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Sample records for electroconvulsive therapy patients

  1. Electroconvulsive therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Keith G; Keegan, B Mark

    2007-09-01

    There are relatively few case reports of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in patients with multiple sclerosis. We present 3 such patients, all of whom received safe, effective ECT without evidence of acute neurological deterioration. We conclude that patients with multiple sclerosis being considered for ECT should have a thorough neurological evaluation, and the informed consent process should include discussion of the possibility of neurological deterioration. However, review of the literature and of our 3 cases does reveal that ECT can be used safely, at least in the short term. Long-term outcomes in such patients remain uncertain. PMID:17804994

  2. Electroconvulsive therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) uses an electric current to treat depression and some other mental illnesses. ... During ECT, the electric current triggers a seizure in the brain. Doctors believe that the seizure activity may help the brain "rewire" itself, which ...

  3. Electroconvulsive therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) uses an electric current to treat depression and some other mental illnesses. Description During ECT, the electric current triggers a seizure in the brain. Doctors believe ...

  4. Electroconvulsive therapy in a patient with glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Amritwar, Ameya; Karia, Sagar; De Sousa, Avinash; Sonavane, Sushma

    2016-01-01

    There is little information on the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in the presence of glaucoma. An elderly man with known severe depression underwent surgery for cataract and glaucoma in the left eye. His depression worsened in the postoperative period and he required two sessions of ECT within 2 months of the surgery. There were no ophthalmic complications or adverse events associated with ECT and he responded well to treatment. PMID:27586212

  5. Electroconvulsive therapy in catatonic patients: Efficacy and predictors of response

    PubMed Central

    Luchini, Federica; Medda, Pierpaolo; Mariani, Michela Giorgi; Mauri, Mauro; Toni, Cristina; Perugi, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence favors the view of catatonia as an autonomous syndrome, frequently associated with mood disorders, but also observed in neurological, neurodevelopmental, physical and toxic conditions. From our systematic literature review, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) results effective in all forms of catatonia, even after pharmacotherapy with benzodiazepines has failed. Response rate ranges from 80% to 100% and results superior to those of any other therapy in psychiatry. ECT should be considered first-line treatment in patients with malignant catatonia, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, delirious mania or severe catatonic excitement, and in general in all catatonic patients that are refractory or partially responsive to benzodiazepines. Early intervention with ECT is encouraged to avoid undue deterioration of the patient’s medical condition. Little is known about the long-term treatment outcomes following administration of ECT for catatonia. The presence of a concomitant chronic neurologic disease or extrapyramidal deficit seems to be related to ECT non-response. On the contrary, the presence of acute, severe and psychotic mood disorder is associated with good response. Severe psychotic features in responders may be related with a prominent GABAergic mediated deficit in orbitofrontal cortex, whereas non-responders may be characterized by a prevalent dopaminergic mediated extrapyramidal deficit. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that ECT is more effective in “top-down” variant of catatonia, in which the psychomotor syndrome may be sustained by a dysregulation of the orbitofrontal cortex, than in “bottom-up” variant, in which an extrapyramidal dysregulation may be prevalent. Future research should focus on ECT response in different subtype of catatonia and on efficacy of maintenance ECT in long-term prevention of recurrent catatonia. Further research on mechanism of action of ECT in catatonia may also contribute to the development of

  6. [Electroconvulsive therapy of depressive disorders].

    PubMed

    Folkerts, H

    2000-02-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective treatment in all types of major depression. On the other side ECT has long suffered from controversial public image, a reputation that has effectively removed it as treatment option for many patients. Today ECT is an effective and safe treatment for those with severe mental illness. Electroconvulsive therapy has undergone fundamental changes since its introduction 65 years ago. It is no longer a memory-modifying, fearsome treatment pictured in films. Anesthesia, controlled oxygenation, and muscle relaxation make the ECT so safe that the risks are less as those which accompany the use of several psychotropic drugs. Indeed, for the elderly, the systematic ill, and pregnant women, electroconvulsive therapy is a safer treatment for mental illness than any alternative. PMID:10730103

  7. Electroconvulsive Therapy and Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanney, Bryan L.

    1986-01-01

    When the effectiveness and mortality-morbidity of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) are compared with those of drug therapies, it appears that ECT is an effective and preferred treatment strategy. It remains underutilized as a modality of suicide prevention. Addresses controversies that presently limit the use of this treatment. (Author/ABB)

  8. Electroconvulsive therapy in octogenarians.

    PubMed

    Cattan, R A; Barry, P P; Mead, G; Reefe, W E; Gay, A; Silverman, M

    1990-07-01

    Medical records of 81 older patients (65 years of age and over) who underwent electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) at a university-affiliated private geriatric hospital were reviewed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this treatment for depression in the "young-old" (65 to 80 years) compared with the "old-old" age group (over 80 years), a group that has not yet been adequately studied. Information was obtained regarding demographics, medical and psychiatric diagnosis, medications, indications for ECT, number and laterality of treatments, outcome, and complications. Thirty-nine patients 80+ years of age (mean age, 85 +/- 3.2) were compared with 42 patients 65 to 80 years of age (mean age, 74 +/- 5.2). Statistical analysis was performed using confidence intervals of the difference in proportions of patients in each group. There were no significant differences in the demographics, number and laterality of ECT treatments, indications for ECT treatment, medical diagnosis, medications, or prior history of falls, but psychiatric diagnoses differed slightly. Patients over 80 years had significantly more cardiovascular complications and falls (95% confidence interval) and tended to have a worse ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) scale rating and a somewhat less successful outcome. This study confirms the role of ECT as a relatively safe and effective treatment, which may be lifesaving in selected depressed older patients. Prospective studies are needed to understand better the long-term outcome and to prevent the morbidity and mortality associated with ECT in this frail, high-risk older group. PMID:2370395

  9. Electroconvulsive therapy in a patient after radiation treatment of a brain metastasis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kranaster, Laura; Hoyer, Carolin; Krisam, Mathias; Deuschle, Michael; Janke, Christoph; Sartorius, Alexander

    2012-12-01

    Major depression has a high incidence in patients with cancer, but treatment guidelines for this vulnerable population are missing and antidepressants seem to be less effective than in patients not affected by cancer. We report the case of a patient with bronchial cancer with a single temporo-occipital brain metastasis that had been treated by radiotherapy (whole-brain radiation, 40 Gy, followed by a stereotactic radiotherapy, 15 Gy). The patient developed a major depressive episode and was successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy without relevant adverse events. This case further underscores the safety and effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy after radiotherapy of the brain and demonstrates a viable alternative for severely depressed patients with cancer who do not adequately respond to psychotherapy or pharmacotherapy alone. PMID:22669038

  10. Electroconvulsive therapy: present and future.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Gerda E

    2004-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been used to treat patients for 60 years. It is a humane and effective treatment. It is now firmly established as an important and effective method of treating certain severe forms of depression. Still, very little is known about its mode of action. Research in the refinement of administration has reduced undesirable side effects. There are almost no absolute contraindications to its administration. Nurses are involved directly with patients before, during, and after treatment. PMID:15204891

  11. Electroconvulsive therapy for elderly patients with multiple system atrophy: a case series.

    PubMed

    Roane, D M; Rogers, J D; Helew, L; Zarate, J

    2000-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a progressive neurological illness associated with parkinsonism. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) improves motor function in Parkinson's disease and, thus, might be beneficial in MSA. Three cases of MSA treated with ECT are described. All patients improved neurologically, but none regained independent ambulation. A review, including previously reported cases, demonstrates that ECT can be safe and effective for depression associated with MSA. Reduced tremor and rigidity may occur, but substantial gait improvement cannot be expected. PMID:10804079

  12. Patient-Centered Electroconvulsive Therapy Care: A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    Coffey, M Justin; Coffey, C Edward

    2016-06-01

    We present our experience applying the IOM's "10 Simple Rules" to our ECT Service at a major teaching hospital in order to achieve patient-centered care. We encourage all ECT providers to partner with their patients in engaging family members and significant others in each aspect of ECT care, especially the ECT treatment itself. PMID:26252555

  13. [Cardiac safety of electroconvulsive therapy in an elderly patient--a case report].

    PubMed

    Karakuła-Juchnowicz, Hanna; Próchnicki, Michał; Kiciński, Paweł; Olajossy, Marcin; Pelczarska-Jamroga, Agnieszka; Dzikowski, Michał; Jaroszyński, Andrzej

    2015-10-01

    Since electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) was introduced as treatment for psychiatric disorders in 1938, it has remained one of the most effective therapeutic methods. ECT is often used as a "treatment of last resort" when other methods fail, and a life-saving procedure in acute clinical states when a rapid therapeutic effect is needed. Mortality associated with ECT is lower, compared to the treatment with tricyclic antidepressants, and comparable to that observed in so-called minor surgery. In the literature, cases of effective and safe electroconvulsive therapy have been described in patients of advanced age, with a burden of many somatic disorders. However, cases of acute cardiac episodes have also been reported during ECT. The qualification of patients for ECT and the selection of a group of patients at the highest risk of cardiovascular complications remains a serious clinical problem. An assessment of the predictive value of parameters of standard electrocardiogram (ECG), which is a simple, cheap and easily available procedure, deserves special attention. This paper reports a case of a 74-year-old male patient treated with ECT for a severe depressive episode, in the context of cardiologic safety. Both every single ECT session and the full course were assessed to examine their impact on levels of troponin T, which is a basic marker of cardiac damage, and selected ECG parameters (QTc, QRS). In the presented case ECT demonstrated its high general and cardiac safety with no negative effect on cardiac troponin (TnT) levels, corrected QT interval (QTc) duration, or other measured ECG parameters despite initially increased troponin levels, the patient's advanced age, the burden of a severe somatic disease and its treatment (anticancer therapy). PMID:26608489

  14. [Clinical characteristics of patients treated with electroconvulsive therapy in a public hospital in Peru].

    PubMed

    Cortez-Vergara, Carla; Cruzado, Lizardo; Rojas-Rojas, Ira Galia; Sánchez-Fernández, Miguel; Ladd-Huarachi, Guillermo

    2016-03-01

    With the purpose of describe the profile of use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on hospitalized patients at "Honorio Delgado - Hideyo Noguchi" National Institute of Mental Health in Lima, Peru, the medical records of patients receiving ECT between 2001 and 2011 were reviewed. The main findings were: four hundred and nineteen ECT courses were applied to 372 patients, with a total of 5439 applications the most common diagnosis was paranoid schizophrenia (70.7%), the most common indication was resistance to treatment (80.7%), also the clinical response to ECT was good in 70.1% of cases while side effects were generally transient and mild. The use of ECT decreased over the period of the study but it was tolerable and safe, especially in the modified version, and it had a high response rate so remains as a first-line psychiatric treatment. PMID:27384628

  15. Medication management during electroconvulsant therapy.

    PubMed

    Zolezzi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has demonstrated to be highly effective and safe, even life saving for many psychiatric disorders such as major depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Most patients who require ECT are also on concurrent pharmacotherapy. As such, the objective of this article is to provide a review of the most recent literature focusing on the medications used during an ECT procedure and on the effects of concurrent psychiatric and non-psychiatric medications on the effectiveness and safety of ECT. The review also attempts to summarize the recommendations derived from existing documents to guide pharmacotherapy decisions for patients undergoing ECT. For this purpose, using electronic databases, an extensive search of the current literature was made using ECT and medications or drug classes as keywords. PMID:27143894

  16. Medication management during electroconvulsant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zolezzi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has demonstrated to be highly effective and safe, even life saving for many psychiatric disorders such as major depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Most patients who require ECT are also on concurrent pharmacotherapy. As such, the objective of this article is to provide a review of the most recent literature focusing on the medications used during an ECT procedure and on the effects of concurrent psychiatric and non-psychiatric medications on the effectiveness and safety of ECT. The review also attempts to summarize the recommendations derived from existing documents to guide pharmacotherapy decisions for patients undergoing ECT. For this purpose, using electronic databases, an extensive search of the current literature was made using ECT and medications or drug classes as keywords. PMID:27143894

  17. Recurrent Aspiration in a Patient With Gastric Band Undergoing Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lubit, Elana B; Fetterman, Tammy Cohen; Ying, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of a 33-year-old woman with depression and suicidal ideation, treated successfully with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in the past. Since her previous course of ECT, she underwent gastric banding, a bariatric surgical procedure associated with increased risk of gastric regurgitation. Despite increasingly stringent measures to minimize the risk of regurgitation and aspiration during ECT, she had several episodes of regurgitation, the last of which precipitated an acute illness consistent with aspiration pneumonitis. We took additional precautions after each event, until she had no further episodes of regurgitation. We discuss the risk posed by the gastric band, the measures we implemented to minimize that risk, and our recommendations for assessment and management of post-gastric banding patients who present for ECT. PMID:26075693

  18. Maintenance electroconvulsive therapy in a patient with multiple system atrophy and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Obiora, Onwuameze; McCormick, Laurie May; Karim, Yasser; Gonzales, Pedro; Beeghly, James

    2012-06-01

    Multiple system atrophy is a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disorder with no known cure. It is a clinical diagnosis with no confirmation available other than brain biopsy after death. We report the successful treatment of multiple system atrophy co-occurring with bipolar disorder in a 62-year-old man using electroconvulsive therapy. PMID:22622294

  19. Electroconvulsive Therapy in Sweden 2013

    PubMed Central

    Nordanskog, Pia; Hultén, Martin; Landén, Mikael; Lundberg, Johan; von Knorring, Lars; Nordenskjöld, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) varies across countries. The aim of this study was to describe and explore the use of ECT in Sweden in 2013. Methods The Swedish mandatory patient register of the National Board of Health and Welfare includes information on diagnoses and treatments, including ECT. All 56 hospitals that provide ECT in Sweden also report to the nonmandatory national quality register for ECT, which contains information on patient and treatment characteristics. In this study, we combined data from both registers. In addition, all hospitals responded to a survey concerning equipment and organization of ECT. Results We identified 3972 unique patients who received ECT in Sweden in 2013. This translates into 41 ECT-treated individuals per 100,000 inhabitants. Of these patients, 85% opted to participate in the quality register. The median age was 55 years (range, 15–94 years), and 63% were women. The indication was depression in 78% of the treatment series. Of 4 711 hospitalized patients with severe depression, 38% received ECT. The median number of treatments per index series was 7. Unilateral treatment was used in 86% of the series. Conclusions In Sweden, ECT is used at a relatively high rate as compared with other western countries, and the rate was unchanged from the last survey in 1975. However, there is room for improvement in the specificity of use and availability of ECT for disorders where ECT is considered a first-line treatment. PMID:25973769

  20. [Electroconvulsive therapy in depressed adolescents].

    PubMed

    van Niel, M C; Hegeman, J M; van Megen, H J G M

    2007-08-11

    Two patients, young women aged 15 and 17, both suffering from major depression with psychotic features, were resistant to treatment with antidepressive regimen and psychotherapy. Both patients became severely suicidal and were subsequently successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). The second patient needed maintenance ECT once a month in order to stay in remission. Whereas ECT is a well-studied and accepted treatment option in adult psychiatry, in child psychiatry people are reluctant to even consider this option. This resistance is partly based on the possible side effects ofECT i.e. memory problems. As a result, the effect ofECT in adolescents has not yet been well studied. In 2004, the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry proposed guidelines for the use of ECT in adolescents. Following these guidelines, the use ofECT in adolescents seems to be a safe treatment option, however further research to the effect of ECT in this age group is warranted. PMID:17822246

  1. Electroconvulsive therapy and its different indications

    PubMed Central

    Baghai, Thomas C.; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    In spite of recent developments in the pharmacotherapy of depressive disorders, the delay until clinical improvement can be achieved, and the considerable rate of nonresponse and nonremission, are major problems which remain unresolved. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a nonpharmacoloqic bioloqical treatment which has been proven to be a highly effective treatment option, predominantly for depression, but also for schizophrenia and other indications. Though there is a lack of controlled investigations on long-term treatments, ECT can also be used for relapse prevention during maintenance therapies. The safety and tolerabitity of electroconvulsive treatment have been enhanced by the use of modified stimulation techniques and by progress in modern anesthesia. Thus, today a safe treatment can also be offered to patients with higher somatic risks, ECT still represents an important option, especially in the therapy of treatmentresistant psychiatric disorders after medication treatment failures. Earlier consideration of ECT may reduce the rate of chronic and difficult-to-treat psychiatric disorders. PMID:18472488

  2. Electroconvulsive therapy treatment of depression in a patient with adult GM2 gangliosidosis.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, P F; Stern, T A; Welch, C; Schouten, R; Kolodny, E H

    1992-03-01

    Adult GM2 gangliosidosis is a rare disorder that often presents with both neurological and psychiatric syndromes. Effective treatment of the psychotic and affective symptoms associated with this disorder has been complicated by poor treatment response and the concern that many psychotropic agents may worsen the underlying gangliosidosis. We report the successful use of electroconvulsive therapy for treatment of severe depression in a young man with adult GM2 gangliosidosis. PMID:1386210

  3. Knowledge of attitude toward experience and satisfaction with electroconvulsive therapy in a sample of Iranian patients.

    PubMed

    Malekian, Azadeh; Amini, Zahra; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Barekatain, Majid

    2009-06-01

    Despite the wide consensus over the safety and efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), it still faces negative publicity and unfavorable attitudes of patients and families. Little is known about how the experience with ECT affects the patients' and their families' attitude toward it. The aim of this study was to examine a sample of Iranian patients and their families regarding their experience with ECT and to compare their knowledge and attitude toward ECT before and after this experience and their satisfaction with it. We surveyed 22 patients with major depressive disorder about to undergo ECT and 1 family member of each patient for their knowledge and attitude toward ECT and then surveyed them again after the trial of ECT to compare those variables while assessing their experience and satisfaction with ECT. Patients were rated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Mini-Mental Status Examination before and after the treatment. We found that, before ECT, family members had a more favorable attitude toward ECT than patients, but after ECT, the patients' attitude changed more positively compared with their families. Both patients and their families had a poor knowledge of ECT before the ECT trial, but their total knowledge increased afterward, although not in the areas of indications and therapeutic effects. The majority of patients and their families found ECT to be beneficial and were satisfied with it. Satisfaction with ECT was independent of treatment outcome. There was a high rate of perceived coercion to consent to ECT. Attention should be paid toward educating patients and their families about the ECT process, indications, risks, safety, and effects as well as informing them about their freedom of choice and right to refuse. PMID:18708944

  4. Electroconvulsive therapy treatment in patients with somatic symptom and related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Leong, KaWai; Tham, Joseph CW; Scamvougeras, Anton; Vila-Rodriguez, Fidel

    2015-01-01

    Objective Medically unexplained somatic complaints are highly prevalent, and lead to significant impairment and disability. The number of effective treatment modalities for somatic symptom and related disorders (SSDs) or somatoform disorders (SDs) remains limited. To date, there is no formal indication for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in SSD or SD. We report on the largest case series to date regarding the effectiveness of ECT in patients with SSD and SD. Methods A retrospective chart review of all patients treated with an index course of ECT at the Neuropsychiatric Program at the University of British Columbia Hospital from 2000 to 2010 was conducted. The primary outcomes consisted of changes in pseudoneurologic symptoms, pain symptoms, cardiopulmonary symptoms, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Complaints were examined pre- and post-ECT. Results Twenty-eight participants were included in this study. Twenty-one participants received right unilateral ECT. Six received bifrontal ECT. One received bitemporal ECT. Eighteen of 21 participants reported improvement in pseudoneurologic symptoms; eleven of 14 participants reported improvement in pain symptoms; one participant reported improvement in cardiopulmonary symptoms; and one of two participants reported improvement in gastrointestinal symptoms. This paper discusses the putative mechanism of action of ECT in the treatment of SD/SSD. Conclusion This retrospective study suggests that ECT could be included as part of the existing treatment for refractory SSD and SD, particularly in refractory cases with comorbid mood disorders. PMID:26504388

  5. Electroconvulsive therapy: Promoting awareness among primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Sicher, Sarah; Gedzior, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    This article aims to promote awareness among primary care providers and support electroconvulsive therapy as a generally well-tolerated, effective therapeutic modality to treat specific psychiatric conditions in appropriately selected patients. There seem to be several potential barriers to treatment with electroconvulsive therapy including stigma, lack of providers who preform it, and lack of awareness among providers referring patients who may be appropriate candidates. The article provides a brief overview of electroconvulsive therapy principles and topics and includes a case report to illustrate clinical utility. The article proposes the concept that a potential way to overcome barriers to treatment with electroconvulsive therapy may be to promote education and awareness of it as a viable treatment modality among primary care providers. PMID:27284120

  6. Electroconvulsive Therapy Treatment in a Patient With Neurosyphilis and Psychotic Disorder: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Pecenak, Jan; Janik, Peter; Vaseckova, Barbora; Trebulova, Kristina

    2015-12-01

    Syphilis is an infectious disease caused by Treponema pallidum that presents clinically in different ways. Over recent years, an upsurge of new cases of syphilis has been reported, often in combination with human immunodeficiency virus infection. The clinical picture is changing because of the widespread use of antibiotics, and psychiatric manifestations may be the main reason why patients seek medical help. In most cases, treatment with penicillin and psychotropic medication is effective. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is rarely used for the psychiatric manifestations of neurosyphilis: we identified only 19 cases in the literature. We report here on a 40-year-old man newly diagnosed with neurosyphilis during hospitalization for a psychotic state with depression and also review the literature. He was treated with 2 courses of penicillin and several antipsychotics. The ECT was indicated because he failed to respond well to antipsychotic treatment and developed a high risk of dangerous behavior. A series of 8 sessions of ECT rapidly relieved the psychotic symptoms. PMID:25634568

  7. Supportive Nursing Care and Satisfaction of Patients Receiving Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Navidian, Ali; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Keykha, Roghaieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient satisfaction is the most important criterion in evaluating the quality of care. Besides, its assessment in patients with severe mental disorder treated by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is highly appropriate. The ECT is accompanied by lower satisfaction and may exacerbate the patients’ condition. Objectives: The current study aimed to determine the effect of supportive nursing care on the satisfaction of patients receiving ECT. Patients and Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted in the education center of Baharan psychiatric hospital, Zahedan, Iran. Seventy hospitalized patients receiving ECT were randomly divided into two groups of control (n = 35) and intervention (n = 35).The socio-personal and Webster Satisfaction Questionnaire were used as data collection tools. The intervention group received supportive nursing care by nurses trained in informational, emotional, and physical aspects. The control group received only regular nursing care. The levels of satisfaction were measured and compared between groups, before and after the intervention. Data were analyzed using the SPSS software, and Chi-square, independent and paired t tests, as well as covariance analysis were performed. Results: The results showed similarities in socio-personal characteristics of both groups. However, there was a significant difference (P < 0.001) between the means of satisfaction in the groups, predominantly for the intervention group. In other words, a significant difference (P < 0.001) was observed between the means of satisfaction of the intervention (54.71 ± 5.27) and control (36.28 ± 7.00) groups after intervention by controlling the effect of socio-personal variables. Conclusions: Results of the current study confirmed the effect of supportive nursing care on increasing the level of satisfaction in ECT receiving patients, recommending the use of this therapeutic method. PMID:26473077

  8. Patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who receive multiple electroconvulsive therapy sessions: characteristics, indications, and results

    PubMed Central

    Iancu, Iulian; Pick, Nimrod; Seener-Lorsh, Orit; Dannon, Pinhas

    2015-01-01

    Background While electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been used for many years, there is insufficient research regarding the indications for continuation/maintenance (C/M)-ECT, its safety and efficacy, and the characteristics of patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who receive multiple ECT sessions. The aims of this study were to characterize a series of patients who received 30 ECT sessions or more, to describe treatment regimens in actual practice, and to examine the results of C/M-ECT in terms of safety and efficacy, especially the effect on aggression and functioning. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of 20 consecutive patients (mean age 64.6 years) with schizophrenia (n=16) or schizoaffective disorder (n=4) who received at least 30 ECT sessions at our ECT unit, and also interviewed the treating physician and filled out the Clinical Global Impression-Severity, Global Assessment of Functioning, and the Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised. Results Patients received a mean of 91.3 ECT sessions at a mean interval of 2.6 weeks. All had been hospitalized for most or all of the previous 3 years. There were no major adverse effects, and cognitive side effects were relatively minimal (cognitive deficit present for several hours after treatment). We found that ECT significantly reduced scores on the Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised subscales for verbal aggression and self-harm, and improved Global Assessment of Functioning scores. There were reductions in total aggression scores, subscale scores for harm to objects and to others, and Clinical Global Impression-Severity scores, these were not statistically significant. Conclusion C/M-ECT is safe and effective for chronically hospitalized patients. It improves general functioning and reduces verbal aggression and self-harm. More research using other aggression tools is needed to determine its effects and to reproduce our findings in prospective and controlled studies. PMID

  9. Early effects of modern electroconvulsive therapy on subjective memory in patients with mania or depression

    PubMed Central

    Bag, Sevda; Canbek, Ozge; Atagun, Ilhan Murat; Kutlar, Tarik Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Context: Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered a very effective tool for the treatment of psychiatric diseases, memory disturbances are among the most important adverse effects. Aims: This study aimed to assess prospectively early subjective memory complaints in depressive and manic patients due to bilateral, brief-pulse ECT, at different stages of the treatment, compare the associations between psychiatric diagnosis, sociodemographic characteristics, and ECT characteristics. Settings and Design: This prospective study was done with patients undergoing ECT between November 2008 and April 2009 at a tertiary care psychiatry hospital of 2000 beds. Materials and Methods: A total of 140 patients, scheduled for ECT with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder (depressive or manic episode) or unipolar depression according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV diagnostic criteria, were included in the study and invited to complete the Squire Subjective Memory Questionnaire (SSMQ) before ECT, after the first and third sessions and end of ECT treatment. Statistical Analysis: Mean values were compared with the Kruskal–Wallis test and comparison of the longitudinal data was performed with a nonparametric longitudinal data analysis method, F1_LD_F1 design. Results: SSMQ scores of the patients before ECT were zero. SSMQ scores showed a decrease after the first and third ECT sessions and before discharge, showing a memory disturbance after ECT and were significantly less severe in patients with mania in comparison to those with depression. Conclusions: These findings suggest an increasing degree of subjective memory complaints with bilateral brief-pulse ECT parallel to the increasing number of ECT sessions. PMID:27385854

  10. The Psychiatric Patient as a Health Resource Consumer: Costs Associated with Electroconvulsive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Selva-Sevilla, Carmen; Gonzalez-Moral, Maria Luisa; Tolosa-Perez, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical practice protocols should consider both the psychological criteria related to a patient’s satisfaction as a consumer of health services and the economic criteria to allocate resources efficiently. An electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) program was implemented in our hospital to treat psychiatric patients. The main objective of this study was to determine the cost associated with the ECT sessions implemented in our hospital between 2008 and 2014. A secondary objective was to calculate the cost of sessions that were considered ineffective, defined as those sessions in which electrical convulsion did not reach the preset threshold duration, in order to identify possible ways of saving money and improving satisfaction among psychiatric patients receiving ECT. Methods: A descriptive analysis of the direct health costs related to ECT from the perspective of the public health system between 2008 and 2014 was performed using a retrospective chart review. All of the costs are in euros (2011) and were discounted at a rate of 3%. Based on the base case, a sensitivity analysis of the changes of those variables showing the greatest uncertainty was performed. Results: Seventy-six patients received 853 sessions of ECT. The cumulative cost of these sessions was €1409528.63, and 92.9% of this cost corresponded to the hospital stay. A total of €420732.57 (29.8%) was inefficiently spent on 269 ineffective sessions. A sensitivity analysis of the economic data showed stable results to changes in the variables of uncertainty. Conclusion: The efficiency of ECT in the context outlined here could be increased by discerning a way to shorten the associated hospital stay and by reducing the number of ineffective sessions performed. PMID:27303347

  11. Adverse Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Arumugham, Shyam Sundar; Thirthalli, Jagadisha

    2016-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment commonly used for depression and other major psychiatric disorders. We discuss potential adverse effects (AEs) associated with ECT and strategies for their prevention and management. Common acute AEs include headache, nausea, myalgia, and confusion; these are self-limiting and are managed symptomatically. Serious but uncommon AEs include cardiovascular, pulmonary, and cerebrovascular events; these may be minimized with screening for risk factors and by physiologic monitoring. Although most cognitive AEs of ECT are short-lasting, troublesome retrograde amnesia may rarely persist. Modifications of and improvements in treatment techniques minimize cognitive and other AEs. PMID:27514303

  12. Structural network changes in patients with major depression and schizophrenia treated with electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Robert Christian; Nolte, Henrike Maria; Hirjak, Dusan; Hofer, Stefan; Seidl, Ulrich; Depping, Malte Sebastian; Stieltjes, Bram; Maier-Hein, Klaus; Sambataro, Fabio; Thomann, Philipp Arthur

    2016-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective treatments in severe and treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD). In schizophrenia (SZ), ECT is frequently considered in drug-resistant cases, as an augmentation of antipsychotic treatment or in cases when rapid symptom relief is indicated. Accumulating neuroimaging evidence suggests modulation of medial temporal lobe and prefrontal cortical regions in MDD by ECT. In SZ, ECT-effects on brain structure have not been systematically investigated so far. In this study, we investigated brain volume in 21 ECT-naïve patients (12 with MDD, 9 with SZ) who received right-sided unilateral ECT. Twenty-one healthy controls were included. Structural magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired before and after ECT. Healthy participants were scanned once. Source-based morphometry was used to investigate modulation of structural networks pre/post ECT. ECT had an impact on distinct structural networks in MDD and SZ. In both MDD and SZ SBM revealed a medial temporal lobe (MTL) network (including hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex) which showed a significant increase after ECT. The increase in MTL network strength was not associated with clinical improvement in either MDD or SZ. In SZ a lateral prefrontal/cingulate cortical network showed a volume increase after ECT, and this effect was accompanied by clinical improvement. These findings provide preliminary evidence for structural network change in response to ECT in MDD and SZ. The data suggest both diagnosis-specific and transdiagnostic ECT-effects on brain volume. In contrast to SZ, in MDD structural network modulation by ECT was not associated with clinical improvement. PMID:27424799

  13. Electroconvulsive Therapy Part II: A Biopsychosocial Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Nancy A.; Prudic, Joan

    2011-01-01

    The myths surrounding electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and the misconceptions held by the general public, clinicians, and patients have interfered with acceptance of this treatment throughout its history. Misunderstandings surrounding ECT, and its consequent stigmatization, are reviewed, including negative depictions of ECT in film, print media, and on the Internet. Clinicians involved in the delivery of ECT benefit from gaining an understanding of how ECT may be perceived by patients and other mental health professionals; they can play a vital role in educating patients and helping ensure the delivery of a successful course of ECT. Guidance is provided for clinicians on how to support patients and families through the ECT process using a model team approach. Anxiety reduction, meeting individual needs, patient and family psychoeducation, assessment of psychosocial supports, and discharge planning are discussed. PMID:19820554

  14. 21 CFR 882.5940 - Electroconvulsive therapy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electroconvulsive therapy device. 882.5940 Section 882.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Electroconvulsive therapy device. (a) Identification. An electroconvulsive therapy device is a device used...

  15. 21 CFR 882.5940 - Electroconvulsive therapy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electroconvulsive therapy device. 882.5940 Section 882.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Electroconvulsive therapy device. (a) Identification. An electroconvulsive therapy device is a device used...

  16. 21 CFR 882.5940 - Electroconvulsive therapy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electroconvulsive therapy device. 882.5940 Section 882.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Electroconvulsive therapy device. (a) Identification. An electroconvulsive therapy device is a device used...

  17. 21 CFR 882.5940 - Electroconvulsive therapy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electroconvulsive therapy device. 882.5940 Section 882.5940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Electroconvulsive therapy device. (a) Identification. An electroconvulsive therapy device is a device used...

  18. Grey matter volume increase following electroconvulsive therapy in patients with late life depression: a longitudinal MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Bouckaert, Filip; De Winter, François-Laurent; Emsell, Louise; Dols, Annemieke; Rhebergen, Didi; Wampers, Martien; Sunaert, Stefan; Stek, Max; Sienaert, Pascal; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Background The evidence on the mechanisms of action of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has grown over the past decades. Recent studies show an ECT-related increase in hippocampal, amygdala and subgenual cortex volume. We examined grey matter volume changes following ECT using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) whole brain analysis in patients with severe late life depression (LLD). Methods Elderly patients with unipolar depression were treated twice weekly with right unilateral ECT until remission on the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) was achieved. Cognition (Mini Mental State Examination) and psychomotor changes (CORE Assessment) were monitored at baseline and 1 week after the last session of ECT. We performed 3 T structural MRI at both time points. We used the VBM8 toolbox in SPM8 to study grey matter volume changes. Paired t tests were used to compare pre- and post-ECT grey matter volume (voxel-level family-wise error threshold p < 0.05) and to assess clinical response. Results Twenty-eight patients (mean age 71.9 ± 7.8 yr, 8 men) participated in our study. Patients received a mean of 11.2 ± 4 sessions of ECT. The remission rate was 78.6%. Cognition, psychomotor agitation and psychomotor retardation improved significantly (p < 0.001). Right- hemispheric grey matter volume was increased in the caudate nucleus, medial temporal lobe (including hippocampus and amygdala), insula and posterior superior temporal regions but did not correlate with MADRS score. Grey matter volume increase in the caudate nucleus region correlated significantly with total CORE Assessment score (r = 0.63; p < 0.001). Limitations Not all participants were medication-free. Conclusion Electroconvulsive therapy in patients with LLD is associated with significant grey matter volume increase, which is most pronounced ipsilateral to the stimulation side. PMID:26395813

  19. Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Elderly: New Findings in Geriatric Depression.

    PubMed

    Geduldig, Emma T; Kellner, Charles H

    2016-04-01

    This paper reviews recent research on the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in elderly depressed patients. The PubMed database was searched for literature published within the past 4 years, using the search terms: "electroconvulsive elderly," "electroconvulsive geriatric," "ECT and elderly," and "ECT elderly cognition." The studies in this review indicate excellent efficacy for ECT in geriatric patients. Adverse cognitive effects of ECT in this population are usually transient and not typically severe. In addition, continuation/maintenance ECT (C/M-ECT) may be a favorable strategy for relapse prevention in the elderly after a successful acute course of ECT. ECT is an important treatment option for depressed geriatric patients with severe and/or treatment-resistant illness. New data add to the evidence demonstrating that ECT is a highly effective, safe, and well-tolerated antidepressant treatment option for geriatric patients. PMID:26909702

  20. Prolonged Apnea During Modified Electroconvulsive Therapy in a Patient of Suicidal Attempt by Organophosphorus Poisoning: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dhakne, Rajesh; Mishra, Kshirod K; Kumar, Vinay; Khairkar, Praveen

    2016-06-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides are commonly used in agricultural fields to control pests in India. However, exposure to it can cause poisoning in humans and animals, or it can be taken intentionally as poison to commit suicide. We present a case of a 35-year-old suicidal man who developed prolonged apnea for almost 4 hours on day 13 of OP poisoning after brief general anesthesia induced by propofol and 1 mg/kg of suxamethonium, during the first session of the third cycle of modified electroconvulsive therapy, despite all due precautions. Such prolonged apnea secondary to complex interactions has been reported very rarely in literature. This case therefore, highlights the importance of careful evaluation and monitoring while giving anesthesia to OP-poisoning patients. PMID:26595234

  1. Effectiveness of left anterior right temporal electrode placement in electroconvulsive therapy: 3 case reports.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Alan Micheal; Hansen, Shane Michael; Safranko, Ivan; Hughes, Pequita

    2015-03-01

    Unilateral and bitemporal electrode placement has been the dominant mode of delivery in electroconvulsive therapy. We report 3 patients receiving maintenance electroconvulsive therapy where the use of dominant electrode placements was ineffective. Changing to left anterior right temporal electrode placement resulted in marked clinical improvement. This supports the limited literature on this electrode placement. PMID:24831996

  2. Electroconvulsive therapy from a social work perspective.

    PubMed

    Katz, G

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to fill a gap in the social work literature which has not, to date, included a thorough discussion of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) from a social work perspective. It discusses the rationale for ECT in current practice; enumerates improvements made in stimulus delivery since convulsive therapy was introduced in 1934; and summarizes the myths, realities, advantages and limitations of the treatment in modern psychiatry. It advocates a team approach, which includes social work support and education of the patient and family regarding treatment related matters and discharge planning. Several clinical vignettes are included to illustrate the types of illness for which ECT is used as well as the social work role with the team and patient/family during hospitalization and discharge planning. The Ontario College of Certified Social Workers Guidelines are used to explain social work interventions. The paper is also relevant to social workers in non-psychiatric settings in understanding and planning with patients and families where a member has experienced ECT. PMID:1529408

  3. Influence of valproate on the required dose of propofol for anesthesia during electroconvulsive therapy of bipolar affective disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    Hızlı Sayar, Gökben; Eryılmaz, Gül; Şemieoğlu, Siban; Özten, Eylem; Göğcegöz Gül, Işıl

    2014-01-01

    Background Propofol is often used as an anesthetic agent for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). In recent studies, propofol was shown to possess significant seizure-shortening properties during ECT. “Valproate” is a mood stabilizer used mainly in the treatment of bipolar affective disorder. It is reported that valproate, being an anticonvulsant, raises the seizure threshold, thus decreases the efficacy of ECT treatment. Aim The purpose of our study was to compare the dose of propofol in valproate-using patients and valproate-free patients. Methods In an open design, 17 patients with bipolar affective disorder manic episodes who were to be treated with valproate and ECT in combination, were compared with 16 manic-episode patients who were to be treated with ECT but not valproate. The two groups were compared on the basis of electroencephalography-registered seizure duration and the propofol dosage required to induce anesthesia. Results Valproate, compared with no valproate treatment, results in a decrease in the propofol dose required to induce anesthesia. In the valproate group of study participants, seizure duration was significantly shorter than in the valproate-free group. Conclusion The results suggest that valproate reduces the dose of propofol required for anesthesia during ECT treatment in patients with bipolar affective disorder manic episodes. Although propofol is a safe and efficacious anesthetic for ECT treatment, lower doses of propofol should be used to induce anesthesia for patients under valproate treatment. When the clinician needs to prolong seizure duration in patients treated with valproate, interruption of the valproate treatment or an anesthetic agent other than propofol should be considered. PMID:24623978

  4. The effect of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on implicit memory: skill learning and perceptual priming in patients with major depression.

    PubMed

    Vakil, E; Grunhaus, L; Nagar, I; Ben-Chaim, E; Dolberg, O T; Dannon, P N; Schreiber, S

    2000-01-01

    While explicit memory in amnesics is impaired, their implicit memory remains preserved. Memory impairment is one of the side effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). ECT patients are expected to show impairment on explicit but not implicit tasks. The present study examined 17 normal controls and 17 patients with severe major depressive disorder who underwent right unilateral ECT. Patients were tested in three sessions: 24-48 hours prior to, 24-48 hours following the first ECT, and 24-48 hours following the eighth ECT. The controls were tested in three sessions, at time intervals that paralleled those of the patients. Implicit memory was tested by the perceptual priming task - Partial Picture-Identification (PPI). The skill learning task used entailed solving the Tower of Hanoi puzzle (TOHP). Explicit memory was tested by picture recall from the PPI task, verbal recall of information regarding the TOHP, and by the Visual Paired Association (VPA) test. Results showed that explicit questions about the implicit tasks were impaired following ECT treatment. Patients' learning ability, as measured by the VPA task, was only impaired in the first testing session, prior to ECT treatment, reflecting the effect of depression. In addition, groups only differed in the first session on the learning rate of the skill learning task. Perceptual priming was preserved in the patients' group in all sessions, indicating that it is resilient to the effect of depression and ECT. The results are interpreted in terms of the differential effect of depression and ECT on explicit and implicit memory. PMID:10869584

  5. Practical and Legal Challenges to Electroconvulsive Therapy in Malignant Catatonia.

    PubMed

    Shenai, Neeta; White, Crystal D; Azzam, Pierre N; Gopalan, Priya; Solai, LalithKumar K

    2016-01-01

    In cases of malignant catatonia, prompt administration of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can decrease mortality, whereas delays to initiating ECT have resulted in adverse outcomes, including death. We present a clinical vignette of malignant catatonia that required court-ordered ECT, followed by a discussion of practical and legal obstacles to expediting emergent ECT when patients cannot provide consent. We review particularly exacting mandates for involuntary ECT from three states: California, Texas, and New York. As compared to standard practice for other clinical interventions when a patient lacks decision-making capacity, ECT is highly regulated; in some cases, these regulations can interfere with life-saving treatment. PMID:27148914

  6. Treatment escalation in patients not responding to pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and electro-convulsive therapy: experiences from a novel regimen using intravenous S-ketamine as add-on therapy in treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Kallmünzer, Bernd; Volbers, Bastian; Karthaus, Anne; Tektas, Ozan Yüksel; Kornhuber, Johannes; Müller, Helge H

    2016-05-01

    A lack of response despite maximum therapy is common in patients fulfilling criteria of treatment-resistant depression. Therefore, innovative strategies for treatment escalation are warranted. Here, we report the clinical experiences associated with a novel therapeutic regimen combining electroconvulsive therapy and repeated intravenous S-ketamine treatment in three patients. The combined therapy was feasible and had no serious side effects. All patients responded to the new treatment option. The augmentative effect of sub-anesthetic S-ketamine on ECT is discussed. PMID:26721476

  7. Assessment of mood state in patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy: the utility of visual analog mood scales developed for cognitively impaired patients.

    PubMed

    Arruda, J E; Stern, R A; Legendre, S A

    1996-12-01

    Reliable, valid, and brief measures of mood state are essential to the evaluation of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) efficacy. However, existing measures of mood state may be inappropriate for patients with transient cognitive impairment. Stern and colleagues have recently developed a set of Visual Analog Mood Scales (VAMS) for use in neurologically impaired patients. These brief scales (including measures of sad, confused, afraid, happy, tired, angry, and energetic states) are easily administered and have documented reliability and validity in neurologically impaired patients and in healthy adult and geriatric samples. In the present study, we assessed the validity and sensitivity of the VAMS to detect ECT-related mood change. Twenty-five inpatients who were diagnosed with major depressive episode and referred for ECT were administered the VAMS and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) both pre- and post-ECT. Results indicate that the VAMS are as sensitive to the therapeutic effects of ECT as is the more lengthy and verbally demanding HDRS. In addition, the VAMS were highly correlated with the clinician's Clinical Global Improvement rating and the patient's self-report using a modified Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale. The VAMS are brief, reliable scales that are sensitive to the treatment effects of ECT and that are appropriate for patients with transient cognitive impairment. PMID:9034694

  8. Antidepressant Drugs to Electroconvulsive Therapy: Kristina's Story.

    PubMed

    Sammons, Kristina M; Abraham, Sam

    2016-08-01

    A mother of three children experienced depression after each delivery. The worst bout occurred after the birth of her third child. Antidepressant drugs helped initially, but a change in dosage caused severe decompensating symptoms that resulted in feelings and thoughts that life is not worth living. Health care providers would not facilitate entry into an inpatient program for help. She was told that unless actively suicidal or homicidal, she could not be admitted to an inpatient unit. None of the prescribed antidepressant medications seemed to work and the physicians said there was nothing else they could do. Family and friends searched for help and found a psychiatrist who recommended electroconvulsive therapy. Kristina tells her story of experiencing depression and recovery. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Nursing, 54(8), 43-47.]. PMID:27479479

  9. Current electroconvulsive therapy practice and research in the geriatric population

    PubMed Central

    Kerner, Nancy; Prudic, Joan

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is utilized worldwide for various severe and treatment-resistant psychiatric disorders. Research studies have shown that ECT is the most effective and rapid treatment available for elderly patients with depression, bipolar disorder and psychosis. For patients who suffer from intractable catatonia and neuroleptic malignant syndrome, ECT can be life saving. For elderly patients who cannot tolerate or respond poorly to medications and who are at a high risk for drug-induced toxicity or toxic drug interactions, ECT is the safest treatment option. Organic causes are frequently associated with late-life onset of neuropsychiatric conditions, such as parkinsonism, dementia and stroke. ECT has proven to be efficacious even when these conditions are present. During the next decade, research studies should focus on the use of ECT as a synergistic therapy, to enhance other biological and psychological treatments, and prevent symptom relapse and recurrence. PMID:24778709

  10. Changes in EEG complexity with electroconvulsive therapy in a patient with autism spectrum disorders: a multiscale entropy approach.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryoko; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Ueno, Kanji; Takahashi, Koichi; Ishitobi, Makoto; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Higashima, Masato; Wada, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorders that are reportedly characterized by aberrant neural networks. Recently developed multiscale entropy analysis (MSE) can characterize the complexity inherent in electroencephalography (EEG) dynamics over multiple temporal scales in the dynamics of neural networks. We encountered an 18-year-old man with ASD whose refractory catatonic obsessive-compulsive symptoms were improved dramatically after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). In this clinical case study, we strove to clarify the neurophysiological mechanism of ECT in ASD by assessing EEG complexity using MSE. Along with ECT, the frontocentral region showed decreased EEG complexity at higher temporal scales, whereas the occipital region expressed an increase at lower temporal scales. Furthermore, these changes were associated with clinical improvement associated with the elevation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which is a molecular hypothesis of ECT, playing key roles in ASD pathogenesis. Changes in EEG complexity in a region-specific and temporal scale-specific manner that we found might reflect atypical EEG dynamics in ASD. Although MSE is not a direct approach to measuring neural connectivity and the results are from only a single case, they might reflect specific aberrant neural network activity and the therapeutic neurophysiological mechanism of ECT in ASD. PMID:25767444

  11. Changes in EEG Complexity with Electroconvulsive Therapy in a Patient with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Multiscale Entropy Approach

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Ryoko; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Ueno, Kanji; Takahashi, Koichi; Ishitobi, Makoto; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Higashima, Masato; Wada, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorders that are reportedly characterized by aberrant neural networks. Recently developed multiscale entropy analysis (MSE) can characterize the complexity inherent in electroencephalography (EEG) dynamics over multiple temporal scales in the dynamics of neural networks. We encountered an 18-year-old man with ASD whose refractory catatonic obsessive–compulsive symptoms were improved dramatically after electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). In this clinical case study, we strove to clarify the neurophysiological mechanism of ECT in ASD by assessing EEG complexity using MSE. Along with ECT, the frontocentral region showed decreased EEG complexity at higher temporal scales, whereas the occipital region expressed an increase at lower temporal scales. Furthermore, these changes were associated with clinical improvement associated with the elevation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which is a molecular hypothesis of ECT, playing key roles in ASD pathogenesis. Changes in EEG complexity in a region-specific and temporal scale-specific manner that we found might reflect atypical EEG dynamics in ASD. Although MSE is not a direct approach to measuring neural connectivity and the results are from only a single case, they might reflect specific aberrant neural network activity and the therapeutic neurophysiological mechanism of ECT in ASD. PMID:25767444

  12. [Electroconvulsive therapy. Indications, procedure and treatment results].

    PubMed

    Folkerts, H W

    2011-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective forms of treatment for severe and persistent psychiatric disorders. ECT is used for a broad spectrum of diseases; however, it has proven particularly helpful in the treatment of therapy-resistant depressive episodes. In addition it has also been successfully used in the treatment of other disorders, such as acute mania and acute psychotic states. Basically ECT should be considered in all cases of severe psychiatric disorder in which an adequate psychopharmacological and/or psychotherapeutic treatment strategy has failed or when the side-effects of medications have proven unbearable. As with other forms of psychiatric treatment ECT is not always used in the same manner and in different institutions in the same way and there are also differences in opinions between clinicians and researchers on various aspects of ECT. In this article the up-to-date standards for effective ECT treatment are outlined and discussed in the light of the current knowledge. PMID:20878140

  13. Effects of electroconvulsive therapy on cognitive functioning in patients with depression: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    McNeely, Heather; Losier, Bruno; Parlar, Melissa; King, Matthew; Hasey, Gary; Fervaha, Gagan; Graham, Allyson C; Gregory, Caitlin; Hanford, Lindsay; Nazarov, Anthony; Restivo, Maria; Tatham, Erica; Truong, Wanda; Hall, Geoffrey B C; Lanius, Ruth; McKinnon, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide, affecting approximately 350 million people. Evidence indicates that only 60–70% of persons with major depressive disorder who tolerate antidepressants respond to first-line drug treatment; the remainder become treatment resistant. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered an effective therapy in persons with treatment-resistant depression. The use of ECT is controversial due to concerns about temporary cognitive impairment in the acute post-treatment period. We will conduct a meta-analysis to examine the effects of ECT on cognition in persons with depression. Methods This systematic review and meta-analysis has been registered with PROSPERO (registration number: CRD42014009100). We developed our methods following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) statement. We are searching MEDLINE, PsychINFO, EMBASE, CINAHL and Cochrane from the date of database inception to the end of October 2014. We are also searching the reference lists of published reviews and evidence reports for additional citations. Comparative studies (randomised controlled trials, cohort and case–control) published in English will be included in the meta-analysis. Three clinical neuropsychologists will group the cognitive tests in each included article into a set of mutually exclusive cognitive subdomains. The risk of bias of randomised controlled trials will be assessed using the Jadad scale. We will supplement the Jadad scale with additional questions based on the Cochrane risk of bias tool. The risk of bias of cohort and case–control studies will be assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. We will employ the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) to assess the strength of evidence. Statistical analysis Separate meta-analyses will be conducted for each ECT treatment modality and cognitive subdomain using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis V.2

  14. Electroconvulsive therapy in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Shoirah, Hazem; Hamoda, Hesham M

    2011-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a recognized and effective treatment in adults for several psychiatric and neurological conditions in which the use of pharmacotherapy is ineffective, untimely or contraindicated. It has been used with success in mood and psychotic disorders, catatonia, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, Parkinson's disease and intractable seizures. Its benefits have been recognized and its risks identified through an extensive body of research. The benefits of ECT are not limited to the adult population; research has been conducted on its use in child and adolescent populations for decades. In 2004, the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry published practice parameters for the use of ECT in adolescent populations. However, ECT continues to be underused in cases where it is clearly indicated. In this article, we review the use of ECT in the adolescent population; its indications, administration, contraindications and risks, with emphasis on articles published after the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry practice parameters were formulated. We also review reasons behind the underutilization of ECT in adolescents for whom this treatment modality is indicated. PMID:21158560

  15. The effect of electroconvulsive therapy on executive functioning in a treatment-resistant man with depression: a case report.

    PubMed

    Getz, Glen E; Edner, Benjamin J; Nickell, P V

    2014-03-01

    This case examines the executive functioning in a 42-year-old married white man before receiving and after an index course of electroconvulsive therapy for 4 weeks using right unilateral lead placement. Results indicate clear cognitive improvements on objective measures of executive functioning, attention, and memory after electroconvulsive therapy. However, the patient expressed continued elevated impairments on the subjective questionnaire examining behaviors thought to be controlled by executive functioning. PMID:24553321

  16. Comparison between neurostimulation techniques repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation vs electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of resistant depression: patient preference and cost-effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Magnezi, Racheli; Aminov, Emanuel; Shmuel, Dikla; Dreifuss, Merav; Dannon, Pinhas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common disorder, widely distributed in the population, and is often associated with severe symptoms and functional impairment. It has been estimated that 30% of MDD patients do not benefit adequately from therapeutic interventions, including pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is generally defined as a failure to achieve remission, despite therapeutic interventions. Aim The most effective treatment alternatives for TRD are hospitalization, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Here we compared the clinical effectiveness of ECT and TMS, including success rates, patient responses, side-effect profiles, and financial worthiness. Results We found that ECT (P<0.0001) was more effective than TMS (P<0.012) (not statistically significant in group effect) in TRD patients. However, ECT patients reported a higher percentage of side effects (P<0.01) and the TMS treatment scored better in terms of patient preference. The cost benefit of ECT was higher than that of TMS (US$2075 vs US$814). Patient’s preferences for treatment could be more intense in the TMS, if the TMS is included in the Health Maintenance Organization’s service list. Conclusion We propose that both of these treatment options should be available in psychiatric wards, thus expanding the therapeutic toolkit for TRD. PMID:27536079

  17. [Assessment of individual clinical outcomes: regarding an electroconvulsive therapy case].

    PubMed

    Iraurgi, Ioseba; Gorbeña, Susana; Martínez-Cubillos, Miren-Itxaso; Escribano, Margarita; Gómez-de-Maintenant, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of therapeutic results and of the efficacy and effectiveness of treatments is an area of interest both for clinicians and researchers. In general, randomized controlled trial designs have been used as the methodology of choice in which intergroup comparisons are made having a minimum of participants in each arm of treatment. However, these procedures are seldom used in daily clinical practice. Despite this fact, the evaluation of treatment results for a specific patient is important for the clinician in order to address if therapeutic goals have been accomplished both in terms of statistical significance and clinical meaningfulness. The methodology based on the reliable change index (Jacobson y Truax)1 provides an estimate of these two criteria. The goal of this article is to propose a procedure to apply the methodology with a single case study of a woman diagnosed with major depression and treated with electroconvulsive therapy. PMID:25282427

  18. Impact comparison of ketamine and sodium thiopental on anesthesia during electroconvulsive therapy in major depression patients with drug-resistant; a double-blind randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, B.; Mohammadbeigi, A.; Kamali, A. R.; Taheri-Nejad, M. R.; Moshiri, I.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the available and the most effective therapies for the treatment of resistant depression. Considering the crucial role of seizure duration on therapeutic response in patients treated with ECT, this study aimed to compare the effect of ketamine and sodium thiopental anesthesia during ECT for treatment of patients with drug-resistant major depression (DRMD). Materials and Methods: In a double-blind randomized clinical trial, 160 patients with DRMD were selected consequently and were assigned randomly into two groups including ketamine 0.8 mg/kg and sodium thiopental 1.5 mg/kg. The seizure duration, recovery time, and the side effects of anesthesia were evaluated after 1-h after anesthesia. Data of recovery time and complication collected in 2nd, 4th, 6th, and 8th ECT. Depression was assessed by Hamilton depression scale. Results: The results indicated that ketamine and sodium thiopental had a significant effect on the reduction of depression scores in patients with DRMD (P < 0.05). Complications such as a headache, nausea, pain at the injection site, short-term delirium, and long-term delirium were higher in ketamine group (P > 0.05). But ketamine was more effective in improvement of depression score and increasing systolic and diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.05). The mean of seizure duration showed a decreasing trend and was significant between two study groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Anesthesia induced by ketamine during ECT therapy increased blood pressure and seizure duration. Therefore, due to lower medical complication and attack rate of seizure, ketamine is an appropriate option for anesthesia with ECT in patients with DRMD. PMID:26440233

  19. Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Primer for Mental Health Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leinbaugh, Tracy C.

    2001-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy is the treatment of choice for severe depressive episodes. Although little definitive research exists to explain its effectiveness, since its development in 1938 it has proven effective for the treatment of depression with psychotic features and suicidal ideation. Explains the procedure and discusses implications for the…

  20. Practice Parameter for Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaziuddin, Neera; Kutcher, Stanley P.; Knapp, Penelope

    2004-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) may be an effective treatment for adolescents with severe mood disorders and other Axis I psychiatric disorders when more conservative treatments have been unsuccessful. ECT may be considered when there is a lack of response to two or more trials of pharmacotherapy or when the severity of symptoms precludes waiting…

  1. Achieving Competency in Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Model Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolenc, Tamara J.; Philbrick, Kemuel L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This article illustrates a model electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) curriculum with specific parameters of both practice-based learning and medical knowledge. Method: The authors review the recommendations of the APA Task Force on ECT as they relate to training in ECT in psychiatry residency programs, and discuss diverse educational…

  2. Electroconvulsive Therapy. Consensus Development Conference Statement, Vol. 5, No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), a treatment for severe mental illness in which a brief application of electric stimulus is used to produce a generalized seizure, has been in use for over 45 years. Controversies still exist today concerning the use of ECT. In 1985, the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Mental Health held…

  3. Efficacy of Memoral Herbal on Prevention of Electroconvulsive Therapy-Induced Memory Impairment in Mood Disorder Patients (Isfahan – Iran 2011)

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyed Ghafur; Mohsen, Ghasemi; Reza, Maracy M; Amrollah, Ebrahimi; Majid, Barekatain; Fariba, Noori

    2012-01-01

    Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most efficacious treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD), it is also used as a rapid and efficacious treatment for other psychiatric disorders, especially treatment resistant ones. The cognitive impairment is one of the most important side effects of ECT. This study examined the Memoral herbal efficacy in prevention of ECT-induced memory impairment. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 70 patients with mood disorders who were candidates for ECT enrolled in either Memoral or Control group, and received either Memoral or placebo. The memory was assessed by Addenbrook Cognitive Examination (ACE), and the findings were analyzed by ANOVA under SPSS18. Results: The Memoral group patients showed significantly higher total ACE scores than placebo group (P < 0.001). The scores of attention and orientation, verbal fluency and memory subscales not only never decreased during the study in Memoral group, but also increased. There was no significant difference between these scores of Memoral and placebo groups for the subscales of language and visuospacial ability. Conclusion: The Memoral herbal is an efficacious and safe choice in prevention of ECT- induced cognitive impairment. PMID:22891152

  4. [Electroconvulsive therapy for major depression in borderline personality disorder].

    PubMed

    Gescher, D M; Malevani, J

    2012-03-01

    Depressive disorder is a serious and frequent complication in borderline personality disorder (BPD), however, its severity tends to be neglected particularly if symptoms are short-lived or inconsistent as is common in patients with BPD. Yet the high frequency in these patients requires especially rapid and effective therapy to reduce the risks of vital endangerment, chronification and psychosocial impairment. Efficient crisis intervention is essential for continuity of the disease-specific multimodal therapy enabling lasting remission and social and vocational rehabilitation in BPD. In particular with regard to the high incidence of poor or failed pharmacological responses in patients with BPD, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is of significant relevance among antidepressant treatment options. Despite the wide consensus on its efficacy, there are only few selected trials on ECT for major depression (MD) in BPD. This review summarises the published original studies on this issue, and critically scrutinises indication, benefits and risks of ECT for MD in BPD. It contributes to a focused, discriminating view on ECT and thus enables an optimised patient-oriented, efficient indication for MD in BPD. PMID:21678232

  5. Cotard's syndrome with schizophreniform disorder can be successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy: case report

    PubMed Central

    Caliyurt, Okan; Vardar, Erdal; Tuglu, Cengiz

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of Cotard's syndrome associated with psychotic symptoms. A 27-year-old man was admitted to hospital with the diagnosis of schizophreniform disorder. His presenting symptoms, which had started 1 month before hospital admission, were somatic delusions of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular malfunction and the absence of a stomach, which resulted in a decrease in weight from 75 kg to 63 kg in 1 month. Cranial computed tomographic images showed dilatation of the lateral and third ventricles, whereas magnetic resonance imaging revealed central atrophy and lateral ventricle dilatation. Single- photon emission computed tomography demonstrated left temporal, left frontal and left parietal hypoperfusion. The patient did not respond to antipsychotic therapies, but he was successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy. This report emphasizes that Cotard's syndrome may be accompanied by lesions of the left hemisphere and that electroconvulsive therapy could be the first-line therapy in such patients with psychotic disorder. PMID:15069468

  6. How bad was unmodified electroconvulsive therapy! A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Ray, Anindya Kumar

    2016-01-01

    "Unmodified"-electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) being considered unethical remained away from the scientific literature, but continued in practice in many parts of the world. The Mental Health Care Bill, 2011, proposed for its banning in India. The aim of this study is to retrospectively observe "how bad was unmodified-ECT" to the patients in a naturalistic setting. The study was done at the Central Institute of Psychiatry, India. Files of patients receiving unmodified ECT during 1990-1995 were retrospectively reviewed. Outcome was evaluated in terms of desired effectiveness and the side effects as noted in the files by the treating team. Six hundred and thirty-seven patients (6.94% of total admission) received ECT with meticulous standard-of-care except provision of anesthesia. Satisfactory improvement was noted in 95.45% patients with no noticeable/reported complication in 89.05%. Premature termination of ECT for complications occurred in 2.19% patients. "Unmodified"-ECT, though unethical, still could ensure favorable outcome with proper case selection and meticulous standard-of-care. PMID:27385857

  7. How bad was unmodified electroconvulsive therapy! A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Anindya Kumar

    2016-01-01

    “Unmodified”-electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) being considered unethical remained away from the scientific literature, but continued in practice in many parts of the world. The Mental Health Care Bill, 2011, proposed for its banning in India. The aim of this study is to retrospectively observe “how bad was unmodified-ECT” to the patients in a naturalistic setting. The study was done at the Central Institute of Psychiatry, India. Files of patients receiving unmodified ECT during 1990–1995 were retrospectively reviewed. Outcome was evaluated in terms of desired effectiveness and the side effects as noted in the files by the treating team. Six hundred and thirty-seven patients (6.94% of total admission) received ECT with meticulous standard-of-care except provision of anesthesia. Satisfactory improvement was noted in 95.45% patients with no noticeable/reported complication in 89.05%. Premature termination of ECT for complications occurred in 2.19% patients. “Unmodified”-ECT, though unethical, still could ensure favorable outcome with proper case selection and meticulous standard-of-care.

  8. Multifactorial Determinants of the Neurocognitive Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, Shawn M.; Choi, Jimmy; Deng, Zhi-De; Appelbaum, Lawrence G.; Krystal, Andrew D.; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2014-01-01

    For many patients with neuropsychiatric illnesses, standard psychiatric treatments with mono or combination pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and transcranial magnetic stimulation are ineffective. For these patients with treatment resistant neuropsychiatric illnesses, a main therapeutic option is electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Decades of research have found ECT to be highly effective; however, it can also result in adverse neurocognitive effects. Specifically, ECT results in disorientation after each session, anterograde amnesia for recently learned information, and retrograde amnesia for previously learned information. Unfortunately, the neurocognitive effects and underlying mechanisms of action of ECT remain poorly understood. The purpose of this paper is to synthesize the multiple moderating and mediating factors that are thought to underlie the neurocognitive effects of ECT into a coherent model. Such factors include demographic and neuropsychological characteristics, neuropsychiatric symptoms, ECT technical parameters, and ECT associated neurophysiological changes. Future research is warranted to evaluate and test this model, so that these findings may support the development of more refined clinical seizure therapy delivery approaches and efficacious cognitive remediation strategies to improve the utility of this important and widely used intervention tool for neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:24820942

  9. Electroconvulsive therapy, the placebo effect and informed consent.

    PubMed

    Blease, Charlotte Rosalind

    2013-03-01

    Major depressive disorder is not only the most widespread mental disorder in the world, it is a disorder on the rise. In cases of particularly severe forms of depression, when all other treatment options have failed, the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a recommended treatment option for patients. ECT has been in use in psychiatric practice for over 70 years and is now undergoing something of a restricted renaissance following a sharp decline in its use in the 1970s. Despite its success in treating severe depression there is continued debate as to the effectiveness of ECT: in some studies, it is argued that ECT is marginally more effective than sham ECT. In addition, there is still no clear explanation of how ECT works; among the range of hypotheses proposed it is claimed that ECT may work by harnessing placebo effects. In light of the uncertainties over the mechanism of action of ECT and given the risk of serious side effects that ECT may produce, I contend that the process of informed consent must include comprehensive accounts of these uncertainties. I examine the possible consequences of providing adequate information to potential ECT patients, including the consideration that ECT may still prove to be effective even if physicians are open about the possibility of it working as a placebo. I conclude that if we value patient autonomy as well as the professional reputation of medical practitioners, a fuller description of ECT must be provided to patients and their carers. PMID:23038801

  10. Evaluation of an electroconvulsive therapy service in a general hospital.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Scott; Brunero, Scott; Barclay, Christopher; Wijeratne, Chanaka

    2011-06-01

    There has been much recent literature on the technical parameters of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) with regard to improving efficacy and minimizing adverse effects, but relatively little on ECT service delivery. This paper will discuss the development and characteristics of an ECT service at a teaching hospital in metropolitan Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. A mixture of qualitative and quantitative methods, including a selective literature review and audit of ECT use were used. The results of the audit were compared with the 2007 revision of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists' clinical memorandum on ECT. We discuss issues, such as the optimal site for ECT delivery, ECT mental health nurse coordinator role, credentialing of psychiatrists, registrar supervision, and the development of an ECT committee. A significant finding of the audit was that the majority of patients were treated under the New South Wales Mental Health Act, and voluntary patients were more likely to have a diagnosis of a depressive disorder, whereas involuntary patients were more likely to have a non-mood disorder diagnosis. This study has shown that auditing of ECT practices and services by mental health nurses is essential for quality improvement processes. The audit highlighted areas of service delivery that should be subject to review and evaluation against professional standards. PMID:21492361

  11. [Comparative effectiveness of detoxification hemosorption and electroconvulsive therapy in patients with endogenous depression resistant to tricyclic antidepressants].

