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Sample records for electromagnetic radiation detectors

  1. Electromagnetic radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Benson, Jay L.; Hansen, Gordon J.

    1976-01-01

    An electromagnetic radiation detector including a collimating window, a cathode member having a photoelectric emissive material surface angularly disposed to said window whereby radiation is impinged thereon at acute angles, an anode, separated from the cathode member by an evacuated space, for collecting photoelectrons emitted from the emissive cathode surface, and a negatively biased, high transmissive grid disposed between the cathode member and anode.

  2. Simple dynamic electromagnetic radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Been, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    Detector monitors gamma dose rate at particular position in a radiation facility where a mixed neutron-gamma environment exists, thus determining reactor power level changes. Device also maps gamma intensity profile across a neutron-gamma beam.

  3. Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation detector using micromechanical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.; Wachter, Eric A.

    2000-01-01

    Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation is detected by micromechanical sensors that can be coated with various interactive materials. As the micromechanical sensors absorb radiation, the sensors bend and/or undergo a shift in resonance characteristics. The bending and resonance changes are detected with high sensitivity by any of several detection methods including optical, capacitive, and piezoresistive methods. Wide bands of the electromagnetic spectrum can be imaged with picoJoule sensitivity, and specific absorptive coatings can be used for selective sensitivity in specific wavelength bands. Microcantilevers coated with optical cross-linking polymers are useful as integrating optical radiation dosimeters. Nuclear radiation dosimetry is possible by fabricating cantilevers from materials that are sensitive to various nuclear particles or radiation. Upon exposure to radiation, the cantilever bends due to stress and its resonance frequency shifts due to changes in elastic properties, based on cantilever shape and properties of the coating.

  4. A high-dynamic and accurate electromagnetic radiation and thermal energy detector for planetary studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, P.; Karatekin, O.; Noel, J.-P.; van Ruymbeke, M.; Dehant, V.

    2012-04-01

    The radio meter has been broadly applied for the study of the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI). As the electromagnetic radiation is the main external climate driving force of our planet: Earth, the Imbalance of the Earth's Radiation Budget (IERB) is a key to better understanding our climate system. The PICARD mission is to study the Sun-Earth's climate connections. With the opportunity of the PICARD mission, we have developed a Bolometric Oscillation Sensor (BOS), which are currently flying side by side with the radiometer SOlar Variability for Picard (SOVAP-an updated instrument of DIARAD/VIRGO on SOHO) to study the solar constant as well as the radiation of the Earth. The BOS sensor is composed with two detectors, the light mass detector (m1), which is rapidly response to the thermal-flux change, and the heavy mass detector (m2), which is slowly modulated by the electromagnetic energy. In addition, the m1 detector can stand alone to precisely monitor the ambient temperature. The original goal of the BOS-PICARD is to study the irradiance of the Sun's and the Earth's. After nearly two year's observations, the variations of Long-Wave radiation of the Earth can be well determined from the BOS measurements. It confirms that the BOS can be applied to measure the electromagnetic radiation near the infrared. Encouraged by these results, we are now working on a second generation of the BOS sensor for the nano-satellite project and future planetary missions. The new sensor will be able to determine the albedo (visible), infrared radiation as well as to detect the thermal initial of objective target either by the remote sensing on-board satellite or by the in-situ measurement setting up in the Lander.

  5. RADIATION DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

    1960-05-10

    A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

  6. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Zane W.; Burger, Arnold

    2010-03-30

    A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

  7. Time domain electromagnetic metal detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, P.

    1996-04-01

    This presentation focuses on illustrating by case histories the range of applications and limitations of time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) systems for buried metal detection. Advantages claimed for TDEM metal detectors are: independent of instrument response (Geonics EM61) to surrounding soil and rock type; simple anomaly shape; mitigation of interference by ambient electromagnetic noise; and responsive to both ferrous and non-ferrous metallic targets. The data in all case histories to be presented were acquired with the Geonics EM61 TDEM system. Case histories are a test bed site on Molokai, Hawaii; Fort Monroe, Virginia; and USDOE, Rocky Flats Plant. The present limitations of this technology are: discrimination capabilities in terms of type of ordnance, and depth of burial is limited, and ability of resolving targets with small metallic ambient needs to be improved.

  8. Radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Fultz, Brent T.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  9. Radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Fultz, B.T.

    1980-12-05

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and x-rays generated in backscatter Moessbauer effect spectroscopy and x-ray spectrometry, which has a large window for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  10. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2014-04-22

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  11. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2015-07-28

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  12. Electromagnetic Flaw Detector Is Easier To Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clendenin, C. Gerald; Namkung, Min; Simpson, John W.; Fulton, James P.; Wincheski, Buzz; Todhunter, Ronald G.

    1994-01-01

    Electromagnetic flaw detector based on eddy-current principle. It nondestructively detects cracks, voids, and other flaws introducing electrical discontinuities into specimens of electrically conductive materials. Circuitry associated with this flaw detector simpler than older eddy-current flaw detectors. Unlike older eddy-current nondestructive testers, calibration ordinarily not needed, and readings interpreted with relative ease.

  13. Gravitational scattering of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooker, J. T.; Janis, A. I.

    1980-01-01

    The scattering of electromagnetic radiation by linearized gravitational fields is studied to second order in a perturbation expansion. The incoming electromagnetic radiation can be of arbitrary multipole structure, and the gravitational fields are also taken to be advanced fields of arbitrary multipole structure. All electromagnetic multipole radiation is found to be scattered by gravitational monopole and time-varying dipole fields. No case has been found, however, in which any electromagnetic multipole radiation is scattered by gravitational fields of quadrupole or higher-order multipole structure. This lack of scattering is established for infinite classes of special cases, and is conjectured to hold in general. The results of the scattering analysis are applied to the case of electromagnetic radiation scattered by a moving mass. It is shown how the mass and velocity may be determined by a knowledge of the incident and scattered radiation.

  14. Conical electromagnetic radiation flux concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Concentrator provides method of concentrating a beam of electromagnetic radiation into a smaller beam, presenting a higher flux density. Smaller beam may be made larger by sending radiation through the device in the reverse direction.

  15. Tin Can Radiation Detector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crull, John L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides instructions for making tin can radiation detectors from empty aluminum cans, aluminum foil, clear plastic, copper wire, silica gel, and fine, unwaxed dental floss put together with tape or glue. Also provides suggestions for activities using the detectors. (JN)

  16. RADIATION WAVE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wouters, L.F.

    1958-10-28

    The detection of the shape and amplitude of a radiation wave is discussed, particularly an apparatus for automatically indicating at spaced lntervals of time the radiation intensity at a flxed point as a measure of a radiation wave passing the point. The apparatus utilizes a number of photomultiplier tubes surrounding a scintillation type detector, For obtainlng time spaced signals proportional to radiation at predetermined intervals the photolnultiplier tubes are actuated ln sequence following detector incidence of a predetermined radiation level by electronic means. The time spaced signals so produced are then separately amplified and relayed to recording means.

  17. Mossbauer spectrometer radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A Mossbauer spectrometer with high efficiencies in both transmission and backscattering techniques is described. The device contains a sodium iodide crystal for detecting radiation caused by the Mossbauer effect, and two photomultipliers to collect the radiation detected by the crystal. When used in the transmission technique, the sample or scatterer is placed between the incident radiation source and the detector. When used in a backscattering technique, the detector is placed between the incident radiation source and the sample of scatterer such that the incident radiation will pass through a hole in the crystal and strike the sample. Diagrams of the instrument are provided.

  18. Microwave Radiation Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Direct photon detector responds to microwave frequencies. Method based on trapped-ion frequency-generation standards proposed to detect radio-frequency (RF) radiation at 40.5 GHz. Technique used for directdetection (RF) communication, radar, and radio astronomy.

  19. Detectors for Particle Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinknecht, Konrad

    1999-01-01

    This textbook provides a clear, concise and comprehensive review of the physical principles behind the devices used to detect charged particles and gamma rays, and the construction and performance of these many different types of detectors. Detectors for high-energy particles and radiation are used in many areas of science, especially particle physics and nuclear physics experiments, nuclear medicine, cosmic ray measurements, space sciences and geological exploration. This second edition includes all the latest developments in detector technology, including several new chapters covering micro-strip gas chambers, silicion strip detectors and CCDs, scintillating fibers, shower detectors using noble liquid gases, and compensating calorimeters for hadronic showers. This well-illustrated textbook contains examples from the many areas in science in which these detectors are used. It provides both a coursebook for students in physics, and a useful introduction for researchers in other fields.

  20. [Nonionizing radiation and electromagnetic fields].

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, J H

    1991-01-01

    Nonionising radiation comprises all kinds of radiation and fields of the electromagnetic spectrum where biological matter is not ionised, as well as mechanical waves such as infrasound and ultrasound. The electromagnetic spectrum is subdivided into individual sections and includes: Static and low-frequency electric and magnetic fields including technical applications of energy with mains frequency, radio frequency fields, microwaves and optic radiation (infrared, visible light, ultraviolet radiation including laser). The following categories of persons can be affected by emissions by non-ionising radiation: Persons in the environment and in the household, workers, patients undergoing medical diagnosis or treatment. If the radiation is sufficiently intense, or if the fields are of appropriate strength, a multitude of effects can occur (depending on the type of radiation), such as heat and stimulating or irritating action, inflammations of the skin or eyes, changes in the blood picture, burns or in some cases cancer as a late sequel. The ability of radiation to penetrate into the human body, as well as the types of interaction with biological tissue, with organs and organisms, differs significantly for the various kinds of nonionising radiation. The following aspects of nonionising radiation are discussed: protection of humans against excessive sunlight rays when sunbathing and when exposed to UV radiation (e.g. in solaria); health risks of radio and microwaves (safety of microwave cookers and mobile radio units); effects on human health by electric and magnetic fields in everyday life. PMID:1837859

  1. Underwater radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, Lyle W.; McKnight, Richard P.

    1986-01-01

    A detector apparatus for differentiating between gamma and neutron radiation is provided. The detector includes a pair of differentially shielded Geiger-Mueller tubes. The first tube is wrapped in silver foil and the second tube is wrapped in lead foil. Both the silver and lead foils allow the passage of gamma rays at a constant rate in a gamma ray only field. When neutrons are present, however, the silver activates and emits beta radiation that is also detected by the silver wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube while the radiation detected by the lead wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube remains constant. The amount of radiation impinging on the separate Geiger-Mueller tubes is then correlated in order to distinguish between the neutron and gamma radiations.

  2. Radiation Detectors and Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, Andrea

    The use of radiation detectors in the analysis of art objects represents a very special application in a true interdisciplinary field. Radiation detectors employed in this field detect, e.g., x-rays, γ-rays, β particles, and protons. Analyzed materials range from stones, metals, over porcelain to paintings. The available nondestructive and noninvasive analytical methods cover a broad range of techniques. Hence, for the sake of brevity, this chapter will concentrate on few techniques: Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Proton Induced γ-ray Emission (PIGE).

  3. Ionizing radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1990-01-01

    An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

  4. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  5. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  6. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Patt, Bradley E.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Tull, Carolyn R.; Vilkelis, Gintas

    2002-01-01

    A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

  7. Handheld CZT radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, William S.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.; Baird, William

    2004-08-24

    A handheld CZT radiation detector having a CZT gamma-ray sensor, a multichannel analyzer, a fuzzy-logic component, and a display component is disclosed. The CZT gamma-ray sensor may be a coplanar grid CZT gamma-ray sensor, which provides high-quality gamma-ray analysis at a wide range of operating temperatures. The multichannel analyzer categorizes pulses produce by the CZT gamma-ray sensor into channels (discrete energy levels), resulting in pulse height data. The fuzzy-logic component analyzes the pulse height data and produces a ranked listing of radioisotopes. The fuzzy-logic component is flexible and well-suited to in-field analysis of radioisotopes. The display component may be a personal data assistant, which provides a user-friendly method of interacting with the detector. In addition, the radiation detector may be equipped with a neutron sensor to provide an enhanced mechanism of sensing radioactive materials.

  8. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, Dimitrios C.

    1983-01-01

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  9. Photovoltaic radiation detector element

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, D.C.

    1980-12-17

    A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

  10. Compton Sources of Electromagnetic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft,Gerd Priebe

    2011-01-01

    When a relativistic electron beam interacts with a high-field laser beam, intense and highly collimated electromagnetic radiation will be generated through Compton scattering. Through relativistic upshifting and the relativistic Doppler effect, highly energetic polarized photons are radiated along the electron beam motion when the electrons interact with the laser light. For example, X-ray radiation can be obtained when optical lasers are scattered from electrons of tens-of-MeV beam energy. Because of the desirable properties of the radiation produced, many groups around the world have been designing, building, and utilizing Compton sources for a wide variety of purposes. In this review article, we discuss the generation and properties of the scattered radiation, the types of Compton source devices that have been constructed to date, and the prospects of radiation sources of this general type. Due to the possibilities of producing hard electromagnetic radiation in a device that is small compared to the alternative storage ring sources, it is foreseen that large numbers of such sources may be constructed in the future.

  11. Precision synchrotron radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, M.; Rouse, F.; Butler, J.; Jung, C.K.; Lateur, M.; Nash, J.; Tinsman, J.; Wormser, G.; Gomez, J.J.; Kent, J.

    1989-03-01

    Precision detectors to measure synchrotron radiation beam positions have been designed and installed as part of beam energy spectrometers at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The distance between pairs of synchrotron radiation beams is measured absolutely to better than 28 /mu/m on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This contributes less than 5 MeV to the error in the measurement of SLC beam energies (approximately 50 GeV). A system of high-resolution video cameras viewing precisely-aligned fiducial wire arrays overlaying phosphorescent screens has achieved this accuracy. Also, detectors of synchrotron radiation using the charge developed by the ejection of Compton-recoil electrons from an array of fine wires are being developed. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. High resistivity silicon radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, Julie Diane

    This work addresses the use of silicon detectors both for charged particles in a high energy physics application, and for electromagnetic radiation, specifically x-ray and γ-ray detectors. The second generation of a PIN diode array pixel detector integrated with full twin well CMOS was developed for high energy particle physics. A new vertical high voltage diode termination structure was developed and compared to other diode termination structures through simulations. The new structure reduced the process complexity and improved the yield and robustness to mechanical damage to the backside, allowing us to build a much larger detector with denser frontside patterning, implementing a new sparse-field read-out design. Radiation measurements from this pixel detector are presented, which represent the first integrated sparse-field read-out results ever reported. A prototype 1mm thick PIN diode array x-ray detector with a depletion voltage of 800V was simulated, designed and fabricated for protein crystallography. Using 2D simulations, an optimized 5 floating ring high voltage structure was designed and implemented. Preliminary measurements indicate that the detector can be operated successfully up to 1000V. A new cylindrical drift detector was developed for x-ray absorbtion spectroscopy. To minimize the drift time, an analytic expression for drift field and 2D simulations were used to optimize the applied surface potential for a uniform drift field. Three novel integrated transistors for first stage amplification were designed and fabricated, which show promise of working with fairly straightforward optimization. A new technique for controlling dark current due to surface generation was introduced and implemented successfully. Instead of collecting the surface current at a guard anode, surface generation is suppressed by putting n+ diffusion rings between the p+ rings, dramatically reducing the depleted oxide interface area which is the site for surface generation

  13. Anisotropic conducting films for electromagnetic radiation applications

    DOEpatents

    Cavallo, Francesca; Lagally, Max G.; Rojas-Delgado, Richard

    2015-06-16

    Electronic devices for the generation of electromagnetic radiation are provided. Also provided are methods for using the devices to generate electromagnetic radiation. The radiation sources include an anisotropic electrically conducting thin film that is characterized by a periodically varying charge carrier mobility in the plane of the film. The periodic variation in carrier mobility gives rise to a spatially varying electric field, which produces electromagnetic radiation as charged particles pass through the film.

  14. Constraining neutrino electromagnetic properties by germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Chi, Hsin-Chang; Huang, Keh-Ning; Li, Hau-Bin; Liu, C.-P.; Singh, Lakhwinder; Wong, Henry T.; Wu, Chih-Liang; Wu, Chih-Pan

    2015-01-01

    The electromagnetic properties of neutrinos, which are either trivial or negligible in the context of the Standard Model, can probe new physics and have significant implications in astrophysics and cosmology. The current best direct limits on the neutrino millicharges and magnetic moments are both derived from data taken with germanium detectors with low thresholds at keV levels. In this paper, we discuss in detail a robust, ab initio method: the multiconfiguration relativistic random-phase approximation, that enables us to reliably understand the germanium detector response at the sub-keV level, where atomic many-body physics matters. By using existing data with sub-keV thresholds, limits on the reactor antineutrino's millicharge, magnetic moment, and charge radius squared are derived. The projected sensitivities for next-generation experiments are also given and discussed.

  15. RADIATION DETECTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Gundlach, J.C.; Kelley, G.G.

    1958-02-25

    This patent relates to radiation detection devices and presents a unique detection system especialiy desirable for portable type instruments using a Geiger-Mueller for a high voltage battery, thereby reducing the size and weight of the instrument, by arranging a one-shot multivibrator to recharge a capacitance applying operating potential to tho Geiger-Mueller tube each time a nuclear particle is detected. When detection occurs, the multivibrator further delivers a pulse to an appropriate indicator doing away with the necessity for the pulse amplifier conventionally intermediate between the detector and indicator in pulse detection systems.

  16. Radiation Hazard Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA technology has made commercially available a new, inexpensive, conveniently-carried device for protection, of people exposed to potentially dangerous levels of microwave radiation. Microwaves are radio emissions of extremely high frequency. They can be hazardous but the degree of hazard is not yet well understood. Generally, it is believed that low intensity radiation of short duration is not harmful but that exposure to high levels can induce deep internal burns, affecting the circulatory and nervous systems, and particularly the eyes. The Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has established an allowable safe threshold of exposure. However, people working near high intensity sources of microwave energy-for example, radar antennas and television transmitters-may be unknowingly exposed to radiation levels beyond the safe limit. This poses not only a personal safety problem but also a problem for employers in terms of productivity loss, workman's compensation claims and possible liability litigation. Earlier-developed monitoring devices which warn personnel of dangerous radiation levels have their shortcomings. They can be cumbersome and awkward to use while working. They also require continual visual monitoring to determine if a person is in a dangerous area of radiation, and they are relatively expensive, another deterrent to their widespread adoption. In response to the need for a cheaper and more effective warning system, Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed, under NASA auspices, a new, battery-powered Microwave Radiation Hazard Detector. To bring the product to the commercial market, California Institute Research Foundation, the patent holder, granted an exclusive license to Cicoil Corporation, Chatsworth, California, an electronic components manufacturer.

  17. Nano structural anodes for radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph V.; Serkiz, Steven M.; McWhorter, Christopher S.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-07-07

    Anodes for proportional radiation counters and a process of making the anodes is provided. The nano-sized anodes when present within an anode array provide: significantly higher detection efficiencies due to the inherently higher electric field, are amenable to miniaturization, have low power requirements, and exhibit a small electromagnetic field signal. The nano-sized anodes with the incorporation of neutron absorbing elements (e.g., .sup.10B) allow the use of neutron detectors that do not use .sup.3He.

  18. Influence of electromagnetic interference on the analog part of hybrid Pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, M.; Kraus, V.; Granja, C.; Jakubek, J.; Georgiev, V.; Hromadka, M.; Skala, J.; Kubik, Z.

    2011-12-01

    The analog signal from the sensor of hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors is prone to electro-magnetic interference. The study and diagnosis of induced and common electro-magnetic coupling between the analog part and digital part of these devices is required. The influence of electro-magnetic interference was tested on the setup with a pixel detector Timepix or Medipix and a FITPix read-out interface. Measurements were carried out of external as well as internal interference. We evaluated the influence of both sources of electro-magnetic interference to the noise recorded by pixels. We measured the local spatial intensity distribution and frequency spectrum of the electro-magnetic field originating inside the readout chip during its own operation. In context of this test we exposed the detector chip to a locally generated artificial electro-magnetic field evaluating its sensitivity to induced interference. Consequently, the whole setup of the detector and read-out interface was exposed to a distant source of electro-magnetic radiation, during which we tested efficiency of the electro-magnetic shielding of various arrangements. Further, tests measured the coupling over power supply lines. In particular, the noise generated by the operation of the detector itself was determined. In addition, the detector sensitivity to deliberately induced noise was evaluated. By means of these tests weak points of the setup sensitive to the intrusion of electro-magnetic interference are revealed. When locations of susceptible places are identified proper methods can be applied to increase immunity of the detector setup against the electro-magnetic interference. Experiences gained are planned to be used in development of the EMI shielded version of the FITPIX interface shielded to electro-magnetic interference.

  19. Method and apparatus for measuring electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Been, J. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An apparatus and method are described in which the capacitance of a semiconductor junction subjected to an electromagnetic radiation field is utilized to indicate the intensity or strength of the radiation.

  20. Apparatus for processing electromagnetic radiation and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatewood, George D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Measuring apparatus including a ruled member having alternate transparent and opaque zones. An optical coupler connecting the ruled member with electromagnetic radiation-conversion apparatus. The conversion apparatus may include a photomultiplier and a discriminator. Radiation impinging on the ruled member will, in part, be converted to electrical pulses which correspond to the intensity of the radiation. A method of processing electromagnetic radiation includes providing a member having alternating dark and light zones, establishing movement of the member through the beam of electromagnetic radiation with the dark zones interrupting passage of radiation through the rule, providing an optical coupler to connect a portion of the radiation with a conversion station where the radiation portion is converted into an electrical pulse which is related to the intensity of the radiation received at the conversion station. The electrical pulses may be counted and the digitized signals stored or permanently recorded to produce positional information.

  1. Radiation damage of germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pehl, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Energetic particles can produce interstitial-vacancy pairs in a crystal by knocking the atoms from their normal positions. Detectors are unique among semiconductor devices in depending on very low concentrations of electrically active impurities, and also on efficient transport of holes and electrons over relatively large distances. Because the dense regions of damage produced by energetic particles may result in donors and/or acceptors, and also provide trapping sites for holes and electrons, detectors are very sensitive to radiation damage. In addition to these effects occurring within the detector, radiation may also change the characteristics of the exposed surfaces causing unpredictable effects on the detector leakage current. Radiation-induced surface degradation has rarely, if ever, been observed for germanium detectors. The possibility of minimizing hole trapping in charge collection by the use of a high-purity germanium coaxial detector configured with the p (+) contact on the coaxial periphery is discussed.

  2. Detection of electromagnetic radiation using nonlinear materials

    DOEpatents

    Hwang, Harold Y.; Liu, Mengkun; Averitt, Richard D.; Nelson, Keith A.; Sternbach, Aaron; Fan, Kebin

    2016-06-14

    An apparatus for detecting electromagnetic radiation within a target frequency range is provided. The apparatus includes a substrate and one or more resonator structures disposed on the substrate. The substrate can be a dielectric or semiconductor material. Each of the one or more resonator structures has at least one dimension that is less than the wavelength of target electromagnetic radiation within the target frequency range, and each of the resonator structures includes at least two conductive structures separated by a spacing. Charge carriers are induced in the substrate near the spacing when the resonator structures are exposed to the target electromagnetic radiation. A measure of the change in conductivity of the substrate due to the induced charge carriers provides an indication of the presence of the target electromagnetic radiation.

  3. Updating Plasma Scattering of Electromagnetic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, J.

    2010-05-01

    The monograph Plasma Scattering of Electromagnetic Radiation was published by Academic Press in 1975. A Russian edition, Atomidzat, came out in 1978. An updated version is being prepared by D. Froula, S. Glenzer. N Luhmann, and J. Sheffield for publication in 2010 by Elsevier. The new version will discuss the broader applications of Thomson scattering, which include the full range of plasmas used in research and industry. The expansion of the field has been made possible by the growing number of powerful radiation sources (from X-rays to microwaves), detectors, and innovative techniques. When the book was published, the highest temperatures in laboratory plasmas were around 2 keV for the electrons. Compare this to today's 25 keV where the relativistic effects are dramatic. The application to low temperature plasmas with Te in the range of 1 - 30+ eV, important in industry, has grown. Important capabilities have been developed in the areas of energetic particle, micro-instability, and high energy density plasma measurements. For the future, we look forward to the use of scattering as a diagnostic on the large new fusion facilities-NIF, LMJ, and ITER.

