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Sample records for electrically-small conformal antenna

  1. Conformal Pad-Printing Electrically Conductive Composites onto Thermoplastic Hemispheres: Toward Sustainable Fabrication of 3-Cents Volumetric Electrically Small Antennas

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haoyi; Chiang, Sum Wai; Yang, Cheng; Lin, Ziyin; Liu, Jingping; Moon, Kyoung-Sik; Kang, Feiyu; Li, Bo; Wong, Ching Ping

    2015-01-01

    Electrically small antennas (ESAs) are becoming one of the key components in the compact wireless devices for telecommunications, defence, and aerospace systems, especially for the spherical one whose geometric layout is more closely approaching Chu’s limit, thus yielding significant bandwidth improvements relative to the linear and planar counterparts. Yet broad applications of the volumetric ESAs are still hindered since the low cost fabrication has remained a tremendous challenge. Here we report a state-of-the-art technology to transfer electrically conductive composites (ECCs) from a planar mould to a volumetric thermoplastic substrate by using pad-printing technology without pattern distortion, benefit from the excellent properties of the ECCs as well as the printing-calibration method that we developed. The antenna samples prepared in this way meet the stringent requirement of an ESA (ka is as low as 0.32 and the antenna efficiency is as high as 57%), suggesting that volumetric electronic components i.e. the antennas can be produced in such a simple, green, and cost-effective way. This work can be of interest for the development of studies on green and high performance wireless communication devices. PMID:26317999

  2. Conformal Pad-Printing Electrically Conductive Composites onto Thermoplastic Hemispheres: Toward Sustainable Fabrication of 3-Cents Volumetric Electrically Small Antennas.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haoyi; Chiang, Sum Wai; Yang, Cheng; Lin, Ziyin; Liu, Jingping; Moon, Kyoung-Sik; Kang, Feiyu; Li, Bo; Wong, Ching Ping

    2015-01-01

    Electrically small antennas (ESAs) are becoming one of the key components in the compact wireless devices for telecommunications, defence, and aerospace systems, especially for the spherical one whose geometric layout is more closely approaching Chu's limit, thus yielding significant bandwidth improvements relative to the linear and planar counterparts. Yet broad applications of the volumetric ESAs are still hindered since the low cost fabrication has remained a tremendous challenge. Here we report a state-of-the-art technology to transfer electrically conductive composites (ECCs) from a planar mould to a volumetric thermoplastic substrate by using pad-printing technology without pattern distortion, benefit from the excellent properties of the ECCs as well as the printing-calibration method that we developed. The antenna samples prepared in this way meet the stringent requirement of an ESA (ka is as low as 0.32 and the antenna efficiency is as high as 57%), suggesting that volumetric electronic components i.e. the antennas can be produced in such a simple, green, and cost-effective way. This work can be of interest for the development of studies on green and high performance wireless communication devices. PMID:26317999

  3. Electrically Small Folded Slot Antenna Utilizing Capacitive Loaded Slot Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Ponchak, George E.; Merritt, Shane; Minor, John S.; Zorman, Christian A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an electrically small, coplanar waveguide fed, folded slot antenna that uses capacitive loading. Several antennas are fabricated with and without capacitive loading to demonstrate the ability of this design approach to reduce the resonant frequency of the antenna, which is analogous to reducing the antenna size. The antennas are fabricated on Cu-clad Rogers Duriod(TM) 6006 with multilayer chip capacitors to load the antennas. Simulated and measured results show close agreement, thus, validating the approach. The electrically small antennas have a measured return loss greater than 15 dB and a gain of 5.4, 5.6, and 2.7 dBi at 4.3, 3.95, and 3.65 GHz, respectively.

  4. Biologically-inspired, electrically small antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Amir Reza

    First, the motivation behind adding a passive external coupling network after antenna arrays is discussed, the concept of biomimetic antenna arrays (BMAAs) introduced and some of the previous work done in this area have been reviewed. Next, a BMAA which achieves an angular resolution of roughly 15 times its regular counterpart is introduced and fully characterized. The introduced BMAA employs transformers which considerably degrade its performance, namely its output power. To cicumvent this shortcoming a new architecture of a BMAA that does not employ transformers and therefore yields a higher output power for the same angular resolution has been subsequently presented. Moreover, a detailed noise analysis of this BMAA is carried out and the output noise of the new architecture is compared with the output noise of the original design. The modified twoelement BMAA architecture is then extended to multiple elements. A novel nonlinear optimization process is introduced that maximizes the total power captured by the BMAA for a given angular resolution and the concept illustrated for a three-element antenna array. Next an optimum two-element BMAA which achieves the maximum possible angular resolution while obtaining the same output power level of a regular antenna array with the same elements and spacing is introduced. A novel two-element superdirective array based on this optimum BMAA has been also discussed. The passive BMAAs discussed in this thesis have a relatively narrow bandwidth. To extend the bandwidth of BMAAs, non- Foster networks have been employed in their external coupling networks and it has been demonstrated that they can increase their bandwidth by a factor of roughly 33. Finally, the BMAA concept has been extended to nano-antenna arrays and a concept for designing sub-wavelength angle-sensing detectors at optical wavelengths has been introduced.

  5. 2-SR-based electrically small antenna for RFID applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, Ferran; Zuffanelli, Simone; Aguilà, Pau; Zamora, Gerard; Martin, Ferran; Bonache, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the 2-turn spiral resonator (2-SR) is proposed as an electrically small antenna for passive radio frequency identification (RFID) tags at the European ultra-high frequency (UHF) band. The radiation properties are studied in order to explore the viability of the 2-SR applied to tag antenna design. Based on analytical calculations, the radiation pattern is found to provide a cancelation of the radiation nulls. This results in a mitigation of the blind spots in the read range, which are present in typical UHF-RFID tags as an undesired feature. As a proof of concept, a passive tag of size 35 mm × 40 mm (λ 0/10 × λ 0/9) based on the 2-SR antenna is designed and fabricated. Good radiation efficiency (75 %) and a quasi-isotropic radiation pattern are obtained. The experimental tag read range for different directions is in good agreement with the simulation results. The measured read range exhibits maximum and minimum values of 6.7 and 3.5 m, respectively.

  6. Thin magnetic conductor substrate for placement-immune, electrically-small antennas.

    SciTech Connect

    Eubanks, Travis Wayne; McDonald, Jacob J.; Loui, Hung

    2011-09-01

    An antenna is considered to be placement-immune when the antenna operates effectively regardless of where it is placed. By building antennas on magnetic conductor materials, the radiated fields will be positively reinforced in the desired radiation direction instead of being negatively affected by the environment. Although this idea has been discussed thoroughly in theoretical research, the difficulty in building thin magnetic conductor materials necessary for in-phase field reflections prevents this technology from becoming more widespread. This project's purpose is to build and measure an electrically-small antenna on a new type of non-metallic, thin magnetic conductor. This problem has not been previously addressed because non-metallic, thin magnetic conductor materials have not yet been discovered. This work proposed the creation of an artificial magnetic conductor (AMC) with in-phase field reflections without using internal electric conductors, the placement of an electrically-small antenna on this magnetic conductor, and the development of a transmit-receive system that utilizes the substrate and electrically-small antenna. By not using internal electric conductors to create the AMC, the substrate thickness can be minimized. The electrically-small antenna will demonstrate the substrate's ability to make an antenna placement immune, and the transmit-receive system combines both the antenna and the substrate while adding a third layer of system complexity to demonstrate the complete idea.

  7. Electrically Small Microstrip Quarter-Wave Monopole Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. Robert

    2004-01-01

    Microstrip-patch-style antennas that generate monopole radiation patterns similar to those of quarter-wave whip antennas can be designed to have dimensions smaller than those needed heretofore for this purpose, by taking advantage of a feed configuration different from the conventional one. The large sizes necessitated by the conventional feed configuration have, until now, made such antennas impractical for frequencies below about 800 MHz: for example, at 200 MHz, the conventional feed configuration necessitates a patch diameter of about 8 ft (.2.4 m) . too large, for example, for mounting on the roof of an automobile or on a small or medium-size aircraft. By making it possible to reduce diameters to between a tenth and a third of that necessitated by the conventional feed configuration, the modified configuration makes it possible to install such antennas in places where they could not previously be installed and thereby helps to realize the potential advantages (concealment and/or reduction of aerodynamic drag) of microstrip versus whip antennas. In both the conventional approach and the innovative approach, a microstrip-patch (or microstrip-patch-style) antenna for generating a monopole radiation pattern includes an electrically conductive patch or plate separated from an electrically conductive ground plane by a layer of electrically insulating material. In the conventional approach, the electrically insulating layer is typically a printed-circuit board about 1/16 in. (.1.6 mm) thick. Ordinarily, a coaxial cable from a transmitter, receiver, or transceiver is attached at the center on the ground-plane side, the shield of the cable being electrically connected to the ground plane. In the conventional approach, the coaxial cable is mated with a connector mounted on the ground plane. The center pin of this connector connects to the center of the coaxial cable and passes through a hole in the ground plane and a small hole in the insulating layer and then connects with the patch above one-third of the radial distance from the center. The modified feed configuration of the innovative approach is an inductive-short-circuit configuration that provides impedance matching and that has been used for many years on other antennas but not on microstrip-style monopole antennas. In this configuration, the pin is connected to both the conductive patch and the ground plane. As before, the shield of the coaxial cable is connected to the ground plane, but now the central conductor is connected to a point on the pin between the ground plane and the conductive plate (see figure). The location of the connection point on the pin is chosen so that together, the inductive short circuit and the conductive plate or patch act as components of a lumped-element resonant circuit that radiates efficiently at the resonance frequency and, at the resonance frequency, has an impedance that matches that of the coaxial cable. It should be noted that the innovative design entails two significant disadvantages. One disadvantage is that the frequency bandwidth for efficient operation is only about 1/20 to 1/15 that of a whip antenna designed for the same nominal frequency. The other disadvantage is that the estimated gain is between 3-1/2 and 4-1/2 dB below that of the whip antenna. However, if an affected radio-communication system used only a few adjacent frequency channels and the design of the components of the system other than the antenna provided adequate power or gain margin, then these disadvantages could be overcome.

  8. Aircraft antennas/conformal antennas missile antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solbach, Klaus

    1987-04-01

    Three major areas of airborne microwave antennas are examined. The basic system environment for missile telemetry/telecommand and fuze functions is sketched and the basic antenna design together with practical examples are discussed. The principle requirements of modern nose radar flat plate antennas are shown to result from missile/aircraft system requirements. Basic principles of slotted waveguide antenna arrays are sketched and practical antenna designs are discussed. The present early warning system designs are sketched to point out requirements and performance of practical radar warning and jamming antennas (broadband spiral antennas and horn radiators). With respect to newer developments in the ECM scenario, some demonstrated and proposed antenna systems (lens fed arrays, phased array, active array) are discussed.

  9. An electrically-small monopole phased array antenna for wide band applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, S. Y.; Pfaff, G. A.

    An electrically-small, lightweight, and low RCS (radar cross-section) Monopole Array Antenna has been developed for wide band application. The monopoles were printed on a low dielectric constant (epsilon sub gamma = 2.3) substrate and fed by a modified meanderline microstrip feed structure, with quarter-wavelength stubs to improve feed efficiency. The operational frequency is from 0.65 to 2.0 GHz. The physical size of the monopole array measures only 0.125 wavelength in height. The weight is about 0.3 pounds. A four-element subarray was built and tested. Its overall physical size is 2.5 inches in height by 10 inches in length by 24.4 inches in width. The measured gain and pattern data are presented, as well as the low RCS property and many applications of the monopole array.

  10. Conformal phased array antenna pattern corrector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonucci, J. D.

    1984-11-01

    The present invention relates to radar antenna systems and particularly to a pattern corrector for a conformal phased array monopulse antenna system. In certain monopulse radar applications, such as aboard aircraft, it becomes advantageous to mount a phased array antenna onto the curved exterior surface of the host vehicle. Such a conformal phased array antenna, however, produces a distorted radiation pattern when the beam is scanned off of broadside.

  11. The Study and Implementation of Electrically Small Printed Antennas for an Integrated Transceiver Design

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, Pete

    2009-04-15

    This work focuses on the design and evaluation of the inverted-F, meandering-monopole, and loop antenna geometries. These printed antennas are studied with the goal of identifying which is suitable for use in a miniaturized transceiver design and which has the ability to provide superior performance using minimal Printed Circuit Board (PCB) space. As a result, the main objective is to characterize tradeoffs and identify which antenna provides the best compromise among volume, bandwidth and efficiency. For experimentation purposes, three types of meandering-monopole antenna are examined resulting in five total antennas for the study. The performance of each antenna under study is evaluated based upon return loss, operational bandwidth, and radiation pattern characteristics. For our purposes, return loss is measured using the S11-port reflection coefficient which helps to characterize how well the small antenna is able to be efficiently fed. Operational bandwidth is measured as the frequency range over which the antenna maintains 2:1 Voltage Standing Wave Ratio (VSWR) or equivalently has 10-dB return loss. Ansoft High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS) is used to simulate expected resonant frequency, bandwidth, VSWR, and radiation pattern characteristics. Ansoft HFSS simulation is used to provide a good starting point for antenna design before actual prototype are built using an LPKF automated router. Simulated results are compared with actual measurements to highlight any differences and help demonstrate the effects of antenna miniaturization. Radiation characteristics are measured illustrating how each antenna is affected by the influence of a non-ideal ground plane. The antenna with outstanding performance is further evaluated to determine its maximum range of communication. Each designs range performance is evaluated using a pair of transceivers to demonstrate round-trip communication. This research is intended to provide a knowledge base which will help decrease the number of design iterations needed for future implementation of products requiring integration of small printed antennas. In the past, several design iterations have been needed to fine tune antenna dimensions and achieve acceptable levels of performance. This process consumes a large amount of time and material resources leading to costly development of transceiver designs. Typically, this occurs because matching components and antenna geometries are almost never correct on the first design. This work hopes to determine the limitations associated with antenna miniaturization and provide well known antenna examples that can be easily used in future work.

  12. Electrically small, near-field resonant parasitic (NFRP) antennas augmented with passive and active circuit elements to enhance their functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ning

    Metamaterials have drawn considerable attention because they can exhibit epsilon-negative (ENG) and/or mu-negative (MNG) properties, which in turn can lead to exotic physical effects that can enable interesting, practical applications. For instance, ENG and MNG properties can be engineered to yield double negative (DNG) properties, such as a negative index of refraction, which leads to flat lenses. Similarly, their extreme versions enable cloaking effects. Inspired by such metamaterial properties, a promising methodology has been developed to design electrically small antennas (ESAs). These ESAs use unit cells of metamaterials as their near-field resonant parasitic (NFRP) elements. This new metamaterial-inspired antenna miniaturization method is extended in this dissertation by augmenting the antenna designs with circuits. A rectifying circuit augmentation is used to achieve electrically small, high efficiency rectenna systems. Rectennas are the enabling components of power harvesting and wireless power transmission systems. Electrically small, integrated rectennas have become popular and in demand for several wireless applications including sensor networks and bio-implanted devices. Four global positioning system (GPS) L1 frequency (1.5754 GHz) rectenna systems were designed, fabricated and measured: three resistor-loaded and one supercapacitor-loaded. The simulated and measured results will be described; good agreement between them was obtained. The NFRP ESAs are also augmented with active, non-Foster elements in order to overcome the physical limits of the impedance bandwidth of passive ESA systems. Unlike conventional active external matching network approaches, the non-Foster components are incorporated directly into the NFRP element of the ESA. Three 300 MHz non-Foster circuit-augmented broadband, ESA systems were demonstrated: an Egyptian axe monopole (EAM) antenna, an Egyptian axe dipole (EAD) antenna, and a protractor antenna. The simulated and measured results will be described; reasonable agreement between them was obtained. Moreover, a deeper practical engineering understanding of how lumped components with tighter tolerances, more accurate transistor models, and integrated circuit-based implementations will lead to more satisfactory performance characteristics of the non-Foster circuit-augmented ESAs was accomplished and is also reported.

  13. Hemispherical coil electrically small antenna made by stretchable conductors printing and plastic thermoforming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhigang; Jobs, Magnus; Rydberg, Anders; Hjort, Klas

    2015-02-01

    A production scalable technique is presented to make hemispherical coil antennas by using a stretchable printed silver paste conductor and plastic thermoforming. To ease the fabrication process an unbalanced feed-structure was designed for solderless mounting on conductive materials. The manufactured antenna had a resonance frequency of 2.467 GHz with a reflection coefficient of -33.8 dB. The measured and simulated radiation patterns corresponded to that of monopole structure and the measured efficiency was 40%.

  14. Conformal, Transparent Printed Antenna Developed for Communication and Navigation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Simons, Rainee N.

    1999-01-01

    Conformal, transparent printed antennas have advantages over conventional antennas in terms of space reuse and aesthetics. Because of their compactness and thin profile, these antennas can be mounted on video displays for efficient integration in communication systems such as palmtop computers, digital telephones, and flat-panel television displays. As an array of multiple elements, the antenna subsystem may save weight by reusing space (via vertical stacking) on photovoltaic arrays or on Earth-facing sensors. Also, the antenna could go unnoticed on automobile windshields or building windows, enabling satellite uplinks and downlinks or other emerging high-frequency communications.

  15. Thin conformal antenna array for microwave power conversions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A structure of a circularly polarized, thin conformal, antenna array which may be mounted integrally with the skin of an aircraft employs microstrip elliptical elements and interconnecting feed lines spaced from a circuit ground plane by a thin dielectric layer. The feed lines are impedance matched to the elliptical antenna elements by selecting a proper feedpoint inside the periphery of the elliptical antenna elements. Diodes connected between the feed lines and the ground plane rectify the microwave power, and microstrip filters (low pass) connected in series with the feed lines provide dc current to a microstrip bus. Low impedance matching strips are included between the elliptical elements and the rectifying and filtering elements.

  16. High Data Rate Link from DIVA Using a Conformal Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeffler, D.; Wiesbeck, W.; Wiesler, A.; Bastian, U.; Roeser, S.; Mandel, H.; Seifert, W.; Wagner, S.

    Like some other small spinning scientific satellites, DIVA has a fixed position of the spinning axis with respect to sun. Due to this alignment, the earth can appear in any angular position relative to the satellite, which causes the need for an antenna with full spherical coverage to maintain a permanent link to the control facilities on earth. Up to now this coverage usually was achieved by the use of ordinary TT&C-antennas, as they are utilized on communication satellites for telemetry, tracing and command. In this control application there is no need for high-data-rate communication, so this antenna neither offers high bandwidth nor high gain. Especially the low gain of this antenna type results in a bad signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at the receiving antenna on the earth. As a consequence the low SNR limits the data rate to small values. In scientific missions with a high amount of data needed to be transferred to the earth, the use of these antennas results in a bottle neck in the data link and lowers the efficiency of the scientific mission itself. An increase in SNR at the receiving antenna needs an increase in signal strength because the noise figure of commercially used receiving antennas on the earth is already extremely low and cannot be lowered further without major technical effort. Hence the gain of the transmitting antenna on the satellite has to be increased. In this contribution a broadband conformal antenna concept is presented which yields an average gain of 7.6 dBi over the full sphere for the antenna on the satellite. The antenna consists of 26 elements which are located at different positions on the surface of the satellite. By using the knowledge of the earth's angular position from the satellite's navigation system, the element pointing best towards the earth is used for the link. Technically this problem is solved by using a low-loss switching matrix. Slot spirals are used as single elements. The element consists of an etched slot spiral on an RT/duroid 6002 substrate. A honeycomb structure and a carrier complete the simple mechanical setup of the single element. Using this new antenna there appears to be no limitation in the bandwidth of the data link due to the transmitting antenna, because the bandwidth of the used slot spiral can easily be one octave. Besides the large bandwidth, the pure circular polarisation is a major advantage of the spiral antenna. A usable data rate of 1.2 Mbit/s having a BER of 10^{-5} can be achieved using this switched conformal array antenna and an RF-bandwidth of 2 MHz in S-band.

  17. A finite element-boundary integral method for conformal antenna arrays on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.; Woo, Alex C.; Yu, C. Long

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. In the past, antenna designers have had to resort to expensive measurements in order to develop a conformal array design. This is due to the lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays, and as a result the design of conformal arrays is primarily based on planar antenna design concepts. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. Herewith we shall extend this formulation for conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In this we develop the mathematical formulation. In particular we discuss the finite element equations, the shape elements, and the boundary integral evaluation, and it is shown how this formulation can be applied with minimal computation and memory requirements. The implementation shall be discussed in a later report.

  18. A finite element-boundary integral method for conformal antenna arrays on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. In the past, antenna designers have had to resort to expensive measurements in order to develop a conformal array design. This was due to the lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays. As a result, the design of conformal arrays was primarily based on planar antenna design concepts. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. We are extending this formulation to conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In doing so, we will develop a mathematical formulation. In particular, we discuss the finite element equations, the shape elements, and the boundary integral evaluation. It is shown how this formulation can be applied with minimal computation and memory requirements.

  19. Design and analysis of a conformal patch antenna for a wearable breast hyperthermia treatment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curto, Sergio; Ramasamy, Manoshika; Suh, Minyoung; Prakash, Punit

    2015-03-01

    To overcome the limitations of currently available clinical hyperthermia systems which are based on rigid waveguide antennas, a wearable microwave hyperthermia system is presented. A light wearable system can improve patient comfort and be located in close proximity to the breast, thereby enhancing energy deposition and reducing power requirements. The objective of this work was to design and assess the feasibility of a conformal patch antenna element of an array system to be integrated into a wearable hyperthermia bra. The feasibility of implementing antennas with silver printed ink technology on flexible substrates was evaluated. A coupled electromagnetic-bioheat transfer solver and a hemispheric heterogeneous numerical breast phantom were used to design and optimize a 915 MHz patch antenna. The optimization goals were device miniaturization, operating bandwidth, enhanced energy deposition pattern in targets, and reduced Efield back radiation. The antenna performance was evaluated for devices incorporating a hemispheric conformal groundplane and a rectangular groundplane configuration. Simulated results indicated a stable -10 dB return loss bandwidth of 88 MHz for both the conformal and rectangular groundplane configurations. Considering applied power levels restricted to 15 W, treatment volumes (T>410C) and depth from the skin surface were 11.32 cm3 and 27.94 mm, respectively, for the conformal groundplane configuration, and 2.79 cm3 and 19.72 mm, respectively, for the rectangular groundplane configuration. E-field back-radiation reduced by 85.06% for the conformal groundplane compared to the rectangular groundplane configuration. A prototype antenna with rectangular groundplane was fabricatd and experimentally evaluated. The groundplane was created by printing silver ink (Metalon JS-B25P) on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film surface. Experiments revealed stable antenna performance for power levels up to 15.3 W. In conclusion, the proposed patch antenna with conformal groundplane and prined ink technology shows promising performance to be integrated in a clinical array system.

  20. Radiation and scattering from cylindrically conformal printed antennas. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1994-01-01

    Microstrip patch antennas offer considerable advantages in terms of weight, aerodynamic drag, cost, flexibility, and observables over more conventional protruding antennas. These flat patch antennas were first proposed over thirty years ago by Deschamps in the United States and Gutton and Baisinot in France. Such antennas have been analyzed and developed for planar as well as curved platforms. However, the methods used in these designs employ gross approximations, suffer from extreme computational burden, or require expensive physical experiments. The goal of this thesis is to develop accurate and efficient numerical modeling techniques which represent actual antenna structures mounted on curved surfaces with a high degree of fidelity. In this thesis, the finite element method is extended to cavity-backed conformal antenna arrays embedded in a circular, metallic, infinite cylinder. Both the boundary integral and absorbing boundary mesh closure conditions will be used for terminating the mesh. These two approaches will be contrasted and used to study the scattering and radiation behavior of several useful antenna configurations. An important feature of this study will be to examine the effect of curvature and cavity size on the scattering and radiation properties of wraparound conformal antenna arrays.

  1. Characteristics of a Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna (LTSA) Conformed Longitudinally Around a Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jennifer L.; Ponchak, George E.; Tavassolian, Negar; Tentzeris, Manos M.

    2007-01-01

    The family of tapered slot antennas (TSA s) is suitable for numerous applications. Their ease of fabrication, wide bandwidth, and high gain make them desirable for military and commercial systems. Fabrication on thin, flexible substrates allows the TSA to be conformed over a given body, such as an aircraft wing or a piece of clothing for wearable networks. Previously, a Double Exponentially Tapered Slot Antenna (DETSA) was conformed around an exponential curvature, which showed that the main beam skewed towards the direction of curvature. This paper presents a Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna (LTSA) conformed longitudinally around a cylinder. Measured and simulated radiation patterns and the direction of maximum H co-polarization (Hco) as a function of the cylinder radius are presented.

  2. Designing of a small wearable conformal phased array antenna for wireless communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sayan

    In this thesis, a unique design of a self-adapting conformal phased-array antenna system for wireless communications is presented. The antenna system is comprised of one microstrip antenna array and a sensor circuit. A 1x4 printed microstrip patch antenna array was designed on a flexible substrate with a resonant frequency of 2.47 GHz. However, the performance of the antenna starts to degrade as the curvature of the surface of the substrate changes. To recover the performance of the system, a flexible sensor circuitry was designed. This sensor circuitry uses analog phase shifters, a flexible resistor and operational-amplifier circuitry to compensate the phase of each array element of the antenna. The proposed analytical method for phase compensation has been first verified by designing an RF test platform consisting of a microstrip antenna array, commercially available analog phase shifters, analog voltage attenuators, 4-port power dividers and amplifiers. The platform can be operated through a LabVIEW GUI interface using a 12-bit digital-to-analog converter. This test board was used to design and calibrate the sensor circuitry by observing the behavior of the antenna array system on surfaces with different curvatures. In particular, this phased array antenna system was designed to be used on the surface of a spacesuit or any other flexible prototype. This work was supported in part by the Defense Miroelectronics Activity (DMEA), NASA ND EPSCoR and DARPA/MTO.

  3. Simulation of Conformal Spiral Slot Antennas on Composite Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volakis, J. L.; Nurnberger, M. W.; Ozdemir,T.

    1998-01-01

    During the course of the grant, we wrote and distributed about 12 reports and an equal number of journal papers supported fully or in part by this grant. The list of reports (title & abstract) and papers are given in Appendices A and B. This grant has indeed been instrumental in developing a robust hybrid finite element method for the analysis of complex broadband antennas on doubly curved platforms. Previous to the grant, our capability was limited to simple printed patch antennas on mostly planar platforms. More specifically: (1) mixed element formulations were developed and new edge-based prisms were introduced; (2) these elements were important in permitting flexibility in geometry gridding for most antennas of interest; (3) new perfectly matched absorbers were introduced for mesh truncations associated with highly curved surfaces; (4) fast integral algorithms were introduced for boundary integral truncations reducing CPU time from O(N-2) down to O(N-1.5) or less; (5) frequency extrapolation schemes were developed for efficient broadband performance evaluations. This activity has been successfully continued by NASA researchers; (6) computer codes were developed and extensively tested for several broadband configurations. These include FEMA-CYL, FEMA-PRISM and FEMA-TETRA written by L. Kempel, T. Ozdemir and J. Gong, respectively; (7) a new infinite balun feed was designed nearly constant impedance over the 800-3000 MHz operational band; (8) a complete slot spiral antenna was developed, fabricated and tested at NASA Langley. This new design is a culmination of the projects goals and integrates the computational and experimental efforts. this antenna design resulted in a U.S. patent and was revised three times to achieve the desired bandwidth and gain requirements from 800-3000 MHz.

  4. Radiation and scattering from printed antennas on cylindrically conformal platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.; Bindiganavale, Sunil

    1994-01-01

    The goal was to develop suitable methods and software for the analysis of antennas on cylindrical coated and uncoated platforms. Specifically, the finite element boundary integral and finite element ABC methods were employed successfully and associated software were developed for the analysis and design of wraparound and discrete cavity-backed arrays situated on cylindrical platforms. This work led to the successful implementation of analysis software for such antennas. Developments which played a role in this respect are the efficient implementation of the 3D Green's function for a metallic cylinder, the incorporation of the fast Fourier transform in computing the matrix-vector products executed in the solver of the finite element-boundary integral system, and the development of a new absorbing boundary condition for terminating the finite element mesh on cylindrical surfaces.

  5. An investigation of conformable antennas for the astronaut backpack communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Stuart A.; Jackson, David R.; Williams, Jeffery T.; Wilton, Donald R.

    1988-01-01

    During periods of extravehicular activity it is obviously important that communication and telemetry systems continue to function independently of the astronaut. A system of antennas must therefore be designed that will provide the necessary isotropic coverage using circular polarization over both the transmit and receive frequency bands. To avoid the inherent physical limitations to motion that would be incurred with any sort of protruding antenna, it is necessary that the radiator be essentially flush-mounted or conformable to the structure on which it is attached. Several individual antenna elements are needed for the desired coverage. Both the particular elements chosen and their location determine the ultimate radiation pattern of the overall system. For these reasons a two-fold research plan was undertaken. First, individual elements were investigated and designed. Then various mounting locations were considered and the radiation patterns were predicted taking into account the effects of the astronaut's backpack.

  6. Characteristics of Double Exponentially Tapered Slot Antenna (DETSA) Conformed in the Longitudinal Direction Around a Cylindrical Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Jordan, Jennifer L.; Chevalier, Christine T.

    2006-01-01

    The characteristics of a double exponentially tapered slot antenna (DETSA) as a function of the radius that the DETSA is conformed to in the longitudinal direction is presented. It is shown through measurements and simulations that the radiation pattern of the conformed antenna rotates in the direction through which the antenna is curved, and that diffraction affects the radiation pattern if the radius of curvature is too small or the frequency too high. The gain of the antenna degrades by only 1 dB if the radius of curvature is large and more than 2 dB for smaller radii. The main effect due to curving the antenna is an increased cross-polarization in the E-plane.

  7. Superconducting antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, R.C

    1990-03-01

    The applicability of superconductors to antennas is examined, with emphasis on the roles of external and internal fields. Six potential implementations have resulted. These are superdirective arrays, millimeter wavelength arrays, electrically small antennas, matching of antennas, phasers for electronic scanning, and travelling wave array feeds. Most superdirective arrays are still impractical, due to high {ital Q} and strict tolerances. Large millimeter arrays now appear feasible, due to a major reduction in feed losses. For electrically small antennas, high {ital Q} again limits applicability. However matching of small superdirective arrays, and all electrically small antennas, including large transmit antennas, is very attractive, as matching network losses are greatly reduced. Switched-line phasers offer a major size reduction; phase control via temperature of a single line poses some problems. Travelling wave array beam steering via temperature also appears possible. The last two utilize the kinetic inductance provided by thin films.

  8. Energy flow in the cryptophyte PE545 antenna is directed by bilin pigment conformation.

    PubMed

    Curutchet, Carles; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; Kongsted, Jacob; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; van Grondelle, Rienk; Scholes, Gregory D; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2013-04-25

    Structure-based calculations are combined with quantitative modeling of spectra and energy transfer dynamics to detemine the energy transfer scheme of the PE545 principal light-harvesting antenna of the cryptomonad Rhodomonas CS24. We use a recently developed quantum-mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method that allows us to account for pigment-protein interactions at atomic detail in site energies, transition dipole moments, and electronic couplings. In addition, conformational flexibility of the pigment-protein complex is accounted for through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We find that conformational disorder largely smoothes the large energetic differences predicted from the crystal structure between the pseudosymmetric pairs PEB50/61C-PEB50/61D and PEB82C-PEB82D. Moreover, we find that, in contrast to chlorophyll-based photosynthetic complexes, pigment composition and conformation play a major role in defining the energy ladder in the PE545 complex, rather than specific pigment-protein interactions. This is explained by the remarkable conformational flexibility of the eight bilin pigments in PE545, characterized by a quasi-linear arrangement of four pyrrole units. The MD-QM/MM site energies allow us to reproduce the main features of the spectra, and minor adjustments of the energies of the three red-most pigments DBV19A, DBV19B, and PEB82D allow us to model the spectra of PE545 with a similar quality compared to our original model (model E from Novoderezhkin et al. Biophys. J.2010, 99, 344), which was extracted from the spectral and kinetic fit. Moreover, the fit of the transient absorption kinetics is even better in the new structure-based model. The largest difference between our previous and present results is that the MD-QM/MM calculations predict a much smaller gap between the PEB50/61C and PEB50/61D sites, in better accord with chemical intuition. We conclude that the current adjusted MD-QM/MM energies are more reliable in order to explore the spectral properties and energy transfer dynamics in the PE545 complex. PMID:22992117

  9. Manufacture of a conformal multilayer rf antenna substrate using excimer mask imaging technology and a 6-axis robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrier, Michel; Everett, Daniel; Fieret, Jim; Karrer, Tobias; Rau, Sven; Valard, Jean-Luc

    2001-06-01

    A novel method is presented to produce a high precision pattern of copper tracks on both sides of a 4-layer conformal radar antenna made of PEI polymer and shaped as a truncated pseudo-parabolic cylinder. The antenna is an active emitter-receiver so that an accuracy of a fraction of the wavelength of the microwave radiation is required. After 2D layer design in Allegro, the resulting Gerber file-format circuits are wrapped around the antenna shape, resulting in a cutter-path file which provides the input for a postprocessor that outputs G-code for robot- and laser control. A rules file contains embedded information such as laser parameters and mask aperture related to the Allegro symbols. The robot consists of 6 axes that manipulate the antenna, and 2 axes for the mask plate. The antenna can be manipulated to an accuracy of +/- 20 micrometers over its full dimensions of 200x300x50 mm. The four layers are constructed by successive copper coating, resist coating, laser ablation, copper etching, resist removal, insulation polyimide film lamination and laser dielectric drilling for microvia holes and through-holes drilling. Applications are in space and aeronautical communication and radar detection systems, with possible extensions to automotive and mobile hand-sets, and land stations.

  10. Size reduction and radiation pattern shaping of multi-fed DCC slot antennas used in conformal microwave array hyperthermia applicators

    PubMed Central

    Maccarini, Paolo F.; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Martins, Carlos D.; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    The use of conformal antenna array in the treatment of superficial diseases can significantly increase patient comfort while enhancing the local control of large treatment area with irregular shapes. Originally a regular square multi-fed slot antenna (Dual Concentric Conductor - DCC) was proposed as basic unit cell of the array. The square DCC works well when the outline of the treatment area is rectangular such as in the main chest or back area but is not suitable to outline diseases spreading along the armpit and neck area. In addition as the area of the patch increases, the overall power density decreases affecting the efficiency and thus the ability to deliver the necessary thermal dose with medium power amplifier (<50W). A large number of small efficient antennas is preferable as the disease is more accurately contoured and the lower power requirement for the amplifiers correlates with system reliability, durability, linearity and overall reduced cost. For such reason we developed a set of design rules for multi-fed slot antennas with irregular contours and we implemented a design that reduce the area while increasing the perimeter of the slot, thus increasing the antenna efficiency and the power density. The simulation performed with several commercial packages (Ansoft HFSS, Imst Empire, SemcadX and CST Microwave Studio) show that the size reducing method can be applied to several shapes and for different frequencies. The SAR measurements of several DCCs are performed using an in-house high resolution scanning system with tumor equivalent liquid phantom both at 915 MHz for superficial hyperthermia systems in US) and 433 MHz (Europe). The experimental results are compared with the expected theoretical predictions and both simulated and measured patterns of single antennas of various size and shapes are then summed in various combinations using Matlab to show possible treatment irregular contours of complex diseases. The local control is expected to significantly improve while maintaining the patient comfort. PMID:24224073

  11. Antenna Technologies for NASA Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation addresses the efforts being performed at GRC to develop antenna technology in support of NASA s Exploration Vision. In particular, the presentation discusses the communications architecture asset-specific data services, as well as wide area coverage, high gain, low mass deployable antennas. Phased array antennas as well as electrically small, lightweight, low power, multifunctional antennas will be also discussed.

  12. Antenna Technologies for NASA Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix

    2007-01-01

    This presentation addresses the efforts being performed at GRC to develop antenna technology in support of NASA s Exploration Vision. In particular, the presentation discusses the communications architecture asset-specific data services, as well as wide area coverage, high gain, low mass deployable antennas. Phased array antennas as well as electrically small, lightweight, low power, multifunctional antennas will be also discussed.

  13. Antennae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Atlas Image mosaic, covering 7' x 7' on the sky of the interacting galaxies NGC 4038 and NGC 4039, better known as the Antennae, or Ring Tail galaxies. The two galaxies are engaged in a tug-of-war as they collide. The mutual gravitation between them is working to distort each spiral galaxy's appearance as the two merge. The interaction is evidently impetus for an intense burst of new star formation, as can be seen from the many infrared-bright knots and bright galactic nuclei. Compare the 2MASS view of this system with that obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope in the optical. Many of the same features are seen, although 2MASS is able to peer through much of the dust seen in the galaxies' disks. The galaxy light looks smoother. Also, in the near-infrared the bright knots of star formation are likely highlighted by the light of massive red supergiant stars. The much more extended 'tidal tails,' which give the Antennae their name, are quite faint in the 2MASS image mosaic.

  14. Body conformal antennas for superficial hyperthermia: the impact of bending contact flexible microstrip applicators on their electromagnetic behavior.

    PubMed

    Correia, Davi; Kok, H Petra; de Greef, Martijn; Bel, Arjan; van Wieringen, Niek; Crezee, Johannes

    2009-12-01

    Hyperthermia is a powerful radiosensitizer for treatment of superficial tumors. This requires body conformal antennas with a power distribution as homogeneous as possible over the skin area. The contact flexible microstrip applicators (CFMA) operating at 434 MHz exist in several sizes, including the large size 3H and 5H. This paper investigates the behavior of the electromagnetic fields for the 3H and 5H CFMA in both flat and curved configurations, and the impact on performance parameters like the penetration depth (PD) and the effective heating depth (EHD). The underlying theory behind the electromagnetic behavior in curved situations is presented as well as numerical simulations of both flat and curved configurations. The results are compared to measurements of the electromagnetic field distributions in a cylindrical patient model. Due to their large size multimode solutions may exist, and our results confirm their existence. These multimode solutions affect both the power distribution and PD/EHD, with a dependence on applicator curvature. Therefore, the performance parameters like PD and EHD need to be carefully assessed when bending large size CFMA applicators to conform to the patient body. This conclusion also holds for other types of large size surface current applicators. PMID:19695983

  15. Analysis of cylindrical wrap-around and doubly conformal patch antennas by way of the finite element-artificial absorber method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volakis, J. L.; Kempel, L. C.; Sliva, R.; Wang, H. T. G.; Woo, A. G.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop analysis codes for computing the scattering and radiation of antennas on cylindrically and doubly conformal platforms. The finite element-boundary integral (FE-BI) method has been shown to accurately model the scattering and radiation of cavity-backed patch antennas. Unfortunately extension of this rigorous technique to coated or doubly curved platforms is cumbersome and inefficient. An alternative approximate approach is to employ an absorbing boundary condition (ABC) for terminating the finite element mesh thus avoiding use of a Green's function. A FE-ABC method is used to calculate the radar cross section (RCS) and radiation pattern of a cavity-backed patch antenna which is recessed within a metallic surface. It is shown that this approach is accurate for RCS and antenna pattern calculations with an ABC surface displaced as little as 0.3 lambda from the cavity aperture. These patch antennas may have a dielectric overlay which may also be modeled with this technique.

  16. A True Metasurface Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Badawe, Mohamed El; Almoneef, Thamer S.; Ramahi, Omar M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a true metasurface antenna based on electrically-small resonators. The resonators are placed on a flat surface and connected to one feed point using corporate feed. Unlike conventional array antennas where the distance between adjacent antennas is half wavelength to reduce mutual coupling between adjacent antennas, here the distance between the radiating elements is electrically very small to affect good impedance matching of each resonator to its feed. A metasurface antenna measuring 1.2λ × 1.2λ and designed to operate at 3 GHz achieved a gain of 12 dBi. A prototype was fabricated and tested showing good agreement between numerical simulations and experimental results. Through numerical simulation, we show that the metasurface antenna has the ability to provide beam steering by phasing all the resonators appropriately. PMID:26759177

  17. A True Metasurface Antenna.

    PubMed

    El Badawe, Mohamed; Almoneef, Thamer S; Ramahi, Omar M

    2016-01-01

    We present a true metasurface antenna based on electrically-small resonators. The resonators are placed on a flat surface and connected to one feed point using corporate feed. Unlike conventional array antennas where the distance between adjacent antennas is half wavelength to reduce mutual coupling between adjacent antennas, here the distance between the radiating elements is electrically very small to affect good impedance matching of each resonator to its feed. A metasurface antenna measuring 1.2λ × 1.2λ and designed to operate at 3 GHz achieved a gain of 12 dBi. A prototype was fabricated and tested showing good agreement between numerical simulations and experimental results. Through numerical simulation, we show that the metasurface antenna has the ability to provide beam steering by phasing all the resonators appropriately. PMID:26759177

  18. A True Metasurface Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawe, Mohamed El; Almoneef, Thamer S.; Ramahi, Omar M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a true metasurface antenna based on electrically-small resonators. The resonators are placed on a flat surface and connected to one feed point using corporate feed. Unlike conventional array antennas where the distance between adjacent antennas is half wavelength to reduce mutual coupling between adjacent antennas, here the distance between the radiating elements is electrically very small to affect good impedance matching of each resonator to its feed. A metasurface antenna measuring 1.2λ × 1.2λ and designed to operate at 3 GHz achieved a gain of 12 dBi. A prototype was fabricated and tested showing good agreement between numerical simulations and experimental results. Through numerical simulation, we show that the metasurface antenna has the ability to provide beam steering by phasing all the resonators appropriately.

