Science.gov

Sample records for electromagnetics electron cooling

  1. Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    DeFord, J.F.

    1993-03-01

    The Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics thrust area is a focal point for computer modeling activities in electronics and electromagnetics in the Electronics Engineering Department of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Traditionally, they have focused their efforts in technical areas of importance to existing and developing LLNL programs, and this continues to form the basis for much of their research. A relatively new and increasingly important emphasis for the thrust area is the formation of partnerships with industry and the application of their simulation technology and expertise to the solution of problems faced by industry. The activities of the thrust area fall into three broad categories: (1) the development of theoretical and computational models of electronic and electromagnetic phenomena, (2) the development of useful and robust software tools based on these models, and (3) the application of these tools to programmatic and industrial problems. In FY-92, they worked on projects in all of the areas outlined above. The object of their work on numerical electromagnetic algorithms continues to be the improvement of time-domain algorithms for electromagnetic simulation on unstructured conforming grids. The thrust area is also investigating various technologies for conforming-grid mesh generation to simplify the application of their advanced field solvers to design problems involving complicated geometries. They are developing a major code suite based on the three-dimensional (3-D), conforming-grid, time-domain code DSI3D. They continue to maintain and distribute the 3-D, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code TSAR, which is installed at several dozen university, government, and industry sites.

  2. ELECTRON COOLING OF RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.; BARTON, D.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    We report progress on the R&D program for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This electron cooler is designed to cool 100 GeV/nucleon at storage energy using 54 MeV electrons. The electron source will be a superconducting RF photocathode gun. The accelerator will be a superconducting energy recovery linac. The frequency of the accelerator is set at 703.75 MHz. The maximum electron bunch frequency is 9.38 MHz, with bunch charge of 20 nC. The R&D program has the following components: The photoinjector and its photocathode, the superconducting linac cavity, start-to-end beam dynamics with magnetized electrons, electron cooling calculations including benchmarking experiments and development of a large superconducting solenoid. The photoinjector and linac cavity are being incorporated into an energy recovery linac aimed at demonstrating ampere class current at about 20 MeV.

  3. Electron cooling for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A., FNAL,

    1998-09-25

    Electron cooling of completely stripped gold ions {sup 197}Au{sup 79+} in RHIC is considered for the store energy, {gamma} = 108. The optimal parameters of the required electron storage ring are discussed and proposed. The cooling time is calculated as 15 minutes, which would allow not only to avoid the beam loss due to the intra-beam scattering, but also reduce the transverse emittance and increase the luminosity several times.

  4. MEIC electron cooling program

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is a high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.

  5. MEIC electron cooling program

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is amore »high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.« less

  6. Electron Cooling of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    I. Ben-Zvi; D.S. Barton; D.B. Beavis; M. Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X.Y. Chang; R. Connolly; Yu.I. Eidelman; A.V. Fedotov; W. Fischer; D.M. Gassner; H. Hahn; M. Harrison; A. Hershcovitch; H.-C. Hseuh; A.K. Jain; P.D.J. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; V. Litvinenko; W.W. MacKay; G.J. Mahler; N. Malitsky; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; K.A.M. Mirabella; C. Montag; T.C.N. Nehring; T. Nicoletti; B. Oerter; G. Parzen; D. Pate; J. Rank; T. Rao; T. Roser; T. Russo; J. Scaduto; K. Smith; D. Trbojevic; G. Wang; J. Wei; N.W.W. Williams; K.-C. Wu; V. Yakimenko; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; D.T. Abell; D.L. Bruhwiler; H. Bluem; A. Burger; M.D. Cole; A.J. Favale; D. Holmes; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; A.V. Burov; S. Nagaitsev; J.R. Delayen; Y.S. Derbenev; L. W. Funk; P. Kneisel; L. Merminga; H.L. Phillips; J.P. Preble; I. Koop; V.V. Parkhomchuk; Y.M. Shatunov; A.N. Skrinsky; I. Koop; V.V. Parkhomchuk; Y.M. Shatunov; A.N. Skrinsky; J.S. Sekutowicz

    2005-05-16

    We report progress on the R&D program for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This electron cooler is designed to cool 100 GeV/nucleon at storage energy using 54 MeV electrons. The electron source will be a superconducting RF photocathode gun. The accelerator will be a superconducting energy recovery linac. The frequency of the accelerator is set at 703.75 MHz. The maximum electron bunch frequency is 9.38 MHz, with bunch charge of 20 nC. The R&D program has the following components: The photoinjector and its photocathode, the superconducting linac cavity, start-to-end beam dynamics with magnetized electrons, electron cooling calculations including benchmarking experiments and development of a large superconducting solenoid. The photoinjector and linac cavity are being incorporated into an energy recovery linac aimed at demonstrating ampere class current at about 20 MeV. A Zeroth Order Design Report is in an advanced draft state, and can be found on the web at http://www.agsrhichome.bnl.gov/eCool/.