    PubMed

    Kosov, N E; Mosolov, S N

    1991-01-01

    In 79 patients with endogenous depressions (66 MDP and 13 circular schizophrenic patients) which received high doses of tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline in agitated forms and melipramine++ in inhibited ones) that remained ineffective for at least one month, hemosorption (HS; 39 patients) or ECT (40 patients) were randomly applied. The overall efficiency of HS and ECT was 53.8% and 60%, respectively. The efficiency of HS was substantially higher than that of ECT in the cases with dominant obsessive-phobic symptoms in depression. The reverse relation was observed in the cases with dominant anxious-delirious symptoms. In order to determine the predictors of the efficiency of the therapies, the stepwise discriminant analysis was used and the linear discriminant function equations were derived for HS and ECT involving 11 and 8 parameters, respectively. Correlation coefficients between predicted and de-facto therapeutic effects determined in an additional test group of 20 patients were 0.63 for HS and 0.88 for ECT. This is important in terms of directing a practitioner toward one or another technique with due respect for the individual differential therapeutic prediction of its result. PMID:1650104

  12. Electroconvulsive therapy and/or plasmapheresis in autoimmune encephalitis?

    PubMed

    Gough, Jessica L; Coebergh, Jan; Chandra, Brunda; Nilforooshan, Ramin

    2016-08-16

    Autoimmune encephalitis is a poorly understood condition that can present with a combination of neurological and psychiatric symptoms, either of which may predominate. There are many autoantibodies associated with a variety of clinical syndromes - anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is the commonest. Currently, the most widely used therapy is prompt plasmapheresis and steroid treatment (and tumour resection if indicated), followed by second line immunosuppression if this fails. Given the growing awareness of autoimmune encephalitis as an entity, it is increasingly important that we consider it as a potential diagnosis in order to provide timely, effective treatment. We discuss several previously published case reports and one new case. These reports examined the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on patients with autoimmune encephalitis, particularly those in whom psychiatric symptoms are especially debilitating and refractory to standard treatment. We also discuss factors predicting good outcome and possible mechanisms by which ECT may be effective. Numerous cases, such as those presented by Wingfield, Tsutsui, Florance, Sansing, Braakman and Matsumoto, demonstrate effective use of ECT in anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients with severe psychiatric symptoms such as catatonia, psychosis, narcolepsy and stupor who had failed to respond to standard treatments alone. We also present a new case of a 71-year-old female who presented to a psychiatric unit initially with depression, which escalated to catatonia, delusions, nihilism and auditory hallucinations. After anti-NMDAR antibodies were isolated, she was treated by the neurology team with plasmapheresis and steroids, with a partial response. She received multiple sessions of ECT and her psychiatric symptoms completely resolved and she returned to her premorbid state. For this reason, we suggest that ECT should be considered, particularly in those patients who are non-responders to standard therapies. PMID

  13. Electroconvulsive therapy and/or plasmapheresis in autoimmune encephalitis?

    PubMed Central

    Gough, Jessica L; Coebergh, Jan; Chandra, Brunda; Nilforooshan, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis is a poorly understood condition that can present with a combination of neurological and psychiatric symptoms, either of which may predominate. There are many autoantibodies associated with a variety of clinical syndromes - anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is the commonest. Currently, the most widely used therapy is prompt plasmapheresis and steroid treatment (and tumour resection if indicated), followed by second line immunosuppression if this fails. Given the growing awareness of autoimmune encephalitis as an entity, it is increasingly important that we consider it as a potential diagnosis in order to provide timely, effective treatment. We discuss several previously published case reports and one new case. These reports examined the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on patients with autoimmune encephalitis, particularly those in whom psychiatric symptoms are especially debilitating and refractory to standard treatment. We also discuss factors predicting good outcome and possible mechanisms by which ECT may be effective. Numerous cases, such as those presented by Wingfield, Tsutsui, Florance, Sansing, Braakman and Matsumoto, demonstrate effective use of ECT in anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients with severe psychiatric symptoms such as catatonia, psychosis, narcolepsy and stupor who had failed to respond to standard treatments alone. We also present a new case of a 71-year-old female who presented to a psychiatric unit initially with depression, which escalated to catatonia, delusions, nihilism and auditory hallucinations. After anti-NMDAR antibodies were isolated, she was treated by the neurology team with plasmapheresis and steroids, with a partial response. She received multiple sessions of ECT and her psychiatric symptoms completely resolved and she returned to her premorbid state. For this reason, we suggest that ECT should be considered, particularly in those patients who are non-responders to standard therapies. PMID

  14. Hippocampal structural and functional changes associated with electroconvulsive therapy response

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, C C; Jones, T; Lemke, N T; Gallegos, P; McClintock, S M; Mayer, A R; Bustillo, J; Calhoun, V D

    2014-01-01

    Previous animal models and structural imaging investigations have linked hippocampal neuroplasticity to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) response, but the relationship between changes in hippocampal volume and temporal coherence in the context of ECT response is unknown. We hypothesized that ECT response would increase both hippocampal resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity and hippocampal volumes. Patients with major depressive disorder (n=19) were scanned before and after the ECT series. Healthy, demographically matched comparisons (n=20) were scanned at one-time interval. Longitudinal changes in functional connectivity of hippocampal regions and volumes of hippocampal subfields were compared with reductions in ratings of depressive symptoms. Right hippocampal connectivity increased (normalized) after the ECT series and correlated with depressive symptom reduction. Similarly, the volumes of the right hippocampal cornu ammonis (CA2/3), dentate gyrus and subiculum regions increased, but the hippocampal subfields were unchanged relative to the comparison group. Connectivity changes were not evident in the left hippocampus, and volume changes were limited to the left CA2/3 subfields. The laterality of the right hippocampal functional connectivity and volume increases may be related to stimulus delivery method, which was predominately right unilateral in this investigation. The findings suggested that increased hippocampal functional connectivity and volumes may be biomarkers for ECT response. PMID:25405780

  15. Subgenual cingulate cortical activity predicts the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Argyelan, M; Lencz, T; Kaliora, S; Sarpal, D K; Weissman, N; Kingsley, P B; Malhotra, A K; Petrides, G

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective treatment for depression, yet its mechanism of action is unknown. Our goal was to investigate the neurobiological underpinnings of ECT response using longitudinally collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) in 16 patients with treatment-resistant depression and 10 healthy controls. Patients received bifrontal ECT 3 times a week under general anesthesia. We acquired rs-fMRI at three time points: at baseline, after the 1st ECT administration and after the course of the ECT treatment; depression was assessed with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D). The primary measure derived from rs-fMRI was fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF), which provides an unbiased voxel-wise estimation of brain activity. We also conducted seed-based functional connectivity analysis based on our primary findings. We compared treatment-related changes in HAM-D scores with pre- and post-treatment fALFF and connectivity measures. Subcallosal cingulate cortex (SCC) demonstrated higher BOLD signal fluctuations (fALFF) at baseline in depressed patients, and SCC fALFF decreased over the course of treatment. The baseline level of fALFF of SCC predicted response to ECT. In addition, connectivity of SCC with bilateral hippocampus, bilateral temporal pole, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex was significantly reduced over the course of treatment. These results suggest that the antidepressant effect of ECT may be mediated by downregulation of SCC activity and connectivity. SCC function may serve as an important biomarker of target engagement in the development of novel therapies for depression that is resistant to treatment with standard medications. PMID:27115120

  16. Subgenual cingulate cortical activity predicts the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Argyelan, M; Lencz, T; Kaliora, S; Sarpal, D K; Weissman, N; Kingsley, P B; Malhotra, A K; Petrides, G

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective treatment for depression, yet its mechanism of action is unknown. Our goal was to investigate the neurobiological underpinnings of ECT response using longitudinally collected resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) in 16 patients with treatment-resistant depression and 10 healthy controls. Patients received bifrontal ECT 3 times a week under general anesthesia. We acquired rs-fMRI at three time points: at baseline, after the 1st ECT administration and after the course of the ECT treatment; depression was assessed with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D). The primary measure derived from rs-fMRI was fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF), which provides an unbiased voxel-wise estimation of brain activity. We also conducted seed-based functional connectivity analysis based on our primary findings. We compared treatment-related changes in HAM-D scores with pre- and post-treatment fALFF and connectivity measures. Subcallosal cingulate cortex (SCC) demonstrated higher BOLD signal fluctuations (fALFF) at baseline in depressed patients, and SCC fALFF decreased over the course of treatment. The baseline level of fALFF of SCC predicted response to ECT. In addition, connectivity of SCC with bilateral hippocampus, bilateral temporal pole, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex was significantly reduced over the course of treatment. These results suggest that the antidepressant effect of ECT may be mediated by downregulation of SCC activity and connectivity. SCC function may serve as an important biomarker of target engagement in the development of novel therapies for depression that is resistant to treatment with standard medications. PMID:27115120

  17. Electroconvulsive therapy in rehabilitation: the Hong Kong experience.

    PubMed

    Tang, W K; Ungvari, G S

    2001-03-01

    Persistent psychotic symptoms can intrude on an individual's cognitive and psychosocial functioning and interfere with that person's active and constructive participation in social and vocational rehabilitation. Amelioration or elimination of intrusive positive and negative symptoms of psychosis is the major task for clinicians during the acute phase of schizophrenia. Successful treatment permits the patient to transition into stabilization and recovery phases, when psychosocial rehabilitation can take primacy (1). The introduction of clozapine has enlarged the proportion of individuals with schizophrenia whose psychotic symptoms can be controlled (2), but symptoms remain refractory in a large number of patients. One largely unexplored alternative for treating individuals who are chronically disabled is electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Already known for its efficacy in treating affective disorders, its effectiveness in treating schizophrenia--although more limited--has been documented over more than five decades (3,4). ECT has been found to be particularly effective in treating first-episode cases in which affective and catatonic symptoms are manifested and in 20 to 50 percent of treatment-resistant cases, including those in which the patient was nonresponsive to clozapine (5,6,7,8). Without continuation and maintenance ECT, however, results are usually short-lived (4,7,9). Tang and Ungvari have used ECT in an attempt to increase the responsiveness to psychosocial rehabilitation of patients who have treatment-refractory schizophrenia. They describe their experiences with ECT at a facility in Hong Kong, where long-term hospitalization is still the norm for a sizable proportion of patients with chronic schizophrenia. ECT is more compatible with the biological view of schizophrenia that is prevalent in Asian countries; hence it has greater cultural congruence and acceptability among consumers and families in China than in the United States. PMID:11239096

  18. Electroconvulsive therapy increases temporal gray matter volume and cortical thickness.

    PubMed

    Sartorius, Alexander; Demirakca, Traute; Böhringer, Andreas; Clemm von Hohenberg, Christian; Aksay, Suna Su; Bumb, Jan Malte; Kranaster, Laura; Ende, Gabriele

    2016-03-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a treatment of choice for severe and therapy resistant forms of major depressive episodes (MDE). Temporal brain volume alterations in MDE have been described for more than two decades. In our prospective study we aimed to investigate individual pre-post ECT treatment whole brain gray matter (GM) volume changes (quantified with voxel-based morphometry) in a sample of 18 patients with MDE. In addition, we studied the effect of ECT on voxel-based cortical thickness in cortical brain regions. The most prominent longitudinal GM increases (significant at a whole brain corrected level) occurred in temporal lobe regions. Within specific region of interest analyses we detected highly significant increases of GM in the hippocampus and the amygdala and to a lesser extent in the habenula (left p=0.003, right p=0.032). A voxel based cortical thickness analysis revealed an increase in cortical temporal regions (basically temporal pole and insula) further corroborating our cortical voxel-based morphometry results. Neither GM decreases or white matter increases nor correlations of GM changes with basic psychopathological parameters were detected. We corroborate earlier findings of hippocampal and amygdala GM volume increase following an acute ECT series in patients with MDE. Temporal GM volume increase was significant on a whole brain level and further corroborated by a cortical thickness analysis. Our data widely exclude white matter loss as an indirect cause of GM growth. Our data add further evidence to the hypothesis that ECT enables plasticity falsifying older ideas of ECT induced "brain damaging". PMID:26792445

  19. Psychosis and temporal lobe epilepsy-role of electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Naomi Mifflen; Gadit, Amin

    2012-01-01

    A 49-year-old female presented for admission with features of being withdrawn, inability to comprehend questions, auditory hallucinations and disorganised thoughts. She also had a previous diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy. She did not respond well to psychotropic medications. During her sleep deprived EEG, she had a brief episode of seizures. Following this, she showed improvement in psychosis for a day or so. Based on this finding, it was decided to initiate a course of electroconvulsive therapy. She improved remarkably on six treatments. At the time of discharge, she was in a stable condition. PMID:22729342

  20. Postpartum catatonia treated with electroconvulsive therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Strain, Angela Katherine; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha; Bullard, Elizabeth; Gaynes, Bradley N

    2012-01-01

    Catatonia is a rare syndrome that occurs in mood and psychotic disorders, and general medical conditions. Postpartum depression affects 10%-15% of women within 6 months after delivery. Postpartum psychosis affects 0.1%-0.5% of women within weeks after delivery, though it can occur within hours; it carries risk for suicide and infanticide. There is limited evidence available to guide treatment. We review a case of postpartum psychosis that presented with catatonia and was resistant to medications, but responded to electroconvulsive therapy. PMID:22227030

  1. Contemporary use and practice of electroconvulsive therapy worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Leiknes, Kari Ann; Jarosh-von Schweder, Lindy; Høie, Bjørg

    2012-01-01

    To explore contemporary (from 1990) utilization and practice of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) worldwide. Systematic search (limited to studies published 1990 and after) was undertaken in the databases Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, SveMed, and EBSCO/Cinahl. Primary data-based studies/surveys with reported ECT utilization and practice in psychiatric institutions internationally, nationally, and regionally; city were included. Two reviewers independently checked study titles and abstracts according to inclusion criteria, and extracted ECT utilization and practice data from those retrieved in full text. Seventy studies were included, seven from Australia and New Zealand, three Africa, 12 North and Latin America, 33 Europe, and 15 Asia. Worldwide ECT differences and trends were evident, average number ECTs administered per patient were eight; unmodified (without anesthesia) was used in Asia (over 90%), Africa, Latin America, Russia, Turkey, Spain. Worldwide preferred electrode placement was bilateral, except unilateral at some places (Europe and Australia/New Zealand). Although mainstream was brief-pulse wave, sine-wave devices were still used. Majority ECT treated were older women with depression in Western countries, versus younger men with schizophrenia in Asian countries. ECT under involuntary conditions (admissions), use of ambulatory-ECT, acute first line of treatment, as well as administered by other professions (geriatricians, nurses) were noted by some sites. General trends were only some institutions within the same country providing ECT, training inadequate, and guidelines not followed. Mandatory reporting and overall country ECT register data were sparse. Many patients are still treated with unmodified ECT today. Large global variation in ECT utilization, administration, and practice advocates a need for worldwide sharing of knowledge about ECT, reflection, and learning from each other's experiences. PMID:22741102

  2. Contemporary use and practice of electroconvulsive therapy worldwide.

    PubMed

    Leiknes, Kari Ann; Jarosh-von Schweder, Lindy; Høie, Bjørg

    2012-05-01

    To explore contemporary (from 1990) utilization and practice of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) worldwide. Systematic search (limited to studies published 1990 and after) was undertaken in the databases Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, SveMed, and EBSCO/Cinahl. Primary data-based studies/surveys with reported ECT utilization and practice in psychiatric institutions internationally, nationally, and regionally; city were included. Two reviewers independently checked study titles and abstracts according to inclusion criteria, and extracted ECT utilization and practice data from those retrieved in full text. Seventy studies were included, seven from Australia and New Zealand, three Africa, 12 North and Latin America, 33 Europe, and 15 Asia. Worldwide ECT differences and trends were evident, average number ECTs administered per patient were eight; unmodified (without anesthesia) was used in Asia (over 90%), Africa, Latin America, Russia, Turkey, Spain. Worldwide preferred electrode placement was bilateral, except unilateral at some places (Europe and Australia/New Zealand). Although mainstream was brief-pulse wave, sine-wave devices were still used. Majority ECT treated were older women with depression in Western countries, versus younger men with schizophrenia in Asian countries. ECT under involuntary conditions (admissions), use of ambulatory-ECT, acute first line of treatment, as well as administered by other professions (geriatricians, nurses) were noted by some sites. General trends were only some institutions within the same country providing ECT, training inadequate, and guidelines not followed. Mandatory reporting and overall country ECT register data were sparse. Many patients are still treated with unmodified ECT today. Large global variation in ECT utilization, administration, and practice advocates a need for worldwide sharing of knowledge about ECT, reflection, and learning from each other's experiences. PMID:22741102

  3. Effect of Supportive Nursing Care on Self Esteem of Patients Receiving Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Navidian, Ali; Keykha, Roghaieh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Self-esteem is an important potential indicator in etiology, diagnosis and treatment of patients with severe mental illness. ECT is a popular treatment for these patients that can effect on their self-esteem and reinforce their problems. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of supportive nursing care in increasing self esteem of patients receiving ECT. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted in the Baharan psychiatric hospital of Zahedan. A total of 70 cases of patients who received ECT were randomly allocated to control (n=35) and intervention (n=35) groups. The data were collected by demographic characteristics questionnaire and Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (RSES). Intervention group received the supportive nursing care. The control group received only routine treatment. Self esteem level was measured and compared before and after intervention for two groups. The data was analyzed by SPSS using the χ2, t-test and ANCOVA. Results: Results showed that both groups were homogeneous on the socio- demographic characteristics. The mean self esteem in the intervention group compared with the control group was significantly increased. While controlling the effects of individual and social variables, the result shows significant differences between two groups in the mean scores of self esteem after the intervention. Conclusion: The results suggest that supportive nursing care can have positive effect on self esteem of patients receiving ECT. It is recommended to use this method for increasing self esteem of these patients. PMID:25276758

  4. Beta-blocking agents during electroconvulsive therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Boere, E; Birkenhäger, T K; Groenland, T H N; van den Broek, W W

    2014-07-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is associated with at least transient episodes of hypertension and tachycardia. Beta-blocking agents may be indicated to prevent cardiovascular complications and may shorten seizure duration. This review evaluates studies that used beta-blocking agents during ECT to determine which agent has the most favourable outcomes on cardiovascular variables and seizure duration. A Medline database search was made using the combined keywords 'adrenergic beta-antagonists' and 'electroconvulsive therapy'. The search was restricted to double-blind randomized controlled trials and yielded 29 original studies. With the use of esmolol, significant attenuating effects were found on cardiovascular parameters in the first 5 min after stimulation; its shortening effects on seizure duration may be dose-related. With the use of labetalol, findings on cardiovascular effects were inconsistent during the first minutes after stimulation but were significant after 5 min and thereafter; seizure duration was scarcely studied. Landiolol attenuates heart rate but with inconsistent findings regarding arterial pressure (AP); seizure duration was mostly unaffected. Esmolol appears to be effective in reducing the cardiovascular response, although seizure duration may be affected with higher dosages. Landiolol can be considered a suitable alternative, but effects on AP need further investigation. Labetalol has been studied to a lesser extent and may have prolonged cardiovascular effects. The included studies varied in design, methodology, and the amount of exact data provided in the publications. Further study of beta-blocking agents in ECT is clearly necessary. PMID:24942714

  5. Prevalence and correlates of electroconvulsive therapy delivery in 1001 obsessive-compulsive disorder outpatients.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos-Ribeiro, Samara; Lins-Martins, Natália M; Frydman, Ilana; Conceição do Rosário, Maria; Ferrão, Ygor A; Shavitt, Roseli G; Yücel, Murat; Miguel, Euripedes C; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

    2016-05-30

    Individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) who sought treatment in seven different specialized centers (n=1001) were evaluated with a structured assessment battery. Thirteen OCD patients (1.3% of the sample) reported having been treated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in the past. They were older and exhibited higher global severity of OCD symptoms, but were less likely to display symmetry/ordering and contamination/washing symptoms. They also had greater suicidality and increased rates of psychosis. Finally, OCD patients exposed to ECT were more frequently treated with antipsychotics, although they did not differ in terms of responses to adequate trials with serotonin reuptake inhibitors. PMID:27137976

  6. [Towards the rehabilitation of maintenance electroconvulsive therapy?].

    PubMed

    Lôo, H; de Carvalho, W; Galinowski, A

    1990-01-01

    ECT is a reliable treatment of serious affective disorders more efficacious than antidepressants either used alone or combined with mood stabilizers or neuroleptics. Recurrent affective disorders refractory to all treatments presently available have been tentatively treated by prophylactic ECT since the beginning of ECT. In this study, 16 cases of recurrent affective disorders treated with maintenance ECT are discussed. Six continue to show a good response to maintenance ECT. Six remain improved although they discontinued ECT. ECT failed to improve 4 patients. Indications and inclusion criteria of maintenance ECT are defined. Good responses in cases refractory to all other treatment strategies are promising but still require prospective studies, difficult to implement, in order to confirm the efficacy of maintenance ECT. PMID:2191618

  7. A man with urethral polyembolokoilamania successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Ingves, Matthew V; Lau, Timothy; Fedoroff, J Paul; Levine, Sharon

    2014-08-01

    Polyembolokoilamania is the act of inserting foreign objects into bodily orifices and can be classified as a paraphilia if done for sexual pleasure. Although problematic sexual behaviors are common in dementia, the majority of case reports of urethral polyembolokoilamania in the elderly have occurred in the absence of dementia or cognitive impairment. Little empirical evidence exists for managing problematic sexual behaviors in the elderly and in dementia. Most evidence in the form of case reports demonstrates that behavioral, environmental, and pharmacological interventions can be effective. In this case report, we describe the management of sexually disinhibited behavior in the form of polyembolokoilamania in a 67-year-old man suffering from treatment-resistant depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, and early signs of frontotemporal dementia. The successful treatment included a course of electroconvulsive therapy. PMID:24569921

  8. A Systematic Review of the Combined Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Psychotherapy for Depression

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, Shawn M.; Brandon, Anna R.; Husain, Mustafa M.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective treatments for severe Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). However, after acute phase treatment and initial remission, relapse rates are significant. Strategies to prolong remission include continuation phase ECT, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, or their combinations. This systematic review synthesizes extant data regarding the combined use of psychotherapy with ECT for the treatment of patients with severe MDD and offers the hypothesis that augmenting ECT with depression-specific psychotherapy represents a promising strategy for future investigation. Methods The authors performed two independent searches in PsychInfo (1806 – 2009) and MEDLINE (1948 – 2009) using combinations of the following search terms: Electroconvulsive Therapy (including ECT, ECT therapy, electroshock therapy, EST, shock therapy) and Psychotherapy (including cognitive behavioral, interpersonal, group, psychodynamic, psychoanalytic, individual, eclectic, and supportive). We included in this review a total of six articles (English language) that mentioned ECT and psychotherapy in the abstract, and provided a case report, series, or clinical trial. We examined the articles for data related to ECT and psychotherapy treatment characteristics, cohort characteristics, and therapeutic outcome. Results Although research over the past seven decades documenting the combined use of ECT and psychotherapy is limited, the available evidence suggests that testing this combination has promise and may confer additional, positive functional outcomes. Conclusions Significant methodological variability in ECT and psychotherapy procedures, heterogeneous patient cohorts, and inconsistent outcome measures prevent strong conclusions; however, existing research supports the need for future investigations of combined ECT and psychotherapy in well-designed, controlled clinical studies. Depression-specific psychotherapy approaches may need special

  9. Immune and neurotrophin stimulation by electroconvulsive therapy: is some inflammation needed after all?

    PubMed

    van Buel, E M; Patas, K; Peters, M; Bosker, F J; Eisel, U L M; Klein, H C

    2015-01-01

    A low-grade inflammatory response is commonly seen in the peripheral blood of major depressive disorder (MDD) patients, especially those with refractory and chronic disease courses. However, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), the most drastic intervention reserved for these patients, is closely associated with an enhanced haematogenous as well as neuroinflammatory immune response, as evidenced by both human and animal studies. A related line of experimental evidence further shows that inflammatory stimulation reinforces neurotrophin expression and may even mediate dramatic neurogenic and antidepressant-like effects following exposure to chronic stress. The current review therefore attempts a synthesis of our knowledge on the neurotrophic and immunological aspects of ECT and other electrically based treatments in psychiatry. Perhaps contrary to contemporary views, we conclude that targeted potentiation, rather than suppression, of inflammatory responses may be of therapeutic relevance to chronically depressed patients or a subgroup thereof. PMID:26218851

  10. Decisional capacity of depressed elderly to consent to electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Lapid, Maria I; Rummans, Teresa A; Pankratz, V Shane; Appelbaum, Paul S

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to determine the abilities of severely depressed elderly to consent to electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and to investigate the impact of educational intervention on their capacity. Forty severely depressed adults referred for ECT, with Mini-Mental State Examination scores greater than 20, were recruited. Using the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Treatment (MacCAT-T), decisional capacities were assessed at baseline and reassessed after education. Between the 2 assessments, all subjects received standard education, and half of the group was subsequently randomized to receive further education. At baseline, the geriatric group scored lower on understanding, reasoning, and choice and higher on appreciation. After education, all MacCAT-T scores increased for both age groups. Depressed elderly in the sample, as a group, had adequate decisional capacities to consent to ECT. They showed greater improvement in decisional capacity with education. The findings highlight the importance of providing education to the elderly to optimize their ability to give informed consent. PMID:15018698

  11. Genetic mechanisms of electroconvulsive therapy response in depression.

    PubMed

    Benson-Martin, Janine J; Stein, Dan J; Baldwin, David S; Domschke, Katharina

    2016-05-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is known to be one of the most effective treatments for managing depression and other severe mental illnesses. Nevertheless, the exact mechanisms underlying response to ECT remain uncertain. This mini-review presents clinical findings regarding the role of genetic factors in the aetiology of the ECT response. Studies on the role of variation in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene; other dopamine-, serotonin-, and G-protein-related genes; brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF); apolipoprotein E (APOE); angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) genes in mediating response to ECT are summarized. The existing data support the notion that some genetic factors-particularly the functional COMT val158met polymorphism-may play a role in the magnitude of clinical response to ECT, and thus could serve as potential biomarkers for future personalized treatment approaches. However, much of the work to date is preliminary, and large-scale confirmatory studies are still needed. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27062668

  12. A new method to model electroconvulsive therapy in rats with increased construct validity and enhanced translational value.

    PubMed

    Theilmann, Wiebke; Löscher, Wolfgang; Socala, Katarzyna; Frieling, Helge; Bleich, Stefan; Brandt, Claudia

    2014-06-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy is the most effective therapy for major depressive disorder (MDD). The remission rate is above 50% in previously pharmacoresistant patients but the mechanisms of action are not fully understood. Electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) in rodents mimics antidepressant electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in humans and is widely used to investigate the underlying mechanisms of ECT. For the translational value of findings in animal models it is essential to establish models with the highest construct, face and predictive validity possible. The commonly used model for ECT in rodents does not meet the demand for high construct validity. For ECT, cortical surface electrodes are used to induce therapeutic seizures whereas ECS in rodents is exclusively performed by auricular or corneal electrodes. However, the stimulation site has a major impact on the type and spread of the induced seizure activity and its antidepressant effect. We propose a method in which ECS is performed by screw electrodes placed above the motor cortex of rats to closely simulate the clinical situation and thereby increase the construct validity of the model. Cortical ECS in rats induced reliably seizures comparable to human ECT. Cortical ECS was more effective than auricular ECS to reduce immobility in the forced swim test. Importantly, auricular stimulation had a negative influence on the general health condition of the rats with signs of fear during the stimulation sessions. These results suggest that auricular ECS in rats is not a suitable ECT model. Cortical ECS in rats promises to be a valid method to mimic ECT. PMID:24607291

  13. Electroconvulsive therapy in the presence of a metallic skull plate after meningioma resection.

    PubMed

    Ling, Ted; Manepalli, Jothika; Grossberg, George

    2010-06-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective and safe treatment even in the frail and in the medically ill. A case report of ECT being administered to a patient with a history of a recently resected meningioma and the presence of a metallic skull plate is presented here. The patient has a history of bipolar disorder in remission but had an acute manic episode with psychotic features after resection of suprasellar meningioma. He presented with superimposed delirium that complicated the presentation. Because there was no effective resolution with medications, ECT was administered. This case documents the safe administration of ECT in complicated situations such as these. This case also demonstrates that ECT can be successfully administered in the presence of superimposed delirium and after a recent meningioma resection. Clinical skills and expertise are required to safely and effectively administer ECT in such cases. PMID:19935094

  14. Remission of Methamphetamine-Induced Withdrawal Delirium and Craving After Electroconvulsive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Ekramzadeh, Sara; Pridmore, Saxby

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to describe the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in the treatment of methamphetamine-induced withdrawal delirium and craving in a single case. Case Presentation: A 44-year-old male presented to the hospital in Fars province, Iran, with Methamphetamine-Induced Withdrawal Delirium who responded to ECT. Conclusions: The electroconvulsive therapy can be a suitable option for the treatment of methamphetamine withdrawal delirium and craving. Also, it can be usefully employed in these very serious conditions which may represent a risk to life. PMID:26834801

  15. Physical deformity as sequela of chronic catatonia and response to electroconvulsive therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Devi, Sugnyani; Behere, Rishikesh V; Varambally, Shivarama; Rao, Naren P; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Gangadhar, Bangalore N

    2011-09-01

    Chronic catatonia with posturing can cause joint contractures leading to greater morbidity associated with the physical deformity. We report a case of a young man with chronic catatonic schizophrenia with posturing of bilateral upper limbs in flexion leading to fixed flexion contracture of left metacarpophalangeal joints. Initiation of electroconvulsive therapy along with physical rehabilitation measures helped him regain full range of motion in the right upper limb. The fixed flexion contracture, however, remained resistant to intensive treatment efforts. Early interventions in the form of electroconvulsive therapy and physical rehabilitation can be useful in reversing such potentially disabling complications. PMID:21865951

  16. Electroconvulsive therapy during pregnancy: a systematic review of case studies.

    PubMed

    Leiknes, Kari Ann; Cooke, Mary Jennifer; Jarosch-von Schweder, Lindy; Harboe, Ingrid; Høie, Bjørg

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to explore practice, use, and risk of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in pregnancy. A systematic search was undertaken in the databases Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, SveMed and CINAHL (EBSCO). Only primary data-based studies reporting ECT undertaken during pregnancy were included. Two reviewers independently checked study titles and abstracts according to inclusion criteria and extracted detailed use, practice, and adverse effects data from full text retrieved articles. Studies and extracted data were sorted according to before and after year 1970, due to changes in ECT administration over time. A total of 67 case reports were included and studies from all continents represented. Altogether, 169 pregnant women were identified, treated during pregnancy with a mean number of 9.4 ECTs, at mean age of 29 years. Most women received ECT during the 2nd trimester and many were Para I. Main diagnostic indication in years 1970 to 2013 was Depression/Bipolar disorder (including psychotic depression). Missing data on fetus/child was 12 %. ECT parameter report was often sparse. Both bilateral and unilateral electrode placement was used and thiopental was the main anesthetic agent. Adverse events such as fetal heart rate reduction, uterine contractions, and premature labor (born between 29 and 37 gestation weeks) were reported for nearly one third (29 %). The overall child mortality rate was 7.1 %. Lethal outcomes for the fetus and/or baby had diverse associations. ECT during pregnancy is advised considered only as last resort treatment under very stringent diagnostic and clinical indications. Updated international guidelines are urgently needed. PMID:24271084

  17. Random Forest Classification of Depression Status Based On Subcortical Brain Morphometry Following Electroconvulsive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Benjamin S.C.; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Pirnia, Tara; Leaver, Amber M.; Woods, Roger P.; Thompson, Paul M.; Espinoza, Randall; Narr, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Disorders of the central nervous system are often accompanied by brain abnormalities detectable with MRI. Advances in biomedical imaging and pattern detection algorithms have led to classification methods that may help diagnose and track the progression of a brain disorder and/or predict successful response to treatment. These classification systems often use high-dimensional signals or images, and must handle the computational challenges of high dimensionality as well as complex data types such as shape descriptors. Here, we used shape information from subcortical structures to test a recently developed feature-selection method based on regularized random forests to 1) classify depressed subjects versus controls, and 2) patients before and after treatment with electroconvulsive therapy. We subsequently compared the classification performance of high-dimensional shape features with traditional volumetric measures. Shape-based models outperformed simple volumetric predictors in several cases, highlighting their utility as potential automated alternatives for establishing diagnosis and predicting treatment response. PMID:26413200

  18. Summary of the Practice Parameter for the Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghaziuddin, N.; Kutcher, S. P.; Knapp, P.

    2004-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) may be an effective treatment for adolescents with severe mood disorders and other Axis I psychiatric disorders when more conservative treatments have been unsuccessful. ECT may be considered when there is a lack of response to two or more trials of pharmacotherapy or when the severity of symptoms precludes waiting…

  19. Teaching Electroconvulsive Therapy to Medical Students: Effects of Instructional Method on Knowledge and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnell, Ronald L.; Duk, Anthony D.; Christison, George W.; Haviland, Mark G.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of learning about electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) via live observation to learning via an instructional videotape. Method: During their psychiatry clerkship, 122 medical students were randomized using these two educational methods, and their ECT knowledge and attitudes were assessed during the first and last weeks…

  20. Brief Report: Electroconvulsive Therapy for Malignant Catatonia in an Autistic Adolescent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachtel, Lee Elizabeth; Griffin, Margaret Merrie; Dhossche, Dirk Marcel; Reti, Irving Michael

    2010-01-01

    A 14-year-old male with autism and mild mental retardation developed malignant catatonia characterized by classic symptoms of catatonia, bradycardia and hypothermia. Bilateral electroconvulsive therapy and lorazepam were required for resolution. The case expands the occurrence of catatonia in autism into its malignant variant.

  1. Impact of electroconvulsive therapy on magnetoencephalographic correlates of dysfunctional emotional processing in major depression.

    PubMed

    Zwanzger, Peter; Klahn, Anna Luisa; Arolt, Volker; Ruland, Tillmann; Zavorotnyy, Maxim; Sälzer, Johannes; Domschke, Katharina; Junghöfer, Markus

    2016-04-01

    In major depressive disorder (MDD), electrophysiological and imaging studies provide evidence for a reduced neural activity in parietal and dorsolateral prefrontal regions. In the present study, neural correlates and temporal dynamics of visual affective perception have been investigated in patients with unipolar depression in a pre/post treatment design using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Nineteen in-patients and 19 balanced healthy controls passed MEG measurement while passively viewing pleasant, unpleasant and neutral pictures. After a 4-week treatment with electroconvulsive therapy or 4-week waiting period without intervention respectively, 16 of these patients and their 16 corresponding controls participated in a second MEG measurement. Before treatment neural source estimations of magnetic fields evoked by the emotional scenes revealed a general bilateral parietal hypoactivation in depressed patients compared to controls predominately at early and mid-latency time intervals. Successful ECT treatment, as reflected by a decline in clinical scores (Hamilton Depression Scale; HAMD) led to a normalization of this distinct parietal hypoactivation. Effective treatment was also accompanied by relatively increased neural activation at right temporo-parietal regions. The present study indicates dysfunctional parietal information processing and attention processes towards emotional stimuli in MDD patients which can be returned to normal by ECT treatment. Since convergent neural hypoactivations and treatment effects have recently been shown in MDD patients before and after pharmacological therapy, this electrophysiological correlate might serve as a biomarker for objective treatment evaluation and thereby potentially advance treatment options and support the prediction of individual treatment responses. PMID:26922827

  2. Effectiveness of Electroconvulsive Therapy in Persistent Methamphetamine Psychosis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ziaaddini, Hassan; Roohbakhsh, Toktam; Nakhaee, Nouzar; Ghaffari-Nejad, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background Persistent methamphetamine (METH) psychosis is a psychotic state beyond 1-month after abstinence, for which there is no effective treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in persistent METH psychosis patients hospitalized at Shahid Beheshti Hospital, Kerman, Iran, from 6 September 2012 until 6 September 2013, who were not remitted after treatment with olanzapine. Methods This research was a pilot study on hospitalized patients. After 4 weeks of treatment with olanzapine, 10 out of 71 studied patients did not show complete remission of psychotic symptoms despite their response to the treatment. The mentioned 10 patients were divided into 2 groups by random digit numbers. 5 patients had continued olanzapine and other 5 received 6 sessions of bilateral ECT every other day in addition to olanzapine. Findings Remission rate of patients in the initial 4 weeks was 78.7%. Reduction in total brief psychiatric rating scale (BPRS) scale at the end of 1-week compared with the next week demonstrated improvement in the symptoms until the end of the study. There was no significant difference in BPRS scores between weeks 4 and 6 in the two groups. Conclusion This research demonstrated that few sessions of ECT in persistent METH psychosis will not lead to remission in all patients. PMID:26322206

  3. [Contemporary place of the electroconvulsive therapy Part 1. The historical context arnd the biological basis].

    PubMed

    Zyss, Tomasz; Datka, Wojciech; Rachel, Wojciech; Hese, Robert T; Gorczyca, Piotr; Zięba, Andrzej; Szwajca, Krzysztof; Piekoszewskl, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a former physical therapy method in psychiatry which is applicable up till today in relation to its high effectiveness and the safety. Centuries of applying nonconvulsive methods of the electric stimulation preceded introducing this method into the clinical practice. ECT is arousing a lot of controversies; populous myths are connected with its applying--that demands explanations. Numerous biological mechanisms explaining the clinical efficacy of ECT action are well-known. PMID:25951704

  4. Electroconvulsive therapy for depression following acute coronary syndromes: a concern for the anesthesiologist.

    PubMed

    Pourafkari, Nosratollah; Pourafkari, Leili; Nader, Nader D

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of depression in patients with cardiovascular disease is higher than general population and especially following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), a significant number of patients report a wide spectrum of behavioral and mood changes attributable to clinical depression. Treatment of depression following ACS event is particularly challenging since most of the therapeutic modalities are associated with increasing the systemic sympathetic tone from neurogenic or pharmacologic sources. Increased activity of the adrenergic and catecholamine activity may further deter the myocardial oxygen supply and demand therefore treating depression should be carefully evaluated for its risk benefit ratio. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is recommended for patients with severe depression, in whom behavioral and pharmacologic treatments have failed. Patients who refuse to take medications or present with any psychological emergency such as harming self or others, are also candidates for ECT. ECT is also associated with sudden surges of catecholamines and may cause recurrent myocardial ischemia and fatal dysrhythmias in patients convalescing from an ACS event. Herein, we provide an overview and practical guidelines for management of patients presented for ECT following ACS. PMID:27185716

  5. The first-line use of electroconvulsive therapy in major affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Maletzky, Barry M

    2004-06-01

    Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has generally been reserved for patients refractory to other forms of treatment, its use as a first-line treatment, prior to the use of other biologic approaches, has occasionally been mentioned in the literature on the treatment of affective disorders and, when indicated, can prove rapidly effective and even life saving. The present study retrospectively reviewed 27 cases treated over the span of a decade in which ECT was chosen as the first treatment of an affective episode. In none of these cases was antidepressant medication or other biologic approaches used for the current episode. A clinical global rating scale was employed to measure improvement. Although the majority of such patients were treated with ECT first based upon the severity of their depressive illness, 13 received ECT because of their obtunded condition and these patients, initially diagnosed as catatonic on admission, were suspected of having a bipolar condition, as revealed on their discharge diagnosis. In addition, ECT was recommended preferentially in 4 patients because they were pregnant and in another 4 because it had worked well in the past; an additional patient received ECT first because of his fragile medical condition. Almost all patients recovered and none suffered serious adverse effects. Sample case histories are provided along with tentative guidelines for the consideration of first-line use of ECT in clinically difficult cases. PMID:15167428

  6. Influence of GRIK4 genetic variants on the electroconvulsive therapy response.

    PubMed

    Minelli, Alessandra; Congiu, Chiara; Ventriglia, Mariacarla; Bortolomasi, Marco; Bonvicini, Cristian; Abate, Maria; Sartori, Riccardo; Gainelli, Giulio; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2016-07-28

    Several lines of evidence have shown the involvement of the glutamatergic system in the function of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). In particular, patients with treatment resistant depression (TRD) and chronic depression have lower levels of glutamate/glutamine than controls, and ECT can reverse this deficit. Genetic factors might contribute to modulating the mechanisms underlying ECT. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between three polymorphisms (rs1954787, rs4936554 and rs11218030) of the glutamate receptor ionotropic kainate 4 (GRIK4) gene and responsiveness to ECT treatment in a sample of one hundred individuals, TRD or depressive Bipolar Disorder patients resistant to pharmacological treatments. The results revealed that GRIK4 variants were significantly associated with the response to ECT. In particular, we found that patients carrying the G allele of the GRIK4 rs11218030 had a significantly poorer response to ECT (p=2.71×10(-4)), showing five times the risk of relapse after ECT compared to the AA homozygotes. Analogously, patients carrying the GG rs1954787 genotype and rs4936554A allele carriers presented a double risk of lack of response after ECT (p=0.013 and p=0.040, respectively). In conclusion, the current study provides new evidence, indicating that some GRIK4 variants modulate the response to ECT in patients with depression resistant to treatment, suggesting a role for kainate receptor modulation. PMID:27222927

  7. Are morphological changes necessary to mediate the therapeutic effects of electroconvulsive therapy?

    PubMed

    Nickl-Jockschat, Thomas; Palomero Gallagher, Nicola; Kumar, Vinod; Hoffstaedter, Felix; Brügmann, Elisabeth; Habel, Ute; Eickhoff, Simon B; Grözinger, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The neurotrophic hypothesis has become the favorite model to explain the antidepressant properties of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). It is based on the assumption that a restoration of previously defective neural networks drives therapeutic effects. Recent data in rather young patients suggest that neurotrophic effects of ECT might be detectable by diffusion tensor imaging. We here aimed to investigate whether the therapeutic response to ECT necessarily goes along with mesoscopic effects in gray matter (GM) or white matter (WM) in our patients in advanced age. Patients (n = 21, 15 males and 7 females) suffering from major depressive disorder were treated with ECT. Before the start of treatment and after the completion of the index series, they underwent magnetic resonance imaging, including a diffusion-weighed sequence. We used voxel-based morphometry to assess GM changes and tract-based spatial statistics and an SPM-based whole-brain analysis to detect WM changes in the course of treatment. Patients significantly improved clinically during the course of ECT. This was, however, not accompanied by GM or WM changes. This result challenges the notion that mesoscopic brain structure changes are an obligatory prerequisite for the antidepressant effects of ECT. PMID:26260901

  8. Electroconvulsive therapy improves clinical manifestations of treatment-resistant depression without changing serum BDNF levels.

    PubMed

    Rapinesi, Chiara; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Curto, Martina; Serata, Daniele; Ferri, Vittoria R; Scatena, Paola; Carbonetti, Paolo; Napoletano, Flavia; Miele, Jessica; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Del Casale, Antonio; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Angeletti, Gloria; Girardi, Paolo

    2015-06-30

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is effective in treatment-resistant depression (TRD). It may act through intracellular process modulation, but its exact mechanism is still unknown. Animal research supports a neurotrophic effect for ECT. We aimed to investigate the association between changes in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (sBDNF) levels and clinical improvement following ECT in patients with TRD. Twenty-one patients with TRD (2 men, 19 women; mean age, 63.5 years; S.D., 11.9) were assessed through the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), and the Clinical Global Impressions scale, Severity (CGIs) before and after a complete ECT cycle. At the same time-points, patients underwent blood withdrawal for measuring sBDNF levels. ECT significantly reduced HDRS, BPRS, and CGIS scores, but not sBDNF levels. No significant correlation was found between sBDNF changes, and each of HDRS, BPRS, and CGIs score changes. sBDNF levels in TRD patients were low both at baseline and post-ECT. Our results do not support that improvements in TRD following ECT are mediated through increases in sBDNF levels. PMID:25910420

  9. Continuation and Maintenance Electroconvulsive Therapy for Mood Disorders: Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Petrides, Georgios; Tobias, Kristen G.; Kellner, Charles H.; Rudorfer, Matthew V.

    2011-01-01

    Background Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a highly effective treatment for mood disorders. Continuation ECT (C-ECT) and maintenance ECT (M-ECT) are required for many patients suffering from severe and recurrent forms of mood disorders. This is a review of the literature regarding C- and M-ECT. Methods We conducted a computerized search using the words continuation ECT, maintenance ECT, depression, mania, bipolar disorder and mood disorders. We report on all articles published in the English language from 1998 to 2009. Results We identified 32 reports. There were 24 case reports and retrospective reviews on 284 patients. Two of these reports included comparison groups, and 1 had a prospective follow-up in a subset of subjects. There were 6 prospective naturalistic studies and 2 randomized controlled trials. Conclusions C-ECT and M-ECT are valuable treatment modalities to prevent relapse and recurrence of mood disorders in patients who have responded to an index course of ECT. C-ECT and M-ECT are underused and insufficiently studied despite positive clinical experience of more than 70 years. Studies which are currently under way should allow more definitive recommendations regarding the choice, frequency and duration of C-ECT and M-ECT following acute ECT. PMID:21811083

  10. Treatment-resistant, five-year long, postpartum-onset Capgras episode resolving after electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Rapinesi, Chiara; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Del Casale, Antonio; Ferri, Vittoria Rachele; Di Pietro, Simone; Scatena, Paola; Serata, Daniele; Danese, Emanuela; Sani, Gabriele; Koukopoulos, Alexia E; Angeletti, Gloria; Girardi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Postpartum psychosis, which rarely presents with Capgras syndrome (delusional misidentification), requires rapid symptom resolution. First-line drugs have important drawbacks, such as delayed onset of clinical response and secretion in breast milk. In this report, we report successful treatment of a treatment-resistant woman presenting with treatment-resistant Capgras syndrome, with onset during postpartum. A 36-year-old woman had presented with Capgras syndrome during postpartum. For more than five years, she believed her son and other family members were substituted by impostors. All adequately administrated treatments were unsuccessful. We suggested electroconvulsive therapy to overcome treatment resistance. After six electroconvulsive therapy sessions, delusions of doubles subsided and other symptoms improved. She was discharged two weeks later with a mood stabilizer and low-dose atypical antipychotic combination and is well at the one-and-a-half-year follow-up. Electroconvulsive therapy followed by a mood stabilizer-antipsychotic drug combination showed rapid, permanent, and effective control of long-standing Capgras syndrome in a young woman. PMID:25926594

  11. Electroconvulsive Therapy Part I: A Perspective on the Evolution and Current Practice of ECT

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Nancy A.; Prudic, Joan

    2010-01-01

    The concept of inducing convulsions, mainly through chemical means, to promote mental wellness has existed since the 16th century. In 1938, Italian scientists first applied electrically induced therapeutic seizures. Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is employed in the treatment of several psychiatric disorders, it is most frequently used today to treat severe depressive episodes and remains the most effective treatment available for those disorders. Despite this, ECT continues to be the most stigmatized treatment available in psychiatry, resulting in restrictions on and reduced accessibility to a helpful and potentially life-saving treatment. The psychiatric and psychosocial ramifications of this stigmatization may include the exacerbation of the increasingly serious, global health problem of major depressive disorders as well as serious consequences for individual patients who may not be offered, or may refuse, a potentially beneficial treatment. The goal of this first article in this two-part series is to provide an overview of ECT's historical development and discuss the current state of knowledge about ECT, including technical aspects of delivery, patient selection, its side-effect profile, and factors that may contribute to underuse of ECT. PMID:19820553

  12. Cognitive Impairment and Electroconvulsive Therapy in Geriatric Depression, What Could be the Role of Rivastigmine? A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Rhebergen, Didi; Henstra, Marieke Jantien; Kadouch, Daniel J.; van Exel, Eric; Stek, Maximilianus Lourentius

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), albeit highly effective in treating depression, is frequently associated with cognitive impairment, either temporary or more persistent. Especially in older patients, who generally respond even better, serious cognitive impairment during the course of ECT may lead to premature termination of ECT. Treatment of this cognitive impairment is of utmost importance. In this case series report, we present the effect of rivastigmine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, on cognitive impairment in three older, severely depressed patients during or after a course of ECT. An improvement of cognitive functioning, in particular a decline of confusional symptoms, was observed in two patients with structural brain alterations associated with aging. In the other patient, who suffered primarily from amnesia, no effect of rivastigmine was observed. These preliminary results emphasize the need for detailed profiling of cognitive impairment when developing a research design to study the potential benefits of rivastigmine in the prevention or treatment of cognitive impairment in severely depressed patients treated with ECT. PMID:26664715

  13. Levels of serum immunomodulators and alterations with electroconvulsive therapy in treatment-resistant major depression

    PubMed Central

    Zincir, Serkan; Öztürk, Pelin; Bilgen, Ali Emrah; İzci, Filiz; Yükselir, Cihad

    2016-01-01

    Studies in recent years have indicated that neuroimmunological events and immune activation may have a place in the etiology of depression. It has been suggested from data that there is a causal relationship between activation of the immune system and excessive release of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 1 (IL-1), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and the etiology of depression. Although the mechanism of action of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is unclear, there is evidence that it can reduce cytokines and immune system changes. In our study, we aimed to determine how levels of serum immunomodulators were affected by ECT in major depression patients. This study was conducted on 50 patients with treatment-resistant major depression. The data of the patients were compared with 30 healthy individuals with similar demographic characteristics. A clinical response occurred in the patients and at the end of therapy, IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IL-10, IL-4, and interferon-gamma levels were measured. The disease severity was assessed with the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Data analysis was performed using SPSS Version 15. Significant differences were determined between the patients with major depression and control group with respect to basal serum IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IL-10, IL-4, and interferon-gamma levels. ECT treatment was shown to reduce these differences. ECT may cause significant changes in the activity of the immune system. The consideration of the relationship between the immune endocrine neurotransmitter systems could contribute to new theories regarding the mechanism of antidepressant treatment and biology of depression. PMID:27366071

  14. Levels of serum immunomodulators and alterations with electroconvulsive therapy in treatment-resistant major depression.

    PubMed

    Zincir, Serkan; Öztürk, Pelin; Bilgen, Ali Emrah; İzci, Filiz; Yükselir, Cihad

    2016-01-01

    Studies in recent years have indicated that neuroimmunological events and immune activation may have a place in the etiology of depression. It has been suggested from data that there is a causal relationship between activation of the immune system and excessive release of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 1 (IL-1), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and the etiology of depression. Although the mechanism of action of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is unclear, there is evidence that it can reduce cytokines and immune system changes. In our study, we aimed to determine how levels of serum immunomodulators were affected by ECT in major depression patients. This study was conducted on 50 patients with treatment-resistant major depression. The data of the patients were compared with 30 healthy individuals with similar demographic characteristics. A clinical response occurred in the patients and at the end of therapy, IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IL-10, IL-4, and interferon-gamma levels were measured. The disease severity was assessed with the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Data analysis was performed using SPSS Version 15. Significant differences were determined between the patients with major depression and control group with respect to basal serum IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IL-10, IL-4, and interferon-gamma levels. ECT treatment was shown to reduce these differences. ECT may cause significant changes in the activity of the immune system. The consideration of the relationship between the immune endocrine neurotransmitter systems could contribute to new theories regarding the mechanism of antidepressant treatment and biology of depression. PMID:27366071

  15. Measuring retrograde autobiographical amnesia following electroconvulsive therapy: historical perspective and current issues.

    PubMed

    Semkovska, Maria; McLoughlin, Declan M

    2013-06-01

    Retrograde amnesia following electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a major concern for both patients and clinicians. In contemporary ECT research, retrograde autobiographical amnesia (RAA) is commonly measured with instruments assessing autobiographical memory (AM) consistency over time. However, normal AM recall loses in consistency with the passage of time, and time has a differential effect on stability of personal memories. In addition, experiencing depression is associated with a decreased ability to recall specific AMs, and this difficulty may persist in the euthymic phase of recurrent depression. Despite these scientific facts, relatively few attempts have been made to accurately measure the specific effect of ECT on AM independent of both normal and mood-associated forgetting over time. This major gap in our knowledge prevents us at present from objectively quantifying the nature and extent of RAA associated with ECT. In turn, this hinders our identifying and implementing strategies for prevention or remediation of AM deficits. The present article aims to provide an up-to-date review and historical perspective of this major methodological conundrum for ECT research, highlight current issues in retrograde amnesia assessment following ECT, and propose directions for future studies. In conclusion, we suggest methods to reliably and specifically measure the extent and progression over time of ECT-associated RAA independently from persistent depressive symptoms' contribution and normal loss in AM consistency over time. PMID:23303426

  16. Effect of Electroconvulsive Therapy on Striatal Morphometry in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Wade, Benjamin S C; Joshi, Shantanu H; Njau, Stephanie; Leaver, Amber M; Vasavada, Megha; Woods, Roger P; Gutman, Boris A; Thompson, Paul M; Espinoza, Randall; Narr, Katherine L

    2016-09-01

    Patients with major depression show reductions in striatal and paleostriatal volumes. The functional integrity and connectivity of these regions are also shown to change with antidepressant response. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a robust and rapidly acting treatment for severe depression. However, whether morphological changes in the dorsal and ventral striatum/pallidum relate to or predict therapeutic response to ECT is unknown. Using structural MRI, we assessed cross-sectional effects of diagnosis and longitudinal effects of ECT for volume and surface-based shape metrics of the caudate, putamen, pallidum, and nucleus accumbens in 53 depressed patients (mean age: 44.1 years, 13.8 SD; 52% female) and 33 healthy controls (mean age: 39.3 years, 12.4 SD; 57% female). Patients were assessed before ECT, after their second ECT, and after completing an ECT treatment index. Controls were evaluated at two time points. Support vector machines determined whether morphometric measures at baseline predicted ECT-related clinical response. Patients showed smaller baseline accumbens and pallidal volumes than controls (P<0.05). Increases in left putamen volume (P<0.03) occurred with ECT. Global increases in accumbens volume and local changes in pallidum and caudate volume occurred in patients defined as treatment responders. Morphometric changes were absent across time in controls. Baseline volume and shape metrics predicted overall response to ECT with up to 89% accuracy. Results support that ECT elicits structural plasticity in the dorsal and ventral striatum/pallidum. The morphometry of these structures, forming key components of limbic-cortical-striatal-pallidal-thalamic circuitry involved in mood and emotional regulation, may determine patients likely to benefit from treatment. PMID:27067127

  17. Seizure Duration Decreases Over a Course of Bifrontal and Not Bitemporal Electroconvulsive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abhishekh, Hulegar A.; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Hegde, Anusha; Phutane, Vivek H.; Kumar, Channaveerachari N.; Muralidharan, Kesavan; Gangadhar, Bangalore N.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Mechanism of action of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is unclear. Anticonvulsant action of ECT has also been one among the hypothesized mechanisms. Anticonvulsant effect may manifest during ECT in at least two ways (a) increased seizure threshold (b) decrease in seizure duration. In depression, increased seizure threshold has been shown to be associated with better antidepressant response. However, relationship between seizure duration and antidepressant activity has been inconsistent. These issues are not investigated in conditions other than depression. Aims: We examined seizure duration over the course of ECT in schizophrenia patients. Settings and Design: Material for this analysis was obtained from a clinical trial examining the differential efficacy of bifrontal ECT (BFECT) versus bitemporal ECT (BTECT) in schizophrenia patients. As a part of study 122 schizophrenia patients who were prescribed ECT were randomized to receive either BFECT or BTECT. Subjects and Methods: Final analysis was conducted on data from 70 patients, as the rest of the data either had artifact or there was a significant change in medication status. Electroencephalogram seizure duration was noted in each session for these patients. Results: Seizure duration declined significantly from second ECT to 6th ECT (repeated measures analysis of variance F = 4.255; P = 0.006). When separate analysis was conducted for BTECT and BFECT patients the decline in seizure duration from 2nd to 6th ECT was significant only with BFECT (F = 3.94; P = 0.014) and not with BTECT (F = 0.966; P = 0.424). Conclusions: Better anticonvulsant effects with BFECT may explain the better therapeutic observed with BFECT in schizophrenia as well as mania in our earlier studies. PMID:24701009

  18. Near-infrared spectroscopy of the human brain during electroconvulsive therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantini, Sergio; Fabbri, Francesco; Nadgir, Shalini; Henry, Michael E.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Franceschini, Maria-Angela

    2003-07-01

    We report non-invasive, bilateral measurements of cerebral oxygenation performed with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) on ten patients undergoing right unilateral electro-convulsive therapy (ECT). Right unilateral ECT consists of delivering an electrical current through the right brain hemisphere to induce a seizure, which is associated with significant changes in systemic and regional physiological parameters. In this work, we have examined the regional cerebral oxygenation (StO2) measured with NIRS on the right and left sides of the frontal brain region, and the systemic arterial oxygenation (SaO2) measured with pulse oximetry. On the ten patients examined, we have found that the decrease in the cerebral oxygenation on the side ipsilateral to the ECT electrical discharge (ΔStO2(ipsi)) is consistently stronger than the decrease on the contralateral side (ΔStO2(contra)). The average and standard deviation for the ipsilateral and contralateral oxygenation changes across the ten patients are ΔStO2(ipsi) = -22 +/- 10% and ΔStO2(contra) = -6 +/- 10%, respectively. By contrast, we observed two distinct behaviors in the arterial saturation; in five patients, SaO2 did not significantly change during the ECT procedure, and in three patients, SaO2 decreased by -16+/- 6%, an intermediate value with respect to the changes observed in StO2(ipsi) and StO2(contra) (we do not have the SaO2 recording in the remaining two patients for technical reasons). These results indicate that NIRS monitoring of the cerebral oxygenation during ECT has the potential of being a valuable addition to the standard monitoring of arterial saturation with pulse oximetry.

  19. Electroconvulsive therapy and structural neuroplasticity in neocortical, limbic and paralimbic cortex.

    PubMed

    Pirnia, T; Joshi, S H; Leaver, A M; Vasavada, M; Njau, S; Woods, R P; Espinoza, R; Narr, K L

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a highly effective and rapidly acting treatment for severe depression. To understand the biological bases of therapeutic response, we examined variations in cortical thickness from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data in 29 patients scanned at three time points during an ECT treatment index series and in 29 controls at two time points. Changes in thickness across time and with symptom improvement were evaluated at high spatial resolution across the cortex and within discrete cortical regions of interest. Patients showed increased thickness over the course of ECT in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), inferior and superior temporal, parahippocampal, entorhinal and fusiform cortex and in distributed prefrontal areas. No changes across time occurred in controls. In temporal and fusiform regions showing significant ECT effects, thickness differed between patients and controls at baseline and change in thickness related to therapeutic response in patients. In the ACC, these relationships occurred in treatment responders only, and thickness measured soon after treatment initiation predicted the overall ECT response. ECT leads to widespread neuroplasticity in neocortical, limbic and paralimbic regions and changes relate to the extent of antidepressant response. Variations in ACC thickness, which discriminate treatment responders and predict response early in the course of ECT, may represent a biomarker of overall clinical outcome. Because post-mortem studies show focal reductions in glial density and neuronal size in patients with severe depression, ECT-related increases in thickness may be attributable to neuroplastic processes affecting the size and/or density of neurons and glia and their connections. PMID:27271858

  20. Electroconvulsive therapy and structural neuroplasticity in neocortical, limbic and paralimbic cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pirnia, T; Joshi, S H; Leaver, A M; Vasavada, M; Njau, S; Woods, R P; Espinoza, R; Narr, K L

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a highly effective and rapidly acting treatment for severe depression. To understand the biological bases of therapeutic response, we examined variations in cortical thickness from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data in 29 patients scanned at three time points during an ECT treatment index series and in 29 controls at two time points. Changes in thickness across time and with symptom improvement were evaluated at high spatial resolution across the cortex and within discrete cortical regions of interest. Patients showed increased thickness over the course of ECT in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), inferior and superior temporal, parahippocampal, entorhinal and fusiform cortex and in distributed prefrontal areas. No changes across time occurred in controls. In temporal and fusiform regions showing significant ECT effects, thickness differed between patients and controls at baseline and change in thickness related to therapeutic response in patients. In the ACC, these relationships occurred in treatment responders only, and thickness measured soon after treatment initiation predicted the overall ECT response. ECT leads to widespread neuroplasticity in neocortical, limbic and paralimbic regions and changes relate to the extent of antidepressant response. Variations in ACC thickness, which discriminate treatment responders and predict response early in the course of ECT, may represent a biomarker of overall clinical outcome. Because post-mortem studies show focal reductions in glial density and neuronal size in patients with severe depression, ECT-related increases in thickness may be attributable to neuroplastic processes affecting the size and/or density of neurons and glia and their connections. PMID:27271858

  1. Seizure (Ictal)—EEG Characteristics in Subgroups of Depressive Disorder in Patients Receiving Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT)—A Preliminary Study and Multivariate Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wahlund, Björn; Piazza, Paolo; von Rosen, Dietrich; Liberg, Benny; Liljenström, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. Examine frequency distributions of ictal EEG after ECT stimulation in diagnostic subgroups of depression. Methods. EEG registration was consecutively monitored in 33 patients after ECT stimulation. Patients were diagnosed according to DSM IV and subdivided into: (1) major depressive disorder with psychotic features (n = 7), (2) unipolar depression (n = 20), and (3) bipolar depression (n = 6). Results. Results indicate that the diagnostically subgroups differ in their ictal EEG frequency spectrumml: (1) psychotic depression has a high occurrence of delta and theta waves, (2) unipolar depression has high occurrence of delta, theta and gamma waves, and (3) bipolar depression has a high occurrence of gamma waves. A linear discriminant function separated the three clinical groups with an accuracy of 94%. Conclusion. Psychotic depressed patients differ from bipolar depression in their frequency based on probability distribution of ictal EEG. Psychotic depressed patients show more prominent slowing of EEG than nonpsychotic depressed patients. Thus the EEG results may be supportive in classifying subgroups of depression already at the start of the ECT treatment. PMID:19551153

  2. Seizure Duration and Hemodynamic State during Electroconvulsive Therapy: Sodium Thiopental versus Propofol

    PubMed Central

    Jarineshin, Hashem; Kashani, Saeed; Fekrat, Fereydoon; Vatankhah, Majid; Golmirzaei, Javad; Alimolaee, Esmaeel; Zafarpour, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: General anesthesia is required for Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) and it is usually provided by a hypnotic agent. The seizure duration is important for the treatment, and it is usually accompanied by severe hemodynamic changes. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of sodium thiopental versus Propofol on seizure duration and hemodynamic variables during ECT. Methods: A number of 100 patient-sessions of ECT were included in this randomized clinical trial. The initial hemodynamic state of each patient was recorded. Anesthesia was induced by Sodium thiopental in the 1st group and with Propofol in 2nd group. All the patients received the muscle relaxant succinylcholine. The hemodynamic variables after seizure and seizure duration were recorded. The data were analyzed through SPSS 20 and independent t-test. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The mean duration of seizure in the sodium thiopental group was significantly longer than the Propofol group (40.3±16.6 sec versus 32±11.3 sec) (P=0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between the mean energy level applied in the two groups (20.5±3.81 joules in the sodium thiopental versus 20.2±3.49 joules in the Propofol group). The mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure at all times after seizure and mean heart rate at 3 and 5 minutes after seizure were significantly lower in Propofol than sodium thiopental groups. Discussion and Conclusion: Propofol provides a more stable hemodynamic state for the ECT procedures, and its use is highly preferred over sodium thiopental in patients with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26383207

  3. A new early cognitive screening measure to detect cognitive side-effects of electroconvulsive therapy?

    PubMed

    Martin, Donel M; Katalinic, Natalie; Ingram, Anna; Schweitzer, Isaac; Smith, Deidre J; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Loo, Colleen K

    2013-12-01

    Cognitive side-effects from electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be distressing for patients and early detection may have an important role in guiding treatment decisions over the ECT course. This prospective study examined the utility of an early cognitive screening battery for predicting cognitive side-effects which develop later in the ECT course. The screening battery, together with the Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE), was administered to 123 patients at baseline and after 3 ECT treatments. A more detailed cognitive battery was administered at baseline, after six treatments (post ECT 6) and after the last ECT treatment (post treatment) to assess cognitive side-effects across several domains: global cognition, anterograde memory, executive function, speed and concentration, and retrograde memory. Multivariate analyses examined the predictive utility of change on items from the screening battery for later cognitive changes at post ECT 6 and post treatment. Results showed that changes on a combination of items from the screening battery were predictive of later cognitive changes at post treatment, particularly for anterograde memory (p < 0.01), after controlling for patient and treatment factors. Change on the MMSE predicted cognitive changes at post ECT 6 but not at post treatment. A scoring method for the new screening battery was tested for discriminative ability in a sub-sample of patients. This study provides preliminary evidence that a simple and easy-to-administer measure may potentially be used to help guide clinical treatment decisions to optimise efficacy and cognitive outcomes. Further development of this measure and validation in a more representative ECT clinical population is required. PMID:24074514

  4. Repeated dose titration versus age-based method in electroconvulsive therapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aten, Jan Jaap; Oudega, Mardien; van Exel, Eric; Stek, Max L; van Waarde, Jeroen A

    2015-06-01

    In electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), a dose titration method (DTM) was suggested to be more individualized and therefore more accurate than formula-based dosing methods. A repeated DTM (every sixth session and dose adjustment accordingly) was compared to an age-based method (ABM) regarding treatment characteristics, clinical outcome, and cognitive functioning after ECT. Thirty-nine unipolar depressed patients dosed using repeated DTM and 40 matched patients treated with ABM were compared. Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were assessed at baseline and at the end of the index course, as well as the total number of ECT sessions. Both groups were similar regarding age, sex, psychotic features, mean baseline MADRS, and median baseline MMSE. At the end of the index course, the two methods showed equal outcome (mean end MADRS, 11.6 ± 8.3 in DTM and 9.5 ± 7.6 in ABM (P = 0.26); median end MMSE, 28 (25-29) and 28 (25-29.8), respectively (P = 0.81). However, the median number of all ECT sessions differed 16 (11-22) in DTM versus 12 (10-14.8) in ABM; P = 0.02]. Using regression analysis, dosing method and age were independently associated with the total number of ECT sessions, with less sessions needed in ABM (P = 0.02) and in older patients (P = 0.001). In this comparative cohort study, ABM and DTM showed equal outcome for depression and cognition. However, the median ECT course duration in repeated DTM appeared longer. Additionally, higher age was associated with shorter ECT courses regardless of the dosing method. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:25804765

  5. Efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy in treatment-resistant schizophrenia: a prospective open trial.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wai-Kwong; Ungvari, Gabor S

    2003-05-01

    There is a lack of controlled trials examining the effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) combined with olanzapine or risperidone in treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS). The authors conducted a prospective, open, controlled trial of ECT in TRS in a long-term psychiatric rehabilitation unit in Hong Kong. Thirty patients with TRS from an inpatient psychiatric rehabilitation unit participated in this study. All subjects were resistant to a host of antipsychotic medications given singly or in different combinations. In addition, they were also resistant to or they refused clozapine treatment. Fifteen patients completed a course of ECT consisting of 8-20 sessions. Fifteen patients who refused ECT formed the control Subjects were assessed at baseline, 1 week, 1 month, and 2 months after their last ECT. Assessment instruments included the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), Global Assessment Scale (GAS), Clinical Global Impression (CGI), CGI Severity of Illness [CGI(SOI)], CGI Global Improvement [CGI(GI)], Nurses' Observation Scale for Inpatient Evaluation (NOSIE-30), and occupational therapists' rating of the subjects' functioning with respect to work (OT-W), social (OT-S), and leisure (OT-L) activities. In comparison with the control group, the ECT group showed statistically significant improvement only in the GAS and CGI at each posttreatment evaluation. There was a trend for ECT to reduce positive and negative symptoms, although the rate of improvement did not reach statistically significant levels. ECT augmentation of risperidone and olanzapine is of marginal efficacy compared to reports of the greater augmentation of these antipsychotics with other agents. PMID:12691772

  6. Alfentanil anesthetic augmentation lengthens seizure duration in electroconvulsive therapy with older people.

    PubMed

    D'Cunha, Craig; Plakiotis, Christos; O'Connor, Daniel W

    2016-06-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) prescription rates rise with age, making it important that treatments be made as effective and safe as possible (Plakiotis et al., 2012). Older people are vulnerable to post-treatment confusion and to subsequent deficits in attention, new learning, and autobiographical memory (Gardner and O'Connor, 2008). Strategies to minimize cognitive side-effects include unilateral electrode placement and stimulus dose titration whereby electrical charge is individually calibrated to seizure threshold (Sackeim et al., 2000). It remains the case, however, that threshold levels typically rise over the treatment course, leading to an increase both in delivered charge and the risk of adverse sequelae. PMID:26847795

  7. Treatment of affective illness in the elderly with drugs and electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Jenike, M A

    1989-01-01

    concomitant depression when we have the tools at hand to effectively treat such symptoms. Recent data on the potentiation of antidepressant effects by lithium or T3 indicate that they may be useful adjuvants in some tricyclic-resistant patients. Risks, side effects, and recent procedural advances in the use of ECT have been reviewed. Electroconvulsive therapy is both more effective and faster-acting than drugs in the treatment of depression. Many depressed elderly patients, especially those with psychotic symptoms, do not respond to drugs but improve with ECT. PMID:2691555

  8. Use of electroconvulsive therapy in an elderly after 5 weeks of myocardial infraction with 30% cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sandeep; Suchendra, K; Mehra, Aseem; Parkash, Vijay; Saini, Vikas; Bagga, Shiv

    2015-01-01

    There is limited literature on the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in patients with recent myocardial infarction and in those with reduced cardiac output. In this report, we describe the safe use of ECT in a 70-year-male suffering from severe depressive episode with psychotic symptoms. He had a history of poor response to adequate pharmacotherapy and had suffered from myocardial infraction (MI), about 3 weeks prior to admission to the psychiatric unit. In view of severe depression associated with marked anxiety, agitation, psychotic symptoms, and poor food intake he was started on ECT after 5 weeks of MI when his cardiac output was only 30%. He received nine sessions of ECT without any cardiac complications and his depression remitted with ECT. PMID:27212828

  9. Effect of anatomical variability on electric field characteristics of electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy: a parametric modeling study.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H; Peterchev, Angel V

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) are conventionally applied with a fixed stimulus current amplitude, which may result in differences in the neural stimulation strength and focality across patients due to interindividual anatomical variability. The objective of this study is to quantify the effect of head anatomical variability associated with age, sex, and individual differences on the induced electric field characteristics in ECT and MST. Six stimulation modalities were modeled including bilateral and right unilateral ECT, focal electrically administered seizure therapy (FEAST), and MST with circular, cap, and double-cone coils. The electric field was computed using the finite element method in a parameterized spherical head model representing the variability in the general population. Head tissue layer thicknesses and conductivities were varied to examine the impact of interindividual anatomical differences on the stimulation strength, depth, and focality. Skull conductivity most strongly affects the ECT electric field, whereas the MST electric field is independent of tissue conductivity variation in this model but is markedly affected by differences in head diameter. Focal ECT electrode configurations such as FEAST is more sensitive to anatomical variability than that of less focal paradigms such as BL ECT. In MST, anatomical variability has stronger influence on the electric field of the cap and circular coils compared to the double-cone coil, possibly due to the more superficial field of the former. The variability of the ECT and MST electric fields due to anatomical differences should be considered in the interpretation of existing studies and in efforts to improve dosing approaches for better control of stimulation strength and focality across patients, such as individualization of the current amplitude. The conventional approach to individualizing dosage by titrating the number of pulses cannot compensate for differences in

  10. Effect of anatomical variability on electric field characteristics of electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy: a parametric modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2014-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) are conventionally applied with a fixed stimulus current amplitude, which may result in differences in the neural stimulation strength and focality across patients due to interindividual anatomical variability. The objective of this study is to quantify the effect of head anatomical variability associated with age, sex, and individual differences on the induced electric field characteristics in ECT and MST. Six stimulation modalities were modeled including bilateral and right unilateral ECT, focal electrically administered seizure therapy (FEAST), and MST with circular, cap, and double-cone coils. The electric field was computed using the finite element method in a parameterized spherical head model representing the variability in the general population. Head tissue layer thicknesses and conductivities were varied to examine the impact of interindividual anatomical differences on the stimulation strength, depth, and focality. Skull conductivity most strongly affects the ECT electric field, whereas the MST electric field is independent of tissue conductivity variation in this model but is markedly affected by differences in head diameter. Focal ECT electrode configurations such as FEAST is more sensitive to anatomical variability than that of less focal paradigms such as BL ECT. In MST, anatomical variability has stronger influence on the electric field of the cap and circular coils compared to the double-cone coil, possibly due to the more superficial field of the former. The variability of the ECT and MST electric field due to anatomical differences should be considered in the interpretation of existing studies and in efforts to improve dosing approaches for better control of stimulation strength and focality across patients, such as individualization of the current amplitude. The conventional approach to individualizing dosage by titrating the number of pulses cannot compensate for differences in

  11. Acute effects of electroconvulsive therapy on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in psychiatric disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Prohovnik, I.; Alderson, P.O.; Sackheim, H.A.; Decina, P.; Kahn, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is frequently used in the treatment of major depression and other psychiatric disorders; its mechanism of action is not established, but previous evidence suggests that it is associated with postictal metabolic suppression. The authors have used measurements of rCBF as an index of cortical metabolic activity to study the acute effects of ECT. Measurements of rCBF were made in 32 cortical regions in 10 patients (pts) following one minute breathing of Xe-133 (5mCi/L); the measurements were performed 30min before and 50min after ECT. Bilateral ECT was administered to six pts (five diagnosed as major depressives and one schizophrenic) and unilateral ECT to four (all diagnosed as unipolar or bipolar affective disorder). The total rCBF material consists of 52 measurements in these pts, made before and after 16 bilateral and 10 unilateral treatments. ECT was found to cause significant reduction of rCBF. Mean hemispheric flows (using the Initial Slope Index to measure grey-matter flow) were reduced by about 5% in both hemispheres following bilateral treatment. Unilateral treatment caused a 9% reduction of flow in the treated hemisphere, but only 2% contralaterally. Regional patterns of flow decreases also differed between the two treatment modes: bilateral frontal reductions were found after bilateral treatment, whereas unilateral ECT caused a widespread flow reduction in the treated hemisphere, and almost no effect contralaterally. These results suggest that rCBF studies are useful for assessing ECT, and indicate that the acute cerebral effects of ECT vary with the mode of treatment.