  19. Antenna engineering handbook /2nd edition/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. C.; Jasik, H.

    Essential principles, methods, and data for solving a wide range of problems in antenna design and application are presented. The basic concepts and fundamentals of antennas are reviewed, followed by a discussion of arrays of discrete elements. Then all primary types of antennas currently in use are considered, providing concise descriptions of operating principles, design methods, and performance data. Small antennas, microstrip antennas, frequency-scan antennas, conformal and low-profile arrays, adaptive antennas, and phased arrays are covered. The major applications of antennas and the design methods peculiar to those applications are discussed in detail. The employment of antennas to meet the requirements of today's complex electronic systems is emphasized, including earth station antennas, satellite antennas, seeker antennas, microwave-relay antennas, tracking antennas, radiometer antennas, and ECM and ESM antennas. Finally, significant topics related to antenna engineering, such as transmission lines and waveguides, radomes, microwave propagation, and impedance matching and broadbanding, are addressed.

  20. High-temperature superconductor antenna investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasack, Vincent G.

    1990-01-01

    The use of superconductors to increase antenna radiation efficiency and gain is examined. Although the gain of all normal-metal antennas can be increased through the use of superconductors, some structures have greater potential for practical improvement than others. Some structures suffer a great degradation in bandwidth when replaced with superconductors, while for others the improvement in efficiency is trivial due to the minimal contribution of the conductor loss mechanism to the total losses, or the already high efficiency of the structure. The following antennas and related structures are discussed: electrically small antennas, impedance matching of antennas, microstrip antennas, microwave and millimeter-wave antenna arrays, and superdirective arrays. The greatest potential practical improvements occur for large microwave and millimeter-wave arrays and the impedance matching of antennas.

  1. X-Antenna: A graphical interface for antenna analysis codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. L.; Newman, E. H.; Shamansky, H. T.

    1995-01-01

    This report serves as the user's manual for the X-Antenna code. X-Antenna is intended to simplify the analysis of antennas by giving the user graphical interfaces in which to enter all relevant antenna and analysis code data. Essentially, X-Antenna creates a Motif interface to the user's antenna analysis codes. A command-file allows new antennas and codes to be added to the application. The menu system and graphical interface screens are created dynamically to conform to the data in the command-file. Antenna data can be saved and retrieved from disk. X-Antenna checks all antenna and code values to ensure they are of the correct type, writes an output file, and runs the appropriate antenna analysis code. Volumetric pattern data may be viewed in 3D space with an external viewer run directly from the application. Currently, X-Antenna includes analysis codes for thin wire antennas (dipoles, loops, and helices), rectangular microstrip antennas, and thin slot antennas.

  2. Furlable antenna. [antenna design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, M. A. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An improved furlable antenna particularly suited for use in a celestial space environment is described. The antenna is characterized by an actuator comprising an elastomeric member of an annular configuration, an annular array of uniformly spaced antenna ribs rigidly affixed at the base ends to an actuator which enables it to be supported for pivotal displacement from a deployed configuration. The ribs are radially extended from the actuator to a furled configuration. The ribs are extended parallel to the axis of the actuator with flexible reflecting web affixed to the ribs, with angularly spaced bearing blocks.

  3. Advanced MMW antenna system for hypervelocity interceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, G.; Bryanos, J.; Gale, J.; Harris, M.; Shui, Ven; Monk, V.; Mullins, J. U.S. Army, Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, AL )

    1992-05-01

    Application of conformal surface wave antennas for RF homing systems on endo-atmospheric interceptors is considered. Conformal apertures near the base of the interceptor are employed to generate orthogonal, steerable fan beams for target aquisition and tracking with minimal incursion of the internal interceptor volume. Measured patterns demonstrate the viability of the antenna concept.

  4. Application for smart skin technologies to the development of a conformal antenna installation in the vertical tail of a military aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt, Kevin H.; Lockyer, Allen J.; Martin, Christopher A.; Kudva, Jayanth N.; Goetz, Allan C.

    1995-05-01

    Recent developments in smart skins technology at Northrop Grumman have paved the way toward incorporating avionics communication functions, previously provided by blade antennas, into the vertical tail of a military aircraft. Radio frequency communication link ranges can be significantly improved by structurally integrating the antenna radiating element into the tail region. Excitation of the large vertical tail surface improves radiation efficiency in the VHF-FM, VHF-AM, and UHF frequency bands. Analysis shows use of the whole tail region as an antenna would provide the best gain and coverage, however, confining the antenna design to the end cap region alone, also significantly enhances performance compared to blade installations. Near term technology applications to retrofit aircraft with minimum perturbations to the existing tail design are therefore possible. Multidisciplinary aspects of the application approach are discussed under the subheadings (1) antenna design, (2) structures and materials, (3) manufacturing, and (4) weight assessment along with the resolution of key technical road blocks. Finally, recommendations for further work necessary to transition the application to a production aircraft are discussed.

  5. Experimental demonstration of superdirective dielectric antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnok, Alexander E.; Filonov, Dmitry S.; Belov, Pavel A.; Simovski, Constantin R.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2014-03-31

    We propose and demonstrate experimentally a simple approach for achieving superdirectivity of emitted radiation for electrically small antennas based on a spherical dielectric resonator with a notch excited by a dipole source. Superdirectivity is achieved without using complex antenna arrays and for a wide range of frequencies. We also demonstrate the steering effect for a subwavelength displacement of the source. Finally, unlike previously known superdirective antennas, our design has significantly smaller losses, at the operation frequency radiation efficiency attains 80%, and matching holds in the 3%-wide frequency band without any special matching technique.

  6. The polarizabilities of electrically small apertures of arbitrary shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okon, E. E.; Harrington, R. F.

    1981-11-01

    Numerical procedures, based on a method of moments approach, are presented for computing the magnetic and electric polarizabilities of electrically small apertures of arbitrary shape. The magnetic polarizability density is determined by using pulse expansion functions defined over quadrilateral subdomains, while the electric polarizability density is obtained by using basis functions. Each of the basis functions consists of a piecewise arrangement of simple linear functions defined over triangles and having an area coordinate representation. All the subdomains are generated automatically by applying either the Gordon-Hall or the Zienkiewicz-Phillips subdivision methods. Computed results are obtained for several aperture shapes, among them the circle and ellipse.

  7. Spiral Microstrip Antenna with Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, David G. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spiral microstrip antenna having resistor elements embedded in each of the spiral arms is provided. The antenna is constructed using a conductive back plane as a base. The back plane supports a dielectric slab having a thickness between one-sixteenth and one-quarter of an inch. A square spiral, having either two or four arms, is attached to the dielectric slab. Each arm of the spiral has resistor elements thereby dissipating an excess energy not already emitted through radiation. The entire configuration provides a thin, flat, high gain, wide bandwidth antenna which requires no underlying cavity. The configuration allows the antenna to be mounted conformably on an aircraft surface.

  8. Tri-band small monopole antenna based on SRR units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehata, Gehan; Mohanna, Mahmoud; Rabeh, Mohammed Lotfy

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a novel design for a tri-band monopole antenna coupled with metamaterial units is introduced. The proposed antenna was designed to cover WiMAX (2.5, 3.5) and WLAN (5.2) bands. In our proposal, a coplanar waveguide (CPW) fed circular-disk monopole antenna is coupled with three split ring resonator (SRR) units which exist on its back side. In our design a monopole antenna and SRR units are designed first to resonate at 5.2 GHz and 2.5 GHz respectively. In addition, antenna is loaded with post to force resonance at 3.5 GHz. SRR units are used for 2.5 GHz resonance to miniaturize antenna size, and our proposed antenna considered an electrically small antenna (ESA) at its first resonance frequency. Simulated and measured results exhibit a good agreement that validate our design.

  9. Spiral microstrip antenna with resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shively, David G.

    1994-06-01

    The present invention relates to microstrip antennas, and more particularly to wide bandwidth spiral antennas with resistive loading. A spiral microstrip antenna having resistor element embedded in each of the spiral arms is provided. The antenna is constructed using a conductive back plane as a base. The back plane supports a dielectric slab having a thickness between one-sixteenth and one-quarter of an inch. A square spiral, having either two or four arms, is attached to the dielectric slab. Each arm of the spiral has resistor elements thereby dissipating an excess energy not already emitted through radiation. The entire configuration provides a thin, flat, high gain, wide bandwidth antenna which requires no underlying cavity. The configuration allows the antenna to be mounted conformably on an aircraft surface.

  10. Design and development of a conformal load-bearing smart skin antenna: overview of the AFRL Smart Skin Structures Technology Demonstration (S3TD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockyer, Allen J.; Alt, Kevin H.; Coughlin, Daniel P.; Durham, Michael D.; Kudva, Jayanth N.; Goetz, Allan C.; Tuss, James

    1999-07-01

    Documented herein is a review of progress for the recently completed 'Smart Skin Structure Technology Demonstration' (S3TD) contract number F33615-93-C-3200 performed by Northrop Grumman Corporation, Hawthorne, California and TRW/ASD, Rancho Bernardo, San Diego, California under the Air Force Research Laboratory, Flight Dynamics Directorate, Structures Division's direction and sponsorship. S3TD was conceived as the first serious attempt, to made a complex antenna become a bone fide aircraft structural panel, without loss of overall structural integrity or electrical performance. The program successfully demonstrated the design, fabrication, and structural validation of a load bearing multifunction antenna component panel subjected to realistic aircraft flight load conditions. The final demonstration article was a structurally effective 36 by 36 inch curved multifunction antenna component panel that withstood running loads of 4,000 pounds per inch, and principal strain levels of 4,700 microstrain. Testing the structural component to ultimate, the panel failed at the predicted limit of 148 kips equating to 150 percent design limit load, after successfully completing one lifetime of fatigue. The load conditions were representative of a mid-fuselage F-18 class fighter component panel installation. The panel was designed not to buckle at ultimate failure, and the dominant failure mode was face sheet pull off, as predicted. Structural test data correlated closely with analysis. Wide band electrical performance for the component antenna panel was validated using anechoic chamber measurements and near field probing techniques, covering avionics communication navigation and identification and electronic warfare functions in the 0.15 to 2.2 GHz frequency regimes.

  11. Deployable antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor); Lin, Greg Y. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Scully, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A deployable antenna and method for using wherein the deployable antenna comprises a collapsible membrane having at least one radiating element for transmitting electromagnetic waves, receiving electromagnetic waves, or both.

  12. User Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Cramer, Paul

    1990-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) impact of frequency change of user and spacecraft antenna gain and size; (2) basic personal terminal antennas (impact of 20/30 GHz frequency separation; parametric studies - gain, size, weight; gain and figure of merit (G/T); design data for selected antenna concepts; critical technologies and development goals; and recommendations); and (3) user antenna radiation safety concerns.

  13. Microstrip antenna technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carver, K. R.; Mink, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of microstrip antenna elements is presented, with emphasis on theoretical and practical design techniques. Available substrate materials are reviewed along with the relation between dielectric constant tolerance and resonant frequency of microstrip patches. Several theoretical analysis techniques are summarized, including transmission-line and modal-expansion (cavity) techniques as well as numerical methods such as the method of moments and finite-element techniques. Practical procedures are given for both standard rectangular and circular patches, as well as variations on those designs including circularly polarized microstrip patches. The quality, bandwidth, and efficiency factors of typical patch designs are discussed. Microstrip dipole and conformal antennas are summarized. Finally, critical needs for further research and development for this antenna are identified.

  14. Antenna options in radar system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skolnik, M. I.

    1983-12-01

    The radar systems designer has many choices available regarding the antenna. A description is provided of some examples regarding these choices. Aspects of parabolic cylinder vs paraboloid section are considered along with questions of parabolic reflector vs mechanical planar array, solid-state transmitters on or off the antenna, single antenna vs back-to-back antennas, electronically-steered phased array vs mechanically steered antennas, and the choice of frequency for a phased array radar. Attention is also given to conformal electronically-steered arrays vs planar phased arrays, dome antenna vs four planar phased arrays, four fixed phased arrays vs one or two trainable phased arrays, modules per phased array element vs a single transmitter/receiver, lens antenna vs reflector, and electronic vs mechanical antenna stabilization.

  15. Reconfigurable antenna pattern verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drexler, Jerome P. (Inventor); Becker, Robert C. (Inventor); Meyers, David W. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of verifying programmable antenna configurations is disclosed. The method comprises selecting a desired antenna configuration from a plurality of antenna configuration patterns, with the selected antenna configuration forming at least one reconfigurable antenna from reconfigurable antenna array elements. The method validates the formation of the selected antenna configuration to determine antenna performance of the at least one reconfigurable antenna.

  16. Temperature induced conformational changes in hybrid complexes formed from CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals and the phycobiliprotein antenna of Acaryochloris marina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Franz-Josef

    2010-08-01

    In hybrid systems which are self-assembled in solution from surface treated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) and isolated phycobiliprotein (PBP) complexes from the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina, excitation energy transfer (EET) from the QDs to the PBP complexes was observed. The EET from the QDs to attached PBPs was analyzed with time integrated fluorescence spectroscopy and time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) at different temperatures. This functional connection between QDs and PBPs via EET is interrupted at temperatures below 273 K (0 °C) (Schmitt et al 2010 Photon. Nanostruct. submitted). The evaluation of the temperature-dependent fluorescence spectra of the QDs showed that the change of the excitation energy transfer efficiency at temperatures below 273 K cannot be explained by the change of the spectral overlap integral alone. Therefore the value of κ2/R126 must change at 273 K. We assume that micro crystals of water, formed in between the QDs and the PBP antenna structures, lead to a structural change of the hybrid complex. Our results show that TCSPC is suitable to distinguish strongly coupled and weakly coupled QD-PBP complexes at different temperatures.

  17. Computer program aids dual reflector antenna system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firnett, P.; Gerritsen, R.; Jarvie, P.; Ludwig, A.

    1968-01-01

    Computer program aids in the design of maximum efficiency dual reflector antenna systems. It designs a shaped cassegrainian antenna which has nearly 100 percent efficiency, and accepts input parameters specifying an existing conventional antenna and produces as output the modifications necessary to conform to a shaped design.

  18. Active antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An antenna, which may be a search coil, is connected to an operational amplifier circuit which provides negative impedances, each of which is in the order of magnitude of the positive impedances which characterize the antenna. The antenna is connected to the inverting input of the operational amplifier; a resistor is connected between the inverting input and the output of the operational amplifier; a capacitor-resistor network, in parallel, is connected between the output and the noninverting input of the operational amplifier; and a resistor is connected from the noninverting input and the circuit common. While this circuit provides a negative resistance and a negative inductance, in series, which appear, looking into the noninverting input of the operational amplifier, in parallel with the antenna, these negative impedances appear in a series loop with the antenna positive impedances, so as to algebraically add. This circuit is tuned by varying the various circuit components so that the negative impedances are very close, but somewhat less, in magnitude, to the antenna impedances. The result is to increase the sensitivity of the antenna by lowering its effective impedance. This, in turn, increases the effective area of the antenna, which may be broadband.

  19. Land vehicle antennas for satellite mobile communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, H. A.; Pieper, B. V.; Mckenna, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    The RF performance, size, pointing system, and cost were investigated concepts are: for a mechanically steered 1 x 4 tilted microstrip array, a mechanically steered fixed-beam conformal array, and an electronically steered conformal phased array. Emphasis is on the RF performance of the tilted 1 x 4 antenna array and methods for pointing the various antennas studied to a geosynchronous satellite. An updated version of satellite isolations in a two-satellite system is presented. Cost estimates for the antennas in quantities of 10,000 and 100,000 unites are summarized.

  20. Adjoint sensitivity analysis of an ultrawideband antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanson, M B; White, D A

    2011-07-28

    The frequency domain finite element method using H(curl)-conforming finite elements is a robust technique for full-wave analysis of antennas. As computers become more powerful, it is becoming feasible to not only predict antenna performance, but also to compute sensitivity of antenna performance with respect to multiple parameters. This sensitivity information can then be used for optimization of the design or specification of manufacturing tolerances. In this paper we review the Adjoint Method for sensitivity calculation, and apply it to the problem of optimizing a Ultrawideband antenna.

  1. Notch Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.

    2004-01-01

    Notch antennas, also known as the tapered slot antenna (TSA), have been the topics of research for decades. TSA has demonstrated multi-octave bandwidth, moderate gain (7 to 10 dB), and symmetric E- and H- plane beam patterns and can be used for many different applications. This chapter summarizes the research activities on notch antennas over the past decade with emphasis on their most recent advances and applications. This chapter begins with some discussions on the designs of single TSA; then follows with detailed discussions of issues associated with TSA designs and performance characteristics. To conclude the chapter, some recent developments in TSA arrays and their applications are highlighted.

  2. Spacecraft Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Manshadi, Farzin; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Cramer, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Some of the various categories of issues that must be considered in the selection and design of spacecraft antennas for a Personal Access Satellite System (PASS) are addressed, and parametric studies for some of the antenna concepts to help the system designer in making the most appropriate antenna choice with regards to weight, size, and complexity, etc. are provided. The question of appropriate polarization for the spacecraft as well as for the User Terminal Antenna required particular attention and was studied in some depth. Circular polarization seems to be the favored outcome of this study. Another problem that has generally been a complicating factor in designing the multiple beam reflector antennas, is the type of feeds (single vs. multiple element and overlapping vs. non-overlapping clusters) needed for generating the beams. This choice is dependent on certain system design factors, such as the required frequency reuse, acceptable interbeam isolation, antenna efficiency, number of beams scanned, and beam-forming network (BFN) complexity. This issue is partially addressed, but is not completely resolved. Indications are that it may be possible to use relatively simple non-overlapping clusters of only a few elements, unless a large frequency reuse and very stringent isolation levels are required.

  3. Antenna Technologies for Future NASA Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2006-01-01

    NASA s plans for the manned exploration of the moon and Mars will rely heavily on the development of a reliable communications infrastructure on the surface and back to Earth. Future missions will thus focus not only on gathering scientific data, but also on the formation of the communications network. In either case, unique requirements become imposed on the antenna technologies necessary to accomplish these tasks. For example, surface activity applications such as robotic rovers, human extravehicular activities (EVA), and probes will require small size, lightweight, low power, multi-functionality, and robustness for the antenna elements being considered. Trunk-line communications to a centralized habitat on the surface and back to Earth (e.g., surface relays, satellites, landers) will necessitate wide-area coverage, high gain, low mass, deployable antennas. Likewise, the plethora of low to high data rate services desired to guarantee the safety and quality of mission data for robotic and human exploration will place additional demands on the technology. Over the past year, NASA Glenn Research Center has been heavily involved in the development of candidate antenna technologies with the potential for meeting these strict requirements. This technology ranges from electrically small antennas to phased array and large inflatable structures. A summary of this overall effort is provided, with particular attention being paid to small antenna designs and applications. A discussion of the Agency-wide activities of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) in forthcoming NASA missions, as they pertain to the communications architecture for the lunar and Martian networks is performed, with an emphasis on the desirable qualities of potential antenna element designs for envisioned communications assets. Identified frequency allocations for the lunar and Martian surfaces, as well as asset-specific data services will be described to develop a foundation for viable antenna technologies which might address these requirements and help guide future technology development decisions.

  4. DIRECTIONAL ANTENNA

    DOEpatents

    Bittner, B.J.

    1958-05-20

    A high-frequency directional antenna of the 360 d scaring type is described. The antenna has for its desirable features the reduction in both size and complexity of the mechanism for rotating the antenna through its scanning movement. These advantages result from the rotation of only the driven element, the reflector remaining stationary. The particular antenna structure comprises a refiector formed by a plurality of metallic slats arranged in the configuration of an annular cage having the shape of a zone of revolution. The slats are parallel to each other and are disposed at an angle of 45 d to the axis of the cage. A directional radiator is disposed inside the cage at an angle of 45 d to the axis of the cage in the same direction as the reflecting slats which it faces. As the radiator is rotated, the electromagnetic wave is reflected from the slats facing the radiator and thereafter passes through the cage on the opposite side, since these slats are not parallel with the E vector of the wave.

  5. Problems of antenna technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhrakh, Lev D.; Voskresenskii, D. I.

    The current state of antenna development and various problems in developing antenna technology are examined. Consideration is given to the prediction of the parameters that determine electromagnetic compatibility, numerical modeling of phased-array networks, and methods for setting radiation patterns. Various types of antennas are discussed, including multifrequency scanning networks, multiray networks, adaptive networks, radiooptic networks, large mirror antennas, and antenna systems on automated space stations. Other topics include scanning antennas based on a refractive lens, statistical synthesis of antennas, the operation of antenna complexes, the electronic and spectral characteristics of antenna networks, and the economic aspects of antenna construction and operation.

  6. Structurally Integrated Antenna Concepts for HALE UAVs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravey, Robin L.; Vedeler, Erik; Goins, Larry; Young, W. Robert; Lawrence, Roland W.

    2006-01-01

    This technical memorandum describes work done in support of the Multifunctional Structures and Materials Team under the Vehicle Systems Program's ITAS (Integrated Tailored Aero Structures) Project during FY 2005. The Electromagnetics and Sensors Branch (ESB) developed three ultra lightweight antenna concepts compatible with HALE UAVs (High Altitude Long Endurance Unmanned Aerial Vehicles). ESB also developed antenna elements that minimize the interaction between elements and the vehicle to minimize the impact of wing flexure on the EM (electromagnetic) performance of the integrated array. In addition, computer models were developed to perform phase correction for antenna arrays whose elements are moving relative to each other due to wing deformations expected in HALE vehicle concepts. Development of lightweight, conformal or structurally integrated antenna elements and compensating for the impact of a lightweight, flexible structure on a large antenna array are important steps in the realization of HALE UAVs for microwave applications such as passive remote sensing and communications.

  7. Curved spiral antennas for underwater biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llamas, Ruben

    We developed curved spiral antennas for use in underwater (freshwater) communications. Specifically, these antennas will be integrated in so-called mussel backpacks. Backpacks are compact electronics that incorporate sensors and a small radio that operate around 300 MHz. Researchers attach these backpacks in their freshwater mussel related research. The antennas must be small, lightweight, and form-fit the mussel. Additionally, since the mussel orientation is unknown, the antennas must have broad radiation patterns. Further, the electromagnetic environment changes significantly as the mussels burrow into the river bottom. Broadband antennas, such a spiral antennas, will perform better in this instance. While spiral antennas are well established, there has been little work on their performance in freshwater. Additionally, there has been some work on curved spiral antennas, but this work focused on curving in one dimension, namely curving around a cylinder. In this thesis we develop spiral antennas that curve in two dimensions in order to conform the contour of a mussel's shell. Our research has three components, namely (a) an investigation of the relevant theoretical underpinning of spiral antennas, (b) extensive computer simulations using state-of-the art computational electromagnetics (CEM) simulation software, and (c) experimental validation. The experimental validation was performed in a large tank in a laboratory setting. We also validated some designs in a pool (~300,000 liters of water and ~410 squared-meter dive pool) with the aid of a certified diver. To use CEM software and perform successful antenna-related experiments require careful attention to many details. The mathematical description of radiation from an antenna, antenna input impedance and so on, is inherently complex. Engineers often make simplifying assumptions such as assuming no reflections, or an isotropic propagation environment, or operation in the antenna far field, and so on. This makes experiments on antennas challenging since it often quite difficult to replicate the simplifying assumptions in an experimental setting. Still, with careful consideration of the important factors and careful experimental design it is possible to perform successful experiments. For example, antenna measurements are often performed in anechoic chambers. For our research we used a large swimming pool to mimic an underwater anechoic chamber. Our CEM simulations and experimental results are in most cases congruent. We are confident that we can design formfitting, compact (spiral) antennas that one could deploy on mussels. This will greatly enhance the mussel backpacks that are used by researchers at the University of Iowa.

  8. Developing novel 3D antennas using advanced additive manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaee, Milad

    In today's world of wireless communication systems, antenna engineering is rapidly advancing as the wireless services continue to expand in support of emerging commercial applications. Antennas play a key role in the performance of advanced transceiver systems where they serve to convert electric power to electromagnetic waves and vice versa. Researchers have held significant interest in developing this crucial component for wireless communication systems by employing a variety of design techniques. In the past few years, demands for electrically small antennas continues to increase, particularly among portable and mobile wireless devices, medical electronics and aerospace systems. This trend toward smaller electronic devices makes the three dimensional (3D) antennas very appealing, since they can be designed in a way to use every available space inside the devise. Additive Manufacturing (AM) method could help to find great solutions for the antennas design for next generation of wireless communication systems. In this thesis, the design and fabrication of 3D printed antennas using AM technology is studied. To demonstrate this application of AM, different types of antennas structures have been designed and fabricated using various manufacturing processes. This thesis studies, for the first time, embedded conductive 3D printed antennas using PolyLactic Acid (PLA) and Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) for substrate parts and high temperature carbon paste for conductive parts which can be a good candidate to overcome the limitations of direct printing on 3D surfaces that is the most popular method to fabricate conductive parts of the antennas. This thesis also studies, for the first time, the fabrication of antennas with 3D printed conductive parts which can contribute to the new generation of 3D printed antennas.

  9. Analysis of a microstrip dipole antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, B. V.; Sabhnani, N. H.

    1984-02-01

    Assuming a quasi-TEM mode of wave propagation and using a conformal transformation technique, accurate and simple analytic expressions for the characteristic wave resistance and the effective dielectric constant of the microstrip dipole antenna in the mixed dielectric medium have been derived. The theoretical values are in close agreement with the experimental results.

  10. Handbook of microstrip antennas. Volumes 1 & 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Jim R.; Hall, Peter S.

    The design and operation of microstrip antennas (MAs) are discussed in chapters contributed by leading experts. Topics addressed include the analysis of circular MAs, improving the frequency agility and bandwidth of patch MAs, circular polarization and bandwidth, microstrip dipoles, multilayer and parasitic MAs, wideband flat dipole and short-circuit MA patch elements and arrays, numerical analysis methods for MAs, multiport-network and transmission-line models of MAs, the design of low-cost printed MAs, printed phase-array antennas, and circularly polarized arrays. Consideration is given to MA feeds, substrate technology, measurement techniques for printed antennas, CAD of microstrip and triplate circuits, resonant MA elements and arrays for aerospace applications, MAs for mobile and satellite systems, a conical conformal microstrip tracking antenna, MA field diagnostics, MAs on a cylindrical surface, and extensions and variations of the MA concept.

  11. Lightweight ultrawideband antenna development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, Everett G.; Bowen, Leland H.; Salo, Glen R.; Gwynne, John S.; Baum, Carl E.; Prather, William D.; Tran, Tyrone C.

    2000-07-01

    We have designed, built, and tested two 18-inch diameter antennas, a reflector Impulse Radiating Antenna, and a Pulse Radiating Antenna Element. We provide extensive measurements of the two antennas, made both in the time domain range of Farr Research, and at the frequency domain range of Mission Research. We then evaluate these antennas for possible use as a lightweight component in both a Synthetic Aperture Radar system and in a Remote Target Identification system.

  12. Statistical Properties of Antenna Impedance in an Electrically Large Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    WARNE,LARRY K.; LEE,KELVIN S.H.; HUDSON,H. GERALD; JOHNSON,WILLIAM A.; JORGENSON,ROY E.; STRONACH,STEPHEN L.

    2000-12-13

    This paper presents models and measurements of antenna input impedance in resonant cavities at high frequencies.The behavior of input impedance is useful in determining the transmission and reception characteristics of an antenna (as well as the transmission characteristics of certain apertures). Results are presented for both the case where the cavity is undermoded (modes with separate and discrete spectra) as well as the over moded case (modes with overlapping spectra). A modal series is constructed and analyzed to determine the impedance statistical distribution. Both electrically small as well as electrically longer resonant and wall mounted antennas are analyzed. Measurements in a large mode stirred chamber cavity are compared with calculations. Finally a method based on power arguments is given, yielding simple formulas for the impedance distribution.

  13. A reconfigurable plasma antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajneesh; Bora, Dhiraj

    2010-03-15

    An experiment aimed at investigating the antenna properties of different plasma structures of a plasma column as a reconfigurable plasma antenna, is reported. A 30 cm long plasma column is excited by surface wave, which acts as a plasma antenna. By changing the operating parameters, e.g., working pressure, drive frequency, input power, radius of glass tube, length of plasma column, and argon gas, single plasma antenna (plasma column) can be transformed to multiple small antenna elements (plasma blobs). It is also reported that number, length, and separation between two antenna elements can be controlled by operating parameters. Moreover, experiments are also carried out to study current profile, potential profile, conductivity profile, phase relations, radiation power patterns, etc. of the antenna elements. The effect on directivity with the number of antenna elements is also studied. Findings of the study indicate that entire structure of antenna elements can be treated as a phased array broadside vertical plasma antenna, which produces more directive radiation pattern than the single plasma antenna as well as physical properties and directivity of such antenna can be controlled by operating parameters. The study reveals the advantages of a plasma antenna over the conventional antenna in the sense that different antennas can be formed by tuning the operating parameters.

  14. A Review of Antenna Technologies for Future NASA Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Nessel, James A.; Romanofsky, Robert R.; Acostia, Roberto J.

    2006-01-01

    NASA s plans for the manned exploration of the Moon and Mars will rely heavily on the development of a reliable communications infrastructure from planetary surface-to-surface, surface-to-orbit and back to Earth. Future missions will thus focus not only on gathering scientific data, but also on the formation of the communications network. In either case, unique requirements become imposed on the antenna technologies necessary to accomplish these tasks. For example, proximity (i.e., short distance) surface activity applications such as robotic rovers, human extravehicular activities (EVA), and probes will require small size, lightweight, low power, multi-functionality, and robustness for the antenna elements being considered. In contrast, trunk-line communications to a centralized habitat on the surface and back to Earth (e.g., relays, satellites, and landers) will necessitate high gain, low mass antennas such as novel inflatable/deployable antennas. Likewise, the plethora of low to high data rate services desired to guarantee the safety and quality of mission data for robotic and human exploration will place additional demands on the technology. Over the last few years, NASA Glenn Research Center has been heavily involved in the development and evaluation of candidate antenna technologies with the potential for meeting the aforementioned requirements. These technologies range from electrically small antennas to phased arrays and large inflatable antenna structures. A summary of these efforts will be discussed in this paper. NASA planned activities under the Exploration Vision as they pertain to the communications architecture for the Lunar and Martian scenarios will be discussed, with emphasis on the desirable qualities of potential antenna element designs for envisioned communications assets. Identified frequency allocations for the Lunar and Martian surfaces, as well as asset-specific data services will be described to develop a foundation for viable antenna technologies which might address these requirements and help guide future technology development decisions

  15. A Review of Antenna Technologies for Future NASA Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Nessel, James A.; Romanofsky, Robert R.; Acosta, J.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's plans for the manned exploration of the Moon and Mars will rely heavily on the development of a reliable communications infrastructure from planetary surface-to-surface, surface-to-orbit and back to Earth. Future missions will thus focus not only on gathering scientific data, but also on the formation of the communications network. In either case, unique requirements become imposed on the antenna technologies necessary to accomplish these tasks. For example, proximity (i.e., short distance) surface activity applications such as robotic rovers, human extravehicular activities (EVA), and probes will require small size, lightweight, low power, multi-functionality, and robustness for the antenna elements being considered. In contrast, trunk-line communications to a centralized habitat on the surface and back to Earth (e.g., relays, satellites, and landers) will necessitate high gain, low mass antennas such as novel inflatable/deployable antennas. Likewise, the plethora of low to high data rate services desired to guarantee the safety and quality of mission data for robotic and human exploration will place additional demands on the technology. Over the last few years, NASA Glenn Research Center has been heavily involved in the development and evaluation of candidate antenna technologies with the potential for meeting the aforementioned requirements. These technologies range from electrically small antennas to phased arrays and large inflatable antenna structures. A summary of these efforts will be discussed in this paper. NASA planned activities under the Exploration Vision as they pertain to the communications architecture for the Lunar and Martian scenarios will be discussed, with emphasis on the desirable qualities of potential antenna element designs for envisioned communications assets. Identified frequency allocations for the Lunar and Martian surfaces, as well as asset-specific data services will be described to develop a foundation for viable antenna technologies which might address these requirements and help guide future technology development decisions.

  16. Shortened horn-reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lantz, P. A.

    1967-01-01

    A shortened horn-reflector antenna overcomes the mechanical disadvantages and complexity of the conventional horn-reflector antenna. The shortened antenna offers broadband performance, economic construction, very low antenna temperature, and excellent pattern performance.

  17. Atacama compact array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, M.; Inatani, J.; Nakanishi, K.; Saito, H.; Iguchi, S.

    2012-09-01

    The ACA (Atacama Compact Array) system is an important element of ALMA and consists of four ACA 12-m antennas and twelve ACA 7-m antennas. The ACA system aims to acquire the total power data with four 12-m antennas and the short baseline interferometer data with 7-m antennas. The ACA system also increases reliability of the interferometer maps of astronomical sources larger than the field view of the 12-m antenna. The science performance of these antennas has been extensively verified at OSF (operation support facility) at an elevation of 2900 m in Atacama desert in northern Chile since 2007. The pointing performance has been verified with a dedicated optical pointing telescope, the servo performance is tested with angle encoders, and the surface accuracy has been measured with a radio holography method. Both ACA 12-m antennas and 7-m antennas have been successfully demonstrated to meet the very stringent ALMA specifications.

  18. Space-Frame Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    The space-frame antenna is a conceptual antenna structure that would be lightweight, deployable from compact stowage, and capable of deforming itself to a size, shape, and orientation required for a specific use. The space-frame antenna would be a trusslike structure consisting mostly of a tetrahedral mesh of nodes connected by variable-length struts. The deformation of the antenna to a desired size, shape, and orientation would be effected through coordinated lengthening and shorting of the struts.

  19. Cross resonant optical antenna.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, P; Huang, J S; Duò, L; Finazzi, M; Hecht, B

    2009-06-26

    We propose a novel cross resonant optical antenna consisting of two perpendicular nanosized gold dipole antennas with a common feed gap. We demonstrate that the cross antenna is able to convert propagating fields of any polarization state into correspondingly polarized, localized, and enhanced fields and vice versa. The cross antenna structure therefore opens the road towards the control of light-matter interactions based on polarized light as well as the analysis of polarized fields on the nanometer scale. PMID:19659107

  20. Coherently combining antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dybdal, Robert B. (Inventor); Curry, Samuel J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus includes antenna elements configured to receive a signal including pseudo-random code, and electronics configured to use the pseudo-random code to determine time delays of signals incident upon the antenna elements and to compensate the signals to coherently combine the antenna elements.

  1. Compact acoustic antenna design using labyrinthine metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Chunyu

    2015-05-01

    We present an effective design and architecture for a class of acoustic antennas in air. The work begins with a conformal transformation method that yields the preliminary design, which is constructed using an isotropic but inhomogeneous material. However, the desired material parameters have been unavailable until now. Here we show that by scaling up the refractive index and optimizing the geometry in the preliminary design, a series of square antennas can be achieved to exhibit an excellent beam-collimating effect. An important part of our strategy is that the device's thickness and material properties can be tailored easily to greatly facilitate its realization. It is also demonstrated that the proposed antenna can be made very thin and readily implemented using labyrinthine acoustic metamaterials.

  2. The ALMA antenna procurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanghellini, S.; Zivick, Jeff; Inatani, Junji

    2009-10-01

    Visitors who come to the OSF at regular intervals find a growing population of antennas at various stages of assembly and testing. The long path from the start of the definition of antenna specifications to the start of science operations with the antennas was and still is a formidable endeavor. When completed, ALMA will comprise a 12-meter diameter antennas array, the bilateral interferometer array, of a minimum of fifty antennas and in addition, the ACA (Atacama Compact Array), composed of four 12-meter diameter antennas and twelve 7-meter diameter antennas. Out of the fifty antennas of the bilateral interferometer array, one-half are provided by the North American partners of ALMA, the other half by the European partners. The sixteen antennas that will comprise the ACA are provided by the East Asian Partners of ALMA. Here we review some key points of this challenging process and we provide a brief history and status of the ALMA antennas. Because of the length of the description, we will present this in a series of two articles. In this first part we concentrate mostly on the bilateral antenna procurement. A detailed description of the ACA will be presented in the next newsletter.

  3. Antenna Controller Replacement Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Roger Y.; Morgan, Scott C.; Strain, Martha M.; Rockwell, Stephen T.; Shimizu, Kenneth J.; Tehrani, Barzia J.; Kwok, Jaclyn H.; Tuazon-Wong, Michelle; Valtier, Henry; Nalbandi, Reza; Wert, Michael; Leung, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The Antenna Controller Replacement (ACR) software accurately points and monitors the Deep Space Network (DSN) 70-m and 34-m high-efficiency (HEF) ground-based antennas that are used to track primarily spacecraft and, periodically, celestial targets. To track a spacecraft, or other targets, the antenna must be accurately pointed at the spacecraft, which can be very far away with very weak signals. ACR s conical scanning capability collects the signal in a circular pattern around the target, calculates the location of the strongest signal, and adjusts the antenna pointing to point directly at the spacecraft. A real-time, closed-loop servo control algorithm performed every 0.02 second allows accurate positioning of the antenna in order to track these distant spacecraft. Additionally, this advanced servo control algorithm provides better antenna pointing performance in windy conditions. The ACR software provides high-level commands that provide a very easy user interface for the DSN operator. The operator only needs to enter two commands to start the antenna and subreflector, and Master Equatorial tracking. The most accurate antenna pointing is accomplished by aligning the antenna to the Master Equatorial, which because of its small size and sheltered location, has the most stable pointing. The antenna has hundreds of digital and analog monitor points. The ACR software provides compact displays to summarize the status of the antenna, subreflector, and the Master Equatorial. The ACR software has two major functions. First, it performs all of the steps required to accurately point the antenna (and subreflector and Master Equatorial) at the spacecraft (or celestial target). This involves controlling the antenna/ subreflector/Master-Equatorial hardware, initiating and monitoring the correct sequence of operations, calculating the position of the spacecraft relative to the antenna, executing the real-time servo control algorithm to maintain the correct position, and monitoring tracking performance.

  4. Microstrip patch antenna receiving array operating in the Ku band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walcher, Douglas A.

    1996-01-01

    Microstrip patch antennas were first investigated from the idea that it would be highly advantageous to fabricate radiating elements (antennas) on the same dielectric substrate as RF circuitry and transmission lines. Other advantages were soon discovered to be its lightweight, low profile, conformability to shaped surfaces, and low manufacturing costs. Unfortunately, these same patches continually exhibit narrow bandwidths, wide beamwidths, and low antenna gain. This thesis will present the design and experimental results of a microstrip patch antenna receiving array operating in the Ku band. An antenna array will be designed in an attempt to improve its performance over a single patch. Most Ku band information signals are either wide band television images or narrow band data and voice channels. An attempt to improve the gain of the array by introducing parasitic patches on top of the array will also be presented in this thesis.

  5. Analysis of a microstrip reflectarray antenna for microspacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.

    1995-01-01

    A microstrip reflectarray is a flat reflector antenna that can be mounted conformally onto a spacecraft's outside structure without consuming a significant amount of spacecraft volume and mass. For large apertures (2 m or larger), the antenna's reflecting surface, being flat, can be more easily and reliably deployed than a curved parabolic reflector. This article presents the study results on a microstrip reflect-array with circular polarization. Its efficiency and bandwidth characteristics are analyzed. Numerous advantages of this antenna system are discussed. Three new concepts using this microstrip reflectarray are also proposed.

  6. Combined fast multipole-QR compression technique for solving electrically small to large structures for broadband applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jandhyala, Vikram (Inventor); Chowdhury, Indranil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An approach that efficiently solves for a desired parameter of a system or device that can include both electrically large fast multipole method (FMM) elements, and electrically small QR elements. The system or device is setup as an oct-tree structure that can include regions of both the FMM type and the QR type. An iterative solver is then used to determine a first matrix vector product for any electrically large elements, and a second matrix vector product for any electrically small elements that are included in the structure. These matrix vector products for the electrically large elements and the electrically small elements are combined, and a net delta for a combination of the matrix vector products is determined. The iteration continues until a net delta is obtained that is within predefined limits. The matrix vector products that were last obtained are used to solve for the desired parameter.

  7. Dipole-Excited Ring Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, H., Jr

    1982-01-01

    Dipole radiator drives ring radiator in compact C-band antenna. Antenna can be mounted flush with surface. Compared with horn or parabolic dish with same aperature, new ring antenna has greater gain, lower side lobes, and narrower beam width. Used on vehicles requiring flush-mounted antennas with very directive signals. Used as radar altimeter antenna for aircraft.