  7. ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.

    2001-05-13

    The Accelerator Collider Department (CAD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is operating the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), which includes the dual-ring, 3.834 km circumference superconducting collider and the venerable AGS as the last part of the RHIC injection chain. CAD is planning on a luminosity upgrade of the machine under the designation RHIC II. One important component of the RHIC II upgrade is electron cooling of RHIC gold ion beams. For this purpose, BNL and the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk entered into a collaboration aimed initially at the development of the electron cooling conceptual design, resolution of technical issues, and finally extend the collaboration towards the construction and commissioning of the cooler. Many of the results presented in this paper are derived from the Electron Cooling for RHIC Design Report [1], produced by the, BINP team within the framework of this collaboration. BNL is also collaborating with Fermi National Laboratory, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and the University of Indiana on various aspects of electron cooling.

  8. Computational electronics and electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, C. C.

    1997-02-01

    The Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serves as the focal point for engineering R&D activities for developing computer-based design, analysis, and tools for theory. Key representative applications include design of particle accelerator cells and beamline components; engineering analysis and design of high-power components, photonics, and optoelectronics circuit design; EMI susceptibility analysis; and antenna synthesis. The FY-96 technology-base effort focused code development on (1) accelerator design codes; (2) 3-D massively parallel, object-oriented time-domain EM codes; (3) material models; (4) coupling and application of engineering tools for analysis and design of high-power components; (5) 3-D spectral-domain CEM tools; and (6) enhancement of laser drilling codes. Joint efforts with the Power Conversion Technologies thrust area include development of antenna systems for compact, high-performance radar, in addition to novel, compact Marx generators. 18 refs., 25 figs., 1 tab.

  9. ELECTRON COOLING STUDY FOR MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhang; Douglas, David R.; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    Electron cooling of the ion beams is one critical R&D to achieve high luminosities in JLab's MEIC proposal. In the present MEIC design, a multi-staged cooling scheme is adapted, which includes DC electron cooling in the booster ring and bunched beam electron cooling in the collider ring at both the injection energy and the collision energy. We explored the feasibility of using both magnetized and non-magnetized electron beam for cooling, and concluded that a magnetized electron beam is necessary. Electron cooling simulation results for the newly updated MEIC design is also presented.

  10. Dynamical backaction cooling with free electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niguès, A.; Siria, A.; Verlot, P.

    2015-09-01

    The ability to cool single ions, atomic ensembles, and more recently macroscopic degrees of freedom down to the quantum ground state has generated considerable progress and perspectives in fundamental and technological science. These major advances have been essentially obtained by coupling mechanical motion to a resonant electromagnetic degree of freedom in what is generally known as laser cooling. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the first self-induced coherent cooling mechanism that is not mediated by an electromagnetic resonance. Using a focused electron beam, we report a 50-fold reduction of the motional temperature of a nanowire. Our result primarily relies on the sub-nanometre confinement of the electron beam and generalizes to any delayed and spatially confined interaction, with important consequences for near-field microscopy and fundamental nanoscale dissipation mechanisms.

  11. Dynamical backaction cooling with free electrons.

    PubMed

    Niguès, A; Siria, A; Verlot, P

    2015-01-01

    The ability to cool single ions, atomic ensembles, and more recently macroscopic degrees of freedom down to the quantum ground state has generated considerable progress and perspectives in fundamental and technological science. These major advances have been essentially obtained by coupling mechanical motion to a resonant electromagnetic degree of freedom in what is generally known as laser cooling. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the first self-induced coherent cooling mechanism that is not mediated by an electromagnetic resonance. Using a focused electron beam, we report a 50-fold reduction of the motional temperature of a nanowire. Our result primarily relies on the sub-nanometre confinement of the electron beam and generalizes to any delayed and spatially confined interaction, with important consequences for near-field microscopy and fundamental nanoscale dissipation mechanisms. PMID:26381454

