study. Cases were compared with randomly selected controls with non-MDRTB registered for treatment in the same year across these sites. Of 495 MDRTB patients, 243 (49.7%) showed resistance to at least one second-line drug, 206 (42.1%) had pre-XDRTB (i.e. MDRTB with additional resistance to a second-line injectable or fluoroquinolones) and 64 (13.1%) had XDRTB. Younger age, male gender and known contact with an MDRTB case were associated with increased risk of primary infection with X/MDRTB strains. Previous treatment and alcohol abuse were strong predictors for MDRTB acquisition; defaults and failures in the past triggered XDRTB development. All patients received appropriate therapy; less than half of the patients were fully adherent. An erroneous treatment strategy is unlikely to drive resistance development. Increasing patients' compliance, addressing issues of social support, rapid detection of drug resistance and improving infection control is crucial for prevention of further spread of X/MDRTB and achieving higher cure rates. PMID:26164355

  18. Proteomic Profiling of Detergent Resistant Membranes (Lipid Rafts) of Prostasomes.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Louise; Ronquist, Karl K Göran; Ek, Bo; Ronquist, Gunnar; Larsson, Anders

    2015-11-01

    Prostasomes are exosomes derived from prostate epithelial cells through exocytosis by multivesicular bodies. Prostasomes have a bilayered membrane and readily interact with sperm. The membrane lipid composition is unusual with a high contribution of sphingomyelin at the expense of phosphatidylcholine and saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids are dominant. Lipid rafts are liquid-ordered domains that are more tightly packed than the surrounding nonraft phase of the bilayer. Lipid rafts are proposed to be highly dynamic, submicroscopic assemblies that float freely within the liquid disordered membrane bilayer and some proteins preferentially partition into the ordered raft domains. We asked the question whether lipid rafts do exist in prostasomes and, if so, which proteins might be associated with them. Prostasomes of density range 1.13-1.19g/ml were subjected to density gradient ultracentrifugation in sucrose fabricated by phosphate buffered saline (PBS) containing 1% Triton X-100 with capacity for banding at 1.10 g/ml, i.e. the classical density of lipid rafts. Prepared prostasomal lipid rafts (by gradient ultracentrifugation) were analyzed by mass spectrometry. The clearly visible band on top of 1.10g/ml sucrose in the Triton X-100 containing gradient was subjected to liquid chromatography-tandem MS and more than 370 lipid raft associated proteins were identified. Several of them were involved in intraluminal vesicle formation, e.g. tetraspanins, ESCRTs, and Ras-related proteins. This is the first comprehensive liquid chromatography-tandem MS profiling of proteins in lipid rafts derived from exosomes. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002163. PMID:26272980

  19. Negative resist profiles in 248 nm photolithography: experiment, modelling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karafyllidis, I.; Hagouel, P. I.; Neureuther, A. R.

    1998-06-01

    We consider the effects both of exposure energy dose and of developer temperature on the developed negative resist profiles. The spin-formatted resist film tends to have macromolecules oriented parallel to the substrate surface. The orientation of the resist macromolecules introduces an anisotropic component to the etch rate: higher in the direction parallel to the substrate surface and lower in the perpendicular one. We performed a series of experiments for 400 nm pitch periodic and isolated lines on Shipley SNR-248 negative resist coated Si wafers using a stepper and a deep UV source at 248 nm. We obtained scanning electron micrographs for various developer temperatures and exposure doses. The variation of the lateral etch rate manifested itself in sidewall profile slopes. We used Dill's ABC parameter model to model and quantify the exposure, and cellular automata to model the resist cross-linking during post-exposure bake and the resist etching. Simulation using an algorithm based on this model validated the experimental results.

  20. Electrical Properties of Materials for Elevated Temperature Resistance Strain Gage Application. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Jih-Fen

    1987-01-01

    The objective was to study the electrical resistances of materials that are potentially useful as resistance strain gages at 1000 C. Transition metal carbides and nitrides, boron carbide and silicon carbide were selected for the experimental phase of this research. Due to their low temperature coefficient of resistance and good stability, TiC, ZrC, B sub 4 C and beta-SiC are suggested as good candidates for high temperature resistance strain gage applications.

  1. Corrosion-resistant, electrically-conductive plate for use in a fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Carter, J. David (Bolingbrook, IL); Mawdsley, Jennifer R. (Woodridge, IL); Niyogi, Suhas (Woodridge, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Naperville, IL); Cruse, Terry (Lisle, IL); Santos, Lilia (Lombard, IL)

    2010-04-20

    A corrosion resistant, electrically-conductive, durable plate at least partially coated with an anchor coating and a corrosion resistant coating. The corrosion resistant coating made of at least a polymer and a plurality of corrosion resistant particles each having a surface area between about 1-20 m.sup.2/g and a diameter less than about 10 microns. Preferably, the plate is used as a bipolar plate in a proton exchange membrane (PEMFC) fuel cell stack.

  2. Electrical resistance sensors record spring flow timing, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, E.A.; Monroe, S.A.; Springer, A.E.; Blasch, K.W.; Bills, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    Springs along the south rim of the Grand Canyon, Arizona, are important ecological and cultural resources in Grand Canyon National Park and are discharge points for regional and local aquifers of the Coconino Plateau. This study evaluated the applicability of electrical resistance (ER) sensors for measuring diffuse, low-stage (<1.0 cm) intermittent and ephemeral flow in the steep, rocky spring-fed tributaries of the south rim. ER sensors were used to conduct a baseline survey of spring flow timing at eight sites in three spring-fed tributaries in Grand Canyon. Sensors were attached to a nearly vertical rock wall at a spring outlet and were installed in alluvial and bedrock channels. Spring flow timing data inferred by the ER sensors were consistent with observations during site visits, with flow events recorded with collocated streamflow gauging stations and with local precipitation gauges. ER sensors were able to distinguish the presence of flow along nearly vertical rock surfaces with flow depths between 0.3 and 1.0 cm. Laboratory experiments confirmed the ability of the sensors to monitor the timing of diffuse flow on impervious surfaces. A comparison of flow patterns along the stream reaches and at springs identified the timing and location of perennial and intermittent flow, and periods of increased evapotranspiration.

  3. Electrical resistance sensors record spring flow timing, Grand Canyon, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Adams, Eric A; Monroe, Stephen A; Springer, Abraham E; Blasch, Kyle W; Bills, Donald J

    2006-01-01

    Springs along the south rim of the Grand Canyon, Arizona, are important ecological and cultural resources in Grand Canyon National Park and are discharge points for regional and local aquifers of the Coconino Plateau. This study evaluated the applicability of electrical resistance (ER) sensors for measuring diffuse, low-stage (<1.0 cm) intermittent and ephemeral flow in the steep, rocky spring-fed tributaries of the south rim. ER sensors were used to conduct a baseline survey of spring flow timing at eight sites in three spring-fed tributaries in Grand Canyon. Sensors were attached to a nearly vertical rock wall at a spring outlet and were installed in alluvial and bedrock channels. Spring flow timing data inferred by the ER sensors were consistent with observations during site visits, with flow events recorded with collocated streamflow gauging stations and with local precipitation gauges. ER sensors were able to distinguish the presence of flow along nearly vertical rock surfaces with flow depths between 0.3 and 1.0 cm. Laboratory experiments confirmed the ability of the sensors to monitor the timing of diffuse flow on impervious surfaces. A comparison of flow patterns along the stream reaches and at springs identified the timing and location of perennial and intermittent flow, and periods of increased evapotranspiration. PMID:16961484

  4. Measuring turbulence in a flotation cell using electrical resistance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jun; Xie, Weiguo; Runge, Kym; Bradshaw, Dee

    2015-11-01

    Measuring turbulence in an industrial flotation environment has long been problematic due to the opaque, aggressive, and abrasive three-phase environment in a flotation cell. One of the promising measurement techniques is electrical resistance tomography (ERT). By measuring the conductivity distribution across a measurement area, ERT has been adopted by many researchers to monitor and investigate many processes involving multiphase flows. In the research outlined in this paper, a compact ERT probe was built and then used to measure the conductivity distribution within a 60 l flotation cell operated with water and air. Two approaches were then developed to process the ERT data and estimate turbulence-related parameters. One is a conductivity variance method and the other is based on the Green-Kubo relations. Both rely on and use the fluctuation in the ERT measurement caused by bubbles moving through the measurement area changing the density of the fluid. The results from both approaches were validated by comparing the results produced by the ERT probe in a 60l flotation cell operated at different air rates and impeller speeds to that measured using an alternative turbulence measurement device. The second approach is considered superior to the first as the first requires the development of auxiliary information which would not usually be known for a new system.

  5. Metabolic profiling of chickpea-Fusarium interaction identifies differential modulation of disease resistance pathways.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Yashwant; Dholakia, Bhushan B; Panigrahi, Priyabrata; Kadoo, Narendra Y; Giri, Ashok P; Gupta, Vidya S

    2015-08-01

    Chickpea is the third most widely grown legume in the world and mainly used as a vegetarian source of human dietary protein. Fusarium wilt, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri (Foc), is one of the major threats to global chickpea production. Host resistance is the best way to protect crops from diseases; however, in spite of using various approaches, the mechanism of Foc resistance in chickpea remains largely obscure. In the present study, non-targeted metabolic profiling at several time points of resistant and susceptible chickpea cultivars using high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied to better understand the mechanistic basis of wilt resistance or susceptibility. Multivariate analysis of the data (OPLS-DA) revealed discriminating metabolites in chickpea root tissue after Foc inoculation such as flavonoids, isoflavonoids, alkaloids, amino acids and sugars. Foc inoculated resistant plants had more flavonoids and isoflavonoids along with their malonyl conjugates. Many antifungal metabolites that were induced after Foc infection viz., aurantion-obstine ?-glucosides and querecitin were elevated in resistant cultivar. Overall, diverse genetic and biochemical mechanisms were operational in the resistant cultivar for Foc defense as compared to the susceptible plant. The resistant chickpea plants employed the above-mentioned metabolic pathways as potential defense strategy against Foc. PMID:25935544

  6. Investigating electrical contact resistance losses in lithium-ion battery assemblies for hybrid and electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Peyman; Hsieh, Scott; Bahrami, Majid

    2011-08-01

    Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are favored in hybrid-electric vehicles and electric vehicles for their outstanding power characteristics. In this paper the energy loss due to electrical contact resistance (ECR) at the interface of electrodes and current-collector bars in Li-ion battery assemblies is investigated for the first time. ECR is a direct result of contact surface imperfections, i.e., roughness and out-of-flatness, and acts as an ohmic resistance at the electrode-collector joints. A custom-designed testbed is developed to conduct a systematic experimental study. ECR is measured at separable bolted electrode connections of a sample Li-ion battery, and a straightforward analysis to evaluate the relevant energy loss is presented. Through the experiments, it is observed that ECR is an important issue in energy management of Li-ion batteries. Effects of surface imperfection, contact pressure, joint type, collector bar material, and interfacial materials on ECR are highlighted. The obtained data show that in the considered Li-ion battery, the energy loss due to ECR can be as high as 20% of the total energy flow in and out of the battery under normal operating conditions. However, ECR loss can be reduced to 6% when proper joint pressure and/or surface treatment are used. A poor connection at the electrode-collector interface can lead to a significant battery energy loss as heat generated at the interface. Consequently, a heat flow can be initiated from the electrodes towards the internal battery structure, which results in a considerable temperature increase and onset of thermal runaway. At sever conditions, heat generation due to ECR might cause serious safety issues, sparks, and even melting of the electrodes.

  7. The effects of rotation, electric field, and recycling neutrals on determining the edge pedestal density profile

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, W. M.

    2010-05-15

    The edge density profile is calculated from the continuity and momentum balance equations, using experimental electric field and rotation velocities and a calculated recycling neutral source, to evaluate the relative importance of these quantities in determining the observed structure of the edge density profile in a DIII-D [J. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] high-confinement mode discharge.

  8. A one-dimensional model of solid-earth electrical resistivity beneath Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blum, Cletus; Love, Jeffrey J.; Pedrie, Kolby; Bedrosian, Paul A.; Rigler, E. Joshua

    2015-01-01

    An estimated one-dimensional layered model of electrical resistivity beneath Florida was developed from published geological and geophysical information. The resistivity of each layer is represented by plausible upper and lower bounds as well as a geometric mean resistivity. Corresponding impedance transfer functions, Schmucker-Weidelt transfer functions, apparent resistivity, and phase responses are calculated for inducing geomagnetic frequencies ranging from 10?5 to 100 hertz. The resulting one-dimensional model and response functions can be used to make general estimates of time-varying electric fields associated with geomagnetic storms such as might represent induction hazards for electric-power grid operation. The plausible upper- and lower-bound resistivity structures show the uncertainty, giving a wide range of plausible time-varying electric fields.

  9. The influence of changes in water content on the electrical resistivity of a natural unsaturated loess

    E-print Network

    Munoz-Castelblanco, José; Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu Jun

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive methods of measuring water content in soils have been extensively developed in the last decades, especially in soil science. Among these methods, the measurements based on the electrical resistivity are simple and reliable thanks to the clear relationship between the water content and the electrical resistivity of soils. In this work, a new electrical resistivity probe was developed to monitor the change in local water content in the triaxial apparatus. The probe is composed of two-pair of electrodes, and an electrical current is induced through the soil at the vicinity of the contact between the probe and the specimen. Some experimental data on the changes in resistivity with the degree of saturation were obtained in specimens of a natural unsaturated loess from Northern France. Two theoretical models of resistivity were also used to analyze the obtained data. Results are finally discussed with respect to the loess's water retention properties.

  10. Thermal Expansion and Electrical Resistivity Studies of Nickel and ARMCO Iron at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchaev, D. K.; Murlieva, Zh. Kh.; Gadzhimagomedov, S. H.; Iskhakov, M. E.; Rabadanov, M. Kh.; Abdulagatov, I. M.

    2015-10-01

    The electrical resistance, ? (T) , and thermal expansion coefficient, ? (T) , of nickel and ARMCO iron have been simultaneously measured over a wide temperature range from (300 to 1100) K. The well-known standard four-probe potentiometric method was used for measurements of the electrical resistance. The thermal expansion coefficient was measured using the quartz dilatometer technique. Both techniques were combined in the same apparatus for simultaneous measurements of the electrical resistance and TEC for the same specimen. The combined expanded uncertainty of the electrical resistance and thermal expansion coefficient measurements at the 95 % confidence level with a coverage factor of k = 2 is estimated to be 0.5 % and (1.5 to 4.0) %, respectively. The distinct ? (T) scattering contribution (phonon ? _{ph} , magnetic ? m , and residual ? S ) terms were separated and extracted from the measured total resistivity. The physical nature and details of the temperature dependence of the electrical resistance of solid materials and correct estimations of the contributions of various scattering mechanisms to the measured total resistivity were discussed in terms of the anharmonic effect. We experimentally found simple, universal, physically based, semiempirical linear correlations between the kinetic coefficient (electrical resistance) and a thermodynamic (equilibrium) property, the thermal expansion coefficient, of solid materials. The developed, physically based, correlation model has been successfully applied for nanoscale materials (ferromagnetic nickel nanowire). A new s-d-exchange interaction energy determination technique has been proposed.

  11. Challenges of using electrical resistivity method to locate karst conduits-A field case in the Inner Bluegrass Region, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, J.; Currens, J.C.; Dinger, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Conduits serve as major pathways for groundwater flow in karst aquifers. Locating them from the surface, however, is one of the most challenging tasks in karst research. Geophysical methods are often deployed to help locate voids by mapping variations of physical properties of the subsurface. Conduits can cause significant contrasts of some physical properties that can be detected; other subsurface features such as water-bearing fractures often yield similar contrasts, which are difficult to distinguish from the effects of the conduits. This study used electrical resistivity method to search for an unmapped karst conduit that recharges Royal Spring in the Inner Bluegrass karst region, Kentucky, USA. Three types of resistivity techniques (surface 2D survey, quasi-3D survey, and time-lapse survey) were used to map and characterize resistivity anomalies. Some of the major anomalies were selected as drilling targets to verify the existence of the conduits. Drilling near an anomaly identified by an electrical resistivity profile resulted in successful penetration of a major water-filled conduit. The drilling results also suggest that, in this study area, low resistivity anomalies in general are associated with water-bearing features. However, differences in the anomaly signals between the water-filled conduit and other water-bearing features such as water-filled fracture zones were undistinguishable. The electrical resistivity method is useful in conduit detection by providing potential drilling targets. Knowledge of geology and hydrogeology about the site and professional judgment also played important roles in locating the major conduit. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Comparative Genomics of Klebsiella pneumoniae Strains with Different Antibiotic Resistance Profiles?†

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Sun, Peng; Vamathevan, Jessica; Li, Yong; Ingraham, Karen; Palmer, Leslie; Huang, Jianzhong; Brown, James R.

    2011-01-01

    There is a global emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae, a Gram-negative enteric bacterium that causes nosocomial and urinary tract infections. While the epidemiology of K. pneumoniae strains and occurrences of specific antibiotic resistance genes, such as plasmid-borne extended-spectrum ?-lactamases (ESBLs), have been extensively studied, only four complete genomes of K. pneumoniae are available. To better understand the multidrug resistance factors in K. pneumoniae, we determined by pyrosequencing the nearly complete genome DNA sequences of two strains with disparate antibiotic resistance profiles, broadly drug-susceptible strain JH1 and strain 1162281, which is resistant to multiple clinically used antibiotics, including extended-spectrum ?-lactams, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, trimethoprim, and sulfamethoxazoles. Comparative genomic analysis of JH1, 1162281, and other published K. pneumoniae genomes revealed a core set of 3,631 conserved orthologous proteins, which were used for reconstruction of whole-genome phylogenetic trees. The close evolutionary relationship between JH1 and 1162281 relative to other K. pneumoniae strains suggests that a large component of the genetic and phenotypic diversity of clinical isolates is due to horizontal gene transfer. Using curated lists of over 400 antibiotic resistance genes, we identified all of the elements that differentiated the antibiotic profile of MDR strain 1162281 from that of susceptible strain JH1, such as the presence of additional efflux pumps, ESBLs, and multiple mechanisms of fluoroquinolone resistance. Our study adds new and significant DNA sequence data on K. pneumoniae strains and demonstrates the value of whole-genome sequencing in characterizing multidrug resistance in clinical isolates. PMID:21746949

  13. Electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) survey at the Giribaile site (upper Guadalquivir valley; southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, J.; Rey, J.; Gutiérrez, L. M.; Novo, A.; Ortiz, A. J.; Alejo, M.; Galdón, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Giribaile archaeological site is one of the most important Iberian enclaves of the Alto Guadalquivir (Southern Spain). However, to date, only minimal excavation work has been performed at the site. Evaluation requires a preliminary, non-destructive general analysis to determine high-interest areas. This stage required a geophysical survey. Specifically, a 100 m2 grid was selected, where an initial campaign of nine electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) profiles was performed, where each profile was 111 m in length; these profiles were previously located using a detailed topographical survey. A total of 112 electrodes were used for each profile, spaced at 1 m apart with a Wenner-Schlumberger configuration. Secondly, 201 GPR profiles were created using a 500 MHz antenna. The 100 m long profiles were spaced 0.5 m apart and parallel to one another. The present research analyses the efficiency of each of these geophysical tools in supporting archaeological research. Using these methodologies, the position, morphology, and depth of different buried structures can be determined. 3D interpretation of the geophysical survey in 100 × 100 m grid allowed to differentiate structures square and rectangular, interesting buildings in a semicircle (interpreted as ovens) plus delineate different streets. From the geophysical survey follows the Carthaginian presence inside this ancient Iberian enclave.

  14. Integrated optical waveguides: refractive-index profile control by temperature and electric-field programming.

    PubMed

    Kapila, D; Plawsky, J L

    1995-12-01

    Ion exchange is often used to manufacture integrated optical waveguides in glasses and crystals. The manufacture of low-loss, compact, integrated optical waveguides can be achieved by varying the processing conditions (the temperature and the electric field) during the ion exchange. We have simulated the formation of waveguides in glass with a molten salt silver ion-exchange technique and have shown that, by simply linearly varying the temperature and electric field during processing of waveguides, one can tailor the refractive-index profiles to produce low-loss parabolic and hyperbolic secant dopant profiles or any other generic dopant profile. PMID:21068898

  15. Fabrication of intermetallic coatings for electrical insulation and corrosion resistance on high-temperature alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.-H.; Cho, W.D.

    1996-11-01

    Several intermetallic films were applied to high-temperature alloys (V alloys and 304, 316 stainless steels) to provide electrical insulation and corrosion resistance. Alloy grain growth at 1000 C for the V-5Cr-5Ti alloy was investigated to determine stability of the alloy substrate during coating formation by CVD or metallic vapor processes at 800-850 C. Film layers were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and by electron-energy-dispersive and XRD analysis; they were also tested for electrical resistivity and corrosion resistance. Results elucidated the nature of the coatings, which provided both electrical insulation and high-temperature corrosion protection.

  16. Studies on the drug resistance profile of Enterococcus faecium distributed from poultry retailers to hospitals.

    PubMed

    Limayem, Alya; Donofrio, Robert Scott; Zhang, Chao; Haller, Edward; Johnson, Michael G

    2015-11-01

    The multidrug resistant Enterococcus faecium (MEF) strains originating from farm animals are proliferating at a substantial pace to impact downstream food chains and could reach hospitals. This study was conducted to elucidate the drug susceptibility profile of MEF strains collected from poultry products in Ann Arbor, MI area and clinical settings from Michigan State Lab and Moffitt Cancer Center (MCC) in Florida. Presumptive positive Enterococcus isolates at species level were identified by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis. The antibiotic susceptibility profile for both poultry and clinical strains was determined by the Thermo Scientific's Sensititre conform to the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) and validated via quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) methods. Out of 50 poultry samples (Turkey: n = 30; Chicken: n = 20), 36 samples were positive for Enterococcus species from which 20.83% were identified as E. faecium. All the E. faecium isolates were multidrug resistant and displayed resistance to the last alternative drug, quinupristin/dalfopristin (QD) used to treat vancomycin resistant E. faecium (VRE) in hospitals. Results indicate the presence of MEF strains in food animals and clinical settings that are also resistant to QD. PMID:26357893

  17. PCR-based identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains and their antibiotic resistance profiles

    PubMed Central

    Pournajaf, Abazar; Ardebili, Abdollah; Goudarzi, Leyla; Khodabandeh, Mahmoud; Narimani, Tahmineh; Abbaszadeh, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluated the PCR for mecA gene compared with the conventional oxacillin disk diffusion method for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) identification. Methods A total of 292 S. aureus strains were isolated from various clinical specimens obtained from hospitalized patients. Susceptibility test to several antimicrobial agents was performed by disk diffusion agar according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. The PCR amplification of the mecA gene was carried out in all the clinical isolates. Results Among antibiotics used in our study, penicillin showed the least anti-staphylococcal activity and vancomycin was the most effective. The rate of methicillin-resistant S. aureus prevalence determined by oxacillin disk diffusion method was 47.6%; whereas, 45.1% of S. aureus isolates were mecA- positive in the PCR assay. Conclusions This study is suggestive that the PCR for detection of mecA gene is a fast, accurate and valuable diagnostic tool, particularly in hospitals in areas where methicillin-resistant S. aureus is endemic. PMID:25183100

  18. Molecular Characterization and Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Retail Chicken.

    PubMed

    Sallam, Khalid Ibrahim; Abd-Elghany, Samir Mohammed; Elhadidy, Mohamed; Tamura, Tomohiro

    2015-10-01

    The emergence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in food-producing animals is of increasing interest, raising questions about the presence of MRSA in food of animal origin and potential sources of transmission to humans via the food chain. In this study, the prevalence, molecular characterization, virulence factors, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of MRSA isolates from 200 retail raw chicken samples in Egypt were determined. MRSA was detected by positive amplification of the mecA gene in 38% (76 of 200) of chicken samples analyzed. This represents a potential public health threat in Egypt, as this contamination rate seems to be the highest among other studies reported worldwide. Furthermore, genes encoding ?-hemolysin (hla) and staphylococcal enterotoxins (sea, seb, and sec) were detected in all of the 288 MRSA isolates. Nonetheless, none of the strains tested carried tst, the gene encoding toxic shock syndrome toxin 1. Antimicrobial resistance of MRSA isolates was most frequently detected against penicillin (93.4%), ampicillin (88.9%), and cloxacillin (83.3%). These results suggest that retail chicken might be a significant potential source for transmission of multidrug-resistant and toxigenic S. aureus in Egypt. This underlines the need for stricter hygienic measures in chicken production in Egypt to minimize the risk of transmission of these strains to consumers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that reports the isolation and molecular characterization of MRSA in retail chicken samples in Egypt. PMID:26408138

  19. Electrical resistivity of some Zintl phase and the precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, L.

    1990-09-21

    Resistivity measurements have been performed for electric characterization of the compounds Ba{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} and Ba{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}Cl, both with the Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3} structure type, along with Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3} and Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}F, both with the {beta}-Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} structure type. These measurements were taken as a function of temperature using the four probe method on pressed polycrystalline pellets of the compounds. A sealed apparatus was developed for containing these air-sensitive compounds throughout the experiments. By a simple electron count, one extra electron in both Ba{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} and Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3} should occupy a conduction band, giving these compounds a metallic character. In the cases of Ba{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}Cl and Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}F, the extra electron should bond to the halide, both filling the valence band and giving rise to semiconducting character. Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}, Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}F, and Ba{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}Cl were found to comply with the electron count prediction. Ba{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}, however, was found to be a semiconductor (E{sub g} = 0.30 eV) with a larger band gap than its corresponding chloride (E{sub g} = 0.09 eV).

  20. On the Intensity Profile of Electric Lamps and Light Bulbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacalla, Xavier; Salumbides, Edcel John

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that the time profile of the light intensity from domestic lighting sources exhibits simple yet interesting properties that foster lively student discussions. We monitor the light intensity of an industrial fluorescent lamp (also known as TL) and an incandescent bulb using a photodetector connected to an oscilloscope. The light…

  1. Evaluation of antimicrobial resistance profiles of Salmonella isolates from broiler chickens at slaughter in Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Mainali, C; McFall, M; King, R; Irwin, R

    2014-03-01

    Antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella species are threatening to become a serious public health problem. Therefore, surveillance and prudent use of antimicrobials is needed in both the agricultural and human health sectors. The aim of this study was to describe the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Salmonella isolates recovered from healthy broiler chickens at slaughter from November 2004 to April 2005. Salmonella isolates recovered from 36 broiler flocks in Alberta, Canada, were serotyped and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility against 15 antimicrobials. Of 272 Salmonella isolates tested, 64.0% were resistant to one or more antimicrobials, 10.0% were resistant to three or more antimicrobials, and 1.8% were resistant to five antimicrobials. All isolates were susceptible to amikacin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ceftiofur, cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, and nalidixic acid. The highest prevalence of resistance was to tetracycline (54.8%), followed by streptomycin (24.2%) and sulfisoxazole (8.4%). The most common multiantimicrobial resistance patterns were to streptomycin-tetracycline (24.3%), streptomycin-sulfisoxazole-tetracycline (6.6%), and ampicillin-streptomycin-sulfisoxazole-tetracycline (3.7%). The strongest associations were observed between resistance to kanamycin and tetracycline (odds ratio = 65.7, P = 0.001) and to ampicillin and sulfisoxazole (odds ratio = 62.9, P = 0.001). Salmonella Hadar and Salmonella Heidelberg were the two most common serovars accounting for 40.4 and 13.6% of the total isolates, respectively. Eighty-one percent and 12.7% of Salmonella Hadar isolates and 62.0 and 8.1% of Salmonella Heidelberg isolates were resistant to 1 or more and three or more antimicrobials, respectively. The flock level prevalence of resistance ranged from 5.6% for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole to 83.3% for tetracycline. This study provides baseline information on antimicrobial susceptibility of Salmonella isolates of broiler chickens at slaughter in Alberta that can serve as a benchmark for future research. PMID:24674442

  2. Modeling the electrical resistivity of deformation processed metal-metal composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Liang; Anderson, Iver; Riedemann, Trevor; Russell, Alan

    2014-09-01

    Deformation processed metal–metal (matrix–reinforcement) composites (DMMCs) are high-strength, high-conductivity in situ composites produced by severe plastic deformation. The electrical resistivity of DMMCs is rarely investigated mechanistically and tends to be slightly higher than the rule-of-mixtures prediction. In this paper, we analyze several possible physical mechanisms (i.e. phonons, interfaces, mutual solution, grain boundaries, dislocations) responsible for the electrical resistivity of DMMC systems and how these mechanisms could be affected by processing conditions (i.e. temperature, deformation processing). As an innovation, we identified and assembled the major scattering mechanisms for specific DMMC systems and modeled their electrical resistivity in combination. From this analysis, it appears that filament coarsening rather than dislocation annihilation is primarily responsible for the resistivity drop observed in these materials after annealing and that grain boundary scattering contributes to the resistivity at least at the same magnitude as does interface scattering.

  3. Composite Materials with Distinctive Behaviors under High Electric Fields: I - Material Switches to 'High Resistive' State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, H.

    1994-01-01

    Electrically conductive silver filled epoxy ECF-563 preform, sandwiched between gold contact pads exhibits intermittent current-voltage characteristics with switching to 'high resistive' state under applied bias voltage.

  4. Gene Expression Profiling in the Thiamethoxam Resistant and Susceptible B-biotype Sweetpotato Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen; Yang, Xin; Wang, Shao-Ii; Wu, Qing-jun; Yang, Ni-na; Li, Ru-mei; Jiao, Xiaoguo; Pan, Hui-peng; Liu, Bai-ming; Feng, Yun-tao; Xu, Bao-yun; Zhou, Xu-guo; Zhang, You-jun

    2012-01-01

    Thiamethoxam has been used as a major insecticide to control the B-biotype sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae). Due to its excessive use, a high level of resistance to thiamethoxam has developed worldwide over the past several years. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this resistance in B. tabaci, gene profiles between the thiamethoxam-resistant and thiamethoxam-susceptible strains were investigated using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) library approach. A total of 72 and 52 upand down-regulated genes were obtained from the forward and reverse SSH libraries, respectively. These expressed sequence tags (ESTs) belong to several functional categories based on their gene ontology annotation. Some categories such as cell communication, response to abiotic stimulus, lipid particle, and nuclear envelope were identified only in the forward library of thiamethoxam-resistant strains. In contrast, categories such as behavior, cell proliferation, nutrient reservoir activity, sequence-specific DNA binding transcription factor activity, and signal transducer activity were identified solely in the reverse library. To study the validity of the SSH method, 16 differentially expressed genes from both forward and reverse SSH libraries were selected randomly for further analyses using quantitative realtime PCR (qRT-PCR). The qRT-PCR results were fairly consistent with the SSH results; however, only 50% of the genes showed significantly different expression profiles between the thiamethoxam-resistant and thiamethoxam-susceptible whiteflies. Among these genes, a putative NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase was substantially over-expressed in the thiamethoxamresistant adults compared to their susceptible counterparts. The distributed profiles show that it was highly expressed during the egg stage, and was most abundant in the abdomen of adult females. PMID:22957505

  5. Determination of surface electric charge profile in pyroelectric crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ghaderi, R.; Davani, F. Abbasi

    2014-12-08

    Pyroelectric crystals are used to produce high energy self-focused electron beams. Here, an experimental analysis in combination with simulation studies will be reported to investigate possible sources of this effect. In the experiments, the surface of crystal was divided into six separated parts and the rate of surface electric charge production was measured accordingly. A non-steady and spatially non-uniform distribution of the surface charge generation was observed, in which it tends to a uniform distribution in the course of experiment. The obtained surface electric charges from the experiments were used to simulate the electric field and potential around the crystal by COMSOL Multiphysics. It was observed that emitted electrons from the crystal surface were focused, and the non-uniformity in spatial charge is responsible for this phenomenon.

  6. Determination of doping profiles in silicon from resistivity measurements via the four-point probe in combination with layer strippings via anodic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lis, Brian H.

    1987-08-01

    The performance of resistivity measurements using the four-point probe in combination with layer strippings using anodic oxidation, is a well-known and useful method for profiling doped layers of silicon. The method is implemented and critically assessed. This method uses a technique for forming silicon dioxide on the surface of silicon wafers at room temperature. By performing four-point probe resistivity measurements both before and after the process, the differential resistivity is calculated and converted to an electrically active dopant concentration for the average depth of the layer removed. Repeating this process until the opposite conductivity type silicon is reached, yields the series of points quantifying the dopant concentration at specific depths into the silicon. Anodic oxidation is used to form the silicon dioxide. This technique is discussed and a critical review of the literature presented. Precautions and general considerations for measuring resistivity via the four-point probe are also given. An error analysis is undertaken to determine the source of some of the observed experimental error. The project report details all aspects of the method, offers techniques for improved accuracy and repeatability, looks into surface effects, critiques the method, and explores further areas for work. The experimental doping profiles obtained are compared with profiles obtained from four other methods (two experimental and two theoretical).

  7. Strain-dependent electrical resistance of multi-walled carbon nanotube/polymer composite films.

    PubMed

    Park, Myounggu; Kim, Hyonny; Youngblood, Jeffrey P

    2008-02-01

    The strain-dependent electrical resistance characteristics of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/polymer composite films were investigated. In this research, polyethylene oxide (PEO) is used as the polymer matrix. Two representative volume fractions of MWCNT/PEO composite films were selected: 0.56 vol% (near the percolation threshold) and 1.44 vol% (away from the percolation threshold) of MWCNT. An experimental setup which can measure electrical resistance and strain simultaneously and continuously has been developed. Unique and repeatable relationships in resistance versus strain were obtained for multiple specimens with different volume fractions of MWCNT. The overall pattern of electrical resistance change versus strain for the specimens tested consists of linear and nonlinear regions. A resistance change model to describe the combination of linear and nonlinear modes of electrical resistance change as a function of strain is suggested. The unique characteristics in electrical resistance change for different volume fractions imply that MWCNT/PEO composite films can be used as tunable strain sensors and for application into embedded sensor systems in structures. PMID:21817619

  8. An Ultra-Precise System for Electrical Resistivity Tomography Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    LaBrecque, Douglas J; Adkins, Paula L

    2008-12-09

    The objective of this research was to determine the feasibility of building and operating an ERT system that will allow measurement precision that is an order of magnitude better than existing systems on the market today and in particular if this can be done without significantly greater manufacturing or operating costs than existing commercial systems. Under this proposal, we performed an estimation of measurement errors in galvanic resistivity data that arise as a consequence of the type of electrode material used to make the measurements. In our laboratory, measurement errors for both magnitude and induced polarization (IP) were estimated using the reciprocity of data from an array of electrodes as might be used for electrical resistance tomography using 14 different metals as well as one non-metal - carbon. In a second phase of this study, using archival data from two long-term ERT surveys, we examined long-term survivability of electrodes over periods of several years. The survey sites were: the Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (which was sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy as part of the civilian radioactive waste management program), and a water infiltration test at a site adjacent to the New Mexico Institute of Mines and Technology in Socorro, New Mexico (sponsored by the Sandia/Tech vadose program). This enabled us to compare recent values with historical values and determine electrode performance over the long-term as well as the percentage of electrodes that have failed entirely. We have constructed a prototype receiver system, made modifications and revised the receiver design. The revised prototype uses a new 24 bit analog to digital converter from Linear Technologies with amplifier chips from Texas Instruments. The input impedance of the system will be increased from 107 Ohms to approximately 1010 Ohms. The input noise level of the system has been decreased to approximately 10 Nanovolts and system resolution to about 1 Nanovolt at the highest gain range of 125 to 1. The receiver also uses very high precision and high temperature stability components. The goal is to improve the accuracy to better than 0.1%. The system has more receiver channels, eight, to allow efficient data collection at lower base frequencies. We are also implementing a frequency-domain acquisition mode in addition to the time-domain acquisition mode used in the earlier systems. Initial field tests were started in the fall of 2008. We conducted tests on a number of types of cable commonly used for resistivity surveys. A series of different tests were designed to determine if the couplings were primarily resistive, capacitive, or inductive in nature and to ascertain that the response was due to the cable cross-talk and did not depend on the receiver electronics. The results show that the problem appears to be primarily capacitive in nature and does not appear to be due to problems in the receiver electronics. Thus a great deal of emphasis has been placed on finding appropriate cables as well as stable electrodes that have low contact impedance at the very low current flows observed at the receiver. One of the issues in survey design and data collection has been determining how long one must wait before using the same electrode as a transmitter and as a receiver. A series of tests was completed in the laboratory sand tank where four-electrode measurements were made using the same dipole transmitters and dipole receivers (the dipoles used adjacent electrodes). For each data series, a single set of normal measurements were collected with no reciprocals and electrodes were never reused as a receiver after being used as a transmitter. After waiting a specified length of time, the reciprocal measurements were collected using a schedule of measurements. The order of this second schedule was rearranged such that if this second set of measurements were performed without first using the normal schedule, no electrode would be used as a receiver after being used as a transmitter. For this study, we cannot conclude that increasing the

  9. An appraisal of the electrical resistance method for assessing root surface area

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yang; Repo, Tapani; Silvennoinen, Raimo; Lehto, Tarja; Pelkonen, Paavo

    2010-01-01

    Electrical resistances of roots and stems of hydroponically raised willows (Salix schwerinii) were studied and related to root morphology. Willow cuttings with and without roots were set in a constant electric field (effective voltage of 0.1 V, sine-AC, 128 Hz) in a hydroponic solution. The electrical resistance of different components in the measurement system was measured and analysed in relation to root surface area in contact with the cultivation solution. Axial resistivities of single root segments and of stems were measured. The results showed that the resistance decreased in relation to an increase in the contact surface area of the roots with the solution. The resistance depended strongly on the contact area of the stem with the solution, however, thus causing bias in the evaluation of root surface area. This work is a new contribution for the understanding of current pathways in the root system as exposed to an external electric field and for developing a non-destructive method to study plant roots accordingly. It may be concluded that the electrical resistance method is a useful non-destructive method to study roots and their physiological properties. Electrical analogues for roots and stem comprising resistors are discussed in relation to in situ measurements. PMID:20363862

  10. The effects of electrical stimulation on body composition and metabolic profile after spinal cord injury – Part II

    PubMed Central

    Gorgey, Ashraf S.; Dolbow, David R.; Dolbow, James D.; Khalil, Refka K.; Gater, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Diet and exercise are cornerstones in the management of obesity and associated metabolic complications, including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and disturbances in the lipid profile. However, the role of exercise in managing body composition adaptations and metabolic disorders after spinal cord injury (SCI) is not well established. The current review summarizes evidence about the efficacy of using neuromuscular electrical stimulation or functional electrical stimulation in exercising the paralytic lower extremities to improve body composition and metabolic profile after SCI. There are a number of trials that investigated the effects on muscle cross-sectional area, fat-free mass, and glucose/lipid metabolism. The duration of the intervention in these trials varied from 6 weeks to 24 months. Training frequency ranged from 2 to 5 days/week. Most studies documented significant increases in muscle size but no noticeable changes in adipose tissue. While increases in skeletal muscle size after twice weekly training were greater than those trials that used 3 or 5 days/week, other factors such as differences in the training mode, i.e. resistance versus cycling exercise and pattern of muscle activation may be responsible for this observation. Loading to evoke muscle hypertrophy is a key component in neuromuscular training after SCI. The overall effects on lean mass were modest and did not exceed 10% and the effects of training on trunk or pelvic muscles remain unestablished. Most studies reported improvement in glucose metabolism with the enhancement of insulin sensitivity being the major factor following training. The effect on lipid profile is unclear and warrants further investigation. PMID:25001669

  11. Fracture network characterisation of a landslide by electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalai, S.; Szokoli, K.; Novák, A.; Tóth, Á.; Metwaly, M.; Prácser, E.

    2014-06-01

    In contrary to most of the landslide studies which concentrate to the sliding surface in this paper the fracture system of a loess landslide is investigated. The continuity and geometry, orientation and dip of the major fractures are crucial parameters for assessing rock stability and landslide evolution. Rain infiltrating moreover easily into the rock mass through fractures providing lubrication for the material to slide, and increases the self-mass of the material increasing the slumping rate. Fracture maps enable beside of the characterisation of the fractured area the delineation of the endangered area of slow-moving landslides in due time and getting information about its inner structure. For constructing such maps Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) measurements have been carried out using different geoelectric configurations. In spite of the high density of the fractures and their changing physical parameters in function of their water content - which make the interpretation rather difficult - a number of fractures have been detected and more or less well localised. On the basis of the present research the application of the Schlumberger and the Pole-Dipole arrays is recommended to fulfil the aim of the study. The optimised Stummer array is at the same time the only array which presents conductive anomalies (supposedly water filled fractures), as well, and indicates that fractures elongate deep downwards. Because these features seem to be realistic based on field observations or theoretical considerations the Stummer array may be a very good tool for completing e.g. P-Dp measurements. The study area could have been divided by all arrays into differently fractured zones, which assists a lot in understanding the landslide structure and evolution. It was shown, moreover, that in the still passive area there are thick fractures, too, verifying its dangerousness, as well. The ERT results enabled localising the rupture surfaces of future slumps which proved to be distributed uniformly with about 10 m distance between them and predicting mass movements which may prevent the slump along the visible fracture. Similar unidirectional fracture systems could be investigated by the ERT method for any hydrogeological or engineering geological aim.

  12. Spatial and temporal monitoring of soil water content with an irrigated corn crop cover using surface electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michot, Didier; Benderitter, Yves; Dorigny, Abel; Nicoullaud, Bernard; King, Dominique; Tabbagh, Alain

    2003-05-01

    A nondestructive and spatially integrated multielectrode method for measuring soil electrical resistivity was tested in the Beauce region of France during a period of corn crop irrigation to monitor soil water flow over time and in two-dimensional (2-D) with simultaneous measurements of soil moisture and thermal profiles. The results suggested the potential of surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) for improving soil science and agronomy studies. The method was able to produce a 2-D delimitation of soil horizons as well as to monitor soil water movement. Soil drainage through water uptake by the roots, the progression of the infiltration front with preferential flow zones, and the drainage of the plowed horizon were well identified. At the studied stage of corn development (3 months) the soil zones where infiltration and drainage occurred were mainly located under the corn rows. The structural soil characteristics resulting from agricultural practices or the passage of agricultural equipment were also shown. Two-dimensional sections of soil moisture content were calculated using ERT. The estimates were made by using independently established "in situ" calibration relationships between the moisture and electrical resistivity of typical soil horizons. The thermal soil profile was also considered in the modeling. The results showed a reliable linear relationship between the calculated and measured water contents in the crop horizon. The precision of the calculation of the specific soil water content, quantified by the root mean square error (RMSE), was 3.63% with a bias corresponding to an overestimation of 1.45%. The analysis and monitoring of the spatial variability of the soil moisture content with ERT represent two components of a significant tool for better management of soil water reserves and rational irrigation practices.

  13. Geophysical investigations at the Istron archaeological site, eastern Crete, Greece using seismic refraction and electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrukh, M.; Soupios, P.; Papadopoulos, N.; Sarris, A.

    2012-12-01

    The subsurface characteristics of the archaeological site of Priniatikos Pyrgos at Istron, Eastern Crete were studied through the combined use of seismic and electrical tomography techniques. Twenty-nine seismic refraction profiles were applied to determine soil thickness and bedrock geometrical characteristics. First arrivals were picked and a 3D algorithm of seismic tomography was used to invert the travel times. To confirm the reliability of the final results a checkboard test was used. Part of the seismic area was overlapped with six electrical resistivity tomography sections. The ERT data were used to validate the resulted tomographic images. The integrated application of these tomographic methods enhanced the knowledge regarding the geological conditions and contributed in the archaeo-environmental reconstruction of Istron area by providing indications regarding the ancient harbour of the nearby settlement.

  14. Spitzer or neoclassical resistivity: A comparison between measured and model poloidal field profiles on PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.M.; Hatcher, R.; Kaita, R.; Kessel, C.; LeBlanc, B.; McCune, D.C.; Paul, S. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Levinton, F.M. )

    1992-01-01

    Direct measurements of the radial profile of the magnetic field line pitch on PBX-M coupled with model predictions of these profiles allow a critical comparison with the Spitzer and neoclassical models of plasma parallel resistivity. The measurements of the magnetic field line pitch are made by Motional Stark Effect polarimetry, while the model profiles are determined by solving the poloidal field diffusion equation in the TRANSP transport code using measured plasma profiles and assuming either Spitzer or neoclassical resistivity. The measured field pitch profiles were available for only seven cases, and the model profiles were distinguishable from each other in only three of those cases due to finite resistive diffusion times. The data in two of these three were best matched by the Spitzer model, especially in the inner half of the plasma. Portions of the measured pitch profiles for these two cases and the full profiles for other cases, however, departed significantly from both the Spitzer and neoclassical models, indicating a plasma resistivity profile different from either model.

  15. Electrical resistance measurements of highly inhibited SiC coated carbon-carbon laminates 

    E-print Network

    Parker, Paul Albert

    1998-01-01

    The effect of oxidation damage at 900'C of highly inhibited, SiC coated carbon-carbon laminates on shear modulus, mass loss, and electrical resistance are studied. The approach taken enabled the interpretation of the shear modulus and electrical...

  16. Percolation of gallium dominates the electrical resistance of focused ion beam deposited metals

    SciTech Connect

    Faraby, H.; DiBattista, M.; Bandaru, P. R.

    2014-04-28

    Metal deposition through focused ion beam (FIB) based systems is thought to result in material composed of the primary metal from the metallo-organic precursor in addition to carbon, oxygen, and gallium. We determined, through electrical resistance and chemical composition measurements on a wide range of FIB deposited platinum and tungsten lines, that the gallium ion (Ga{sup +}) concentration in the metal lines plays the dominant role in controlling the electrical resistivity. Effective medium theory, based on McLachlan's formalisms, was used to describe the relationship between the Ga{sup +} concentration and the corresponding resistivity.

  17. Electrical Resistance of Ceramic Matrix Composites for Damage Detection and Life-Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Morscher, Gregory N.; Xia, Zhenhai

    2008-01-01

    The electric resistance of woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites were measured under tensile loading conditions. The results show that the electrical resistance is closely related to damage and that real-time information about the damage state can be obtained through monitoring of the resistance. Such self-sensing capability provides the possibility of on-board/in-situ damage detection or inspection of a component during "down time". The correlation of damage with appropriate failure mechanism can then be applied to accurate life prediction for high-temperature ceramic matrix composites.

  18. Concentration dependence of electrical resistivity of binary liquid alloy HgZn: Ab-initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Nalini; Thakur, Anil; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2013-06-01

    The electrical resistivity of HgZn liquid alloy has been made calculated using Troullier and Martins ab-initio pseudopotential as a function of concentration. Hard sphere diameters of Hg and Zn are obtained through the inter-ionic pair potential have been used to calculate partial structure factors. Considering the liquid alloy to be a ternary mixture Ziman's formula for calculating the resistivity of binary liquid alloys, modified for complex formation, has been used. These results suggest that ab-initio approach for calculating electrical resistivity is quite successful in explaining the electronic transport properties of binary Liquid alloys.

  19. Young Men’s Condom Use Resistance Tactics: A Latent Profile Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Kelly Cue; Stappenbeck, Cynthia A.; Norris, Jeanette; George, William H.; Jacques-Tiura, Angela J.; Schraufnagel, Trevor J.; Kajumulo, Kelly F.

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that many men have used a variety of tactics to avoid using a condom when having sex with a woman. Guided by previous work demonstrating that men’s use of coercive condom resistance tactics was predicted by negative attitudes toward women, inconsistent condom use, multiple partners, and sexual sensation seeking, the current study used latent profile analysis (LPA) to determine whether similar constructs were associated with a variety of resistance tactics. A community sample of 313 moderate drinking men participated, of whom 80% reported employing at least one condom use resistance tactic since adolescence. The LPA revealed three classes of men. In general, men with the least negative beliefs about women, low levels of sexual sensation seeking and impulsivity, and positive beliefs about condoms (Condom Positive/Low Hostility) reported less use of resistance tactics than men with moderate sexual sensation seeking and impulsivity, negative beliefs about condoms, and moderate (Condom Negative/Moderate Hostility) or high (Condom Negative/High Hostility) negative attitudes about women. The classes also differed in terms of their sexual behaviors. This study demonstrated that sexual risk behavior interventions should not only address the tactics through which men resist using condoms but also tailor these efforts to men’s individual characteristics. PMID:23548069

  20. Antimicrobial Resistance and Plasmid Profile of Bacterial Strains Isolated from the Urbanized Eltsovka-1 River (Russia).