  8. A new analysis for the transmission line characteristics of the Microstrip Dipole Antenna Feed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabhnani, N. H.; Rao, B. V.

    1983-10-01

    The characteristic wave impedance and effective dielectric constant of a Microstrip Dipole Antenna Feed are evaluated through a conformal mapping technique. The obtained design equations are explicit, simple and yield results with an accuracy better than 2.2 percent.

  9. ALMA Antenna Contract Signed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-12-01

    On December 6, ESO signed a contract with the consortium led by Alcatel Alenia Space and composed also of European Industrial Engineering (Italy) and MT Aerospace (Germany), to supply 25 antennas for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) project, along with an option for another seven antennas. The contract, worth 147 million euros, covers the design, manufacture, transport and on-site integration of the antennas. It is the largest contract ever signed in ground-based astronomy in Europe.

  10. Phased array antenna control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doland, G. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Several new and useful improvements in steering and control of phased array antennas having a small number of elements, typically on the order of 5 to 17 elements are provided. Among the improvements are increasing the number of beam steering positions, reducing the possibility of phase transients in signals received or transmitted with the antennas, and increasing control and testing capacity with respect to the antennas.

  11. Technique for Solving Electrically Small to Large Structures for Broadband Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jandhyala, Vikram; Chowdhury, Indranil

    2011-01-01

    Fast iterative algorithms are often used for solving Method of Moments (MoM) systems, having a large number of unknowns, to determine current distribution and other parameters. The most commonly used fast methods include the fast multipole method (FMM), the precorrected fast Fourier transform (PFFT), and low-rank QR compression methods. These methods reduce the O(N) memory and time requirements to O(N log N) by compressing the dense MoM system so as to exploit the physics of Green s Function interactions. FFT-based techniques for solving such problems are efficient for spacefilling and uniform structures, but their performance substantially degrades for non-uniformly distributed structures due to the inherent need to employ a uniform global grid. FMM or QR techniques are better suited than FFT techniques; however, neither the FMM nor the QR technique can be used at all frequencies. This method has been developed to efficiently solve for a desired parameter of a system or device that can include both electrically large FMM elements, and electrically small QR elements. The system or device is set up as an oct-tree structure that can include regions of both the FMM type and the QR type. The system is enclosed with a cube at a 0- th level, splitting the cube at the 0-th level into eight child cubes. This forms cubes at a 1st level, recursively repeating the splitting process for cubes at successive levels until a desired number of levels is created. For each cube that is thus formed, neighbor lists and interaction lists are maintained. An iterative solver is then used to determine a first matrix vector product for any electrically large elements as well as a second matrix vector product for any electrically small elements that are included in the structure. These matrix vector products for the electrically large and small elements are combined, and a net delta for a combination of the matrix vector products is determined. The iteration continues until a net delta is obtained that is within the predefined limits. The matrix vector products that were last obtained are used to solve for the desired parameter. The solution for the desired parameter is then presented to a user in a tangible form; for example, on a display.

  12. MASTER TELEVISION ANTENNA SYSTEM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island State Dept. of Education, Providence.

    SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE FURNISHING AND INSTALLATION OF TELEVISION MASTER ANTENNA SYSTEMS FOR SECONDARY AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS ARE GIVEN. CONTRACTOR REQUIREMENTS, EQUIPMENT, PERFORMANCE STANDARDS, AND FUNCTIONS ARE DESCRIBED. (MS)

  13. Antennas for diverse requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukamp, Joachim

    An account is given of a major German aerospace manufacturer's state-of-the-art methods for development, design, construction, testing and certification of a wide variety of civilian and military communications and radar antennas. Attention is given to reflector antennas for very large aperture/wavelength ratios, slotted waveguide arrays in which the radiating aperture is synthesized by guided structures, and both microstrip arrays and active arrays, for the creation of very large area antennas. Antenna tests and measurements are conducted in an anechoic chamber.

  14. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  15. The single antenna interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J.P.

    1990-01-15

    Air and space borne platforms using synthetic aperture radars (SAR) have made interferometric measurements by using either two physical antennas mounted on one air-frame or two passes of one antenna over a scene. In this paper, a new interferometric technique using one pass of a single-antenna SAR system is proposed and demonstrated on data collected by the NASA-JPL AirSAR. Remotely sensed L-band microwave data are used to show the sensitivity of this technique to ocean surface features as well as a baseline for comparison with work by others using two-antenna systems. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  16. MSU Antenna Pattern Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Tsan; Kleespies, Thomas J.; Green, J. Philip

    2000-01-01

    The Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) antenna pattern data for nine MSU Flight Models (FMs) have been successfully rescued from 22-year old 7-track and 9-track magnetic tapes and cartridges. These antenna pattern data were unpacked into user-friendly ASCII format, and are potentially useful for making antenna pattern corrections to MSU antenna temperatures in retrieving the true brightness temperatures. We also properly interpreted the contents of the data and show how to convert the measured antenna signal amplitude in volts into relative antenna power in dB with proper normalization. It is found that the data are of high quality with a 60-dB drop in the co-polarized antenna patterns from the central peak value to its side-lobe regions at scan angles beyond 30 deg. The unpacked antenna pattern data produced in this study provide a useful database for data users to correct the antenna side-lobe contribution to MSU measurements. All of the data are available to the scientific community on a single CD-ROM.

  17. Flexible 16 Antenna Array for Microwave Breast Cancer Detection.

    PubMed

    Bahramiabarghouei, Hadi; Porter, Emily; Santorelli, Adam; Gosselin, Benoit; Popović, Milica; Rusch, Leslie A

    2015-10-01

    Radar-based microwave imaging has been widely studied for breast cancer detection in recent times. Sensing dielectric property differences of tissues has been studied over a wide frequency band for this application. We design single- and dual-polarization antennas for wireless ultrawideband breast cancer detection systems using an inhomogeneous multilayer model of the human breast. Antennas made from flexible materials are more easily adapted to wearable applications. Miniaturized flexible monopole and spiral antennas on a 50-μm Kapton polyimide are designed, using a high-frequency structure simulator, to be in contact with biological breast tissues. The proposed antennas are designed to operate in a frequency range of 2-4 GHz (with reflection coefficient (S11) below -10 dB). Measurements show that the flexible antennas have good impedance matching when in different positions with different curvature around the breast. Our miniaturized flexible antennas are 20 mm × 20 mm. Furthermore, two flexible conformal 4 × 4 ultrawideband antenna arrays (single and dual polarization), in a format similar to that of a bra, were developed for a radar-based breast cancer detection system. By using a reflector for the arrays, the penetration of the propagated electromagnetic waves from the antennas into the breast can be improved by factors of 3.3 and 2.6, respectively. PMID:26011862

  18. Recent results for plasma antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeff, Igor; Anderson, Ted; Farshi, Esmaeil; Karnam, Naresh; Pulasani, Nanditha Reddy

    2008-05-15

    Plasma antennas are just as effective as metal antennas. They can transmit, receive, and reflect radio waves just as well as metal antennas. In addition, plasma generated noise does not appear to be a problem.

  19. Improved circularly polarized antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Atta, L. C.; Mailloux, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Antenna includes two sets of linearly polarized elements. Each set contains slots in parallel array. Sets are mutually orthogonal and are driven in phase quadrature. By changing lengths of slots or their separations, antenna beamwidth can be changed over wide range. Similar results are achieved with dipole configuration.

  20. Broadband pillbox antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, J. B. L.; Wright, B. D.

    1984-09-01

    The possibility of designing very broadband pillbox antennas has been demonstrated. It was also shown that the operating bandwidth of the existing IFF (pillbox) antenna, AS 1065/UPX, can be improved by a simple modification of the existing feed. Additional modifications are suggested to further improve the performance at the low frequency end.

  1. Deformations in VLBI antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, T. A.; Thomsen, P.

    1988-01-01

    A study is presented of deformations in antennas with the emphasis on their influence on VLBI measurements. The GIFTS structural analysis program has been used to model the VLBI antenna in Fairbanks (Alaska). The report identifies key deformations and studies the effect of gravity, wind, and temperature. Estimates of expected deformations are given.

  2. Experiments with Dipole Antennas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Employment of a data-acquisition system for data collection and calculations makes experiments with antennas more convenient and less time consuming. The determined directional patterns of the dipole antennas of different lengths are in reasonable agreement with theory. The enhancement of the signal by using a reflector is demonstrated, and a…

  3. Milestones in Broadcasting: Antennas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Media in Education and Development, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Briefly describes the development of antennas in the prebroadcast era (elevated antenna, selectivity to prevent interference between stations, birth of diplex, directional properties, support structures), as well as technological developments used in long-, medium-, and short-wave broadcasting, VHF/FM and television broadcasting, and satellite…

  4. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagherian, A. B.; Mielke, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Use of calculation program START and modeling program P 3D to produce radiation patterns of antennas mounted on a space station is discussed. Basic components of two space stations in the early design stage are simulated and radiation patterns for antennas mounted on the modules are presented.

  5. Advanced design methodologies and novel applications of reflectarray antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayeri, Payam

    Reflectarray antennas combine the numerous advantages of printed antenna arrays and reflector antennas and create a hybrid high-gain antenna with a low-profile, low-mass, and diversified radiation performance. Reflectarrays are now emerging as the new generation of high-gain antennas for long-distance communications. In this dissertation, some advanced concepts demonstrating novel features of reflectarray antennas are presented. • First, various approaches for radiation analysis of reflectarray antennas are described and implemented. Numerical results are then presented for a variety of systems and the advantages, limitations, and accuracy of these approaches are discussed and compared with each other. • A broadband technique by using sub-wavelength elements is proposed and prototypes are fabricated and tested. This technique enables the reflectarray to achieve a significant bandwidth improvement with no additional cost. • Infrared reflectarrays antennas are studied for possible applications in concentrating solar power systems. Material losses, an important design issue at infrared frequencies, are investigated and reflectarrays consisted of dielectric resonant elements are proposed with low-loss features at infrared. • Multi-beam reflectarray antennas are studied and it is demonstrated that by optimizing the phase of the elements, a desirable multi-beam performance can be achieved using a single-feed. Local and global phase-only optimization techniques have been implemented. Two Ka-band quad-beam prototypes with symmetric and asymmetric beams have been fabricated and tested. • Different approaches for beam-scanning with reflectarray antennas are also reviewed and it is shown that for moderately wide angle beam-scanning, utilizing a feed displacement technique is more suitable than an aperture phase tuning approach. A feed displacement beam-scanning design with novel aperture phase distribution is proposed for the reflectarray antenna, and is further optimized to improve the performance. A high-gain Ka-band prototype achieving 60 degrees scan range with side-lobe levels below 15 dB is demonstrated. • The feasibility of designing reflectarray antennas on conformal surfaces is also studied numerically. A generalized analysis approach is presented and the radiation performance of reflectarray antennas on singly-curved conformal cylindrical platforms are studied and compared with their planar counterpart. It is revealed that conformal reflectarray antennas are a suitable choice for a high-gain antenna where curved platforms are required. In summary, different challenges in reflectarray analysis and design are addressed in this dissertation. On the element design challenges, bandwidth improvement and infrared operation of reflectarray antennas have been studied. On the system level challenges, multi-beam designs, beam-scanning performance, and conformal platforms have been investigated. Several prototypes have been fabricated and tested, demonstrating the novel features and potential applications of reflectarray antennas.

  6. GPS antenna designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, Samuel J. P.

    1987-05-01

    Application of the current GPS NAVSTAR system to civilian service requires that a right hand, circularly polarized, -160 dBW spread spectrum signal be received from an orbiting satellite, where the antenna environment is also moving. This presents a design challenge when inexpensive antennas are desired. The intent of this survey is to provide information on the antennas mentioned and to construct and test prototypes to determine whether the choice made by the industry, the quadrifilar helix, is the best. The helix antenna is currently the low cost standard for GPS. Prototype versions were constructed using 12 gauge wire and subminiature coaxial hardline. The constructed antennas were tested using a signal generator and a reference turnstile. A spectrum analyzer was used to measure the level of the received signal.

  7. Flexible sixteen monopole antenna array for microwave breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, H; Porter, E; Santorelli, A; Gosselin, B; Popovic, M; Rusch, L A

    2014-01-01

    Radar based microwave imaging (MI) has been widely studied for breast cancer detection in recent times. Sensing dielectric property differences of tissues over a wide frequency band has been made possible by ultra-wideband (UWB) techniques. In this paper, a flexible, compact monopole antenna on a 100 μm Kapton polyimide is designed, using a high frequency structure simulator (HFSS), to be in contact with biological breast tissues over the 2-5GHz frequency range. The antenna parameters are optimized to obtain a good impedance match over the required frequency range. The designed antenna size is 18mm × 18mm. Further, a flexible conformal 4×4 ultra-wideband antenna array, in a format similar to that of a bra, was developed for a radar-based breast cancer detection system. PMID:25570813

  8. Radiation by cavity-backed antennas on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.; Sliva, Randy

    1994-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays are popular antennas for aircraft, spacecraft and land vehicle platforms due to their inherent low weight, cost and drag properties. However, to date there has been a dearth of rigorous analytical or numerical solutions to aid the designer. In fact, it has been common practice to use limited measurements and planar approximations in designing such non-planar antennas. The finite element-boundary integral method is extended to radiation by cavity-backed structures in an infinite, metallic cylinder. The formulation is used to investigate the effect of cavity size on the radiation pattern for typical circumferentially and axially polarized patch antennas. Curvature effect on the gain, pattern shape, and input impedance is also studied. Finally, the accuracy of the FE-BI approach for a microstrip patch array is demonstrated.

  9. Autonomous omnidirectional spacecraft antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a low gain Electronically Switchable Spherical Array Antenna is discussed. This antenna provides roughly 7 dBic gain for receive/transmit operation between user satellites and the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System. When used as a pair, the antenna provides spherical coverage. The antenna was tested in its primary operating modes: directed beam, retrodirective, and Omnidirectional.

  10. RF MEMS Based Reconfigurable Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2004-01-01

    The presentation will first of all address the advantages of RF MEMS circuit in antenna applications and also the need for electronically reconfigurable antennas. Next, discuss some of the recent examples of RF MEMS based reconfigurable microstrip antennas. Finally, conclude the talk with a summary of MEMS antenna performance.

  11. Conformable seal

    DOEpatents

    Neef, W.S.; Lambert, D.R.

    1982-08-10

    Sealing apparatus and method, comprising first and second surfaces or membranes, at least one of which surfaces is deformable, placed in proximity to one another. Urging means cause these surfaces to contact one another in a manner such that the deformable surface deforms to conform to the geometry of the other surface, thereby creating a seal. The seal is capable of undergoing multiple cycles of sealing and unsealing.

  12. Satellite Antenna Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Through the Technology Affiliates Program at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the ACTS antenna system was transferred from experimental testing status to commercial development with KVH Industries, Inc. The ACTS design enables mobile satellite antennas to remain pointed at the satellite, regardless of the motion or vibration on which it is mounted. KVH's first product based on the ACTS design is a land-mobile satellite antenna system that will enable direct broadcast satellite television aboard moving trucks, recreational vehicles, trains, and buses. Future products could include use in broadcasting, emergency medical and military vehicles.

  13. Single-Loop Antenna Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawronski, W.

    2002-07-01

    This article presents a study of a single-loop antenna control system. A typical antenna control system consists of two feedback loops. The first one -- an inner loop -- is called a rate loop. It uses tachometers to control the drive rate. The second loop -- called a position loop -- uses encoders to control antenna position. The questions arise: Does one need two loops to control antenna motions? Can one achieve similar performance for a system with the position loop only? In order to answer these questions, we studied three types of antennas with a single-loop control: a rigid (or idealized) antenna in order to obtain initial insight into properties of the closed-loop antenna systems; a small antenna, 5 meters in diameter; and a large antenna, 34 meters in diameter. The study compares command following and rejection of wind disturbances of antennas with and without rate loops, and we show that both configurations are equivalent.

  14. Coaxial phased array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A coaxial antenna array for communicating circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation is disclosed. A pair of open ended antenna cavities is coaxially constructed and operates by excitation of linear radiation elements arranged within each of the cavities. A pair of crossed dipole radiation devices is centered within the inner cavity and operated by means of a phase shifting network circuit to transmit as well as receive circularly polarized radiation. Four monopole radiation devices are symmetrically arranged to operate in the outer cavity in phase quadrature by means of the phase shifting network circuit to both transmit and receive circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation. Combined operation of the two antenna cavities with a 180 deg phase differential between the fields related to the two antenna cavities provides a broad beam, relatively wide frequency bandwidth communication capability. Particular embodiments disclosed feature a generally square cavity array as well as a circular cavity array.

  15. CIRCULAR CAVITY SLOT ANTENNA

    DOEpatents

    Kerley, P.L.

    1959-01-01

    A small-size antenna having a doughnut-shaped field pattern and which can act both as an antenna and a resonant circuit is described. The antenna is of the slotted type and comprises a resonant cavity with a center hole. A circular slot is provided in one wall of the cavity concentric with the hole and a radio frequency source is connected across the slot. The pattern and loading of the antenna are adjusted by varying the position and shape of a center element slidably disposed within the hole and projecting from the slotted side of the resonant cavity. The disclosed structure may also be used to propagate the oscillator signal down a transniission line by replacing the center element with one leg of the transmission line in a spaced relation from the walls of the cavity.

  16. Rotary antenna attenuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.; Hardy, J. C.

    1969-01-01

    Radio frequency attenuator, having negligible insertion loss at minimum attenuation, can be used for making precise antenna gain measurements. It is small in size compared to a rotary-vane attenuator.

  17. Antenna pattern study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Warren

    1988-01-01

    Prediction of antenna radiation patterns has long been an important function in the design of command, communication, and tracking systems for rocket vehicles and spacecraft. An acceptable degree of assurance that a radio link will provide the required quality of data or certainty of correct command execution must be acquired by some means if the system is to be certified as reliable. Two methods have been used to perform this function: (1) Theoretical analysis, based on the known properties of basic antenna element types and their behavior in the presence of conductive structures of simple shape, and (2) Measurement of the patterns on scale models of the spacecraft or rocket vehicle on which the antenna is located. Both of these methods are ordinarily employed in the antenna design process.

  18. Dielectric Covered Planar Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llombart Juan, Nuria (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Gill, John J. (Inventor); Skalare, Anders J. (Inventor); Siegel, Peter H. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An antenna element suitable for integrated arrays at terahertz frequencies is disclosed. The antenna element comprises an extended spherical (e.g. hemispherical) semiconductor lens, e.g. silicon, antenna fed by a leaky wave waveguide feed. The extended spherical lens comprises a substantially spherical lens adjacent a substantially planar lens extension. A couple of TE/TM leaky wave modes are excited in a resonant cavity formed between a ground plane and the substantially planar lens extension by a waveguide block coupled to the ground plane. Due to these modes, the primary feed radiates inside the lens with a directive pattern that illuminates a small sector of the lens. The antenna structure is compatible with known semiconductor fabrication technology and enables production of large format imaging arrays.

  19. NASA technology for large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.; Campbell, T. G.; Freeland, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Some leading concepts for deployable antennas are described and an assessment of the state of the art in deployable antennas is presented. The advanced sunflower precision antenna, the radial rib antenna and the maypole (hoop/column) antenna, the wrap rib antenna and the parabolic erectable truss antenna are covered. In addition, a discussion on the technology development program for two deployable antenna concepts that are responsive to the antenna mission requirements as defined in the NASA mission model is presented.

  20. Polarized Antenna Splitting Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Larkoski, Andrew J.; Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2009-10-17

    We consider parton showers based on radiation from QCD dipoles or 'antennae'. These showers are built from 2 {yields} 3 parton splitting processes. The question then arises of what functions replace the Altarelli-Parisi splitting functions in this approach. We give a detailed answer to this question, applicable to antenna showers in which partons carry definite helicity, and to both initial- and final-state emissions.

  1. MLS airborne antenna research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C. L.; Burnside, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The geometrical theory of diffraction was used to analyze the elevation plane pattern of on-aircraft antennas. The radiation patterns for basic elements (infinitesimal dipole, circumferential and axial slot) mounted on fuselage of various aircrafts with or without radome included were calculated and compared well with experimental results. Error phase plots were also presented. The effects of radiation patterns and error phase plots on the polarization selection for the MLS airborne antenna are discussed.

  2. Superconducting elementary antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavliuk, V. A.; Krivosheev, E. F.

    1981-05-01

    A theoretical and experimental study evaluates the possibility of increasing gain, Q-factor, sensitivity, and radiating power of simple small-size antennas as a consequence of reduced Joule losses, higher electric current densities, Josephson effects, and magnetic field quantization resulting from a superconducting state. Improved characteristics of loop and whip antennas are demonstrated as a consequence of superconductivity. Technological difficulties and the advisability of somewhat higher temperatures are briefly discussed.

  3. Magneto-Dielectric Wire Antennas Theory and Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Tom

    There is a pervasive need in the defense industry for conformal, low-profile, efficient and broadband (HF-UHF) antennas. Broadband capabilities enable shared aperture multi-function radiators, while conformal antenna profiles minimize physical damage in army applications, reduce drag and weight penalties in airborne applications and reduce the visual and RF signatures of the communication node. This dissertation is concerned with a new class of antennas called Magneto-Dielectric wire antennas (MDWA) that provide an ideal solution to this ever-present and growing need. Magneto-dielectric structures (mur > 1; epsilon r > 1) can partially guide electromagnetic waves and radiate them by leaking off the structure or by scattering from any discontinuities, much like a metal antenna of the same shape. They are attractive alternatives to conventional whip and blade antennas because they can be placed conformal to a metallic ground plane without any performance penalty. A two pronged approach is taken to analyze MDWAs. In the first, antenna circuit models are derived for the prototypical dipole and loop elements that include the effects of realistic dispersive magneto-dielectric materials of construction. A material selection law results, showing that: (a) The maximum attainable efficiency is determined by a single magnetic material parameter that we term the hesitivity: Closely related to Snoek's product, it measures the maximum magnetic conductivity of the material. (b) The maximum bandwidth is obtained by placing the highest amount of mu" loss in the frequency range of operation. As a result, high radiation efficiency antennas can be obtained not only from the conventional low loss (low mu") materials but also with highly lossy materials (tan(deltam) >> 1). The second approach used to analyze MDWAs is through solving the Green function problem of the infinite magneto-dielectric cylinder fed by a current loop. This solution sheds light on the leaky and guided waves supported by the magneto-dielectric structure and leads to useful design rules connecting the permeability of the material to the cross sectional area of the antenna in relation to the desired frequency of operation. The Green function problem of the permeable prolate spheroidal antenna is also solved as a good approximation to a finite cylinder.

  4. The Folded Horn Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, E. G.; Bowen, L. H.; Baum, C. E.; Prather, W. D.

    Antennas for radiating high-power mesoband (medium-bandwidth) electromagnetic signals are critical to the mission of upsetting electronics at a distance. When operated at frequencies of a few hundred megahertz, RF weapons require highly efficient antennas that can fit into a small volume. Most of the existing antennas, such as pyramidal horns, are too large to fit onto certain platforms of interest. To address this challenge, we investigate the folded horn, which has aperture dimensions of 0.5 2 wavelengths, and a depth of 1.5-2 wavelengths. This antenna has a nearly focused aperture field, due to a parabolic fold in the H-plane. We report here on the fabrication and testing of the first folded horn, operating at 3 GHz. After a number of iterations, we obtained a realized gain of at least 10 dBi over 3-5 GHz, an aperture efficiency of 80%, and a return loss below -10 dB over 2.8-3.35 GHz. This design could be adapted to high-voltages, and it could work well in a two-antenna array, with two antennas positioned back to back, driven by a differential source.

  5. UHF coplanar-slot antenna for aircraft-to-satellite data communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myhre, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    A lightweight low drag coplanar slot antenna was developed for use on commercial jet aircraft that will provide upper hemisphere coverage in the UHF band at frequencies of 402 and 468 MHz is described. The antenna is designed to transmit meteorological data from wide body jet aircraft to ground users via synchronous meteorological data relay satellites. The low profile antenna (23.5 cm wide by 38.1 cm long slot by 1.9 cm high) is a conformal antenna utilizing the coplanar approach with the advantages of broad frequency bandwidth and improved electrical integrity over wide range of temperature. The antenna is circular polarized, has anon axis gain of near +2.5 dB, and a HPBW greater than 90 deg. Areas discussed include antenna design, radiation characteristics, flight testing, and system performance.

  6. Multibeam antenna study, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellamy, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    A multibeam antenna concept was developed for providing spot beam coverage of the contiguous 48 states. The selection of a suitable antenna concept for the multibeam application and an experimental evaluation of the antenna concept selected are described. The final analysis indicates that the preferred concept is a dual-antenna, circular artificial dielectric lens. A description of the analytical methods is provided, as well as a discussion of the absolute requirements placed on the antenna concepts. Finally, a comparative analysis of reflector antenna off-axis beam performance is presented.

  7. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity, F. W.

    1987-09-01

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas, the model treats sub-tuned RDL antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mock-ups of RDL antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  8. Robust Hybrid Finite Element Methods for Antennas and Microwave Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, J.; Volakis, John L.

    1996-01-01

    One of the primary goals in this dissertation is concerned with the development of robust hybrid finite element-boundary integral (FE-BI) techniques for modeling and design of conformal antennas of arbitrary shape. Both the finite element and integral equation methods will be first overviewed in this chapter with an emphasis on recently developed hybrid FE-BI methodologies for antennas, microwave and millimeter wave applications. The structure of the dissertation is then outlined. We conclude the chapter with discussions of certain fundamental concepts and methods in electromagnetics, which are important to this study.

  9. Adaptive antenna design considerations for satellite communication antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayhan, J. T.

    1983-02-01

    The present investigation is concerned with some general considerations inherent in designing an adaptive antenna system for use on a geosynchronous satellite illuminating the earth field of view. The problem has been addressed from the viewpoint of the system designer who has to determine the required antenna characteristics and the antenna aperture size. Concerning the choice of the antenna type, it usually has to be decided whether to use a phased array (PA) or a multiple-beam antenna (MBA). Attention is given to nulling resolution and MBA/PA configuration, taking into account the phased array and multiple-beam antennas. The choice of which antenna type to use depends on the nulling bandwidth, the number of weighted channels in the adaptive processor, and the overall coverage area to be served by the antenna system.

  10. Antenna cab interior showing waveguide from external parabolic antenna (later ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Antenna cab interior showing waveguide from external parabolic antenna (later addition), looking north. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  11. View of Antenna #1 (foreground), and Antenna #2 surface doors. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Antenna #1 (foreground), and Antenna #2 surface doors. Image looking northeast - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, looking west. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  13. Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Antenna cab interior showing equipment rack and fiberglass antenna panels, looking southeast. - Western Union Telegraph Company, Jennerstown Relay, Laurel Summit Road off U.S. 30, Laughlintown, Westmoreland County, PA

  14. Cup Cylindrical Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Darby, William G.; Kory, Carol L.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Breen, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    The cup cylindrical waveguide antenna (CCWA) is a short backfire microwave antenna capable of simultaneously supporting the transmission or reception of two distinct signals having opposite circular polarizations. Short backfire antennas are widely used in mobile/satellite communications, tracking, telemetry, and wireless local area networks because of their compactness and excellent radiation characteristics. A typical prior short backfire antenna contains a half-wavelength dipole excitation element for linear polarization or crossed half-wavelength dipole elements for circular polarization. In order to achieve simultaneous dual circular polarization, it would be necessary to integrate, into the antenna feed structure, a network of hybrid components, which would introduce significant losses. The CCWA embodies an alternate approach that entails relatively low losses and affords the additional advantage of compactness. The CCWA includes a circular cylindrical cup, a circular disk subreflector, and a circular waveguide that serves as the excitation element. The components that make it possible to obtain simultaneous dual circular polarization are integrated into the circular waveguide. These components are a sixpost polarizer and an orthomode transducer (OMT) with two orthogonal coaxial ports. The overall length of the OMT and polarizer (for the nominal middle design frequency of 2.25 GHz) is about 11 in. (approximately equal to 28 cm), whereas the length of a commercially available OMT and polarizer for the same frequency is about 32 in. (approximately equal to 81 cm).

  15. Aperture excited dielectric antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswell, W. F.; Chatterjee, J. S.; Mason, V. B.; Tai, C. T.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the effect of placing dielectric objects over the aperture of waveguide antennas are presented. Experimental measurements of the radiation patterns, gain, impedance, near-field amplitude, and pattern and impedance coupling between pairs of antennas are given for various Plexiglas shapes, including the sphere and the cube, excited by rectangular, circular, and square waveguide feed apertures. The waveguide excitation of a dielectric sphere is modeled using the Huygens' source, and expressions for the resulting electric fields, directivity, and efficiency are derived. Calculations using this model show good overall agreement with experimental patterns and directivity measurements. The waveguide under an infinite dielectric slab is used as an impedance model. Calculations using this model agree qualitatively with the measured impedance data. It is concluded that dielectric loaded antennas such as the waveguide excited sphere, cube, or sphere-cylinder can produce directivities in excess of that obtained by a uniformly illuminated aperture of the same cross section, particularly for dielectric objects with dimensions of 2 wavelengths or less. It is also shown that for certain configurations coupling between two antennas of this type is less than that for the same antennas without dielectric loading.

  16. Imaging antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, D. B.; Muha, M. S.

    1982-01-01

    Many millimeter and far-infrared imaging systems are limited in sensitivity and speed because they depend on a single scanned element. Because of recent advances in planar detectors such as Schottky diodes, superconducting tunnel junctions, and microbolometers, an attractive approach to this problem is a planar antenna array with integrated detectors. A planar line antenna array and optical system for imaging has been developed. The significant advances are a 'reverse-microscope' optical configuration and a modified bow-tie antenna design. In the 'reverse-microscope' configuration, a lens is attached to the bottom of the substrate containing the antennas. Imaging is done through the substrate. This configuration eliminates the troublesome effects of substrate surface waves. The substrate lens has only a single refracting surface, making possible a virtually aplanatic system, with little spherical aberration or coma. The array is characterized by an optical transfer function that is easily measured. An array with 19 dB crosstalk levels between adjacent antennas has been tested and it was found that the array captured 50 percent of the available power. This imaging system was diffraction limited.

  17. Satellite dual antenna pointing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keigler, John E. (Inventor); Hartshorne, Frank A. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A satellite antenna pointing system for separately pointing separated transmit and receive high gain antenna systems includes means for separately and sequentially applying a beacon signal to the transmit and receive antenna systems and a broad beam width antenna which has a coverage area greater than the overall coverage region of the spot beam antenna systems. The system includes ground stations located at or near the periphery of the overall coverage region adapted to receive these beacon signals. At a central control station these beacon signals are compared to provide first signals proportional to the ratio of said beacon signals received from said transmit antenna system and said broad beam width antenna and second signals proportional to the ratio of said beacon signals received from said satellite receive antenna system and said broad beam width antenna. The central station generates from said first signals transmit antenna control signals which are sent to the satellite to control the orientation of said transmit antenna system. Likewise, the central control station generates from the second signals receiver antenna control signals which are applied to the satellite to control the orientation of the satellite receive antenna system.

  18. Switched-beam array of dielectric rod antenna with RF-MEMS switch for millimeter-wave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousstia, M. W.; Reniers, A. C. F.; Herben, M. H. A. J.

    2015-03-01

    A conformal dielectric rod antenna array with operating frequency of 11.2 GHz is investigated, designed, and measured. This antenna array is combined with a single pole double throw radio frequency microelectromechanical systems (RF-MEMS) switch to realize switched-beam performance. Moreover, this antenna array exhibits uniform radiation performance for different scan angles with no grating lobes. The characterization and measurement of the antenna system have been performed. The measured radiation pattern of the antenna in the anechoic chamber is in good agreement with the simulated antenna pattern. The measured antenna with the RF-MEMS switch has 13.5 dBi realized gain, -15 dB sidelobe level, 22 half-power beamwidth, and 7.3% (fractional) bandwidth (or 800 MHz) at 11.2 GHz.

  19. View of antenna tunnel end. Right to Antenna Silo #1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of antenna tunnel end. Right to Antenna Silo #1, left to Antenna Silo #2 - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. View north of the antenna array, note the communications antenna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View north of the antenna array, note the communications antenna in the middleground - Over-the-Horizon Backscatter Radar Network, Christmas Valley Radar Site Transmit Sector Four Antenna Array, On unnamed road west of Lost Forest Road, Christmas Valley, Lake County, OR

  1. A 96-antenna radioheliograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesovoi, Sergey V.; Altyntsev, Alexander T.; Ivanov, Eugene F.; Gubin, Alexey V.

    2014-07-01

    Here we briefly present some design approaches for a multifrequency 96-antenna radioheliograph. The configuration of the array antenna, transmission lines and digital receivers is the main focus of this work. The radioheliograph is a T-shaped centrally condensed radiointerferometer operating in the frequency range 4-8 GHz. The justification for the choice of such a configuration is discussed. The signals from antennas are transmitted to a workroom by analog optical links. The dynamic range and phase errors of the microwave-over-optical signal are considered. The signals after downconverting are processed by digital receivers for delay tracking and fringe stopping. The required step of delay tracking and data rates are considered. Two 3-bit data streams (I and Q) are transmitted to a correlator with the transceivers embedded in Field Programmed Gate Array chips and with PCI Express cables.

  2. The ACTS multibeam antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regier, Frank A.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1993 is briefly introduced. Its multibeam antenna, consisting of electrically similar 30 GHz receive and 20 GHz transmit offset Cassegrain systems, both utilizing orthogonal polarizations, is described. Dual polarization is achieved by using one feed assembly for each polarization in conjunction with nested front and back subreflectors, the gridded front subreflector acting as a window for one polarization and a reflector for the other. The antennas produce spot beams with approximately 0.3 degree beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dbi. High surface accuracy and high edge taper produce low sidelobe levels and high cross-polarization isolation. A brief description is given of several Ka-band components fabricated for ACTS. These include multiflare antenna feedhorns, beam-forming networks utilizing latching ferrite waveguide switches, a 30 GHz HEMT low-noise amplifier and a 20 GHz TWT power amplifier.

  3. Hemispheric ultra-wideband antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-04-01

    This report begins with a review of reduced size ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas and the peculiar problems that arise when building a UWB antenna. It then gives a description of a new type of UWB antenna that resolves these problems. This antenna, dubbed the hemispheric conical antenna, is similar to a conventional conical antenna in that it uses the same inverted conical conductor over a ground plane, but it also uses a hemispheric dielectric fill in between the conductive cone and the ground plane. The dielectric material creates a fundamentally new antenna which is reduced in size and much more rugged than a standard UWB conical antenna. The creation of finite-difference time domain (FDTD) software tools in spherical coordinates, as described in SAND2004-6577, enabled this technological advance.

  4. PASS Spacecraft Antenna Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeland, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose was to generate estimates of mechanical performance for the classes of spacecraft antenna under construction for application to the Personal Access Satellite System (PASS). These performance data are needed for the support of trade studies involving antenna system development. The classes of antenna considered included: (1) rigid non-deployable antenna structures; (2) mechanical deployable antenna concepts; (3) inflatable deployable antenna concepts; and (4) mesh deployable antenna concepts. The estimates of mechanical performance are presented in terms of structural weight and cost as a function of the reflector size. Estimates of aperture surface precision are presented for a few discrete antenna sizes. The range of reflector size is 1 to 4 meters for non-deployable structures and 2 to 8 meters for deployable structures. The range of reflector surface precision is lambda/30 to lambda/50 for 20 and 30 GHz, respectively.

  5. A plasma receiving dipole antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Minaev, I. M.; Gusein-zade, N. G.; Rukhadze, K. Z.

    2010-10-15

    Results from experimental studies of a short-wave plasma dipole transceiver antenna are presented. The efficiency of the plasma receiving antenna is estimated, and the optimal frequency range for excitation and reception under the given experimental conditions is determined.

  6. Galileo satellite antenna modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Dach, Rolf; Prange, Lars; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The space segment of the European satellite navigation system Galileo currently consists of six satellites. Four of them belong to the first generation of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites whereas the other two are Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. High-precision geodetic applications require detailed knowledge about the actual phase center of the satellite and receiver antenna. The deviation of this actual phase center from a well-defined reference point is described by phase center offsets (PCOs) and phase center variations (PCVs). Unfortunately, no public information is available about the Galileo satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs, neither for the IOV, nor the FOC satellites. Therefore, conventional values for the IOV satellite antenna PCOs have been adopted for the Multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The effect of the PCVs is currently neglected and no PCOs for the FOC satellites are available yet. To overcome this deficiency in GNSS observation modeling, satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs are estimated for the Galileo IOV satellites based on global GNSS tracking data of the MGEX network and additional stations of the legacy IGS network. Two completely independent solutions are computed with the Bernese and Napeos software packages. The PCO and PCV values of the individual satellites are analyzed and the availability of two different solutions allows for an accuracy assessment. The FOC satellites are built by a different manufacturer and are also equipped with another type of antenna panel compared to the IOV satellites. Signal transmission of the first FOC satellite has started in December 2014 and activation of the second satellite is expected for early 2015. Based on the available observations PCO estimates and, optionally PCVs of the FOC satellites will be presented as well. Finally, the impact of the new antenna model on the precision and accuracy of the Galileo orbit determination is analyzed.

  7. Furlable spacecraft antenna development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, R. E.; Wilson, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    The development of large furlable spacecraft antennas using conical main reflectors is described. Two basic antenna configurations which utilize conical main reflectors have been conceived and are under development. In the conical-Gregorian configuration each ray experiences two reflections in traveling from the feed center to the aperture plane. In the Quadreflex (four reflection) configuration, each ray experiences four reflections, one at each of two subreflector surfaces and two at the main conical reflector surface. The RF gain measurements obtained from 6-ft and 30-in. models of the conical-Gregorian and Quadreflex concepts respectively were sufficiently encouraging to warrant further development of the concepts.

  8. Spaced antenna drift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royrvik, O.

    1983-01-01

    It has been suggested that the spaced antenna drift (SAD) technique could be successfully used by VHF radars and that it would be superior to a Doppler-beam-swinging (DBS) technique because it would take advantage of the aspect sensitivity of the scattered signal, and might also benefit from returns from single meteors. It appears, however, that the technique suffers from several limitations. On the basis of one SAD experiment performed at the very large Jicamarca radar, it is concluded that the SAD technique can be compared in accuracy to the DBS technique only if small antenna dimensions are used.

  9. Ionospheric effects to antenna impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bethke, K. H.

    1986-01-01

    The reciprocity between high power satellite antennas and the surrounding plasma are examined. The relevant plasma states for antenna impedance calculations are presented and plasma models, and hydrodynamic and kinetic theory, are discussed. A theory from which a variation in antenna impedance with regard to the radiated power can be calculated for a frequency range well above the plasma resonance frequency is give. The theory can include photo and secondary emission effects in antenna impedance calculations.

  10. Electromagnetic exposure in a phantom in the near and far fields of wire and planar antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazady, Md. Anas Boksh

    Due to the wide availability and usage of wireless devices and systems there have been and are concerns regarding their effects on the human body. Respective regulatory agencies have developed safety standards based on scientific research on electromagnetic (EM) exposure from wireless devices and antennas. The metric that quantifies the exposure level is called the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). Wireless devices must satisfy the regulatory standards before being marketed. In the past, researchers have primarily focused on investigating the EM exposure from wireless devices that are used very near to the user's head or body (less than 25 mm). But as time progressed many more wireless devices have become ubiquitous (vehicular wireless devices, laptop PCMCIA cards, Bluetooth dongles, wireless LAN routers, cordless phone base stations, and pico base stations are to name a few) and are operated at distances greater than 25 mm yet smaller than 200 mm. Given the variations in operating frequency, distance, and antenna size and type it is challenging to develop an approach using which EM exposure from a wide variety of wireless devices can be evaluated. The problem becomes more involved owing to the difficulties in identifying the antenna zone boundaries, e.g. reactive near-field, radiating near-field, far-field etc. The focus of this thesis is to investigate a large class of low and highly directive antennas and evaluate the EM exposure from them into a large elliptical phantom. The objective is to be able to predict threshold power levels that meet the SAR limits imposed by the regulatory agencies. It was observed that among the low directivity antennas at close near-field distances, electrically small antennas induced distinguishably higher SAR than electrically larger antennas. But differences in SAR were small as the phantom moved into the far-fields of the antennas. SAR induced by highly directive antennas were higher when the phantom was in the far-field of the antennas and was facing the antenna frontal plane. The same was not true when the phantom was in the near-field of the antennas. Finally, by analyzing the simulation and measurement data threshold power formulas were developed for low directivity antennas using which power levels corresponding to the safe exposure limits independent of device type or geometry can be estimated.