  12. SAFETY AND UTILITY OF ACUTE ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY FOR AGITATION AND AGGRESSION IN DEMENTIA

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Deepa; Harper, David G.; Achtyes, Eric D.; Seiner, Stephen J.; Mahdasian, Jack A.; Nykamp, Louis J.; Adkison, Lesley; Van der Schuur White, Lori; McClintock, Shawn M.; Ujkaj, Manjola; Davidoff, Donald A.; Forester, Brent P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Agitation and aggression are among the most frequent and disruptive behavioral complications of dementia that contribute to increased cost of care, hospitalization, caregiver burden, and risk of premature institutionalization. This current study examined the safety and efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) as a treatment for behavioral disturbances in dementia. We hypothesized that ECT would result in reduced agitated and aggressive behaviors between baseline and discharge. Methods Twenty-three participants admitted to McLean Hospital (Belmont, MA) and Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services (Grand Rapids, MI), with a diagnosis of dementia who were referred for ECT to treat agitation and/or aggression, were enrolled in the study. We administered the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI)-short form, Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI)-Nursing Home Version, Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD), and the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI) at baseline, during, and after the ECT course. Results Regression analyses revealed a significant decrease from baseline to discharge on the CMAI (F(4, 8) =13.3; p=0.006) and NPI (F(4, 31)= 14.6; p<0.001). There was no statistically significant change in scores on the CSDD. The CGI scores on average changed from a rating of “markedly agitated/aggressive” at baseline to “borderline agitated/aggressive” at discharge. Treatment with ECT was well tolerated by most participants; discontinuation of ECT occurred for two participants due to recurrence of agitation and for three participants due to adverse events. Conclusions ECT may be a safe treatment option to reduce symptoms of agitation and aggression in patients with dementia whose behaviors are refractory to medication management. PMID:24838521

  13. 21 CFR 882.5940 - Electroconvulsive therapy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... treating severe psychiatric disturbances (e.g., severe depression) by inducing in the patient a major motor seizure by applying a brief intense electrical current to the patient's head. (b) Classification....

  14. Phenylbutyric acid protects against spatial memory deficits in a model of repeated electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhao-Hui; Kang, Xiang; Yang, Liu; Niu, Yi; Lu, Ye; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Tian, Qing; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2014-05-01

    Repeated electroconvulsive therapy (rECT) is widely applied in the treatment of refractory depression. Among the side effects of rECT, memory impairment is noticeable and needs effective protection. In this study, by employing a recognized repeated electroconvulsive shock (rECS) rat model, we found that rECS induced the significant spatial memory retention deficits with the simultaneous decreases in long-term potential (LTP), enhanced excitable postsynaptic potentials (EPSP), population spike (PS) and input/output curve in perforant pathway-dentate gyrus (PP-DG), but had no obvious neuron loss or dentritic spine loss in the brain by Nissle or Golgi stainings. Furthermore, the increased synaptic proteins of NR2A/B, PSD93, PSD95, the immediate early gene c-Fos and CREB protein were detected in hippocampus of rECS rats. rECS was also found to cause enhanced axon reorganization in DG region of hippocampus by Timm staining. Intraperitoneal injection of phenylbutyric acid (PBA), an aromatic short chain fatty acid acting as a molecule chaperon, could prevent rats from the rECS-induced memory deficits and synaptic potential enhancement by decreasing the levels of the abnormally increased memory-associated proteins and enhanced axon reorganization in hippocampus. Our data suggested that PBA might be potentially used to attenuate the rECS-induced memory impairment. PMID:24712645

  15. Beyond the metaphor of the pendulum: electroconvulsive therapy, psychoanalysis, and the styles of American psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Sadowsky, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    It is common to represent the history of American psychiatry by comparing it to a pendulum. In this metaphorical rendering, psychiatry has swung back and forth between extremes of emphasis on psyche (life events and inner conflict ruling etiological thinking, talk therapy dominating treatment) and soma (biochemical sources dominating etiological thinking, somatic treatments dominating treatment). This article argues that, while this metaphor is suited to capturing certain aspects of American psychiatric history, it distorts others by, for example, exaggerating the extent of dogmatism on either side and obscuring continuities in psychiatry's history. The article looks specifically at the reception by psychoanalysts to the introduction of electroconvulsive therapy. It shows that psychoanalytic views of ECT were diverse and more receptive to ECT than the pendulum metaphor might lead us to believe. PMID:16239498

  16. Efficacy of Electroconvulsive Therapy in Bipolar Disorder with Mixed Features

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Berta; Borja-Santos, Nuno; Trancas, Bruno; Monteiro, Céu; Cardoso, Graça

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Mixed states represent a frequent presentation of bipolar disorder, associated with higher resistance to psychopharmacology. Limited evidence supports the use of ECT in these patients. We aim to report our experience on treating bipolar mixed states with ECT. Methods. Retrospective data were collected from all bipolar patients submitted to acute ECT treatment, between June 2006 and June 2011. Three groups were created in terms of affective polarity of the episode. CGI rating was used to establish clinical remission and demographic and clinical variables were compared among groups. Long-term outcome was assessed through readmission measures, considering the use of continuation or maintenance ECT. Results. During the study time frame, a total of 50 ECT course treatments were performed on 41 bipolar patients. All affective episodes, except one mixed state, showed a positive clinical response. Patients with mixed state presentation tended to be younger and have an earlier first hospitalization than depressed patients. No differences were found in terms of ECT sessions performed, length of hospital admission, referral to continuation ECT treatment, number of readmissions, and time until next readmission. Conclusions. Our results support the effectiveness of ECT in patients experiencing a mixed affective state. PMID:26881069

  17. Efficacy of Electroconvulsive Therapy in Bipolar Disorder with Mixed Features.

    PubMed

    Palma, Miguel; Ferreira, Berta; Borja-Santos, Nuno; Trancas, Bruno; Monteiro, Céu; Cardoso, Graça

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Mixed states represent a frequent presentation of bipolar disorder, associated with higher resistance to psychopharmacology. Limited evidence supports the use of ECT in these patients. We aim to report our experience on treating bipolar mixed states with ECT. Methods. Retrospective data were collected from all bipolar patients submitted to acute ECT treatment, between June 2006 and June 2011. Three groups were created in terms of affective polarity of the episode. CGI rating was used to establish clinical remission and demographic and clinical variables were compared among groups. Long-term outcome was assessed through readmission measures, considering the use of continuation or maintenance ECT. Results. During the study time frame, a total of 50 ECT course treatments were performed on 41 bipolar patients. All affective episodes, except one mixed state, showed a positive clinical response. Patients with mixed state presentation tended to be younger and have an earlier first hospitalization than depressed patients. No differences were found in terms of ECT sessions performed, length of hospital admission, referral to continuation ECT treatment, number of readmissions, and time until next readmission. Conclusions. Our results support the effectiveness of ECT in patients experiencing a mixed affective state. PMID:26881069

  18. Electroconvulsive therapy in a psychiatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hafner, R J; Holme, G

    1994-06-01

    This study reviewed all patients (N = 37) treated with ECT in a psychiatric intensive care unit during 1989-91. Diagnoses were: psychotic depression (8); bipolar disorder, manic phase (13); schizoaffective disorder (14); and schizophrenia (2). All patients were very severely disturbed and had failed to respond to medication given at highest levels judged to be safe, usually over 3-4 weeks. Response to ECT was generally rapid and marked, allowing substantial reductions in medication. To achieve the same clinical outcome for each course of ECT, 50% more unilateral than bilateral treatments were required, suggesting that bilateral ECT has a more rapid effect in this highly disturbed population. PMID:7993281

  19. Efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy combined with antipsychotic medication in treatment-resistant schizophrenia: a prospective, open trial.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wai Kwong; Ungvari, Gabor S

    2002-06-01

    This study examined the short-term efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) combined with antipsychotic medication in treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS). Fifteen patients with TRS from an in-patient psychiatric rehabilitation unit participated. Patients completed a course of ECT consisting of 8 to 20 sessions, while their antipsychotic medications were continued throughout the study. Patients were assessed at baseline, 1 week, 1 month, and 2 months after their last ECT session. Assessment instruments included the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), Global Assessment Scale (GAS), Clinical Global Impression (CGI), Nurses' Observation Scale for In-Patient Evaluation, and occupational therapists' rating of the patients' functioning with respect to work, social, and leisure activities. Compared with the baseline assessment, at each posttreatment evaluation, patients showed statistically significant improvement in the GAS and CGI. In addition, they were significantly better in terms of BPRS and SANS scores, as well as work performance and social functioning at the 2-month post-ECT evaluation. PMID:12195137

  20. The woman who wanted electroconvulsive therapy and do-not-resuscitate status. Questions of competence on a medical-psychiatry unit.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M D; Ward, N G; Laxton, A

    1992-05-01

    A case involving an elderly woman suffering concurrently from serious psychiatric and medical illnesses is presented. Ethical considerations concerning her treatment on a medical-psychiatry unit are discussed with special attention to her requests for both electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and do-not-resuscitate (DNR) status. The compatibility of simultaneous requests for ECT and DNR is examined on three levels. The effect of depression upon competence to request and refuse treatment is analyzed. This case illustrates a conflict between medical and psychiatric treatment goals and ethical traditions which will become more common as psychiatrists treat older and more medically ill patients. PMID:1601298

  1. Premedication effect of dexmedetomidine and alfentanil on seizure time, recovery duration, and hemodynamic responses in electroconvulsive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, Esmail; Modir, Hesameddin; Bagheri, Niknam; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Jamilian, Hamidreza; Eshrati, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for many mental disorders, especially severe and persistent depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of dexmedetomidine and alfentanil on agitation, satisfaction, seizure duration, and patients hemodynamic after ECT. Materials and Methods: In a three phase crossover randomized clinical trial, 75 patients aged between 18 and 50 years and candidate for ECT were enrolled and assigned into three groups (25 patients in each group). All patients, respectively, took premedication of dexmedetomidine, alfentanil, or saline in three consecutive phases. Patients received 0.5 μg/kg dexmedetomidine, 10 μg/kg alfentanil or normal saline intravenously, 10 min before induction. Finally, seizure and recovery duration, satisfaction and agitation score, and hemodynamic parameters were evaluated. Results: There was no significant difference about seizure duration, agitation score, and hemodynamic parameters between groups but recovery duration was significantly lower in the control group than dexmedetomidine (P = 0.016) and alfentanil group (P = 0.0001). Patients’ satisfaction was significantly higher in intervention groups (alfentanil and dexmedetomidine groups) (P = 0.0001). Conclusion: Given the equal effects of alfentanil and dexmedetomidine, it seems that choosing one of these two drugs for premedication of patients undergoing ECT is appropriate. Drug choice is influenced by numerous factors such as accessibility of each drug and the dominance of anesthesiologist and psychiatrist. PMID:27052067

  2. Self-administered electroconvulsive treatment with a homemade device.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Takuya; Masumura, Toshiaki; Arai, Minoru; Adachi, Naoto; Akazawa, Shigeru; Arai, Heii

    2006-09-01

    Two patients with personality disorder and depression attempted to self-administer electroconvulsive therapy with a homemade device. The patients showed no proper psychopathological improvement after these attempts. Both of the patients' temples were seriously burned, and one of them required skin grafting. Both patients rejected to have reasonable psychosocial support, and followed a cult mental health manual in attempting to self-administer electroconvulsive therapy. To our knowledge, this is only the second report of its kind. The intractable psychopathology, poor interpersonal skills, and misleading information seemed to lead to the self-harm behaviors of our 2 patients. PMID:16957542

  3. Electroconvulsive in a Schizophrenic Patient With Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome and Rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    San Gabriel, Maria Chona P; Eddula-Changala, Bharathi; Tan, Yonghong; Longshore, Carrol T

    2015-09-01

    We present the case of a middle-aged man with a chronic history of schizoaffective disorder, depressed type, stable on a second-generation antipsychotic. Psychotic symptoms recurred contingent to medication noncompliance necessitating hospitalization. Treatment was complicated by the development of neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS). In addition, subsequent medication rechallenges failed because of recurrent rhabdomyolysis and atypical NMS. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) treatment was initiated, affording remission of psychotic symptoms and nonrecurrence of NMS and rhabdomyolysis. Our experience confirmed the efficacy of ECT treatment in providing symptom relief of psychosis complicated by recurrent episodes of NMS and atypical NMS. Likewise, it illustrated the efficacy of ECT treatment for rhabdomyolysis. PMID:25243752

  4. Monitoring daily affective symptoms and memory function using Interactive Voice Response (IVR) in outpatients receiving electroconvulsive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fazzino, Tera L.; Rabinowitz, Terry; Althoff, Robert R.; Helzer, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Recently there has been a gradual shift from inpatient-only electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) toward outpatient administration. Potential advantages include convenience and reduced cost. But providers do not have the same opportunity to monitor treatment response and side effects as they do with inpatients. This can obviate some of the potential advantages of outpatient ECT, such as tailoring treatment intervals to clinical response. Scheduling is typically algorithmic rather than empirically based. Daily monitoring through an automated telephone, interactive voice response (IVR), is a potential solution to this quandary. Methods To test feasibility of clinical monitoring via IVR, we recruited 26 patients (69% female, mean age 51 years) receiving outpatient ECT to make daily IVR reports of affective symptoms and subjective memory for 60 days. The IVR also administered a word recognition task daily to test objective memory. Every seventh day a longer IVR weekly interview included questions about suicidal ideation. Results Overall daily call compliance was high (mean=80%). Most participants (96%) did not consider the calls to be time-consuming. Longitudinal regression analysis using Generalized Estimating Equations revealed that participant objective memory functioning significantly improved during the study (p<.05). Out of 123 weekly IVR interviews, 41 reports (33%) in 14 patients endorsed suicidal ideation during the previous week. Conclusion IVR monitoring of outpatient ECT can provide more detailed clinical information than standard outpatient ECT assessment. IVR data offer providers a comprehensive, longitudinal picture of patient treatment response and side effects as a basis for treatment scheduling and ongoing clinical management. PMID:23774054

  5. Regional electric field induced by electroconvulsive therapy: a finite element simulation study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Hee; Deng, Zhi-De; Kim, Tae-Seong; Laine, Andrew F; Lisanby, Sarah H; Peterchev, Angel V

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the regional distribution of the electric field (E-field) strength induced by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and to contrast clinically relevant electrode configurations through finite element (FE) analysis. An FE human head model incorporating tissue heterogeneity and white matter anisotropy was generated based on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI) data. We simulated the E-field spatial distributions of three standard ECT electrode placements [bilateral (BL), bifrontal (BF), and right unilateral (RUL)] and an investigational electrode configuration [focal electrically administered seizure therapy (FEAST)]. A quantitative comparison of the E-field strength was subsequently carried out in various brain regions of interests (ROIs) that have putative role in the therapeutic action and/or adverse side effects of ECT. This study illustrates how the realistic FE head model provides quantitative insight in the biophysics of ECT, which may shed light on the differential clinical outcomes seen with various forms of ECT, and may guide the development of novel stimulation paradigms with improved risk/benefit ratio. PMID:21096148

  6. Variations in myo-inositol in fronto-limbic regions and clinical response to electroconvulsive therapy in major depression.

    PubMed

    Njau, Stephanie; Joshi, Shantanu H; Leaver, Amber M; Vasavada, Megha; Van Fleet, Jessica; Espinoza, Randall; Narr, Katherine L

    2016-09-01

    Though electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an established treatment for severe depression, the neurobiological factors accounting for the clinical effects of ECT are largely unknown. Myo-inositol, a neurometabolite linked with glial activity, is reported as reduced in fronto-limbic regions in patients with depression. Whether changes in myo-inositol relate to the antidepressant effects of ECT is unknown. Using magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), we measured dorsomedial anterior cingulate cortex (dmACC) and left and right hippocampal myo-inositol in 50 ECT patients (mean age: 43.78, 14 SD) and 33 controls (mean age: 39.33, 12 SD) to determine cross sectional effects of diagnosis and longitudinal effects of ECT. Patients were scanned prior to treatment, after the second ECT and at completion of the ECT index series. Controls were scanned twice at intervals corresponding to patients' baseline and end of treatment scans. Myo-inositol increased over the course of ECT in the dmACC (p = 0.042). A significant hemisphere by clinical response effect was observed for the hippocampus (p = 0.003) where decreased myo-inositol related to symptom improvement in the left hippocampus. Cross-sectional differences between patients and controls at baseline were not detected. Changes in myo-inositol observed in the dmACC in association with ECT and in the hippocampus in association with ECT-related clinical response suggest the mechanisms of ECT could include gliogenesis or a reversal of gliosis that differentially affect dorsal and ventral limbic regions. Change in dmACC myo-inositol diverged from control values with ECT suggesting compensation, while hippocampal change suggested normalization. PMID:27285661

  7. The effectiveness of a mouth guard to protect against strong occlusion caused by modified electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Ogami, Saori; Yamada, Morimasa; Kanazawa, Mayuko; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Kimura, Naoaki; Mizutani, Hideki; Kohase, Hikaru; Fukayama, Haruhisa

    2014-10-01

    Modified electroconvulsive therapy (m-ECT) is a treatment for mental disease such as depressive disorder. Although a muscle relaxant is used during current application, strong occlusion occurs due to the proximity of the electrode to the temporal and masseter muscles. Although a feedback mechanism to avoid excessive occlusion occurs unconsciously, the mechanism does not work under general anesthesia. Strong occlusion may cause complications such as tooth injury, pain of the jaw, lip laceration, and bleeding of the gums. Although there was a report that the insertion of shock-absorbing materials such as gauze reduces complications, there has been no study on the effectiveness of a mouth guard (MG) for alleviating the occlusal force during m-ECT. The present study investigated the effectiveness of MG for alleviation of the occlusal force and complications during m-ECT. An ethyl-vinyl-acetate (EVA) MG was used as a shock absorbing material to mitigate the strong occlusion during m-ECT to investigate the influence of MG on the occlusal force and its effectiveness. The results showed that the occlusal force was alleviated by 58 ± 22% on average using MG during m-ECT. It also helped reduce intra-oral problems such as pain and bleeding. The results suggest the effectiveness of MG for alleviating the occlusal force during m-ECT and avoiding complications due to strong occlusion. PMID:25364808

  8. Comparison of current distributions in electroconvulsive therapy and transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekino, Masaki; Ueno, Shoogo

    2002-05-01

    We compared current density distributions in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) by numerical calculations. The model consisted of an air region and three types of tissues with different conductivities representing the brain, the skull, and the scalp. In the ECT model, electric currents were applied through electrodes with a voltage of 100 V. In the TMS model, a figure-eight coil (6 cm diameter per coil) was placed on the vertex of the head model. An alternating current with a peak intensity of 3.0 kA and a frequency of 4.2 kHz was applied to the coil. The maximum current densities inside the brain in ECT (bilateral electrode position) and TMS were 234 and 322 A/m2, respectively. The results indicate that magnetic stimulators can generate comparable current densities to ECT. While the skull significantly affected current distributions in ECT, TMS efficiently induced eddy currents in the brain. In addition, TMS is more beneficial than ECT because the localized current distribution reduces the risk of adverse side effects.

  9. Relationship Between Hippocampal Volume, Serum BDNF, and Depression Severity Following Electroconvulsive Therapy in Late-Life Depression.

    PubMed

    Bouckaert, Filip; Dols, Annemiek; Emsell, Louise; De Winter, François-Laurent; Vansteelandt, Kristof; Claes, Lene; Sunaert, Stefan; Stek, Max; Sienaert, Pascal; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu

    2016-10-01

    Recent structural imaging studies have described hippocampal volume changes following electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). It has been proposed that serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (sBDNF)-mediated neuroplasticity contributes critically to brain changes following antidepressant treatment. To date no studies have investigated the relationship between changes in hippocampal volume, mood, and sBDNF following ECT. Here, we combine these measurements in a longitudinal study of severe late-life unipolar depression (LLD). We treated 88 elderly patients with severe LLD twice weekly until remission (Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) <10). sBDNF and MADRS were obtained before ECT (T0), after the sixth ECT (T1), 1 week after the last ECT (T2), 4 weeks after the last ECT (T3), and 6 months after the last ECT (T4). Hippocampal volumes were quantified by manual segmentation of 3T structural magnetic resonance images in 66 patients at T0 and T2 and in 23 patients at T0, T2, and T4. Linear mixed models (LMM) were used to examine the evolution of MADRS, sBDNF, and hippocampal volume over time. Following ECT, there was a significant decrease in MADRS scores and a significant increase in hippocampal volume. Hippocampal volume decreased back to baseline values at T4. Compared with T0, sBDNF levels remained unchanged at T1, T2, and T3. There was no coevolution between changes in MADRS scores, hippocampal volume, and sBDNF. Hippocampal volume increase following ECT is an independent neurobiological effect unrelated to sBDNF and depressive symptomatology, suggesting a complex mechanism of action of ECT in LLD. PMID:27272769

  10. Global decrease of serotonin-1A receptor binding after electroconvulsive therapy in major depression measured by PET

    PubMed Central

    Lanzenberger, R; Baldinger, P; Hahn, A; Ungersboeck, J; Mitterhauser, M; Winkler, D; Micskei, Z; Stein, P; Karanikas, G; Wadsak, W; Kasper, S; Frey, R

    2013-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a potent therapy in severe treatment-refractory depression. Although commonly applied in psychiatric clinical routine since decades, the exact neurobiological mechanism regarding its efficacy remains unclear. Results from preclinical and clinical studies emphasize a crucial involvement of the serotonin-1A receptor (5-HT1A) in the mode of action of antidepressant treatment. This includes associations between treatment response and changes in 5-HT1A function and density by antidepressants. Further, alterations of the 5-HT1A receptor are consistently reported in depression. To elucidate the effect of ECT on 5-HT1A receptor binding, 12 subjects with severe treatment-resistant major depression underwent three positron emission tomography (PET) measurements using the highly selective radioligand [carbonyl-11C]WAY100635, twice before (test–retest variability) and once after 10.08±2.35 ECT sessions. Ten patients (∼83%) were responders to ECT. The voxel-wise comparison of the 5-HT1A receptor binding (BPND) before and after ECT revealed a widespread reduction in cortical and subcortical regions (P<0.05 corrected), except for the occipital cortex and the cerebellum. Strongest reductions were found in regions consistently reported to be altered in major depression and involved in emotion regulation, such as the subgenual part of the anterior cingulate cortex (−27.5%), the orbitofrontal cortex (−30.1%), the amygdala (−31.8%), the hippocampus (−30.6%) and the insula (−28.9%). No significant change was found in the raphe nuclei. There was no significant difference in receptor binding in any region comparing the first two PET scans conducted before ECT. This PET study proposes a global involvement of the postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptor binding in the effect of ECT. PMID:22751491

  11. Electric field strength and focality in electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy: a finite element simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2011-02-01

    We present the first computational study comparing the electric field induced by various electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) paradigms. Four ECT electrode configurations (bilateral, bifrontal, right unilateral, and focal electrically administered seizure therapy) and three MST coil configurations (circular, cap, and double cone) were modeled. The model incorporated a modality-specific neural activation threshold. ECT (0.3 ms pulse width) and MST induced the maximum electric field of 2.1-2.5 V cm-1 and 1.1-2.2 V cm-1 in the brain, corresponding to 6.2-7.2 times and 1.2-2.3 times the neural activation threshold, respectively. The MST electric field is more confined to the superficial cortex compared to ECT. The brain volume stimulated was much larger with ECT (up to 100%) than with MST (up to 8.2%). MST with the double-cone coil was the most focal, and bilateral ECT was the least focal. Our results suggest a possible biophysical explanation of the reduced side effects of MST compared to ECT. Our results also indicate that the conventional ECT pulse amplitude (800-900 mA) is much higher than necessary for seizure induction. Reducing the ECT pulse amplitude should be explored as a potential means of diminishing side effects.

  12. Optimal dose of landiolol for preventing abrupt changes in both cardiac output and middle cerebral artery flow velocity after electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    Kadoi, Yuji; Saito, Shigeru

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the dose-dependent effects of landiolol on systemic hemodynamics, cardiac output, and cerebral artery blood flow. Eight patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) received 1 of the 3 drugs/doses (saline, 0.125 mg/kg of landiolol, 0.25 mg/kg of landiolol), in turn, for 3 ECT sessions, immediately after the administration of succinylcholine. In the case of 0.25 mg/kg of landiolol, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and cardiac output remained unchanged throughout the study period.We believe that 0.25 mg/kg of landiolol may be suitable for preventing the increase in systemic hemodynamics, including cardiac output after ECT. PMID:24755725

  13. Long-term Effectiveness of Modified Electroconvulsive Therapy Compared With Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for the Treatment of Recurrent Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xi-Long; Xu, Wei-Qin; Le, Ya-Juan; Dai, Xiong-Kai

    2016-06-01

    This retrospective study recruited 150 patients with recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) who received modified electroconvulsive therapy (MECT) and 150 cases treated with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), which aimed to compare the short- and long-term effectiveness, as well as economic outcomes, of MECT and rTMS with a large sample size in patients with recurrent MDD. The results showed that the response rate of patients in the rTMS group was lower than that in the MECT group (46.0% vs 58.7%, p < 0.05). Patients in the rTMS group had elevated rate of dizziness, but reduced rates of poor memory and headache, as well as lower costs compared with the MECT group (p < 0.05). Importantly, we found that the relapse-free survival of patients was similar between the rTMS and MECT groups in the long term. In conclusion, rTMS is an alternative method for MECT in the treatment of patients with recurrent MDD. PMID:26915018

  14. 'A Berlin psychiatrist with an American passport': Lothar Kalinowsky, electroconvulsive therapy and international exchange in the mid-twentieth century.

    PubMed

    Rzesnitzek, Lara

    2015-12-01

    The emigration of Lothar Kalinowsky (1899-1992) might, at first glance, seem to be a history of coincidence and twists of fate, but it is shown to be a truly entangled and intertwined history and story. The international introduction of electroconvulsive therapy was not only closely involved with the political, scientific and economic conditions during World War II, but the story of Kalinowsky's relevance to it emerges from competing stories, told differently in Europe and the USA - and by Kalinowsky himself. Tracing these stories up to the end of the 1960s reveals Kalinowsky as an influential inheritor and patron of Berlin Biological Psychiatry, rather than telling the history of an émigré innovator of international neuropsychiatric research. PMID:26574059

  15. Practice of Acute and Maintenance Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Psychiatric Clinic of a University Hospital from Turkey: between 2007 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Sengul, Melike Ceyhan Balci; Kenar, Ayse Nur Inci; Hanci, Ezgi; Sendur, İbrahim; Sengul, Cem; Herken, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be given as the form of acute, continuation or maintenance ECT according to the process of administration. We report our 7 years’ observation with acute and maintenance ECT in a university hospital in Turkey. Methods The medical records of the hospitalized patients treated with acute or maintenance ECT between the years 2007 and 2013 was retrospectively analyzed. The sociodemographic characteristics, diagnosis, data of ECT and the co-administered psychotropic drugs were recorded. The frequency of ECT was calculated by identifying the total number of the hospitalized patients during the study period from the hospital records. Results A total number of 1,432 female and 1,141 male patients hospitalized in a period of 7 years, with a total number of 111 patients treated with ECT. The ratio of ECT was 4%, maintenance/acute ECT 11%. For acute ECT, affective disorders (65.3%) and psychotic disorders (21.6%) were among the leading diagnoses. Maintenance ECT, the diagnosis was; 6 affective disorders, 4 psychotic disorders and 1 obsessive compulsive disorder. There was a significant difference between the patients receiving acute and maintenance ECT in terms of age, duration of illness, and number of previous hospitalizations and ECTs. Conclusion The percentage of patients treated with acute ECT is lower in our institution than that in many other institutions from our country. Acute and maintenance ECT should be considered as an important treatment option particularly for patients with long disease duration, a high number of hospitalizations and a history of benefiting from previous ECTs. PMID:26792041

  16. The effect of adjuvant remifentanil with propofol or thiopentone on seizure quality during electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, R; Marroquin-Harris, M; Gálvez, V; Tor, P; Loo, C

    2016-03-01

    In order to optimise outcome to Electro Convulsive therapy (ECT), there has been a trend to utilise remifentanil as an adjunct to standard intravenous induction agents. This has allowed a reduction in the dose of anaesthetic agent, and usually an improved response to stimulation. However there have been no previous studies to ascertain whether this improvement is simply as a result of the reduced dose of anaesthetic agent or whether remifentanil itself might possess epileptogenic properties. This retrospective case-controlled study examined ECT outcomes, determined by EEG quality analysis, in patients who received ECT with or without remifentanil, where there was no dose reduction in the anaesthetic agent. There were no improvements seen in the measurements of any EEG parameter, including seizure duration. These observations suggest that remifentanil does not possess any intrinsic pro-convulsant activity and that any improvement in outcome seen with its use is as a result of dose reduction in the IV anaesthetic agent. PMID:27029661

  17. Electroconvulsive Therapy Added to Non-Clozapine Antipsychotic Medication for Treatment Resistant Schizophrenia: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Cao, Xiao-Lan; Ungvari, Gabor S; Xiang, Ying-Qiang; Guo, Tong; Liu, Zheng-Rong; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Forester, Brent P; Seiner, Stephen J; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examined the efficacy and safety of the combination of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and antipsychotic medication (except for clozapine) versus the same antipsychotic monotherapy for treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS). Two independent investigators extracted data for a random effects meta-analysis and pre-specified subgroup and meta-regression analyses. Weighted and standard mean difference (WMD/SMD), risk ratio (RR) ±95% confidence intervals (CIs), number needed to treat (NNT), and number needed to harm (NNH) were calculated. Eleven studies (n = 818, duration = 10.2±5.5 weeks) were identified for meta-analysis. Adjunctive ECT was superior to antipsychotic monotherapy regarding (1) symptomatic improvement at last-observation endpoint with an SMD of -0.67 (p<0.00001; I(2) = 62%), separating the two groups as early as weeks 1-2 with an SMD of -0.58 (p<0.00001; I(2) = 0%); (2) study-defined response (RR = 1.48, p<0.0001) with an NNT of 6 (CI = 4-9) and remission rate (RR = 2.18, p = 0.0002) with an NNT of 8 (CI = 6-16); (3) PANSS positive and general symptom sub-scores at endpoint with a WMD between -3.48 to -1.32 (P = 0.01 to 0.009). Subgroup analyses were conducted comparing double blind/rater-masked vs. open RCTs, those with and without randomization details, and high quality (Jadad≥adadup analyses were Jadad<3) studies. The ECT-antipsychotic combination caused more headache (p = 0.02) with an NNH of 6 (CI = 4-11) and memory impairment (p = 0.001) with an NNH of 3 (CI = 2-5). The use of ECT to augment antipsychotic treatment (clozapine excepted) can be an effective treatment option for TRS, with increased frequency of self-reported memory impairment and headache. PMID:27285996

  18. Increases in iPS Transcription Factor (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4) Gene Expression after Modified Electroconvulsive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nishiguchi, Masaki; Kanazawa, Tetsufumi; Tsutsumi, Atsushi; Kaneko, Takao; Uenishi, Hiroyuki; Kawabata, Yasuo; Kawashige, Seiya; Koh, Jun; Yoneda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a reasonable option for intractable depression or schizophrenia, but a mechanism of action has not been established. One credible hypothesis is related to neural plasticity. Three genes (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc) involved in the induction of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are Wnt-target genes, which constitute a key gene group involved in neural plasticity through the TCF family. Klf4 is the other gene among Yamanaka's four transcription factors, and increases in its expression are induced by stimulation of the canonical Wnt pathway. Methods We compared the peripheral blood gene expression of the four iPS genes (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4) before and after modified ECT (specifically ECT with general anesthesia) of patients with intractable depression (n=6) or schizophrenia (n=6). Using Thymatron ten times the total bilateral electrical stimulation was evoked. Results Both assessments of the symptoms demonstrated significant improvement after mECT stimulation. Expression of all four genes was confirmed to increase after initial stimulation. The gene expression levels after treatment were significantly different from the initial gene expression in all twelve cases at the following treatment stages: at the 3rd mECT for Oct4; at the 6th and 10th mECT for Sox2; and at the 3rd, 6th and 10th mECT for c-Myc. Conclusion These significant differences were not present after correction for multiple testing; however, our data have the potential to explain the molecular mechanisms of mECT from a unique perspective. Further studie should be conducted to clarify the pathophysiological involvement of iPS-inducing genes in ECT. PMID:26508965

  19. Regional electric field induced by electroconvulsive therapy in a realistic finite element head model: influence of white matter anisotropic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Hee; Deng, Zhi-De; Kim, Tae-Seong; Laine, Andrew F; Lisanby, Sarah H; Peterchev, Angel V

    2012-02-01

    We present the first computational study investigating the electric field (E-field) strength generated by various electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) electrode configurations in specific brain regions of interest (ROIs) that have putative roles in the therapeutic action and/or adverse side effects of ECT. This study also characterizes the impact of the white matter (WM) conductivity anisotropy on the E-field distribution. A finite element head model incorporating tissue heterogeneity and WM anisotropic conductivity was constructed based on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor MRI data. We computed the spatial E-field distributions generated by three standard ECT electrode placements including bilateral (BL), bifrontal (BF), and right unilateral (RUL) and an investigational electrode configuration for focal electrically administered seizure therapy (FEAST). The key results are that (1) the median E-field strength over the whole brain is 3.9, 1.5, 2.3, and 2.6 V/cm for the BL, BF, RUL, and FEAST electrode configurations, respectively, which coupled with the broad spread of the BL E-field suggests a biophysical basis for observations of superior efficacy of BL ECT compared to BF and RUL ECT; (2) in the hippocampi, BL ECT produces a median E-field of 4.8 V/cm that is 1.5-2.8 times stronger than that for the other electrode configurations, consistent with the more pronounced amnestic effects of BL ECT; and (3) neglecting the WM conductivity anisotropy results in E-field strength error up to 18% overall and up to 39% in specific ROIs, motivating the inclusion of the WM conductivity anisotropy in accurate head models. This computational study demonstrates how the realistic finite element head model incorporating tissue conductivity anisotropy provides quantitative insight into the biophysics of ECT, which may shed light on the differential clinical outcomes seen with various forms of ECT, and may guide the development of novel stimulation paradigms

  20. Effect of age and anticonvulsants on seizure threshold during bilateral electroconvulsive therapy with brief-pulse stimulus: A chart-based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nitturkar, Abhishek R.; Sinha, Preeti; Bagewadi, Virupakshappa I.; Thirthalli, Jagadisha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Efficacy and adverse effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) depend on the extent to which the electrical stimulus exceeds patients' seizure thresholds (STs). Titration method of estimating ST is recommended. Age and co-prescribed anticonvulsants (ACs) are known to affect ST. Literature on ST in bilateral ECT (BLECT) is sparse. Objective: To explore the clinical and demographic determinants of ST in a clinically representative sample of patients prescribed with BLECT. Materials and Methods: ECT records of 640 patients who received BLECT in 2011 in an academic psychiatric setting were studied. Demographic, clinical, pharmacological, and ECT details were analyzed. As per the standard practice, during the 1st ECT session, ST was determined by titration method, starting with 30 milli-Coulombs (mC) and increasing by 30 mC and thence in steps of 60 mC. Increase in ST over up to 6th session of ECT was noted. Receiver operating characteristic curve was used to find age cut-off with high specificity for ST ≥120 mC. The associations of ST and increase in ST with the age cut-off and other clinical factors were assessed using Chi-square test and logistic regression analysis. Results: The mean age was 30.98 years (+11.23 years) and mean ST at 1st ECT session was 130.36 mC (+51.96 mC). There was significantly high positive correlation (r = 0.37, P < 0.001) between age and ST. Cut-off age of 45 years had high specificity: Only 4.6% of those older than 45 years had ST <120 mC. Higher proportion of patients on AC had ST ≥120 mC. These associations were seen even after controlling for potential confounds of each other using logistic regression analysis. The results were similar for increase in ST over the course of ECT. Sex, diagnosis, use of antipsychotics, antidepressants, lithium, and benzodiazepines (BZPs) had no effect on ST or its increase. Conclusions: For BLECT using brief-pulse stimulus, ST depends on age and use of AC. For patients above the age of 45

  1. Electroconvulsive Therapy Added to Non-Clozapine Antipsychotic Medication for Treatment Resistant Schizophrenia: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei; Cao, Xiao-Lan; Ungvari, Gabor S.; Xiang, Ying-Qiang; Guo, Tong; Liu, Zheng-Rong; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Forester, Brent P.; Seiner, Stephen J.; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examined the efficacy and safety of the combination of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and antipsychotic medication (except for clozapine) versus the same antipsychotic monotherapy for treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS). Two independent investigators extracted data for a random effects meta-analysis and pre-specified subgroup and meta-regression analyses. Weighted and standard mean difference (WMD/SMD), risk ratio (RR) ±95% confidence intervals (CIs), number needed to treat (NNT), and number needed to harm (NNH) were calculated. Eleven studies (n = 818, duration = 10.2±5.5 weeks) were identified for meta-analysis. Adjunctive ECT was superior to antipsychotic monotherapy regarding (1) symptomatic improvement at last-observation endpoint with an SMD of -0.67 (p<0.00001; I2 = 62%), separating the two groups as early as weeks 1–2 with an SMD of -0.58 (p<0.00001; I2 = 0%); (2) study-defined response (RR = 1.48, p<0.0001) with an NNT of 6 (CI = 4–9) and remission rate (RR = 2.18, p = 0.0002) with an NNT of 8 (CI = 6–16); (3) PANSS positive and general symptom sub-scores at endpoint with a WMD between -3.48 to -1.32 (P = 0.01 to 0.009). Subgroup analyses were conducted comparing double blind/rater-masked vs. open RCTs, those with and without randomization details, and high quality (Jadad≥adadup analyses were Jadad<3) studies. The ECT-antipsychotic combination caused more headache (p = 0.02) with an NNH of 6 (CI = 4–11) and memory impairment (p = 0.001) with an NNH of 3 (CI = 2–5). The use of ECT to augment antipsychotic treatment (clozapine excepted) can be an effective treatment option for TRS, with increased frequency of self-reported memory impairment and headache. Trial registration CRD42014006689 (PROSPERO). PMID:27285996

  2. Electroconvulsive therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder: efficacy, mechanisms and a hypothesis for new directions.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; McCall, W Vaughn; Youssef, Nagy A

    2016-07-01

    A small body of literature suggests that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may respond to ECT. Laboratory research has identified changes in the amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex that might explain the treatment response. One randomized controlled trial in depressed patients in a laboratory setting demonstrated the use of ECT to impair reconsolidation of reactivated, emotionally-aversive test memories. It can therefore be hypothesized that ECT may be more effective in patients with PTSD if the trauma memories are deliberately recalled immediately before each ECT session. This hypothesis has received preliminary support in a single case report and may be worthy of formal study in carefully designed clinical trials. Practical challenges are discussed. PMID:27095363

  3. Two decades of an indigenously developed brief-pulse electroconvulsive therapy device: A review of research work from National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Preeti; ShyamSundar, A.; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Gangadhar, B. N.; Candade, Vittal S.

    2016-01-01

    In 1993, a device to administer brief-pulse electroconvulsive therapy was indigenously developed through collaboration between the National Institution for Quality and Reliability and the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Bengaluru, Karnataka, India. The additional feature of computerized recording of the electroencephalograph and electrocardiograph for both online and offline use had substantial clinical and research implications. Over the past two decades, this device has been used extensively in different academic and nonacademic settings. A considerable body of research with clinical and heuristic interest has also emanated using this device. In this paper, we present the development of this device and follow it up with a review of research conducted at NIMHANS that validate the features and potentials of this device. PMID:26985102

  4. [Are convulsions necessary for the antidepressive effect of electroconvulsive therapy: outcome of repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation].

    PubMed

    Post, R M; Kimbrell, T A; McCann, U; Dunn, R T; George, M S; Weiss, S R

    1997-06-01

    Sismotherapy (ST) brings about numerous neurobiological changes, particularly changes in neuromediators and their receptors, second messengers, neuropeptides and neurotropic factors, a number of which are hypothesized to play a role in the pathophysiology or therapeutics of affective disorders (M. Fink). What is not yet known is which of these mechanisms is crucial for the psychotropic and anticonvulsant effects of ST. However, it is clear that the effects of ST tend to be relatively acute, and do not attack the deep-seated abnormalities that are the underlying causes of recurrences of affective disorders. This is corroborated by the fact that in animals, most of the effects of ECS on catecholamines and their receptors (and on receptors for benzodiazepines or neuropeptides such as TRH) tend to be relatively transient, and in most cases have been found to represent compensatory adaptations to the induced motor convulsions. However, recent preclinical data using attenuation, and clinical findings using reiterated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), suggest that it may not be necessary to provoke a clonic convulsion in order to achieve the beneficial psychotropic and anticonvulsant effects of ST. In rodents receiving stimulation to the cerebellar tonsil, seven daily subacute low-frequency sessions (stimulation at 1 Hz for 15 minutes) produced clear improvement in clonic convulsions and in post-discharge thresholds, together with durable inhibition of convulsions when stimulation was resumed (Weiss et al., 1995). Stimulation at 1 Hz for 15 minutes was more effective than stimulation at 10 or 20 Hz in attenuating convulsions. Although reiterated ECS also induced an anti-triggering effect, this dissipated rapidly over five days (Post et al., 1984). It is of great interest that recent publications have shown that rTMS at 10 or 20 Hz to the left frontal cortex, administered to patients suffering from refractory depression (George et al., 1995) or to patients

  5. Effect of electroconvulsive seizures on cognitive flexibility.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Maria; Grahm, Matilda; Ekstrand, Joakim; Höglund, Peter; Johansson, Mikael; Tingström, Anders

    2016-07-01

    Electroconvulsive seizures (ECS), an animal model of electroconvulsive therapy, strongly stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis, but it is not known how this relates to the therapeutic effect or to the unwanted cognitive side effects. Recent findings suggest that neurogenesis might be important for flexible learning in changing environments. We hypothesize that animals receiving ECS treatment, which induces hippocampal neurogenesis, will show enhanced cognitive flexibility compared with controls. We have utilized a touch screen-based cognitive test (location discrimination (LD) task) to assess how five consecutive ECS treatments affect cognitive flexibility (measured as reversal of cognitive strategy) as well as spatial pattern separation ability. ECS-treated animals performed more reversals in the LD task earlier than controls over the 9 experimental weeks irrespective of spatial separation of visual stimuli, indicating an enhanced cognitive flexibility but unaffected pattern separation ability after ECS. We observed no correlation between hippocampal neurogenesis and the number of performed reversals during the last experimental week. This is the first study to elucidate the effect of ECS on cognitive flexibility. Our results indicate that ECS improves cognitive flexibility without affecting spatial pattern separation ability. Whether cognitive flexibility is enhanced via neurogenesis or other ECS-modulated processes, remains unknown. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26850212

  6. PBA regulates neurogenesis and cognition dysfunction after repeated electroconvulsive shock in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhao-Hui; Kang, Xiang; Yang, Liu; Niu, Yi; Lu, Ye; Nie, Li

    2015-12-15

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) was widely used to treat the refractory depression. But ECT led to the cognitive deficits plaguing the depression patients. The underlying mechanisms of the cognitive deficits remain elusive. Repeated electroconvulsive shock (rECS) was used to simulate ECT and explore the mechanisms of ECT during the animal studies. Previous studies showed rECS could lead to neurogenesis and cognitive impairment. But it was well known that neurogenesis could improve the cognition. So these suggested that the mechanism of the cognitive deficit after rECS was very complex. In present study, we explored the probable mechanisms of the cognitive deficit after rECS from neurogenesis aspect. We found the cognitive deficit was reversible and neurogenesis could bring a long-term beneficial effect on cognition. Astrogliosis and NR1 down-regulation probably participated in the reversible cognitive deficits after rECS. Phenylbutyric acid (PBA), generally as an agent to investigate the roles of histone acetylation, could prevent the reversible cognitive dysfunction, but PBA could diminish the long-term effect of enhanced cognition by rECS. These suggested that ECT could possibly bring the long-term beneficial cognitive effect by regulating neurogenesis. PMID:26381183

  7. Art Therapy with Laryngectomy Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anand, Susan Ainlay; Anand, Vinod K.

    1997-01-01

    Reports on the experiences of patients with laryngeal cancer who used art therapy. Drawing on 14 years of experience and 109 laryngeal cancer patients, describes treatment results and the case material substantiating the distinct role of art therapy. Provides an overview of the special medical and therapeutic needs of this group. (RJM)

  8. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Antidepressive Effect of Electroconvulsive Therapy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses of the Preclinical and Clinical Literature

    PubMed Central

    Polyakova, M.; Schroeter, M. L.; Elzinga, B. M.; Holiga, S.; Schoenknecht, P.; de Kloet, E. R.; Molendijk, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging data suggest that Electro-Convulsive Treatment (ECT) may reduce depressive symptoms by increasing the expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF). Yet, conflicting findings have been reported. For this reason we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the preclinical and clinical literature on the association between ECT treatment (ECS in animals) and changes in BDNF concentrations and their effect on behavior. In addition, regional brain expression of BDNF in mouse and human brains were compared using Allen Brain Atlas. ECS, over sham, increased BDNF mRNA and protein in animal brain (effect size [Hedge’s g]: 0.38―0.54; 258 effect-size estimates, N = 4,284) but not in serum (g = 0.06, 95% CI = -0.05―0.17). In humans, plasma but not serum BDNF increased following ECT (g = 0.72 vs. g = 0.14; 23 effect sizes, n = 281). The gradient of the BDNF increment in animal brains corresponded to the gradient of the BDNF gene expression according to the Allen brain atlas. Effect-size estimates were larger following more ECT sessions in animals (r = 0.37, P < .0001) and in humans (r = 0.55; P = 0.05). There were some indications that the increase in BDNF expression was associated with behavioral changes in rodents, but not in humans. We conclude that ECS in rodents and ECT in humans increase BDNF concentrations but this is not consistently associated with changes in behavior. PMID:26529101

  9. Comparison of the neuropsychological mechanisms of 2,6-diisopropylphenol and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist against electroconvulsive therapy-induced learning and memory impairment in depressed rats

    PubMed Central

    LIU, GANG; LIU, CHAO; NING-ZHANG, XUE

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the neurophysiological mechanisms of the 2,6-diisopropylphenol and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist against learning and memory impairment, induced by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). A total of 48 adult depressed rats without olfactory bulbs were randomly divided into six experimental groups: i) saline; ii) 10 mg/kg MK-801; iii) 10 mg/kg MK-801 and a course of ECT; iv) 200 mg/kg 2,6-diisopropylphenol; v) 200 mg/kg 2,6-diisopropylphenol and a course of ECT; and vi) saline and a course of ECT. The learning and memory abilities of the rats were assessed using a Morris water maze 1 day after a course of ECT. The hippocampus was removed 1 day after assessment using the Morris water maze assessment. The content of glutamate in the hippocampus was detected using high-performance liquid chromatography. The expression levels of p-AT8Ser202 and GSK-3β1H8 in the hippocampus were determined using immunohistochemical staining and western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that the 2,6-diisopropylphenol NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 and ECT induced learning and memory impairment in the depressed rats. The glutamate content was significantly upregulated by ECT, reduced by 2,6-diisopropylphenol, and was unaffected by the NMDA receptor antagonist in the hippocampus of the depressed rats. Tau protein hyperphosphorylation in the hippocampus was upregulated by ECT, but was reduced by 2,6-diisopropylphenol and the MK-801 NMDA receptor antagonist. It was also demonstrated that 2,6-diisopropylphenol prevented learning and memory impairment and reduced the hyperphosphorylation of the Tau protein, which was induced by eECT. GSK-3β was found to be the key protein involved in this signaling pathway. The ECT reduced the learning and memory impairment, caused by hyperphosphorylation of the Tau protein, in the depressed rats by upregulating the glutamate content. PMID:25998151

  10. Treatment-resistant depression in Hispanic patients.

    PubMed

    Podawiltz, Alan; Culpepper, Larry

    2010-06-01

    About one-third of patients treated with antidepressants do not respond to initial treatment, and Spanish-speaking Hispanic patients with major depression may exhibit a worse response to initial medication than English-speaking patients. Patients and clinicians should be resolute and patient as different regimens are tried throughout the course of treatment. Other options include electroconvulsive therapy, vagus nerve stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and the medicinal food L-methylfolate. PMID:20573322

  11. Cortical electroconvulsive stimulation alleviates breeding-induced prepulse inhibition deficit in rats.

    PubMed

    John, Nadine; Theilmann, Wiebke; Frieling, Helge; Krauss, Joachim K; Alam, Mesbah; Schwabe, Kerstin; Brandt, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    In patients with medical-refractory schizophrenia electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), i.e., the induction of therapeutic seizures via cortical surface electrodes, is effectively used. Electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) in rodents simulates ECT in humans and is applied to investigate the mechanisms underlying this treatment. Experimentally-induced reduced prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response (ASR), i.e., the reduction of the startle response to an intense acoustic stimulus when this stimulus is shortly preceded by a weaker not-startling stimulus, serves as an endophenotype for neuropsychiatric disorders that are accompanied by disturbed sensorimotor gating, such as schizophrenia. Here we used rats selectively bred for high and low PPI to evaluate whether bifrontal cortical ECS would affect PPI. For this purpose, cortical screw electrodes were stereotactically implanted above the frontal cortex. After recovery ECS was applied for five consecutive days with stimuli of 1 ms pulse-width, 100 pulses/s, 1 s duration, ranging from 5.5 mA to 10 mA. PPI of ASR was measured one day before ECS, and on days 1, 7, and 14 after the last ECS. In rats with breeding-induced low PPI ECS increased PPI one week after stimulation. In contrast, ECS decreased PPI in rats with high PPI on the first day after stimulation. The reaction to the startle impulse was reduced by ECS without difference between groups. This work provides evidence that rats with breeding-induced high or low PPI could be used to further investigate the underlying mechanisms of ECT in neuropsychiatric disorders with disturbed sensorimotor gating like schizophrenia. PMID:26476178

  12. Patient satisfaction with antihypertensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, K; Chiou, C-F; Plauschinat, C A; Frech, F; Harper, A; Dubois, R

    2005-10-01

    The objective of the study was to assess factors associated with treatment satisfaction among patients receiving antihypertensive therapy. A weighted cross-sectional online survey was conducted with hypertensive patients participating in a chronic disease panel in the US. Patients on monotherapy with medications from the following classes were identified: ACE inhibitors (ACEIs), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), beta blockers (BBs), calcium channel blockers (CCBs), and diuretics. The control group included patients without treatment. Pairwise comparisons between groups were conducted for factors that may affect patients' satisfaction. The study population had a mean age of 54.7+/-14.2 years and was 56.7% female. Participants with blood pressure (BP) controlled to JNC 7 guidelines were more satisfied with their medication than those with uncontrolled BP (90.3 vs 71.5%, P<0.05). Patients who had not experienced adverse events had higher satisfaction than patients experiencing adverse events (90.9 vs 75.8%, P<0.05). The most frequently self-reported adverse events were frequent urination, sexual dysfunction, and fatigue ranging from 7.0 to 9.6% across classes. The adverse event rates differed by class and were lowest among the ARBs. Patients on ARBs were the most likely to have switched from a previous antihypertensive class as compared to other classes (57.1% ARBs vs 49.8% ACEIs, 38.7% diuretics, 36.3% CCBs, and 31.7% BBs). Physician recommendation was the most common reason for switching. In conclusion, the ability to effectively treat hypertension depends upon a patient's satisfaction with antihypertensive therapy, which may be improved by achieving BP control and minimizing the occurrence of adverse events. PMID:15951740

  13. Electroconvulsive seizure induces thrombospondin-1 in the adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Okada-Tsuchioka, Mami; Segawa, Masahiro; Kajitani, Naoto; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Shibasaki, Chiyo; Morinobu, Shigeru; Takebayashi, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction has recently gained attention for its involvement in mood disorders. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) possibly plays a role in synaptic repair. However, the underlying mechanisms remain uncertain. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), a member of the TSP family, is reported to be secreted by astrocytes and to regulate synaptogenesis. We investigated the effects of electroconvulsive seizure (ECS) on the expression of TSPs in the adult rat hippocampus. Single and repeated ECS significantly increased TSP-1 mRNA expression after 2h and returned to sham levels at 24h. Conversely, the TSP-2 and -4 mRNA levels did not change. Only repeated ECS induced TSP-1 proteins. ECS also induced glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression. The GFAP expression occurred later than the TSP-1 mRNA expression following single ECS; however, it occurred earlier and was more persistent following repeated ECS. ECS had no effect on the α2δ-1 or neuroligin-1 expressions, both of which are TSP-1 receptors. Furthermore, chronic treatment with antidepressants did not induce the expression of TSP-1 or GFAP. These findings suggest that repeated ECS, but not chronic treatment with antidepressants, induces TSP-1 expression partially via the activation of astrocytes. Therefore, TSP-1 is possibly involved in the synaptogenic effects of ECS. PMID:24121060

  14. A Bayesian framework systematic review and meta-analysis of anesthetic agents effectiveness/tolerability profile in electroconvulsive therapy for major depression

    PubMed Central

    Fond, Guillaume; Bennabi, Djamila; Haffen, Emmanuel; Brunel, Lore; Micoulaud-Franchi, Jean-Arthur; Loundou, Anderson; Lançon, Christophe; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Auquier, Pascal; Boyer, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability/acceptability of 6 anesthetic agents in ECT for depressive disorders. We systematically reviewed 14 double-blind randomized controlled trials (610 participants). Efficacy was measured by the mean scores on validated depression scales at 6 ECT (or the nearest score if not available), number of responders at the end of treatment and seizure duration. The acceptability was measured by the proportion of patients who dropped out of the allocated treatment, and the tolerability by the number of serious adverse events and post-treatment cognition assessment. After excluding the trials responsible for heterogeneity, depression scores of patients who were administered methohexital were found to be significantly more improved than those who received propofol (p = 0.001). On the contrary, those who were administered propofol had lower depression scores than those with thiopental at the end of treatment (p = 0.002). Compared to propofol, methohexital was found to be significantly associated with higher seizure duration (p = 0.018). No difference was found for the acceptability profile (all p > 0.05). In summary, ketamine and methohexital may be preferred to propofol or thiopental in regard of effectiveness in depression scores and increased seizure duration. Further studies are warranted to compare ketamine and methohexital. PMID:26806849

  15. Aberrant CYP2D6 metabolizer phenotypes do not show increased frequency in patients undergoing ECT after antidepressant therapy.

    PubMed

    Mirzakhani, Hooman; van Dormolen, Juliët; van der Weide, Karen; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; van Noorden, Martijn S; Swen, Jesse

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the accumulation of aberrant CYP2D6 genotypes and predicted metabolizer phenotypes (ultrarapid metabolizer, intermediate metabolizer and poor metabolizer) potentially affecting the antidepressant treatment response in depressive patients indicated for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) compared with patients with a single episode of depression. Seventy-six Dutch White patients with unipolar or bipolar treatment-resistant depression who underwent ECT were genotyped using the Amplichip CYP450 Test for CYP2D6. Two hundred and eight patients with a single episode of unipolar or bipolar depression were used as controls. No difference was observed in the prevalence of CYP2D6 phenotypes (poor metabolizer, intermediate metabolizer, extensive metabolizer and ultrarapid metabolizer) between the ECT and the control patients (5.3, 38.7, 56.0 and 0.0% vs. 6.4, 51.0, 42.6 and 0.0%, respectively). The types of depression (odds ratio = 0.33, P = 0.018) and age (odds ratio = 1.55 for a 10-year increase, P < 0.001), but not CYP2D6 phenotype or activity score were associated with the response to antidepressant treatment. In conclusion, preemptive genotyping for CYP2D6 currently appears to have no clinical implications in treatment-resistant depressive patients indicated for ECT. PMID:26230381

  16. Patient Education and Adherence to Aerosol Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ari, Arzu

    2015-06-01

    Nonadherence to prescribed medications results in disease instability and poor clinical control, with increases in hospital admissions, emergency room visits, school/work absenteeism, morbidity, and mortality. Poor patient adherence to therapy can be due to lack of cognition, competence, or contrivance. Patients who have not been trained or fail to understand use of drug and device combinations (cognition) often do not have the ability to use an aerosol device correctly (competence). Many patients have the competence to use the device correctly and know why they should use the device in the way they were taught; however, they still contrive to use it in an ineffective and suboptimal manner that reduces its efficiency and effectiveness. Ensuring effective aerosol therapy and optimizing its role in disease management involve not only delivery of aerosolized medications to the lungs, but also understanding why, when, and how to use the medications, competence to use the device, motivation to adhere to therapy, and not contriving to use the device in a way that will prevent effective drug delivery. This paper explains some of the problems with patient education and adherence to aerosol therapy and suggests strategies to evaluate, monitor, and improve patient adherence effectively in primary care. Factors affecting patient adherence to prescribed medications, effective educational interventions, and strategies to promote patient adherence to aerosol therapy are also discussed. PMID:26070585

  17. [Therapy for male patients with sexual dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Casella, Roberto

    2010-03-01

    Phosphodiasterase type 5 inhibitors (sildenafil, vardenafil, tadalafil) are the first line symptomatic therapy for patients with erectile dysfunction. The patient should receive a meticolous information on the use of these drugs and their possible side effects. These drugs are safe and can be used even in patients with stable cardiovascular disease. Patients not responding to oral drugs may be offered intraurethral or intracavernous alprostadil. Vacuum constriction devices are a second line option more acceptable to older patients. Penile prosthesis are very seldom used in Switzerland and vascular surgery is a vanishing option. Testosterone substitution is seldom needed in this setting. Treatment of premature ejaculation subdivides into behavioural therapy ("stop-start" or "squeeze" technique) and drug therapy as well. Topical therapy with lidocaine/prilocaine-containing medications to be applied before sexual intercourse and a oral daily off label use therapy with selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (paroxetine, fluoxetine, sertraline) can be offered. Dapoxetine, a potent selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor with short half life time, is the first officially approved medication for the treatment of premature ejaculation and should be available soon in Switzerland. PMID:20235039

  18. Which therapy for which patient?

    PubMed

    Pierangeli, G; Cevoli, S; Sancisi, E; Grimaldi, D; Zanigni, S; Montagna, P; Cortelli, P

    2006-05-01

    Prophylactic treatment is mainly intended to reduce the frequency of migraine attacks, enhance response to acute medications, improve patient function and reduce disability. Sufficient evidence and consensus exist to recommend propranolol, timolol, amitriptyline, pizotifen, divalproex, sodium valproate and topiramate as first line agents for migraine prevention. These drugs can halve the frequency of attacks in 50% of patients. The anticipated benefit must be weighed against the adverse effects associated with each agent in determining the optimal preventive regimen for individual patients considering any comorbid conditions that are often present. The decision to treat and the choice of prophylactic drug must be taken with the patient. It is important to balance expectations and therapeutic realities for each particular drug. Recent data on the effect of prophylactic treatment on trigeminovascular activation and on cortical spreading depression emphasise the importance of developing research on migraine-preventive drugs. PMID:16688621

  19. Rapidly-progressive catatonia responsive to zolpidem in a patient with ovarian teratoma-associated paraneoplastic encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Edilberto; McDade, Eric M

    2016-08-01

    Psychiatric symptoms and catatonia are key components of the clinical presentation of paraneoplastic encephalitis; additionally symptoms can be long-lasting and often difficult to treat. We report a 73-year-old patient with rapidly progressive catatonia not responsive to immunotherapy, tumor resection, electroconvulsive therapy, or benzodiazepines who had significant improvement after zolpidem administration. This report suggests that zolpidem is an option in the treatment of patients with refractory catatonia and paraneoplastic encephalitis. PMID:26964475

  20. Insulin therapy in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Ellahham, Samer

    2010-01-01

    Hyperglycemia frequently occurs with acute medical illness, especially among patients with cardiovascular disease, and has been linked to increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Even patients who are normoglycemic can develop hyperglycemia in response to acute metabolic stress. An expanding body of literature describes the benefits of normalizing hyperglycemia with insulin therapy in hospitalized patients. As a result, both the American Diabetes Association and the American College of Endocrinology have developed guidelines for optimal control of hyperglycemia, specifically targeting critically ill, hospitalized patients. Conventional blood glucose values of 140–180 mg/dL are considered desirable and safely achievable in most patients. More aggressive control to <110 mg/dL remains controversial, but has shown benefits in certain patients, such as those in surgical intensive care. Intravenous infusion is often used for initial insulin administration, which can then be transitioned to subcutaneous insulin therapy in those patients who require continued insulin maintenance. This article reviews the data establishing the link between hyperglycemia and its risks of morbidity and mortality, and describes strategies that have proven effective in maintaining glycemic control in high-risk hospitalized patients. PMID:21191429

  1. [Shiatsu therapy for patients and caregivers].