    PubMed

    Lobova, Tatiana I; Yemelyanova, Elena; Andreeva, Irina S; Puchkova, Larisa I; Repin, Vladimir Ye

    2015-08-01

    Antimicrobial resistance and plasmid profile of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains isolated from the urbanized Eltsovka-1 River (Russia) were investigated. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA of of G+ strains showed 99-100% identity to that of Bacillus aerophilus, Bacillus altitudinis, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus anthrancis, Bacillus barbaricus, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus flexus, Bacillus indriensis, Bacillus stratosphericus, Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis, Streptomyces albidoflavus, Streptomyces albus, Streptomyces exfoliatus, Streptomyces odorifer, and Streptomyces sampsonii. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA of G-strains was similar in 99-100% to that of Aeromonas bestiarum, Aeromonas encheleia, Aeromonas hydrophila, A. hydrophila subsp. anaerogenes, A. hydrophila subsp. dhakensis, Aeromonas media, Aeromonas molluscorum, Aeromonas popoffii, Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. masoucida, A. salmonicida subsp. pectinolytica, A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, Aeromonas punctata, Aeromonas sobria, and Shewanella putrefaciens. The highest percentage (88.4%) of strains was resistant to polymyxin B followed by 69% to lincomycin, 61.5% to benzilpenicillin, 57.7% to ampicillin, and 50% to carbenicillin. A low level of resistance (4%) was found to kanamycin (8%), to streptomycin (11.5%), to neomycin and tetracycline, and (15%) to erythromycin. No resistance was found to gentamycin, monomycin, and chloroamphenicol. The majority (80.7%) of strains was multidrug-resistant. Ninety-two percent of all strains carried plasmid DNA of various sizes. PMID:25803299

  1. The competing impacts of geology and groundwater on electrical resistivity around Wrightsville Beach, NC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Rob. L.; Lizarralde, Dan

    2011-05-01

    Measurements of electrical resistivity have long been used to find freshwater resources below the earth's surface. Recently, offshore resistivity and electromagnetic techniques have been used to map occurrences of submarine groundwater originating from the offshore extension of terrestrial aquifers. In many cases, observations of a high resistivity (low conductivity) anomaly in the seafloor are sufficient to suggest the presence of fresh (and less conductive) pore waters. Data from offshore Wrightsville Beach, NC show highly variable resistivity structure, with moderately high resistivity at depths of ˜20 m subsurface that is at least in part caused by lithologic complexity in an underlying limestone unit, the Castle Hayne. These offshore results suggest caution in the interpretation of resistivity anomalies simply in terms of groundwater volumes. In contrast, low onshore resistivities show evidence for intrusion of saltwater into the subsurface beneath the beach, adjacent to areas of pumping for water supply.

  2. Effects of contact resistance on electrical conductivity measurements of SiC-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngblood, G. E.; Thomsen, E. C.; Henager, C. H.

    2013-11-01

    A combination 2/4-probe method was used to measure electrical resistances across a pure, monolithic CVD-SiC disc sample with contact resistance at the SiC/metallic electrode interfaces. By comparison of the almost simultaneous 2/4-probe measurements, the specific contact resistance (Rc) and its temperature dependence were determined for two types (sputtered gold and porous nickel) electrodes from room temperature (RT) to ˜973 K. The Rc-values behaved similarly for each type of metallic electrode: Rc > ˜1000 ? cm2 at RT, decreasing continuously to ˜1-10 ? cm2 at 973 K. The temperature dependence of the inverse Rc indicated thermally activated electrical conduction across the SiC/metallic interface with an apparent activation energy of ˜0.3 eV. For the flow channel insert application in a fusion reactor blanket, contact resistance potentially could reduce the transverse electrical conductivity by about 50%.

  3. Effects of contact resistance on electrical conductivity measurements of SiC-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Gerald E.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-06-30

    A combination 2/4-probe method was used to measure electrical resistances across a pure, monolithic CVD-SiC disc sample with contact resistance at the SiC/metallic electrode interfaces. By comparison of the almost simultaneous 2/4-probe measurements, the specific contact resistance (Rc) and its temperature dependence were determined for two types (sputtered gold and porous nickel) electrodes from room temperature (RT) to ?973 K. The Rc-values behaved similarly for each type of metallic electrode: Rc > ?1000 ? cm2 at RT, decreasing continuously to ?1–10 ? cm2 at 973 K. The temperature dependence of the inverse Rc indicated thermally activated electrical conduction across the SiC/metallic interface with an apparent activation energy of ?0.3 eV. For the flow channel insert application in a fusion reactor blanket, contact resistance potentially could reduce the transverse electrical conductivity by about 50%.

  4. Electricity Diversity Profiles for Energy Simulation of Office Buildings 

    E-print Network

    Claridge, D.E.; Abushakra, B.; Haberl, J.S.; Sreshthaputra, A.

    2004-01-01

    , Division of Energy Economics and Plan­ ning, Lund, Sweden. Noren, c., and J. Pyrko. 1998a. Using multiple regression analysis to develop electricity consumption indicators for public schools. Proceedings of the 1998 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy... Efficiency in Buildings, pp. 3.255-3.266. Noren, c., and 1. Pyrko. 1998b. Typical load shapes for Swedish schools and hotels. Energy and Buildings Vol­ ume 28, Number 3,1998, pp.145-157. Turner, WD., D.E. Claridge, DL. O'Neal, 1. Haberl, W Hef­ fington, D...

  5. Strategies of ARP application (Automatic Resistivity Profiling) for viticultural precision farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, E. A. C.; Andrenelli, M. C.; Bucelli, P.; Magini, S.; Natarelli, L.; Pellegrini, S.; Perria, R.; Storchi, P.; Vignozzi, N.

    2009-04-01

    Introduction Viticultural precision farming needs detailed soil information, which can be obtained by means of remote as well as proximal sensors, besides traditional invasive soil survey. Nevertheless, the use of the new technologies is still in its infancy, because of their costs and the lack of knowledge about the detail actually needed for the viticultural husbandry. The main aim of this work was to test the sensitivity of the ARP methodology (Automatic Resistivity Profiling) in supporting soil survey for viticultural precision farming. In addition, we tried to optimize the detail of geoelectrical measurements and soil sampling to reduce the cost of the integrated survey, maintaining a significant information accuracy for viticulture. Materials and methods Two vineyards in coastal Tuscany (central Italy), about 3.5 ha each, were selected. Vineyard 1 was cultivated with Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc, while vineyard 2 only had Cabernet Sauvignon. Soil survey and geoelectrical investigation were conducted in may 2007. The ARP methodology consists in the injection in soil of electric current through one pair of electrodes mounted on teeth wheels and measuring the resulting potential with other three pairs of electrodes, placed of the same mobile equipment. The electrical resistance of the soil (ER) is expressed as ohm per m. The depth of investigation is a function of the geometry of the electrodes and the soil being probed. Increasing the distance between electrodes will increase the depth while decreasing the measured potential. The innovative character of the ARP technique is represented by the passage of a mobile machinery, able to perform 30,000 measurements per hectare, with a measurement every 0.2 m. The ARP system, equipped with a digital encoder and DGPS system, is transported by a four-wheeled vehicle. It is fitted with three sensors that contemporaneously analyse three distinct levels of the soil, the values of which are represented by maps of apparent resistivity, from the surface to 0.5 m, 1 m and 1.7 m depth respectively. Soil sampling at 0.1-0.3 m and 0.5-0.7 m was carried out with hand auger on a regular grid sampling scheme (35-40 m per 20 m). Soil samples were analysed for moisture, particle size, and electrical conductivity in water. The spatial viticultural behaviour was appreciated in both vineyards through image analysis of aerial photographs and, in vineyard 2, by means of a grape sampling and analysis of the must at harvest. The vines chosen for the sampling were selected according to the results of the geoelectrical survey. Results and discussion Laboratory analysis showed that the most frequent texture class in both vineyards was clay loam, followed by clay. ER spatial variability however was different in the two vineyards. In vineyard 1, the occurrence of low ER values at 0-0.5 and 0-1 m depths correlated with the presence of clayey and saline soil horizons. In vineyard 2, only ER at 0-1 m depth correlated with clay and soil water content. In vineyard 1, the relationship between ER and clay content allowed the evaluation of the loss of accuracy caused by the reduction of the number of analysed soil samples. Passing from the initial 51 samples, to 25, 12, and 6, the accuracy in clay prediction passed from 100% to 79.4, 79.1, and 74%, respectively. The reduction of accuracy of ER prediction at less intense surveys, was limited, in spite of the relatively high soil variability. In fact, doubling the distance between the passages of the machinery between the vine rows, the accuracy of ER prediction was still of 74%, and even widening it at 24 m, from the initial 6 m, the accuracy remained 64%. The density of vegetation in vineyard 1 was positively correlated with ER, while it was inverse in vineyard 2. The opposite behaviour was due to the soil salinity of vineyard 1, which inversely correlated with ER and vegetation vigour. In vineyard 2, on the other hand, the lack of soil salinity enhanced the relationship between vine vigour and water content. In the same vineyard, the sugar content of

  6. Electrical resistivity response of amorphous carbon nitride thin films in various gas atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Naoyuki; Aono, Masami; Abe, Hiroshi; Kitazawa, Nobuaki; Watanabe, Yoshihisa

    2015-04-01

    Electrical behaviors of amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) films following exposure to various gas species were investigated. The a-CNx film was prepared by reactive RF magnetron sputtering at 873 K. The resistivity of the film was measured in flowing He, N2, O2, Ar, and CO2. Regardless of gas species, the electrical resistivity of the a-CNx film dropped rapidly following gas injection and recovered in the evacuation process. This phenomenon is closely related to the changes in the film microstructure and electrical state. The response time in the adsorption process decreased with increasing gas pressure. The variation range of the electrical resistivity changed depending on the gas species.

  7. Simultaneous electrical resistivity and mass uptake measurements in bromine intercalated fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Changes in mass and electrical resistivity of several types of pitch-based and vapor-grown graphite fibers were monitored during reaction with bromine. The observed threshold pressure dependent reaction suggested that the fibers were intercalated. In the fully brominated compound, the mass was increased by 44 percent and the resistivity was improved by a factor of 17. In the residue compound, the mass was increased by 22 percent and the resistivity was improved by a factor of 5. Fibers possessing different degrees of graphitization had surprisingly similar changes in both mass and resistivity.

  8. Electrical resistivity cross-section across the Garhwal Himalaya: Proxy to fluid-seismicity linkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Gautam; Arora, B. R.; Gupta, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) measurements along a profile cutting across the Garhwal Himalaya of India are inverted to obtain 2-D electrical resistivity structures of the Himalayan wedge and of the underthrusting Indian plate. The imaged resistivity cross-section is dominated by a low-angle north-east dipping intra-crustal high conducting layer (IC-HCL) with an average thickness of 5 km. At transition from the Lesser Himalaya to the Higher Himalaya, the IC-HCL is marked by a ramp structure across which its top jumps from a depth of 8 km to 13 km. High conductivity of the layer is caused by pounding of upward propagating metamorphic fluids trapped by tectonically induced neutral buoyancy. In compression regime of the Himalaya, the mechanical weakening effects of the fluids counteract the fault-normal stresses, thereby facilitating thrust-type earthquakes on a plane imaged as the top of the IC-HCL. It is suggested that in the Himalaya collision belt, like the active subduction zone, the active seismic plane forming seat of large and great earthquakes is located a few kilometers above the top of the down-going plate. In this tectonic setting, the high conductance ramp symbolizes a block of low shear strength and high strain, which under the deviatoric stresses release accentuated stresses into the brittle crust, thereby generating small but more frequent earthquakes in the narrow Himalayan Seismic Belt. In response to either the co-seismic pumping or the stress transfer during inter-seismic period, the upward infiltration of fluid fluxes into the over pressurized zones sufficiently reduces the shear strength of local thrusts and shear zones, turning these into locales of concentrated seismicity.

  9. Electrical resistivity and hydrogen permeation of dip-coated Er 2O 3 on JLF-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongxun; Tanaka, Teruya; Muroga, Takeo

    2011-10-01

    Liquid blanket systems are very promising directions for future fusion reactors. A ceramic coating on the ducts would solve issues for the liquid blankets such as MHD pressure drop and tritium permeation through structure materials. In this study, an Er 2O 3 coating was fabricated on JLF-1 (Fe-9Cr-2W based reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel), SUS430 (18Cr based commercial ferritic steel) by dip-coating method with metal organic decomposition (MOD) liquid followed by baking in air. XRD patterns indicated that good crystallinity of the Er 2O 3 coating was obtained for the baking temperature of 600 °C. The highest electrical resistivity was about 10 11 ? m. Below the coating, a substrate oxidation layer was also formed according to a XPS elemental depth profile. Hydrogen permeability of the coated sample was decreased only by 1/15 compared with bare JLF-1 sample. The reason might be oxidation of the substrate surface for degrading the coating barrier performance.

  10. Transcriptional profiling reveals elevated CO2 and elevated O3 alter resistance of soybean (Glycine max) to Japanese

    E-print Network

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Transcriptional profiling reveals elevated CO2 and elevated O3 alter resistance of soybean (Glycine the interactions between plants and insects. Using microarray analysis of field-grown soybean (Glycine max), we the ability to mount an effective defence, elevated CO2 may decrease resistance of soybean to herbivory. Key

  11. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    DOEpatents

    Daily, W.D.; Laine, D.L.; Laine, E.F.

    1997-08-26

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid though the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution. 6 figs.

  12. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Laine, Daren L. (San Antonio, TX); Laine, Edwin F. (Alamo, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid though the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution.

  13. Methods for detecting and locating leaks in containment facilities using electrical potential data and electrical resistance tomographic imaging techniques

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Laine, Daren L. (San Anotonio, TX); Laine, Edwin F. (Penn Valley, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Methods are provided for detecting and locating leaks in liners used as barriers in the construction of landfills, surface impoundments, water reservoirs, tanks, and the like. Electrodes are placed in the ground around the periphery of the facility, in the leak detection zone located between two liners if present, and/or within the containment facility. Electrical resistivity data is collected using these electrodes. This data is used to map the electrical resistivity distribution beneath the containment liner or between two liners in a double-lined facility. In an alternative embodiment, an electrode placed within the lined facility is driven to an electrical potential with respect to another electrode placed at a distance from the lined facility (mise-a-la-masse). Voltage differences are then measured between various combinations of additional electrodes placed in the soil on the periphery of the facility, the leak detection zone, or within the facility. A leak of liquid through the liner material will result in an electrical potential distribution that can be measured at the electrodes. The leak position is located by determining the coordinates of an electrical current source pole that best fits the measured potentials with the constraints of the known or assumed resistivity distribution.

  14. ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY TECHNIQUE TO ASSESS THE INTEGRITY OF GEOMEMBRANE LINERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two-dimensional electrical modeling of a liner system was performed using computer techniques. The modeling effort examined the voltage distributions in cross sections of lined facilities with different leak locations. Results confirmed that leaks in the liner influenced voltage ...

  15. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography: a powerful tool for landslide monitoring?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, A.

    2011-12-01

    The extreme rainfall events and the quick snowmelt occurrences play an important role in the triggering of the landslides. The occurrence of one of these factors can determine the variation of water content in the first layers of the subsoil and as a consequence a quick soil saturation inducing both an increase in pore-water pressures and the overloaded of the slopes progressively collapsing. The electrical resistivity, self-potential, electromagnetic induction and GPR methods can be considered as the most appropriate for assessing the presence of water in the underground. Such methods allow us to study the behavior of water content over much wider and deeper areas than those offered by traditional methods (thermo-gravimetric, tensiometric, TDR, etc) based on spot measures and concerning small volumes. In particular, the Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), which has already proved to be a powerful tool both for the geometrical reconstruction of a landslide body (location of sliding surface, estimation of the thickness of the slide material) and the individuation of high water content areas, can be considered as an alternative tool to be employed for a qualitative and quantitative water content monitoring in the first layers of the subsoil. Indeed, time-lapse 2D ERT can be tested in order to gather information on the temporal and spatial patterns of water infiltration processes and water content variation. This work reports the preliminary results from a new prototype system planned to obtain time-lapse 2D ERTs, TDR and precipitation measurements in two landslide areas located in the Southern Apennine chain (Italy). The system was planned with the aim to estimate the variation of the resistivity parameter on a long period considering the water content variation, the rain water infiltration and the seasonal changes. The prototype system, linked to a pc used for storing data and managing the time interval acquisition, consists of: a resistivimeter connected to a multichannel cable, 48 steel electrodes buried in the soil at a depth of about 0.5 m at a distance of 1 or 5 m; a TDR system linked to 4 probes 20 cm length, buried at different depths along the same profile of the geoelectrical one; while a weather station consists of a rain gauge to quantify the amount of rain falling on that area, one sensor to measure the temperature and another to determine the speed and direction of the wind. At the beginning the time-lapse ERT were analysed to verify the functionality and stability of the system and to decide the measurement time intervals. After that, the statistical analysis of the results obtained was performed with the aim to define the water content variation in the first layers of the subsoil, in particular in the vadose zone. The results were compared with the TDR ones and the piezometric measurements were performed in the area thanks to the presence of equipped boreholes. The correlation between the variation of the parameters measured (electrical resistivity, water content and piezometric level) and the rain-gauge measurements was also considered. The preliminary results seem to be encouraged also if the analysis of the data acquired on a longer period could better highlight the capability of the system.

  16. Electrical profiles of ultrashallow p+ layers formed in Si by low-energy BF2+ ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaki, Y.; Ozaki, D.; Inada, T.

    2005-04-01

    Carrier-concentration and mobility profiles formed in Si by BF2 implantation and by subsequent rapid thermal annealing (RTA) have been examined by differential Hall-effect measurements. B-concentration profiles are measured before and after RTA by a secondary-ion-mass spectroscopic technique. It is shown that a significant amount of B atoms, over 40% of an effective implant dose, is lost during RTA if the substrate is dipped in a dilute HF solution prior to annealing. The loss of B atoms gives rise to the increase in sheet resistivity of the formed p-type layers. It is revealed that an approximately 1.3-1.5-nm-thick, native oxide layer acts as an encapsulant and depresses the loss of implanted B atoms from the substrate during RTA at/above 950 °C, resulting in the formation of an electrical profile with a long tail. The redistribution of B atoms during RTA is suppressed in the sample from which the native oxide has been stripped. Also, an approximately 25-nm-thick, p+ layer with a maximum carrier concentration of 1×1020/cm3 is formed by 3-keV BF2 implantation and subsequent RTA at 1000 °C. Experimental data indicate that the HF dipping effect is negligibly small if BF2 implantation is carried out above 40 keV.

  17. Gene expression profiling of Naïve sheep genetically resistant and susceptible to gastrointestinal nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Orla M; Zadissa, Amonida; Wilson, Theresa; Hyndman, Dianne L; Greer, Gordon J; Baird, David B; McCulloch, Alan F; Crawford, Allan M; McEwan, John C

    2006-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal nematodes constitute a major cause of morbidity and mortality in grazing ruminants. Individual animals or breeds, however, are known to differ in their resistance to infection. Gene expression profiling allows us to examine large numbers of transcripts simultaneously in order to identify those transcripts that contribute to an animal's susceptibility or resistance. Results With the goal of identifying genes with a differential pattern of expression between sheep genetically resistant and susceptible to gastrointestinal nematodes, a 20,000 spot ovine cDNA microarray was constructed. This array was used to interrogate the expression of 9,238 known genes in duodenum tissue of four resistant and four susceptible female lambs. Naïve animals were used in order to look at genes that were differentially expressed in the absence of infection with gastrointestinal nematodes. Forty one unique known genes were identified that were differentially expressed between the resistant and susceptible animals. Northern blotting of a selection of the genes confirmed differential expression. The differentially expressed genes had a variety of functions, although many genes relating to the stress response and response to stimulus were more highly expressed in the susceptible animals. Conclusion We have constructed the first reported ovine microarray and used this array to examine gene expression in lambs genetically resistant and susceptible to gastrointestinal nematode infection. This study indicates that susceptible animals appear to be generating a hyper-sensitive immune response to non-nematode challenges. The gastrointestinal tract of susceptible animals is therefore under stress and compromised even in the absence of gastrointestinal nematodes. These factors may contribute to the genetic susceptibility of these animals. PMID:16515715

  18. Electrical Resistivity Imaging Below Nuclear Waste Tank Farms at the Hanford Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucker, D. F.; Levitt, M. T.

    2006-12-01

    The Hanford Site, a Department of Energy nuclear processing facility in eastern Washington, contains a complex series of radiological liquid waste disposal and storage facilities. The primary method of interim storage is the use of large single-shelled steel tanks with capacities of up to 3790 m3 (1 million gallons). The tanks are organized below ground into tank farms, with about 12 tanks per farm. The liquid waste within the tanks is primarily comprised of inorganic salts with minor constituents of heavy metals and radiological metals. The electrical properties of the radiological waste are significantly different to that of the surrounding engineered fill and native geologic formations. Over the past 60 years since the earliest tanks have been in use, many have been known to leak. An electrical resistivity survey was conducted within a tank farm to map the extent of the plumes resulting from historic leaks. Traditional surface-based electrical resistivity surveys resulted in unusable data due to the significant subsurface infrastructure that included a network of delivery pipes, wells, fences, and electrical discharge sources . HGI adapted the resistivity technique to include the site infrastructure as transceivers to augment data density and geometry. The results show a distribution of low resistivity values within the farm in areas that match known historic leak sites. The addition of site infrastructure as sensors demonstrates that the electrical resistivity technique can be used in highly industrial sites.

  19. PREDOMINANT PROPERTIES AFFECTING PROFILE SOIL ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY IN THE US MIDWEST

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercially available sensors for measuring apparent profile soil electrical conductivity (ECa) can provide an indirect indication of a number of soil physical and chemical properties helpful in characterizing within-field variability for precision agriculture. The objective of this research was to...

  20. Development of an angular scanning system for sensing vertical profiles of soil electrical conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apparent soil electrical conductivity (EC**a**) is typically mapped to define soil spatial variability within an agricultural field. Knowledge of the vertical variability of EC**a** is desired to define site-specific behavior of the soil profile. A Pneumatic Angular Scanning System (PASS) was develo...

  1. Metagenomic Profiling of Microbial Composition and Antibiotic Resistance Determinants in Puget Sound

    PubMed Central

    Port, Jesse A.; Wallace, James C.; Griffith, William C.; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2012-01-01

    Human-health relevant impacts on marine ecosystems are increasing on both spatial and temporal scales. Traditional indicators for environmental health monitoring and microbial risk assessment have relied primarily on single species analyses and have provided only limited spatial and temporal information. More high-throughput, broad-scale approaches to evaluate these impacts are therefore needed to provide a platform for informing public health. This study uses shotgun metagenomics to survey the taxonomic composition and antibiotic resistance determinant content of surface water bacterial communities in the Puget Sound estuary. Metagenomic DNA was collected at six sites in Puget Sound in addition to one wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) that discharges into the Sound and pyrosequenced. A total of ?550 Mbp (1.4 million reads) were obtained, 22 Mbp of which could be assembled into contigs. While the taxonomic and resistance determinant profiles across the open Sound samples were similar, unique signatures were identified when comparing these profiles across the open Sound, a nearshore marina and WWTP effluent. The open Sound was dominated by ?-Proteobacteria (in particular Rhodobacterales sp.), ?-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes while the marina and effluent had increased abundances of Actinobacteria, ?-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. There was a significant increase in the antibiotic resistance gene signal from the open Sound to marina to WWTP effluent, suggestive of a potential link to human impacts. Mobile genetic elements associated with environmental and pathogenic bacteria were also differentially abundant across the samples. This study is the first comparative metagenomic survey of Puget Sound and provides baseline data for further assessments of community composition and antibiotic resistance determinants in the environment using next generation sequencing technologies. In addition, these genomic signals of potential human impact can be used to guide initial public health monitoring as well as more targeted and functionally-based investigations. PMID:23144718

  2. Non-invasive determination of absolute lung resistivity in adults using electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Patterson, Robert

    2010-08-01

    Lung resistivity is a physiological parameter that describes the electrical characteristics of the lungs. Lung composition changes due to changes in the lung tissues, fluid and air volume. Various diseases that can cause a change in lung composition may be monitored by measuring lung resistivity. Currently, there is no accepted non-invasive method to measure lung resistivity. In this study, we presented a method and framework to non-invasively determine lung resistivity using electrical impedance tomography (EIT). By comparing actual measurements from subjects with data from a 3D human thorax model, an EIT image can be reconstructed to show a resistivity difference between the model and the subject. By adjusting the lung resistivity in the model, the resistivity difference in the lung regions can be reduced to near zero. This resistivity value then is the estimation of the lung resistivity of the subject. Using the proposed method, the lung resistivities of four normal adult males (43 +/- 13 years, 78 +/- 10 kg) in the supine position at air volumes starting at functional residual capacity (FRC--end expiration) and increasing in 0.5 l steps to 1.5 l were studied. The averaged lung resistivity changes 12.59%, from 1406 Omega cm to 1583 Omega cm, following the inspiration of 1.5 l air from FRC. The coefficients of variation (CV) of precision for the four subjects are less than 10%. The experiment was repeated five times at each air volume on a subject to test the reproducibility. The CVs are less than 3%. The results show that it is feasible to determine absolute lung resistivity using an EIT-based method. PMID:20647615

  3. Model 'zero-age' lunar thermal profiles resulting from electrical induction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, F.; Sonett, C. P.; Wiskerchen, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal profiles for the moon are calculated under the assumption that a pre-main-sequence T-Tauri-like solar wind excites both transverse magnetic and transverse electric induction while the moon is accreting. A substantial initial temperature rise occurs, possibly of sufficient magnitude to cause subsequent early extensive melting throughout the moon in conjunction with nominal long-lived radioactives. In these models, accretion is an unimportant direct source of thermal energy but is important because even small temperature rises from accretion cause significant changes in bulk electrical conductivity. Induction depends upon the radius of the moon, which we take to be accumulating while it is being heated electrically. The 'zero-age' profiles calculated in this paper are proposed as initial conditions for long-term thermal evolution of the moon.

  4. Assessment of Continuous Resistivity Profiling for the Characterization of Paved Roads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouteau, M.; Vallieres, S.; Miralles, M.

    2004-05-01

    We have assessed the continuous resistivity profiling method using towed arrays as a diagnostic NDT method for the evaluation of pavements. Whether the pavement consists of a sequence of asphalt, concrete slab and subgrade layer (rigid pavement) or a layer of asphalt overlying a subgrade and grade base layers (flexible pavement) defects within those different layers can cause pavement deterioration that must be identified. We first examine the response of the method to the various problems using numerical modeling. It is shown that with an optimally designed system the method allows the determination of the thickness and the location of cracks in the asphalt cover. It is also sensitive to the presence of cracks, internal defects and chloride ions (de-icing salt) within the concrete slab below. For reinforced concrete it is possible to estimate the concrete resistivity related directly to its composition (quality) and the thickness of the top coating over the level of rebars. A low resistivity of concrete will usually be diagnostic of advanced stage of rebar corrosion and delamination could occur. However it is shown that the rebars cause current channeling and the depth of investigation is limited then to the depth of the first row of rebars. Finally heterogeneities within the foundation reflecting subsidence, bad drainage, frost-defrost cycles or cavities can be mapped. The optimal design is based on a system with 10 to 20 receiver dipoles and one transmitter dipole (first or last of the array) with a dipole length typically of 10 cm that can be used in equatorial or in-line mode. Static resistivity measurements have been carried out at the laboratory scale over concrete slabs built to verify results obtained from the numerical modeling. Observed data fit very well the modeled data and validate the overall conclusions. Tests have been performed in December 2003 in some selected streets (6 visited, 3 re-visited) of Montreal using a CORIM system (Iris Instruments, France), a capacitively-coupled resistivity towed equatorial array that continuously record data collected with six receiver dipoles and one transmitter dipole. Typical acquisition sampling and velocity were 0,20-0,50 m and 1 to 2 km/h respectively. Although the system is not optimally designed for the applications described above it provides useful diagnostic information about the state of deterioration of pavement. Data have been imaged using 2D resistivity inversion. In general it shows a high resistivity for the shallow depth related to the asphalt layer and a decreasing resistivity with depth related to the concrete slab first and the granular foundation below. Lateral variations appear to be correlated with degradation of the concrete slab.

  5. Fabrication of intermetallic coatings for electrical and corrosion resistance on high-temperature alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Cho, W.D.

    1994-10-01

    Several intermetallic films were fabricated to high-temperature alloys (V-alloys and 304 and 316 stainless steels) to provide electrical insulation and corrosion resistance. Alloy grain-growth behavior at 1000{degrees}C for the V-5Cr-5Ti was investigated to determine the stability of alloy substrate during coating formation by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or metallic vapor processes at 800-850{degrees}C. Film layers were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and by electron-energy-dispersive and X-ray diffraction analysis and tested for electrical resistivity and corrosion resistance. The results elucidated the nature of the coatings, which provided both electrical insulation and high-temperature corrosion protection.

  6. A digitally controlled system for effecting and presenting a selected electrical resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (inventor); Ross, Walter L. (inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A digitally controlled resistance generator is described, in which resistors having values selected according to an expression 2(sup N-1)(R), where N is equal to the number of terms in the expression, and R is equal to the lowest value of resistance, are electrically inserted into a resistive circuit in accordance with a parallel binary signal provided by an analog-to-digital converter or a programmable computer. This binary signal is coupled via optical isolators which, when activated by a logical 1, provides a negative potential to some or all of the gate inputs of the normally on field effect transistors which, when on, shorts out the associated resistor. This applied negative potential turns the field effect transistors off and electrically inserts the resistor coupled between the source terminal and the drain terminal of that field effect transistor into the resistive circuit between the terminals.

  7. Association between insulin resistance and plasma amino acid profile in non-diabetic Japanese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Chizumi; Kondo, Masumi; Kishimoto, Noriaki; Shibata, Takeo; Nagai, Yoko; Imanishi, Tadashi; Oroguchi, Takashige; Ishii, Naoaki; Nishizaki, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Elevation of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), valine, leucine and isoleucine; and the aromatic amino acids, tyrosine and phenylalanine, has been observed in obesity-related insulin resistance. However, there have been few studies on Asians, who are generally less obese and less insulin-resistant than Caucasian or African-Americans. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and plasma amino acid concentration in non-diabetic Japanese participants. Materials and Methods A total of 94 healthy men and women were enrolled, and plasma amino acid concentration was measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry after overnight fasting. The associations between HOMA-IR and 20 amino acid concentrations, and anthropometric and clinical parameters of lifestyle-related diseases were evaluated. Results The mean age and body mass index were 40.1 ± 9.6 years and 22.7 ± 3.9, respectively. Significantly positive correlations were observed between HOMA-IR and valine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine and total BCAA concentration. Compared with the HOMA-IR ? 1.6 group, the HOMA-IR > 1.6 group showed significantly exacerbated anthropometric and clinical parameters, and significantly elevated levels of valine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine and BCAA. Conclusions The present study shows that the insulin resistance-related change in amino acid profile is also observed in non-diabetic Japanese subjects. These amino acids include BCAAs (valine, isoleucine and leucine) and aromatic amino acids (tyrosine and phenylalanine), in agreement with previous studies carried out using different ethnic groups with different degrees of obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:26221519

  8. Antimicrobial resistance and virulence gene profiles in P. multocida strains isolated from cats

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Thais Sebastiana Porfida; Felizardo, Maria Roberta; de Gobbi, Debora Dirani Sena; Moreno, Marina; Moreno, Andrea Micke

    2015-01-01

    Cats are often described as carriers of Pasteurella multocida in their oral microbiota. This agent is thought to cause pneumonia, conjunctivitis, rhinitis, gingivostomatitis, abscess and osteonecrosis in cats. Human infection with P. multocida has been described in several cases affecting cat owners or after cat bites. In Brazil, the cat population is approximately 21 million animals and is increasing, but there are no studies of the presence of P. multocida in the feline population or of human cases of infection associated with cats. In this study, one hundred and ninety-one healthy cats from owners and shelters in São Paulo State, Brazil, were evaluated for the presence of P. multocida in their oral cavities. Twenty animals were positive for P. multocida , and forty-one strains were selected and characterized by means of biochemical tests and PCR. The P. multocida strains were tested for capsular type, virulence genes and resistance profile. A total of 75.6% (31/41) of isolates belonged to capsular type A, and 24.4% (10/41) of the isolates were untypeable. None of the strains harboured toxA, tbpA or pfhA genes. The frequencies of the other genes tested were variable, and the data generated were used to build a dendrogram showing the relatedness of strains, which were clustered according to origin. The most common resistance profile observed was against sulfizoxazole and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole. PMID:26221117

  9. Using electrical resistivity tomography to differentiate sapwood from heartwood: application to conifers.

    PubMed

    Guyot, Adrien; Ostergaard, Kasper T; Lenkopane, Mothei; Fan, Junliang; Lockington, David A

    2013-02-01

    Estimating sapwood area is one of the main sources of error when upscaling point scale sap flow measurements to whole-tree water use. In this study, the potential use of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) to determine the sapwood-heartwood (SW-HW) boundary is investigated for Pinus elliottii Engelm var. elliottii?×?Pinus caribaea Morelet var. hondurensis growing in a subtropical climate. Specifically, this study investigates: (i) how electrical resistivity is correlated to either wood moisture content, or electrolyte concentration, or both, and (ii) how the SW-HW boundary is defined in terms of electrical resistivity. Tree cross-sections at breast height are analysed using ERT before being felled and the cross-section surface sampled for analysis of major electrolyte concentrations, wood moisture content and density. Electrical resistivity tomography results show patterns with high resistivities occurring in the inner part of the cross-section, with much lower values towards the outside. The high-resistivity areas were generally smaller than the low-resistivity areas. A comparison between ERT and actual SW area measured after felling shows a slope of the linear regression close to unity (=0.96) with a large spread of values (R(2)?=?0.56) mostly due to uncertainties in ERT. Electrolyte concentrations along sampled radial transects (cardinal directions) generally showed no trend from the centre of the tree to the bark. Wood moisture content and density show comparable trends that could explain the resistivity patterns. While this study indicates the potential for application of ERT for estimating SW area, it shows that there remains a need for refinement in locating the SW-HW boundary (e.g., by improvement of the inversion method, or perhaps electrode density) in order to increase the robustness of the method. PMID:23329335

  10. Electrical resistivity well-logging system with solid-state electronic circuitry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, James Henry; Farstad, Arnold J.

    1977-01-01

    An improved 4-channel electrical resistivity well-logging system for use with a passive probe with electrodes arranged in the 'normal' configuration has been designed and fabricated by Westinghouse Electric Corporation to meet technical specifications developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. Salient features of the system include solid-state switching and current regulation in the transmitter circuit to produce a constant-current source square wave, and synchronous solid-state switching and sampling of the potential waveform in the receiver circuit to provide an analog dc voltage proportions to the measured resistivity. Technical specifications and design details are included in this report.

  11. Electrical Resistivity of Liquid Ge2Sb2Te5 in Patterned Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cil, Kadir; Dirisaglik, Faruk; Wennberg, Maren; King, Adrienne; Akbulut, Mustafa; Zhu, Yu; Lam, Chung; Silva, Helena; Gokirmak, Ali

    2012-02-01

    Phase change memory devices are based on the electrical resistivity contrast between the amorphous and the crystalline phases of chalcogenide materials [1]. Since melting is required to amorphize the material, knowledge of the liquid state properties is critical for device design. Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is the most studied phase change material. However, the two experimental values reported to date for electrical resistivity of liquid GST (one on a thin film [2], the other in bulk [3]) differ by an order of magnitude. We have extracted the electrical resistivity of liquid GST from single pulse measurements on a large number of encapsulated GST line structures with varying lengths, widths and thicknesses. Each structure is self-heated to melt by the microsecond voltage pulse while voltage and current are monitored using an oscilloscope. The liquid state resistivity is calculated from slopes of liquid state resistance versus 1/width, fitted as a function of length. The results we obtained for the liquid resistivity of GST in nanostructures are close to those obtained from measurements on bulk GST [3]. 1. H. Wong et al., Proc IEEE 98, 2201, 2010. 2. T. Kato and K. Tanaka, Jap. J. Appl. Phys. 44, 7340, 2005. 3. R. Endo et al., Jap. J. Appl. Phys. 49, 5802, 2010.

  12. Clonal profile, virulence and resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from sheep milk.

    PubMed

    Martins, Katheryne Benini; Faccioli-Martins, Patricia Yoshida; Riboli, Danilo Flávio Moraes; Pereira, Valéria Cataneli; Fernandes, Simone; Oliveira, Aline A; Dantas, Ariane; Zafalon, Luiz Francisco; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the clonal profile, virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance, particularly oxacillin resistance, of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from sheep milk. Milk samples were collected from all teats for the California Mastitis Test (CMT), somatic cell count, identification of S. aureus, investigation in these strains of genes encoding toxins (sea, seb, sec, sed, tst), biofilm (icaA, icaC, icaD, bap), leukocidin (luk-PV) oxacillin resistance by mecA gene detection and susceptibility testing (12 antibiotics). Messenger RNA expression was evaluated by RT-PCR in isolates carrying toxin and biofilm genes. Biofilm formation was also evaluated phenotypically by adherence to polystyrene plates. The clonal profile of S. aureus was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A total of 473 milk samples were collected from 242 animals on three farms and 20 S. aureus strains were isolated and none carried the mecA gene. The two sec gene-positive isolates and the isolates carrying the tst and luk-PV genes were positive by RT-PCR. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the three flocks studied showed high susceptibility to the drugs tested and none was biofilm producer, indicating that biofilm formation was not a virulence factor causing infection by these strains. The typing of 17 S. aureus isolates revealed the presence of a common clone on the three farms studied, and the presence and expression of the sec and tst genes in one strain of this clone suggest the possible acquisition of virulence genes by this clone, a fact that is important for animal health and food hygiene. PMID:26273271

  13. Clonal profile, virulence and resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from sheep milk

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Katheryne Benini; Faccioli-Martins, Patricia Yoshida; Riboli, Danilo Flávio Moraes; Pereira, Valéria Cataneli; Fernandes, Simone; Oliveira, Aline A.; Dantas, Ariane; Zafalon, Luiz Francisco; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the clonal profile, virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance, particularly oxacillin resistance, of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from sheep milk. Milk samples were collected from all teats for the California Mastitis Test (CMT), somatic cell count, identification of S. aureus, investigation in these strains of genes encoding toxins (sea, seb, sec, sed, tst), biofilm (icaA, icaC, icaD, bap), leukocidin (luk-PV) oxacillin resistance by mecA gene detection and susceptibility testing (12 antibiotics). Messenger RNA expression was evaluated by RT-PCR in isolates carrying toxin and biofilm genes. Biofilm formation was also evaluated phenotypically by adherence to polystyrene plates. The clonal profile of S. aureus was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A total of 473 milk samples were collected from 242 animals on three farms and 20 S. aureus strains were isolated and none carried the mecA gene. The two sec gene-positive isolates and the isolates carrying the tst and luk-PV genes were positive by RT-PCR. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the three flocks studied showed high susceptibility to the drugs tested and none was biofilm producer, indicating that biofilm formation was not a virulence factor causing infection by these strains. The typing of 17 S. aureus isolates revealed the presence of a common clone on the three farms studied, and the presence and expression of the sec and tst genes in one strain of this clone suggest the possible acquisition of virulence genes by this clone, a fact that is important for animal health and food hygiene. PMID:26273271

  14. Structural insight into selectivity and resistance profiles of ROS1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davare, Monika A.; Vellore, Nadeem A.; Wagner, Jacob P.; Eide, Christopher A.; Goodman, James R.; Drilon, Alexander; Deininger, Michael W.; O’Hare, Thomas; Druker, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic ROS1 fusion proteins are molecular drivers in multiple malignancies, including a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The phylogenetic proximity of the ROS1 and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) catalytic domains led to the clinical repurposing of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved ALK inhibitor crizotinib as a ROS1 inhibitor. Despite the antitumor activity of crizotinib observed in both ROS1- and ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients, resistance due to acquisition of ROS1 or ALK kinase domain mutations has been observed clinically, spurring the development of second-generation inhibitors. Here, we profile the sensitivity and selectivity of seven ROS1 and/or ALK inhibitors at various levels of clinical development. In contrast to crizotinib’s dual ROS1/ALK activity, cabozantinib (XL-184) and its structural analog foretinib (XL-880) demonstrate a striking selectivity for ROS1 over ALK. Molecular dynamics simulation studies reveal structural features that distinguish the ROS1 and ALK kinase domains and contribute to differences in binding site and kinase selectivity of the inhibitors tested. Cell-based resistance profiling studies demonstrate that the ROS1-selective inhibitors retain efficacy against the recently reported CD74-ROS1G2032R mutant whereas the dual ROS1/ALK inhibitors are ineffective. Taken together, inhibitor profiling and stringent characterization of the structure–function differences between the ROS1 and ALK kinase domains will facilitate future rational drug design for ROS1- and ALK-driven NSCLC and other malignancies. PMID:26372962

  15. Temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of amorphous Co 80-xEr xB 20 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touraghe, O.; Khatami, M.; Menny, A.; Lassri, H.; Nouneh, K.

    2008-06-01

    The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of amorphous Co 80-xEr xB 20 alloys with x=0, 3.9, 7.5 and 8.6 prepared by melt spinning in pure argon atmosphere was studied. All amorphous alloys investigated here are found to exhibit a resistivity minimum at low temperature. The electrical resistivity exhibits logarithmic temperature dependence below the temperature of resistivity minimum Tmin. In addition, the resistivity shows quadratic temperature behavior in the interval Tmin< T<77 K. At high temperature, the electrical resistivity was discussed by the extended Ziman theory. For the whole series of alloys, the composition dependence of the temperature coefficient of electrical resistivity ? shows a change in structural short range occurring in the composition range 8-9 at%.

  16. Parallel electric fields in extragalactic jets - Double layers and anomalous resistivity in symbiotic relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borovsky, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    After examining the properties of Coulomb-collision resistivity, anomalous (collective) resistivity, and double layers, a hybrid anomalous-resistivity/double-layer model is introduced. In this model, beam-driven waves on both sides of a double layer provide electrostatic plasma-wave turbulence that greatly reduces the mobility of charged particles. These regions then act to hold open a density cavity within which the double layer resides. In the double layer, electrical energy is dissipated with 100 percent efficiency into high-energy particles, creating conditions optimal for the collective emission of polarized radio waves.

  17. Characterization of Contact and Bulk Thermal Resistance of Laminations for Electric Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Cousineau, J. Emily; Bennion, Kevin; DeVoto, Doug; Mihalic, Mark; Narumanchi, Sreekant

    2015-06-30

    The ability to remove heat from an electric machine depends on the passive stack thermal resistances within the machine and the convective cooling performance of the selected cooling technology. This report focuses on the passive thermal design, specifically properties of the stator and rotor lamination stacks. Orthotropic thermal conductivity, specific heat, and density are reported. Four materials commonly used in electric machines were tested, including M19 (29 and 26 gauge), HF10, and Arnon 7 materials.

  18. Abnormal drop in electrical resistivity with impurity doping of single-crystal Ag

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Young; Oh, Min-Wook; Lee, Seunghun; Cho, Yong Chan; Yoon, Jang-Hee; Lee, Geun Woo; Cho, Chae-Ryong; Park, Chul Hong; Jeong, Se-Young

    2014-01-01

    Resistivity is an intrinsic feature that specifies the electrical properties of a material and depends on electron-phonon scattering near room temperature. Reducing the resistivity of a metal to its potentially lowest value requires eliminating grain boundaries and impurities, but to date few studies have focused on reducing the intrinsic resistivity of a pure metal itself. We could reduce the intrinsic resistivity of single-crystal Ag, which has an almost perfect structure, by impurity doping it with Cu. This paper presents our results: resistivity was reduced to 1.35???·cm at room temperature after 3?mol% Cu-doping of single-crystal Ag. Various mechanisms were examined in an attempt to explain the abnormal behavior. PMID:24965478

  19. Influence of natural time-dependent variations of electrical conductivity on DC resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rein, Arno; Hoffmann, Ruth; Dietrich, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Long-term direct current (DC) resistivity monitoring surveys are carried out to investigate structures and processes in the subsurface which are coupled to changes in electrical conductivity. Examples would be leaching tests in the unsaturated zone or the observation of a salt tracer spreading in the saturated zone. As these investigations usually take some hours to weeks, natural time-dependent background variations of electrical conductivity have to be considered. Parameters influencing the electrical conductivity are temperature changes, variable water contents in soil due to precipitation or changing groundwater levels, and natural fluctuations of the ionar content in groundwater. Measurements over different time periods (one month to one year) at different test sites demonstrated daily and seasonal trends of electrical conductivity and temperature of groundwater, surface temperatures and groundwater levels. Variable water saturation and changing soil temperatures (in the uppermost soil) are estimated to influence the electrical conductivity most significantly, followed by changing water temperatures and varying ionar content. To verify these conclusions, multi-electrode DC resistivity monitoring has been performed at two test sites for 16 and 22 days. The results reflect natural characteristics and processes in the subsurface. With mean values and standard deviations of apparent resistivities plotted in pseudosections, different areas of the subsurface with different ranges of resistivity variations have been specified. In the area of variable groundwater level (varying water saturation) and in the uppermost soil (strong temperature and moisture changes), especially high resistivity variations are obvious (up to 26%). In the saturated zone, variations are low (predominately below 1%). Concerning resistivity measurements, we conclude that electrodes positioned below the groundwater level (e.g. for salt tracer tests) or between the uppermost meter of subsurface and the area of variable groundwater level (e.g. for leaching tests in the unsaturated zone) should be used to avoid strong influences of background variations.

  20. Detection of macropore flow at field scales using electrical resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moysey, S. M.

    2008-12-01

    Even though macropores make up a very small portion of the pore space in a soil, their high connectivity allows them to carry large fluxes of flow to the subsurface. As a result, macropores can be a critical factor in determining groundwater recharge and contaminant transport. Despite their importance, there is a lack of field-scale methodologies for detecting the existence and activation of macropores in watersheds. The connectivity that makes macropores good conductors of fluid flow suggests that they may also be good conductors of electrical current when filled with water and could therefore be monitored using electrical resistivity measurements. To test this hypothesis and evaluate whether the resulting electrical response could be detected with field-scale dipole-dipole resistivity measurements this work combines hydrologically- driven equivalent medium models with anisotropic 3D numerical models of electrical current flow. The equivalent medium models are based on a dual-domain concept where the bulk electrical conductivity of the soil matrix is governed by water content and pore-water solute concentration, whereas macropore conductivity is directly related to the solute concentration of the filling fluid. Therefore, vertical and horizontal electrically conductivity values have dynamic responses depending on the soil saturation characteristics, evaporation and precipitation history, and activation of macropore flow. The resulting equivalent bulk electrical conductivity for the dual-domain is then used in a numerical model to determine the apparent resistivity response for a dipole-dipole array located on the ground surface. For conditions typical of watersheds near Clemson, i.e., runoff TDS values of about 50mg/L, the results of the model indicate that apparent resistivity measurements drop by 40% when macroporosity represents only 0.5% of the sample volume and by 80% when macroporosity is increased to 5% of the sample volume. This result represents the initial response when the soil matrix is very dry (saturation=10%) and soil water solute concentrations are 100mg/L. The response decreases over time as the soil saturates or if the soil water solute concentrations are initially high relative to the macropore influent; if the soil saturation is 50% and the pore water concentration is 500mg/L, the reduction in apparent resistivity due to the onset of macropore flow is less than 5%. These modeling results suggest that electrical resistivity can be a powerful tool for studying macropore flow through field-scale monitoring studies or watershed-scale mapping efforts using mobile resistivity systems.