  11. Modular Amplifier/Antenna Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belohoubek, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    Two proposed solar-powered microwave transmitter modules would include amplifiers in direct contact with antenna dipoles so that metalization of dipoles serves as heat-dissipation areas for amplifiers. In integrated energy converter (solar radiation to microwaves), solar cells feed dc power directly to microwave amplifier/antenna modules. Antenna elements also serve as heat sinks for amplifiers.

  12. The JPL mechanically steered antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berner, Jeff B.; Bell, David J.

    1988-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has designed and developed a mechanically steered antenna for tracking satellites in a mobile environment. This antenna was used to track an L-band beacon on the MARISAT satellite. A description of the antenna and the results of the satellite experiment are given.

  13. Near-field testing of the 15-meter hoop-column antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Lyle C.; Adams, Richard R.; Bailey, M. C.; Belvin, W. Keith; Butler, David H.; Campbell, Thomas G.

    1989-01-01

    A 15-m-diameter antenna was tested to verify that dimensional tolerances for acceptable performance could be achieved and to verify structural, electromagnetic, and mechanical performance predictions. This antenna utilized the hoop column structure, a gold plated molybdenum mesh reflector, and 96 control cables to adjust the reflector conformance with a paraboloid. The dimensional conformance of the antenna structure and surface was measured with metric camera and theodolites. Near field pattern data were used to assess the electromagnetic performance at five frequencies from 2.225 to 11.6 GHz. The reflector surface was adjusted to greatly improve electromagnetic performance with a finite element model and the surface measurements. Measurement results show that antenna surface figure and adjustments and electromagnetic patterns agree well with predictions.

  14. Microstrip backfire antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, T. G.; Cohen, N. V.

    1978-01-01

    Microstrip resonator is improvement over dipole-fed waveguide-fed backfire designs. Advantages include simpler construction with reduction in weight and size over other backfire designs. Microstrip backfire concept has potential in dual-polarization antenna systems, array-thinning designs, and feed designs for larger parabolic reflectors.

  15. Antenna calibration at Havana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Z.; Southworth, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    The procedures for calibrating the antenna patterns of the Havana radar system are described along with the reduction of the measurements made using a dipole towed behind an airplane. The power-gain pattern for the north, south, and joint troughs of sites 3 and 4 are plotted.

  16. Antenna array research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, C.

    1973-01-01

    Antenna array research on electromagnetic field problems in inhomogeneous media is presented along with characteristics of the Eaton lens. Comparisons are given of the radiation pattern and directivity of small Luneburg lens with a homogeneous lens. References and figure captions on radiation patterns are included.

  17. Community Antenna Television (CATV).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    The number of households hooked up to cable television or community antenna television (CATV) is expanding rapidly, and Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has been developing regulations since 1962 to guide the growth of the industry. By 1965 the FCC had claimed jurisdiction over all CATV systems in the U. S. This jurisdiction was challenged…

  18. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knerr, T. J.; Schaffner, P. R.; Mielke, R. R.; Gilreath, M. C.

    1980-01-01

    A procedure for numerically calculating radiation patterns of fuselage-mounted airborne antennas using the Volumetric Pattern Analysis Program is presented. Special attention is given to aircraft modeling. An actual case study involving a large commercial aircraft is included to illustrate the analysis procedure.

  19. Attitudinal Conformity and Anonymity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyson, Herbert; Kaplowitz, Stan

    1977-01-01

    Tested college students for conformity when conditions contributing to conformity were absent. Found that social pressures (responding in public, being surveyed by fellow group members) are necessary to produce conformity. (RL)

  20. Quartz antenna with hollow conductor

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Benabou, Elie

    2002-01-01

    A radio frequency (RF) antenna for plasma ion sources is formed of a hollow metal conductor tube disposed within a glass tube. The hollow metal tubular conductor has an internal flow channel so that there will be no coolant leakage if the outer glass tube of the antenna breaks. A portion of the RF antenna is formed into a coil; the antenna is used for inductively coupling RF power to a plasma in an ion source chamber. The antenna is made by first inserting the metal tube inside the glass tube, and then forming the glass/metal composite tube into the desired coil shape.

  1. Development of Leaky Wave Antennas for Layered Ridge Dielectric Waveguide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1993-01-01

    The millimeter wave, especially above 100 GHz, and the submillimeter wave frequency spectrum offers the possibility for narrow-beam, high-resolution antennas which are critical for high definition radars required for space debris tracking, airport ground avoidance radars, and missile tracking. In addition, the frequency which most atmospheric constituents may be detected lie in this part of the frequency spectrum. Therefore, the development of electronic components for millimeter/submillimeter wave passive sensors is required for environmental monitoring of the Earth's atmosphere. Typical microwave transmission lines such as microstrip and coplanar waveguide rely on two or more electrical conductors to concentrate and guide the electromagnetic energy. Unfortunately, the surface resistance of the conductors increases as the square root of frequency. In addition, the circuit dimensions must be decreased with increasing frequency to maintain a single mode transmission line which further increases the conductor loss. An alternative family of transmission lines are formed from two or more insulating materials and rely on the differences in the permittivities between the two materials to guide the wave. No metal conductors are required although some dielectric waveguides do utilize a metallic ground plane to facilitate the interconnections of active electrical elements or to reduce the transmission line size. Examples of such transmission lines are image guides, insulated image guides, trapped image guides, ridge guide, and layered ridge dielectric waveguide (LRDW). Although most dielectric waveguides have dimensions on the order of lambda to provide sufficient field confinement, the LRDW has been shown to provide good field confinement for electrically small lines. This offers an advantage in circuit integration. It has been shown that a periodic array of metallic strips placed either along or on top of a dielectric waveguide forms an effective radiator. This antenna is easy to fabricate and there is good background of microstrip type antenna design information in the literature. This paper reports the development of the first frequency scanning antenna fed by a LRDW.

  2. System consideration, design approach and test of a low gain spherical coverage antenna for large space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, R. E.; Patterson, T. D.; Moreno, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    A fixed beam array antenna approach is proposed to meet the omnidirectional receiving and transmitting requirements of LST (Large Space Telescope). The proposed method uses an antenna of known performance and scales the size and frequency to conform with the LST 1/5-th scale model. The simplification that the approach provides over switching antenna elements on board the LST or switching from the ground by frequency diversity makes it worthy of consideration against the factors of performance, cost, reliability, and operations complexity. For LST applications, the system capabilities, requirements, and margins are summarized. The areas to be covered by further investigations into the proposed LST antenna are noted.

  3. Conformation and conformational exchange of Olopatadine hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Lian-di; Zhu, Chuan-jun; Yang, Chun-hui; Cui, Yu-xin

    2008-12-01

    Besides the assignments of the 13C and 1H shifts by 1D and 2D NMR, the experiment 1H spectra of Olopatadine hydrochloride were recorded at temperature range 228-338 K. The variable-temperature spectra revealed a dynamic NMR effect which is attributed to conformational interconversion of the drug. At low temperature, the solution was shown to contain two conformers and the ration of them was 1:1. A conformational process with a free energy of activation of 56.7 kJ mol -1, coalescence temperature 298 K, was interpreted as geminal 1H exchange. Using molecule simulation, conformational candidates for two conformers are proposed.

  4. Concepts and cost trade-offs for land vehicle antennas in satellite mobile communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, H. A.

    1948-01-01

    Several antenna design concepts, operating at UHF (821 to 825 MHz transmit and 866 to 870 MHz receive bands), with gain ranging between 6 and 12 dBic, that are suitable for land mobile vehicles are presented. The antennas may be used within CONUS and ALASKA to communicate to and from a geosynchronous satellite. Depending on the type of steering mechanism, the antennas are broken down into three categories; (1) electronically scanned arrays with phase shifters, (2) electronically switched arrays with switchable power dividers/combiners, and (3) mechanically steered arrays. The operating characteristics of two of these design concepts, one a conformal antenna with electronic beam steering and the other a nonconformal design with mechanical steering, were evaluated with regard to two and three satellite system. Cost estimates of various antenna concepts were made and plotted against their overall gain performance.

  5. Microsecond switchable thermal antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe Benisty, Henri; Besbes, Mondher

    2014-07-21

    We propose a thermal antenna that can be actively switched on and off at the microsecond scale by means of a phase transition of a metal-insulator material, the vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}). This thermal source is made of a periodically patterned tunable VO{sub 2} nanolayer, which support a surface phonon-polariton in the infrared range in their crystalline phase. Using electrodes properly registered with respect to the pattern, the VO{sub 2} phase transition can be locally triggered by ohmic heating so that the surface phonon-polariton can be diffracted by the induced grating, producing a highly directional thermal emission. Conversely, when heating less, the VO{sub 2} layers cool down below the transition temperature, the surface phonon-polariton cannot be diffracted anymore so that thermal emission is inhibited. This switchable antenna could find broad applications in the domain of active thermal coatings or in those of infrared spectroscopy and sensing.

  6. Microsecond switchable thermal antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Benisty, Henri; Besbes, Mondher

    2014-07-01

    We propose a thermal antenna that can be actively switched on and off at the microsecond scale by means of a phase transition of a metal-insulator material, the vanadium dioxide (VO2). This thermal source is made of a periodically patterned tunable VO2 nanolayer, which support a surface phonon-polariton in the infrared range in their crystalline phase. Using electrodes properly registered with respect to the pattern, the VO2 phase transition can be locally triggered by ohmic heating so that the surface phonon-polariton can be diffracted by the induced grating, producing a highly directional thermal emission. Conversely, when heating less, the VO2 layers cool down below the transition temperature, the surface phonon-polariton cannot be diffracted anymore so that thermal emission is inhibited. This switchable antenna could find broad applications in the domain of active thermal coatings or in those of infrared spectroscopy and sensing.

  7. Stacked optical antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Dieter W.; Rodrigo, Sergio G.; Novotny, Lukas

    2011-01-01

    We propose and analyze a stacked optical antenna (SOA). It is characterized by a stacked structure of its arms at the center, and an interstitial gap layer (IGL) in between, which plays the role of the feed gap. Because of its in-plane arrangement, the IGL can be fabricated by standard planar deposition techniques providing high accuracy and control. A SOA can be an enabling element for several technologies, in particular for optical detection, communication, and encryption besides applications in microscopy.

  8. Novel metamaterial based antennas for flexible wireless systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleel, Haider Raad

    Recent years have witnessed a great deal of interest from both academia and industry in the field of flexible electronic systems. This research topic tops the pyramid of research priorities requested by many national research agencies. Consistently, flexible electronic systems require the integration of flexible antennas operating in specific frequency bands to provide wireless connectivity which is highly demanded by today's information oriented society. On the other hand, metamaterials have become very popular in the design of contemporary antenna and microwave devices due to their wide range of applications derived from their unique properties which significantly enhances the performance of antennas and RF systems. Accordingly, the integration of metamaterial structures within flexible wireless systems is very beneficial in this growing field of research. A systematic approach to the analysis and design of flexible and conformal antennas and metamaterials is ultimately needed. The research reported in this thesis focuses on developing flexible low profile antennas and metamaterial structures in addition to characterizing their performance when integrated within flexible wireless systems. Three flexible, compact, and extremely low profile (50.8 microm) antennas intended for WLAN, Bluetooth and Ultra Wide Band (UWB) applications are presented. Next, a novel miniaturized Artificial Magnetic Conductor (AMC) and a new technique to enhance the bandwidth of micro-Negative (MNG) metamaterial are reported. Furthermore, the effect of bending on the AMC and MNG metamaterial is investigated in this thesis for the first time. Finally, the findings of this research are utilized in practical applications with specific design constraints including mutual coupling reduction between radiating elements in antenna arrays and MIMO systems and Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) reduction in telemedicine systems.

  9. The ACTS multibeam antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regier, Frank A.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1993 introduces several new technologies including a multibeam antenna (MBA) operating at Ka-band. The satellite is introduced briefly, and then the MBA, consisting of electrically similar 30 GHz received and 20 GHz transmit offset Cassegrain systems utilizing orthogonal linear polarizations, is described. Dual polarization is achieved by using one feed assembly for each polarization in conjunction with nested front and back subreflectors, the gridded front subreflector acting as a window for one polarization and a reflector for the other. The antennas produce spot beams with approximately 0.3 deg beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dbi. High surface accuracy and high edge taper produce low sidelobe levels and high cross-polarization isolation. A brief description is given of several Ka-band components fabricated for ACTS. These include multiflare antenna feedhorns, beam-forming networks utilizing latching ferrite waveguide switches, a 30 GHz high mobility electron transmitter (HEMT) low-noise amplifier and a 20 GHz TWT power amplifier.

  10. Modular antenna design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribble, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanical design of a modular antenna concept was developed sufficiently to allow manufacture of a working demonstration model of a module, to predict mass properties, and to make performance estimates for antenna reflectors composed of these modules. The primary features of this concept are: (1) each module is an autonomous structural element which can be attached to adjacent modules through a three point connection; (2) the upper surface is a folding hexagonal truss plate mechanism which serves as the supporting structure for a reflective surface; and (3) the entire truss and surface can be folded into a cylindrical envelope in which all truss elements are essentially parallel. The kinematic studies and engineering demonstration model fully verified the deployment kinematics, stowing philosophy, and deployment sequencing for large antenna modules. It was established that such modules can be stowed in packages as small as 25 cm in diameter, using 1.27 cm diameter structural tubes. The development activity indicates that this deployable modular approach towards building large structures in space will support erection of 450 m apertures for operation up to 3 GHz with a single space shuttle flight.

  11. LOFAR High Band Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, N.; Kratzenberg, E.; Corey, B.

    2003-12-01

    The Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) will initiate a new era of astronomical discovery at the low frequency end of the electromagnetic spectrum by virtue of its large number of antennas ( 13,000 each in multiple frequency bands), large spatial extent ( 400 km), and wide frequency range (10-240 MHz). Each High Band Antenna, which covers 120-240 MHz, is an electronically steerable, compact array of 16 dual-polarization receptors. The starting point for the antenna design -- a 4x4 square array of inverted-vee dipole receptors -- is studied using both electromagnetic computer simulations and prototype field testing. Through analysis at selected frequencies, the effect of spacing on the severity of grating lobes and beam steering is determined. In computer simulation, the shape of the dipole receptor is adjusted in order to optimize performance and ease of manufacture, and a particular model is highlighted which provides an improved beamwidth and greater sensitivity across the band of operation. This work was funded by the REU program of the NSF.

  12. JPL Large Advanced Antenna Station Array Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In accordance with study requirements, two antennas are described: a 30 meter standard antenna and a 34 meter modified antenna, along with a candidate array configuration for each. Modified antenna trade analyses are summarized, risks analyzed, costs presented, and a final antenna array configuration recommendation made.

  13. 47 CFR 80.863 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.863 Section 80.863... Antenna system. (a) An antenna system must be installed which is as nondirectional and as efficient as is... construction of the required antenna must insure operation in time of emergency. (b) If the required antenna...

  14. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  15. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  16. 47 CFR 80.863 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.863 Section 80.863... Antenna system. (a) An antenna system must be installed which is as nondirectional and as efficient as is... construction of the required antenna must insure operation in time of emergency. (b) If the required antenna...

  17. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  18. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  19. 47 CFR 80.866 - Spare antenna.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spare antenna. 80.866 Section 80.866... Spare antenna. A spare transmitting antenna completely assembled for immediate erection must be provided. If the installed transmitting antenna is suspended between supports, this spare antenna must be...

  20. Antenna structure with distributed strip

    DOEpatents

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.

    2008-03-18

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element is in proximity to a ground conductor. The folded line and the distributed strip can be electrically interconnected and substantially coplanar. The ground conductor can be spaced from, and coplanar to, the radiating element, or can alternatively lie in a plane set at an angle to the radiating element. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise a ground plane and radiating element on opposed sides of a printed wiring board. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise conductors that can be arranged as free standing "foils". Other embodiments include antennas that are encapsulated into a package containing the antenna.

  1. Antenna structure with distributed strip

    DOEpatents

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.

    2008-10-21

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element is in proximity to a ground conductor. The folded line and the distributed strip can be electrically interconnected and substantially coplanar. The ground conductor can be spaced from, and coplanar to, the radiating element, or can alternatively lie in a plane set at an angle to the radiating element. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise a ground plane and radiating element on opposed sides of a printed wiring board. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise conductors that can be arranged as free standing "foils". Other embodiments include antennas that are encapsulated into a package containing the antenna.

  2. Efficient Placement of Directional Antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Feng; Kasiviswanathan, Shiva

    2010-09-20

    Directional antenna is an technology for the proliferation of wireless networks. In centralized wireless network, wireless devices communicate through base stations. Directed antennas are placed on base stations and form a backbone of communication. The communication between base stations and wireless devices can be interfered due to a large number of wireless device. Methodically positioning and orienting directed antennas can help to reduce the interference while saving energy. An integer linear programming is developed for siting and directing antennas on multiple base stations, and this formulation can be extended to model non-overlapping channels. Through the integer programming formulation, optimal antenna positions can be used to analyze the performance of directed antennas with different parameters like the number base stations and the number of non-overlapping channels.

  3. Antenna Calibration and Measurement Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Cortes, Manuel Vazquez

    2012-01-01

    A document describes the Antenna Calibration & Measurement Equipment (ACME) system that will provide the Deep Space Network (DSN) with instrumentation enabling a trained RF engineer at each complex to perform antenna calibration measurements and to generate antenna calibration data. This data includes continuous-scan auto-bore-based data acquisition with all-sky data gathering in support of 4th order pointing model generation requirements. Other data includes antenna subreflector focus, system noise temperature and tipping curves, antenna efficiency, reports system linearity, and instrument calibration. The ACME system design is based on the on-the-fly (OTF) mapping technique and architecture. ACME has contributed to the improved RF performance of the DSN by approximately a factor of two. It improved the pointing performances of the DSN antennas and productivity of its personnel and calibration engineers.

  4. A Mars Riometer: Antenna Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Craig D.

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on NASA Grant NAG5-9706. This project explored riometer (relative ionospheric opacity meter) antenna designs that would be practical for a Mars surface or balloon mission. The riometer is an important radio science instrument for terrestrial aeronomy investigations. The riometer measures absorption of cosmic radio waves by the overhead ionosphere. Studies have shown the instrument should work well on Mars, which has an appreciable daytime ionosphere. There has been concern that the required radio receiver antenna (with possibly a 10 meter scale size) would be too large or too difficult to deploy on Mars. This study addresses those concerns and presents several antenna designs and deployment options. It is found that a Mars balloon would provide an excellent platform for the riometer antenna. The antenna can be incorporated into the envelope design, allowing self-deployment of the antenna as the balloon inflates.

  5. Deployable antenna phase A study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, J.; Bernstein, J.; Fischer, G.; Jacobson, G.; Kadar, I.; Marshall, R.; Pflugel, G.; Valentine, J.

    1979-01-01

    Applications for large deployable antennas were re-examined, flight demonstration objectives were defined, the flight article (antenna) was preliminarily designed, and the flight program and ground development program, including the support equipment, were defined for a proposed space transportation system flight experiment to demonstrate a large (50 to 200 meter) deployable antenna system. Tasks described include: (1) performance requirements analysis; (2) system design and definition; (3) orbital operations analysis; and (4) programmatic analysis.

  6. Analyzing Large Reflector Antenna Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Roy; Strain, Douglas M.

    1991-01-01

    Iterative Design of Antenna Structures (IDEAS) computer program performs finite-element analysis and optimization of design, with special features for analysis and design of microwave antennas and associated structural components. Primary feature to perform root-mean-square-best-fitting path-length-error and boresight-pointing-error analyses for Cassegrain microwave antenna structure loaded by gravity, wind, or other environmental effects. Flexible and easy to use. Written in ATHENA FORTRAN and ASSEMBLER.

  7. Analysis of rectangular microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of microstrip antennas covered by a dielectric substrate is formulated in terms of coupled integro-differential equations with the current distribution on the conducting patch as an unknown quantity. The Galerkin method is used to solve for the unknown patch current. Using the present formulation, the radiation pattern, the resonant frequency, and the bandwidth of a rectangular microstrip antenna are computed. Design data for a rectangular microstrip antenna are also presented.

  8. Antenna system for MSAT mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, Ingmar; Patenaude, Yves; Stipelman, Leora

    1988-01-01

    Spar has evaluated and compared several antenna concepts for the North American Mobile Satellite. The paper describes some of the requirements and design considerations for the antennas and demonstrates the performance of antenna concepts that can meet them. Multiple beam reflector antennas are found to give best performance and much of the design effort has gone into the design of the primary feed radiators and beam forming networks to achieve efficient beams with good overlap and flexibility. Helices and cup dipole radiators have been breadboarded as feed element candidates and meausured results are presented. The studies and breadboard activities have made it possible to proceed with a flight program.

  9. Metamaterial-based "sabre" antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafdallah Ouslimani, Habiba; Yuan, Tangjie; Kanane, Houcine; Priou, Alain; Collignon, Gérard; Lacotte, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    The "sabre" antenna is an array of two monopole elements, vertically polarized with omnidirectional radiation patterns, and placed on either side of a composite material on the tail of an airplane. As an in-phase reflector plane, the antenna uses a compact dual-layer high-impedance surface (DL-HIS) with offset mushroom-like Sivenpiper square shape unit cells. This topology allows one to control both operational frequency and bandgap width, while reducing the total height of the antenna to under λ0/36. The designed antenna structure has a wide bandwidth higher than 24% around 1.4 GHz. The measurements and numerical simulations agree very well.

  10. Development of inflatable antenna structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lou, M. C.; Fang, H.

    2002-01-01

    Self-rigidizable spring-tape-reinforced (STR) booms were used to develop structural systems for large-aperture space inflatable radar antennas. The lightweight planar frames built with STR booms can be compactly stowed for launch, deployed by inflation pressure in space, and used to tension the RF membrane apertures of the antennas. Engineering models of a Ka-band reflectarray antenna and a L-band synthetic-aperture radar antenna were developed and have successfully demonstrated stowage and deployment, as well as RF performance. A design improvement was also being implemented to enhance long-term configuration stability and widen the application range of the STR booms.

  11. Electronic switching spherical array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockton, R.

    1978-01-01

    This work was conducted to demonstrate the performance levels attainable with an ESSA (Electronic Switching Spherical Array) antenna by designing and testing an engineering model. The antenna was designed to satisfy general spacecraft environmental requirements and built to provide electronically commandable beam pointing capability throughout a hemisphere. Constant gain and beam shape throughout large volumetric coverage regions are the principle characteristics. The model is intended to be a prototype of a standard communications and data handling antenna for user scientific spacecraft with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Some additional testing was conducted to determine the feasibility of an integrated TDRSS and GPS (Global Positioning System) antenna system.

  12. Design and Development of Aerogel-Based Antennas for Aerospace Applications: A Final Report to the NARI Seedling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2014-01-01

    As highly porous solids possessing low density and low dielectric permittivity combined with good mechanical properties, polyimide (PI) aerogels offer great promise as an enabling technology for lightweight aircraft antenna systems. While they have been aggressively explored for thermal insulation, barely any effort has been made to leverage these materials for antennas or other applications that take advantage of their aforementioned attributes. In Phase I of the NARI Seedling Project, we fabricated PI aerogels with properties tailored to enable new antenna concepts with performance characteristics (wide bandwidth and high gain) and material properties (low density, environmental stability, and robustness) superior to the state of practice (SOP). We characterized electromagnetic properties, including permittivity, reflectivity, and propagation losses for the aerogels. Simple, prototype planar printed circuit patch antennas from down-selected aerogel formulations were fabricated by molding the aerogels to net shapes and by gold-metalizing the pattern onto the templates via electron beam evaporation in a clean room environment. These aerogel based antennas were benchmarked against current antenna SOP, and exhibited both broader bandwidth and comparable or higher gain performance at appreciably lower mass. Phase II focused on the success of the Phase I results pushing the PI aerogel based antenna technology further by exploring alternative antenna design (i.e., slot coupled antennas) and by examining other techniques for fabricating the antennas including ink jet printing with the goal of optimizing antenna performance and simplifying production. We also examined new aerogel formulations with better moisture and solvent resistance to survive processing conditions. In addition, we investigated more complex antenna designs including passive phased arrays such as 2x4 and 4x8 element arrays to assess the scalability of the aerogel antenna concept. Furthermore, we explored the possibility of developing these arrays in thin, flexible form to make conformable antennas.

  13. Highly Omnidirectional and Frequency Controllable Carbon/Polyaniline-based 2D and 3D Monopole Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Keun-Young; Kim, Minkyu; Lee, James S.; Jang, Jyongsik

    2015-01-01

    Highly omnidirectional and frequency controllable carbon/polyaniline (C/PANI)-based, two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) monopole antennas were fabricated using screen-printing and a one-step, dimensionally confined hydrothermal strategy, respectively. Solvated C/PANI was synthesized by low-temperature interfacial polymerization, during which strong π–π interactions between graphene and the quinoid rings of PANI resulted in an expanded PANI conformation with enhanced crystallinity and improved mechanical and electrical properties. Compared to antennas composed of pristine carbon or PANI-based 2D monopole structures, 2D monopole antennas composed of this enhanced hybrid material were highly efficient and amenable to high-frequency, omnidirectional electromagnetic waves. The mean frequency of C/PANI fiber-based 3D monopole antennas could be controlled by simply cutting and stretching the antenna. These antennas attained high peak gain (3.60 dBi), high directivity (3.91 dBi) and radiation efficiency (92.12%) relative to 2D monopole antenna. These improvements were attributed the high packing density and aspect ratios of C/PANI fibers and the removal of the flexible substrate. This approach offers a valuable and promising tool for producing highly omnidirectional and frequency-controllable, carbon-based monopole antennas for use in wireless networking communications on industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) bands. PMID:26338090

  14. Highly Omnidirectional and Frequency Controllable Carbon/Polyaniline-based 2D and 3D Monopole Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Keun-Young; Kim, Minkyu; Lee, James S.; Jang, Jyongsik

    2015-09-01

    Highly omnidirectional and frequency controllable carbon/polyaniline (C/PANI)-based, two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) monopole antennas were fabricated using screen-printing and a one-step, dimensionally confined hydrothermal strategy, respectively. Solvated C/PANI was synthesized by low-temperature interfacial polymerization, during which strong π-π interactions between graphene and the quinoid rings of PANI resulted in an expanded PANI conformation with enhanced crystallinity and improved mechanical and electrical properties. Compared to antennas composed of pristine carbon or PANI-based 2D monopole structures, 2D monopole antennas composed of this enhanced hybrid material were highly efficient and amenable to high-frequency, omnidirectional electromagnetic waves. The mean frequency of C/PANI fiber-based 3D monopole antennas could be controlled by simply cutting and stretching the antenna. These antennas attained high peak gain (3.60 dBi), high directivity (3.91 dBi) and radiation efficiency (92.12%) relative to 2D monopole antenna. These improvements were attributed the high packing density and aspect ratios of C/PANI fibers and the removal of the flexible substrate. This approach offers a valuable and promising tool for producing highly omnidirectional and frequency-controllable, carbon-based monopole antennas for use in wireless networking communications on industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) bands.

  15. Highly Omnidirectional and Frequency Controllable Carbon/Polyaniline-based 2D and 3D Monopole Antenna.

    PubMed

    Shin, Keun-Young; Kim, Minkyu; Lee, James S; Jang, Jyongsik

    2015-01-01

    Highly omnidirectional and frequency controllable carbon/polyaniline (C/PANI)-based, two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) monopole antennas were fabricated using screen-printing and a one-step, dimensionally confined hydrothermal strategy, respectively. Solvated C/PANI was synthesized by low-temperature interfacial polymerization, during which strong π-π interactions between graphene and the quinoid rings of PANI resulted in an expanded PANI conformation with enhanced crystallinity and improved mechanical and electrical properties. Compared to antennas composed of pristine carbon or PANI-based 2D monopole structures, 2D monopole antennas composed of this enhanced hybrid material were highly efficient and amenable to high-frequency, omnidirectional electromagnetic waves. The mean frequency of C/PANI fiber-based 3D monopole antennas could be controlled by simply cutting and stretching the antenna. These antennas attained high peak gain (3.60 dBi), high directivity (3.91 dBi) and radiation efficiency (92.12%) relative to 2D monopole antenna. These improvements were attributed the high packing density and aspect ratios of C/PANI fibers and the removal of the flexible substrate. This approach offers a valuable and promising tool for producing highly omnidirectional and frequency-controllable, carbon-based monopole antennas for use in wireless networking communications on industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) bands. PMID:26338090

  16. Large Space Antenna Systems Technology, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, W. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Mission applications for large space antenna systems; large space antenna structural systems; materials and structures technology; structural dynamics and control technology, electromagnetics technology, large space antenna systems and the Space Station; and flight test and evaluation were examined.

  17. Ferrite attenuator modulation improves antenna performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, J. C.; Larson, S. G.; Shorkley, F. H.; Williams, B. T.

    1970-01-01

    Ferrite attenuator inserted into appropriate waveguide reduces the gain of the antenna element which is causing interference. Modulating the ferrite attenuator to change the antenna gain at the receive frequency permits ground tracking until the antenna is no longer needed.

  18. View of Antenna #2 (foreground), and Antenna #1 surface doors. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Antenna #2 (foreground), and Antenna #1 surface doors. Orientation Target #1 in background. Image looking northwest - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. View of Antenna #1 (foreground), and Antenna #2 surface doors. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Antenna #1 (foreground), and Antenna #2 surface doors. Orientation Target #2 in background. Image looking northeast - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Microelectromechanical Systems Actuator Based Reconfigurable Printed Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A polarization reconfigurable patch antenna is disclosed. The antenna includes a feed element, a patch antenna element electrically connected to the feed element, and at least one microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuator, with a partial connection to the patch antenna element along an edge of the patch antenna element. The polarization of the antenna can be switched between circular polarization and linear polarization through action of the at least one MEMS actuator.

  1. Fake conformal symmetry in conformal cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackiw, R.; Pi, So-Young

    2015-03-01

    We examine the local conformal invariance (Weyl invariance) in tensor-scalar theories used in recently proposed conformal cosmological models. We show that the Noether currents associated with Weyl invariance in these theories vanish. We assert that the corresponding Weyl symmetry does not have any dynamical role.

  2. Terahertz antenna electronic chopper.

    PubMed

    Sterczewski, L A; Grzelczak, M P; Plinski, E F

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present an electronic circuit used to bias a photoconductive antenna that generates terahertz radiation. The working principles and the design process for the device are discussed in detail. The noise and shape of the wave measurements for a built device are considered. Furthermore, their impact on a terahertz pulse and its spectra is also examined. The proposed implementation is simple to build, robust and offers a real improvement over THz instrumentation due to the frequency tuning. Additionally, it provides for galvanic isolation and ESD protection. PMID:26827336

  3. Patch antenna terahertz photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Palaferri, D.; Todorov, Y. Chen, Y. N.; Madeo, J.; Vasanelli, A.; Sirtori, C.; Li, L. H.; Davies, A. G.; Linfield, E. H.

    2015-04-20

    We report on the implementation of 5 THz quantum well photodetector exploiting a patch antenna cavity array. The benefit of our plasmonic architecture on the detector performance is assessed by comparing it with detectors made using the same quantum well absorbing region, but processed into a standard 45° polished facet mesa. Our results demonstrate a clear improvement in responsivity, polarization insensitivity, and background limited performance. Peak detectivities in excess of 5 × 10{sup 12} cmHz{sup 1/2}/W have been obtained, a value comparable with that of the best cryogenic cooled bolometers.

  4. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knerr, T. J.; Mielke, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Progress on the development of modeling software, testing software against caclulated data from program VPAP and measured patterns, and calculating roll plane patterns for general aviation aircraft is reported. Major objectives are the continued development of computer software for aircraft modeling and use of this software and program OSUVOL to calculate principal plane and volumetric radiation patterns. The determination of proper placement of antennas on aircraft to meet the requirements of the Microwave Landing System is discussed. An overview of the performed work, and an example of a roll plane model for the Piper PA-31T Cheyenne aircraft and the resulting calculated roll plane radiation pattern are included.

  5. Terahertz antenna electronic chopper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterczewski, L. A.; Grzelczak, M. P.; Plinski, E. F.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present an electronic circuit used to bias a photoconductive antenna that generates terahertz radiation. The working principles and the design process for the device are discussed in detail. The noise and shape of the wave measurements for a built device are considered. Furthermore, their impact on a terahertz pulse and its spectra is also examined. The proposed implementation is simple to build, robust and offers a real improvement over THz instrumentation due to the frequency tuning. Additionally, it provides for galvanic isolation and ESD protection.

  6. Collapsible corrugated horn antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthlome, D. E. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A horn antenna that is readily collapsible while not in use is described. A number of different sized annular metal rings are arranged in a sequence such that each ring is larger than the one that precedes it in the sequence. A number of thin flexible electrically conductive members attach successive metal rings together physically and connect them together electrically. Each flexible conductive member is attached to make electrical contact between the outside surface of a metal ring and the inside surface of an adjacent metal ring in the sequence.

  7. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, Michael S; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C

    2015-02-10

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼ 200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35 × corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼ 115 ×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼ 2,500 × spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d(2). Unfortunately, at d < 10 nm, antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, I(o) = qω|x(o)|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|x(o)| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency. PMID:25624503

  8. Emergency-vehicle VHF antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. E.; Carlson, A. W.; Lewis, J.

    1977-01-01

    Helical VHF antenna mounts on roof of moving vehicle to communicate with distant stations via earth satellites. Antenna requires no pointing and can provide two-way communication while vehicle moves at high speed. Device has proved extremely successful in electrocardiogram transmission tests between medical services vehicle and hospital emergency room.

  9. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission

    PubMed Central

    Eggleston, Michael S.; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C.

    2015-01-01

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35× corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼115×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼2,500× spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d2. Unfortunately, at d < 10 nm, antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, Io = qω|xo|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|xo| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency. PMID:25624503

  10. Soret Fishnet Metalens Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Orazbayev, Bakhtiyar; Beruete, Miguel; Pacheco-Peña, Víctor; Crespo, Gonzalo; Teniente, Jorge; Navarro-Cía, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    At the expense of frequency narrowing, binary amplitude-only diffractive optical elements emulate refractive lenses without the need of large profiles. Unfortunately, they also present larger Fresnel reflection loss than conventional lenses. This is usually tackled by implementing unattractive cumbersome designs. Here we demonstrate that simplicity is not at odds with performance and we show how the fishnet metamaterial can improve the radiation pattern of a Soret lens. The building block of this advanced Soret lens is the fishnet metamaterial operating in the near-zero refractive index regime with one of the edge layers designed with alternating opaque and transparent concentric rings made of subwavelength holes. The hybrid Soret fishnet metalens retains all the merits of classical Soret lenses such as low profile, low cost and ease of manufacturing. It is designed for the W-band of the millimeter-waves range with a subwavelength focal length FL = 1.58 mm (0.5λ0) aiming at a compact antenna or radar systems. The focal properties of the lens along with its radiation characteristics in a lens antenna configuration have been studied numerically and confirmed experimentally, showing a gain improvement of ~2 dB with respect to a fishnet Soret lens without the fishnet metamaterial. PMID:25950243

  11. Soret fishnet metalens antenna.

    PubMed

    Orazbayev, Bakhtiyar; Beruete, Miguel; Pacheco-Peña, Víctor; Crespo, Gonzalo; Teniente, Jorge; Navarro-Cía, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    At the expense of frequency narrowing, binary amplitude-only diffractive optical elements emulate refractive lenses without the need of large profiles. Unfortunately, they also present larger Fresnel reflection loss than conventional lenses. This is usually tackled by implementing unattractive cumbersome designs. Here we demonstrate that simplicity is not at odds with performance and we show how the fishnet metamaterial can improve the radiation pattern of a Soret lens. The building block of this advanced Soret lens is the fishnet metamaterial operating in the near-zero refractive index regime with one of the edge layers designed with alternating opaque and transparent concentric rings made of subwavelength holes. The hybrid Soret fishnet metalens retains all the merits of classical Soret lenses such as low profile, low cost and ease of manufacturing. It is designed for the W-band of the millimeter-waves range with a subwavelength focal length FL = 1.58 mm (0.5λ0) aiming at a compact antenna or radar systems. The focal properties of the lens along with its radiation characteristics in a lens antenna configuration have been studied numerically and confirmed experimentally, showing a gain improvement of ~2 dB with respect to a fishnet Soret lens without the fishnet metamaterial. PMID:25950243

  12. Transcatheter Microwave Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, Dickey G. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Ngo, Phong (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A method, simulation, and apparatus are provided that are highly suitable for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). A catheter is disclosed that includes a small diameter disk loaded monopole antenna surrounded by fusion material having a high heat of fusion and a melting point preferably at or near body temperature. Microwaves from the antenna heat prostatic tissue to promote necrosing of the prostatic tissue that relieves the pressure of the prostatic tissue against the urethra as the body reabsorbs the necrosed or dead tissue. The fusion material keeps the urethra cool by means of the heat of fusion of the fusion material. This prevents damage to the urethra while the prostatic tissue is necrosed. A computer simulation is provided that can be used to predict the resulting temperature profile produced in the prostatic tissue. By changing the various control features of the catheter and method of applying microwave energy a temperature profile can be predicted and produced that is similar to the temperature profile desired for the particular patient.

  13. Graphene-antenna sandwich photodetector.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zheyu; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Yumin; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2012-07-11

    Nanoscale antennas sandwiched between two graphene monolayers yield a photodetector that efficiently converts visible and near-infrared photons into electrons with an 800% enhancement of the photocurrent relative to the antennaless graphene device. The antenna contributes to the photocurrent in two ways: by the transfer of hot electrons generated in the antenna structure upon plasmon decay, as well as by direct plasmon-enhanced excitation of intrinsic graphene electrons due to the antenna near field. This results in a graphene-based photodetector achieving up to 20% internal quantum efficiency in the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum. This device can serve as a model for merging the light-harvesting characteristics of optical frequency antennas with the highly attractive transport properties of graphene in new optoelectronic devices. PMID:22703522

  14. Electrically connected resonant optical antennas.

    PubMed

    Prangsma, Jord C; Kern, Johannes; Knapp, Alexander G; Grossmann, Swen; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Hecht, Bert

    2012-08-01

    Electrically connected resonant optical antennas hold promise for the realization of highly efficient nanoscale electro-plasmonic devices that rely on a combination of electric fields and local near-field intensity enhancement. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of such a concept by attaching leads to the arms of a two-wire antenna at positions of minimal near-field intensity with negligible influence on the antenna resonance. White-light scattering experiments in accordance with simulations show that the optical tunability of connected antennas is fully retained. Analysis of the electric properties demonstrates that in the antenna gaps direct current (DC) electric fields of 10(8) V/m can consistently be achieved and maintained over extended periods of time without noticeable damage. PMID:22800440

  15. Lithographic antennas at visible frequencies.

    PubMed

    Fumeaux, C; Alda, J; Boreman, G D

    1999-11-15

    The response of antenna-coupled thin-film Ni-NiO-Ni diodes to 633-nm helium-neon laser radiation is investigated. Although these detectors and their integrated dipole antennas are optimized for the detection of mid-infrared radiation, a polarization dependence of the measured response to visible radiation is observed. The strongest signals are measured for the polarization parallel to the dipole antenna axis, which demonstrates antenna operation of the device in the visible in addition to the expected thermal and photoelectric effects. The connection structure of the diode also resonates and contributes to the polarization-dependent signal. The receiving area of the dipole antenna is approximately 2 microm(2) . PMID:18079886

  16. The ICRF antennas for TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.J.; Colestock, P.L.; Gardner, W.L.; Hosea, J.C.; Nagy, A.; Stevens, J.; Swain, D.W.; Wilson, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Two compact loop antennas have been designed to provide ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) heating for TFTR. The antennas can convey a total of 10 MW to accomplish core heating in either high-density or high-temperature plasmas. The near-term goal of heating TFTR plasmas and the longer-term goals of ease in handling (for remote maintenance) and high reliability (in an inaccessible tritium tokamak environment) were major considerations in the antenna designs. The compact loop configuration facilitates handling because the antennas fit completely through their ports. Conservative design and extensive testing were used to attain the reliability required for TFTR. This paper summarizes how these antennas will accomplish these goals. 5 figs, 1 tab.

  17. A Novel Class of Reconfigurable Spherical Fermat Spiral Multi-port Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caratelli, D.; Yarovoy, A.; Haider, N.

    Reconfigurability in antenna systems is a desired characteristic that has attracted attention in the past years. In this work, a novel class of spherical Fermat spiral multi-port antennas for next-generation wireless communications and radar applications is presented. The device modelling is carried out by using a computationally enhanced locally conformal finite-difference time-domain full-wave procedure. In this way, the circuital characteristics and radiation properties of the antennas are investigated accurately. The structure reconfigurability, in terms of frequency of operation and radiation efficiency, is technically performed by a suitable solid-state tuning circuitry adopted to properly change the feeding/loading conditions at the input ports of the antenna.