    PubMed

    Bouheret, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Shiatsu therapy is a manual discipline originating from traditional Chinese medicine. It is developing as an interesting form of support in the fight against stress and chronic fatigue. Shiatsu is used in some hospitals to support not only patients but also caregivers, to prevent burnout. PMID:26861088

  2. Tuberculosis: Art Therapy with Patients in Isolation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosner-David, Irene; Ilusorio, Shereen

    1995-01-01

    Tuberculosis is reappearing with increasing prevalence and presenting new treatment challenges. Art therapy, which partly originated in a tuberculosis sanatoria, again serves to assist patients in coping with their illness and confinement. Case examples illustrate aspects of the disease and related emotions and highlight the potential for such an…

  3. Oral surgery in patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Demian, Nagi M; Shum, Jonathan W; Kessel, Ivan L; Eid, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Oral health care in patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy can be complex. Care delivered by a multidisciplinary approach is timely and streamlines the allocation of resources to provide prompt care and to attain favorable outcomes. A hospital dentist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, and a maxillofacial prosthodontist must be involved early to prevent avoidable oral complications. Prevention and thorough preparation are vital before the start of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oral complications must be addressed immediately and, even with the best management, can cause delays and interruption in treatment, with serious consequences for the outcome and prognosis. PMID:24794266

  4. Increased expression of endocytosis-Related proteins in rat hippocampus following 10-day electroconvulsive seizure treatment.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Shingo; Shimizu, Kunio; Nibuya, Masashi; Toda, Hiroyuki; Yoshino, Aihide; Suzuki, Eiji; Kondo, Takashi; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2016-06-15

    Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is clinically used for severe depression and drug-resistant Parkinson's disease, its exact biological background and mechanism have not yet been fully elucidated. Two potential explanations have been presented so far to explain the increased neuroplastic and resilient profiles of multiple ECT administrations. One is the alteration of central neurotransmitter receptor densities and the other is the expressional upregulation of brain derived neurotrophic factor in various brain regions with enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis and mossy fiber sprouting. In the present report, western blot analyses revealed significantly upregulated expression of various endocytosis-related proteins following 10-day electroconvulsive seizure (ECS) treatment in rat hippocampal homogenates and hippocampal lipid raft fractions extracted using an ultracentrifugation procedure. Upregulated proteins included endocytosis-related scaffolding proteins (caveolin-1, flotillin-1, and heavy and light chains of clathrin) and small GTPases (Rab5, Rab7, Rab11, and Rab4) specifically expressed on various types of endosomes. Two scaffolding proteins, caveolin-1 and flotillin-1, were also increased in the lipid raft fraction. Together with our previous finding of increased autophagy-related proteins in the hippocampal region, the present results suggest membrane trafficking machinery is enhanced following 10-day ECS treatment. We consider that the membrane trafficking machinery that transports functional proteins in the neuronal cells and from or into the synaptic membranes is one of the new candidates supporting the cellular and behavioral neuroplastic profiles of ECS treatments in animal experiments and ECT administrations in clinical settings. PMID:27177725

  5. Electroconvulsive shocks decrease α2-adrenoceptor binding in the Flinders rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Lillethorup, Thea P; Iversen, Peter; Fontain, Jesper; Wegener, Gregers; Doudet, Doris J; Landau, Anne M

    2015-03-01

    Despite years of drug development, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) remains the most effective treatment for severe depression. The exact therapeutic mechanism of action of ECT is still unresolved and therefore we tested the hypothesis that the beneficial effect of ECT could in part be the result of increased noradrenergic neurotransmission leading to a decrease in α2-adrenoceptor binding. We have previously shown that both the Flinders sensitive line (FSL) and Flinders resistant line (FRL) rats had altered α2-adrenoceptor binding compared to control Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. In this study, we treated female FSL, FRL and SD rats with electroconvulsive shock (ECS), an animal model of ECT, or sham stimulation for 10 days before brains were removed and cut into 20µm thick sections. Densities of α2-adrenoceptors were measured by quantitative autoradiography in the hippocampus, thalamic nucleus, hypothalamus, amygdala, frontal cortex, insular cortex, and perirhinal cortex using the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist, [(3)H]RX 821002. ECS decreased the binding of α2-adrenoceptors in cortical regions in the FSL and cortical and amygdaloid regions in the control FRL rats compared to their respective sham treated group. The normal SD controls showed no significant response to ECS treatment. Our data suggest that the therapeutic effect of ECS may be mediated through a decrease of α2-adrenoceptors, probably due to a sustained increase in noradrenaline release. These data confirm the importance of the noradrenergic system and the α2-adrenoceptor in depression and in the mechanism of antidepressant treatments. PMID:25604421

  6. Electroconvulsive stimulation reverses anhedonia and cognitive impairments in rats exposed to chronic mild stress.

    PubMed

    Henningsen, K; Woldbye, D P D; Wiborg, O

    2013-12-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy remains the most effective treatment for depression including a fast onset of action. However, this therapeutic approach suffers from some potential drawbacks. In the acute phase this includes amnesia. Electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) has previously been shown to reverse a depression-like state in the chronic mild stress model of depression (CMS), but the effect of ECS on cognition has not previously been investigated. In this study the CMS model was used to induce a depressive-like condition in rats. The study was designed to investigate the acute effect of ECS treatment on working memory and the chronic effect of repeated ECS treatments on depression-like behavior and working memory. The results indicated that, in the acute phase, ECS treatment induced a working memory deficit in healthy controls unexposed to stress, while repeated treatments reversed stress-induced decline in working memory, as well as recovering rats submitted to the CMS paradigm from the anhedonic-like state. Like in the clinical setting, a single ECS exposure was ineffective in inducing remission from a depression-like state. PMID:23597878

  7. Antimicrobial therapy in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Pastene, Bruno; Duclos, Gary; Martin, Claude; Leone, Marc

    2016-04-01

    Providing antibiotics is a life-saving intervention in patients with septic shock. Cultures as clinically appropriate before antimicrobial therapy are required. Guidelines recommend providing broad-spectrum antibiotics within the first hour after recognition of shock. The site of infection, the patient's history and clinical status, and the local ecology all affect the choice of empirical treatment. The appropriateness of this choice is an important determinant of patient outcome. At 48-96h, the antimicrobial treatment should be systematically reassessed based on the clinical course and culture results. Cessation, de-escalation, continuation, or escalation are discussed according to these variables. Unnecessary treatment should be avoided to reduce the emergence of multidrug resistant pathogens. PMID:27062114

  8. Individualising Anticoagulant Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist (VKA) oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have emerged as alternatives to VKAs for the prevention of stroke in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Four NOACS: dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban and edoxaban, have received regulatory approval in Europe from the European Medicines Agency. Numerous factors can influence the decision to prescribe a NOAC, the most important of which are assessment of stroke and bleeding risks. Given the variation in design of the pivotal phase III clinical trials investigating the efficacy and safety of NOACs, and in the absence of head-to-head comparative data, it is impossible to recommend one NOAC over the other. However, NOACS offer the opportunity for individualised therapy based on factors such as renal function, age or patient/doctor preference for once- or twice-daily dosing regimens. Dose reduction of some NOACS should be considered in at-risk patient populations. PMID:27617088

  9. Hormone replacement therapy for the adolescent patient.

    PubMed

    DiVasta, Amy D; Gordon, Catherine M

    2008-01-01

    Pubertal induction and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) during adolescence are conducted with the aim of closely mirroring the pubertal changes that occur in children with a normal hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. The challenge for the clinician is to determine the most appropriate form, dosing, and duration of replacement therapy to achieve that goal in an individual patient. While the optimal regimen remains unclear and data in adolescents are limited, this review presents the evidence available to clinicians as they care for adolescent girls and young women. Both the goals and phases of HRT are reviewed, and commonly used medication regimens are presented. Both the benefits and risks associated with various methods of HRT are also discussed, as are special issues of concern regarding adolescent HRT, including eating disorders and bone health. PMID:18574226

  10. Mirror neuron therapy for hemispatial neglect patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xin; Ji, Xiangtong; Ye, Qian; Chen, Wenli; Ni, Jun; Shen, Guangyu; Zhang, Bing; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Shan, Chunlei

    2015-01-01

    Mirror neuron system(MNS) based therapy has been employed to treat stroke induced movement disorders. However, its potential effects on patients with hemispatial neglect were uninvestigated. The present study set out to test the therapeutic efficiency of video watching of series of hand actions/movements (protocol A) in two patients with left hemispatial neglect, due to the right hemisphere stroke. The video containing dynamic landscape of natural scene or cities but not human/animals was used as the protocol B. The “ABA” training procedure for 3 weeks therefore allows us to internally control the individual differences. Before and after each week of training, the Chinese behavioral inattention test- Hongkong version (CBIT-HK) was implemented to evaluate the hemispatial neglect severity. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment was implemented in two health subjects to reveal the difference of brain activation between protocol A and B. The results showed that protocol A rather than protocol B significantly improved the CBIT-HK scores at first and third weeks, respectively. Protocol A induced more bilateral activations including right inferior parietal lobe (supramarginal gyrus), which belongs to MNS and is also critical region resulting to hemineglect. Conclusion: MNS activation can provide a novel therapy for hemispatial neglect patients. PMID:25727354

  11. Nicotine replacement therapies: patient safety and persistence

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Stuart G; Shiffman, Saul; Gitchell, Joseph G

    2011-01-01

    Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) has become a central part of the treatment of nicotine dependence. However, NRT’s potential efficacy is limited to some extent by patient adherence and persistence. Here we review the relationship between NRT compliance and adherence, and overall treatment outcome. We then examine the factors that likely impact on treatment compliance and persistence, with a special focus on users’ perceptions of treatment safety and efficacy as possible mediators. Potential clinical strategies for improving suboptimal medication use are also discussed. PMID:22915971

  12. Impact on Psychiatric Interns of Watching Live Electroconvulsive Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazdag, Gabor; Sebestyen, Gabor; Ungvari, Gabor S.; Tolna, Judit

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Watching a live electroconvulsive treatment (ECT) has both positive and negative effects on spectators. The authors aim to survey the attitude change towards ECT in interns after watching a live ECT session. Methods: A 23-item questionnaire was administered to 66 interns before and after watching ECT. Results: In five statements, the…

  13. [Therapy of pain in multiborbid elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Junker, Uwe; Lux, Eberhard Albert; Neugebauer, Edmund A G; Basler, Heinz-Dieter

    2009-05-01

    All human organ systems are prone to age-related physiological changes. Functional impairment is especially found in the liver, the kidneys, the nervous system, the gastrointestinal tract and the blood vessels. Changes in metabolism cause, e.g., changes in the composition of blood, reduction in neurotransmitters and the respective receptors, changes in calcium homeostasis with consequences for the stability of bones. As with any pharmacotherapy, the treatment of pain must consider these age-related factors. Adequate pain treatment is especially important in elderly patients, because the number of morbidities increases together with the number of pain conditions of different origin. In Germany, most patients with severe pain are undertreated. Although tumor pain, e.g., can be relieved in up to 95% of patients, up to 40% of patients under medical treatment still have pain, the German Pain League states. The WHO's pain ladder, developed in the 1980ies, is still regarded as an appropriate guideline, albeit too often disregarded by physicians, reflecting the reserve of patients and doctors towards opioids. With progress in opioid therapy, however, experts tend to early prescription of step-III-analgesics without sticking to the steps of the WHO ladder. Constipation, the major side effect of opioids, can be overcome by co-medication with laxatives. The combination of slow-release oxycodone with naloxone, an orally given antagonist of intestinal micro-receptors is effective as analgesic and maintains the normal bowel function. PMID:19469187

  14. Electroconvulsive Treatment: Hypotheses about Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Fosse, Roar; Read, John

    2013-01-01

    No consensus has been reached on the mode of action of electroconvulsive treatment (ECT). We suggest that two features may aid in the delineation of the involved mechanisms. First, when effective, ECT would be likely to affect brain functions that are typically altered in its primary recipient group, people with severe depression. Central among these are the frontal and temporal lobes, the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress axis, and the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. Second, the involved mechanisms should be affected for a time period that matches the average endurance of clinical effects, which is indicated to be several days to a few weeks. To identify effects upon frontal and temporal lobe functioning we reviewed human studies using EEG, PET, SPECT, and fMRI. Effects upon the HPA axis and the dopamine system were assessed by reviewing both human and animal studies. The EEG studies indicate that ECT decelerates neural activity in the frontal and temporal lobes (increased delta and theta wave activity) for weeks to months. Comparable findings are reported from PET and SPECT studies, with reduced cerebral blood flow (functional deactivation) for weeks to months after treatment. The EEG deceleration and functional deactivation following ECT are statistically associated with reduced depression scores. FMRI studies indicate that ECT flattens the pattern of activation and deactivation that is associated with cognitive task performance and alters cortical functional connectivity in the ultra slow frequency range. A common finding from human and animal studies is that ECT acutely activates both the HPA axis and the dopamine system. In considering this evidence, we hypothesize that ECT affects the brain in a similar manner as severe stress or brain trauma which activates the HPA axis and the dopamine system and may compromise frontotemporal functions. PMID:23986724

  15. Care of the patient receiving radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yasko, J.M.

    1982-12-01

    External radiation therapy, or teletherapy, is the use of ionizing radiation to destroy cancer cells. Clinical use of ionizing radiation as treatment for cancer began with the discovery of x-rays in 1895, the identification of natural radioactivity (radium) in 1896, and the first reported cure of cancer, a basal cell epithelioma, induced by radiation in 1899. Initially, radiation was administered as a single large dose and produced severe, life-threatening side effects. The basis for the use of ionizing radiation in daily increments for a period of weeks was provided by Regaud in 1922; ten years later, Coutard clinically developed the method of dose fractionation, which remains in use today. Although the use of ionizing radiation as a treatment is over eighty years old, only in recent years have advancements in its clinical application been based on research related to the biologic effect of radiation on human cells. To effectively care for the patient prior to, during, and at the completion of external radiation therapy, the nurse must know the physical and biologic basis of external radiation therapy and its clinical application.

  16. Modified sequential therapy vs quadruple therapy as initial therapy in patients with Helicobacter infection

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiao-Min; Nong, Gao-Hui; Chen, Mei-Zu; Huang, Xue-Ping; Cong, Yun-Yan; Huang, Yi-Ying; Wu, Bai-He; Wei, Jin-Qi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of modified sequential therapy and to compare modified sequential therapy with standard quadruple therapy for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication. METHODS: In total, 200 consecutive patients who were diagnosed with H. pylori-infected chronic gastritis by electronic endoscopy and rapid urease testing from December 2012 to October 2013 were enrolled in this study. The patients had not previously received H. pylori eradication treatment, and were randomized into two groups. The patients in Group A (n = 101) were treated with ilaprazole + bismuth potassium citrate + amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium + levofloxacin, and the patients in Group B (n = 99) were administered a modified sequential therapy composed of ilaprazole at 5 mg bid and amoxicillin and clavulanate potassium at 914 mg for the first five days followed by ilaprazole at 5 mg bid, furazolidone at 100 mg bid and levofloxacin at 500 mg qid for the next five days. Four to six weeks after the end of treatment, a 14C-urea breath test was performed for all the subjects to confirm the eradication of H. pylori. The intention-to-treat and per-protocol eradication rates were determined. RESULTS: A total of 190 of the 200 patients completed the study. All 200 patients were included in the intention-to-treat analysis, whereas 190 patients were included in the per-protocol analysis. In the intention-to-treat analysis, the rates of H. pylori eradication in Groups A and B were 85.15% (86/101) and 81.82% (81/99), respectively. In the per-protocol analysis, the H. pylori eradication rates in Groups A and B were 88.66% (86/97) and 87.09% (81/93), respectively. No significant difference was observed (χ2 = 0.109, P = 0.741) in the eradication rate between Groups A and B. The rates of adverse effects observed in the groups were similar at 6.19% (6/97) for Group A and 7.53% (7/93) for Group B (P > 0.05). No mortality or major morbidities were observed in any of the patients

  17. Which depressed patients respond to ECT? The Nottingham results.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, D; Gill, D; Gregory, S; Shawcross, C

    1995-04-01

    The Nottingham electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) trial was designed with a simulated treatment group to test prospectively the power of delusions or agitation to predict response. The response of patients without retardation and without delusions was examined retrospectively as well because of doubts over the usefulness of ECT for this subgroup. Deluded/nondeluded and agitated/nonagitated subtypes responded significantly to real treatment. Neither delusions nor agitation predicted greater treatment response. Patients without retardation, with or without delusions responded to real ECT, supporting the continuing prescription of ECT for these patients as well. PMID:7790678

  18. Cellular cardiac regenerative therapy in which patients?

    PubMed

    Chachques, Juan C

    2009-08-01

    Cell-based myocardial regenerative therapy is undergoing experimental and clinical trials in order to limit the consequences of decreased contractile function and compliance of damaged ventricles owing to ischemic and nonischemic myocardial diseases. A variety of myogenic and angiogenic cell types have been proposed, such as skeletal myoblasts, mononuclear and mesenchymal bone marrow cells, circulating blood-derived progenitors, adipose-derived stromal cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, umbilical cord cells, endometrial mesenchymal stem cells, adult testis pluripotent stem cells and embryonic cells. Current indications for stem cell therapy concern patients who have had a left- or right-ventricular infarction or idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathies. Other indications and potential applications include patients with diabetic cardiomyopathy, Chagas heart disease (American trypanosomiasis), ischemic mitral regurgitation, left ventricular noncompacted myocardium and pediatric cardiomyopathy. Suitable sources of cells for cardiac implant will depend on the types of diseases to be treated. For acute myocardial infarction, a cell that reduces myocardial necrosis and augments vascular blood flow will be desirable. For heart failure, cells that replace or promote myogenesis, reverse apoptopic mechanisms and reactivate dormant cell processes will be useful. It is important to note that stem cells are not an alternative to heart transplantation; selected patients should be in an early stage of heart failure as the goal of this regenerative approach is to avoid or delay organ transplantation. Since the cell niche provides crucial support needed for stem cell maintenance, the most interesting and realistic perspectives include the association of intramyocardial cell transplantation with tissue-engineered scaffolds and multisite cardiac pacing in order to transform a passive regenerative approach into a 'dynamic cellular support', a promising method for the creation of

  19. Post-stroke depression therapy: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Turner, Alyna; Dean, Olivia; Sureda, Antoni; Mohammad, Seyed

    2014-01-01

    Post-stroke depression is an important psychological consequence of ischemic stroke, and affects around one third of stroke patients at any time post-stroke. It has a negative impact on patient morbidity and mortality, and as such development of effective post-stroke recognition and treatment strategies are very important. There are several therapeutic strategies for post-stroke depression, including both pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches. In this review, we present evidence regarding the underlying biology of post-stroke depression, commonalities between post-stroke depression and Major Depressive Disorder and explore several treatment approaches, including antidepressant therapy, psychotherapy, surgical therapy, electroconvulsive therapy, acupuncture, music therapy and natural products. Further experimental and clinical studies are required, particularly in emerging fields such as the role of nutraceuticals in the treatment of stroke. PMID:24852795

  20. Optimizing antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Vitrat, Virginie; Hautefeuille, Serge; Janssen, Cécile; Bougon, David; Sirodot, Michel; Pagani, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Critically ill patients with infection in the intensive care unit (ICU) would certainly benefit from timely bacterial identification and effective antimicrobial treatment. Diagnostic techniques have clearly improved in the last years and allow earlier identification of bacterial strains in some cases, but these techniques are still quite expensive and not readily available in all institutions. Moreover, the ever increasing rates of resistance to antimicrobials, especially in Gram-negative pathogens, are threatening the outcome for such patients because of the lack of effective medical treatment; ICU physicians are therefore resorting to combination therapies to overcome resistance, with the direct consequence of promoting further resistance. A more appropriate use of available antimicrobials in the ICU should be pursued, and adjustments in doses and dosing through pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have recently shown promising results in improving outcomes and reducing antimicrobial resistance. The aim of multidisciplinary antimicrobial stewardship programs is to improve antimicrobial prescription, and in this review we analyze the available experiences of such programs carried out in ICUs, with emphasis on results, challenges, and pitfalls. Any effective intervention aimed at improving antibiotic usage in ICUs must be brought about at the present time; otherwise, we will face the challenge of intractable infections in critically ill patients in the near future. PMID:25349478

  1. Optimizing antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Vitrat, Virginie; Hautefeuille, Serge; Janssen, Cécile; Bougon, David; Sirodot, Michel; Pagani, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Critically ill patients with infection in the intensive care unit (ICU) would certainly benefit from timely bacterial identification and effective antimicrobial treatment. Diagnostic techniques have clearly improved in the last years and allow earlier identification of bacterial strains in some cases, but these techniques are still quite expensive and not readily available in all institutions. Moreover, the ever increasing rates of resistance to antimicrobials, especially in Gram-negative pathogens, are threatening the outcome for such patients because of the lack of effective medical treatment; ICU physicians are therefore resorting to combination therapies to overcome resistance, with the direct consequence of promoting further resistance. A more appropriate use of available antimicrobials in the ICU should be pursued, and adjustments in doses and dosing through pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have recently shown promising results in improving outcomes and reducing antimicrobial resistance. The aim of multidisciplinary antimicrobial stewardship programs is to improve antimicrobial prescription, and in this review we analyze the available experiences of such programs carried out in ICUs, with emphasis on results, challenges, and pitfalls. Any effective intervention aimed at improving antibiotic usage in ICUs must be brought about at the present time; otherwise, we will face the challenge of intractable infections in critically ill patients in the near future. PMID:25349478

  2. Suitability of antiplatelet therapy in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Orozco, M J; Perseguer-Torregrosa, Z; Gil-Guillén, V F; Palazón-Bru, A; Orozco-Beltran, D; Carratalá-Munuera, C

    2015-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy (AT) is indicated in hypertensive patients with increased cardiovascular risk. The literature about the adequate or inadequate prescription of AT is scarce. We conducted a prospective descriptive study to quantify therapeutic inertia and non-guideline-recommended prescription (NGRP) of AT (aspirinor clopidogrel or both), and to assess associated factors, calculating the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) from multivariate models. In 2007-2009, 712 primary health-care hypertensive patients in a Spanish region were enrolled. Inertia was defined as the lack of an AT prescription, despite being indicated by guidelines, whereas NGRP was defined as AT prescription when there was no guideline recommendation. We also recorded cardiovascular variables. Inertia and NGRP were quantified for primary and secondary prevention. Of 108 patients in secondary prevention, 53 had inertia (49.1%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 39.6-58.5%). Associated profile: female (OR=0.460, P=0.091), no dyslipidemia (OR=0.393, P=0.048), no coronary heart disease (OR=0.215, P=0.001) and high diastolic blood pressure (OR=1.076, P=0.016). In primary prevention, NGRP was present in 69 of 595 patients (11.6%, 95% CI: 9.0-14.2%). Associated profile: male (OR=1.610, P=0.089), smoking (OR=2.055, P=0.045), dyslipidemia (OR=3.227, P<0.001) and diabetes (OR=2.795, P<0.001). Although certain factors were clearly associated with these phenomena much still remains to be learnt. PMID:24694801

  3. Complementary and alternative therapies and health literacy in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dişsiz, Gülçin; Yilmaz, Medine

    2016-05-01

    The aim was to determine health literacy and the use of complementary and alternative therapies (CATs) in patients with cancer and to investigate the relationship between CAT usage and health literacy. The study cohort consisted of 250 oncology patients. The Patient Interview Form and the Adult Literacy in Medicine Scale were used for collecting data. The use of at least one CAT was reported by 24% of the patients surveyed. Herbal therapies (32.6%) constituted the most popular method, and the most popular herbal therapy was Nigella sativa (54.6%). A total of 29.8% of the patients using CATs reported using herbal therapies for an enhanced immune system. Illiterate patients and those who live in rural areas/towns displayed low levels of health literacy. Healthcare professionals should investigate patients' use of complementary and alternative approaches, and health literacy should be improved so that patients can be informed regarding the possible benefits and disadvantages of CATs. PMID:27157956

  4. Efficacy of Mirror Therapy Containing Functional Tasks in Poststroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of mirror therapy containing functional tasks on upper extremity function and activities of daily living in patients with subacute stroke. Methods The subjects were randomly divided into two groups: the mirror therapy group (30 patients) and the sham therapy group (30 patients). The mirror therapy group underwent a mirror therapy program together with conventional therapy for 20 minutes per day on 5 days per week for 4 weeks. The control group received a sham conventional therapy program under the same schedule as the mirror therapy group. The Fugl-Meyer Motor Function Assessment (FMA), Brunnstrom motor recovery stage, and Modified Barthel Index (MBI) were evaluated 4 weeks after the treatment. Results The upper extremity function on the affected side and ability to perform daily life activities after the intervention were significantly improved in both groups. After 4 weeks of intervention, improvements in the FMA (p=0.027) and MBI (p=0.041) were significantly greater in the mirror therapy group than the sham therapy group. Conclusion In this study, we found that the mirror therapy containing functional task was effective in terms of improving the upper extremity functions and activities of daily living in patients with subacute stroke. PMID:27606269

  5. [Optimization of pharmacological therapy for weakness syndrome in incurable patients].

    PubMed

    Ryazankina, A A; Rozengard, S A; Glushchenko, V A; Karitsky, A P; Kvashnin, A V

    2015-01-01

    In this work there is considered the possibility of correction of therapy for weakness syndrome in incurable patients with the use of drugs affecting dopamine and serotonin exchanges. It is showed that the use of 100 mg of ladasten, 16 mg of ondansetron orally per day and 50 mg of agomelatine per night is more effective in therapy for fatigue/weakness syndrome in incurable cancer patients compared to standard therapy. PMID:26087610

  6. A Case Report of Prolonged Apnea during ECT in a Patient with Suicidal Attempt by Organophosphorus Poison

    PubMed Central

    Moudi, Sussan; Alijanpour, Ebrahim; Manouchehri, Ali-asghar; Jafarian, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides have been used in some cases for suicidal attempts. Such poison can affect plasma cholinesterase activity. The case was a 47-year-old man hospitalized due to suicide attempt with swallowing agricultural poison. The patient, diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD), underwent treatment with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). At the first ECT session, the patient developed apnea for 45 minutes following receiving 20 mg succinylcholine. The patient was intubated; after restoration of respiration depth and rate, the patient was extubated. Collectively, in cases with history of suicide attempts, taking organophosphorus pesticides should be warn for pre-ECT anesthesia. PMID:24644472

  7. A Case Report of Prolonged Apnea during ECT in a Patient with Suicidal Attempt by Organophosphorus Poison.

    PubMed

    Moudi, Sussan; Alijanpour, Ebrahim; Manouchehri, Ali-Asghar; Jafarian, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides have been used in some cases for suicidal attempts. Such poison can affect plasma cholinesterase activity. The case was a 47-year-old man hospitalized due to suicide attempt with swallowing agricultural poison. The patient, diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD), underwent treatment with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). At the first ECT session, the patient developed apnea for 45 minutes following receiving 20 mg succinylcholine. The patient was intubated; after restoration of respiration depth and rate, the patient was extubated. Collectively, in cases with history of suicide attempts, taking organophosphorus pesticides should be warn for pre-ECT anesthesia. PMID:24644472

  8. Management of patients with hepatitis B who require immunosuppressive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jessica P.; Lok, Anna S.-F.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic HBV infection are at risk of reactivation of HBV should they require immunosuppressive therapies for a variety of clinical settings, including chemotherapy for patients with cancer, immunosuppression for solid organ and stem cell transplant recipients, and use of anti-CD20 antibodies, TNF inhibitors, or corticosteroids in patients with oncological, gastrointestinal, rheumatological or dermatological conditions. The key to preventing HBV reactivation is the identification of patients with HBV infection prior to immunosuppressive therapy, initiation of prophylactic antiviral therapy in patients at moderate or high risk of HBV reactivation, and close monitoring of other patients so that antiviral therapy can be initiated at the first sign of HBV reactivation. Unfortunately, many patients infected with HBV are unaware of their infection or risk factors, and physicians often do not have sufficient time to systematically assess patients for risk factors for HBV prior to starting immunosuppressive therapy. In this article, we review the incidence, risk factors and outcomes of HBV reactivation, and the efficacy of antiviral therapy in preventing its occurrence. We also propose an algorithm for managing patients with HBV infection who require immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:24247262

  9. Associations between therapy skills and patient experiences of change processes in cognitive behavioral therapy for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Wittorf, Andreas; Jakobi-Malterre, Ute E; Beulen, Silke; Bechdolf, Andreas; Müller, Bernhard W; Sartory, Gudrun; Wagner, Michael; Wiedemann, Georg; Wölwer, Wolfgang; Herrlich, Jutta; Klingberg, Stefan

    2013-12-30

    Despite the promising findings in relation to the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for psychosis (CBTp), little attention has been paid to the therapy skills necessary to deliver CBTp and to the influence of such skills on processes underlying therapeutic change. Our study investigated the associations between general and technical therapy skills and patient experiences of change processes in CBTp. The study sample consisted of 79 patients with psychotic disorders who had undergone CBTp. We randomly selected one tape-recorded therapy session from each of the cases. General and technical therapy skills were assessed by the Cognitive Therapy Scale for Psychosis. The Bern Post Session Report for Patients was applied to measure patient experiences of general change processes in the sense of Grawe's psychological therapy. General skills, such as feedback and understanding, explained 23% of the variance of patients' self-esteem experience, but up to 10% of the variance of mastery, clarification, and contentment experiences. The technical skill of guided discovery consistently showed negative associations with patients' alliance, contentment, and control experiences. The study points to the importance of general therapy skills for patient experiences of change processes in CBTp. Some technical skills, however, could detrimentally affect the therapeutic relationship. PMID:23992793

  10. Patient satisfaction with glaucoma therapy: reality or myth?

    PubMed

    Lemij, Hans G; Hoevenaars, Juliette Gmm; van der Windt, Cees; Baudouin, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    While safe and effective treatments for glaucoma exist, their effectiveness is compromised by poor compliance. Patients who have problems with their topical glaucoma medication are acknowledged to be at higher risk for poor compliance, frequent medication switching, and surgery. Patient satisfaction with therapy and its associated benefits have until recently taken second place to efficacy. The present study is a transverse cross-sectional epidemiological survey among glaucoma patients receiving therapy with prostaglandin analogs. The primary objective was to determine and characterize patient satisfaction with glaucoma therapy, and the secondary objective was to identify factors that may contribute to poor patient satisfaction. Ophthalmologists in the Netherlands included 199 patients and 164 were analyzed. Patients were predominantly elderly with early, primary, open angle glaucoma. Eighty-nine percent of them stated they were satisfied or very satisfied with their treatment. However, signs of ocular surface disorder on ophthalmological examination were evident in 44% of patients, corneal fluorescein staining was positive in 28% of patients, and 38% of patients were using tear substitutes. The prevalence of blepharitis/meibomian gland dysfunction and dry eye was more than twice as high after the commencement of therapy compared with before therapy. Univariate analysis revealed that patient dissatisfaction with their glaucoma therapy was statistically significantly (P<0.001) associated with the presence of ocular surface disease, hyperemia, ocular signs, symptoms upon and between instillation, and the use of tear substitutes. Apparently, patients in the present study are satisfied with their treatment; 89% expressed satisfaction compared with only 11% who professed dissatisfaction. The results suggest that even if local adverse events and ocular surface disease, in particular, contribute to glaucoma patient dissatisfaction, only a minority of patients expressed

  11. Effects of Music Therapy on Mood in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Soo; Choi, Jung Hwa; Im, Sang-Hee; Jung, Kang Jae; Cha, Young A; Jung, Chul Oh; Yoon, Yeo Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of music therapy on depressive mood and anxiety in post-stroke patients and evaluate satisfaction levels of patients and caregivers. Materials and Methods Eighteen post-stroke patients, within six months of onset and mini mental status examination score of over 20, participated in this study. Patients were divided into music and control groups. The experimental group participated in the music therapy program for four weeks. Psychological status was evaluated with the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) before and after music therapy. Satisfaction with music therapy was evaluated by a questionnaire. Results BAI and BDI scores showed a greater decrease in the music group than the control group after music therapy, but only the decrease of BDI scores were statistically significant (p=0.048). Music therapy satisfaction in patients and caregivers was affirmative. Conclusion Music therapy has a positive effect on mood in post-stroke patients and may be beneficial for mood improvement with stroke. These results are encouraging, but further studies are needed in this field. PMID:22028163

  12. [Shock therapy and psychosurgery in the early German Democratic Republic (GDR)].

    PubMed

    Rzesnitzek, L

    2015-11-01

    Patient files, textbooks and published articles of the time show that the wide range of psychiatric therapies of the 1950s and 1960s was also used in the early German Democratic Republic (GDR). The use of insulin coma therapy, cardiazol and electroconvulsive therapies and especially of leucotomy in the GDR must not only be seen in the context of the international development and debate concerning these therapies up to the introduction of psychopharmaceutic therapy but also, in a similar way as in the Federal Republic of Germany, in relation to the locally sometimes different availability of insulin and cardiazol in the post-war period, different schools of academic thought and scientific research interest and priorities of the clinics concerned. PMID:25962346

  13. CAM therapies among primary care patients using opioid therapy for chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Sara; Rabago, David P; Mundt, Marlon P; Fleming, Michael F

    2007-01-01

    Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is an increasingly common therapy used to treat chronic pain syndromes. However; there is limited information on the utilization and efficacy of CAM therapy in primary care patients receiving long-term opioid therapy. Method A survey of CAM therapy was conducted with a systematic sample of 908 primary care patients receiving opioids as a primary treatment method for chronic pain. Subjects completed a questionnaire designed to assess utilization, efficacy and costs of CAM therapies in this population. Results Patients were treated for a variety of pain problems including low back pain (38.4%), headaches (9.9%), and knee pain (6.5%); the average duration of pain was 16 years. The median morphine equivalent opioid dose was 41 mg/day, and the mean dose was 92 mg/day. Forty-four percent of the sample reported CAM therapy use in the past 12 months. Therapies utilized included massage therapy (27.3%, n = 248), chiropractic treatment (17.8%, n = 162), acupuncture (7.6%, n = 69), yoga (6.1%, n = 55), herbs and supplements (6.8%, n = 62), and prolotherapy (5.9%, n = 54). CAM utilization was significantly related to age female gender, pain severity income pain diagnosis of neck and upper back pain, and illicit drug use. Medical insurance covered chiropractic treatment (81.8%) and prolotherapy (87.7%), whereas patients primarily paid for other CAM therapies. Over half the sample reported that one or more of the CAM therapies were helpful. Conclusion This study suggests CAM therapy is widely used by patients receiving opioids for chronic pain. Whether opioids can be reduced by introducing such therapies remains to be studied. PMID:17506893

  14. Gerson Therapy (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the use of the Gerson therapy as a treatment for people with cancer. Note: The information in this summary is no longer being updated and is provided for reference purposes only.

  15. Exercise in Treating Hypertension: Tailoring Therapies for Active Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chintanadilok, Jirayos

    2002-01-01

    Exercise can be definitive therapy for some, and adjunctive therapy for many, people with hypertension, though people with secondary hypertension may not derive as much benefit. Low-to- moderate-intensity aerobic exercise can help with mild hypertension and reduce drug dosages in more severe cases. For active patients requiring medication,…

  16. [Speech therapy for cognitive disorders in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Marquis, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The aim of providing speech therapy to elderly patients, in the framework of a personalised approach, is to help them maintain their autonomy and delay their move to a specialised hospital. The family and caregivers play an essential role in ensuring the success of this therapy. PMID:25137959

  17. 4.6 Doses to Patients in Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.6 Doses to Patients in Therapy' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy' with the contents:

  18. [Snoezelen and animal-assisted therapy in dementia patients].

    PubMed

    Javelot, Hervé; Antoine-Bernard, Emilie; Garat, Jennifer; Javelot, Thierry; Weiner, Luisa; Mervelay, Véroníque

    2012-01-01

    A number of non medication-based methods of nursing care for geriatric patients have been developed over recent decades to treat non cognitive symptoms associated with dementia. Among these, Snoezelen rooms for multisensory behavioural therapy and animal-assisted therapy emerge as innovative strategies which could potentially complement other more frequently developed methods such as physical activity. PMID:22611886

  19. New Therapies Offer Valuable Options for Patients with Melanoma

    Cancer.gov

    Two phase III clinical trials of new therapies for patients with metastatic melanoma presented in June at the 2011 ASCO conference confirmed that vemurafenib and ipilimumab (Yervoy™) offer valuable new options for the disease.

  20. Persistent Genital Arousal Disorder: Confluent Patient History of Agitated Depression, Paroxetine Cessation, and a Tarlov Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Hans Mørch

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a woman suffering from persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD) after paroxetine cessation. She was admitted to a psychiatric department and diagnosed with agitated depression. Physical investigation showed no gynaecological or neurological explanation; however, a pelvic MRI scan revealed a Tarlov cyst. Size and placement of the cyst could not explain the patient's symptoms; thus neurosurgical approach would not be helpful. Her depression was treated with antidepressant with little effect. Electroconvulsive therapy improved the patient's symptoms though they did not fully resolve. More awareness of PGAD and thorough interdisciplinary conferences are necessary to insure an unequivocal treatment strategy. PMID:25525548

  1. [Innovative therapies for metastatic melanoma in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Du-Thanh, A; Lesage, C; Ferreira, E; Dereure, O; Guillot, B

    2015-10-01

    The mortality rate for malignant melanoma is higher in elderly patients aged 75 years or more, with over 25% of melanomas being diagnosed in this population. This poorer prognosis might perhaps be improved by emerging targeted therapies and immunotherapy, although these agents must be prescribed with care in this rather fragile population. The purpose of our review of the literature concerning phase-2 and -3 published trials of these innovative molecules was to examine their optimal use in elderly patients presenting metastatic malignant melanoma. Most of the trials examined included elderly patients and some were analyzed by age sub-groups. In conclusion, elderly patients with ECOG 0/1 status can be given ipilimumab or vemurafenib as first-line therapy depending on tumoral BRaf mutation status. The benefit of combined targeted therapies does not seem to apply consistently in elderly patients and their use must be discussed. Further specific data must be collected in elderly patients concerning anti-PD1 molecules. For more fragile patients, risk scales or scores should enable more accurate use of innovative therapies in metastatic melanoma. Moreover, physicians must be aware of the common drug interactions with targeted therapies, since elderly patients are often taking several concomitant drugs. PMID:25986740

  2. The treatment of ambulatory venous ulcer patients with warming therapy.

    PubMed

    Cherry, G W; Wilson, J

    1999-09-01

    The standard treatment for ambulatory patients with venous ulcers is compression therapy. The aim of the present study was to develop a warming regimen to treat venous ulcers, which could be easily used by patients in their home or work environment. Five patients with a mean age of 66 years (51-80) who had venous ulcers for an average of 8 months (3-13) were treated with zip-up compression stockings (gradient compression 40 mmHg at the ankle) and a warming dressing. The latter was controlled by the patient to warm the ulcer to 38 degrees C for 1 hour three times daily. Warming therapy was carried out for 2 weeks and patients' ulcers were monitored for healing for 12 weeks. In all but one of the patients following warming therapy, there was marked increase in granulation tissue as well as a decrease in pain. Four of the five patients completely healed during the 12-week period. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated that warming therapy can be used by ambulatory patients with venous ulcers in conjunction with compression therapy. A randomized prospective study is in progress. PMID:10655876

  3. Effect of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy and Mirror Therapy for Patients With Subacute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jin A; Koo, Bon Il; Shin, Myung Jun; Shin, Yong Beom; Ko, Hyun-Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) and combined mirror therapy for inpatient rehabilitation of the patients with subacute stroke. Methods Twenty-six patients with subacute stroke were enrolled and randomly divided into three groups: CIMT combined with mirror therapy group, CIMT only group, and control group. Two weeks of CIMT for 6 hours a day with or without mirror therapy for 30 minutes a day were performed under supervision. All groups received conventional occupational therapy for 40 minutes a day for the same period. The CIMT only group and control group also received additional self-exercise to substitute for mirror therapy. The box and block test, 9-hole Pegboard test, grip strength, Brunnstrom stage, Wolf motor function test, Fugl-Meyer assessment, and the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index were performed prior to and two weeks after the treatment. Results After two weeks of treatment, the CIMT groups with and without mirror therapy showed higher improvement (p<0.05) than the control group, in most of functional assessments for hemiplegic upper extremity. The CIMT combined with mirror therapy group showed higher improvement than CIMT only group in box and block test, 9-hole Pegboard test, and grip strength, which represent fine motor functions of the upper extremity. Conclusion The short-term CIMT combined with mirror therapy group showed more improvement compared to CIMT only group and control group, in the fine motor functions of hemiplegic upper extremity for the patients with subacute stroke. PMID:25229024

  4. Patient experience of computerised therapy for depression in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Sarah E; Lovell, Karina; Bower, Peter; Gilbody, Simon; Littlewood, Elizabeth; Lester, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore patient experience of computerised cognitive behaviour therapy (cCBT) for depression in a pragmatic randomised controlled trial (Randomised Evaluation of the Effectiveness and Acceptability of Computerised Therapy, REEACT). Design Qualitative semistructured interviews with 36 participants. Participants Depressed patients with a Patient Health Questionnaire 9 of 10 or above recruited into the REEACT randomised controlled trial. Setting Primary care settings in England. Results Participant experience was on a continuum, with some patients unable or unwilling to accept psychological therapy without interpersonal contact while others appreciated the enhanced anonymity and flexibility of cCBT. The majority of patients were ambivalent, recognising the potential benefits offered by cCBT but struggling with challenges posed by the severity of their illness, lack of support and limited personalisation of programme content. Low completion rates were commonly reported, although more positive patients reported greater engagement. Both positive and ambivalent patients perceived a need for monitoring or follow-up to support completion, while negative patients reported deliberate non-adherence due to dissatisfaction with the programme. Patients also reported that severity of depression impacted on engagement, and viewed cCBT as unsuitable for patients undergoing more severe depressive episodes. Conclusions The study demonstrates both the unique demands and benefits of computerised therapy. cCBT was preferred by some patients and rejected by others, but the majority of patients were ambivalent about the therapy. cCBT could be offered within a menu of options in stepped care if matched appropriately to individual patients or could be offered with enhanced support to appeal to a greater number of patients. Trial registration number ISRCTN91947481. PMID:26621513

  5. Gestalt Therapy with the Dying Patient: Integrative Work Using Clay, Poetry Therapy, and Creative Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petzold, Hilarion G.

    1982-01-01

    Reports the use of death therapy with a cancer patient. Gestalt therapy and creative media were used to facilitate an integration of life and a sense of balance with life. Suggests that counseling the dying means walking along a stretch of the path together. (Author)

  6. Body awareness therapy for patients with fibromyalgia and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Gard, Gunvor

    2005-06-17

    There are several therapies designed to increase body awareness. They are commonly known as body awareness therapies (BAT) and include Basic BAT, Mensendieck and Feldenkrais therapy. A focus on emotions is important in all these therapies. In this article the aim and development of Basic BAT is described together with evaluations of treatments including Basic BAT. Multidisciplinary studies have shown that Basic BAT can increase health-related quality of life and cost-effectiveness. However Basic BAT needs to be further studied in relation to patients with fibromyalgia (FM) and chronic pain. Studies so far indicate that Basic BAT has positive effects. PMID:16012065

  7. Cardiac resynchronization therapy: optimizing the device, optimizing the patient.

    PubMed

    Trupp, Robin J

    2004-01-01

    Heart failure is a major health problem in the United States, associated with high morbidity, mortality, and economic burden. Despite recent advances in pharmacological treatments to attenuate disease progression, medications become relatively ineffective, resulting in worsening congestive symptoms and increased exercise intolerance. Cardiac resynchronization therapy provides a new adjunct for heart failure patients who remain symptomatic despite optimized medical therapies. This article discusses cardiac resynchronization therapy and measures that should be considered to ensure proper functioning of the device and improved quality of life for patients. PMID:15326978

  8. Transforming the patient experience in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, J Andrew

    2003-01-01

    Healthcare providers are paying more attention to behavioral neuroscience research that confirms what patients intuitively know: physical environments deeply influence one's sense of well being. Recognizing the importance of comforting environments, healthcare providers have been working with architects to design new facilities around the patient's experience. This doesn't mean that functional and technical considerations are unimportant; it's just that the patient's experience comes first. The patient is the most important user of a healthcare facility, and yet is the only user not sitting at the table during design meetings. For this reason, some healthcare providers work with their architects to develop the conceptual design from the patient's standpoint before seeking detailed staff input. Many indignities experienced by patients may be unwittingly imposed by caring and dedicated professional staff. Medical clutter, waste containers, water coolers, coffee makers, personal displays and decorations add up to create a distressing level of visual chaos. Departments are required to eliminate clutter and maintain a calm, pleasing environment. Employees appreciate a well-designed physical environment, too. Facilities that reduce stress for patients have the same impact on staff, alleviating tension as they care for patients. Putting the patient's experience first need not add capital construction cost to a project. Rearranging spaces for the sake of the patient adds no more to floor area. Added windows, skylights and interior finishes can add cost, but the incremental cost of these amenities is small in proportion to the total project cost. Facilities project powerful visual dues about an institution's values. Providers who carefully plan for a positive patient experience traditionally enjoy strong reputations and exceptional customer loyalty. These providers know that good design is not simply wrapping a pretty facade around a building or decorating the lobby. Good

  9. Radiation therapy in the management of patients with mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, W. Jr.; Antman, K.H.; Greenberger, J.S.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Chaffey, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    The results of radiation therapy in the management of 27 patients with malignant mesothelioma were reviewed. Eight patients were treated with a curative intent combining attempted surgical excision of tumor (thoracic in 6 and peritoneal in 2), aggressive radiation therapy, and combination chemotherapy using an adriamycin-containing regimen. One patient achieved a 2-year disease-free inteval followed by recurrence of tumor above the thoracic irradiation field. This patient was retreated with localized irradiation and is disease-free after 5 years of initial diagnosis. One patient has persistent abdominal disease at 18 months; the other 6 patients suffered local recurrence within 8-13 months of initiation of treatment. Radiation therapy was used in 19 other patients who received 29 courses for palliation of dyspnea, superior vena cava syndrome, dysphagia, or neurological symptoms of brain metastasis. A palliation index was used to determine the effectiveness of irradiation and revealed that relief of symptoms was complete or substantial in 5 treatment courses, moderately effective in 6 courses and inadequate in 18 treatment courses. Adequate palliation strongly correlated with a dose at or above 4,000 rad in 4 weeks. The management of patients with mesothelioma requires new and innovative approaches to increase the effectiveness of radiation therapy and minimize the significant potential combined toxicity of pulmonary irradiation and adriamycin.

  10. [Metronome therapy in patients with Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Enzensberger, W; Oberländer, U; Stecker, K

    1997-12-01

    We studied 10 patients with Parkinson's disease and 12 patients with Parkinson-plus-syndrome, trying to improve patients' gait by application of various external rhythmic stimuli, including metronome stimulation (96 beats per minute = middle andante). The test course of the patients was 4 x 10 meters and 3 U-turns. The patients' gait quality under stimulation was compared with their free walk (velocity, number of steps, number of freezing episodes). Metronome stimulation significantly reduced the time and number of steps needed for the test course and also diminished the number of freezing episodes. March music stimulation was less effective and tactile stimulation (rhythmically tapping on the patient's shoulder) even produced negative results. The positive effect of metronome stimulation was also found, when the tests were not performed inside the hospital building, but outside in the hospital parc. Metronome stimulation was comparably effective in both patient sub-groups examined in this study (M. Parkinson, Parkinson-plus-syndrome) and seems to be an important additional help in the treatment of these patients. Electronical metronomes are not expensive, easy in handling, and portable. A theoretical explanation of metronome stimulation effectivity in patients with Parkinson's disease still needs to be elucidated. PMID:9465340

  11. Purpuric herpes zoster in patients in therapy with clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Veraldi, S; Vaira, F; Nazzaro, G

    2015-08-01

    Clopidogrel is an adenosine diphosphate receptor antagonist used for the prevention of vascular events in patients with atherothrombotic diseases manifested by recent myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke or peripheral arterial disease. Diarrhoea, rash and pruritus are rather common side effects of clopidogrel. Other side effects include epistaxis, nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting, gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer. Thrombocytopenia is the most common laboratory abnormality. Leucopenia and neutropenia are rare. We report three cases of purpuric herpes zoster in patients in therapy with clopidogrel. To our knowledge, only one case of haemorrhagic herpes zoster has been published in a patient in therapy with this drug. PMID:26209393

  12. [Our experience with hormonal therapy in transsexual patients].

    PubMed

    Weiss, Vladimír; Weiss, Petr; Fifková, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Hormonal therapy in transsexual patients (TS) includes sexagens administration: androgens in female-to-male transsexual patients (FtM) and oestrogens and antiandrogens in male-to-female transsexual patients (MtF). Duration of hormonal therapy should continue at least 1 year before gender reassignment surgery. Hormonal therapy supresses former gender and induces partially new gender changes. Hormonal therapy continues subsequently after surgery during life. Hormonal therapy in MtF TS includes oestrogens and antiandrogens application. In very young persons in both groups blocking gonadoliberin analogues can be used. In FtM TS testosterone oneself is given (orally and/or parenterally). Authors describe their own experiences with hormonal treatment in 282 TS (163 FtM and 119 MtF). During hormonal therapy statistically significant weight increasing was found in both groups. Total cholesterol increased in FtM. In MtF during hormonal therapy average prolactin level increased from 350.1 to 570.5 mU/l without clinical significance. Total average hormonal therapy duration was 6.73 years in FtM and 4.64 years in MtF and so overall therapy safety assessment is not possible. Any endocrinopathy occurence in the beginning of surveillance was found in 35 persons (12.4 %): simple goiter, autoimmune thyreoiditis, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, gynecomastia, DM type 1, congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), Klinefelter syndrome and nonfunctional pituitary adenoma. It is appropriate as well as in other rare medicine conditions to manage diagnosing and therapy in centers with experience with these issues. PMID:25873114

  13. Antinuclear antibodies in patients on anticonvulsant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón-Segovia, D.; Fishbein, Eugenia; Reyes, P. A.; Díes, H.; Shwadsky, S.

    1972-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies to calf thymus nuclei, NP, DNA, sDNA, sNP and Sm antigen were investigated in sera from 170 patients on various programmes of prolonged anticonvulsant treatment. Findings were compared to those on 214 tuberculous patients on isoniazid, 109 SLE patients and 66 healthy subjects. Patients on anticonvulsants had a significantly higher incidence of ANA to DNA, sDNA, sNP and Sm antigen than the controls but had a lower incidence of ANA to all antigens, except sNP, than the SLE patients. Patients on isoniazid did not have DNA antibodies, but had antibodies to whole nuclei and to NP which were practically absent in the anticonvulsant group. Of all patients on anticonvulsants only those receiving hydantoins had ANA to Sm antigen, while those receiving only primidone had antibodies to sNP but no antibodies to DNA. Alteration of sNP with isoniazid did not result in an increased incidence of ANA in the anticonvulsant group as it does in isoniazid treated subjects. It is concluded that the SLE-activating properties of diverse anticonvulsants probably resides in their potential to induce ANA. Although all anticonvulsants elicit ANA directed primarily to sNP, each may do so by different mechanisms or by altering different sites in the sNP molecule. The mechanisms by which anticonvulsant and isoniazid intake results in ANA probably differ. Presence of DNA antibodies in some patients on anticonvulsants may indicate that their convulsions were due to SLE. PMID:4117275

  14. Psychiatric benefits of integrative therapies in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Cassileth, Barrie R

    2014-02-01

    Integrative oncology uses non-pharmacological adjuncts to mainstream care to manage physical, emotional, and psychological symptoms experienced by cancer survivors. Depression, anxiety, fatigue and pain are among the common, often burdensome symptoms that can occur in clusters, deplete patient morale, interfere with treatment plans, and hamper recovery. Patients already seek various modalities on their own to address a broad range of problems. Legitimate complementary therapies offered at major cancer institutions improve quality of life, speed recovery, and optimize patient support. They also augment the benefits of psychiatric interventions, due to their ability to increase self-awareness and improve physical and psychological conditioning. Further, these integrated therapies provide lifelong tools and develop skills that patients use well after treatment to develop self-care regimens. The active referral of patients to integrative therapies achieves three important objectives: complementary care is received from therapists experienced in working with cancer patients, visits become part of the medical record, allowing treatment teams to guide individuals in maximizing benefit, and patients are diverted from useless or harmful 'alternatives.' We review the reciprocal physical and psychiatric benefits of exercise, mind-body practices, massage, acupuncture, and music therapy for cancer survivors, and suggest how their use can augment mainstream psychiatric interventions. PMID:24716505

  15. The efficacy of tenofovir-based therapy in patients showing suboptimal response to entecavir-adefovir combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Han; Ahn, Sung Hyun; Ko, Soon Young; Choe, Won Hyeok; Kim, Kyun-Hwan; Kwon, So Young

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Before tenofovir (TDF) become available in South Korea, combination therapy with entecavir (ETV) and adefovir (ADV) was the most potent regimen for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients who fail to respond to rescue therapy for drug resistance. We analyzed the efficacy of ETV-ADV combination therapy and investigated the clinical and clonal results of TDF-based rescue therapy in CHB patients refractory to this combination. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of CHB patients treated for up to 3 years with ETV-ADV combination therapy as a rescue therapy for drug resistance. In cases refractory to this combination, clinical and clonal analyses were performed for TDF-based rescue therapy. Results: The analysis was performed on 48 patients. Twelve patients achieved a virological response (VR) within 3 years. A VR was subsequently achieved in nine of the ten patients without a VR who switched to TDF monotherapy. A VR was also achieved in six of the seven patients who switched to lamivudine-TDF combination therapy, and in two of the two patients who switched to ETV-TDF combination therapy. In an in vitro susceptibility test, viral replication was detected with TDF monotherapy but not with ETV-TDF combination therapy. Conclusions: The efficacy of ETV-ADV combination therapy was insufficient in CHB patients who were refractory to rescue therapy. A more potent regimen such as ETV-TDF combination therapy may be considered in such refractory cases. PMID:27304549

  16. E-cigarette use in patients receiving home oxygen therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lacasse, Yves; Légaré, Martin; Maltais, François

    2015-01-01

    Current smokers who are prescribed home oxygen may not benefit from the therapy. In addition to being an obvious fire hazard, there is some evidence that the physiological mechanisms by which home oxygen is believed to operate are inhibited by smoking. Although their effectiveness is yet to be demonstrated, electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are often regarded as an aid to smoking cessation. However, several burn accidents in e-cigarette smokers receiving home oxygen therapy have also been reported, leading Health Canada to release a warning of fire risk to oxygen therapy patients from e-cigarettes. It is the authors’ position that patients receiving oxygen should definitely not use e-cigarettes. The authors provide suggestions for addressing the delicate issue of home oxygen therapy in current cigarette and/or e-cigarette smokers. PMID:25848719

  17. Mind body therapies in rehabilitation of patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, Angela; Maddali-Bongi, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    Mind body therapies (MBT) share a global approach involving both mental and physical dimensions, and focus on relationship between brain, mind, body and behavior and their effects on health and disease. MBT include concentration based therapies and movement based therapies, comprising traditional Oriental practices and somatic techniques. The greatest part of rheumatic diseases have a chronic course, leading to progressive damages at musculoskeletal system and causing physical problems, psychological and social concerns. Thus, rheumatic patients need to be treated with a multidisciplinary approach integrating pharmacological therapies and rehabilitation techniques, that not should only aim to reduce the progression of damages at musculoskeletal system. Thus, MBT, using an overall approach, could be useful in taking care of the overall health of the patients with chronic rheumatic diseases. This review will deal with different MBT and with their effects in the most common chronic rheumatic diseases (Rheumatoid Arthritis, Ankylosing Spondylitis, Fibromyalgia Syndrome). PMID:26850811

  18. E-cigarette use in patients receiving home oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Lacasse, Yves; Légaré, Martin; Maltais, François

    2015-01-01

    Current smokers who are prescribed home oxygen may not benefit from the therapy. In addition to being an obvious fire hazard, there is some evidence that the physiological mechanisms by which home oxygen is believed to operate are inhibited by smoking. Although their effectiveness is yet to be demonstrated, electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are often regarded as an aid to smoking cessation. However, several burn accidents in e-cigarette smokers receiving home oxygen therapy have also been reported, leading Health Canada to release a warning of fire risk to oxygen therapy patients from e-cigarettes. It is the authors' position that patients receiving oxygen should definitely not use e-cigarettes. The authors provide suggestions for addressing the delicate issue of home oxygen therapy in current cigarette and⁄or e-cigarette smokers. PMID:25848719

  19. Patient's Guide to Perioperative Antithrombotic Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... most often are warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), and aspirin. How Are Blood-Thinning Medications Managed Before and ... or at home. What About Patients Who Take Aspirin and/or Clopidogrel (Plavix) to Thin Their Blood? "! ...

  20. [Drug therapy of patients with dyscirculatory encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Macheret, Ie L; Khanenko, N V

    2002-01-01

    Results are submitted of treatment of discirculatory encephalopathy having developed against the background of arterial hypertension, with a combination of drugs aktovegin and captopril in 56 patients. The positive effect of the instituted monotherapy has been documented clinically, with correlation established with indices of additional methods of investigation. The secured results of treatment permit recommending actovegin and captopril for a wide use in practical medicine to treat patients in the above category. PMID:12145902

  1. Racial Disparities Among Lung Cancer Patients Recommended Operative Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Farjah, Farhood; Wood, Douglas E.; Yanez, N. David; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Symons, Rebecca Gaston; Krishnadasan, Bahirathan; Flum, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Hypothesis Healthcare system/provider biases and differences in patient characteristics are thought to be prevailing factors underlying racial disparities. The influence of these factors on the receipt of care would likely be mitigated among patients recommended optimal therapy. We hypothesized that there would be no significant evidence of racial disparities among early-stage lung cancer patients recommended surgical therapy. Design Retrospective cohort study. Patients and Setting Patients within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results-Medicare database diagnosed with stage I or II lung cancer between 1992 and 2002 (follow-up through 2005). Main Outcome Measures Receipt of lung resection and overall survival. Results Among 17,739 patients recommended surgical therapy—mean (SD) age 75 (5) years, 89% white, 6% black—blacks less frequently underwent resection compared to whites (69% versus 83%, p<0.001). After adjustment, black race was associated with a lower odds of receiving surgical therapy (OR 0.43, 99% CI 0.36-0.52). Unadjusted 5-year survival rates were lower for blacks compared to whites (36% versus 42%, p<0.001). After adjustment, there was no significant association between race and death (HR 1.03, 99% CI 0.92-1.14) despite a 14% difference in receipt of optimal therapy. Conclusions Even among patients recommend surgical therapy, blacks underwent lung resection less often then whites. Unexpectedly, racial differences in the receipt of optimal therapy did not appear to affect outcomes. These findings suggest that distrust, beliefs and perceptions about lung cancer and its treatment, and limited access to care (despite insurance) might have a more dominant role in perpetuating racial disparities than previously recognized. PMID:19153319

  2. Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Infection: When to Initiate Therapy, Which Regimen to Use, and How to Monitor Patients on Therapy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven C

    Antiretroviral therapy is recommended for all patients with HIV infection. The benefit of immediate antiretroviral therapy was confirmed by results from the START (Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment) trial, which showed a 57% reduction in risk for the composite end point of AIDS-related events, serious non-AIDS-related events, or death from any cause with immediate treatment in antiretroviral therapy-naive participants with CD4+ cell counts above 500/µL. Other changes in HIV care include the widespread adoption of integrase strand transfer inhibitor-based regimens. Considerations regarding when to initiate antiretroviral therapy, which initial regimens to use, and appropriate monitoring of individuals taking antiretroviral therapy are discussed. This article summarizes an IAS-USA continuing education webinar presented by Steven C. Johnson, MD, in July 2015. PMID:27398769

  3. Current concepts in combination antibiotic therapy for critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Armin; Azim, Afzal; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Widespread emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens is a problem of global dimension. MDR infections are difficult to treat and frequently associated with high mortality. More than one antibiotic is commonly used to treat such infections, but scientific evidence does not favor use of combination therapy in most cases. However, there are certain subgroups where combination therapy may be beneficial, e.g. sepsis due to carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia, and patients with multiple organ failure. Well-designed prospective studies are needed to clearly define the role of combination therapy in these subgroups. PMID:24914260

  4. Drug therapy for the patient with resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Donazzan, Luca; Ewen, Sebastian; Papademetriou, Vasilios; Linicus, Yvonne; Linz, Dominik; Böhm, Michael; Mahfoud, Felix

    2015-03-01

    Resistant hypertension is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure above targets despite treatment with at least three antihypertensive drugs in adequate dose and combination. Nonadherence is a frequent cause of uncontrolled hypertension and can be improved by providing fixed dose (of two or three agents) single pill combination. Triple combination of the most widely used antihypertensive agents (renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system antagonists, calcium channel blockers and diuretics) is a safe and effective therapy. Fourth line therapy is the use of an aldosterone antagonist. Renal denervation and baroreceptor stimulation can be considered in patients who remained uncontrolled despite optimal medical therapy. PMID:25760878

  5. Reconstructive surgery in immunocompromised patients: evaluation and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dunda, Sebastian E.; Bozkurt, Ahmet; Pallua, Norbert; Krapohl, Björn Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of patients undergoing reconstructive surgery are immunocompromised due to different reasons and different medical treatments. Some of the used immunosuppressive drugs may affect the process of wound healing and thereby, impair the long-term success of surgical treatment. Therefore, this retrospective analysis aimed at the evaluation of the perioperative treatment and surgical outcome of immunocompromised patients undergoing different reconstructive procedures. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of 8 immunocompromised patients with different primary diseases who needed reconstructive surgery: 2 patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 1 patient with an acute myeloid leukemia, 1 patient with colitis ulcerosa, 1 patient with liver cirrhosis, 1 patient with chronic polyarthritis, and 2 patients with malignant melanoma. Results: In 7 of our 8 presented cases, multiple operations with wound debridements have been necessary to optimize the granulation of the wound bed before reconstructive surgery. 3 out of these 7 patients required further operations due to wound dehiscence or necrosis, with 2 of them as a result of increased immunosuppressive therapy. 5 out of 8 patients needed no further surgical treatment. Conclusions: Both the perioperative drug therapy and the reconstructive surgery concept need to be determined carefully in each individual case of the immunocompromised patients. Thus, the appropriate point in time of operation to achieve the best possible wound healing as well as the complexity of the procedure will require the consideration of a ‘less is more’ strategy in selected cases. PMID:26734539

  6. Proton Beam Therapy for Aged Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, Masaharu Tokuuye, Koichi; Sugahara, Shinji; Tohno, Eriko; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Mizumoto, Masashi; Abei, Masato; Shoda, Junichi; Minami, Manabu; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of proton beam therapy for aged patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients aged {>=}80 years with HCC underwent proton beam therapy. At the time of irradiation, patient age ranged from 80 to 85 years (median, 81 years). Hepatic tumors were solitary in 17 patients and multiple in 4. Tumor size ranged from 10 to 135 mm (median, 40 mm) in maximum diameter. Ten, 5, and 6 patients received proton beam irradiation with total doses of 60 Gy in 10 fractions, 66 Gy in 22 fractions, and 70 Gy in 35 fractions, respectively, according to tumor location. Results: All irradiated tumors were controlled during the follow-up period of 6-49 months (median, 16 months). Five patients showed new hepatic tumors outside the irradiated volume, 2-13 months after treatment, and 1 of them also had lung metastasis. The local progression-free and disease-free rates were 100% and 72% at 3 years, respectively. Of 21 patients, 7 died 6-49 months after treatment; 2 patients each died of trauma and old age, and 1 patient each died of HCC, pneumonia, and arrhythmia. The 3-year overall, cause-specific, and disease-free survival rates were 62%, 88%, and 51%, respectively. No therapy-related toxicity of Grade {>=} 3 but thrombocytopenia in 2 patients was observed. Conclusions: Proton beam therapy seems to be tolerable, effective, and safe for aged patients with HCC. It may contribute to prolonged survival due to tumor control.

  7. Effect of hope therapy on the hope of diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Ghazavi, Zahra; Khaledi-Sardashti, Firouz; Kajbaf, Mohamad Bagher; Esmaielzadeh, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hope is the most important factor in diabetic patients’ life. The level of hope may be changing among these individuals as a result of chronic nature of diabetes and its complications. When the level of hope increases among these patients, they can resist against physical and psychological complications of diabetes more, accept the treatment better, enjoy life more, and adapt with their situations more efficiently. This study aimed to define the efficacy of hope therapy on hope among diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study conducted on 38 diabetic patients referring to Sedigheh Tahereh Research and Treatment Center affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in Iran in 2012. The subjects were selected based on the goals and inclusion criteria of the study and then were randomly assigned to study and control groups. Herth Hope Index (HHI) was completed by both groups before, after, and 1 month after intervention. In the study group, 120-min sessions of hope therapy were held twice a week for 4 weeks. Descriptive and inferential statistical tests were adopted to analyze the data through SPSS version 12. Results: Comparison of the results showed that hope therapy significantly increased hope in diabetic patients after intervention in the study group compared to control (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The results showed that hope therapy increased hope among diabetic patients. This method is suggested to be conducted for diabetic patients. PMID:25709694

  8. Iron Therapy Challenges for the Treatment of Nondialysis CKD Patients.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Francesco; Mazzaferro, Sandro; Yee, Jerry

    2016-07-01

    The clinical consequences of untreated, severe anemia in patients with nondialysis CKD can be significant, but disparities exist in the anemia treatment guidelines and position papers issued from working groups and associations across the world. These differ in hemoglobin target and iron levels and their emphasis on various iron markers and other clinical outcomes. Not surprisingly, disparities are observed in anemia treatment strategies among patients with nondialysis CKD across different areas of the world. Over the past decade, the prescription and dosage of both iron therapies and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents have shifted, with notable regional differences observed. Moreover, there is ongoing debate regarding oral versus intravenous administration of iron. Compared with oral iron therapy, which often leads to gastrointestinal adverse events, low patient adherence, and low efficacy, intravenous iron administration has been associated with potential serious adverse events, such as anaphylaxis. New iron-based compounds and drugs currently under development are reviewed to describe their potential benefits in the treatment of anemia in patients with CKD. New oral compounds, including iron-based phosphate binders, heme iron polypeptide, and liposomal iron, show different rates of absorption with possibly different efficacy and improved tolerability. These new potential therapies offer health care providers additional anemia treatment options for their patients with CKD; however, the management of anemia in the CKD population continues to present challenges that require prospective studies to identify the optimal iron therapy for patients. PMID:27185524

  9. Anti-coagulant therapy with dabigatran for cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Manvi; Ren, Clement L

    2016-08-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism, especially in association with central venous catheter use. Coumarin drugs and low molecular weight heparin are frequently used for anti-coagulant therapy, but are more challenging to administer in CF patients. Dabigatran, an oral thrombin antagonist, is an alternative anti-coagulant medication, but its use in CF has not been reported. We describe our experience in successfully using dabigatran for long-term anti-coagulation therapy in two CF patients. Our experience suggests that dabigatran can serve as an option for anticoagulation therapy in CF. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:E29-E30. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27128852

  10. Sex therapy in an in-patient and out-patient setting.

    PubMed

    Kratochvíl, S

    1980-01-01

    This paper summarizes the experience with sex therapy in an in-patient ward for neurotics (N = 82), where it could be combined with interpersonally oriented group psychotherapy in a therapeutic community setting. Outcome data are compared with an out-patient form of sex therapy, used in several counseling centers (N = 111). The in-patient form of therapy had a success rate of 76% at completion of treatment and 52% after a follow-up period of 15 months. The out-patient therapy was successful in 71% but no follow-up was carried out. Almost 50% of the couples who originally started therapy dropped out. Three illustrative successful cases are described. PMID:7205970

  11. [Successful amantadine treatment of a patient with ECT-resistant catatonia].

    PubMed

    Walstra, A N; den Broek, M VAN; Giltay, E J; van Paassen, J; van Noorden, M S

    2016-01-01

    Catatonia is a common neuropsychiatric syndrome. There is a life-threatening subtype of this disease known as malignant catatonia. One of the hypotheses regarding the pathogenesis is an imbalance of multiple neurotransmitters (gaba, glutamate and dopamine). The first step in treatment is to administer benzodiazepines; if the response is insufficient, the treatment can be replaced by electroconvulsive therapy (ect). So far, there is no consensus with regard to the tertiary treatment step. On the basis of a case report we describe the beneficial effects of administering an nmda receptor antagonist, amantadine, as the tertiary step for treating a patient with treatment-resistant malignant catatonia. PMID:27527886

  12. Patient's Guide to Antithrombotic Therapy in Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... have had ischemic strokes. 5. How important is aspirin for a new stroke? ! Aspirin is a drug that “thins” the blood by ... cases, it is recommended that patients start taking aspirin within 48 hours of an ischemic stroke. While ...

  13. Understanding patient preferences and willingness to pay for hemophilia therapies

    PubMed Central

    Chaugule, Shraddha S; Hay, Joel W; Young, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite clearly improved clinical outcomes for prophylaxis compared to on-demand therapy, on average only 56% of patients diagnosed with severe hemophilia receive prophylactic factor replacement therapy in the US. Prophylaxis rates generally drop as patients transition from childhood to adulthood, partly due to patients becoming less adherent when they reach adulthood. Assessment of patient preferences is important because these are likely to translate into increased treatment satisfaction and adherence. In this study, we assessed preferences and willingness to pay (WTP) for on-demand, prophylaxis, and longer acting prophylaxis therapies in a sample of US hemophilia patients. Methods Adult US hemophilia patients and caregivers (N=79) completed a discrete-choice survey that presented a series of trade-off questions, each including a pair of hypothetical treatment profiles. Using a mixed logit model for analysis, we compared the relative importance of five treatment characteristics: 1) out-of-pocket treatment costs (paid by patients), 2) factor dose adjustment, 3) treatment side effects, 4) availability of premixed factor, and 5) treatment effectiveness and dosing frequency. Based on these attribute estimates, we calculated patients’ WTP. Results Out-of-pocket treatment costs (P<0.001), side effects (P<0.001), and treatment effectiveness and dosing frequency (P<0.001) were found to be statistically significant in the model. Patients were willing to pay US $410 (95% confidence interval: $164–$656) out of pocket per month for thrice-weekly prophylaxis therapy compared to on-demand therapy and $360 (95% confidence interval: $145–$575) for a switch from thrice-weekly to once-weekly prophylaxis therapy. Conclusion Improvements in treatment effectiveness and dosing frequency, treatment side effects, and out-of-pocket costs per month were the greatest determinants of hemophilia treatment choice and WTP. The positive preferences and WTP for longer acting

  14. Contemporary Systemic Therapy for Urologic Malignancies in Geriatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Grivas, Petros D

    2015-11-01

    Current data on systemic therapy in geriatric populations with genitourinary malignancies are largely derived from retrospective analyses of prospectively conducted trials or retrospective reviews. Although extrapolation of these data to real-world patients should be cautious, patients aged 65 years or older with good functional status and minimal comorbidities seem to enjoy similar survival benefit from therapy as their younger counterparts. Chronologic age alone should generally not be used to guide management decisions. Comprehensive geriatric assessment tools and prospective studies in older adults integrating comprehensive geriatric assessment can shed light on the optimal management of urologic malignancies in this population. PMID:26476122

  15. Economic evaluation of resistant major depressive disorder treatment in Iranian population: a comparison between repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation with electroconvulsive

    PubMed Central

    Ghiasvand, Hesam; Moradi- Joo, Mohammad; Abolhassani, Nazanin; Ravaghi, Hamid; Raygani, Seyed Mansoor; Mohabbat-Bahar, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is estimated that major depression disorders constitute 8.2% of years lived with disability (YLDs) globally. The repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) and Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) are two relative common interventions to treat major depressive disorders, especially for treatment resistant depression. In this study the cost- effectiveness and cost-utility of rTMS were compared with ECT in Iranian population suffering from major depressive disorder using a decision tree model. Methods: A decision tree model conducted to compare the cost-effectiveness ratio of rTMS with ECT in a health system prospective and 7 months’ time horizon. The outcome variables were: response rate, remission rate and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) of the rTMS and ECT as primary and secondary outcomes extracted from systematic reviews and randomized control trials. The costs were also calculated through a field study in one clinic and one hospital; the direct costs have only been considered. Results: The total cost for rTMS and ECTstrategieswere11015000Rials (373US$) and 11742700 Rials (397.7US$), respectively. Also the rTMS/ECT ratio of costs per improved patients was 1194410Rials (40.5 US$); the ratio for costs per QALYs utility was 21017139 Rials (711.72 US$). The incremental cost- effectiveness ratio of rTMS versus ECT was 1194410 Rials (40.44 US$) after treatment and maintenance courses. Conclusion: Given the current prevalence of depressive disorders in Iranian population, the ECT is more cost-effective than TMS. The sensitivity analysis showed that if the prevalence of major depressive disorders declines to below 5% or the costs of rTMS decrease (rTMS provided by public sector), then the rTMS becomes more cost-effective compared with ECT. However, efficacy of rTMS depends on the frequency of pulsed magnetic field, the location of rTMS on the head, the number of therapeutic sessions and the length of each session. PMID:27390700

  16. Mind-body therapies for the pediatric oncology patient: matching the right therapy with the right patient.

    PubMed

    Ott, Mary Jane

    2006-01-01

    Pediatric oncology nurses provide care for children across a continuum from the point of diagnostic evaluation through treatments and cure or a peaceful, dignified death. Nurses provide this care in a wide variety of settings such as the home, hospital, clinics, schools, camps, and residential facilities. Mind-body therapies are being used more frequently in the care of children receiving treatment for cancer. Matching the right therapy with the right patient is an important component of care. PMID:16902078

  17. Drug therapy in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Clinical pharmacokinetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Lee, C S; Marbury, T C

    1984-01-01

    Haemodialysis is utilised therapeutically as supportive treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In conjunction with haemodialysis therapy, ESRD patients frequently receive a large number of drugs to treat a multitude of intercurrent conditions. Because of the impaired renal function in ESRD patients, dosage reduction is often recommended to avoid adverse drug reactions, particularly for drugs and active metabolites with extensive renal excretion. On the other hand, if the removal of a drug by haemodialysis during concomitant drug therapy is significant, a dosage supplement would be required to ensure adequate therapeutic efficacy. Knowledge of the impact of haemodialysis on the elimination of specific drugs is therefore essential to the rational design of the dosage regimen in patients undergoing haemodialysis. This review addresses the clinical pharmacokinetic aspects of drug therapy in haemodialysis patients and considers: (a) the effects of ESRD on the general pharmacokinetics of drugs; (b) dialysis clearance and its impact on drug and metabolite elimination; (c) the definition of dialysability and the criteria for evaluation of drug dialysability; (d) pharmacokinetic parameters which are useful in the prediction of drug dialysability; and (e) the application of pharmacokinetic principles to the adjustment of dosage regimens in haemodialysis patients. Finally, drugs commonly associated with haemodialysis therapy are tabulated with updated pharmacokinetics and dialysability information. PMID:6362952

  18. [Neuroprotector therapy of patients with decompensated diabetes mellitus type 1].