  1. Profile of Resistance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus to Mannose-Specific Plant Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, Jan; Van Laethem, Kristel; Hatse, Sigrid; Vermeire, Kurt; De Clercq, Erik; Peumans, Willy; Van Damme, Els; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Böhlmstedt, Anders; Schols, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    The mannose-specific plant lectins from the Amaryllidaceae family (e.g., Hippeastrum sp. hybrid and Galanthus nivalis) inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of human lymphocytic cells in the higher nanogram per milliliter range and suppress syncytium formation between persistently HIV type 1 (HIV-1)-infected cells and uninfected CD4+ T cells. These lectins inhibit virus entry. When exposed to escalating concentrations of G. nivalis and Hippeastrum sp. hybrid agglutinin, a variety of HIV-1(IIIB) strains were isolated after 20 to 40 subcultivations which showed a decreased sensitivity to the plant lectins. Several amino acid changes in the envelope glycoprotein gp120, but not in gp41, of the mutant virus isolates were observed. The vast majority of the amino acid changes occurred at the N glycosylation sites and at the S or T residues that are part of the N glycosylation motif. The degree of resistance to the plant lectins was invariably correlated with an increasing number of mutated glycosylation sites in gp120. The nature of these mutations was entirely different from that of mutations that are known to appear in HIV-1 gp120 under the pressure of other viral entry inhibitors such as dextran sulfate, bicyclams (i.e., AMD3100), and chicoric acid, which also explains the lack of cross-resistance of plant lectin-resistant viruses to any other HIV inhibitor including T-20 and the blue-green algae (cyanobacteria)-derived mannose-specific cyanovirin. The plant lectins represent a well-defined class of anti-HIV (microbicidal) drugs with a novel HIV drug resistance profile different from those of other existing anti-HIV drugs. PMID:15367629

  2. Electrical resistivity characterization and defect detection on a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) on an experimental site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirieix, C.; Fernández Martínez, J. L.; Riss, J.; Genelle, F.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we analyze the onsite characterization of a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) that serves to ensure the impermeability of a landfill cap by DC electrical methods. The imaging of the GCL geoelectrical properties is a challenging problem because it is a very thin (between 4 and 7 mm thick) and resistive layer (from 100,000 to 2,000,000 ?·m) depending on meteorological conditions and aging. We compare results obtained using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) using two different kinds of arrays (dipole-dipole DD and Wenner-Schlumberger) on an experimental site with engineered defects. To confirm these results and to find the real onsite GCL resistivity we have performed sampling of the posterior distribution of this parameter using vertical electrical sounding (VES) inversions. Different VES methods were extracted from ERT with DD array and converted into a Schlumberger array. As a main conclusion the dipole-dipole array provides a better resistivity resolution of the defects than the Wenner-Schlumberger array. On ERT images, the defect detection seems to be impossible if the GCL has very high resistivity, as it happened when it was put in place. Taking into account the equivalence rules, the inversions are in both cases (ERT and VES) compatible. The GCL resistivity estimated from PSO (particle swarm optimization) varies from 3.0 105 to 1.106 ?·m depending on saturation conditions during the twenty first months of its placing. Then, the resistivity dropped to 4.104-9.104 ?·m, indicating a probable chemical damage of the GCL due to aging. Finally the fact that the VES inversions are solved via PSO sampling allows for the detection of a very thin and resistive layer and opens the possibility of performing micro VES surveys along the landfill to detect possible GCL defects.

  3. Implications for the lithospheric geometry of the Iapetus suture beneath Ireland based on electrical resistivity models from deep-probing magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, C. K.; Jones, Alan G.; Moorkamp, Max; Weckmann, Ute

    2014-08-01

    Broad-band and long period magnetotelluric (MT) data were acquired at 39 stations along five NNW-SSE profiles crossing the Iapetus Suture Zone (ISZ) in Ireland. Regional strike analyses indicate that the vast majority of the MT data is consistent with an assumption of a 2-D geo-electric strike direction. Strike is N52°E for the three easternmost profiles and N75°E for the two westernmost profiles; these directions correlate well with the observed predominant geological strike of the study region. 2-D inversions of the galvanic distortion-corrected TE and TM mode data from each profile are shown and discussed. As mapped geological variations between the neighbouring profiles suggest a heterogeneous subsurface, it is important to verify the robustness of the presence and geometries of prominent conductivity anomalies by employing 3-D forward and inverse modelling. A high conductivity layer (resistivity of 1-10 ?m), found at middle to lower crustal depths and presumed to be indicative of metamorphosed graphitic sediments rich in sulphides deposited during the convergence of the Laurentian and Avalonian continents, essentially constitutes the electrical signature of the ISZ. Shallow conductors observed are probably due to black shales that were widely deposited within the sedimentary accretionary wedge during Ordovician time. We interpret the moderately low resistivity at shallow depths from west to east across Ireland as indicative of an increase in maturity of the black shales in the easterly direction. From our conductivity models the southern extent of the ISZ is inferred to lie between the Navan Silvermines Fault and the Navan Tipperary Line, and shows clear resistivity contrast along all the profiles at the southern MT stations. The change in resistivity deduced from the 2-D models is spatially related to the composition of Lower Palaeozoic Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian and Carboniferous rocks. At upper mantle depths of about 60 km, a high conductivity block below the central MT stations is found to lie within the accretionary wedge of the Iapetus suture, and the location of the conductive anomaly corroborates reasonably well with the inferred spreading head of the putative Iceland plume-related magmatic intrusion. The low resistivity upper crust beneath the ISZ is indeed rich in Ordovician rocks with black shale content in the eastern as well as the central part; the western part is largely underlain by a highly resistive block of volcanic and metamorphosed rocks forming crystalline basement.

  4. Characterization and monitoring of subsurface processes using parallel computing and electrical resistivity imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Truex, Michael J.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Marble, Justin

    2011-12-01

    This newsletter discusses recent advancement in subsurface resistivity characterization and monitoring capabilities. The BC Cribs field desiccation treatability test resistivity monitoring data is use an example to demonstrate near-real time 3D subsurface imaging capabilities. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a method of imaging the electrical resistivity distribution of the subsurface. An ERT data collection system consists of an array of electrodes, deployed on the ground surface or within boreholes, that are connected to a control unit which can access each electrode independently (Figure 1). A single measurement is collected by injecting current across a pair of current injection electrodes (source and sink), and measuring the resulting potential generated across a pair of potential measurement electrodes (positive and negative). An ERT data set is generated by collecting many such measurements using strategically selected current and potential electrode pairs. This data set is then processed using an inversion algorithm, which reconstructs an estimate (or image) of the electrical conductivity (i.e. the inverse of resistivity) distribution that gave rise to the measured data.

  5. Impact damage of carbon fiber polymermatrix composites, studied by electrical resistance measurement

    E-print Network

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    , was studied by electrical resistance measurement, which was shown to be more sensitive than the ultrasonic properties; D. Non-destructive testing; Damage 1. Introduction Impact is a commonly encountered cause. Evaluation of impact damage has been conducted in prior work after damage application by ultrasonic

  6. Electrical-resistivity imaging of the central Trans-Hudson orogen1, 2

    E-print Network

    Jones, Alan G.

    495 Electrical-resistivity imaging of the central Trans- Hudson orogen1, 2 Ian J. Ferguson, Kevin M the Trans-Hudson orogen in 1992 as part of the Lithoprobe transect. The present study includes analysis and arc rocks of the western Trans-Hudson orogen have been juxtaposed against the Archean Sask craton

  7. Inter-electrode tissue resistance is not affected by tissue edema when electrically

    E-print Network

    Durfee, William K.

    1 Inter-electrode tissue resistance is not affected by tissue edema when electrically stimulating develop edema. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the edema would change inter electrodes. The protocol was administered to nine ICU patients with edema, eight surgical patients without

  8. Electrical resistance determination of actual contact area of cold welded metal joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hordon, M. J.

    1970-01-01

    Method measures the area of the bonded zone of a compression weld by observing the electrical resistance of the weld zone while the load changes from full compression until the joint ruptures under tension. The ratio of bonding force to maximum tensile load varies considerably.

  9. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography applied to cave sustainability (Barbados) and groundwater exploration (Saint Lucia)

    E-print Network

    Agramakova, Yulia

    2011-01-01

    In this work we apply the method of two-dimensional time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (2D time-lapse ERT) for two different problems. In the first problem, we monitor the structural stability of the roof of the ...

  10. Ion Permeability of Artificial Membranes Evaluated by Diffusion Potential and Electrical Resistance Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shlyonsky, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    In the present article, a novel model of artificial membranes that provides efficient assistance in teaching the origins of diffusion potentials is proposed. These membranes are made of polycarbonate filters fixed to 12-mm plastic rings and then saturated with a mixture of creosol and "n"-decane. The electrical resistance and potential…

  11. Capacitive conductivity logging and electrical stratigraphy in a high-resistivity aquifer, Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    Capacitive conductivity logging and electrical stratigraphy in a high-resistivity aquifer, Boise a prototype capacitive-conductivity borehole tool in a shallow, unconfined aquifer with coarse, unconsoli- dated sediments and very-low-conductivity water at the Boi- se Hydrogeophysical Research Site BHRS

  12. High School Students' Understanding of Resistance in Simple Series Electric Circuits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liegeois, Laurent; Mullet, Etienne

    2002-01-01

    Studies the understanding that 8-12 grade high school students were able to develop with regard to the interrelationships between resistance, potential difference, and current concepts (Ohm's law). Explores the immediate effects of exposure to electricity courses on the intuitive mastery of these relationships. (Contains 32 references.)…

  13. Monitoring Cracking of a Smectitic Vertisol using Three-dimensional Electrical Resistivity Tomography 

    E-print Network

    Ackerson, Jason Paul

    2013-11-20

    for cracking due in part to a lack of reliable information on the development and morphology of cracks. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has shown promise as a new, non-destructive method of monitoring cracking in the field. We investigated the use...

  14. Electrical resistivity sounding to study water content distribution in heterogeneous soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electrical resistivity (ER) sounding is increasingly being used as non-invasive technique to reveal and map soil heterogeneity. The objective of this work was to assess ER sounding applicability to study soil water distribution in spatially heterogeneous soils. The 30x30-m study plot was located at ...

  15. Ternary Cu3NPdx exhibiting invariant electrical resistivity over 200 K Ailing Ji, Chaorong Li, and Zexian Caoa

    E-print Network

    Zexian, Cao

    properties nearly invariant over a substantial temperature range can be very useful for applications. OneTernary Cu3NPdx exhibiting invariant electrical resistivity over 200 K Ailing Ji, Chaorong Li 2006; published online 22 December 2006 Electrical resistivity is a physical property of enormous

  16. Electrical Resistance of the Solder Connections for the Consolidation of the LHC Main Interconnection Splices

    E-print Network

    Lutum, R; Scheuerlein, C

    2013-01-01

    For the consolidation of the LHC 13 kA main interconnection splices, shunts will be soldered onto each of the 10170 splices. The solder alloy selected for this purpose is Sn60Pb40. In this context the electrical resistance of shunt to busbar lap splices has been measured in the temperature range from RT to 20 K. A cryocooler set-up has been adapted such that a test current of 150 A could be injected for accurate resistance measurements in the low n? range. To study the influence of the solder bulk resistivity on the overall splice resistance, connections produced with Sn96Ag4 and Sn77.2In20Ag2.8 have been studied as well. The influence of the Sn60Pb40 solder resistance is negligible when measuring the splice resistance in a longitudinal configuration over a length of 6 cm. In a transverse measurement configuration the splice resistance is significantly influenced by the solder. The connections prepared with Sn77.2In20Ag2.8 show significantly higher resistance values, as expected from the relatively high sol...

  17. Surface roughness and electrical resistance on Si( 1 0 0 )2×3-Na surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryjkov, S. V.; Nagao, T.; Lifshits, V. G.; Hasegawa, S.

    2001-11-01

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy, reflection-high-energy-electron diffraction and in situ electrical-resistance measurements, we studied the relation between surface morphology and electrical resistance of a Si(1 0 0)2×3-Na surface phase. It was found that the step density and domain size of the 2×3-Na phase depended on Si coverages deposited prior to Na deposition, because the amount of Si atoms incorporated in the 2×3-Na phase is a definite value, 1/3 monolayer (ML). The evolution of surface morphology was found to influence the transport properties dramatically. The resistance was reduced for smoother surfaces with larger domains with the pre-deposited Si of around 1/3 or 4/3 ML, while it increased for rougher surfaces with the intermediate amounts of Si pre-deposition. These phenomena directly associate with carrier scattering due to surface roughness.

  18. Influence of Electron Scattering from Morphological Granularity and Surface Roughness on Thin Film Electrical Resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattani, M.; Vaz, A. R.; Wiederkehr, R. S.; Teixeira, F. S.; Salvadori, M. C.; Brown, I. G.

    We report electrical resistivity measurements of platinum and gold thin films over a range of film thickness d (1.3 ? d ? 11.7nm), together with associated measurements of the film morphological and crystallographic grain size. The resistivity results are compared to predictions of the Fuchs-Sondheimer and the Mayadas-Shatzkes models, based on the electron mean free path and crystallographic grain size, and the agreement is not satisfactory. We describe an alternative model based on elastic electron scattering with morphological granularity (grain structure as measured on the film surface) and film surface roughness, and good agreement is obtained with the experimental results. This suggests that electron scattering by morphological granularity and surface roughness plays an important role in determining the electrical resistivity of thin metal films.

  19. 3D Electrical Resistivity Imaging to Predict Slope Failure in USM Campus, Penang, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Hussein A.; Nawawi, Mohd M. N.; Abdullah, Khiruddin

    2010-07-01

    3D electrical resistivity imaging was carried out to monitor slope failure in the USM campus. The natural disasters that occur suddenly such as landslides can cause loss of life, and money by damaging roads and cars. The prediction of a landslide before it occurs will reduce or stop these hazards. Geophysical techniques can be used to image slopes and monitor slope failure. The geophysical technique that was used in this study is electrical resistivity imaging. The results from the resistivity sections show that there are two different regions made up of granite, and sand zone. The results show that there are two factors which make the landslide possible. The first factor is the subsurface boulders and the other factor is saturated sand which may results subsidence of the surface.

  20. Electrical Resistivity of Na K Binary Liquid Alloy Using Ab-Initio Pseudopotentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anil, Thakur; Ahluwalia K., P.

    2005-10-01

    The study of electrical resistivity of simple binary liquid alloy Na-K is presented as a function of concentration. Hard sphere diameters of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) are obtained through the inter ionic pair potentials evaluated using Troullier and Martins ab-initio pseudopotentials, which have been used to calculate partial structure factors S(q). The Ziman formula for calculating resistivity of binary liquid alloys has been used. Form factors are calculated using ab-initio pseudopotentials. The results suggest that the first principle approach for calculating pseudopotentials with in the frame work of Ziman formalism is quite successful in explaining the electrical resistivity data of compound forming binary liquid alloys.

  1. Electrical resistivity of NaSn compound forming liquid alloy using ab initio pseudopotentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Anil; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2006-03-01

    The electrical resistivity of the compound forming liquid alloy NaSn is studied as a function of concentration. Hard-sphere diameters of Na and Sn are obtained through the inter-ionic pair potentials evaluated using Troullier and Martins ab initio pseudopotential, which have been used to calculate partial structure factors S(q). Considering the liquid alloy to be a ternary mixture, Ziman's formula for calculating the resistivity of binary liquid alloys, modified for complex formation, has been used. Form factors are calculated using ab initio pseudopotentials. The results suggest that the Ziman formalism, when used with ab initio pseudopotentials, is quite successful in explaining the electrical resistivity data of compound forming binary liquid alloys.

  2. Electrical resistivity of NaPb compound-forming liquid alloy using ab initio pseudopotentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Anil; Negi, N. S.; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2005-08-01

    The study of electrical resistivity of compound-forming liquid alloy, NaPb, is presented as a function of concentration. Hard sphere diameters of Na and Pb are obtained through the interionic pair potentials evaluated using Troullier and Martins ab initio pseudopotential, which have been used to calculate the partial structure factors S(q). Considering the liquid alloy to be a ternary mixture, Ziman formula, modified for complex formation has been used for calculating resistivity of binary liquid alloys. Form factors are calculated using ab initio pseudopotentials. The results suggest that Ziman formalism, when used with ab initio pseudopotentials, are quite successful in explaining the electrical resistivity data of compound-forming binary liquid alloys.

  3. On the Modeling of Electrical Effects Experienced by Space Explorers During Extra Vehicular Activities: Intracorporal Currents, Resistances, and Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cela, Carlos J.; Loizos, Kyle; Lazzi, Gianluca; Hamilton, Douglas; Lee, Raphael C.

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has shown that space explorers engaged in Extra Vehicular Activities (EVAs) may be exposed, under certain conditions, to undesired electrical currents. This work focuses on determining whether these undesired induced electrical currents could be responsible for involuntary neuromuscular activity in the subjects, possibly caused by either large diameter peripheral nerve activation or reflex activity from cutaneous afferent stimulation. An efficient multiresolution variant of the admittance method along with a millimeter-resolution model of a male human body were used to calculate induced electric fields, resistance between contact electrodes used to simulate the potential exposure condition, and currents induced in the human body model. Results show that, under realistic exposure conditions using a 15V source, current density magnitudes and total current injected are well above previously reported startle reaction thresholds. This indicates that, under the considered conditions, the subjects could experience involuntary motor response.

  4. Metabolomic profiling of the response of susceptible and resistant soybean strains to foxglove aphid, Aulacorthum solani Kaltenbach.

    PubMed

    Sato, Dan; Akashi, Hiromichi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Tomita, Masaru; Soga, Tomoyoshi

    2013-04-15

    Aphid infection reduces soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) yield. Consequently, cultivation of aphid-resistant strains is a promising approach to pest control, and understanding the resistance mechanism is of importance. Here, we characterized the resistance of soybeans to foxglove aphid, Aulacorthum solani Kaltenbach, at the metabolite level. First, we evaluated aphid mortality and settlement rates on the leaves of two soybean strains, 'Tohoku149' and 'Suzuyutaka', and found that the former had strong resistance soon after introduction of the aphids. The metabolomic response to aphid introduction was analyzed using capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We found the following three features in the profiles: (1) concentrations of citrate, amino acids, and their intermediates were intrinsically higher for Tohoku149 than Suzuyutaka, (2) concentrations of several metabolites producing secondary metabolites, such as flavonoids and alkaloids, drastically changed 6h after aphid introduction, and (3) concentrations of TCA cycle metabolites increased in Tohoku149 48 h after aphid introduction. We also profiled free amino acids in aphids reared on both soybean strains and under starvation, and found that the profile of the aphids on Tohoku149 was similar to that of the starved aphids, but different to that of aphids on Suzuyutaka. These tests confirmed that aphids suck phloem sap even from Tohoku149. This study demonstrates the metabolomic profiles of both soybean strains and aphids, which will contribute to the molecular level understanding of mechanisms of soybean resistance to aphids. PMID:23523883

  5. Characterization of photoresist and simulation of a developed resist profile for the fabrication of gray-scale diffractive optic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong Rak; Sierchio, Justin; Zaverton, Melissa; Kim, Youngsik; Milster, Tom D.

    2012-02-01

    We have characterized a photoresist used for the fabrication of gray-scale diffractive optic elements in terms of Dill's and Mack's model parameters. The resist model parameters were employed for the simulations of developed resist profiles for sawtooth patterns executed by solving the Eikonal equation with the fast-marching method. The simulated results were shown to be in good agreement with empirical data.

  6. Determining concentration depth profiles in fluorinated networks by means of electric force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miccio, Luis A.; Schwartz, Gustavo A.

    2011-08-14

    By means of electric force microscopy, composition depth profiles were measured with nanometric resolution for a series of fluorinated networks. By mapping the dielectric permittivity along a line going from the surface to the bulk, we were able to experimentally access to the fluorine concentration profile. Obtained data show composition gradient lengths ranging from 30 nm to 80 nm in the near surface area for samples containing from 0.5 to 5 wt. % F, respectively. In contrast, no gradients of concentration were detected in bulk. This method has several advantages over other techniques because it allows profiling directly on a sectional cut of the sample. By combining the obtained results with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, we were also able to quantify F/C ratio as a function of depth with nanoscale resolution.

  7. Analysis of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by IS1181 profiling.

    PubMed Central

    Symms, C.; Cookson, B.; Stanley, J.; Hookey, J. V.

    1998-01-01

    Variation in the genomic location and copy number of the insertion element IS1181 in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was investigated. Sixty-three isolates representing the Jevons type strain (NCTC 10442), phage-propagating strains, and epidemic strains were examined. A PCR amplicon of the insertion element was used to probe genomic restriction endonuclease digests. HindIII genomic digests gave 25 distinct IS1181 patterns, while EcoRI digests gave 20 patterns. EMRSA-01, -02, -04, -06, -07, -09, -10, -11, -13 and -14 contained the element but could not be subtyped by profiling it. EMRSA-16 did not contain IS1181, consistent with a unique evolutionary origin for this major UK epidemic strain. Marked heterogeneity was observed among isolates of EMRSA-03. Each EMRSA-03 strain examined gave a unique pattern, thereby allowing subtyping of an important epidemic phage type for the purposes of hospital cross-infection control. PMID:9692606

  8. Continuous resistivity profiling data from Northport Harbor and Manhasset Bay, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, V.A.; Bratton, J.F.; Crusius, J.; Kroeger, K.D.; Worley, C.R.

    2012-01-01

    An investigation of coastal groundwater systems was performed along the North Shore of Long Island, New York, during May 2008 to constrain nutrient delivery to Northport Harbor and Manhasset Bay by delineating locations of likely groundwater discharge. The embayments are bounded by steep moraines and are underlain by thick, fine-grained sediments deposited in proglacial lakes during the last ice age. Beach sand and gravel overlie the glacial deposits along the coast. The continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) surveys that were conducted indicate the existence of low-salinity groundwater in shore-parallel bands, typically 25 to 50 meters wide, along the shorelines of both bays. Piezometer sampling and seepage meter deployments in intertidal and subtidal areas of the two bays confirmed the presence and discharge of brackish and low-salinity groundwater. The large tidal ranges (up to 3 meters) and the steep onshore topography and hydraulic gradients are important variables controlling coastal groundwater discharge in these areas.

  9. An experimentally validated contactless acoustic energy transfer model with resistive-reactive electrical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A.

    2015-04-01

    This paper investigates analytical modeling and experimental validation of Ultrasonic Acoustic Energy Transfer (UAET) for low-power electricity transfer to exploit in wireless applications ranging from medical implants to underwater sensor systems. A piezoelectric receiver bar is excited by incident acoustic waves originating from a source of known strength located at a specific distance from the receiver. The receiver is a free-free piezoelectric cylinder operating in the 33- mode of piezoelectricity with a fundamental resonance frequency above the audible frequency range. In order to extract the electrical power output, the piezoelectric receiver bar is shunted to a generalized resistive-reactive circuit. The goal is to quantify the electrical power delivered to the load (connected to the receiver) in terms of the source strength. Experimental validations are presented along with parameter optimization studies. Sensitivity of the electrical power output to the excitation frequency in the neighborhood of the receiver's underwater resonance frequency, source-to-receiver distance, and source-strength level are reported. Resistive and resistive-reactive electrical loading cases are discussed for performance enhancement and frequency-wise robustness. Simulations and experiments reveal that the presented multiphysics analytical model for UAET can be used to predict the coupled system dynamics with very good accuracy.

  10. Electrically controlled adjustable-resistance exercise equipment employing magnetorheological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukianovich, Alex; Ashour, Osama N.; Thurston, Wilbert L.; Rogers, Craig A.; Chaudhry, Zaffir A.

    1996-05-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluids consist of stable suspensions of magnetic particles in a carrying fluid. The magnetorheological effect is one of the direct influences on the mechanical properties of a fluid. It represents a reversible increase, due to an external magnetic field, of the effective viscosity. Besides the variation of the rheological properties (viscosity, elasticity, and plasticity), the magnetic properties of the fluid (permeability and susceptibility), as well as the thermal and acoustic properties, are strongly influenced when an external magnetic field is applied. MR fluids have many appealing applications in the area of vibration control. The distinguishing feature of any MR fluid device is the absence of moving mechanical parts and the extreme simplicity of construction and technology. The most important element of any MR fluid device is an MR valve, which is functionally a controllable hydraulic resistance. As a demonstration of such devices, two commercially available pieces of exercise equipment, a cross stepper and a bench press, were modified to incorporate MR fluid and an external MR valve. As the magnetic field strength operating across the MR valve is adjusted, the viscosity of the flowing MR fluid changes and, accordingly, the needed force is adjusted.

  11. Structure-property relationships in Waspaloy via small angle scattering and electrical resistivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Whelchel, R.; Gerhardt, Dr. Rosario; Littrell, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties in superalloys are controlled by the distribution of the {gamma}{prime} precipitate phase. Electrical measurements have been shown to be sensitive to certain aspects of the precipitation process and show promise for predicting the evolving microstructural state in superalloys. Aging experiments were conducted on Waspaloy samples for temperatures between 600 and 950 C for times ranging from 2min to 500h. Particle size distributions were obtained by modeling of small angle scattering (SAS) data, whereas, small precipitate size information, strain, and lattice mismatch data were obtained from X-ray diffraction. The microstructural information was then used to create a figure of merit of electron scattering intended to correlate electrical properties to the precipitate microstructure. The proposed figure of merit shows an empirical correlation with the electrical resistivity data, demonstrating the sensitivity of the resistivity measurements to the precipitation process and coarsening behavior.

  12. Relationships among low frequency (2 Hz) electrical resistivity, porosity, clay content and permeability in reservoir sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tongcheng; Best, Angus I.; Sothcott, Jeremy; North, Laurence J.; MacGregor, Lucy M.

    2015-01-01

    The improved interpretation of marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data requires knowledge of the inter-relationships between reservoir parameters and low frequency electrical resistivity. Hence, the electrical resistivities of 67 brine (35 g/l) saturated sandstone samples with a range of petrophysical properties (porosity from 2% to 29%, permeability from 0.0001 mD to 997.49 mD and volumetric clay content from 0 to 28%) were measured in the laboratory at a frequency of 2 Hz using a four-electrode circumferential resistivity method with an accuracy of ± 2%. The results show that sandstones with porosity higher than 9% and volumetric clay content up to 22% behave like clean sandstones and follow Archie's law for a brine concentration of 35 g/l. By contrast, at this brine salinity, sandstones with porosity less than 9% and volumetric clay content above 10% behave like shaly sandstones with non-negligible grain surface conductivity. A negative, linear correlation was found between electrical resistivity and hydraulic permeability on a logarithmic scale. We also found good agreement between our experimental results and a clay pore blocking model based on pore-filling and load-bearing clay in a sand/clay mixture, variable (non-clay) cement fraction and a shaly sandstone resistivity model. The model results indicate a general transition in shaly sandstones from clay-controlled resistivity to sand-controlled resistivity at about 9% porosity. At such high brine concentrations, no discernible clay conduction effect was observed above 9% porosity.

  13. Local tests of parallel electrical resistivity in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M.; Ramsey, A.T.; Schmidt, G.L.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    The motional Stark effect (MSE) polarimeter measures the local magnetic field pitch angle, proportional to the ratio of the poloidal to toroidal magnetic fields, in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The authors have used the polarimeter to measure the temporal evolution of the local value of the magnetic field pitch angle during large changes in the current profile such as during a current ramp or discharge initiation. The measured evolution is compared to the evolution predicted by classical and neoclassical resistivity models. The neoclassical resistivity model is a better predictor of the local pitch angle temporal evolution than the classical model.

  14. Characterization and calibration of seawater intrusion models using electrical resistivity tomography (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, F. H.; Kemna, A.; Antonsson, A.; Engesgaard, P. K.; Beaujean, J.

    2009-12-01

    The urban development of coastal regions create seawater intrusion (SWI) problems which threatens groundwater quality and coastal ecosystems. To study SWI, one needs both robust measuring technologies, and reliable predictions. A key aspect in the calibration of SWI models involves reproducing measured groundwater chloride concentrations. Drilling such multi-screen wells to obtain a whole concentration profile is a risky task if reliable information about the position of the salt wedge is not available. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is increasingly being used to characterize seawater intrusion and constrain corresponding models, given its high sensitivity to ion concentration in groundwater and its relatively high spatial resolution. We have investigated the potential of ERT using field data from a site in Almeria, SE Spain and synthetic data. Simulations have been run for several scenarios, with a simple hydrogeological model reflecting the local site conditions. The simulations showed that only the lower salt concentrations of the seawater-freshwater transition zone could be recovered, due to the loss of resolution with depth. We quantified this capability in terms of image appraisal indicators (cumulative sensitivity) associated with the measurement setup and showed that the mismatch between the targeted and imaged parameter values occurs from a certain threshold. Similarly, heterogeneity may only be determined accurately if located in an adequately sensitive area. Inversion of the synthetic data was performed by coupling an inversion code (PEST) with a finite-difference density-dependent flow and transport modeling code (HTS). The numerical results demonstrate the capacity of sensitivity-filtered ERT images to constrain transverse hydraulic dispersivity and longitudinal hydraulic conductivity of homogeneous seawater intrusion models. At the field site, we identified SWI at the scale of a few kilometers down to a hundred meters. Borehole logs show a remarkable correlation with the image obtained from surface data but indicate that the electrically derived mass fraction of pure seawater could not be recovered due to the discrepancy between the in-situ and laboratory-derived petrophysical relationships. Inversion of hydrologic model parameters using the field ERT image was not possible due to the inadequacy of a 2D representation of the geology at the site. Using ERT-derived data to estimate hydrological parameters requires to address resolution loss issues and the non-stationarity of the petrophysical relationship. The first issue may be approached using objective criteria. The most crucial limitation, however, is probably the non-stationarity of the petrophysical relationship. This is currently being investigated using more realistic models based on geostatistical modeling (SGeMS) of the petrophysical properties of a coastal aquifer and for transient simulations.

  15. Genotypic resistance profiles of HIV-2-treated patients in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Charpentier, Charlotte; Eholié, Serge; Anglaret, Xavier; Bertine, Mélanie; Rouzioux, Christine; Avettand-Fenoël, Véronique; Messou, Eugène; Minga, Albert; Damond, Florence; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Dabis, François; Peytavin, Gilles; Brun-Vézinet, Françoise; Ekouevi, Didier K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the virological response, genotypic resistance profiles, and antiretroviral plasma concentrations in HIV-2 antiretroviral-treated (antiretroviral therapy, ART) patients in Côte d‘Ivoire. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among HIV-2 patients receiving ART. Plasma HIV-2 viral load was performed using the Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le SIDA et les hépatites virales (ANRS) assay. Protease and reverse transcriptase sequencing was performed using in-house methods and antiretroviral plasma concentrations were assessed using ultra performance liquid chromatography combined with tandem mass spectrometry. Results One hundred and forty-five HIV-2-treated patients were enrolled with a median CD4+ cell count of 360 cells/µl (interquartile range, IQR = 215–528). Median duration of ART was 4 years (IQR = 2–7) and 74% of patients displayed viral load less than 50 copies/ml. Median plasma HIV-2 RNA among patients with viral load more than 50 copies/ml was 3016 copies/ml (IQR = 436–5156). Most patients (84%) received a lopinavir/ritonavir-based regimen. HIV-2 resistance mutations to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors were detected in 21 of 25 (84%) and 20 of 29 (69%) samples, respectively. The most prevalent nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutations were M184I/V (90%), Q151M (24%), and S215F/Y (24%). The most prevalent protease inhibitor resistance mutations were V47A (60%) and I54M (30%). Median CD4+ cell counts were 434 cells/µl (292–573) and 204 cells/µl (122–281) in patients with viral load less than 50 copies/ml and those exhibiting virological failure (P < 0.0001), respectively. The proportions of patients with adequate antiretroviral plasma concentrations were 81 and 93% in patients displaying virological failure and in those with viral load less than 50 copies/ml, respectively (P = 0.046), suggesting good treatment adherence. Conclusion We observed adequate drug plasma concentrations and virological suppression in a high proportion of HIV-2-infected patients. However, in cases of virological failure, the limited HIV-2 therapeutic arsenal and cross-resistance dramatically reduced treatment options. PMID:24583671

  16. Resistance minimum and electrical conduction mechanism in polycrystalline CoFeB thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkat Swamy, G.; Rout, P. K.; Singh, Manju; Rakshit, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    The temperature dependent resistance R(T) of polycrystalline ferromagnetic CoFeB thin films of varying thicknesses are analyzed considering various electrical scattering processes. We observe a resistance minimum in R(T) curves below ?29 K, which can be explained as an effect of the intergranular Coulomb interaction in a granular system. The structural and Coulomb interaction related scattering processes contribute more as the film thickness decreases implying the role of disorder and granularity. Although the magnetic contribution to the resistance is the weakest compared to these two, it is the only thickness independent process. On the contrary, the negative coefficient of resistance can be explained by the electron interaction effect in disordered amorphous films.

  17. Erwinia amylovora modifies phenolic profiles of susceptible and resistant apple through its type III secretion system.

    PubMed

    Pontais, Isabelle; Treutter, Dieter; Paulin, Jean-Pierre; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle

    2008-03-01

    Fire blight is a disease affecting Maloideae caused by the necrogenic bacterium Erwinia amylovora, which requires the type III protein secretion system (TTSS) for pathogenicity. Profiles of methanol-extractable leaf phenolics of two apple (Malus x domestica) genotypes with contrasting susceptibility to this disease were analyzed by HPLC after infection. Some qualitative differences were recorded between the constitutive compositions of the two genotypes but in both of them dihydrochalcones accounted for more than 90% of total phenolics. Principal component analysis separated leaves inoculated with a virulent wild-type strain from those inoculated with a non-pathogenic TTSS-defective mutant or with water. The changes in levels of the various groups of phenolics in response to the virulent bacterium were similar between the two genotypes, with a significant decrease of dihydrochalcones and a significant increase of hydroxycinnamate derivatives. Differences between genotypes were, however, recorded in amplitude and kinetic of variation in these groups. Occurrence of oxidation and polymerization reactions is proposed, based on the browning process of infected tissues, but whether some by-products act in defense as toxic compounds remain to be tested. Among direct antibacterial constitutive compounds present in apple leaves, the dihydrochalcone phloretin only was found at levels close to lethal concentrations in both genotypes. However, E. amylovora exhibited the ability to stabilize this compound at sublethal levels even in the resistant apple, rejecting the hypothesis of its involvement in the resistance of this genotype. PMID:18275458

  18. Rapid detection and antimicrobial resistance gene profiling of Yersinia pestis using pyrosequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Amoako, Kingsley K; Thomas, Matthew C; Kong, Fanliang; Janzen, Timothy W; Hahn, Kristen R; Shields, Michael J; Goji, Noriko

    2012-09-01

    When a bioterrorism attack is attempted or perpetrated there is considerable risk for public health and large scale socioeconomic consequences. It is imperative that we possess established assays for the rapid identification of biothreat agents with high sensitivity and specificity to ensure emergency response measures can be deployed appropriately. Highly trustworthy information within a relevant timeframe is required to make a rapid and informed decision. Obtaining DNA sequence data from a suspected agent provides an added layer of confidence compared to a presumptive positive PCR amplicon. Sequencing based technologies, such as pyrosequencing, have sufficient discrimination potential to be used for microbial identification and can also be used to identify antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes. We have shown in this study the power of pyrosequencing in the unambiguous detection and identification of nine Yersinia pestis strains based on virulence genes. Furthermore, we developed assays to characterize their AMR gene profiles. Sequence results ranging from 40 to 84bp were generated in about 60 min following initial PCR amplification and provide a rapid method for determining the AMR profile as compared to the conventional plate method which takes several days. The high sequence identities (95-100%) and specificity observed indicate the high level of accuracy of pyrosequencing technology. In addition, the read lengths of up to 84 bp observed in this study are unprecedented for pyrosequencing using the Pyromark Q24. We propose this method as a novel, rapid, sequence based detection and identification tool for Y. pestis with a potential application in biodefence. PMID:22634001

  19. Aerodynamic resistance reduction of electric and hybrid vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The generation of an EHV aerodynamic data base was initiated by conducting full-scale wind tunnel tests on 16 vehicles. Zero-yaw drag coefficients ranged from a high of 0.58 for a boxey delivery van and an open roadster to a low of about 0.34 for a current 4-passenger prototype automobile which was designed with aerodynamics as an integrated parameter. Characteristic effects of aspect ratio or fineness ratio which might appear if electric vehicle shape proportions were to vary significantly from current automobiles were identified. Some preliminary results indicate a 5 to 10% variation in drag over the range of interest. Effective drag coefficient wind-weighting factors over J227a driving cycles in the presence of annual mean wind fields were identified. Such coefficients, when properly weighted, were found to be from 5 to 65% greater than the zero-yaw drag coefficient in the cases presented. A vehicle aerodynamics bibliography of over 160 entries, in six general categories is included.

  20. Dependence of thermal conductivity on electrical resistivity in Bismuth Tellurides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Osamu; Satou, Kouji; Odahara, Hirotaka; Tomiyoshi, Shoichi

    2005-07-01

    The p-type (Bi0.25Sb0.75)2Te3 doped with 3 12 wt% excess Te alone and n-type Bi2(Te0.94Se0.06)3 codoped with 0.017 0.026 wt% Te and 0.068 0.102 wt% I were prepared by the Bridgman method, to produce intentionally polycrystalline. Some of the as-grown specimens were annealed, in order to prepare specimens with much different ?. These polycrystalline specimens have almost the same degree of alignment of the c plane parallel to the freezing direction. The electrical rersistivity ? and thermal conductivity ? were measured at 298 K along the freezing direction and ? was plotted as a function of ?. As a result, the lattice components ?ph obtained by subtracting the electronic component ?el from the observed ? were found to decrease almost linearly with a decrease of ? in both p- and n-type specimens, where ?el was calculated using Wiedemann Franz law. This tendency is consistent with the conventional result that ?ph becomes negligible small in metals. The significant decrease in ?ph with decrease in ? is considered to be caused predominantly by the phonon scattering due to dopants. The relationship between ?ph and ? was first clarified in the intermediate region between the metal and insulator.

  1. Multifractal analysis of vertical profiles of soil penetration resistance at the field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, G. M.; Silva, E. F. F.; Montenegro, A. A. A.; Vidal Vázquez, E.; Paz-Ferreiro, J.

    2013-07-01

    Soil penetration resistance (PR) is widely used as an indirect indicator of soil strength. Soil PR is linked to basic soil properties and correlated to root growth and plant production, and as such it is extensively used as a practical tool for assessing soil compaction and to evaluate the effects of soil management. This study investigates how results from multifractal analysis can quantify key elements of depth-dependent soil PR profiles and how this information can be used at the field scale. We analysed multifractality of 50 PR vertical profiles, measured from 0 to 60 cm depth and randomly located on a 6.5 ha sugar cane field in northeastern Brazil. The scaling property of each profile was typified by singularity, and Rényi spectra estimated by the method of moments. The Hurst exponent was used to parameterize the autocorrelation of the vertical PR data sets. The singularity and Rènyi spectra showed that the vertical PR data sets exhibited a well-defined multifractal structure. Hurst exponent values were close to 1, ranging from 0.944 to 0.988, indicating strong persistence in PR variation with soil depth. Also, the Hurst exponent was negatively and significantly correlated to coefficient of variation (CV), skewness and maximum values of the depth-dependent PR. Multifractal analysis added valuable information to describe the spatial arrangement of depth-dependent penetrometer data sets, which was not taken into account by classical statistical indices. Multifractal parameters were mapped over the experimental field and compared with mean and maximum values of PR. Combination of spatial variability survey and multifractal analysis appear to be useful to manage soil compaction.

  2. Electron Beam Lithography Double Step Exposure Technique for Fabrication of Mushroom-Like Profile in Bilayer Resist System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornelia, Indykiewicz; Bogdan, Paszkiewicz; Tomasz, Szyma?ski; Regina, Paszkiewicz

    2015-01-01

    The Hi/Lo bilayer resist system exposure in e-beam lithography (EBL) process, intended for mushroom-like profile fabrication, was studied. Different exposure parameters and theirs influence on the resist layers were simulated in CASINO software and the obtained results were compared with the experimental data. The AFM technique was used for the estimation of the e-beam penetration depth in the resist stack. Performed numerical and experimental results allow us to establish the useful ranges of the exposure parameters.

  3. Noninvasive Imaging of Head-Brain Conductivity Profiles Using Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Yan, Dandan; Zhu, Shanan; He, Bin

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a recently introduced non-invasive conductivity imaging modality, which combines the magnetic resonance current density imaging (CDI) and the traditional electrical impedance tomography (EIT) techniques. MREIT is aimed at providing high spatial resolution images of electrical conductivity, by avoiding solving the well-known ill-posed problem in the traditional EIT. In this paper, we review our research activities in MREIT imaging of head-brain tissue conductivity profiles. We have developed several imaging algorithms and conducted a series of computer simulations for MREIT imaging of the head and brain tissues. Our work suggests MREIT brain imaging may become a useful tool in imaging conductivity distributions of the brain and head. PMID:18799394

  4. Investigating preferential flow processes in soils using anisotropy in electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hazaimay, S.; Huisman, J. A.; Zimmermann, E.; Kemna, A.; Vereecken, H.

    2012-12-01

    Macropores occupy a small volume fraction of the pore space in the vadose zone. Water and solutes can quickly bypass the vadose zone through these macropores in a process known as macropore preferential flow. In the last few decades, many efforts were made to improve understanding the macropore preferential flow processes because of their importance in transporting agrochemicals and contaminants to the groundwater. Unfortunately, very few measurement methods provide insights into these preferential flow processes. In this context, the objective of this study is to evaluate whether anisotropy in electrical resistivity can be used to identify the existence of flow in macropores and perhaps even to characterize the exchange between macropores and bulk soil. In a first step, infiltration into a soil column with an artificial macropore was simulated using the HYDRUS software package that solves the pseudo three-dimensional axisymmetric Richards equation. The simulated temporal development of the resistivity anisotropy was obtained by solving the Poisson equation in MATLAB after converting the simulated water content distributions to electrical resistivity distributions. At the beginning of the simulation, a small anisotropy ratio was simulated because of the presence of the empty ('deactivated') macropore in the moist matrix. As soon as the infiltration process started, macropore flow occurred and both the horizontal and vertical resistivity decreased strongly. However, the vertical and horizontal resistivity reacted differently because of the presence of the conductive ('activated') macropore, which led to anisotropy in the resistivity. As soon as infiltration into the macropore stopped, water re-distributed from the macropore to the matrix domain and contrasts in electrical resistivity decreased within the column. To verify the simulation results in the laboratory, we measured the temporal dynamics of the anisotropy in resistivity during water infiltration into a soil column of 9 cm diameter and 40 cm length with an artificial macropore of 2 cm diameter in the center of the column. The first experimental results confirmed that the anisotropy in electrical resistivity can indeed be used to identify and perhaps even quantify macropore flow.

  5. Monitoring radio-frequency heating of contaminated soils using electrical resistance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.L.; Daily, W.D.

    1993-09-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to monitor a radio-frequency heating process for the insitu remediation of volatile organic compounds from subsurface water and soil at the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina. A dipole antenna located in a horizontal well in the unsaturated zone was used to heat a contaminated clay layer. The heat-induced changes were tomographically imaged by their effects on the formation electrical resistivity. The resistivity changes observed appear to be related to heating and vaporization of the pore water, formation of steam condensate, and infiltration of rainwater through the heated zones and adjacent areas. There is a clear asymmetry downward in the resistivity decreases associated with the heating process. The resistivity decreases observed in the vicinity of the heating well are believed to be caused by the heating and downward migration of warm water originally located within a radius of a few feet around the heating well; the magnitude of the change is between 10--20%. The decreasing resistivity implies an increasing rate of radio wave attenuation as heating progressed; therefore, the rate of energy deposition around the heating well increased while the penetration distance of the radio waves decreased. Saturation changes in the clay near the antenna during heating were estimated to be 50--55% based on the observed resistivity decreases. Resistivity changes observed at distances greater than 3 meters to one side of the antenna appear to be related to rainwater infiltration. We propose that gaps in near surface clay layers allow rainwater to migrate downward and reach the top of clay rich zone penetrated by the antenna borehole. The water may then accumulate along the top of the clay.

  6. Comparative analysis of virulence and resistance profiles of Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from poultry meat and foodborne outbreaks in northern Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Jaradat, Ziad W; Abedel Hafiz, Leena; Ababneh, Mustafa M; Ababneh, Qotaibah O; Al Mousa, Waseem; Al-Nabulsi, Anas; Osaili, Tareq M; Holley, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to isolate Salmonella Enteritidis from poultry samples and compare their virulence and antibiotic resistance profiles to S. Enteritidis isolated from outbreaks in northern Jordan. Two hundred presumptive isolates were obtained from 302 raw poultry samples and were subjected to further analysis and confirmation. A phylogenic tree based on 16S rRNA sequencing was constructed and selected isolates representing each cluster were further studied for their virulence in normal adult Swiss white mice. The most virulent strains were isolated from poultry samples and had an LD50 of 1.55 × 105 CFU, while some of the outbreak isolates were avirulent in mice. Antibiotic resistance profiling revealed that the isolates were resistant to seven of eight antibiotics screened with each isolate resistant to multiple antibiotics (from two to six). Of the poultry isolates, 100%, 88.9%, 77.8%, 66.7%, and 50% showed resistance to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, ampicillin, cephalothin, and cefoperazone, respectively. Two outbreak isolates were sensitive to all tested antibiotics, while 71.4% were resistant to cefoperazone and only 28.6% showed resistance to nalidixic acid. Salmonella outbreak isolates were genetically related to poultry isolates as inferred from the 16S rRNA sequencing, yet were phenotypically different. Although outbreak strains were similar to poultry isolates, when tested in the mouse model, some of the outbreak isolates were highly virulent while others were avirulent. This might be due to a variation in susceptibility of the mouse to different S. Enteritidis isolates. PMID:24780883

  7. The Behaviour of Laboratory Soil Electrical Resistivity Value under Basic Soil Properties Influences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Aziman, M.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Chitral, W. D.; Fauziah, A.; Rosli, S.

    2015-01-01

    Electrical resistivity method (ERM) was a popular indirect geophysical tools adopted in engineering, environmental and archaeological studies. In the past, results of the electrical resistivity value (ERV) were always subjected to a long discussion and debate among the related parties such as an engineers, geophysicists and geologists due to its lack of clarification and evidences in quantitative point of view. Most of the results produced in the past was always been justified using qualitative ways which difficult to be accept by certain parties. In order to reduce the knowledge gap between those parties, this study has performed a laboratory experiment of soil box resistivity test which supported by an additional basic geotechnical test as referred to particle size distribution test (d), moisture content test (w), density test (?bulk) and Atterberg limit test (LL, PL and PI). The test was performed to establish a series of electrical resistivity value with different quantity of water content for Clayey SILT and Silty SAND soil. It was found that the ERV of Silty SAND (600 - 7300 ?m) was higher than Clayey SILT (13 - 7700 ?m) due to the different quantity of basic soil properties value obtained from the basic geotechnical test. This study was successfully demonstrated that the fluctuation of ERV has greatly influenced by the variations of the soil physical properties (d, w, ?bulk, LL, PL and PI). Hence, the confidence level of ERV interpretation will be increasingly meaningful since it able to be proved by others parameter generated by laboratory direct test.

  8. Electrical resistance tomography for imaging the spatial distribution of moisture in pavement sections

    SciTech Connect

    Buettner, M.; Ramirez, A.; Daily, W.

    1995-11-08

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) was used to image spatial moisture distribution and movement in pavement sections during an infiltration test. ERT is a technique for determining the electrical resistivity distribution within a volume from measurement of injected currents and the resulting electrical potential distribution on the surface. The transfer resistance (ratio of potential to injected current) data are inverted using an algorithm based on a finite element forward solution which is iteratively adjusted in a least squares sense until the measured and calculated transfer resistances agree to within some predetermined value. Four arrays of ERT electrodes were installed in vertical drill holes 1.22 m (4 ft) placed at the comers of a square 61 cm (2 ft) on a side into a pavement section which is used for a truck scale ramp on U.S. Highway 99 just north of Sacramento, CA. Water was introduced slowly into the pavement through a shallow hole in the center of this pattern and ERT data were collected in various planes as the water infiltrated into the pavement and subgrade materials over a period of several hours. The ERT data were inverted, and the resulting images show (1) the basic structure of the pavement section and (2) the movement of water through the image planes as a function of time during infiltration. An interesting result is that the water does not appear to drain from the section toward the shoulder as had been expected based on the design.