  18. Antennas for Ubiquitous Sensor Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kihun; Yoon, Young Joong

    Recent advancements in the ubiquitous sensor network field have brought considerable feasibility to the realization of a ubiquitous society. A ubiquitous sensor network will enable the cooperative gathering of environmental information or the detection of special events through a large number of spatially distributed sensor nodes. Thus far, radio frequency identification (RFID) as an application for realizing the ubiquitous environment has mainly been developed for public and industrial systems. To this end, the most existing applications have demanded low-end antennas. In recent years, interests of ubiquitous sensor network have been broadened to medical body area networks (BAN), wireless personal area networks (WPAN), along with ubiquitous smart worlds. This increasing attention toward in ubiquitous sensor network has great implications for antennas. The design of functional antennas has received much attention because they can provide various kinds of properties and operation modes. These high-end antennas have some functions besides radiation. Furthermore, smart sensor nodes equipped with cooperated high-end antennas would allow them to respond adaptively to environmental events. Therefore, some design approaches of functional antennas with sensing and reconfigurability as high-end solution for smart sensor node, as well as low-end antennas for mobile RFID (mRFID) and SAW transponder are presented in this paper.

  19. Proteomic Analysis of Silkworm Antennae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunpo; Li, Haichao; Miao, Xuexia

    2015-11-01

    The silkworm Bombyx mori is an oligophagous insect that feeds mainly on mulberry leaves. The olfactory system of silkworm is a good model to study olfaction in Lepidoptera. Here, we carried out shotgun proteomic analysis and MS sequencing of the silkmoth antennae. A total of 364 proteins were detected, 77 were female specific, 143 were male specific, and 144 were expressed in both male and female antennae. Five odorant-binding proteins, two chemosensory proteins, and one olfactory receptor were identified. They may play a major role in the perception of odorants. An esterase and an aldehyde dehydrogenase were found only in male antennae. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and cytochrome P450s, also found in silkworm antennae, may be involved in the degradation of xenobiotics. Additionally, antioxidation proteins and immunity proteins were identified. Juvenile hormone binding proteins (JHBP), juvenile hormone resistance protein II, and juvenile hormone episode hydrolase (JHEH) were found in the proteomic analysis, which suggests that the antennae are a target for juvenile hormone in the silkworm. Our results provide insight into the expression of proteins in the antennae of silkworm and will facilitate the future functional analysis of silkworm antennae. PMID:26515890

  20. Comparative antenna measurement in real environment: 30-80 MHz antennas in wooded areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, F.; Asp, B.; Ladell, L.; Nilsson, S.

    1981-06-01

    Comparative antenna measurements were carried out with different types of antennas, such as whip, Scoobydo, longwire, Haller, disk cone and vehicle mounted antennas, for the frequency region 30 to 80 MHz. The antennas were mounted at seven different places in a wooded environment. At five of these antenna sites five antennas were mounted, and at the other two sites there were two and three antennas, respectively. The measurements were performed with the frequencies 38 and 66 MHz. At the antenna site with only two antennas, only 42 MHz was used. Only results from the measurement and facts about the measurements are given.

  1. Composite antenna feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakstys, V. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A composite antenna feed subsystem concentrated in a small area at the prime focus of the parabola of a satellite parabolic reflector accomodates a plurality of frequency bands. The arrays comprising the subsystem are mounted on the top cover of a communication module. A multimode horn is arranged at the center of the subsystem axis which functions at X- And C-band frequencies, and a cross array consisting of individual elements form the S-band feed, with one arm of the S-band array containing an element mutually shared with the L-band array. Provision is also made for UHF frequencies, and a dipole arrangement for VHF frequencies is arranged around the S-band arms.

  2. Antenna sunshield membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogorad, Alexander (Inventor); Bowman, Jr., Charles K. (Inventor); Meder, Martin G. (Inventor); Dottore, Frank A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An RF-transparent sunshield membrane covers an antenna reflector such as a parabolic dish. The blanket includes a single dielectric sheet of polyimide film 1/2-mil thick. The surface of the film facing away from the reflector is coated with a transparent electrically conductive coating such as vapor-deposited indium-tin oxide. The surface of the film facing the reflector is reinforced by an adhesively attached polyester or glass mesh, which in turn is coated with a white paint. In a particular embodiment of the invention, polyurethane paint is used. In another embodiment of the invention, a layer of paint primer is applied to the mesh under a silicone paint, and the silicone paint is cured after application for several days at room temperature to enhance adhesion to the primer.

  3. Metal Patch Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil F. (Inventor); Hodges, Richard E. (Inventor); Zawadzki, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a patch antenna comprises a planar conductive patch attached to a ground plane by a support member, and a probe connector in electrical communication with the conductive patch arranged to conduct electromagnetic energy to or from the conductive patch, wherein the conductive patch is disposed essentially parallel to the ground plane and is separated from the ground plane by a spacing distance; wherein the support member comprises a plurality of sides disposed about a central axis oriented perpendicular to the conductive patch and the ground plane; wherein the conductive patch is solely supported above the ground plane by the support member; and wherein the support member provides electrical communication between the planer conductive patch and the ground plane.

  4. 47 CFR 73.510 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.510 Section 73.510... Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.510 Antenna systems. (a) All noncommercial educational... § 73.316 concerning antenna systems contained in subpart B of this part. (b) Directional antenna....

  5. 47 CFR 95.1213 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1213 Section 95.1213... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1213 Antennas. No antenna for a MedRadio transmitter shall be configured for permanent outdoor use. In addition, any MedRadio antenna used...

  6. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  7. 47 CFR 73.510 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.510 Section 73.510... Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.510 Antenna systems. (a) All noncommercial educational... § 73.316 concerning antenna systems contained in subpart B of this part. (b) Directional antenna....

  8. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  9. 47 CFR 95.1213 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1213 Section 95.1213... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1213 Antennas. No antenna for a MedRadio transmitter shall be configured for permanent outdoor use. In addition, any MedRadio antenna used...

  10. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in... this chapter. (b) The antenna for a small base station or for a small control station must not be...

  11. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  12. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  13. 47 CFR 73.1680 - Emergency antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency antennas. 73.1680 Section 73.1680... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1680 Emergency antennas. (a) An emergency antenna is one that is erected for temporary use after the authorized main and auxiliary antennas are damaged...

  14. 47 CFR 73.1680 - Emergency antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency antennas. 73.1680 Section 73.1680... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1680 Emergency antennas. (a) An emergency antenna is one that is erected for temporary use after the authorized main and auxiliary antennas are damaged...

  15. 47 CFR 73.510 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.510 Section 73.510... Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.510 Antenna systems. (a) All noncommercial educational... § 73.316 concerning antenna systems contained in subpart B of this part. (b) Directional antenna....

  16. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently installed and available for use when the main antenna is out of service...

  17. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  18. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  19. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  20. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  1. 47 CFR 73.510 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.510 Section 73.510... Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.510 Antenna systems. (a) All noncommercial educational... § 73.316 concerning antenna systems contained in subpart B of this part. (b) Directional antenna....

  2. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753... International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall operate with directional antennas. Such antennas shall be designed and operated so that the radiated power...

  3. 47 CFR 73.1680 - Emergency antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency antennas. 73.1680 Section 73.1680... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1680 Emergency antennas. (a) An emergency antenna is one that is erected for temporary use after the authorized main and auxiliary antennas are damaged...

  4. 47 CFR 73.510 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.510 Section 73.510... Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.510 Antenna systems. (a) All noncommercial educational... § 73.316 concerning antenna systems contained in subpart B of this part. (b) Directional antenna....

  5. 47 CFR 73.1680 - Emergency antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency antennas. 73.1680 Section 73.1680... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1680 Emergency antennas. (a) An emergency antenna is one that is erected for temporary use after the authorized main and auxiliary antennas are damaged...

  6. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  7. 47 CFR 73.1680 - Emergency antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency antennas. 73.1680 Section 73.1680... Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1680 Emergency antennas. (a) An emergency antenna is one that is erected for temporary use after the authorized main and auxiliary antennas are damaged...

  8. 47 CFR 95.1013 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1013 Section 95.1013... SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1013 Antennas. (a) The maximum allowable... this chapter, at the band edges. (b) AMTS stations must employ directional antennas. (c) Antennas...

  9. L-band orthogonal-mode crossed-slot antenna and VHF crossed-loop antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsson, T.

    1972-01-01

    A low gain, circularly polarized, L-band antenna; a low gain, linealy polarized, L-band antenna; and a low gain, circularly polarized, upper hemisphere, VHF satellite communications antenna intended for airborne applications are described. The text includes impedance and antenna radiation pattern data, along with physical description of the construction of the antennas.

  10. Smart antennas based on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldrigo, Martino; Dragoman, Mircea; Dragoman, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    We report two configurations of smart graphene antennas, in which either the radiation pattern of the antenna or the backscattering of the periodic metallic arrays is controlled by DC biases that induce metal-insulator reversible transitions of graphene monolayers. Such a transition from a high surface resistance (no bias) to a low surface resistance state (finite bias voltage) causes the radiation pattern of metallic antennas backed with graphene to change dramatically, from omnidirectional to broadside. Moreover, reflectarrays enhance the backscattered field due to the same metal-dielectric transition.

  11. Optical antenna enhanced graphene photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Chitraleema; Beams, Ryan; Goodfellow, Kenneth M.; Wicks, G. W.; Novotny, Lukas; Nick Vamivakas, A.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the integration of an individual, metal-based, plasmonic nano-antenna on a graphene photodetector. The device exhibits an electromagnetic resonance at a wavelength of 580 nm with well-defined polarization sensitivity. With no applied bias voltage, this antenna-coupled graphene photodetector features a responsivity of ˜17 nA/μW, which is four orders of magnitude higher than previously studied single antenna enhanced detectors. Finally, we measure a signal-to-noise ratio of ˜200 in a 1-Hz bandwidth, with an average photocurrent value of 1.2 nA.

  12. Designing Rectangular RHCP Microstrip Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Shayla E.

    1987-01-01

    RHCP, Right-Handed, Circularly Polarized Microstrip Antenna program, aids in design of rectangular microstrip-antenna element, given desired frequency of operation and characteristics of substrate. Begins design calculations on basis of square element with linear polarization. Effective dielectric constant and changes in electrical length due to fringing at edges of radiating element taken into account. Coaxial feed inset with 50 ohms input impedance. Placement of feed such that two orthonormal modes produced in antenna cavity, right- or left-handed circular polarization obtained. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  13. Moths smell with their antennae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Thomas; Ballard, Matthew; Alexeev, Alexander; Hu, David

    2015-11-01

    Moths are reported to smell each other from over 6 miles away, locating each other with just 200 airborne molecules. In this study, we investigate how the structure of the antennae influences particle capture. We measure the branching patterns of over 40 species of moths, across two orders of magnitude in weight. We find that moth antennae have 3 levels of hierarchy, with dimensions on each level scaling with body size. We perform lattice-Boltzman simulations to determine optimal flow patterns around antennae branches allowing for capture of small particles.

  14. Conical quadreflex antenna analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, P. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A method for evaluating the performance of a four-reflection or quadreflex antenna is reported. Geometrical optics was used initially to determine the ideal feed pattern required to produce uniform illumination on the aperture of the conical reflector and the reverse problem of quickly finding the aperture illumination given an arbitrary feed pattern. The knowledge of the aperture illumination makes it possible to compute the antenna efficiency, which is useful for comparing antenna performance during tradeoff studies. Scattering calculations, using physical optics techniques, were then used to more accurately determine the performance of a specific design.

  15. Multiple-Beam Communications Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myhre, R. W.; Roberts, T. E.; Wong, W. C.

    1989-01-01

    System has both fixed-spot and scanning coverage. Advanced offset-fed spacecraft antenna systems operating in 30/20 GHz frequency bands developed to provide multiple-radiating fixed-spot and regional-coverage scanning beams for use on communications satellites. Operating at higher frequencies, provides alternate frequency bands for expansion of existing satellite services and achieving frequency reuse capability for conservation of frequency spectrum. 20-GHz transmitting antenna is offset-fed, dual-reflector configuration. 30-GHz receiving antenna has orthogonal polarized feeds, hyperbolic reflectors, and two subreflectors.

  16. Large inflated-antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinson, W. F.; Keafer, L. S.

    1984-01-01

    It is proposed that for inflatable antenna systems, technology feasibility can be demonstrated and parametric design and scalability (scale factor 10 to 20) can be validated with an experiment using a 16-m-diameter antenna attached to the Shuttle. The antenna configuration consists of a thin film cone and paraboloid held to proper shape by internal pressure and a self-rigidizing torus. The cone and paraboloid would be made using pie-shaped gores with the paraboloid being coated with aluminum to provide reflectivity. The torus would be constructed using an aluminum polyester composite that when inflated would erect to a smooth shell that can withstand loads without internal pressure.

  17. Smart antennas based on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrigo, Martino; Dragoman, Mircea; Dragoman, Daniela

    2014-09-21

    We report two configurations of smart graphene antennas, in which either the radiation pattern of the antenna or the backscattering of the periodic metallic arrays is controlled by DC biases that induce metal-insulator reversible transitions of graphene monolayers. Such a transition from a high surface resistance (no bias) to a low surface resistance state (finite bias voltage) causes the radiation pattern of metallic antennas backed with graphene to change dramatically, from omnidirectional to broadside. Moreover, reflectarrays enhance the backscattered field due to the same metal-dielectric transition.

  18. HF broadband whip antenna evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, R. W.; Shaw, H. B., III

    1984-10-01

    Present Navy shipboard antenna couplers used with whip antennas will not suffice for future frequency agile transmitting systems. A new broadband whip antenna which operates without a coupler should be evaluated for potential application in a frequency hopping mode. VSWR for various mounting configurations and gain relative to a 35 foot whip were measured in this initial portion of the evaluation. VSWR was typically less than 2:1 and relative gain averaged -19 dB with respect to a standard Navy 35 foot whip.

  19. Semi hemi antenna. [balloon parachuted microwave antenna for stratospheric testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repucci, T. A.; Ferris, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    The University of Michigan minipod, which is released from a balloon and floats down on a parachute, is designed for stratospheric testing. The present paper briefly describes the evolution of antenna designs for the minipod 1.5 GHz transceiver, which communicates with and relays information to an aircraft and ground station. The following stages are noted: ordinary monopole, crossed dipole, capacitative antenna, fat monopole, the addition of parasitic elements, and a thinner monopole with taper.

  20. Scattering by cavity-backed antennas on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1994-01-01

    Conformal arrays are popular antennas for aircraft, spacecraft, and land vehicle platforms due to their inherent low weight and drag properties. However, to date there has been a dearth of rigorous analytical or numerical solutions to aid the designer. In fact, it has been common practice to use limited measurements and planar approximations in designing such non-planar antennas. The finite element-boundary integral method is extended to scattering by cavity-backed structures in an infinite, metallic cylinder. In particular, the formulation specifics such as weight functions, dyadic Green's function, implementation details and particular difficulties inherent to cylindrical structures are discussed. Special care is taken to ensure that the resulting computer program has low memory demand and minimal computational requirements. Scattering results are presented and validated as much as possible.

  1. Ion source with external RF antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ji, Qing; Wilde, Stephen

    2005-12-13

    A radio frequency (RF) driven plasma ion source has an external RF antenna, i.e. the RF antenna is positioned outside the plasma generating chamber rather than inside. The RF antenna is typically formed of a small diameter metal tube coated with an insulator. An external RF antenna assembly is used to mount the external RF antenna to the ion source. The RF antenna tubing is wound around the external RF antenna assembly to form a coil. The external RF antenna assembly is formed of a material, e.g. quartz, which is essentially transparent to the RF waves. The external RF antenna assembly is attached to and forms a part of the plasma source chamber so that the RF waves emitted by the RF antenna enter into the inside of the plasma chamber and ionize a gas contained therein. The plasma ion source is typically a multi-cusp ion source.

  2. Electrically floating, near vertical incidence, skywave antenna

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Allen A.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Tremblay, Paul A.; Mays, Belva L.

    2014-07-08

    An Electrically Floating, Near Vertical Incidence, Skywave (NVIS) Antenna comprising an antenna element, a floating ground element, and a grounding element. At least part of said floating ground element is positioned between said antenna element and said grounding element. The antenna is separated from the floating ground element and the grounding element by one or more electrical insulators. The floating ground element is separated from said antenna and said grounding element by one or more electrical insulators.

  3. Planar microstrip YAGI antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A directional microstrip antenna includes a driven patch surrounded by an isolated reflector and one or more coplanar directors, all separated from a ground plane on the order of 0.1 wavelength or less to provide end fire beam directivity without requiring power dividers or phase shifters. The antenna may be driven at a feed point a distance from the center of the driven patch in accordance with conventional microstrip antenna design practices for H-plane coupled or horizontally polarized signals. The feed point for E-plane coupled or vertically polarized signals is at a greater distance from the center than the first distance. This feed point is also used for one of the feed signals for circularly polarized signals. The phase shift between signals applied to feed points for circularly polarized signals must be greater than the conventionally required 90 degrees and depends upon the antenna configuration.

  4. Inflatable Antennas Support Emergency Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Glenn Research Center awarded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts to ManTech SRS Technologies, of Newport Beach, California, to develop thin film inflatable antennas for space communication. With additional funding, SRS modified the concepts for ground-based inflatable antennas. GATR (Ground Antenna Transmit and Receive) Technologies, of Huntsville, Alabama, licensed the technology and refined it to become the world s first inflatable antenna certified by the Federal Communications Commission. Capable of providing Internet access, voice over Internet protocol, e-mail, video teleconferencing, broadcast television, and other high-bandwidth communications, the systems have provided communication during the wildfires in California, after Hurricane Katrina in Mississippi, and following the 2010 Haiti earthquake.

  5. Antennas in Radio Telescope Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingson, S. W.

    2015-03-01

    Radio astronomy is the study of the universe by measurement of radio frequency emission at frequencies ranging from a few MHz to the far infrared. Signals of interest are typically extraordinarily weak, necessitating large effective aperture and resulting in some of the world's largest antenna systems. Technologies now commonly employed include reflector antennas ("dishes") using horn-type feeds or feed arrays, beamforming arrays consisting of elements ranging from dipoles to large dishes, and interferometry. Many problems in radio astronomy also require very fine angular resolution, leading to aperture synthesis imaging instruments consisting of antennas distributed over apertures ranging from hundreds of meters to intercontinental distances. This chapter provides a brief review of antenna systems used in operational modern radio telescopes and in anticipated new radio telescopes.

  6. Antennas Designed for Advanced Communications for Air Traffic Management (AC/ATM) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of the Advanced Communications for Air Traffic Management (AC/ATM) Project at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field is to enable a communications infrastructure that provides the capacity, efficiency, and flexibility necessary to realize a mature free-flight environment. The technical thrust of the AC/ATM Project is targeted at the design, development, integration, test, and demonstration of enabling technologies for global broadband aeronautical communications. Since Ku-band facilities and equipment are readily available, one of the near-term demonstrations involves a link through a Kuband communications satellite. Two conformally mounted antennas will support the initial AC/ATM communications links. Both of these are steered electronically through monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplifiers and phase shifters. This link will be asymmetrical with the downlink to the aircraft (mobile vehicle) at a throughput rate of greater than 1.5 megabits per second (Mbps), whereas the throughput rate of the uplink from the aircraft will be greater than 100 kilobits per second (kbps). The data on the downlink can be narrow-band, wide-band, or a combination of both, depending on the requirements of the experiment. The AC/ATM project is purchasing a phased-array Ku-band transmitting antenna for the uplink from the test vehicle. Many Ku-band receiving antennas have been built, and one will be borrowed for a short time to perform the initial experiments at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. The Ku-band transmitting antenna is a 254-element MMIC phased-array antenna being built by Boeing Phantom Works. Each element can radiate 100 mW. The antenna is approximately 43-cm high by 24-cm wide by 3.3-cm thick. It can be steered beyond 60 from broadside. The beamwidth varies from 6 at broadside to 12 degrees at 60 degrees, which is typical of phased-array antennas. When the antenna is steered to 60 degrees, the beamwidth will illuminate approximately five satellites on the orbital arc. Spread spectrum techniques will be employed to keep the power impinging on the adjacent satellites below their noise floor so that no interference results. This antenna is power limited. If the antenna elements (currently 254) are increased by a factor of 4 (1024) or 16 (4096), the gain will increase and the beamwidth will decrease in proportion. For the latter two antenna sizes, the power must be "backed off" to prevent interference with the neighboring satellites. The receiving antenna, which is approximately 90-cm high, 60-cm wide, and 3.5-cm thick, is composed of 1500 phased-array elements. The system phased-array controller can control both a 1500-element receiving antenna and a 500-element transmitting antenna. For ground testing, this controller will allow manual beam pointing and polarization alignment. For normal operation, the system can be connected to the receiving antenna and the navigation system for real-time autonomous track operation. This will be accomplished by first pointing both antennas at the satellite using information from the aircraft data bus. Then, the system phased-array controller will electronically adjust the antenna pointing of the receiving antenna to find the peak signal. After the peak signal has been found, the beam of the transmitting antenna will be pointed to the same steering angles as the receiving antenna. For initial ground testing without an aircraft, the ARINC 429 data bus (ARINC Inc., Annapolis, Maryland) will be simulated by a gyro system purchased for the follow-on to the Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Arrays for Satellite Communication on the Move (MASCOM) Project. MASCOM utilized the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) with a pair of Ka-band experimental phased-array antennas.

  7. Fin-line horn antenna

    DOEpatents

    Reindel, John

    1990-01-01

    A fin line circuit card containing a fin line slot feeds a dipole antenna ich extends a quarterwave outside the waveguide and provides an energy beam focal point at or near the open end of the waveguide. The dipole antenna thus maintains a wide and nearly constant beamwidth, low VSWR and a circular symmetric radiation pattern for use in electronic warfare direction finding and surveillance applications.

  8. Antennas for mobile satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, John

    1991-12-01

    A NASA sponsored program, called the Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system, has prompted the development of several innovative antennas at L-band frequencies. In the space segment of the MSAT system, an efficient, light weight, circularly polarized microstrip array that uses linearly polarized elements was developed as a multiple beam reflector feed system. In the ground segment, a low-cost, low-profile, and very efficient microstrip Yagi array was developed as a medium-gain mechanically steered vehicle antenna. Circularly shaped microstrip patches excited at higher-order modes were also developed as low-gain vehicle antennas. A more recent effort called for the development of a 20/30 GHz mobile terminal antenna for future-generation mobile satellite communications. To combat the high insertion loss encountered at 20/30 GHz, series-fed Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) microstrip array antennas are currently being developed. These MMIC arrays may lead to the development of several small but high-gain Ka-band antennas for the Personal Access Satellite Service planned for the 2000s.

  9. Antennas for mobile satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John

    1991-01-01

    A NASA sponsored program, called the Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system, has prompted the development of several innovative antennas at L-band frequencies. In the space segment of the MSAT system, an efficient, light weight, circularly polarized microstrip array that uses linearly polarized elements was developed as a multiple beam reflector feed system. In the ground segment, a low-cost, low-profile, and very efficient microstrip Yagi array was developed as a medium-gain mechanically steered vehicle antenna. Circularly shaped microstrip patches excited at higher-order modes were also developed as low-gain vehicle antennas. A more recent effort called for the development of a 20/30 GHz mobile terminal antenna for future-generation mobile satellite communications. To combat the high insertion loss encountered at 20/30 GHz, series-fed Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) microstrip array antennas are currently being developed. These MMIC arrays may lead to the development of several small but high-gain Ka-band antennas for the Personal Access Satellite Service planned for the 2000s.

  10. Electromagnetic antenna modeling (EAM) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packer, Malcolm; Powers, Robert; Tsitsopoulos, Paul

    1994-12-01

    The determination of foreign communications capabilities and intent is an important assessment function performed by the USAF National Air Intelligence Center (NAIC). In this context, Rome Laboratory became the NAIC engineering agent for the development of an NAIC requirement for the rapid analysis and evaluation of antenna structures based on often vague to sometimes detailed dimensional information. To this end, the Rome Laboratory sponsored development of the Electromagnetic Antenna Modeling (EAM) System, a state-of-the-art Pascal program with an MS Windows graphical user interface (GUI) pre- and post-processor. Users of NAIC capabilities initiate antenna analysis efforts that range from simple parametric studies to more complex, detailed antenna design and communication-system evaluations. Accordingly, EAM provides a modeling capability 'matched' to the sophistication of the individual analyst, with features appropriate for users ranging from nontechnical analysts to experienced antenna engineers. This capability is particularly valuable in the military-intelligence environment, in which high-speed assessments are required. In particular, EAM meets the specific antenna-analysis requirements of NAIC with a versatile graphical user interface.

  11. Wide scanning spherical antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Bing (Inventor); Stutzman, Warren L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for calculating the surface shapes for subreflectors in a suboptic assembly of a tri-reflector spherical antenna system is introduced, modeled from a generalization of Galindo-Israel's method of solving partial differential equations to correct for spherical aberration and provide uniform feed to aperture mapping. In a first embodiment, the suboptic assembly moves as a single unit to achieve scan while the main reflector remains stationary. A feed horn is tilted during scan to maintain the illuminated area on the main spherical reflector fixed throughout the scan thereby eliminating the need to oversize the main spherical reflector. In an alternate embodiment, both the main spherical reflector and the suboptic assembly are fixed. A flat mirror is used to create a virtual image of the suboptic assembly. Scan is achieved by rotating the mirror about the spherical center of the main reflector. The feed horn is tilted during scan to maintain the illuminated area on the main spherical reflector fixed throughout the scan.

  12. Feed Structure For Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor); Lin, Greg Y. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A novel feed structure, for an antenna having a resonant electric field structure, comprising a patch element, an integrated circuit attached to the patch element, at least one inner conductor electrically connected to and terminating at the integrated circuit on a first end of the at least one inner conductor, wherein the at least one inner conductor extends through and is not electrically connected to the patch element, and wherein the at least one inner conductor is available for electrical connectivity on a second end of the at least one inner conductor, and an outer conductor electrically connected to and terminating at the patch element on a first end of the outer conductor, wherein the outer conductor is available for electrical connectivity on a second end of the outer conductor, and wherein the outer conductor concentrically surrounds the at least one inner conductor from the second end of the at least one inner conductor available for electrical connectivity to the first end of the outer conductor terminating at the patch element.

  13. Mobile antenna development at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J.; Jamnejad, V.; Densmore, A.; Tulintseff, A.; Thomas, R.; Woo, K.

    1993-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), under the sponsorship of NASA, has pioneered the development of land vehicle antennas for commercial mobile satellite communications. Several novel antennas have been developed at L-band frequencies for the Mobile Satellite (MSAT) program initiated about a decade ago. Currently, two types of antennas are being developed at K- and Ka-band frequencies for the ACTS (Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) Mobile Terminal (AMT) project. For the future, several hand-held antenna concepts are proposed for the small terminals of the Ka-band Personal Access Satellite System (PASS). For the L-band MSAT program, a number of omni-directional low-gain antennas, such as the crossed drooping-dipoles, the higher-order-mode circular microstrip patch, the quadrifilar helix, and the wrapped-around microstrip 'mast' array, have been developed for lower data rate communications. Several medium-gain satellite tracking antennas, such as the electronically scanned low-profile phased array, the mechanically steered tilted microstrip array, the mechanically steered low-profile microstrip Yagi array, and the hybrid electronically/mechanically steered low-profile array, have been developed for the MSAT's higher data rate and voice communications. To date, for the L-band vehicle application, JPL has developed the world's lowest-profile phased array (1.8 cm height), as well as the lowest-profile mechanically steered antenna (3.7 cm height). For the 20/30 GHz AMT project, a small mechanically steered elliptical reflector antenna with a gain of 23 dBi has recently been developed to transmit horizontal polarization at 30 GHz and receive vertical polarization at 20 GHz. Its hemispherical radome has a height of 10 cm and a base diameter of 23 cm. In addition to the reflector, a mechanically steered printed MMIC active array is currently being developed to achieve the same electrical requirements with a low profile capability. These AMT antenna developments, along with other Ka-band technologies, will lead to the development of several compact hand-held terminals for the PASS program. A few antenna concepts, such as the lap-top or desk-top terminal's printed array, the hand-held phased array, and the head-mounted low-profile array, have been proposed to achieve a future vision for the personal access communications system.

  14. Mobile antenna development at JPL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Jamnejad, V.; Densmore, A.; Tulintseff, A.; Thomas, R.; Woo, K.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), under the sponsorship of NASA, has pioneered the development of land vehicle antennas for commercial mobile satellite communications. Several novel antennas have been developed at L-band frequencies for the Mobile Satellite (MSAT) program initiated about a decade ago. Currently, two types of antennas are being developed at K- and Ka-band frequencies for the ACTS (Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) Mobile Terminal (AMT) project. For the future, several hand-held antenna concepts are proposed for the small terminals of the Ka-band Personal Access Satellite System (PASS). For the L-band MSAT program, a number of omni-directional low-gain antennas, such as the crossed drooping-dipoles, the higher-order-mode circular microstrip patch, the quadrifilar helix, and the wrapped-around microstrip 'mast' array, have been developed for lower data rate communications. Several medium-gain satellite tracking antennas, such as the electronically scanned low-profile phased array, the mechanically steered tilted microstrip array, the mechanically steered low-profile microstrip Yagi array, and the hybrid electronically/mechanically steered low-profile array, have been developed for the MSAT's higher data rate and voice communications. To date, for the L-band vehicle application, JPL has developed the world's lowest-profile phased array (1.8 cm height), as well as the lowest-profile mechanically steered antenna (3.7 cm height). For the 20/30 GHz AMT project, a small mechanically steered elliptical reflector antenna with a gain of 23 dBi has recently been developed to transmit horizontal polarization at 30 GHz and receive vertical polarization at 20 GHz. Its hemispherical radome has a height of 10 cm and a base diameter of 23 cm. In addition to the reflector, a mechanically steered printed MMIC active array is currently being developed to achieve the same electrical requirements with a low profile capability. These AMT antenna developments, along with other Ka-band technologies, will lead to the development of several compact hand-held terminals for the PASS program. A few antenna concepts, such as the lap-top or desk-top terminal's printed array, the hand-held phased array, and the head-mounted low-profile array, have been proposed to achieve a future vision for the personal access communications system.

  15. NASA technology for large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.; Campbell, T. G.; Freeland, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Technology developed by NASA in conjunction with industry for potential large, deployable space antennas with applications in communication, radio astronomy and earth observation is reviewed. Concepts for deployable antennas that have been developed to the point of detail design are summarized, including the advanced sunflower precision antenna, the radial rib antenna, the maypole (hoop/column) antenna and the parabolic erectable truss antenna. The assessment of state-of-the-art deployable antenna technology is discussed, and the approach taken by the NASA Large Space Systems Technology (LSST) Program to the development of technology for large space antenna systems is outlined. Finally, the further development of the wrap-rib antenna and the maypole (hoop/column) concept, which meet mission model requirements, to satisfy LSST size and frequency requirements is discussed.

  16. E-Textile Antennas for Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to integrate antennas and other radio frequency (RF) devices into wearable systems is increasingly important as wireless voice, video, and data sources become ubiquitous. Consumer applications including mobile computing, communications, and entertainment, as well as military and space applications for integration of biotelemetry, detailed tracking information and status of handheld tools, devices and on-body inventories are driving forces for research into wearable antennas and other e-textile devices. Operational conditions for military and space applications of wireless systems are often such that antennas are a limiting factor in wireless performance. The changing antenna platform, i.e. the dynamic wearer, can detune and alter the radiation characteristics of e-textile antennas, making antenna element selection and design challenging. Antenna designs and systems that offer moderate bandwidth, perform well with flexure, and are electronically reconfigurable are ideally suited to wearable applications. Several antennas, shown in Figure 1, have been created using a NASA-developed process for e-textiles that show promise in being integrated into a robust wireless system for space-based applications. Preliminary characterization of the antennas with flexure indicates that antenna performance can be maintained, and that a combination of antenna design and placement are useful in creating robust designs. Additionally, through utilization of modern smart antenna techniques, even greater flexibility can be achieved since antenna performance can be adjusted in real-time to compensate for the antenna s changing environment.

  17. Magnetic antenna excitation of whistler modes. II. Antenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The excitation of whistler modes from magnetic loop antennas has been investigated experimentally. The field topology of the excited wave driven by a single loop antenna has been measured for different loop orientations with respect to the uniform background field. The fields from two or more antennas at different locations are then created by superposition of the single-loop data. It is shown that an antenna array can produce nearly plane waves which cannot be achieved with single antennas. By applying a phase shift along the array, oblique wave propagation is obtained. This allows a meaningful comparison with plane wave theory. The Gendrin mode and oblique cyclotron resonance are demonstrated. Wave helicity and polarization in space and time are demonstrated and distinguished from the magnetic helicity of the wave field. The superposition of two oblique plane whistler modes produces in a "whistler waveguide" mode whose polarization and helicity properties are explained. The results show that single point measurements cannot properly establish the wave character of wave packets. The laboratory observations are relevant for excitation and detection of whistler modes in space plasmas.

  18. Magnetic antenna excitation of whistler modes. II. Antenna arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2014-12-15

    The excitation of whistler modes from magnetic loop antennas has been investigated experimentally. The field topology of the excited wave driven by a single loop antenna has been measured for different loop orientations with respect to the uniform background field. The fields from two or more antennas at different locations are then created by superposition of the single-loop data. It is shown that an antenna array can produce nearly plane waves which cannot be achieved with single antennas. By applying a phase shift along the array, oblique wave propagation is obtained. This allows a meaningful comparison with plane wave theory. The Gendrin mode and oblique cyclotron resonance are demonstrated. Wave helicity and polarization in space and time are demonstrated and distinguished from the magnetic helicity of the wave field. The superposition of two oblique plane whistler modes produces in a “whistler waveguide” mode whose polarization and helicity properties are explained. The results show that single point measurements cannot properly establish the wave character of wave packets. The laboratory observations are relevant for excitation and detection of whistler modes in space plasmas.

  19. Antenna for passive RFID tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Vladescu, Marian; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    Minuscule devices, called RFID tags are attached to objects and persons and emit information which positioned readers may capture wirelessly. Many methods of identification have been used, but that of most common is to use a unique serial number for identification of person or object. RFID tags can be characterized as either active or passive [1,2]. Traditional passive tags are typically in "sleep" state until awakened by the reader's emitted field. In passive tags, the reader's field acts to charge the capacitor that powers the badge and this can be a combination of antenna and barcodes obtained with SAW( Surface Acoustic Wave) devices [1,2,3] . The antenna in an RFID tag is a conductive element that permits the tag to exchange data with the reader. The paper contribution are targeted to antenna for passive RFID tags. The electromagnetic field generated by the reader is somehow oriented by the reader antenna and power is induced in the tag only if the orientation of the tag antenna is appropriate. A tag placed orthogonal to the reader yield field will not be read. This is the reason that guided manufacturers to build circular polarized antenna capable of propagating a field that is alternatively polarized on all planes passing on the diffusion axis. Passive RFID tags are operated at the UHF frequencies of 868MHz (Europe) and 915MHz (USA) and at the microwave frequencies of 2,45 GHz and 5,8 GHz . Because the tags are small dimensions, in paper, we present the possibility to use circular polarization microstrip antenna with fractal edge [2].

  20. Research on Size Reduction of Plasma Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian; Xu, Yuemin; Sun, Hailong

    The structure of plasma antenna is more complex than metal antenna to reach ideal gain, efficiency, matching, etc. Therefore, earlier plasma antenna prototypes were always featured with larger size and weight. The NSSC research team has developed new prototypes with equivalent performance as metal antenna. In recent research, we also optimized the antenna structure to reduce size and weight. The new plasma antenna prototype is much smaller than the former ones, and its power consumption is also reduced from more than 100 watts to about 30 watts.

  1. Multilayer Microstrip Slot And Dipole Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulintseff, Ann N.

    1994-01-01

    Multilayer antenna structure contains interleaved linear subarrays of microstrip dipole and slot radiating antenna elements to provide compact, dual-band antenna. Structure also contains associated microstrip transmission lines, plus high-power amplifiers for transmission and low-noise amplifiers for reception. Overall function is to transmit in horizontal polarization at frequency of 29.634 GHz and receive in vertical polarization at 19.914 GHz, in direction 44 degrees from broadside to antenna. Antenna structure is part of apparatus described in "Steerable K/Ka-band Antenna for Land-Mobile Satellite Applications," NPO-18772.

  2. Vehicle antenna development for mobile satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, K.

    1988-01-01

    The paper summarizes results of a vehicle antenna program at JPL in support of a developing U.S. mobile satellite services (MSS) designed to provide telephone and data services for the continental United States. Two classes of circularly polarized vehicle antennas have been considered for the MSS: medium-gain, satellite-tracking antennas with 10-12-dBic gain; and low-gain, azimuthally omnidirectional antennas with 3-5-dBic gain. The design and performance of these antennas are described, and the two antennas are shown to have peculiar advantages and disadvantages.

  3. Imaging Antenna Structure For Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebeiz, G.; Rutledge, D.

    1990-01-01

    Integrated-circuit antenna structure contains two-dimensional array of antennas and antenna reflectors. In receiving mode, each antenna acts as part of detector for one picture element in millimeter- or submillimeter-wavelength imaging radar system. Millimeter-wave imaging system used to view objects through fog, smoke, or smog with resolution intermediate between microwave and visible-light imaging systems. Antenna elements, supports, and reflectors made by integrated-circuit techniques. Structures fabricated on front and back substrates separately. Substrates then joined. Inexpensive way to provide large number of small antenna elements required for imaging, all mounted rigidly in way that does not degrade operation.

  4. CONSENSUS AND CONFORMITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALLEN, VERNON L.; LEVINE, JOHN M.

    IN THIS STUDY, PROFESSOR ALLEN EMPLOYS TWO METHODS OF BREAKING GROUP CONSENSUS, AND HE MEASURES THE EFFECTS ON THE RESPONSES OF COLLEGE SUBJECTS TO BOTH OBJECTIVE AND SUBJECTIVE STIMULI. THE RESULTS SUGGEST THE NEED FOR MODIFICATION OF EXISTING THEORIES OF CONFORMITY BEHAVIOR. IN ADDITION, THESE RESULTS EMPHASIZE THE DIFFERENCES IN CONFORMITY OF…

  5. Conformations of Substituted Ethanes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsbury, Charles A.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews state-of-the-art of conformational analysis and factors which affect it. Emphasizes sp-3 hybridized acrylic molecules. Provides examples on the importance of certain factors in determining conformation. Purpose, is to provide examples for examination questions. (Author/SA)

  6. Microwave sensing of protein conformation and binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Kimberly

    2003-03-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy of biological macromolecules has not been pursued with the same vigor as fluorescence. One reason for this is the difficulty in measuring dielectric dispersion of biological species. All biological macromolecules are weakly dielectric, but in solution they are surrounded by a high concentration of weakly bound and bulk water. Bound water may be distinguished from bulk solution, however, and may act as a reporter for macromolecular conformation. Here we report dielectric measurements in the range 0.5 to 20 GHz made with a planar slot antenna attached to a fused-quartz cuvette, allowing simultaneous measurements of optical and dielectric spectra. Two sets of experiments demonstrate our ability to detect changes in protein conformation and binding of small ligands. In the first set, the reversible thermal unfolding of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase A), a small globular protein, was monitored using both UV/VIS and dielectric spectroscopies. In the second set of experiments, the binding of fluormone (a synthetic fluorescent estrogen) and other hormones to human estrogen receptor β was measured using fluorescence polarization and dielectric spectroscopies. Similar results are obtained from optical and dielectric spectroscopy for both experiments. These two sets of experiments demonstrate that: 1) dielectric spectroscopy in the microwave range is a viable technique for detection of changes in protein conformation and ligand binding; 2) protein and/or ligand is not grossly perturbed by the presence of microwave radiation.

  7. Conformity index: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Feuvret, Loic . E-mail: loic.feuvret@cpo.curie.net; Noel, Georges; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Bey, Pierre

    2006-02-01

    We present a critical analysis of the conformity indices described in the literature and an evaluation of their field of application. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, with or without intensity modulation, is based on medical imaging techniques, three-dimensional dosimetry software, compression accessories, and verification procedures. It consists of delineating target volumes and critical healthy tissues to select the best combination of beams. This approach allows better adaptation of the isodose to the tumor volume, while limiting irradiation of healthy tissues. Tools must be developed to evaluate the quality of proposed treatment plans. Dosimetry software provides the dose distribution in each CT section and dose-volume histograms without really indicating the degree of conformity. The conformity index is a complementary tool that attributes a score to a treatment plan or that can compare several treatment plans for the same patient. The future of conformal index in everyday practice therefore remains unclear.