    PubMed

    Kligunenko, E N; Sedinkin, V A

    2011-01-01

    The influence of actovegin and reamberin on diabetic ketoacidotic crises has been studied on a group of 128 patients with severe diabetic ketoacidosis on the background of diabetes mellitus type 1 with disorders ranging from consciousness to coma or precoma states. Patients of group 1 received standard intensive therapy of diabetic ketoacidosis. In group 2, an intensive therapy for neuroprotection by actovegin was added. In group 3, patients received reamberin on the background of standard therapy. In group 4, the neuroprotective therapy using actovegin and reamberin was combined. The mental status was estimated upon recovery from coma, on 5th and 28th days from the beginning of treatment, by taking into consideration cognitive functions such as attention, memory, mentality. The results showed that the use of neuroprotective drugs, including the combination of actovegin and reamberin, allowed to the restore the compensatory-adaptive reaction of patients to ketoacidotic crisis, accelerate the restoration of consciousness within 19.2 +/- 3.8 h, restore the cognitive functions with exceeding norm for patients with diabetes mellitus in compensation stage and maintain their high level on 28th day after crisis. PMID:22379876

  19. Vascular access for extracorporeal renal replacement therapy in veterinary patients.

    PubMed

    Chalhoub, Serge; Langston, Cathy E; Poeppel, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Vascular access is the first and most basic requirement for successful extracorporeal renal replacement therapy (ERRT). Dual-lumen catheters are the most commonly used method of vascular access for ERRT in veterinary patients. An adequately functioning dialysis catheter allows for smooth and efficient patient management, whereas a poorly functioning catheter frustrates the technician, doctor, and patient. These catheters are fairly quick to place but require meticulous care for optimal function. The most common complications are thrombosis and infection. Monitoring catheter performance should be a routine part of dialysis patient care. PMID:21251515

  20. Mirror therapy enhances upper extremity motor recovery in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Mirela Cristina, Luca; Matei, Daniela; Ignat, Bogdan; Popescu, Cristian Dinu

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of mirror therapy program in addition with physical therapy methods on upper limb recovery in patients with subacute ischemic stroke. 15 subjects followed a comprehensive rehabilitative treatment, 8 subjects received only control therapy (CT) and 7 subjects received mirror therapy (MT) for 30 min every day, five times a week, for 6 weeks in addition to the conventional therapy. Brunnstrom stages, Fugl-Meyer Assessment (upper extremity), the Ashworth Scale, and Bhakta Test (finger flexion scale) were used to assess changes in upper limb motor recovery and motor function after intervention. After 6 weeks of treatment, patients in both groups showed significant improvements in the variables measured. Patients who received MT showed greater improvements compared to the CT group. The MT treatment results included: improvement of motor functions, manual skills and activities of daily living. The best results were obtained when the treatment was started soon after the stroke. MT is an easy and low-cost method to improve motor recovery of the upper limb. PMID:25850528

  1. ACG Clinical Guideline: Nutrition Therapy in the Adult Hospitalized Patient.

    PubMed

    McClave, Stephen A; DiBaise, John K; Mullin, Gerard E; Martindale, Robert G

    2016-03-01

    The value of nutrition therapy for the adult hospitalized patient is derived from the outcome benefits achieved by the delivery of early enteral feeding. Nutritional assessment should identify those patients at high nutritional risk, determined by both disease severity and nutritional status. For such patients if they are unable to maintain volitional intake, enteral access should be attained and enteral nutrition (EN) initiated within 24-48 h of admission. Orogastric or nasogastric feeding is most appropriate when starting EN, switching to post-pyloric or deep jejunal feeding only in those patients who are intolerant of gastric feeds or at high risk for aspiration. Percutaneous access should be used for those patients anticipated to require EN for >4 weeks. Patients receiving EN should be monitored for risk of aspiration, tolerance, and adequacy of feeding (determined by percent of goal calories and protein delivered). Intentional permissive underfeeding (and even trophic feeding) is appropriate temporarily for certain subsets of hospitalized patients. Although a standard polymeric formula should be used routinely in most patients, an immune-modulating formula (with arginine and fish oil) should be reserved for patients who have had major surgery in a surgical ICU setting. Adequacy of nutrition therapy is enhanced by establishing nurse-driven enteral feeding protocols, increasing delivery by volume-based or top-down feeding strategies, minimizing interruptions, and eliminating the practice of gastric residual volumes. Parenteral nutrition should be used in patients at high nutritional risk when EN is not feasible or after the first week of hospitalization if EN is not sufficient. Because of their knowledge base and skill set, the gastroenterologist endoscopist is an asset to the Nutrition Support Team and should participate in providing optimal nutrition therapy to the hospitalized adult patient. PMID:26952578

  2. Oral Complications and Management Strategies for Patients Undergoing Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With cancer survival rate climbing up over the past three decades, quality of life for cancer patients has become an issue of major concern. Oral health plays an important part in one's overall quality of life. However, oral health status can be severely hampered by side effects of cancer therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Moreover, prevention and treatment of these complications are often overlooked in clinical practice. The present paper aims at drawing health care professionals' attention to oral complications associated with cancer therapy by giving a comprehensive review. Brief comments on contemporary cancer therapies will be given first, followed by detailed description of oral complications associated with cancer therapy. Finally, a summary of preventive strategies and treatment options for common oral complications including oral mucositis, oral infections, xerostomia, and dysgeusia will be given. PMID:24511293

  3. Listening is therapy: Patient interviewing from a pain science perspective.

    PubMed

    Diener, Ina; Kargela, Mark; Louw, Adriaan

    2016-07-01

    The interview of a patient attending physical therapy is the cornerstone of the physical examination, diagnosis, plan of care, prognosis, and overall efficacy of the therapeutic experience. A thorough, skilled interview drives the objective tests and measures chosen, as well as provides context for the interpretation of those tests and measures, during the physical examination. Information from the interview powerfully influences the treatment modalities chosen by the physical therapist (PT) and thus also impacts the overall outcome and prognosis of the therapy sessions. Traditional physical therapy focuses heavily on biomedical information to educate people about their pain, and this predominant model focusing on anatomy, biomechanics, and pathoanatomy permeates the interview and physical examination. Although this model may have a significant effect on people with acute, sub-acute or postoperative pain, this type of examination may not only gather insufficient information regarding the pain experience and suffering, but negatively impact a patient's pain experience. In recent years, physical therapy treatment for pain has increasingly focused on pain science education, with increasing evidence of pain science education positively affecting pain, disability, pain catastrophization, movement limitations, and overall healthcare cost. In line with the ever-increasing focus of pain science in physical therapy, it is time for the examination, both subjective and objective, to embrace a biopsychosocial approach beyond the realm of only a biomedical approach. A patient interview is far more than "just" collecting information. It also is a critical component to establishing an alliance with a patient and a fundamental first step in therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE) for patients in pain. This article highlights the interview process focusing on a pain science perspective as it relates to screening patients, establishing psychosocial barriers to improvement, and pain

  4. Current status of pharmacologic therapies in patient blood management.

    PubMed

    Goodnough, Lawrence Tim; Shander, Aryeh

    2013-01-01

    Patient blood management(1,2) incorporates patient-centered, evidence-based medical and surgical approaches to improve patient outcomes by relying on the patient's own (autologous) blood rather than allogeneic blood. Particular attention is paid to preemptive measures such as anemia management. The emphasis on the approaches being "patient-centered" is to distinguish them from previous approaches in transfusion medicine, which have been "product-centered" and focused on blood risks, costs, and inventory concerns rather than on patient outcomes. Patient blood management(3) structures its goals by avoiding blood transfusion(4) with effective use of alternatives to allogeneic blood transfusion.(5) These alternatives include autologous blood procurement, preoperative autologous blood donation, acute normovolemic hemodilution, and intra/postoperative red blood cell (RBC) salvage and reinfusion. Reviewed here are the available pharmacologic tools for anemia and blood management: erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs), iron therapy, hemostatic agents, and potentially, artificial oxygen carriers. PMID:23223098

  5. Novel psoriasis therapies and patient outcomes, part 1: topical medications.

    PubMed

    Feely, Meghan A; Smith, Barry L; Weinberg, Jeffrey M

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, advances in our understanding of inflammatory mediators and the underlying pathogenesis of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis have shed light on potential therapeutic targets, which has led to the development of several new promising treatments. In this article, key clinical trials, mechanisms of action, patient outcomes, and relevant safety information for these novel topical medications will be evaluated. This article is the first in a 3-part series on treatments presently in the pipeline for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis including topical agents, biologic treatments, and systemic therapies in phase 2 and phase 3 clinical trials. With novel approaches to the disease process, these therapies may afford more targeted individualized treatment regimens and offer hope to patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis who have reported a suboptimal therapeutic response to conventional therapies. PMID:25844785

  6. Adjuvant antiarrhythmic therapy in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Bunch, T Jared; Anderson, Jeffrey L

    2014-04-01

    The risk of sudden cardiac death from ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia in patients with cardiomyopathy related to structural heart disease has been favorably impacted by the wide adaptation of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) for both primary and secondary prevention. Unfortunately, after ICD implantation both appropriate and inappropriate ICD therapies are common. ICD shocks in particular can have significant effects on quality of life and disease-related morbidity and mortality. While not indicated for primary prevention of ICD therapies, beta-blockers and antiarrhythmic drugs are a cornerstone for secondary prevention of them. This review will summarize our current understanding of adjuvant antiarrhythmic drug therapy in ICD patients. The review will also discuss the roles of nonantiarrhythmic drug approaches that are used in isolation and in combination with antiarrhythmic drugs to reduce subsequent risk of ICD shocks. PMID:24288157

  7. [Combined modality therapy for a patient with primary adrenal lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Teppei; Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Jomen, Wataru; Yoshida, Masahiro; Yamada, Michiko; Sato, Masanori; Abe, Tomoyuki; Sakurai, Tamaki; Fujii, Shigeyuki; Maeda, Masahiro; Fujita, Miri; Nagashima, Kazuo; Nojiri, Shuichi; Arihara, Yohei; Kato, Junji

    2014-04-01

    A 71-year-old man with malaise, anorexia, and weight loss was referred to our hospital from a clinic. Abdominal computed tomography(CT)revealed bilateral adrenal masses. An ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle biopsy of the adrenal grand indicated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. A rapid adrenocorticotropic hormone(ACTH)test revealed primary adrenal failure. Rituximab-cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/vincristine/prednisolone(common name, R-CHOP)therapy accompanied by intrathecal treatment was initiated along with steroid replacement therapy. After the fourth courses, a CT scan showed a reduction of the adrenal masses, and there was no[18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose(FDG)uptake in the adrenal masses. The patient has remained in metabolic complete remission. Subsequently, both adrenal lymphomas were irradiated. The patient has been disease-free for 6 months after the diagnosis of primary adrenal lymphoma. The combined modality of chemoradiation therapy plus intrathecal treatment could be effective for primary adrenal lymphoma with a poor prognosis. PMID:24743371

  8. Opportunistic microorganisms in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Querido, Silvia Maria Rodrigues; Back-Brito, Graziella Nuernberg; dos Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira; Leão, Mariella Vieira Pereira; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial therapy may cause changes in the resident oral microbiota, with the increase of opportunistic pathogens. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of Candida, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas and Enterobacteriaceae in the oral cavity of fifty patients undergoing antibiotic therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis and systemically healthy controls. Oral rinsing and subgingival samples were obtained, plated in Sabouraud dextrose agar with chloramphenicol, mannitol agar and MacConkey agar, and incubated for 48 h at 37°C. Candida spp. and coagulase-positive staphylococci were identified by phenotypic tests, C. dubliniensis, by multiplex PCR, and coagulase-negative staphylococci, Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas spp., by the API systems. The number of Candida spp. was significantly higher in tuberculosis patients, and C. albicans was the most prevalent specie. No significant differences in the prevalence of other microorganisms were observed. In conclusion, the antimicrobial therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis induced significant increase only in the amounts of Candida spp. PMID:24031759

  9. Effect of losartan therapy on endothelial function in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Canache, Beatriz; Hernández-Hernández, Rafael; Armas-Padilla, María Cristina; Armas-Hernández, María José; Cammarata-Segura, Rosalba; Pacheco, Beatriz; Guerrero, Jaime; Israili, Zafar H; Valasco, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of losartan therapy on endothelial function by measuring serum nitric oxide (NO) levels and urinary excretion of NO in patients with essential hypertension. A group of 30 untreated stage 2 hypertensive patients (15 males and 15 females; age, 51.3 +/- 1.5 years) were included in the study. Office systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) was measured by using a mercury sphygmomanometer according to phase I and V of Korotkoff sounds. NO levels in serum and 24-hour urine were determined at baseline and after 6 weeks of daily dosing with losartan (50-100 mg). Losartan therapy resulted in a significant fall in systolic/diastolic BP (from 169.7 +/- 4.1/105 +/- 1.8 mm Hg at baseline to 146 +/- 2.7/91 +/- 1.9 mm Hg at the end of losartan treatment; P < 0.001). The therapy also caused significant increases in both serum NO level (32.74 +/- 3.01 microM/L at baseline versus 79.04 +/- 5.17 microM/L; P < 0.001 after therapy) and urinary NO excretion (58.21 +/- 3.72 microM/L at baseline versus 113.21 +/- 8.63 microM/L; P < 0.001 after therapy). Losartan therapy also reduced serum malondialdehyde (MDA), which is a measure of oxidative stress, by 0.201 nM (15.3%; P = 0.009). Losartan at a dose of 50 to 100 mg per day was effective in reducing elevated BP. The increase in serum NO levels and urinary NO excretion and a decrease in serum MDA levels by losartan treatment indicate a reduction in oxidative stress and enhances NO availability, both of which improve endothelial function. Thus, losartan therapy improves endothelial function in hypertensive patients with essential hypertension. PMID:17414585

  10. [Therapy-related chronic myelogenous leukemia following RFM therapy in a patient with follicular lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Shibazaki, Mio; Sumi, Masahiko; Takeda, Wataru; Kirihara, Takehiko; Kurihara, Taro; Sato, Keijiro; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Hiroshima, Yuki; Ueno, Mayumi; Ichikawa, Naoaki; Mori, Yuichi; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2014-08-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia are increasingly being recognized as treatment complications in patients receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy for previous neoplasms. However, therapy-related chronic myelogenous leukemia is relatively rare. A 61-year-old woman with a history of radiation therapy for breast cancer had previously, in 2007, received 4 courses of chemotherapy (RFM: rituximab, fludarabine, and mitoxantrone) for follicular lymphoma. In 2010, she was diagnosed with chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) with Philadelphia chromosome but no other cytogenetic anomalies. Although a complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) was achieved with imatinib therapy, she developed leukocytosis with lymphoblasts and lymphoid crisis was diagnosed in January 2013. G-banded karyotyping showed 45, XX, -7, t, (9;22)(q33;q11.2). Unrelated bone marrow stem cell transplantation was performed after she had achieved a CCyR with dasatinib therapy. Polymerase chain reaction detected no major bcr/abl transcript in her bone marrow 42 days after transplantation. The majority of secondary leukemias resulting from the use of cytotoxic drugs can be divided into two well-defined groups depending on whether the patient has received alkylating agents or topoisomerase II inhibitors. However, concerns regarding the leukemogenic potential of fludarabine-based chemotherapy are growing. The potential risk of therapy-related leukemias including CML needs to be considered following fludarabine-based chemotherapy. PMID:25186488

  11. Efficacy of Olanzapine Combined Therapy for Patients Receiving Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy Resistant to Standard Antiemetic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Masakazu; Kasamatsu, Yuka; Kado, Nobuhiro; Kuji, Shiho; Tanaka, Aki; Takahashi, Nobutaka; Takekuma, Munetaka; Hirashima, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Olanzapine is proved to be effective for chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). But its efficacy in combination with standard antiemetic therapy is unknown. The purpose of this study is to prove the preventive effect of olanzapine for the prevention of CINV caused by highly emetogenic chemotherapy when used with standard antiemetic therapy. Method. Gynecologic cancer patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy who had grade 2 or 3 nausea in overall phase (0–120 h after chemotherapy) despite standard therapy were assigned to this study. From the next cycles to cycles in which patients developed grade 2 or 3 nausea, they received olanzapine with standard therapy. 5 mg oral olanzapine was administered for 7 days from the day before chemotherapy. The effectiveness of preventive administration of olanzapine was evaluated retrospectively. The primary endpoint was nausea control rate (grade 0 or 1) with olanzapine. Results. Fifty patients were evaluable. The nausea control rate with olanzapine was improved from 58% to 98% in acute phase (0–24 h after chemotherapy) and 2% to 94% in delayed phase (24–120 h after chemotherapy). In overall phase, the nausea control rate improved from 0% to 92%, and it was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Preventive use of olanzapine combined with standard antiemetic therapy showed improvement in control of refractory nausea. PMID:26425564

  12. Gestalt therapy with the dying patient: integrative work using clay, poetry therapy, and creative media.

    PubMed

    Petzold, H G

    1982-01-01

    This is a report on death therapy with a 36-year-old cancer patient. Gestalt therapy and creative media (clay, poetry, and colors) were used to facilitate an integration of life and to give the person a sense of balance with life. The author tries to communicate his thoughts and feelings as they were during the course of the therapy, to show that counseling the dying means walking along a stretch of the path together. The companion-therapist cannot avoid his own perplexity and confusion by simply falling back on his professional role. Once he has become involved in an interpersonal relationship, he does not treat the patient as some kind of object. With the aid of transcripts taken from tape recordings, the integrating effect of using gestalt dialogue, and fantasy work becomes evident. PMID:10262695

  13. Gene therapy enhances chemotherapy tolerance and efficacy in glioblastoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Adair, Jennifer E.; Johnston, Sandra K.; Mrugala, Maciej M.; Beard, Brian C.; Guyman, Laura A.; Baldock, Anne L.; Bridge, Carly A.; Hawkins-Daarud, Andrea; Gori, Jennifer L.; Born, Donald E.; Gonzalez-Cuyar, Luis F.; Silbergeld, Daniel L.; Rockne, Russell C.; Storer, Barry E.; Rockhill, Jason K.; Swanson, Kristin R.; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Temozolomide (TMZ) is one of the most potent chemotherapy agents for the treatment of glioblastoma. Unfortunately, almost half of glioblastoma tumors are TMZ resistant due to overexpression of methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMThi). Coadministration of O6-benzylguanine (O6BG) can restore TMZ sensitivity, but causes off-target myelosuppression. Here, we conducted a prospective clinical trial to test whether gene therapy to confer O6BG resistance in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) improves chemotherapy tolerance and outcome. METHODS. We enrolled 7 newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients with MGMThi tumors. Patients received autologous gene-modified HSCs following single-agent carmustine administration. After hematopoietic recovery, patients underwent O6BG/TMZ chemotherapy in 28-day cycles. Serial blood samples and tumor images were collected throughout the study. Chemotherapy tolerance was determined by the observed myelosuppression and recovery following each cycle. Patient-specific biomathematical modeling of tumor growth was performed. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were also evaluated. RESULTS. Gene therapy permitted a significant increase in the mean number of tolerated O6BG/TMZ cycles (4.4 cycles per patient, P < 0.05) compared with historical controls without gene therapy (n = 7 patients, 1.7 cycles per patient). One patient tolerated an unprecedented 9 cycles and demonstrated long-term PFS without additional therapy. Overall, we observed a median PFS of 9 (range 3.5–57+) months and OS of 20 (range 13–57+) months. Furthermore, biomathematical modeling revealed markedly delayed tumor growth at lower cumulative TMZ doses in study patients compared with patients that received standard TMZ regimens without O6BG. CONCLUSION. These data support further development of chemoprotective gene therapy in combination with O6BG and TMZ for the treatment of glioblastoma and potentially other tumors with overexpression of MGMT. TRIAL

  14. Pelvic radiation therapy for gynecologic malignancy in geriatric patients

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, P.T.; Jeffrey, J.F.; Fraser, R.C.; Tompkins, M.G.; Filbee, J.F.; Wong, O.S.

    1989-05-01

    Thirty-one patients, aged 75 years or older, who received pelvic radiation therapy as part of primary treatment for a gynecologic malignancy, were reviewed. Ten patients (32%) failed to complete their treatment and 4 patients (13%) died of treatment-related complications. The treatment-related complications were independent of increasing age, but did correlate closely with the patients' pretreatment ECOG performance status. Ten patients with performance levels of 2 or higher had a mortality rate of 30%, while 70% failed to complete treatment. Treatment fractions of greater than 220 cGy per day also resulted in unacceptably high complication rates. Alternative treatment formats should be considered in geriatric patients with poor initial performance levels.

  15. [Efficiency of laser therapy in patients with nonspecific pulmonary diseases].

    PubMed

    Farkhutdinov, U R; Farkhutdinov, R R; Farkhutdinov, Sh U

    2001-01-01

    Generation of active oxygen forms (AOF) in whole blood was studied in 63 patients with acute pneumonia and 72 asthmatics by chemiluminescence (CL) registration. CL intensity depended on the intensity of inflammatory process. Groups of patients with high and low blood CL were distinguished. In 35 patients intravascular laser exposure of the blood (ILEB) was added to therapeutic complexes. Disorders of free radical oxidation persisted for a long time in the majority of patients with high CL of the blood, treated by ILEB; in many cases the inflammatory process acquired a protracted pattern. By contrast, in patients with low intensity of blood CL, ILEB stimulated the generation of AOF and increased the treatment efficiency. Hence, whole blood CL can serve as a criterion of ILEB prescription and can be used for monitoring the patient's status during laser therapy. PMID:11588785

  16. 21 CFR 892.5770 - Powered radiation therapy patient support assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Powered radiation therapy patient support assembly... therapy patient support assembly. (a) Identification. A powered radiation therapy patient support assembly is an electrically powered adjustable couch intended to support a patient during radiation...

  17. Propofol alleviates electroconvulsive shock-induced memory impairment by modulating proBDNF/mBDNF ratio in depressive rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Luo, Jie; Min, Su; Ren, Li; Qin, Peipei

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of propofol and electroconvulsive shock (ECS), the analogue of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in animals, on tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and its inhibitor (PAI-1) as well as the precursor of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (proBDNF)/mature BDNF (mBDNF) ratio in depressive rats. ECT is an effective treatment for depression, but can cause cognitive deficit. Some studies have indicated that propofol can ameliorate cognitive decline induced by ECT, but the underlying molecular mechanism is still unclear. Recent evidence has found that mBDNF and its precursor proBDNF are related to depression and cognitive function; they elicit opposite effects on cellular functions. Chronic unpredicted mild stress is widely used to induce depressive behaviors in rodents. This study found that the depression resulted in an increased expression of PAI-1 and upregulation of the proBDNF/mBDNF ratio, together with a decreased level of tPA, long-term potentiation (LTP) impairment, and cognitive decline. The proBDNF/mBDNF ratio was further upregulated after the ECS treatment in depressive rats, resulting in the deterioration of cognitive function and hippocampal LTP. Propofol alone did not reverse the changes in depressive rats, but when co-administered with ECS, it improved the cognitive function, alleviated the impairment of LTP, downregulated the proBDNF/mBDNF ratio, and increased the tPA expression. The results of this study suggest that propofol ameliorates cognitive decline induced by ECT, which was partly by modulating the proBDNF/mBDNF ratio and reversing the excessive changes in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, providing a new evidence for involving the proBDNF/mBDNF system in the progression and treatment of depression. PMID:27017958

  18. Hepatic-directed Therapies in Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Andrew S

    2016-02-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract have a propensity for producing hepatic metastases. Most GI NETs arise from the foregut or midgut, are malignant, and can cause severe debilitating symptoms adversely affecting quality of life. Aggressive treatments to reduce symptoms have an important role in therapy. Patients with GI NETs usually present with inoperable metastatic disease and severe symptoms from a variety of hormones and biogenic amines. This article describes intra-arterial hepatic-directed therapies for metastases from NETs, a group of treatments in which the therapeutic and/or embolic agents are released intra-arterially in specific hepatic vessels to target tumors. PMID:26614377

  19. [Can music therapy for patients with neurological disorders?].

    PubMed

    Myskja, Audun

    2004-12-16

    Recent developments in brain research and in the field of music therapy have led to the development of music-based methods specifically aimed at relieving symptoms of Parkinson's disease and other neurologic disorders. Rhythmic auditory stimulation uses external rhythmic auditory cues from song, music or metronome to aid patients improving their walking functioning and has been shown to be effective both within sessions and as a result of training over time. Melodic intonation therapy and related vocal techniques can improve expressive dysphasia and aid rehabilitation of neurologic disorders, particularly Parkinson's disease, stroke and developmental disorders. PMID:15608775

  20. Factors Affecting Hemodialysis Patients' Satisfaction with Their Dialysis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Al Eissa, M.; Al Sulaiman, M.; Jondeby, M.; Karkar, A.; Barahmein, M.; Shaheen, F. A. M.; Al Sayyari, A.

    2010-01-01

    Aim. To assess the degree of satisfaction among hemodialysis patients and the factors influencing this satisfaction. Methods. Patients were recruited from 3 Saudi dialysis centers. Demographic data was collected. Using 1 to 10 Likert scale, the patients were asked to rate the overall satisfaction with, and the overall impact of, their dialysis therapy on their lives and to rate the effect of the dialysis therapy on 15 qualities of life domains. Results. 322 patients were recruited (72.6% of the total eligible patients). The mean age was 51.7 years (±15.4); 58% have been on dialysis for >3 years. The mean Charlson Comorbidity Index was 3.2 (±2), and Kt/V was 1.3 (±0.44). The mean satisfaction score was (7.41 ± 2.75) and the mean score of the impact of the dialysis on the patients' lives was 5.32 ± 2.55. Male patients reported worse effect of dialysis on family life, social life, energy, and appetite. Longer period since the commencement of dialysis was associated with adverse effect on finances and energy. Lower level of education was associated with worse dialysis effect on stress, overall health, sexual life, hobbies, and exercise ability. Conclusion. The level of satisfaction is affected by gender, duration on dialysis, educational level, and standard of care given. PMID:21152200

  1. Assessing Patients' Cognitive Therapy Skills: Initial Evaluation of the Competencies of Cognitive Therapy Scale.

    PubMed

    Strunk, Daniel R; Hollars, Shannon N; Adler, Abby D; Goldstein, Lizabeth A; Braun, Justin D

    2014-10-01

    In Cognitive Therapy (CT), therapists work to help patients develop skills to cope with negative affect. Most current methods of assessing patients' skills are cumbersome and impractical for clinical use. To address this issue, we developed and conducted an initial psychometric evaluation of self and therapist reported versions of a new measure of CT skills: the Competencies of Cognitive Therapy Scale (CCTS). We evaluated the CCTS at intake and post-treatment in a sample of 67 patients participating in CT. The CCTS correlated with a preexisting measure of CT skills (the Ways of Responding Questionnaire) and was also related to concurrent depressive symptoms. Across CT, self-reported improvements in CT competencies were associated with greater changes in depressive symptoms. These findings offer initial evidence for the validity of the CCTS. We discuss the CCTS in comparison with other measures of CT skills and suggest future research directions. PMID:25408560

  2. Evaluation of Low-Level Laser Therapy in TMD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ayyildiz, Simel; Emir, Faruk; Sahin, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (laser) is one of the most recent treatment modalities in dentistry. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is suggested to have biostimulating and analgesic effects through direct irradiation without causing thermal response. There are few studies that have investigated the efficacy of laser therapy in temporomandibular disorders (TMD), especially in reduced mouth opening. The case report here evaluates performance of LLLT with a diode laser for temporomandibular clicking and postoperative findings were evaluated in two cases of TMD patients. First patient had a history of limited mouth opening and pain in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region since nine months. Second patient's main complaint was his restricted mouth opening, which was progressed in one year. LLLT was performed with a 685 nm red probed diode laser that has an energy density of 6.2 J/cm2, three times a week for one month, and application time was 30 seconds (685 nm, 25 mW, 30 s, 0.02 Hz, and 6.2 J/cm2) (BTL-2000, Portative Laser Therapy Device). The treatment protocol was decided according to the literature. One year later patients were evaluated and there were no changes. This application suggested that LLLT is an appropriate treatment for TMD related pain and limited mouth opening and should be considered as an alternative to other methods. PMID:26587294

  3. Antiviral Therapy in Elderly Patients With Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rheem, Justin; Sundaram, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents has revolutionized the treatment schema for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. From cure rates to tolerability, DAA agents have shown outstanding profiles compared with the prior therapy of pegylated interferon with ribavirin. However, the efficacy and safety profiles of DAA therapy in older patients, particularly the elderly, have been unclear, and patients in the 1945 to 1965 birth cohort constitute the largest proportion of the HCV population in the United States. Treating elderly patients with pegylated interferon and ribavirin has been challenging due to the frequent presence of multiple comorbidities in the elderly and high discontinuation rates caused by adverse events. Now, as more DAA agents have become widely studied and approved, subgroup analyses for the elderly population are being elucidated. Analysis of the current literature shows that these agents have been effective, well tolerated, and safe in the elderly population. This article highlights the efficacy and safety differences in interferon-based therapy and interferon-free regimens for elderly patients with HCV infection.

  4. Cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Kurzencwyg, David; Filion, Kristian B; Pilote, Louise; Nault, Patrice; Platt, Robert W; Rahme, Elham; Steinmetz, Oren; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2006-09-01

    Open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is a common surgical procedure associated with high mortality rates. Our objective was to describe the use of in-hospital cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing open AAA repair and to examine the effect of perioperative cardiac medical therapy on in-hospital mortality. We examined clinical data and in-hospital medication use among 223 patients who underwent open AAA repair at three North American hospitals, all of which used the Transition resource and cost accounting system. Medication use was described [angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, aspirin, ss-blockers, and statins] within the cohort at five specific periods of time: presurgery, day of surgery, 1 day after surgery, postsurgery, and discharge. We then performed a matched case-control study where cases were defined as patients who died in-hospital. We compared medication use between cases and controls to assess its impact on in-hospital mortality. Most patients were elderly (mean age 72.5 +/- 9.8 years), 70.4% were male, and in-hospital mortality within the cohort was 10.8%. Medication use in all periods of administration was low. ss-Blocker use was highest among all classes on the day of surgery, with 20.6% of patients undergoing AAA repair receiving the medication. Less than 50% of patients received any of the medications at discharge. After adjusting for baseline differences, perioperative ACE inhibitor use showed a trend toward a protective effect [odds ratio (OR) = 0.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01-1.31, p = 0.08], and perioperative ss-blocker use was significantly associated with a decrease in mortality (OR = 0.07, 95% CI 0.01-0.87, p = 0.04). Cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing AAA repair is low throughout all periods of hospitalization. ACE inhibitor and ss-blocker use may be associated with decreased in-hospital mortality. PMID:16794911

  5. Phage Neutralization by Sera of Patients Receiving Phage Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Żaczek, Maciej; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Kłak, Marlena; Fortuna, Wojciech; Letkiewicz, Sławomir; Rogóż, Paweł; Szufnarowski, Krzysztof; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Owczarek, Barbara; Górski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of our investigation was to verify whether phage therapy (PT) can induce antiphage antibodies. The antiphage activity was determined in sera from 122 patients from the Phage Therapy Unit in Wrocław with bacterial infections before and during PT, and in sera from 30 healthy volunteers using a neutralization test. Furthermore, levels of antiphage antibodies were investigated in sera of 19 patients receiving staphylococcal phages and sera of 20 healthy volunteers using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The phages were administered orally, locally, orally/locally, intrarectally, or orally/intrarectally. The rate of phage inactivation (K) estimated the level of phages' neutralization by human sera. Low K rates were found in sera of healthy volunteers (K≤1.73). Low K rates were detected before PT (K≤1.64). High antiphage activity of sera K>18 was observed in 12.3% of examined patients (n=15) treated with phages locally (n=13) or locally/orally (n=2) from 15 to 60 days of PT. High K rates were found in patients treated with some Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterococcus faecalis phages. Low K rates were observed during PT in sera of patients using phages orally (K≤1.04). Increased inactivation of phages by sera of patients receiving PT decreased after therapy. These results suggest that the antiphage activity in patients' sera depends on the route of phage administration and phage type. The induction of antiphage activity of sera during or after PT does not exclude a favorable result of PT. PMID:24893003

  6. Intensive Insulin Therapy in Severely Burned Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Marc G.; Kulp, Gabriela A.; Kraft, Robert; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Mlcak, Ron; Lee, Jong O.; Herndon, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Hyperglycemia and insulin resistance have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality in severely burned patients, and glycemic control appears essential to improve clinical outcomes. However, to date no prospective randomized study exists that determines whether intensive insulin therapy is associated with improved post-burn morbidity and mortality. Objectives: To determine whether intensive insulin therapy is associated with improved post-burn morbidity. Methods: A total of 239 severely burned pediatric patients with burns over greater than 30% of their total body surface area were randomized (block randomization 1:3) to intensive insulin treatment (n = 60) or control (n = 179). Measurements and Main Results: Demographics, clinical outcomes, sepsis, glucose metabolism, organ function, and inflammatory, acute-phase, and hypermetabolic responses were determined. Demographics were similar in both groups. Intensive insulin treatment significantly decreased the incidence of infections and sepsis compared with controls (P < 0.05). Furthermore, intensive insulin therapy improved organ function as indicated by improved serum markers, DENVER2 scores, and ultrasound (P < 0.05). Intensive insulin therapy alleviated post-burn insulin resistance and the vast catabolic response of the body (P < 0.05). Intensive insulin treatment dampened inflammatory and acute-phase responses by deceasing IL-6 and acute-phase proteins compared with controls (P < 0.05). Mortality was 4% in the intensive insulin therapy group and 11% in the control group (P = 0.14). Conclusions: In this prospective randomized clinical trial, we showed that intensive insulin therapy improves post-burn morbidity. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00673309). PMID:20395554

  7. Integrative and complementary therapies for patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Lucille

    2014-07-01

    In integrative medicine, well-being is emphasized, and in palliative care, quality of life (QOL) is a similar concept or goal. Both can occur despite advanced cancer. Integrative medicine serves to combine the best of alternative, complementary and conventional therapies to optimize well-being and QOL, whether or not a person is at the end of their life. When integrative medicine is combined with palliative care modalities, the toolbox to provide symptom control and well-being or QOL is increased or broadened. Palliative care and integrative medicine are best provided early in the trajectory of illness such as cancer, and increase in amount as the illness progresses toward end of life. In cancer care, symptoms of the cancer, as well as symptoms produced by cancer therapies, are addressed with conventional and integrative therapies. Goals of care change as the disease progresses, and a patient's unique situation creates a different balance of integrative and conventional therapies. Integrative therapies such as music, aromatherapy, and massage might appeal to more patients than more specific, less common integrative therapies that might be more expensive, or seem more unusual such as Ayurvedic medicine and energy modalities. Each person may be drawn to different integrative modalities depending on factors such as cultural traditions, beliefs, lifestyle, internet information, advice from family and friends, books, etc. This review focuses on how integrative and complementary modalities can be included in comprehensive palliative care for patients with advanced malignancies. Nutrition and movement, often neglected in conventional treatment strategies, will also be included in the larger context of integrative and palliative modalities. Both conventional and integrative modalities in palliative care help patients live with empowerment, hope, and well-being no matter how long their lives last. A comprehensive review of all integrative and complementary therapies is

  8. Neutropenia in antibody-deficient patients under IVIG replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Sonia; Jacob, Cristina M A; Pastorino, Antonio C; Castro, Ana Paula B M; Fomin, Angela B F; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda M S

    2009-02-01

    Patients with antibody deficiencies are more prone to develop acute neutropenic episodes even during immunoglobulin replacement. The aims of this study were to evaluate the presence of acute neutropenia in 42 patients with primary antibody immunodeficiencies, currently receiving intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and to describe the clinical and laboratory findings during neutropenic episodes. Of all patients, 10 (23.8%) presented acute neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count <1500 cells/mm3) during follow up (mean of 6.4 yr). The absolute neutrophil count ranged from 71 to 1488 cells/mm3. Neutropenia was not clearly associated with antibiotic prophylactic therapy or immunoglobulin levels, while infections were associated with neutropenia in the majority of episodes. Most acute neutropenia episodes were mild or moderate, except in CVID patients who present more severe neutropenia. Although IVIG may have contributed to reducing the severity of neutropenia, it does not prevent its occurrence in all patients. In conclusion, primary immunodeficient patients, even submitted to IVIG replacement therapy, must be regularly evaluated for neutropenia in order to minimize the risk of infections and its appropriate approach. PMID:18373514

  9. Leg ulcer in a patient associated with hydroxyurea therapy.

    PubMed

    Dissemond, Joachim; Hoeft, Daniela; Knab, Julia; Franckson, Tom; Kroger, Knut; Goos, Manfred

    2006-02-01

    Hydroxyurea is a hydroxylated derivate of urea commonly used in the treatment of various hematologic disorders. Cutaneous side-effects such as alopecia, diffuse hyperpigmentation, scaling, poikiloderma, atrophy of the skin and subcutaneous tissues or nail changes can develop after long-term treatment with hydroxyurea. Painful leg ulcers in association with hydroxyurea have only rarely been reported. We present a report of a 52-year-old patient with essential thrombocythemia suffering from painful leg ulcers 3 years after starting therapy with hydroxyurea. We decided to treat the leg ulcers following a modern phase-adapted wound-healing strategy and continued hydroxyurea therapy until complete healing of the ulcers. In conclusion, cutaneous ulceration of the leg is one adverse effect in patients with essential thrombocythemia during hydroxyurea therapy. Healing does not necessarily require discontinuation of the drug. Therefore, therapists should first optimize a conservative and systematic wound-healing strategy. If these interventions fail, discontinuation of hydroxyurea therapy is advisable. PMID:16445510

  10. Supplemental Oxygen Therapy for Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Barjaktarevic, Igor; Cooper, Christopher B

    2015-08-01

    Oxygen is necessary for aerobic metabolism. Since the human body cannot produce or store oxygen, a continuous and adequate delivery of oxygen needs to be secured by oxygen uptake from inhaled air via the respiratory system and oxygen delivery to body tissues via the circulation. Severely reduced lung function in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may be a limiting factor for adequate oxygen uptake and patients with this disease may require supplemental oxygen therapy. While the methodology of oxygen delivery in home settings represents a continuously evolving field, oxygen therapy itself has been an integral part of the management of severely hypoxemic patients with COPD for more than 50 years despite the lack of full understanding of its effects and the relative paucity of clinical evidence supporting its use. In this article, we review the physiological effects and discuss the clinical benefits of oxygen therapy. We also evaluate the evidence supporting and arguing against its use in the published literature, discuss its risks and benefits, define criteria for prescribing oxygen therapy, and review methods of oxygen delivery in home settings. PMID:26238641

  11. Herbal and plant therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllidi, Aikaterini; Xanthos, Theodoros; Papalois, Apostolos; Triantafillidis, John K.

    2015-01-01

    The use of herbal therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the efficacy of herbal therapy in IBD patients. Studies on herbal therapy for IBD published in Medline and Embase were reviewed, and response to treatment and remission rates were recorded. Although the number of the relevant clinical studies is relatively small, it can be assumed that the efficacy of herbal therapies in IBD is promising. The most important clinical trials conducted so far refer to the use of mastic gum, tormentil extracts, wormwood herb, aloe vera, triticum aestivum, germinated barley foodstuff, and boswellia serrata. In ulcerative colitis, aloe vera gel, triticum aestivum, andrographis paniculata extract and topical Xilei-san were superior to placebo in inducing remission or clinical response, and curcumin was superior to placebo in maintaining remission; boswellia serrata gum resin and plantago ovata seeds were as effective as mesalazine, whereas oenothera biennis had similar relapse rates as ω-3 fatty acids in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. In Crohn’s disease, mastic gum, Artemisia absinthium, and Tripterygium wilfordii were superior to placebo in inducing remission and preventing clinical postoperative recurrence, respectively. Herbal therapies exert their therapeutic benefit by different mechanisms including immune regulation, antioxidant activity, inhibition of leukotriene B4 and nuclear factor-kappa B, and antiplatelet activity. Large, double-blind clinical studies assessing the most commonly used natural substances should urgently be conducted. PMID:25830661

  12. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Susan Crump

    2011-08-01

    Sleep-wake disturbances, particularly insomnia, are among the most prevalent and distressing symptoms experienced by patients with cancer. As a result of extensive interdisciplinary research conducted since 2000, cognitive-behavioral therapy now is considered the standard of care for the treatment of insomnia in the general population and also has been upgraded to "likely to be effective" in the Oncology Nursing Society Putting Evidence Into Practice weight of evidence category. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is a multicomponent psychological and behavioral treatment designed to eliminate the perpetuating factors of insomnia. The most frequently used strategies are stimulus control, sleep restriction and relaxation therapies, paradoxical intention, sleep hygiene, and cognitive restructuring. Although this insomnia treatment recommendation has been well publicized, the nursing literature has not effectively translated the theories and principles of cognitive-behavioral therapy into practical guidelines or considerations for use by oncology staff nurses and advanced practitioners. This article attempts to demystify cognitive-behavioral therapy and provide nurses at different levels of practice a foundation from which to evaluate and potentially deliver this promising insomnia intervention. PMID:21810565

  13. Management of the Patient with Incomplete Response to PPI Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kahrilas, Peter J; Boeckxstaens, Guy; Smout, Andre JPM

    2013-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) remove most of the acid from the gastroesophageal refluxate. However, PPIs do not eliminate reflux and the response of specific GERD symptoms to PPI therapy depends on the degree to which acid drives those symptoms. PPIs are progressively less effective for heartburn, regurgitation, chest pain and extra-esophageal symptoms. Hence, with an incomplete PPI response, obtaining an accurate history, detailing which symptoms are ‘refractory’ and exactly what evidence exists linking these symptoms to GERD is paramount. Reflux can continue to cause symptoms despite PPI therapy because of persistent acid reflux or weakly acidic reflux. Given these possibilities, diagnostic testing (pH or pH-impedance monitoring) becomes essential. Antireflux surgery is an alternative in patients if a clear relationship is established between persistent symptoms, particularly regurgitation, and reflux. Treating visceral hypersensitivity may also benefit the subset of GERD patients whose symptoms are driven by this mechanism. PMID:23998978

  14. Serologic Evolution of Neurocysticercosis Patients after Antiparasitic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Hector H.; Gilman, Robert H.; Catacora, Manuel; Verastegui, Manuela; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Tsang, Victor C. W.

    2011-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is the main cause of acquired epilepsy in developing countries and is an emerging disease in the United States. Introduction of the immunoblot assay provided a new tool for the diagnosis and monitoring of neurocysticercosis. This study analyzed the relationship between clinical characteristics of cerebral infection (number and type of lesions) plus the baseline response on immunoblot and the changes observed after therapy. Reaction to all 7 diagnostic bands was associated with severe infection (more lesions). Seventeen patients (35%) had no active lesions on computed tomography (CT) 3 months after therapy and were considered cured. Although most cured patients remained seropositive after 1 year, 3 became seronegative before 9 months. In these 3 cases, the lesions had resolved on CT at 3 months. Persistent seropositivity does not necessarily indicate active infection. Serologic follow-up will be clinically helpful only in rare cases in which early antibody disappearance occurs. PMID:9203680

  15. Use of negative pressure wound therapy in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Teng, Shou-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    According to previous research, adjunctive negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) can help manage infected wounds when applied along with appropriate debridement and antibiotic therapy as deemed clinically relevant. NPWT not only removes fluid, and reduces oedema, but also promotes perfusion around the wounds. In addition, NPWT may lead to improved graft fixation when used as a bolster, especially in patients who are less compliant or have poor graft fixation that result from using traditional methods. NPWT is a good choice to bolster skin grafts in young, active and less-compliant patients. We propose an enhanced segmental compartment-covered technique, which uses NPWT adjunctively as first-line wound treatment to help manage postoperative infection. Moreover, NPWT promotes granulation tissue formation to prepare the wound bed for subsequent skin graft and may be used as a bolster over the graft, which helps to attain skin graft viability. PMID:27547959

  16. The Effectiveness of Neural Therapy in Patients With Bell's Palsy.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Ferdi; Kelle, Bayram; Balaban, Birol

    2016-06-01

    This report describes the case of a 42-y-old man with a type of facial nerve palsy of the lower motor neurons (LMNs) on the right side, who was treated with neural therapy. After exposure to cold weather, the patient had suddenly developed difficulty in closing his right eye and a deviation to the left in the angle of his mouth. He had no previous medical illness and had no history of trauma, smoking, alcohol intake, or blood transfusion. PMID:27547166

  17. Sex therapy: considerations in the selection of patients.

    PubMed Central

    Maurice, W. L.; Stuart, F.; Szasz, G.

    1976-01-01

    Sex therapy has proven helpful for many patients with sexual dysfunctions. In judging the appropriateness of this new treatment procedure the clinician should determine the following: that a sexual dysfunction exists, that a stable couple relationship exists, that there are no major marital, psychiatric or physical problems that are etiologically important or that would interfere with treatment, and that both partners are willing to engage in a treatment program. PMID:953899

  18. [From shock therapies to new neuromodulation techniques].

    PubMed

    Plaze, Marion; Krebs, Marie-Odile

    2013-01-01

    The first shock therapies date back to 1933 with the Sakel therapy. Electric induction experiments led to electroconvulsive therapy first used by Ugo Cerletti and Lucio Bini in 1938. Today, transcranial magnetic stimulation offers new therapeutic perspectives for the treatment of mental disorders. Similarly, deep brain stimulation techniques have been developed for the treatment of compulsive obsessive disorders and severe and treatment-resistant depression. PMID:23757891

  19. Outcomes of Proton Therapy for Patients With Functional Pituitary Adenomas

    SciTech Connect

    Wattson, Daniel A.; Tanguturi, Shyam K.; Spiegel, Daphna Y.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Biller, Beverly M.K.; Nachtigall, Lisa B.; Bussière, Marc R.; Swearingen, Brooke; Chapman, Paul H.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): This study evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of proton therapy for functional pituitary adenomas (FPAs). Methods and Materials: We analyzed 165 patients with FPAs who were treated at a single institution with proton therapy between 1992 and 2012 and had at least 6 months of follow-up. All but 3 patients underwent prior resection, and 14 received prior photon irradiation. Proton stereotactic radiosurgery was used for 92% of patients, with a median dose of 20 Gy(RBE). The remainder received fractionated stereotactic proton therapy. Time to biochemical complete response (CR, defined as ≥3 months of normal laboratory values with no medical treatment), local control, and adverse effects are reported. Results: With a median follow-up time of 4.3 years (range, 0.5-20.6 years) for 144 evaluable patients, the actuarial 3-year CR rate and the median time to CR were 54% and 32 months among 74 patients with Cushing disease (CD), 63% and 27 months among 8 patients with Nelson syndrome (NS), 26% and 62 months among 50 patients with acromegaly, and 22% and 60 months among 9 patients with prolactinomas, respectively. One of 3 patients with thyroid stimulating hormone—secreting tumors achieved CR. Actuarial time to CR was significantly shorter for corticotroph FPAs (CD/NS) compared with other subtypes (P=.001). At a median imaging follow-up time of 43 months, tumor control was 98% among 140 patients. The actuarial 3-year and 5-year rates of development of new hypopituitarism were 45% and 62%, and the median time to deficiency was 40 months. Larger radiosurgery target volume as a continuous variable was a significant predictor of hypopituitarism (adjusted hazard ratio 1.3, P=.004). Four patients had new-onset postradiosurgery seizures suspected to be related to generously defined target volumes. There were no radiation-induced tumors. Conclusions: Proton irradiation is an effective treatment for FPAs, and hypopituitarism remains the primary

  20. Effect of electroconvulsive stimulation on morphological and physiological aspects of post-cardiac arrest cerebral microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Sheleg, Sergey; Hixon, Hugh; Aizberg, Oleg R; Korotkevich, Alexander E; Nedzved, Mikhail K

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effect of electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) on cerebral circulation in vivo using the method for measuring microcirculation in real time with the photosensitizer dye Photosense and the fiber optic spectrofluorometer LESA-01-BIOSPEC. We have found that electroconvulsive stimulation significantly improved cerebral microcirculation (fourfold higher comparing to the control cerebral perfusion) after 30 min of room-temperature cardiac arrest. Morphologic study of the brain tissue showed the absence of rouleaux formation of erythrocytes ("sludged blood") in the cerebral cortex microcirculation after the application of electrical stimulus. Electroconvulsive stimulation may be useful for improving cerebral microcirculation (blood flow) in cases of long-term brain hypoxia/anoxia after prolonged cardiac arrest. PMID:18586374

  1. Inhaled therapies, azithromycin and Mycobacterium abscessus in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Catherinot, Emilie; Roux, Anne-Laure; Vibet, Marie-Anne; Bellis, Gil; Lemonnier, Lydie; Le Roux, Evelyne; Bernède-Bauduin, Claire; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Guillemot, Didier; Gaillard, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are at particularly high risk of developing lung disease caused by Mycobacterium abscessus complex (MABSC). Over the last 10 years, changes in CF treatment, with increasing use of inhaled therapies and low-dose azithromycin, have been accompanied by an increase in the prevalence of MABSC infections in CF patients. There is therefore some concern about the role of new CF treatments in the emergence of MABSC infections. We addressed this issue by means of a case-control study including 30 MABSC-positive cases and 60 nontuberculous mycobacteria-negative CF controls matched for age, sex and centre. We also compared practices at the CF centres with the highest prevalence of MABSC with those at the other centres. No positive association was found between MABSC lung disease and the use of inhaled therapies or low-dose azithromycin in the 4 years preceding MABSC isolation. These treatments were not significantly more frequently used at the CF centres with the highest MABSC prevalence rates. In conclusion, there is no evidence for a link between M. abscessus complex lung disease and inhaled therapies or low-dose azithromycin in patients with CF. PMID:22936714

  2. THE USE OF ANTABUS IN THE THERAPY OF ALCOHOLIC PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, John D.

    1950-01-01

    Preliminary studies on the effects of antabus (tetraethylthiuram disulfide) in the therapy of alcoholic patients indicate that it is very valuable in providing a “chemical foundation” for sobriety, even in those with a severe, long term drinking problem. In the first 30 patients treated, a favorable degree of control of the alcoholism has been effected in approximately 80 per cent. When taken regularly the drug maintains in the patient a very high degree of sensitivity to alcohol, quickly producing a number of very distressing bodily reactions whenever even very small amounts of spirits are ingested. Because of its potential dangers, antabus should be used only after thorough clinical and laboratory studies in properly staffed institutions. It is contraindicated in individuals with existing major psychosis or drug addiction and must be used only with caution in patients with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, goiter, pregnancy, epilepsy, asthma, and hepatic disease. Antabus therapy should be considered only one aspect of the total treatment program for the alcoholic patient. PMID:15426987

  3. Sodium Bicarbonate Therapy in Patients with Metabolic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Adeva-Andany, María M.; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Mouriño-Bayolo, David; Castro-Quintela, Elvira; Domínguez-Montero, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis occurs when a relative accumulation of plasma anions in excess of cations reduces plasma pH. Replacement of sodium bicarbonate to patients with sodium bicarbonate loss due to diarrhea or renal proximal tubular acidosis is useful, but there is no definite evidence that sodium bicarbonate administration to patients with acute metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis, septic shock, intraoperative metabolic acidosis, or cardiac arrest, is beneficial regarding clinical outcomes or mortality rate. Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease usually show metabolic acidosis due to increased unmeasured anions and hyperchloremia. It has been suggested that metabolic acidosis might have a negative impact on progression of kidney dysfunction and that sodium bicarbonate administration might attenuate this effect, but further evaluation is required to validate such a renoprotective strategy. Sodium bicarbonate is the predominant buffer used in dialysis fluids and patients on maintenance dialysis are subjected to a load of sodium bicarbonate during the sessions, suffering a transient metabolic alkalosis of variable severity. Side effects associated with sodium bicarbonate therapy include hypercapnia, hypokalemia, ionized hypocalcemia, and QTc interval prolongation. The potential impact of regular sodium bicarbonate therapy on worsening vascular calcifications in patients with chronic kidney disease has been insufficiently investigated. PMID:25405229

  4. Progress in sensorimotor rehabilitative physical therapy programs for stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Ching; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2014-08-16

    Impaired motor and functional activity following stroke often has negative impacts on the patient, the family and society. The available rehabilitation programs for stroke patients are reviewed. Conventional rehabilitation strategies (Bobath, Brunnstrom, proprioception neuromuscular facilitation, motor relearning and function-based principles) are the mainstream tactics in clinical practices. Numerous advanced strategies for sensory-motor functional enhancement, including electrical stimulation, electromyographic biofeedback, constraint-induced movement therapy, robotics-aided systems, virtual reality, intermittent compression, partial body weight supported treadmill training and thermal stimulation, are being developed and incorporated into conventional rehabilitation programs. The concept of combining valuable rehabilitative procedures into "a training package", based on the patient's functional status during different recovery phases after stroke is proposed. Integrated sensorimotor rehabilitation programs with appropriate temporal arrangements might provide great functional benefits for stroke patients. PMID:25133141

  5. Art Therapy Outcomes in the Rehabilitation Treatment of a Stroke Patient: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sun-Hyun; Kim, Min-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Chun, Sae-il

    2008-01-01

    This case report discusses the potential for art therapy to aid in the recovery of early-chronic stroke patients. The patient was diagnosed with having a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a cerebral aneurysm rupture 1 year prior to hospitalization. Therapies used as part of the patient's treatment included 10 weeks of art therapy conducted twice a…

  6. Efficacy of Two Different Types of Speech Therapy for Aphasic Stroke Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prins, R. S.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of two speech therapy programs for patients with stroke-induced aphasia. Neither a systematic therapy program for auditory communication disorders nor a conventional stimulation therapy program had any clear effect on the patients' language recovery, especially when contrasted against the progress of patients receiving…

  7. Predictors of overall satisfaction of cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Schiebe, Martina; Pinkert, Uwe; Ahmad, Tahera; Schäfer, Christof; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Franz, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Background Reporting the experiences and satisfaction of patients, as well as their quality of care scores is an emerging recommendation in health care systems. Many aspects of patients’ experience determine their overall satisfaction. The aim of this evaluation was to define the main factors contributing to the satisfaction of patients undergoing radiotherapy in an outpatient setting. Patients and methods A total of 1,710 patients with a histologically proven cancer, who were treated in our department between 2012 and 2014, were recruited for this prospective evaluation. At the end of therapy, each patient was asked to grade the skills and the care provided by radiation therapists, physicians, and physician’s assistants, as well as the overall satisfaction during therapy. Statistical analysis was performed to determine which parameters had the greatest influence on overall satisfaction. Results Overall satisfaction with the provided care was high with a mean satisfaction score of 1.4. Significant correlations were found between overall satisfaction and each of the following survey items: courtesy, protection of privacy, professional skills and care provided by the radiation therapists and physicians, accuracy of provided information, and cleanliness. Linear regression analysis demonstrated that courteous behavior and the protection of privacy were the strongest predictors for overall satisfaction (P<0.001), followed by care and skills of physicians and radiation therapists. Patients suffering from head and neck cancer expressed lower overall satisfaction. Conclusion Based on our prospectively acquired data, we were able to identify and confirm key factors for patient satisfaction in an outpatient radiooncological cancer center. From these results, we conclude that patients want most importantly to be treated with courtesy, protection of privacy and care. PMID:26491266

  8. Late radiation toxicity in Hodgkin lymphoma patients: proton therapy's potential.

    PubMed

    Toltz, Allison; Shin, Naomi; Mitrou, Ellis; Laude, Cecile; Freeman, Carolyn R; Seuntjens, Jan; Parker, William; Roberge, David

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, all young patients treated for intrathoracic Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) at one of 10 radiotherapy centers in the province of Quebec received 3D conformal photon therapy. These patients may now be at risk for late effects of their treatment, notably secondary malignancies and cardiac toxicity. We hypothesized that more complex radiotherapy, including intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and possibly IMRT (in the form of helical tomotherapy (HT)), could benefit these patients. With institutional review board approval at 10 institutions, all treatment plans for patients under the age of 30 treated for HL during a six-month consecutive period of 2010 were retrieved. Twenty-six patients were identified, and after excluding patients with extrathoracic radiation or treatment of recurrence, 20 patients were replanned for HT and IMPT. Neutron dose for IMPT plans was estimated from published measurements. The relative seriality model was used to predict excess risk of cardiac mortality. A modified linear quadratic model was used to predict the excess absolute risk for induction of lung cancer and, in female patients, breast cancer. Model parameters were derived from published data. Predicted risk for cardiac mortality was similar among the three treatment techniques (absolute excess risk of cardiac mortality was not reduced for HT or IMPT (p > 0.05, p > 0.05) as compared to 3D CRT). Predicted risks were increased for HT and reduced for IMPT for secondary lung cancer (p < 0.001, p < 0.001) and breast cancers (p< 0.001, p< 0.001) as compared to 3D CRT. PMID:26699298

  9. Diabetes therapies in hemodialysis patients: Dipeptidase-4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuya; Hasegawa, Hitomi; Tsuji, Mayumi; Udaka, Yuko; Mihara, Masatomo; Shimizu, Tatsuo; Inoue, Michiyasu; Goto, Yoshikazu; Gotoh, Hiromichi; Inagaki, Masahiro; Oguchi, Katsuji

    2015-06-25

    Although several previous studies have been published on the effects of dipeptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors in diabetic hemodialysis (HD) patients, the findings have yet to be reviewed comprehensively. Eyesight failure caused by diabetic retinopathy and aging-related dementia make multiple daily insulin injections difficult for HD patients. Therefore, we reviewed the effects of DPP-4 inhibitors with a focus on oral antidiabetic drugs as a new treatment strategy in HD patients with diabetes. The following 7 DPP-4 inhibitors are available worldwide: sitagliptin, vildagliptin, alogliptin, linagliptin, teneligliptin, anagliptin, and saxagliptin. All of these are administered once daily with dose adjustments in HD patients. Four types of oral antidiabetic drugs can be administered for combination oral therapy with DPP-4 inhibitors, including sulfonylureas, meglitinide, thiazolidinediones, and alpha-glucosidase inhibitor. Nine studies examined the antidiabetic effects in HD patients. Treatments decreased hemoglobin A1c and glycated albumin levels by 0.3% to 1.3% and 1.7% to 4.9%, respectively. The efficacy of DPP-4 inhibitor treatment is high among HD patients, and no patients exhibited significant severe adverse effects such as hypoglycemia and liver dysfunction. DPP-4 inhibitors are key drugs in new treatment strategies for HD patients with diabetes and with limited choices for diabetes treatment. PMID:26131325

  10. "The home infusion patient": patient profiles for the home infusion therapy market.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, K W; Powers, T

    1999-01-01

    The authors review the relevant literature regarding home health care patient profiles. An empirical analysis is provided from archival data for a home infusion company servicing patients in urban and rural areas. The results are provided as a 2 x 2 matrix for patients in urban and rural areas seeing either a specialist or primary care physicians. A series of moderated regressions indicate that type of treating physician, patient's gender, geographic residence and level of acuity are cogent in predicting the complexity of prescribed infusion therapies. Managerial implications are provided for the home care marketer in segmenting patient markets for infusion services. PMID:10538737

  11. Propofol ameliorates electroconvulsive shock-induced learning and memory impairment by regulation of synaptic metaplasticity via autophosphorylation of CaMKIIa at Thr 305 in stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Li; Zhang, Fan; Min, Su; Hao, Xuechao; Qin, Peipei; Zhu, Xianlin

    2016-06-30

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for depression, but it can induce learning and memory impairment. Our previous study found propofol (γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor agonist) could ameliorate electroconvulsive shock (ECS, an analog of ECT to animals)-induced cognitive impairment, however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of propofol on metaplasticity and autophosphorylation of CaMKIIa in stressed rats receiving ECS. Depressive-like behavior and learning and memory function were assessed by sucrose preference test and Morris water test respectively. LTP were tested by electrophysiological experiment, the expression of CaMKIIa, p-T305-CaMKII in hippocampus and CaMKIIα in hippocampal PSD fraction were evaluated by western blot. Results suggested ECS raised the baseline fEPSP and impaired the subsequent LTP, increased the expression of p-T305-CaMKII and decreased the expression of CaMKIIα in hippocampal PSD fraction, leading to cognitive dysfunction in stressed rats. Propofol could down-regulate the baseline fEPSP and reversed the impairment of LTP partly, decreased the expression of p-T305-CaMKII and increased the expression of CaMKIIα in hippocampal PSD fraction and alleviated ECS-induced learning and memory impairment. In conclusion, propofol ameliorates ECS-induced learning and memory impairment, possibly by regulation of synaptic metaplasticity via p-T305-CaMKII. PMID:27104927

  12. Combination and triple therapy in patients with stable angina pectoris not adequately controlled by optimal β-blocker therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kok, W.E.M.; Visser, F.C.; Visser, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    In 60 to 80% of patients with stable angina pectoris at low risk for future coronary events, monotherapy with a β-blocker is an effective treatment. When patients with stable angina pectoris and low risk for events do not respond adequately to optimal β-blocker monotherapy, combination therapy or even triple therapy is may be recommended, but little is known of the actual benefit of such a strategy. We reviewed the evidence from the literature on the effectiveness of combination and triple therapy. Combination therapy with a calcium antagonist or nitrate was found to be more effective than β-blocker monotherapy in the majority of studies, but only an estimated 30% of patients objectively benefit from these combination therapies. Direct comparison shows that combination therapy of a β-blocker with a calcium antagonist is more effective than the combination of a β-blocker with a nitrate. An inadequate response to β-blocker monotherapy is more effectively improved by addition of a calcium antagonist than by alternative use of a calcium antagonist. The use of triple therapy is controversial and not recommended in patients with mild angina pectoris, while for patients with severe angina pectoris not responding to combination therapy of a β-blocker with a nitrate, triple therapy may be of advantage, although the number of patients studied has been small. PMID:25696045

  13. Could Biomarkers Direct Therapy for the Septic Patient?

    PubMed

    Sims, Clark R; Nguyen, Trung C; Mayeux, Philip R

    2016-05-01

    Sepsis is a serious medical condition caused by a severe systemic inflammatory response to a bacterial, fungal, or viral infection that most commonly affects neonates and the elderly. Advances in understanding the pathophysiology of sepsis have resulted in guidelines for care that have helped reduce the risk of dying from sepsis for both children and older adults. Still, over the past three decades, a large number of clinical trials have been undertaken to evaluate pharmacological agents for sepsis. Unfortunately, all of these trials have failed, with the use of some agents even shown to be harmful. One key issue in these trials was the heterogeneity of the patient population that participated. What has emerged is the need to target therapeutic interventions to the specific patient's underlying pathophysiological processes, rather than looking for a universal therapy that would be effective in a "typical" septic patient, who does not exist. This review supports the concept that identification of the right biomarkers that can direct therapy and provide timely feedback on its effectiveness will enable critical care physicians to decrease mortality of patients with sepsis and improve the quality of life of survivors. PMID:26857961

  14. [Evidence based therapy with insulin in diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Jermendy, György

    2005-02-20

    A fast development in therapy with insulin was observed after its discovery. Besides the widely used human regular insulin preparations, nowadays ultrashort and long-acting insulin analogues are also available for the patients. At present, the results of large clinical trials enable an evidence based diabetes care. It is well documented, that near-normoglycemia should be achieved by intensive conservative insulin treatment or pump therapy in type 1 diabetic patients. The beneficial effects of the good metabolic control could also be observed years later concerning late specific complications of diabetes. Similarly, as good as possible metabolic control should be aimed with antidiabetic treatment including insulin, if necessary, in type 2 diabetic patients. It is documented that the risk of cardiovascular complications is not increased in type 2 diabetic patients treated with insulin. Hypoglycemia and weight gain are the most important side effects of the insulin treatment. Recently, evidence based recommendations for treatment with ultrashort (insulin lispro, insulin aspart) and long-acting insulin analogues (glargine) can also be determined. PMID:15803885

  15. The mechanisms of electroconvulsive stimuli in BrdU-positive cells of the dentate gyrus in ACTH-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Kuwatsuka, Keiko; Hayashi, Hiromi; Onoue, Yuka; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Koyama, Toshihiro; Asanuma, Masato; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Sendo, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    In clinical studies, electroconvulsive stimuli have been associated with improvements in both depression and treatment-resistant depression. In a previous study, treatment with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) for 14 days decreased adult hippocampal cell proliferation. Furthermore, electroconvulsive stimuli significantly decreased the duration of immobility following repeated administration of ACTH for 14 days in rats. The present study was undertaken to further characterize the mechanism of treatmentresistant antidepressant effects of electroconvulsive stimuli by measuring cell proliferation, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, and phosphorylated and total cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element-binding protein (pCREB/CREB) levels in the hippocampus of ACTH-treated rats. Electroconvulsive stimuli increased cell proliferation in both saline-treated and ACTH-treated rats. Mature-BDNF protein levels showed a tendency to decrease in ACTH-treated rats. Electroconvulsive stimuli treatment increased mature-BDNF protein levels in the hippocampus of both saline-treated and ACTH-treated rats. Furthermore, electroconvulsive stimuli increased phospho-Ser133-CREB (pCREB) levels and the ratio of pCREB/CREB in both saline-treated and ACTH-treated rats. These findings suggest that the treatment-resistant antidepressant effects of electroconvulsive stimuli may be attributed, at least in part, to an enhancement of hippocampal cell proliferation. PMID:23615225

  16. Concurrent radiation therapy and ipilimumab immunotherapy for patients with melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Christopher A.; Postow, Michael A.; Khan, Shaheer A.; Beal, Kathryn; Parhar, Preeti K.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Lee, Nancy Y.; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2015-01-01

    Ipilimumab and radiation therapy (RT) are commonly used to treat unresectable and metastatic melanoma. Results from preclinical studies and case reports suggest a biologic interaction between these two treatments. To understand the clinical implications of the interaction, we performed a retrospective study reviewing records of patients treated with ipilimumab and RT for melanoma at our institution between 2005 and 2011. The review included details of treatment, response, adverse events (AEs), and overall survival (OS). Twenty-nine patients underwent 33 courses of non-brain RT between their first and last dose of ipilimumab. Immune-related AEs (ir-AEs) were observed in 43% of patients receiving ipilimumab at 10 mg/kg, and in 22% of patients receiving 3 mg/kg; the frequency of ir-AEs was not significantly different compared to previous studies of ipilimumab alone. RT-related AEs were significantly more common in patients receiving higher doses of radiation. Palliation of symptoms was reported by 77% of patients after RT. Median OS was 9 and 39 months in patients receiving RT during induction and maintenance with ipilimumab, respectively. In this retrospective study, concurrent ipilimumab and RT was not associated with higher than expected rates of AEs, nor did it abrogate palliative effects of RT or survival benefits of ipilimumab. Further studies to prospectively explore the efficacy of this therapeutic combination are warranted. PMID:24777500

  17. Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation Therapy in Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeng Jin; Na, Yeon Kyung; Hong, Hae Sook

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of progressive muscle relaxation therapy (PMRT) on cortisol level, the Stress Arousal Checklist (SACL) score, blood pressure, and heart rate in colorectal cancer patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery. Forty-six patients were divided into control and experimental groups. Cortisol levels, blood pressure, and heart rate were measured before surgery and between 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. on the first, third, and fifth days after surgery. SACL score was measured before surgery and on the fifth day after surgery at the same time points. PMRT was performed twice a day for 5 days. Analyses of covariance with advanced covariate levels and t tests showed that PMRT helps colorectal cancer patients achieve a lower stress response and provides an important basis for stress control. PMID:26945016

  18. Vocal changes in patients undergoing radiation therapy for glottic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Miller, S; Harrison, L B; Solomon, B; Sessions, R B

    1990-06-01

    A prospective evaluation of vocal changes in patients receiving radiation therapy for T1 and T2 (AJC) glottic carcinoma was undertaken in January 1987. Vocal analysis was performed prior to radiotherapy and at specific intervals throughout the radiation treatment program. The voicing ratio was extrapolated from a sustained vowel phonation using the Visipitch interfaced with the IBM-PC. Preliminary observations suggested three distinct patterns of vocal behavior: 1. reduced voicing ratio with precipitous improvement within the course of treatment, 2. high initial voicing ratio with reduction secondary to radiation induced edema, with rapid improvement in the voicing component after the edema subsided, and 3. fluctuating voicing ratio during and following treatment. Enrollment of new patients and a 2-year follow-up of current patients was undertaken. PMID:2348739

  19. Vocal changes in patients undergoing radiation therapy for glottic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.; Harrison, L.B.; Solomon, B.; Sessions, R.B. )

    1990-06-01

    A prospective evaluation of vocal changes in patients receiving radiation therapy for T1 and T2 (AJC) glottic carcinoma was undertaken in January 1987. Vocal analysis was performed prior to radiotherapy and at specific intervals throughout the radiation treatment program. The voicing ratio was extrapolated from a sustained vowel phonation using the Visipitch interfaced with the IBM-PC. Preliminary observations suggested three distinct patterns of vocal behavior: 1. reduced voicing ratio with precipitous improvement within the course of treatment, 2. high initial voicing ratio with reduction secondary to radiation induced edema, with rapid improvement in the voicing component after the edema subsided, and 3. fluctuating voicing ratio during and following treatment. Enrollment of new patients and a 2-year follow-up of current patients was undertaken.