  9. Using Electrical Resistivity Tomography for Constraining a Hydrogeological Model in a Data Sparse Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, S.; Allen, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Geological and hydrogeological data are often spatially limited in mountainous regions. In these settings, geophysical techniques can be used to constrain hydrogeological models by providing insight into the hydrostratigraphy and the continuity of units in the subsurface. This study we used electrical resistivity tomography coupled with a priori geological data from residential water wells to improve the accuracy and confidence of a hydrogeological model. The study area is situated within the mountainous Cowichan watershed in British Columbia, Canada. Throughout the watershed, unconsolidated deposits of variable thickness overlie bedrock. Based on available water well information, at high elevation, sediment thickness is on the order of a few metres, but within the valley bottom, sediment thickness can be up to 300 m. The unconsolidated deposits are heterogeneous due to a complex depositional environment that was controlled by glacial advances and recessions, most notably during the Fraser Glaciation. Six electrical resistivity transects of various lengths spanning 135 to 830 metres were conducted in an area of the watershed that is particularly data poor. The electrical resistivity transects were strategically placed, first, to make use of available lithology information from existing water wells in order to constrain the geophysical interpretation, and second, to contribute data to areas that lack subsurface lithological records. Electrical resistivity was measured using a AGI SuperSting R1 system, and data were processed using robust inversion software to identify stark geophysical contacts. The technique successfully delineated zones of conductive and resistive units that have been interpreted as aquitards (clay and till formations), aquifers (water bearing sand and gravel lenses), and bedrock based on dielectric contrast. Available surficial geology and bedrock geology maps, coupled with residential well drilling records, further assisted in mapping the continuity of the hydrogeological units at a larger scale, and the results were digitized and integrated to construct a three dimensional hydrogeological model of the watershed.

  10. Monitoring of olive oil mills' wastes using electrical resistivity tomography techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simyrdanis, Kleanthis; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Kirkou, Stella; Sarris, Apostolos; Tsourlos, Panagiotis

    2014-08-01

    Olive oil mills' wastes (OOMW) are one of the byproducts of the oil production that can lead to serious environmental pollution when they are deposited in ponds dug on the ground surface. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) method can provide a valuable tool in order to monitor through time the physical flow of the wastes into the subsurface. ERT could potentially locate the electrical signature due to lower resistivity values resulting from the leakage of OOMW to the subsurface. For this purpose, two vertical boreholes were installed (12m depth, 9 m apart) in the vicinity of an existing pond which is filled with OOMW during the oil production period. The test site is situated in Saint Andreas village about 15km south of the city of Rethymno (Crete, Greece). Surface ERT measurements were collected along multiple lines in order to reconstruct the subsurface resistivity models. Data acquisition was performed with standard and optimized electrode configuration protocols. The monitoring survey includes the ERT data collection for a period of time. The study was initiated before the OOMW were deposited in the pond, so resistivity fluctuations are expected due to the flow of OOMW in the porous subsurface media through time. Preliminary results show the good correlation of the ERT images with the drilled geological formations and the identification of low resistivity subsurface zone that could be attributed to the flow of the wastes within the porous layers.

  11. Laser-induced change of electrical resistivity of metals and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, Ryszard; Kostrubiec, Franciszek; Tomczyk, Mariusz; Walczak, Maria

    2005-01-01

    Applying of laser alloying for modification of electrical resistivity of metals with significant importance in electrical and electronic engineering and utilization of this method for producing passive elements of electric circuit have been presented. The alloyed metals were obtained by means of laser beams with different wave length and various mode of working (cw or pulse), by different methods for the supplying of alloying elements. It was possible to form alloyed layers of metals forming different types of metallurgical systems: with full (Cu-Au, Cu-Ni) or partial solubility (Mo-Ni, W-Ni, Cu-Al, Ag-Sn), insoluble (Mo-Au and Cu-Cr) and immiscible (Ag-Ni and Ni-Au) metals, with metallic as well as non-metallic additions (oxide). It has been shown as well that it is possible to achieve resistive elements modified in whole cross section, in a single technological process. The results of systematic investigations into the resistivity of alloyed metals in the temperature range of 77-450 K have been presented. The alloyed layers, obtained, were characterised by a range of resistivity from 2.8 x 10-8 ?m (Cu-Cr) to 128 x 10-8 ?m (W-Ni). The microstructure and composition of alloyed layers were examined by means of SEM-microscopy and EDX analyser. In selected cases it was shown how results of investigations could be utilized for modification of surface layer of contact materials or to optimize the resistance of laser welded joints. In addition the results of investigations of new developed microtechnology -- producing micro-areas with extremely high resistivity -- have been presented.

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF LEAKS USING TIME LAPSED LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS DA; RUCKER DF; FINK JB; LOKE MH

    2009-12-16

    Highly industrialized areas pose challenges for surface electrical resistivity characterization due to metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically more conductive than the desired targets and will mask the deeper subsurface information. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes in the area near the target. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes to electrically monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank with both synthetic examples and a field demonstration. The synthetic examples place a simple target of varying electrical properties beneath a very low resistivity layer. The layer is meant to replicate the effects of infrastructure. Both surface and long electrodes are tested on the synthetic domain. The leak demonstration for the field experiment is simulated by injecting a high conductivity fluid in a perforated well within the S tank farm at Hanford, and the resistivity measurements are made before and after the leak test. All data are processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure is applied in both the time and space domains. The synthetic test case shows that the long electrode ERM could detect relative changes in resistivity that are commensurate with the differing target properties. The surface electrodes, on the other hand, had a more difficult time matching the original target's footprint. The field results shows a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site after cessation of the injections. The time lapsed regularization parameter has a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post injection datasets, but the interpretation of the target is consistent across all values of the parameter. The long electrode ERM method may provide a tool for near real-time monitoring of leaking underground storage tanks.

  13. GEOGRAPHICAL VARIATION IN ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE PROFILES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI ISOLATED FROM SWINE, POULTRY, BEEF AND DAIRY CATTLE FARMS IN FLORIDA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) profiles have been studied to identify sources of fecal pollution. However, research is needed to understand the geographical limitations in applying MAR. More than 2000 E. coli were isolated from swine, poultry, beef and dairy farms in south ...

  14. MULTIPLE ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE PROFILES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI ISOLATED FROM SWINE, POULTRY, BEEF AND CATTLE FARMS IN FLORIDA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) profiles have been studied in Escherichia coli in an effort to predict specific sources of fecal pollution. However, research is needed to understand the geographical limitations in applying MAR to defined pollution sources. More than 2000 E. coli were isolated ...

  15. Electrical Transport in Charge-Ordered Fe2OBO3: Resistive Switching and Pressure Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Akrap, A.; Angst, M; Khalifah, Peter; Mandrus, D.; Sales, Brian C; Forro, Laszlo

    2010-01-01

    The pressure-temperature-electric field phase diagram of Fe{sub 2}OBO{sub 3} is studied under ambient and high pressure using resistivity and thermoelectric power measurements. The onset of the incommensurate charge order at T{sub CO} = 340 K does not depend on pressure up to at least 2 GPa. The temperature of the transition to the commensurate charge order is increased by {approx}10 K/GPa. High pressure stabilizes the commensurate phase. We find evidence for resistive switching in the incommensurate phase, which may be linked to the dynamics of the charge-order domain boundaries.

  16. Electrical resistivity surface for FeO-Fe2O3-P2O5 glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, J. G.; Kinser, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The dc electrical properties and microstructure of x(FeO-Fe2O3)-(100-x)P2O5 glasses were investigated up to a maximum of x = 75 mol %. Results indicate that, in general, the minimum resistivity of the glass does not occur at equal Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) concentrations, although for the special case where x = 55 mol % the minimum does occur at Fe(2+)/Fe total = 0.5, as reported by other investigators. Evidence presented shows that the position of the minimum resistivity is a function of total iron content. The minimum shifts to glasses richer in Fe(2+) at higher total iron concentrations.

  17. Microbiota and anthropic interference on antimicrobial resistance profile of bacteria isolated from Brazilian maned-wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus)

    PubMed Central

    Vieira-da-Motta, Olney; Eckhardt-de-Pontes, Luiz Antonio; Petrucci, Melissa Paes; dos Santos, Israel Pereira; da Cunha, Isabel Candia Nunes; Morato, Ronaldo Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    Both the study of Brazilian wild mammal fauna and the conditions that foster the preservation of endangered species, such as Brazilian Maned-wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), in wild life are of extreme importance. In order to study the resistance profile of microbiota bacterial colonizing Brazilian Maned-wolf, this work investigated samples from eight male captive and free roaming animals originating from different Brazilian geographical regions. Samples for microbiological purposes were collected with swabs and kept in appropriate transport medium. Using routine microbiological techniques, the isolated bacteria were tested toward antimicrobial drugs by the agar disk diffusion method. Results showed that all samples from wild animals were sensitive toward all drugs tested. Conversely, the resistance profile of bacteria isolated from captive animals varied among strains and animal body site location. Escherichia coli samples from prepuce, anus and ear showed multi-resistance toward at least four drugs, especially against erythromycin and tetracycline, followed by Proteus mirabilis and P. vulgaris strains isolated from anus and ear. Among Gram-positive bacteria, strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci showed multi-resistance mainly toward erythromycin and amoxicillin. The work discusses these findings and suggests that profile of multi-resistance bacteria from captive subjects may be attributed to direct contact with human or through lifestyle factors such as feeding, predation or contact of animals with urban animals such as birds, rodents, and insects from surrounding environments. PMID:24688529

  18. Rough surface electrical contact resistance considering scale dependent properties and quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Robert L.; Crandall, Erika R.; Bozack, Michael J.

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the effect of scale dependent mechanical and electrical properties on electrical contact resistance (ECR) between rough surfaces. This work attempts to build on existing ECR models that neglect potentially important quantum- and size-dependent contact and electrical conduction mechanisms present due to the asperity sizes on typical surfaces. The electrical conductance at small scales can quantize or show a stepping trend as the contact area is varied in the range of the free electron Fermi wavelength squared. This work then evaluates if these effects remain important for the interface between rough surfaces, which may include many small scale contacts of varying sizes. The results suggest that these effects may be significant in some cases, while insignificant for others. It depends on the load and the multiscale structure of the surface roughness.

  19. Rough surface electrical contact resistance considering scale dependent properties and quantum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Robert L.; Crandall, Erika R.; Bozack, Michael J.

    2015-05-21

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the effect of scale dependent mechanical and electrical properties on electrical contact resistance (ECR) between rough surfaces. This work attempts to build on existing ECR models that neglect potentially important quantum- and size-dependent contact and electrical conduction mechanisms present due to the asperity sizes on typical surfaces. The electrical conductance at small scales can quantize or show a stepping trend as the contact area is varied in the range of the free electron Fermi wavelength squared. This work then evaluates if these effects remain important for the interface between rough surfaces, which may include many small scale contacts of varying sizes. The results suggest that these effects may be significant in some cases, while insignificant for others. It depends on the load and the multiscale structure of the surface roughness.

  20. Earthquake resistant construction of electric transmission and telecommunication facilities serving the Federal government report

    SciTech Connect

    Yokel, F.Y.

    1990-02-01

    The vulnerability of electrical transmission and telecommunication facilities to damage in past earthquakes, as well as available standards and technologies to protect these facilities against earthquake damage are reviewed. An overview is presented of measures taken by various Federal agencies to protect electrical transmission and telecommunication facilities against earthquake hazards. It is concluded that while most new facilities which are owned and operated by Federal agencies are presently designed to provide some, though not necessarily adequate, earthquake resistance, there generally is no effort to retrofit existing facilities. No evidence was found of requirements to protect electrical transmission and communication facilities which have major contractual obligations to serve the Federal Government and only limited seismic design requirements are stipulated for electrical transmission systems constructed with Federal funding.

  1. Correlation between Group B Streptococcal Genotypes, Their Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles, and Virulence Genes among Pregnant Women in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Hannoun, Antoine; Shehab, Marwa; Khairallah, Marie-Therese; Sabra, Ahmad; Abi-Rached, Roland; Bazi, Tony; Yunis, Khalid A.; Araj, George F.; Matar, Ghassan M.

    2009-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of 76 Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococci [GBS]) isolates from vaginal specimens of pregnant women near term were correlated to their genotypes generated by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA analysis and their virulence factors encoding genes cylE, lmb, scpB, rib, and bca by PCR. Based on the distribution of the susceptibility patterns, six profiles were generated. RAPD analysis detected 7 clusters of genotypes. The cylE gene was present in 99% of the isolates, the lmb in 96%, scpB in 94.7%, rib in 33%, and bca in 56.5% of isolates. The isolates demonstrated a significant correlation between antimicrobial resistance and genotype clusters denoting the distribution of particular clones with different antimicrobial resistance profiles, entailing the practice of caution in therapeutic options. All virulence factors encoding genes were detected in all seven genotypic clusters with rib and bca not coexisting in the same genome. PMID:20148175

  2. Correlation between Group B Streptococcal Genotypes, Their Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles, and Virulence Genes among Pregnant Women in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Hannoun, Antoine; Shehab, Marwa; Khairallah, Marie-Therese; Sabra, Ahmad; Abi-Rached, Roland; Bazi, Tony; Yunis, Khalid A; Araj, George F; Matar, Ghassan M

    2009-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of 76 Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococci [GBS]) isolates from vaginal specimens of pregnant women near term were correlated to their genotypes generated by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA analysis and their virulence factors encoding genes cylE, lmb, scpB, rib, and bca by PCR. Based on the distribution of the susceptibility patterns, six profiles were generated. RAPD analysis detected 7 clusters of genotypes. The cylE gene was present in 99% of the isolates, the lmb in 96%, scpB in 94.7%, rib in 33%, and bca in 56.5% of isolates. The isolates demonstrated a significant correlation between antimicrobial resistance and genotype clusters denoting the distribution of particular clones with different antimicrobial resistance profiles, entailing the practice of caution in therapeutic options. All virulence factors encoding genes were detected in all seven genotypic clusters with rib and bca not coexisting in the same genome. PMID:20148175

  3. L- and Corner-arryas for 3D electric resistivity tomography: An alternative for geophysical surveys in urban zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez Segura, R. E.; Tejero-Andrade, A.; Delgado-Solorzano, C.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; Hernández-Quintero, E.

    2011-12-01

    3D Electric Resitivity Tomography methods carried out on heavily urbanized areas become a difficult task, since buildings, houses or other type of obstacles do not allow parallel ERT arrays to be deployed. Therefore, insufficient information from the subsoil could be obtained. The present paper presents two new techniques, which allow acquiring information beneath a construction by simply surrounding the building or buildings to be studied by a series of ERT profiles. Apparent resistivities are obtained from L-shaped profiles, where alternations between current and potential electrodes along this array are carried out in an automatic way. Four L-arrays and four Corner-arrays are needed to cover the subsurface beneath the studied area. A field test was carried out on a small University of Mexico main Campus garden, where trees and other anthropogenic structures were the so called 'obstacles'. Geophysical work was performed employing parallel arrays (traditional methodology) and compared with this new method presented. Results show that the new method has a poor resolution towards the central portion of the area, mainly from anomalies produced by shallow structures as compared with the traditional grid method. However, the L- and Corner- arrays are more sensitive to anomalies produced by deeper objects, which cannot be observed in the traditional method. The final goal is to apply this method to study habitational complexes built on top of the ancient lake of Mexico City, where buildings are in constant risk due to fracturing and subsidence.

  4. Characterization of Contact and Bulk Thermal Resistance of Laminations for Electric Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Cousineau, Emily; Bennion, Kevin; Devoto, Douglas; Naramanchi, Sreekant

    2015-07-06

    Thermal management for electric motors is important as the automotive industry continues to transition to more electrically dominant vehicle propulsion systems. The transition to more electrically dominant propulsion systems leads to higher-power duty cycles for electric-drive systems. Thermal constraints place significant limitations on how electric motors ultimately perform. As thermal management improves, there will be a direct trade-off among motor performance, efficiency, cost, and the sizing of electric motors to operate within the thermal constraints. During the development of thermal finite element analysis models and computational fluid dynamics models for electric motors, it was found that there was a lack of open literature detailing the thermal properties of key materials common in electric motors that are significant in terms of heat removal. The lack of available literature, coupled with the strong interest from industry in the passive-stack thermal measurement results, led to experiments to characterize the thermal contact resistance between motor laminations. We examined four lamination materials, including the commonly used 26 gauge and 29 gauge M19 materials, the HF10 and Arnon 7 materials. These latter two materials are thinner and reduce eddy currents responsible for core losses. We measured the thermal conductivity of the lamination materials and the thermal contact resistance between laminations in a stack, as well as investigated factors affecting contact resistance between laminations such as the contact pressure and surface finish. Lamination property data will be provided and we also develop a model to estimate the through-stack thermal conductivity for materials beyond those that were directly tested in this work. For example, at a clamping pressure of 138 kPa, the 29 gauge M19 material has a through-stack thermal conductivity of 1.68 W/m-K, and the contact resistance between laminations was measured to be 193 mm^2-K/W. The measured bulk thermal conductivity for the M19 29 gauge material is 21.0 W/m-K. Density and specific heat were measured to be 7450 kg/m^3 and 463 J/kg-K, respectively. These results are helping, and will continue to help engineers and researchers in the design and development of motors.

  5. Monitoring active layer thaw and freeze-back in four different periglacial landforms in Svalbard using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliussen, H.; Oswald, A.; Watanabe, T.; Christiansen, H. H.; Matsuoka, N.

    2012-04-01

    Thawing and freezing of the active layer has an important impact on the underlying permafrost through latent heat effects and changes in effective thermal conductivity and mechanisms of heat transport. Information on the active layer freeze/thaw dynamics is therefore important to understand the permafrost response to climate variability. In addition, active layer deepening may be an early sign of permafrost degradation, making monitoring programs such as the CALM network important. Active layer depths are traditionally measured by mechanical probing in fine-grained sediments or by vertical arrays of ground temperature sensors. The first technique prevents measurements to be made in stony sediments, while the latter technique gives only a point value of the active layer depth. In this study we have tested Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) as a tool to measure and monitor active layer depth and freeze/thaw dynamics. The electrical resistivity of the ground is largely dependent on the unfrozen water content, making resistivity monitoring a potentially valuable tool to delineate freeze and thaw extent, and patterns in soil moisture. The results presented here are part of the IPY 2007-2009 research project 'Permafrost Observatory Project: A Contribution to the Thermal State of Permafrost in Norway and Svalbard' (TSP NORWAY) and the IPA periglacial working group project on 'High-Resolution Periglacial Climate Indicators'. Electrode arrays were installed permanently in four different periglacial landforms in the Adventdalen valley area in central Svalbard; a solifluction slope in May 2007, a loess terrace (the UNISCALM site) in September 2007, and a mudboil site and ice-wedge site in June 2009 (Watanabe et al., submitted). The arrays were 16m long, giving maximum profile depths of 2m, and electrodes were installed with 0.2m spacing. Measurements were made with irregular but approximately two- to four-week time intervals, depending on weather conditions and instrument availability. Data are available until autumn 2009 for all sites, and until autumn 2010 for the mudboil and ice-wedge sites. Ground temperature and soil moisture is monitored at all four sites, and mechanical probing of thaw depth progression was performed along with the resistivity measurements for parts of the period. The apparent resistivity raw data error is low in the summer, but in the wintertime 40 to 50% of the data was excluded in the worst cases. The errors are higher in the dry loess site also in the summer, compared to the other three relatively wet sites. After inverting the raw data to give subsurface models of the specific resistivity, depth of investigation mapping was made to identify model areas that were not well constrained by the data. The models show good reliability except at the model edges, in some cases of steep resistivity gradients and at local resistivity extremes. Preliminary results of this study have been presented (Juliussen et al 2010, Oswald 2010), but here the aim is to (1) quantify the accuracy of ERT-based thaw depth estimates as compared to the probed depths, and (2) to analyze the resistivity values with respect to soil moisture and temperature data and ground ice content obtained from coring.

  6. Electrical resistivity and TDR methods for soil moisture estimation in central Italy test-sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calamita, G.; Brocca, L.; Perrone, A.; Piscitelli, S.; Lapenna, V.; Melone, F.; Moramarco, T.

    2012-08-01

    SummaryIn this study, the feasibility of the resistivity method for the study of the spatial and temporal soil moisture variations in the Vallaccia catchment (central Italy), covering an area of about 56 km2, was investigated. Correlation and regression analyses were performed over a 1 year data set of simultaneous soil electrical resistivity and soil moisture measurements, acquired in eight different sites with a Resistivimeter Syscal Junior and a portable Time Domain Reflectometer (TDR), respectively. Measurements acquired in-time by continuous Frequency Domain Reflectometer (FDR) sensors were also used and compared with simultaneous resistivity measurements. The statistical analyses were conducted not only for the whole data set, but also separately for each sampling day, for each sampling site and considering spatially averaged data. Results showed a good correlation between resistivity and soil moisture measurements, revealing the capability of resistivity measurements to infer soil moisture spatial and temporal variability with a root mean square error equal, on average, to 4.4% vol/vol. In comparison with TDR, the resistivity method gives information integrated on a greater volume of soil and the measurements are easier and quicker to be carried out. Therefore, this method can be considered as an alternative tool to be employed for qualitative and quantitative soil moisture monitoring in small to medium catchments.

  7. A high temperature cell for simultaneous electrical resistance and neutron diffraction measurements.

    PubMed

    Engin, T E; Powell, A V; Haynes, R; Chowdhury, M A H; Goodway, C M; Done, R; Kirichek, O; Hull, S

    2008-09-01

    An in situ cell that allows the electrical resistance of a sample pellet to be measured while performing neutron diffraction experiments has been developed at the ISIS pulsed neutron source. The sample is held between two spring loaded platinum electrodes embedded in a boron nitride clamp assembly with the resistance measured using the four-probe method. An outer quartz glass jacket allows the atmosphere within the sample enclosure to be controlled, and the entire device can be accommodated within a standard ISIS neutron furnace for measurements at temperatures up to 1270 K. The operation of this cell is illustrated using data for the structural, magnetic, and electrical properties of chalcopyrite CuFeS(2) collected over the temperature range of 398-873 K on the Polaris powder diffractometer at ISIS. PMID:19044451

  8. Electrical resistivity measurements of the chalcogenide spinel, CuIr2S4, under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanni, Mark

    2006-10-01

    Electrical resistivity as a function of pressure will be investigated for the thiospinel compound, CuIr2S4, which exhibits a metal to insulator transition at high pressures. This study will corroborate existing experimental and theoretical work and is the first of its kind to perform high pressure electrical conductivity and insulating phase optical studies in the range of room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature. In addition, the transport properties of adamantine semiconductors will be studied at high pressure. The resistivity measurements will be made using a pseudo four-wire probing technique, using an AC constant current source, to eliminate thermal noise in the connections, and a nanovoltmeter. The study is currently ongoing and results are still pending. Improvements made to a stepper motor control program and changes to the system used for optical studies will be presented.

  9. Hillslope characterization in terms of geophysical units based on the joint interpretation of electrical resistivity and seismic velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feskova, Tatiana; Dietrich, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Hydrological conditions in a catchment depend on many factors such as climatic, geological, geomorphological, biological and human, which interact with each other and influence water balance in a catchment. This interaction leads to the subordination in the landscape structure, namely the weak elements subordinate to the powerful elements. Thereby, geological and geomorphological factors play an essential role in catchment development and organization. A hillslope consequently can be allocated to one class of the representative units because the important flow processes run at the hillslope. Moreover, a hillslope can be subdivided into stratigraphic subsurface units and significant hillslope areas based on the lithological change of contrasting interfaces. The knowledge of subsurface structures is necessary to understand and predicate complex hydrological processes in a catchment. Geophysical techniques provide a good opportunity to explore the subsurface. A complete geophysical investigation of subsurface in a catchment with difficult environmental conditions never will be achieved because of large time effort in the field, equipment logistic, and ambiguity in the data interpretation. The case study demonstrates how a catchment can be investigated using geophysical methods in an effective manner in terms of characterization of representative units with respect to a functional role in the catchment. This case study aims to develop combined resistivity and seismic velocity hillslope subsurface models for the distinction of representative functional units. In order to identify the contrasting interfaces of the hillslope, to localize significant hillslope areas, and to address the ambiguity in the geophysical data interpretation, the case study combined resistivity surveys (vertical electrical soundings and electrical resistivity tomography) with refraction seismic method, and conducted these measurements at one single profile along the hillslope transect and perpendicular to this transect. The measurements along the hillslope transect deliver the two-dimensional hillslope section of resistivity and seismic velocity distribution with contrasting stratigraphic interfaces, whereas the measurements perpendicular to the hillslope transect obtained from vertical electrical soundings survey localize significant hillslope areas indicating existence of two-dimensional features in the subsurface. To demonstrate the suitability of the suggested approach, resistivity and refraction seismic measurements were carried out at the forested gently inclined hillslope in the Weierbach catchment, which belongs to the hydrological observatory Attert Basin locating in the mid-western part of the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg. This hillslope is characterized by Pleistocene periglacial slope deposits, which plays an important role in the ecosystem functioning. The obtained resistivity and seismic hillslope models of the Weierbech catchment complement well one another. The hillslope models identify three significant hillslope areas along the hillslope called as elementary functional units, and four electrical vertical stratigraphic units and two seismic vertical stratigraphic units that agree with lithological stratigraphy of this study site. In conclusions, the suggested geophysical approach is suitable to characterise a hillslope as the representative unit only at a single transect in the efficient manner in contrast to the expensive 3D-measurements.

  10. Mining Genes Involved in Insecticide Resistance of Liposcelis bostrychophila Badonnel by Transcriptome and Expression Profile Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Wei; Shen, Guang-Mao; Niu, Jin-Zhi; Ding, Tian-Bo; Wei, Dan-Dan; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies indicate that infestations of psocids pose a new risk for global food security. Among the psocids species, Liposcelis bostrychophila Badonnel has gained recognition in importance because of its parthenogenic reproduction, rapid adaptation, and increased worldwide distribution. To date, the molecular data available for L. bostrychophila is largely limited to genes identified through homology. Also, no transcriptome data relevant to psocids infection is available. Methodology and Principal Findings In this study, we generated de novo assembly of L. bostrychophila transcriptome performed through the short read sequencing technology (Illumina). In a single run, we obtained more than 51 million sequencing reads that were assembled into 60,012 unigenes (mean size?=?711 bp) by Trinity. The transcriptome sequences from different developmental stages of L. bostrychophila including egg, nymph and adult were annotated with non-redundant (Nr) protein database, gene ontology (GO), cluster of orthologous groups of proteins (COG), and KEGG orthology (KO). The analysis revealed three major enzyme families involved in insecticide metabolism as differentially expressed in the L. bostrychophila transcriptome. A total of 49 P450-, 31 GST- and 21 CES-specific genes representing the three enzyme families were identified. Besides, 16 transcripts were identified to contain target site sequences of resistance genes. Furthermore, we profiled gene expression patterns upon insecticide (malathion and deltamethrin) exposure using the tag-based digital gene expression (DGE) method. Conclusion The L. bostrychophila transcriptome and DGE data provide gene expression data that would further our understanding of molecular mechanisms in psocids. In particular, the findings of this investigation will facilitate identification of genes involved in insecticide resistance and designing of new compounds for control of psocids. PMID:24278202

  11. Antibiotic resistance profiles among mesophilic aerobic bacteria in Nigerian chicken litter and associated antibiotic resistance genes1.

    PubMed

    Olonitola, Olayeni Stephen; Fahrenfeld, Nicole; Pruden, Amy

    2015-05-01

    The effect of global antibiotic use practices in livestock on the emergence of antibiotic resistant pathogens is poorly understood. There is a paucity of data among African nations, which suffer from high rates of antibiotic resistant infections among the human population. Escherichia (29.5%), Staphylococcus (15.8%), and Proteus (15.79%) were the dominant bacterial genera isolated from chicken litter from four different farms in Zaria, Nigeria, all of which contain human pathogenic members. Escherichia isolates were uniformly susceptible to augmentin and cefuroxime, but resistant to sulfamethoxazole (54.5%), ampicillin (22.7%), ciprofloxacin (18.2%), cephalothin (13.6%) and gentamicin (13.6%). Staphylococcus isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and sulfamethoxazole, but resistant to tetracycline (86.7%), erythromycin (80%), clindamycin (60%), and penicillin (33.3%). Many of the isolates (65.4%) were resistant to multiple antibiotics, with a multiple antibiotic resistance index (MARI) ? 0.2. sul1, sul2, and vanA were the most commonly detected antibiotic resistance genes among the isolates. Chicken litter associated with antibiotic use and farming practices in Nigeria could be a public health concern given that the antibiotic resistant patterns among genera containing pathogens indicate the potential for antibiotic treatment failure. However, the MARI values were generally lower than reported for Escherichia coli from intensive poultry operations in industrial nations. PMID:25725076

  12. A method to investigate the electron scattering characteristics of ultrathin metallic films by in situ electrical resistance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Trindade, I. G.; Sousa, J. B.; Fermento, R.; Leitao, D.

    2009-07-15

    In this article, a method to measure the electrical resistivity/conductivity of metallic thin films during layer growth on specific underlayers is described. The in situ monitoring of an underlayer electrical resistance, its change upon the incoming of new material atoms/molecules, and the growth of a new layer are presented. The method is easy to implement and allows obtaining in situ experimental curves of electrical resistivity dependence upon film thickness with a subatomic resolution, providing insight in film growth microstructure characteristics, specular/diffuse electron scattering surfaces, and optimum film thicknesses.

  13. Effect of pressure on the electrical resistance of EuO

    SciTech Connect

    DiMarzio, D.; Croft, M.; Sakai, N.; Shafer, M.W.

    1987-06-01

    The electrical resistivity of EuO has been measured from room temperature to 70 K and at pressures up to 250 kbar. A semiconductor-to-semiconductor transition is observed around 140 kbar at room temperature, and the conduction remains activated with a narrow gap up to 250 kbar. The magnetic transition temperature is observed to rise rapidly with pressure below 100 kbar but to saturate near 200 K in the 100--250-kbar range.

  14. Electrical resistivity survey to search for a recent clandestine burial of a homicide victim, UK.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Jamie K; Jervis, John R

    2010-10-10

    This case report details an electrical resistivity survey to assist the search for a suspected 1-year-old clandestine burial of a murder victim in North Wales in the UK. Conventional search techniques (victim recovery dogs and probing) proved unsuccessful, and with a significant survey area and a high clay content soil precluding GPR as a geophysical search method, a resistivity survey was instead trialled. Ten resistivity grids were collected and site detrended with user-specified, contoured anomalies being generated. The resulting anomalies were compared to anomalies derived from similar-aged, simulated clandestine burial surveys. Seven anomalies with comparative sizes and amplitudes (±3?) of the simulated burials were identified within the search area and prioritised for further investigation. The shallowly buried victim was subsequently recovered outside the survey area. PMID:20471188

  15. Electrical resistivity measurements of brine saturated porous media near reservoir conditions: Awibengkok preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B; Duba, A; Roberts, J

    1999-06-28

    Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of rocks and synthetic rocks with confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures between 20 and 211 C were performed to further investigate how the pore-size distribution and capillarity affects boiling in porous media. Similar to previous measurements on samples from The Geysers, CA, we observed a gradual increase in resistivity when pore pressure was decreased below the phase-boundary pressure of free water, an indication that boiling is controlled not only by temperature and pressure, but also by pore size distribution. Other important phenomena observed were strong resistance fluctuations during boiling that may be chaotic, and salt deposition that caused sample cracking. If confirmed in further experiments, these results may lead to a new geophysical diagnostic for locating boiling in high permeability areas of geothermal reservoirs and for methods of permeability alteration.

  16. Hydrogeophysical Approach for Identification of Layered Structures of the Vadose Zone from Electrical Resistivity Data

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Bolster, Diogo; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    2008-11-01

    Electric resistivity surveys and borehole collection of resistivity data are one of the oldest geophysical tools for characterization of the vadose zone. The current trend is to conduct such surveys in a tomographic manner, which requires significant computational resources. We present a simple semi-analytical approach to delineate multiple layers in partially saturated soils from resistivity measurements taken in a borehole at several depths. The proposed inversion algorithm is computationally efficient and can serve either as a stand-alone tool for layers delineation or as an autonomous module in a more comprehensive geophysical survey. It is most robust when each layer is sampled at least once. When one or more layers have not been sampled, the algorithm’s robustness (convergence) is dependent on the accuracy of an initial guess (e.g., expert knowledge or other hard and/or soft data). We provide a detailed analysis of the algorithm’s convergence and identify potential pitfalls.

  17. Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dunbar, John

    2012-12-31

    Electrical methods offer a geophysical approach for determining the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate in deep marine environments. Methane hydrate is essentially non-conductive. Hence, sediments containing hydrate are more resistive than sediments without hydrates. To date, the controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method has been used in marine hydrates studies. This project evaluated an alternative electrical method, direct current resistivity (DCR), for detecting marine hydrates. DCR involves the injection of direct current between two source electrodes and the simultaneous measurement of the electric potential (voltage) between multiple receiver electrodes. The DCR method provides subsurface information comparable to that produced by the CSEM method, but with less sophisticated instrumentation. Because the receivers are simple electrodes, large numbers can be deployed to achieve higher spatial resolution. In this project a prototype seafloor DCR system was developed and used to conduct a reconnaissance survey at a site of known hydrate occurrence in Mississippi Canyon Block 118. The resulting images of sub-bottom resistivities indicate that high-concentration hydrates at the site occur only in the upper 50 m, where deep-seated faults intersect the seafloor. Overall, there was evidence for much less hydrate at the site than previously thought based on available seismic and CSEM data alone.

  18. Correlation between index properties and electrical resistivity of hydrocarbon contaminated periodic marine clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, P.; Shah, M. V.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrocarbon contamination is a measure issue of concern as it adversely affects the soil inherent properties viz. index properties and strength properties.The main objective of this research work is to determine Electrical resistivity to study and correlate with soil index properties and engineering propertiescontaminated with hydrocarbon at the rate of 3%, 6% and 9% for the period of 15, 30 45 and 60 days and compare it with the results obtained for non-contaminated marine clay. Electrical resistivity of virgin marine clay (bentonite which is expansive in nature) and hydrocarbon contaminated clay for each percent of contamination is obtained in the laboratory for each period and its co-relation with index properties and engineering properties is proposed. CEC, EDAX tests were performed to evaluate the effect of ions of montmorillonite clays and their penetrability into hydrocarbon- clay matrix. The correlations at the end of each period for each percentage of contamination thus enabled to integrate index properties of non-contaminated and hydrocarbon contaminated marine clays with Electrical resistivity.

  19. Joining characteristics of beta-titanium wires with electrical resistance welding.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Masahiro; Brantley, William A; Yuasa, Toshihiro; Kawashima, Isao; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2008-05-01

    The goal of this research was to investigate the effects of different conditions for electrical resistance welding of beta-titanium orthodontic wires. Three electrode types were used with a range of power settings on an electrical resistance welding machine to join beta-titanium wires (Resolve, GAC International). Forces that caused bond failures for joined specimens were obtained with tensile loading, and the values were compared using one-way ANOVA and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05). Metallurgical phases in the joint region were determined by micro-X-ray diffraction. Mean tensile forces for bond failure ranged from 5 to 20 kgf for the eight specimen groups and were dependent on electrode type and power setting. All X-ray diffraction peaks in the joint region were indexed to beta-titanium. Superior bond strength was achieved with the use of wide electrodes. The absence of phases other than beta-titanium in the joint area suggests that the electrical resistance welding may not adversely affect clinically important mechanical properties. Scanning microscope observations indicated that the localized permanent deformation and the formation of an undesirable equiaxed grain structure occurred with the use of narrow electrodes. PMID:17937410

  20. Electrical resistivity monitoring of the drift scale test in Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.

    1997-01-13

    Of the several thermal, mechanical and hydrological measurements being used to monitor the rockmass response, electrical resistance tomography (ERT) is being used to monitor the movement of liquid water with a special interest in the movement of condensate out of the system. Eight boreholes, containing a total of 140 ERT electrodes, were drilled above and below the Heated Drift (HD) to form vertical planes parallel to the drift. In addition, 4 boreholes, containing 60 electrodes, drilled from the Access Observation Drift (AOD) form vertical planes at right angles to the HD. Four ERT surveys, three before and one after heating began, were conducted during the first quarter of FY 98. Tomographic images of absolute electrical resistivity have been calculated using these data and are presented in this report. The report also presents the coordinates of the electrodes used for the ERT surveys. Future reports will include images of electrical resistivity change calculated using data collected before and during the heating episode. The changes to be recovered will then be used in combination with temperature maps of the region to calculate maps of saturation change around the HD.

  1. Comparative study of electrical resistivity of d and f-shell liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baria, J. K.

    2003-09-01

    A model potential depending on an effective core radius but otherwise parameter free is used for the comparative study of electrical resistivity of d and f-shell liquid metals. In the present paper electrical resistivity of d and f-shell liquid metals have been calculated using Ziman's formula, Ziman's formula modified and used by Khajil and Tomak and t-matrix formulation given by Evans and Evans et al. Previously no one have reported such comparative study using pseudopotentials. In the electrical resistivity calculations we have used structure factor derived through charge hard sphere approximation. The beauty of this approximation is that it needs pseudopotential form factor for the calculation of structure factor. So this gives the better explanation of structure factor than any other approximations. From present investigations it is found that t-matrix formulation results are excellently agrees with the experimental findings. A successful application is an evidence our potential to predict wide class of physical properties of d and f-shell metals.

  2. Effects of boiling on electrical resistivity of microporous rocks from the Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.; Duba, A.; Bonner, B.; Kasameyer, P.

    1997-12-31

    In a laboratory study of cores from borehole SB-15-D in The Geysers geothermal area, we measured the electrical resistivity of metashale with and without pore-pressure control, with confining pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures between 20 and 150{degrees}C, to determine how the pore-size distribution and capillarity affected boiling. We observed a gradual increase in resistivity when the downstream pore pressure or confining pressure decreased below the phase boundary of free water. For the conditions of this experiment, boiling, as indicated by an increase in resistivity, is initiated at pore pressures of approximately 0.5 to 1 bar (0.05 to 0.1 MPa) below the free-water boiling curve, and it continues to increase gradually as pressure is lowered to atmospheric. A simple model of the effects of capillarity suggests that at 145{degrees}C, less than 15% of the pore water can boil in these rocks. If subsequent experiments bear out these preliminary observations, then boiling within a geothermal reservoir is controlled not just by pressure and temperature but also by pore-size distribution. Thus, it may be possible to determine reservoir characteristics by monitoring changes in electrical resistivity as reservoir conditions change.

  3. Noncontact technique for measuring the electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility of electrostatically levitated materials.

    PubMed

    Rustan, G E; Spyrison, N S; Kreyssig, A; Prozorov, R; Goldman, A I

    2012-10-01

    We describe the development of a new method for measuring the electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility of high temperature liquids and solids. The technique combines a tunnel diode oscillator with an electrostatic levitation furnace to perform noncontact measurements on spherical samples 2-3 mm in diameter. The tank circuit of the oscillator is inductively coupled to the sample, and measurements of the oscillator frequency as a function of sample temperature can be translated into changes in the sample's electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility. Particular emphasis is given on the need to improve the positional stability of the levitated samples, as well as the need to stabilize the temperature of the measurement coil. To demonstrate the validity of the technique, measurements have been performed on solid spheres of pure zirconium and low-carbon steel. In the case of zirconium, while absolute values of the resistivity were not determined, the temperature dependence of the resistivity was measured over the range of 640-1770 K and found to be in good agreement with literature data. In the case of low-carbon steel, the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition was clearly observable and, when combined with thermal data, appears to occur simultaneously with the solid-solid structural transition. PMID:23126782

  4. Continuous resistivity profiling data from the upper Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, 2004-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, VeeAnn A.; Bratton, John F.; Bergeron, Emile M.; Meunier, Jeff K.; Crusius, John; Koopmans, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    The Neuse River Estuary in North Carolina has suffered impacts of eutrophication in recent years. As part of a larger project to better constrain nutrient budgets in the estuary, field investigations were performed to study occurrence and discharge of fresh and brackish ground water and nutrients beneath the estuary itself (fig. 1). A Continuous Resistivity Profiling (CRP) system (Manheim and others, 2004) was used to map the depth of the freshwater-saltwater interface (FSI) in sub-estuarine groundwater. This study area serves as a typological representation of a submarine groundwater environment characteristic of a shallow estuary in a wide coastal plain that has not experienced glaciation. Similar settings extend from New Jersey to Georgia, and along the Gulf of Mexico in the U.S. This report archives 29 lines of data collected during 2004 and 2005 surveys representing almost 210 km of survey lines. These data are further explained in the Data Processing section of the report and previews available of the processed data are available.

  5. Impact of low-temperature electrical resistance heating on subsurface flow and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, M. M.; Sleep, B. E.; Johnson, R. L.

    2011-05-01

    The effects of subboiling electrical resistance heating (ERH) on subsurface flow and transport were examined in a series of two-dimensional tank experiments, with temperatures reaching 50°C. To analyze the experiments and determine the dominant mechanisms affecting flow and transport, a fully coupled two-dimensional finite difference electrothermal model was developed to simulate electrical current flow, temperature-dependent fluid flow, and mass transport. The model incorporates temperature-dependent equations for density, viscosity, diffusion coefficient, and electrical conductivity, capturing the nonisothermal processes dominant in the subsurface. The model was validated with laboratory-scale experiments in which voltage distribution, instantaneous electrical power, temperature, and tracer transport were measured. Tracer experiments and transport modeling indicated that temperature-induced buoyant flow and contaminant movement could be significant when applying ERH in the subsurface, even at 50°C. A sensitivity study was performed to assess the impact of including temperature-dependent properties such as water density, viscosity, and electrical conductivity. A change in water density of 1.3% (at 50°C) resulted in buoyant flow and increased velocity through the heated zone, indicating that heating contaminated zones to 50°C can have a large impact on mass transport. Temperature-dependent electrical conductivity had a direct impact on ERH power consumption as well as the time to reach desired temperatures.

  6. Chilling resistance of Phaseolus vulgaris and Brassica oleracea under a high-intensity electric field.

    PubMed

    Cakmak, Turgay; Dumlupinar, Rahmi; Erdal, Serkan

    2010-01-01

    An electric field may have different effects on plant metabolism depending upon its application style and density, and environmental conditions. The effects of an electric field, low temperature, and their combinations on tissue vitality and some physiological variables regarding antioxidant responses of "bean" (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Gina) and "cole" (Brassica oleracea L. cv. Acephale) leaves were studied. Fifteen-day-old seedlings were exposed to an electric field (100 kV m(-1)) for 10 or 40 min prior to cold treatment. In both plant leaves, cold application caused statistically significant increments in total soluble protein levels and selected antioxidant enzyme activities such as catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities. However, tissue vitality and H2O2 levels did not change in "cole", while tissue vitality decreased and H2O2 levels increased in "bean". Electric field application itself did not cause any significant changes in "bean" and "cole" leaves. On the other hand, 40 min electric field application increased the deteriorative effect of cold in both plant species, while 10 min electric field augmented the chilling resistance by increasing the tissue vitality and antioxidant enzyme activities resulting in decreased H2O2 levels. PMID:20653240

  7. Investigation of degree of saturation in landfill liners using electrical resistivity imaging.

    PubMed

    Kibria, Golam; Hossain, Md Sahadat

    2015-05-01

    During construction of compacted clay liners and evapotranspiration (ET) covers, quality control involves laboratory and field tests in individual lifts. However, the available methods may be inadequate to determine non-uniform compaction conditions, poor bonding of lifts, and/or variable soil composition. Moreover, the applicability of the available methods is restricted, in many instances, when spatial variability of the subsurface is expected. Resistivity Imaging (RI) is a geophysical method employed to investigate a large area in a rapid and non-destructive way. High resistivity of clay liner soil is an indication of a low degree of saturation, high air-filled voids, and poor lift bonding. To utilize RI as a quality control tool in a landfill liner, it is important to determine the saturation condition of the compacted soils because compaction and permeability of liner soil are functions of degrees of saturation. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the degree of saturation of a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill liner, using RI. Electrical resistivity tests were performed in the laboratory, at varied moisture contents and dry unit weights, on four types of soil samples, i.e., highly plastic clay (CH), low plastic clay (CL), Ca-bentonite, and kaolinite. According to the experimental results, electrical resistivity of the specimens decreased as much as 15.3 times of initial value with increase in the degrees of saturation from 23% to 100%. In addition, cation exchange capacity (CEC) substantially affected resistivity. A multiple linear regression (MLR) model was developed to correlate electrical resistivity with degree of saturation and CEC using experimental results. Additionally, RI tests were conducted on compacted clay liners to determine the degrees of saturation, and predicted degrees of saturation were compared with the in-situ density tests. The study results indicated that the developed model can be utilized for liner soils having CEC, resistivity and degrees of saturation between 13.3 and 79cmol+/kg, and 2.6 and 504.3Ohmm, and 21.8% to 100%; respectively. PMID:25758909

  8. Identification of RFLP and NBS/PK profiling markers for disease resistance loci in genetic maps of oats.

    PubMed

    Sanz, M J; Loarce, Y; Fominaya, A; Vossen, J H; Ferrer, E

    2013-01-01

    Two of the domains most widely shared among R genes are the nucleotide binding site (NBS) and protein kinase (PK) domains. The present study describes and maps a number of new oat resistance gene analogues (RGAs) with two purposes in mind: (1) to identify genetic regions that contain R genes and (2) to determine whether RGAs can be used as molecular markers for qualitative loci and for QTLs affording resistance to Puccinia coronata. Such genes have been mapped in the diploid A. strigosa × A. wiestii (Asw map) and the hexaploid MN841801-1 × Noble-2 (MN map). Genomic and cDNA NBS-RGA probes from oat, barley and wheat were used to produce RFLPs and to obtain markers by motif-directed profiling based on the NBS (NBS profiling) and PK (PK profiling) domains. The efficiency of primers used in NBS/PK profiling to amplify RGA fragments was assessed by sequencing individual marker bands derived from genomic and cDNA fragments. The positions of 184 markers were identified in the Asw map, while those for 99 were identified in the MN map. Large numbers of NBS and PK profiling markers were found in clusters across different linkage groups, with the PK profiling markers more evenly distributed. The location of markers throughout the genetic maps and the composition of marker clusters indicate that NBS- and PK-based markers cover partly complementary regions of oat genomes. Markers of the different classes obtained were found associated with the two resistance loci, PcA and R-284B-2, mapped on Asw, and with five out of eight QTLs for partial resistance in the MN map. 53 RGA-RFLPs and 187 NBS/PK profiling markers were also mapped on the hexaploid map A. byzantina cv. Kanota × A. sativa cv. Ogle. Significant co-localization was seen between the RGA markers in the KO map and other markers closely linked to resistance loci, such as those for P. coronata and barley yellow dwarf virus (Bydv) that were previously mapped in other segregating populations. PMID:22948438

  9. Improving the Erosion Resistance of Electrical Insulating Materials Using Nano Fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hag, A.; Ul-Haq, S.; Jayaram, S.; Cherney, E.

    2007-08-01

    The paper presents the experimental results obtained to test the effect of nano-fillers on the aging performance of silicone rubber for outdoor applications and enamelled wire for motor insulation. The erosion resistance of silicone rubber (SIR) filled with 12 nm size fumed silica is compared to those filled with 5 ?m size silica filler using the ASTM 2303 Inclined Plane Tracking and Erosion Test. The erosion resistance of the SIR materials increased with increasing percentage of the fillers, and it was observed that 10% by weight of nano-filled SIR gives a performance that is similar to that obtained with 50% by weight of micro-filled SIR. The paper discusses the possible reasons for the improvement in the erosion resistance of nano-filled silicone composites using different material analysis techniques like Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Also, the effect of using different nano fillers like alumina, fumed silica and titanium oxide on the erosion resistance of enamel wire insulating material subjected to different electrical stresses will be addresses. Surface roughness is used to evaluate the effect of different nano-fillers on the erosion resistance of enamel wire insulation.