  8. Analysis of a log periodic nano-antenna for multi-resonant broadband field enhancement and the Purcell factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Kong, Fanmin; Li, Kang; Sheng, Shiwei

    2015-05-01

    Broadband nano-antennas play a central role in many areas of science and technology. However, a more intuitive understanding for rational design of nano-antennas with broadband response is desirable. A log periodic nano-antenna was studied in the paper. The finite-difference time-domain method was used to explore the spectral characteristics of the log periodic nano-antenna by the excitation mode of reception and emission. The effects of geometry on field enhancement and the Purcell factor were systematically described and investigated. The field enhancement of the nano-antenna can be tuned by geometric parameters such as the outer radius, the tooth angle, and the ratio of the radial sizes of successive teeth, which provide control over both the spectral resonance position and the field enhancement peak amplitude. The Purcell factor mainly depends on the outer radius, the tooth angle, and the bow angle. In addition, multi-resonant field enhancement was analyzed in detail by conformal transformation. Furthermore, a careful comparison of the characteristics of a bowtie nano-antenna demonstrated that the log periodic nano-antenna has considerable potential for multi-resonant field enhancement and improvement of the Purcell factor. The results provide a promising prospect for designing and optimizing the log periodic nano-antenna in a broad range of wavelengths.

  9. Method and apparatus for self-calibration and phasing of array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A technique for self-calibrating and phasing a lens-feed array antenna, while normal operation is stopped, utilizes reflected energy of a continuous and coherent wave broadcast by a transmitter through a central feed while a phase controller advances the phase angles of reciprocal phase shifters in radiation electronics of the array elements at different rates to provide a distinct frequency modulation of electromagnetic wave energy returned by reflection in one mode and leakage in another mode from the radiation electronics of each array element. The composite return signal received by a synchronous receiver goes through a Fourier transform processing system and produces a response function for each antenna element. Compensation of the phase angles for the antenna elements required to conform the antenna response to a precomputed array pattern is derived from the reciprocal square root of the response functions for the antenna elements which, for a rectangular array of NXM elements, is a response function T(n,m). A third mode of calibration uses an external pilot tone from a separate antenna element. Respective responses are thus obtained from the three modes of calibration.

  10. Compact Low Frequency Radio Antenna

    DOEpatents

    Punnoose, Ratish J.

    2008-11-11

    An antenna is disclosed that comprises a pair of conductive, orthogonal arches and a pair of conductive annular sector plates, wherein adjacent legs of each arch are fastened to one of the annular sector plates and the opposite adjacent pair of legs is fastened to the remaining annular sector plate. The entire antenna structure is spaced apart from a conductive ground plane by a thin dielectric medium. The antenna is driven by a feed conduit passing through the conductive ground plane and dielectric medium and attached to one of the annular sector plates, wherein the two orthogonal arched act as a pair of crossed dipole elements. This arrangement of elements provides a radiation pattern that is largely omni-directional above the horizon.

  11. Antenna Technology Shuttle Experiment (ATSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeland, R. E.; Mettler, E.; Miller, L. J.; Rahmet-Samii, Y.; Weber, W. J., III

    1987-01-01

    Numerous space applications of the future will require mesh deployable antennas of 15 m in diameter or greater for frequencies up to 20 GHz. These applications include mobile communications satellites, orbiting very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) astrophysics missions, and Earth remote sensing missions. A Lockheed wrap rip antennas was used as the test article. The experiments covered a broad range of structural, control, and RF discipline objectives, which is fulfilled in total, would greatly reduce the risk of employing these antenna systems in future space applications. It was concluded that a flight experiment of a relatively large mesh deployable reflector is achievable with no major technological or cost drivers. The test articles and the instrumentation are all within the state of the art and in most cases rely on proven flight hardware. Every effort was made to design the experiments for low cost.

  12. Antenna coupled photonic wire lasers.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tsung-Yu; Cai, Xiaowei; Lee, Alan W M; Reno, John L; Hu, Qing

    2015-06-29

    Slope efficiency (SE) is an important performance metric for lasers. In conventional semiconductor lasers, SE can be optimized by careful designs of the facet (or the modulation for DFB lasers) dimension and surface. However, photonic wire lasers intrinsically suffer low SE due to their deep sub-wavelength emitting facets. Inspired by microwave engineering techniques, we show a novel method to extract power from wire lasers using monolithically integrated antennas. These integrated antennas significantly increase the effective radiation area, and consequently enhance the power extraction efficiency. When applied to wire lasers at THz frequency, we achieved the highest single-side slope efficiency (~450 mW/A) in pulsed mode for DFB lasers at 4 THz and a ~4x increase in output power at 3 THz compared with a similar structure without antennas. This work demonstrates the versatility of incorporating microwave engineering techniques into laser designs, enabling significant performance enhancements. PMID:26191717

  13. New antennas for secondary surveillance radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, J. M.

    Large vertical aperture antenna (LVA) radars in monopulse and sliding window modes were compared with hogtrough antennas. Track quality and vertical lobing were assessed. Results confirm the greatly superior performance of the LVA design.

  14. The systems background for satellite communication antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnbak, J. C.

    The major elements of the operational environment of satellite communication antennas are reviewed, including: perturbations and stationkeeping in the geostationary orbit; antenna tracking on earth-satellite links; earth-terminal off-axis limitations; satellite link budgets; multiple access and satellite antennas; and the specification of satellite antennas. Also given are definitions and formulas which are intended to provide general guidance and show major constraints relevant at all stages of antenna engineering for satellite systems. Two main trends in satellite communication antenna technology are noted: (1) an increasing impact of general system requirements on the specific design and operational exploitation of antennas in satellite systems; and (2) more emphasis on adaptive, flexible, or multipurpose antenna systems.

  15. Integrated resonant tunneling diode based antenna

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, Vincent M.; Tiggers, Chris P.; Plut, Thomas A.

    2000-01-01

    An antenna comprising a plurality of negative resistance devices and a method for making same comprising employing a removable standoff layer to form the gap between the microstrip antenna metal and the bottom contact layer.

  16. Wireless interrogation of passive antenna sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, S.; Huang, H.

    2010-03-01

    Recently, we discovered that the resonant frequency of a microstrip patch antenna is sensitive to mechanical strains or crack presence in the ground plane. Based on this principle, antenna sensors have been demonstrated to measure strain and detect crack in metallic structures. This paper presents a wireless method to remotely interrogate a dual-frequency antenna sensor. An interrogation horn antenna was used to irradiate the antenna sensor with a linear chirp microwave signal. By implementing a light-activated switch at the sensor node and performing signal processing of the backscattered signals, the resonant frequencies of the antenna sensor along both polarizations can be measured remotely. Since the antenna sensor does not need a local power source and can be interrogated wirelessly, electric wiring can be eliminated. The sensor implementation, the signal processing and the experimental setup that validate the remote interrogation of the antenna sensor are presented. A power budget model has also been established to estimate the maximum interrogation range.

  17. Low-Cost Phased Array Antenna for Sounding Rockets, Missiles, and Expendable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullinix, Daniel; Hall, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Corbin, Brian

    2012-01-01

    A low-cost beamformer phased array antenna has been developed for expendable launch vehicles, rockets, and missiles. It utilizes a conformal array antenna of ring or individual radiators (design varies depending on application) that is designed to be fed by the recently developed hybrid electrical/mechanical (vendor-supplied) phased array beamformer. The combination of these new array antennas and the hybrid beamformer results in a conformal phased array antenna that has significantly higher gain than traditional omni antennas, and costs an order of magnitude or more less than traditional phased array designs. Existing omnidirectional antennas for sounding rockets, missiles, and expendable launch vehicles (ELVs) do not have sufficient gain to support the required communication data rates via the space network. Missiles and smaller ELVs are often stabilized in flight by a fast (i.e. 4 Hz) roll rate. This fast roll rate, combined with vehicle attitude changes, greatly increases the complexity of the high-gain antenna beam-tracking problem. Phased arrays for larger ELVs with roll control are prohibitively expensive. Prior techniques involved a traditional fully electronic phased array solution, combined with highly complex and very fast inertial measurement unit phased array beamformers. The functional operation of this phased array is substantially different from traditional phased arrays in that it uses a hybrid electrical/mechanical beamformer that creates the relative time delays for steering the antenna beam via a small physical movement of variable delay lines. This movement is controlled via an innovative antenna control unit that accesses an internal measurement unit for vehicle attitude information, computes a beam-pointing angle to the target, then points the beam via a stepper motor controller. The stepper motor on the beamformer controls the beamformer variable delay lines that apply the appropriate time delays to the individual array elements to properly steer the beam. The array of phased ring radiators is unique in that it provides improved gain for a small rocket or missile that uses spin stabilization for stability. The antenna pattern created is symmetric about the roll axis (like an omnidirectional wraparound), and is thus capable of providing continuous coverage that is compatible with very fast spinning rockets. For larger ELVs with roll control, a linear array of elements can be used for the 1D scanned beamformer and phased array, or a 2D scanned beamformer can be used with an NxN element array.

  18. Nested-cone transformer antenna

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, Carl A.

    1991-01-01

    A plurality of conical transmission lines are concentrically nested to form n output antenna for pulsed-power, radio-frequency, and microwave sources. The diverging conical conductors enable a high power input density across a bulk dielectric to be reduced below a breakdown power density at the antenna interface with the transmitting medium. The plurality of cones maintain a spacing between conductors which minimizes the generation of high order modes between the conductors. Further, the power input feeds are isolated at the input while enabling the output electromagnetic waves to add at the transmission interface. Thus, very large power signals from a pulse rf, or microwave source can be radiated.

  19. Nested-cone transformer antenna

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1991-05-28

    A plurality of conical transmission lines are concentrically nested to form an output antenna for pulsed-power, radio-frequency, and microwave sources. The diverging conical conductors enable a high power input density across a bulk dielectric to be reduced below a breakdown power density at the antenna interface with the transmitting medium. The plurality of cones maintain a spacing between conductors which minimizes the generation of high order modes between the conductors. Further, the power input feeds are isolated at the input while enabling the output electromagnetic waves to add at the transmission interface. Thus, very large power signals from a pulse rf, or microwave source can be radiated. 6 figures.

  20. Adaptive Antenna Control (AAC) program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsen, P.; Eschle, J.

    1980-09-01

    This is the test report for the Adaptive Antenna Control Program (Contract No. DAAB07-76-C-8085). The program is under the management of the U.S. Army Communications Systems Agency and monitored by the U.S. Army Communications R D Command both of Ft. Monmouth, New Jersey. SIGNATRON, Inc. and RF Systems, Inc. (as antenna sub-contractor) had the responsibility for executing the program tasks. This report summarizes these tasks and includes the results of the factory and field test phases.

  1. Antenna reconfiguration verification and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Robert C. (Inventor); Meyers, David W. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor); Carlson, Douglas R. (Inventor); Drexler, Jerome P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method of testing the electrical functionality of an optically controlled switch in a reconfigurable antenna is provided. The method includes configuring one or more conductive paths between one or more feed points and one or more test point with switches in the reconfigurable antenna. Applying one or more test signals to the one or more feed points. Monitoring the one or more test points in response to the one or more test signals and determining the functionality of the switch based upon the monitoring of the one or more test points.

  2. Interleaved array antenna technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This is the third phase of a program to establish an antenna concept for shuttle and free flying spacecraft earth resources experiments using Synthetic Aperture Radar. The feasibility of a plated graphite epoxy waveguide for a space antenna was evaluated. A quantity of flat panels and waveguides were developed, procured, and tested for electrical and mechanical properties. In addition, processes for the assembly of a unique waveguide array were investigated. Finally, trades between various configurations that would allow elevation (range) electronic scanning and that would minimize feed complexity for various RF bandwidths were made.

  3. High Resolution Scanning Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R. (Inventor); Miranda, Felix A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a High Resolution Scanning Reflectarray Antenna (HRSRA) for the purpose of tracking ground terminals and space craft communication applications. The present invention provides an alternative to using gimbaled parabolic dish antennas and direct radiating phased arrays. When compared to a gimbaled parabolic dish, the HRSRA offers the advantages of vibration free steering without incurring appreciable cost or prime power penalties. In addition, it offers full beam steering at a fraction of the cost of direct radiating arrays and is more efficient.

  4. Automatic Phase-Compensation Modules For Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terry, John D.; Kunath, Richard R., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Automatic amplitude-controlling and phase-shifting modules developed in order to adaptively compensate for distortions in reflectors of microwave communication antennas. Antenna of type in question includes phased array of radiating antenna elements in focal plane of off-axis paraboloidal or similar reflector. Module lies on path of radio-frequency feed between each antenna element and radio-frequency transmitting/receiving equipment.

  5. Large Space Antenna Systems Technology, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, W. J. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Papers are presented which provide a comprehensive review of space missions requiring large antenna systems and of the status of key technologies required to enable these missions. Topic areas include mission applications for large space antenna systems, large space antenna structural systems, materials and structures technology, structural dynamics and control technology, electromagnetics technology, large space antenna systems and the space station, and flight test and evaluation.

  6. The Galileo high gain antenna deployment anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    On April 11, 1991, the Galileo spacecraft executed a sequence that would open the spacecraft's High Gain Antenna. The Antenna's launch restraint had been released just after deployment sequence, the antenna, which opens like an umbrella, never reached the fully deployed position. The analyses and tests that followed allowed a conclusive determination of the likely failure mechanisms and pointed to some strategies to use for recovery of the high gain antenna.

  7. Analysis of Satellite Communications Antenna Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Computer program accurately and efficiently predicts far-field patterns of offset, or symmetric, parabolic reflector antennas. Antenna designer uses program to study effects of varying geometrical and electrical (RF) parameters of parabolic reflector and its feed system. Accurate predictions of far-field patterns help designer predict overall performance of antenna. These reflectors used extensively in modern communications satellites and in multiple-beam and low side-lobe antenna systems.

  8. Conformal and non conformal dilaton gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Enrique; Herrero-Valea, Mario; Martín, C. P.

    2014-10-01

    The quantum dynamics of the gravitational field non-minimally coupled to an (also dynamical) scalar field is studied in the broken phase. For a particular value of the coupling the system is classically conformal, and can actually be understood as the group averaging of Einstein-Hilbert's action under conformal transformations. Conformal invariance implies a simple Ward identity asserting that the trace of the equation of motion for the graviton is the equation of motion of the scalar field. We perform an explicit one-loop computation to show that the DeWitt effective action is not UV divergent on shell and to find that the Weyl symmetry Ward identity is preserved on shell at that level. We also discuss the fate of this Ward identity at the two-loop level — under the assumption that the two-loop UV divergent part of the effective action can be retrieved from the Goroff-Sagnotti counterterm — and show that its preservation in the renormalized theory requires the introduction of counterterms which exhibit a logarithmic dependence on the dilaton field.

  9. Development of a new type of beam-steerable earth station antenna - Offset Spherical Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Fumio

    1989-12-01

    The Offset Spherical Antenna, a beam-steerable earth station antenna, is introduced. The architecture and configuration of the antenna are described. The antenna is compared to other types of multibeam and/or beam-steerable antennas. The Offset Spherical Antenna consists of a feed subsystem, a spherical main reflector, and two subreflectors with special and unique curved profiles. The antenna's beam-steering capability is independent of the main reflector. Also, the antenna has multibeam-forming capability and the ability to achieve low sidelobe performance. The design parameters for Intelsat's Standard A, C, and E-3 earth station antennas are given and results are presented from experiments with a model antenna with a gain of 60 dBi.

  10. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in a GMRS system and that are more than 60.96 m (200 ft) in height, or are located near or at a...

  11. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in a GMRS system and that are more than 60.96 m (200 ft) in height, or are located near or at a...

  12. 47 CFR 95.51 - Antenna height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna height. 95.51 Section 95.51... SERVICES General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS) § 95.51 Antenna height. (a) Certain antenna structures used in a GMRS system and that are more than 60.96 m (200 ft) in height, or are located near or at a...

  13. Microwave performance characterization of large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathker, D. A. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Performance capabilities of large microwave space antenna configurations with apertures generally from 100 wavelengths upwards are discussed. Types of antennas considered include: phased arrays, lenses, reflectors, and hybrid combinations of phased arrays with reflectors or lenses. The performance characteristics of these broad classes of antennas are examined and compared in terms of applications.

  14. Lightweight S-band helix antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cribb, H. E.

    1970-01-01

    Pyrotechnically operated S-band helical antenna is developed in which helix is deployed subsequent to antenna placement. Antenna is small, lightweight, and novel in that deployable helix is used in place of fixed dish or horn. It can be designed to cover L- and X-band frequencies.

  15. Wireless link design using a patch antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E

    2000-08-11

    A wireless link was designed using a patch antenna. In the process, several different models were tested. Testing proved a patch antenna was a viable solution for building a wireless link within the design specifications. Also, this experimentation provided a basis for future patch antenna design.

  16. 47 CFR 78.105 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna systems. 78.105 Section 78.105... SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.105 Antenna systems. (a) For fixed stations operating in the 12.7-13.2... planes. (2) New periscope antenna systems will be authorized upon a certification that the radiation,...

  17. 47 CFR 74.641 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna systems. 74.641 Section 74.641... Stations § 74.641 Antenna systems. (a) For fixed stations operating above 2025 MHz, the following standards... elevation planes. (2) New periscope antenna systems will be authorized upon a certification that...

  18. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.203 Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than...

  19. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.203 Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than...

  20. 47 CFR 95.859 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antennas. 95.859 Section 95.859... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.859 Antennas. (a) The overall height from ground to topmost tip of the CTS antenna shall not exceed the height necessary to assure adequate service....

  1. 47 CFR 74.737 - Antenna location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna location. 74.737 Section 74.737... Booster Stations § 74.737 Antenna location. (a) An applicant for a new low power TV, TV translator, or TV.... (b) The transmitting antenna should be placed above growing vegetation and trees lying in...

  2. 47 CFR 80.1017 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.1017 Section 80.1017... MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installations Required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1017 Antenna system. (a) An antenna must be provided for nonportable bridge-to-bridge radiotelephone...

  3. 47 CFR 78.105 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna systems. 78.105 Section 78.105... SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.105 Antenna systems. (a) For fixed stations operating in the 12.7-13.2... directional antennas that meet the performance standards indicated in the following table. (i) Stations...

  4. 47 CFR 80.923 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.923 Section 80.923... MARITIME SERVICES Compulsory Radiotelephone Installations for Small Passenger Boats § 80.923 Antenna system. An antenna must be provided in accordance with the applicable requirements of § 80.81 of this...

  5. 47 CFR 74.737 - Antenna location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna location. 74.737 Section 74.737... Booster Stations § 74.737 Antenna location. (a) An applicant for a new low power TV, TV translator, or TV.... (b) The transmitting antenna should be placed above growing vegetation and trees lying in...

  6. 47 CFR 80.967 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.967 Section 80.967... MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installation Required for Vessels on the Great Lakes § 80.967 Antenna system. The antenna must be omni-directional, vertically polarized and located as high as practicable...

  7. 47 CFR 73.816 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antennas. 73.816 Section 73.816... Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.816 Antennas. (a) Permittees and licensees may employ nondirectional antennas with horizontal only polarization, vertical only polarization, circular polarization...

  8. 47 CFR 80.923 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.923 Section 80.923... MARITIME SERVICES Compulsory Radiotelephone Installations for Small Passenger Boats § 80.923 Antenna system. An antenna must be provided in accordance with the applicable requirements of § 80.81 of this...

  9. 47 CFR 80.967 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.967 Section 80.967... MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installation Required for Vessels on the Great Lakes § 80.967 Antenna system. The antenna must be omni-directional, vertically polarized and located as high as practicable...

  10. 47 CFR 80.1017 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.1017 Section 80.1017... MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installations Required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1017 Antenna system. (a) An antenna must be provided for nonportable bridge-to-bridge radiotelephone...

  11. 47 CFR 101.517 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antennas. 101.517 Section 101.517... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.517 Antennas. (a) Transmitting antennas may be omnidirectional or directional, consistent with coverage and interference requirements....

  12. 47 CFR 95.859 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antennas. 95.859 Section 95.859... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.859 Antennas. (a) The overall height from ground to topmost tip of the CTS antenna shall not exceed the height necessary to assure adequate service....

  13. 47 CFR 74.641 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna systems. 74.641 Section 74.641... Stations § 74.641 Antenna systems. (a) For fixed stations operating above 2025 MHz, the following standards apply: (1) Fixed TV broadcast auxiliary stations shall use directional antennas that meet...

  14. 47 CFR 101.115 - Directional antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Directional antennas. 101.115 Section 101.115... SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.115 Directional antennas. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 59572... authorized under the rules of this part must employ a directional antenna adjusted with the center of...

  15. 47 CFR 101.117 - Antenna polarization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna polarization. 101.117 Section 101.117... SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.117 Antenna polarization. Except as set forth herein, stations operating... polarization for antennas located within 20 kilometers of the outermost edge of their service area....

  16. 47 CFR 73.816 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antennas. 73.816 Section 73.816... Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.816 Antennas. (a) Permittees and licensees may employ nondirectional antennas with horizontal only polarization, vertical only polarization, circular polarization...

  17. 47 CFR 73.69 - Antenna monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... citations affecting § 73.69 see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna monitors. 73.69 Section 73.69... Broadcast Stations § 73.69 Antenna monitors. (a) Each station using a directional antenna must have...

  18. Antenna Construction and Propagation of Radio Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on antenna construction and propagation of radio waves is designed to provide communicators with instructions in the selection and/or construction of the proper antenna(s) for use with current field radio equipment. Introductory materials include…

  19. 47 CFR 101.517 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antennas. 101.517 Section 101.517... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.517 Antennas. (a) Transmitting antennas may be omnidirectional or directional, consistent with coverage and interference requirements....

  20. 47 CFR 74.641 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna systems. 74.641 Section 74.641... Stations § 74.641 Antenna systems. (a) For fixed stations operating above 2025 MHz, the following standards apply: (1) Fixed TV broadcast auxiliary stations shall use directional antennas that meet...

  1. 47 CFR 95.1213 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1213 Section 95.1213... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1213 Antennas. Except for the 2390-2400 MHz band, no antenna for a MedRadio transmitter shall be configured for permanent outdoor use....

  2. 47 CFR 80.967 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.967 Section 80.967... MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installation Required for Vessels on the Great Lakes § 80.967 Antenna system. The antenna must be omni-directional, vertically polarized and located as high as practicable...

  3. 47 CFR 74.737 - Antenna location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna location. 74.737 Section 74.737... Booster Stations § 74.737 Antenna location. (a) An applicant for a new low power TV, TV translator, or TV.... (b) The transmitting antenna should be placed above growing vegetation and trees lying in...

  4. 47 CFR 78.105 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna systems. 78.105 Section 78.105... SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.105 Antenna systems. (a) For fixed stations operating in the 12.7-13.2... directional antennas that meet the performance standards indicated in the following table. (i) Stations...

  5. 47 CFR 80.967 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.967 Section 80.967... MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installation Required for Vessels on the Great Lakes § 80.967 Antenna system. The antenna must be omni-directional, vertically polarized and located as high as practicable...

  6. 47 CFR 95.1213 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1213 Section 95.1213... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1213 Antennas. Link to an amendment published at 77 FR 55733, Sept. 11, 2012. No antenna for a MedRadio transmitter shall be configured...

  7. 47 CFR 95.1213 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antennas. 95.1213 Section 95.1213... SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1213 Antennas. Except for the 2390-2400 MHz band, no antenna for a MedRadio transmitter shall be configured for permanent outdoor use....

  8. 47 CFR 73.816 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antennas. 73.816 Section 73.816... Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.816 Antennas. (a) Permittees and licensees may employ nondirectional antennas with horizontal only polarization, vertical only polarization, circular polarization...

  9. 47 CFR 80.967 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.967 Section 80.967... MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installation Required for Vessels on the Great Lakes § 80.967 Antenna system. The antenna must be omni-directional, vertically polarized and located as high as practicable...

  10. 47 CFR 80.1017 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.1017 Section 80.1017... MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installations Required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1017 Antenna system. (a) An antenna must be provided for nonportable bridge-to-bridge radiotelephone...

  11. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203... Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than that furnished by the responsible party shall be used with the device. The use of a permanently attached...

  12. 47 CFR 95.859 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antennas. 95.859 Section 95.859... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.859 Antennas. (a) The overall height from ground to topmost tip of the CTS antenna shall not exceed the height necessary to assure adequate service....

  13. 47 CFR 80.1017 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.1017 Section 80.1017... MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installations Required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1017 Antenna system. (a) An antenna must be provided for nonportable bridge-to-bridge radiotelephone...

  14. 47 CFR 101.117 - Antenna polarization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna polarization. 101.117 Section 101.117... SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.117 Antenna polarization. Except as set forth herein, stations operating... polarization for antennas located within 20 kilometers of the outermost edge of their service area....

  15. 47 CFR 74.737 - Antenna location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna location. 74.737 Section 74.737... Booster Stations § 74.737 Antenna location. (a) An applicant for a new low power TV, TV translator, or TV.... (b) The transmitting antenna should be placed above growing vegetation and trees lying in...

  16. 47 CFR 101.117 - Antenna polarization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna polarization. 101.117 Section 101.117... SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.117 Antenna polarization. Except as set forth herein, stations operating... polarization for antennas located within 20 kilometers of the outermost edge of their service area....

  17. 47 CFR 74.641 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna systems. 74.641 Section 74.641... Stations § 74.641 Antenna systems. (a) For fixed stations operating above 2025 MHz, the following standards apply: (1) Fixed TV broadcast auxiliary stations shall use directional antennas that meet...

  18. 47 CFR 73.816 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antennas. 73.816 Section 73.816... Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.816 Antennas. (a) Permittees and licensees may employ nondirectional antennas with horizontal only polarization, vertical only polarization, circular polarization...

  19. Small X-Band Oscillator Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Miranda, Felix A.; Clark, Eric B.; Wilt, David M.; Mueller, Carl H.; Kory, Carol L.; Lambert, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    A small, segmented microstrip patch antenna integrated with an X-band feedback oscillator on a high-permittivity substrate has been built and tested. This oscillator antenna is a prototype for demonstrating the feasibility of such devices as compact, low-power-consumption building blocks of advanced, lightweight, phased antenna arrays that would generate steerable beams for communication and remotesensing applications.

  20. 47 CFR 95.859 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antennas. 95.859 Section 95.859... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.859 Antennas. (a) The overall height from ground to topmost tip of the CTS antenna shall not exceed the height necessary to assure adequate service....

  1. 47 CFR 74.737 - Antenna location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna location. 74.737 Section 74.737... Booster Stations § 74.737 Antenna location. (a) An applicant for a new low power TV, TV translator, or TV.... (b) The transmitting antenna should be placed above growing vegetation and trees lying in...

  2. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203... Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than that furnished by the responsible party shall be used with the device. The use of a permanently attached...

  3. 47 CFR 78.105 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna systems. 78.105 Section 78.105... SERVICE Technical Regulations § 78.105 Antenna systems. (a) For fixed stations operating in the 12.7-13.2... directional antennas that meet the performance standards indicated in the following table. (i) Stations...

  4. 47 CFR 73.816 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antennas. 73.816 Section 73.816... Low Power FM Broadcast Stations (LPFM) § 73.816 Antennas. (a) Permittees and licensees may employ nondirectional antennas with horizontal only polarization, vertical only polarization, circular polarization...

  5. 47 CFR 80.1017 - Antenna system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna system. 80.1017 Section 80.1017... MARITIME SERVICES Radiotelephone Installations Required by the Bridge-to-Bridge Act § 80.1017 Antenna system. (a) An antenna must be provided for nonportable bridge-to-bridge radiotelephone...

  6. 47 CFR 101.117 - Antenna polarization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna polarization. 101.117 Section 101.117... SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.117 Antenna polarization. Except as set forth herein, stations operating... polarization for antennas located within 20 kilometers of the outermost edge of their service area....

  7. 47 CFR 95.859 - Antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antennas. 95.859 Section 95.859... SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service Technical Standards § 95.859 Antennas. (a) The overall height from ground to topmost tip of the CTS antenna shall not exceed the height necessary to assure adequate service....

  8. 47 CFR 15.203 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.203 Section 15.203... Antenna requirement. An intentional radiator shall be designed to ensure that no antenna other than that furnished by the responsible party shall be used with the device. The use of a permanently attached...

  9. 47 CFR 74.641 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna systems. 74.641 Section 74.641... Stations § 74.641 Antenna systems. (a) For fixed stations operating above 2025 MHz, the following standards apply: (1) Fixed TV broadcast auxiliary stations shall use directional antennas that meet...

  10. 47 CFR 78.105 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... directional antennas that meet the performance standards indicated in the following table. (i) Stations must... polarization of each transmitted signal. (iii) Licensees shall comply with the antenna standards table shown in..., 1981, may continue to use its existing antenna system, subject to periodic renewal until April 1,...

  11. 47 CFR 73.1675 - Auxiliary antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Auxiliary antennas. 73.1675 Section 73.1675 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1675 Auxiliary antennas. (a)(1) An auxiliary antenna is one that is permanently...

  12. Research in large adaptive antenna arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, R. S.; Dzekov, T.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of microwave holographic imaging of targets near the earth using a large random conformal array on the earth's surface and illumination by a CW source on a geostationary satellite is investigated. A geometrical formulation for the illuminator-target-array relationship is applied to the calculation of signal levels resulting from L-band illumination supplied by a satellite similar to ATS-6. The relations between direct and reflected signals are analyzed and the composite resultant signal seen at each antenna element is described. Processing techniques for developing directional beam formation as well as SNR enhancement are developed. The angular resolution and focusing characteristics of a large array covering an approximately circular area on the ground are determined. The necessary relations are developed between the achievable SNR and the size and number of elements in the array. Numerical results are presented for possible air traffic surveillance system. Finally, a simple phase correlation experiment is defined that can establish how large an array may be constructed.

  13. Quantum massive conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, F. F.

    2016-04-01

    We first find the linear approximation of the second plus fourth order derivative massive conformal gravity action. Then we reduce the linearized action to separated second order derivative terms, which allows us to quantize the theory by using the standard first order canonical quantization method. It is shown that quantum massive conformal gravity is renormalizable but has ghost states. A possible decoupling of these ghost states at high energies is discussed.

  14. Delineating the conformal window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frandsen, Mads T.; Pickup, Thomas; Teper, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We identify and characterise the conformal window in gauge theories relevant for beyond the standard model building, e.g. technicolour, using the criteria of metric confinement and causal analytic couplings, which are known to be consistent with the phase diagram of supersymmetric QCD from Seiberg duality. Using these criteria we find perturbation theory to be consistent throughout the predicted conformal window for several of these gauge theories and we discuss recent lattice results in the light of our findings.

  15. Assemblies of Conformal Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Assemblies of tanks having shapes that conform to each other and/or conform to other proximate objects have been investigated for use in storing fuels and oxidizers in small available spaces in upper stages of spacecraft. Such assemblies might also prove useful in aircraft, automobiles, boats, and other terrestrial vehicles in which space available for tanks is limited. The basic concept of using conformal tanks to maximize the utilization of limited space is not new in itself: for example, conformal tanks are used in some automobiles to store windshield -washer liquid and coolant that overflows from radiators. The novelty of the present development lies in the concept of an assembly of smaller conformal tanks, as distinguished from a single larger conformal tank. In an assembly of smaller tanks, it would be possible to store different liquids in different tanks. Even if the same liquid were stored in all the tanks, the assembly would offer an advantage by reducing the mechanical disturbance caused by sloshing of fuel in a single larger tank: indeed, the requirement to reduce sloshing is critical in some applications. The figure shows a prototype assembly of conformal tanks. Each tank was fabricated by (1) copper plating a wax tank mandrel to form a liner and (2) wrapping and curing layers of graphite/epoxy composite to form a shell supporting the liner. In this case, the conformal tank surfaces are flat ones where they come in contact with the adjacent tanks. A band of fibers around the outside binds the tanks together tightly in the assembly, which has a quasi-toroidal shape. For proper functioning, it would be necessary to maintain equal pressure in all the tanks.

  16. RF/Optical Hybrid Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrez, T. M.

    2015-05-01

    This article details analyses performed on several variations of a proposed radio frequency (RF)/optical hybrid antenna. The goal was to determine the structural impact of adding an assembly of optical mirrors to the antenna; stresses in the structural members and reflector surface deformation were used to assess this impact. The results showed that the structure could handle the added assembly, and the surface RMS increased, as expected, with larger increases seen as the antenna translates in elevation from the rigging angle of 45 deg (a predetermined location chosen to optimize panel settings during installation). In addition, actuators are located behind each optical mirror to reoptimize the mirror positions after they deflect due to the antenna being tipped in elevation. The necessary actuator motion was calculated for each mirror for a range of elevation angles, and it was found that the required motions are achievable by commonly used actuators. Resonant frequency analysis was also performed on the quadripod and tripod (for DSS-13 at Goldstone) to determine the effect that adding optical components on the apex has on the structure and its first mode; it was found that the impact is minimal to both the stresses seen in the structure and its first mode.

  17. High-directivity acoustic antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Sum, H. M. A.

    1974-01-01

    Acoustic antenna with unique electronic steering control is used to identify and define aerodynamic noise sources in free field, particularly in wind tunnel which is quite reverberant. Provision is made for high directivity as well as improved discrimination against unwanted background noise such as reverberation or echoes.

  18. The Antenna Bride and Bridegroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    ALMA Achieves Major Milestone With Antenna-Link Success The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), an international telescope project, reached a major milestone on 2 March, when two 12-m ALMA prototype antennas were first linked together as an integrated system to observe an astronomical object. "This achievement results from the integration of many state-of-the-art components from Europe and North America and bodes well for the success of ALMA in Chile", said Catherine Cesarsky, ESO's Director General. ESO PR Photo 10/07 ESO PR Photo 10/07 The Prototype Antennas The milestone achievement, technically termed 'First Fringes', came at the ALMA Test Facility (ATF), located near Socorro in New Mexico. Faint radio waves emitted by the planet Saturn were collected by two ALMA prototype antennas, then processed by new, high-tech electronics to turn the two antennas into a single, high-resolution telescope system, called an interferometer. The planet's radio emissions at a frequency of 104 gigahertz were tracked by the ALMA system for more than an hour. Such pairs of antennas are the basic building blocks of the multi-antenna imaging system ALMA. In such a system, the signals recorded by each antenna are electronically combined with the signals of every other antenna to form a multitude of pairs. Each pair contributes unique information that is used to build a highly detailed image of the astronomical object under observation. When completed in the year 2012, ALMA will have 66 antennas. "Our congratulations go to the dedicated team of scientists, engineers and technicians who produced this groundbreaking achievement for ALMA. Much hard work and many long hours went into this effort, and we appreciate it all. This team should be very proud today," said NRAO Director Fred K.Y. Lo. "With this milestone behind us, we now can proceed with increased confidence toward completing ALMA," he added. ALMA, located at an elevation of 5,000m in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile, will provide astronomers with the world's most advanced tool for exploring the Universe at millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths. ALMA will detect fainter objects and be able to produce much higher-quality images at these wavelengths than any previous telescope system. Scientists are eager to use this transformational capability to study the first stars and galaxies that formed in the early Universe, to learn long-sought details about how stars are formed, and to trace the motion of gas and dust as it whirls toward the surface of newly-formed stars and planets. "The success of this test is fundamental proof that the hardware and software now under development for ALMA will work to produce a truly revolutionary astronomical tool," said Massimo Tarenghi, the ALMA Director. In addition to the leading-edge electronic and electro-optical hardware and custom software that proved itself by producing ALMA's first fringes, the system's antennas are among the most advanced in the world. The stringent requirements for the antennas included extremely precise reflecting surfaces, highly accurate ability to point at desired locations in the sky, and the ability to operate reliably in the harsh, high-altitude environment of the ALMA site. The ALMA Test Facility operates the two prototype antennas built by Alcatel Alenia Space and European Industrial Engineering in Europe, and by VertexRSI (USA). These antennas were evaluated individually at the ATF. Both prototypes were equipped with electronic equipment for receiving, digitizing and transmitting signals to a central facility, where the signals are combined to make the antennas work together as a single astronomical instrument. "The successful achievement of recording the first fringes with two ALMA antennas is certainly an important milestone in the scientific program," said Hans Rykaczewski, the European ALMA Project Manager. "It is encouraging and adds to our motivation to see that the principles of ALMA work - not only scientifically, but also from the point of view of organizing this project by partners located in four continents. This successful partnership is a good proof of principle for the future of large scientific projects in astronomy." The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), an international astronomy facility, is a partnership among Europe, Japan and North America, in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. ALMA is funded in Europe by the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, in Japan by the National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS) in cooperation with the Academia Sinica in Taiwan and in North America by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) in cooperation with the National Research Council of Canada (NRC). ALMA construction and operations are led on behalf of Europe by ESO, on behalf of Japan by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) and on behalf of North America by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), which is managed by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI).

  19. The NOAA TOGA antenna array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecklund, W. L.; Carter, D. A.; Balsley, B. B.

    1986-01-01

    The Aeronomy Laboratory recently installed a 100 x 100 meter array antenna with limited beam steering on Christmas Island as a part of the TOGA (Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere) program. The array and the associated beam steering and indicating hardware are described.

  20. Photogrammetry Of A Parabolic Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrick, W. D.; Lansing, F. L.; Stoller, F. W.; Lobb, V. B.

    1988-01-01

    Surface measured with accuracy better than 10 to the negative fifth power times diameter. Report describes use of advanced close-range photogrammetry to determine deviations of 34-m-diameter antenna main reflector and subreflector from nominal paraboloidal shapes. Measurements enable removal of linear offsets and angular misalignments of subreflector, with consequent increase of 4 percent in aperture efficiency.

  1. Optically addressed ultra-wideband phased antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jian

    Demands for high data rate and multifunctional apertures from both civilian and military users have motivated development of ultra-wideband (UWB) electrically steered phased arrays. Meanwhile, the need for large contiguous frequency is pushing operation of radio systems into the millimeter-wave (mm-wave) range. Therefore, modern radio systems require UWB performance from VHF to mm-wave. However, traditional electronic systems suffer many challenges that make achieving these requirements difficult. Several examples includes: voltage controlled oscillators (VCO) cannot provide a tunable range of several octaves, distribution of wideband local oscillator signals undergo high loss and dispersion through RF transmission lines, and antennas have very limited bandwidth or bulky sizes. Recently, RF photonics technology has drawn considerable attention because of its advantages over traditional systems, with the capability of offering extreme power efficiency, information capacity, frequency agility, and spatial beam diversity. A hybrid RF photonic communication system utilizing optical links and an RF transducer at the antenna potentially provides ultra-wideband data transmission, i.e., over 100 GHz. A successful implementation of such an optically addressed phased array requires addressing several key challenges. Photonic generation of an RF source with over a seven-octave bandwidth has been demonstrated in the last few years. However, one challenge which still remains is how to convey phased optical signals to downconversion modules and antennas. Therefore, a feed network with phase sweeping capability and low excessive phase noise needs to be developed. Another key challenge is to develop an ultra-wideband array antenna. Modern frontends require antennas to be compact, planar, and low-profile in addition to possessing broad bandwidth, conforming to stringent space, weight, cost, and power constraints. To address these issues, I will study broadband and miniaturization techniques for both single and array antennas. In addition, a prototype transmitting phased array system is developed and shown to demonstrate large bandwidth as well as a beam steering capability. The architecture of this system can be further developed to a large-scale array at higher frequencies such as mm-wave. This solution serves as a candidate for UWB multifunctional frontends.

  2. Measured and predicted root-mean-square errors in square and triangular antenna mesh facets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1989-01-01

    Deflection shapes of square and equilateral triangular facets of two tricot-knit, gold plated molybdenum wire mesh antenna materials were measured and compared, on the basis of root mean square (rms) differences, with deflection shapes predicted by linear membrane theory, for several cases of biaxial mesh tension. The two mesh materials contained approximately 10 and 16 holes per linear inch, measured diagonally with respect to the course and wale directions. The deflection measurement system employed a non-contact eddy current proximity probe and an electromagnetic distance sensing probe in conjunction with a precision optical level. Despite experimental uncertainties, rms differences between measured and predicted deflection shapes suggest the following conclusions: that replacing flat antenna facets with facets conforming to parabolically curved structural members yields smaller rms surface error; that potential accuracy gains are greater for equilateral triangular facets than for square facets; and that linear membrane theory can be a useful tool in the design of tricot knit wire mesh antennas.

  3. Antennas for portable VHF-FM receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoday, R. D. C.

    A number of compact antennas are described which have been considered as replacements for the standard whip antenna which is normally fitted to VHF portable receivers. A comparison made of their characteristics shows that, of the antennas considered in the survey, the quarter-wave whip still provides the best sensitivity. However the normal-mode helix is a more convenient and compact antenna and is shown to perform better than a short whip of the same axial length. This antenna can be easily engineered to operate over the VHF band and has sufficient sensitivity for normal use.