  4. Porous material for protection from electromagnetic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmina, Olga E-mail: bdushkina89@mail.ru; Dushkina, Maria E-mail: bdushkina89@mail.ru; Suslyaev, Valentin; Semukhin, Boris

    2014-11-14

    It is shown that the porous glass crystalline material obtained by a low temperature technology can be used not only for thermal insulation, but also for lining of rooms as protective screens decreasing harmful effect of electromagnetic radiation as well as to establish acoustic chambers and rooms with a low level of electromagnetic background. The material interacts with electromagnetic radiation by the most effective way in a high frequency field (above 100 GHz). At the frequency of 260 GHz the value of the transmission coefficient decreases approximately in a factor times in comparison with foam glass.

  5. Electromagnetic Radiation under Explicit Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Dhiraj; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.

    2015-04-01

    We report our observation that radiation from a system of accelerating charges is possible only when there is explicit breaking of symmetry in the electric field in space within the spatial configuration of the radiating system. Under symmetry breaking, current within an enclosed area around the radiating structure is not conserved at a certain instant of time resulting in radiation in free space. Electromagnetic radiation from dielectric and piezoelectric material based resonators are discussed in this context. Finally, it is argued that symmetry of a resonator of any form can be explicitly broken to create a radiating antenna.

  6. Electromagnetic radiation from beam-plasma instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Whelan, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism by which unstable electrostatic waves of an electron-beam plasma system are converted into observed electromagnetic waves is of great current interest in space plasma physics. Electromagnetic radiation arises from both natural beam-plasma systems, e.g., type III solar bursts and kilometric radiation, and from man-made electron beams injected from rockets and spacecraft. In the present investigation the diagnostic difficulties encountered in space plasmas are overcome by using a large laboratory plasma. A finite diameter (d approximately equal to 0.8 cm) electron beam is injected into a uniform quiescent magnetized afterglow plasma of dimensions large compared with electromagnetic wavelength. Electrostatic waves grow, saturate and decay within the uniform central region of the plasma volume so that linear mode conversion on density gradients can be excluded as a possible generation mechanism for electromagnetic waves.

  7. Relativistically strong electromagnetic radiation in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Kondo, K.

    2016-03-01

    Physical processes in a plasma under the action of relativistically strong electromagnetic waves generated by high-power lasers have been briefly reviewed. These processes are of interest in view of the development of new methods for acceleration of charged particles, creation of sources of bright hard electromagnetic radiation, and investigation of macroscopic quantum-electrodynamical processes. Attention is focused on nonlinear waves in a laser plasma for the creation of compact electron accelerators. The acceleration of plasma bunches by the radiation pressure of light is the most efficient regime of ion acceleration. Coherent hard electromagnetic radiation in the relativistic plasma is generated in the form of higher harmonics and/or electromagnetic pulses, which are compressed and intensified after reflection from relativistic mirrors created by nonlinear waves. In the limit of extremely strong electromagnetic waves, radiation friction, which accompanies the conversion of radiation from the optical range to the gamma range, fundamentally changes the behavior of the plasma. This process is accompanied by the production of electron-positron pairs, which is described within quantum electrodynamics theory.

  8. Broadband optical radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Hong, S. D.; Moacanin, J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting optical radiation by optically monitoring temperature changes in a microvolume caused by absorption of the optical radiation to be detected is described. More specifically, a thermal lens forming material is provided which has first and second opposite, substantially parallel surfaces. A reflective coating is formed on the first surface, and a radiation absorbing coating is formed on the reflective coating. Chopped, incoming optical radiation to be detected is directed to irradiate a small portion of the radiation absorbing coating. Heat generated in this small area is conducted to the lens forming material through the reflective coating, thereby raising the temperature of a small portion of the lens forming material and causing a thermal lens to be formed therein.

  9. Radiation energy detector and analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, T.G.

    1981-09-15

    A radiation detector array and a method for measuring the spectral content of radiation. The radiation sensor or detector is an array or stack of thin solid-electrolyte batteries. The batteries, arranged in a stack, may be composed of independent battery cells or may be arranged so that adjacent cells share a common terminal surface. This common surface is possible since the polarity of the batteries with respect to an adjacent battery is unrestricted, allowing a reduction in component parts of the assembly and reducing the overall stack length. Additionally, a test jig or chamber for allowing rapid measurement of the voltage across each battery is disclosed. A multichannel recorder and display may be used to indicate the voltage gradient change across the cells, or a small computer may be used for rapidly converting these voltage readings to a graph of radiation intensity versus wavelength or energy. The behavior of the batteries when used as a radiation detector and analyzer are such that the voltage measurements can be made at leisure after the detector array has been exposed to the radiation, and it is not necessary to make rapid measurements as is now done.

  10. Electromagnetic radiation from beam-plasma instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, P. L.; Dawson, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A computer simulation is developed for the generation of electromagnetic radiation in an electron beam-plasma interaction. The plasma is treated as a two-dimensional finite system, and effects of a continuous nonrelativistic beam input are accounted for. Three momentum and three field components are included in the simulation, and an external magnetic field is excluded. EM radiation generation is possible through interaction among Langmuir oscillations, ion-acoustic waves, and the electromagnetic wave, producing radiation perpendicular to the beam. The radiation is located near the plasma frequency, and polarized with the E component parallel to the beam. The scattering of Langmuir waves caused by ion-acoustic fluctuations generates the radiation. Comparison with laboratory data for the three-wave interactions shows good agreement in terms of the radiation levels produced, which are small relative to the plasma thermal energy.

  11. Cadmium telluride photovoltaic radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, D.C.; Fox, R.J.

    A dosimetry-type radiation detector is provided which employs a polycrystalline, chlorine-compensated cadmium telluride wafer fabricated to operate as a photovoltaic current generator used as the basic detecting element. A photovoltaic junction is formed in the wafer by painting one face of the cadmium telluride wafer with an n-type semi-conductive material. The opposite face of the wafer is painted with an electrically conductive material to serve as a current collector. The detector is mounted in a hermetically sealed vacuum containment. The detector is operated in a photovoltaic mode (zero bias) while DC coupled to a symmetrical differential current amplifier having a very low input impedance. The amplifier converts the current signal generated by radiation impinging upon the barrier surface face of the wafer to a voltage which is supplied to a voltmeter calibrated to read quantitatively the level of radiation incident upon the detecting wafer.

  12. Cadmium telluride photovoltaic radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, Dimitrios C.; Fox, Richard J.

    1981-01-01

    A dosimetry-type radiation detector is provided which employs a polycrystalline, chlorine-compensated cadmium telluride wafer fabricated to operate as a photovoltaic current generator used as the basic detecting element. A photovoltaic junction is formed in the wafer by painting one face of the cadmium telluride wafer with an n-type semiconductive material. The opposite face of the wafer is painted with an electrically conductive material to serve as a current collector. The detector is mounted in a hermetically sealed vacuum containment. The detector is operated in a photovoltaic mode (zero bias) while DC coupled to a symmetrical differential current amplifier having a very low input impedance. The amplifier converts the current signal generated by radiation impinging upon the barrier surface face of the wafer to a voltage which is supplied to a voltmeter calibrated to read quantitatively the level of radiation incident upon the detecting wafer.

  13. Portable Radiation Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Through a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center, General Pneumatics Corporation's Western Research Center satisfied a NASA need for a non-clogging Joule-Thomson cryostat to provide very low temperature cooling for various sensors. This NASA-supported cryostat development played a key part in the development of more portable high-purity geranium gamma-ray detectors. Such are necessary to discern between the radionuclides in medical, fuel, weapon, and waste materials. The outcome of the SBIR project is a cryostat that can cool gamma-ray detectors, without vibration, using compressed gas that can be stored compactly and indefinitely in a standby mode. General Pneumatics also produces custom J-T cryostats for other government, commercial and medical applications.

  14. Advanced Space Radiation Detector Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2013-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of multiple solid-state detectors will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art instruments for the detection and monitoring of the space radiation field for deep space and aerospace applications.

  15. Advanced Space Radiation Detector Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2013-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of multiple solid-state detectors will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art instruments for the detection and monitoring of the space radiation field for deep space and aerospace applications.

  16. Advanced Space Radiation Detector Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2013-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of multiple solid-state detectors will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art (SOA) instruments for the detection and monitoring of the space radiation field for deep space and aerospace applications.

  17. Ionizing Radiation Detector

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Gomez W.; James, Ralph B.; Burger, Arnold; Chinn, Douglas A.

    2003-11-18

    A CdZnTe (CZT) crystal provided with a native CdO dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals is disclosed. A two step process is provided for forming the dielectric coating which includes etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water after attaching electrical contacts to the crystal surface.

  18. Flexible composite radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D. Wayne; Bennett, Bryan L.; Muenchausen, Ross E.; Wrobleski, Debra A.; Orler, Edward B.

    2006-12-05

    A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum response of photomultipliers (about 400 nanometers) or photodiodes (about 600 nanometers), which maximizes the overall detector efficiency.

  19. Advanced Radiation Detector Development

    SciTech Connect

    The University of Michigan

    1998-07-01

    Since our last progress report, the project at The University of Michigan has continued to concentrate on the development of gamma ray spectrometers fabricated from cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). This material is capable of providing energy resolution that is superior to that of scintillation detectors, while avoiding the necessity for cooling associated with germanium systems. In our past reports, we have described one approach (the coplanar grid electrode) that we have used to partially overcome some of the major limitations on charge collection that is found in samples of CZT. This approach largely eliminates the effect of hole motion in the formation of the output signal, and therefore leads to pulses that depend only on the motion of a single carrier (electrons). Since electrons move much more readily through CZT than do holes, much better energy resolution can be achieved under these conditions. In our past reports, we have described a 1 cm cube CZT spectrometer fitted with coplanar grids that achieved an energy resolution of 1.8% from the entire volume of the crystal. This still represents, to our knowledge, the best energy resolution ever demonstrated in a CZT detector of this size.

  20. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, Michael A.; Crowell, John M.

    1987-01-01

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  1. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

    1985-04-09

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  2. A low temperature gravitational radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, W. O.

    1971-01-01

    The beginning design of an experiment is discussed for studying gravitational radiation by using massive detectors which are cooled to ultralow temperatures in order to improve the signal to noise ratios and the effective range and stability of the detectors. The gravitational detector, a low detection system, a cooled detector, magnetic support, superconducting shielding, and superconducting accelerometer detector are described.

  3. Radiated fields from an electromagnetic pulse simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, M.; Delisle, G. Y.; Kashyap, S.

    Simulators of electromagnetic pulses allow generation within a limited time of very high-intensity fields such as those produced in a nuclear explosion. These fields can be radiated out of the test zone at a lower but nevertheless significant level; if the intensity of these fields is sufficiently high, damage to humans and electronic equipment can result. An evaluation of the potential danger of these simulator emissions requires knowledge of the amplitude, duration, and the energy of the radiated impulses. A technique is presented for calculating the fields radiated by a parallel-plane electromagnetic pulse simulator. The same method can also be applied to a rhombic type simulator. Sample numerical results are presented along with the calculations of the energy and power density and a discussion of the formation of the field in the frequency domain.

  4. High-power ultrawideband electromagnetic pulse radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshelev, Vladimir I.; Buyanov, Yuri I.; Koval'chuk, Boris M.; Andreev, Yuri A.; Belichenko, Victor P.; Efremov, Anatoly M.; Plisko, Vyacheslav V.; Sukhushin, Konstantin N.; Vizir, Vadim A.; Zorin, Valery B.

    1997-10-01

    Basing on energetic processes studying in the near-field radiator zone, a new concept of antenna synthesizing for ultrawideband electromagnetic pulse radiation has been suggested. The results of experimental investigations of the antennae developed with using of this concept for high-power applications are presented. The antennae have small dimensions, high electrical strength, cardioid pattern with linear polarization of the pulse radiated and they are ideally adapted to be used as a steering antenna array element. A high-voltage nanosecond bipolar pulse generator design to excite antennae is described.

  5. Plasma Panel Based Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Dr. Peter S.; Varner Jr, Robert L; Ball, Robert; Beene, James R; Ben Moshe, M.; Benhammou, Yan; Chapman, J. Wehrley; Etzion, E; Ferretti, Claudio; Bentefour, E; Levin, Daniel S.; Moshe, M.; Silver, Yiftah; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Zhou, Bing

    2013-01-01

    The plasma panel sensor (PPS) is a gaseous micropattern radiation detector under current development. It has many operational and fabrication principles common to plasma display panels (PDPs). It comprises a dense matrix of small, gas plasma discharge cells within a hermetically sealed panel. As in PDPs, it uses non-reactive, intrinsically radiation-hard materials such as glass substrates, refractory metal electrodes, and mostly inert gas mixtures. We are developing these devices primarily as thin, low-mass detectors with gas gaps from a few hundred microns to a few millimeters. The PPS is a high gain, inherently digital device with the potential for fast response times, fine position resolution (< 50 m RMS) and low cost. In this paper we report here on prototype PPS experimental results in detecting betas, protons and cosmic muons, and we extrapolate on the PPS potential for applications including detection of alphas, heavy-ions at low to medium energy, thermal neutrons and X-rays.

  6. Direct detector for terahertz radiation

    DOEpatents

    Wanke, Michael C.; Lee, Mark; Shaner, Eric A.; Allen, S. James

    2008-09-02

    A direct detector for terahertz radiation comprises a grating-gated field-effect transistor with one or more quantum wells that provide a two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region. The grating gate can be a split-grating gate having at least one finger that can be individually biased. Biasing an individual finger of the split-grating gate to near pinch-off greatly increases the detector's resonant response magnitude over prior QW FET detectors while maintaining frequency selectivity. The split-grating-gated QW FET shows a tunable resonant plasmon response to FIR radiation that makes possible an electrically sweepable spectrometer-on-a-chip with no moving mechanical optical parts. Further, the narrow spectral response and signal-to-noise are adequate for use of the split-grating-gated QW FET in a passive, multispectral terahertz imaging system. The detector can be operated in a photoconductive or a photovoltaic mode. Other embodiments include uniform front and back gates to independently vary the carrier densities in the channel region, a thinned substrate to increase bolometric responsivity, and a resistive shunt to connect the fingers of the grating gate in parallel and provide a uniform gate-channel voltage along the length of the channel to increase the responsivity and improve the spectral resolution.

  7. [Applications of electromagnetic radiation in medicine].

    PubMed

    Miłowska, Katarzyna; Grabowska, Katarzyna; Gabryelak, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Recent decades have been devoted to the intense search for the response to questions related to the impact of radiation on the human body. Due to the growing fashion for a healthy lifestyle, increasing numbers of works about the alleged dangers of electromagnetic waves and diseases that they cause appeared. However, the discoveries of 20th century, and knowledge of the properties of electromagnetic radiation have allowed to broaden the horizons of the use of artificial sources of radiation in many fields of science and especially in medicine. The aim of this paper is to show that although excessive radiation or high doses are dangerous to the human body, its careful and controlled use, does not pose a threat, and it is often necessary in therapy. The possibility of using ionizing radiation in radiotherapy, isotope diagnostics or medical imaging, and non-ionizing radiation in the treatment for dermatological disorders and cancers will be presented. The unique properties of synchrotron radiation result in using it on a large scale in the diagnosis of pathological states by imaging methods. PMID:24864099

  8. Virtual detector of synchrotron radiation (VDSR) - A C++ parallel code for particle tracking and radiation calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Rykovanov, S. G.; Chen, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-12-21

    The Virtual Detector for Synchrotron Radiation (VDSR) is a parallel C++ code developed to calculate the incoherent radiation from a single charged particle or a beam moving in given external electro-magnetic fields. In this proceedings the code structure and features are introduced. An example of radiation generation from the betatron motion of a beam in the focusing fields of the wake in a laser-plasma accelerator is presented.

  9. Electromagnetic radiation absorbers and modulators comprising polyaniline

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, Arthur J.; Ginder, John M.; Roe, Mitchell G.; Hajiseyedjavadi, Hamid

    1992-01-01

    A composition for absorbing electromagnetic radiation, wherein said electromagnetic radiation possesses a wavelength generally in the range of from about 1000 Angstroms to about 50 meters, wherein said composition comprises a polyaniline composition of the formula ##STR1## where y can be equal to or greater than zero, and R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 are independently selected from the group containing of H, --OCH.sub.3, --CH.sub.3, --F, --Cl, --Br, --I, NR.sup.3 .sub.2, --NHCOR.sup.3, --OH, --O.sup.-, SR.sup.3, --OCOR.sup.3, --NO.sub.2, --COOH, --COOR.sup.3, --COR.sup.3, --CHO, and --CN, where R.sup.3 is a C.sub.1 to C.sub.8 alkyl, aryl or aralkyl group.

  10. Classical electromagnetic radiation of the Dirac electron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, G.

    1973-01-01

    A wave-function-dependent four-vector potential is added to the Dirac equation in order to achieve conservation of energy and momentum for a Dirac electron and its emitted electromagnetic field. The resultant equation contains solutions which describe transitions between different energy states of the electron. As a consequence it is possible to follow the space-time evolution of such a process. This evolution is shown in the case of the spontaneous emission of an electromagnetic field by an electron bound in a hydrogen-like atom. The intensity of the radiation and the spectral distribution are calculated for transitions between two eigenstates. The theory gives a self-consistent deterministic description of some simple radiation processes without using quantum electrodynamics or the correspondence principle.

  11. Does electromagnetic radiation accelerate galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichler, D.

    1977-01-01

    The 'reactor' theories of Tsytovich and collaborators (1973) of cosmic-ray acceleration by electromagnetic radiation are examined in the context of galactic cosmic rays. It is shown that any isotropic synchrotron or Compton reactors with reasonable astrophysical parameters can yield particles with a maximum relativistic factor of only about 10,000. If they are to produce particles with higher relativistic factors, the losses due to inverse Compton scattering of the electromagnetic radiation in them outweigh the acceleration, and this violates the assumptions of the theory. This is a critical restriction in the context of galactic cosmic rays, which have a power-law spectrum extending up to a relativistic factor of 1 million.

  12. Inexpensive solid state radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, Karen; Hastings, Peter; Harrison, R. Giles; Nicoll, Keri

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring of environmental radioactivity is of interest both within the geosciences community and to groups such as the emergency services who need to quickly assess the safety of an environment. Here we present a light weight and inexpensive detector based on solid state technology, that can be easily worn or carried, or used disposably. It responds to gamma radiation and other radioactive particles such as those from space weather and cosmic rays. Unlike traditional technology such as the Geiger counter, the detector can operate at low voltage without the need for step-up circuitry, and it can also distinguish different particle energies. It is suitable for monitoring background radioactivity from cosmic rays and radon as well as responding to higher radioactivity levels. We anticipate that the device will have a broad range of end users, from terrestrial to space applications.

  13. Radiation force and balance of electromagnetic momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, I.; Jiménez, J. L.; Roa-Neri, J. A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Some force densities can be expressed as a divergence of a stress tensor, as is the case with the electromagnetic force density. We have shown elsewhere that from the Maxwell equations several balance equations of electromagnetic momentum can be derived, depending on the form these equations are expressed in terms of fields E, D, B, H, and polarisations P and M. These balance equations imply different force densities and different stress tensors, providing a great flexibility to solve particular problems. Among these force densities we have found some proposed in the past with plausibility arguments, like the Einstein–Laub force density, while other proposed force densities appear as particular or limit cases of these general force densities, like the Helmholtz force density. We calculate the radiation force of an electromagnetic wave incident on a semi-infinite negligibly absorbing material using these balance equations, corroborating in this way that the surface integration of the stress tensor gives the same result that the calculation made through a volume integration of the force density, as done by Bohren. As is usual in applications of Gauss’s theorem, the surface on which the surface integral is to be performed must be chosen judiciously, and due care of discontinuities on the boundary conditions must be taken. Advanced undergraduates and graduate students will find a different approach to new aspects of the interaction of radiation with matter.

  14. Large numbers hypothesis. II - Electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper develops the theory of electromagnetic radiation in the units covariant formalism incorporating Dirac's large numbers hypothesis (LNH). A direct field-to-particle technique is used to obtain the photon propagation equation which explicitly involves the photon replication rate. This replication rate is fixed uniquely by requiring that the form of a free-photon distribution function be preserved, as required by the 2.7 K cosmic radiation. One finds that with this particular photon replication rate the units covariant formalism developed in Paper I actually predicts that the ratio of photon number to proton number in the universe varies as t to the 1/4, precisely in accord with LNH. The cosmological red-shift law is also derived and it is shown to differ considerably from the standard form of (nu)(R) - const.

  15. Hybrid anode for semiconductor radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ge; Bolotnikov, Aleksey E; Camarda, Guiseppe; Cui, Yonggang; Hossain, Anwar; Kim, Ki Hyun; James, Ralph B

    2013-11-19

    The present invention relates to a novel hybrid anode configuration for a radiation detector that effectively reduces the edge effect of surface defects on the internal electric field in compound semiconductor detectors by focusing the internal electric field of the detector and redirecting drifting carriers away from the side surfaces of the semiconductor toward the collection electrode(s).

  16. Pocket-size microwave radiation hazard detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolbly, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Inexpensive lightweight unit is easily carried in coat pocket or attached to belt, detector sounds alarm in presence of dangerous microwave radiation levels. Unit consists of antenna, detector, level sensor, keyed oscillator, and speaker. Antenna may be single equiangular spiral or set of orthogonal slot dipoles. Signal detector is simple diode in small package.

  17. Electromagnetic Shower Reconstruction for theSilicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, N.

    2005-12-08

    This report presents a two-pass reconstruction algorithm for electromagnetic showers, based on studies with simulated photons in the highly segmented Silicon Tungsten calorimeter of the Silicon Detector concept for the International Linear Collider. It is shown that the initial reconstruction and identification of the dense shower cores allows shower separation down to 3 cm distance between two photons on the calorimeter surface. First results are shown for the subsequent collection of unassociated hits around the shower cores necessary to reconstruct complete energy deposits by individual particles.

  18. The Electromagnetic Calorimeter of the future PANDA Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Novotny, Rainer

    2006-10-27

    Experiments with a cooled antiproton beam at the future accelerator facility FAIR at GSI, Darmstadt, will be performed with the 4{pi} detector PANDA comprising a high resolution, compact and fast homogeneous electromagnetic calorimeter to detect photons between 10MeV and 10GeV energy inside a superconducting solenoid (2T). The target calorimeter comprises more than 20,000 PbWO4 crystals of significantly enhanced quality read-out with large area avalanche photodiodes at an operating temperature of -25 degree sign C. The paper describes the quality of PWO-II and illustrates the future performance based on response measurements with high-energy photons.

  19. Societal Impacts of Solar Electromagnetic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lean, J. L.

    2000-05-01

    Changes in solar electromagnetic radiation, which occur continuously and at all wavelengths of the spectrum, can have significant societal impacts on a wide range of time scales. Detection of climate change and ozone depletion requires reliable specification of solar-induced processes that mask or exacerbate anthropogenic effects. Living with, and mitigating, climate change and ozone depletion has significant economic, habitat and political impacts of international extent. As an example, taxes to restrict carbon emission may cause undue economic stress if the role of greenhouse gases in global warming is incorrectly diagnosed. Ignoring solar-induced ozone changes in the next century may lead to incorrect assessment of the success of the Montreal Protocol in protecting the ozone layer by limiting the use of ozone-destroying chlorofluorocarbons. Societal infrastructure depends in many ways on space-based technological assets. Communications and navigation for commerce, industry, science and defense rely on satellite signals transmitted through, and reflected by, electrons in the ionosphere. Electron densities change in response to solar flares, and by orders of magnitude in response to EUV and X-ray flux variations during the Sun's 11-year activity cycle. Spacecraft and space debris experience enhanced drag on their orbits when changing EUV radiation causes upper atmosphere densities to increase. Especially affected are spacecraft and debris in lower altitude orbits, such as Iridium-type communication satellites, and the International Space Station (ISS). Proper specification of solar-induced fluctuations in the neutral upper atmosphere can, for example, aid in tracking the ISS and surrounding space debris, reducing the chance of ISS damage from collisions, and maximizing its operations. Aspects of solar electromagnetic radiation variability will be briefly illustrated on a range of time scales, with specific identification of the societal impacts of different

  20. Discriminating electromagnetic radiation based on angle of incidence

    DOEpatents

    Hamam, Rafif E.; Bermel, Peter; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin; Yeng, Adrian Y. X.; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Joannopoulos, John D.