  10. Gene expression profiling of taxol-resistant nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells with siRNA-mediated FOLR1 downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yexun; Peng, Xiaowei; Wang, Min; Xie, Jun; Tan, Guolin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Our previous study has shown that downregulation of FOLR1 by siRNA partially reversed taxol-resistant phenotype in taxol-resistant nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines. We aim to gain further insight into the molecular mechanisms of this process and identify the differentially expressed genes after FOLR1 downregulation. Method: The global gene expression profile was identified and analyzed using the Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 array. Results: There was a significant dysregulation in the global gene expression of the FOLR1-suppressed taxol-resistant nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines. There were 41 upregulated genes and 109 downregulated genes. QRT-PCR validation of the selected differentially expressed genes demonstrated there was a good correlation with the microarray analysis. There was a significant deregulation of expression in the apoptosis-related genes such as BIRC3, PRKX, TNFRSF10A and involved in Viral carcinogenesis, MAPK signaling pathways after FOLR1 was downregulated. Conclusion: The suppression of FOLR1 by RNA interference altered gene expression profile of taxol-resistant nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines. The apoptosis-related genes and the gene alterations in viral carcinogenesis, MAPK signaling pathways might be important in FOLR1 siRNA-induced taxol-resistant reversal. PMID:26617855

  11. Expression Profile of Genes during Resistance Reversal in a Temephos Selected Strain of the Dengue Vector, Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Strode, Clare; de Melo-Santos, Maria; Magalhães, Tereza; Araújo, Ana; Ayres, Contancia

    2012-01-01

    Background The mosquito Aedes aegypti is one of the most important disease vectors because it transmits two major arboviruses, dengue and yellow fever, which cause significant global morbidity and mortality. Chemical insecticides form the cornerstone of vector control. The organophosphate temephos a larvicide recommended by WHO for controlling Ae. aegypti, however, resistance to this compound has been reported in many countries, including Brazil. Methodology/Principal Findings The aim of this study was to identify genes implicated in metabolic resistance in an Ae. aegypti temephos resistant strain, named RecR, through microarray analysis. We utilized a custom ‘Ae. aegypti detox chip’ and validated microarray data through RT-PCR comparing susceptible and resistant individuals. In addition, we analyzed gene expression in 4th instar larvae from a reversed susceptible strain (RecRev), exposed and unexposed to temephos. The results obtained revealed a set of 13 and 6 genes significantly over expressed in resistant adult mosquitoes and larvae, respectively. One of these genes, the cytochrome P450 CYP6N12, was up-regulated in both stages. RT-PCR confirmed the microarray results and, additionally, showed no difference in gene expression between temephos exposed and unexposed RecRev mosquitoes. This suggested that the differences in the transcript profiles among the strains are heritable due to a selection process and are not caused by immediate insecticide exposure. Reversal of temephos resistance was demonstrated and, importantly, there was a positive correlation between a decrease in the resistance ratio and an accompanying decrease in the expression levels of previously over expressed genes. Some of the genes identified here have also been implicated in metabolic resistance in other mosquito species and insecticide resistant populations of Ae. aegypti. Conclusions/Significance The identification of gene expression signatures associated to insecticide resistance and their suppression could greatly aid the development of improved strategies of vector control. PMID:22870187

  12. Electrical current influence on resistance and localization length of a Co-Al2O3 granular thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boff, M. A. S.; Canto, B.; Hinrichs, R.; Pereira, L. G.; Mesquita, F.; Schmidt, J. E.; Fraga, G. L. F.

    2011-11-01

    Electrical, magnetic and magnetotransport properties were measured in a Co-Al2O3 granular film. Electrical resistance was obtained in the low-field regime (e ?V?kBT) under variation of injected current and bias and as a function of temperature and bias. Electrical properties were best described with the model of variable range hopping, where the electrical resistance decreases and the electronic localization length increases with increase of the applied bias and/or current. We associate this behavior to the activation of new electronic paths between more distant grains, reducing the total resistance whilst additional parallel paths are formed. This behavior is similar to results obtained with Fe-Al2O3 granular thin films, which however have a higher range of resistance variation.

  13. Three dimensional modeling and inversion of Borehole-surface Electrical Resistivity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Liu, D.; Liu, Y.; Qin, M.

    2013-12-01

    After a long time of exploration, many oil fields have stepped into the high water-cut period. It is sorely needed to determining the oil-water distribution and water flooding front. Borehole-surface electrical resistivity tomography (BSERT) system is a low-cost measurement with wide measuring scope and small influence on the reservoir. So it is gaining more and more application in detecting water flooding areas and evaluating residual oil distribution in oil fields. In BSERT system, current is connected with the steel casing of the observation well. The current flows along the long casing and transmits to the surface through inhomogeneous layers. Then received electric potential difference data on the surface can be used to inverse the deep subsurface resistivity distribution. This study presents the 3D modeling and inversion method of electrical resistivity data. In an extensive literature, the steel casing is treated as a transmission line current source with infinite small radius and constant current density. However, in practical multi-layered formations with different resistivity, the current density along the casing is not constant. In this study, the steel casing is modeled by a 2.5e-7 ohm-m physical volume that the casing occupies in the finite element mesh. Radius of the casing can be set to a little bigger than the true radius, and this helps reduce the element number and computation time. The current supply point is set on the center of the top surface of the physical volume. The homogeneous formation modeling result shows the same precision as the transmission line current source model. The multi-layered formation modeling result shows that the current density along the casing is high in the low-resistivity layer, and low in the high-resistivity layer. These results are more reasonable. Moreover, the deviated and horizontal well can be simulated as simple as the vertical well using this modeling method. Based on this forward modeling method, the inversion procedure can be implemented by using open source software R3t (Lancaster University, UK). First, establish triangular prism meshes for the BSERT model by using the freeware gmsh (Geuzaine and Remacle, 2009). Second, transform the mesh data file into R3t required format and set the inversion areas in the mesh. Third, attach resistivity to the elements in the mesh according to the local geology analysis and resistivity logging results. Fourth, assign the field measured electric potential data to electrodes. Finally, set the inversion parameters and solve the inversion problem. Inversion results of synthetic modeling data can match well with the positions of anomalies and validate that the method works on the inversion of the borehole-surface electric resistivity data. Then filed example of Changqing oil field in China is carried out using the inversing method.

  14. Size effects of lead-free solder joint thickness under shear creep based on micro-electrical-resistance strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Zhang, Guiying; Zhou, Jieming

    2008-08-01

    Single shear lap creep specimens with a 1 mm2 cross sectional area between thin copper strips were developed and fabricated using a lead-free solder (Sn-3.5Ag) to quantify their electrical resistance. The electrical-resistance strain of solder joints with different thicknesses (0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25, 0.30, 0.40, 0.50 mm) were measured by a tailor-made in situ micro-electrical-resistance measurement. The results showed that the solder joints with 0.25 mm thickness yielded a minimum electrical-resistance strain and the longest creep life. Thicker solder joints produced a larger electrical-resistance strain and a shorter lifetime if the thickness >0.25 mm. In contrast, thinner solder joints produced a larger electrical-resistance strain and a shorter lifetime if the thickness <0.25 mm. A quantificational relationship between the electrical-resistance strain and the solder joint thickness was obtained according to the experimental data. On the other hand, solder joints with different thicknesses (corresponding to those used in the experiment) were studied by the finite element method (FEM). The results showed that the creep strain of solder joints was the lowest with 0.25 mm thickness, and the creep strain increased with the increment in the thickness if the thickness >0.25 mm but decreased with the increment in the thickness if the thickness <0.25 mm. The quantificational relationship between the creep strain and solder joints thickness was obtained according to the data of FEM. Finally, the quantificational relationship between the creep strain and the electrical-resistance strain was obtained by combining the experimental data and the FEM data.

  15. Electric potential profile of a spherical soft particle with a charged core.

    PubMed

    Phan, Anh D; Tracy, Dustin A; Nguyen, T L Hoai; Viet, N A; Phan, The-Long; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2013-12-28

    The electrostatic potential profile of a spherical soft particle is derived by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equations on a spherical system both numerically and analytically. The soft particle is assumed to consist of an ion-permeable charged outer layer and a non-permeable charged core with constant charged density. The contribution of the core to the potential profile is calculated for different charges and dielectric constants. Our results show that the charged core heavily influences the local potential within the soft particle. By contrast, the potential distribution outside the particle in the salt solution is found to be weakly dependent on the core features. These findings are consistent with previous experiments showing the minor impact of the core of the MS2 virus on its overall electrical properties. Our studies also indicate that while a change in temperature from 290 K to 310 K only slightly varies the potential, the ionic strength in the range of 1-600 mM has a significant effect on the potential profile. Our studies would provide good understanding for experimental research in the field of biophysics and nanomedicine. PMID:24387397

  16. Determination of the correlation between the electrical resistivity of non-cohesive soils and the degree of compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, Sebastian; Ma?lakowski, Maciej; Tucholka, Piotr

    2014-11-01

    Electrical resistivity measurements provide potentially powerful tool for estimation of physical parameters of soils and materials used in earthworks and constructions like embankments and dams. The study demonstrates the correlation between the resistivity of non-cohesive soils and the degree of compaction, which is an indicator of important and possibly risks bearing hydraulic piping or tunneling. In this paper we investigate the relationship between electrical resistivity of non-cohesive soils and granulated materials used in earth-works and constructions such as road embankments, and degree of compaction. Laboratory analyses of the last parameter are time consuming and estimated using parameters such as moisture content, bulk density and porosity, the same parameters (mostly obviously porosity and moisture content and including pore water mineralization) determine electrical resistivity. In consequence, electrical resistivity is a potentially well adapted alternative method for determination of the degree of compaction. To investigate the problem, electrical resistivity survey was conducted in a laboratory using soil samples representing fine, medium and coarse sands, submitted to successive steps of compaction. The measurements were carried out in the box, which may be compared with the construction such as an embankment. Obtained resistivity values were analyzed taking into consideration electrode spacing and the physical parameters of soil at each step of compaction.

  17. Comparative analysis of virulence and resistance profiles of Salmonella Enteritidis isolates from poultry meat and foodborne outbreaks in northern Jordan.

    PubMed

    Jaradat, Ziad W; Abedel Hafiz, Leena; Ababneh, Mustafa M; Ababneh, Qotaibah O; Al Mousa, Waseem; Al-Nabulsi, Anas; Osaili, Tareq M; Holley, Richard

    2014-07-01

    This study was conducted to isolate Salmonella Enteritidis from poultry samples and compare their virulence and antibiotic resistance profiles to S. Enteritidis isolated from outbreaks in northern Jordan. Two hundred presumptive isolates were obtained from 302 raw poultry samples and were subjected to further analysis and confirmation. A phylogenic tree based on 16S rRNA sequencing was constructed and selected isolates representing each cluster were further studied for their virulence in normal adult Swiss white mice. The most virulent strains were isolated from poultry samples and had an LD 50 of 1.55 × 10 (5) CFU, while some of the outbreak isolates were avirulent in mice. Antibiotic resistance profiling revealed that the isolates were resistant to seven of eight antibiotics screened with each isolate resistant to multiple antibiotics (from two to six). Of the poultry isolates, 100%, 88.9%, 77.8%, 66.7%, and 50% showed resistance to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, ampicillin, cephalothin, and cefoperazone, respectively. Two outbreak isolates were sensitive to all tested antibiotics, while 71.4% were resistant to cefoperazone and only 28.6% showed resistance to nalidixic acid. Salmonella outbreak isolates were genetically related to poultry isolates as inferred from the 16S rRNA sequencing, yet were phenotypically different. Although outbreak strains were similar to poultry isolates, when tested in the mouse model, some of the outbreak isolates were highly virulent while others were avirulent. This might be due to a variation in susceptibility of the mouse to different S. Enteritidis isolates. PMID:24780883

  18. Electrical resistivity change in amorphous Ta42Si13N45 films by stress relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolet, M.-A.; Ryser, M.; Romano, V.

    2015-03-01

    In a first experiment, a reactively sputtered amorphous Ta42Si13N45 film about 260 nm thick deposited on a flat and smooth alumina substrate was thermally annealed in air for 30 min and let cooled again repeatedly at successively higher temperatures from 200 to 500 °C. This treatment successively and irreversibly increases the room temperature resistivity of the film monotonically from its initial value of 670 ?? cm to a maximum of 705 ?? cm (+5.2 %). Subsequent heat treatments at temperatures below 500 °C and up to 6 h have no further effect on the room temperature resistivity. The new value remains unchanged after 3.8 years of storage at room temperature. In a second experiment, the evolution of the initially compressive stress of a film similarly deposited by reactive sputtering on a 2-inch silicon wafer was measured by tracking the wafer curvature during similar thermal annealing cycles. A similar pattern of irreversible and reversible changes of stress was observed as for the film resistivity. Transmission electron micrographs and secondary ion mass profiles of the film taken before and after thermal annealing in air establish that both the structure and the composition of the film scarcely change during the annealing cycles. We reason that the film stress is implicated in the resistivity change. In particular, to interpret the observations, a model is proposed where the interface between the film and the substrate is mechanically unyielding.

  19. The projects of Disaster-Resistant Information Communication Network at the Research Organization of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwatsuki, Katsumi

    2012-12-01

    After the East Japan Great Earthquake, Tohoku University has established Research Organization of Electrical Communication to achieve the most advanced disaster-resistant information communication network in the world. In this paper, we will introduce our projects of "Disaster-Resistant Information Communication Network" based on industry-academia-government collaboration.

  20. Novel laboratory methods for determining the fine scale electrical resistivity structure of core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslam, E. P.; Gunn, D. A.; Jackson, P. D.; Lovell, M. A.; Aydin, A.; Prance, R. J.; Watson, P.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution electrical resistivity measurements are made on saturated rocks using novel laboratory instrumentation and multiple electrical voltage measurements involving in principle a four-point electrode measurement but with a single, moving electrode. Flat, rectangular core samples are scanned by varying the electrode position over a range of hundreds of millimetres with an accuracy of a tenth of a millimetre. Two approaches are tested involving a contact electrode and a non-contact electrode arrangement. The first galvanic method uses balanced cycle switching of a floating direct current (DC) source to minimise charge polarisation effects masking the resistivity distribution related to fine scale structure. These contacting electrode measurements are made with high common mode noise rejection via differential amplification with respect to a reference point within the current flow path. A computer based multifunction data acquisition system logs the current through the sample and voltages along equipotentials from which the resistivity measurements are derived. Multiple measurements are combined to create images of the surface resistivity structure, with variable spatial resolution controlled by the electrode spacing. Fine scale sedimentary features and open fractures in saturated rocks are interpreted from the measurements with reference to established relationships between electrical resistivity and porosity. Our results successfully characterise grainfall lamination and sandflow cross-stratification in a brine saturated, dune bedded core sample representative of a southern North Sea reservoir sandstone, studied using the system in constant current, variable voltage mode. In contrast, in a low porosity marble, identification of open fracture porosity against a background very low matrix porosity is achieved using the constant voltage, variable current mode. This new system is limited by the diameter of the electrode that for practical reasons can only be reduced to between 0.5 and 0.75 mm. Improvements to this resolution may be achieved by further reducing the electrode footprint to 0.1 mm × 0.1 mm using a novel high-impedance, non-contact potential probe. Initial results with this non-contact electric potential sensor indicate the possibility for generating images with grain-scale resolution.

  1. Monitoring Shallow Vadose Zone Moisture Dynamics using Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Electromagnetic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, A. L.; Toy, C. W.; Steelman, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    High-resolution electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and electromagnetic induction (EMI) surveys are currently being used to monitor changes in shallow moisture conditions at five different locations within a clayey vineyard site located in Vineland, Ontario, Canada. These geophysical measurements have been collected every 2-3 weeks since late summer 2010. Our current data set consists of a 12 month period encompassing a wide range of seasonal soil conditions including dry summer, wet fall and spring, and frozen winter periods. At each monitoring location, an ERT survey is collected using a half meter electrode spacing with 48 electrodes. EMI surveys using EM-38 and EM-31 devices are concurrently collected in both vertical and horizontal dipole modes. In addition, gravimetric water content data has been collected at each location. Preliminary analysis of these data show significant temporal variation in both ERT and EMI response due to seasonal moisture changes in the shallow subsurface overlying relatively stable moisture conditions. Gravimetric water content data supports these geophysical observations. Through the inversion of ERT data, differences in the seasonal evolution of resistivity at various depths down to 3 metres can be extracted. Future analysis will focus on how these depth-varying conductivities can be quantitatively extracted from EM-38 and EM-31 data. Additionally, ongoing studies are looking into the use of ERT-acquired resistivity data to calibrate the apparent electrical conductivity values obtained from EM-38 surveys.

  2. Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Investigations for Imaging the Grouting Injection in Shallow Subsurface Cavities

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Muhammad; Kim, Jung Ho; Song, Young Soo; Amjad Sabir, Mohammad; Umar, Muhammad; Tariq, Mohammad; Muhammad, Said

    2014-01-01

    The highway of Yongweol-ri, Muan-gun, south-western part of the South Korean Peninsula, is underlain by the abandoned of subsurface cavities, which were discovered in 2005. These cavities lie at shallow depths with the range of 5?15 meters below the ground surface. Numerous subsidence events have repeatedly occurred in the past few years, damaging infrastructure and highway. As a result of continuing subsidence issues, the Korean Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) was requested by local administration to resolve the issue. The KIGAM used geophysical methods to delineate subsurface cavities and improve more refined understanding of the cavities network in the study area. Cement based grouting has been widely employed in the construction industry to reinforce subsurface ground. In this research work, time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys were accomplished to monitor the grouting injection in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway, which have provided a quasi-real-time monitoring for modifying the subsurface cavities related to ground reinforcement, which would be difficult with direct methods. The results obtained from time-lapse electrical resistivity technique have satisfactory imaged the grouting injection experiment in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway. Furthermore, the borehole camera confirmed the presence of grouting material in the subsurface cavities, and hence this procedure increases the mechanical resistance of subsurface cavities below the highway. PMID:24578621

  3. Changes in gene expression profiles as they relate to the adult plant leaf rust resistance in the wheat cv. Toropi

    PubMed Central

    Casassola, Alice; Brammer, Sandra P.; Chaves, Márcia S.; Martinelli, José A.; Stefanato, Francesca; Boyd, Lesley A.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf rust, caused by the foliar pathogen Puccinia triticina is a major disease of wheat in the southern region of Brazil and invariably impacts on production, being responsible for high yield losses. The Brazilian wheat cultivar Toropi has proven, durable adult plant resistance (APR) to leaf rust, which uniquely shows a pre-haustorial resistance phenotype. In this study we aimed to understand the interaction between P. triticina and the pre-haustorial APR in Toropi by quantitatively evaluating the temporal transcription profiles of selected genes known to be related to infection and defense in wheat. The expression profiles of 15 selected genes varied over time, grouping into six expression profile groups. The expression profiles indicated the induction of classical defence pathways in response to pathogen development, but also the potential modification of Toropi's cellular status for the benefit of the pathogen. Classical defence genes, including peroxidases, ?-1,3-glucanases and an endochitinase were expressed both early (pre-haustorial) and late (post-haustorial) over the 72 h infection time course, while induction of transcription of other infection-related genes with a potential role in defence, although variable was maintained through-out. These genes directly or indirectly had a role in plant lignification, oxidative stress, the regulation of energy supply, water and lipid transport, and cell cycle regulation. The early induction of transcription of defence-related genes supports the pre-haustorial resistance phenotype in Toropi, providing a valuable source of genes controlling leaf rust resistance for wheat breeding. PMID:25892845

  4. Electrical voltages and resistances measured to inspect metallic cased wells and pipelines

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA); Momii, Steven Thomas (Seattle, WA)

    2001-01-01

    A cased well in the earth is electrically energized with A.C. current. Voltages are measured from three voltage measurement electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing while the casing is electrically energized. In a measurement mode, A.C. current is conducted from a first current carrying electrode within the cased well to a remote second current carrying electrode located on the surface of the earth. In a calibration mode, current is passed from the first current carrying electrode to a third current carrying electrode located vertically at a different position within the cased well, where the three voltage measurement electrodes are located vertically in between the first and third current carrying electrodes. Voltages along the casing and resistances along the casing are measured to determine wall thickness and the location of any casing collars present so as to electrically inspect the casing. Similar methods are employed to energize a pipeline to measure the wall thickness of the pipeline and the location of pipe joints to electrically inspect the pipeline.

  5. Electrical voltages and resistances measured to inspect metallic cased wells and pipelines

    DOEpatents

    Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA); Momii, Steven Thomas (Seattle, WA)

    2000-01-01

    A cased well in the earth is electrically energized with A.C. current. Voltages are measured from three voltage measurement electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing while the casing is electrically energized. In a measurement mode, A.C. current is conducted from a first current carrying electrode within the cased well to a remote second current carrying electrode located on the surface of the earth. In a calibration mode, current is passed from the first current carrying electrode to a third current carrying electrode located vertically at a different position within the cased well, where the three voltage measurement electrodes are located vertically in between the first and third current carrying electrodes. Voltages along the casing and resistances along the casing are measured to determine wall thickness and the location of any casing collars present so as to electrically inspect the casing. Similar methods are employed to energize a pipeline to measure the wall thickness of the pipeline and the location of pipe joints to electrically inspect the pipeline.

  6. Differential gene expression profiling of Listeria monocytogenes in Cacciatore and Felino salami to reveal potential stress resistance biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Mataragas, M; Rovetto, F; Bellio, A; Alessandria, V; Rantsiou, K; Decastelli, L; Cocolin, L

    2015-04-01

    The current study reports a) the in situ transcriptional profiles of Listeria monocytogenes in response to fermented sausage stress and b) an approach in which in situ RT-qPCR data have been combined with advanced statistical techniques to discover potential stress resistance or cell viability biomarkers. Gene expression profiling of the pathogen has been investigated using RT-qPCR to understand how L. monocytogenes responds to the conditions encountered during the fermentation and ripening of sausages. A cocktail of five L. monocytogenes strains was inoculated into the batter of Cacciatore and Felino sausages. The RT-qPCR data showed that the acidic and osmotic stress-related genes were up-regulated. The transcripts of the lmo0669 gene increased during the fermentation and ripening of Cacciatore, whereas gbuA and lmo1421 were up-regulated during the ripening of Felino and Cacciatore, respectively. sigB expression was induced in both sausages throughout the whole process. Finally, the virulence-related gene prfA was down-regulated during the fermentation of Cacciatore. The multivariate gene expression profiling analysis suggested that sigB and lmo1421 or sigB and gbuA could be used as different types of stress resistance biomarkers to track, for example, stress resistance or cell viability in fermented sausages with short (Cacciatore) or long (Felino) maturation times, respectively. PMID:25475310

  7. Clinical application of electric resistance welding and soldering methods to removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Nokubi, T; Nakamura, S; Ono, T; Ikebe, K; Kita, S; Okuno, Y; Taga, Y

    1990-12-01

    The joining procedure for uniting metal structures is very important in the construction of removable partial dentures. However, it has several restricted problems in joining wrought wire clasps to rests or major connectors. For example, the base metal wires made of chromium-cobalt alloy are subject to changes in their mechanical properties caused by heating, and damage to acrylic resin materials (denture base and artificial teeth) occurs in the repair of removable partial dentures by using the torch soldering method. In this paper, in order to resolve these problems, an electric resistance welding machine was applied to attach wrought wire components to a removable partial denture framework. This welding machine was used to attach metal structures temporarily to each other, and to solder the welded joint with hard solder. Consequently, some problems of the conventional torch soldering method were improved by using the electric resistance welding and soldering methods. It was suggested that the clinical application of the electric welding and soldering methods was very useful in the construction of removable partial dentures. PMID:1983361

  8. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography of a water infiltration test on Johannishus Esker, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulusoy, ?nan; Dahlin, Torleif; Bergman, Bo

    2015-05-01

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is an efficient way to remove organic matter from raw water and, at the same time, reduce temperature variation. Two MAR sites were constructed by Karlskrona municipality on Johannishus Esker in Sweden. One of these sites, Vång, was monitored for electrical conductivity and electrical resistivity (using electrical resistivity tomography - ERT) during a 9-week tracer infiltration test. The aim of the monitoring was to map the pathways of the infiltrated water, with the overall goal to increase the efficiency of the MAR. ERT proved useful in determining both the nature of the esker formation and the water migration pathways. In Vång, the esker ridge follows a tectonically controlled paleo-valley. The fault/fracture zone in the bedrock along this paleo-valley was mapped. During the tracer test, the infiltrated water was detected in the area close to the infiltration ponds, whereas far-situated observation wells were less affected. For sequential infiltration and recharge periods in MAR, the timing of the well pumping is another important factor. Natural groundwater flow direction was a determinant in the infiltration process, as expected. ERT measurements provide supplementary data for site selection, for monitoring the functionality of the MAR sites, and for revealing the geological, hydrogeological and structural characteristics of the site.

  9. Stable hole doping of graphene for low electrical resistance and high optical transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tongay, S.; Berke, K.; Lemaitre, M.; Nasrollahi, Z.; Tanner, D. B.; Hebard, A. F.; Appleton, B. R.

    2011-10-01

    We report on the p doping of graphene with the polymer TFSA ((CF3SO2)2NH). Modification of graphene with TFSA decreases the graphene sheet resistance by 70%. Through such modification, we report sheet resistance values as low as 129 ?, thus attaining values comparable to those of indium-tin oxide (ITO), while displaying superior environmental stability and preserving electrical properties over extended time scales. Electrical transport measurements reveal that, after doping, the carrier density of holes increases, consistent with the acceptor nature of TFSA, and the mobility decreases due to enhanced short-range scattering. The Drude formula predicts that competition between these two effects yields an overall increase in conductivity. We confirm changes in the carrier density and Fermi level of graphene through changes in the Raman G and 2D peak positions. Doped graphene samples display high transmittance in the visible and near-infrared spectrum, preserving graphene's optical properties without any significant reduction in transparency, and are therefore superior to ITO films in the near infrared. The presented results allow integration of doped graphene sheets into optoelectronics, solar cells, and thermoelectric solar cells as well as engineering of the electrical characteristics of various devices by tuning the Fermi level of graphene.

  10. Four-point probe electrical resistivity scanning system for large area conductivity and activation energy mapping.

    PubMed

    Shimanovich, Klimentiy; Bouhadana, Yaniv; Keller, David A; Rühle, Sven; Anderson, Assaf Y; Zaban, Arie

    2014-05-01

    The electrical properties of metal oxides play a crucial role in the development of new photovoltaic (PV) systems. Here we demonstrate a general approach for the determination and analysis of these properties in thin films of new metal oxide based PV materials. A high throughput electrical scanning system, which facilitates temperature dependent measurements at different atmospheres for highly resistive samples, was designed and constructed. The instrument is capable of determining conductivity and activation energy values for relatively large sample areas, of about 72 × 72 mm(2), with the implementation of geometrical correction factors. The efficiency of our scanning system was tested using two different samples of CuO and commercially available Fluorine doped tin oxide coated glass substrates. Our high throughput tool was able to identify the electrical properties of both resistive metal oxide thin film samples with high precision and accuracy. The scanning system enabled us to gain insight into transport mechanisms with novel compositions and to use those insights to make smart choices when choosing materials for our multilayer thin film all oxide photovoltaic cells. PMID:24880411

  11. A method to improve tree water use estimates by distinguishing sapwood from heartwood using Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyot, A.; Ostergaard, K.; Lenkopane, M.; Fan, J.; Lockington, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Estimating whole-plant water use in trees requires reliable and accurate methods. Measuring sap velocity and extrapolating to tree water use is seen as the most commonly used. However, deducing the tree water use from sap velocity requires an estimate of the sapwood area. This estimate is the highest cause of uncertainty, and can reach more than 50 % of the uncertainty in the estimate of water use per day. Here, we investigate the possibility of using Electrical Resistivity Tomography to evaluate the sapwood area distribution in a plantation of Pinus elliottii. Electric resistivity tomographs of Pinus elliottii show a very typical pattern of electrical resistivity, which is highly correlated to sapwood and heartwood distribution. To identify the key factors controlling the variation of electrical resistivity, cross sections at breast height for ten trees have been monitored with electrical resistivity tomography. Trees have been cut down after the experiment to identify the heartwood/sapwood boundaries and to extract wood and sap samples. pH, electrolyte concentration and wood moisture content have then been analysed for these samples. Results show that the heartwood/sapwood patterns are highly correlated with electrical resistivity, and that the wood moisture content is the most influencing factor controlling the variability of the patterns. These results show that electric resistivity tomography could be used as a powerful tool to identify the sapwood area, and thus be used in combination with sapflow sensors to map tree water use at stand scale. However, if Pinus elliottii shows typical patterns, further work is needed to identify to see if there are species - specific characterictics as shown in previous works (, electrolyte gradients from the bark to the heartwood). Also, patterns of high resistivity in between needles positions, which are not correlated with either wood moisture content or sapwood, appear to be artifacts. Thus, inversion methods have also to be improved to take into account these measurements issues.

  12. Phenotypic and transcriptional profiling in Entamoeba histolytica reveal costs to fitness and adaptive responses associated with metronidazole resistance

    PubMed Central

    Penuliar, Gil M.; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial chemotherapy is critical in the fight against infectious diseases caused by Entamoeba histolytica. Among the drugs available for the treatment of amebiasis, metronidazole (MTZ) is considered the drug of choice. Recently, in vitro studies have described MTZ resistance and the potential mechanisms involved. Costs to fitness and adaptive responses associated with resistance, however, have not been investigated. In this study we generated an HM-1 derived strain resistant to 12 ?M MTZ (MTZR). We examined its phenotypic and transcriptional profile to determine the consequences and mRNA level changes associated with MTZ resistance. Our results indicated increased cell size and granularity, and decreased rates in cell division, adhesion, phagocytosis, cytopathogenicity, and glucose consumption. Transcriptome analysis revealed 142 differentially expressed genes in MTZR. In contrast to other MTZ resistant parasites, MTZR did not down-regulate pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, but showed increased expression of genes for a hypothetical protein (HP1) and several iron-sulfur flavoproteins, and downregulation of genes for leucine-rich proteins. Fisher's exact test showed 24 significantly enriched GO terms in MTZR, and a 3-way comparison of modulated genes in MTZR against those of MTZR cultured without MTZ and HM-1 cultured with MTZ, showed that 88 genes were specific to MTZR. Overall, our findings suggested that MTZ resistance is associated with specific transcriptional changes and decreased parasite virulence. PMID:25999919

  13. Phenotypic and transcriptional profiling in Entamoeba histolytica reveal costs to fitness and adaptive responses associated with metronidazole resistance.

    PubMed

    Penuliar, Gil M; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial chemotherapy is critical in the fight against infectious diseases caused by Entamoeba histolytica. Among the drugs available for the treatment of amebiasis, metronidazole (MTZ) is considered the drug of choice. Recently, in vitro studies have described MTZ resistance and the potential mechanisms involved. Costs to fitness and adaptive responses associated with resistance, however, have not been investigated. In this study we generated an HM-1 derived strain resistant to 12 ?M MTZ (MTZR). We examined its phenotypic and transcriptional profile to determine the consequences and mRNA level changes associated with MTZ resistance. Our results indicated increased cell size and granularity, and decreased rates in cell division, adhesion, phagocytosis, cytopathogenicity, and glucose consumption. Transcriptome analysis revealed 142 differentially expressed genes in MTZR. In contrast to other MTZ resistant parasites, MTZR did not down-regulate pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, but showed increased expression of genes for a hypothetical protein (HP1) and several iron-sulfur flavoproteins, and downregulation of genes for leucine-rich proteins. Fisher's exact test showed 24 significantly enriched GO terms in MTZR, and a 3-way comparison of modulated genes in MTZR against those of MTZR cultured without MTZ and HM-1 cultured with MTZ, showed that 88 genes were specific to MTZR. Overall, our findings suggested that MTZ resistance is associated with specific transcriptional changes and decreased parasite virulence. PMID:25999919

  14. Drug resistance profile and biofilm forming potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from contact lenses in Karachi-Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The contaminated contact lens provides Pseudomonas aeruginosa an ideal site for attachment and biofilm production. Continuous contact of the eye to the biofilm-infested lens can lead to serious ocular diseases, such as keratitis (corneal ulcers). The biofilms also prevent effective penetration of the antibiotics, which increase the chances of antibiotic resistance. Methods For this study, 22 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were obtained from 36 contact lenses and 14 contact lens protective fluid samples. These isolates were tested against eight commonly used antibiotics using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The biofilm forming potential of these isolates was also evaluated using various qualitative and quantitative techniques. Finally, a relationship between biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance was also examined. Results The isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa tested were found resistant to most of the antibiotics tested. Qualitative and quantitative biofilm analysis revealed that most of the isolates exhibited strong biofilm production. The biofilm production was significantly higher in isolates that were multi-drug resistant (p?resistant, biofilm forming Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates are mainly involved in contact lens associated infections. This appears to be the first report from Pakistan, which analyzes both antibiotic resistance profile and biofilm forming potential of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from contact lens of the patients with contact lens associated infections. PMID:24134792

  15. Evaluation of Electrical Resistivity Tomography with Applications to Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, Stephen James

    Field-scale studies have shown Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) to be an effective tool for imaging resistivity anomalies and monitoring infiltration events in the near subsurface. ERT also shows potential for monitoring supercritical CO2 injections, despite deployment challenges in the deep subsurface. We present results from analog bench-scale experiments aimed at evaluating the ability of ERT to quantify the volume and spatial distribution of a resistive fluid injected into a brine-saturated porous medium. We injected measured volumes of air into translucent chambers filled with quartz sand, lined with electrodes, and saturated with a low resistivity salt solution. Between injections, a CCD camera captured high-resolution images, and an ERT data acquisition system scanned the chamber. Processing of the CCD images using quantitative visualization techniques resulted in high-resolution measurements of the spatial distribution and saturation of the injected gas. Direct comparison to inverted resistivity fields then provided a quantitative measure of the ability of ERT to estimate the total volume of injected gas and its spatial distribution within the chamber. Results show that ERT provided good estimates of the shape, size and location of the primary plume, but overestimated brine saturation within the plume and did not detect thin pathways of gas from the injection port or within the overlying capillary barrier. In one instance, ERT measurements also indicated a change in saturation within the primary plume that corresponded with observed leakage through the capillary barrier, demonstrating the potential utility of ERT as a leakage-monitoring tool. Repeated ERT scans during our experiments led to degradation in data quality that corresponded with an increase in measured contact resistance. Decreased data quality over time is clearly a concern for ERT implementation as a long-term monitoring strategy and deserves further study to quantify the responsible mechanisms.

  16. Carbon fiber polymer-matrix structural composites for electrical-resistance-based sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Daojun

    This dissertation has advanced the science and technology of electrical-resistance-based sensing of strain/stress and damage using continuous carbon fiber epoxy-matrix composites, which are widely used for aircraft structures. In particular, it has extended the technology of self-sensing of carbon fiber polymer-matrix composites from uniaxial longitudinal loading and flexural loading to uniaxial through-thickness loading and has extended the technology from structural composite self-sensing to the use of the composite (specifically a one-lamina composite) as an attached sensor. Through-thickness compression is encountered in the joining of composite components by fastening. Uniaxial through-thickness compression results in strain-induced reversible decreases in the through-thickness and longitudinal volume resistivities, due to increase in the fiber-fiber contact in the through-thickness direction, and minor-damage-induced irreversible changes in these resistivities. The Poisson effect plays a minor role. The effects in the longitudinal resistivity are small compared to those in the through-thickness direction, but longitudinal resistance measurement is more amenable to practical implementation in structures than through-thickness resistance measurement. The irreversible effects are associated with an increase in the through-thickness resistivity and a decrease in the longitudinal resistivity. The through-thickness gage factor is up to 5.1 and decreases with increasing compressive strain above 0.2%. The reversible fractional change in through-thickness resistivity per through-thickness strain is up to 4.0 and decreases with increasing compressive strain. The irreversible fractional change in through-thickness resistivity per unit through-thickness strain is around -1.1 and is independent of the strain. The sensing is feasible by measuring the resistance away from the stressed region, though the effectiveness is less than that at the stressed region. A one-lamina carbon fiber epoxy-matrix composite is an effective attached flexural sensor, with effectiveness comparable to a commercially manufactured self-sensing 24-lamina quasi-isotropic carbon fiber epoxy-matrix composite. In the one-lamina sensor, the arrangement of the fibers is such that adjacent fibers make contact with one another at points along their length, as shown by the substantial conductivity in the transverse direction. The surface resistance of the sensor attached to the tension surface of the beam increases upon flexure, due to decrease in the degree of current penetration within thickness of the sensor. The surface resistance of the sensor attached to the compression surface of the beam decreases upon flexure, due to increase in the degree of current penetration. The sensing effectiveness is superior for the tension surface than the compression surface. Minor/major/catastrophic damage and damage evolution during flexure are indicated by characteristic increases in the surface resistance of the one-lamina sensor; the characteristics are simpler and easier to interpret than those of previously reported 24-lamina quasi-isotropic carbon fiber composites without glass fiber.

  17. Shifting serotypes, plasmid profile analysis and antimicrobial resistance pattern of shigellae strains isolated from Kolkata, India during 1995-2000.

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, S.; Rajendran, K.; Roy, S.; Chatterjee, A.; Dutta, P.; Nair, G. B.; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Yoshida, S-I

    2002-01-01

    One hundred and sixty-six shigellae strains, isolated from stool samples of paediatric patients (< 5 years old) at a Childrens' Hospital in Kolkata, India during the period of 1995-2000 were examined for serotyping, drug resistance pattern and plasmid profiles. Sh. flexneri (58 %) was found to be commonest isolate of total shigellae, followed by Sh. sonnei (28 %), Sh. boydii (9%) and Sh. dysenteriae (5%). This profile of species was in sharp contrast to the picture obtained before 1995, when Sh. dysenteriae 1 predominated over Sh. flexneri. In Sh. flexneri strains, Sh. flexneri 2a (35%) was the most prevalent serotype, following Sh. flexneri 3a (31%), Sh. flexneri 6 (14%), Sh. flexneri 2b (11%) and Sh. flexneri 4 (9%). Resistance patterns of the strains to 12 commonly used antimicrobial agents and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the antibiotics were also tested. All strains were found uniformly susceptible to norfloxacin, but more than 90% strains were resistant to tetracycline, co-trimoxazole and 67% strains were resistant to ampicillin. Resistance to amoxicillin, chloramphenicol and nalidixic acid was found in 55% (range 45-74%), 46% (range 40-60%) and 29% (range 15-40%) strains respectively. Overall, shigellae strains showed statistically significant increase in resistance against tetracycline, nalidixic acid and furazolidone (P < 0.05) over the years of this study. This indicates decreased efficacy of furazolidone, cotrimoxazole and nalidixic acid for the empirical treatment of shigellosis in Kolkata. Although a few strains showed intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (4%) and cefotaxime (10%) by disk diffusion test, but the MICs of those antibiotics were within the normal limits. Almost 57% of the strains were resistant to four or more drugs with high MICs of the antibiotics. Plasmid profile analysis revealed presence of large plasmid of 220 kb in majority of the strains except in Sh. sonnei and a correlation between presence of smaller plasmids and shigellae serotypes. Hence this study reports epidemiological change of shigellae species in Kolkata, India with regard to serotypes and antibiotic resistance patterns. PMID:12403099

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF LEAKS USING TIME LAPSED LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    RUCKER DF; FINK JB; LOKE MH; MYERS DA

    2009-11-05

    Highly industrialized areas pose significant challenges for surface based electrical resistivity characterization and monitoring due to the high degree of metallic infrastructure. The infrastructure is typically several orders of magnitude more conductive than the desired targets, preventing the geophysicist from obtaining a clear picture of the subsurface. These challenges may be minimized if steel-cased wells are used as long electrodes. We demonstrate a method of using long electrodes in a complex nuclear waste facility to monitor a simulated leak from an underground storage tank. The leak was simulated by injecting high conductivity fluid in a perforated well and the resistivity measurements were made before and after the leak test. The data were processed in four dimensions, where a regularization procedure was applied in both the time and space domains. The results showed a lowered resistivity feature develop south of the injection site. The time lapsed regularization parameter had a strong influence on the differences in inverted resistivity between the pre and post datasets, potentially making calibration of the results to specific hydrogeologic parameters difficult.

  19. Investigation of the Interaction between Perovskite Films with Moisture via in Situ Electrical Resistance Measurement.

    PubMed

    Hu, Long; Shao, Gang; Jiang, Tao; Li, Dengbing; Lv, Xinlin; Wang, Hongya; Liu, Xinsheng; Song, Haisheng; Tang, Jiang; Liu, Huan

    2015-11-18

    Organometal halide perovskites have recently emerged as outstanding semiconductors for solid-state optoelectronic devices. Their sensitivity to moisture is one of the biggest barriers to commercialization. In order to identify the effect of moisture in the degradation process, here we combined the in situ electrical resistance measurement with time-resolved X-ray diffraction analysis to investigate the interaction of CH3NH3PbI3-xClx perovskite films with moisture. Upon short-time exposure, the resistance of the perovskite films decreased and it could be fully recovered, which were ascribed to a mere chemisorption of water molecules, followed by the reversible hydration into CH3NH3PbI3-xClx·H2O. Upon long-time exposure, however, the resistance became irreversible due to the decomposition into PbI2. The results demonstrated the formation of monohydrated intermediate phase when the perovskites interacted with moisture. The role of moisture in accelerating the thermal degradation at 85 °C was also demonstrated. Furthermore, our study suggested that the perovskite films with fewer defects may be more inherently resistant to moisture. PMID:26497670

  20. Evaluation of the profile and the resistance method for estimation of surface fluxes of momentum, sensible and latent heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacovides, C.; Kerkides, P.; Papaioannou, G.; Smith, F. B.

    1992-06-01

    Hourly lysimetric and micrometeorological data taken over a grass surface at the Meteorological Research Unit, Cardington U.K. have been analysed. A temperature difference and measurements of wind speed at only one height, combined with an independently estimated effective roughness length allowed sensible heat and momentum fluxes determination by the profile method on an hourly basis. The estimates are compared with direct measurements of sensible heat and friction velocity obtained by the eddy correlation method. The sensible and latent heat fluxes are also modelled by the resistance method. Equations based on the Monin—Obukhov similarity theory are used to account for stability effects through various forms of parameterization Aerodynamic and surface resistances, necessary for the Penman—Monteith equation are calculated from routinely measured meteorological data. The profile method for estimation of sensible heat flux and friction velocity is found to work excellently on the discussed daytime experimental data which correspond mainly to near neutral or slightly unstable conditions. Surface latent and sensible heat fluxes can also be described very well by the resistance method. A slightly better estimate of the sensible heat flux is achieved when stability corrections are taken into account. On the contrary Penman-Monteith equation for estimating latent heat flux is insensitive to adjustments for atmospheric stability. The comparison of the various methods leads to the establishment of empirical relationships which correlate various quantities such as soil heat flux, resistances, evapotranspiration etc. to routinely measured meteorological data.

  1. Damage Characterization in SiC/SiC Composites using Electrical Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig E.; Xia, Zhenhai

    2011-01-01

    SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) under creep-rupture loading accumulate damage by means of local matrix cracks that typically form near a stress concentration, such as a 90o fiber tow or large matrix pore, and grow over time. Such damage is difficult to detect through conventional techniques. Electrical resistance changes can be correlated with matrix cracking to provide a means of damage detection. Sylramic-iBN fiber-reinforced SiC composites with both melt infiltrated (MI) and chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) matrix types are compared here. Results for both systems exhibit an increase in resistance prior to fracture, which can be detected either in situ or post-damage.

  2. Electrical resistivity of some palladium-silver alloys containing hydrogen at 4.2 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. J.; Otterson, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    The electrical resistivities of the alloys 90at.%Pd - 10at.%Ag, 80at.%Pd - 20at.%Ag, 70at.%Pd - 30at.%Ag, 60at.%Pd - 40at.%Ag, and 50at.%Pd - 50at.%Ag were measured as functions of absorbed hydrogen x at 4.2 K. These results show a minimum in the resistivity for all the alloys except 90Pd-10Ag; they show a maximum for all the alloys except for 50Pd-Ag. We associate the shapes of the plots with a modification of the Pd D-band because of the substitutional alloying of Ag and the interstitial absorption of hydrogen.

  3. Effect of high pressure on the electrical resistivity of Ge-Te-In glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, K. N. N.; Varma, G. Sreevidya; Rukmani, K.; Asokan, S.

    2015-06-01

    The variation in the electrical resistivity of the chalcogenide glasses Ge15Te85-xInx has been studied as a function of high pressure for pressures up to 8.5GPa. All the samples studied undergo a semi-conductor to metallic transition in a continuous manner at pressures between 1.5-2.5GPa. The transition pressure at which the samples turn metallic increases with increase in percentage of Indium. This increase is a direct consequence of the increase in network rigidity with the addition of Indium. At a constant pressure of 0.5GPa, the normalized resistivity shows some signature of the existence of the intermediate phase. Samples recovered after a pressure cycle remain amorphous suggesting that the semi-conductor to metallic transition arises from a reduction of the band gap due to pressure or the movement of the Fermi level into the conduction or valence band.

  4. Conceptualizing Spatially Dynamic Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions along a Fractured Sedimentary Bedrock Riverbed through Electrical Resistivity and Induced Conductivity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steelman, C. M.; Kennedy, C. S.; Parker, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Eramosa River located within the Grand River Watershed in Ontario, Canada, resides upon a densely fractured dolostone aquifer with abundant dissolution-enhanced channel features. While the bedrock aquifer represents a major component of the total water supply for the surrounding region, potential effects of increased groundwater extraction on surface water and surrounding ecosystems are not yet fully understood. In general, little is known about the nature of the interaction between surface water and groundwater along densely fractured sedimentary bedrock riverbeds. For instance, the timing and magnitude of groundwater discharge to surface water and surface water recharge in a fractured carbonate rock environment is expected to differ significantly from its alluvial channel analogs due to the presence of highly transmissive, planar and strongly orientated discrete fracture features that control flow. Non-invasive geophysical methods represent an opportunity to evaluate shallow groundwater dynamics with minimal environmental risk to biota and, ultimately enhance the interpretation of direct hydrogeologic data. Preliminary spatial electrical conductivity measurements collected along a 200 m reach of the river, suggests a seasonally dynamic hyporheic response over a riffle-pool sequence. Based on these results, time-lapse electrical resistivity measurements are being collected every 2-3 weeks along two ~50 m transects perpendicular to the river: the first transect considers changes across an intact bedrock section with exposed vertical and horizontal fracturing along the riverbed, while the second is positioned across a weathered bedrock section with a thin layer of course gravel and sand alluvium. The objective of this study is to collect electrical resistivity snapshots across the riverbed (6-8 m depths) to non-invasively quantify temporal and spatial changes in groundwater-surface water mixing from low to high-stage periods through multiple seasonal cycles. These geophysical measurements are being supported by multilevel vertical hydraulic head profiles, groundwater discharge measurements, continuous aqueous electrical conductivity of the surface water and groundwater, and time-lapse groundwater temperature profiles along lined boreholes.

  5. Resistivity profiling to locate an infiltration area and the possible recovery of the dried Andara lake (Picos de Europa National Park, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallastegui, Jorge; Olona, Javier; Farias, Pedro; González-Cortina, Juan Manuel; Fernández-Viejo, Gabriela; López, Carlos; Cadenas, Patricia

    2013-04-01

    The Ándara Lake constituted the third mass of water by extension (approximately 19000 m2) within the calcareous Picos de Europa Massif in NW Spain, but only a small pond remains today (about 1250 m2). The lake developed in a former glacial valley and its sudden draining occurred in the second decade of the 20th century, during the development of underground Pb-Zn mining, between 1889 and 1929, in the vicinity. Old mining maps show that there were shallow galleries active below the bottom of the ancient lake. The present study was requested by the Picos de Europa National Park Administration (Spanish Ministry of Environment) with the purpose of: i) localizing the areas of water infiltration and ii) establishing the cause of the draining, specially its possible relation with the mining activity in the surroundings. With this aim a geological study of the substrate of the lake was made, followed by a series of electrical resistivity profiles. Three resistivity parallel profiles were recorded along the axis of the dried lake on the 29th July. Each profile included 56 electrodes with 5 m spacing for a total profile length of 275 m. Data was recorded in both dipole-dipole and Schlumberger array configuration. The western profile had been recorded earlier in the summer (30th June) and was also repeated towards the end of the season (3rd September) in order to evaluate the evolution of the infiltrations. The results showed two areas of infiltration to the NE and SW of the present-day pond. Both of them cut across the underlying carboniferous limestone. However. the southwestern anomaly does not reach the surface and may be related with water flowing in karstic conduits in the limestone. The northeastern one reached the surface and the anomaly decreased as the pond dried during the summer allowing us to interpret it as the main area of infiltration. This area coincides with the intersection of two seams exploited both on the surface and by underground mining. This corroborates the relationship between the water disappearance and the mining activities, which is an indispensable condition for the National Park management to consider taking any future actions aimed to a possible recovery of the original water mass.