  20. Progress in sensorimotor rehabilitative physical therapy programs for stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia-Ching; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2014-01-01

    Impaired motor and functional activity following stroke often has negative impacts on the patient, the family and society. The available rehabilitation programs for stroke patients are reviewed. Conventional rehabilitation strategies (Bobath, Brunnstrom, proprioception neuromuscular facilitation, motor relearning and function-based principles) are the mainstream tactics in clinical practices. Numerous advanced strategies for sensory-motor functional enhancement, including electrical stimulation, electromyographic biofeedback, constraint-induced movement therapy, robotics-aided systems, virtual reality, intermittent compression, partial body weight supported treadmill training and thermal stimulation, are being developed and incorporated into conventional rehabilitation programs. The concept of combining valuable rehabilitative procedures into “a training package”, based on the patient’s functional status during different recovery phases after stroke is proposed. Integrated sensorimotor rehabilitation programs with appropriate temporal arrangements might provide great functional benefits for stroke patients. PMID:25133141

  1. Dual Antiplatelet Therapy (DAPT) versus No Antiplatelet Therapy and Incidence of Major Bleeding in Patients on Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Biever, Paul M.; Benk, Christoph; Ahrens, Ingo; Bode, Christoph; Wengenmayer, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Aims Bleeding is a frequent complication in patients on venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO). An indication for dual antiplatelet therapy due to coronary stent implantation is present in a considerable number of these patients. The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate if dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) significantly increases the high intrinsic bleeding risk in patients on VA-ECMO. Methods and Results A total of 93 patients were treated with VA-ECMO between October 2010 and October 2013. Average time on VA-ECMO was 58.9 ± 1.7 hours. Dual antiplatelet therapy was given to 51.6% of all patients. Any bleeding was recorded in 60.2% of all patients. There was no difference in bleeding incidence in patients on DAPT when compared to those without any antiplatelet therapy including any bleeding (66.7% vs. 57.1%, p = 0.35), BARC3 bleeding (43.8% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.31) or pulmonary bleeding (16.7% vs. 19.0%, p = 0.77). This holds true after adjustment for confounders. Rate of transfusion of red blood cells were similar in patients with or without DAPT (35.4% vs. 28.6%, p = 0.488). Conclusions Bleeding on VA-ECMO is frequent. This registry recorded no statistical difference in bleeding in patients on dual antiplatelet therapy when compared to no antiplatelet therapy. When indicated, DAPT should not be withheld from VA ECMO patients. PMID:27467697

  2. Loco-regional therapies for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma awaiting liver transplantation: Selecting an optimal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Thomas J; Rakela, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common, increasingly prevalent malignancy. For all but the smallest lesions, surgical removal of cancer via resection or liver transplantation (LT) is considered the most feasible pathway to cure. Resection - even with favorable survival - is associated with a fairly high rate of recurrence, perhaps since most HCCs occur in the setting of cirrhosis. LT offers the advantage of removing not only the cancer but the diseased liver from which the cancer has arisen, and LT outperforms resection for survival with selected patients. Since time waiting for LT is time during which HCC can progress, loco-regional therapy (LRT) is widely employed by transplant centers. The purpose of LRT is either to bridge patients to LT by preventing progression and waitlist dropout, or to downstage patients who slightly exceed standard eligibility criteria initially but can fall within it after treatment. Transarterial chemoembolization and radiofrequency ablation have been the most widely utilized LRTs to date, with favorable efficacy and safety as a bridge to LT (and for the former, as a downstaging modality). The list of potentially effective LRTs has expanded in recent years, and includes transarterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting beads, radioembolization and novel forms of extracorporal therapy. Herein we appraise the various LRT modalities for HCC, and their potential roles in specific clinical scenarios in patients awaiting LT. PMID:27358775

  3. Loco-regional therapies for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma awaiting liver transplantation: Selecting an optimal therapy.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Thomas J; Rakela, Jorge

    2016-06-24

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common, increasingly prevalent malignancy. For all but the smallest lesions, surgical removal of cancer via resection or liver transplantation (LT) is considered the most feasible pathway to cure. Resection - even with favorable survival - is associated with a fairly high rate of recurrence, perhaps since most HCCs occur in the setting of cirrhosis. LT offers the advantage of removing not only the cancer but the diseased liver from which the cancer has arisen, and LT outperforms resection for survival with selected patients. Since time waiting for LT is time during which HCC can progress, loco-regional therapy (LRT) is widely employed by transplant centers. The purpose of LRT is either to bridge patients to LT by preventing progression and waitlist dropout, or to downstage patients who slightly exceed standard eligibility criteria initially but can fall within it after treatment. Transarterial chemoembolization and radiofrequency ablation have been the most widely utilized LRTs to date, with favorable efficacy and safety as a bridge to LT (and for the former, as a downstaging modality). The list of potentially effective LRTs has expanded in recent years, and includes transarterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting beads, radioembolization and novel forms of extracorporal therapy. Herein we appraise the various LRT modalities for HCC, and their potential roles in specific clinical scenarios in patients awaiting LT. PMID:27358775

  4. Enteral nutrition during multimodality therapy in upper gastrointestinal cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Daly, J M; Weintraub, F N; Shou, J; Rosato, E F; Lucia, M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate long-term enteral nutrition support in postoperative cancer patients. BACKGROUND: Multimodality therapy for surgical patients with upper gastrointestinal malignancies may improve survival, but often results in substantial malnutrition, immunosuppression, and morbidity. The benefits of combined inpatient and outpatient enteral feeding with standard diets or diets supplemented with arginine, RNA + omega-3 fatty acids are unclear. METHODS: Sixty adult patients with esophageal (22), gastric (16), and pancreatic (22) lesions were stratified by disease site and percent usual weight and randomized to receive supplemental or standard diet via jejunostomy beginning on the first postoperative day (goal = 25 kcal/kg/day) until hospital discharge. Patients also were randomized to receive (n = 37) or not receive (n = 23) enteral jejunostomy feedings (1000 kcal/day overnight) for the 12- to 16-week recovery and radiation/chemotherapy periods. Plasma and peripheral white blood cells were obtained for fatty acid levels and PGE2 production measurements. RESULTS: Mean plasma and cellular omega 3/omega 6 fatty acid levels (percent composition) increased significantly (p < 0.05) in the arginine + omega-3 fatty acid group by postoperative day 7 (0.30 vs. 0.13) and (0.29 vs. 0.14) and continued to increase over time. Mean PGE2 production decreased significantly (p < 0.05) from 2760 to 1600 ng/10(6) cells/mL at day 7 in the arginine + omega-3 fatty acid group, whereas no significant change over time was noted in the standard group. Infectious/wound complications occurred in 10% of the supplemented group compared with 43% of the standard group (p < 0.05); mean length of hospital stay was 16 vs. 22 (p < 0.05) days, respectively. Of the patients who received postoperative chemoradiation therapy, only 1 (6%) of the 18 patients randomized to receive tube feeding did not continue, whereas 8 (61%) of the 13 patients not randomized to tube

  5. Topical Therapies for Psoriasis: Improving Management Strategies and Patient Adherence.

    PubMed

    Stein Gold, Linda F

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic disease that has a substantial effect on quality of life of patients and often needs long-term treatment. Topical treatments for psoriasis include corticosteroids, vitamin D derivatives, tazarotene, anthralin, tacrolimus, pimecrolimus, and newer formulations of tar. Although many of these treatments are effective, they must be prescribed appropriately and used consistently for a period of weeks to months before clinical evidence of improvement can be seen and patients perceive that the treatment is working. As such, medication dosage/schedule, choice of vehicle, and especially patient adherence to medication are key factors for a treatment to be effective. Addressing patient preferences about treatments and concerns about treatment-related toxicities and managing their expectations represent additional aspects of patient care. Therapies such as calcipotriene and betamethasone dipropionate (Cal/BD) fixed combination foam and new drugs and vehicles continuously enhance the treatment landscape for psoriasis. Because adherence to topical treatment can be a major difficulty, keeping the treatment regimen simple and using new and sophisticated treatment vehicles that are acceptable to patients can likely improve treatment outcomes. PMID:27074696

  6. Antithrombotic therapy and survival in patients with malignant disease

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, A K; Macbeth, F

    2010-01-01

    A broad range of studies suggest a two-way relationship between cancer and venous thromboembolism (VTE). Patients with cancer have consistently been shown to be at elevated risk for VTE; this risk is partly driven by an intrinsic hypercoagulable state elicited by the tumour itself. Conversely, thromboembolic events in patients without obvious risk factors are often the first clinical manifestation of an undiagnosed malignancy. The relationship between VTE and cancer is further supported by a number of trials and meta-analyses which, when taken together, strongly suggest that antithrombotic therapy can extend survival in patients with cancer by a mechanism that extends beyond its effect in preventing VTE. Moreover, accumulating evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies has shown that tumour growth, invasion, and metastasis are governed, in part, by elements of the coagulation system. On 22 May 2009, a group of health-care providers based in the United Kingdom met in London, England, to examine recent advances in cancer-associated thrombosis and its implications for UK clinical practice. As part of the discussion, attendees evaluated evidence for and against an effect of antithrombotic therapy on survival in cancer. This paper includes a summary of the data presented at the meeting and explores potential mechanisms by which antithrombotic agents might exert antitumour effects. The summary is followed by a consensus statement developed by the group. PMID:20386547

  7. Antiplatelet Therapy in Hemodialysis Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Summaria, Francesco; Giannico, Maria B.; Talarico, Giovanni P.; Patrizi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Context: Coronary artery disease is highly prevalent among patients with end stage renal disease/hemodialysis (ESRD/HD) and coronary percutaneous interventions (PCI) has been increased by nearly 50% over the past decade. After PCI with stent placement, guidelines recommend dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), but no specifically tailored pharmacotherapy approach is outlined for this frail population, mostly excluded from large randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Evidence Acquisition: We reviewed current evidences on the use of antiplatelet therapy in patients with ESRD/HD undergoing PCI, focusing on the efficacy and safety of specific agents and their indications for detailed clinical settings. Results: Clinical setting in HD patients is the principal determinant of the type, onset, combination and duration of the DAPT. However, irrespective clinical setting, in addition to aspirin, clopidogrel is currently the most used antiplatelet agent even if no information derived from RCTs are available in ESRD. Due to the large experience acquired in routine clinical practice, the awareness of safety is higher for clopidogrel than newer antiplatelet agents. Because of lack of data, the use of prasugrel and ticagrelor is actually not recommended. However, in case of high ischemic and acceptable bleeding risk, they may be selectively used in ESRD/HD. Conclusions: This investigation might contribute to delineate the best treatment options for this high risk population. PMID:26528445

  8. Response to ovarian stimulation in patients facing gonadotoxic therapy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lauren N C; Dillon, Katherine E; Sammel, Mary D; Efymow, Brenda L; Mainigi, Monica A; Dokras, Anuja; Gracia, Clarisa R

    2013-04-01

    Chemotherapy naïve patients undergoing embryo/oocyte banking for fertility preservation (FP) were assessed for response to ovarian stimulation. Fifty FP patients facing gonadotoxic therapy were matched by age, race, cycle number, date of stimulation and fertilization method to patients undergoing IVF for infertility or oocyte donation. There were no differences in baseline FSH, anti-Müllerian hormone, antral follicle count and total gonadotrophin dose. FP patients had more immature oocytes (2.2 versus 1.1; P=0.03) and lower fertilization rates per oocyte retrieved (52% versus 70%; P=0.002). There were no differences in numbers of oocytes retrieved, mature oocytes or fertilized embryos. Subgroup analysis revealed that FP patients taking letrozole required higher gonadotrophin doses (3077IU versus 2259IU; P=0.0477) and had more immature oocytes (3.4 versus 1.2; P=0.03) than matched controls. There were no differences in gonadotrophin dose or oocyte immaturity among FP patients not taking letrozole. Overall, chemotherapy naïve FP patients had similar ovarian reserve, response to stimulation and oocyte and embryo yield compared to controls. Patients who received letrozole required higher gonadotrophin doses and produced more immature oocytes, suggesting that response to ovarian stimulation may be impaired in patients with hormone-sensitive cancers receiving letrozole. With improvement in cancer survival rates, there has been a shift in attention toward management of long-term consequences of cancer therapy, including infertility. Many young women with cancer, particularly those who will be treated with chemotherapy, pursue fertility preservation (FP) strategies for the purpose of banking oocytes or embryos for future use. We examined patients with no prior exposure to chemotherapy who underwent IVF to freeze embryos or oocytes for FP. Fifty FP patients were identified and matched to healthy controls by age, race, cycle number, date of stimulation and fertilization

  9. Evaluating complementary and alternative therapies for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cassileth, B R

    1999-01-01

    "Complementary and alternative" therapies are actually a vast collection of disparate, unrelated regimens and products, ranging from adjunctive modalities that effectively enhance quality of life and promising antitumor herbal remedies now under investigation, to bogus therapies that claim to cure cancer and that harm not only directly, but also indirectly by encouraging patients to avoid or postpone effective cancer care. Complementary therapies such as music and massage, herbal teas to aid digestion and relieve nausea, yoga, tai chi, meditation, and the many other well-documented techniques that relieve stress and enhance well-being should be made available to patients to augment and ease the experience of cancer treatment and recovery. Many time-tested herbal and diet-based remedies are now being studied for their abilities to induce or extend remission without toxicity. At the same time, lack of government regulatory authority leaves consumers at the mercy of those who promote unproved remedies, scores of which the grocery store and pharmacy shelves. Many of these over-the-counter products contain harmful ingredients. Herb-drug interactions, only some of which are documented, occur with frequency and are sufficiently problematic to require that patients stop taking herbal remedies prior to surgery (to prevent interactions with anesthetics and anticoagulant effects); before radiation (due to potential for increased photosensitivity); and during courses of chemotherapy (to prevent product-drug interactions). Moreover, both good information and misinformation that appear in printed materials and on the Internet appeal to better educated consumers, who are, in fact, the most likely to try complementary and alternative methods. PMID:11198952

  10. Complementary therapy use by cancer patients. Physicians' perceptions, attitudes, and ideas.

    PubMed Central

    O'Beirne, Maeve; Verhoef, Marja; Paluck, Elan; Herbert, Carol

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore family physicians' perceptions of their cancer patients' use of complementary therapy. DESIGN: Qualitative pilot study. SETTING: British Columbia and Alberta. PARTICIPANTS: Rural and urban family physicians. METHOD: Five focus groups were conducted with a total of 28 participants. Content analysis of focus group transcripts. MAIN FINDINGS: Eight themes were identified: definition of complementary therapies, importance of holistic health, role of evidence, attitudes toward complementary therapies, perceptions of cancer patients' use of complementary therapies, patient-physician communication, perceptions of family physicians' role with respect to complementary therapies, and concerns about complementary therapies. Family physicians believed that many of their patients were using complementary therapies and that patients and physicians needed to communicate about this practice. CONCLUSION: The study increased understanding of physicians'perspectives on communication about complementary therapies and exposed issues that need to be addressed through education and research. PMID:15233371

  11. Contemporary anticoagulation therapy in patients undergoing percutaneous intervention.

    PubMed

    Bhatty, Shaun; Ali, Asghar; Shetty, Ranjith; Sumption, Kevin F; Topaz, On; Jovin, Ion S

    2014-04-01

    The proper use of anticoagulants is crucial for ensuring optimal patient outcomes post percutaneous interventions in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Anticoagulant agents such as unfractionated heparin, a thrombin inhibitor; low-molecular weight heparins, predominantly Factor Xa inhibitors; fondaparinux, a Factor Xa inhibitor and bivalirudin, a direct thrombin inhibitor have been developed to target various steps in the coagulation cascade to prevent formation of thrombin. Optimal anticoagulation achieves the correct balance between thrombosis and bleeding and is related to optimal outcomes with minimal complications. This review will discuss the mechanisms and appropriate use of current and emerging anticoagulant therapies used during percutaneous interventions. PMID:24506409

  12. Patient Preferences Regarding Rheumatoid Arthritis Therapies: A Conjoint Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Louder, Anthony M.; Singh, Amitabh; Saverno, Kim; Cappelleri, Joseph C.; Aten, Aaron J.; Koenig, Andrew S.; Pasquale, Margaret K.

    2016-01-01

    burden, 9.8 (± 8.2); joint pain reduction, 8.9 (± 3.8); and daily tasks improvement, 8.8 (± 4.7). For the route of administration attribute, the part-worth utility was highest for the oral route. Conjoint simulation results showed that 56.4% of respondents would prefer an oral route of administration. Conclusion Based on this survey completed by 380 patients with RA, commercially insured patients with RA consider the route of administration to be the most important attribute of their RA treatment. In this study, the majority (56.4%) of patients preferred the oral route of administration over other routes. Understanding patient preferences may help to inform provider and payer decisions in treatment selection that may enhance patient adherence to therapy. PMID:27182427

  13. Translational Development Strategy for Magnetic Seizure Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rowny, Stefan; Benzl, Karla; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2009-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has unparalleled antidepressant efficacy, but its cognitive side effects may be persistent. Research suggests that the side effects may be at least partially dissociable from the therapeutic effects of ECT, suggesting that distinct cortical networks may underlie them and introducing a role for focal seizure induction as a means of minimizing side effects. In magnetic seizure therapy (MST), magnetic fields avoid tissue impedance and induce electrical currents confined to superficial cortex, facilitating focal seizure induction. The translational development strategy for MST has included: (1) device development, (2) feasibility in animals and initial human trials, (3) testing in nonhuman primates on safety and mechanisms of action (with neuroanatomical, neurophysiological and cognitive endpoints), (4) safety testing in patients, (5) initial efficacy testing in patients, (6) dosage optimization, and (7) randomized comparison with ECT. These stages have been iterative, with results of early clinical testing prompting device enhancements that were, in turn, tested in nonhuman primates prior to human trials. Safety testing was aided by development of a nonhuman primate model of human ECT, and the validation of a cognitive battery for the monkey that is sensitive to the range of effects of ECT on human memory. Human testing has been facilitated by the development of an international consortium of centers addressing various aspects of technique and dose/response relationships. Challenges facing MST are common to other device based therapies: characterizing dose/response relationships, optimizing efficacy, and developing efficient and reliable methods to induce lasting therapeutic change in the circuitry underlying depression. PMID:19348798

  14. Brief Exposure to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Reduces Side-Effect Symptoms in Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, R Eric; Goodfellow, Linda

    2016-01-01

    No study has tested the effectiveness of individualized cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) interventions to reduce persistent nausea, pain, anxiety, and fatigue in patients on continuous antiretroviral therapy (ART). Our objective was to determine if CBT could reduce nausea, pain, anxiety, and fatigue in patients with HIV on ART. Men ages 40 to 56 years on ART (n = 18) at a suburban HIV clinic were randomly assigned to a control group or the CBT intervention. Usual adherence education and side-effect management were provided to both groups. Symptoms, health perception, medication adherence, and side-effect-reducing medication use were measured at four time points over 3 months. Participants in the intervention group rated usual fatigue and worst fatigue at 60 days, and nausea duration at 90 days significantly lower than controls (p < .05). Brief CBT training may reduce fatigue and nausea in patients with HIV undergoing ART. PMID:26996984

  15. [Metabolic therapy and pulmonary disfunction in patients with obstetric sepsis].

    PubMed

    Iakovlev, A Iu; Zaĭtsev, P M; Zubeev, P S; Mokrov, K B; Balandina, A V; Gushchina, N N; Kucherenko, V E

    2011-01-01

    The role of reamberin, a succinate-containing infusion preparation in correlation of pulmonary metabolic and respiratory disturbances in patients with obstetric puerperal sepsis was estimated. The prospective randomized study enrolled 43 patients with puerperal obstetric sepsis complicated by polyorganic deficiency (SOFA 8-10). Nineteen patients of the 1st group and 24 patients of the 2nd group were additionally treated with reamberin in a dose of 800 ml/day for 8 days. The venous and arterial difference by glucose, lactate, pyruvate, diene conjugates, malondialdehyde and ceruloplasmin was investigated. The blood gases were determined with the Ciba Corning 45 apparatus. Lower metabolic activity of the lungs with prevalence of the glucose anaerobic metabolism and lower activity of the intrapulmonary antioxidant protection were observed in the patients with obstetric sepsis. The use of reamberin in the complex therapy of obstetric sepsis promoted maintenance of the initial balance and anaeroibic and aerobic pulmonary metabolism, thus providing shorter terms of the decompensation and recovery of the lungs respiratory function. PMID:21913408

  16. Drug therapy in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson`s disease (PD) is a progressive, disabling neurodegenerative disorder with onset of motor and non-motor features. Both reduce quality of life of PD patients and cause caregiver burden. This review aims to provide a survey of possible therapeutic options for treatment of motor and non motor symptoms of PD and to discuss their relation to each other. MAO-B-Inhibitors, NMDA antagonists, dopamine agonists and levodopa with its various application modes mainly improve the dopamine associated motor symptoms in PD. This armentarium of PD drugs only partially influences the onset and occurrence of non motor symptoms. These PD features predominantly result from non dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Autonomic features, such as seborrhea, hyperhidrosis, orthostatic syndrome, salivation, bladder dysfunction, gastrointestinal disturbances, and neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as depression, sleep disorders, psychosis, cognitive dysfunction with impaired execution and impulse control may appear. Drug therapy of these non motor symptoms complicates long-term PD drug therapy due to possible occurrence of drug interactions, - side effects, and altered pharmacokinetic behaviour of applied compounds. Dopamine substituting compounds themselves may contribute to onset of these non motor symptoms. This complicates the differentiation from the disease process itself and influences therapeutic options, which are often limited because of additional morbidity with necessary concomitant drug therapy. PMID:23211041

  17. Cell Therapy in Patients with Critical Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Compagna, Rita; Amato, Bruno; Massa, Salvatore; Amato, Maurizio; Grande, Raffaele; Butrico, Lucia; de Franciscis, Stefano; Serra, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) represents the most advanced stage of peripheral arterial obstructive disease (PAOD) with a severe obstruction of the arteries which markedly reduces blood flow to the extremities and has progressed to the point of severe rest pain and/or even tissue loss. Recent therapeutic strategies have focused on restoring this balance in favor of tissue survival using exogenous molecular and cellular agents to promote regeneration of the vasculature. These are based on stimulation of angiogenesis by extracellular and cellular components. This review article carries out a systematic analysis of the most recent scientific literature on the application of stem cells in patients with CLI. The results obtained from the detailed analysis of the recent literature data have confirmed the beneficial role of cell therapy in reducing the rate of major amputations in patients with CLI and improving their quality of life. PMID:26300924

  18. Tailor systemic therapy to the patient with severe psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Vanessa; Tidman, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    There is no standard definition regarding the severity of psoriasis, and a number of factors should be considered, including the extent and stability of skin disease, involvement of joints, response to treatment, and impact on quality of life. Erythrodermic psoriasis and pustular psoriasis are severe conditions and the patient may be systemically unwell and febrile. NICE recommends that four key areas should be evaluated and recorded when assessing patients: severity, using the static Physician's Global Assessment (sPGA); disease impact on physical, psychological and social wellbeing using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI); the presence of psoriatic arthritis; and comorbidities. Ideally, patients should be assessed annually for psoriatic arthritis: the Psoriasis Epidemiology Screening Tool is a validated tool to screen for psoriatic arthritis in primary and secondary care. Patients with severe psoriasis should undergo cardiovascular risk assessment at presentation and every five years, or more frequently if indicated. Referral to secondary care should be made for patients with any type of psoriasis with poor response to topical therapy (after 2 or 3 months according to SIGN) and for extensive psoriasis. Cases where the psoriasis is having a significant physical or psychological impact on an individual's quality of life warrant early referral, as do those where the diagnosis is uncertain. Patients with generalised pustular psoriasis or erythroderma should be referred urgently for same-day specialist input. Patients with acute guttate psoriasis who may require phototherapy should also be referred. Children and adolescents with any type of psoriasis should be referred to a specialist at initial presentation. PMID:27032223

  19. MABS: targeted therapy tailored to the patient's need.

    PubMed

    El Miedany, Yasser

    2015-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MABs) represent the window of opportunity in modern medicine. As immunology plays a vital role both in our survival and in disease development, MABs were found to be of great help in diagnosing, prognosticating and managing certain malignancies, inflammatory conditions, autoimmune as well as infectious diseases. Technological advances have enabled the production of MABs that target specific antigens linked with several disease processes. These drugs are now a component of therapy, not only for many common malignancies, including breast, colorectal, lung and pancreatic cancers, as well as lymphoma, leukaemia and multiple myeloma, but also for several inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Targeted therapy has raised new questions about tailoring treatment, including cancer management, to the individual patient's needs. This would have a positive impact on the drug's effectiveness and toxicity as well as the economics of care. While targeted MABs are generally better tolerated than traditional chemotherapy, they are associated with several adverse effects, which vary from one patient to another. PMID:26946646

  20. Medical therapy for patients with subclinical and clinical carotid atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Corrado, E; Bacarella, D; Coppola, G; Rizzo, M; Muratori, I; Dell'oglio, S; Nugara, C; Ferrara, F; Novo, S

    2012-02-01

    The management of carotid artery disease includes both modifications in life style as well treatment of vascular risk factors. However, strict risk factor modification, including improved antihypertensive therapy, lipid management, smoking cessation, and antiplatelet therapy, promise for reducing the vascular event rate in patients with carotid atherosclerosis. The best medical management for stroke prevention was highlighted in clinical practice guidelines issued jointly in 2006 by the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association, and co-sponsored by the Council on Cardiovascular Radiology and Intervention and the American Academy of Neurology. Lowering blood pressure to a target below 120/80 mm Hg by life style interventions and antihypertensive treatment. Glucose control to near-normoglycemic levels (target hemoglobin A1C ≤7%) is recommended among diabetics to reduce micro-vascular complications and, with lesser certainty, macrovascular complications. The primary objective of this review is to summarize the current evidence and standards for the advanced diagnostic and management strategies used in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients with carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:22330618

  1. Animal-Assisted Therapy for Patients Undergoing Treatment at NIH Clinical Center | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Therapy Dogs Animal-Assisted Therapy for Patients Undergoing Treatment at ... Kerry (middle), a patient, is with the therapy dog team of Jeanette Golden (left) and Tucker the ...

  2. Symptomatic Pericardial Effusion After Chemoradiation Therapy in Esophageal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Fukada, Junichi; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Ohashi, Toshio; Saikawa, Yoshiro; Takaishi, Hiromasa; Hanada, Takashi; Shiraishi, Yutaka; Kitagawa, Yuko; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: We investigated clinical and treatment-related factors as predictors of symptomatic pericardial effusion in esophageal cancer patients after concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 214 consecutive primary esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy between 2001 and 2010 in our institute. Pericardial effusion was detected on follow-up computed tomography. Symptomatic effusion was defined as effusion ≥grade 3 according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0 criteria. Percent volume irradiated with 5 to 65 Gy (V5-V65) and mean dose to the pericardium were evaluated employing dose-volume histograms. To evaluate dosimetry for patients treated with two-dimensional planning in the earlier period (2001-2005), computed tomography data at diagnosis were transferred to a treatment planning system to reconstruct three-dimensional plans without modification. Optimal dosimetric thresholds for symptomatic pericardial effusion were calculated by receiver operating characteristic curves. Associating clinical and treatment-related risk factors for symptomatic pericardial effusion were detected by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up was 29 (range, 6-121) months for eligible 167 patients. Symptomatic pericardial effusion was observed in 14 (8.4%) patients. Dosimetric analyses revealed average values of V30 to V45 for the pericardium and mean pericardial doses were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic pericardial effusion than in those with asymptomatic pericardial effusion (P<.05). Pericardial V5 to V55 and mean pericardial doses were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic pericardial effusion than in those without pericardial effusion (P<.001). Mean pericardial doses of 36.5 Gy and V45 of 58% were selected as optimal cutoff values for predicting symptomatic pericardial effusion. Multivariate analysis identified mean pericardial dose as the

  3. Treatment-resistant depression: new therapies on the horizon.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2003-03-01

    Managing patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) remains a major challenge for the practicing physician. Depression is considered treatment-resistant when at least two adequate monotherapy trials with drugs from different pharmacologic classes fail to elicit a therapeutic response. Although determining the stage of TRD may allow concise description of a patient's antidepressant history, management of TRD is better served by recent attempts to create a treatment algorithm that encompasses definitive diagnosis of true TRD and strategies for optimizing available therapies, including consideration of novel treatment options. Present strategies for managing TRD include optimization of the initial drug, substitution of another drug from the same or a different antidepressant class, combination of two antidepressants with different mechanisms of action, and adding an antidepressant drug from another class. Potential nonpharmacologic treatments include vagus nerve stimulation, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, and magnetic seizure therapy as an alternative to electroconvulsive therapy. Several neuropeptides and their receptors have also been identified as potential targets for pharmacologic intervention, including corticotropin-releasing factor and substance P. Other treatments currently under investigation include augmentation of antidepressant therapy with an atypical antipsychotic agent such as olanzapine or risperidone. This kind of therapeutic intervention may prove to be especially useful in treating patients with TRD. PMID:12839433

  4. Testing patient targeted therapies in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder with the arthrokinetic reflex: individual patient research.

    PubMed

    Demerjian, Garabed G; Barkhordarian, Andre; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Traditional research in the health sciences has involved control and experimental groups of patients, and descriptive and inferential statistical analyses performed on the measurements obtained from the samples in each group. As the novel model of translational healthcare, which integrates translational research and translational effectiveness, becomes increasingly established in modern contemporary medicine, healthcare continues to evolve into a model of care that is evidence-based, effectiveness-focused and patient-centered. Patient-centered care and patient-targeted therapies require the timely and critical development and validation of a new research paradigm, individual patient research (IPR), as opposed to the customary group research approach. Here, we propose a model of individual patient research to define and characterize the effectiveness of a novel therapeutic intervention for temporomandibular joint disorder. The intervention must be tailor-made for each individual patient, and the data from each patient must be analyzed individually. We propose that this endeavor is best achieved by means of an adaptive cluster randomized stepped wedge blinded controlled trial, because it permit individual patient outcomes research and analysis, ensures equipoise, and maintains adequate power. The patient targeted therapies section of the Journal of Translational Medicine must endeavor to facilitate the dissemination of studies that focus broadly on translational research for the ultimate benefit of individual patients. PMID:27484895

  5. Selecting patients with severe sepsis for drotrecogin alfa (activated) therapy.

    PubMed

    Sollet, Jean-Pierre; Garber, Gary E

    2002-12-01

    Selecting patients for drotrecogin alfa (activated) (Xigris; Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN) therapy outside of a clinical trial setting requires knowledge of the rationale that led the Protein C Worldwide Evaluation in Severe Sepsis (PROWESS) investigators to select the various entry criteria for the trial. Enrollment criteria for the study included a known or suspected infection, presence of at least 3 systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria, and dysfunction of > or =1 organ or system. The infection criteria used in PROWESS were designed to be straightforward and were based on common clinical and radiological data. Although previous definitions of sepsis required only 2 SIRS criteria, the PROWESS trial investigators required the presence of > or =3 SIRS criteria to improve the sensitivity and specificity of these criteria for the diagnosis of sepsis. Acute organ dysfunction, the diagnostic criterion for severe sepsis, was used to define the study population because it identifies patients at significant risk of death. Characteristics of drotrecogin alfa (activated)-treated patients, including infection, modified SIRS criteria, and organ dysfunction, were similar to those of the placebo group and the general sepsis population. Proper clinical judgment and use of the these inclusion criteria as a guide will help clinicians select and treat sepsis patients with drotrecogin alfa (activated). PMID:12521613

  6. Providing medication therapy management for smoking cessation patients.

    PubMed

    Smalls, Tiffany D; Broughton, Amelia D; Hylick, Ericka V; Woodard, Todd J

    2015-02-01

    Nearly 50 years ago, the Surgeon General of the US Public Health Service released the first report of the Surgeon General's Advisory Committee on Smoking and Health. The report concluded that cigarette smoking caused lung and laryngeal cancer as well as bronchitis. Today, smoking is one of the leading preventable causes of deaths in the United States. Research has shown that it potentially causes more deaths than human immunodeficiency virus, illegal drug use, alcohol use, motor vehicle injuries, and firearm-related incidents. Health care providers play a critical role in guiding and directing patients to quit smoking by introducing them to smoking-cessation options. This is due to the fact that if these patients quit, they can reduce their cardiovascular risk. Pharmacists, being one of the easily accessible health care providers, have an advantage over other clinicians when it comes to influencing patients to quit smoking and to modify their lifestyles. Pharmacists through medication therapy management directly interact with these patients to manage medications as well as behavioral factors. PMID:25500554

  7. Does Interpersonal Therapy Help Patients with Binge Eating Disorder Who Fail to Respond to Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agras, W. Stewart; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of group interpersonal therapy (IPT) in treating overweight, binge-eating patients. Participants were randomly allocated to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or to an assessment-only group. After 12 weeks, those who did not respond to CBT were assigned 12 weeks of IPT. IPT led to no further improvement. (JPS)

  8. Pattern of drug therapy problems and interventions in ambulatory patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ojeh, Victor B.; Naima, Nasir; Abah, Isaac O.; Falang, Kakjing D.; Lucy, Ogwuche; London, Ibrahim; Dady, Christiana; Agaba, Patricia; Agbaji, Oche

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We describe the frequency and types of drug therapy problems (DTPs), and interventions carried out to resolve them, among a cohort of HIV-infected patients on ART in Jos, Nigeria. Methods: A prospective pharmacists’ intervention study was conducted between January and August 2012 at the outpatient HIV clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH). Pharmacists identified DTPs and made recommendations to resolve them. The main outcome measures were number of DTPs encountered, interventions proposed and acceptance rate of recommendations. Results: A total of 42,416 prescriptions were dispensed to 9339 patients during the eight months study. A total of 420 interventions (Intervention rate of 1 per 100 prescriptions) were made to resolve DTPs in 401 (4.3%) patients with a mean age of 41 (SD=10) years, and made up of 73% females. DTPs encountered were drug omission (n=89, 21.2%), unnecessary drug (n=55, 13.1%) and wrong drug indication (n=55, 13.1%). Recommendations offered included; Addition of another drug to the therapy (n=87, 20.7%), rectification of incomplete prescriptions (n=85, 20.2%), change of drug or dosage (n=67, 16.0%), and discontinuation of the offending drug (n=59, 14.0%). A total of 389 (93%) out of 420 of the recommendations were accepted. In all, 50.4% (212) of the problematic prescriptions were changed and dispensed, 22.2% (89) were clarified and dispensed, while wrong identities were corrected in 11.7% (49). However, 7.5% (30) prescriptions were dispensed as prescribed, 5.2% (21) were not dispensed, and 3% (12) were unresolved. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that pharmacists-initiated interventions can ameliorate DTPs in patients receiving ART given the high intervention acceptance rate recorded. The implication of this finding is that pharmacists with requisite training in HIV pharmacotherapy are an excellent resource in detecting and minimizing the effect of antiretroviral drug-related errors. PMID:26131046

  9. Nonadherence to Medication Therapy in Haemodialysis Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Saurav; Castelino, Ronald L.; Lioufas, Nicole M.; Peterson, Gregory M.; Zaidi, Syed Tabish R.

    2015-01-01

    Background End-stage kidney disease (ESKD) patients are often prescribed multiple medications. Together with a demanding weekly schedule of dialysis sessions, increased number of medicines and associated regimen complexity pre-dispose them at high risk of medication nonadherence. This review summarizes existing literature on nonadherence and identifies factors associated with nonadherence to medication therapy in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Methods A comprehensive search of PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, PsycInfo, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews covering the period from 1970 through November 2014 was performed following a predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Reference lists from relevant materials were reviewed. Data on study characteristics, measures of nonadherence, prevalence rates and factors associated with nonadherence were collected. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines was followed in conducting this systematic review. Results Of 920 relevant publications, 44 were included. The prevalence of medication nonadherence varied from 12.5% to 98.6%, with widespread heterogeneity in measures and definitions employed. Most common patient-related factors significantly associated with nonadherence were younger age, non-Caucasian ethnicity, illness interfering family life, being a smoker, and living single and being divorced or widowed. Similarly, disease-related factors include longevity of haemodialysis, recurrent hospitalization, depressive symptoms and having concomitant illness like diabetes and hypertension. Medication-related factors such as daily tablet count, total pill burden, number of phosphate binders prescribed and complexity of medication regimen were also associated with poor adherence. Conclusions A number of patient-, disease-, and medication-related factors are associated with medication nonadherence in haemodialysis patients. Clinicians should be aware of such factors so that

  10. Torsade de pointes tachycardia in a patient on dronedarone therapy.

    PubMed

    Huemer, Martin; Sarganas, Giselle; Bronder, Elisabeth; Klimpel, Andreas; Garbe, Edeltraut; Haverkamp, Wilhelm

    2015-05-01

    Dronedarone is a promising, relatively new antiarrhythmic agent characterized by structural similarities to amiodarone but without amiodarone's severe organ toxicity. The proarrhythmic potential of dronedarone, however, is of increasing concern. We describe a 76-year-old woman who had been receiving dronedarone 400 mg twice/day to prevent recurrent atrial tachycardia with rapid ventricular response. Several months later, she came to the emergency department with decompensated congestive heart failure and episodes of atrial tachycardia; digoxin 0.5 mg and furosemide 40 mg were administered intravenously. Thereafter nonsustained torsade de pointes (TdP) tachycardia occurred. She was transferred to the intensive care unit where a dose of amiodarone 150 mg was administered intravenously by mistake. Thereafter, the patient showed sustained TdP necessitating cardiac resuscitation. Dronedarone was discontinued, and digoxin and amiodarone were not administered again. Under dronedarone a relevant QT prolongation was documented that was additionally augmented after concomitant treatment with digoxin and amiodarone. Use of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated a probable adverse drug reaction to dronedarone (score of 7). To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a patient who experienced TdP tachycardias while receiving dronedarone therapy in connection with a worsening of heart failure and possible drug interactions with digoxin and amiodarone. Clinicians should be aware of this potential adverse drug reaction and perform repeated heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) interval measurements as well as screening for congestive heart failure in patients receiving dronedarone therapy. PMID:25823967

  11. [Enzyme replacement therapy in a patient with Pompe disease].

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Yoshinao; Kinoshita, Satoru; Miyamoto, Yusaku; Nakayama, Tojo; Endo, Yusaku; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2007-09-01

    Pompe disease is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by the deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA), which is required for the degradation of lysosomal glycogen. Glycogen accumulation in heart, muscle and liver eventually leads to muscle weakness, hepatomegaly and cardiomegaly. Although an approved therapy does not exist, the efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has recently been reported in multinational trials in Europe and the US. Here, we present data on the efficacy of recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase (rhGAA) (provided by Genzyme Corporation) in a patient with Pompe disease. At 5 months of age, motor delay (could not raise his head) and cardiomegaly were observed. A definite diagnosis of Pompe disease was made at 8 months of age after the accumulation of glycogen in a muscle biopsy specimen was observed. This was confirmed by low GAA activity. Since then, motor delay predominated and he was unable to sit independently by age 2.5 years. Every 2 weeks, 20 mg/kg of rhGAA was infused intravenously. To assess the effectiveness, chest X-ray, echocardiography and auditory brain response were recorded. The patient was administered rhGAA for 26 months from 2 years and 8 months of age. Following the initiation of ERT, hepatomegaly and cardiac function (ejection fraction) were rapidly improved and motor function was gradually improved. At 4 years and 10 months, the patient could walk with support. No adverse event has been observed. It can be concluded that ERT with rhGAA is an effective and safe regimen for this case. PMID:17879614

  12. Singing Therapy Can Be Effective for a Patient with Severe Nonfluent Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Akanuma, Kyoko; Hatayama, Yuka; Otera, Masako; Meguro, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Patients with severe aphasia are rarely treated using speech therapy. We used music therapy to continue to treat a 79-year-old patient with chronic severe aphasia. Interventions 1, 2, and 3 were to practice singing a song that the patient knew, to practice singing a song with a therapist, and to practice saying a greeting using a song with lyrics,…

  13. [Anesthesia and intensive therapy for a patient with mitochondrial myopathy].

    PubMed

    Breucking, E; Mortier, W; Lampert, R; Brandt, L

    1993-10-01

    Since 1983 we have been involved in the diagnostic work-up and emergency treatment of a female patient now 48 years old who has a mitochondrial myopathy resembling Luft's disease. The syndrome was first described in 1959, and in more detail in 1962, by Luft and et al., who reported a picture of hypermetabolism with high temperature, extreme sweating, tachycardia, dyspnoea at rest, polydipsia, polyphagia and irritability but normal thyroid function. In 1971 and 1976 Haydar and Di Mauro presented a second case and proposed treatment with chloramphenicol. Our patient has the third case of the syndrome reported so far: her case was initially published in 1987. CASE REPORT. Since her 17th year of life the patient had suffered from episodes of fever, tachycardia and sweating. At the age of 32 these attacks worsened, leading to unconsciousness and apnoea. The patient then had to be intubated, ventilated and sometimes resuscitated. The diagnosis of MH susceptibility and Luft's disease was made on biochemical grounds after the first muscle biopsy in 1983. Therapy with chloramphenicol failed. Therapy with beta blockers, vitamin C and K or E, coenzyme Q10 and a high-caloric diet was started in 1985. The patient was registered with an emergency service, which flew her to our ICU whenever she had a severe crisis. For milder episodes she was supplied with an oxygen breathing mask at home. Myalgia increased with the episodes starting in 1988, and the patient needed dantrolene infusions and analgesics at home. To facilitate venepuncture a Port-A-Cath system was implanted in 1987, which had to be removed four times due to infection and sepsis. A muscle biopsy was taken in Rotterdam, which revealed differences in mitochondrial function from the biochemical findings recorded in 1983 and not in keeping with Luft's disease. Unfortunately, the patient was not able to undergo further metabolic investigations or therapeutic trials. ANAESTHESIA. The patient received three local and six

  14. Predicting virological decay in patients starting combination antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Model trajectories of viral load measurements from time of starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), and use the model to predict whether patients will achieve suppressed viral load (≤200 copies/ml) within 6-months of starting cART. Design: Prospective cohort study including HIV-positive adults (UK Collaborative HIV Cohort Study). Methods: Eligible patients were antiretroviral naive and started cART after 1997. Random effects models were used to estimate viral load trends. Patients were randomly selected to form a validation dataset with those remaining used to fit the model. We evaluated predictions of suppression using indices of diagnostic test performance. Results: Of 9562 eligible patients 6435 were used to fit the model and 3127 for validation. Mean log10 viral load trajectories declined rapidly during the first 2 weeks post-cART, moderately between 2 weeks and 3 months, and more slowly thereafter. Higher pretreatment viral load predicted steeper declines, whereas older age, white ethnicity, and boosted protease inhibitor/non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors based cART-regimen predicted a steeper decline from 3 months onwards. Specificity of predictions and the diagnostic odds ratio substantially improved when predictions were based on viral load measurements up to the 4-month visit compared with the 2 or 3-month visits. Diagnostic performance improved when suppression was defined by two consecutive suppressed viral loads compared with one. Conclusions: Viral load measurements can be used to predict if a patient will be suppressed by 6-month post-cART. Graphical presentations of this information could help clinicians decide the optimum time to switch treatment regimen during the first months of cART. PMID:27124894

  15. Electron arc therapy: chest wall irradiation of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    McNeely, L K; Jacobson, G M; Leavitt, D D; Stewart, J R

    1988-06-01

    From 1980 to October 1985 we treated 45 breast cancer patients with electron arc therapy. This technique was used in situations where optimal treatment with fixed photon or electron beams was technically difficult: long scars, recurrent tumor extending across midline or to the posterior thorax, or marked variation in depth of target tissue. Forty-four patients were treated following mastectomy: 35 electively because of high risk of local failure, and 9 following local recurrence. One patient with advanced local regional disease was treated primarily. The target volume boundaries on the chest wall were defined by a foam lined cerrobend cast which rested on the patient during treatment, functioning as a tertiary collimator. A variable width secondary collimator was used to account for changes in the radius of the thorax from superior to inferior border. All patients had computerized tomography performed to determine Internal Mammary Chain depth and chest wall thickness. Electron energies were selected based on these thicknesses and often variable energies over different segments of the arc were used. The chest wall and regional node areas were irradiated to 45 Gy-50 Gy in 5-6 weeks by this technique. The supraclavicular and upper axillary nodes were treated by a direct anterior photon field abutted to the superior edge of the electron arc field. Follow-up is from 10-73 months with a median of 50 months. No major complications were observed. Acute and late effects and local control are comparable to standard chest wall irradiation. The disadvantages of this technique are that the preparation of the tertiary field defining cast and CT treatment planning are labor intensive and expensive. The advantage is that for specific clinical situations large areas of chest wall with marked topographical variation can be optimally, homogeneously irradiated while sparing normal uninvolved tissues. PMID:3384727

  16. Electron arc therapy: chest wall irradiation of breast cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    McNeely, L.K.; Jacobson, G.M.; Leavitt, D.D.; Stewart, J.R.

    1988-06-01

    From 1980 to October 1985 we treated 45 breast cancer patients with electron arc therapy. This technique was used in situations where optimal treatment with fixed photon or electron beams was technically difficult: long scars, recurrent tumor extending across midline or to the posterior thorax, or marked variation in depth of target tissue. Forty-four patients were treated following mastectomy: 35 electively because of high risk of local failure, and 9 following local recurrence. One patient with advanced local regional disease was treated primarily. The target volume boundaries on the chest wall were defined by a foam lined cerrobend cast which rested on the patient during treatment, functioning as a tertiary collimator. A variable width secondary collimator was used to account for changes in the radius of the thorax from superior to inferior border. All patients had computerized tomography performed to determine Internal Mammary Chain depth and chest wall thickness. Electron energies were selected based on these thicknesses and often variable energies over different segments of the arc were used. The chest wall and regional node areas were irradiated to 45 Gy-50 Gy in 5-6 weeks by this technique. The supraclavicular and upper axillary nodes were treated by a direct anterior photon field abutted to the superior edge of the electron arc field. Follow-up is from 10-73 months with a median of 50 months. No major complications were observed. Acute and late effects and local control are comparable to standard chest wall irradiation. The disadvantages of this technique are that the preparation of the tertiary field defining cast and CT treatment planning are labor intensive and expensive. The advantage is that for specific clinical situations large areas of chest wall with marked topographical variation can be optimally, homogeneously irradiated while sparing normal uninvolved tissues.

  17. Sex Differences in Patients Receiving Anticoagulant Therapy for Venous Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Molina, Angeles; Enea, Iolanda; Gadelha, Telma; Tufano, Antonella; Bura-Riviere, Alessandra; Di Micco, Pierpaolo; Bounameaux, Henri; González, José; Villalta, Jaume; Monreal, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE), the outcome during the course of anticoagulant therapy may differ according to the patient’s sex. We used the RIETE (Registro Informatizado Enfermedad TromboEmbólica) database to compare the rate of VTE recurrences, major bleeding, and mortality due to these events according to sex. As of August 2013, 47,499 patients were enrolled in RIETE, of whom 24,280 (51%) were women. Women were older, more likely presented with pulmonary embolism (PE), and were more likely to have recent immobilization but less likely to have cancer than men. During the course of anticoagulation (mean duration: 253 d), 659 patients developed recurrent deep vein thrombosis (DVT), 576 recurrent PE, 1368 bled, and 4506 died. Compared with men, women had a lower rate of DVT recurrences (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.67–0.91), a similar rate of PE recurrences (HR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.83–1.15), a higher rate of major bleeding (HR: 1.21; 95% CI: 1.09–1.35), and higher mortality due to PE (HR: 1.24; 95% CI: 1.04–1.47). On multivariable analysis, any influence of sex on the risk for recurrent DVT (HR: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.75–1.03), major bleeding (HR: 1.10; 95% CI: 0.98–1.24), or fatal PE (HR: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.84–1.22) was no longer statistically significant. In conclusion, women had fewer DVT recurrences and more bleeds than men during the course of anticoagulation. These differences were not due to sex, but very likely to other patient characteristics more common in female patients and differences in treatment choice. PMID:25398066

  18. Assessing adherence in Thai patients taking combination antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Kerr, S J; Avihingsanon, A; Putcharoen, O; Chetchotisakd, P; Layton, M; Ubolyam, S; Ruxrungtham, K; Cooper, D A; Phanuphak, P; Duncombe, C

    2012-03-01

    In settings where medications and viral load (VL) monitoring are limited by cost, clinicians need reliable ways to assess patient adherence to therapy. We assessed sensitivity and specificity of two self-reported adherence tools (a visual analogue scale [VAS] and the CASE [Center for Adherence Support Evaluation] adherence index), against a standard of detectable VL, with 288 patients from three sites in Thailand. We also assessed predictors of non-adherence. The sensitivity and specificity of the VAS <95% and CASE adherence index ≤11 against a VL >50 copies/mL were 26% and 90%, 19% and 95%, respectively. Against a VL ≥1000 copies/mL sensitivities increased to 55% and 36%, respectively, and specificities were unchanged. Attending a clinic not staffed by HIV specialists (odds ratio [OR] 3.14; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19-8.34) and being educated to primary school level or less (OR 2.24; 95% CI 1.01-4.94) were associated with self-reported adherence <95% on the VAS in multivariate analysis. Adherence assessed by the VAS was a more accurate predictor of detectable VL. Policy-makers in resource-limited settings should ensure that treatment centres are staffed with well-trained personnel aware of the importance of good patient adherence. PMID:22581867

  19. Deformity incidence in leprosy patients treated with multidrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Rao, P S; Subramanian, M; Subramanian, G

    1994-01-01

    The records of 2,285 (2,007 paucibacillary (PB) and 278 multibacillary (MB)) cases of leprosy which were declared as released from treatment (RFT) after multidrug therapy (MDT) and under surveillance as per the National Leprosy Eradication Programme (NLEP) guidelines in the rural field practice area of Central Leprosy Teaching & Research Institute (CLTRI), Chengalpattu, between September 1986 and September 1993 were analyzed for collecting data on the incidence of deformity. Of the 2,285 cases 2,053 (1,947 PB and 106 MB) did not have deformity at the commencement of treatment. Three MB cases and one PB case out of the 2,053 developed deformity (all grade II) during the course of treatment. No patient developed deformity during surveillance. Thus the deformity incidence in the population of patients was 0.681 per 1000 person-years of observation. Age, sex, type of disease, prior dapsone monotherapy and nerve involvement at the commencement of treatment appear to influence the deformity incidence. The risk of development of deformity in patients treated with MDT appear to be very low and analysis of larger data sets is suggested to corroborate the above findings as the information would be useful for planning prevention and management of deformity services. PMID:7714354

  20. [Rational diuretic therapy in patients with liver cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Vogt, B; Reichen, J

    2000-06-01

    When ascites develops in a patient with liver cirrhosis his probability to survive the following two years amounts to 50%. It is determined essentially by the residual functional capacity of the liver. In 80 to 90% of patients ascites due to portal hypertension can be managed by salt restriction and diuretics. A daily reduction of body weight of 0.5 to 0.75 kg should not be exceeded because prerenal failure may become a threat. Aldosterone-antagonists are more efficient and have fewer side-effects than loop diuretics. The urinary ratio of Na/K may be used to adjust the therapy. They may lower portal hypertension by an additional direct effect on the vasculature. If diuretics are insufficient or when a rapid therapeutic success is needed, paracentesis of 4-6 l is a safe option if intravascular volume is substituted simultaneously with albumin. Only in the few patients whose ascites is intractable by the forementioned measures, alternatives such as peritoneo-, venous or porto-systemic shunts (nowadays mostly by interventional techniques via a transjugular catheter) should be evaluated. The only treatment which not only attacks ascites symptomatically but also corrects the underlying disease is liver transplantation. PMID:10894019

  1. Yoga therapy for breast cancer patients: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sudarshan, Monisha; Petrucci, Andrea; Dumitra, Sinziana; Duplisea, Jodie; Wexler, Sharon; Meterissian, Sarkis

    2013-11-01

    We sought to study the impact of yoga therapy on anxiety, depression and physical health in breast cancer patients. Stage I-III post-operative breast cancer patients were recruited with twelve 1-h weekly yoga sessions completed with an experienced yoga instructor. Before and after each module completion, assessments were obtained with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS), the Dallas pain scale and shoulder flexibility measurements. Fourteen patients completed the entire yoga session with 42.8% having a total mastectomy and 15.4% having breast reconstruction. Both right and left shoulder abduction flexibility significantly improved (p = 0.004; p = 0.015 respectively) as well as left shoulder flexion (p = 0.046). An improvement trend in scores for the HADS and Dallas questionnaires pre- and post-intervention was found, although it was not statistically significant. Our data indicates an improvement in physical function in addition to a consistent amelioration in anxiety, depression and pain symptoms after a yoga intervention. PMID:24199978

  2. CLAG-based induction therapy in previously untreated high risk acute myeloid leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Seiter, Karen; Ahmed, Nasir; Shaikh, Azfar; Baskind, Paul; Liu, Delong

    2016-07-01

    The CLAG regimen is highly active in patients with relapsed and/or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We administered CLAG-based chemotherapy to 20 previously untreated AML patients who were poor candidates for standard induction therapy. Responding patients received further CLAG as post-remission therapy followed by additional therapy that was tailored to their AML subtype. Patients were considered poor candidates for standard therapy due to either cardiac disease, prior chemotherapy for another malignancy, prior myeloproliferative disease, or myelodysplastic syndrome that had progressed after hypomethylator therapy. Overall, thirteen patients had a complete response (CR) to the first cycle of therapy (65%), one patient had a CR without platelet recovery, and 3 patients had a partial response (PR). Two of the patients with PR converted to CR after further therapy. The median duration of response has not been reached; the mean duration of response is 36.8 months (95% CI 28.8-44.8 months). Median overall survival (including deaths from all causes) is 29.0 months (95% CI 18.0-46.0 months). Patients with de novo AML had a CR rate of 90.9% and a median overall survival of 38.5 months. CLAG-based therapy is a well-tolerated, efficacious induction strategy in previously-untreated patients with high risk AML. CLAG-based regimens should be studied in a broader group of newly diagnosed AML patients. PMID:27151544

  3. Insulin Therapy for the Management of Hyperglycemia in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, Marie E.; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2013-01-01

    It has long been established that hyperglycemia with or without a prior diagnosis of diabetes increases both mortality and disease-specific morbidity in hospitalized patients1–4 and that goal-directed insulin therapy can improve outcomes.5–9 During the past decade, since the widespread institutional adoption of intensified insulin protocols after the publication of a landmark trial,5,10 the pendulum in the inpatient diabetes literature has swung away from achieving intensive glucose control and toward more moderate and individualized glycemic targets.11,12 This change in clinical practice is the result of several factors, including challenges faced by hospitals to coordinate glycemic control across all levels of care,13,14 publication of negative prospective trials,15,16 revised recommendations from professional organizations,17,18 and increasing evidence on the deleterious effect of hypoglycemia.19–22 This article reviews the pathophysiology of hyperglycemia during illness, the mechanisms for increased complications and mortality due to hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, beneficial mechanistic effects of insulin therapy and provides updated recommendations for the inpatient management of diabetes in the critical care setting and in the general medicine and surgical settings.23,24 PMID:22575413

  4. [Anesthetic Management of an Adrenoleukodystrophy Patient for Intrathecal Baclofen Therapy].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yuichi; Takahashi, Kei; Yamamoto, Yuko; Ogata, Tokiko; Arai, Takero; Okuda, Yasuhisa

    2016-04-01

    A 34-year-old man with adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) was scheduled for pump system insertion of intrathecal baclofen therapy under general anesthesia. ALD, a rare genetic disorder, is associated with a total body increase in long chain fatty acids caused by defective degradation, and includes various nervous system abnormalities, muscular weakness, in addition to adrenal insufficiency. He had contracture of the both legs, and muscular weakness of the left hand, and Mallampati class III, but no respiratory disability. In the operating room, we administered hydrocortisone 100 mg for steroid coverage, and low-dose midazolam, and fentanyl. As spontaneous breathing remained, we could easily see epiglottis and arytenoid cartilage by McGRATH. Therefore we selected rapid-induction of anesthesia with thiamylal, and rocuronium 40 mg, under cricoid pressure. We avoided propofol. Anesthsia was maintained with sevoflurane and remifentanil, monitoring BIS and train of four. No more rocuronium was administered, and anesthesia was uneventful. Intrathecal baclofen therapy is given to patients who have severe contracture. When we selected general anesthesia, we should be aware of the possibility of muscular weakness, and cannot intubate cannot ventilate scenario. PMID:27188115

  5. Dyslipidaemia associated with antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Calza, Leonardo; Manfredi, Roberto; Chiodo, Francesco

    2004-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has had a significant impact on the natural history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, leading to a remarkable decrease in its morbidity and mortality, but is frequently associated with clinical and metabolic complications. Fat redistribution or lipodystrophy, hypertriglyceridaemia, hypercholesterolaemia, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus have been extensively reported in subjects treated with protease inhibitor (PI)-based antiretroviral regimens. In particular, dyslipidaemia occurs in up to 70-80% of HIV-infected individuals receiving HAART and can be associated with all the available PIs, although hypertriglyceridaemia appears to be more frequent in patients treated with ritonavir, ritonavir-saquinavir, or ritonavir-lopinavir. The potential long-term consequences of HAART-associated hyperlipidaemia are not completely understood, but an increased risk of premature coronary artery disease has been reported in young HIV-positive persons receiving PIs. Dietary changes, regular aerobic exercise and switching to a PI-sparing regimen may act favourably on dyslipidaemia. Lipid-lowering therapy is often required with statins or fibrates. The choice of hypolipidaemic drugs should take into account potential pharmacological interactions with antiretroviral agents. PMID:14645323

  6. Two young stroke patients associated with regular intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yumiko; Hayashi, Takeshi; Deguchi, Kentaro; Sato, Kota; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Yamashita, Toru; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Takao, Yoshiki; Morio, Tomohiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-02-15

    We recently experienced 2 young adult patients who developed ischemic stroke after regular intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy for agammaglobulinemia with diagnosis of common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) in their childhood. Patient 1 was 26-year-old woman, who developed Wallenberg's syndrome 6 days after the last IVIg therapy, but had no further stroke recurrence with cilostazol later. Patient 2 was 37-year-old man, who developed recurrent cerebral infarction in the territory of bilateral lenticulostriate branches like branch atheromatous disease (BAD) several days after the IVIg therapy. However, he had no further stroke recurrence after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) therapy for his lymphoproliferative disorder. It was suggested that IVIg therapy was associated to these different types of ischemic stroke in our 2 young adult patients with minimal vascular risk factors. Although IVIg therapy is widely used as a relatively safe medication for immunodeficiency disorders or autoimmune diseases, we need to pay more attention to stroke occurrence with regular IVIg therapy. PMID:26810508

  7. Effects of brief pulse and ultrabrief pulse electroconvulsive stimulation on rodent brain and behaviour in the corticosterone model of depression.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, Sinead; Dalton, Victoria; Harkin, Andrew; McLoughlin, Declan M

    2014-09-01

    Brief pulse electroconvulsive therapy (BP ECT; pulse width 0.5-1.5 ms) is the most effective treatment available for severe depression. However, its use is associated with side-effects. The stimulus in ultrabrief pulse ECT (UBP ECT; pulse width 0.25-0.3 ms) is more physiological and has been reported to be associated with less cognitive side-effects, but its antidepressant effectiveness is not yet well established. Using electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS), the animal model of ECT, we previously reported UBP ECS to be significantly less effective than well-established BP ECS in eliciting behavioural, molecular and cellular antidepressant-related effects in naïve rats. We have now compared the effects of BP and UBP ECS in an animal model of depression related to exogenous supplementation with the stress-induced glucocorticoid hormone, corticosterone. Corticosterone administration resulted in an increase in immobility time in the forced swim test (FST) (p < 0.01) and decreases in the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (p < 0.05) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (p < 0.001) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. There was no significant difference in the duration or type of seizure induced by BP (0.5 ms) or UBP (0.3 ms) ECS. UBP ECS proved to be as effective as BP ECS at inducing a behavioural antidepressant response in the FST with a significant decrease (p < 0.001) in immobility seen following administration of ECS. Both forms of ECS also induced significant increases in BDNF protein (p < 0.01) expression in the hippocampus. BP ECS (p < 0.05) but not UBP ECS induced a significant increase in GFAP levels in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Overall, UBP ECS effectively induced antidepressant-related behavioural and molecular responses in the corticosterone supplementation model, providing the first preclinical data on the potential role of this form of ECS to treat a depression phenotype related to elevated corticosterone. PMID

  8. Hybrid Imaging for Patient-Specific Dosimetry in Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ljungberg, Michael; Gleisner, Katarina Sjögreen

    2015-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy aims to treat malignant diseases by systemic administration of radiopharmaceuticals, often using carrier molecules such as peptides and antibodies. The radionuclides used emit electrons or alpha particles as a consequence of radioactive decay, thus leading to local energy deposition. Administration to individual patients can be tailored with regards to the risk of toxicity in normal organs by using absorbed dose planning. The scintillation camera, employed in planar imaging or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), generates images of the spatially and temporally varying activity distribution. Recent commercially available combined SPECT and computed tomography (CT) systems have dramatically increased the possibility of performing accurate dose planning by using the CT information in several steps of the dose-planning calculation chain. This paper discusses the dosimetry chain used for individual absorbed-dose planning and highlights the areas where hybrid imaging makes significant contributions. PMID:26854156

  9. Hybrid Imaging for Patient-Specific Dosimetry in Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ljungberg, Michael; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy aims to treat malignant diseases by systemic administration of radiopharmaceuticals, often using carrier molecules such as peptides and antibodies. The radionuclides used emit electrons or alpha particles as a consequence of radioactive decay, thus leading to local energy deposition. Administration to individual patients can be tailored with regards to the risk of toxicity in normal organs by using absorbed dose planning. The scintillation camera, employed in planar imaging or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), generates images of the spatially and temporally varying activity distribution. Recent commercially available combined SPECT and computed tomography (CT) systems have dramatically increased the possibility of performing accurate dose planning by using the CT information in several steps of the dose-planning calculation chain. This paper discusses the dosimetry chain used for individual absorbed-dose planning and highlights the areas where hybrid imaging makes significant contributions. PMID:26854156

  10. State of the Art Antiemetic Therapy for Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Lau, Thomas K H; Yip, Claudia H W; Yeo, Winnie

    2016-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are common in cancer patients. The most common cause of nausea and vomiting is the administration of cytotoxic chemotherapy. Apart from chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), biological agents may also cause these symptoms. In this review, discussion will be focused on management of nausea and vomiting due to antineoplastic therapies. The cornerstone of effective management of nausea and vomiting secondary to these antineoplastic drugs is the prevention with the use of appropriate guideline-directed combination antiemetic regimen. Type 3 serotonin receptor antagonists (5HT3RAs), neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists (NK1RAs), and dexamethasone are the backbone antiemetic drugs. In recent years, newer drugs and preparations have been introduced for clinical use and include second-generation 5HT3RA, palonosetron; granisetron transdermal patch; the recently introduced NK1RA rolapitant; and the novel oral combined drug NEPA (netupitant plus palonosetron); and last but not least, the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine. PMID:26694923

  11. Salvage therapy in patients with germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Einhorn, Lawrence H

    2015-01-01

    Testicular cancer is the most curable metastatic solid tumor. Initial chemotherapy is evidence based with risk stratification into three prognostic categories: good, intermediate, and advanced disease. Guidelines for disease management following progression after initial cisplatin combination chemotherapy are less clear. Options include salvage surgery for patients with anatomically confined relapse, standard-dose cisplatin combination chemotherapy, or high-dose chemotherapy with carboplatin plus etoposide with peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Proper interpretation of a presumed relapse can be complicated. Growing masses on imaging studies might reflect a growing teratoma. Persistent elevations of serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) or alpha fetoprotein (AFP) are only an indication for salvage therapy if there is a definitive rise in the tumor marker. Elevated and rising serum hCG as the only evidence of recurrence can be because of cross reactivity with luteinizing hormone or usage of marijuana rather than progressive cancer. Elevated liver function tests can cause rising serum AFP. PMID:25993183

  12. HRV response of vegetative state patient with music therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yaw-Chern; Lei, Chun-Yang; Shih, Yi-Sen; Zhang, Wen-Chih; Wang, Hui-Min; Tseng, Cheng-Lung; Hou, Mark C; Chiang, Hui-Ya; Huang, Sheng-Chieh

    2011-01-01

    This case study centered on the effects of Music Therapy (MT) on vegetative state (VS) patients for a continuous 41-day experiment with electrocardiogram (ECG) recorded. Mahler's Second Symphony was used for this MT. There are various elements in Mahler's second symphony, with string, wind, drum, and even voice; providing the subject a strong and dynamic stimulation. There are some significant changes after 14-day stimulation: both standard deviation of all normal RR intervals (SDNN) and root mean square successive differences (RMSSD) in heart rate variability of the subject increased, indicating the activity of the cardiovascular system was enhanced. Although there's only one subject in this experiment, the results are still encouraging. PMID:22254653