    2015-06-16

    The present invention provides systems, articles, and methods for discriminating electromagnetic radiation based upon the angle of incidence of the electromagnetic radiation. In some cases, the materials and systems described herein can be capable of inhibiting reflection of electromagnetic radiation (e.g., the materials and systems can be capable of transmitting and/or absorbing electromagnetic radiation) within a given range of angles of incidence at a first incident surface, while substantially reflecting electromagnetic radiation outside the range of angles of incidence at a second incident surface (which can be the same as or different from the first incident surface). A photonic material comprising a plurality of periodically occurring separate domains can be used, in some cases, to selectively transmit and/or selectively absorb one portion of incoming electromagnetic radiation while reflecting another portion of incoming electromagnetic radiation, based upon the angle of incidence. In some embodiments, one domain of the photonic material can include an isotropic dielectric function, while another domain of the photonic material can include an anisotropic dielectric function. In some instances, one domain of the photonic material can include an isotropic magnetic permeability, while another domain of the photonic material can include an anisotropic magnetic permeability. In some embodiments, non-photonic materials (e.g., materials with relatively large scale features) can be used to selectively absorb incoming electromagnetic radiation based on angle of incidence.

  1. Radiation damage effects on solid state detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainor, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Totally depleted silicon diodes are discussed which are used as nuclear particle detectors in investigations of galactic and solar cosmic radiation and trapped radiation. A study of radiation and chemical effects on the diodes was conducted. Work on electron and proton irradiation of surface barrier detectors with thicknesses up to 1 mm was completed, and work on lithium-drifted silicon devices with thicknesses of several millimeters was begun.

  2. A novel compact real time radiation detector.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiping; Xu, Xiufeng; Cao, Hongrui; Tang, Shibiao; Ding, Baogang; Yin, Zejie

    2012-08-01

    A novel compact real time radiation detector with cost-effective, ultralow power and high sensitivity based on Geiger counter is presented. The power consumption of this detector which employs CMOS electro circuit and ultralow-power microcontroller is down to only 12.8 mW. It can identify the presences of 0.22 μCi (60)Co at a distance of 1.29 m. Furthermore, the detector supports both USB bus and serial interface. It can be used for personal radiation monitoring and also fits the distributed sensor network for radiation detection. PMID:22738843

  3. Electron gas grid semiconductor radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Edwin Y.; James, Ralph B.

    2002-01-01

    An electron gas grid semiconductor radiation detector (EGGSRAD) useful for gamma-ray and x-ray spectrometers and imaging systems is described. The radiation detector employs doping of the semiconductor and variation of the semiconductor detector material to form a two-dimensional electron gas, and to allow transistor action within the detector. This radiation detector provides superior energy resolution and radiation detection sensitivity over the conventional semiconductor radiation detector and the "electron-only" semiconductor radiation detectors which utilize a grid electrode near the anode. In a first embodiment, the EGGSRAD incorporates delta-doped layers adjacent the anode which produce an internal free electron grid well to which an external grid electrode can be attached. In a second embodiment, a quantum well is formed between two of the delta-doped layers, and the quantum well forms the internal free electron gas grid to which an external grid electrode can be attached. Two other embodiments which are similar to the first and second embodiment involve a graded bandgap formed by changing the composition of the semiconductor material near the first and last of the delta-doped layers to increase or decrease the conduction band energy adjacent to the delta-doped layers.

  4. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exceptions for radiation detectors. 173.310... for radiation detectors. Radiation detectors, radiation sensors, electron tube devices, or ionization chambers, herein referred to as “radiation detectors,” that contain only Division 2.2 gases, are...

  5. Electromagnetic radiation properties of foods and agricultural products

    SciTech Connect

    Mohsenin, N.N.

    1984-01-01

    In this book, the author examines the effects of the various regions of the electromagnetic radiation spectrum on foods and agricultural products. Among the regions of the electromagnetic radiation spectrum covered are high-energy beta and neutron particles, gamma-rays and X-rays, to lower-energy visible, near infrared, infrared, microwave and low-energy radiowaves and electric currents. Dr. Mohsenin applies these electromagnetic phenomena to food products such as fruits, vegetables, seeds, dairy products, meat and processed foods. Contents: Some Basic Concepts of Electromagnetic Radiation. Basic Instruments for Measurement of Optical Properties. Applications of Radiation in the Visible Spectrum. Color and its Measurement. Sorting for Color and Appearance. Near-Infrared and Infrared Radiation Applications. Applications of High-Energy Radiation. Related Concepts of Microwaves, Radiowaves, and Electric Currents. Measurement of Electrical Properties of Foods and Agricultural Products. Applications of Electrical Properties. Appendix, Cited References. Subject Index.

  6. Magnetic fields and nonthermal electromagnetic radiation of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryvdyk, Volodymyr

    2016-07-01

    The results of the astrophysical observations of the magnetic fields and the nonthermal electromagnetic radiation of stars and the mechanisms generation of the nonthermal electromagnetic radiation from the magnetized stars of different spectral classes on the different stages their evolution are present. Results of observations allow to calculate the plasma parameters and the magnetic fields in areas around magnetized stars where is generated given radiation and their change during stellar evolution.

  7. First experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models for detector simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadio, G.; Apostolakis, J.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bianchini, C.; Bitzes, G.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; de Fine Licht, J.; Duhem, L.; Elvira, D.; Gheata, A.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Novak, M.; Presbyterian, M.; Shadura, O.; Seghal, R.; Wenzel, S.

    2015-12-01

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. The GeantV vector prototype for detector simulations has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth, parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance or memory access latency and speed. An additional challenge is to avoid the code duplication often inherent to supporting heterogeneous platforms. In this paper we present the first experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models developed for the GeantV project.

  8. First experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models for detector simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Amadio, G.; Apostolakis, J.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bianchini, C.; Bitzes, G.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; Licht, J.de Fine; Duhem, L.; Elvira, D.; Gheata, A.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Novak, M.; Presbyterian, M.; Shadura, O.; Seghal, R.; Wenzel, S.

    2015-12-23

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. The GeantV vector prototype for detector simulations has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth, parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance or memory access latency and speed. An additional challenge is to avoid the code duplication often inherent to supporting heterogeneous platforms. In this paper we present the first experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models developed for the GeantV project.

  9. Metamaterials for Cherenkov Radiation Based Particle Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tyukhtin, A. V.; Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Antipov, S.

    2009-01-22

    Measurement of Cherenkov radiation (CR) has long been a useful technique for charged particle detection and beam diagnostics. We are investigating metamaterials engineered to have refractive indices tailored to enhance properties of CR that are useful for particle detectors and that cannot be obtained using conventional media. Cherenkov radiation in dispersive media with a large refractive index differs significantly from the same effect in conventional detector media, like gases or aerogel. The radiation pattern of CR in dispersive metamaterials presents lobes at very large angles with respect to particle motion. Moreover, the frequency and particle velocity dependence of the radiated energy can differ significantly from CR in a conventional dielectric medium.

  10. Detectivity of gas leakage based on electromagnetic radiation transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yunting; Wang, Lingxue; Li, Jiakun; Zhang, Changxing; Zhang, Bei

    2011-05-01

    Standoff detection of gas leakage is a fundamental need in petrochemical and power industries. The passive gas imaging system using thermal imager has been proven to be efficient to visualize leaking gas which is not visible to the naked eye. The detection probability of gas leakage is the basis for designing a gas imaging system. Supposing the performance parameters of the thermal imager are known, the detectivity based on electromagnetic radiation transfer model to image gas leakage is analyzed. This model takes into consideration a physical analysis of the gas plume spread in the atmosphere-the interaction processes between the gas and its surrounding environment, the temperature of the gas and the background, the background surface emissivity, and also gas concentration, etc. Under a certain environmental conditions, through calculating the radiation reaching to the detector from the camera's optical field of view, we obtain an entity "Gas Equivalent Blackbody Temperature Difference (GEBTD)" which is the radiation difference between the on-plume and off-plume regions. Comparing the GEBTD with the Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD) of the thermal imager, we can know whether the system can image the gas leakage. At last, an example of detecting CO2 gas by JADE MWIR thermal imager with a narrow band-pass filter is presented.

  11. Three-dimensional architecture for solid state radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Sherwood

    1999-01-01

    A radiation-damage resistant radiation detector is formed on a substrate formed of a material doped with a first conductivity type dopant. The detector includes at least one first electrode formed of first conductivity type dopant, and at least one second electrode that is spaced-apart from the first electrode and formed of a second conductivity type dopant. Each first and second electrode penetrates into the substrate from a substrate surface, and one or more electrodes may penetrate entirely through the substrate, that is traversing from one surface to the other surface. Particulate and/or electromagnetic radiation penetrating at least a surface of the substrate releases electrons and holes in substrate regions. Because the electrodes may be formed entirely through the substrate thickness, the released charges will be a relatively small distance from at least a portion of such an electrode, e.g., a distance less than the substrate thickness. The electrons and/or holes traverse the small distance and are collected by said electrodes, thus promoting rapid detection of the radiation. By providing one or more electrodes with a dopant profile radially graded in a direction parallel to a substrate surface, an electric field results that promotes rapid collection of released electrons and said holes. Monolithic combinations of such detectors may be fabricated including CMOS electronics to process radiation signals.

  12. Three-dimensional architecture for solid state radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Parker, S.

    1999-03-30

    A radiation-damage resistant radiation detector is formed on a substrate formed of a material doped with a first conductivity type dopant. The detector includes at least one first electrode formed of first conductivity type dopant, and at least one second electrode that is spaced-apart from the first electrode and formed of a second conductivity type dopant. Each first and second electrode penetrates into the substrate from a substrate surface, and one or more electrodes may penetrate entirely through the substrate, that is traversing from one surface to the other surface. Particulate and/or electromagnetic radiation penetrating at least a surface of the substrate releases electrons and holes in substrate regions. Because the electrodes may be formed entirely through the substrate thickness, the released charges will be a relatively small distance from at least a portion of such an electrode, e.g., a distance less than the substrate thickness. The electrons and/or holes traverse the small distance and are collected by said electrodes, thus promoting rapid detection of the radiation. By providing one or more electrodes with a dopant profile radially graded in a direction parallel to a substrate surface, an electric field results that promotes rapid collection of released electrons and said holes. Monolithic combinations of such detectors may be fabricated including CMOS electronics to process radiation signals. 45 figs.

  13. Apparatus and method for the simultaneous detection of neutrons and ionizing electromagnetic radiation

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Zane W.

    2000-01-01

    A sensor for simultaneously detecting neutrons and ionizing electromagnetic radiation comprising: a sensor for the detection of gamma radiation, the sensor defining a sensing head; the sensor further defining an output end in communication with the sensing head; and an exterior neutron-sensitive material configured to form around the sensing head; wherein the neutron-sensitive material, subsequent to the capture of the neutron, fissions into an alpha-particle and a .sup.7 Li ion that is in a first excited state in a majority of the fissions, the first excited state decaying via the emission of a single gamma ray at 478 keV which can in turn be detected by the sensing head; and wherein the sensing head can also detect the ionizing electromagnetic radiation from an incident radiation field without significant interference from the neutron-sensitive material. A method for simultaneously detecting neutrons and ionizing electromagnetic radiation comprising the steps of: providing a gamma ray sensitive detector comprising a sensing head and an output end; conforming an exterior neutron-sensitive material configured to form around the sensing head of the detector; capturing neutrons by the sensing head causing the neutron-sensitive material to fission into an alpha-particle and a .sup.7 Li ion that is in a first excited state in a majority of the fissions, the state decaying via the emission of a single gamma ray at 478 keV; sensing gamma rays entering the detector through the neutron-sensitive material; and producing an output through a readout device coupled to the output end; wherein the detector provides an output which is proportional to the energy of the absorbed ionizing electromagnetic radiation.

  14. Processing circuitry for single channel radiation detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Samuel D. (Inventor); Delaune, Paul B. (Inventor); Turner, Kathryn M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Processing circuitry is provided for a high voltage operated radiation detector. An event detector utilizes a comparator configured to produce an event signal based on a leading edge threshold value. A preferred event detector does not produce another event signal until a trailing edge threshold value is satisfied. The event signal can be utilized for counting the number of particle hits and also for controlling data collection operation for a peak detect circuit and timer. The leading edge threshold value is programmable such that it can be reprogrammed by a remote computer. A digital high voltage control is preferably operable to monitor and adjust high voltage for the detector.

  15. Enhanced radiation detectors using luminescent materials

    DOEpatents

    Vardeny, Zeev V.; Jeglinski, Stefan A.; Lane, Paul A.

    2001-01-01

    A radiation detecting device comprising a radiation sensing element, and a layer of luminescent material to expand the range of wavelengths over which the sensing element can efficiently detect radiation. The luminescent material being selected to absorb radiation at selected wavelengths, causing the luminescent material to luminesce, and the luminescent radiation being detected by the sensing element. Radiation sensing elements include photodiodes (singly and in arrays), CCD arrays, IR detectors and photomultiplier tubes. Luminescent materials include polymers, oligomers, copolymers and porphyrines, Luminescent layers include thin films, thicker layers, and liquid polymers.

  16. Wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Edwin Y.; James, Ralph B.

    2002-01-01

    Wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector useful for gamma-ray and x-ray spectrometers and imaging systems. The detector is fabricated using wafer fusion to insert an electrically conductive grid, typically comprising a metal, between two solid semiconductor pieces, one having a cathode (negative electrode) and the other having an anode (positive electrode). The wafer fused semiconductor radiation detector functions like the commonly used Frisch grid radiation detector, in which an electrically conductive grid is inserted in high vacuum between the cathode and the anode. The wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector can be fabricated using the same or two different semiconductor materials of different sizes and of the same or different thicknesses; and it may utilize a wide range of metals, or other electrically conducting materials, to form the grid, to optimize the detector performance, without being constrained by structural dissimilarity of the individual parts. The wafer-fused detector is basically formed, for example, by etching spaced grooves across one end of one of two pieces of semiconductor materials, partially filling the grooves with a selected electrical conductor which forms a grid electrode, and then fusing the grooved end of the one semiconductor piece to an end of the other semiconductor piece with a cathode and an anode being formed on opposite ends of the semiconductor pieces.

  17. Adverse reproductive events and electromagnetic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, W.; Ouellet-Hellstrom, R.

    1991-07-31

    In 1989 approximately 42,000 questionnaires were mailed to female physical therapists to assess the risk of adverse reproductive effects among those exposed to electromagnetic radiation at radiofrequencies. From the resulting data, the risk of early recognized fetal loss was assessed using a nested case-control design. The cases (1753 miscarriages) were matched to controls (1753 other pregnancies except ectopics) on mothers age at conception and the number of years elapsed between conception and interview. The results of the study indicate that female physical therapists who work with microwave diathermy 6 months prior to the pregnancy and/or during the first trimester were at increased risk of experiencing a recognized early fetal loss, but female physical therapists who work with shortwave diathermy were not at an increased risk. This association was shown to hold even when the mother's age at conception, the number of years elapsed between conception and interview, the number of prior early fetal losses, mother's conditions ever diagnosed, and use of other modalities were controlled. The data also suggest a possible association between exposure to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation with an elevated risk of early recognized fetal loss.

  18. Dynamic channeling of electromagnetic radiation by extended plasma formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolpakov, V. I.; Norinskii, L. V.; Rogov, V. S.

    1991-05-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of using axisymmetric extended plasma formations (EPFs) as guide lines for the transmission of electromagnetic radiation. The EPF was formed as a result of optical breakdown in air via radiation from an Nd:glass laser. The results obtained demonstrate the channeling of microwave radiation in an EPF with a blurred boundary.

  19. Gravitational Stokes parameters. [for electromagnetic and gravitational radiation in relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anile, A. M.; Breuer, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    The electromagnetic and gravitational Stokes parameters are defined in the general theory of relativity. The general-relativistic equation of radiative transfer for polarized radiation is then derived in terms of the Stokes parameters for both high-frequency electromagnetic and gravitational waves. The concept of Stokes parameters is generalized for the most general class of metric theories of gravity, where six (instead of two) independent states of polarization are present.

  20. Device for calibrating a radiation detector system

    DOEpatents

    Mc Fee, Matthew C.; Kirkham, Tim J.; Johnson, Tippi H.

    1994-01-01

    A device for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a "shield plate" or shell, and an opposing "source plate" containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, heart, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects.

  1. Device for calibrating a radiation detector system

    DOEpatents

    McFee, M.C.; Kirkham, T.J.; Johnson, T.H.

    1994-12-27

    A device is disclosed for testing a radiation detector system that includes at least two arrays of radiation detectors that are movable with respect to each other. The device includes a ''shield plate'' or shell, and an opposing ''source plate'' containing a source of ionizing radiation. Guides are attached to the outer surface of the shell for engaging the forward ends of the detectors, thereby reproducibly positioning the detectors with respect to the source and with respect to each other, thereby ensuring that a predetermined portion of the radiation emitted by the source passes through the shell and reaches the detectors. The shell is made of an hydrogenous material having approximately the same radiological attenuation characteristics as composite human tissue. The source represents a human organ such as the lungs, heart, kidneys, liver, spleen, pancreas, thyroid, testes, prostate, or ovaries. The source includes a source of ionizing radiation having a long half-life and an activity that is within the range typically searched for in human subjects. 3 figures.

  2. Detailed observations of the source of terrestrial narrowband electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.

    1982-01-01

    Detailed observations are presented of a region near the terrestrial plasmapause where narrowband electromagnetic radiation (previously called escaping nonthermal continuum radiation) is being generated. These observations show a direct correspondence between the narrowband radio emissions and electron cyclotron harmonic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency. In addition, electromagnetic radiation propagating in the Z-mode is observed in the source region which provides an extremely accurate determination of the electron plasma frequency and, hence, density profile of the source region. The data strongly suggest that electrostatic waves and not Cerenkov radiation are the source of the banded radio emissions and define the coupling which must be described by any viable theory.

  3. Radiation and particle detector and amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, K. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A radiation or charged particle detector is described which incorporates a channel multiplier structure to amplify the detected rays or particles. The channel multiplier structure has a support multiplying element with a longitudinal slot along one side. The element supports a pair of plates positioned contiguous with the slot. The plates funnel the particles or rays to be detected into the slotted aperture and the element, thus creating an effectively wide aperture detector of the windowless type.

  4. Multiple-mode radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, Liam D.; Derzon, Mark S.; Kay, Randolph R.; Bauer, Todd; Trotter, Douglas Chandler; Henry, Michael David

    2015-08-25

    An apparatus for detecting radiation is provided. In embodiments, at least one sensor medium is provided, of a kind that interacts with radiation to generate photons and/or charge carriers. The apparatus also includes at least one electrode arrangement configured to collect radiation-generated charge from a sensor medium that has been provided. The apparatus also includes at least one photodetector configured to produce an electrical output in response to photons generated by radiation in such a sensor medium, and an electronic circuit configured to produce an output that is jointly responsive to the collected charge and to the photodetector output. At least one such electrode arrangement, at least one such photodetector, and at least one such sensor medium are combined to form an integral unit.

  5. Radiative Thrust Chamber -enthalpy gain by absorption of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamgami, Farid; Scharringhausen, Marco

    Propulsion systems in aerospace engineering either use chemical, thermal or electrical energy to accelerate a medium in order to create thrust. In the first case the energy is already contained in the propulsive medium itself whereas for the latter two the energy is stored externally and provided to the driving medium via different ways. This paper discusses an unconventional, purely radiation-based method to convey energy to the mass flow via electromagnetic interaction. Depending on the wavelength of the incident radiation, it can interact with the medium in different ways. Among these are absorption and scattering. The first mechanism always leads to an increase of the atoms' and molecules' energy, whereas the second can be elastic or inelastic. Depending on the atomic or molecular structure of the driving medium, different degrees of freedom are energized. Whereas atomic particles possess translational and electronic degrees of freedom, molecules exhibit rotational and vibrational modes. We intend to focus the discussion on possibilities to enhance the mass flow enthalpy by absorp-tion as an alternative to the conventional methods. It is outlined whether certain degrees of freedom can be thermalized efficiently to provide momentum.

  6. Radiation hardness characteristics of Si-PIN radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Manhee; Jo, Woo Jin; Kim, Han Soo; Ha, Jang Ho

    2015-06-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has fabricated Si-PIN radiation detectors with low leakage current, high resistivity (>11 kΩ cm) and low capacitance for high-energy physics and X-ray spectroscopy. Floating-zone (FZ) 6-in. diameter N-type silicon wafers, with <1 1 1> crystal orientation and 675 μm thick, were used in the detector fabrication. The active areas are 3 mm×3 mm, 5 mm×5 mm and 10 mm×10 mm. We used a double deep-diffused structure at the edge of the active area for protection from the surface leakage path. We also compared the electrical performance of the Si-PIN detector with anti-reflective coating (ARC). For a detector with an active area of 3 mm×3 mm, the leakage current is about 1.9 nA and 7.4 nA at a 100 V reverse bias voltage, and 4.6 pF and 4.4 pF capacitance for the detector with and without an ARC, respectively. In addition, to compare the energy resolution in terms of radiation hardness, we measured the energy spectra with 57Co and 133Ba before the irradiation. Using developed preamplifiers (KAERI-PA1) that have ultra-low noise and high sensitivity, and a 3 mm×3 mm Si-PIN radiation detector, we obtained energy resolutions with 122 keV of 57Co and 81 keV of 133Ba of 0.221 keV and 0.261 keV, respectively. After 10, 100, 103, 104 and 105 Gy irradiation, we tested the characteristics of the radiation hardness on the Si-PIN radiation detectors in terms of electrical and energy spectra performance changes. The fabricated Si-PIN radiation detectors are working well under high dose irradiation conditions.

  7. Low-Power Multi-Aspect Space Radiation Detector System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave; Freeman, Jon C.; Burkebile, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    The advanced space radiation detector development team at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has the goal of developing unique, more compact radiation detectors that provide improved real-time data on space radiation. The team has performed studies of different detector designs using a variety of combinations of solid-state detectors, which allow higher sensitivity to radiation in a smaller package and operate at lower voltage than traditional detectors. Integration of all of these detector technologies will result in an improved detector system in comparison to existing state-of-the-art (SOA) instruments for the detection and monitoring of the deep space radiation field.

  8. Imaging radiation detector with gain

    DOEpatents

    Morris, C.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Atencio, L.G.

    1982-07-21

    A radiation imaging device which has application in x-ray imaging. The device can be utilized in CAT scanners and other devices which require high sensitivity and low x-ray fluxes. The device utilizes cumulative multiplication of charge carriers on the anode plane and the collection of positive ion charges to image the radiation intensity on the cathode plane. Parallel and orthogonal cathode wire arrays are disclosed as well as a two-dimensional grid pattern for collecting the positive ions on the cathode.

  9. Imaging radiation detector with gain

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Idzorek, George C.; Atencio, Leroy G.

    1984-01-01

    A radiation imaging device which has application in x-ray imaging. The device can be utilized in CAT scanners and other devices which require high sensitivity and low x-ray fluxes. The device utilizes cumulative multiplication of charge carriers on the anode plane and the collection of positive ion charges to image the radiation intensity on the cathode plane. Parallel and orthogonal cathode wire arrays are disclosed as well as a two-dimensional grid pattern for collecting the positive ions on the cathode.

  10. Radiation effects in IRAS extrinsic infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnell, L.; Langford, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    During the calibration and testing of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) focal plane, it was observed that the extrinsic photoconductor detectors were affected by gamma radiation at dose levels of the order of one rad. Since the flight environment will subject the focal plane to dose levels of this order from protons in single pass through the South Atlantic Anomaly, an extensive program of radiation tests was carried out to measure the radiation effects and to devise a method to counteract these effects. The effects observed after irradiation are increased responsivity, noise, and rate of spiking of the detectors after gamma-ray doses of less than 0.1 rad. The detectors can be returned almost to pre-irradiation performance by increasing the detector bias to breakdown and allowing a large current to flow for several minutes. No adverse effects on the detectors have been observed from this bias boost, and this technique will be used for IRAS with frequent calibration to ensure the accuracy of observations made with the instrument.