  4. Non-Gimbaled Antenna Pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigil, Jeannine S.

    1997-01-01

    The small satellite community has been interested in accessing fixed ground stations for means of space-to-ground transmissions, although a problem arises from the limited global coverage. There is a growing interest for using the Space Network (SN) or Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS) as the primary support for communications because of the coverage it provides. This thesis will address the potential for satellite access of the Space Network with a non-gimbaled antenna configuration and low-power, coded transmission. The non-gimbaled antenna and the TDRS satellites, TDRS-East, TDRS-West, and TDRS-Zone of Exclusion, were configured in an orbital analysis software package called Satellite Tool Kit to emulate the three-dimensional position of the satellites. The access potential, which is the average number of contacts per day and the average time per contact, were obtained through simulations run over a 30-day period to gain all the possible orientations. The orbital altitude was varied from 600 km through 1200 km with the results being a function of orbital inclination angles varying from 20 deg through 100 deg and pointing half-angles of I0 deg through 40 deg. To compare the validity of the simulations, Jet Propulsion Laboratory granted the use of the TOPEX satellite. The TOPEX satellite was configured to emulate a spin-stabilized antenna with its communications antenna stowed in the zenith-pointing direction. This mimicked the antenna pointing spin-stabilized satellite in the simulations. To make valid comparisons, the TOPEX orbital parameters were entered into Satellite Tool Kit and simulated over five test times provided by Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  5. Design of broadband single polarized antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Phoo Kho; Aziz, Mohamad Zoinol Abidin Abd.; Ahmad, Badrul Hisham; Ramli, Mohamad Hafize Bin; Fauzi, Noor Azamiah Md; Malek, Mohd Fareq Abd

    2015-05-01

    In practical wireless communication application, bandwidth enhancement becomes one of the major design considerations. At the same time, circular polarized (CP) antenna received much attention for the applications of modern wireless communication system when compared to linear polarized (LP) antenna. This is because CP antenna can reduce the multipath effect. Hence, broadband antenna with operating frequency at 2.4GHz for WLAN application is proposed. The proposed antenna is done by using L-probe amendment with rectangular patch. The rectangular patch and copper ground plane is separated with 10mm air gap. This approach is used to enhance the bandwidth and the gain of the proposed antenna. The bandwidth of the designed antenna is more than 200MHz which meet broadband application. The return loss for the antenna is below -10dB to achieved 90% matching efficiency. The position of L-probe feed is altered in order to obtained different polarizations. The broadband antenna had been designed and simulated by using Computer Simulation Technology (CST) software. In this paper, the comparison for single polarized antenna with the design of non-inverted patch and inverted patch is discussed. The characteristics of the S-parameter, axial ratio, gain, surface current for each designed antenna are analyzed.

  6. Integrated broadband bowtie antenna on transparent substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingyu; Wang, Shiyi; Subbaraman, Harish; Zhan, Qiwen; Pan, Zeyu; Chung, Chi-jui; Yan, Hai; Chen, Ray T.

    2015-03-01

    The bowtie antenna is a topic of growing interest in recent years. In this paper, we design, fabricate, and characterize a modified gold bowtie antenna integrated on a transparent glass substrate. We numerically investigate the antenna characteristics, specifically its resonant frequency and enhancement factor. We simulate the dependence of resonance frequency on bowtie geometry, and verify the simulation results through experimental investigation, by fabricating different sets of bowtie antennas on glass substrates utilizing CMOS compatible processes and measuring their resonance frequencies. Our designed bowtie antenna provides a strong broadband electric field enhancement in its feed gap. The far-field radiation pattern of the bowtie antenna is measured, and it shows dipole-like characteristics with large beam width. Such a broadband antenna will be useful for a myriad of applications, ranging from wireless communications to electromagnetic wave detection.

  7. A phased array tracking antenna for vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohmori, Shingo; Mano, Kazukiko; Tanaka, Kenji; Matsunaga, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Makio

    1990-01-01

    An antenna system including antenna elements and a satellite tracking method is considered a key technology in implementing land mobile satellite communications. In the early stage of land mobile satellite communications, a mechanical tracking antenna system is considered the best candidate for vehicles, however, a phased array antenna will replace it in the near future, because it has many attractive advantages such as a low and compact profile, high speed tracking, and potential low cost. Communications Research Laboratory is now developing a new phased array antenna system for land vehicles based on research experiences of the airborne phased array antenna, which was developed and evaluated in satellite communication experiments using the ETS-V satellite. The basic characteristics of the phased array antenna for land vehicles are described.

  8. Foldable nanopaper antennas for origami electronics.

    PubMed

    Nogi, Masaya; Komoda, Natsuki; Otsuka, Kanji; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2013-05-21

    Foldable antennas are required for small-sized electronic devices with high portability. Antennas on plastic substrates provide high flexibility and high sensitivity but are not foldable. Antennas on paper substrates are foldable, but their sensitivity is poor because of their coarse surfaces. In this paper, nanopapers with smooth surfaces and high foldability are fabricated from 30 nm wide cellulose nanofibers for use as foldable antenna substrates. Silver nanowires are then printed on the nanopapers to act as antenna lines. These nanopaper antennas with silver nanowires exhibit high sensitivity because of their smooth surfaces and high foldability because of their network structures. Also, their high foldability allows the mechanical tuning of their resonance points over a wide frequency range without using additional components such as condensers and coils. Nanopaper antennas with silver nanowires are therefore suitable for the realization of future foldable electronics. PMID:23575553

  9. Single- and dual-polarized slot and patch antennas with wide tuning ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Carson R.

    Frequency- and polarization-agile antennas are of great interest for multi-function, software-defined, and cognitive radios. Frequency tuning over an octave is challenging because the radiation conductance changes as the antennas are tuned. In this work, single- and dual-polarized antennas are tuned over frequency ranges of up to 2:1 and 1.7:1, respectively, while remaining impedance matched. The impedance match over tuning is maintained by a properly chosen reactive element in series with the antenna. Both polarizations of the dual-polarized antennas are tuned independently, enabling either simultaneous frequency- and polarization-agility, or operation at two independent frequencies on orthogonal polarizations. First, the tunability of the slot-ring antenna is demonstrated with fixed-capacitor loading, and then, single and dual-polarized slot-ring antennas are tuned from 0.95-1.8 GHz and 0.93-1.6 GHz, respectively, using varactor diodes. Microstrip reactive loads are developed to maintain >20 dB port-to-port isolation over most of the tuning range of the dual-polarized antenna. This may be the first dual-polarized tunable antenna with independent control of both polarizations over a 1.7:1 frequency range. Single-sided radiation is desirable for many applications, and varactor-tuned cavity-backed slots are investigated for this purpose. A shallow cavity-backed slot is tuned from 1.0 to 1.9 GHz with <-20 dB return loss. The antenna operates either in free-space or conformally mounted with minimal change in input impedance. Finally, a dual-polarized cavity-backed patch antenna is tuned from 0.6-1 GHz. Differential feeds are employed to achieve >30 dB port-to-port isolation (differential- differential mode) over the tuning range, and the measured cross-polarization level at 0.65, 0.8, and 0.95 GHz is <-25 dB. This may be the first demonstration of dual-polarized independent tuning over a 1.7:1 frequency range with single-sided radiation.

  10. Conformity: Implications for ABE Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Huey B.

    1977-01-01

    Provides an interpretative review of the literature of conforming behavior with special attention to implications for adult education. Eight different research areas of conformity research are summarized, and five reasons for conformity and three different kinds of conforming behavior are identified and discussed. (SH)

  11. Conformal invariance of curvature perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Jinn-Ouk; Hwang, Jai-chan; Park, Wan Il; Sasaki, Misao; Song, Yong-Seon E-mail: jchan@knu.ac.kr E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2011-09-01

    We show that in the single component situation all perturbation variables in the comoving gauge are conformally invariant to all perturbation orders. Generally we identify a special time slicing, the uniform-conformal transformation slicing, where all perturbations are again conformally invariant to all perturbation orders. We apply this result to the δN formalism, and show its conformal invariance.

  12. Conformational kinetics reveals affinities of protein conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Kyle G.; Suo, Yang; Oas, Terrence G.

    2015-01-01

    Most biological reactions rely on interplay between binding and changes in both macromolecular structure and dynamics. Practical understanding of this interplay requires detection of critical intermediates and determination of their binding and conformational characteristics. However, many of these species are only transiently present and they have often been overlooked in mechanistic studies of reactions that couple binding to conformational change. We monitored the kinetics of ligand-induced conformational changes in a small protein using six different ligands. We analyzed the kinetic data to simultaneously determine both binding affinities for the conformational states and the rate constants of conformational change. The approach we used is sufficiently robust to determine the affinities of three conformational states and detect even modest differences in the protein’s affinities for relatively similar ligands. Ligand binding favors higher-affinity conformational states by increasing forward conformational rate constants and/or decreasing reverse conformational rate constants. The amounts by which forward rate constants increase and reverse rate constants decrease are proportional to the ratio of affinities of the conformational states. We also show that both the affinity ratio and another parameter, which quantifies the changes in conformational rate constants upon ligand binding, are strong determinants of the mechanism (conformational selection and/or induced fit) of molecular recognition. Our results highlight the utility of analyzing the kinetics of conformational changes to determine affinities that cannot be determined from equilibrium experiments. Most importantly, they demonstrate an inextricable link between conformational dynamics and the binding affinities of conformational states. PMID:26162682

  13. Antenna design and characterization based on the elementary antenna concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligthart, L. P.

    An antenna-design technique based on an elementary-antenna model (an infinitesimal pillbox structure carrying electric and magnetic currents and containing propagating TEM fields) is developed and demonstrated. An EM description of a waveguide aperture is obtained by applying approximate boundary conditions at specific points; the transmitted field is developed locally into a set of TEM field components to compute the radiation pattern; and aperture matching is achieved by calculating the aperture reflection as well. Parallel-plate, circular, and rectangular waveguides; two single-polarization TEM waveguide radiators (with and without dielectric filling); a dielectric-filled dual-polarization TE(01) waveguide radiator; and a hybrid reflector array with limited beam switching based on the TE(01) radiator are presented.

  14. Conformational flexibility of mephenesin.

    PubMed

    Écija, Patricia; Evangelisti, Luca; Vallejo, Montserrat; Basterretxea, Francisco J; Lesarri, Alberto; Castaño, Fernando; Caminati, Walther; Cocinero, Emilio J

    2014-05-22

    The mephenesin molecule (3-(2-methylphenoxy)propane-1,2-diol) serves as a test bank to explore several structural and dynamical issues, such as conformational flexibility, the orientation of the carbon linear chain relative to the benzene plane, or the effect of substituent position on the rotational barrier of a methyl group. The molecule has been studied by rotational spectroscopy in the 4-18 GHz frequency range by Fourier-transform methods in a supersonic expansion. The experiment has been backed by a previous conformational search plus optimization of the lowest energy structures by ab initio and density functional quantum calculations. The three lowest-lying conformers that can interconvert to each other by simple bond rotations have been detected in the jet. Rotational parameters for all structures have been obtained, and methyl torsional barriers have been determined for the two lowest-lying rotamers. The lowest-lying structure of mephenesin is highly planar, with all carbon atoms lying nearly in the benzene ring plane, and is stabilized by the formation of cooperative intramolecular hydrogen bonding. An estimation of the relative abundance of the detected conformers indicates that the energetically most stable conformer will have an abundance near 80% at temperatures relevant for biological activity. PMID:24754523

  15. Antenna impedance measurements in a magnetized plasma. II. Dipole antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, David D.; Walker, David N.; Messer, Sarah J.; Amatucci, William E.

    2007-09-15

    This paper presents experimental impedance measurements of a dipole antenna immersed in a magnetized plasma. The impedance was derived from the magnitude and phase of the reflected power using a network analyzer over a frequency range of 1 MHz-1 GHz. The plasma density was varied between 10{sup 7} and 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} in weakly ({omega}{sub ce}<{omega}{sub pe}) and strongly ({omega}{sub ce}>{omega}{sub pe}) magnetized plasmas in the Space Physics Simulation Chamber at the Naval Research Laboratory. Over this range of plasma conditions the wavelength in the plasma varies from the short dipole limit ({lambda}>>L) to the long dipole limit ({lambda}{approx}L). As with previous impedance measurements, there are two resonant frequencies observed as frequencies where the impedance of the antenna is real. Measurements have indicated that in the short dipole limit the majority of the power deposition takes place at the lower resonance frequency which lies between the cyclotron frequency and the upper hybrid frequency. These measured curves agree very well with the analytic theory for a short dipole in a magnetoplasma. In the long dipole regime, in addition to the short dipole effects still being present, there is resonant energy deposition which peaks at much higher frequencies and correlates to 1/2 and 3/2 wavelength dipole resonances. The wavelengths in the plasma predicted by these resonances are consistent with the antenna radiating R and L-waves.

  16. Design and analysis of an electronically steerable microstrip patch and a novel Coplanar Waveguide (CPW) fed slot antenna array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldossary, Hamad

    Conformal Phased Array Antennas (CPAAs) are very attractive for their high gain, low profile, and beam scanning ability while being conformal to their mounting surface. Among them are microstrip patch phased arrays and wideband slot phased arrays which are of particular significance. In this work, first the study, design, and implementation of a conformal microstrip patch phased array is presented which consists of a high gain beam scanning array implemented using microstrip delay lines controlled using GaAs SPDT switches. Then the study and design of a wideband Coplanar Waveguide (CPW)-fed slot phased array antenna is presented. In both cases the array beam scanning properties are elucidated by incorporating the measured delay line scattering parameters inside Ansys Designer simulation models and then computing and presenting their full-wave radiation characteristics.

  17. Gravity on Conformal Superspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleher, Bryan

    2003-11-01

    The configuration space of general relativity is superspace - the space of all Riemannian 3-metrics modulo diffeomorphisms. However, it has been argued that the configuration space for gravity should be conformal superspace - the space of all Riemannian 3-metrics modulo diffeomorphisms and conformal transformations. Taking this conformal nature seriously leads to a new theory of gravity which although very similar to general relativity has some very different features particularly in cosmology and quantisation. It should reproduce the standard tests of general relativity. The cosmology is studied in some detail. The theory is incredibly restrictive and as a result admits an extremely limited number of possible solutions. The problems of the standard cosmology are addressed and most remarkably the cosmological constant problem is resolved in a natural way. The theory also has several attractive features with regard to quantisation particularly regarding the problem of time.

  18. Hexagonal and Pentagonal Fractal Multiband Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Philip W.; Wahid, Parveen

    2005-01-01

    Multiband dipole antennas based on hexagonal and pentagonal fractals have been analyzed by computational simulations and functionally demonstrated in experiments on prototypes. These antennas are capable of multiband or wide-band operation because they are subdivided into progressively smaller substructures that resonate at progressively higher frequencies by virtue of their smaller dimensions. The novelty of the present antennas lies in their specific hexagonal and pentagonal fractal configurations and the resonant frequencies associated with them. These antennas are potentially applicable to a variety of multiband and wide-band commercial wireless-communication products operating at different frequencies, including personal digital assistants, cellular telephones, pagers, satellite radios, Global Positioning System receivers, and products that combine two or more of the aforementioned functions. Perhaps the best-known prior multiband antenna based on fractal geometry is the Sierpinski triangle antenna (also known as the Sierpinski gasket), shown in the top part of the figure. In this antenna, the scale length at each iteration of the fractal is half the scale length of the preceding iteration, yielding successive resonant frequencies related by a ratio of about 2. The middle and bottom parts of the figure depict the first three iterations of the hexagonal and pentagonal fractals along with typical dipole-antenna configuration based on the second iteration. Successive resonant frequencies of the hexagonal fractal antenna have been found to be related by a ratio of about 3, and those of the pentagonal fractal antenna by a ratio of about 2.59.

  19. Negative ion source with external RF antenna

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Hahto, Sami K.; Hahto, Sari T.

    2007-02-13

    A radio frequency (RF) driven plasma ion source has an external RF antenna, i.e. the RF antenna is positioned outside the plasma generating chamber rather than inside. The RF antenna is typically formed of a small diameter metal tube coated with an insulator. An external RF antenna assembly is used to mount the external RF antenna to the ion source. The RF antenna tubing is wound around the external RF antenna assembly to form a coil. The external RF antenna assembly is formed of a material, e.g. quartz, which is essentially transparent to the RF waves. The external RF antenna assembly is attached to and forms a part of the plasma source chamber so that the RF waves emitted by the RF antenna enter into the inside of the plasma chamber and ionize a gas contained therein. The plasma ion source is typically a multi-cusp ion source. A converter can be included in the ion source to produce negative ions.

  20. Distal heme pocket conformers of carbonmonoxy derivatives of Ascaris hemoglobin: evidence of conformational trapping in porous sol-gel matrices.

    PubMed

    Das, Tapan K; Samuni, Uri; Lin, Yu; Goldberg, Daniel E; Rousseau, Denis L; Friedman, Joel M

    2004-03-12

    We report the ligand dependence of the conformer distribution in the distal heme pocket of Ascaris suum hemoglobin (Hb) studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy. The heme-bound CO is used as a spectroscopic antenna to probe the original distribution of conformers in the dioxygen derivative of Ascaris Hb, by utilizing sol-gel encapsulation. The first step is to encapsulate the dioxygen derivative in the porous sol-gel and let the gel age, thus trapping the equilibrium conformational distribution of Ascaris dioxygen Hb. In the second step, the dioxygen ligand is replaced by CO. The sol-gel environment impedes any large scale movements, drastically slowing down the conformational relaxation triggered by the ligation change, essentially "locking in" the initial quaternary and even tertiary structure of the protein. Studying the Fe-CO frequencies of the latter sample allows evaluation of the distribution of the distal heme pocket conformers that was originally associated with the dioxygen derivative. Extending the study to the Ascaris mutants allows for examination of the effect of specific residues in the distal pocket on the conformational distribution. The choice of mutants was largely based on the anticipated variation in hydrogen bonding patterns. The results show that the sol-gel encapsulation can slow or prevent re-equilibration within the distal heme pocket of Ascaris Hb and that the distribution of distal heme pocket conformers for the CO derivative of Ascaris Hb in the sol-gel is highly dependent on the history of the sample. Additionally, we report a detailed study of the CO complex of the mutants in solution for assignment of the various heme pocket conformers, and we present a comparison of the sol-gel data with solution data. The results support a picture in which the dioxygen derivative biases the population strongly toward a tightly packed configuration that favors the network of strong hydrogen bonding interactions, and suggest that Ascaris Hb is uniquely designed for dioxygen capture. PMID:14688246

  1. Charged conformal Killing spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-15

    We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spin{sup c}-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ≤5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space.

  2. Transparent antennas for solar cell integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Tursunjan

    Transparent patch antennas are microstrip patch antennas that have a certain level of optical transparency. Highly transparent patch antennas are potentially suitable for integration with solar panels of small satellites, which are becoming increasingly important in space exploration. Traditional patch antennas employed on small satellites compete with solar cells for surface area. However, a transparent patch antenna can be placed directly on top of solar cells and resolve the issue of competing for limited surface real estate. For such an integration, a high optical transparency of the patch antenna is required from the solar cells' point of view. On the other hand, the antenna should possess at least acceptable radiation properties at the same time. This dissertation focuses on some of the most important concerns from the perspective of small satellite applications. For example, an optimization method to simultaneously improve both optical transparency and radiation efficiency of the antenna is studied. Active integrated antenna design method is extended to meshed patch applications in an attempt to improve the overall power efficiency of the front end communication subsystem. As is well known, circular polarization is immune from Faraday rotation effect in the ionosphere and thus can avoid a 3-dB loss in geo-satellite communication. Therefore, this research also aims to present design methods for circularly polarized meshed patch antennas. Moreover, a meshed patch antenna capable of supporting a high communication data rate is investigated. Lastly, other types of transparent patch antennas are also analyzed and compared to meshed patches. In summary, many properties of transparent patch antennas are examined in order to meet different design requirements.

  3. Slotted antenna waveguide plasma source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A high density plasma generated by microwave injection using a windowless electrodeless rectangular slotted antenna waveguide plasma source has been demonstrated. Plasma probe measurements indicate that the source could be applicable for low power ion thruster applications, ion implantation, and related applications. This slotted antenna plasma source invention operates on the principle of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR). It employs no window and it is completely electrodeless and therefore its operation lifetime is long, being limited only by either the microwave generator itself or charged particle extraction grids if used. The high density plasma source can also be used to extract an electron beam that can be used as a plasma cathode neutralizer for ion source beam neutralization applications.

  4. Research on MLS airborne antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C. L.; Burnside, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical solutions for the radiation patterns of antennas mounted on aircraft are developed. The airborne antenna problems associated with the Microwave Landing System (MLS) are emphasized. Based on the requirements of the MLS, volumetric pattern solutions are essential. Previous attempts at solving for the volumetric patterns were found to be far too complex and very inefficient. However as a result of previous efforts, it is possible to combine the elevation and roll plane pattern solutions to give the complete volumetric pattern. This combination is described as well as the aircraft simulation models used in the analysis. A numerical technique is presented to aid in the simulation of the aircraft studied. Finally, a description of the input data used in the computer code is given.

  5. Photo-generated THz antennas

    PubMed Central

    Georgiou, G.; Tyagi, H. K.; Mulder, P.; Bauhuis, G. J.; Schermer, J. J.; Rivas, J. Gómez

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetic resonances in conducting structures give rise to the enhancement of local fields and extinction efficiencies. Conducting structures are conventionally fabricated with a fixed geometry that determines their resonant response. Here, we challenge this conventional approach by demonstrating the photo-generation of THz linear antennas on a flat semiconductor layer by the structured optical illumination through a spatial light modulator. Free charge carriers are photo-excited only on selected areas, which enables the realization of different conducting antennas on the same sample by simply changing the illumination pattern, thus without the need of physically structuring the sample. These results open a wide range of possibilities for the all-optical spatial control of resonances on surfaces and the concomitant control of THz extinction and local fields. PMID:24394920

  6. Plasmonic Antenna Coupling for QWIPs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, John

    2007-01-01

    In a proposed scheme for coupling light into a quantum-well infrared photodetector (QWIP), an antenna or an array of antennas made of a suitable metal would be fabricated on the face of what would otherwise be a standard QWIP. This or any such coupling scheme is required to effect polarization conversion: Light incident perpendicularly to the face is necessarily polarized in the plane of the face, whereas, as a matter of fundamental electrodynamics and related quantum selection rules, light must have a non-zero component of perpendicular polarization in order to be absorbed in the photodetection process. In a prior coupling scheme, gratings in the form of surface corrugations diffract normally gles, thereby imparting some perpendicular polarization. Unfortunately, the corrugation- fabrication process increases the overall nonuniformity of a large QWIP array. The proposed scheme is an alternative to the use of surface corrugations.

  7. Distributed antenna system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    System and methods are disclosed for employing one or more radiators having non-unique phase centers mounted to a body with respect to a plurality of transmitters to determine location characteristics of the body such as the position and/or attitude of the body. The one or more radiators may consist of a single, continuous element or of two or more discrete radiation elements whose received signals are combined. In a preferred embodiment, the location characteristics are determined using carrier phase measurements whereby phase center information may be determined or estimated. A distributed antenna having a wide angle view may be mounted to a moveable body in accord with the present invention. The distributed antenna may be utilized for maintaining signal contact with multiple spaced apart transmitters, such as a GPS constellation, as the body rotates without the need for RF switches to thereby provide continuous attitude and position determination of the body.

  8. Photo-generated THz antennas.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, G; Tyagi, H K; Mulder, P; Bauhuis, G J; Schermer, J J; Rivas, J Gómez

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetic resonances in conducting structures give rise to the enhancement of local fields and extinction efficiencies. Conducting structures are conventionally fabricated with a fixed geometry that determines their resonant response. Here, we challenge this conventional approach by demonstrating the photo-generation of THz linear antennas on a flat semiconductor layer by the structured optical illumination through a spatial light modulator. Free charge carriers are photo-excited only on selected areas, which enables the realization of different conducting antennas on the same sample by simply changing the illumination pattern, thus without the need of physically structuring the sample. These results open a wide range of possibilities for the all-optical spatial control of resonances on surfaces and the concomitant control of THz extinction and local fields. PMID:24394920

  9. DSS 13 Microprocessor Antenna Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosline, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    A microprocessor based antenna controller system developed as part of the unattended station project for DSS 13 is described. Both the hardware and software top level designs are presented and the major problems encounted are discussed. Developments useful to related projects include a JPL standard 15 line interface using a single board computer, a general purpose parser, a fast floating point to ASCII conversion technique, and experience gained in using off board floating point processors with the 8080 CPU.

  10. Transcatheter Antenna For Microwave Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor); Karasack, Vincent G. (Inventor); Pacifico, Antonio (Inventor); Pieper, Carl F. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for propagating microwave energy into heart tissues to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally ablating arrhythmogenic cardiac tissue to treat ventricular tachycardia and other arrhythmias while preventing excessive heating of surrounding tissues, organs, and blood. A wide bandwidth double-disk antenna is effective for this purpose over a bandwidth of about six gigahertz. A computer simulation provides initial screening capabilities for an antenna such as antenna, frequency, power level, and power application duration. The simulation also allows optimization of techniques for specific patients or conditions. In operation, microwave energy between about 1 Gigahertz and 12 Gigahertz is applied to monopole microwave radiation having a surface wave limiter. A test setup provides physical testing of microwave radiators to determine the temperature profile created in actual heart tissue or ersatz heart tissue. Saline solution pumped over the heart tissue with a peristaltic pump simulates blood flow. Optical temperature sensors disposed at various tissue depths within the heart tissue detect the temperature profile without creating any electromagnetic interference. The method may he used to produce a desired temperature profile in other body tissues reachable by catheter such as tumors and the like.

  11. Membrane Shell Reflector Segment Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Im, Eastwood; Lin, John; Moore, James

    2012-01-01

    The mesh reflector is the only type of large, in-space deployable antenna that has successfully flown in space. However, state-of-the-art large deployable mesh antenna systems are RF-frequency-limited by both global shape accuracy and local surface quality. The limitations of mesh reflectors stem from two factors. First, at higher frequencies, the porosity and surface roughness of the mesh results in loss and scattering of the signal. Second, the mesh material does not have any bending stiffness and thus cannot be formed into true parabolic (or other desired) shapes. To advance the deployable reflector technology at high RF frequencies from the current state-of-the-art, significant improvements need to be made in three major aspects: a high-stability and highprecision deployable truss; a continuously curved RF reflecting surface (the function of the surface as well as its first derivative are both continuous); and the RF reflecting surface should be made of a continuous material. To meet these three requirements, the Membrane Shell Reflector Segment (MSRS) antenna was developed.

  12. Layout Of Antennas And Cables In A Large Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Layout devised to minimize total land area occupied by large phased array of antennas and to minimize total length of cables in array. In original intended application, array expanded version of array of paraboloidal-dish microwave communication antennas of Deep Space Network. Layout also advantageous for other phased arrays of antennas and antenna elements, including notably printed-circuit microwave antenna arrays.

  13. Measurement techniques for cryogenic Ka-band microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, M. A.; Bhasin, K. B.; Gilbert, C.; Metzler, S.; Claspy, P. C.

    1991-01-01

    The measurement of cryogenic antennas poses unique logistical problems since the antenna under test must be embedded in a cooling chamber. A method of measuring the performance of cryogenic microstrip antennas using a closed cycle gas cooled refrigerator in a far field range is described. Antenna patterns showing the performance of gold and superconducting Ka-band microstrip antennas at various temperatures are presented.

  14. 47 CFR 22.365 - Antenna structures; air navigation safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna structures; air navigation safety. 22... Antenna structures; air navigation safety. Licensees that own their antenna structures must not allow these antenna structures to become a hazard to air navigation. In general, antenna structure owners...

  15. 47 CFR 22.365 - Antenna structures; air navigation safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna structures; air navigation safety. 22... Antenna structures; air navigation safety. Licensees that own their antenna structures must not allow these antenna structures to become a hazard to air navigation. In general, antenna structure owners...

  16. 47 CFR 22.365 - Antenna structures; air navigation safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna structures; air navigation safety. 22... Antenna structures; air navigation safety. Licensees that own their antenna structures must not allow these antenna structures to become a hazard to air navigation. In general, antenna structure owners...

  17. 47 CFR 22.365 - Antenna structures; air navigation safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna structures; air navigation safety. 22... Antenna structures; air navigation safety. Licensees that own their antenna structures must not allow these antenna structures to become a hazard to air navigation. In general, antenna structure owners...

  18. 47 CFR 22.365 - Antenna structures; air navigation safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna structures; air navigation safety. 22... Antenna structures; air navigation safety. Licensees that own their antenna structures must not allow these antenna structures to become a hazard to air navigation. In general, antenna structure owners...

  19. PERSONALITY AND CONFORMITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAROCAS, RALPH; GORLOW, LEON

    AN INVESTIGATION WAS MADE OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PERSONALITY FACTORS AND CONFORMITY. THE SUBJECTS WERE 243 RANDOMLY SELECTED STUDENTS ENROLLED IN COLLEGE PSYCHOLOGY COURSES WHO WERE DIVIDED INTO GROUPS OF 97, 96, AND 50 SUBJECTS. A PERSONALITY FACTOR INVENTORY WAS OBTAINED FROM RESPONSES TO A LARGE LIST OF TRUE-FALSE PERSONALITY ITEM…

  20. Conformal cloak for waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Huanyang; Leonhardt, Ulf; Tyc, Tomas

    2011-05-15

    Conformal invisibility devices are only supposed to work within the valid range of geometrical optics. Here, we show by numerical simulations and analytical arguments that for certain quantized frequencies, they are nearly perfect even in a regime that clearly violates geometrical optics. The quantization condition follows from the analogy between the Helmholtz equation and the stationary Schroedinger equation.

  1. Distributed control of large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, J. M.; Hamidi, M.; Lin, Y. H.; Wang, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    A systematic way to choose control design parameters and to evaluate performance for large space antennas is presented. The structural dynamics and control properties for a Hoop and Column Antenna and a Wrap-Rib Antenna are characterized. Some results of the effects of model parameter uncertainties to the stability, surface accuracy, and pointing errors are presented. Critical dynamics and control problems for these antenna configurations are identified and potential solutions are discussed. It was concluded that structural uncertainties and model error can cause serious performance deterioration and can even destabilize the controllers. For the hoop and column antenna, large hoop and long meat and the lack of stiffness between the two substructures result in low structural frequencies. Performance can be improved if this design can be strengthened. The two-site control system is more robust than either single-site control systems for the hoop and column antenna.

  2. Compact Miniaturized Antenna for 210 MHz RFID

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Chun, Kue

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the design and simulation of a miniaturized square-ring antenna. The miniaturized antenna, with overall dimensions of approximately one tenth of a wavelength (0.1 ), was designed to operate at around 210 MHz, and was intended for radio-frequency identification (RFID) application. One unique feature of the design is the use of a parasitic element to improve the performance and impedance matching of the antenna. The use of parasitic elements to enhance the gain and bandwidth of patch antennas has been demonstrated and reported in the literature, but such use has never been applied to miniaturized antennas. In this work, we will present simulation results and discuss design parameters and their impact on the antenna performance.

  3. Antenna pattern control using impedance surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Liu, Kefeng; Tirkas, Panayiotis A.

    1993-01-01

    During the period of this research project, a comprehensive study of pyramidal horn antennas was conducted. Full-wave analytical and numerical techniques were developed to analyze horn antennas with or without impedance surfaces. Based on these full-wave analytic techniques, research was conducted on the use of impedance surfaces on the walls of the horn antennas to control the antenna radiation patterns without a substantial loss of antenna gain. It was found that the use of impedance surfaces could modify the antenna radiation patterns. In addition to the analytical and numerical models, experimental models were also constructed and they were used to validate the predictions. Excellent agreement between theoretical predictions and the measured data was obtained for pyramidal horns with perfectly conducting surfaces. Very good comparisons between numerical and experimental models were also obtained for horns with impedance surfaces.

  4. Advanced microwave radiometer antenna system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummer, W. H.; Villeneuve, A. T.; Seaton, A. F.

    1976-01-01

    The practicability of a multi-frequency antenna for spaceborne microwave radiometers was considered in detail. The program consisted of a comparative study of various antenna systems, both mechanically and electronically scanned, in relation to specified design goals and desired system performance. The study involved several distinct tasks: definition of candidate antennas that are lightweight and that, at the specified frequencies of 5, 10, 18, 22, and 36 GHz, can provide conical scanning, dual linear polarization, and simultaneous multiple frequency operation; examination of various feed systems and phase-shifting techniques; detailed analysis of several key performance parameters such as beam efficiency, sidelobe level, and antenna beam footprint size; and conception of an antenna/feed system that could meet the design goals. Candidate antennas examined include phased arrays, lenses, and optical reflector systems. Mechanical, electrical, and performance characteristics of the various systems were tabulated for ease of comparison.

  5. Integration of microbolometers with infrared microstrip antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codreanu, Iulian; Boreman, Glenn D.

    2002-12-01

    We report on various integration schemes of infrared microbolometers with microstrip antennas. The first integration design consists of two gold (Au) rectangular microstrip patches coupled along the radiating edges by a narrow niobium (Nb) strip. Devices using silicon oxide are compared to devices using amorphous silicon as antenna substrate. An extension of the twin-patch detector design is the microstrip dipole antenna-coupled microbolometer. Two ways of connecting the device to the contact pads via narrow dc leads are presented and compared. The contribution of the dc leads to the detector response is eliminated by directly connecting the dipole to the contact pads. The thermal isolation of the microbolometer from the silicon wafer is improved by incorporating air into the antenna dielectric substrate. This leads to higher detector responsivity and shifts the resonance towards longer antennas. The implementation of a bridge microstrip dipole antenna structure is also discussed.

  6. Adaptive antenna arrays for weak interfering signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, I. J.

    1985-01-01

    The interference protection provided by adaptive antenna arrays to an Earth station or satellite receive antenna system is studied. The case where the interference is caused by the transmission from adjacent satellites or Earth stations whose signals inadverently enter the receiving system and interfere with the communication link is considered. Thus, the interfering signals are very weak. To increase the interference suppression, one can either decrease the thermal noise in the feedback loops or increase the gain of the auxiliary antennas in the interfering signal direction. Both methods are examined. It is shown that one may have to reduce the noise correlation to impractically low values and if directive auxiliary antennas are used, the auxiliary antenna size may have to be too large. One can, however, combine the two methods to achieve the specified interference suppression with reasonable requirements of noise decorrelation and auxiliary antenna size. Effects of the errors in the steering vector on the adaptive array performance are studied.

  7. Lower Hybrid Antenna Design for MST

    SciTech Connect

    Goetz, J.A.; Thomas, M.A.; Kaufman, M.C.; Oliva, S.P.

    2005-09-26

    Inter-digital line antennas are being used to test the feasibility of lower hybrid current drive in MST. The antennas use {lambda}/4 resonators and launch slow waves at 800 MHz with n parallel {approx} 7.5. Routine operation has been achieved with a good impedance match between antenna and plasma. High power antenna design improvements include larger vacuum feed-throughs, better impedance matching, and rf instrumentation on all resonators. The antenna and feed-through modeling was performed with CST Microwave Studio{sup TM}. The pulse-forming network that powers the klystron is being upgraded to a 50 kV - 30 ms pulse. The goal for the LHCD system on MST is a modular design that can handle 300 kW per antenna.

  8. Mobile satellite communications - Vehicle antenna technology update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, D.; Naderi, F. M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses options for vehicle antennas to be used in mobile satellite communications systems. Two types of antennas are identified. A non-steerable, azimuthally omnidirectional antenna with a modest gain of 3 to 5 dBi is suggested when a low cost is desired. Alternatively, mechanically or electronically steerable antennas with a higher gain of 10 to 12 dBi are suggested to alleviate power and spectrum scarcity associated with mobile satellite communications. For steerable antennas, both open-loop and closed-loop pointing schemes are discussed. Monopulse and sequential lobing are proposed for the mechanically steered and electronically steered antennas, respectively. This paper suggests a hybrid open-loop/closed-loop pointing technique as the best performer in the mobile satellite environment.

  9. Orthogonal feeding techniques for tapered slot antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Simons, Rainee N.

    1998-01-01

    For array of "brick" configuration there are electrical and mechanical advantages to feed the antenna with a feed on a substrate perpendicular to the antenna substrate. Different techniques have been proposed for exciting patch antennas using such a feed structure.Rncently, an aperture-coupled dielectric resonator antenna using a perpendicular feed substrate has been demonstrated to have very good power coupling efficiency. For a two-dimensional rectangular array with tapered slot antenna elements, a power combining network on perpendicular substrate is generally required to couple power to or from the array. In this paper, we will describe two aperture-coupled techniques for coupling microwave power from a linearly tapered slot antenna (LTSA) to a microstrip feed on a perpendicular substrate. In addition, we will present measured results for return losses and radiation patterns.

  10. Multi-mode horn antenna simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dod, L. R.; Wolf, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation patterns were computed for a circular multimode horn antenna using waveguide electric field radiation expressions. The circular multimode horn was considered as a possible reflector feed antenna for the Large Antenna Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR). This horn antenna uses a summation of the TE sub 11 deg and TM sub 11 deg modes to generate far field primary radiation patterns with equal E and H plane beamwidths and low sidelobes. A computer program for the radiation field expressions using the summation of waveguide radiation modes is described. The sensitivity of the multimode horn antenna radiation patterns to phase variations between the two modes is given. Sample radiation pattern calculations for a reflector feed horn for LAMMR are shown. The multimode horn antenna provides a low noise feed suitable for radiometric applications.

  11. Photonic crystal horn and array antennas.

    PubMed

    Weily, Andrew R; Esselle, Karu P; Sanders, Barry C

    2003-07-01

    We introduce a defect-based horn antenna in a two-dimensional photonic crystal. Our numerical simulations demonstrate the efficient, highly directional nature of the antenna. It has a large operating bandwidth, low loss, and an operating frequency that is scalable to various regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. We also show that the photonic crystal horn antenna can be successfully used in an array configuration that uses a feed network made from photonic crystal waveguide circuits. The feed network and antennas have been integrated into a single photonic crystal device. This photonic crystal array antenna is shown to have high directivity and compact size while retaining the advantages of the photonic crystal horn antenna. PMID:12935272

  12. Microfluidic serpentine antennas with designed mechanical tunability.

    PubMed

    Huang, YongAn; Wang, Yezhou; Xiao, Lin; Liu, Huimin; Dong, Wentao; Yin, Zhouping

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the design and characterization of microfluidic serpentine antennas with reversible stretchability and designed mechanical frequency modulation (FM). The microfluidic antennas are designed based on the Poisson's ratio of the elastomer in which the liquid alloy antenna is embedded, to controllably decrease, stabilize or increase its resonance frequency when being stretched. Finite element modelling was used in combination with experimental verification to investigate the effects of substrate dimensions and antenna aspect ratios on the FM sensitivity to uniaxial stretching. It could be designed within the range of -1.2 to 0.6 GHz per 100% stretch. When the aspect ratio of the serpentine antenna is between 1.0 and 1.5, the resonance frequency is stable under stretching, bending, and twisting. The presented microfluidic serpentine antenna design could be utilized in the field of wireless mobile communication for the design of wearable electronics, with a stable resonance frequency under dynamic applied strain up to 50%. PMID:25144304

  13. Quantum conformal superspace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Arthur E.; Moncrief, Vincent

    1996-02-01

    For a compact connected orientablen-manifold M, n ≥ 3, we study the structure ofclassical superspace {S} equiv {{M} {/ {{M} {D}}} } {D}}, quantum superspace {S}_0 equiv {{M} {/ {{M} {{D}_0 }}} } {{D}_0}}, classical conformal superspace {C} equiv {{( {{{M} {/ {M} {P}}} {P}}} )} {/ {{( {{{M} {left/ {M} {P}}} } {P}}} )} {D}}} } {D}}, and quantum conformal superspace {C}_0 equiv {{( {{{M} {/ {M} {P}}} } {P}}} )} {/ {{( {{{M} {/ {M} {P}}} {P}}} )} {{D}_0 }}} {D}_0 }}. The study of the structure of these spaces is motivated by questions involving reduction of the usual canonical Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity to a non-degenerate Hamiltonian formulation, and to questions involving the quantization of the gravitational field. We show that if the degree of symmetry ofM is zero, thenS,S 0,C, andC 0 are ilh orbifolds. The case of most importance for general relativity is dimension n=3. In this case, assuming that the extended Poincaré conjecture is true, we show that quantum superspaceS 0 and quantum conformal superspace C 0 are in fact ilh-manifolds. If, moreover, M is a Haken manifold, then quantum superspace and quantum conformal superspace arecontractible ilh-manifolds. In this case, there are no Gribov ambiguities for the configuration spacesS 0 andC 0. Our results are applicable to questions involving the problem of thereduction of Einstein's vacuum equations and to problems involving quantization of the gravitational field. For the problem of reduction, one searches for a way to reduce the canonical Hamiltonian formulation together with its constraint equations to an unconstrained Hamiltonian system on a reduced phase space. For the problem of quantum gravity, the spaceC 0 will play a natural role in any quantization procedure based on the use of conformal methods and the reduced Hamiltonian formulation.

  14. Galilean conformal and superconformal symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Lukierski, J.

    2012-10-15

    Firstly we discuss briefly three different algebras named as nonrelativistic (NR) conformal: Schroedinger, Galilean conformal, and infinite algebra of local NR conformal isometries. Further we shall consider in some detail Galilean conformal algebra (GCA) obtained in the limit c{yields}{infinity} from relativistic conformal algebraO(d+1, 2) (d-number of space dimensions). Two different contraction limits providing GCA and some recently considered realizations will be briefly discussed. Finally by considering NR contraction of D = 4 superconformal algebra the Galilei conformal superalgebra (GCSA) is obtained, in the formulation using complexWeyl supercharges.