  6. High resolution electrical resistivity tomography of golf course greens irrigated with reclaimed wastewater: Hydrological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapias, Josefina C.; Lovera, Raúl; Himi, Mahjoub; Gallardo, Helena; Sendrós, Alexandre; Marguí, Eva; Queralt, Ignasi; Casas, Albert

    2014-05-01

    Actually, there are over 300 golf courses and more than three thousand licensed players in Spain. For this reason golf cannot be considered simply a hobby or a sport, but a very significant economic activity. Considered as one of the most rapidly expanding land-use and water demanding business in the Mediterranean, golf course development generates controversy. In the recent years there has been a considerable demand for golf courses to adopt environmentally sustainable strategies and particularly water authorities are forcing by law golf managers to irrigate with alternative water resources, mainly reclaimed wastewater. Watering practices must be based on soil properties that are characterized by samples removed from the different zones of the golf course and submitted to an accredited physical soil testing laboratory. Watering schedules are critical on greens with poor drainage or on greens with excessively high infiltration rates. The geophysical survey was conducted over the greens of the Girona Golf Club. Eighteen electrical resistivity tomographies were acquired using a mixed Wenner-Schlumberger configuration with electrodes placed 0.5 meter apart. Small stainless-steel nails were used as electrodes to avoid any damage in the fine turfgrass of greens The resistivity meter was set for systematically and automatically selects current electrodes and measurement electrodes to sample apparent resistivity values. Particle size analysis (PSA) has been performed on soil materials of any putting green. The PSA analysis has been composed of two distinct phases. The first has been the textural analysis of the soils for determining the content of sand, silt, and clay fraction via the use of a stack of sieves with decreasing sized openings from the top sieve to the bottom. Subsequently, the hydraulic conductivity of the substrates has been evaluated by means of Bredding and Hazen empirical relationships. The results of this research show that the electrical resistivity tomography is a non-invasive and cost-effective technique for high resolution characterizing the subsurface below golf course greens. The obtained models have provided detailed information on the lateral and vertical variability of each the subsurface and from an empirical correlation between the values of electrical resistivity and hydraulic permeability to assess the preferred areas of drainage that could pose in risk to the vulnerability of the underlying aquifers.

  7. Internal Structure of Periglacial Landforms: Assessment using 3D Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert, Adrian; Kneisel, Christof

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence of internal heterogeneities within periglacial landforms (e.g. frost table topography or varying ice content) is in most cases not inferable from the surface. Hence, to develop an enhanced understanding of the interaction between surface and subsurface processes, it is necessary to analyse the internal structure of different periglacial landforms and landform elements. The assessment of the internal structure is provided by the application of three-dimensional Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI). ERI is the technique of merging datum points from several parallel and perpendicular performed two-dimensional ERT (Electrical Resistivity Tomography) measurements and inverting the data set with a 3D inversion algorithm (sometimes also referred to as quasi-3D ERT). The application of this method has proven to be a valuable tool for mapping the spatial extent of isolated permafrost bodies and associated subsurface conditions. In this contribution, we present results from four ERI measurements, carried out in summer 2014 at different investigation sites in the Swiss Alps: Three measurements were performed on pebbly rockglaciers of different size and topographical position and one measurement was performed on a solifluction slope. Each of the 3D survey grids consists of 17 to 32 single 2D ERT surveys (Dipol-Dipol or Wenner-Schlumberger array) and covers an area of between 6000 m² and 7000 m², depending on the specific survey grid set-up. The inversions of the data sets were performed using the two different inversion algorithms of the software products "RES3DINV" and "BERT" (Boundless Electrical Resistivity Tomography) for a comparative analysis and to further support the geomorphological interpretation of the geophysical models. Each of the resulting resistivity models shows strong small-scale spatial heterogeneities between the investigated landforms but also within landform elements. For the investigated rockglacier sites, these structures include anomalies referred to as embedded snowbanks and ice remnants of sedimentary origin. According to our results, we presume that these structures also influence rockglacier hydrology. With another measurement grid which was stretched over parts of two adjacent pebbly rockglaciers, we could detect a strong contrast between their specific resistivity regimes. This is probably caused by their material composition as the sources of rock fall are from different geological layers. At the investigated solifluction slope, the survey grid contained several solifluction lobes and the resulting model reveals that some of them are influenced by contemporary permafrost occurrences while adjacent lobes do not show any signs of frozen ground in the shallow subsurface.

  8. Combined pressure and electrical-resistivity measurements of warm dense aluminum and titanium plasmas.

    PubMed

    Renaudin, P; Blancard, C; Faussurier, G; Noiret, P

    2002-05-27

    Electrical resistivity, pressure, and internal energy variation of warm dense correlated titanium (density 0.2 g/cm(3)) and aluminum (density 0.1 g/cm(3)) plasmas are measured using a homogeneous and thermally equilibrated media produced inside an isochoric closed-vessel plasma. These data are compared to detailed calculations based on the density functional theory. In the studied temperature range (15,000-30,000 K), it appears that both exchange-correlation and ion-ion interaction treatments are of great importance to calculate accurate theoretical values. PMID:12059478

  9. Electrical resistance of SrFeO2 at ultra high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Masayoshi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    SrFeO2 shows antiferromagnetic and insulating order at ambient pressure. The crystal structure of SrFeO2 has 2-dementional FeO2 plate and is interested in because this is common structure of high temperature superconductor. SrFeO2 has M-I, magnetic and spin transition with applying pressure. If magnetism disappears and metallization occurs with applying pressure, SrFeO2 may show superconductivity because of the crystal structure, so we measured electrical resistance at high pressure up to 150 GPa and low temperature down to 100 mK.

  10. Structure and Electrical Resistivities of Liquid Al and Ga Metals and Their Binary Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkmaz, ?.; Korkmaz, S. D.

    2012-05-01

    The ionic and electronic properties of liquid Al and Ga metals and Al1- x Ga x alloys have been investigated self-consistently. Partial structure factors have been calculated from the solution of the Ornstein-Zernike equation with the hybridized mean spherical approximation closure, and the transferable electron-ion potential of Fiolhais et al. has been used as the input pseudopotential. Two different formulas are used in the electrical resistivity calculation, namely, the Faber-Ziman formula and the modified Ziman's formula suggested by Ferraz-March. The results are compared with each other and experimental values.

  11. Electric field effects in low resistance CoFeB-MgO magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, H.; Sbiaa, R.; Akhtar, M. A. K.; Liu, R. S.; Naik, V. B.; Wang, C. C.

    2012-03-01

    We have investigated the electric field effects in low resistance perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) devices and found that the electric field can effectively reduce the coercivity (Hc) of free layer (FL) by 30% for a bias voltage Vb = -0.2 V. In addition, the bias field (Hb) on free layer is almost linearly dependent on Vb yet independent on the device size. The demonstrated Vb dependences of Hc and Hb in low resistance MTJ devices present the potential to extend the scalability of the electric field assisted spin transfer torque magnetic random access memory and improve its access speed.

  12. Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids

    DOEpatents

    Ramirez, A.L.; Cooper, J.F.; Daily, W.D.

    1996-02-27

    This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination. 1 fig.

  13. Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids

    DOEpatents

    Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination.

  14. Electric-Field-Driven Resistive Switching in the Dissipative Hubbard Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiajun; Aron, Camille; Kotliar, Gabriel; Han, Jong E

    2015-06-01

    We study how strongly correlated electrons on a dissipative lattice evolve out of equilibrium under a constant electric field, focusing on the extent of the linear regime and hysteretic nonlinear effects at higher fields. We access the nonequilibrium steady states, nonperturbatively in both the field and the electronic interactions, by means of a nonequilibrium dynamical mean-field theory in the Coulomb gauge. The linear response regime, limited by Joule heating, breaks down at fields much smaller than the quasiparticle energy scale. For large electronic interactions, strong but experimentally accessible electric fields can induce a resistive switching by driving the strongly correlated metal into a Mott insulator. We predict a nonmonotonic upper switching field due to an interplay of particle renormalization and the field-driven temperature. Hysteretic I-V curves suggest that the nonequilibrium current is carried through a spatially inhomogeneous metal-insulator mixed state. PMID:26196634

  15. Microstructure and electrical resistance evolution during sintering of a Ag nanoparticle paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scola, J.; Tassart, X.; Vilar, C.; Jomard, F.; Dumas, E.; Veniaminova, Y.; Boullay, P.; Gascoin, S.

    2015-04-01

    Silver nanoparticle pastes are promising materials for high temperature interconnection particularly above 400 °C. Reliability is a major concern in interconnection and it mainly depends on the behavior under the stress induced by thermal cycling. The joint microstructure is then a crucial parameter for reliability and determines the electrical, mechanical and thermal properties. Here, an investigation procedure is proposed to describe the microstructure of a joint and to monitor its evolution in real-time during the sintering. Combining electron and x-ray diffraction with electrical resistance measurement and secondary ion mass spectroscopy, our method is used on a sample made out of a home-made silver nanoparticle paste. The influence of the chemical composition of the paste on the microstructure is discussed as well as the compatibility of the paste for oxide interconnection.

  16. Salmonella isolated from ready-to-eat pasteurized liquid egg products: Thermal resistance, biochemical profile, and fatty acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Gurtler, Joshua B; Hinton, Arthur; Bailey, Rebecca B; Cray, William C; Meinersmann, Richard J; Ball, Takiyah A; Jin, Tony Z

    2015-08-01

    The Egg Products Inspection Act of 1970 requires that egg products in the U.S. must be pasteurized prior to release into commerce. The USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is responsible for regulating egg products. Salmonellae are infrequently isolated from pasteurized egg products by food manufacturers or the FSIS and may be present as a result of either pasteurization-resistant bacteria or post-processing contamination. In this study, seventeen strains of Salmonella isolated from pasteurized egg products and three heat-resistant control strains were compared for the following attributes: thermal resistance in liquid whole egg (LWE) at 60 °C, enzymatic profiles, and serotyping and phage typing, antibiotic susceptibility, fatty acid analysis and strain morphological variation evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Isolates were serotyped as Heidelberg (4 isolates), Widemarsh, Mbandaka, Cerro, Thompson, 4,12:i:-, and Enteritidis (8 isolates). All 20 isolates were sensitive to all 14 antibiotics tested for. The D60 values in LWE ranged from 0.34 to 0.58 min. All 20 strains were recovered from LWE inoculated with 8.5 logCFU/mL of Salmonella and pasteurized at 60 °C for 3.5 min; however, some isolates were not recovered from pasteurized LWE that had been inoculated with only 4.5 logCFU/mL Salmonella and treated at 60 °C for 3.5 min. Although some strains exhibited atypical enzymatic activity (e.g., reduction of adonitol, hydrolysis of proline nitroanilide or p-n-p-beta-glucuronide, and nonreduction of melibiose), differences in biochemical reactions could not be correlated with differences in thermal resistance. Furthermore, fatty acid analysis revealed that differences insaturate/unsaturated profiles may be correlated with differences in heat resistance, in two instances. One heat resistant strain (#13, Enteritidis) had the statistically lowest unsaturated/saturate ratio at 39%. However, one heat sensitive strain (#3, serovar 4,12:i:-) had the highest unsaturated/saturate ratio at 81%, and also the lowest concentration of stearic acid. This data represents the first steps in determining whether Salmonella contamination in pasteurized egg products may be the result of either thermally-resistant isolates or post-processing contamination. Contamination of LWE by Salmonella strains with higher heat resistance, (e.g., isolate #'s 2, 6, 10 and 12) may indicate the ability of Salmonella to survive pasteurization, while contamination of LWE strains with lower heat resistance (e.g., isolate #'s 1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 11, and 15) may indicate post-processing contamination of LWE by this foodborne pathogen. PMID:26001379

  17. Imaging the mantle lithosphere of the Precambrian Grenville Province: large-scale electrical resistivity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adetunji, Ademola Q.; Ferguson, Ian J.; Jones, Alan G.

    2015-05-01

    The resistivity structure of the lithospheric mantle beneath the Proterozoic Grenville Province in southern Ontario, Canada is investigated using 84 magnetotelluric (MT) sites divided into four profiles. Depth-based regional geoelectric dimensionality analyses of the MT responses indicate that the mantle lithosphere north of Lake Ontario can be subdivided into upper (45-150 km) and deeper (>200 km) lithospheric mantle layers with regional strike azimuths of N85°E (±5°) and N65°E (±5°), respectively. MT responses from the Grenville Front and the northwest part of the Central Gneiss Belt are compatible with the presence of 2-D resistivity structures but farther to the southeast, in the southeast part of the Central Gneiss Belt and Central Metasedimentary Belt, they suggest the presence of localized 3-D structures. 2-D inversion of distortion-free MT responses images a large scale very resistive (>20 000 ? m) region that extends 300 km southeast of the Grenville Front and for at least 800 km along-strike in the lithospheric mantle beneath the Grenville Province. This feature is interpreted to be Superior Province lithosphere and the corresponding N85°E geoelectric strike to be associated with the fabric of the Superior Province. The base of the resistor reaches depths of 280 km on two of the three MT profiles north of Lake Ontario and this depth is interpreted to be the base of the lithosphere. A large region of enhanced conductivity in the lower lithosphere, spatially correlated with decreased seismic velocity, is bounded to the northwest by a subvertical resistivity anomaly located near the Kirkland Lake and Cobalt kimberlite fields. The enhanced conductivity in the lower lithosphere is attributed to refertilization by fluids associated with Cretaceous kimberlite magmatism and can be explained by water content in olivine of 50 wt ppm in background areas with higher values in a localized anomaly beneath the kimberlite fields. Farther to the southeast the resistivity models include a lithospheric conductor between 100 and 150 km depth beneath the Central Metasedimentary Belt. The enhanced conductivity is attributed to grain boundary graphite films, associated with the Cretaceous kimberlitic magmatic process, or to water and carbon, introduced into the mantle during the pre-Grenvillian tectonism.

  18. Lunar magnetic field measurements, electrical conductivity calculations and thermal profile inferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, D. S.

    1971-01-01

    Steady magnetic field measurements of magnitude 30 to 100 gamma on the lunar surface impose problems of interpretation when coupled with the nondetectability of a lunar field at 0.4 lunar radius altitude and the limb induced perturbations of the solar wind at the Explorer orbit. The lunar time-varying magnetic field clearly indicates the presence of eddy currents in the lunar interior and permits calculation of an electrical conductivity profile. The problem is complicated by the day-night asymmetry of the moon's electromagnetic environment, the possible presence of the transverse magnetic mode, and the variable wave directions of the driving function. The electrical conductivity is calculated to be low near the surface, rising to a peak of .006/ohm meter at 250 km, dropping steeply inwards to a value of about .00005/ohm meter, and then rising toward the interior. A transition at 250 km depth from a high conductivity to a low conductivity material is inferred, suggesting an olivine-like core at approximately 800 C, although other models are possible.

  19. Application of electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) to a tailings dam project for artisanal and small-scale gold mining in Zaruma-Portovelo, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarroca, Mario; Linares, Rogelio; Velásquez-López, Patricio C.; Roqué, Carles; Rodríguez, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Thanks to advances in geoelectrical resistivity method over the past two decades, researchers can now gather massive geophysical data sets encompassing long distances and depths, at reasonable cost. The enhanced resolution and spatial coverage of these techniques make them, now, very attractive for use in geological engineering applications, an area for which they were previously charged to be unsuitable. The study shows the capability of electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) to identify key subsoil features that might affect a future tailings dam slated for construction at the Zaruma-Portovelo Mining District, Ecuador. The ERI profiles were gathered and processed with the aim of obtaining resistivity images of a sufficiently resolution for geotechnical use. A geophysical model was created based on these images. The resistivity images were calibrated according to geomorphological, hydrogeological and geotechnical data in order to translate geophysical information into rational geological information. The ERI results, supported by the geomorphological and geotechnical work, suggested that the rock massif is composed of weathering horizons of different rock qualities, slopes are affected by sliding surfaces and these features exert a control on the groundwater flow. These results indicated that the original site selected to construct the dam dike was susceptible to land sliding and an alternative construction site was suggested. Based on the same results, a geomorphological-hydrogeological conceptual model for layered weathered granitic massif in mountainous areas was also proposed.

  20. Can we use Electrical Resistivity Tomography to measure root zone moisture dynamics in fields with multiple crops?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garre, S.; Coteur, I.; Wongleecharoen, C.; Diels, J.; Vanderborght, J.

    2012-12-01

    Agriculture on shallow or steep soils in the humid tropics often leads to low resource use efficiency. Contour hedgerow intercropping systems have been proposed to reduce run-off and control soil erosion. However, competition for water and nutrients between crops and associated hedgerows may reduce the overall performance of contour hedgerow systems. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a valuable technique to assess the distribution and dynamics of soil moisture non-invasively. Root water uptake is a spatially variable and small-scale process, which requires at least decimeter resolution and a high sensitivity in order to be able to monitor changes in time and space. Careful experimental design is of uttermost importance in order to maximize the information content of the ERT survey and to gain insights in the possibilities and limitations of the survey. Virtual experiments in combination with absolute and spatial performance measures provide a way to optimize the information that can be retrieved from an ERT experiment. We used this approach to identify a suitable measurement methodology to monitor water fluxes in a contour hedgerow intercropping system in Ratchaburi province, Thailand. The virtual experiment showed that there are important differences between the tested measurement configurations. We saw that the optimal ERT array was capable of recognizing distinct water depletion zones under the different crops. However, sharp contrasts in the 1-D water depletion profile are smoothened. ERT measurements conducted in Thailand showed that the soils of our experimental plots were very heterogeneous both along the slope as with depth. This observation highlighted some constraints of the ERT method for soil moisture monitoring in the field, such as the difficulty to define a relationship between electrical conductivity and soil moisture in very heterogeneous soils. Nevertheless, the data indeed revealed contrasting water depletion patterns under monocropping and intercropping systems. ERT allowed us to access information about the vadose zone moisture dynamics that would be unavailable with classical soil moisture measurements.

  1. Electrical contact resistance theory for conductive rough surfaces separated by a thin insulating film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogut, L.; Komvopoulos, K.

    2004-01-01

    An electrical contact resistance (ECR) theory is presented for conductive and rough (fractal) surfaces separated by a thin insulating film, which is treated as an energy barrier that impedes current flow due to the electric-tunnel effect. The analysis yields insight into the effects of film properties, current flow, surface topography, mechanical properties, and contact load on the ECR. It is shown that the variation of ECR with the contact load is less pronounced than that observed in the absence of an insulating layer due to the intrinsic voltage dependence of the tunnel resistance and the associated voltage compensation mechanism. The effect of nonohmic behavior on the relationships of the ECR with the contact load and the real contact area is discussed and results are compared with approximate analytical relationships developed herein. The relationship between the real contact area and the ECR depends on the current intensity and film properties and is independent of the surface topography and mechanical properties. Approaches for determining the surface roughness, mechanical properties, insulating film properties, and real contact area from ECR measurements are interpreted in light of the theory developed.

  2. Surface roughness and electrical resistivity of high-purity zinc irradiated with nanosecond visible laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, M. Z.; Ali, Dilawar; Tanveer, M. Usman; Naseem, S.

    2014-06-01

    Six specimens of 99.995% pure zinc in the form of strips (15 mm × 8 mm × 0.5 mm) were irradiated with Q-switched pulsed Nd:YAG laser (? = 532 nm, E = 50 mJ, ? = 6 ns, repetition rate = 10 Hz) in vacuum ?10-3 Torr. The specimens were irradiated with 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 laser shots; the laser fluence and laser intensity at the irradiation spot were 4.24 J/cm2 and 7.07 × 108 W/cm2, respectively. Surface morphology of laser irradiated specimens was examined by both optical and scanning electron microscopes. Crater area as well as heat affected area were measured by optical microscope using Motic software. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination revealed different features, e.g., wavelike structures, ridges, dips, micro cones, cavities, nano and micro size droplets, as well as solid flakes, etc., on the surface. These features are a result of splashing, hydrodynamic and exfoliational sputtering. Average surface roughness was measured from SEM micrographs using Nanotec software WSxM 5.0 develop 1.1. The electrical resistivity was determined by four-point probe technique. It is observed that average surface roughness and electrical resistivity vary with the number of laser shots in an identical manner, and are therefore found to be directly related to each other.

  3. Nanocrystalline SmCo5 magnets with laminated structure and increased electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabay, A. M.; Marinescu-Jasinski, M.; Li, W. F.; Liu, J. F.; Hadjipanayis, G. C.

    2011-04-01

    Magnetically isotropic Sm-Co permanent magnets with anisotropic electrical conductivity were produced by hot-pressing SmCo5 ultrathin flakes with or without insulating additions of mica, MoS2, CaF2, and B2O3. The laminated structures of the magnets were assured by the natural packing of the flakes in the die. In the additive-free magnets, the resistivity is increased due to oxidized flake boundaries. Additives with platelet-shaped particles (mica, MoS2) and especially those with low-melting temperature (B2O3) form more continuous insulating layers. On the other hand, the CaF2 additive does not react with the magnetic Sm-Co phase. The characteristic values of the maximum energy product and electrical resistivity, measured in orthogonal directions, were 9.7 MG Oe and 130 ?? cm for the additive-free magnet, 5.7 MG Oe and 640 ?? cm for the magnet made with 2 wt. % B2O3 and 5.7 MG Oe and 330 ?? cm for the magnet made with 10 wt. % CaF2.

  4. The (RH+t) aging correlation. Electrical resistivity of PVB at various temperatures and relative humidities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1985-01-01

    Electrical products having organic materials functioning as pottants, encapsulants, and insulation coatings are commonly exposed to elevated conditions of temperature and humidity. In order to assess service life potential from this method of accelerated aging, it was empirically observed that service life seems proportional to an aging correlation which is the sum of temperature in degrees Celsius (t), and the relative humidity (RH) expressed in percent. Specifically, the correlation involves a plot of time-to-failure on a log scale versus the variable RH + T plotted on a linear scale. A theoretical foundation is provided for this empirically observed correlation by pointing out that the correlation actually involves a relationship between the electrical resistivity (or conductivity) of the organic material, and the variable RH + t. If time-to-failure is a result of total number of coulombs conducted through the organic material, then the correlation of resistivity versus RH + t is synonymous with the empirical correlation of time-to-failure versus RH + t.

  5. A cylindrical electrical resistivity tomography array for three-dimensional monitoring of hydrate formation and dissociation.

    PubMed

    Priegnitz, Mike; Thaler, Jan; Spangenberg, Erik; Rücker, Carsten; Schicks, Judith M

    2013-10-01

    The LArge Reservoir Simulator (LARS) was developed to investigate various processes during gas hydrate formation and dissociation under simulated in situ conditions of relatively high pressure and low temperature (close to natural conditions). To monitor the spatial hydrate distribution during hydrate formation and the mobility of the free gas phase generated during hydrate dissociation, a cylindrical Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) array was implemented into LARS. The ERT contains 375 electrodes, arranged in 25 circular rings featuring 15 electrodes each. The electrodes were attached to a neoprene jacket surrounding the sediment sample. Circular (2D) dipole-dipole measurements are performed which can be extended with additional 3D cross measurements to provide supplemental data. The data quality is satisfactory, with the mean standard deviation due to permanent background noise and data scattering found to be in the order of 2.12%. The measured data are processed using the inversion software tool Boundless Electrical Resistivity Tomography to solve the inverse problem. Here, we use data recorded in LARS to demonstrate the data quality, sensitivity, and spatial resolution that can be obtained with this ERT array. PMID:24182137

  6. Transcriptome profiling of resistant and susceptible Cavendish banana roots following inoculation with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense tropical race 4

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fusarium wilt, caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense tropical race 4 (Foc TR4), is considered the most lethal disease of Cavendish bananas in the world. The disease can be managed in the field by planting resistant Cavendish plants generated by somaclonal variation. However, little information is available on the genetic basis of plant resistance to Foc TR4. To a better understand the defense response of resistant banana plants to the Fusarium wilt pathogen, the transcriptome profiles in roots of resistant and susceptible Cavendish banana challenged with Foc TR4 were compared. Results RNA-seq analysis generated more than 103 million 90-bp clean pair end (PE) reads, which were assembled into 88,161 unigenes (mean size?=?554 bp). Based on sequence similarity searches, 61,706 (69.99%) genes were identified, among which 21,273 and 50,410 unigenes were assigned to gene ontology (GO) categories and clusters of orthologous groups (COG), respectively. Searches in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG) mapped 33,243 (37.71%) unigenes to 119 KEGG pathways. A total of 5,008 genes were assigned to plant-pathogen interactions, including disease defense and signal transduction. Digital gene expression (DGE) analysis revealed large differences in the transcriptome profiles of the Foc TR4-resistant somaclonal variant and its susceptible wild-type. Expression patterns of genes involved in pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) recognition, activation of effector-triggered immunity (ETI), ion influx, and biosynthesis of hormones as well as pathogenesis-related (PR) genes, transcription factors, signaling/regulatory genes, cell wall modification genes and genes with other functions were analyzed and compared. The results indicated that basal defense mechanisms are involved in the recognition of PAMPs, and that high levels of defense-related transcripts may contribute to Foc TR4 resistance in banana. Conclusions This study generated a substantial amount of banana transcript sequences and compared the defense responses against Foc TR4 between resistant and susceptible Cavendish bananas. The results contribute to the identification of candidate genes related to plant resistance in a non-model organism, banana, and help to improve the current understanding of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:22863187

  7. Serovar distribution, antimicrobial resistance profiles, and PFGE typing of Salmonella enterica strains isolated from 2007–2012 in Guangdong, China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica includes the major serovars associated with human salmonellosis. In this study, 1764 clinical Salmonella enterica isolates from diarrhea outpatients were collected from fifteen cities in Guangdong province, China, between 2007 and 2012. These isolates represent all of the Salmonella isolates collected from the province during that period. Methods The isolates were characterized by serovar determination, antimicrobial susceptibility tests and PFGE fingerprint typing. Results The serovar distribution results demonstrated that Salmonella Typhimurium (n?=?523, 29.65%) and Salmonella 4,5,12:i:- (n?=?244, 13.83%) are the most common serovars causing infant salmonellosis, whereas Salmonella Enteritidis (n?=?257, 14.57%) mainly causes human salmonellosis in adults. The serovar shift from Salmonella Enteritidis to Salmonella Typhimurium occurred in 2008. Antimicrobial susceptibility data showed a high burden of multidrug resistance (MDR) (n?=?1128, 56.58%), and a 20%-30% increase in the number of isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin (n?=?142, 8.05%) and third-generation cephalosporins (n?=?88, 4.99%) from 2007–2012. Only 9.97% of isolates (n?=?176) were fully susceptible to all agents tested. A high burden of MDR was observed in Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella 4,5,12:i:- for all age groups, and a reduced susceptibility to third-generation cephalosporins and quinolones occurred particularly in infants (?6 years). The dominant PFGE patterns were JPXX01.GD0004, JEGX01.GD0006-7 and JNGX01.GD0006-7. ACSSuT was the predominant MDR profile in the Salmonella Typhimurium & 4,5,12:i:- complexes, while ASSuT-Nal and ASSu-Nal were the major MDR profiles in Salmonella Enteritidis. The predominant PFGE patterns of the Salmonella Typhimurium & 4,5,12:i:- complexes and Salmonella Stanley were most prevalent in infants (?6 years). However, no obvious relationship was observed between these PFGE profiles and geographic location. Conclusions These data reveal the serovar distribution of isolates recovered from diarrhea patients, the characteristics of resistant strains and fingerprint typing in Guangdong from 2007 to 2012. These results highlight a serovar shift and a worrying percentage of MDR strains with increasing resistance to quinolones and third-generation cephalosporins. Thus, continued surveillance of Salmonella and their MDR profiles using combined molecular tools and efforts to control the rapid increase in antimicrobial resistance among Salmonella in Guangdong are needed. PMID:24939394

  8. Emergence of a community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain with a unique resistance profile in Southwest Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ghebremedhin, B; Olugbosi, M O; Raji, A M; Layer, F; Bakare, R A; König, B; König, W

    2009-09-01

    Phenotypic, genotypic, and toxin gene analyses have not yet been done all in one for the Nigerian Staphylococcus aureus population. This study provides a comprehensive overview of the molecular epidemiology and genetic diversity of S. aureus strains at the largest university clinic in Ibadan, Nigeria. From 1,300 patients' clinical samples collected at the University Teaching Hospital in Ibadan, Nigeria, during a 1-year-surveillance in 2007, 346 nonduplicate S. aureus isolates were obtained. All isolates underwent antibiotic susceptibility testing, toxin gene analysis, multilocus sequence typing, agr group typing, and spa typing. For methicillin (meticillin)-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing was also performed. Of the 346 isolates, 20.23% were methicillin resistant. Thirty-three patients' isolates (47.15%) fulfilled the definition criteria for community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) according to a review of the medical charts. The majority of MRSA strains analyzed were isolated from surgical or pediatric patients. The commonest types of MRSA infection identified were surgical-site infections (>70%), whereas those for CA-MRSA were conjunctivitis and otitis (19 patients [57.6%]) and accidental skin and subcutaneous tissue infections (14 patients [42.4%]). The methicillin-susceptible S. aureus strains (ST1, ST5, ST15, ST7, ST8, ST25, ST30, ST72, ST80, ST121, and ST508) were heterogeneous by phenotypic and genotypic analyses. The first report of a Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive ST88 strain (agr III, SCCmec IV) in Nigeria, as well as genetic analyses of this strain, is presented in this study. The ST88 strain was resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole as well as to penicillin and oxacillin. CA-MRSA infections are increasing rapidly among young patients with ophthalmologic and auricular infections. Urban regions with populations of lower socioeconomic status and evidence of overcrowding appear to be at high risk for the emergence of this clone. PMID:19571020

  9. Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus among HIV Infected Pediatric Patients in Northwest Ethiopia: Carriage Rates and Antibiotic Co-Resistance Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Lemma, Martha Tibebu; Zenebe, Yohannes; Tulu, Begna; Mekonnen, Daniel; Mekonnen, Zewdie

    2015-01-01

    Background MRSA infections are becoming more prevalent throughout the HIV community. MRSA infections are a challenge to both physicians and patients due to limited choice of therapeutic options and increased cost of care. Objectives This study was aimed to determine the prevalence of colonization and co-resistance patterns of MRSA species among HIV positive pediatric patients in the Amhara National Regional State, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods Culture swabs were collected from the anterior nares, the skin and the perineum of 400 participants. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done on Muller Hinton Agar by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method, using 30 ?g cefoxitin (OXOID, ENGLAND) according to the recommendations of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Methicillin sensitivity/resistance was tested using cefoxitin. Data was analyzed by descriptive statistics and logistic regression model using Epi Info 7. Results S. aureus was detected in 206 participants (51.5%). The prevalence of MRSA colonization in this study was 16.8%. Colonization by S. aureus was associated with male gender (OR = 0.5869; 95% CI: 0.3812–0.9036; p-value = 0.0155), history of antibiotic use over the previous 3 months (OR = 2.3126; 95% CI: 1.0707–4.9948; p-value = 0.0329) and having CD4 T-cell counts of more than 350 x 106 cells / L (OR = 0.5739; 95% CI = 0.3343–0.9851; p-value = 0.0440). Colonization by MRSA was not associated with any one of the variables. Concomitant resistance of the MRSA to clindamycin, chloramphenicol, co-trimoxazole, ceftriaxone, erythromycin and tetracycline was 7.6%, 6%, 5.25%, 20.9%, 23.9% and 72.1%, respectively. Conclusion High rates of colonization by pathogenic MRSA strains is observed among HIV positive pediatric patients in the Amhara National Regional state. PMID:26421927

  10. Electrical Resistance of SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites for Damage Detection and Life-Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Morscher, Gregory; Xia, Zhenhai

    2009-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are suitable for high temperature structural applications such as turbine airfoils and hypersonic thermal protection systems due to their low density high thermal conductivity. The employment of these materials in such applications is limited by the ability to accurately monitor and predict damage evolution. Current nondestructive methods such as ultrasound, x-ray, and thermal imaging are limited in their ability to quantify small scale, transverse, in-plane, matrix cracks developed over long-time creep and fatigue conditions. CMC is a multifunctional material in which the damage is coupled with the material s electrical resistance, providing the possibility of real-time information about the damage state through monitoring of resistance. Here, resistance measurement of SiC/SiC composites under mechanical load at both room temperature monotonic and high temperature creep conditions, coupled with a modal acoustic emission technique, can relate the effects of temperature, strain, matrix cracks, fiber breaks, and oxidation to the change in electrical resistance. A multiscale model can in turn be developed for life prediction of in-service composites, based on electrical resistance methods. Results of tensile mechanical testing of SiC/SiC composites at room and high temperatures will be discussed. Data relating electrical resistivity to composite constituent content, fiber architecture, temperature, matrix crack formation, and oxidation will be explained, along with progress in modeling such properties.

  11. Tabletop Models for Electrical and Electromagnetic Geophysics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Charles T.

    2002-01-01

    Details the use of tabletop models that demonstrate concepts in direct current electrical resistivity, self-potential, and electromagnetic geophysical models. Explains how data profiles of the models are obtained. (DDR)

  12. Oxidation Resistant, Cr Retaining, Electrically Conductive Coatings on Metallic Alloys for SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Gorokhovsky

    2008-03-31

    This report describes significant results from an on-going, collaborative effort to enable the use of inexpensive metallic alloys as interconnects in planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) through the use of advanced coating technologies. Arcomac Surface Engineering, LLC, under the leadership of Dr. Vladimir Gorokhovsky, is investigating filtered-arc and filtered-arc plasma-assisted hybrid coating deposition technologies to promote oxidation resistance, eliminate Cr volatility, and stabilize the electrical conductivity of both standard and specialty steel alloys of interest for SOFC metallic interconnect (IC) applications. Arcomac has successfully developed technologies and processes to deposit coatings with excellent adhesion, which have demonstrated a substantial increase in high temperature oxidation resistance, stabilization of low Area Specific Resistance values and significantly decrease Cr volatility. An extensive matrix of deposition processes, coating compositions and architectures was evaluated. Technical performance of coated and uncoated sample coupons during exposures to SOFC interconnect-relevant conditions is discussed, and promising future directions are considered. Cost analyses have been prepared based on assessment of plasma processing parameters, which demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed surface engineering process for SOFC metallic IC applications.

  13. Electrical resistance tomography for monitoring the infiltration of water into a pavement section

    SciTech Connect

    Buettner, M.; Daily, B.; Ramirez, A.

    1997-07-03

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to follow the infiltration of water into pavement section at the UC Berkeley Richmond Field Station. A volume of pavement 1m square and 1.29 m deep was sampled by an ERT array consisting of electrodes in 9 drilled holes plus 8 surface electrodes. The data were collected using a computer controlled data acquisition system capable of collecting a full data set in under 1 hour, allowing for nearly real time sampling of the infiltration. The infiltration was conducted in two phases. During the first phase, water was introduced into the asphalt-concrete (AC) layers at a slow rate of about 8 ml per hour for a period of about 6 days. In the second phase, water was introduced into the asphalt-treated-permeable base (ATPB) layer at a more rapid rate of about 100 ml/h for about 2 days. The ERT images show that water introduced into the upper AC layers shows up as a decrease in resistivity which grows with time. The images also appear to show that when water moves into the layers below the ATPB, the resistivity increases; an unexpected result. There are some indications that the water moved laterally as well as down into the deeper ATPB and the aggregate base. The images also show that when water is introduced directly into the ATPB and aggregate layer, the water moves into the the underlying materials much more quickly.

  14. Small scale monitoring of a bioremediation barrier using miniature electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentenac, Philippe; Hogson, Tom; Keenan, Helen; Kulessa, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess, in the laboratory, the efficiency of a barrier of oxygen release compound (ORC) to block and divert a diesel plume migration in a scaled aquifer model using miniature electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) as the monitoring system. Two plumes of contaminant (diesel) were injected in a soil model made of local sand and clay. The diesel plumes migration was imaged and monitored using a miniature resistivity array system that has proved to be accurate in soil resistivity variations in small-scaled models of soil. ERT results reflected the lateral spreading and diversion of the diesel plumes in the unsaturated zone. One of the contaminant plumes was partially blocked by the ORC barrier and a diversion and reorganisation of the diesel in the soil matrix was observed. The technique of time-lapse ERT imaging showed that a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminant like diesel can be monitored through a bioremediation barrier and the technique is well suited to monitor the efficiency of the barrier. Therefore, miniature ERT as a small-scale modelling tool could complement conventional techniques, which require more expensive and intrusive site investigation prior to remediation.

  15. Electrical resistivity and thermopower of Y1-xPrxCo2 Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchima, K.; Teruya, A.; Takaesu, Y.; Akamine, H.; Kakihana, M.; Tomori, K.; Uejo, T.; Nakamura, A.; Hedo, M.; Nakama, T.; Yagasaki, K.; Burkov, A. T.

    2015-03-01

    Electrical resistivity ? and thermopower S of the pseudo-binary compounds of Y1-xPrxCo2 have been measured in the temperature range between 2 and 300 K under magnetic fields up to 10 T, together with the pressure measurements of ? and S in Y0.4Pr0.6Co2. The Curie temperature decreases with decreasing x, and vanishes at the critical composition xc ? 0.4, where the residual resistivity attains a maximum value. The Curie temperature and the residual resistivity of Y0.4Pr0.6Co2 show the same pressure dependence as those of the heavy-rare-earth based compounds. These behaviors of ? and S indicate the inhomogeneous distribution of the Co 3d magnetization. The magnetoresistance of the light-rare earth Y1-xPrxCo2 system is negative in the whole range of x, except for x = 0 and 1, which is a characteristic behavior related with magnetic state and magnitude of the effective field acting on the Co 3d subsystem.

  16. Transient mechanical and electrical properties of uncooled resistive microbolometer focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Biao; Huang, Shusen; Zhang, Xin

    2004-10-01

    Recent advances in MEMS and focal plane array (FPA) technologies have led to the development of manufacturing microbolometers monolithically on a readout integrated circuit (ROIC). In this work, both numerical and finite element methods were performed to simulate the transient electrical and mechanical responses of resistive microbolometer FPAs made by several TCR (thermal coefficient of resistance) materials including a-Si, VOx and semiconducting YBCO. Numerical simulation shows that the pulsed bias readout mode in resistive microbolometer FPAs causes a non-steady-state of the system during the operation. As a result, NETD decreases with the increasing pulse width. In FPAs, the array size, frame rate, ROIC and mechanical reliability set the up-limit to the pulse width. The transient mechanical response for three microbolometer configurations was investigated using finite element modeling. The biased pulse results in membrane bending along the z-axis for the symmetric extended configuration (Type I), or twisting in three axes for the asymmetric extended configuration (Type II) due to the constraint force from the supporting arms. The square configuration (Type III) exhibits the smallest deformation and minimum shear stress at the sharp geometries. a-Si microbolometer generates higher shear stress than other microbolometers with the same square configuration.

  17. Electrical resistivity of liquid nickel-lanthanum and nickel-cerium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gasser, J.; Kefif, B. )

    1990-02-15

    The high-temperature melting points of transition metals and the extreme reactivity of rare-earth metals at high temperature explain why very few results exist on the physical properties of this kind of alloy. Except for some papers of Solodovnikov {ital et} {ital al}., no paper on the electronic properties of transition-metal--rare-earth alloys have been published to our knowledge. The scarce pure-metal results are often contradictory. The electrical resistivity of nine liquid lanthanum-nickel alloys (up to 60 at. % nickel) and of six cerium-nickel alloys (up to 53 at. % nickel) has been measured. The raw experimental results had been presented earlier. The concentration dependence of the resistivity is discussed in the framework of the extended Faber-Ziman theory of Dreirach {ital et} {ital al}. in terms of structure factors and form factors. Following a hard-sphere description, we used the Ashcroft-Langreth formula to compute the partial structure factors. The form factors have been deduced by taking transition-- and rare-earth--metal model potentials of the Heine-Abarenkov-Animalu type which incorporate formally the {ital s}-{ital d} and the {ital s}-{ital f} hybridization in the energy band of the lanthanides. Alternatively, we also compute a {ital t}-matrix form factor expressed in terms of phase shifts. The model-potential and {ital t}-matrix--form-factor calculations are compared to the experimental resistivity.

  18. Electrical Resistance of Nb3Sn/Cu Splices Produced by Electromagnetic Pulse Technology and Soft Soldering

    E-print Network

    Schoerling, D; Scheuerlein, C; Atieh, S; Schaefer, R

    2011-01-01

    The electrical interconnection of Nb3Sn/Cu strands is a key issue for the construction of Nb3Sn based damping ring wigglers and insertion devices for third generation light sources. We compare the electrical resistance of Nb3Sn/Cu splices manufactured by solid state welding using Electromagnetic Pulse Technology (EMPT) with that of splices produced by soft soldering with two different solders. The resistance of splices produced by soft soldering depends strongly on the resistivity of the solder alloy at the operating temperature. By solid state welding splice resistances below 10 nOhm can be achieved with 1 cm strand overlap length only, which is about 4 times lower than the resistance of Sn96Ag4 soldered splices with the same overlap length. The comparison of experimental results with Finite Element simulations shows that the electrical resistance of EMPT welded splices is determined by the resistance of the stabilizing copper between the superconducting filaments and confirms that welding of the strand matr...

  19. Electrical resistance of Nb3Sn/Cu splices produced by electromagnetic pulse technology and soft soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoerling, D.; Heck, S.; Scheuerlein, C.; Atieh, S.; Schaefer, R.

    2012-02-01

    The electrical interconnection of Nb3Sn/Cu strands is a key issue for the construction of Nb3Sn based damping ring wigglers and insertion devices for third generation light sources. We compare the electrical resistance of Nb3Sn/Cu splices manufactured by solid state welding using electromagnetic pulse technology (EMPT) with that of splices produced by soft soldering with two different solders. The resistance of splices produced by soft soldering depends strongly on the resistivity of the solder alloy at the operating temperature. Using solid state welding, splice resistances below 10 n? can be achieved with 1 cm strand overlap length only, which is about four times lower than the resistance of Sn96Ag4 soldered splices with the same overlap length. A comparison of experimental results with finite element simulations shows that the electrical resistance of EMPT welded splices is determined by the resistance of the stabilizing copper between the superconducting filaments, and confirms that welding of the strand matrix is indeed achieved. EMPT allows the ductile, unreacted strands to be interconnected, which reduces the risk of damaging the brittle reacted Nb3Sn strands.

  20. Effect of resistivity profile on current decay time of initial phase of current quench in neon-gas-puff inducing disruptions of JT-60U

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, S.; Ohno, N.; Shibata, Y.; Isayama, A.; Kawano, Y.; Watanabe, K. Y.; National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 ; Takizuka, T.; Okamoto, M.

    2013-11-15

    According to an early work [Y. Shibata et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 025015 (2010)] on the behavior of the plasma current decay in the JT-60U disruptive discharges caused by the radiative collapse with a massive neon-gas-puff, the increase of the internal inductance mainly determined the current decay time of plasma current during the initial phase of current quench. To investigate what determines the increase of the internal inductance, we focus attention on the relationship between the electron temperature (or the resistivity) profile and the time evolution of the current density profile and carry out numerical calculations. As a result, we find the reason of the increase of the internal inductance: The current density profile at the start of the current quench is broader than an expected current density profile in the steady state, which is determined by the temperature (or resistivity) profile. The current density profile evolves into peaked one and the internal inductance is increasing.

  1. Good electrical contacts for high resistivity (Cd,Mn)Te crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowska-Baran,M.; Mycielski, A.; Kochanowska, D.; Szadkowski, A. J.; Jakiela, r.; Witkowska, B.; Kaliszek, W.; Domagala, J.; Lusakowska, E.; Domukhovski, V.; Dybko, K.; Cui, Y.; James, R. B.

    2008-10-19

    We consider that semi-insulating (Cd,Mn)Te crystals may well successfully replace the commonly used (Cd,Zn)Te crystals as a material for manufacturing large-area X- and gamma-ray detectors. The Bridgman growth method yields good quality and high-resistivity (10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} {Omega}-cm) crystals of (Cd,Mn)Te:V. Doping with vanadium ({approx} 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}), which acts as a compensating agent, and annealing in cadmium vapors, which reduces the number of cadmium vacancies in the as-grown crystal, ensure this high resistivity. Detector applications of the crystals require satisfactory electrical contacts. Hence, we explored techniques of ensuring good electrical contacts to semi-insulating (Cd,Mn)Te crystals. Our findings are reported here. Before depositing the contact layers, we prepared an 'epi-ready' surface of the crystal platelet by a procedure described earlier for various tellurium-based II-VI compound crystals. A molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) apparatus was used to deposit various types of contact layers: Monocrystalline semiconductor layers, amorphous- and nanocrystalline semiconductor layers, and metal layers were studied. We employed ZnTe heavily doped ({approx} 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}) with Sb, and CdTe heavily doped ({approx} 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) with In as the semiconductors to create contact layers that subsequently enable good contact (with a narrow, tunneling barrier) to the Au layer that usually is applied as the top contact layer. We describe and discuss the technology and some properties of the electrical contacts to semi-insulating (Cd,Mn)Te.

  2. Microgravity and Electrical Resistivity Techniques for Detection of Caves and Clandestine Tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, N. C.; Croft, L. A.; Cesin, G. L.; Wilson, S.

    2006-05-01

    The Center for Cave and Karst Studies, CCKS, has been using microgravity to locate caves from the ground's surface since 1985. The geophysical subsurface investigations began during a period when explosive and toxic vapors were rising from the karst aquifer under Bowling Green into homes, businesses, and schools. The USEPA provided the funding for this Superfund Emergency, and the CCKS was able to drill numerous wells into low-gravity anomalies to confirm and even map the route of caves in the underlying limestone bedrock. In every case, a low-gravity anomaly indicated a bedrock cave, a cave with a collapsed roof or locations where a bedrock cave had collapsed and filled with alluvium. At numerous locations, several wells were cored into microgravity anomalies and in every case, additional wells were drilled on both sides of the anomalies to confirm that the technique was in fact reliable. The wells cored on both sides of the anomalies did not intersect caves but instead intersected virtually solid limestone. Microgravity also easily detected storm sewers and even sanitary sewers, sometimes six meters (twenty feet) beneath the surface. Microgravity has also been used on many occasions to investigate sinkhole collapses. It identified potential collapse areas by detecting voids in the unconsolidated material above bedrock. The system will soon be tested over known tunnels and then during a blind test along a section of the U.S. border at Nogales, Arizona. The CCKS has experimented with other geophysical techniques, particularly ground penetrating radar, seismic and electrical resistivity. In the late 1990s the CCKS started using the Swift/Sting resistivity meter to perform karst geophysical subsurface investigations. The system provides good depth to bedrock data, but it is often difficult to interpret bedrock caves from the modeled data. The system typically used now by the CCKS to perform karst subsurface investigations is to use electrical resistivity traverses followed by microgravity over suspect areas identified on the modeled resistivity data. Some areas of high resistivity indicate caves, but others simply indicate pockets of dry limestone, and the signatures looks virtually identical. Therefore, the CCKS performs microgravity over all suspect areas along the resistivity traverses. A low-gravity anomaly that corresponds with a high-resistivity anomaly indicates a cave location. A high-resistivity anomaly that does not also have a low- gravity anomaly indicates a pocket of dry limestone. Numerous cored wells have been drilled both into the anomalies and on both sides to confirm the cave locations and to establish that the technique is accurate. The September 11, 2001 World Trade Center catastrophe was the catalyst for the formation of a program within the CCKS to use the techniques for locating bedrock caves and voids in unconsolidated materials for search and rescue and for locating clandestine tunnels. We are now into our third year of a grant from the Kentucky Science and Technology Center to develop a robot that will measure microgravity and other geophysical techniques. The robot has the potential for detecting clandestine tunnels under the U.S. border as well as military applications. The system will soon be tested over known tunnels and then during a blind test along a section of the U.S. border at Nogales, Arizona.

  3. Electrical Resistivity and Seismic Surveys at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, Seth S.; Burton, Bethany L.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Asch, Theodore H.