  11. Radiation damage in barium fluoride detector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Levey, P.W.; Kierstead, J.A.; Woody, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    To develop radiation hard detectors, particularly for high energy physics studies, radiation damage is being studied in BaF/sub 2/, both undoped and doped with La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Gd and Tm. Some dopants reduce radiation damage. In La doped BaF/sub 2/ they reduce the unwanted long lifetime luminescence which interferes with the short-lived fluorescence used to detect particles. Radiation induced coloring is being studied with facilities for making optical measurements before, during and after irradiation with /sup 60/C0 gamma rays. Doses of 10/sup 6/ rad, or less, create only ionization induced charge transfer effects since lattice atom displacement damage is negligible at these doses. All crystals studied exhibit color center formation, between approximately 200 and 800 nm, during irradiation and color center decay after irradiation. Thus only measurements made during irradiation show the total absorption present in a radiation field. Both undoped and La doped BaF/sub 2/ develop damage at minimum detectable levels in the UV---which is important for particle detectors. For particle detector applications these studies must be extended to high dose irradiations with particles energetic enough to cause lattice atom displacement damage. In principle, the reduction in damage provided by dopants could apply to other applications requiring radiation damage resistant materials.

  12. Bismuth tri-iodide radiation detector development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhale, Sasmit S.

    Bismuth tri-iodide is an attractive material for room temperature radiation detection. BiI3 demonstrates a number of properties that are apt for semiconductor radiation detection, especially gamma ray spectroscopy. The high atomic number (ZBi = 83 and ZI = 53) and the relatively high density (5.78 g/cm3) cause the material to have good photon stopping power, while the large band-gap (1.67 eV ) allows it to function as a room temperature radiation detector without any cooling mechanism. This work presents the fabrication and characterization of BiI3 radiation detectors. For the purpose of this research detectors were fabricated by cutting BiI3 crystal boules, followed by mechanical and chemical surface treatments. Detectors with various electrode geometries enabling single polarity charge sensing were fabricated. The electrical characteristics and the radiation response of the detectors were measured. The radiation response measurement was performed at room temperature using a 241Am alpha particle source and a 241Am sealed gamma-ray source. The spectral resolutions of the detectors varied from 2.09% - 6.1% for 59.5 keV gamma-rays and between 26% - 40% for 5.48 MeV alpha particles. Charge carrier properties such as the electron and hole mobility and lifetime were also estimated. The electron mobility for an ultrapure BiI 3 detector was estimated to be approximately 433 cm 2/Vs while that for antimony doped BiI3 was estimated to be around 956 cm2/Vs and the mobility-lifetime product for electrons was estimated to be around 5.44 x 10-4 cm 2/V. Detector simulation was performed using the Monte Carlo simulation code MCNP5. A Matlab script which incorporates charge carrier trapping and statistical variation was written to generate a gamma-ray spectrum from the simulated energy deposition spectra. Measured and simulated spectra were compared to extract the charge carrier mobility-lifetime products, which for electrons and holes were estimated to be 5 x 10-3 cm2/V and 1.3 x

  13. Integrator Circuitry for Single Channel Radiation Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Samuel D. (Inventor); Delaune, Paul B. (Inventor); Turner, Kathryn M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Input circuitry is provided for a high voltage operated radiation detector to receive pulses from the detector having a rise time in the range of from about one nanosecond to about ten nanoseconds. An integrator circuit, which utilizes current feedback, receives the incoming charge from the radiation detector and creates voltage by integrating across a small capacitor. The integrator utilizes an amplifier which closely follows the voltage across the capacitor to produce an integrator output pulse with a peak value which may be used to determine the energy which produced the pulse. The pulse width of the output is stretched to approximately 50 to 300 nanoseconds for use by subsequent circuits which may then use amplifiers with lower slew rates.

  14. Radiation detectors: needs and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Armantrout, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    Important applications for x- and ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy are found in prospecting, materials characterization, environmental monitoring, the life sciences, and nuclear physics. The specific requirements vary for each application with varying degrees of emphasis on either spectrometer resolution, detection efficiency, or both. Since no one spectrometer is ideally suited to this wide range of needs, compromises are usually required. Gas and scintillation spectrometers have reached a level of maturity, and recent interest has concentrated on semiconductor spectrometers. Germanium detectors are showing continuing refinement and are the spectrometers of choice for high resolution applications. The new high-Z semiconductors, such as CdTe and HgI/sub 2/, have shown steady improvement but are limited in both resolution and size and will likely be used only in applications which require their unique properties.

  15. Neutron responsive self-powered radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald P.; Cannon, Collins P.

    1978-01-01

    An improved neutron responsive self-powered radiation detector is disclosed in which the neutron absorptive central emitter has a substantially neutron transmissive conductor collector sheath spaced about the emitter and the space between the emitter and collector sheath is evacuated.

  16. Workshop on detectors for synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    2000-11-22

    Forefront experiments in many scientific areas for which synchrotron sources provide sufficient flux are nonetheless hindered because detectors cannot collect data fast enough, do not cover sufficiently solid angle, or do no have adequate resolution. Overall, the synchrotron facilities, each of which represents collective investments from funding agencies and user institutions ranging from many hundreds of millions to more than a billion dollars, are effectively significantly underutilized. While this chronic and growing problem plagues facilities around the world, it is particularly acute in the United States, where detector research often has to ride on the coat tails of explicitly science-oriented projects. As a first step toward moving out of this predicament, scientists from the U.S. synchrotron facilities held a national workshop in Washington, DC, on October 30-31, 2000. The Workshop on Detectors for Synchrotron Research aimed to create a national ''roadmap'' for development of synchrotron-radiation detectors.

  17. Silicon radiation detectors: materials and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Haller, E.E.

    1982-10-01

    Silicon nuclear radiation detectors are available today in a large variety of sizes and types. This profusion has been made possible by the ever increasing quality and diameter silicon single crystals, new processing technologies and techniques, and innovative detector design. The salient characteristics of the four basic detector groups, diffused junction, ion implanted, surface barrier, and lithium drift are reviewed along with the silicon crystal requirements. Results of crystal imperfections detected by lithium ion compensation are presented. Processing technologies and techniques are described. Two recent novel position-sensitive detector designs are discussed - one in high-energy particle track reconstruction and the other in x-ray angiography. The unique experimental results obtained with these devices are presented.

  18. Evolution Characteristics of Electromagnetic Power Radiated in Lightning Discharge Processes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jin-cui; Yuan, Ping; Cen, Jian-yong; Li, Ya-jun; Wang, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Combining the spectra of could-to-ground lightning discharge processes obtained by a slit-less spectrograph with synchronous electric field information, the temperature, the conductivity, the current peak, electromagnetic power peak and the luminance of the discharge channel are calculated. The values are in a normal range reported by references. The correlation among cut-off time before a subsequent return stroke, the luminance and electromagnetic power peak of the channel is discussed. The change trends of the conductivity, the current peak and electromagnetic power peak are also investigated. The results show when cut-off time is long, neutralized charges will grow, the current will rise and electromagnetic power radiated from the channel will increase. When the conductivity and the peak of the electric field change increase simultaneously, the current in the channel will rise and electromagnetic power radiated from the channel will be greater. This work will provide some references for calculating optical and electromagnetic energy radiated by lightning discharge processes. PMID:26601350

  19. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-05-26

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

  20. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Kaplan, Selig N.; Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1992-01-01

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

  1. A semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detector for space radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Martin; Bahadori, Amir; Campbell-Ricketts, Thomas; Empl, Anton; Hoang, Son Minh; Idarraga-Munoz, John; Rios, Ryan; Semones, Edward; Stoffle, Nicholas; Tlustos, Lukas; Turecek, Daniel; Pinsky, Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Progress in the development of high-performance semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detectors based on technologies developed for use in high-energy physics applications has enabled the development of a completely new generation of compact low-power active dosimeters and area monitors for use in space radiation environments. Such detectors can provide real-time information concerning radiation exposure, along with detailed analysis of the individual particles incident on the active medium. Recent results from the deployment of detectors based on the Timepix from the CERN-based Medipix2 Collaboration on the International Space Station (ISS) are reviewed, along with a glimpse of developments to come. Preliminary results from Orion MPCV Exploration Flight Test 1 are also presented. PMID:26256630

  2. A semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detector for space radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroupa, Martin; Bahadori, Amir; Campbell-Ricketts, Thomas; Empl, Anton; Hoang, Son Minh; Idarraga-Munoz, John; Rios, Ryan; Semones, Edward; Stoffle, Nicholas; Tlustos, Lukas; Turecek, Daniel; Pinsky, Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Progress in the development of high-performance semiconductor radiation imaging pixel detectors based on technologies developed for use in high-energy physics applications has enabled the development of a completely new generation of compact low-power active dosimeters and area monitors for use in space radiation environments. Such detectors can provide real-time information concerning radiation exposure, along with detailed analysis of the individual particles incident on the active medium. Recent results from the deployment of detectors based on the Timepix from the CERN-based Medipix2 Collaboration on the International Space Station (ISS) are reviewed, along with a glimpse of developments to come. Preliminary results from Orion MPCV Exploration Flight Test 1 are also presented.

  3. Radiation detectors for occupational safety measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaase, Heinrich; Chen, Mai; Grothmann, Knut

    1995-09-01

    The effective radiant exposures for artificial and natural UV-sources are determined by temporal integration over an 8 h working day. Therefore the spectrally weighted integration of the spectral irradiance from the radiation source in the plane of the exposure is to measure. Such measaurements are made with two different detector systems: measurements of UV radiation according to the integral method should be possible according to a quasi partial filtering method using different individually filtered photodiodes. A spectroradiometer for UV radiation analysis was tested due to its application in field measurements for meteorology, medicin, and occupational safety. The optical part of this compact instrument consists of a cosentrance optic, a monochromator and detector system. A comparison with commercial instruments is described.

  4. Electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; Joseph Mauger, G.; Anderson, Eric H.

    1999-02-01

    We have successfully developed and fielded an electromechanically cooled germanium radiation detector (EMC-HPGe) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This detector system was designed to provide optimum energy resolution, long lifetime, and extremely reliable operation for unattended and portable applications. For most analytical applications, high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors are the standard detectors of choice, providing an unsurpassed combination of high energy resolution performance and exceptional detection efficiency. Logistical difficulties associated with providing the required liquid nitrogen (LN) for cooling is the primary reason that these systems are found mainly in laboratories. The EMC-HPGe detector system described in this paper successfully provides HPGe detector performance in a portable instrument that allows for isotopic analysis in the field. It incorporates a unique active vibration control system that allows the use of a Sunpower Stirling cycle cryocooler unit without significant spectral degradation from microphonics. All standard isotopic analysis codes, including MGA and MGA++ [1], GAMANL [2], GRPANL [3]and MGAU [4], typically used with HPGe detectors can be used with this system with excellent results. Several national and international Safeguards organisations including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have expressed interest in this system. The detector was combined with custom software and demonstrated as a rapid Field Radiometric Identification System (FRIS) for the U.S. Customs Service [5]. The European Communities' Safeguards Directorate (EURATOM) is field-testing the first Safeguards prototype in their applications. The EMC-HPGe detector system design, recent applications, and results will be highlighted.

  5. Alpha-beta radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, Dale M.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Froelich, Thomas J.; Carter, Gregory L.

    1998-01-01

    The invention is based in part on the discovery that a plastic housing that is lightweight is surprisingly efficient inasmuch as background signals from any gamma radiation are significantly reduced by using a plastic housing instead of a metal housing. A further aspect of the present invention is the profile of the housing as a bi-linear approximation to a parabola resulting in full optical response from any location on the scintillation material to the photomultiplier tube. A yet further aspect of the present invention is that the survey probe is resistant to magnetic fields. A yet further aspect of the present invention is the use of a snap-fit retaining bracket that overcomes the need for multiple screws.

  6. Alpha-beta radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, D.M.; Simmons, K.L.; Froelich, T.J.; Carter, G.L.

    1998-08-18

    The invention is based in part on the discovery that a plastic housing that is lightweight is surprisingly efficient inasmuch as background signals from any gamma radiation are significantly reduced by using a plastic housing instead of a metal housing. A further aspect of the present invention is the profile of the housing as a bi-linear approximation to a parabola resulting in full optical response from any location on the scintillation material to the photomultiplier tube. A yet further aspect of the present invention is that the survey probe is resistant to magnetic fields. A yet further aspect of the present invention is the use of a snap-fit retaining bracket that overcomes the need for multiple screws. 16 figs.

  7. BOOK REVIEW: An Introduction to Classical Electromagnetic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Minh Quang

    1998-05-01

    This book provides the basic concepts necessary for an introduction to the classical theory of radiation. The reader is first introduced to Maxwell's equations and then led through their basic properties (Chapters 1 and 2). Non-uniform plane waves are treated in Chapter 3 with a discussion of the two and three dimensional cases. Many examples of two and three dimensional electromagnetic fields are given, and the physics of practical devices is also analysed. Geometrical rays, as well as the notion of a Gaussian beam, are introduced at this stage, and the link between electromagnetism and optical principles is amplified in Chapter 4 (the Huyghens principle, transmission through an aperture, scattering cross-section). The electromagnetic radiation from charge and current distributions is obtained in a general form from potential theory (Chapter 5), followed quite naturally by the classic illustration of the fields produced by a moving charge in the classical (v/c <<1) and relativistic (v/c~1) cases. Important physical examples (synchrotron radiation, Cherenkov radiation) are also considered in detail. The last two chapters treat the various problems associated with dipole radiation, from scattering by small objects (with, as an example, the colour and polarization of sky light) to the determination of the fields from various shapes and configurations of antenna. The reader is provided throughout all the chapters with abundant problems and examples. A much appreciated feature is the inclusion in the text, whenever necessary, of the required mathematical bases: numerical solutions of Maxwell's equation, Fourier transforms (Chapter 1), the stationary phase method (Chapter 3), the Dirac function (Chapter 5) and a review of vector analysis (Annex B). These mathematical sections will be specially useful for advanced undergraduates who may need some mathematical tools and, thus, will not need to search for these in more specialized books. The main focus of the book is to

  8. Influence of gravitation on the propagation of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mashhoon, B.

    1975-01-01

    The existence of a general helicity-rotation coupling is demonstrated for electromagnetic waves propagating in the field of a slowly rotating body and in the Goedel universe. This coupling leads to differential focusing of circularly polarized radiation by a gravitational field which is detectable for a rapidly rotating collapsed body. The electromagnetic perturbations and their frequency spectrum are given for the Goedel universe. The spectrum of frequencies is bounded from below by the characteristic rotation frequency of the Goedel universe. If the universe were rotating, the differential focusing effect would be extremely small due to the present upper limit on the anisotropy of the microwave background radiation.

  9. Development of a plasma panel radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, R.; Beene, J. R.; Ben-Moshe, M.; Benhammou, Y.; Bensimon, B.; Chapman, J. W.; Etzion, E.; Ferretti, C.; Friedman, P. S.; Levin, D. S.; Silver, Y.; Varner, R. L.; Weaverdyck, C.; Wetzel, R.; Zhou, B.; Anderson, T.; McKinny, K.; Bentefour, E. H.

    2014-11-01

    This article reports on the development and experimental results of commercial plasma display panels adapted for their potential use as micropattern gas radiation detectors. The plasma panel sensor (PPS) design and materials include glass substrates, metal electrodes and inert gas mixtures which provide a physically robust, hermetically sealed device. Plasma display panels used as detectors were tested with cosmic ray muons, beta rays and gamma rays, protons, and thermal neutrons. The results demonstrated rise times and time resolution of a few nanoseconds, as well as sub-millimeter spatial resolution compatible with the pixel pitch.

  10. Radiation experience with the CMS pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veszpremi, V.

    2015-04-01

    The CMS pixel detector is the innermost component of the CMS tracker occupying the region around the centre of CMS, where the LHC beams are crossed, between 4.3 cm and 30 cm in radius and 46.5 cm along the beam axis. It operates in a high-occupancy and high-radiation environment created by particle collisions. Studies of radiation damage effects to the sensors were performed throughout the first running period of the LHC . Leakage current, depletion voltage, pixel readout thresholds, and hit finding efficiencies were monitored as functions of the increasing particle fluence. The methods and results of these measurements will be described together with their implications to detector operation as well as to performance parameters in offline hit reconstruction.

  11. Radiation response issues for infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalma, Arne H.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers describe the most important radiation response issues for infrared detectors. In general, the two key degradation mechanisms in infrared detectors are the noise produced by exposure to a flux of ionizing particles (e.g.; trapped electronics and protons, debris gammas and electrons, radioactive decay of neutron-activated materials) and permanent damage produced by exposure to total dose. Total-dose-induced damage is most often the result of charge trapping in insulators or at interfaces. Exposure to short pulses of ionization (e.g.; prompt x rays or gammas, delayed gammas) will cause detector upset. However, this upset is not important to a sensor unless the recovery time is too long. A few detector technologies are vulnerable to neutron-induced displacement damage, but fortunately most are not. Researchers compare the responses of the new technologies with those of the mainstream technologies of PV HgCdTe and IBC Si:As. One important reason for this comparison is to note where some of the newer technologies have the potential to provide significantly improved radiation hardness compared with that of the mainstream technologies, and thus to provide greater motivation for the pursuit of these technologies.

  12. Protection of radiation detectors from fast neutron damage

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, S.

    1986-09-02

    A device is described for measuring radiation emitted from a nuclear explosion, the radiation having a comparatively fast moving gamma ray component and a comparatively slower neutron component. The device consists of: a solid state crystal radiation detector; a voltage source applied to bias the detector; and means responsive to the gamma ray component for removing the bias voltage for a predetermined time period whereby the crystal radiation detector is rendered less sensitive to the passage of the neutron radiation component.

  13. Surface wave chemical detector using optical radiation

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.

    2007-07-17

    A surface wave chemical detector comprising at least one surface wave substrate, each of said substrates having a surface wave and at least one measurable surface wave parameter; means for exposing said surface wave substrate to an unknown sample of at least one chemical to be analyzed, said substrate adsorbing said at least one chemical to be sensed if present in said sample; a source of radiation for radiating said surface wave substrate with different wavelengths of said radiation, said surface wave parameter being changed by said adsorbing; and means for recording signals representative of said surface wave parameter of each of said surface wave substrates responsive to said radiation of said different wavelengths, measurable changes of said parameter due to adsorbing said chemical defining a unique signature of a detected chemical.

  14. Window for radiation detectors and the like

    DOEpatents

    Sparks, C.J. Jr.; Ogle, J.C.

    1975-10-28

    An improved x- and gamma-radiation and particle transparent window for the environment-controlling enclosure of various types of radiation and particle detectors is provided by a special graphite foil of a thickness of from about 0.1 to 1 mil. The graphite must have very parallel hexagonal planes with a mosaic spread no greater than 5$sup 0$ to have the necessary strength in thin sections to support one atmosphere or more of pressure. Such graphite is formed by hot- pressing and annealing pyrolytically deposited graphite and thereafter stripping off layers of sufficient thickness to form the window.

  15. Effects of electromagnetic radiation on the Q of quartz resonators.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yook-Kong; Patel, Mihir; Vig, John; Ballato, Arthur

    2009-02-01

    The quartz resonator Q with aluminum electrodes was studied with respect to its fundamental thickness shear mode frequency and its viscoelastic, viscopiezoelectric, and viscopiezoelectromagnetic behaviors. The governing equations for viscoelasticity, viscopiezoelectricity, and viscopiezoelectromagnetism were implemented for an AT-cut quartz resonator. To simulate the radiation conditions at infinity for the viscopiezoelectromagnetic model, perfectly matched layers over a surface enclosing the resonator were implemented to absorb all incident electromagnetic radiation. The shape of the radiation spectrum of a 5.6 MHz AT-cut quartz resonator was found to compare relatively well the measured results by Campbell and Weber. The mesa-plate resonator was studied for a frequency range of 1.4 GHz to 3.4 GHz. The resonator Q was determined to be influenced predominantly by the quartz viscoelasticity; however at frequencies greater than 2.3 GHz, the quartz electromagnetic radiation had an increasingly significant effect on the resonator Q. At 3.4 GHz, the electromagnetic radiation accounted for about 14% of the loss in resonator Q. At frequencies less than 2 GHz, the calculated resonator Q compared well with the intrinsic Q(x) provided by the formula Q(x) = 16 x 10(6)/f where f was in MHz. At frequencies higher than 2.3 GHz, the aluminum electrodes had significant effects on the resonator Q. At 3.4 GHz, the electromagnetic radiation loss in the electrodes was an order of magnitude greater than their viscoelastic loss; hence, the vibrating aluminum electrodes became an efficient emitter of electromagnetic waves. The effects of electrical resistance in both the electrodes and quartz were determined to be negligible. PMID:19251522

  16. Miniature detector measures deep space radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2011-08-01

    The 1972 journey of Apollo 17 marked not only the last time a human walked on the Moon but also the most recent manned venture beyond the outer reaches of the Earth's atmosphere. With preparations being made for humans to once again explore deep space, important steps are under way to quantify the hazards of leaving low-Earth orbit. One significant risk for long-distance missions is the increased exposure to ionizing radiation—energetic particles that can strip electrons off of otherwise neutral materials, affecting human health and the functioning of spacecraft equipment. The deep space probes that are being sent to measure the risks from ionizing radiation and other hazards can be costly, so maximizing the scientific value of each launch is important. With this goal in mind, Mazur et al. designed and developed a miniature dosimeter that was sent into lunar orbit aboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) in 2009. Weighing only 20 grams, the detector is able to measure fluctuations in ionizing radiation as low as 1 microrad (equivalent to 1.0 × 10-8 joules of energy deposited into 1 kilogram) while requiring minimal power and computer processing. The postage stamp-sized detector tracked radiation dosages for the first year of LRO's mission, with the results being confirmed by other onboard and near-Earth detectors. (Space Weather, doi:10.1029/2010SW000641, 2011)

  17. FLASH requirements for the high intensity radiated field electromagnetic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdock, John K.

    1995-05-01

    The worldwide proliferation of high intensity emitting sources and the more electric aircraft increase the intensity of the Electromagnetic Environment (EME) in which aircraft must operate. A FLASH program HIRF (High Intensity Radiated Field) EME requirement is derived to cover both commercial and military fixed and rotary wing aircraft. This requirement is derived from the radiated susceptibility requirement documents of both the FAA and U.S. military. Specific test data and analysis will show that we can meet this requirement.

  18. New high-power source of directional electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumakhov, M. A.

    2014-07-01

    A new source of electromagnetic radiation in a wide spectral range can be based on multiple contactless deflection of the beams of charged particles in a circular channel. The radiation with wavelengths ranging from submillimeter to radio ranges can be generated using nonrelativistic electrons. Directional radiation is obtained at relativistic energies. The IR, optical, and UV radiation can be generated. The X-ray and gamma-radiation can be obtained at relatively high energies. The new source is compared with the source of synchrotron radiation. The radiation intensity at energies of 1-2 GeV is relatively high, since strong currents are possible in the ring channel. The channeling and synchrotron emission are simultaneously obtained at relatively small (several tens of nanometers) internal diameters of the ring.

  19. Electromagnetic radiation screening of semiconductor devices for long life applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, T. C.; Brammer, W. G.

    1972-01-01

    A review is presented of the mechanism of interaction of electromagnetic radiation in various spectral ranges, with various semiconductor device defects. Previous work conducted in this area was analyzed as to its pertinence to the current problem. The task was studied of implementing electromagnetic screening methods in the wavelength region determined to be most effective. Both scanning and flooding type stimulation techniques are discussed. While the scanning technique offers a considerably higher yield of useful information, a preliminary investigation utilizing the flooding approach is first recommended because of the ease of implementation, lower cost and ability to provide go-no-go information in semiconductor screening.

  20. Comment on "Electromagnetic Radiation under Explicit Symmetry Breaking"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simovski, C.; Miroshnichenko, A. E.; Belov, P.; Krasnok, A.

    2015-09-01

    Recently published paper [PRL 114, 147701 (2015)] contains several misleading statements and misinterpretations of known facts. The main massage of the paper [PRL 114, 147701 (2015)] is as follows: "We have shown that explicit symmetry breaking in the structural configuration of charges leads to symmetry breaking of the electric field which results in electromagnetic radiation due to non-conservative current within a localized region of space and time" seems to transcend mere empiricism, touching the theoretical foundations of electromagnetism. Moreover, basic mistakes are numerous in this article and its main claim is wrong. Below we prove it citing the paper and arguing against it.

  1. Electromagnetic radiation due to nonlinear oscillations of a charged drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiryaeva, S. O.; Grigor'ev, A. N.; Kolbneva, N. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    The nonlinear oscillations of a spherical charged drop are asymptotically analyzed under the conditions of a multimode initial deformation of its equilibrium shape. It is found that if the spectrum of initially excited modes contains two adjacent modes, the translation mode of oscillations is excited among others. In this case, the center of the drop's charge oscillates about the equilibrium position, generating a dipole electromagnetic radiation. It is shown that the intensity of this radiation is many orders of magnitude higher than the intensity of the drop's radiation, which arises in calculations of the first order of smallness and is related to the drop's charged surface oscillations.