  13. Combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir for dialysis patients infected with hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Sato, Ken; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Ohyama, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horiguchi, Norio; Kakizaki, Satoru; Kusano, Motoyasu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2016-03-16

    The standard antiviral therapy for dialysis patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is (pegylated) interferon monotherapy, but its efficacy is insufficient. Oral direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) have recently been developed for chronic hepatitis C patients. However, some DAAs have contraindications for chronic renal failure (CRF). Daclatasvir and asunaprevir are metabolized largely in the liver and are not contraindicated in CRF. Combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir was used for 4 dialysis patients infected with genotype 1b HCV. One patient had viral breakthrough, and the 3 others had sustained virological response 12. One patient was admitted for heart failure and percutaneous coronary intervention due to concomitant ischemic disease. Heart failure was unlikely to be caused by the combination therapy, as it was probably due to water overload. The patient continued to receive the combination therapy after the remission of the heart failure. The combination therapy was well tolerated in the other patients. PMID:26989674

  14. Combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir for dialysis patients infected with hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Ken; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Ohyama, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horiguchi, Norio; Kakizaki, Satoru; Kusano, Motoyasu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2016-01-01

    The standard antiviral therapy for dialysis patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is (pegylated) interferon monotherapy, but its efficacy is insufficient. Oral direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) have recently been developed for chronic hepatitis C patients. However, some DAAs have contraindications for chronic renal failure (CRF). Daclatasvir and asunaprevir are metabolized largely in the liver and are not contraindicated in CRF. Combination therapy with daclatasvir and asunaprevir was used for 4 dialysis patients infected with genotype 1b HCV. One patient had viral breakthrough, and the 3 others had sustained virological response 12. One patient was admitted for heart failure and percutaneous coronary intervention due to concomitant ischemic disease. Heart failure was unlikely to be caused by the combination therapy, as it was probably due to water overload. The patient continued to receive the combination therapy after the remission of the heart failure. The combination therapy was well tolerated in the other patients. PMID:26989674

  15. Behaviors of Providers of Traditional Korean Medicine Therapy and Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapy for the Treatment of Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun-Sang; Kim, Chun-Bae; Kim, Ki-Kyong; Lee, Ji-Eun; Kim, Min-Young

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In Korea, cancer is one of the most important causes of death. Cancer patients have sought alternative methods, like complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) together with Western medicine, to treat cancer. Also, there are many kinds of providers of CAM therapy, including providers of Korean oriental medicine therapy. The purpose of this study is to identify the behaviors of Korean oriental medicine therapy and CAM therapy providers who treat cancer patients and to provide background knowledge for establishing a new policy with the management and quality control of CAM. Methods: Structured and well organized questionnaires were made, and 350 persons were surveyed concerning the providers of CAM or Korean oriental medicine. The questionnaires were collected and analyzed. Results: The questionnaires (182) were collected. The questionnaires identified a total of 73 known providers, such as medicinal professionals or other providers of CAM suppliers, 35.6% of whom had had experience with treating cancer patients (52.6% vs. 29.6%). The treatment methods were a little different: alternative therapy and nutritional therapy being preferred by medicinal professionals and mind body modulation therapy and alternative therapy being preferred by other CAM providers. Four patients (7.4%) experienced side effects, and 6 patients (12.5%) experienced legal problems. As the method for managing the therapy, CAM providers, medicinal professionals, and other CAM providers had different viewpoints. For example, some CAM providers stated that both legislation and an official education on CAM or a national examination were needed as a first step to establish the provider’s qualifications and that as a second step, a license test was needed for quality control. To the contrary, medicinal professionals stated that a license test was needed before legislation. Conclusion: Adequate management and quality control of CAM providers is thought to involve both education and

  16. Effect of electroconvulsive stimulation on messenger RNA expression in the prefrontal cortex in a rat pain model

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, YUSUKE; ISHIKAWA, MASASHI; HORI, YOKO; OKABE, TADASHI; SAKAMOTO, ATSUHIRO

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports have shown that electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is efficacious in the treatment of neuropathic pain; however, its mechanism of action remains unclear. The present study aimed to understand these mechanisms by investigating the alterations in the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in the prefrontal cortex. A rat model of neuropathic pain produced by chronic constrictive injury of the sciatic nerve was used, and mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated starting 2 days after the injury. Using a pulse generator, ECT was administered to the rodents for 6 days from days 7–12 after the injury. Thermal and mechanical stimulation were administered to assess pain thresholds. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction, used to measure gene expression levels in the prefrontal cortex, showed that NPY and IL-1β gene expression levels in the prefrontal cortex increased following the injury. The present results indicate that these gene expression level variations may be associated with the mechanisms underlying the effect of ECT in treating neuropathic pain. PMID:26623019

  17. Couch height-based patient setup for abdominal radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Shingo; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Nishiyama, Kinji; Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Isono, Masaru; Tsujii, Katsutomo; Takashina, Masaaki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Kawanabe, Kiyoto; Teshima, Teruki

    2016-01-01

    There are 2 methods commonly used for patient positioning in the anterior-posterior (A-P) direction: one is the skin mark patient setup method (SMPS) and the other is the couch height-based patient setup method (CHPS). This study compared the setup accuracy of these 2 methods for abdominal radiation therapy. The enrollment for this study comprised 23 patients with pancreatic cancer. For treatments (539 sessions), patients were set up by using isocenter skin marks and thereafter treatment couch was shifted so that the distance between the isocenter and the upper side of the treatment couch was equal to that indicated on the computed tomographic (CT) image. Setup deviation in the A-P direction for CHPS was measured by matching the spine of the digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) of a lateral beam at simulation with that of the corresponding time-integrated electronic portal image. For SMPS with no correction (SMPS/NC), setup deviation was calculated based on the couch-level difference between SMPS and CHPS. SMPS/NC was corrected using 2 off-line correction protocols: no action level (SMPS/NAL) and extended NAL (SMPS/eNAL) protocols. Margins to compensate for deviations were calculated using the Stroom formula. A-P deviation > 5mm was observed in 17% of SMPS/NC, 4% of SMPS/NAL, and 4% of SMPS/eNAL sessions but only in one CHPS session. For SMPS/NC, 7 patients (30%) showed deviations at an increasing rate of > 0.1mm/fraction, but for CHPS, no such trend was observed. The standard deviations (SDs) of systematic error (Σ) were 2.6, 1.4, 0.6, and 0.8mm and the root mean squares of random error (σ) were 2.1, 2.6, 2.7, and 0.9mm for SMPS/NC, SMPS/NAL, SMPS/eNAL, and CHPS, respectively. Margins to compensate for the deviations were wide for SMPS/NC (6.7mm), smaller for SMPS/NAL (4.6mm) and SMPS/eNAL (3.1mm), and smallest for CHPS (2.2mm). Achieving better setup with smaller margins, CHPS appears to be a reproducible method for abdominal patient setup. PMID:26553471

  18. Local Therapy Indications in the Management of Patients with Oligometastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas A; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Advances in surgical, radiation, and interventional radiology therapies carry a reduction in morbidity associated with therapy. Aggressive management of patients with oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer offers the potential for improved disease-free survival and quality of life compared with traditional systemic therapy alone. PMID:27261919

  19. Patient preferences for timing and access to radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Olivotto, I.A.; Soo, J.; Olson, R.A.; Rowe, L.; French, J.; Jensen, B.; Pastuch, A.; Halperin, R.; Truong, P.T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Patient preferences for radiation therapy (rt) access were investigated. Methods Patients completing a course of rt at 6 centres received a 17-item survey that rated preferences for time of day; day of week; actual, ideal, and reasonable travel times for rt; and actual, ideal, and reasonable times between referral and first oncologic consultation. Patients receiving single-fraction rt or brachytherapy alone were excluded. Results Of the respondents who returned surveys (n = 1053), 54% were women, and 74% had received more than 15 rt fractions. With respect to appointment times, 88% agreed or strongly agreed that rt between 08h00 and 16h30 was preferred; 14%–15% preferred 07h30–08h00 or 16h30–17h00; 10% preferred 17h00–18h00; and 6% or fewer preferred times before 07h30 or after 18h00. A preference not to receive rt before 07h30 or after 18h00 was expressed by 30% or more of the respondents. When days of the week were considered, 18% and 11% would have preferred to receive rt on a Saturday or Sunday respectively; 52% and 55% would have preferred not to receive rt on those days. A travel time of 1 hour or less for rt was reported by 82%, but 61% felt that a travel time of 1 hour or more was reasonable. A first consultation within 2 weeks of referral was felt to be ideal or reasonable by 88% and 73% of patients respectively. Conclusions An rt service designed to meet patient preferences would make most capacity available between 08h00 and 16h30 on weekdays and provide 10%–20% of rt capacity on weekends and during 07h30–08h00 and 16h30–18h00 on weekdays. Approximately 80%, but not all, of the responding patients preferred a 2-week or shorter interval between referral and first oncologic consultation. PMID:26300666

  20. Dialytic dose in pediatric continuous renal replacement therapy patients.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Guzzi, Francesco; Tuccinardi, Germana; Romagnoli, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    Although universally recognized as a crucial component of renal replacement therapy (RRT), dialytic dose has not been investigated in children with renal failure, differently from the adult population. Consequently, clear indications on the adequacy of continuous RRT in pediatric population is currently missing and wide variations in clinical practice exist worldwide. Fluid balance has been identified as a key factor in affecting outcomes these patients. Nonetheless, the concept and the precise evaluation of the dialytic dose for continuous pediatric RRT seems crucial, especially in light of the small body surface area of neonates and infants that might result into a difficult dose calculation. The present review clearly demonstrates that dialytic dose in pediatric RRT has been underestimated by scientific literature. Nowadays, the absence of any specific dedicated prospective study and the tendency to overlook theoretical basis of pediatric dialytic dose have led to the absence of a standard prescription: worldwide clinical practice ranges from very high doses to lower ones, also depending on different ways of estimating patients' sizes and solutes' volume of distribution. Large structured studies are warranted in order to define a reference dialytic dose for critically ill children, capable to cope an adequate solute control to gentle and safe treatments. PMID:27467103

  1. [Extracorporeal therapy of patients with liver disease in the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, V; Horvatits, T; Drolz, A; Rutter, K

    2014-05-01

    Acute and acute-on-chronic liver failure are often associated with development of organ failure. Its occurrence is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Extracorporeal replacement therapies are frequently necessary in these patient populations. Replacement therapies can be divided into renal replacement therapies and liver support therapies. These therapies consist of artificial liver support systems (i.e., MARS(®) system, Prometheus(®)), which are able to remove water-soluble and albumin-bound toxins, and of bioartifical liver support systems. This manuscript provides a review of current practice in the extracorporeal support of patients with liver diseases in the intensive care unit. PMID:24770889

  2. A group cognitive behaviour therapy programme with metastatic breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Edelman, S; Bell, D R; Kidman, A D

    1999-01-01

    One-hundred and twenty-four patients with metastatic breast cancer were randomised to either a group Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) intervention, or to a no-therapy control group condition. Both groups received standard oncological care; however, therapy recipients also attended eight weekly sessions of group CBT, followed by a family night, and three further monthly sessions. Patients completed the 'Profile of Mood States' (POMS) and the Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory (CSI) before and after therapy, and at 3 and 6 month follow-up periods. Outcome data in the period following therapy showed reduced depression and total mood disturbance, as well as improved self-esteem amongst therapy participants, relative to a no-therapy control group. These improvements were no longer evident at the 3 or 6 month follow-up assessments. We also report on the difficulties associated with conducting a group intervention with this patient cohort. PMID:10474848

  3. Psychological predictors of survival in cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Leigh, H; Percarpio, B; Opsahl, C; Ungerer, J

    1987-01-01

    In a prospective study to identify psychological factors affecting survival in cancer patients receiving radiation therapy, 101 consecutive patients were evaluated for anxiety, depression, and perception of the seriousness of the condition. In 3 years, the survivors were compared to the nonsurvivors. The survivors had significantly higher mean trait anxiety (p less than 0.05) than the nonsurvivors. State anxiety and depression scores also tended to be higher in the survivors (p less than 0.01). Self-assessment of the seriousness of their disease did not differentiate the two groups. The nonsurvivors had significantly more pain (p less than 0.05). Within the nonsurvivor group, survival time was negatively correlated with state anxiety (p less than 0.01), trait anxiety (p less than 0.02), and depression (p less than 0.01). In the nonsurvivors, women rated their condition to be significantly more serious than men (p less than 0.01). Female nonsurvivors tended to rate their condition to be more serious than female survivors (p less than 0.1), while male nonsurvivors rated their condition to be significantly less serious than male survivors (p less than 0.01). Only among female nonsurvivors did the seriousness rating correlate significantly with anxiety (p less than 0.01). The sex differences confirm our previous finding that men may tend to cope with cancer with more massive denial than women. We hypothesize that patients with higher anxiety and depression in the nonsurvivor group had a massive defensive failure, while those who had high anxiety levels in the survivor group had been more realistic about their disease.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3449880

  4. Barriers Prevent Patient Access to Personalized Therapies Identified by Molecular Tumor Profiling of Gynecologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, R. Tyler; Ward, Kristy; Saenz, Cheryl; McHale, Michael; Plaxe, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study was designed to evaluate the ability of commercial molecular tumor profiling to discover actionable mutations and to identify barriers that might prevent patient access to personalized therapies. Methods. We conducted an IRB-approved retrospective review of 26 patients with gynecologic malignancies who underwent commercial tumor profiling at our institution during the first 18 months of test availability. Tumor profiles reported targeted therapies and clinical trials matched to patient-specific mutations. Data analysis consisted of descriptive statistics. Results. Most patients who underwent tumor profiling had serous epithelial ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube carcinoma (46%). Patients underwent profiling after undergoing a median of two systemic therapies (range 0 to 13). A median of one targeted therapy was suggested per patient profile. Tumor profiling identified no clinically actionable mutations for seven patients (27%). Six patients sought insurance approval for a targeted therapy and two were declined (33%). One patient (4%) received a targeted therapy and this was discontinued due to tumor progression. Conclusions. There are formidable barriers to targeted therapy for patients with gynecologic malignancies. These barriers include a dearth of FDA-approved targeted agents for gynecologic malignancies, lack of third party insurance coverage and limited geographic availability of clinical trials. PMID:26011384

  5. Teaching Family Therapy: Ten Key Questions for Understanding the Family as Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnikoff, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    Ten questions for understanding the family as patient are presented as one aspect of an overall teaching plan for family therapy. Seeing the family as patient is important in initial stages of evaluation and therapy. A case study of a large, overly close family is used as an illustration. (Author)

  6. Art Therapy with Pediatric Cancer Patients: Helping Normal Children Cope with Abnormal Circumstances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Councill, Tracy

    1993-01-01

    Notes that art therapy with pediatric cancer patients addresses emotional and developmental needs of normal population under extreme stress. Reviews literature on the problems likely to be encountered by pediatric cancer patient and presents case examples to illustrate the emergence of these issues and their management in art therapy. (Author/NB)

  7. Manual therapy in the management of a patient with a symptomatic Morton's Neuroma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Sault, Josiah D; Morris, Matthew V; Jayaseelan, Dhinu J; Emerson-Kavchak, Alicia J

    2016-02-01

    Patients with Morton's neuroma are rarely referred to physical therapy. This case reports the resolution of pain, increase in local pressure pain thresholds, and improvement of scores on the Lower Extremity Functional Scale and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure following a course of joint based manual therapy for a patient who had failed standard conservative medical treatment. PMID:25920337

  8. [Prognostic factors of efficacy of eradication therapy in patients with duodenal ulcer].

    PubMed

    Kozlova, I V; Eliseev, Iu Iu; Pakhomova, A L; Khan, Sadzhad Akhmad

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine microorganism-associated predictors of efficacy of eradication therapy in patients with Helicobacter pylori-associated duodenal ulcer. The subjects were 129 such patients. Clinical, endoscopic, microbiological, and immunological examination revealed differences in the initial immune status, the structure of gastroduodenal zone mucosa, and large bowel biocenosis, which predict efficacy of eradication therapy. PMID:16117427

  9. Prokinetic Therapy Reduces Aspiration Pneumonia in Tube-Fed Patients With Severe Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pareek, Namita; Williams, John; Hanna, Deborah; Johnson, William D.; Minocha, Anil; Abell, Thomas L.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical benefit of prokinetic therapy in aspiration pneumonia in patients with developmental disabilities, we conducted a retrospective study; records of 22 tube-fed patients were reviewed from December 1990 to October 1998 for a mean of 22.7 months before and 38.9 months during Cisapride therapy. Numbers of hospital admissions…

  10. Art Therapy with a Hemodialysis Patient: A Case Analysis. Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishida, Miki; Strobino, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Art therapy has been used to support the coping skills of patients with various medical illnesses. The purpose of this case study was to examine the usefulness of art therapy in promoting communication and a positive sense of well-being in a hemodialysis patient. The participant was a 57-year-old Caucasian female who had been treated with…

  11. Art Therapy and Neuroscience Blend: Working with Patients Who have Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Ellen Greene

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores findings from the fields of neuropsychology and art therapy as they relate to treating patients with dementia. It explains the biological, physical, and psychological manifestations of dementia, and current treatment modalities. Art therapy has been shown to be beneficial to patients with dementia. Unfortunately, it is the rare…

  12. Empirically-supported and non-empirically supported therapies for bulimia nervosa: retrospective patient ratings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Empirically supported therapies for bulimia nervosa include cognitive behaviour therapy and interpersonal therapy. Whilst these treatments have been shown to be effective in multiple randomised controlled trials, little research has investigated how they are perceived by patients who receive them. This study investigated whether empirically-supported psychological therapies (ESTs) are associated with superior self-rated treatment outcomes in clients with Bulimia Nervosa (BN). Results 98 adults who had received psychological therapy for BN in the United Kingdom completed a questionnaire which retrospectively assessed the specific contents of their psychological therapy and self-rated treatment outcomes. Around half the sample, fifty three participants reported receiving an EST. Fifty of these received Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) and three Interpersonal Therapy (IPT). Where therapy met expert criteria for Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa (CBT-BN, an EST) participants reported superior treatment outcomes than those who appeared to receive non-specialist cognitive-behavioural therapy. However, self-rated treatment outcomes were similar overall between those whose therapy met criteria for ESTs and those whose therapy did not. Conclusions The findings offer tentative support for the perceived helpfulness of CBT-BN as evaluated in controlled research trials. Cognitive-behavioural therapies for BN, as they are delivered in the UK, may not necessarily be perceived as more beneficial by clients with BN than psychological therapies which currently have less empirical support. PMID:24999419

  13. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenqing; Wang, Aihui; Yu, Limin; Han, Xuesong; Jiang, Guiyun; Weng, Changshui; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Stroke patients with hemiplegia exhibit flexor spasms in the upper limb and extensor spasms in the lower limb, and their movement patterns vary greatly. Constraint-induced movement therapy is an upper limb rehabilitation technique used in stroke patients with hemiplegia; however, studies of lower extremity rehabilitation are scarce. In this study, stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia underwent conventional Bobath therapy for 4 weeks as baseline treatment, followed by constraint-induced movement therapy for an additional 4 weeks. The 10-m maximum walking speed and Berg balance scale scores significantly improved following treatment, and lower extremity motor function also improved. The results of functional MRI showed that constraint-induced movement therapy alleviates the reduction in cerebral functional activation in patients, which indicates activation of functional brain regions and a significant increase in cerebral blood perfusion. These results demonstrate that constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia. PMID:25337108

  14. Constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenqing; Wang, Aihui; Yu, Limin; Han, Xuesong; Jiang, Guiyun; Weng, Changshui; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2012-11-15

    Stroke patients with hemiplegia exhibit flexor spasms in the upper limb and extensor spasms in the lower limb, and their movement patterns vary greatly. Constraint-induced movement therapy is an upper limb rehabilitation technique used in stroke patients with hemiplegia; however, studies of lower extremity rehabilitation are scarce. In this study, stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia underwent conventional Bobath therapy for 4 weeks as baseline treatment, followed by constraint-induced movement therapy for an additional 4 weeks. The 10-m maximum walking speed and Berg balance scale scores significantly improved following treatment, and lower extremity motor function also improved. The results of functional MRI showed that constraint-induced movement therapy alleviates the reduction in cerebral functional activation in patients, which indicates activation of functional brain regions and a significant increase in cerebral blood perfusion. These results demonstrate that constraint-induced movement therapy promotes brain functional reorganization in stroke patients with lower limb hemiplegia. PMID:25337108

  15. Neuronal circuit-dependent alterations in expression of two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase in the hippocampus following electroconvulsive shock: A stereology-based study.

    PubMed

    Jinno, Shozo; Kosaka, Toshio

    2009-11-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence suggesting that GABAergic dysfunction is involved in various psychiatric disorders. The goal of our study was to investigate the influences of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), one of the most effective treatments for depression, on the GABAergic system in the hippocampus. In this stereology-based study, we identified GABAergic neurons by immunostaining for two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65, and GAD67 and estimated the expression changes induced by single or repeated electroconvulsive shock (ECS; an animal model of ECT). The numerical density (ND) of entire population of GABAergic neurons (expressing GAD65 and/or GAD67) was seldom altered by the administration of ECS. GAD67-positive (GAD67(+)) neurons were also rarely affected by ECS. On the other hand, the ND of GAD65(+) neurons was changed in a layer-specific manner. In the CA1 region, the ND of GAD65(+) neurons was increased in the strata radiatum/lacunosum-moleculare (SR/SLM) by repeated ECS. In the CA3 region, the ND of GAD65(+) neurons was decreased in the stratum oriens and SR/SLM after single ECS. The expression ratio of GAD65 in GABAergic neurons was increased specifically in layers receiving afferents from the entorhinal cortex (EC), i.e., SR/SLM of the CA1 region and molecular layer of the dentate gyrus (DG), after repeated ECS administration, whereas the expression ratio of GAD67 in GABAergic neurons was decreased in several layers by the same treatment. These results indicate that the ECS-induced changes in ND of GAD65(+) or GAD67(+) neurons were most likely due to alterations in GAD expression rather than actual increases or decreases in cell numbers. Altogether, the neuronal circuit-dependent alterations in GABA-mediated signaling may play a contributory role in the depression treatment process introduced by ECT. PMID:19283776

  16. Monte Carlo Calculations Supporting Patient Plan Verification in Proton Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thiago V M; Dosanjh, Manjit; Ferrari, Alfredo; Molineli, Silvia; Ciocca, Mario; Mairani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Patient's treatment plan verification covers substantial amount of the quality assurance (QA) resources; this is especially true for Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT). The use of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in supporting QA has been widely discussed, and several methods have been proposed. In this paper, we studied an alternative approach from the one being currently applied clinically at Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO). We reanalyzed the previously published data (Molinelli et al. (1)), where 9 patient plans were investigated in which the warning QA threshold of 3% mean dose deviation was crossed. The possibility that these differences between measurement and calculated dose were related to dose modeling (Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) vs. MC), limitations on dose delivery system, or detectors mispositioning was originally explored, but other factors, such as the geometric description of the detectors, were not ruled out. For the purpose of this work, we compared ionization chambers' measurements with different MC simulation results. It was also studied that some physical effects were introduced by this new approach, for example, inter-detector interference and the delta ray thresholds. The simulations accounting for a detailed geometry typically are superior (statistical difference - p-value around 0.01) to most of the MC simulations used at CNAO (only inferior to the shift approach used). No real improvement was observed in reducing the current delta ray threshold used (100 keV), and no significant interference between ion chambers in the phantom were detected (p-value 0.81). In conclusion, it was observed that the detailed geometrical description improves the agreement between measurement and MC calculations in some cases. But in other cases, position uncertainty represents the dominant uncertainty. The inter-chamber disturbance was not detected for the therapeutic protons energies, and the results from the current delta threshold

  17. Evaluation of Helicobacter Pylori eradication in pediatric patients by triple therapy plus lactoferrin and probiotics compared to triple therapy alone

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate whether the addition of a probiotic could improve Helicobacter pylori (H.P.) eradication rates and reduce the side effects of treatment in children. Methods Between July 2008 and July 2011 all patients with a clinical, laboratory and endoscopic diagnosis of H.P. positive gastritis referred to our Unit were included in the study. Patients suffering from allergy to any of drugs used in the study, with previous attempts to eradicate H.P. and those who received antibiotics, PPIs or probiotics within 4 weeks were excluded from the present study. Patients were randomized into two therapy regimens (group A and B): both groups received standard triple treatment (omeprazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin) while only group B patients were also given a probiotic (Probinul - Cadigroup). Patients compliance was evaluated at the end of the treatment. Successful eradication was defined as a negative 13 C-urea breath test (C13-ubt) result four weeks after therapy discontinuation. Results A total of 68 histopathologically proven H.P.-infection children (32 male and 36 females) were included in the study. All of the patients in both groups used more than 90% of the therapies and no patients were lost at follow up. All side effects were selflimiting and disappeared once the therapy was terminated. Epigastric pain was observed in 6 (17.6%) group A vs 2 (5.8%) group B patients (P<0.05), nausea in 3 (8.8%) group A vs 1 (2.9%) group B patients (P<0.05); vomiting and diarrhea were observed in 2(5.8%) and 8 (23.5%) group A patients, respectively and never in group B (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of constipation (5.8% in group A and B). Four weeks after the completion of therapy, 56/68 patients (82.3%) tested negative for H.P. on C13-ubt. H.P. was eradicated in 26 patients (76.4%) in group A and in 30 patients (88.2%) in group B. There was no significantly difference in the rate of H.P. eradication between group A and

  18. [Advances in the research of effects of music therapy on pain and anxiety in burn patients].

    PubMed

    Jinyi, Li; Yungui, Wang

    2015-06-01

    Pain and anxiety engender major psychic problems during all phases of treatment for burn patients. Analgesic alone does not allay these problems satisfactorily in these patients. Music therapy, as an important complementary and alternative therapy, has been widely used in multiple medical fields. However, its positive effect on alleviation of pain and anxiety in burn patients is undefined. The objective of this review is to summarize the feasibility, application fields, methods, and the effectiveness of music therapy in allaying pain and anxiety of burn patients during the whole course of treatment. PMID:26564564

  19. Exercise therapy for patients with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis.

    PubMed

    Al-Herz, Adeeba; Snip, Jan Paul; Clark, Bruce; Esdaile, John M

    2008-02-01

    We evaluated the effect of exercise therapy on back pain, spinal range of motion (ROM), and disability in persons with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). Persons with symptomatic DISH received a daily exercise program for 24 weeks consisting of mobility, stretching, and strengthening exercises for the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine. It included 14 supervised sessions over 8 weeks. Outcomes included visual analogue scales (VAS) for pain, stiffness, and fatigue, 13 spinal measurements, the neck pain and disability scale, the Quebec back pain disability scale, the Bath Spondylitis Functional Index, and the MACTAR patient preference scale. Assessments were made at baseline, 8 weeks, and 24 weeks. Fifteen of 17 completed the study. Comparing week 24 with baseline, Schober's test improved significantly (p = 0.02), and VAS stiffness and left finger-to-floor test demonstrated a trend to improvement (p = 0.07 each). The physical measures, which were expected to improve with the exercise program, all moved in the direction expected, but had p values > 0.10. At 24 weeks, eight (53.3%) participants rated their status as improved, three (20%) as unchanged, and four (27%) were unsure about the benefit. The exercise program designed for DISH and tested in this study led to small improvements in physical measures which achieved significance only for lumbosacral flexion. PMID:17885726

  20. Cultured breast cystosarcoma phylloides cells and applications to patient therapy.

    PubMed

    Lewko, W M; Vaghmar, R; Maleckar, J R; Husseini, S; Montgomery, C A; Thurman, G B; Oldham, R K

    1990-12-01

    Malignant cystosarcoma phylloides (CP) is a relatively rare cancer of the breast. A CP tumor was processed as part of a tumor acquisition, propagation, and preservation program in patient biotherapy. Two tissue culture cell lines were developed from this tumor, one directly from the biopsy, another from a xenograft tumor grown in athymic mice. The two cell lines were similar in character. There was strong immunochemical reactivity with antibodies to vimentin, type I collagen, and type III collagen. There was no reactivity with antibodies to cytokeratin and epithelial membrane antigen. Both cell lines were aneuploid, clonogenic in soft agar, and tumorigenic in nude mice. 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone and thyroxine added to the culture medium stimulated growth, while testosterone, 17 beta-estradiol, and 4-hydroxytamoxifen were without effect. Dexamethasone and cortisol were inhibitory at high doses (10(-6) M). Dibutyryl cyclic AMP, theophylline, and vitamin C were all inhibitory. The biopsy contained tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes which proliferated in cultures containing interleukin 2. The expanded lymphocytes were activated T cells which had the capacity to lyse tumor cells. These results suggest possibilities in the therapy of cystosarcoma phylloides involving vitamin C, certain hormones, and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. PMID:1965788

  1. Pretreatment with betamethasone of patients with Graves' disease given radioiodine therapy: thyroid autoantibody responses and outcome of therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gamstedt, A.; Karlsson, A. )

    1991-07-01

    The effects of betamethasone on thyroid autoantibody responses and outcome of radioiodine therapy were determined over a period of 1 yr in a prospective randomized study of 40 patients with Graves' disease. Twenty patients were given placebo tablets, and 20 patients were treated with betamethasone from 3 weeks before until 4 weeks after {sup 131}I therapy. At the time of inclusion in the study, the mean serum concentrations of TSH receptor antibodies, thyroid peroxidase antibodies, and thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) were increased in both groups. Three weeks of treatment with betamethasone reduced the thyroid peroxidase antibody and TgAb titers as well as the serum concentrations of thyroid hormones. A decrease in the TSH receptor antibody level was not statistically significant. After radioiodine therapy, transient increases in thyroid autoantibody levels were observed. The titers of the different antibodies generally changed in parallel. In some patients a detectable level of a given antibody was found only after the radioiodine treatment, and in two cases, TgAb did not appear at all, although the two other antibodies increased temporarily. Betamethasone delayed, but did not abolish, the {sup 131}I-induced antibody peaks. Betamethasone also caused a reduction in the total serum immunoglobulin G, a reduction which persisted throughout the study period. When the study ended, 17 patients given placebo and 9 patients given betamethasone were receiving replacement therapy due to the development of hypothyroidism. These patients at this point in time had lower antibody levels than those not requiring T4. The results of this study demonstrate that betamethasone reduces and modifies the thyroid autoantibody responses as well as the outcome of radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease.

  2. Metastasectomy Following Targeted Therapy in Patients with Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Jose A.; Rini, Brian I.; Varella, Leticia; Garcia, Jorge A.; Dreicer, Robert; Choueiri, Toni K.; Jonasch, Eric; Matin, Surena F.; Campbell, Steven C.; Wood, Christopher G.; Tannir, Nizar M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Metastasectomy is often incorporated in the overall management of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). While this approach has been studied in the immunotherapy era, only a few cases have been described in the targeted therapy era. Therefore, we evaluated the role of metastasectomy in patients with mRCC who received prior targeted therapy. Patients and Methods Patients who underwent consolidative metastasectomy following targeted therapy at three institutions from 2004 to 2009 were evaluated in this retrospective study. All patients received at least one cycle of targeted therapy prior to surgical resection of all visible disease. Results Twenty-two patients were identified. Sites of metastasectomy included the retroperitoneum in 12 patients, lung in 6 patients, adrenal gland in 2 patients, bowel in 2 patients, and mediastinum, bone, brain, and IVC thrombus in 1 patient each. A total of 6 postoperative complications were observed in 4 patients within 12 weeks from surgery, all of which resolved with appropriate management. Postoperatively, nine patients received at least one targeted therapy. Eleven patients recurred at a median of 42 weeks from metastasectomy and another eleven patients have not experienced a recurrence at a median of 43 weeks from metastasectomy. Twenty-one patients were alive at a median follow-up of 109 weeks and one patient died of RCC 105 weeks after metastasectomy. Conclusions In a cohort of selected patients with limited tumor burden after treatment with targeted agents, consolidative metastasectomy is feasible with acceptable morbidity. Significant time off targeted therapy and long-term tumor-free status are possible with this approach. PMID:21167518

  3. Language Discordance and Patient- Centered Care in Occupational Therapy: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jenny; Leland, Natalie

    2015-04-01

    The accumulative burden of a growing non-English speaking minority population and health disparities in the United States demonstrate the urgency of examining occupational therapy practices and defining care that is timely, effective, safe, and patient-centered. In this context, we investigate an occupational therapy episode of care from the perspectives of patient, caregiver, and primary occupational therapy care provider. Treatment sessions were observed and one-on-one semistructured interviews were conducted with the participants. Several themes describing areas of concern in communication and care delivery emerged, including expectations for care, the therapy relationship, professional identity, and pragmatic constraints. The use of untrained interpreters compromised treatment effectiveness and safety. This case highlights potential areas of concern in therapy when working with a diverse patient population. Abundant opportunities exist for occupational therapy to situate itself as an equitable, responsive, valuable, and essential service. PMID:26460475

  4. Ceiling art in a radiation therapy department: its effect on patient treatment experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bonett, Jotham

    2015-09-15

    A new initiative has been implemented at the Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre, to provide a calming and comforting environment for patients attending radiation therapy treatment. As part of this initiative, the department's computed tomography (CT) room and radiation therapy bunkers were designed to incorporate ceiling art that replicates a number of different visual scenes. The study was undertaken to determine if ceiling art in the radiation therapy treatment CT and treatment bunkers had an effect on a patient's experience during treatment at the department. Additionally, the study aimed to identify which of the visuals in the ceiling art were most preferred by patients. Patients were requested to complete a 12-question survey. The survey solicited a patient's opinion/perception on the unit's unique ceiling display with emphasis on aesthetic appeal, patient treatment experience and the patient's engagement due to the ceiling display. The responses were dichotomised to ‘positive’ or ‘negative’. Every sixth patient who completed the survey was invited to have a general face-to-face discussion to provide further information about their thoughts on the displays. The results demonstrate that the ceiling artwork solicited a positive reaction in 89.8% of patients surveyed. This score indicates that ceiling artwork contributed positively to patients’ experiences during radiation therapy treatment. The study suggests that ceiling artwork in the department has a positive effect on patient experience during their radiation therapy treatment at the department.

  5. Ceiling art in a radiation therapy department: its effect on patient treatment experience

    PubMed Central

    Bonett, Jotham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A new initiative has been implemented at the Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre, to provide a calming and comforting environment for patients attending radiation therapy treatment. As part of this initiative, the department's computed tomography (CT) room and radiation therapy bunkers were designed to incorporate ceiling art that replicates a number of different visual scenes. The study was undertaken to determine if ceiling art in the radiation therapy treatment CT and treatment bunkers had an effect on a patient's experience during treatment at the department. Additionally, the study aimed to identify which of the visuals in the ceiling art were most preferred by patients. Methods Patients were requested to complete a 12-question survey. The survey solicited a patient's opinion/perception on the unit's unique ceiling display with emphasis on aesthetic appeal, patient treatment experience and the patient's engagement due to the ceiling display. The responses were dichotomised to ‘positive’ or ‘negative’. Every sixth patient who completed the survey was invited to have a general face-to-face discussion to provide further information about their thoughts on the displays. Results The results demonstrate that the ceiling artwork solicited a positive reaction in 89.8% of patients surveyed. This score indicates that ceiling artwork contributed positively to patients’ experiences during radiation therapy treatment. Conclusion The study suggests that ceiling artwork in the department has a positive effect on patient experience during their radiation therapy treatment at the department. PMID:26451241

  6. Vaginal estrogen products in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients on aromatase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Sulaica, Elisabeth; Han, Tiffany; Wang, Weiqun; Bhat, Raksha; Trivedi, Meghana V; Niravath, Polly

    2016-06-01

    Atrophic vaginitis represents a major barrier to compliance with aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy in breast cancer (BC) survivors. While local estrogen therapy is effective for postmenopausal vaginal dryness, the efficacy of such therapies has not been evaluated systematically in hormone receptor-positive (HR+) BC patients on AI therapy. Furthermore, the potential risk of breast cancer recurrence with vaginal estrogen therapy represents a long-term safety concern for the patients with HR + BC. Unfortunately, there is no standardized assay to measure very low concentrations of estradiol (E2) in these women being treated with AI therapy. This makes it difficult to evaluate even indirectly the potential risk of BC recurrence with vaginal estrogen therapy in HR + BC patients on AI therapy. In this review, we describe available assays to measure very low concentrations of E2, discuss the Food and Drug Administration-approved vaginal estrogen products on the market, and summarize published and ongoing clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of vaginal estrogen in HR + BC patients on AI therapy. In the absence of any randomized controlled clinical trials, this review serves as a summary of available clinical data and ongoing studies to aid clinicians in selecting the best available option for their patients. PMID:27178335

  7. Ovarian cancer: contribution of radiation therapy to patient management: Erskine Memorial Lecture, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, R.S.

    1984-10-01

    Ovarian cancer may be treated with radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, or a combination. To evaluate the contribution of radiation therapy to patient management the cure rate must be estimated; data are presented suggesting that the 5-year survival rate provides a reasonable estimate of the cure rate. A study of patients treated since 1971 showed that stage and postoperative residuum could be used to divide patients into two subgroups, a poor prognosis group and a good prognosis group; a multifactorial grouping of patients in the good prognosis group who were treated postoperatively with radiation therapy only was further able to divide patients into low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk groups. Studies of radiation therapy for different subgroups are discussed; abdominopelvic irradiation has been shown to improve survival for approximately one-third of patients with cancer of the ovary.

  8. [Efficacy of CHOP+/-Rituximab-like therapy plus radiation therapy for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma stage I].

    PubMed

    Ueda, Kyoko; Yokoyama, Masahiro; Asai, Hiroaki; Koudaira, Makoto; Yamada, Syuhei; Katsube, Atsushi; Mishima, Yuko; Sakajiri, Sakura; Takeuchi, Kengo; Saotome, Takashi; Terui, Yasuhito; Takahashi, Syunji; Hatake, Kiyohiko

    2010-05-01

    Clinically, R-CHOP-like therapy plus radiation therapy is commonly performed for patients with limited stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. However, the efficacy and the safety of the management have not been evaluated properly. In particular, we have few definitive reports about patients with stage I DLBCL. This time we evaluated the effect of CHOP+/-R-like therapy plus radiation therapy, by analyzing 28 patients with stage I DLBCL, retrospectively. 15 patients were treated with the RCHOP-like therapy, and 13 received CHOP-like therapy combined with radiation therapy. A complete response was observed in all of the patients. With a median follow-up time of 14 months, 1-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 100%, and the 1-year overall survival (OS) was 100% for the patients receiving the R-CHOP-like therapy. With a median follow-up time of 68 months, 5-year PFS was 84. 6%, and 5-year OS was 100% for patients receiving the CHOP-like therapy. Since the followup time was not enough and the patient numbers were too few, the benefit of the addition of Rituximab to the CHOP therapy could not be clarified. We need to assess the safety and the efficacy of the combined modality therapy for patients with limited-stage DLBCL by a larger prospective study. PMID:20495315

  9. Physical therapy methods in the treatment and rehabilitation of cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherova, T. Ya.; Velikaya, V. V.; Gribova, O. V.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Tuzikov, S. A.; Vusik, M. V.; Doroshenko, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    The results of the effective use of magnetic laser therapy in the treatment and rehabilitation of cancer patients were presented. The effect of magnetic-laser therapy in the treatment of radiation-induced reactions in the patients with head and neck cancer and in the patients with breast cancer was analyzed. High efficiency of lymphedema and lymphorrhea treatment in the postoperative period in the patients with breast cancer was proved. The results of rehabilitation of the patients with gastric cancer after surgical treatment were presented. These data indicate a high effectiveness of different physical methods of treatment and rehabilitation of cancer patients.

  10. Effects of upper limb robot-assisted therapy in the rehabilitation of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Doo Han; Kim, Se Yun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of upper limb robot-assisted therapy in the rehabilitation of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen stroke patients with no visual or cognitive problems were enrolled. All subjects received robot-assisted therapy and comprehensive rehabilitation therapy for 30 minutes each. The experimental group received a conventional therapy and an additional half hour per weekday of robot therapy. The patients participated in a total of 20 sessions, each lasting 60 minutes (conventional therapy 30 min, robot-assisted therapy 30 min), which were held 5 days a week for 4 weeks. [Result] The patients showed a significant difference in smoothness and reach error of the point to point test, circle size and independence of the circle in the circle test, and hold deviation of the playback static test between before and after the intervention. On the other hand, no significant difference was observed in the displacement of the round dynamic test. The patients also showed significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Modified Barthel Index after the intervention. [Conclusion] These kinematic factors can provide good information when analyzing the upper limb function of stroke patients in robot-assisted therapy. Nevertheless, further research on technology-based kinematic information will be necessary. PMID:25931706

  11. [The effect of transvenous laser therapy on lipid peroxidation function in patients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Vakhliaev, V D; Smirnova, I E; Uchaĭkina, L V; Barsel', V A; Aksiutina, M S; Matveeva, S A; Paramonova, M A; Shchedrina, I S; Syrkin, A L

    1992-07-01

    The papers deals with changes in the levels of lipid peroxidation products in patients with stable angina of effort, which occurred with intravenous helium-neon blood irradiation. The therapy was highly effective in patients with lower functional classes and persons with normal circulation, resulting in a reduction in lipid peroxidation intensity. Predictors are recommended to determine the efficiency and expediency of laser therapy in patients with coronary heart disease. PMID:1487878

  12. The long-term effects of radiation therapy on patients with ovarian dysgerminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.F.; Gershenson, D.M.; Soeters, R.P.; Eifel, P.J.; Delclos, L.; Wharton, J.T. )

    1991-02-15

    A retrospective chart review and questionnaire study was undertaken to look at the long-term effects of radiation therapy in ovarian dysgerminoma patients. Forty-three patients and 55 controls responded to a questionnaire that detailed bowel, bladder, thyroid, menstrual, reproductive, sexual, and growth function. Statistically significant differences in the number of bowel movements were noticed when comparing patients with controls. The authors noticed no significant differences between cases and controls in bladder function. No thyroid disorders were attributable to mediastinal radiation therapy. Most patients with intact uteri bleed monthly on hormonal replacement. Three patients with a remaining ovary and uterus resumed menstrual function after substantial doses of abdominopelvic radiation therapy. No patients have conceived. The authors noticed a slight increase in dyspareunia in the treated group, but most patients were satisfied with their sexual function. One premenarchal patient exhibited a growth disorder.

  13. Cancer survivorship: cardiotoxic therapy in the adult cancer patient; cardiac outcomes with recommendations for patient management.

    PubMed

    Steingart, Richard M; Yadav, Nandini; Manrique, Carlos; Carver, Joseph R; Liu, Jennifer

    2013-12-01

    Many types of cancer are now curable or, if not cured, becoming a chronic illness. In 2012, it was estimated that there were more than 13,500,000 cancer survivors in the United States. Late outcomes of these survivors are increasingly related to cardiovascular disease, either as a consequence of the direct effects of cancer therapy or its adverse effects on traditional cardiac risk factors (eg, obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus). This article describes the therapies that have led to advances in cancer survival and the acute and chronic cardiovascular toxicities associated with these therapies. Recommendations are made for the surveillance and management of cancer survivors. Published guidelines on the subject of cardio-oncology are reviewed in light of clinical experience caring for these patients. To supplement this cancer-related knowledge base, appropriateness criteria and guidelines for cardiac care in the general population were extrapolated to cancer survivors. The result is a series of recommendations for surveillance and management of cardiovascular disease in cancer survivors. PMID:24331191

  14. Effects of electrical stimulation therapy on the blood flow in chronic critical limb ischemia patients following regenerative therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yamabata, Shiho; Shiraishi, Hirokazu; Munechika, Mai; Fukushima, Hideki; Fukuoka, Yoshiyuki; Hojo, Tatsuya; Shirayama, Takeshi; Horii, Motoyuki; Matoba, Satoaki; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We investigated the effects of electrical stimulation therapy on cutaneous and muscle blood flow in critical limb ischemia patients following regenerative therapy. Methods: Three groups were studied: 10 healthy young subjects, 10 elderly subjects, and 7 critical limb ischemia patients after regenerative therapy. After 5 min rest, electrical stimulation was applied at 5 Hz on the tibialis anterior muscle for 10 min. We estimated the relative changes in oxyhemoglobin and total hemoglobin compared to the basal values at rest (Δ[HbO2], Δ[Hbtot]), which reflected the blood flow in the skin and muscle layer, and we simultaneously measured the tissue O2 saturation (StO2) throughout the electrical stimulation and recovery phase by near-infrared spectroscopy. Results: The Δ[HbO2] and Δ[Hbtot] values of the muscle layer in critical limb ischemia patients increased gradually and remained significantly higher at the 5-min and 10-min recovery periods after the electrical stimulation without reducing the StO2, but there is no significant change in the other two groups. Skin blood flow was not influenced by electrical stimulation in three groups. Conclusion: This improvement of the peripheral circulation by electrical stimulation would be beneficial as the adjunctive therapy after regenerative cell therapy. PMID:27504185

  15. Pharmacokinetic considerations for antimicrobial therapy in patients receiving renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Pea, Federico; Viale, Pierluigi; Pavan, Federica; Furlanut, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), particularly continuous venovenous haemofiltration (CVVH) and continuous venovenous haemodiafiltration (CVVHDF), are gaining increasing relevance in routine clinical management of intensive care unit patients. The application of CRRT, by leading to extracorporeal clearance (CL(CRRT)), may significantly alter the pharmacokinetic behaviour of some drugs. This may be of particular interest in critically ill patients presenting with life-threatening infections, since the risk of underdosing with antimicrobial agents during this procedure may lead to both therapeutic failure and the spread of breakthrough resistance. The intent of this review is to discuss the pharmacokinetic principles of CL(CRRT) of antimicrobial agents during the application of CVVH and CVVHDF and to summarise the most recent findings on this topic (from 1996 to December 2006) in order to understand the basis for optimal dosage adjustments of different antimicrobial agents. Removal of solutes from the blood through semi-permeable membranes during RRT may occur by means of two different physicochemical processes, namely, diffusion or convection. Whereas intermittent haemodialysis (IHD) is essentially a diffusive technique and CVVH is a convective technique, CVVHDF is a combination of both. As a general rule, the efficiency of drug removal by the different techniques is expected to be CVVHDF > CVVH > IHD, but indeed CL(CRRT) may vary greatly depending mainly on the peculiar physicochemical properties of each single compound and the CRRT device's characteristics and operating conditions. Considering that RRT substitutes for renal function in clearing plasma, CL(CRRT) is expected to be clinically relevant for drugs with dominant renal clearance, especially when presenting a limited volume of distribution and poor plasma protein binding. Consistently, CL(CRRT) should be clinically relevant particularly for most hydrophilic antimicrobial agents (e.g. beta

  16. Understanding Radiation Therapy: A Guide for Patients and Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... Saved Articles » My ACS » A Guide to Radiation Therapy Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( En español ) You’ve ... you and your doctor have agreed that radiation therapy is your best choice – either alone or along ...

  17. Similar Survival in Patients Following Heart Transplantation Receiving Induction Therapy Using Daclizumab vs. Basiliximab

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Maryjane; McKeen, Jaclyn T.; Cheema, Faisal; Ji, Mengxi; Ross, Alexandra; Yerebakan, Halit; Naka, Yoshifumi; Takayama, Hiroo; Restaino, Susan; Mancini, Donna; Schulze, P. Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background Induction therapy with interleukin-2 receptor antagonists has been established as an effective immunosuppressive strategy in the management of heart transplant (HTx) recipients. We compared outcomes following HTx in patients receiving basiliximab, daclizumab, or no induction therapy. Methods and Results We investigated post-transplant prognosis of patients receiving basiliximab (n=67), daclizumab (n=98) or no induction therapy (n=70). Patients treated with daclizumab (50.3±14.7 years) were younger than those receiving basiliximab (55.8±11.2 years) or no induction therapy (54.9±14.1 years; both P<0.05). Patients receiving either induction therapy showed better survival 1 year after HTx (95%) than those without induction therapy (82%; P<0.001). Survival was similar between patients receiving basiliximab and daclizumab. The incidence of acute cellular or antibody-mediated rejections did not differ among the groups. The main reason that patients did not receive induction therapy was ongoing infection (65.7%), which was more common in patients on ventricular assist device (VAD) support than those without VAD (76.1% vs. 45.8%; P=0.004). The VAD-related infection rate in the entire study cohort was 29.7% (35/118 VAD recipients). Conclusions Survival following HTx was worse in patients not receiving induction therapy. No differences were noted in survival or the incidence of rejection between the daclizumab- and basiliximab-treated groups. Induction therapy was less used in patients with infection, which was related to prior VAD support. PMID:25501951

  18. Monte Carlo Calculations Supporting Patient Plan Verification in Proton Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Thiago V. M.; Dosanjh, Manjit; Ferrari, Alfredo; Molineli, Silvia; Ciocca, Mario; Mairani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Patient’s treatment plan verification covers substantial amount of the quality assurance (QA) resources; this is especially true for Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT). The use of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in supporting QA has been widely discussed, and several methods have been proposed. In this paper, we studied an alternative approach from the one being currently applied clinically at Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO). We reanalyzed the previously published data (Molinelli et al. (1)), where 9 patient plans were investigated in which the warning QA threshold of 3% mean dose deviation was crossed. The possibility that these differences between measurement and calculated dose were related to dose modeling (Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) vs. MC), limitations on dose delivery system, or detectors mispositioning was originally explored, but other factors, such as the geometric description of the detectors, were not ruled out. For the purpose of this work, we compared ionization chambers’ measurements with different MC simulation results. It was also studied that some physical effects were introduced by this new approach, for example, inter-detector interference and the delta ray thresholds. The simulations accounting for a detailed geometry typically are superior (statistical difference – p-value around 0.01) to most of the MC simulations used at CNAO (only inferior to the shift approach used). No real improvement was observed in reducing the current delta ray threshold used (100 keV), and no significant interference between ion chambers in the phantom were detected (p-value 0.81). In conclusion, it was observed that the detailed geometrical description improves the agreement between measurement and MC calculations in some cases. But in other cases, position uncertainty represents the dominant uncertainty. The inter-chamber disturbance was not detected for the therapeutic protons energies, and the results from the current delta

  19. Anticoagulant and Antiplatelet Therapy in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mischke, Karl; Knackstedt, Christian; Marx, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    Anticoagulation represents the mainstay of therapy for most patients with atrial fibrillation. Patients on oral anticoagulation often require concomitant antiplatelet therapy, mostly because of coronary artery disease. After coronary stent implantation, dual antiplatelet therapy is necessary. However, the combination of oral anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy increases the bleeding risk. Risk scores such as the CHA2DS2-Vasc score and the HAS-BLED score help to identify both bleeding and stroke risk in individual patients. The guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology provide a rather detailed recommendation for patients on oral anticoagulation after coronary stent implantation. However, robust evidence is lacking for some of the recommendations, and especially for new oral anticoagulants and new antiplatelets few or no data are available. This review addresses some of the critical points of the guidelines and discusses potential advantages of new anticoagulants in patients with atrial fibrillation after stent implantation. PMID:22577538

  20. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation therapy in patients with heart failure].

    PubMed

    Dursunoğlu, Dursun; Dursunoğlu, Neşe

    2012-05-01

    Non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) therapy in patients with acute heart failure (HF) improves left ventricular functions via decreasing left ventricular afterload and reduces intubation rate and short-term mortality. In patients with chronic HF, NIMV therapy eliminates central and obstructive apneas and Cheyne-Stokes respiration, and improves morbidity. There are essentially three modes of NIMV that are used in the treatment of HF: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), bilevel positive airway pressure (BIPAP) and adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV). Hereby, NIMV therapy in patients with acute and chronic HF is reviewed as well as methods, indications, effectiveness and complications. PMID:22381927

  1. Patient engagement in radiation therapy: The development of guidelines for current Canadian practices.

    PubMed

    Purificacion, Sunshine; Brown, Erika; Anne-Davis, Carol; French, John

    2016-09-01

    Radiation therapy service quality is not only defined by the technical aspects of care-the patient's involvement and satisfaction also contribute largely to determining the quality of care received. Although there have been recent increases in support for the development of patient engagement activities throughout Canada, the lack of guidance and knowledge of patient engagement techniques within the radiotherapy context limits implementation. Without processes to obtain first-hand insight from patients, the need for these programs is overlooked. With a commitment to improving quality and consistency of care, the Canadian Partnership for Quality Radiotherapy recognized the need for a set of national guidelines on patient engagement in radiation therapy service delivery. Making use of the perspectives and first-hand experience of patient representatives, this initiative aims to develop a pan-Canadian guidance document that radiation therapy centres can adopt for successful integration of patient engagement through core activities of service delivery. PMID:27576854

  2. Zinc deficiency anemia and effects of zinc therapy in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Tatsuo; Horike, Hideyuki; Fujiki, Shigeatsu; Kitada, Shingo; Sasaki, Tamaki; Kashihara, Naoki

    2009-06-01

    Quantitative adjuvant zinc therapy using polaprezinc was performed to examine the correlation between zinc concentration and anemia in maintenance hemodialysis patients to propose appropriate treatment. Anemia and serum zinc concentration were measured in 117 patients with chronic renal failure receiving outpatient maintenance hemodialysis at Tsuyama Chuo Kinen Hospital. Two bags of polaprezinc (containing zinc 34 mg/day) were administered to 58 patients with lower than normal zinc levels (Zn < 80 mg/dl) as adjuvant zinc therapy to assess anemia improvement. Zinc concentration and all anemia parameters showed significant positive correlation, indicating that anemia improves in patients with high serum zinc levels. Regarding the effects of adjuvant zinc therapy for improving anemia, hemoglobin levels were found to increase significantly to the highest value at 3 weeks. During treatment, the dosage of erythropoietin was reduced significantly from baseline at all assessment points. No zinc poisoning from therapy was seen, but two patients had diarrhea (1.9%). Zinc-treated patients required iron therapy due to the development of iron deficiency. Most maintenance hemodialysis patients suffer from zinc deficiency anemia, and zinc-based polaprezinc has been confirmed to be an effective and safe adjuvant zinc treatment. Most patients diagnosed as refractory anemia with no response to erythropoietin also suffer from zinc deficiency anemia, many of whom are expected to benefit from zinc therapy to improve their anemia. Possible zinc deficiency anemia should be considered in the treatment of refractory anemia with no response to erythropoietin. PMID:19527468

  3. [Assisted peritoneal dialysis: home-based renal replacement therapy for the elderly patient].

    PubMed

    Wiesholzer, Martin

    2013-06-01

    The number of elderly patients with end stage renal disease is constantly increasing. Conventional hämodiaylsis as the mainstay of renal replacement therapy is often poorly tolerated by frail eldery patients with multiple comorbidities. Although many of these patients would prefer a home based dialysis treatment, the number of elderly patients using peritoneal dialysis (PD) is still low. Impaired physical and cognitive function often generates insurmountable barriers for self care peritoneal dialysis. Assisted peritoneal dialysis can overcome many of these barriers and give elderly patients the ability of a renal replacement therapy in their own homes respecting their needs. PMID:23797681

  4. Imaging Changes in Pediatric Intracranial Ependymoma Patients Treated With Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Compared to Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, Jillian R.; Sato, Mariko; Chintagumpala, Murali; Ketonen, Leena; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Su, Jack M.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Boehling, Nicholas S.; Khatua, Soumen; Adesina, Adekunle; Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William E.; Mahajan, Anita

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes after radiation therapy (RT) in children with ependymoma is not well defined. We compared imaging changes following proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) to those after photon-based intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with nonmetastatic intracranial ependymoma who received postoperative RT (37 PBRT, 35 IMRT) were analyzed retrospectively. MRI images were reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists. Results: Sixteen PBRT patients (43%) developed postradiation MRI changes at 3.8 months (median) with resolution by 6.1 months. Six IMRT patients (17%) developed changes at 5.3 months (median) with 8.3 months to resolution. Mean age at radiation was 4.4 and 6.9 years for PBRT and IMRT, respectively (P=.06). Age at diagnosis (>3 years) and time of radiation (≥3 years) was associated with fewer imaging changes on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P=.048; OR: 0.36, P=.05). PBRT (compared to IMRT) was associated with more frequent imaging changes, both on univariate (OR: 3.68, P=.019) and multivariate (OR: 3.89, P=.024) analyses. Seven (3 IMRT, 4 PBRT) of 22 patients with changes had symptoms requiring intervention. Most patients were treated with steroids; some PBRT patients also received bevacizumab and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. None of the IMRT patients had lasting deficits, but 2 patients died from recurrent disease. Three PBRT patients had persistent neurological deficits, and 1 child died secondarily to complications from radiation necrosis. Conclusions: Postradiation MRI changes are more common with PBRT and in patients less than 3 years of age at diagnosis and treatment. It is difficult to predict causes for development of imaging changes that progress to clinical significance. These changes are usually self-limiting, but some require medical intervention, especially those involving the brainstem.

  5. Clinical outcomes of systemic therapy for patients with deep fibromatoses (desmoid tumors)

    PubMed Central

    de Camargo, Veridiana Pires; Keohan, Mary L.; D’Adamo, David R.; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Brennan, Murray F.; Singer, Samuel; Ahn, Linda S.; Maki, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We examined outcomes of patients with desmoid tumors receiving systemic therapy at a single institution to provide a basis for examination of newer agents. Methods We reviewed records of patients with desmoid tumors treated with chemotherapy at our institution. The activity of NSAIDs was not addressed. Patients without measurable disease, those receiving therapy we could not document, and those receiving prophylactic therapy were excluded. Results Sixty-eight patients received 157 lines of therapy. Nine patients died, 7 of progressive disease. The cohort was 62% female with median age 32.5, 32% with Gardner syndrome, median follow-up 63 months, and median of 2 lines of therapy. Intra-abdominal primary location was most common (44%). The greatest RECIST response rate was observed with anthracyclines and hormonal therapy and lowest with single agent dacarbazine/temozolomide or tyrosine kinase inhibitors, principally imatinib. In a multivariate analysis, only nodular gross morphology and presence of Gardner syndrome were the only tumor factors associated with greater time to progression. Conclusions Anti-estrogens and anthracycline-containing regimens are associated with a higher radiological response rate against desmoid tumors than other agents. Systemic therapy for desmoid tumors can be successful in patients with desmoids, and is a viable option in lieu of morbid or disabling surgery. PMID:20187095

  6. Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation vs Best Medical Therapy for Patients With Advanced Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Frances M.; Follett, Kenneth; Stern, Matthew; Hur, Kwan; Harris, Crystal; Marks, William J.; Rothlind, Johannes; Sagher, Oren; Reda, Domenic; Moy, Claudia S.; Pahwa, Rajesh; Burchiel, Kim; Hogarth, Penelope; Lai, Eugene C.; Duda, John E.; Holloway, Kathryn; Samii, Ali; Horn, Stacy; Bronstein, Jeff; Stoner, Gatana; Heemskerk, Jill; Huang, Grant D.

    2010-01-01

    Context Deep brain stimulation is an accepted treatment for advanced Parkinson disease (PD), although there are few randomized trials comparing treatments, and most studies exclude older patients. Objective To compare 6-month outcomes for patients with PD who received deep brain stimulation or best medical therapy. Design, Setting, and Patients Randomized controlled trial of patients who received either deep brain stimulation or best medical therapy, stratified by study site and patient age (<70 years vs ≥70 years) at 7 Veterans Affairs and 6 university hospitals between May 2002 and October 2005. A total of 255 patients with PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage ≥2 while not taking medications) were enrolled; 25% were aged 70 years or older. The final 6-month follow-up visit occurred in May 2006. Intervention Bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (n=60) or globus pallidus (n=61). Patients receiving best medical therapy (n=134) were actively managed by movement disorder neurologists. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was time spent in the “on” state (good motor control with unimpeded motor function) without troubling dyskinesia, using motor diaries. Other outcomes included motor function, quality of life, neurocognitive function, and adverse events. Results Patients who received deep brain stimulation gained a mean of 4.6 h/d of on time without troubling dyskinesia compared with 0 h/d for patients who received best medical therapy (between group mean difference, 4.5 h/d [95% CI, 3.7-5.4 h/d]; P<.001). Motor function improved significantly (P<.001) with deep brain stimulation vs best medical therapy, such that 71% of deep brain stimulation patients and 32% of best medical therapy patients experienced clinically meaningful motor function improvements (≥5 points). Compared with the best medical therapy group, the deep brain stimulation group experienced significant improvements in the summary measure of quality of life and on 7 of 8 PD

  7. Variation in the Cost of Radiation Therapy Among Medicare Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paravati, Anthony J.; Boero, Isabel J.; Triplett, Daniel P.; Hwang, Lindsay; Matsuno, Rayna K.; Xu, Beibei; Mell, Loren K.; Murphy, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy represents a major source of health care expenditure for patients with cancer. Understanding the sources of variability in the cost of radiation therapy is critical to evaluating the efficiency of the current reimbursement system and could shape future policy reform. This study defines the magnitude and sources of variation in the cost of radiation therapy for a large cohort of Medicare beneficiaries. Patients and Methods: We identified 55,288 patients within the SEER database diagnosed with breast, lung, or prostate cancer between 2004 and 2009. The cost of radiation therapy was estimated from Medicare reimbursements. Multivariable linear regression models were used to assess the influence of patient, tumor, and radiation therapy provider characteristics on variation in cost of radiation therapy. Results: For breast, lung, and prostate cancers, the median cost (interquartile range) of a course of radiation therapy was $8,600 ($7,300 to $10,300), $9,000 ($7,500 to $11,100), and $18,000 ($11,300 to $25,500), respectively. For all three cancer subtypes, patient- or tumor-related factors accounted for < 3% of the variation in cost. Factors unrelated to the patient, including practice type, geography, and individual radiation therapy provider, accounted for a substantial proportion of the variation in cost, ranging from 44% with breast, 43% with lung, and 61% with prostate cancer. Conclusion: In this study, factors unrelated to the individual patient accounted for the majority of variation in the cost of radiation therapy, suggesting potential inefficiency in health care expenditure. Future research should determine whether this variability translates into improved patient outcomes for further evaluation of current reimbursement practices. PMID:26265172

  8. Survival among patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma in the pretargeted versus targeted therapy eras.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengxiang; Wong, Yu-Ning; Armstrong, Katrina; Haas, Naomi; Subedi, Prasun; Davis-Cerone, Margaret; Doshi, Jalpa A

    2016-02-01

    Between December 2005 and October 2009, FDA approved six targeted therapies shown to significantly extend survival for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients in clinical trials. This study aimed to examine changes in survival between the pretargeted and targeted therapy periods in advanced RCC patients in a real-world setting. Utilizing the 2000-2010 SEER Research files, a pre-post study design with a contemporaneous comparison group was employed to examine differences in survival outcomes for patients diagnosed with advanced RCC (study group) or advanced prostate cancer (comparison group, for whom no significant treatment innovations happened during this period) across the pretargeted therapy era (2000-2005) and the targeted therapy era (2006-2010). RCC patients diagnosed in the targeted therapy era (N = 6439) showed improved survival compared to those diagnosed in the pretargeted therapy era (N = 7231, hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause death: 0.86, P < 0.01), while the change between the pre-post periods was not significant for advanced prostate cancer patients (HR: 0.97, P = 0.08). Advanced RCC patients had significantly larger improvements in overall survival compared to advanced prostate cancer patients (z = 4.31; P < 0.01). More detailed year-to-year analysis revealed greater survival improvements for RCC in the later years of the posttargeted period. Similar results were seen for cause-specific survival. Subgroup analyses by nephrectomy status, age, and gender showed consistent findings. Patients diagnosed with advanced RCC during the targeted therapy era had better survival outcomes than those diagnosed during the pretargeted therapy era. Future studies should examine the real-world survival improvements directly associated with targeted therapies. PMID:26645975

  9. Intravenous albumin infusion is an effective therapy for hyponatraemia in cirrhotic patients with ascites.

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, P A; Mistry, P; Kaye, G; Burroughs, A K; McIntyre, N

    1990-01-01

    The treatment of moderate to severe hyponatraemia in patients with decompensated liver disease is unsatisfactory. We report our preliminary experience using intravenous infusion of albumin to treat this condition. Three patients with cirrhosis, ascites, and hyponatraemia responded satisfactorily to treatment; one patient with fulminant hepatitis B did not respond. Intravenous albumin infusion is a safe and effective therapy for patients with cirrhosis complicated by hyponatraemia. Its main role may be in preparing patients for surgery, particularly liver transplantation. PMID:2311979

  10. Step-down therapy in well-controlled asthmatic patients using salmeterol xinafoate/fluticasone propionate combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Kazuya; Kasahara, Keita; Kuroda, Yusuke; Morohoshi, Haruna; Hagiwara, Yosuke; Ishii, Gen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A combination therapy with inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and a long-acting β agonist (LABA) is the standard treatment for asthmatic patients, and step-down treatment is recommended once control has been achieved. However, little data exist that evaluate the long-term outcomes after step-down treatment. Objective To compare the long-term outcomes of step-down therapy with ICS/LABA or ICS alone for asthmatic patients who have achieved well-controlled asthma by the ICS (250 µg fluticasone)/LABA (50 µg salmeterol) combination (SFC, two puffs per day). Patients and methods We randomized 40 well-controlled patients with asthma receiving SFC (250 µg) to two groups; one group of patients received step-down therapy with low-dose SFC (100 µg, two puffs daily) and another group of patients received step-down therapy with high-dose fluticasone propionate (FP) alone (500 µg, daily). The two groups were monitored over 12 months for changes in asthma control test scores, respiratory function (percent forced expiratory volume in 1 second, maximal expiratory flow rate at 50% of the vital capacity [%FEF50], and maximal expiratory flow rate at 25% of the vital capacity [%FEF25]), and the concentration of fractional exhaled nitric oxide. Results There was no significant difference in the dropout rate between the SFC and FP groups. Low-dose SFC maintained the stability of all parameters over 12 months, whereas the FP group exhibited a rapid 5% decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 second within 2 months after discontinuation of salmeterol; furthermore, after 10 months, there was a gradual decrease in %FEF50 and %FEF25. Conclusion This study suggests that a balanced step-down protocol, including both ICS and LABA, is essential in providing long-term stability to patients with mild-to-moderate well-controlled asthma. PMID:27051309

  11. [Prolonged regional intra-arterial therapy in multimodal treatment of patients with severe skeletal trauma].

    PubMed

    Khomutov, V A; Panteleev, A V; Shchegolev, A V; Kotov, V I

    1999-01-01

    A total of 108 victims with open fractures of long tubular bones of different localization are examined. Regional intraarterial therapy was added to their treatment protocols. Stable functional disorders in local hemodynamics in these patients impede the repair processes and can lead to development of infectious complications. Regional intraarterial therapy allows early elimination of hemodynamic disorders, selective antibiotic therapy, and improves the adaptation potential of the immune system. PMID:10360065

  12. Effects of voice therapy on the voice range profiles of dysphonic patients.

    PubMed

    Speyer, Renée; Wieneke, George H; van Wijck-Warnaar, Ida; Dejonckere, Philippe H

    2003-12-01

    In a group of chronically dysphonic patients, a voice range profile, or phonetogram, was recorded before and after receiving voice therapy and again 3 months later. The voice range profiles took a wide variety of shapes. Therefore, only measures that did not depend on a smooth contour could be used to describe changes before and after therapy. The main effect of voice therapy was an enlargement on the side of low frequency and low intensity. PMID:14740935

  13. Utilizing everyday items in play to facilitate hand therapy for pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Peck-Murray, Jill Ann

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how hand therapy for pediatric patients can be enhanced through the use of play with everyday items. Playful activities integrate purposeful hand skills of pinch, grasp and manipulation, while encouraging the child to fully participate in therapy and home programs. By referring to Takata's developmental hierarchy of play, therapists can design the sessions to include novel, fun and age appropriate activities. The author offers eight sample activities for specific therapy goals utilizing inexpensive, everyday items. PMID:25060856

  14. Brief Behavioral Activation and Problem-Solving Therapy for Depressed Breast Cancer Patients: Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopko, Derek R.; Armento, Maria E. A.; Robertson, Sarah M. C.; Ryba, Marlena M.; Carvalho, John P.; Colman, Lindsey K.; Mullane, Christen; Gawrysiak, Michael; Bell, John L.; McNulty, James K.; Lejuez, Carl W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Major depression is the most common psychiatric disorder among breast cancer patients and is associated with substantial impairment. Although some research has explored the utility of psychotherapy with breast cancer patients, only 2 small trials have investigated the potential benefits of behavior therapy among patients with…

  15. [Estimation of efficiency of anti-helicobacter therapy in patients with a chronic pancreatitis combined with an erosive gastropathy].