  15. RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Christodoulou, Christos George; Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Feldner, Lucas Matthew

    2005-07-01

    A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

  16. RF MEMS reconfigurable triangular patch antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Christodoulou, Christos George; Feldner, Lucas Matthew

    2005-01-01

    A Ka-band RF MEMS enabled frequency reconfigurable triangular microstrip patch antenna has been designed for monolithic integration with RF MEMS phase shifters to demonstrate a low-cost monolithic passive electronically scanned array (PESA). This paper introduces our first prototype reconfigurable triangular patch antenna currently in fabrication. The aperture coupled patch antenna is fabricated on a dual-layer quartz/alumina substrate using surface micromachining techniques.

  17. One antenna, two antennae, big antennae, small: total antennae length, not bilateral symmetry, predicts odor-tracking performance in the American cockroach Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Lockey, Jacob K; Willis, Mark A

    2015-07-01

    Determining the location of a particular stimulus is often crucial to an animal's survival. One way to determine the local distribution of an odor is to make simultaneous comparisons across multiple sensors. If the sensors detect differences in the distribution of an odor in space, the animal can then steer toward the source. American cockroaches, Periplaneta americana, have 4 cm long antennae and are thought to track odor plumes using a spatial sampling strategy, comparing the amount of odor detected between these bilateral sensors. However, it is not uncommon for cockroaches to lose parts of their antennae and still track a wind-borne odor to its source. We examined whether bilateral odor input is necessary to locate an odor source in a wind-driven environment and how the loss of increasing lengths of the antennae affects odor tracking. The tracking performances of individuals with two bilaterally symmetrical antennae of decreasing length were compared with antennal length-matched individuals with one antenna. Cockroaches with one antenna were generally able to track an odor plume to its source. In fact, the performances of unilaterally antennectomized individuals were statistically identical to those of their bilaterally symmetrical counterparts when the combined length of both antennae equaled the length of the single antenna of the antennectomized individuals. This suggests that the total length of available antennae influences odor tracking performance more than any specific piece of antenna, and that they may be doing something more complex than a simple bilateral comparison between their antennae. The possibility of an antenna-topic map is discussed. PMID:25987729

  18. Multi-Mode Broadband Patch Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A multi-mode broad band patch antenna is provided that allows for the same aperture to be used at independent frequencies such as reception at 19 GHz and transmission at 29 GHz. Furthermore, the multi-mode broadband patch antenna provides a ferroelectric film that allows for tuning capability of the multi-mode broadband patch antenna over a relatively large tuning range. The alternative use of a semiconductor substrate permits reduced control voltages since the semiconductor functions as a counter electrode.

  19. Fractal antenna and fractal resonator primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    Self-similarity and fractals have opened new and important avenues for antenna and electronic solutions over the last 25 years. This primer provides an introduction to the benefits provided by fractal geometry in antennas, resonators, and related structures. Such benefits include, among many, wider bandwidths, smaller sizes, part-less electronic components, and better performance. Fractals also provide a new generation of optimized design tools, first used successfully in antennas but applicable in a general fashion.

  20. Passive wireless antenna sensors for crack detection and shear/compression sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Irshad

    Despite the fact that engineering components and structures are carefully designed against fatigue failures, 50 to 90% of mechanical failures are due to fatigue crack development. The severity of the failure depends on both the crack length and its orientation. Many types of sensors are available that can detect fatigue crack propagation. However, crack orientation detection has been rarely reported in the literature. We evaluated a patch antenna sensor capable of detecting crack propagation as well as crack orientation changes. The aim of these sensors would be to evaluate the real-time health condition of metallic structures to avoid catastrophic failures. The proposed crack sensing system consists of a dielectric substrate with a ground plane on one side of the substrate and an antenna patch printed on the other side of the substrate. The ground plane and the antenna patch, both conductive in nature, form an electromagnetic resonant cavity that radiates at distinct frequencies. These frequencies are monitored to evaluate the condition of cracks. A wireless sensor array can be realized by implementing a wireless interrogation unit. The scientific merits of this research are: 1) high sensitivity: it was demonstrated that the antenna sensors can detect crack growth with a sub-millimeter resolution; 2) passive wireless operation: based on microstrip antennas, the antenna sensors encode the sensing information in the backscattered antenna signal and thus can transmit the information without needing a local battery; 3) thin and conformal: the entire sensor unit is less than a millimeter thick and highly conformal; 4) crack orientation detection: the crack orientation on the structure can be precisely evaluated based on a single parameter, which only few sensors can accomplish. In addition to crack detection, the patch antenna sensors are also investigated for measuring shear and pressure forces, with an aim to study the formation, diagnostics and prevention of foot ulcers in diabetic patients. These sensors were vertically integrated and embedded in the insole of shoes for measuring plantar pressure/shear distribution. The scientific merits of this proposed research are: 1) simultaneous shear/pressure measurement : current smart shoe technology can only measure shear and pressure separately due to the size of the shear sensor. The proposed sensor can measure shear and pressure deformation simultaneously; 2) high sensitivity and spatial resolution: these sensors are very sensitive and have compact size that enables measuring stress distribution with fine spatial resolution; 3) passive and un-tethered operation: the sensor transponder was mounted on the top surface of the shoe to facilitate wireless interrogation of the sensor array embedded in the insole of the shoe, eliminating external wiring completely.

  1. Radiation pattern of a borehole radar antenna

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellefsen, K.J.; Wright, D.L.

    2002-01-01

    To understand better how a borehole antenna radiates radar waves into a formation, this phenomenon is simulated numerically using the finite-difference, time-domain method. The simulations are of two different antenna models that include features like a driving point fed by a coaxial cable, resistive loading of the antenna, and a water-filled borehole. For each model, traces are calculated in the far-field region, and then, from these traces, radiation patterns are calculated. The radiation patterns show that the amplitude of the radar wave is strongly affected by its frequency, its propagation direction, and the resistive loading of the antenna.

  2. Optical input impedance of nanostrip antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ivan; Du, Ya-ping

    2012-05-01

    We conduct an investigation into optical nanoantennas in the form of a strip dipole made from aluminum. With the finite-difference time domain simulation both optical input impedance and radiation efficiency of nanostrip antennas are addressed. An equivalent circuit is presented as well for the nanostrip antennas at optical resonances. The optical input resistance can be adjusted by varying the geometric parameters of antenna strips. By changing both strip area and strip length simultaneously, optical input resistance can be adjusted for matching impedance with an external feeding or loading circuit. It is found that the optical radiation efficiency does not change significantly when the size of a nanostrip antenna varies moderately.

  3. MILA Antenna Control Unit Replacement Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bresette, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    The Air to Ground Subsystem (AGS) Antenna Control Units at the MILA Ground Network Tracking Station are at end-of-life and are being replaced. AGS consists of two antennas at MILA (Quad-Helix and Teltrac). Software was taken from the existing Subsystem Controller and modified for the Antenna Control Unit (ACU). The software is capable of receiving and sending commands to and from the ACU. Moving the azimuth clockwise, counterclockwise, moving the elevation up or down, turning servo power on and off, and inputting azimuth and elevation angles are commands that the antenna can receive.

  4. Considerations for millimeter wave printed antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozar, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Calculated data are presented on the performance of printed antenna elements on substrates which may be electrically thick, as would be the case for printed antennas at millimeter wave frequencies. Printed dipoles and microstrip patch antennas on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), quartz, and gallium arsenide substrates are considered. Data are given for resonant length, resonant resistance, bandwidth, loss due to surface waves, loss due to dielectric heating, and mutual coupling. Also presented is an optimization procedure for maximizing or minimizing power launched into surface waves from a multielement printed antenna array. The data are calculated by a moment method solution.

  5. Submillimeter-wave antennas on thin membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebeiz, Gabriel M.; Regehr, Wade G.; Rutledge, David B.; Savage, Richard L.; Luhmann, Neville C., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Submillimeter-wave antennas have been fabricated on 1-micron thick silicon-oxynitride membranes. This approach results in better patterns than previous lens-coupled antennas, and eliminates the dielectric loss associated with the substrate lens. Measurements on a wideband log-periodic antenna at 700 GHz, 370 GHz and 167 GHz show no sidelobes and 3-dB beamwidths between 40 and 60 deg. A linear imaging array has similar patterns at 700 GHz. Possible applications for membrane antennas include wideband superconducting tunnel-junction receivers for radio astronomy and imaging arrays for radiometry and plasma diagnostics.

  6. Structures for remotely deployable precision antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, John M.

    1989-01-01

    There is a need for completely deployable large antenna reflectors capable of efficiently handling millimeter-wave electromagnetic radiation. The structural concepts and technologies that are appropriate to fully automated deployment of dish-type antennas with solid reflector surfaces were studied. First, the structural requirements are discussed. Then, existing concepts for fully deployable antennas are described and assessed relative to the requirements. Finally, several analyses are presented that evaluate the effects of beam steering and segmented reflector design on the accuracy of the antenna.

  7. Integrated reflector antenna design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M. L.; Lee, S. W.; Ni, S.; Christensen, M.; Wang, Y. M.

    1993-01-01

    Reflector antenna design is a mature field and most aspects were studied. However, of that most previous work is distinguished by the fact that it is narrow in scope, analyzing only a particular problem under certain conditions. Methods of analysis of this type are not useful for working on real-life problems since they can not handle the many and various types of perturbations of basic antenna design. The idea of an integrated design and analysis is proposed. By broadening the scope of the analysis, it becomes possible to deal with the intricacies attendant with modem reflector antenna design problems. The concept of integrated reflector antenna design is put forward. A number of electromagnetic problems related to reflector antenna design are investigated. Some of these show how tools for reflector antenna design are created. In particular, a method for estimating spillover loss for open-ended waveguide feeds is examined. The problem of calculating and optimizing beam efficiency (an important figure of merit in radiometry applications) is also solved. Other chapters deal with applications of this general analysis. The wide angle scan abilities of reflector antennas is examined and a design is proposed for the ATDRSS triband reflector antenna. The development of a general phased-array pattern computation program is discussed and how the concept of integrated design can be extended to other types of antennas is shown. The conclusions are contained in the final chapter.

  8. Spaceborne multifunction imaging radar antenna development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeper, H. R. A.; Nitschke, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    Past and present studies of Multifunction Synthetic Aperture Radar Technology at NASA's Johnson Space Center have given attention to the design of lens antennas, planar arrays, and continuous apertures, such as reflectors. Current emphasis is on an interleaved, open ended waveguide array and microstrip antenna, with design work proceeding for multifrequency operation L, C, and X-band antennas, all of which possess multipolarization. In order to meet ground swath and azimuth resolution requirements, the antennas are designed to provide a beamwidth of 6.2 deg in elevation and 1 deg in azimuth.

  9. Antenna technology for advanced mobile communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rammos, Emmanuel; Roederer, Antoine; Rogard, Roger

    1988-01-01

    The onboard antenna front end is the key subsystem conditioning configuration and performance of mobile communication satellites. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate this key role and to review L-band satellite antenna technology for earth coverage and regional applications. Multibeam arrays are first discussed, then unfurlable and inflatable reflector antennas are described. These technologies are now qualified in Europe for future mobile systems, for which the optimum choice of antenna technology has been found to be the key to efficient use of spectrum and power resources.

  10. Whip antenna design for portable rf systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnapalli, Saila; Canora, Frank J.

    1995-12-01

    Whip type antennas are probably the most commonly used antennas in portable rf systems, such as cordless and cellular phones, rf enabled laptop computers, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and handheld computers. Whip antennas are almost always mounted on the chassis which contains the radio and other electronics. The chassis is usually a molded plastic which is coated with a conducting paint for EMI purposes. The chassis which appears as a lossy conductor to the antenna, has several effects -- detuning, altering the gain of the antenna, and shadowing its radiation pattern. Extensive modeling and measurements must be performed in order to fully characterize the affects of the chassis on the whip antenna, and to optimize antenna type, orientation and position. In many instances, modeling plays a more important role in prediction of the performance of whip antennas, since measurements become difficult due to the presence of common mode current on feed cables. In this paper models and measurements are used to discuss the optimum choice of whip antennas and the impact of the chassis on radiation characteristics. A modeling tool which has been previously described and has been successfully used to predict radiated field patterns is used for simulations, and measured and modeled results are shown.

  11. Cable-catenary large antenna concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akle, W.

    1985-04-01

    Deployable to very large diameters (over 1000 ft), while still remaining compatible with a complete satellite system launch by STS, the cable-catenary antenna comprises: 8 radial deployable boom masts; a deployable hub and feed support center mast; balanced front and back, radial and circumferential catenary cabling for highly accurate (mm) surface control; no interfering cabling in the antenna field; and an RF reflecting mesh supported on the front catenaries. Illustrations show the antenna-satellite system deployed and stowed configurations; the antenna deployment sequence; the design analysis logic; the sizing analysis output, and typical parametric design data.

  12. Three-dimensional winged nanocone optical antennas.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Mikko J; Lindfors, Klas; Andriano, Domenico; Mäkitalo, Jouni; Bautista, Godofredo; Lippitz, Markus; Kauranen, Martti

    2014-06-15

    We introduce 3D optical antennas based on winged nanocones. The antennas support particle plasmon oscillations with current distributions that facilitate transformation of transverse far-field radiation to strong longitudinal local fields near the cone apices. We characterize the optical responses of the antennas by their extinction spectra and by second-harmonic generation microscopy with cylindrical vector beams. The results demonstrate a new 3D polarization-controllable optical antenna for applications in apertureless near-field microscopy, spectroscopy, and plasmonic sensing. PMID:24978568

  13. An antenna-pointing mechanism for the ETS-6 K-band Single Access (KSA) antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takada, Noboru; Amano, Takahiro; Ohhashi, Toshiro; Wachi, Shigeo

    1991-01-01

    Both the design philosophy for the Antenna Pointing Mechanism (APM) to be used for the K-band Single Access (KSA) antenna system and experimental results of the APM Engineering Model (EM) tests are described. The KSA antenna system will be flown on the Engineering Test Satellite 6 (ETS-6).

  14. Antenna and Electronics Cost Tradeoffs For Large Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Addario, Larry R.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the cost tradeoffs for large antenna arrays. The contents include: 1) Cost modeling for large arrays; 2) Antenna mechanical cost over a wide range of sizes; and 3) Cost of per-antenna electronics.

  15. Ultra-wideband, omni-directional, low distortion coaxial antenna

    DOEpatents

    Eubanks, Travis Wayne; Gibson, Christopher Lawrence

    2015-01-06

    An antenna for producing an omni-directional pattern, and using all frequencies of a frequency range simultaneously, is provided with first and second electrically conductive elements disposed coaxially relative to a central axis. The first element has a first surface of revolution about the axis, the first surface of revolution tapering radially outwardly while extending axially away from the second element to terminate at a first axial end of the first element. The second element has a second surface of revolution about the axis, the second surface of revolution tapering radially outwardly while extending axially toward the first element to terminate at a first axial end of the second element. The first and second surfaces of revolution overlap one another radially and axially, and are mutually non-conformal.

  16. Magnetic antenna excitation of whistler modes. IV. Receiving antennas and reciprocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    Antenna radiation patterns are an important property of antennas. Reciprocity holds in free space and the radiation patterns for exciting and receiving antennas are the same. In anisotropic plasmas, radiation patterns are complicated by the fact that group and phase velocities differ and certain wave properties like helicity depend on the direction of wave propagation with respect to the background magnetic field B0. Interference and wave focusing effects are different than in free space. Reciprocity does not necessarily hold in a magnetized plasma. The present work considers the properties of various magnetic antennas used for receiving whistler modes. It is based on experimental data from exciting low frequency whistler modes in a large uniform laboratory plasma. By superposition of linear waves from different antennas, the radiation patterns of antenna arrays are derived. Plane waves are generated and used to determine receiving radiation patterns of different receiving antennas. Antenna arrays have radiation patterns with narrow lobes, whose angular position can be varied by physical rotation or electronic phase shifting. Reciprocity applies to broadside antenna arrays but not to end fire arrays which can have asymmetric lobes with respect to B0. The effect of a relative motion between an antenna and the plasma has been modeled by the propagation of a short wave packet moving along a linear antenna array. An antenna moving across B0 has a radiation pattern characterized by an oscillatory "whistler wing." A receiving antenna in motion can detect any plane wave within the group velocity resonance cone. The radiation pattern also depends on loop size relative to the wavelength. Motional effects prevent reciprocity. The concept of the radiation pattern loses its significance for wave packets since the received signal does not only depend on the antenna but also on the properties of the wave packet. The present results are of fundamental interest and of relevance to loop antennas in space.

  17. Conformal complementarity maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbn, Jos L. F.; Rabinovici, Eliezer

    2013-12-01

    We study quantum cosmological models for certain classes of bang/crunch singularities, using the duality between expanding bubbles in AdS with a FRW interior cosmology and perturbed CFTs on de Sitter space-time. It is pointed out that horizon complementarity in the AdS bulk geometries is realized as a conformal transformation in the dual deformed CFT. The quantum version of this map is described in full detail in a toy model involving conformal quantum mechanics. In this system the complementarity map acts as an exact duality between eternal and apocalyptic Hamiltonian evolutions. We calculate the commutation relation between the Hamiltonians corresponding to the different frames. It vanishes only on scale invariant states.

  18. Conformal ALON® windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Lee M.; Balasubramanian, Sreeram; Smith, Mark; Nag, Nagendra; Foti, Robyn; Jha, Santosh; Sastri, Suri

    2014-05-01

    Aluminum Oxynitride (ALON® Optical Ceramic) combines broadband transparency with excellent mechanical properties. ALON's cubic structure means that it is transparent in its polycrystalline form, allowing it to be manufactured by conventional powder processing techniques. Surmet controls every aspect of the manufacturing process, beginning with synthesis of ALON® powder, continuing through forming/heat treatment of blanks, ending with optical fabrication of ALON® windows. Surmet has made significant progress in its production capability in recent years. Additional scale up of Surmet's manufacturing capability, for complex geometries, larger sizes and higher quantities, is underway. The requirements for modern aircraft are driving the need for conformal windows for future sensor systems. However, limitations on optical systems and the ability to produce windows in complex geometries currently limit the geometry of existing windows and window assemblies to faceted assemblies of flat windows. Surmet's ability to produce large curved ALON® blanks is an important step in the development of conformal windows for future aircraft applications.

  19. Conformal gripping device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a conformal gripping device. In an embodiment of the present invention a conformal gripper device may be disclosed comprising a frame that includes an array of movable pins. The device may also include a roller locking and unlocking system within the frame. The system may comprise a pair of locking rollers for each row of gripper pins to facilitate locking and unlocking the array of gripper pins on a column-by-column basis. The system may also include a striker element that may force the locking rollers to roll along an angled roll surface to facilitate unlocking of the array of pins on a column-by-column basis. The system may further include an electromagnetic actuator or solenoid and permanent magnets to facilitate movement of the striker element and the locking rollers.

  20. Visual Analysis in a Deployable Antenna Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, S.; Takeuchi, M.; Fukase, Y.; Harima, K.; Sato, H.; Yoshida, T.

    2002-01-01

    in space under the size constraints of available delivery vehicles. A large space antenna should make it possible to improve the telecommunication bandwidth and reduce the size of ground terminals. reliable and precise deployment. Since the antenna is a highly complex structure, monitoring the deployment process and the detection of anomalies are also important. The deployed antenna should be collimated to achieve its optimal performance. such as tension and acceleration sensors. With a visual analysis, we can acquire information at many locations without complex wiring, which can increase the complexity of the system. Therefore, visual analysis should be used in conjunction with other methods for monitoring large deployable antennas. combination of cross-correlations between images and approximation at sub-pixel precision enables us to detect shifts in images with a precision of up to 0.01 pixels. This method is effective for monitoring and collimation of a deployable antenna. broadcast technologies which was developed by the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) under the cooperation with Communications Research Lab. and NTT Network Innovation Lab.. One of the most important missions of ETS-VIII is to construct a large deployable antenna for S-band telecommunication. In December 2001, the LDREX mission, which was a preliminary experiment for the large deployable antenna of ETS-VIII , was performed as an Ariane-5 auxiliary payload (ASAP). A 6m scale model of the ETS-VIII deployable antenna was launched and deployed in geo-transfer orbit (GTO). During this experiment, anomalies occurred in the deployable antenna, and deployment was aborted. analysis method. Using this analysis, we detected vibrating features of the deployable antenna , which were useful for explaining the anomalies deployable antenna.

  1. Breadboard Signal Processor for Arraying DSN Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongeling, Andre; Sigman, Elliott; Chandra, Kumar; Trinh, Joseph; Soriano, Melissa; Navarro, Robert; Rogstad, Stephen; Goodhart, Charles; Proctor, Robert; Jourdan, Michael; Rayhrer, Benno

    2008-01-01

    A recently developed breadboard version of an advanced signal processor for arraying many antennas in NASA s Deep Space Network (DSN) can accept inputs in a 500-MHz-wide frequency band from six antennas. The next breadboard version is expected to accept inputs from 16 antennas, and a following developed version is expected to be designed according to an architecture that will be scalable to accept inputs from as many as 400 antennas. These and similar signal processors could also be used for combining multiple wide-band signals in non-DSN applications, including very-long-baseline interferometry and telecommunications. This signal processor performs functions of a wide-band FX correlator and a beam-forming signal combiner. [The term "FX" signifies that the digital samples of two given signals are fast Fourier transformed (F), then the fast Fourier transforms of the two signals are multiplied (X) prior to accumulation.] In this processor, the signals from the various antennas are broken up into channels in the frequency domain (see figure). In each frequency channel, the data from each antenna are correlated against the data from each other antenna; this is done for all antenna baselines (that is, for all antenna pairs). The results of the correlations are used to obtain calibration data to align the antenna signals in both phase and delay. Data from the various antenna frequency channels are also combined and calibration corrections are applied. The frequency-domain data thus combined are then synthesized back to the time domain for passing on to a telemetry receiver

  2. Conformal scalar field wormholes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwell, Jonathan J.; Laflamme, Raymond

    1989-01-01

    The Euclidian Einstein equations with a cosmological constant and a conformally coupled scalar field are solved, taking the metric to be of the Robertson-Walker type. In the case Lambda = 0, solutions are found which represent a wormhole connecting two asymptotically flat Euclidian regions. In the case Lambda greater than 0, the solutions represent tunneling from a small Tolman-like universe to a large Robertson-Walker universe.

  3. Evaluation of conformal integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzowski, Adam; McFadden, Paul; Skenderis, Kostas

    2016-02-01

    We present a comprehensive method for the evaluation of a vast class of integrals representing 3-point functions of conformal field theories in momentum space. The method leads to analytic, closed-form expressions for all scalar and tensorial 3-point functions of operators with integer dimensions in any spacetime dimension. In particular, this encompasses all 3-point functions of the stress tensor, conserved currents and marginal scalar operators.

  4. Antenna pattern study, task 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Warren

    1989-01-01

    Two electromagnetic scattering codes, NEC-BSC and ESP3, were delivered and installed on a NASA VAX computer for use by Marshall Space Flight Center antenna design personnel. The existing codes and certain supplementary software were updated, the codes installed on a computer that will be delivered to the customer, to provide capability for graphic display of the data to be computed by the use of the codes and to assist the customer in the solution of specific problems that demonstrate the use of the codes. With the exception of one code revision, all of these tasks were performed.

  5. Interleaved arrays antenna technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Phase one and two of a program to further develop and investigate advanced graphite epoxy waveguides, radiators, and components with application to space antennas are discussed. The objective of the two phases were to demonstrate mechanical integrity of a small panel of radiators and parts procured under a previous contract and to develop alternate designs and applications of the technology. Most of the emphasis was on the assembly and test of a 5 x 5 element module. This effort was supported by evaluation of adhesives and waveguide joint configurations. The evaluation and final assembly considered not only mechanical performance but also producibility in large scale.

  6. Large space deployable antenna systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The design technology is described for manufacturing a 20 m or larger space erectable antenna with high thermal stability, high dynamic stiffness, and minimum stowed size. The selected approach includes a wrap rib design with a cantilever beam basic element and graphite-epoxy composite lenticular cross section ribs. The rib configuration and powered type operated deploying mechanism are described and illustrated. Other features of the parabolic reflector discussed include weight and stowed diameter characteristics, structural dynamics characteristics, orbit thermal aperture limitations, and equivalent element and secondary (on axis) patterns. A block diagram of the multiple beam pattern is also presented.

  7. Linear Low Density Polyethylene (LLDPE) as Flexible Substrate for Wrist and Arm Antennas in C-Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, Pragyan Jyoti; Bhattacharyya, Satyajib; Bhattacharyya, Nidhi S.

    2015-04-01

    This paper focuses on the development and study of linear low density polyethylene as a flexible substrate for conformal antennas for body-worn applications. Thermal stability, tensile strength and elongation at break of the substrate were studied. The permittivity of the substrate was 2.2 and tan ? was found to be 0.0003 at 6 GHz. Since the antenna is being developed for wrist and arm wearing in C-band, the performance of the antenna, such as the S 11 parameter and radiation pattern, were studied with different bending axes and with bending curvature approximating that of the arm and wrist. The performance of a 6 GHz rectangular patch antenna with bending was found to be consistent with the flat profile antenna at the same frequency. A maximum shift in the resonant frequency of 20 MHz was observed. The -10 dB bandwidth and directivity of the antenna did not change much with bending. The maximum bending radius in the present study is 10 mm, and S 11 was found to be -17.53 dB at 5.94 GHz and -14.02 dB at 6.06 GHz for a bending axis parallel to the radiating and non-radiating edge, respectively.

  8. Apparatus and methods for packaging integrated circuit chips with antenna modules providing closed electromagnetic environment for integrated antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaucher, Brian P. (Inventor); Grzyb, Janusz (Inventor); Liu, Duixian (Inventor); Pfeiffer, Ullrich R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Apparatus and methods are provided for packaging IC chips together with integrated antenna modules designed to provide a closed EM (electromagnetic) environment for antenna radiators, thereby allowing antennas to be designed independent from the packaging technology.

  9. Conformations of organophosphine oxides

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Nuwan; Zahariev, Federico; Hay, Benjamin P.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2015-07-17

    The conformations of a series of organophosphine oxides, OP(CH3)2R, where R = methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, tert-butyl, vinyl, and phenyl, are predicted using the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Comparison of potential energy surfaces for rotation about P–C bonds with crystal structure data reveals a strong correlation between predicted location and energetics of minima and histograms of dihedral angle distributions observed in the solid state. In addition, the most stable conformers are those that minimize the extent of steric repulsion between adjacent rotor substituents, and the torsional barriers tend to increase with the steric bulk of the rotating alkyl group. MM3 force field parameters were adjusted to fit the MP2 results, providing a fast and accurate model for predicting organophosphine oxides shapes—an essential part of understanding the chemistry of these compounds. As a result, the predictive power of the modified MM3 model was tested against MP2/cc-pVTZ conformations for triethylphosphine oxide, OP(CH2CH3)3, and triphenylphosphine oxide, OP(Ph)3.

  10. Conformations of organophosphine oxides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    De Silva, Nuwan; Zahariev, Federico; Hay, Benjamin P.; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2015-07-17

    The conformations of a series of organophosphine oxides, OP(CH3)2R, where R = methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, tert-butyl, vinyl, and phenyl, are predicted using the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Comparison of potential energy surfaces for rotation about P–C bonds with crystal structure data reveals a strong correlation between predicted location and energetics of minima and histograms of dihedral angle distributions observed in the solid state. In addition, the most stable conformers are those that minimize the extent of steric repulsion between adjacent rotor substituents, and the torsional barriers tend to increase with the steric bulk of the rotating alkyl group. MM3 forcemore » field parameters were adjusted to fit the MP2 results, providing a fast and accurate model for predicting organophosphine oxides shapes—an essential part of understanding the chemistry of these compounds. As a result, the predictive power of the modified MM3 model was tested against MP2/cc-pVTZ conformations for triethylphosphine oxide, OP(CH2CH3)3, and triphenylphosphine oxide, OP(Ph)3.« less

  11. Antenna Allocation in MIMO Radar with Widely Separated Antennas for Multi-Target Detection

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hao; Wang, Jian; Jiang, Chunxiao; Zhang, Xudong

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we explore a new resource called multi-target diversity to optimize the performance of multiple input multiple output (MIMO) radar with widely separated antennas for detecting multiple targets. In particular, we allocate antennas of the MIMO radar to probe different targets simultaneously in a flexible manner based on the performance metric of relative entropy. Two antenna allocation schemes are proposed. In the first scheme, each antenna is allocated to illuminate a proper target over the entire illumination time, so that the detection performance of each target is guaranteed. The problem is formulated as a minimum makespan scheduling problem in the combinatorial optimization framework. Antenna allocation is implemented through a branch-and-bound algorithm and an enhanced factor 2 algorithm. In the second scheme, called antenna-time allocation, each antenna is allocated to illuminate different targets with different illumination time. Both antenna allocation and time allocation are optimized based on illumination probabilities. Over a large range of transmitted power, target fluctuations and target numbers, both of the proposed antenna allocation schemes outperform the scheme without antenna allocation. Moreover, the antenna-time allocation scheme achieves a more robust detection performance than branch-and-bound algorithm and the enhanced factor 2 algorithm when the target number changes. PMID:25350505

  12. Antenna allocation in MIMO radar with widely separated antennas for multi-target detection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hao; Wang, Jian; Jiang, Chunxiao; Zhang, Xudong

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we explore a new resource called multi-target diversity to optimize the performance of multiple input multiple output (MIMO) radar with widely separated antennas for detecting multiple targets. In particular, we allocate antennas of the MIMO radar to probe different targets simultaneously in a flexible manner based on the performance metric of relative entropy. Two antenna allocation schemes are proposed. In the first scheme, each antenna is allocated to illuminate a proper target over the entire illumination time, so that the detection performance of each target is guaranteed. The problem is formulated as a minimum makespan scheduling problem in the combinatorial optimization framework. Antenna allocation is implemented through a branch-and-bound algorithm and an enhanced factor 2 algorithm. In the second scheme, called antenna-time allocation, each antenna is allocated to illuminate different targets with different illumination time. Both antenna allocation and time allocation are optimized based on illumination probabilities. Over a large range of transmitted power, target fluctuations and target numbers, both of the proposed antenna allocation schemes outperform the scheme without antenna allocation. Moreover, the antenna-time allocation scheme achieves a more robust detection performance than branch-and-bound algorithm and the enhanced factor 2 algorithm when the target number changes. PMID:25350505

  13. Distortion compensation techniques for large reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, W. A.

    2001-01-01

    The high-frequency limit of reflector antennas is usually governed by the magnitude of the surface error. Whereas little can be done for the high-spatial frequency portion of this error, there are various techniques that can be employed to compensate for large-scale surface errors due to gravity induced distortions for spacecraft antennas.

  14. Rectangular Microstrip Antenna with Slot Embedded Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambresh, P. A.; Hadalgi, P. M.; Hunagund, P. V.; Sujata, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, a novel design that improves the performance of conventional rectangular microstrip antenna is discussed. Design adopts basic techniques such as probe feeding technique with rectangular inverted patch structure as superstrate, air filled dielectric medium as substrate and slot embedded patch. Prototype of the proposed antenna has been fabricated and various antenna performance parameters such as impedance bandwidth, return loss, radiation pattern and antenna gain are considered for Electromagnetic-study. The antennas are designed for the wireless application operating in the frequency range of 3.3 GHz to 3.6 GHz, and UK based fixed satellite service application (3 GHz to 4 GHz), and are named as single inverted patch conventional rectangular microstrip antenna (SIP-CRMSA) and slots embedded inverted patch rectangular microstrip antenna (SEIP-RMSA), respectively. Measurement outcomes for SEIP-RMSA1 and SEIP-RMSA2 showed the satisfactory performance with an achievable impedance bandwidth of 260 MHz (7 %) and 250 MHz (6.72 %), with return loss (RL) of -11.06 dB and -17.98 dB, achieved gain of 8.17 dB and 5.17 dB with 10% and 8% size reduction in comparison with the conventional patch antenna.

  15. Wireless SAW Sensors Having Integrated Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Mark (Inventor); Malocha, Donald C. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A wireless surface acoustic wave sensor includes a piezoelectric substrate, a surface acoustic wave device formed on the substrate, and an antenna formed on the substrate. In some embodiments, the antenna is formed on the surface of the substrate using one or more of photolithography, thin film processing, thick film processing, plating, and printing.

  16. Simplified Fabrication of Helical Copper Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    A simplified technique has been devised for fabricating helical antennas for use in experiments on radio-frequency generation and acceleration of plasmas. These antennas are typically made of copper (for electrical conductivity) and must have a specific helical shape and precise diameter.

  17. Planar antenna system for direction finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardale, Iulia-Cezara; Cocias, Gabriela; Dumitrascu, Ana; Tamas, Razvan; Berescu, Serban

    2015-02-01

    Applications of direction finding techniques include detection and localization of pulsed electromagnetic sources. This paper presents the design and analysis of a planar antenna system for direction finding. Our proposed system includes 4 hybrid couplers that generate 900 shifted signals, 2 crossover couplers also known as 0dB couplers, two 450 phase shifters, two 00 phase shifters and 4 patch antennas.

  18. Low-cost quasi-parabolic antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taggart, R. B., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Antenna design employs flat petal-shaped aluminum sheets and novel rim configuration. New antenna is inexpensive and has only slightly degraded performance. Design advantages are low-cost tooling and fabrication, convenient size and shape for transport and assembly, and simple assembly procedure.

  19. Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) Actuators for Antenna Reconfigurability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Chun, Donghoon; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    2001-01-01

    A novel microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuator for patch antenna reconfiguration, is presented for the first time. A key feature is the capability of multi-band operation without greatly increasing the antenna element dimensions. Experimental results demonstrate that the center frequency can be reconfigured from few hundred MHz to few GHz away from the nominal operating frequency.

  20. 47 CFR 101.115 - Directional antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Directional antennas. 101.115 Section 101.115 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.115 Directional antennas. (a) Unless otherwise authorized upon specific request by the applicant,...

  1. 47 CFR 101.117 - Antenna polarization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna polarization. 101.117 Section 101.117 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.117 Antenna polarization. Except as set forth herein, stations operating in the radio...

  2. Antennas For Receiving Signals Broadcast Via Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Huang, John

    1996-01-01

    Four different antennas designed for use in receiving radio AM and FM signals broadcast via Earth-orbiting satellites at carrier frequency of 2.05 GHz in right-hand circular polarization. Antennas small, lightweight, inexpensive units with low-to-medium-gain, quasi-omnidirectional radiation patterns. Designed for outdoor and indoor uses.

  3. 47 CFR 73.753 - Antenna systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna systems. 73.753 Section 73.753 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES International Broadcast Stations § 73.753 Antenna systems. All international broadcasting stations shall...

  4. 47 CFR 15.317 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.317 Section 15.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Unlicensed Personal Communications Service Devices § 15.317 Antenna requirement. An unlicensed PCS device must meet the...

  5. 47 CFR 15.317 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.317 Section 15.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Unlicensed Personal Communications Service Devices § 15.317 Antenna requirement. An unlicensed PCS device must meet the...

  6. 47 CFR 74.1237 - Antenna location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna location. 74.1237 Section 74.1237... FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1237 Antenna location. (a) An applicant for a new station to be... at which there is available a suitable signal from the primary station. The transmitting...

  7. 47 CFR 74.1237 - Antenna location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna location. 74.1237 Section 74.1237... FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1237 Antenna location. (a) An applicant for a new station to be... at which there is available a suitable signal from the primary station. The transmitting...

  8. Antenna impedance matching with neural networks.

    PubMed

    Hemminger, Thomas L

    2005-10-01

    Impedance matching between transmission lines and antennas is an important and fundamental concept in electromagnetic theory. One definition of antenna impedance is the resistance and reactance seen at the antenna terminals or the ratio of electric to magnetic fields at the input. The primary intent of this paper is real-time compensation for changes in the driving point impedance of an antenna due to frequency deviations. In general, the driving point impedance of an antenna or antenna array is computed by numerical methods such as the method of moments or similar techniques. Some configurations do lend themselves to analytical solutions, which will be the primary focus of this work. This paper employs a neural control system to match antenna feed lines to two common antennas during frequency sweeps. In practice, impedance matching is performed off-line with Smith charts or relatively complex formulas but they rarely perform optimally over a large bandwidth. There have been very few attempts to compensate for matching errors while the transmission system is in operation and most techniques have been targeted to a relatively small range of frequencies. The approach proposed here employs three small neural networks to perform real-time impedance matching over a broad range of frequencies during transmitter operation. Double stub tuners are being explored in this paper but the approach can certainly be applied to other methodologies. The ultimate purpose of this work is the development of an inexpensive microcontroller-based system. PMID:16278940

  9. 47 CFR 15.317 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.317 Section 15.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Unlicensed Personal Communications Service Devices § 15.317 Antenna requirement. An unlicensed PCS device must meet the...

  10. 47 CFR 15.317 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.317 Section 15.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Unlicensed Personal Communications Service Devices § 15.317 Antenna requirement. An unlicensed PCS device must meet the...

  11. Juno Microwave Radiometer Patch Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, N.; Chen, J.; Focardi, P.; Hodges, R.; Hughes, R.; Jakoboski, J.; Venkatesan, J.; Zawadzki, M.

    2009-01-01

    Juno is a mission in the NASA New Frontiers Program with the goal of significantly improving our understanding of the formation and structure of Jupiter. This paper discusses the modeling and measurement of the two patch array antennas. An overview of the antenna architecture, design and development at JPL is provided, along with estimates of performance and the results of measurements.

  12. 47 CFR 74.1237 - Antenna location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Antenna location. 74.1237 Section 74.1237... FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1237 Antenna location. (a) An applicant for a new station to be... at which there is available a suitable signal from the primary station. The transmitting...

  13. 47 CFR 74.1237 - Antenna location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna location. 74.1237 Section 74.1237... FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1237 Antenna location. (a) An applicant for a new station to be... at which there is available a suitable signal from the primary station. The transmitting...

  14. 47 CFR 74.1237 - Antenna location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna location. 74.1237 Section 74.1237... FM Broadcast Booster Stations § 74.1237 Antenna location. (a) An applicant for a new station to be... at which there is available a suitable signal from the primary station. The transmitting...

  15. 47 CFR 15.317 - Antenna requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Antenna requirement. 15.317 Section 15.317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Unlicensed Personal Communications Service Devices § 15.317 Antenna requirement. An unlicensed PCS device must meet the...

  16. 47 CFR 101.115 - Directional antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Directional antennas. 101.115 Section 101.115 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Technical Standards § 101.115 Directional antennas. (a) Unless otherwise authorized upon specific request by the applicant,...

  17. 47 CFR 101.115 - Directional antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE... antenna adjusted with the center of the major lobe of radiation in the horizontal plane directed toward... (2) With the minimum radiation suppression to angle requirement. Antenna Standards Frequency...

  18. Planar Antennas On Thick Dielectric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. A.; Frerking, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    Features include ease of fabrication and wide range of operating frequencies. Planar antennas on thick dielectric substrates built for use at millimeter wavelengths from 40 to 400 GHZ. Antennas of this type quasi-optical structures, for which expensive, precisely machined waveguides not required. Made easily by standard photolithography and integrated with planar mixers or detectors to form arrays.

  19. Dual-frequency feed-horn antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuchardt, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    Antenna with novel two-port diplexer separates high power /31.65 GHz/ transmitted signal from low power /15.2 GHz/ received signal. Two-port network feeds dual-frequency horn and excites antenna with minimal loss in power. Isolation between transmit port and receive port ranges from 60 db to 80 db.

  20. Structures for remotely deployable precision antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Future space missions such as the Earth Science Geostationary Platform (ESGP) will require highly accurate antennas with apertures that cannot be launched fully formed. The operational orbits are often inaccessible to manned flight and will involve expendable launch vehicles such as the Delta or Titan. There is therefore a need for completely deployable antenna reflectors of large size capable of efficiently handling millimeter wave electromagnetic radiation. The parameters for the type of mission are illustrated. The logarithmic plot of frequency versus aperture diameter shows the regions of interest for a large variety of space antenna applications, ranging from a 1500-meter-diameter radio telescope for low frequencies to a 20-meter-diameter infrared telescope. For the ESGP, a major application is the microwave radiometry at high frequencies for atmospheric sounding. Almost all existing large antenna reflectors for space employ a mesh-type reflecting surface. Examples are shown and discussed which deal with the various structural concepts for mesh antennas. Fortunately, those concepts are appropriate for creating the very large apertures required at the lower frequencies for good resolution. The emphasis is on the structural concepts and technologies that are appropriate to fully automated deployment of dish-type antennas with solid reflector surfaces. First the structural requirements are discussed. Existing concepts for fully deployable antennas are then described and assessed relative to the requirements. Finally, several analyses are presented that evaluate the effects of beam steering and segmented reflector design on the accuracy of the antenna.