  2. Electromagnetic crystal based terahertz thermal radiators and components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ziran

    This dissertation presents the investigation of thermal radiation from three-dimensional electromagnetic crystals (EMXT), as well as the development of a THz rapid prototyping fabrication technique and its application in THz EMXT components and micro-system fabrication and integration. First, it is proposed that thermal radiation from a 3-D EMXT would be greatly enhanced at the band gap edge frequency due to the redistribution of photon density of states (DOS) within the crystal. A THz thermal radiator could thus be built upon a THz EMXT by utilizing the exceptional emission peak(s) around its band gap frequency. The thermal radiation enhancement effects of various THz EMXT including both silicon and tungsten woodpile structures (WPS) and cubic photonic cavity (CPC) array are explored. The DOS of all three structures are calculated, and their thermal radiation intensities are predicted using Planck's Equation. These calculations show that the DOS of the silicon and tungsten WPS can be enhanced by a factor of 11.8 around 364 GHz and 2.6 around 406 GHz respectively, in comparison to the normal blackbody radiation at same frequencies. An enhancement factor of more than 100 is obtained in calculation from the CPC array. A silicon WPS with a band gap around 200 GHz has been designed and fabricated. Thermal emissivity of the silicon WPS sample is measured with a control blackbody as reference. And enhancements of the emission from the WPS over the control blackbody are observed at several frequencies quite consistent with the theoretical predictions. Second, the practical challenge of THz EMXT component and system fabrication is met by a THz rapid prototyping technique developed by us. Using this technique, the fabrications of several EMXTs with 3D electromagnetic band gaps in the 100-400 GHz range are demonstrated. Characterization of the samples via THz Time-domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) shows very good agreement with simulation, confirming the build accuracy of this

  3. Geant4 electromagnetic physics updates for space radiation effects simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivantchenko, Anton; Nieminen, Petteri; Incerti, Sebastien; Santin, Giovanni; Ivantchenko, Vladimir; Grichine, Vladimir; Allison, John; Karamitos, Mathiew

    The Geant4 toolkit is used in many applications including space science studies. The new Geant4 version 10.0 released in December 2013 includes a major revision of the toolkit and offers multi-threaded mode for event level parallelism. At the same time, Geant4 electromagnetic and hadronic physics sub-libraries have been significantly updated. In order to validate the new and updated models Geant4 verification tests and benchmarks were extended. Part of these developments was sponsored by the European Space Agency in the context of research aimed at modelling radiation biological end effects. In this work, we present an overview of results of several benchmarks for electromagnetic physics models relevant to space science. For electromagnetic physics, recently Compton scattering, photoelectric effect, and Rayleigh scattering models have been improved and extended down to lower energies. Models of ionization and fluctuations have also been improved; special micro-dosimetry models for Silicon and liquid water were introduced; the main multiple scattering model was consolidated; and the atomic de-excitation module has been made available to all models. As a result, Geant4 predictions for space radiation effects obtained with different Physics Lists are in better agreement with the benchmark data than previous Geant4 versions. Here we present results of electromagnetic tests and models comparison in the energy interval 10 eV - 10 MeV.

  4. Generation of radiation by intense plasma and electromagnetic undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, C.

    1991-10-01

    We examine the characteristics of the classical radiation emission resulting from the interaction of a relativistic electron beam that propagates perpendicularly through a large amplitude relativistic plasma wave. Such a study is useful for evaluating the feasibility of using relativistic plasma waves as extremely short wavelength undulators for generating short wavelength radiation. The electron trajectories in a plasma wave undulator and in an ac FEL undulator are obtained using perturbation techniques. The spontaneous radiation frequency spectrum and angular distribution emitted by a single electron oscillating in these two undulators are then calculated. The radiation gain of a copropagating electromagnetic wave is calculated. The approximate analytic results for the trajectories, spontaneous radiation and gain are compared with 3-D simulation results. The characteristics of the plasma wave undulator are compared with the ac FEL undulator and linearly polarized magnetic undulator. 50 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. A new transition radiation detector for cosmic ray nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lheureux, J.; Meyer, P.; Muller, D.; Swordy, S.

    1981-01-01

    Test measurements on materials for transition radiation detectors at a low Lorentz factor are reported. The materials will be based on board Spacelab-2 for determining the composition and energy spectra of nuclear cosmic rays in the 1 TeV/nucleon range. The transition radiation detectors consist of a sandwich of radiator-photon detector combinations. The radiators emit X-rays and are composed of polyolefin fibers used with Xe filled multiwired proportional chamber (MWPC) detectors capable of detecting particle Lorentz factors of several hundred. The sizing of the detectors is outlined, noting the requirement of a thickness which provides a maximum ratio of transition radiation to total signal in the chambers. The fiber radiator-MWPC responses were tested at Fermilab and in an electron cyclotron. An increase in transition radiation detection was found as a square power law of Z, and the use of six radiator-MWPC on board the Spacelab-2 is outlined.

  6. Structures, systems and methods for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation

    DOEpatents

    Novack, Steven D.; Kotter, Dale K.; Pinhero, Patrick J.

    2011-12-06

    Methods, devices and systems for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation are provided including harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation. In one embodiment, a device includes a substrate and one or more resonance elements disposed in or on the substrate. The resonance elements are configured to have a resonant frequency, for example, in at least one of the infrared, near-infrared and visible light spectra. A layer of conductive material may be disposed over a portion of the substrate to form a ground plane. An optical resonance gap or stand-off layer may be formed between the resonance elements and the ground plane. The optical resonance gap extends a distance between the resonance elements and the layer of conductive material approximately one-quarter wavelength of a wavelength of the at least one resonance element's resonant frequency. At least one energy transfer element may be associated with the at least one resonance element.

  7. Energy harvesting devices for harvesting energy from terahertz electromagnetic radiation

    DOEpatents

    Novack, Steven D.; Kotter, Dale K.; Pinhero, Patrick J.

    2012-10-09

    Methods, devices and systems for harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation are provided including harvesting energy from electromagnetic radiation. In one embodiment, a device includes a substrate and one or more resonance elements disposed in or on the substrate. The resonance elements are configured to have a resonant frequency, for example, in at least one of the infrared, near-infrared and visible light spectra. A layer of conductive material may be disposed over a portion of the substrate to form a ground plane. An optical resonance gap or stand-off layer may be formed between the resonance elements and the ground plane. The optical resonance gap extends a distance between the resonance elements and the layer of conductive material approximately one-quarter wavelength of a wavelength of the at least one resonance element's resonant frequency. At least one energy transfer element may be associated with the at least one resonance element.

  8. Radiation detector having a multiplicity of individual detecting elements

    DOEpatents

    Whetten, Nathan R.; Kelley, John E.

    1985-01-01

    A radiation detector has a plurality of detector collection element arrays immersed in a radiation-to-electron conversion medium. Each array contains a multiplicity of coplanar detector elements radially disposed with respect to one of a plurality of positions which at least one radiation source can assume. Each detector collector array is utilized only when a source is operative at the associated source position, negating the necessity for a multi-element detector to be moved with respect to an object to be examined. A novel housing provides the required containment of a high-pressure gas conversion medium.

  9. Portable radiation detector and mapping system

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Hayes, D.W.; Eakle, R.F.

    1995-09-01

    A portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) has been developed to detect, locate and plot nuclear radiation intensities on commercially available digital maps and other images. The field unit records gamma-ray spectra or neutron signals together with positions from a Global Positioning System (GPS) on flash memory cards. The recorded information is then transferred to a lap-top computer for spectral data analyses and then georegistered graphically on maps, photographs, etc. RADMAPS integrates several existing technologies to produce a preprogrammable field unit uniquely suited for each survey, as required. The system presently records spectra from a Nal(Tl) gamma-ray detector or an enriched Li-6 doped glass neutron scintillator. Standard Geographic Information System software installed in a lap-top, complete with CD-ROM supporting digitally imaged maps, permits the characterization of nuclear material in the field when the presence of such material is not otherwise documented. This paper gives the results of a typical site survey of the Savannah River Site (SRS) using RADMAPS.

  10. Portable radiation detector and mapping system

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Hayes, D.W.; Eakle, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    A portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) has been developed to detect, locate, and plot nuclear radiation intensities on commercially available digital maps and other images. The field unit records gamma-ray spectra or neutron signals together with positions from a global positioning system (GPS) on flash memory cards. The recorded information is then transferred to a laptop computer for spectral data analyses and then georegistered graphically on maps, photographs, etc. RADMAPS integrates several existing technologies to produce a preprogrammable field unit uniquely suited for each survey, as required. The system records spectra from a NaI(Tl) gamma-ray detector or an enriched {sup 6}Li doped glass neutron scintillator. Standard Geographic Information System (GIS) software installed in a lap-top, complete with CD-ROM supporting digitally imaged maps, permits the characterization of nuclear material in the field when the presence of such material is not otherwise documented. This paper gives the results of a typical site survey of the Savannah River site (SRS) using RADMAPS. The ability to provide rapid field data should be of use in treaty verification, safeguards, decontamination, and nuclear weapons dismantlement.

  11. Radiation detector system having heat pipe based cooling

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Saveliev, Valeri D.; Barkan, Shaul

    2006-10-31

    A radiation detector system having a heat pipe based cooling. The radiation detector system includes a radiation detector thermally coupled to a thermo electric cooler (TEC). The TEC cools down the radiation detector, whereby heat is generated by the TEC. A heat removal device dissipates the heat generated by the TEC to surrounding environment. A heat pipe has a first end thermally coupled to the TEC to receive the heat generated by the TEC, and a second end thermally coupled to the heat removal device. The heat pipe transfers the heat generated by the TEC from the first end to the second end to be removed by the heat removal device.

  12. The peak electromagnetic power radiated by lightning return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, E. P.; Guo, C.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates of the peak electromagnetic (EM) power radiated by return strokes have been made by integrating the Poynting vector of measured fields over an imaginary hemispherical surface that is centered on the lightning source, assuming that ground losses are negligible. Values of the peak EM power from first and subsequent strokes have means and standard deviations of 2 + or - 2 x 10 to the 10th and 3 + or - 4 x 10 to the 9th W, respectively. The average EM power that is radiated by subsequent strokes, at the time of the field peak, is about 2 orders of magnitude larger than the optical power that is radiated by these strokes in the wavelength interval from 0.4 to 1.1 micron; hence an upper limit to the radiative efficiency of a subsequent stroke is of the order of 1 percent or less at this time.

  13. Spontaneous emission of electromagnetic radiation in turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.; Simões, F. J. R.; Pavan, J.; Gaelzer, R.

    2014-01-15

    Known radiation emission mechanisms in plasmas include bremmstrahlung (or free-free emission), gyro- and synchrotron radiation, cyclotron maser, and plasma emission. For unmagnetized plasmas, only bremmstrahlung and plasma emissions are viable. Of these, bremmstrahlung becomes inoperative in the absence of collisions, and the plasma emission requires the presence of electron beam, followed by various scattering and conversion processes. The present Letter proposes a new type of radiation emission process for plasmas in a state of thermodynamic quasi-equilibrium between particles and enhanced Langmuir turbulence. The radiation emission mechanism proposed in the present Letter is not predicted by the linear theory of thermal plasmas, but it relies on nonlinear wave-particle resonance processes. The electromagnetic particle-in-cell numerical simulation supports the new mechanism.

  14. Electromagnetic radiation generated by arcing in low density plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vayner, Boris V.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Snyder, David B.; Doreswamy, C. V.

    1996-01-01

    An unavoidable step in the process of space exploration is to use high-power, very large spacecraft launched into Earth orbit. Obviously, the spacecraft will need powerful energy sources. Previous experience has shown that electrical discharges occur on the surfaces of a high-voltage array, and these discharges (arcs) are undesirable in many respects. Moreover, any high voltage conductor will interact with the surrounding plasma, and that interaction may result in electrical discharges between the conductor and plasma (or between two conductors with different potentials, for example, during docking and extravehicular activity). One very important aspect is the generation of electromagnetic radiation by arcing. To prevent the negative influence of electromagnetic noise on the operation of spacecraft systems, it seems necessary to determine the spectra and absolute levels of the radiation, and to determine limitations on the solar array bias voltage that depend on the parameters of LEO plasma and the technical requirements of the spacecraft equipment. This report describes the results of an experimental study and computer simulation of the electromagnetic radiation generated by arcing on spacecraft surfaces. A large set of high quality data was obtained during the Solar Array Module Plasma Interaction Experiment (SAMPIE, flight STS-62) and ground test. These data include the amplitudes of current, pulse forms, duration of each arc, and spectra of plasma waves. A theoretical explanation of the observed features is presented in this report too. The elaborated model allows us to determine the parameters of the electromagnetic noise for different frequency ranges, distances from the arcing site, and distinct kinds of plasma waves.

  15. Theory of electromagnetic insertion devices and the corresponding synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumail, Muhammad; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-07-01

    Permanent magnet insertion devices (IDs), which are the main radiation generating devices in synchrotron light sources and free-electron lasers, use a time-invariant but space-periodic magnetic field to wiggle relativistic electrons for short-wavelength radiation generation. Recently, a high power microwave based undulator has also been successfully demonstrated at SLAC which promises the advantage of dynamic tunability of radiation spectrum and polarization. Such IDs employ transverse elecromagnetic fields which are periodic in both space and time to undulate the electrons. In this paper we develop a detailed theory of the principle of electromagnetic IDs from first principles for both linear and circular polarization modes. The electromagnetic equivalent definitions of undulator period (λu) and undulator deflection parameter (K ) are derived. In the inertial frame where the average momentum of the electron is zero, we obtain the figure-8-like trajectory for the linear polarization mode and the circular trajectory for the circular polarization mode. The corresponding radiation spectra and the intensity of harmonics is also calculated.

  16. Ruggedization of CdZnTe detectors and detector assemblies for radiation detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, P. H.; Gomolchuk, P.; Chen, H.; Beitz, D.; Grosser, A. W.

    2015-06-01

    This paper described improvements in the ruggedization of CdZnTe detectors and detector assemblies for use in radiation detection applications. Research included experimenting with various conductive and underfill adhesive material systems suitable for CZT substrates. A detector design with encapsulation patterning was developed to protect detector surfaces and to control spacing between CZT anode and PCB carrier. Robustness of bare detectors was evaluated through temperature cycling and metallization shear testing. Attachment processes using well-chosen adhesives and PCB carrier materials were optimized to improve reliability of detector assemblies, resulted in Improved Attachment Detector Assembly. These detector assemblies were subjected to aggressive temperature cycling, and varying levels of drop/shock and vibration, in accordance with modified JEDEC, ANSI and FedEx testing standards, to assess their ruggedness. Further enhanced detector assembly ruggedization methods were investigated involving adhesive conformal coating, potting and dam filling on detector assemblies, which resulted in the Enhanced Ruggedization Detector Assembly. Large numbers of CZT detectors and detector assemblies with 5 mm and 15 mm thick, over 200 in total, were tested. Their performance was evaluated by exposure to various radioactive sources using comprehensive predefined detector specifications and testing protocols. Detector assemblies from improved attachment and enhanced ruggedization showed stable performances during the harsh environmental condition tests. In conclusion, significant progress has been made in improving the reliability and enhancing the ruggedness of CZT detector assemblies for radiation detection applications deployed in operational environments.

  17. Space Radiation Detector with Spherical Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D. (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave C. (Inventor); Wrbanek, Susan Y. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A particle detector is provided, the particle detector including a spherical Cherenkov detector, and at least one pair of detector stacks. In an embodiment of the invention, the Cherenkov detector includes a sphere of ultraviolet transparent material, coated by an ultraviolet reflecting material that has at least one open port. The Cherenkov detector further includes at least one photodetector configured to detect ultraviolet light emitted from a particle within the sphere. In an embodiment of the invention, each detector stack includes one or more detectors configured to detect a particle traversing the sphere.

  18. Space Radiation Detector with Spherical Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D. (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave C. (Inventor); Wrbanek, Susan Y. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A particle detector is provided, the particle detector including a spherical Cherenkov detector, and at least one pair of detector stacks. In an embodiment of the invention, the Cherenkov detector includes a sphere of ultraviolet transparent material, coated by an ultraviolet reflecting material that has at least one open port. The Cherenkov detector further includes at least one photodetector configured to detect ultraviolet light emitted from a particle within the sphere. In an embodiment of the invention, each detector stack includes one or more detectors configured to detect a particle traversing the sphere.

  19. Low Frequency Electromagnetic Background Radiation From Electron Acceleration Above Thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, Martin; Mezentsev, Andrew; Soula, Serge; van der Velde, Oscar; Farges, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    It was recently proposed that the acceleration of electrons during the growth and branching of streamers above thunderclouds initiated by intense lightning discharges could result in detectable low frequency electromagnetic radiation from several tens of kHz up to several hundreds of kHz (Qin et al., GRL, 2012). The intensity of the predicted radiation scales with the streamer density which is particularly large during spectacular sprite occurrences such as jellyfish sprites and/or dancing sprites. Dancing sprites are up to one second long sequences of consecutive sprites or sprite groups which are typically separated by some hundreds of milliseconds and which tend to follow the spatial development of large scale intracloud lightning discharges. A particularly spectacular series of 10 dancing sprite events over a Mediterranean mesoscale convective system was recorded with a low light video camera in south-eastern France during the early morning hours of August 31, 2012. Each dancing sprite event was composed of ~3-4 consecutive sprites or groups of sprites. All of these sprite occurrences were associated with a sudden enhancement ~2 uV/m/Hz-1/2 of the low frequency electromagnetic background radiation as measured with a radio receiver in south-west England. It is estimated that ~1000 streamers at a height of ~40 km are necessary to epxlain the observed electric field strengths. These sudden enhancements are superimposed on a more continuous low frequency electromagnetic background radiation which accompanies each dancing sprite event. It is speculated that this low frequency 'radio glow' results from filamentary streamers near the cloud top as a result of the large scale electrostatic charging of the thundercloud and that it may be used as an indicator for sprite occurrences in future studies.

  20. GSM base station electromagnetic radiation and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Yurekli, Ali Ihsan; Ozkan, Mehmed; Kalkan, Tunaya; Saybasili, Hale; Tuncel, Handan; Atukeren, Pinar; Gumustas, Koray; Seker, Selim

    2006-01-01

    The ever increasing use of cellular phones and the increasing number of associated base stations are becoming a widespread source of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation. Some biological effects are likely to occur even at low-level EM fields. In this study, a gigahertz transverse electromagnetic (GTEM) cell was used as an exposure environment for plane wave conditions of far-field free space EM field propagation at the GSM base transceiver station (BTS) frequency of 945 MHz, and effects on oxidative stress in rats were investigated. When EM fields at a power density of 3.67 W/m2 (specific absorption rate = 11.3 mW/kg), which is well below current exposure limits, were applied, MDA (malondialdehyde) level was found to increase and GSH (reduced glutathione) concentration was found to decrease significantly (p < 0.0001). Additionally, there was a less significant (p = 0.0190) increase in SOD (superoxide dismutase) activity under EM exposure. PMID:16954120

  1. Pyroelectric detector development for the Radiation Measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, G. S.; Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr.; Hanel, R. P.; Dominguez, D. E.; Valero, F. P. J.; Baumann, Hilary; Hansen, W. L.; Haller, E. E.

    1993-01-01

    A new class of high detectivity pyroelectric detectors developed for optimization of the radiation measurement system within the framework of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program is described. These devices are intended to provide detectivities of up to about 10 exp 11 cm Hz exp 0.5/W with cooling to about 100 K required for the detector focal plane.

  2. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... that are not fitted with a pressure relief device and provide appropriate guidance for exposure to fire. ... fragment upon impact. (b) Radiation detectors must not have a design pressure exceeding 4.83 MPa (700 psig... with a burst pressure of not less than three times the design pressure if the radiation detector...

  3. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... that are not fitted with a pressure relief device and provide appropriate guidance for exposure to fire. ... fragment upon impact. (b) Radiation detectors must not have a design pressure exceeding 4.83 MPa (700 psig... with a burst pressure of not less than three times the design pressure if the radiation detector...

  4. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... that are not fitted with a pressure relief device and provide appropriate guidance for exposure to fire. ... fragment upon impact. (b) Radiation detectors must not have a design pressure exceeding 4.83 MPa (700 psig... with a burst pressure of not less than three times the design pressure if the radiation detector...

  5. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... that are not fitted with a pressure relief device and provide appropriate guidance for exposure to fire. ... fragment upon impact. (b) Radiation detectors must not have a design pressure exceeding 4.83 MPa (700 psig... with a burst pressure of not less than three times the design pressure if the radiation detector...

  6. Real-time self-networking radiation detector apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kaplan, Edward; Lemley, James; Tsang, Thomas Y.; Milian, Laurence W.

    2007-06-12

    The present invention is for a radiation detector apparatus for detecting radiation sources present in cargo shipments. The invention includes the features of integrating a bubble detector sensitive to neutrons and a GPS system into a miniaturized package that can wirelessly signal the presence of radioactive material in shipping containers. The bubble density would be read out if such indicated a harmful source.

  7. Dichroic filters to protect milliwatt far-infrared detectors from megawatt ECRH radiation.

    PubMed

    Bertschinger, G; Endres, C P; Lewen, F; Oosterbeek, J W

    2008-10-01

    Dichroic filters have been used to shield effectively the far infrared (FIR) detectors at the interferometer/polarimeter on TEXTOR. The filters consist of metal foils with regular holes, the hole diameter, the mutual spacing and the thickness of the foils are chosen to transmit radiation at the design frequency with transmission >90%. The attenuation at the low frequency end of the bandpass filter is about 30 dB per octave, the high frequency transmission is between 20% and 40%. The filters have been used to block the stray radiation from the megawatt microwave heating beam to the detectors of the FIR interferometer, operating with power on the detector in the milliwatt range. If required, the low frequency attenuation can be still enhanced, without compromising the transmission in the passband. The FIR interferometer used for plasma density and position control is no longer disturbed by electromagnetic waves used for plasma heating. PMID:19044527

  8. Dichroic filters to protect milliwatt far-infrared detectors from megawatt ECRH radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertschinger, G.; Endres, C. P.; Lewen, F.; Oosterbeek, J. W.

    2008-10-01

    Dichroic filters have been used to shield effectively the far infrared (FIR) detectors at the interferometer/polarimeter on TEXTOR. The filters consist of metal foils with regular holes, the hole diameter, the mutual spacing and the thickness of the foils are chosen to transmit radiation at the design frequency with transmission >90%. The attenuation at the low frequency end of the bandpass filter is about 30dB per octave, the high frequency transmission is between 20% and 40%. The filters have been used to block the stray radiation from the megawatt microwave heating beam to the detectors of the FIR interferometer, operating with power on the detector in the milliwatt range. If required, the low frequency attenuation can be still enhanced, without compromising the transmission in the passband. The FIR interferometer used for plasma density and position control is no longer disturbed by electromagnetic waves used for plasma heating.

  9. Dichroic filters to protect milliwatt far-infrared detectors from megawatt ECRH radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bertschinger, G.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Endres, C. P.; Lewen, F.

    2008-10-15

    Dichroic filters have been used to shield effectively the far infrared (FIR) detectors at the interferometer/polarimeter on TEXTOR. The filters consist of metal foils with regular holes, the hole diameter, the mutual spacing and the thickness of the foils are chosen to transmit radiation at the design frequency with transmission >90%. The attenuation at the low frequency end of the bandpass filter is about 30 dB per octave, the high frequency transmission is between 20% and 40%. The filters have been used to block the stray radiation from the megawatt microwave heating beam to the detectors of the FIR interferometer, operating with power on the detector in the milliwatt range. If required, the low frequency attenuation can be still enhanced, without compromising the transmission in the passband. The FIR interferometer used for plasma density and position control is no longer disturbed by electromagnetic waves used for plasma heating.

  10. Wire chamber radiation detector with discharge control

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor; Mulera, Terrence A.