    PubMed

    Koval', V Iu; Kotsiubniak, L A; Moskal', O M

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Eradikacion therapy at patients with chronic pancreatitis and combined with Helicobacter associated erosive gastropathy in a month after treatment appeared successful at 75% patients which accepted therapy of the first line--pantoprazol, amoksicillin, klaritromicin. Inclusion in antihelicobakter therapy of seknidazol in place of klaritromicin rendered a positive antihelicobakter effect at 85% patients with a chronic pancreatitis. Therapy with the use of seknidazole was better tolerated. Application of synbiotik laktiale on a background antihelicobakter therapy helped normalizations of chair and was comfortable in application, which is important in the treatment of patients. Application of synbiotika laktiale on a background antigelikobakter therapy is helped in the improvement of clinical effect. PMID:25796863

  16. Age Disparity in Palliative Radiation Therapy Among Patients With Advanced Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jonathan; Xu, Beibei; Yeung, Heidi N.; Roeland, Eric J.; Martinez, Maria Elena; Le, Quynh-Thu; Mell, Loren K.; Murphy, James D.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose/Objective: Palliative radiation therapy represents an important treatment option among patients with advanced cancer, although research shows decreased use among older patients. This study evaluated age-related patterns of palliative radiation use among an elderly Medicare population. Methods and Materials: We identified 63,221 patients with metastatic lung, breast, prostate, or colorectal cancer diagnosed between 2000 and 2007 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Receipt of palliative radiation therapy was extracted from Medicare claims. Multivariate Poisson regression analysis determined residual age-related disparity in the receipt of palliative radiation therapy after controlling for confounding covariates including age-related differences in patient and demographic covariates, length of life, and patient preferences for aggressive cancer therapy. Results: The use of radiation decreased steadily with increasing patient age. Forty-two percent of patients aged 66 to 69 received palliative radiation therapy. Rates of palliative radiation decreased to 38%, 32%, 24%, and 14% among patients aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85, respectively. Multivariate analysis found that confounding covariates attenuated these findings, although the decreased relative rate of palliative radiation therapy among the elderly remained clinically and statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, compared to patients 66 to 69 years old, those aged 70 to 74, 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and over 85 had a 7%, 15%, 25%, and 44% decreased rate of receiving palliative radiation, respectively (all P<.0001). Conclusions: Age disparity with palliative radiation therapy exists among older cancer patients. Further research should strive to identify barriers to palliative radiation among the elderly, and extra effort should be made to give older patients the opportunity to receive this quality of life-enhancing treatment at the end

  17. A guide to prepare patients with inflammatory bowel diseases for anti-TNF-α therapy.

    PubMed

    Chebli, Júlio Maria Fonseca; Gaburri, Pedro Duarte; Chebli, Liliana Andrade; da Rocha Ribeiro, Tarsila Campanha; Pinto, André Luiz Tavares; Ambrogini Júnior, Orlando; Damião, Adérson Omar Mourão Cintra

    2014-01-01

    Current therapy of moderate-to-severe inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) often involves the use of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) agents. Although very effective, theses biologics place the patient at increased risk for developing infections and lymphomas, the latter especially when in combination with thiopurines. Appropriate patient selection, counseling, and education are all important features for the successful use of anti-TNF-α therapy. A thorough history to rule-out contraindications of this therapy and emphasis on monitoring guidelines are important steps preceding administration of anti-TNF-α agents. This therapy should only be considered if a recent evaluation has established that the patient has active IBD. In addition, it is important to exclude disease mimickers. Anti-TNF-α agents have been considered to present a globally favorable benefit/risk ratio. However, it is important that in routine practice, initiation of anti-TNF-α therapy be carefully discussed with the patient, extensively explaining the potential benefits and risks of such treatment. Prior to starting anti-TNF-α therapy, the patients need to be screened for latent tuberculosis, hepatitis B virus infection, and (usually) hepatitis C virus and HIV infection. Vaccination schedules of IBD patients should be evaluated and updated prior to the commencement of anti-TNF-α therapy. Ordinarily, immunization in adult patients with IBD should not deviate from recommended guidelines for the general population. With the exception of live vaccines, immunizations can be safely administered in patients with IBD, even those on immunosuppressants or biologics. The purpose of this review is providing an overview of appropriate steps to prepare patients with IBD for anti-TNF-α therapy. PMID:24667275

  18. Follow-up and surveillance of the lung cancer patient following curative-intent therapy.

    PubMed

    Colice, Gene L; Rubins, Jeffrey; Unger, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The following two distinctly different issues should be taken into account when planning patient care following curative-intent therapy for lung cancer: adequate follow-up to manage complications related to the curative-intent therapy; and surveillance to detect recurrences of the primary lung cancer and/or development of a new primary lung cancer early enough to allow potentially curative retreatment. Follow-up for complications should be performed by the specialist responsible for the curative-intent therapy and should last 3 to 6 months. Recurrences of the original lung cancer will be more likely during the first 2 years after curative-intent therapy, but there will be an increased lifelong risk of approximately 1 to 2% per year of developing a metachronous, or new primary, lung cancer. A standard surveillance program for these patients is recommended based on periodic visits, with chest-imaging studies and counseling patients on symptom recognition. Whether subgroups of patients with a higher risk of developing a metachronous lung cancer (eg, those patients whose primary lung cancer was radiographically occult or central and those patients surviving for > 2 years after treatment for small cell lung cancer) should have a more intensive surveillance program is presently unclear. The surveillance program should be coordinated by a multidisciplinary tumor board and overseen by the physician who diagnosed and initiated therapy for the original lung cancer. Smoking cessation is recommended for all patients following curative-intent therapy for lung cancer. PMID:12527585

  19. Targets for Neoadjuvant Therapy – The Preferences of Patients with Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thill, M.; Pisa, G.; Isbary, G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Therapists and administrative bodies consider a pathological complete remission as an independent and relevant endpoint in evaluations of the clinical utility of neoadjuvant therapy for early breast cancer. The present study aims to investigate which treatment outcomes of a neoadjuvant therapy are considered by the patients themselves to be relevant. Materials and Methods: With the help of analytic hierarchy process (AHP) methods patient preferences about the treatment targets of neoadjuvant therapy were assessed quantitatively. All participants had undergone a neoadjuvant therapy in the form of chemotherapy and, in HER2-positive cases, as a targeted antibody therapy against HER2 for the primary diagnosis of early breast cancer 12–36 months prior to the interview. The criteria for the hierarchy model were identified in an earlier qualitative survey. The patient interviews were conducted by 4 experienced female interviewers. Results: Forty-one patients participated in the quantitative survey, of these 15 (36.6 %) had suffered from HER2-positive disease. The achievement of pCR was the most important therapeutic target for the patients, even before disease-free survival, overall survival and the option for breast-preserving operation. Avoidance of side effects was considered to be the least important. In a comparison of the side effects the patients judged fatigue to be most important before nausea and loss of hair. Conclusion: For the patients the achievement of a pathological complete remission is considered to be an independent, relevant and highly desired target of neoadjuvant therapy. PMID:27239064

  20. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Patients With Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Thoracic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Patrick; Balter, Peter A.; Rebueno, Neal; Sharp, Hadley J.; Liao Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides excellent local control with acceptable toxicity for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. However, the efficacy and safety of SBRT for patients previously given thoracic radiation therapy is not known. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed outcomes after SBRT for recurrent disease among patients previously given radiation therapy to the chest. Materials and Methods: A search of medical records for patients treated with SBRT to the thorax after prior fractionated radiation therapy to the chest at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center revealed 36 such cases. The median follow-up time after SBRT was 15 months. The endpoints analyzed were overall survival, local control, and the incidence and severity of treatment-related toxicity. Results: SBRT provided in-field local control for 92% of patients; at 2 years, the actuarial overall survival rate was 59%, and the actuarial progression-free survival rate was 26%, with the primary site of failure being intrathoracic relapse. Fifty percent of patients experienced worsening of dyspnea after SBRT, with 19% requiring oxygen supplementation; 30% of patients experienced chest wall pain and 8% Grade 3 esophagitis. No Grade 4 or 5 toxic effects were noted. Conclusions: SBRT can provide excellent in-field tumor control in patients who have received prior radiation therapy. Toxicity was significant but manageable. The high rate of intrathoracic failure indicates the need for further study to identify patients who would derive the most benefit from SBRT for this purpose.

  1. Ketamine-mediated alleviation of electroconvulsive shock-induced memory impairment is associated with the regulation of neuroinflammation and soluble amyloid-beta peptide in depressive-like rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xianlin; Li, Ping; Hao, Xuechao; Wei, Ke; Min, Su; Luo, Jie; Xie, Fei; Jin, Juying

    2015-07-10

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for depression, but can result in memory deficits. This study aimed to determine whether ketamine could alleviate electroconvulsive shock (ECS, an analog of ECT in animals)-induced memory impairment and the potential molecular mechanism. Chronic unpredictable mild stress was used to generate animal models of depressive-like symptoms. Sixty adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the following five groups: control group (group C); depressive-like model group (group D); ECS group (group DE); ketamine+ECS group (group DKE); and ketamine group (group DK). The sucrose preference test and Morris water maze were used to assess behavioral changes. The expression levels of Iba-1, IL-1β and TNF-α were measured by immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to detect the levels of soluble Aβ. We found that ECS up-regulated the expression of Iba-1, promoted the release of IL-1β and TNF-α, increased the levels of Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 in the hippocampus, and aggravated memory impairment of the depressive-like rats. However, ketamine reversed these ECS-induced molecular changes and effectively attenuated ECS-induced memory impairment. This cognitive protective effect of ketamine may be attributed to its suppression of ECS-induced neuroinflammation and reduction of the levels of soluble Aβ. PMID:25980993

  2. Last Breath: Art Therapy with a Lung Cancer Patient Facing Imminent Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furman, Lisa R.

    2011-01-01

    Art therapy can be an effective way to focus on end of life issues with cancer patients facing imminent death. This viewpoint discusses ethical challenges in the treatment of a 63-year-old man with terminal lung cancer who was participating in short-term individual art therapy. Difficult issues that often surface in the final days of life may…

  3. Effective therapy using voglibose for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in a patient with insufficient dietary and exercise therapy: exploring other treatment possibilities.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Kazuki; Matsumaru, Katsuhiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Nakamura, Noriko

    2011-05-01

    A 56-year-old Japanese female with a 10-year history of thyroiditis presented to our institution. The laboratory data and clinical findings suggested that the patient had complicated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with autoimmune hepatitis according to the criteria by the application of the International Autoimmune Hepatitis score. The patient could not manage by herself so dietary- and exercise-based treatment was difficult. Accordingly, ursodeoxycholic acid and ezetimibe therapy was started and continued until the performance of a liver needle biopsy to define the diagnosis. However, no improvement in liver function was observed. In addition, pathological findings indicated that the patient had NASH. The patient was finally diagnosed as having NASH. Therefore, voglibose was added to the ursodeoxycholic acid and ezetimibe therapy, and this addition of voglibose actually took effect. The patient's serum aspartate transaminase and alanine aminotransferase levels decreased dramatically. This report is the first to document other treatment possibilities of NASH in a case when dietary therapy is difficult. PMID:21712950

  4. Antithrombotic therapy for patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: a review.

    PubMed

    Krasner, Andrew; Halperin, Jonathan L

    2013-07-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation who have risk factors for thromboembolism benefit from chronic oral anticoagulation therapy, and antiplatelet therapy alone is of relatively little benefit for prevention of ischemic stroke and systemic embolism. Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stents require dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and a thienopyridine for 3 to 12 months or more prevention of stent thrombosis and recurrent ischemic events. When patients with atrial fibrillation undergo percutaneous coronary intervention, the need to combine dual antiplatelet therapy and warfarin raises the risk of major bleeding complications considerably. Recent trials have explored the option of omitting aspirin with promising results. The introduction of novel oral anticoagulants that specifically inhibit factor IIa (dabigatran) or factor Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban) and antiplatelet agents that inhibit the P(2)Y(12) receptor (prasugrel and ticagrelor) makes management of these patients even more challenging, but future trials addressing myriad alternative regimens may identify better tolerated strategies. PMID:23689944

  5. Physical Therapy to Treat Torn Meniscus Comparable to Surgery for Many Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013 August 2013 (historical) Physical Therapy to Treat Torn Meniscus Comparable to Surgery for Many Patients Many ... arthroscopic partial meniscectomy that involves surgically removing the torn part of the meniscus and stabilizing it, or ...

  6. [Therapy and Rehabilitation of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Different Treatment Adherence].

    PubMed

    Rubleva, N V; Kolomiets, V M; Kochetkova, E Ya

    2016-01-01

    The pulmonary tuberculosis process as dependent on the disease form and the therapy efficacy with the use of Cycloferon in the treatment scheme were investigated. The study had two stages. At the first stage the data concerning 358 patients with primary pulmonary tuberculosis and infiltration (93 patients) or degradation (89 patients) and 176 patients with pulmonary fibrocavernous tuberculosis were analysed. At the second stage the efficacy of the treatment schemes applied to the patients with pulmonary fibrocavernous tuberculosis was compared. The etiotropic therapy intensive phase was applied to all the patients. Moreover, 56 patients (group 1) under the therapy and rehabilitatinon were treated with Cycloferon in a dose of 0.25 administered intramuscularly twice a week (not less than 16 injections for the course), 60 patients (group 2) were treated with Omega 3, 30 patients (group 3) were given the standard complex (vitamins and tonics), 30 patients (group 4) were under the etiotropic therapy alone. The following additional factors promoting progression and aggravation of the tuberculosis process were confirmed: degradation at the time of the disease diagnosis, high resistance of the pathogen to antituberculosis drugs, low adherence to the treatment, social desadaptation and especially psychofunctional state of the patients. The use of Cycloferon in the schemes of the intensive phase treatment of the primary fibrocavernous tuberculosis resulted in reduction of the intoxication signs, bacteria isolation, positive dynamics of the cavity healing, lower lung infiltration and consequently high frequency of the treatment positive outcomes (94.1 ± 3.33%). PMID:27337863

  7. Learning from dying patients during their final days: life reflections gleaned from dignity therapy.

    PubMed

    Hack, Thomas F; McClement, Susan E; Chochinov, Harvey M; Cann, Beverley J; Hassard, Thomas H; Kristjanson, Linda J; Harlos, Mike

    2010-10-01

    Dignity therapy is a novel therapeutic approach designed to decrease suffering, enhance quality of life and bolster a sense of dignity for patients approaching death. The benefits of dignity therapy were previously documented in a sample of 100 terminally ill patients. One of the products of dignity therapy is a transcript of the edited therapy session(s). In this qualitative study, 50 of the 100 (17 from Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, and 33 from Perth, Australia) dignity therapy transcripts were randomly drawn, and independently coded and analysed by three investigators using a grounded theory approach. The transcripts revealed that dignity therapy serves to provide a safe, therapeutic environment for patients to review the most meaningful aspects of their lives in such a manner that their core values become apparent. The most common values expressed by the patients included 'Family', 'Pleasure', 'Caring', 'A Sense of Accomplishment', 'True Friendship', and 'Rich Experience'. Exemplars of each of these values illustrate the pervasive, defining role of values in our lives. The findings are discussed in terms of values theory, the role of dignity therapy, and consideration of values clarification in clinicians' efforts to enhance the dignity of terminally ill patients. PMID:20605851

  8. Comparison of high-intensity laser therapy and ultrasound treatment in the patients with lumbar discopathy.

    PubMed

    Boyraz, Ismail; Yildiz, Ahmet; Koc, Bunyamin; Sarman, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of high intensity laser and ultrasound therapy in patients who were diagnosed with lumbar disc herniation and who were capable of performing physical exercises. 65 patients diagnosed with lumbar disc were included in the study. The patients were randomly divided into three groups: Group 1 received 10 sessions of high intensity laser to the lumbar region, Group 2 received 10 sessions of ultrasound, and Group 3 received medical therapy for 10 days and isometric lumbar exercises. The efficacy of the treatment modalities was compared with the assessment of the patients before the therapy at the end of the therapy, and in third month after the therapy. Comparing the changes between groups, statically significant difference was observed in MH (mental health) parameter before treatment between Groups 1 and 2 and in MH parameter and VAS score in third month of the therapy between Groups 2 and 3. However, the evaluation of the patients after ten days of treatment did not show significant differences between the groups compared to baseline values. We found that HILT, ultrasound, and exercise were efficient therapies for lumbar discopathy but HILT and ultrasound had longer effect on some parameters. PMID:25883952

  9. Comparison of High-Intensity Laser Therapy and Ultrasound Treatment in the Patients with Lumbar Discopathy

    PubMed Central

    Boyraz, Ismail; Yildiz, Ahmet; Koc, Bunyamin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of high intensity laser and ultrasound therapy in patients who were diagnosed with lumbar disc herniation and who were capable of performing physical exercises. 65 patients diagnosed with lumbar disc were included in the study. The patients were randomly divided into three groups: Group 1 received 10 sessions of high intensity laser to the lumbar region, Group 2 received 10 sessions of ultrasound, and Group 3 received medical therapy for 10 days and isometric lumbar exercises. The efficacy of the treatment modalities was compared with the assessment of the patients before the therapy at the end of the therapy, and in third month after the therapy. Comparing the changes between groups, statically significant difference was observed in MH (mental health) parameter before treatment between Groups 1 and 2 and in MH parameter and VAS score in third month of the therapy between Groups 2 and 3. However, the evaluation of the patients after ten days of treatment did not show significant differences between the groups compared to baseline values. We found that HILT, ultrasound, and exercise were efficient therapies for lumbar discopathy but HILT and ultrasound had longer effect on some parameters. PMID:25883952

  10. American Thoracic Society patient information series. Other therapies for sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    2015-01-15

    Treatment is needed for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) because untreated OSA can result in serious health problems. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is the most common treatment used for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). (see ATS Patient Series http://patients.thoracic.org/wp-content/uploads/ 2014/03/obstructive-sleep-apnea.pdf) For those who cannot use CPAP or want to try another option, there are other therapies that can work for people with OSA. PMID:25590163

  11. Endoscopic laser therapy of erosive-ulcerous and inflammatory damages of patients in oncological hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Oleg N.; Kuvshinov, Yu. P.; Poddubny, Boris K.; Kartasheva, E. O.; Ungiadze, G. V.; Ponomarev, Igor V.; Mazurov, S. T.

    1996-01-01

    The results of laser therapy present in 374 patients with erosive-ulcerous and inflammatory damages of respiratory organs and of gastro-intestinal tract after oncological operations. Two types of laser namely endoscopic laser on the basis of He-Ne and Cu laser were used as sources of radiation. It was shown high therapeutic effectiveness of laser therapy. This method may be recommended for the above-mentioned category of the patients.

  12. Patients' mental models and adherence to outpatient physical therapy home exercise programs.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Jon

    2015-05-01

    Within physical therapy, patient adherence usually relates to attending appointments, following advice, and/or undertaking prescribed exercise. Similar to findings for general medical adherence, patient adherence to physical therapy home exercise programs (HEP) is estimated between 35 and 72%. Adherence to HEPs is a multifactorial and poorly understood phenomenon, with no consensus regarding a common theoretical framework that best guides empirical or clinical efforts. Mental models, a construct used to explain behavior and decision-making in the social sciences, may serve as this framework. Mental models comprise an individual's tacit thoughts about how the world works. They include assumptions about new experiences and expectations for the future based on implicit comparisons between current and past experiences. Mental models play an important role in decision-making and guiding actions. This professional theoretical article discusses empirical research demonstrating relationships among mental models, prior experience, and adherence decisions in medical and physical therapy contexts. Specific issues related to mental models and physical therapy patient adherence are discussed, including the importance of articulation of patients' mental models, assessment of patients' mental models that relate to exercise program adherence, discrepancy between patient and provider mental models, and revision of patients' mental models in ways that enhance adherence. The article concludes with practical implications for physical therapists and recommendations for further research to better understand the role of mental models in physical therapy patient adherence behavior. PMID:25585516

  13. Advances in targeted therapy for the treatment of patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Le Ray, Emmanuelle; Jagannath, Sundar; Palumbo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The development of proteasome inhibitors (PIs) and immunomodulatory drugs has significantly improved outcomes for patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM); however, not all patients benefit from treatment with these agents and some patients can become drug refractory over time. Due to the largely incurable nature of multiple myeloma, the development of newer agents is ongoing and includes new oral PIs (ixazomib), immunotherapies (e.g., CD38- or SLAMF7-targeted antibodies), and small molecules. This review provides an overview of the advances in targeted therapy for patients with RRMM, including recently approved agents, with a focus on monotherapy and combined targeted therapies. PMID:26558304

  14. Linagliptin as add-on therapy to insulin for patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    von Websky, Karoline; Reichetzeder, Christoph; Hocher, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a highly prevalent, progressive disease that often is poorly controlled. The combination of an incretin-based therapy and insulin is a promising approach to optimize the management of glycemic control without hypoglycemia and weight gain. Linagliptin, a recently approved oral dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, has a unique pharmacological profile. The convenient, once-daily dosing does not need adjustment in patients with hepatic and/or renal impairment. In clinical studies linagliptin shows an important reduction of blood glucose with an overall safety profile similar to that of placebo. So far, the combination of linagliptin and insulin has been tested in three major clinical studies in different populations. It has been shown that linagliptin is an effective and safe add-on therapy to insulin in patients with T2DM. The efficacy and safety of this combination was also shown in vulnerable, elderly T2DM patients and in patients with T2DM and renal impairment. Favorable effects regarding the counteraction of hypoglycemia make linagliptin especially interesting as an add-on therapy to insulin. This review aims to present the existing clinical studies on the efficacy and safety of linagliptin as add-on therapy to insulin in patients with T2DM in the context of current literature. Additionally, the possible advantages of linagliptin as an add-on therapy to insulin in relation to cardiovascular safety, patient-centered therapy and the prevention of hypoglycemia, are discussed. PMID:24204157

  15. Intermittent targeted therapies and stochastic evolution in patients affected by chronic myeloid leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzolato, N.; Persano Adorno, D.; Valenti, D.; Spagnolo, B.

    2016-05-01

    Front line therapy for the treatment of patients affected by chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is based on the administration of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, namely imatinib or, more recently, axitinib. Although imatinib is highly effective and represents an example of a successful molecular targeted therapy, the appearance of resistance is observed in a proportion of patients, especially those in advanced stages. In this work, we investigate the appearance of resistance in patients affected by CML, by modeling the evolutionary dynamics of cancerous cell populations in a simulated patient treated by an intermittent targeted therapy. We simulate, with the Monte Carlo method, the stochastic evolution of initially healthy cells to leukemic clones, due to genetic mutations and changes in their reproductive behavior. We first present the model and its validation with experimental data by considering a continuous therapy. Then, we investigate how fluctuations in the number of leukemic cells affect patient response to the therapy when the drug is administered with an intermittent time scheduling. Here we show that an intermittent therapy (IT) represents a valid choice in patients with high risk of toxicity, despite an associated delay to the complete restoration of healthy cells. Moreover, a suitably tuned IT can reduce the probability of developing resistance.

  16. [A comparative evaluation of the efficacy of magneto- and laser therapy in patients with osteoarthrosis deformans].

    PubMed

    Selivonenko, V G; Syvolap, V D; Porada, L V; Medvedeva, V N; Boev, S S; Morozov, A I; Slin'ko, V G; Berest, S M; Garbuz, L N; Sholokh, S G

    1997-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of efficacy of magneto- and laser therapy was carried out in 82 patients with osteoarthrosis deformans. The magnetic field and laser irradiation dispelled the pain syndrome and synovitis manifestations. It is recommendable that the multiple-modality therapy of patients with osteoarthrosis deformans should involve magneto- and laser therapy (15 to 20 procedures per one course) that improve results of the treatment being received and allow the time of hospitalization to be reduced at an average by 5 bed-days. Laser appeared to be a very effective mode of treatment. No unfavourable side effects were recordable. PMID:9491734

  17. [STRATEGY FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF COMPLIANCE WITH ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH HIV INFECTION].

    PubMed

    Yushchuk, N D; Fedyaeva, O N; Sirota, N A

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at identifying prognostic factors of antiretroviral therapy (ARVT) in patients with HIV infection at different stages of the disease and developing an algorithm for the three-component assessment of compliance with therapy. A total of 280 patients given ARVT for at least 6 months were available for comprehensive examination, questionnaire study for the detection of non-compliance risk factors, and psychological testing with the evaluation of non-compliance from the anxiety level (Sheehan scale) with the use of cluster analysis. The study revealed the most significant criteria for the assessment of compliance with therapy and non-compliance risk factors associated with ARVT conditions. PMID:27172722

  18. [Combined helium-neon laser therapy in patients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Korochkin, I M; Kartelishev, A V; Babushkina, G V; Kapustina, G M

    1990-03-01

    The paper describes the combined helium-neon-laser (HNL) therapy (intravenous and topical) developed by the authors to treat patients with coronary heart disease. A high efficacy of this therapy mode was demonstrated in patients over 70 years of age with Functional Classes III-IV angina refractory to antianginal agents. The mechanisms responsible for therapeutic efficiency of laser irradiation were studied at the membraneous and cellular levels. There is evidence that the combined HNL-therapy had advantages over topical HNL exposure in terms of higher clinical efficiency and patterns of abnormal chemical changes. PMID:2381119

  19. A Systematic Review of Music Therapy Practice and Outcomes with Acute Adult Psychiatric In-Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Catherine; Odell-Miller, Helen; Priebe, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported. Review Methods A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis. Results 98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions. Conclusions No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to

  20. Patient-reported outcomes after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gavaruzzi, Teresa; Lotto, Lorella; Giandomenico, Francesca; Perin, Alessandro; Pucciarelli, Salvatore

    2014-08-01

    Neoadjuvant therapy followed by total mesorectal excision is standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer. However, this approach has been previously shown to be associated with high rate of morbidity and it may have a negative effect on patients' reported outcomes (PROs). In order to summarize findings on the effect of the neoadjuvant approach on PROs, we systematically reviewed articles published in the last five years. Thirty-five articles met the inclusion criteria. Ten articles compared the effect of surgery with and without neoadjuvant therapy, six articles compared different neoadjuvant therapies, ten articles reported on patients who were all treated with neoadjuvant therapy, and nine articles examined the effect of neoadjuvant therapy in the analyses. The results are summarized by function investigated and critically commented. PMID:24745308

  1. Treating addiction with tunes: a systematic review of music therapy for the treatment of patients with addictions.

    PubMed

    Mays, Kara L; Clark, David L; Gordon, Adam J

    2008-01-01

    Music therapy is the use of musical interventions in a therapeutic setting to accomplish health-related goals. Descriptions of music therapy exist in the peer-reviewed literature and indicate potential use of music therapy in treatment of patients with addiction disorders. This systematic review describes and compares the types of music therapy demonstrated in the literature and evaluates the evidence that music therapy improves outcomes of patients with addictions. A search and critical review of all the existing published literature on music therapy for the treatment of addictions was conducted using online databases and secondary search strategies. Few studies quantitatively assess the use of music therapy in the treatment of patients with addictions. Music listening provided by music therapists is commonly studied. Music therapy sessions reported were additive, not independent, treatment modalities. In the literature, no consensus exists regarding of the efficacy of music therapy as treatment for patients with addictions. PMID:19042198

  2. Multiple side effects of penicillamine therapy in one patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Essigman, W K

    1982-01-01

    Skin rashes, proteinuria, systemic lupus erythematosus, polymyositis and myasthenia gravis have all been recorded as complications of penicillamine therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. A patient who had developed all 5 is now described. The skin lesion resembled elastosis perforans serpiginosa, which has been reported as a rare side effect in patients with Wilson's disease but not in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with penicillamine. Images PMID:6216862

  3. Toward a comprehensive approach to pharmacoinvasive therapy for patients with ST segment elevation acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Dauerman, Harold L; Sobel, Burton E

    2012-08-01

    What exactly is "pharmacoinvasive therapy" for treatment of patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)? When this term was introduced in 2003, it addressed the need for clinical trials besides those comparing fibrinolysis with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Primary PCI is recognized as the best strategy for treatment of patients for whom it is applicable. However, use of fibrinolytic drugs initially is necessary in many patients for logistic reasons. Studies of pharmacoinvasive therapy addressed the question of what should be done after initial fibrinolysis. Confusion of the terms pharmacoinvasive therapy, facilitated PCI, rescue PCI, and delayed invasive approaches has obscured the principles that have emerged from such studies. In our view, a uniform conceptualization of pharmacoinvasive therapy emerges on the basis of three key considerations--transfer time, initial pharmacologic therapy, and time to PCI. We propose the following definition: Pharmacoinvasive therapy is the treatment of choice for patients with STEMI who require greater than a 60 min transfer time to a PCI center. It entails immediate use of full doses of fibrinolytic agents followed by prompt transfer to a PCI center and a plan to implement PCI within 2-12 h of the time of onset of initial therapy. PMID:22484515

  4. The effects of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy on patients with post-stroke depression

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dong; Shan, Jin; Ze, Yu; Xiao-yan, Zeng; Xiao-hua, Hu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To observe the effect of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy on patients with post-stroke depression. [Subjects] Ninety patients with post-stroke depression were randomly divided into 3 groups: fluoxetine treatment group (n = 30), hyperbaric oxygen therapy group (n = 30), and hyperbaric oxygen combined treatment group (n = 30). [Methods] Fluoxetine treatment group received anti-depression drugs (fluoxetine, 20 mg/day), hyperbaric oxygen therapy group received hyperbaric oxygen (once a day, 5 days/week), hyperbaric oxygen combined treatment group received fluoxetine and hyperbaric oxygen treatments as described above. All patients received routine rehabilitation therapy. Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), and Scandinavian Stroke Scale (SSS) scores were evaluated before and at the end of 4th week. The total effective rate of depression release between the 3 groups was also compared at the end of study. [Results] The end scores of HAMD and SSS in the 3 groups were significantly lower than those before treatment. The total effective rate of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy group after treatment was higher than the other two groups. [Conclusions] Combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy plays an important role in the treatment of patients with post-stroke depression. The total effective rate of combined hyperbaric oxygen therapy was higher than other routine anti post-stroke depression treatments. PMID:26157204

  5. IL-2 therapy promotes suppressive ICOS+ Treg expansion in melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Geok Choo; Martin-Orozco, Natalia; Jin, Lei; Yang, Yan; Wu, Sheng; Washington, Edwina; Sanders, Deborah; Lacey, Carol; Wang, Yijun; Vence, Luis; Hwu, Patrick; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2013-01-01

    High-dose (HD) IL-2 therapy in patients with cancer increases the general population of Tregs, which are positive for CD4, CD25, and the Treg-specific marker Foxp3. It is unknown whether specific subsets of Tregs are activated and expanded during HD IL-2 therapy or whether activation of any particular Treg subset correlates with clinical outcome. Here, we evaluated Treg population subsets that were induced in patients with melanoma following HD IL-2 therapy. We identified a Treg population that was positive for CD4, CD25, Foxp3, and the inducible T cell costimulator (ICOS). This Treg population increased more than any other lymphocyte subset during HD IL-2 therapy and had an activated Treg phenotype, as indicated by high levels of CD39, CD73, and TGF-β. ICOS+ Tregs were the most proliferative lymphocyte population in the blood after IL-2 therapy. Patients with melanoma with enhanced expansion of ICOS+ Tregs in blood following the first cycle of HD IL-2 therapy had worse clinical outcomes than patients with fewer ICOS+ Tregs. However, there was no difference in total Treg expansion between HD IL-2 responders and nonresponders. These data suggest that increased expansion of the ICOS+ Treg population following the first cycle of HD IL-2 therapy may be predictive of clinical outcome. PMID:24292706

  6. [Risk assessment in patients undergoing osseous antiresorptive therapy in dentistry. An update].

    PubMed

    Borm, Jan M; Moser, Stephanie; Locher, Michael; Damerau, Georg; Stadlinger, Bernd; Grätz, Klaus W; Jacobsen, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Antiresorptive therapy is prescribed in particular for the treatment of osteoporosis as well as for the treatment of tumor-induced hypercalcemia and metastatic bone disease. As a consequence, osteopathologies such as bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ) may occur. In 2008, our department reported on BRONJ in a paper that provided dental clinicians with information on diagnostics, therapy, and prevention (Dannemann et al., Schweizer Monatsschrift für Zahnmedizin, Vol. 118, 2/2008). During the last 8 years, new findings have emerged concerning potential etiologies, modes of therapy, and the use of additional antiresorptive therapies. For example, an important point for colleagues in dental practice is the now common intravenous administration of bisphosphonates in osteoporosis patients, which may lead to uncertainty when assessing risk in these patients. For this reason, this article provides an update of the above mentioned publication and gives dental clinicians an updated guideline concerning risk assessment in patients undergoing antiresorptive therapy. In this context, a risk assessment algorithm is presented. The pathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, and prevention of BRONJ and oral implantation in patients receiving antiresorptive therapy are addressed with regard to the current literature. Finally, we present two example cases. PMID:24420526

  7. A Single Institution Consensus on the Use of Sequential or Concurrent Hormonal Therapy for Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Edward; Yaremko, Brian P; Boldt, R Gabriel; Potvin, Kylea; Sexton, Tracy; D'Souza, David; Brackstone, Muriel; Lock, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: For hormone-sensitive breast cancers, treatment with breast-conserving surgery, tamoxifen, or aromatase inhibitors, along with adjuvant radiation, is the mainstay of therapy. The ideal timing of hormonal and radiation treatment is not well defined, and there is a significant degree of practice variability between concurrent and sequential treatment regimes. This variability can cause confusion amongst the clinical team resulting in contradictory recommendations, loss of patient trust, and the potential for missed initiation of hormonal therapy. Methods: To address this question, a systematic review of the literature was conducted and presented to the breast cancer multidisciplinary team at the London Regional Cancer Center. A three-round modified Delphi method was used to obtain a consensus on a series of a priori determined statements. Results: With the currently available evidence, the consensus was that hormonal therapy should be given sequentially after radiation. This will limit potential overlapping adverse effects between hormonal therapy and radiation that may decrease completion of treatment. The sequential approach has not been associated with any harm in clinical outcomes, and there is some suggestion of increased toxicity with concurrent use. However, in patients at high risk of distant recurrence, they felt it would be reasonable to consider concurrent treatment to avoid any delay in therapy. Conclusion: The consensus of our institution to utilize a sequential approach will standardize the treatment decisions and reduce the risk of failing to initiate hormonal therapy. Despite the lack of level 1 evidence, the Delphi methodology did provide a high level of confidence for our group to choose the sequential approach. The consensus was developed after a review of the literature revealed that there was no clear superiority of one schedule over the other and evidence that concurrent treatment may increase adverse events. PMID

  8. Immunomodulating effect of laser therapy in patients with microbial eczema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudchenko, Mycola O.; Denisenko, Olga I.

    1999-11-01

    While examining 90 patients suffering the microbial eczema (ME), we revealed disorders of the immune system in the majority of them (3/4). It was established that the inclusion of percutaneous laser irradiation of the blood in a course of multimodality treatment of patients with ME caused an immunomodulating action which resulted in an improved ME course in these patients.

  9. Antifungal therapy and length of hospitalization in transplant patients with invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Baddley, John W; Andes, David R; Marr, Kieren A; Kauffman, Carol A; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Ito, James I; Schuster, Mindy G; Brizendine, Kyle D; Patterson, Thomas F; Lyon, G Marshall; Boeckh, Michael; Oster, Robert A; Chiller, Tom; Pappas, Peter G

    2013-02-01

    The impact of antifungal therapy on economic outcomes in patients with invasive aspergillosis (IA) needs further exploration. The purpose of this study was to describe antifungal therapy and factors associated with hospital length of stay (LOS) in transplant patients with IA. Patients were enrolled from March 2001 to October 2005 and IA cases identified through March 2006 from a sub-group of patients in the Transplant Associated Infection Surveillance Network (TRANSNET). Factors associated with hospital LOS were determined by logistic regression analysis. Of 361 patients, the mean age was 49 years, 60.7% were male, and 63% were hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients. Primary monotherapy was used in 233 (64.5%) patients, of which voriconazole (93/233, 39.9%) was most commonly used antifungal. Primary combination therapy was used in 128 (35.4%) of 361 patients, with voriconazole plus caspofungin (81/361, 22.4%) the most frequently employed. Mean duration of therapy was 115 days (HSCT 109.7; solid organ transplant [SOT] 125.3). Mean hospital LOS was 35.3 days (HSCT 38.7; SOT 29.7). Regression analysis identified disseminated IA, neutropenia, malnutrition and length of ICU stay as factors associated with increased hospital LOS. Initial voriconazole use was associated with decreased LOS. Further investigation on impact of antifungal therapy on economic outcomes is needed. PMID:22680976

  10. Efficacy of pulmonary vasodilator therapy in patients with functionally single ventricle.

    PubMed

    Park, In-Sam

    2015-01-01

    This study retrospectively evaluated the effectiveness of pulmonary vasodilator therapy with bosentan (n = 14) and/ or sildenafil (n = 23) in 34 patients with a functionally single ventricle. Vasodilator therapy was initiated before the Fontan procedure in 18 patients and after the procedure in 16 patients. The reasons for vasodilator treatment included high pulmonary artery pressure or pulmonary vascular resistance (n = 8), high central venous pressure after the Fontan or bidirectional Glenn procedure (n = 7), and ventilatory impairment (n = 8). In the 11 patients who underwent right heart catheterization before and after the initiation of therapy, the mean pulmonary artery pressure decreased significantly from 19.5 ± 5.5 mmHg to 14.3 ± 3.0 mmHg (P = 0.023) and the transpulmonary pressure gradient decreased significantly from 10.9 ± 4.6 mmHg to 7.2 ± 3.3 mmHg (P = 0.046). Of the 18 patients who started vasodilator therapy before the Fontan procedure, 10 survived surgery, 4 are awaiting surgery, 3 had not been evaluated for the Fontan procedure at the end of the study period, and 1 died of heart failure after discontinuing bosentan therapy. There were no deaths among the patients who started therapy after the Fontan procedure. Two of the 14 patients receiving bosentan discontinued treatment because of adverse effects (hepatic dysfunction and increased serum brain natriuretic peptide level). Bosentan or sildenafil therapy is usually safe and may contribute to reducing pulmonary vascular resistance in patients with a functionally single ventricle before and after a Fontan type operation. PMID:25787795

  11. Long-term outcome of patients after a single interruption of antiretroviral therapy: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To describe the long term outcome of patients who interrupted highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) once, identify the variables associated with earlier need to re-start HAART, and the response when therapy was resumed. A retrospective observational cohort of 66 adult patients with HIV-1 infection who interrupted HAART with a CD4+cell count ≥350 cells/μL and undetectable viral load (VL) was performed. The pre-established CD4+ cell count for restarting therapy was 300cells/μL. Cox regression was used to analyse the variables associated with earlier HAART reinitiation. Results The median follow-up was 209 weeks (range, 64–395). Rates of HIV-related or possible HIV-related events were 0.37 (one case of acute retroviral syndrome) and 1.49 per 100 patient-years, respectively. Two patients died after re-starting therapy and having reached undetectable VL. Three patients suffered a sexually transmitted disease while off therapy. Fifty patients (76%) resumed therapy after a median of 97 weeks (range, 17–267). Age, a nadir of CD4+ <250 cells/μL, and a mean VL during interruption of >10,000 copies/ml were independent predictors for earlier re-start. The intention-to-treat success rate of the first HAART resumed regimen was 85.4%. There were no differences by regimen used, nor between regimens that were the same as or different from the one that had been interrupted. Conclusions Our data suggest highly active antiretroviral therapy may be interrupted in selected patients because in these patients, when the HAART is restarted, the viral and clinical response may be achieved. PMID:23095460

  12. Refusal of Curative Radiation Therapy and Surgery Among Patients With Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aizer, Ayal A.; Chen, Ming-Hui; Parekh, Arti; Choueiri, Toni K.; Kim, Simon P.; Martin, Neil E.; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Nguyen, Paul L.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Surgery and radiation therapy represent the only curative options for many patients with solid malignancies. However, despite the recommendations of their physicians, some patients refuse these therapies. This study characterized factors associated with refusal of surgical or radiation therapy as well as the impact of refusal of recommended therapy on patients with localized malignancies. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program to identify a population-based sample of 925,127 patients who had diagnoses of 1 of 8 common malignancies for which surgery and/or radiation are believed to confer a survival benefit between 1995 and 2008. Refusal of oncologic therapy, as documented in the SEER database, was the primary outcome measure. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate factors associated with refusal. The impact of refusal of therapy on cancer-specific mortality was assessed with Fine and Gray's competing risks regression. Results: In total, 2441 of 692,938 patients (0.4%) refused surgery, and 2113 of 232,189 patients (0.9%) refused radiation, despite the recommendations of their physicians. On multivariable analysis, advancing age, decreasing annual income, nonwhite race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of surgery, whereas advancing age, decreasing annual income, Asian American race, and unmarried status were associated with refusal of radiation (P<.001 in all cases). Refusal of surgery and radiation were associated with increased estimates of cancer-specific mortality for all malignancies evaluated (hazard ratio [HR], 2.80, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.59-3.03; P<.001 and HR 1.97 [95% CI, 1.78-2.18]; P<.001, respectively). Conclusions: Nonwhite, less affluent, and unmarried patients are more likely to refuse curative surgical and/or radiation-based oncologic therapy, raising concern that socioeconomic factors may drive some patients to forego potentially life-saving care.

  13. Pleural Photodynamic Therapy and Surgery in Lung Cancer and Thymoma Patients with Pleural Spread

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Ying-Fan; Shieh, Ming-Jium; Chen, Jin-Shing; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Lee, Jang-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Pleural spread is difficult to treat in malignancies, especially in lung cancer and thymoma. Monotherapy with surgery fails to have a better survival benefit than palliative chemotherapy, the currently accepted treatment. Photodynamic therapy utilizes a photosensitizer to target the tumor site, and the tumor is exposed to light after performing a pleurectomy and tumor resection. However, the benefits of this procedure to lung cancer or thymoma patients are unknown. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with lung cancer or thymoma with pleural seeding who underwent pleural photodynamic therapy and surgery between 2005 and 2013. Eighteen patients enrolled in this study. The mean patient age was 52.9 ± 12.2 years. Lung cancer was the inciting cancer of pleural dissemination in 10 patients (55.6%), and thymoma in 8 (44.4%). There was no procedure-related mortality. Using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the 3-year survival rate and the 5-year survival rate were 68.9% and 57.4%, respectively. We compared the PDT lung cancer patients with those receiving chemotherapy or target therapy (n = 51) and found that the PDT group had better survival than non-PDT patients (mean survival time: 39.0 versus 17.6 months; P = .047). With proper patient selection, radical surgical resection combined with intrapleural photodynamic therapy for pleural spread in patients with non-small cell lung cancer or thymoma is feasible and may provide a survival benefit. PMID:26193470

  14. Functional Class and Targeted Therapy Are Related to the Survival in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yae Min; Choi, Deok Young; Baek, Han Joo; Jung, Sung Hwan; Choi, In Suck; Shin, Eak Kyun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an orphan disease showing poor prognosis. The purpose of study was to evaluate clinical factors influencing outcomes in PAH. Materials and Methods Patients who were diagnosed with PAH at a single center were reviewed retrospectively. Forty patients (34.9±14.5 years, 80% of female) were enrolled. Results Causes were congenital heart disease in 24 (60%), connective tissue disease in 8 (20%) and idiopathic PAH in 6 (15%). Sixteen patients (40%) were WHO functional class III or IV at the time of diagnosis. Twenty seven patients (67.5%) received molecular targeted therapy. During follow-up (53.6±45.5 months), 10 patients (25%) died and 1-, 2-, and 8 year survival rates were 91.3%, 78.7%, and 66.8%, respectively. As expected, median survival of patients with functional class I or II were significantly longer than patients with III or IV (p=0.041). Interestingly, patients with molecular targeted therapy showed longer survival than conventional therapy (p=0.021). Conclusion WHO functional class at the time of diagnosis was the strong predictor of survival, and molecular targeted therapy could significantly improve the survival. Therefore, early screening and intensive management would be crucial to improve the prognosis in the patient with PAH. PMID:25323888

  15. Electrophysiological Monitoring in Patients With Tumors of the Skull Base Treated by Carbon-12 Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Carozzo, Simone; Schardt, Dieter; Narici, Livio; Combs, Stephanie E.; Debus, Jürgen; Sannita, Walter G.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report the results of short-term electrophysiologic monitoring of patients undergoing {sup 12}C therapy for the treatment of skull chordomas and chondrosarcomas unsuitable for radical surgery. Methods and Materials: Conventional electroencephalogram (EEG) and retinal and cortical electrophysiologic responses to contrast stimuli were recorded from 30 patients undergoing carbon ion radiation therapy, within a few hours before the first treatment and after completion of therapy. Methodologies and procedures were compliant with the guidelines of the International Federation for Clinical Neurophysiology and International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision. Results: At baseline, clinical signs were reported in 56.6% of subjects. Electrophysiologic test results were abnormal in 76.7% (EEG), 78.6% (cortical evoked potentials), and 92.8% (electroretinogram) of cases, without correlation with neurologic signs, tumor location, or therapy plan. Results on EEG, but not electroretinograms and cortical responses, were more often abnormal in patients with reported clinical signs. Abnormal EEG results and retinal/cortical responses improved after therapy in 40% (EEG), 62.5% (cortical potentials), and 70% (electroretinogram) of cases. Results on EEG worsened after therapy in one-third of patients whose recordings were normal at baseline. Conclusions: The percentages of subjects whose EEG results improved or worsened after therapy and the improvement of retinal/cortical responses in the majority of patients are indicative of a limited or negligible (and possibly transient) acute central nervous system toxicity of carbon ion therapy, with a significant beneficial effect on the visual pathways. Research on large samples would validate electrophysiologic procedures as a possible independent test for central nervous system toxicity and allow investigation of the correlation with clinical signs; repeated testing over time after therapy would demonstrate, and may

  16. Neuromodulation therapies for geriatric depression.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Verònica; Ho, Kerrie-Anne; Alonzo, Angelo; Martin, Donel; George, Duncan; Loo, Colleen K

    2015-07-01

    Depression is frequent in old age and its prognosis is poorer than in younger populations. The use of pharmacological treatments in geriatric depression is limited by specific pharmacodynamic age-related factors that can diminish tolerability and increase the risk of drug interactions. The possibility of modulating cerebral activity using brain stimulation techniques could result in treating geriatric depression more effectively while reducing systemic side effects and medication interactions. This may subsequently improve treatment adherence and overall prognosis in the older patient. Among clinically available neuromodulatory techniques, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) remains the gold standard for the treatment of severe depression in the elderly. Studies have proven that ECT is more effective and has a faster onset of action than antidepressants in the treatment of severe, unipolar, geriatric depression and that older age is a predictor of rapid ECT response and remission. The application of novel and more tolerable forms of ECT for geriatric depression is currently being examined. Preliminary results suggest that right unilateral ultrabrief ECT (RUL-UB ECT) is a promising intervention, with similar efficacy to brief-pulse ECT and fewer adverse cognitive effects. Overall findings in repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) suggest that it is a safe intervention in geriatric depression. Higher rTMS stimulation intensity and more treatments may need to be given in the elderly to achieve optimal results. There is no specific data on vagus nerve stimulation in the elderly. Transcranial direct current stimulation, magnetic seizure therapy and deep brain stimulation are currently experimental, and more data from geriatric samples is needed. PMID:25995098

  17. [Helpful Factors of Ambulant Art Therapy in the Group and Changes of Experiences in Psychosomatic Patients].

    PubMed

    Oster, Jörg; Moser, Anna Sophie; Danner-Weinberger, Alexandra; von Wietersheim, Jörn

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the experiences of patients suffering from mostly chronic psychosomatic disorders in an ambulant art therapy in the group. Especially, the focus was on the experienced changes, helpful factors and specifics of the therapy as well as on the experienced benefit. For this, 30 patients were interviewed in a semi-standardized way. Additionally, the symptom-based strain was psychometrically recorded in a part of the patients (21) at the beginning of the therapy and after at least 6 months of participation. The evaluation of those interviews with the qualitative analysis of the therapy subjects surrendered an improvement of the health state in most of the participants. Especially group factors, art as a mean of communication, becoming aware of feelings but also diversion and fun were proved to be beneficial. The art therapy also serves for structuring the week as well as a contact point and a resource in the interpersonal communication of everyday life. Nearly all of the patients referred to some important turning point pictures. Mostly, the benefit was valued as being high. But, in contrast, the psychometric measure did not show any significant change. The results emphasize the stabilizing function of art therapy in the examined patients, whereat the classification of the psychometric result is complicated by the absence of a control group. PMID:26859111

  18. The effects of electrical stimulation and exercise therapy in patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kılınç, Muhammed; Yıldırım, Sibel A.; Tan, Ersin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate and compare the effects of exercise therapy and electrical stimulation on muscle strength and functional activities in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). Methods: This controlled clinical trial included 24 subjects who were diagnosed with LGMD by the Neurology Department of the Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey and were referred to the Physical Therapy Department between May 2013 and December 2014. Subjects were enrolled into an electrical stimulation (11 patients) group, or an exercise therapy (13 patients) group. Results: The mean age of patients was 31.62 years in the electrical stimulation group, and 30.14 years in the exercise therapy group. The most important results in this controlled clinical study were that the muscle strength in both groups was significantly decreased and post-treatment evaluation results indicated that muscle strength of the Deltoideus was higher in the electrical stimulation group, and the difference between the groups was maintained in the follow-up period (p<0.05). However, the muscle strength of quadriceps was similar in both groups, according to the post-treatment and follow-up evaluation results (p>0.05). Additionally, the electrical stimulation group presented more obvious overall improvements than the exercise therapy group according to muscle strength, endurance, and timed performance tests. Conclusions: Since no definitive treatments currently exist for patients with LGMD, these results provide important information on the role of exercise therapy and electrical stimulation for clinicians working in rehabilitation. PMID:26166595

  19. Effectiveness of electrochemotherapy after IFN-α adjuvant therapy of melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Hribernik, Andrejc; Cemazar, Maja; Sersa, Gregor; Bosnjak, Maša

    2016-01-01

    Background The combination of electrochemotherapy with immuno-modulatory treatments has already been explored and proven effective. However, the role of interferon alpha (IFN-α) adjuvant therapy of melanoma patients and implication on electrochemotherapy effectiveness has not been explored yet. Therefore, the aim of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness and safety of electrochemotherapy after the previous adjuvant treatment with IFN-α in melanoma patients. Patients and methods The study was a retrospective single-center observational analysis of the patients with advanced melanoma, treated with electrochemotherapy after previous IFN-α adjuvant therapy. Five patients, treated between January 2008 and December 2014, were included into the study, regardless of the time point of IFN-α adjuvant therapy. Results Electrochemotherapy of recurrent melanoma after the IFN-α adjuvant therapy proved to be a safe and effective treatment. Patients with one or two metastases responded completely. Among patients with multiple metastases, there was a variable response rate. In one patient all 23 metastases responded completely, in second patient more than 85% of all together 80 metastases responded completely and in third patient all 5 metastases had partial response. Taking into account all metastases from all patients together there was an 85% complete response rate. Conclusions The study showed that electrochemotherapy of recurrent melanoma after the IFN-α adjuvant therapy is a safe and effective treatment modality, which results in a high complete response rate, not only in single metastasis, but also in multiple metastases. The high complete response rate might be due to an IFN-α immune-editing effect, however, further studies with a larger number of patients are needed to support this presumption. PMID:27069446

  20. PEEP therapy for patients with pleurotomy during coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, S; Ohtaki, A; Takahashi, T; Sakata, K; Koyano, T; Kano, M; Ohki, S; Kawashima, O; Hamada, Y; Morishita, Y

    2000-01-01

    Severe pulmonary oxygenation impairment resulting from peripheral lung atelectasis occurred in some patients with pleurotomy during the harvest of the internal mammary artery graft followed by coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). We studied the efficacy of intraoperative positive end-expiratory airway pressure (PEEP) therapy for the prevention of postoperative pulmonary oxygenation impairment. A total of 66 patients with solitary CABG procedure were included in this study. The pleural cavity was intraoperatively opened in 44 patients and not opened in 22. PEEP therapy was not used in any patient before May 1996 (referred to herein as the former period) and was used more recently in eight patients with pleurotopmy (referred to herein as the latter period). PEEP was initiated immediately after pleurotomy during the harvest of the internal mammary artery graft. Without PEEP therapy, values of PaO2, A-aDO2, and respiratory index (RI) were worse in patients with pleurotomy than in those without pleurotomy. Meanwhile, there were no major differences in these values between patients with or without pleurotomy after the induction of PEEP therapy. Respiratory insufficiency (A-aDO2 > 400 mmHg and RI > 1.5) was detected in six patients with pleurotomy in the former period. Three of these six patients required over 1 week of long-term mechanical respiratory support. No respiratory insufficiency occurred in patients of the latter period. In conclusion, PEEP therapy, which is initiated just after pleurotomy, may prevent oxygen impairment and pulmonary atelectasis after extracorporeal circulation (ECC) and is recommended for patients with pleurotomy, especially for patients with preoperative low respiratory function. PMID:11414602

  1. Outcomes and Tolerability of Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer Patients Aged 75 Years or Older

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, David T.; Mamon, Harvey J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To review the outcomes and tolerability of full-dose chemoradiation in elderly patients aged 75 years or older with localized pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed patients aged 75 years or older with nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy at two institutions from 2002 to 2007. Patients were analyzed for treatment toxicity, local recurrences, distant metastases, and survival. Results: A total of 42 patients with a median age of 78 years (range, 75-90 years) who received chemoradiation therapy for pancreatic cancer were identified. Of the patients, 24 had locally advanced disease treated with definitive chemoradiation, and 18 had disease treated with surgery and chemoradiation. Before chemoradiotherapy, the mean Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 1.0 {+-} 0.8, and the mean 6-month weight loss was 5.3 {+-} 3.8 kg. The mean radiation dose delivered was 48.1 {+-} 9.2 Gy. All patients received fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy concurrently with radiotherapy. In all, 8 patients (19%) were hospitalized, 7 (17%) had an emergency room visit, 15 (36%) required a radiation treatment break, 3 (7%) required a chemotherapy break, 9 (21%) did not complete therapy, and 22 (49%) had at least one of these adverse events. The most common toxicities were nausea, pain, and failure to thrive. Median overall survival was 8.6 months (95% confidence interval, 7.2-13.1) in patients who received definitive chemoradiation therapy and 20.6 months (95% confidence interval, 9.5-{infinity}) in patients who underwent resection and chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: In this dataset of very elderly patients with pancreatic cancer and good Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, outcomes after chemoradiotherapy were similar to those among historic controls for patients with locally advanced and resected pancreatic cancer, although many patients experienced substantial treatment

  2. Risk of Diabetes among Patients Receiving Primary Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Huei-Ting; Keating, Nancy L.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Haque, Reina; Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea E.; Yood, Marianne Ulcickas; Smith, Matthew R.; Potosky, Arnold L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Androgen deprivation therapy may increase diabetes risk. As the benefits of primary androgen deprivation therapy for localized prostate cancer are controversial, and most prostate cancer survivors are of advanced age with comorbidities, it is important to determine if primary androgen deprivation therapy increases the risk of diabetes and to determine the susceptibility factors. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 12,191 men diagnosed with incident localized prostate cancer during 1995 to 2008, age 35 to 100 years, and without diabetes or receipt of prostatectomy or radiation 1 year after diagnosis. Patients were enrolled in 1 of 3 managed health plans and followed through 2010. Primary androgen deprivation therapy was defined as androgen deprivation therapy within 1 year after diagnosis. Incident diabetes was ascertained using inpatient and outpatient diagnosis codes, diabetes medications and hemoglobin A1c values. We estimated primary androgen deprivation therapy associated diabetes risk using Cox proportional hazard models in conventional and propensity score analyses. Results Diabetes developed in 1,203 (9.9%) patients during followup (median 4.8 years) with incidence rates of 2.5 and 1.6 events per 100 person-years in the primary androgen deprivation therapy and nonprimary androgen deprivation therapy groups, respectively. Primary androgen deprivation therapy was associated with a 1.61-fold increased diabetes risk (95% CI 1.38–1.88). The number needed to harm was 29. The association was stronger in men age 70 or younger than in older men (HR 2.25 vs 1.40, p value for interaction = 0.008). Conclusions Primary androgen deprivation therapy may increase diabetes risk by 60% and should be used with caution when managing localized prostate cancer. Because of the consistent association between androgen deprivation therapy and greater diabetes risk across disease states, we recommend routine screening and lifestyle

  3. Role of Anemia in Home Oxygen Therapy in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Copur, Ahmet Sinan; Fulambarker, Ashok; Molnar, Janos; Nadeem, Rashid; McCormack, Charles; Ganesh, Aarthi; Kheir, Fayez; Hamon, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a known comorbidity found in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. Hypoxemia is common and basically due to ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatch in COPD. Anemia, by decreasing arterial oxygen content, may be a contributing factor for decreased delivery of oxygen to tissues. The objective of this study is to determine if anemia is a factor in qualifying COPD patients for home oxygen therapy. The study was designed as a retrospective, cross-sectional, observational chart review. Patients who were referred for home oxygen therapy evaluation were selected from the computerized patient record system. Demographic data, oxygen saturation at rest and during exercise, pulmonary function test results, hemoglobin level, medications, reason for anemia, comorbid diseases, and smoking status were recorded. The χ tests, independent sample t tests, and logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. Only 356 of total 478 patient referrals had a diagnosis of COPD over a 2-year period. Although 39 of them were excluded, 317 patients were included in the study. The overall rate of anemia was 38% in all COPD patients. Anemia was found significantly more frequent in COPD patients on home oxygen therapy (46%) than those not on home oxygen therapy (18.5%) (P < 0.0001). Mean saturation of peripheral oxygen values were significantly lower in anemic COPD patients both at rest and during exercise (P < 0.0001). Also, in COPD patients, age, Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease class, smoking status, hemoglobin level, hematocrit, percent of forced expiratory volume in first second, forced expiratory volume in first second/forced vital capacity, residual volume/total lung volume, percent of carbon monoxide diffusion capacity were significantly different between home oxygen therapy and those not on home oxygen therapy (P < 0.05). Multivariate logistic regression showed that anemia remained a strong predictor for long-term oxygen therapy use in

  4. Use of complementary and alternative therapies to promote sleep in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Richards, Kathy; Nagel, Corey; Markie, Megan; Elwell, Jean; Barone, Claudia

    2003-09-01

    The efficacy of complementary and alternative therapies for sleep promotion in critically ill patients is largely unexamined. We found only seven studies (three on environmental interventions and one each on massage, music therapy, therapeutic touch, and, melatonin) that examined the effect of complementary and alternative therapies. A number of studies, however, have shown that massage, music therapy. and therapeutic touch promote relaxation and comfort in critically ill patients, which likely leads to improved sleep. Massage, music therapy, and therapeutic touch are safe for critically ill patients and should be routinely applied by ICU nurses who have received training on how to administer these specialized interventions. Environmental interventions, such as reducing noise, playing white noise such as ocean sounds, and decreasing interruptions to sleep for care, also are safe and logical interventions that ICU nurses should use to help patients sleep. Progressive muscle relaxation has been extensively studied and shown to be efficacious for improving sleep in persons with insomnia; however, progressive muscle relaxation requires that patients consciously attend to relaxing specific muscle groups and practice these techniques, which may be difficult for critically 11 patients. We do not currently recommend aromatherapy and alternative sedatives, such as valerian and melatonin, for sleep promotion in critically ill patients because the safety of these substances is unclear. In summary, we recommend that ICU nurses implement music therapy, environmental interventions, therapeutic touch, and relaxing massage to promote sleep in critically ill patients. These interventions are safe and may improve patient sleep, although randomized controlled trials are needed to test their efficacy. Aromatherapy and alternative sedatives require further investigation to determine their safety and efficacy. PMID:12943139

  5. [The effectiveness of music therapy in reducing physiological and psychological anxiety in mechanically ventilated patients].

    PubMed

    Wu, Shiau-Jiun; Chou, Fan-Hao

    2008-10-01

    Anxiety, a common reaction in patients receiving ventilation therapy, often impacts negatively on patient recovery. Music therapy, a non-invasion intervention, is readily accepted by patients and has been used to relieve patient anxiety with encouraging results. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of music therapy on reducing anxiety in patients on mechanical ventilators. An experimental design was used and all cases were collected from a medical center in southern Taiwan. While the experimental group patients took a 30-minute music therapy session, control group patients were asked to rest. Both facility anxiety and anxiety visual scales were used as research tools, with other non-invasive medical instruments employed to measure heartbeat and breathing, blood pressure and blood oxygen saturation in both patient groups. When compared with the control group, patients in the experimental group showed significant improvement in sense of anxiety (Brief Anxiety Scale, BAS, t(29) = -4.80, p < .001; Visual Analogue Anxiety Scales, VAAS, t(29) = -3.38, p = .002), diastolic pressure (t(29) = -2.74, p = .002), mean arterial pressure(t(29) = -2.26, p = .031) and breathing rate (t(29) = -4.84, p < .001). In analyzing data from the two groups, we found that the sense of anxiety (BAS, t(58) = -3.21, p = .002; VAAS, t(58) = -2.90, p = .005) and breathing rate (t(58) = -3.20, p = .002) in the experimental group decreased significantly following music therapy. Study results are hoped to serve as an important reference for clinical nursing staff. Also, it is hoped that the music therapy method may help facilitate achievement of broader humanized nursing goals. PMID:18836973

  6. Photodynamic therapy in patients with recurrent gynecological carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetzel, Heinz; Mueller, Elisabeth; Kostron, Herwig

    1993-03-01

    Patients with recurrent gynecological carcinomas have a poor prognosis with a median survival time of 3 - 6 months. Four patients with recurrent vulva carcinomas, one patient with a recurrent breast cancer, and one with a recurrent cervical carcinoma underwent PDT after parenteral or topical sensitization with Photosan 3. Of those patients two women made a complete recovery with no evidence of disease 27 and 24 months after. One patient responded partially with two recurrences which were retreated twice after topical sensitization, she has survived 16 months. The remaining patients showed partial response and died 3 and 8 months after PDT. The energy delivered by an argon-dye-laser ranged between 225 and 750 J/cm2. Photosan 3 was given intravenously at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg body weight and was tolerated without any allergic reaction. A response rate of nearly 50% in recurrent gynecological malignancies encourages us to pursue PDT in gynecological diseases.

  7. Positive predictive values of the coding for bisphosphonate therapy among cancer patients in the Danish National Patient Registry

    PubMed Central

    Nielsson, Malene Schou; Erichsen, Rune; Frøslev, Trine; Taylor, Aliki; Acquavella, John; Ehrenstein, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to estimate the positive predictive value (PPV) of the coding for bisphosphonate treatment in selected cancer patients from the Danish National Patient Registry (DNPR). Methods Through the DNPR, we identified all patients with recorded cancer of the breast, prostate, lung, kidney, and with multiple myeloma. We restricted the study sample to patients with bisphosphonate treatment recorded during an admission to Aalborg Hospital, Denmark, from 2005 through 2009. We retrieved and reviewed medical records of these patients from the initial cancer diagnosis onwards to confirm or rule out bisphosphonate therapy. We calculated the PPV of the treatment coding as the proportion of patients with confirmed bisphosphonate treatment. Results We retrieved and reviewed the medical records of 60 cancer patients with treatment codes corresponding to bisphosphonate therapy. Recorded code corresponded to treatment administered intravenously for 59 of 60 patients, corresponding to a PPV of 98.3% (95% confidence interval 92.5–99.8). In the remaining patient, bisphosphonate treatment was also confirmed but was an orally administered bisphosphonate; thus, the treatment for any bisphosphonate regardless of administration was confirmed for all 60 patients (PPV of 100%, 95% confidence interval 95.9–100.0). Conclusion The PPV of bisphosphonate treatment coding among cancer patients in the DNPR is very high and the recorded treatment nearly always corresponds to intravenous administration. PMID:22977313

  8. Depression in Patients with Mastocytosis: Prevalence, Features and Effects of Masitinib Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Daniela Silva; Sultan, Serge; Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie; Pillet, Nathalie; Montestruc, François; Gineste, Paul; Barete, Stéphane; Damaj, Gandhi; Moussy, Alain; Lortholary, Olivier; Hermine, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Depression in patients with mastocytosis is often reported but its prevalence and characteristics are not precisely described. In addition, the impact of therapies targeting mast cells proliferation, differentiation and degranulation on psychic symptoms of depression have never been investigated. Our objective was to determine the prevalence and to describe features of depression in a large cohort of mastocytosis patients (n = 288) and to investigate the therapeutic impact of the protein kinase inhibitor masitinib in depression symptoms. The description of depression was based on the analysis of a database with Hamilton scores using Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Efficacy of masitinib therapy was evaluated using non parametric Wilcoxon test for paired data within a three months period (n = 35). Our results show that patients with indolent mastocytosis present an elevated prevalence of depression (64%). Depression was moderate in 56% but severe in 8% of cases. Core symptoms (such as psychic anxiety, depressed mood, work and interests) characterized depression in mastocytosis patients. Masitinib therapy was associated with significant improvement (67% of the cases) of overall depression, with 75% of recovery cases. Global Quality of Life slightly improved after masitinib therapy and did not predicted depression improvement. In conclusion, depression is very frequent in mastocytosis patients and masitinib therapy is associated with the reduction its psychic experiences. We conclude that depression in mastocytosis may originate from processes related to mast cells activation. Masitinib could therefore be a useful treatment for mastocytosis patients with depression and anxiety symptoms. PMID:22031830

  9. Preoperative Nutritional Therapy Reduces the Risk of Anastomotic Leakage in Patients with Crohn's Disease Requiring Resections

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhen; Guo, Dong; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Zuo, Lugen; Sun, Jing; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    Background. The rate of anastomotic leakage is high in surgeries for Crohn's disease, and therefore a temporary diverting stoma is often needed. We conducted this study to investigate whether preoperative nutritional therapy could reduce the risk of anastomotic leakage while decreasing the frequency of temporary stoma formation. Methods. This was a retrospective study. Patients requiring bowel resections due to Crohn's disease were reviewed. The rate of anastomotic leakage and temporary diverting stoma was compared between patients who received preoperative nutritional therapy and those on a normal diet before surgery. Possible predictive factors for anastomotic leakage were also analyzed. Results. One hundred and fourteen patients undergoing 123 surgeries were included. Patients in nutritional therapy (NT) group had a significantly lower level of C-reactive protein on the day before surgery. Patients in NT group suffered less anastomotic leakage (2.3% versus 17.9%, P = 0.023) and less temporary diverting stoma (22.8% versus 40.9%, P = 0.036). Serum albumin of the day before surgery ≤35 g/L and preoperative nutritional therapy were identified as factors which independently affected the rate of anastomotic leakage. Conclusion. Preoperative nutritional therapy reduced the risk of anastomotic leakage and the frequency of temporary diverting stoma formation in patients with Crohn's disease requiring resections. PMID:26858749

  10. Spa therapy for elderly: a retrospective study of 239 older patients with osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagülle, Mine; Kardeş, Sinan; Dişçi, Rian; Gürdal, Hatice; Karagülle, Müfit Zeki

    2016-01-01

    Very few studies tested the effectiveness of spa therapy in older patients with osteoarthritis. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the short-term effects of spa therapy in patients aged 65 years and older with generalized, knee, hip, and cervical and lumbar spine osteoarthritis. In an observational retrospective study design at the Medical Ecology and Hydroclimatology Dep