    2008-01-01

    In April 2007, the USGS collected direct-current (DC) electrical resistivity data and shear- (S) and compressional- (P) wave seismic data to provide new detail of previously mapped, overlapping fault splays at two administrative areas in the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In NTS Area 7, we collected two-dimensional DC resistivity data along a transect crossing the Yucca Fault parallel to, and between, two transects along which resistivity data were collected in a previous study in 2006. In addition, we collected three-dimensional DC resistivity data in a grid that overlies part of the 2007 transect. The DC resistivity data show that the fault has a footwall that is more conductive than the hanging wall and an along-strike progression of the fault in a location where overlapping splays are present. Co-located with the northernmost of the two 2006 DC resistivity transects, we acquired S- and P-wave seismic data for both reflection and refraction processing. The S-wave data are corrupted by large amounts of converted (P-wave) energy likely due to the abundance of fractured caliche in the shallow subsurface. The P-wave data show minimal reflected energy, but they show clear refracted first arrivals. We have inverted these first arrival times to determine P-wave seismic velocity models. The seismic model for the transect in Area 7 shows low velocities extending to the base of the model at the location of the Yucca Fault, as well as low velocities at the eastern end of the transect, in the vicinity of the adjacent crater. These new surveys provide further detail about the geometry of the Yucca Fault in this location where it shows two overlapping splays. We collected P- and S-wave seismic data along a transect in the southern part of NTS Area 2, corresponding with the location of a 2006 DC resistivity transect that targeted a set of small faults identified with field mapping. Again, the S-wave data are difficult to interpret. The P-wave data show clear first arrivals that we inverted, yielding a velocity model that shows lateral heterogeneity similar to the 2006 DC resistivity models. Finally, we collected P-wave data along a second transect in Area 2, located north of the first line and in an area of a very minor fault that was targeted by another 2006 DC resistivity survey. The P-wave refraction velocity model shows generally high velocities, with a zone of somewhat lower velocities in the central part of the transect. The position of the low velocity zone corresponds with the location of a minor fault, though it is unclear whether the two are related. Together, these results demonstrate the value of geophysical data for mapping the subsurface extent of faults. The 2007 DC resistivity data complement the 2006 data and provide important new detail of the overlapping fault splays. The seismic data demonstrate the ability of P-wave refraction methods to identify the damage zones at faults, and they show the difficulties associated with S-wave methods in areas with caliche. Combining all of the geophysical data from the Area 7 studies, we are able to develop a coherent interpretation of the relation between the site geology, the fault, and the observations.

  4. Electrical Resistivity and Seismic Surveys at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Seth S. Haines; Bethany L. Burton; Donald S. Sweetkind; Theodore H. Asch

    2009-03-30

    In April 2007, the USGS collected direct-current (DC) electrical resistivity data and shear- (S) and compressional- (P) wave seismic data to provide new detail of previously mapped, overlapping fault splays at two administrative areas in the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In NTS Area 7, we collected two-dimensional DC resistivity data along a transect crossing the Yucca Fault parallel to, and between, two transects along which resistivity data were collected in a previous study in 2006. In addition, we collected three-dimensional DC resistivity data in a grid that overlies part of the 2007 transect. The DC resistivity data show that the fault has a footwall that is more conductive than the hanging wall and an along-strike progression of the fault in a location where overlapping splays are present. Co-located with the northernmost of the two 2006 DC resistivity transects, we acquired S- and P-wave seismic data for both reflection and refraction processing. The S-wave data are corrupted by large amounts of converted (P-wave) energy likely due to the abundance of fractured caliche in the shallow subsurface. The P-wave data show minimal reflected energy, but they show clear refracted first arrivals. We have inverted these first arrival times to determine P-wave seismic velocity models. The seismic model for the transect in Area 7 shows low velocities extending to the base of the model at the location of the Yucca Fault, as well as low velocities at the eastern end of the transect, in the vicinity of the adjacent crater. These new surveys provide further detail about the geometry of the Yucca Fault in this location where it shows two overlapping splays. We collected P- and S-wave seismic data along a transect in the southern part of NTS Area 2, corresponding with the location of a 2006 DC resistivity transect that targeted a set of small faults identified with field mapping. Again, the S-wave data are difficult to interpret. The P-wave data show clear first arrivals that we inverted, yielding a velocity model that shows lateral heterogeneity similar to the 2006 DC resistivity models. Finally, we collected P-wave data along a second transect in Area 2, located north of the first line and in an area of a very minor fault that was targeted by another 2006 DC resistivity survey. The P-wave refraction velocity model shows generally high velocities, with a zone of somewhat lower velocities in the central part of the transect. The position of the low velocity zone corresponds with the location of a minor fault, though it is unclear whether the two are related. Together, these results demonstrate the value of geophysical data for mapping the subsurface extent of faults. The 2007 DC resistivity data complement the 2006 data and provide important new detail of the overlapping fault splays. The seismic data demonstrate the ability of P-wave refraction methods to identify the damage zones at faults, and they show the difficulties associated with S-wave methods in areas with caliche. Combining all of the geophysical data from the Area 7 studies, we are able to develop a coherent interpretation of the relation between the site geology, the fault, and the observations.

  5. Characterization of a dismissed landfill via electrical resistivity tomography and mise-à-la-masse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Carlo, Lorenzo; Perri, Maria Teresa; Caputo, Maria Clementina; Deiana, Rita; Vurro, Michele; Cassiani, Giorgio

    2013-11-01

    Electrical resistivity methods are widely used for environmental applications, and they are particularly useful for the characterization and monitoring of sites where the presence of contamination requires a thorough understanding of the location and movement of water, that can act as a carrier of solutes. One such application is landfill studies, where the strong electrical contrasts between waste, leachate and surrounding formations make electrical methods a nearly ideal tool for investigation. In spite of the advantages, however, electrical investigation of landfills poses also challenges, both logistical and interpretational. This paper presents the results of a study conducted on a dismissed landfill, close to the city of Corigliano d'Otranto, in the Apulia region (Southern Italy). The landfill is located in an abandoned quarry, that was subsequently re-utilized about thirty years ago as a site for urban waste disposal. The waste was thought to be more than 20 m thick, and the landfill bottom was expected to be confined with an HDPE (high-density poli-ethylene) liner. During the digging operations performed to build a nearby new landfill, leachate was found, triggering an in-depth investigation including also non-invasive methods. The principal goal was to verify whether the leachate is indeed confined, and to what extent, by the HDPE liner. We performed both surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and mise-à-la-masse (MALM) surveys, facing the severe challenges posed by the rugged terrain of the abandoned quarry complex. A conductive body, probably associated with leachate, was found as deep as 40 m below the current landfill surface i.e. at a depth much larger than the expected 20 m thickness of waste. Given the logistical difficulties that limit the geometry of acquisition, we utilized synthetic forward modeling in order to confirm/dismiss interpretational hypotheses emerging from the ERT and MALM results. This integration between measurements and modeling helped narrow the alternative interpretations and strengthened the confidence in results, confirming the effectiveness of non-invasive methods in landfill investigation and the importance of modeling in the interpretation of geophysical results.

  6. Dynamic Inversion for Hydrological Process Monitoring with Electrical Resistance Tomography Under Model Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Lehikoinen, A.; Huttunen, J.M.J.; Finsterle, S.; Kowalsky, M.B.; Kaipio, J.P.

    2009-08-01

    We propose an approach for imaging the dynamics of complex hydrological processes. The evolution of electrically conductive fluids in porous media is imaged using time-lapse electrical resistance tomography. The related dynamic inversion problem is solved using Bayesian filtering techniques, that is, it is formulated as a sequential state estimation problem in which the target is an evolving posterior probability density of the system state. The dynamical inversion framework is based on the state space representation of the system, which involves the construction of a stochastic evolution model and an observation model. The observation model used in this paper consists of the complete electrode model for ERT, with Archie's law relating saturations to electrical conductivity. The evolution model is an approximate model for simulating flow through partially saturated porous media. Unavoidable modeling and approximation errors in both the observation and evolution models are considered by computing approximate statistics for these errors. These models are then included in the construction of the posterior probability density of the estimated system state. This approximation error method allows the use of approximate - and therefore computationally efficient - observation and evolution models in the Bayesian filtering. We consider a synthetic example and show that the incorporation of an explicit model for the model uncertainties in the state space representation can yield better estimates than a frame-by-frame imaging approach.

  7. Gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating of water and trichloroethene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegele, P. R.; Mumford, K. G.

    2014-09-01

    The effective remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones using in situ thermal treatment requires successful capture of gas that is produced. Replicate electrical resistance heating experiments were performed in a thin bench-scale apparatus, where water was boiled and pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) trichloroethene (TCE) and water were co-boiled in unconsolidated silica sand. Quantitative light transmission visualization was used to assess gas production and transport mechanisms. In the water boiling experiments, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the gas phase into connected channels were observed at critical gas saturations of Sgc = 0.233 ± 0.017, which allowed for continuous gas transport out of the sand. In experiments containing a colder region above a target heated zone, condensation prevented the formation of steam channels and discrete gas clusters that mobilized into colder regions were trapped soon after discontinuous transport began. In the TCE-water experiments, co-boiling at immiscible fluid interfaces resulted in discontinuous gas transport above the DNAPL pool. Redistribution of DNAPL was also observed above the pool and at the edge of the vapor front that propagated upwards through colder regions. These results suggest that the subsurface should be heated to water boiling temperatures to facilitate gas transport from specific locations of DNAPL to extraction points and reduce the potential for DNAPL redistribution. Decreases in electric current were observed at the onset of gas phase production, which suggests that coupled electrical current and temperature measurements may provide a reliable metric to assess gas phase development.

  8. Electrical Stimulation Improves Microbial Salinity Resistance and Organofluorine Removal in Bioelectrochemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Huajun; Zhang, Xueqin; Guo, Kun; Vaiopoulou, Eleni; Shen, Dongsheng; Long, Yuyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Fed batch bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) based on electrical stimulation were used to treat p-fluoronitrobenzene (p-FNB) wastewater at high salinities. At a NaCl concentration of 40 g/liter, p-FNB was removed 100% in 96 h in the BES, whereas in the biotic control (BC) (absence of current), p-FNB removal was only 10%. By increasing NaCl concentrations from 0 g/liter to 40 g/liter, defluorination efficiency decreased around 40% in the BES, and in the BC it was completely ceased. p-FNB was mineralized by 30% in the BES and hardly in the BC. Microorganisms were able to store 3.8 and 0.7 times more K+ and Na+ intracellularly in the BES than in the BC. Following the same trend, the ratio of protein to soluble polysaccharide increased from 3.1 to 7.8 as the NaCl increased from 0 to 40 g/liter. Both trends raise speculation that an electrical stimulation drives microbial preference toward K+ and protein accumulation to tolerate salinity. These findings are in accordance with an enrichment of halophilic organisms in the BES. Halobacterium dominated in the BES by 56.8% at a NaCl concentration of 40 g/liter, while its abundance was found as low as 17.5% in the BC. These findings propose a new method of electrical stimulation to improve microbial salinity resistance. PMID:25819966

  9. Assessment of contamination by intensive cattle activity through electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainato, Claudia M.; Losinno, Beatriz N.; Malleville, Horacio J.

    2012-01-01

    The intensive animal production is considered highly risky for groundwater and soil because of high mobility of some contaminants from animal wastes. The aim of this work was to obtain an electrical conductivity image of unsaturated and saturated zones at a feedlot (cattle feeding field) at the surroundings of Buenos Aires city (Argentina) in order to detect the most critical sectors of the field, with regard to contamination by animal wastes. Dipole-dipole electrical soundings (electrical resistivity tomography) were performed at the corral zone and the surroundings. 2D and 3D models of conductivity were obtained. Even if there is a calcareous plate below some parts of the corrals and soil compaction is high, vertical infiltration or subsurface runoff may have occurred since these sites, with high animal charge, show soil conductivities higher than the surroundings. The models showed higher conductivities of saturated zone increasing in the direction of groundwater flow. These results were taken into account for further designs of soil and groundwater sampling. Groundwater conductivity was three times greater downgradient from the corrals with high concentrations of nitrates and phosphorous. A zone of high conductivity was found below a small channel of effluents from the corrals.

  10. Electric field manipulation of nonvolatile magnetization in Au/NiO/Pt heterostructure with resistive switching effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Y. Q.; Zhou, W. P.; Li, Q.; He, M. C.; Du, J.; Cao, Q. Q.; Wang, D. H.; Du, Y. W.

    2014-07-01

    The electrical field manipulation of magnetization is investigated in an Au/NiO/Pt heterostructure, which is fully compatible with the standard complementary metal-oxide semiconductor process. Reversible and stable unipolar resistive switching effects as well as a significant nonvolatile change of the magnetization are observed in this device during the set and reset processes at room temperature. Further analysis indicates that the formation and rupture of metallic Ni conducting filaments caused by the electric field would be responsible for the changes of resistivity and magnetization. The coexistence of the electric field control of magnetization change and resistive switching makes Au/NiO/Pt heterostructure a promising candidate for the multifunctional memory devices.

  11. Effects of the resistivity profile on the formation of a reversed configuration and single helicity states in compressible simulations of the reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Onofri, M.; Malara, F.

    2013-10-15

    Compressible magnetohydrodynamics simulations of the reversed-field pinch (RFP) are presented. Previous simulations of the RFP, including density and pressure evolution, showed that a stationary state with a reversed toroidal magnetic field could not be obtained, contrary to the results produced with numerical codes neglecting density and pressure dynamics. The simulations described in the present paper show that including density and pressure evolution, a stationary RFP configuration can be obtained if the resistivity has a radial profile steeply increasing close to the wall. Such resistivity profile is more realistic than a uniform resistivity, since the temperature at the wall is lower than in the plasma core.

  12. Isolation of Environmental Bacteria from Surface and Drinking Water in Mafikeng, South Africa, and Characterization Using Their Antibiotic Resistance Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Mulamattathil, Suma George; Mbewe, Moses; Ateba, Collins Njie

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate and identify environmental bacteria from various raw water sources as well as the drinking water distributions system in Mafikeng, South Africa, and to determine their antibiotic resistance profiles. Water samples from five different sites (raw and drinking water) were analysed for the presence of faecal indicator bacteria as well as Aeromonas and Pseudomonas species. Faecal and total coliforms were detected in summer in the treated water samples from the Modimola dam and in the mixed water samples, with Pseudomonas spp. being the most prevalent organism. The most prevalent multiple antibiotic resistance phenotype observed was KF-AP-C-E-OT-K-TM-A. All organisms tested were resistant to erythromycin, trimethoprim, and amoxicillin. All isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin and faecal coliforms and Pseudomonas spp. to neomycin and streptomycin. Cluster analysis based on inhibition zone diameter data suggests that the isolates had similar chemical exposure histories. Isolates were identified using gyrB, toxA, ecfX, aerA, and hylH gene fragments and gyrB, ecfX, and hylH fragments were amplified. These results demonstrate that (i) the drinking water from Mafikeng contains various bacterial species and at times faecal and total coliforms. (ii) The various bacteria are resistant to various classes of antibiotics. PMID:25105027

  13. Shallow subsurface imaging of the Piano di Pezza active normal fault (central Italy) by high-resolution refraction and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time domain electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Fabio; Tulliani, Valerio; Fierro, Elisa; Sapia, Vincenzo; Civico, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    The Piano di Pezza fault is the north-westernmost segment of the >20 km long Ovindoli-Pezza active normal fault-system (central Italy). Although existing paleoseismic data document high vertical Holocene slip rates (~1 mm/yr) and a remarkable seismogenic potential of this fault, its subsurface setting and Pleistocene cumulative displacement are still poorly known. We investigated for the first time by means of high-resolution seismic and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) measurements the shallow subsurface of a key section of the Piano di Pezza fault. Our surveys cross a ~5 m-high fault scarp that was generated by repeated surface-rupturing earthquakes displacing some Late Holocene alluvial fans. We provide 2-D Vp and resistivity images which clearly show significant details of the fault structure and the geometry of the shallow basin infill material down to 50 m depth. We can estimate the dip (~50°) and the Holocene vertical displacement of the master fault (~10 m). We also recognize in the hangingwall some low-velocity/low-resistivity regions that we relate to packages of colluvial wedges derived from scarp degradation, which may represent the record of several paleo-earthquakes older than the Late Holocene events previously recognized by paleoseismic trenching. Conversely, due to the limited investigation depth of seismic and electrical tomography, the estimation of the cumulative amount of Pleistocene throw is hampered. Therefore, to increase the depth of investigation, we performed 7 TDEM measurements along the electrical profile using a 50 m loop size both in central and offset configuration. The recovered 1-D resistivity models show a good match with 2-D resistivity images in the near surface. Moreover, TDEM inversion results indicate that in the hangingwall, ~200 m away from the surface fault trace, the carbonate pre-Quaternary basement may be found at ~90-100 m depth. The combined approach of electrical and seismic data coupled with TDEM measurements provides a robust constraint to the Piano di Pezza fault cumulative offset. Our data are useful for better reconstructing the deep structural setting of the Piano di Pezza basin and assessing the role played by extensional tectonics in its Quaternary evolution.

  14. Heat Transfer -2 A long copper wire is used to carry an electric current and has an electrical resistance of 0.4 ohm

    E-print Network

    Battaglia, Francine

    of electrical insulation. (You may neglect the thermal capacity of the insulation.) The wire is suspended in air at 50 0 C where the total thermal resistance per unit length of wire (R'th) due to the insulation and convection to air is estimated to be 2 0 C-m/W. The maximum allowable insulation temperature is 90 0 C

  15. A profile of enzalutamide for the treatment of advanced castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Greasley, Rosa; Khabazhaitajer, Mohammad; Rosario, Derek J

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of castration resistant prostate cancer from androgen-sensitive prostate cancer have provided new avenues exploring efficacious therapies in a disease which is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the western world. In the evolution of second generation anti-androgens, enzalutamide, a novel androgen-receptor signaling inhibitor, has emerged targeting multiple steps within the androgenic stimulation pathway. This review discusses what is currently known of the mechanisms surrounding castration resistant prostate cancer development and the current human clinical trials to determine whether enzalutamide presents a new hope for men with advanced prostate cancer. The issues of therapy resistance, withdrawal effects and cross-resistance are briefly touched upon. PMID:26109877

  16. Identification, Typing, Antifungal Resistance Profile, and Biofilm Formation of Candida albicans Isolates from Lebanese Hospital Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Ibrahim; Khalaf, Roy A.; Harastani, Houda; Tokajian, Sima

    2014-01-01

    As leading opportunistic fungal pathogens identification and subtyping of Candida species are crucial in recognizing outbreaks of infection, recognizing particularly virulent strains, and detecting the emergence of drug resistant strains. In this study our objective was to compare identification of Candida albicans by the hospitals through the use of conventional versus identification based on the ITS (Internal Transcribed Spacer) and to assess biofilm forming capabilities, drug resistance patterns and correlate these with MLST typing. ITS typing revealed a 21.2% hospital misidentification rate. Multidrug resistance to three drugs out of four tested was detected within 25% of the isolates raising concerns about the followed treatment regimens. Drug resistant strains as well as biofilm formers were phylogenetically related, with some isolates with significant biofilm forming capabilities being correlated to those that were multidrug resistant. Such isolates were grouped closely together in a neighbor-joining tree generated by MLST typing indicating phylogenetic relatedness, microevolution, or recurrent infection. In conclusion, this pilot study gives much needed insight concerning C. albicans isolates circulating in Lebanese hospitals and is the first study of its kind correlating biofilm formation, antifungal resistance, and evolutionary relatedness. PMID:24982915

  17. Clinical and epidemiological profiles of individuals with drug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pedro, Heloisa da Silveira Paro; Nardi, Susilene Maria Tonelli; Pereira, Maria Izabel Ferreira; Oliveira, Rosângela Siqueira; Suffys, Philip Noel; Gomes, Harrison Magdinier; Finardi, Amanda Juliane; de Moraes, Eloise Brasil; Baptista, Ida Maria Foschiani Dias; Machado, Ricardo Luiz Dantas; Castiglioni, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is a growing global threat. Approximately 450,000 people developed multidrug-resistant TB worldwide in 2012 and an estimated 170,000 people died from the disease. This paper describes the sociodemographic, clinical-epidemiological and bacteriological aspects of TB and correlates these features with the distribution of anti-TB drug resistance. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT) cultures and drug susceptibility testing were performed according to the BACTEC MGIT 960 method. The results demonstrated that MT strains from individuals who received treatment for TB and people who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus were more resistant to TB drugs compared to other individuals (p < 0.05). Approximately half of the individuals received supervised treatment, but most drug-resistant cases were positive for pulmonary TB and exhibited positive acid-fast bacilli smears, which are complicating factors for TB control programs. Primary healthcare is the ideal level for early disease detection, but tertiary healthcare is the most common entry point for patients into the system. These factors require special attention from healthcare managers and professionals to effectively control and monitor the spread of TB drug-resistant cases. PMID:25946248

  18. Coexistence of electric field controlled ferromagnetism and resistive switching for TiO2 film at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Shaoqing; Qin, Hongwei; Bu, Jianpei; Zhu, Gengchang; Xie, Jihao; Hu, Jifan

    2015-08-01

    The Ag/TiO2/Nb:SrTiO3/Ag device exhibits the coexistence of electric field controlled ferromagnetism and resistive switching at room temperature. The bipolar resistive switching in Ag/TiO2/Nb:SrTiO3/Ag device may be dominated by the modulation of Schottky-like barrier with the electron injection-trapped/detrapped process at the interface of TiO2/Nb:SrTiO3. We suggest that the electric field-induced magnetization modulation originates mainly from the creation/annihilation of lots of oxygen vacancies in TiO2.

  19. Removal of oxides from alkali metal melts by reductive titration to electrical resistance-change end points

    DOEpatents

    Tsang, Floris Y. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1980-01-01

    Alkali metal oxides dissolved in alkali metal melts are reduced with soluble metals which are converted to insoluble oxides. The end points of the reduction is detected as an increase in electrical resistance across an alkali metal ion-conductive membrane interposed between the oxide-containing melt and a material capable of accepting the alkali metal ions from the membrane when a difference in electrical potential, of the appropriate polarity, is established across it. The resistance increase results from blocking of the membrane face by ions of the excess reductant metal, to which the membrane is essentially non-conductive.

  20. Electrical Resistance as a NDE Technique to Monitor Processing and Damage Accumulation in SiC/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Craig; Morscher, Gregory N.; Xia, Zhenhai

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are suitable for high temperature structural applications such as turbine airfoils and hypersonic thermal protection systems. The employment of these materials in such applications is limited by the ability to process components reliable and to accurately monitor and predict damage evolution that leads to failure under stressed-oxidation conditions. Current nondestructive methods such as ultrasound, x-ray, and thermal imaging are limited in their ability to quantify small scale, transverse, in-plane, matrix cracks developed over long-time creep and fatigue conditions. Electrical resistance of SiC/SiC composites is one technique that shows special promise towards this end. Since both the matrix and the fibers are conductive, changes in matrix or fiber properties should relate to changes in electrical conductivity along the length of a specimen or part. Initial efforts to quantify the electrical resistance of different fiber and different matrix SiC/SiC composites will be presented. Also, the effect of matrix cracking on electrical resistivity for several composite systems will be presented. The implications towards electrical resistance as a technique applied to composite processing, damage detection, and life-modeling will be discussed.

  1. Surface-roughness contributions to the electrical resistivity of polycrystalline metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, U.; Vancea, J.; Hoffmann, H.

    1990-06-01

    The influence of surface roughness on the electrical conductivity of polycrystalline metal films has to be considered at two different length scales. The large-scale surface roughness due to the granular arrangement of these films gives rise to a fluctuating film cross section. One-dimensional models of these fluctuations lead to roughness values consistent with scanning-tunneling-microscopy images of film surfaces. The microscopic surface roughness, mainly given by atomic steps on the crystallite surfaces, represents centers for surface scattering of conduction electrons. With this concept we were able to describe not only the thickness-dependent conductivity of films with natural (as-deposited) surface roughness, but also the increase in the resistance during subsequent coating with adatoms at 80 K owing to an artificial microscopic roughening of their surfaces.

  2. Diffusion in liquid metal systems. [information on electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukanwa, A. O.

    1975-01-01

    Physical properties of twenty liquid metals are reported; some of the data on such liquid metal properties as density, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity are summarized in graphical form. Data on laboratory handling and safety procedure are summarized for each metal; heat-transfer-correlations for liquid metals under various conditions of laminar and turbulent flow are included. Where sufficient data were available, temperature equations of properties were obtained by the method of least-squares fit. All values of properties given are valid in the given liquid phase ranges only. Additional tabular data on some 40 metals are reported in the appendix. Included is a brief description of experiments that were performed to investigate diffusion in liquid indium-gallium systems.

  3. Demonstration of combined zero-valent iron and electrical resistance heating for in situ trichloroethene remediation.

    PubMed

    Truex, M J; Macbeth, T W; Vermeul, V R; Fritz, B G; Mendoza, D P; Mackley, R D; Wietsma, T W; Sandberg, G; Powell, T; Powers, J; Pitre, E; Michalsen, M; Ballock-Dixon, S J; Zhong, L; Oostrom, M

    2011-06-15

    The effectiveness of in situ treatment using zero-valent iron (ZVI) for nonaqueous phase or significant sediment-associated contaminant mass can be limited by relatively low rates of mass transfer to bring contaminants in contact with the reactive media. For a field test in a trichloroethene (TCE) source area, combining moderate-temperature subsurface electrical resistance heating with in situ ZVI treatment was shown to accelerate TCE treatment by a factor of about 4 based on organic daughter products and a factor about 8 based on chloride concentrations. A mass-discharge-based analysis was used to evaluate reaction, dissolution, and volatilization processes at ambient groundwater temperature (~10 °C) and as temperature was increased up to about 50 °C. Increased reaction and contaminant dissolution were observed with increased temperature, but vapor- or aqueous-phase migration of TCE out of the treatment zone was minimal during the test because reactions maintained low aqueous-phase TCE concentrations. PMID:21591672

  4. Microstructural characterization and hardness properties of electric resistance welding titanium joints for dental applications.

    PubMed

    Ceschini, Lorella; Boromei, Iuri; Morri, Alessandro; Nardi, Diego; Sighinolfi, Gianluca; Degidi, Marco

    2015-06-01

    The electric resistance welding procedure is used to join a titanium bar with specific implant abutments in order to produce a framework directly in the oral cavity of the patient. This investigation studied the effects of the welding process on microstructure and hardness properties of commercially pure (CP2 and CP4) Ti components. Different welding powers and cooling procedures were applied to bars and abutments, normally used to produce the framework, in order to simulate the clinical intraoral welding procedure. The analyses highlighted that the joining process did not induce appreciable changes in the geometry of the abutments. However, because of unavoidable microstructural modifications in the welded zones, the hardness decreased to values lower than those of the unwelded CP2 and CP4 Ti grades, irrespective of the welding environments and parameters. PMID:26045042

  5. Stable transformation of Populus and incorporation of pest resistance by electric discharge particle acceleration.

    PubMed

    McCown, B H; McCabe, D E; Russell, D R; Robison, D J; Barton, K A; Raffa, K F

    1991-02-01

    Three different target tissues (protoplast-derived cells, nodules, and stems) and two unrelated hybrid genotypes of Populus (P. alba x P. grandidentata 'Crandon' and P. nigra 'Betulifolia' x P. trichocarpa) have been stably transformed by electric discharge particle acceleration using a 18.7 kb plasmid containing NOS-NPT, CaMV 35S-GUS, and CaMV 35S-BT. Four transformed plants of one hybrid genotype, NC5339, containing all 3 genes were recovered and analyzed. Two expressed GUS and one was highly resistant to feeding by 2 lepidopteran pests (the forest tent caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria, and the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar.) Pretreatment of the target tissues, fine-tuning of the bombardment parameters, and the use of a selection technique employing flooding of the target tissues were important for reliable recovery of transformed plants. PMID:24220719

  6. Method for reducing formation of electrically resistive layer on ferritic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Rakowski, James M.

    2013-09-10

    A method of reducing the formation of electrically resistive scale on a an article comprising a silicon-containing ferritic stainless subjected to oxidizing conditions in service includes, prior to placing the article in service, subjecting the article to conditions under which silica, which includes silicon derived from the steel, forms on a surface of the steel. Optionally, at least a portion of the silica is removed from the surface to placing the article in service. A ferritic stainless steel alloy having a reduced tendency to form silica on at least a surface thereof also is provided. The steel includes a near-surface region that has been depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the steel.

  7. Development of superconducting YBa2Cu3O(x) wires with low resistance electrical contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.; Byvik, C. E.; Caton, R.; Selim, R.; Lee, B. I.; Modi, V.; Sherrill, M.; Leigh, H. D.; Fain, C. C.; Lewis, G.

    1993-01-01

    Materials exhibiting superconductivity above liquid nitrogen temperatures (77 K) will enable new applications of this phenomena. One of the first commercial applications of this technology will be superconducting magnets for medical imaging. However, a large number of aerospace applications of the high temperature superconducting materials have also been identified. These include magnetic suspension and balance of models in wind tunnels and resistanceless leads to anemometers. The development of superconducting wires fabricated from the ceramic materials is critical for these applications. The progress in application of a patented fiber process developed by Clemson University for the fabrication of superconducting wires is reviewed. The effect of particle size and heat treatment on the quality of materials is discussed. Recent advances made at Christopher Newport College in the development of micro-ohm resistance electrical contacts which are capable of carrying the highest reported direct current to this material is presented.

  8. Study on the electrical conduction mechanism of bipolar resistive switching TiO2 thin films using impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min Hwan; Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Gun Hwan; Seok, Jun Yeong; Song, Seul Ji; Yoon, Jung Ho; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2010-04-01

    The electrical conduction mechanism within a resistive switching TiO2 film in its bipolar high resistance state was examined by ac impedance spectroscopy and dc current-voltage measurements. Bipolar switching, which can be initiated from a unipolar high resistance state, was attributed to both modulation of the Schottky barrier height at the film-electrode interface and the electronic energy state in the film. Numerical fittings of the impedance data revealed two distinct RC domains in series, which were attributed to an interfacial barrier (activation energy ˜0.1 eV) and a nonconducting layer (activation energy ˜0.5 eV), respectively.

  9. Transcriptome Profiling to Discover Putative Genes Associated with Paraquat Resistance in Goosegrass (Eleusine indica L.)

    PubMed Central

    An, Jing; Shen, Xuefeng; Ma, Qibin; Yang, Cunyi; Liu, Simin; Chen, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Background Goosegrass (Eleusine indica L.), a serious annual weed in the world, has evolved resistance to several herbicides including paraquat, a non-selective herbicide. The mechanism of paraquat resistance in weeds is only partially understood. To further study the molecular mechanism underlying paraquat resistance in goosegrass, we performed transcriptome analysis of susceptible and resistant biotypes of goosegrass with or without paraquat treatment. Results The RNA-seq libraries generated 194,716,560 valid reads with an average length of 91.29 bp. De novo assembly analysis produced 158,461 transcripts with an average length of 1153.74 bp and 100,742 unigenes with an average length of 712.79 bp. Among these, 25,926 unigenes were assigned to 65 GO terms that contained three main categories. A total of 13,809 unigenes with 1,208 enzyme commission numbers were assigned to 314 predicted KEGG metabolic pathways, and 12,719 unigenes were categorized into 25 KOG classifications. Furthermore, our results revealed that 53 genes related to reactive oxygen species scavenging, 10 genes related to polyamines and 18 genes related to transport were differentially expressed in paraquat treatment experiments. The genes related to polyamines and transport are likely potential candidate genes that could be further investigated to confirm their roles in paraquat resistance of goosegrass. Conclusion This is the first large-scale transcriptome sequencing of E. indica using the Illumina platform. Potential genes involved in paraquat resistance were identified from the assembled sequences. The transcriptome data may serve as a reference for further analysis of gene expression and functional genomics studies, and will facilitate the study of paraquat resistance at the molecular level in goosegrass. PMID:24927422

  10. A Critical Dose of Doxorubicin Is Required to Alter the Gene Expression Profiles in MCF-7 Cells Acquiring Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Shang-Hsun; Chen, Tzer-Ming; Hsiao, Hui-Ting; Chen, Yen-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Cellular mechanisms of multidrug resistance (MDR) are related to ABC transporters, apoptosis, antioxidation, drug metabolism, DNA repair and cell proliferation. It remains unclear whether the process of resistance development is programmable. We aimed to study gene expression profiling circumstances in MCF-7 during MDR development. Eleven MCF-7 sublines with incremental doxorubicin resistance were established as a valued tool to study resistance progression. MDR marker P-gp was overexpressed only in cells termed MCF-7/ADR-1024 under the selection dose approaching 1024 nM. MCF-7/ADR-1024 and authentic MCF-7/ADR shared common features in cell morphology and DNA ploidy status. MCF-7/ADR-1024 and authentic MCF-7/ADR down regulated repair genes BRCA1/2 and wild type p53, apoptosis-related gene Bcl-2 and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) epithelial marker gene E-cadherin. While detoxifying enzymes glutathione-S transferase-? and protein kinase C-? were up-regulated. The genes involving in EMT mesenchymal formation were also overexpressed, including N-cadherin, vimentin and the E-cadherin transcription reppressors Slug, Twist and ZEB1/2. PI3K/AKT inhibitor wortmannin suppressed expression of Slug, Twist and mdr1. Mutant p53 with a deletion at codons 127-133 markedly appeared in MCF-7/ADR-1024 and authentic MCF-7/ADR as well. In addition, MCF-7/ADR-1024 cells exerted CSC-like cell surface marker CD44 high/CD24 low and form mammospheres. Overall, results suggest that resistance marker P-gp arises owing to turn on/off or mutation of the genes involved in DNA repair, apoptosis, detoxifying enzymes, EMT and ABC transporters at a turning point (1.024 ?M doxorubicin challenge). Behind this point, no obvious alterations were found in most tested genes. Selection for CSC-like cells under this dose may importantly attribute to propagation of the population presenting invasive properties and drug resistance. We thereby suggest two models in the induction of drug resistance. Model 1: Selection for CSC-like cells. Model 2: Mutations for gain-of resistance. Either model 1 or model 2 requires doxorubicin dose approaching 1 ?M to alter gene regulation. PMID:25635866

  11. Electrical resistivity tomography to quantify in situ liquid content in a full-scale dry anaerobic digestion reactor.

    PubMed

    André, L; Lamy, E; Lutz, P; Pernier, M; Lespinard, O; Pauss, A; Ribeiro, T

    2016-02-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method is a non-intrusive method widely used in landfills to detect and locate liquid content. An experimental set-up was performed on a dry batch anaerobic digestion reactor to investigate liquid repartition in process and to map spatial distribution of inoculum. Two array electrodes were used: pole-dipole and gradient arrays. A technical adaptation of ERT method was necessary. Measured resistivity data were inverted and modeled by RES2DINV software to get resistivity sections. Continuous calibration along resistivity section was necessary to understand data involving sampling and physicochemical analysis. Samples were analyzed performing both biochemical methane potential and fiber quantification. Correlations were established between the protocol of reactor preparation, resistivity values, liquid content, methane potential and fiber content representing liquid repartition, high methane potential zones and degradations zones. ERT method showed a strong relevance to monitor and to optimize the dry batch anaerobic digestion process. PMID:26638138

  12. Electrical resistivity of pyrochlore compounds R2Mo2O7 (R = Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Y)

    SciTech Connect

    Greedan, J.E.; Sato, M.; Ali, N.; Datars, W.R.

    1987-06-01

    The electrical resistivity of R2Mo2O7 (R = Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Y) pyrochlores was measured in the temperature range 4.2 to 300 K. Metallic behavior is observed for Nd2Mo2O7, Sm2Mo2O7, and Gd2Mo2O7 which have relatively high magnetic ordering temperatures due to ferromagnetism on the molybdenum sublattice. A clear drop in resistivity is observed near the magnetic ordering point for all metallic materials. A resistance minimum observed at low temperatures, which may be due to the magnetic ordering of the rare earth sublattice, is not completely understood. Tb2Mo2O7 and Y2Mo2O7, which show no molybdenum sublattice ordering down to 4.2 K, are semiconductors. However, the temperature dependence of the resistivity is not exponential. This unusual resistivity behavior is typical of degenerate semiconductors.

  13. Joint application of surface electrical resistivity- and GPR-measurements for groundwater exploration on the island of Spiekeroog—northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronicke, J.; Blindow, N.; Groß, R.; Lange, M. A.

    1999-09-01

    Geophysical surveys have been carried out on the East Frisian island of Spiekeroog at the German North Sea coast in 1996. So-called "freshwater lenses", lying on top of saltwater-saturated layers because of their lower density, provide most of the freshwater supply on the Frisian Islands. The major goal of the present study is to show the possibilities of a joint application of surface electrical resistivity soundings and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) for the hydrogeological investigation of the island. It is shown that a comprehensive interpretation of large-scale GPR-profiling data in a sandy aquifer provides valuable hydrogeological information, especially if there is not any other information available, such as from boreholes or groundwater measuring points. Applying the techniques of surface electrical resistivity and ground penetrating radar jointly, we were able to construct a groundwater contour map for the entire island of Spiekeroog. In addition, we were able to delineate hydrogeologically important changes in grain size and stratigraphical features and to indicate temporal changes of the spatial extent of the freshwater reservoir in comparison to earlier (less complete) investigations. Finally, we located an area, previously unknown, in the eastern part of the island where precipitation appears to be developing a substantial new freshwater lens.

  14. Electrical resistivity tomography for early vadose leak detection under single shell storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Narbutovskih, S.M.

    1996-04-12

    This document describes planned testing with Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT). It is prepared in support of TTP RL46WT51 Rev. 1, funded by the Tank Focus Area through the Office of Technology Integration. The primary goal of the testing for fiscal year 1996 (FY96) is to develop and demonstrate the ability to place vertical electrode arrays (VEA) with the cone penetrometer technology (CPT) to depths below existing single shell tanks (SST) at the DOE Hanford Site. It is desirable to have the capability to use CPT for this application for obvious reasons. First, current methods of emplacement, drilled boreholes, are expensive with respect to the rest of the ERT operation. Cone penetrometer VEA emplacements offer the opportunity to significantly reduce installation costs. Second, use of CPT will reduce emplacement time from weeks or months to just several days depending on the number of VEAs and the depth of placement. ERT is preferable to other monitoring methods since operation costs and turn around time are less than the current baselines of either groundwater sampling networks or borehole logging techniques. ERT cost savings can be substantial and will continue into the future. ERT can also provide complete coverage under a tank or other facility which is an important supplement to existing monitoring methods. Groundwater sampling provides one data point per well and borehole logging provides data along a line in the ground. Neither provide information from beneath a facility and thus, are not able to locate release points. These electrode arrays are used to acquire subsurface electrical resistance data in a manner appropriate for tomographic inversion. The resulting tomograms can then be used to detect, monitor and track contaminated moisture plumes leaking from underground storage tanks during waste retrieval operations.

  15. In vitro toxicity evaluation of silver soldering, electrical resistance, and laser welding of orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Sestini, Silvia; Notarantonio, Laura; Cerboni, Barbara; Alessandrini, Carlo; Fimiani, Michele; Nannelli, Pietro; Pelagalli, Antonio; Giorgetti, Roberto

    2006-12-01

    The long-term effects of orthodontic appliances in the oral environment and the subsequent leaching of metals are relatively unknown. A method for determining the effects of various types of soldering and welding, both of which in turn could lead to leaching of metal ions, on the growth of osteoblasts, fibroblasts, and oral keratinocytes in vitro, is proposed. The effects of cell behaviour of metal wires on osteoblast differentiation, expressed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity; on fibroblast proliferation, assayed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulphophenil)-2H-tetrazolium-phenazine ethosulphate method; and on keratinocyte viability and migration on the wires, observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), were tested. Two types of commercially available wires normally used for orthodontic appliances, with a similar chemical composition (iron, carbon, silicon, chromium, molybdenum, phosphorus, sulphur, vanadium, and nitrogen) but differing in nickel and manganese content, were examined, as well as the joints obtained by electrical resistance welding, traditional soldering, and laser welding. Nickel and chromium, known as possible toxic metals, were also examined using pure nickel- and chromium-plated titanium wires. Segments of each wire, cut into different lengths, were added to each well in which the cells were grown to confluence. The high nickel and chromium content of orthodontic wires damaged both osteoblasts and fibroblasts, but did not affect keratinocytes. Chromium strongly affected fibroblast growth. The joint produced by electrical resistance welding was well tolerated by both osteoblasts and fibroblasts, whereas traditional soldering caused a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in both osteoblast ALP activity and fibroblast viability, and prevented the growth of keratinocytes in vitro. Laser welding was the only joining process well tolerated by all tested cells. PMID:17035485

  16. In-situ contact electrical resistance technique for investigating corrosion inhibitor adsorption on copper electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, G.; Quartarone, G.; Zingales, A.; Molokanov, V.V.

    1998-02-01

    Traditional electrochemical tests and the contact electrical resistance technique (CER) were used to investigate the effect on corrosion of pure copper (99.999 wt%) of adding benzotriazole (BTA) and 1-hydroxybenzotriazone (1-OH-BTA) to acidic solutions (sulfuric acid [H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}], pH = 1.7, and sodium sulfate [Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}] until total sulfate [SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}] concentration = 0.1 M). This technique permitted growth of oxide and/or salt films as well as adsorption of the organic inhibitors on the copper surface to be evaluated. Formation of copper oxide ([Cu{sub 2}O]{sub 2})., sulfate (CuSo{sub 4}{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O), thiocyanate (CuSCN), and halogenyde (CuI, CuBr, and CuCl) films on copper electrodes was followed in situ in sulfate solutions at various pH values under low overpotentials. Effects of pH, solution anion content, and/or the amount of BTA or 1-OH-BTA on electrical resistance (R) of the surface films formed on pure copper electrodes were treated. BTA acted as a more efficient corrosion inhibitor than 1-OH-BTA, reaching inhibition percentages (IP) of {approximately}90% compared to those of 1-OH-BTA, which reached a maximum of {approximately}76% in 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} M solutions. It was possible to distinguish between maximum R of the surface film, found in solutions containing BTA, associated with the adsorption of neutral inhibitor molecules, and the sharp rise in R attributable to [Cu(BTA)]{sub n} complex formation.

  17. Electrical resistivity and TDR methods for soil moisture estimation in central Italy test-sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calamita, G.; Perrone, A.; Brocca, L.

    2009-04-01

    Soil moisture, despite its small percentage, plays an important role in the global hydrological cycle influencing the Earth energy balance and the distribution of precipitations. Moreover, the soil moisture controls the plants transpiration; the structure, the function and the diversity of the dryland ecosystems; it regulates the microbial activity that influences important biogeochemical processes (i.e. nitrification and CO2 production) and it can be responsible of many geo-hydrological processes (floods, erosion, shallow landslides) involving Earth surface. There, soil moisture represents a very important quantity that can be investigated by integrating several methodologies operating at different scales. Recently, new technologies have permitted a remarkable advancing of both punctual and basin or continental scale measurements. However, nowadays a gap still exists in the possibility to obtain routinely measurements at intermediate catchment scale (small basins). Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) is one of the most used soil moisture measurement technique for hydrological applications that, although its high accuracy, has the drawback of limited investigated volume. In the last years, an important contribution for obtaining a wider spatial resolution is given by emerging geophysical methods such as the ones based on electromagnetic waves. In particular, during in-field acquisition operations, the electrical resistivity method has demonstrated to be applicable for this purpose. Results related to the simultaneous applications of both electrical resistivity and TDR methods in some test sites located in the Umbria region (central Italy) are discussed here. The measurements are related to a period of almost one year and allowed to monitor soil moisture variation trend over time and space. In particular, it has been found a good correlation between geophysical and TDR measurements showing that the integration of these two types of survey approaches into hydrological studies could noticeably increase our understanding of physical processes, especially at the intermediate scale.

  18. Upper mantle electrical resistivity structure beneath back-arc spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seama, N.; Shibata, Y.; Kimura, M.; Shindo, H.; Matsuno, T.; Nogi, Y.; Okino, K.

    2011-12-01

    We compare four electrical resistivity structure images of the upper mantle across back-arc spreading centers (Mariana Trough at 18 N and 13 N, and the Eastern Lau at 19.7 S and 21.3 S) to provide geophysical constraints on issues of mantle dynamics beneath the back-arc spreading system related to the subducting slab. The central Mariana Trough at 18 N has the full spreading rate of 25 km/Myr, and shows characteristic slow-spreading features; existence of median valley neovolcanic zone and "Bull's eyes" mantle Bouguer anomaly (MBA) along the axes. On the other hand, the southern Mariana Trough at 13 N shows an EPR type axial relief in morphology and lower MBA than that in the central Mariana Trough (Kitada et al., 2006), suggesting abundance of magma supply, even though the full spreading rate is 35 km/Myr that is categorized as a slow spreading ridge. At the Eastern Lau spreading center, crustal thickness and morphology vary systematically with arc proximity and shows the opposed trends against spreading rate: The full spreading rate increases from 65 km/Myr at 21.3 S to 85 km/Myr at 19.7 S, while the crustal thicknesses decrease together with morphology transitions from shallow peaked volcanic highs to a deeper flat axis (Martinez et al., 2006). Matsuno et al. (2010) provides a resistivity structure image of the upper mantle across the central Mariana subduction system, which contains several key features: There is an uppermost resistive layer with a thickness of 80-100 km beneath the central Mariana Trough, suggesting dry residual from the plate accretion process. But there is no evidence for a conductive feature beneath the back-arc spreading center at 18 N, and this feature is clearly independent from the conductive region beneath the volcanic arc below 60 km depth that reflects melting and hydration driven by water release from the subducting slab. The resultant upper mantle resistivity structure well support that the melt supply is not abundant, resulting in characteristic slow-spreading features at the surface. We have conducted marine magnetotelluric (MT) surveys at the southern Mariana in 2010 and at the Eastern Lau in 2009-2010. We obtained 10 ocean bottom electro-magnetometer (OBEM) data from a 130 km length MT transect across the southern Mariana spreading axis at 13 N, while we obtained 2 OBEM data and 11 ocean bottom magnetometer data from two 160 km length MT transects across the Eastern Lau spreading axes at 19.7 S and 21.3 S. After calculation of MT response functions and their correction for topographic distortion, two-dimensional electrical resistivity structures will be derived using an inversion algorithm. At this meeting, first we will show the resistivity structure images of the upper mantle beneath these spreading axes. Then, these structure images will be compared to identify differences in the mantle dynamics and the melt supply beneath the back-arc spreading system related to the subducting slab.

  19. Phenotypic drug profiling in droplet microfluidics for better targeting of drug-resistant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, S.; Cohen, N.; Sabhachandani, P.; Konry, T.