    1984-01-01

    A wire chamber radiation detector (11) has spaced apart parallel electrodes (16) and grids (17, 18, 19) defining an ignition region (21) in which charged particles (12) or other ionizing radiations initiate brief localized avalanche discharges (93) and defining an adjacent memory region (22) in which sustained glow discharges (94) are initiated by the primary discharges (93). Conductors (29, 32) of the grids (18, 19) at each side of the memory section (22) extend in orthogonal directions enabling readout of the X-Y coordinates of locations at which charged particles (12) were detected by sequentially transmitting pulses to the conductors (29) of one grid (18) while detecting transmissions of the pulses to the orthogonal conductors (36) of the other grid (19) through glow discharges (94). One of the grids (19) bounding the memory region (22) is defined by an array of conductive elements (32) each of which is connected to the associated readout conductor (36) through a separate resistance (37). The wire chamber (11) avoids ambiguities and imprecisions in the readout of coordinates when large numbers of simultaneous or near simultaneous charged particles (12) have been detected. Down time between detection periods and the generation of radio frequency noise are also reduced.

  11. Terahertz electromagnetic radiation from Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy intrinsic Josephson junction stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, Dai; Irie, Akinobu; Yamaki, Kazuhiro; Oya, Gin-ichiro

    We have observed terahertz (THz) electromagnetic wave radiation from Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy intrinsic Josephson junction (IJJ) stacks using high sensitive detector made of a small IJJ mesa. In this study, we focused on the THz radiation from a few hundred IJJs. We fabricated the IJJ oscillator and detector. The oscillators consist of 55 ∼ 300 IJJs with the lateral dimensions of 290 ¥ 50 μm2. The current-voltage characteristics of the IJJ oscillators showed a negative resistance accompanied with large hysteresis. The THz radiation was observed for several samples when the oscillator was biased at some current in the negative resistance region. We attribute the observed radiation to synchronized emission from many IJJs in the stack and find the emission frequency corresponds to the in-phase cavity resonance frequency.

  12. Detection of electromagnetic radiation using micromechanical multiple quantum wells structures

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G [Knoxville, TN; Rajic, Slobodan [Knoxville, TN; Datskou, Irene [Knoxville, TN

    2007-07-17

    An apparatus and method for detecting electromagnetic radiation employs a deflectable micromechanical apparatus incorporating multiple quantum wells structures. When photons strike the quantum-well structure, physical stresses are created within the sensor, similar to a "bimetallic effect." The stresses cause the sensor to bend. The extent of deflection of the sensor can be measured through any of a variety of conventional means to provide a measurement of the photons striking the sensor. A large number of such sensors can be arranged in a two-dimensional array to provide imaging capability.

  13. Detecting excess ionizing radiation by electromagnetic breakdown of air

    SciTech Connect

    Granatstein, Victor L.; Nusinovich, Gregory S.

    2010-09-15

    A scheme is proposed for detecting a concealed source of ionizing radiation by observing the occurrence of breakdown in atmospheric air by an electromagnetic wave whose electric field surpasses the breakdown field in a limited volume. The volume is chosen to be smaller than the reciprocal of the naturally occurring concentration of free electrons. The pulse duration of the electromagnetic wave must exceed the avalanche breakdown time (10-200 ns) and could profitably be as long as the statistical lag time in ambient air (typically, microseconds). Candidate pulsed electromagnetic sources over a wavelength range, 3 mm>{lambda}>10.6 {mu}m, are evaluated. Suitable candidate sources are found to be a 670 GHz gyrotron oscillator with 200 kW, 10 {mu}s output pulses and a Transversely Excited Atmospheric-Pressure (TEA) CO{sub 2} laser with 30 MW, 100 ns output pulses. A system based on 670 GHz gyrotron would have superior sensitivity. A system based on the TEA CO{sub 2} laser could have a longer range >100 m.

  14. The Electromagnetic Calorimeter of the GLUEX Particle Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsaganis, Stamatios

    This thesis focuses on the GLUEX Barrel Calorimeter (BCAL), a key subsystem of the GLUE experiment, which is currently under construction. GLUE will shed light on an as yet unexplored area of the interaction between the fundamental constituents of matter, that of confinement. To achieve its goals, GLUE requires a hermetic detector with good acceptance and good energy and position resolution. To that end, a lot of effort has been spent on R&D in order to optimize the performance of the BCAL. Specifically, the effect of the thickness of the lead sheets, used to build the BCAL, on the performance of the BCAL was simulated using Monte Carlo techniques. Using the GEANT simulation package, three different geometry configurations were simulated and the shape of the longitudinal shower profile, energy resolution and the fractional energy deposition and energy leakage were extracted and the results comprise the first half of this thesis. The second half of the thesis consists of an analysis of data collected in 2006 from a beam test performed at Jefferson Lab on a BCAL prototype module. The analysis was done in order to extract the energy resolution for several different angles of incidence, including the 90° which was used as reference.

  15. Geometrical Effects on the Electromagnetic Radiation from Lightning Return Strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willett, J. C.; Smith, D. A.; LeVine, D. M.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The morphological difference between the electromagnetic radiation-field waveforms of "first" and "subsequent" return strokes in cloud-to-ground lightning flashes is well known and can be used to identify the formation of new channels to ground. This difference is generally believed due to the existence of branches on first-stroke channels, whereas subsequent strokes re-illuminate only the main channel of a previous stroke; but experimental evidence for this hypothesis is relatively weak. It has been argued for the influence of channel geometry on the fine structure of radiation from subsequent return strokes by comparing the field-change waveforms recorded at the same station from strokes within the same flash and between different flashes of both natural and triggered lightning. The present paper introduces new evidence for both of these hypotheses from a comparison of waveforms between sensors in different directions from the same stroke.

  16. Electromagnetic radiation from a kicked sheet of charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, P. C.

    1986-03-01

    The plane-wave electromagnetic fields for a kicked sheet of charge are found and then compared with the fields obtained by superimposing the radiation fields of the individual charges in the plane. Unlike the case of the oscillating sheet of charge discussed in The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Vol. I [R. P. Feynman et al. (Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA, 1963)], the plane-wave fields of the kicked sheet differ from the fields obtained by superposition of the individual radiation fields. The resolution of this problem requires consideration of relativistic effects even though the velocity of the sheet after the kick may be as small as desired. The relation between the solution for the kicked sheet and solution for the oscillating sheet is discussed, and it is shown how the two solutions are consistent if all contributions to the fields are taken into account.

  17. Electromagnetic radiation of charged particles in stochastic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Mocanu, Gabriela

    2016-03-01

    The study of the Brownian motion of a charged particle in electric and magnetic fields has many important applications in plasma and heavy ions physics, as well as in astrophysics. In the present paper we consider the electromagnetic radiation properties of a charged non-relativistic particle in the presence of electric and magnetic fields, of an exterior non-electromagnetic potential, and of a friction and stochastic force, respectively. We describe the motion of the charged particle by a Langevin and generalized Langevin type stochastic differential equation. We investigate in detail the cases of the Brownian motion with or without memory in a constant electric field, in the presence of an external harmonic potential, and of a constant magnetic field. In all cases the corresponding Langevin equations are solved numerically, and a full description of the spectrum of the emitted radiation and of the physical properties of the motion is obtained. The power spectral density of the emitted power is also obtained for each case, and, for all considered oscillating systems, it shows the presence of peaks, corresponding to certain intervals of the frequency.

  18. Radiation environment and shielding for a high luminosity collider detector

    SciTech Connect

    Diwan, M.V.; Fisyak, Y.; Mokhov, N.V.

    1995-12-01

    Detectors now under design for use in the proposed high energy high luminosity colliders must deal with unprecedented radiation levels. We have performed a comprehensive study for the GEM detector at the SSC to determine the best way to shield critical detector components from excessive radiation, with special attention paid to the low energy neutrons and photons. We have used several detailed Monte-Carlo simulations to calculate the particle fluxes in the detector. We describe these methods and demonstrate that two orders of magnitude reduction in the neutron and photon fluxes can be obtained with appropriate shielding of critical forward regions such as the low beta quadrupoles and the forward calorimeter.

  19. Large dynamic range radiation detector and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Marrs, Roscoe E.; Madden, Norman W.

    2012-02-14

    According to one embodiment, a radiation detector comprises a scintillator and a photodiode optically coupled to the scintillator. The radiation detector also includes a bias voltage source electrically coupled to the photodiode, a first detector operatively electrically coupled to the photodiode for generating a signal indicative of a level of a charge at an output of the photodiode, and a second detector operatively electrically coupled to the bias voltage source for generating a signal indicative of an amount of current flowing through the photodiode.

  20. A Xylophone Detector of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, Massimo

    1997-01-01

    We discuss spacecraft Doppler tracking searches for gravitational waves in which Doppler data recorded on the ground are linearly combined with Doppler measurements made on board a spacecraft. By using the four-link radio system first proposed by Vessot and Levine, we describe a new method for removing from the combined data the frequency fluctuations due to the Earth troposphere, ionosphere, and mechanical vibrations of the antenna on the ground. This technique provides also a way for reducing by several orders of magnitude, at selected Fourier components, the frequency fluctuations due to other noise sources, such as the clock on board the spacecraft or the antenna and buffeting of the probe by nongravitational forces. In this respect spacecraft Doppler tracking can be regarded as a xylophone detector of gravitational radiation. In the assumption of calibrating the frequency fluctuations induced by the interplanetary plasma, a strain sensitivity equal to 4.7 x 10(exp -18) at 10(exp -3) Hz is estimated. This experimental technique could be extended to other tests of the theory of relativity, and to radio science experiments that rely on high-precision Doppler measurements.

  1. Flame detector operable in presence of proton radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D. J.; Turnage, J. E.; Linford, R. M. F.; Cornish, S. D. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A detector of ultraviolet radiation for operation in a space vehicle which orbits through high intensity radiation areas is described. Two identical ultraviolet sensor tubes are mounted within a shield which limits to acceptable levels the amount of proton radiation reaching the sensor tubes. The shield has an opening which permits ultraviolet radiation to reach one of the sensing tubes. The shield keeps ultraviolet radiation from reaching the other sensor tube, designated the reference tube. The circuitry of the detector subtracts the output of the reference tube from the output of the sensing tube, and any portion of the output of the sensing tube which is due to proton radiation is offset by the output of the reference tube. A delay circuit in the detector prevents false alarms by keeping statistical variations in the proton radiation sensed by the two sensor tubes from developing an output signal.

  2. Alpha particle response study of polycrstalline diamond radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Topkar, Anita

    2016-05-01

    Chemical vapor deposition has opened the possibility to grow high purity synthetic diamond at relatively low cost. This has opened up uses of diamond based detectors for wide range of applications. These detectors are most suitable for harsh environments where standard semiconductor detectors cannot work. In this paper, we present the fabrication details and performance study of polycrystalline diamond based radiation detector. Effect of different operating parameters such as bias voltage and shaping time for charge collection on the performance of detector has been studied.

  3. Heat Transfer Issues in Thin-Film Thermal Radiation Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Mamadou Y.

    1999-01-01

    The Thermal Radiation Group at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University has been working closely with scientists and engineers at NASA's Langley Research Center to develop accurate analytical and numerical models suitable for designing next generation thin-film thermal radiation detectors for earth radiation budget measurement applications. The current study provides an analytical model of the notional thermal radiation detector that takes into account thermal transport phenomena, such as the contact resistance between the layers of the detector, and is suitable for use in parameter estimation. It was found that the responsivity of the detector can increase significantly due to the presence of contact resistance between the layers of the detector. Also presented is the effect of doping the thermal impedance layer of the detector with conducting particles in order to electrically link the two junctions of the detector. It was found that the responsivity and the time response of the doped detector decrease significantly in this case. The corresponding decrease of the electrical resistance of the doped thermal impedance layer is not sufficient to significantly improve the electrical performance of the detector. Finally, the "roughness effect" is shown to be unable to explain the decrease in the thermal conductivity often reported for thin-film layers.

  4. Design of compact electromagnetic impulse radiating antenna for melanoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Arockiasamy, Petrishia; Mohan, Sasikala

    2016-01-01

    Cancer therapy is one of the several new applications which use nanosecond and subnanosecond high voltage pulses. New treatment based on electromagnetic (EM) fields have been developed as non-surgical and minimally invasive treatments of tumors. In particular, subnanosecond pulses can introduce important non-thermal changes in cell biology, especially the permeabilization of the cell membrane. The motivation behind this work is to launch intense subnanosecond pulses to the target (tumors) non-invasively. This works focuses on the design of a compact intense pulsed EM radiating antenna. In tense EM waves radiated at the first focal point of the Prolate Spheroidal Reflector (PSR) are focused at the second focal point where the target (tumor) is present. Two antennas with PSR but fed with different compact wave radiator are designed to focus pulsed field at the second focal point. The PSR with modified bicone antenna feed and PSR with elliptically tapered horn antenna feed are designed. The design parameters and radiation performance are discussed. PMID:25651405

  5. Homogeneous and isotropic cosmologies with nonlinear electromagnetic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vollick, Dan N.

    2008-09-15

    In this paper I examine cosmological models that contain a stochastic background of nonlinear electromagnetic radiation. I show that for Born-Infeld electrodynamics the equation of state parameter, w=P/{rho}, remains close to 1/3 throughout the evolution of the universe if E{sup 2}=B{sup 2} in the late universe to a high degree of accuracy. Theories with electromagnetic Lagrangians of the form L=-(1/4)F{sup 2}+{alpha}F{sup 4} have recently been studied in magnetic universes, where the electric field vanishes. It was shown that the F{sup 4} term can produce a bounce in the early universe, avoiding an initial singularity. Here I show that the inclusion of an electric field, with E{sup 2}{approx_equal}B{sup 2} in the late universe, eliminates the bounce and the universe begins with an initial singularity. I also examine theories with Lagrangians of the form L=-(1/4)F{sup 2}-{mu}{sup 8}/F{sup 2}, which have been shown to produce a period of late time accelerated expansion in magnetic universes. I show that, if an electric field is introduced, the accelerated phase will only occur if E{sup 2}<3B{sup 2}.

  6. Linking electromagnetic and gravitational radiation in coalescing binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.; Ponce, Marcelo; Anderson, Matthew; Neilsen, David; Motl, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    We expand on our study of the gravitational and electromagnetic emissions from the late stage of an inspiraling neutron star binary as presented in Palenzuela et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 061105 (2013)]. Interactions between the stellar magnetospheres, driven by the extreme dynamics of the merger, can yield considerable outflows. We study the gravitational and electromagnetic waves produced during the inspiral and merger of a binary neutron star system using a full relativistic, resistive magnetohydrodynamics evolution code. We show that the interaction between the stellar magnetospheres extracts kinetic energy from the system and powers radiative Poynting flux and heat dissipation. These features depend strongly on the configuration of the initial stellar magnetic moments. Our results indicate that this power can strongly outshine pulsars in binaries and have a distinctive angular and time-dependent pattern. Our discussion provides more detail than Palenzuela et al., showing clear evidence of the different effects taking place during the inspiral. Our simulations include a few milliseconds after the actual merger and study the dynamics of the magnetic fields during the formation of the hypermassive neutron star. We also briefly discuss the possibility of observing such emissions.

  7. Effects of ionizing radiation on cryogenic infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Silverberg, R. F.; Lakew, B.

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5 K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. Here, ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors are reported. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  8. Effects Of Ionizing Radiation On Cryogenic Infrared Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Lakew, B.; Silverberg, R. F.

    1988-04-01

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. We report here on ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  9. Effects of ionizing radiation on cryogenic infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Silverberg, R. F.; Lakew, B.

    1989-01-01

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5 K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. Here, ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors are reported. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  10. Electromagnetic radiation trapped in the magnetosphere above the plasma frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Shaw, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    An electromagnetic noise band is frequently observed in the outer magnetosphere by the Imp 6 spacecraft at frequencies from about 5 to 20 kHz. This noise band generally extends throughout the region from near the plasmapause boundary to near the magnetopause boundary. The noise typically has a broadband field strength of about 5 microvolts/meter. The noise band often has a sharp lower cutoff frequency at about 5 to 10 kHz, and this cutoff has been identified as the local electron plasma frequency. Since the plasma frequency in the plasmasphere and solar wind is usually above 20 kHz, it is concluded that this noise must be trapped in the low-density region between the plasmapause and magnetopause boundaries. The noise bands often contain a harmonic frequency structure which suggests that the radiation is associated with harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency.

  11. On Linsley Effect and Electromagnetic Radiation from Large EAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Manab Jyoti

    The aim of the present work was to study the following aspects of EAS : i) Detection and determination of air showers parameters by measuring the particle densities. ii) Measurement of inclination of shower axis by recording arrival time distribution of shower front particles. iii) Measurement of FWHM of pulses photographed and study of Linsley effect. iv) Characteristics of Cherenkov radiation from air showers. v) Characteristics of low frequency (120 KHz) radio signal from showers. The experiments based on the above investigations were carried out at the Cosmic Ray Research Laboratory, Gauhati University, India, since September 91 to March, 1994. Electromagnetic radiation both optical Cherenkov radiation and radio frequency (120 KHz) as well as pulses associated with extensive air showers (EAS) of energy ranging from 1.5 X 1015ev to 2.1 X 10 18ev and zenith angles 15° < 0 < 60° were selected for the present analysis. The lateral distribution of Cherenkov pulses were assumed to have an exponential form fitted with an exponential law with an exponent reflecting the depth of shower maxima (Xm). The variation of rise time (FWHM) with core distance (R) was studied from pulses photographed. The high field associated with low frequency radio signal (120KHz) and its variation with primary energy (Ep), core distance and zenith angle (0) were observed. The thesis consists of the following five chapters: 1. INTRODUCTION - This chapter contains a brief history of cosmic rays, its composition, development of EAS, emission of electromagnetic radiation from EAS, a brief introduction to the present work including review of the earlier works and aim of the experiment. 2. THEORY - This chapter mainly reviews the theories and numerical calculations. 3. EXPERIMENTAL SET-UP - This chapter describes in detail the instrumentation developed, working principle, calibration etc. 4. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS - This chapter includes data collection, selection of data for required

  12. Development of bulk GaAs room temperature radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, D.S.; Knoll, G.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Eisen, Y. . Soreq Nuclear Research Center); Brake, R. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports on GaAs, a wide band gap semiconductor with potential use as a room temperature radiation detector. Various configurations of Schottky diode detectors were fabricated with bulk crystals of liquid encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) semi-insulating undoped GaAs material. Basic detector construction utilized one Ti/Au Schottky contact and one Au/Ge/Ni alloyed ohmic contact. Pulsed X-ray analysis indicated pulse decay times dependent on bias voltage. Pulse height analysis disclosed non-uniform electric field distributions across the detectors tentatively explained as a consequence of native deep level donors (EL2) in the crystal.

  13. A high-efficiency focusing Cherenkov radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, K.; Moran, M.J.; Hall, J. ); Graser, M. )

    1992-03-01

    A new design uses advanced technology to produce an efficient, high-bandwidth Cherenkov detector for relativistic charged particles. The detector consists of a diamond-lathe machined ultraviolet-grade Lucite radiator, a parabolic focusing mirror, and a photodiode with an S-20 cathode. This article discusses some details of the detector design and describes preliminary measurements of its response characteristics. The data show the detector to have an overall gain of {approx}76 signal electrons per incident electron and a photodiode-limited response time of {approx}450 ps.

  14. Proton-induced radiation damage in germanium detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner, J.; Korfer, M.; Wanke, H. , Mainz ); Schroeder, A.N.F. ); Figes, D.; Dragovitsch, P. ); Englert, P.A.J. ); Starr, R.; Trombka, J.I. . Goddard Space Flight Center); Taylor, I. ); Drake, D.M.; Shunk, E.R. )

    1991-04-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors will be used in future space missions for gamma-ray measurements and will be subject to interactions with energetic particles. To simulate this process several large-volume n-type HPGe detectors were incrementally exposed to a particle fluence of up to 10{sub 8} protons cm{sup {minus}2} (proton energy: 1.5 GeV) at different operating temperatures (90 to 120 K) to induce radiation damage. Basic scientific as well as engineering data on detector performance were collected. During the incremental irradiation, the peak shape produced by the detectors showed a significant change from a Gaussian shape to a broad complex structure. After the irradiation all detectors were thoroughly characterized by measuring many parameters. To remove the accumulated radiation damage the detectors were stepwise annealed at temperatures T {le} 110{degrees}C while staying specially designed cryostats. This paper shows that n-type HPGe detectors can be used in charged particles environments as high-energy resolution devices until a certain level of radiation damage is accumulated and that the damage can be removed at moderate annealing temperatures and the detector returned to operating condition.

  15. Proton-induced radiation damage in germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, J.; Koerfer, M.; Waenke, H.; Schroeder, A. N. F.; Filges, D.; Dragovitsch, P.; Englert, P. A. J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1991-01-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors will be used in future space missions for gamma-ray measurements and will be subject to interactions with energetic particles. To simulate this process, several large-volume n-type HPGe detectors were incrementally exposed to a particle fluence of up to 10 to the 8th protons/sq cm (proton energy: 1.5 GeV) at different operating temperatures (90 to 120 K) to induce radiation damage. Basic scientific and engineering data on detector performance were collected. During the incremental irradiation, the peak shape produced by the detectors showed a significant change from a Gaussian shape to a broad complex structure. After the irradiation, all detectors were thoroughly characterized by measuring many parameters. To remove the accumulated radiation damage, the detectors were stepwise-annealed at temperatures below 110 C, while kept in their specially designed cryostats. This study shows that n-type HPGe detectors can be used in charged-particle environments as high-energy resolution devices until a certain level of radiation damage is accumulated and that the damage can be removed at moderate annealing temperatures and the detector returned to operating condition.

  16. RD50 Collaboration overview: Development of new radiation hard detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, S.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon sensors are widely used as tracking detectors in high energy physics experiments. This results in several specific requirements like radiation hardness and granularity. Therefore research for highly performing silicon detectors is required. The RD50 Collaboration is a CERN R&D collaboration dedicated to the development of radiation hard silicon devices for application in high luminosity collider experiments. Extensive research is ongoing in different fields since 2001. The collaboration investigates both defect and material characterization, detector characterization, the development of new structures and full detector systems. The report gives selected results of the collaboration and places an emphasis on the development of new structures, namely 3D devices, CMOS sensors in HV technology and low gain avalanche detectors.

  17. Monolithic active pixel radiation detector with shielding techniques

    DOEpatents

    Deptuch, Grzegorz W.

    2016-09-06

    A monolithic active pixel radiation detector including a method of fabricating thereof. The disclosed radiation detector can include a substrate comprising a silicon layer upon which electronics are configured. A plurality of channels can be formed on the silicon layer, wherein the plurality of channels are connected to sources of signals located in a bulk part of the substrate, and wherein the signals flow through electrically conducting vias established in an isolation oxide on the substrate. One or more nested wells can be configured from the substrate, wherein the nested wells assist in collecting charge carriers released in interaction with radiation and wherein the nested wells further separate the electronics from the sensing portion of the detector substrate. The detector can also be configured according to a thick SOA method of fabrication.

  18. Design of a transition radiation detector for cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, G.; Mueller, D.; Prince, T.

    1975-01-01

    Transition radiation detectors consisting of sandwiches of plastic foam radiators and multiwire proportional chambers can be used to identify cosmic ray particles with energies gamma ? E/mc-squared is greater than 10 to the 3rd and to measure their energy in the region gamma is roughly equal to 10 to the 3rd

  19. New electronics of the spectrometric channel for the SND detector electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achasov, M. N.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Korol, A. A.; Koshuba, S. V.; Kovrizhin, D. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Surin, I. K.; Tekut`ev, A. I.; Usov, Yu. V.

    2016-07-01

    The Spherical Neutral Detector (SND) is intended for study of electron-positron annihilation at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider (BINP, Novosibirsk) in the center-of-mass energy region below 2 GeV. The main part of the detector is a three-layer electromagnetic calorimeter based on NaI(Tl) crystals. The physics program of the SND experiment includes a high statistics study of neutron-antineutron production near threshold, for which time measurements in the calorimeter are required. In this paper we describe new shaping and digitizing calorimeter electronics, which allow to reach a time resolution of about 1 ns for 100 MeV signal and an amplitude resolution of about 250 keV.

  20. Polarization of low-frequency electromagnetic radiation in the lobes of Jupiter's magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, S. L.; Kennel, C. F.; Coroniti, F. V.; Scarf, F. L.; Kurth, W. S.

    1987-01-01

    The plasma wave instruments on the Voyager spacecraft have detected intense electromagnetic radiation within the lobes of Jupiter's magnetic tail down to the lowest frequency of the detector (10 Hz). During a yaw maneuver performed by Voyager 1 in the lobe of the Jovian magnetotail, a modulation appeared in the amplitudes of waves detected in the 10-, 17.8- and 31.1-Hz channels of the plasma wave analyzer, well below the local electron cyclotron frequency of 260 Hz. The lowest amplitudes occurred when the antenna axis was most nearly parallel to the magnetic field. Wave amplitudes in the 56.2-Hz and higher frequency channels remained nearly constant during the maneuver. From the cold-plasma theory of electromagnetic waves, it is concluded that the plasma frequency was between the 56.2- and 31.1-Hz channels where the parallel-polarized component of the spectrum cuts off. This implies a tail-lobe density between 0.000032 and 0.000015/cu cm. The left-hand cutoff frequency would then be below 10 Hz, consistent with either the Z-mode (L, X) or whistlers (R-mode) in the modulated channels.

  1. Nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Savignac, Noel Felix; Gomez, Leo S; Yelton, William Graham; Robinson, Alex; Limmer, Steven

    2013-06-04

    This invention is a nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance of silver-silver halide on an interdigitated electrode to detect light or radiation comprised of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, X rays, and/or neutrons. The detector is comprised of an interdigitated electrode covered by a layer of silver halide. After exposure to alpha particles, beta particles, X rays, gamma rays, neutron radiation, or light, the silver halide is reduced to silver in the presence of a reducing solution. The change from the high electrical resistance (impedance) of silver halide to the low resistance of silver provides the radiation warning that detected radiation levels exceed a predetermined radiation dose threshold.

  2. Living Organisms Coupling to Electromagnetic Radiation Below Thermal Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolc, Viktor; Freund, Friedemann

    2013-04-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) and extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic (EM) radiation is part of the natural environment. Prior to major earthquakes the local ULF and global ELF radiation field is often markedly perturbed. This has detrimental effects on living organisms. We are studying the mechanism of these effects on the biochemical, cellular and organismal levels. The transfer of electrons along the Electron Transfer Chain (ETC) controls the universal reduction-oxidation reactions that are essential for fundamental biochemical processes in living cells. In order for these processes to work properly, the ETC has to maintain some form of synchronization, or coherence with all biochemical reactions in the living cells, including energy production, RNA transcription, and DNA replication. As a consequence of this synchronization, harmful chemical conflict between the reductive and the oxidative partial reactions can be minimized or avoided. At the same time we note that the synchronization allows for a transfer of energy, coherent or interfering, via coupling to the natural ambient EM field. Extremely weak high frequency EM fields, well below the thermal noise level, tuned in frequency to the electron spins of certain steps in the ETC, have already been shown to cause aberrant cell growth and disorientation among plants and animals with respect to the magnetic and gravity vectors. We investigate EM fields over a much wider frequency range, including ULF known to be generated deep in the Earth prior to major earthquakes locally, and ELF known to be fed by lightning discharges, traveling around the globe in the cavity formed between the Earth's surface and the ionosphere. This ULF/ELF radiation can control the timing of the biochemical redox cycle and thereby have a universal effect on physiology of organisms. The timing can even have a detrimental influence, via increased oxidative damage, on the DNA replication, which controls heredity.

  3. Specific Electromagnetic Effects of Microwave Radiation on Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Shamis, Yury; Taube, Alex; Mitik-Dineva, Natasa; Croft, Rodney; Crawford, Russell J.; Ivanova, Elena P.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of microwave (MW) radiation applied under a sublethal temperature on Escherichia coli. The experiments were conducted at a frequency of 18 GHz and at a temperature below 40°C to avoid the thermal degradation of bacterial cells during exposure. The absorbed power was calculated to be 1,500 kW/m3, and the electric field was determined to be 300 V/m. Both values were theoretically confirmed using CST Microwave Studio 3D Electromagnetic Simulation Software. As a negative control, E. coli cells were also thermally heated to temperatures up to 40°C using Peltier plate heating. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis performed immediately after MW exposure revealed that the E. coli cells exhibited a cell morphology significantly different from that of the negative controls. This MW effect, however, appeared to be temporary, as following a further 10-min elapsed period, the cell morphology appeared to revert to a state that was identical to that of the untreated controls. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) revealed that fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated dextran (150 kDa) was taken up by the MW-treated cells, suggesting that pores had formed within the cell membrane. Cell viability experiments revealed that the MW treatment was not bactericidal, since 88% of the cells were recovered after radiation. It is proposed that one of the effects of exposing E. coli cells to MW radiation under sublethal temperature conditions is that the cell surface undergoes a modification that is electrokinetic in nature, resulting in a reversible MW-induced poration of the cell membrane. PMID:21378041

  4. UTILIZATION OF PHOSWICH DETECTORS FOR SIMULTANEOUS, MULTIPLE RADIATION DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    William H. Miller; Manuel Diaz de Leon

    2003-04-15

    A phoswich radiation detector is comprised of a phosphor sandwich in which several different phosphors are viewed by a common photomultiplier. By selecting the appropriate phosphors, this system can be used to simultaneously measure multiple radiation types (alpha, beta, gamma and/or neutron) with a single detector. Differentiation between the signals from the different phosphors is accomplished using digital pulse shape discrimination techniques. This method has been shown to result in accurate discrimination with highly reliable and versatile digital systems. This system also requires minimal component count (i.e. only the detector and a computer for signal processing). A variety of detectors of this type have been built and tested including: (1) a triple phoswich system for alpha/beta/gamma swipe counting, (2) two well-type detectors for measuring low levels of low energy photons in the presence of a high energy background, (3) a large area detector for measuring beta contamination in the presence of a photon background, (4) another large area detector for measuring low energy photons from radioactive elements such as uranium in the presence of a photon background. An annular geometry, triple phoswich system optimized for measuring alpha/beta/gamma radiation in liquid waste processing streams is currently being designed.

  5. Recent progress in the development of transition radiation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, M. L.; Hartmann, G.; Prince, T.; Mueller, D.

    1978-01-01

    Transition-radiation detectors have been used in several recent cosmic-ray experiments for particle identification at energies E/mc-squared of at least about 1000. In order to optimize the design of such detectors and to use them for energy measurements over a broad energy range, it is necessary to study the details of the transition-radiation process. Experimental results are presented which test the theoretical predictions more precisely and at higher energies than in previous experiments. The dependence of the interference pattern in the frequency spectrum on the radiator dimensions is studied, and the total transition-radiation yield generated by electrons in various radiators is measured over a very wide energy range, from 5 to 300 GeV. The significance of the individual experimental parameters in the design of transition radiation detectors is reviewed, and the characteristics of transition-radiation detectors capable of measuring particle energies over the range E/mc-squared from about 300 to 100,000 are discussed.

  6. Scattering of electromagnetic radiation by a multilayered sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, O.; Pal, U.

    2009-11-01

    The computer implementation of the algorithm for the calculation of electromagnetic radiation scattering by a multilayered sphere developed by Yang, is presented. It has been shown that the program is effective, resulting in very accurate values of scattering efficiencies for a wide range of size parameters, which is a considerable improvement over previous implementations of similar algorithms. The program, named scattnlay, would be the first of its kind to be publicly available. Catalogue identifier: AEEY_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEY_1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Gnu General Public License (GPL) No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 8932 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 175 276 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: ANSI C Computer: Any with a C compiler Operating system: Linux (any), Windows, Solaris RAM: ∼1-100 MB Classification: 1.3 Nature of problem: The scattering of electromagnetic (EM) radiation by a multilayered sphere is an interesting phenomenon to study for the application of such materials in several fields. Just to mention two examples, metal nanoshells (a dielectric core surrounded by a metallic shell) are a class of nanoparticles with tunable optical resonances that can be used, among others, in medicine for optical imaging and photothermal cancer therapy; while in the field of atmospheric sciences, light absorption by aerosols has a heating effect in the atmosphere that is of great interest to study several climatic effects. Although at first glance the expressions of the scattering coefficients seem simple and straightforward to implement, they involve several numerical difficulties which make most of

  7. Experimental studies of radiation damage of silicon detectors. Internal report

    SciTech Connect

    Angelescu, T.; Ghete, V.M.; Ghiordanescu, N.; Lazanu, I.; Mihul, A.; Golutvin, I.; Lazanu, S.; Savin, I.; Vasilescu, A.; Biggeri, U.; Borchi, E.; Bruzzi, M. |; Li, Z.; Kraner, H.W.

    1994-02-01

    New particle physics experiments are correlated with high luminosity and/or high energy. The new generation of colliding beam machines which will be constructed will make an extrapolation of a factor of 100 in the center of mass energy and of 1000 in luminosity beyond present accelerators. The scientific community hopes that very exciting physics results could be achieved this way, from the solution to the problem of electroweak symmetry breaking to the possible discovery of new, unpredicted phenomena. The particles which compose the radiation field are: electrons, pions, neutrons, protons and photons. It has become evident that the problem of the radiation resistance of detectors in this severe environment is a crucial one. This situation is complicated more by the fact that detectors must work all the run time of the machine, and better all the time of the experiment, without replacement (part or whole). So, studies related to the investigation of the radiation hardness of all detector parts, are developing. The studies are in part material and device characterization after irradiation, and in part technological developments, made in order to find harder, cheaper technologies, for larger surfaces. Semiconductor detectors have proven to be a good choice for vertex and calorimeter. Both fixed target machines and colliders had utilized in the past silicon junction detectors as the whole or part of the detection system. Precision beam hodoscopes and sophisticated trigger devices with silicon are equally used. The associated electronics in located near the detectors, and is subjected to the same radiation fields. Studies of material and device radiation hardness are developing in parallel. Here the authors present results on the radiation hardness of silicon, both as a bulk material and as detectors, to neutron irradiation at high fluences.

  8. THz electromagnetic radiation driven by intense relativistic electron beam based on ion focus regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qing; Yang, Shengpeng; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Wenchao; Tang, Changjian; Duan, Zhaoyun; Gong, Yubin

    2016-06-01

    The simulation study finds that the relativistic electron beam propagating through the plasma background can produce electromagnetic (EM) radiation. With the propagation of the electron beam, the oscillations of the beam electrons in transverse and longitudinal directions have been observed simultaneously, which provides the basis for the electromagnetic radiation. The simulation results clearly show that the electromagnetic radiation frequency can reach up to terahertz (THz) wave band which may result from the filter-like property of plasma background, and the electromagnetic radiation frequency closely depends on the plasma density. To understand the above simulation results physically, the dispersion relation of the beam-plasma system has been derived using the field-matching method, and the dispersion curves show that the slow wave modes can couple with the electron beam effectively in THz wave band, which is an important theoretical evidence of the EM radiation.

  9. The electromagnetic radiation from semiconductor minerals in orebody

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, M.; Nagahama, H.; Muto, J.; Nagase, T.

    2013-12-01

    In complex ore deposits composing semiconductor minerals, electromagnetic radiation in the radio frequency (30 kHz ~ 3 MHz) is induced by propagation of elastic waves [1]. Semiconductor minerals are divided into n- or p-type. When each p-type and n-type is joined, the resulting junction (p-n junction) has the rectifying property. Many natural orebodies show this property, but it has not been evaluated qualitatively. A lot of p-n junctions exist as which connect in parallel and in series in the orebody [2]. They can be regarded as a single p-n junction at large scale. Hence elucidating the electric property of micro p-n junction is required to understand the semiconductor properties of orebody. To discuss the electromagnetic emission from semiconductor minerals in the orebody associated with tectonic process, we measure the electric property of the semiconductor pyrite. Composition and electric properties of natural semiconductor minerals are heterogeneous due to the presence of impurities and defects. Therefore, it is needed to clarify the properties at each microscopic region. In this research, we apply electroetching method and SEM analysis to acquire composition characteristics and use an indentation probe to reveal microscopic electric properties. Sample of pyrite is from Waga-Sennin mine, Akita prefecture, Japan. The area of cross section is 1.4 cm2 with thickness of 0.38 mm2. In the electrolytic etching, the surface of samples showed etching figures and zonal structures with widths of about 10 -100 μm. According to the SEM analysis, Pb inclusions were observed to be precipitated parallel to crystallographic planes. The heterogeneous change in electric properties of each area was observed to be as etching figure. Thermal probing method clarified that the regions of n-p type differences were also coincidence well to etching figure patterns. P-type regions showed a higher solubility than n-type regions. At p-n junction regions, rectifying property was observed

  10. Spin-down of Pulsars, and Their Electromagnetic and Gravitational Wave Radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue-zhu, Zhang; Yan-yan, Fu; Yi-huan, Wei; Cheng-min, Zhang; Shao-hua, Yu; Yuan-yue, Pan; Yuan-qi, Guo; De-hua, Wang

    2016-04-01

    Pulsars posses extremely strong magnetic fields, and their magnetic axis does not coincide with their rotation axis, this causes the pulsars to emit electromagnetic radiations. Pulsars rely on their rotational energy to compensate for the energy loss caused by the electromagnetic radiation, which leads to the gradually decelerated spin of pulsars. According to the theoretical deduction, we have calculated the initial period of the Crab Nebula pulsar, and derived the period evolution of the pulsar at any time in the future under the effect of the electromagnetic radiation. Considered the possible existence of quadrupole moment in the mass distribution of a pulsar, the gravitational wave radiation will also make the pulsar spin down, hence the variation of spin period of the Crab pulsar under the effect of gravitational wave radiation is further analyzed. Finally, combining the two kinds of radiation mechanisms, the evolution of spin period of the Crab pulsar under the joint action of these two kinds of radiation mechanisms is analyzed.

  11. Operation of silicon microstrip detectors in a high radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kapustinsky, J.S.; Alde, D.M.; Boissevain, J.G.; Jeppesen, R.G.; Lane, D.W.; Leitch, M.J.; Lillberg, J.W.; Lopez, T.A.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.; Peng, J.C. ); Brooks, B.M.; Isenhower, L.D.; Sadler, M.E. ); Lederman, L.M.; Schub, M.H. ); Brown, C.N.; Cooper, W.E.; Gounder, K.; Hsiung, Y.B.; Mishra, C.S. (Fermi National

    1990-01-01

    A Silicon Microstrip Spectrometer was recently installed and operated in an 800 GeV proton beamline at Fermilab as a major new component of experiment E789. The detectors received an estimated radiation exposure of up to 7.8 {times} 10{sup 12} minimum ionizing particles per cm{sup 2} over a period of two months. We report on the changes in detector performance that we have observed following preliminary data analysis. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Cardiovascular risk in operators under radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Vangelova, Katia; Deyanov, Christo; Israel, Mishel

    2006-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the long-term effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (EMR) on the cardiovascular system. Two groups of exposed operators (49 broadcasting (BC) station and 61 TV station operators) and a control group of 110 radiorelay station operators, matched by sex and age, with similar job characteristics except for the radiofrequency EMR were studied. The EMR exposure was assessed and the time-weighted average (TWA) was calculated. The cardiovascular risk factors arterial pressure, lipid profile, body mass index, waist/hip ratio, smoking, and family history of cardiovascular disease were followed. The systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were significantly higher in the two exposed groups. It was found that the radiofrequency EMR exposure was associated with greater chance of becoming hypertensive and dyslipidemic. The stepwise multiple regression equations showed that the SBP and TWA predicted the high TC and high LDL-C, while the TC, age and abdominal obesity were predictors for high SBP and DBP. In conclusion, our data show that the radiofrequency EMR contributes to adverse effects on the cardiovascular system. PMID:16503299

  13. Changes in Frequency of Electromagnetic Radiation from Loaded Coal Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dazhao; Wang, Enyuan; Song, Xiaoyan; Jin, Peijian; Qiu, Liming

    2016-01-01

    To understand the relationship between the frequency of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emitted from loaded coal rock and the micro-crack structures inside it, and assess the stress state and the stability of coal rock by analyzing frequency changes in characteristics of its emitted EMR, we first experimentally studied the changes in time sequence and the frequency spectrum characteristics of EMR during uniaxial compression, then theoretically derived the relationship between the principal frequency of EMR signals and the mechanical parameters of coal crack and analyzed the major factors causing the changes in the principal frequency, and lastly verified the results at Nuodong Coal Mine, Guizhou Province, China. The experimental results showed that (1) EMR intensity increased with the applied stress on loaded coal rock during its deformation and failure and could qualitatively reflect the coal's stress status; (2) with the applied stress increasing, the principal frequency gradually increased from near zero to about 60 kHz and then dropped to less than 20 kHz. During this period, coal rock first stepped into the linearly and elastically deformed stage and then ruptured around the peak load. Theoretical analysis showed that there was a negative correlation between the principle frequency and the size of internal cracks. Field detection showed that a lower principle frequency was generated from coal rock applied by a greater load, while a higher principal frequency was generated from coal rocks suffering a weaker load.

  14. Proposal to reduce the carcinogenic character of electromagnetic radiation (EMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2011-03-01

    Non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation (NIEMR) interacts with matter in 3 ways: it can transfer energy, linear momentum, and angular momentum to matter. At high frequencies (e.g., microwaves), evidence exists of a carcinogenic effect on living creatures irradiated with NIEMR. Which effect is carcinogenic? NIEMR heats matter by transfer of energy; this effect is used to kill established cancers. Transfer of linear momentum to matter merely alters the local pressure; cancer has never been associated with pressure changes. So the transfer of non-zero angular momentum to matter is the interaction most likely to be carcinogenic. EMR polarization can be circular, elliptical, or plane. Only plane-polarized EMR possesses zero angular momentum and therefore cannot transfer any angular momentum to matter. Everything that is true of NIEMR is also true of ionizing EMR, so it seems likely that the carcinogenic potential of all EMR (whether ionizing or non-ionizing) will be minimized by filtering it or taking other steps to make it plane-polarized before using it to irradiate a person or animal. Obvious applications are medical/dental X-rays and the full body scanners used on travelers at airports. M. Lundquist, BAPS 51(1):518 (2006).

  15. Radiation hardness of three-dimensional polycrystalline diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lagomarsino, Stefano Sciortino, Silvio; Bellini, Marco; Corsi, Chiara; Cindro, Vladimir; Kanxheri, Keida; Servoli, Leonello; Morozzi, Arianna; Passeri, Daniele; Schmidt, Christian J.

    2015-05-11

    The three-dimensional concept in particle detection is based on the fabrication of columnar electrodes perpendicular to the surface of a solid state radiation sensor. It permits to improve the radiation resistance characteristics of a material by lowering the necessary bias voltage and shortening the charge carrier path inside the material. If applied to a long-recognized exceptionally radiation-hard material like diamond, this concept promises to pave the way to the realization of detectors of unprecedented performances. We fabricated conventional and three-dimensional polycrystalline diamond detectors, and tested them before and after neutron damage up to 1.2 ×10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}, 1 MeV-equivalent neutron fluence. We found that the signal collected by the three-dimensional detectors is up to three times higher than that of the conventional planar ones, at the highest neutron damage ever experimented.

  16. Three-axis asymmetric radiation detector system

    DOEpatents

    Martini, Mario Pierangelo; Gedcke, Dale A.; Raudorf, Thomas W.; Sangsingkeow, Pat

    2000-01-01

    A three-axis radiation detection system whose inner and outer electrodes are shaped and positioned so that the shortest path between any point on the inner electrode and the outer electrode is a different length whereby the rise time of a pulse derived from a detected radiation event can uniquely define the azimuthal and radial position of that event, and the outer electrode is divided into a plurality of segments in the longitudinal axial direction for locating the axial location of a radiation detection event occurring in the diode.

  17. The Dielectric Bolometer, A New Type of Thermal Radiation Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanel, R. A.

    1960-01-01

    Thermal detectors for the infrared, such as thermocouples and bolometers, are limited in their ultimate sensitivity predominantly by Johnson noise rather than temperature noise. Low noise figures are hard to achieve since Johnson noise preponderates temperature noise, which is the only essential noise for thermal detectors. The dielectric constants of some materials are sufficiently temperature dependent to make a new type of bolometer feasible. The basic theory of a dielectric bolometer, as shown here, promises noise figures below 3 decibels even at chopper frequencies well above the 1/tau value of the detector. Ferroelectrics such as barium-strontium titanate and others seem to be well suited for radiation-cooled dielectric bolometers.

  18. Radiation detectors as surveillance monitors for IAEA safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Fehlau, P.E.; Dowdy, E.J.

    1980-10-01

    Radiation detectors used for personnel dosimetry are examined for use under IAEA Safeguards as monitors to confirm the passage or nonpassage (YES/NO) of plutonium-bearing nuclear material at barrier penetrations declared closed. In this application where backgrounds are ill defined, no advantage is found for a particular detector type because of intrinsic efficiency. Secondary considerations such as complexity, ease of tamper-proofing, and ease of readout are used to recommend specific detector types for routine monitoring and for data-base measurements. Recommendations are made for applications, data acquisition, and instrument development.

  19. R&D for Better Nuclear Security: Radiation Detector Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kammeraad, J E

    2009-04-02

    I am going to talk about the need for better materials for radiation detectors. I believe that government investment in this area can enable transformational technology change that could impact domestic nuclear security and also national nuclear security in some very positive and powerful ways. I'm not going to give you a lecture on how radiation detectors work, but I am going to tell you a bit about today's off-the-shelf technology and why it is not sufficient, what we need, and what security benefit you could get from improvements. I think we're at a critical point in time for some very impactful investments. In particular I'm going to focus on the use of gamma-ray radiation detectors at ports of entry. Not long before DHS was formed, Congress decreed that counter measures against the delivery of radiological and nuclear threats would be put in place at US ports of entry, under the authority of US Customs (later Customs and Border Protection in DHS). This included the screening of all cars and trucks passing through a port of entry. Existing off-the-shelf radiation detectors had to be selected for this purpose. Plans were made to make the most of the available technologies, but there are some inherent limitations of these detectors, plus the operational setting can bring out other limitations.

  20. Electromagnetic and Radiative Properties of Neutron Star Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jason G.

    2014-05-01

    Magnetospheres of neutron stars are commonly modeled as either devoid of plasma in "vacuum'' models or filled with perfectly conducting plasma with negligible inertia in "force-free'' models. While numerically tractable, neither of these idealized limits can simultaneously account for both the plasma currents and the accelerating electric fields that are needed to explain the morphology and spectra of high-energy emission from pulsars. In this work we improve upon these models by considering the structure of magnetospheres filled with resistive plasma. We formulate Ohm's Law in the minimal velocity fluid frame and implement a time-dependent numerical code to construct a family of resistive solutions that smoothly bridges the gap between the vacuum and force-free magnetosphere solutions. We further apply our method to create a self-consistent model for the recently discovered intermittent pulsars that switch between two distinct states: an "on'', radio-loud state, and an "off'', radio-quiet state with lower spin-down luminosity. Essentially, we allow plasma to leak off open field lines in the absence of pair production in the "off'' state, reproducing observed differences in spin-down rates. Next, we examine models in which the high-energy emission from gamma-ray pulsars comes from reconnecting current sheets and layers near and beyond the light cylinder. The reconnected magnetic field provides a reservoir of energy that heats particles and can power high-energy synchrotron radiation. Emitting particles confined to the sheet naturally result in a strong caustic on the skymap and double peaked light curves for a broad range of observer angles. Interpulse bridge emission likely arises from interior to the light cylinder, along last open field lines that traverse the space between the polar caps and the current sheet. Finally, we apply our code to solve for the magnetospheric structure of merging neutron star binaries. We find that the scaling of electromagnetic

  1. Transition-radiation-Compton-scattering detector for very relativistic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, W. Z.; Mack, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents the design and predicted performance of a large acceptance (2 sq m sr) transition-radiation-Compton-scattering detector system which can be used to measure energy spectra up to several thousand Gev/nucleon for nuclei with Z between 6 and 28, as well as up to 40,000 GeV/nucleon for He. The following circumstances made such a detector system practicable: (1) transition radiation output is proportional to the square of particle charge; (2) output varies at least as rapidly as the square of Lorentz factor over the range from several hundred to several thousand.

  2. Weakly Dissipative Dust Ion-Acoustic Solitons in the Presence of Electromagnetic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Golub', A. P.; Izvekova, Y. N.; Losseva, T. V.; Popel, S. I.; Shukla, P. K.

    2011-11-29

    We present the model, which describes nonlinear dust ion-acoustic (DIA) perturbations in complex plasmas with electromagnetic radiation. We study time-evolution of the individual DIA soliton and interaction of two DIA solitons.