    2015-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance is a key factor in the failure of chemotherapy. Due to intratumoral heterogeneity, cancer cells depict variations in intracellular drug uptake and efflux at the single cell level, which may not be detectable in bulk assays. In this study we present a droplet microfluidics-based approach to assess the dynamics of drug uptake, efflux and cytotoxicity in drug-sensitive and drug-resistant breast cancer cells. An integrated droplet generation and docking microarray was utilized to encapsulate single cells as well as homotypic cell aggregates. Drug-sensitive cells showed greater death in the presence or absence of Doxorubicin (Dox) compared to the drug-resistant cells. We observed heterogeneous Dox uptake in individual drug-sensitive cells while the drug-resistant cells showed uniformly low uptake and retention. Dox-resistant cells were classified into distinct subsets based on their efflux properties. Cells that showed longer retention of extracellular reagents also demonstrated maximal death. We further observed homotypic fusion of both cell types in droplets, which resulted in increased cell survival in the presence of high doses of Dox. Our results establish the applicability of this microfluidic platform for quantitative drug screening in single cells and multicellular interactions. PMID:26456240

  20. Metagenomic Profiling of Antibiotic Resistance Genes and Mobile Genetic Elements in a Tannery Wastewater Treatment Plant

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhu; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Huang, Kailong; Miao, Yu; Shi, Peng; Liu, Bo; Long, Chao; Li, Aimin

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are often used to prevent sickness and improve production in animal agriculture, and the residues in animal bodies may enter tannery wastewater during leather production. This study aimed to use Illumina high-throughput sequencing to investigate the occurrence, diversity and abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) in aerobic and anaerobic sludge of a full-scale tannery wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Metagenomic analysis showed that Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria dominated in the WWTP, but the relative abundance of archaea in anaerobic sludge was higher than in aerobic sludge. Sequencing reads from aerobic and anaerobic sludge revealed differences in the abundance of functional genes between both microbial communities. Genes coding for antibiotic resistance were identified in both communities. BLAST analysis against Antibiotic Resistance Genes Database (ARDB) further revealed that aerobic and anaerobic sludge contained various ARGs with high abundance, among which sulfonamide resistance gene sul1 had the highest abundance, occupying over 20% of the total ARGs reads. Tetracycline resistance genes (tet) were highly rich in the anaerobic sludge, among which tet33 had the highest abundance, but was absent in aerobic sludge. Over 70 types of insertion sequences were detected in each sludge sample, and class 1 integrase genes were prevalent in the WWTP. The results highlighted prevalence of ARGs and MGEs in tannery WWTPs, which may deserve more public health concerns. PMID:24098424

  1. Sputtering pressure influence on growth morphology, surface roughness, and electrical resistivity for strong anisotropy beryllium film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Bing-Chi; Li, Kai; Kang, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Ji-Qiang; He, Yu-Dan; Luo, Jiang-Shan; Wu, Wei-Dong; Tang, Yong-Jian

    2014-06-01

    The strong anisotropy beryllium (Be) films are fabricated at different sputtering pressures by direct current magnetron sputtering. With the increase of pressure, the deposition rate of Be film first increases, and when the pressure exceeds 0.8 Pa, it gradually descends. The X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that Be film is of ?-Be phase, its surface always reveals the (101) crystal plane possessing the low surface energy. As for the growth morphology of Be film, the surface is mainly characterized by the fibrous grains, while the cross section shows a transition from a columnar grain to a mixed grain consisting of a cone-shaped grain and a columnar grain as the sputtering pressure increases. The large grain fraction decays exponentially from 75.0% to 59.3% with the increase of sputtering pressure p, which can improve the grain size uniformity. The surface roughness increases due to the insufficient atom diffusion, which is comparable to its decrease due to the etching effect at p < 0.8 Pa, while it increases drastically at p > 0.8 Pa, and this increase is dominated by the atom diffusion. The electrical resistivity values of Be films range from 1.7 ??·m to 2.7 ??·m in the range 0.4 Pa-1.2 Pa, which is 50 times larger than the bulk resistivity.

  2. Effect of praseodymium on the electrical resistance of Y??2?u3?7-? single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, R. V.; Vovk, N. R.; Khadzhai, G. Ya.; Goulatis, I. L.; Chroneos, A.

    2014-07-01

    The electrical resistivity in the ab-plane of the Y1-yPry??2?u3?7-? single crystals with high degree of perfection in the interval of ?c - 300 K was investigated. The increasing of praseodymium content leads to the reduction of the critical temperature (Tc) from 92 to 30 K. The experimental results can be approximated by the expression, taking into account the scattering of electrons by phonons, defects, the fluctuation conductivity in the 3D Aslamazov-Larkin model, as well as the transition to a "semiconductor" type behavior of the resistivity at the high praseodymium concentrations. The concentration dependences of all fitting parameters indicate a structural transition in the region 0.35???0.43. In particular, the Debye temperature changes in this range from 350 to 550 K, and the transverse coherence length passes through a maximum ??(0)?5 Å. The concentration dependence of the critical temperature testifies the d-pairing of the BCS model.

  3. An integration of aeromagnetic and electrical resistivity methods in dam site investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Aina, A.; Olorunfemi, M.O.; Ojo, J.S.

    1996-03-01

    Aeromagnetic map and electrical resistivity sounding data obtained along eight traverses were examined at two sites across the Katsina-Ala River. The principal goals of this exercise were to define depths to the bedrock, bedrock relief, geologic structures, define the nature of the superficial deposit, and select probable minor and major axes for hydroelectric power dams. The aeromagnetic map shows that the basement rocks trend roughly northeast-southwest, which correlates with the strike of foliation measurements made on rock outcrops along the river channel. A network of cross cutting lineaments, suspected to be faults/fractures that trend approximately northeast/southwest and northwest/southeast, was also delineated from the magnetic map. The depths to the bedrock estimated from resistivity depth sounding data at site 1 generally vary from 1--53.1 m. Depths to the bedrock estimated at site 2 range from 1.9--19.5 m. The superficial deposit varies from clay to sandy clay, to clayey sand (with boulders in places), and to sand and laterite. The bedrock relief is relatively flat and gently undulates along most of the traverses, with an overall dip towards the river channel. Traverses E-F or I-J at site 1 and K-L at site 2 are probable dame axes. These traverses are characterized by relatively thin overburden thicknesses and rock heads dipping toward the river channel, thereby reducing the likelihood of water seepages from the flanks of the proposed dam axes.

  4. Distribution-based fuzzy clustering of electrical resistivity tomography images for interface detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, W. O. C.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Chambers, J. E.; Oxby, L. S.; Bai, L.

    2014-04-01

    A novel method for the effective identification of bedrock subsurface elevation from electrical resistivity tomography images is described. Identifying subsurface boundaries in the topographic data can be difficult due to smoothness constraints used in inversion, so a statistical population-based approach is used that extends previous work in calculating isoresistivity surfaces. The analysis framework involves a procedure for guiding a clustering approach based on the fuzzy c-means algorithm. An approximation of resistivity distributions, found using kernel density estimation, was utilized as a means of guiding the cluster centroids used to classify data. A fuzzy method was chosen over hard clustering due to uncertainty in hard edges in the topography data, and a measure of clustering uncertainty was identified based on the reciprocal of cluster membership. The algorithm was validated using a direct comparison of known observed bedrock depths at two 3-D survey sites, using real-time GPS information of exposed bedrock by quarrying on one site, and borehole logs at the other. Results show similarly accurate detection as a leading isosurface estimation method, and the proposed algorithm requires significantly less user input and prior site knowledge. Furthermore, the method is effectively dimension-independent and will scale to data of increased spatial dimensions without a significant effect on the runtime. A discussion on the results by automated versus supervised analysis is also presented.

  5. Natural variation in RPS2-mediated resistance among Arabidopsis accessions: correlation between gene expression profiles and phenotypic responses.

    PubMed

    Van Poecke, Remco M P; Sato, Masanao; Lenarz-Wyatt, Lisa; Weisberg, Sanford; Katagiri, Fumiaki

    2007-12-01

    Natural variation in gene expression (expression traits or e-traits) is increasingly used for the discovery of genes controlling traits. An important question is whether a particular e-trait is correlated with a phenotypic trait. Here, we examined the correlations between phenotypic traits and e-traits among 10 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. We studied defense against Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 (Pst), with a focus on resistance gene-mediated resistance triggered by the type III effector protein AvrRpt2. As phenotypic traits, we measured growth of the bacteria and extent of the hypersensitive response (HR) as measured by electrolyte leakage. Genetic variation among accessions affected growth of Pst both with (Pst avrRpt2) and without (Pst) the AvrRpt2 effector. Variation in HR was not correlated with variation in bacterial growth. We also collected gene expression profiles 6 h after mock and Pst avrRpt2 inoculation using a custom microarray. Clusters of genes whose expression levels are correlated with bacterial growth or electrolyte leakage were identified. Thus, we demonstrated that variation in gene expression profiles of Arabidopsis accessions collected at one time point under one experimental condition has the power to explain variation in phenotypic responses to pathogen attack. PMID:18083910

  6. Feature enhancement from electrical resistivity data in an archaeological survey: the Sapelos hillfort experiment (Boticas, Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Mafalda; Bernardes, Paulo; Fontes, Luís.; Martins, Manuela; Madeira, Joaquim

    2015-06-01

    The PoPaTERVA project is developing applied research regarding the comprehension of the multi-layered cultural background of the Terva Valley Archaeological Park, in Boticas, Portugal. One of the main aspects focused on the project is the appliance of remote sensing techniques to enhance non visible archaeological features. An earth resistance tomography (ERT) survey was carried out at the Sapelos hillfort, by the specialized SINERGEO geophysicist's team, using a Wenner-Schlumberger array. The resulting data was analyzed by the authors in order to extract and verify valid archaeological features regarding the settlement's structures. There are several adequate systems that can be used to visualize the surveyed data (x, y, z, ?). However, the authors preferred the open source Visualization Toolkit (VTK) from Kitware Inc., since it supports several visualization and modelling techniques that are useful for interpretation purposes in archaeological contexts: for instance, it is possible to represent the archaeological site as a virtual scale model, which can be freely manipulated. For the Sapelos hillfort, two distinct visualizations were developed to represent the acquired electrical resistivity data. The first one is used to create a comprehensive volume from the surveyed data, which is imported as structured 3D points and mapped into a 3D volume. However, this representation does not provide the necessary insight for analysis purposes, so a second visualization is needed to cluster the relevant data for archaeological research. This visualization is based on contouring algorithms that generate isosurfaces from scalar resistivity values (?), therefore enhancing the features with potential archaeological interest.

  7. Leachate plume delineation and lithologic profiling using surface resistivity in an open municipal solid waste dumpsite, Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Wijesekara, Hasintha Rangana; De Silva, Sunethra Nalin; Wijesundara, Dharani Thanuja De Silva; Basnayake, Bendict Francis Antony; Vithanage, Meththika Suharshini

    2015-12-01

    This study presents the use of direct current resistivity techniques (DCRT) for investigation and characterization of leachate-contaminated subsurface environment of an open solid waste dumpsite at Kandy, Sri Lanka. The particular dumpsite has no liner and hence the leachate flows directly to the nearby river via subsurface and surface channels. For the identification of possible subsurface flow paths and the direction of the leachate, DCRT (two-dimensional, three-dimensional and vertical electrical sounding) have been applied. In addition, the physico-chemical parameters such as pH, electrical conductivity (EC), alkalinity, hardness, chloride, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic carbon (TOC) of leachate collected from different points of the solid waste dumping area and leachate drainage channel were analysed. Resistivity data confirmed that the leachate flow is confined to the near surface and no separate plume is observed in the downstream area, which may be due to the contamination distribution in the shallow overburden thickness. The stratigraphy with leachate pockets and leachate plume movements was well demarcated inside the dumpsite via low resistivity zones (1-3 ?m). The recorded EC, alkalinity, hardness and chloride contents in leachate were averaged as 14.13?mS?cm(-1), 3236, 2241 and 320?mg?L(-1), respectively, which confirmed the possible causes for low resistivity values. This study confirms that DCRT can be effectively utilized to assess the subsurface characteristics of the open dumpsites to decide on corridor placement and depth of permeable reactive barriers to reduce the groundwater contamination. PMID:25209886

  8. Simulated Fuel Economy and Performance of Advanced Hybrid Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Using In-Use Travel Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Earleywine, M.; Gonder, J.; Markel, T.; Thornton, M.

    2010-01-01

    As vehicle powertrain efficiency increases through electrification, consumer travel and driving behavior have significantly more influence on the potential fuel consumption of these vehicles. Therefore, it is critical to have a good understanding of in-use or 'real world' driving behavior if accurate fuel consumption estimates of electric drive vehicles are to be achieved. Regional travel surveys using Global Positioning System (GPS) equipment have been found to provide an excellent source of in-use driving profiles. In this study, a variety of vehicle powertrain options were developed and their performance was simulated over GPS-derived driving profiles for 783 vehicles operating in Texas. The results include statistical comparisons of the driving profiles versus national data sets, driving performance characteristics compared with standard drive cycles, and expected petroleum displacement benefits from the electrified vehicles given various vehicle charging scenarios.

  9. Smoothing of geoelectrical resistivity profiles in order to build a 3D model: A case study from an outcropping limestone block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Krisztina; Kovács, Gábor

    2014-05-01

    Geoelectrical imaging is one of the most common survey methods in the field of shallow geophysics. In order to get information from the subsurface electric current is induced into the ground. In our summer camp organized by the Department of Geophysics and Space Sciences, Eötvös Loránd University we have carried out resistivity surveys to get more accurate information about the lithology of the Dorog basin located in the Transdanubian range, Middle Hungary. This study focused on the outcropping limestone block located next to the village Leányvár in the Dorog basin. The main aim of the research is the impoundment of the subsurface continuation of the limestone outcrop. Cable problems occurred during field survey therefore the dataset obtained by the measurement have become very noisy thus we had to gain smoothed data with the appropriate editing steps. The goal was to produce an optimized model to demonstrate the reality beneath the subsurface. In order to achieve better results from the noisy dataset we changed some parameters based on the description of the program. Whereas cable problems occurred we exterminated the bad datum points visually and statistically as well. Because of the noisiness we increased the value of the so called damping factor which is a variable parameter in the equation used by the inversion routine responsible for smoothing the data. The limitation of the range of model resistivity values based on our knowledge about geological environment was also necessary in order to avoid physically unrealistic results. The purpose of the modification was to obtain smoothed and more interpretable geoelectric profiles. The geological background combined with the explanation of the profiles gave us the approximate location of the block. In the final step of the research we created a 3D model with proper location and smoothed resistivity data included. This study was supported by the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA NK83400) and was realized in the frames of TÁMOP 4.2.4.A/2-11-1-2012-0001 high priority "National Excellence Program - Elaborating and Operating an Inland Student and Researcher Personal Support System convergence program" project's scholarship support.

  10. Interplay between pathogenicity island carriage, resistance profile and plasmid acquisition in uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Calhau, Vera; Domingues, Sara; Ribeiro, Graça; Mendonça, Nuno; Da Silva, Gabriela Jorge

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to characterize the relationship between pathogenicity islands (PAIs), single virulence genes and resistance among uropathogenic Escherichia coli, evaluating the resistance plasmid carriage fitness cost related to PAIs. For 65 urinary E. coli, antimicrobial susceptibility and extended-spectrum ?-lactamase production were determined with the Vitek 2 Advanced Expert system. Phylogroup determination, detection of PAIs and virulence genes papAH, papC, sfa/foc, afa/dra, iutA, kpsMII, cnf1, eaeA, hlyA, stx1 and stx2, plasmid replicon typing and screening for plasmidic resistance determinants qnr, aac(6')-Ib-cr, qepA and bla(CTX-M) were carried out by PCR. Conjugation was performed between a donor carrying IncF, IncK and bla(CTX-M-15), and receptors carrying one to six PAIs. The relative fitness of transconjugants was estimated by pairwise competition experiments. PAI IV(536) (68?%), gene iutA (57?%) and resistance to ampicillin were the most prevalent traits. PAI I(536), PAI II(536), PAI III(536) and PAI II(J96) were exclusively associated with susceptibility to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and were more prevalent in strains susceptible to ampicillin and cefalotin. PAI IV(536), PAI II(CFT073) and PAI I(CFT073) were more prevalent among isolates showing resistance to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefalotin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime and gentamicin. An inverse relationship was observed between the number of plasmids and the number of PAIs carried. Transconjugants were obtained for receptors carrying three or fewer PAIs. The mean relative fitness rates of these transconjugants were 0.87 (two PAIs), 1.00 (one PAI) and 1.09 (three PAI). The interplay between resistance, PAI carriage and fitness cost of plasmid acquisition could be considered PAI specific, and not necessarily associated with the number of PAIs. PMID:26293926

  11. High-entropy alloys with high saturation magnetization, electrical resistivity, and malleability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zuo, TingTing; Cheng, YongQiang; Liaw, Peter K

    2013-01-01

    Soft magnetic materials (SMMs) find important applications in a number of areas. The diverse requirements for these applications are often demanding and challenging for the design and fabrication of SMMs. Here we report a new class of FeCoNi(AlSi)x (0 ? x ? 0.8 in molar ratio) SMMs based on high-entropy alloys (HEAs). It is found that with the compositional and structural changes, the optimal balance of magnetic, electrical, and mechanical properties is achieved at x = 0.2, for which the combination of saturation magnetization (1.15 T), coercivity (1,400 A/m), electrical resistivity (69.5 ??·cm), yield strength (342 MPa), and strain without fracture (50%) makes the alloy an excellent SMM. Ab initio calculations are used to explain the high magnetic saturation of the present HEAs and the effects of compositional structures on magnetic characteristics. The HEA-based SMMs point to new directions in both the application of HEAs and the search for novel SMMs. PMID:23492734

  12. Molecular profiling of drug resistant isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the state of Santa Catarina, southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Prim, Rodrigo Ivan; Schörner, Marcos André; Senna, Simone Gonçalves; Nogueira, Christiane Lourenço; Figueiredo, Anna Carolina Cançado; Oliveira, Jaquelline Germano de; Rovaris, Darcita Bürger; Bazzo, Maria Luiza

    2015-08-01

    Drug resistance is a global threat and one of the main contributing factors to tuberculosis (TB) outbreaks. The goal of this study was to analyse the molecular profile of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) in the state of Santa Catarina in southern Brazil. Fifty-three MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates were analysed by spoligotyping and a partial region of the rpoB gene, which is associated with rifampicin resistance (RMP-R), was sequenced. Some isolates were also distinguished by their mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRU). S531L was the most prevalent mutation found within rpoB in RMP-R isolates (58.5%), followed by S531W (20.8%). Only two MDR isolates showed no mutations within rpoB. Isolates of the Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) family were the most prevalent (45.3%) found by spoligotyping, followed by Haarlem (9.4%) and T (7.5%) families. SIT106 was found in 26.4% of isolates and all SIT106 isolates typed by MIRU-12 (5 out of 14) belong to MIT251. There was a high correlation between the S531W mutation and the LAM family mainly because all SIT2263 (LAM9) isolates carry this mutation. Among isolates with the S531W mutation in rpoB MIRU demonstrates a cluster formed by four isolates (SIT2263 and MIT163) and very similar profiles were observed between eight of the nine isolates. Better characterisation of TB isolates may lead to new ways in which to control and treat TB in this region of Brazil. PMID:26154743

  13. Molecular profiling of drug resistant isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the state of Santa Catarina, southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Prim, Rodrigo Ivan; Schörner, Marcos André; Senna, Simone Gonçalves; Nogueira, Christiane Lourenço; Figueiredo, Anna Carolina Cançado; de Oliveira, Jaquelline Germano; Rovaris, Darcita Bürger; Bazzo, Maria Luiza

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance is a global threat and one of the main contributing factors to tuberculosis (TB) outbreaks. The goal of this study was to analyse the molecular profile of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) in the state of Santa Catarina in southern Brazil. Fifty-three MDR Mycobacterium tuberculosisclinical isolates were analysed by spoligotyping and a partial region of therpoB gene, which is associated with rifampicin resistance (RMP-R), was sequenced. Some isolates were also distinguished by their mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units (MIRU). S531L was the most prevalent mutation found within rpoB in RMP-R isolates (58.5%), followed by S531W (20.8%). Only two MDR isolates showed no mutations withinrpoB. Isolates of the Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) family were the most prevalent (45.3%) found by spoligotyping, followed by Haarlem (9.4%) and T (7.5%) families. SIT106 was found in 26.4% of isolates and all SIT106 isolates typed by MIRU-12 (5 out of 14) belong to MIT251. There was a high correlation between the S531W mutation and the LAM family mainly because all SIT2263 (LAM9) isolates carry this mutation. Among isolates with the S531W mutation in rpoB MIRU demonstrates a cluster formed by four isolates (SIT2263 and MIT163) and very similar profiles were observed between eight of the nine isolates. Better characterisation of TB isolates may lead to new ways in which to control and treat TB in this region of Brazil. PMID:26154743

  14. Human T cells with a type-2 cytokine profile are resistant to apoptosis induced by primary activation: consequences for immunopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Carbonari, M; Tedesco, T; Del Porto, P; Paganelli, R; Fiorilli, M

    2000-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to a relative dominance of T cells producing type 2 cytokines in certain human immune disorders are still unclear. We investigated the relative susceptibility to apoptosis induced by primary in vitro activation of human type 1 (producing interferon-gamma (IFN-?)) or type 2 (producing IL-4) T cells. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated from patients with immune disorders characterized by expansion of type 2 cells (four with AIDS and hyper-IgE/hypereosinophilia, one with Churg–Strauss syndrome, and one with idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome) or from individuals with normal cytokine balances. Cells were stimulated for 16 h with ionomycin and phorbol ester, and apoptosis of cytokine-producing cells was assessed by flow cytometry. T cells with a type-2 cytokine profile, i.e. producing IL-4 alone, were significantly more resistant to activation-induced apoptosis than those producing IFN-? alone. This was observed in AIDS patients, whose type 2 cells were mostly CD8+, as well as in the patients with Churg–Strauss and with hypereosinophilic syndrome. CD4+ and CD8+ IL-4-producing cells were equally resistant to apoptosis. Lower susceptibility to apoptosis of type-2 T cells was also observed in subjects with normal cytokine balances. Bcl-2 expression was high in type-2 cells and in viable type-1 cells, whereas it was low in apoptotic type-1 cells. Resistance to activation-induced apoptosis may explain the expansion of cells producing type-2 cytokines in certain immune disorders. PMID:10844523

  15. Seismic refraction and electrical resistivity tomography to investigate subsurface controls on vegetation distribution in a mountain watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, W.; Bradford, J. H.; Seyfried, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate subsurface controls on the distribution of vegetation at two sites located within the Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory (CZO). Located in southwestern Idaho, the Reynolds Creek CZO extends over a steep elevation-climatic gradient (mean annual precipitation 250 - 1100 mm/yr, mean annual temperature 5.5 °C to 11°C). The existing, publically available hydroclimatic data are long-term and spatially extensive, including precipitation (>50 yr), snow course SWE (>50 yr), temperature (30-50 yr), soil moisture and temperature (>10 yr), and some soil depth data. Both sites we investigated were at elevation greater than 2000m, and both sites showed abrupt changes in vegetation with no surface expression of changes in the underlying geology. The first site, termed Dry Meadow (DM), consists of a grassy meadow that transitions from being saturated to the surface during the spring runoff to dry with a water table at a depth of 4-6m in the late summer. The grassy meadow transitions abruptly to sage brush dominated terrain with no significant change in elevation. The second site, termed the Aspen Grove (AG), shows an abrupt transition from dry grassy terrain to an Aspen grove along a constant, and low gradient hill slope. At both sites we acquired high density seismic refraction data (1m receiver spacing) along transects that ranged from 95 to 160 m. Additionally we acquired 107 m long electrical resistivity profiles in both dipole-dipole and Wenner arrays with 2 m electrode spacing. At both sites, both seismic and ERT data indicate a distinct and abrupt drop in depth to the top of the weathered rock surface of 10-15 m. These topographic lows in the bedrock may be either erosional or structurally controlled, but in either case create accommodation space for the accumulation of sediment and an altered groundwater distribution that can accommodate a shift in the dominant vegetation type.

  16. Gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating of water and trichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Hegele, P R; Mumford, K G

    2014-09-01

    The effective remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones using in situ thermal treatment requires successful capture of gas that is produced. Replicate electrical resistance heating experiments were performed in a thin bench-scale apparatus, where water was boiled and pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) trichloroethene (TCE) and water were co-boiled in unconsolidated silica sand. Quantitative light transmission visualization was used to assess gas production and transport mechanisms. In the water boiling experiments, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the gas phase into connected channels were observed at critical gas saturations of Sgc=0.233±0.017, which allowed for continuous gas transport out of the sand. In experiments containing a colder region above a target heated zone, condensation prevented the formation of steam channels and discrete gas clusters that mobilized into colder regions were trapped soon after discontinuous transport began. In the TCE-water experiments, co-boiling at immiscible fluid interfaces resulted in discontinuous gas transport above the DNAPL pool. Redistribution of DNAPL was also observed above the pool and at the edge of the vapor front that propagated upwards through colder regions. These results suggest that the subsurface should be heated to water boiling temperatures to facilitate gas transport from specific locations of DNAPL to extraction points and reduce the potential for DNAPL redistribution. Decreases in electric current were observed at the onset of gas phase production, which suggests that coupled electrical current and temperature measurements may provide a reliable metric to assess gas phase development. PMID:25084057

  17. Development of a Laboratory Experiment to Derivate the Thermal Conductivity based on Electrical Resistivity Measurments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vienken, T.; Firmbach, L.; Dietrich, P.

    2014-12-01

    In the course of the energy transition, the number of shallow geothermal systems is constantly growing. These systems allow the exploitation of renewable energy from the subsurface, reduced CO2 emission and additionally, energy storage. An efficient performance of geothermal systems strongly depends upon the availability of exploration data (e.g. thermal conductivity distribution). However, due to high exploration costs, the dimensioning of smaller plants (< 30 kW) is generally based on literature values. While standard in-situ-tests are persistent for larger scale projects, they yield only integral values, e.g. entire length of a borehole heat exchanger. Hence, exploring the distribution of the thermal conductivity as important soil parameter requires the development of new cost-efficient technologies. The general relationship between the electrical (RE) and the thermal resistivity (RT) can be described as log(RE) = CR log(RT) with CRas a multiplier depending on additional soil parameter (e.g. water content, density, porosity, grain size and distribution). Knowing the influencing factor of these additional determining parameters, geoelectrical measurements could provide a cost-efficient exploration strategy of the thermal conductivity for shallow geothermal sites. The aim of this study now is to define the multiplier CRexperimentally to conclude the exact correlation of the thermal and electrical behavior. The set-up consists of an acrylic glass tube with two current electrodes installed at the upper and lower end of the tube. Four electrode chains (each with eight electrodes) measure the potential differences in respect to an induced heat flux initiated by a heat plate. Additional, eight temperature sensors measure the changes of the temperature differences. First, we use this set-up to analyze the influence of soil properties based on differing homogenous sediments with known chemical and petro-physical properties. Further, we analyze the influence of the water content by using differing saturation levels. Based on these values, we will define the multiplier CR and finally determine the exact correlation between the thermal and the electrical resistivity.

  18. Fungicide resistance profiles for 13 Botrytis cinerea isolated from strawberry in southeastern Louisiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Fungicidal sprays have been widely used for disease control of gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea. In recent years strawberry growers in southeastern Louisiana reported a failure of their fungicide spray programs to control Botrytis fruit rot. Botrytis cinerea has become resistant ...

  19. Transcriptional profiling of resistant and susceptible buffalograsses in response to Blissus occiduus (Hemiptera: Blissidae) feeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding plant resistance mechanisms at a molecular level would provide valuable insights into the biological pathways impacted by insect feeding, and help explain specific plant tolerance mechanisms. As a first step in this process, we conducted next generation sequencing using RNA extracted f...

  20. Whole Genome Sequencing of Sugar Beet and Transcriptional Profiling of Beet Curly Top Resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of the sugar beet (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris) doubled haploid line (KDH13) has been sequenced using Illumina HiSeq2000 next generation sequencing platform. This line (PI663862) was released by USDA-ARS as a genetic stock resistant to beet curly top. Sequencing of a standard paired end...

  1. Antimicrobial resistance profile of Enterococcus spp isolated from food in Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Riboldi, Gustavo Pelicioli; Frazzon, Jeverson; d’Azevedo, Pedro Alves; Frazzon, Ana Paula Guedes

    2009-01-01

    Fifty-six Enterococcus spp. strains were isolated from foods in Southern Brazil, confirmed by PCR and classified as Enterococcus faecalis (27), Enterococcus faecium (23) and Enterococcus spp (6). Antimicrobial susceptibility tests showed resistance phenotypes to a range of antibiotics widely administrated in humans such as gentamycin, streptomycin, ampicillin and vancomycin. PMID:24031330

  2. Sedentary lifestyle and its relation to cardiovascular risk factors, insulin resistance and inflammatory profile

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study is to analyze the association between sitting time and biomarkers of insulin resistance and inflammation in a sample of healthy male workers. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of 929 volunteers belonging to the Aragon Workers' Health Study cohort. Sociod...

  3. Proceedings of the Sudden Oak Death Fifth Science Symposium Metabolite Profiling to Predict Resistance to

    E-print Network

    phenolic biomarkers of oak resistance to the pathogen have been identified and include tyrosol hexoside pentoside, ellagic acid, and total phenolics. To test the accuracy of these biomarkers in predicting source of variation in CLO phenolics, we measured biomarkers every season from December 2010 to November

  4. Comparative Analysis of Electrical Resistivity and Ground Penetrating Radar For Subsurface Parameters in a Basaltic Terrain, Nagpur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, T. A.; Vasudeo, A., Sr.

    2014-12-01

    Hard rock crystalline terrains pose difficulty in groundwater modeling as they present anisotropic conditions for groundwater storage. It is most important to estimate accurate parameters for better visualization and analysis of subsurface conditions for groundwater. Western Nagpur in central India is on Basalt formation which has low storing capacity. There are several Basaltic Flows in Nagpur area which have varying hydrogeological characteristics. Unconfined aquifer system and deep seated confined systems, both are present in the Nagpur Urban area. The half of the water demand in these areas mainly depends on groundwater. Water supply for domestic use, apart from the irrigation and Gardening etc in majority cases are fulfilled by groundwater sources. Electrical Resistivity Meter and Ground Penetrating Radar has been used to detect the subsurface parameters qualitatively. Using Electrical Resistivity Meter, apparent resistivity (?) is calculated for various depths. GPR is used for the same area to determine the characteristics of subsurface parameters. Data collected by both the instrument is analyzed and compared its accuracy. The results obtained through comparison from two geophysical methods are further seen with respect to the Land Use / Land Cover and surface morphology of the study area, generated from the high resolution satellite data. Key Words: Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), Electrical Resistivity Meter, Apparent resistivity, Land Use/ Land Cover etc.

  5. Crystal structure, electrical resistivity and Curie temperature of Ho(MnFex)2 and Ho(CoNix)2 intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarski, M.; Chmist, J.; Pszczo?a, J.

    2013-05-01

    Synthesis of Ho(MnFex)2 and Ho(CoNix)2 intermetallic compounds, studies of their crystal structure and electrical resistivity were carried out. A pure cubic Fd3m, C15, MgCu2-type Laves phase was evidenced by X-ray measurements for all compounds. The unit cell parameter decreases nonlinearly with composition parameter x (or the average number n of 3d electrons per transition metal atom). Electrical resistivities for Ho(MnFex)2 and Ho(CoNix)2 compounds were measured in a wide temperature range (13-1000 K) and, for most of them, the component resistivities: residual, phonon and magnetic were separated. The parameters characterising the dependence of resistivity on temperature and composition, including the Debye temperature, were determined. The differential of the magnetic part of electrical resistivity against temperature was used to estimate Curie temperatures. The Curie temperature grows with an increasing amount of iron for Ho(MnFex)2 compounds, and for Ho(CoNix)2 it reduces with an increasing amount of nickel. All results are summarized together with those for the Ho(FeCox)2 series, which have been presented previously.

  6. Identification of a Putative Protein Profile Associated with Tamoxifen Therapy Resistance in Breast Cancer*S?

    PubMed Central

    Umar, Arzu; Kang, Hyuk; Timmermans, Annemieke M.; Look, Maxime P.; Meijer-van Gelder, Marion E.; den Bakker, Michael A.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Martens, John W. M.; Luider, Theo M.; Foekens, John A.; Paša-Toli?, Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Tamoxifen resistance is a major cause of death in patients with recurrent breast cancer. Current clinical factors can correctly predict therapy response in only half of the treated patients. Identification of proteins that are associated with tamoxifen resistance is a first step toward better response prediction and tailored treatment of patients. In the present study we intended to identify putative protein biomarkers indicative of tamoxifen therapy resistance in breast cancer using nano-LC coupled with FTICR MS. Comparative proteome analysis was performed on ?5,500 pooled tumor cells (corresponding to ?550 ng of protein lysate/analysis) obtained through laser capture microdissection (LCM) from two independently processed data sets (n = 24 and n = 27) containing both tamoxifen therapy-sensitive and therapy-resistant tumors. Peptides and proteins were identified by matching mass and elution time of newly acquired LC-MS features to information in previously generated accurate mass and time tag reference databases. A total of 17,263 unique peptides were identified that corresponded to 2,556 non-redundant proteins identified with ?2 peptides. 1,713 overlapping proteins between the two data sets were used for further analysis. Comparative proteome analysis revealed 100 putatively differentially abundant proteins between tamoxifen-sensitive and tamoxifen-resistant tumors. The presence and relative abundance for 47 differentially abundant proteins were verified by targeted nano-LC-MS/MS in a selection of unpooled, non-microdissected discovery set tumor tissue extracts. ENPP1, EIF3E, and GNB4 were significantly associated with progression-free survival upon tamoxifen treatment for recurrent disease. Differential abundance of our top discriminating protein, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, was validated by tissue microarray in an independent patient cohort (n = 156). Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer levels were higher in therapy-resistant tumors and significantly associated with an earlier tumor progression following first line tamoxifen treatment (hazard ratio, 1.87; 95% confidence interval, 1.25–2.80; p = 0.002). In summary, comparative proteomics performed on laser capture microdissection-derived breast tumor cells using nano-LC-FTICR MS technology revealed a set of putative biomarkers associated with tamoxifen therapy resistance in recurrent breast cancer. PMID:19329653

  7. Effect of Trivalent Bi Doping on the Seebeck Coefficient and Electrical Resistivity of Ca3Co4O9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jun-Young; Kwon, O.-Jong; Chung, Yong Kwon; Kim, Jin-Sang; Kim, Woo-Seok; Song, Kyu Jeong; Park, Chan

    2015-10-01

    We present the effects of trivalent Bi doping on the microstructure and thermoelectric (TE) properties of Ca3Co4O9 (Ca-349). Specimens were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The lattice parameters of the conducting [CoO2] layer and insulating [Ca2CoO3] layer of Ca-349 were determined using Rietveld refinements of x-ray diffraction (XRD) data. Partial substitution of Bi for Ca did not lead to any change in the misfit ratio of the conducting versus insulating layers. XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) results show the presence of Bi2O3 phase in the grain-boundary region. The Seebeck coefficient ( S) increased with increasing Bi content due to the decrease in the hole carrier concentration after Bi doping. As the amount of Bi was increased, the electrical resistivity ( ?) initially decreased but then increased with further addition of Bi. Addition of small amount of Bi led to large decrease in electrical resistivity due to the increased amount of Bi2O3 phase in the grain-boundary region. With further increase of Bi addition, the electrical resistivity increased due to the decrease in the hole carrier concentration. Optimum Bi doping not significantly affecting the hole carrier concentration is an effective approach for increasing the Seebeck coefficient and decreasing the electrical resistivity of Ca-349.

  8. Characterization of major lithologic units underlying the lower American River using water-borne continuous resistivity profiling, Sacramento, California, June 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, Lyndsay B.; Teeple, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    The levee system of the lower American River in Sacramento, California, is situated above a mixed lithology of alluvial deposits that range from clay to gravel. In addition, sand deposits related to hydraulic mining activities underlie the floodplain and are preferentially prone to scour during high-flow events. In contrast, sections of the American River channel have been observed to be scour resistant. In this study, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, explores the resistivity structure of the American River channel to characterize the extent and thickness of lithologic units that may impact the scour potential of the area. Likely lithologic structures are interpreted, but these interpretations are non-unique and cannot be directly related to scour potential. Additional geotechnical data would provide insightful data on the scour potential of certain lithologic units. Additional interpretation of the resistivity data with respect to these results may improve interpretations of lithology and scour potential throughout the American River channel and floodplain. Resistivity data were collected in three profiles along the American River using a water-borne continuous resistivity profiling technique. After processing and modeling these data, inverted resistivity profiles were used to make interpretations about the extent and thickness of possible lithologic units. In general, an intermittent high-resistivity layer likely indicative of sand or gravel deposits extends to a depth of around 30 feet (9 meters) and is underlain by a consistent low-resistivity layer that likely indicates a high-clay content unit that extends below the depth of investigation (60 feet or 18 meters). Immediately upstream of the Watt Avenue Bridge, the high-resistivity layer is absent, and the low-resistivity layer extends to the surface where a scour-resistant layer has been previously observed in the river bed.

  9. Geophysical investigation of tumuli by means of surface 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Nikos G.; Yi, Myeong-Jong; Kim, Jung-Ho; Tsourlos, Panagiotis; Tsokas, Gregory N.

    2010-03-01

    Tumuli are artificially erected small hills that cover monumental tombs or graves. In this work, the surface three-dimensional (3D) Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) method, composed of dense parallel two-dimensional (2D) tomographies, was used to investigate the properties of the tumuli filling material and to resolve buried archaeological structures inside the tumuli. The effectiveness of the method was investigated by numerical modeling and through 3D inversion of synthetic apparent resistivity data. A resistivity model that simulates the inhomogeneous tumulus material and the tombs that are buried inside the tumulus was assumed. The Dipole-Dipole (DD), Pole-Dipole (PD), Pole-Pole (PP), Gradient (GRAD), Midpoint-Potential-Referred (MPR) and Schlumberger Reciprocal (SCR) arrays, which are suitable for multichannel resistivity instruments, were tested. The tumulus topography (pyramid or capsized cup) was incorporated into the inversion procedure through a distorted finite element mesh. The inversion procedure was based on a smoothness constrained Gauss-Newton algorithm in which the Active Constraint Balancing (ACB) method was also applied in order to enhance the least-squares resolving power and stability. Synthetic modeling showed that the different tumulus layers and the horizontal contact of the artificial tumulus material with the natural background soil were reconstructed by all of the tested electrode arrays. Generally, PD and the GRAD arrays comprise the optimum choices to investigate the subsurface properties of a tumulus and locate buried tombs. The MPR model was inferior to the GRAD model, while the DD, PP and SCR models had the poorest resolution. It was also shown that the inversion models are practically independent from the survey direction and the topography shape of the tumulus. The real field data collected employing the PD array along a small tumulus from the archaeological site of Vergina in northern Greece enhanced the synthetic modeling results. The inversion model outlined a number of archaeological structures that exhibit a high possibility to correlate with graves. Overall, this work signifies that the surface 3D ERT method can provide a valuable tool in the non-destructive archaeological exploration of tumuli.

  10. Variability in Soil Moisture in a Temperate Deciduous Forest Using Electrical Resistivity and Throughfall Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.; Van Dam, R. L.; Jayawickreme, D.

    2013-12-01

    In deciduous forests, soil moisture is an important driver of energy and carbon cycling, as well as ecosystem dynamics. The amount and distribution of soil moisture also influences soil microbial activity, nutrient fluxes, and groundwater recharge. Consequently, accurate characterization of interactions and interdependencies between vegetation and soil moisture is critical to forecast water resources and ecosystem health in a changing climate. Such relationships and processes are nevertheless difficult to measure, both in time and space because of our limited ability to monitor the subsurface at necessary scales and frequencies. Several recent studies have shown that electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), using an array of minimally invasive surface electrodes, is a promising method for in-situ soil moisture monitoring. To this point, however, only few studies have used ERT to investigate spatial variability of soil moisture in temperate deciduous forests and to explore any links between soil water and above ground ecosystem variables. In our study in a central Michigan (USA) maple forest during the 2012 growing season, we combined ERT with detailed vegetation surveys and throughfall measurements to obtain better insight into spatial variations in rainwater input and soil water patterns. Resistivity data were collected on a weekly basis along an array of 84 electrodes with a spacing of 1.5 m. The inversion results were temperature corrected, converted to soil moisture, and differenced to obtain 2D images of soil moisture changes. The throughfall data were obtained using a novel method based on dissolution of plaster-of-paris tablets that were positioned below funnels, at 19 locations in the forest. Our results show that: 1) resistivity changes spatially with vegetation distribution, 2) in-season temporal changes in resistivity are related to plant characteristics, in particular to tree count and basal area, and 3) our low-budget throughfall method was capable of measuring precipitation variations over periods of several weeks but not sensitive enough to pick up in-forest variability in detail. The combination of above-ground throughfall measurements, vegetation surveys, and below-ground measurements of soil moisture using ERT did allow for a better understanding of the environmental variables important for studies of forest ecohydrology and atmosphere-plant-soil continuum of temperate forests.

  11. Virulence Gene Profiles of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated From Iranian Hospital Infections

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Nastaran; Momtaz, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The most common hospital-acquired pathogen is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is a multidrug resistant bacterium causing systemic infections. Objectives: The present study was carried out in order to investigate the distribution of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from various types of hospital infections in Iran. Patients and Methods: Two-hundred and seventeen human infection specimens were collected from Baqiyatallah and Payambaran hospitals in Tehran, Iran. The clinical samples were cultured immediately and samples positive for P. aeruginosa were analyzed for the presence of antibiotic resistance and bacterial virulence genes using PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using disk diffusion methodology with Müeller–Hinton agar. Results: Fifty-eight out of 127 (45.66%) male infection specimens and 44 out of 90 (48.88%) female infection specimens harbored P. aeruginosa. Also, 65% (in male specimens) and 21% (in female specimens) of respiratory system infections were positive for P. aeruginosa, which was a high rate. The genes encoding exoenzyme S (67.64%) and phospholipases C (45.09%) were the most common virulence genes found among the strains. The incidences of various ?-lactams encoding genes, including blaTEM, blaSHV, blaOXA, blaCTX-M, blaDHA, and blaVEB were 94.11%, 16.66%, 15.68%, 18.62%, 21.56%, and 17.64%, respectively. The most commonly detected fluoroquinolones encoding gene was gyrA (15. 68%). High resistance levels to penicillin (100%), tetracycline (90.19%), streptomycin (64.70%), and erythromycin (43.13%) were observed too. Conclusions: Our findings should raise awareness about antibiotic resistance in hospitalized patients in Iran. Clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing antibiotics, especially in cases of human infections. PMID:25763199

  12. Electric-field-ratio profiling at the Silsilah tin-bearing greisen deposit, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kamilli, R.J.; Zablocki, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    Buried, possibly mineralized granite cupolas at the Silsilah tin deposit in Saudi Arabia have been successfully located using a closely spaced electric-field-ratio profiling technique. In this study electrical fields at 27 and 270 Hz across grounded electrodes spaced 50m apart were measured along six traverses. The technique allowed the authors to identify and distinguish among unroofed granite cupolas, cupolas with their aplite-pegmatite apical contact zones intact, strong and weak greisens, dikes, faults, and pervasively argillized rocks. -from Authors

  13. Expression profile analysis of long non-coding RNA associated with vincristine resistance in colon cancer cells by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiu-Li; Zhao, Chun-Peng; Wang, Tian-Yun; Hao, Xiao-Bo; Wang, Xiao-Yin; Zhang, Xi; Li, Yi-Chun

    2015-11-01

    Vincristine (VCR) is widely used in tumor treatment. However, long-term use of this drug can make tumor cells resistant to it. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying resistance development are unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) associated with colon cancer drug resistance using next-generation sequencing. A cDNA library of HCT-8 VCR-resistant colon cancer cell was established through PCR amplification. Using HiSeq 2500 sequencing and bioinformatic methods, we identified lncRNAs showing different expression levels in drug-resistant and non-resistant cells, and constructed expression profiles of the lncRNA differences. The pretreatment of data was quality controlled using FastQC software. Transcription of lncRNA was calculated using Fragments Per Kilobase of transcript per Million fragments mapped (FPKM). To reveal the potential functions of these lncRNAs, we applied GO analysis to study the differentially expressed lncRNAs. Total transcript number was higher in resistant cells than in non-resistant colon cancer cells, and high-quality transcripts constituted the major portion of the total. In addition, 121 transcripts showed significantly different expression in VCR-resistant and non-resistant cells. Of these, we observed 23 up-regulated and 20 down-regulated lncRNAs (fold change >10.0). This is the first report of the expression profile of lncRNA of VCR-resistant colon cancer cells. Abnormal lncRNA expression was associated with VCR resistance in colon cancer cells and these expression differences may play a key role in VCR resistance of these cells. PMID:26164760

  14. Pressure induced phase transition in Mg2GeO4 as determined by frequency dependent complex electrical resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nover, Georg; Will, Georg; Waitz, Ralf

    1992-09-01

    The phase transition of Mg2GeO4 from the olivine structure (?-phase) to the spinel structure (?-phase) was determined by complex electrical resistivity measurements in the frequency range 10 Hz up to 100 kHz. The stability fields of the ?- and the ?-phase were confirmed up to 2.05 GPa in the temperature range 845° C 1400° C. Based on volume resistivity data, a decrease of about a factor of 5 was found at the ?-? phase transition. Activation energies of electrical conduction E a at 1.05 GPa and 2.05 GPa were calculated using the volume resistivities (?) and the relaxation times (?). The values range from 1.98 eV up to 2.78 eV. The relative dielectric permeability increases with increasing temperature. This is is due to crystal defects and charge transport mechanisms.

  15. A study of rolling resistance of electrorheological fluids impregnated polymer fibers as a function of electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zade, Vishal; Zhang, Xiaomin; Wong, Shing-Chung

    2015-05-01

    Rolling resistance contributes to 6-10% of the overall fuel consumption. In an effort to provide tunable rolling resistance and tunable damping rubbers, smart fluids are introduced to composites to fabricate smart composites. The subsequent composites will possess unique mechanical properties in response to an externally applied voltage. This paper discusses the measurement of rolling resistance of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) using a wooden pendulum roller, crafted in our lab. All fibers can be submerged in the electro rheological fluids (ERF) and become impregnated with barium titanyl oxalate with urea coated particles. Under the influence of electric field strength, the properties such as damping coefficient, rolling force and viscoelastic properties are altered. A comparison between the properties of different PVDF samples was made. PVDF3 with 0.17 g/ml concentration is best aligned and shows the highest change in properties as a function of electric field strength.

  16. Modelling Sediment Thickness for Site-Effect Characterisation using H/V Spectral Ratio Analysis and Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Noten, Koen; Lecocq, Thomas; Watlet, Arnaud; Camelbeeck, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    The H/V Spectral Ratio (HVSR) analysis of ambient seismic noise has been widely used to estimate the fundamental site resonance frequency in the context of site-effect characterisation. In regions of unknown subsurface structure, in which there is a significant acoustic impedance contrast between sediments and the underlying bedrock, HVSR can be a very powerful tool to map bedrock morphology and sediment thickness. Calibrating the power-law relationship between the variation in fundamental frequency and sediment thickness around these unknown sites is crucial for sediment thickness mapping. This empirical relationship can be easily calculated by conducting HVSR analysis of ambient noise measurements above boreholes with known bedrock depth. Additional local H/V measurements above near-surface geophysical profiles, for instance created by Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), allow training and improving the power-law relationship for sites with a shallow bedrock depth. As the compaction of sediments influences the Vs, one has however to take into account that this empirical relationship can only be applied in relative small areas with a similar local geology. Between 2008 and 2010, a seismic swarm (MLmax = 3.2) occurred in a hilly area, 20 km SE of Brussels (Belgium). 60 of the 300 recorded events were felt/heard by the local residents and were reported in the corresponding 'Did You Feel It' internet inquiries held by Royal Observatory of Belgium. Several low-magnitude events show a distinct macroseismic intensity variation that can be explained by the geological site effect, i.e. the local sediment thickness, affecting the human perception of these earthquake-induced ground motions. In this presentation, we apply the above described methodology and discuss the results of a geophysical survey including ERT-profiling, ambient noise recording, HVSR analysis in Geopsy and DEM-modelling to characterise the local site effects. The resulting sediment thickness model (between 0 m and 80 m) allows us to demonstrate that the highest macroseismic intensities are reported by respondents living on eroded valley flanks above shallow bedrock, whereas lower macroseismic intensities are reported on hill sites where respondents live on a thicker sedimentary pile. This site-effect characterisation shows that the lower macroseismic intensities of felt events on hill tops can only be explained by the absorption of high frequency seismic energy radiated by the local source if a considerable thickness of the local sediment column is present.

  17. Application of Electrical Resistivity Method for Detecting Shallow Old Gold Mine Workings: An Example from Boksburg, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diop, S.; Chirenje, E.

    2011-12-01

    Subsidence has been observed at several locations along the northern perimeter of the Central Witwatersrand Mining Basin south of Johannesburg, South Africa. Previous studies have defined the extent and distribution of hundreds of open ventilation shafts and surface collapses linked to areas of known and suspected shallow undermining. Many collapses appear to be in a meta-stable state prone to further collapse, which could and have led to casualties. Identification of zones of incipient instability is therefore an urgent state responsibility to protect life and property, as much of these abandoned mine lands have been invaded by shack dwellers. This paper outlines the results of an investigation using 2D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in combination with a standard geotechnical engineering drilling exploration, with the aim of identifying areas of incipient instability and possible future collapse. The electrical resistivity data were acquired via a network of intersecting survey lines using a SYSCAL Pro multimode resistivity imaging system equipped with 72 electrodes. The dipole-dipole and the Schlumberger arrays with an electrode spacing of 5 and 10 m were used. Inversion of the data was carried out using the commercially available software package RES2DINV. Analysis of the electrical resistivity data and conventiona