  3. Gauge Invariant Formulation of the Interaction of Electromagnetic Radiation and Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobe, Donald H.; Smirl, Arthur L.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a discussion in Perturbation theory in quantum mechanics for the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. Advocates the use of electric dipole interaction whenever it can be used as compared to the vector potential interaction. (GA)

  4. Radiation sensitivity of GSO and LSO scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozma, Peter; Kozma, Petr

    2005-02-01

    Radiation resistance of 4×4×30 mm 3 GSO and LSO imaging scintillation detectors has been studied for low-energy gamma-ray doses of 10 4 Gy (10 6 rad) and 10 5 Gy (10 7 rad). Radiation hardness was determined by the measurement of optical transmission through GSO and LSO scintillation crystals before and after irradiations with 60Co gamma-rays. The results have been analysed in terms of the radiation-induced absorption coefficients and compared with radiation sensitivity measurements of small BGO scintillation crystals. The recovery time of irradiated small GSO and LSO crystals has also been determined.

  5. The Forward Endcap of the Electromagnetic Calorimeter for the PANDA Detector at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Malte; PANDA Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The versatile 4π-detector PANDA will be built at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), an accelerator complex, currently under construction near Darmstadt, Germany. A cooled antiproton beam in a momentum range of 1.5 - 15GeV/c will be provided by the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR). All measurements at PANDA rely on an excellent performance of the detector with respect to tracking, particle identification and energy measurement. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) of the PANDA detector will be equipped with 15744 PbWO4 crystals (PWO-II), which will be operated at a temperature of - 25° C in order to increase the light output. The design of the forward endcap of the EMC has been finalized. The crystals will be read out with Large Area Avalanche Photo Diodes (LAAPDs) in the outer regions and with Vacuum Photo Tetrodes (VPTTs) in the innermost part. Production of photosensor units utilizing charge integrating preamplifiers has begun. A prototype comprised of 216 PbWO4 crystals has been built and tested at various accelerators (CERN SPS, ELSA/Bonn, MAMI/Mainz), where the crystals have been exposed to electron and photon beams of 25MeV up to 15GeV. The results of these test measurements regarding the energy and position resolution are presented.

  6. Prototype of readout electronics for the LHAASO KM2A electromagnetic particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang; Chang, Jing-Fan; Wang, Zheng; Fan, Lei

    2016-07-01

    The KM2A (one kilometer square extensive air shower array) is the largest detector array in the LHAASO (Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory) project. The KM2A consists of 5242 EDs (Electromagnetic particle Detectors) and 1221 MDs (Muon Detectors). The EDs are distributed and exposed in the wild. Two channels, anode and dynode, are employed for the PMT (photomultiplier tube) signal readout. The readout electronics designed in this paper aims at accurate charge and arrival time measurement of the PMT signals, which cover a large amplitude range from 20 P.E. (photoelectrons) to 2 × 105 P.E. By using a “trigger-less” architecture, we digitize signals close to the PMTs. All digitized data is transmitted to DAQ (Data Acquisition) via a simplified White Rabbit protocol. Compared with traditional high energy experiments, high precision of time measurement over such a large area and suppression of temperature effects in the wild become the key techniques. Experiments show that the design has fulfilled the requirements in this project. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375210) and the Knowledge Innovation Fund of IHEP, Beijing

  7. (Effects of ionizing radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors)

    SciTech Connect

    Proudfoot, J.

    1992-01-01

    It is my task to summarise the great variety of topics (covering a refreshing mix of physics, chemistry and technology) presented at this conference, which has focused on the effects of ionising radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors. One of the reasons and the central interest of many of the participants was the use of such detectors in experiments at two future large hadron colliders: the Superconducting Super Collider to be operating outside of Dallas in the United States by the turn of the decade and its European counterpart the Large Hadron Collider to be operating outside of Geneva in Switzerland on a similar time scale. These accelerators are the apple of the high energy physicist's eye.'' Their goal is to uncover the elusive Higgs particle and thereby set the cornerstone in our current knowledge of elementary particle interactions. This is the Quest, and from this lofty height the presentations rapidly moved on to the specific questions of experimental science: how such an experiment is carried out; why radiation damage is an issue; how radiation damage affects detectors; which factors affect radiation damage characteristics; which factors are not affected by radiation damage; and how better detectors may be constructed. These were the substance of this conference.

  8. Generation of high-power electromagnetic radiation by a beam-driven plasma antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annenkov, V. V.; Volchok, E. P.; Timofeev, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we study how efficiently electromagnetic radiation can be generated by a relativistic electron beam with a gigawatt power level during its injection into a thin magnetized plasma. It is shown that, if the transverse beam and plasma size is compared with the radiation wavelength and the plasma density is modulated along the magnetic field, such a beam-plasma system can radiate electromagnetic waves via the antenna mechanism. We propose a theoretical model describing generation of electromagnetic waves by this plasma antenna and calculate its main radiation characteristics. In the two-dimensional case theoretical predictions on the radiation efficiency are shown to be confirmed by the results of particle-in-cell simulations, and the three-dimensional variant of this theory is used to estimate the peak power of sub-terahertz radiation that can be achieved in beam-plasma experiments in mirror traps.

  9. Study on electromagnetic radiation and mechanical characteristics of coal during an SHPB test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chengwu, Li; Qifei, Wang; Pingyang, Lyu

    2016-06-01

    Dynamic loads provided by a Split Hopkinson pressure bar are applied in the impact failure experiment on coal with an impact velocity of 4.174–17.652 m s‑1. The mechanical property characteristics of coal and an electromagnetic radiation signal can be detected and measured during the experiment. The variation of coal stress, strain, incident energy, dissipated energy and other mechanical parameters are analyzed by the unidimensional stress wave theory. It suggests that with an increase of the impact velocity, the mechanical parameters and electromagnetic radiation increased significantly and the dissipated energy of the coal sample has a high discrete growing trend during the failure process of coal impact. Combined with the received energy of the electromagnetic radiation signal, the relationship between these mechanical parameters and electromagnetic radiation during the failure process of coal burst could be analyzed by the grey correlation model. The results show that the descending order of the gray correlation degree between the mechanical characteristics and electromagnetic radiation energy are impact velocity, maximum stress, the average stress, incident energy, the average strain, maximum strain, the average strain rate and dissipation energy. Due to the correlation degree, the impact velocity and incident energy are relatively large, and the main factor affecting the electromagnetic radiation energy of coal is the energy magnitude. While the relationship between extreme stress and the radiation energy change trend is closed, the stress state of coal has a greater impact on electromagnetic radiation than the strain and destruction which can deepen the research of the coal-rock dynamic disaster electromagnetic monitoring technique.

  10. Semiconductor radiation detector with internal gain

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan; Patt, Bradley E.; Vilkelis, Gintas

    2003-04-01

    An avalanche drift photodetector (ADP) incorporates extremely low capacitance of a silicon drift photodetector (SDP) and internal gain that mitigates the surface leakage current noise of an avalanche photodetector (APD). The ADP can be coupled with scintillators such as CsI(Tl), NaI(Tl), LSO or others to form large volume scintillation type gamma ray detectors for gamma ray spectroscopy, photon counting, gamma ray counting, etc. Arrays of the ADPs can be used to replace the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) used in conjunction with scintillation crystals in conventional gamma cameras for nuclear medical imaging.

  11. Radiation damage effects in CZT drift strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Joergensen, Carl; Korsbech, Uffe; Jensen, H. J.

    2003-03-01

    At DSRI, in collaboration with the cyclotron facility at Copenhagen University Hospital, we have performed a study of radiation effects exposing a 2.7 mm thick CZT drift strip detector to 30 MeV protons. The detector characteristics were evaluated after exposure to a number of dose loads in the range from 2*108 to 60*108 p+/cm2. Even for the highest dose loads, which had a dramatic effect on the spectroscopic performance, we were able to recover the detectors after an appropriate annealing procedure. The radiation damage was studied as function of depth inside the detector material. A numerical model that emulates the physical processes of the charge transport in the CZT detector was used to derive the charge trapping parameter , μτe (the product of charge mobility and trapping time) as function of dose. The analysis showed that the electron trapping increased proportional with the proton dose. The radiation contribution to the electron trapping was found to obey the following relation: (μτe)-1rad =(2.5±0.2)*10-7*Φ (V/cm2) with the proton fluence, Φ in p+/cm2. The trapping depth dependence, however, did not agree well the damage profile calculated using the standard Monte Carlo simulations, TRIM for the proton induced radiation effects. The present results suggest that proton induced nuclear reactions contribute significantly to the radiation damage. Further work will elaborate on these effects. The detector energy resolution was investigated as function of proton dose. It was found that the observed degradation is well explained by the decrease of μτe when the fluctuations of the electron path length are taken into account. The proton irradiation produced In meta stable isotopes in the CZT material. Their decay and production yield as function of depth were analyzed.

  12. The High Energy Particle Detector on board the CSES China Seismo-Electromagnetic satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparvoli, Roberta

    2015-04-01

    The CSES space mission will study the ionospheric perturbations possibly associated with earthquakes - especially with destructive ones - and explore new approaches for short-term and imminent forecast. It will also help finding a new way for theoretical studies on the mechanism of earthquake preparation processes. CSES satellite will be launched in 2016 and inserted into a circular Sun-syncronous orbit with 98 degrees inclination and 500 km altitude. Expected lifetime is 5 years. CSES hosts several instruments onboard: 2 magnetometers, an electrical field detector, a plasma analyzer, a Langmiur probe and a High Energy Particle Detector (HEPD). Task of the HEPD is to study particle fluxes on the Earth radiation belts in order to find sudden burst. Previous space missions, indeed, have found time-correlations between particle bursts measured in space and the occurrence of an earthquake on Ground. HEPD detector will measure electrons (3 - 100 MeV) and protons (30 - 300 MeV) along CSES orbit. The angular and energy resolution and the detector acceptance are optimized to accurately detect the expected low short-term time variations of the particle flux from the radiation belts. Topic of this talk is the technical description of the HEPD and its main characteristics.

  13. Recent progress in the transition radiation detector techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, L. C. L.

    1973-01-01

    A list of some of the major experimental achievements involving charged particles in the relativistic region are presented. With the emphasis mainly directed to the X-ray region, certain modes of application of the transition radiation for the identification and separation of relativistic charged particles are discussed. Some recent developments in detection techniques and improvements in detector performances are presented. Experiments were also carried out to detect the dynamic radiation, but no evidence of such an effect was observed.

  14. EFFECTS OF P / N IN HOMOGENEITY ON CDZNTE RADIATION DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    CHU,M.; TERTERIAN,S.; TING,D.; JAMES,R.B.; SZAWLOWSKI,M.; VISSER,G.J.

    2002-07-08

    Spectrometer grade, room-temperature radiation detectors have been produced on Cd{sub 0.90}Zn{sub 0.10}Te grown by the low-pressure Bridgman technique. Small amount of indium has been used to compensate the uncompensated Cd vacancies for the crystals to be semi-insulating. The properties of the detectors are critically dependent on the amount of excess Te introduced into the growth melts of the Cd{sub 0.90}Zn{sub 0.10}Te crystals and the best detectors are fabricated from crystals grown with 1.5% excess Te. Detector resolution of {sup 57}Co and {sup 241}Am radiation peaks are observed on all detectors except the ones produced on Cd{sub 0.90}Zn{sub 0.10}Te grown from the melt in the stoichiometric condition. The lack of resolution of these stoichiometric grown detectors is explained by a p/n conduction-type inhomogeneity model.

  15. Two-dimensional position sensitive radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, John T.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear reaction detectors capable of position sensitivity with submillimeter resolution in two dimensions are each provided by placing arrays of scintillation or wave length shifting optical fibers formed of a plurality of such optical fibers in a side-by-side relationship in X and Y directions with a layer of nuclear reactive material operatively associated with surface regions of the optical fiber arrays. Each nuclear reaction occurring in the layer of nuclear reactive material produces energetic particles for simultaneously providing a light pulse in a single optical fiber in the X oriented array and in a single optical fiber in the Y oriented array. These pulses of light are transmitted to a signal producing circuit for providing signals indicative of the X-Y coordinates of each nuclear event.

  16. Two-dimensional position sensitive radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1994-02-22

    Nuclear reaction detectors capable of position sensitivity with submillimeter resolution in two dimensions are each provided by placing arrays of scintillation or wavelength shifting optical fibers formed of a plurality of such optical fibers in a side-by-side relationship in X and Y directions with a layer of nuclear reactive material operatively associated with surface regions of the optical fiber arrays. Each nuclear reaction occurring in the layer of nuclear reactive material produces energetic particles for simultaneously providing a light pulse in a single optical fiber in the X oriented array and in a single optical fiber in the Y oriented array. These pulses of light are transmitted to a signal producing circuit for providing signals indicative of the X-Y coordinates of each nuclear event. 6 figures.

  17. Research on radiation detectors, boiling transients, and organic lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The accomplishments of a space projects research facility are presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) a study of radiation resistant semiconductor devices, (2) synthesis of high temperature organic lubricants, (3) departure from phase equilibrium during boiling transients, (4) effects of neutron irradiation on defect state in tungsten, and (5) determination of photon response function of NE-213 liquid scintillation detectors.

  18. Radiation Response of Emerging High Gain, Low Noise Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Heidi N.; Farr, William H; Zhu, David Q.

    2007-01-01

    Data illustrating the radiation response of emerging high gain, low noise detectors are presented. Ionizing dose testing of silicon internal discrete avalanche photodiodes, and 51-MeV proton testing of InGaAs/InAlAs avalanche photodiodes operated in Geiger mode are discussed.

  19. Synchrotron radiation applications of charge coupled device detectors (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, R. ); Lowe, W.P.; MacHarrie, R.A. ); Brizard, C.; Rodricks, B.G. )

    1992-01-01

    Scientific charge coupled devices (CCDs) offer many opportunities for high brightness synchrotron radiation applications where good spatial resolution and fast data acquisition are important. We describe the use of virtual-phase CCD pixel arrays as two-dimensional area detectors illustrating the techniques with results from recent x-ray scattering, imaging, and absorption spectroscopy studies at NSLS, CHESS, SRC, and LURE DCI. The virtual phase architecture allows direct frontside illumination of the CCD detector chips giving advantages in the speed and sensitivity of the detector. Combining developments in x-ray optics (dispersive geometry), position sensitive area detectors (CCDs), and fast data acquisition, we have been able to perform time-resolved measurements at the microsecond level. Current developments include faster data transfer rates so that the single bunch timing structure of third generation synchrotron sources can be exploited.

  20. Electromagnetic radiation and nonlinear energy flow in an electron beam-plasma system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whelan, D. A.; Stenzel, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the unstable electron-plasma waves of a beam-plasma system can generate electromagnetic radiation in a uniform plasma. The generation mechanism is a scattering of the unstable electron plasma waves off ion-acoustic waves, producing electromagnetic waves whose frequency is near the local plasma frequency. The wave vector and frequency matching conditions of the three-wave mode coupling are experimentally verified. The electromagnetic radiation is observed to be polarized with the electric field parallel to the beam direction, and its source region is shown to be localized to the unstable plasma wave region. The frequency spectrum shows negligible intensity near the second harmonic of the plasma frequency. These results suggest that the observed electromagnetic radiation of type III solar bursts may be generated near the local plasma frequency and observed downstream where the wave frequency is near the harmonic of the plasma frequency.

  1. Scalable, Finite Element Analysis of Electromagnetic Scattering and Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, T.; Lou, J.; Katz, D.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper a method for simulating electromagnetic fields scattered from complex objects is reviewed; namely, an unstructured finite element code that does not use traditional mesh partitioning algorithms.

  2. Examination results of the Three Mile Island radiation detector HP-R-212

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, G.M.

    1983-12-01

    Area radiation detector HP-R-212 was removed from the Three Mile Island containment building on November 13, 1981. The detector apparently started to fail during November 1979 and by the first part of December 1979 the detector readings had degraded from 1 R/hr to 20 mR/hr. This report discusses the cause of failure, detector radiation measurement characteristics, and our estimates of the total gamma radiation dose received by the detector electronics.

  3. Multi-directional radiation detector using photographic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junet, L. K.; Majid, Z. A. Abdul; Sapuan, A. H.; Sayed, I. S.; Pauzi, N. F.

    2014-11-01

    Ionising radiation has always been part of our surrounding and people are continuously exposed to it. Ionising radiation is harmful to human health, thus it is vital to monitor the radiation. To monitor radiation, there are three main points that should be observed cautiously, which are energy, quantity, and direction of the radiation sources. A three dimensional (3D) dosimeter is an example of a radiation detector that provide these three main points. This dosimeter is able to record the radiation dose distribution in 3D. Applying the concept of dose detection distribution, study has been done to design a multi-directional radiation detector of different filter thicknesses. This is obtained by designing a cylinder shaped aluminum filter with several layers of different thickness. Black and white photographic material is used as a radiation-sensitive material and a PVC material has been used as the enclosure. The device is then exposed to a radiation source with different exposure factors. For exposure factor 70 kVp, 16 mAs; the results have shown that optical density (OD) value at 135° is 1.86 higher compared with an OD value at 315° which is 0.71 as the 135° area received more radiation compare to 315° region. Furthermore, with an evidence of different angle of film give different value of OD shows that this device has a multidirectional ability. Materials used to develop this device are widely available in the market, thus reducing the cost of development and making it suitable for commercialisation.

  4. Investigation of Advanced Resonant-Mass Gravitational Radiation Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiqing

    1994-01-01

    The sensitivity of resonant-mass gravitational radiation detectors depends on both the antenna cross-section and the detector noise. The cross-section is determined by the sound velocity VS and density rho of the antenna material, as well as the antenna geometry. The principal detector noise sources are thermal Nyquist noise and noise due to the readout electromechanical amplifier. The cross-section is proportional to rho V_sp{S}{5} for a given frequency and antenna geometry while the thermal noise is inversely proportional to the antenna's mechanical quality factor Q for a given temperature. Materials with high VS could, in principle, provide about a hundred-fold increase in the antenna cross -section as compared to current generation detectors. In this dissertation we report the results of measurements of the temperature-dependent mechanical losses in several suitable high sound velocity materials. The results show that the signal-to-noise ratios of detectors made of these materials could be improved by a factor of 15 to 100 at 4 K as compared to current detectors with aluminum antennas. A spherical gravitational wave antenna is very promising for gravitational wave astronomy because of its large cross-section, isotropic sky coverage, and the capability it can provide for determining the wave direction. In this dissertation several aspects of spherical detectors, including the eigenfunctions and eigenfrequencies of the normal-modes of an elastic sphere, the energy cross-section, and the response functions that are used to obtain the noise-free solution to the inverse problem are discussed. Using the maximum likelihood estimation method the inverse problem in the presence of noise is solved. We also determine the false-alarm probability and the detection probability for a network of spherical detectors and estimate the detectable event rates for supernovae core collapses and binary coalescences. Six identical cylindrical detectors, with a suitable arrangement of

  5. Improved spectrometric characteristics of thallium bromide nuclear radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitomi, K.; Murayama, T.; Shoji, T.; Suehiro, T.; Hiratate, Y.

    1999-06-01

    Thallium bromide (TlBr) is a compound semiconductor with a high atomic number and wide band gap. In this study, nuclear radiation detectors have been fabricated from the TlBr crystals. The TlBr crystals were grown by the horizontal travelling molten zone (TMZ) method using the materials purified by many pass zone refining. The crystals were characterized by measuring the resistivity, the mobility-lifetime ( μτ) product and the energy required to create an electron-hole pair (the ɛ value). Improved energy resolution has been obtained by the TlBr radiation detectors. At room temperature the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) for the 59.5, 122 and 662 keV γ-ray photo peak obtained from the detectors were 3.3, 8.8 and 29.5 keV, respectively. By comparing the saturated peak position of the TlBr detector with that of the CdTe detector, the ɛ value has been estimated to be about 5.85 eV for the TlBr crystal.

  6. Device for detachably securing a collimator to a radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Hanz, G.J.; Jung, G.; Pflaum, M.

    1986-12-16

    A device is described for detachably securing a collimator to a radiation detector, comprising: (a) a first annular groove means secured to the radiation detector; (b) a second annular groove means secured to the collimator; (c) a split ring having a first and second ring ends, the ring being received in the first annular groove means; and (d) a ring diameter control system, including (d1) a first lever system having two ends; (d2) a second lever system having two ends; and (d3) a rotating hub being rotatably secured to the detector head; wherein the first lever system is rotatably mounted with one end linked to the first ring end and with the other end linked to the rotating hub. The second lever system is rotatably mounted with one end linked to the second ring end and with the other end linked to the rotating hub, such that rotation of the rotating hub moves the first and second lever systems in opposite directions thereby moving the first and second ring ends between a first position, in which the split ring is positioned only in the first annular groove means, and a second position, in which the split ring is located in both the first annular groove means and the second annular groove means, thus attaching the collimator to the radiation detector.

  7. GaN as a radiation hard particle detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, J.; Bates, R.; Cunningham, W.; Blue, A.; Melone, J.; McEwan, F.; Vaitkus, J.; Gaubas, E.; O'Shea, V.

    2007-06-01

    Semiconductor tracking detectors at experiments such as ATLAS and LHCb at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be subjected to intense levels of radiation. The proposed machine upgrade, the Super-LHC (SLHC), to 10 times the initial luminosity of the LHC will require detectors that are ultra-radiation hard. Much of the current research into finding a detector that will meet the requirements of the SLHC has focused on using silicon substrates with enhanced levels of oxygen, for example Czochralski silicon and diffusion oxygenated float zone silicon, and into novel detector structures such as 3D devices. Another avenue currently being investigated is the use of wide band gap semiconductors such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN). Both SiC and GaN should be intrinsically more radiation hard than silicon. Pad and guard ring structures were fabricated on three epitaxial GaN wafers. The epitaxial GaN thickness was either 2.5 or 12 μm and the fabricated detectors were irradiated to various fluences with 24 GeV/c protons and 1 MeV neutrons. Detectors were characterised pre- and post-irradiation by performing current-voltage ( I- V) and charge collection efficiency (CCE) measurements. Devices fabricated on 12 μm epitaxial GaN irradiated to fluences of 1016 protons cm-2 and 1016 neutrons cm-2 show maximum CCE values of 26% and 20%, respectively, compared to a maximum CCE of 53% of the unirradiated device.

  8. Research on the test method of using injection as an equivalent substitute for electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, X. D.; Wei, G. H.; Lu, X. F.; Li, K.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a method to carry out high intensity radiated field (HIRF) effect experiments by using injection as an equivalent substitute for electromagnetic radiation. In allusion to typical interconnected system, the equal response voltage on the equipment cable port is regarded as an equivalent basis of injection and radiation methods. The equivalent relation formula between injected voltage and radiated field is derived theoretically. The conditions needed for extrapolating injected voltage in HIRF are confirmed, and the extrapolation method is proposed. On the basis of the above research, the electromagnetic environment effect test new method combined injection with radiation for interconnected system is summarized. The typical nonlinear interconnected system is selected as equipment under test, and the single frequency continuous wave radiation and injection effect experiments are carried out separately. The test results indicate that the relation between radiated field and injected voltage is linear, and the equivalent injected voltage used to substitute HIRF can be obtained by linear extrapolation.

  9. Development of Superconducting Tunnel Junction as an Imaging Radiation Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, N. Y.; Rokutanda, E.; Kikuchi, K.; Kushino, A.; Ohashi, T.; Kurakado, M.

    Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) as X-ray detectors have been developed mainly aiming at high resolution spectrometers. We archived an energy resolution of 106 eV at 5.9 keV (FWHM) using an STJ developed at Nippon Steel Corporation with a cooled (~ 100K) FET. Furthermore, series-connected STJs as an imaging radiation detector are developed. Both the pulse hight and the rise time of signals from 241Am α-particles irradiated on a series-connected STJ give a good position sensitivity, indicating the intrinsic position resolution less than 0.5 mm

  10. A neural network for positron identification by transition radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, R.; Castellano, M.; De Marzo, C.; Pasquariello, G.; Satalino, G.; Spinelli, P.

    1994-11-01

    A neural network algorithm has been applied in order to distinguish positrons from protons by a transition radiation detector (TRD). New variables are introduced, that simultaneously take into account spatial and energy TRD information. This method is found to be better than the one based on classical analysis: the results improve the detector performance in particle identification for efficiency higher than 90%. The high accuracy achieved with this method is used to identify positrons versus protons with 3 × 10 -3 contamination, as required by TRAMP-SI cosmic ray space experiment on the NASA Balloon-Borne Magnet Facility.