  12. Dynamical backaction cooling with free electrons

    PubMed Central

    Niguès, A.; Siria, A.; Verlot, P.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to cool single ions, atomic ensembles, and more recently macroscopic degrees of freedom down to the quantum ground state has generated considerable progress and perspectives in fundamental and technological science. These major advances have been essentially obtained by coupling mechanical motion to a resonant electromagnetic degree of freedom in what is generally known as laser cooling. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the first self-induced coherent cooling mechanism that is not mediated by an electromagnetic resonance. Using a focused electron beam, we report a 50-fold reduction of the motional temperature of a nanowire. Our result primarily relies on the sub-nanometre confinement of the electron beam and generalizes to any delayed and spatially confined interaction, with important consequences for near-field microscopy and fundamental nanoscale dissipation mechanisms. PMID:26381454

  13. Impingement cooling of electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Hollworth, B.R. ); Durbin, M. )

    1992-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the performance of a system of low-velocity air jets used to cool a simulated electronics package. The test model consisted of a uniform array of rectangular elements mounted to a circuit board. Each element was cooled by a cluster of four jets, and the spent fluid was vented at one end of the channel formed between the circuit board and the plate from which the jets were discharged. Reported are measurements of system pressure drop and convective heat transfer coefficients for elements at various sites within the array. Results indicate that (for the geometry tested) the largest portion of the total pressure drop occurs across the jet orifices. Further, the crossflow of spent air appears to enhance heat transfer for those elements near the exit end of the channel.

  14. Power electronics cooling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sanger, Philip Albert (Monroeville, PA); Lindberg, Frank A. (Baltimore, MD); Garcen, Walter (Glen Burnie, MD)

    2000-01-01

    A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

  15. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    DOEpatents

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN) [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  16. Cooling system for electronic components

    DOEpatents

    Anderl, William James; Colgan, Evan George; Gerken, James Dorance; Marroquin, Christopher Michael; Tian, Shurong

    2015-12-15

    Embodiments of the present invention provide for non interruptive fluid cooling of an electronic enclosure. One or more electronic component packages may be removable from a circuit card having a fluid flow system. When installed, the electronic component packages are coincident to and in a thermal relationship with the fluid flow system. If a particular electronic component package becomes non-functional, it may be removed from the electronic enclosure without affecting either the fluid flow system or other neighboring electronic component packages.

  17. Electronic cooling using thermoelectric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebarjadi, M.

    2015-05-01

    Thermoelectric coolers or Peltier coolers are used to pump heat in the opposite direction of the natural heat flux. These coolers have also been proposed for electronic cooling, wherein the aim is to pump heat in the natural heat flux direction and from hot spots to the colder ambient temperature. In this manuscript, we show that for such applications, one needs to use thermoelectric materials with large thermal conductivity and large power factor, instead of the traditionally used high ZT thermoelectric materials. We further show that with the known thermoelectric materials, the active cooling cannot compete with passive cooling, and one needs to explore a new set of materials to provide a cooling solution better than a regular copper heat sink. We propose a set of materials and directions for exploring possible materials candidates suitable for electronic cooling. Finally, to achieve maximum cooling, we propose to use thermoelectric elements as fins attached to copper blocks.

  18. Cooling Shelf For Electronic Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanzer, Herbert J.

    1989-01-01

    Heat-pipe action cools and maintains electronics at nearly constant temperature. System designed to control temperatures of spacecraft shelves or baseplates by combining honeycomb sandwich panel with reservoir of noncondensable gas and processing resulting device as variable-conductance heat pipe. Device provides flat surface for mounting heat-dissipating electronics that is effectively cooled and maintained at nearly constant temperature. Potentially useful in freeze drying, refrigeration, and air conditioning.

  19. Optimization of electron cooling in the Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Shemyakin, A.; Burov, A.; Carlson, K.; Prost, L.R.; Sutherland, M.; Warner, A.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Antiprotons in Fermilab's Recycler ring are cooled by a 4.3 MeV, 0.1A DC electron beam (as well as by a stochastic cooling system). The paper describes electron cooling improvements recently implemented: adjustments of electron beam line quadrupoles to decrease the electron angles in the cooling section and better stabilization and control of the electron energy.

  20. Energy Efficient Electronics Cooling Project

    SciTech Connect

    Steve O'Shaughnessey; Tim Louvar; Mike Trumbower; Jessica Hunnicutt; Neil Myers

    2012-02-17

    Parker Precision Cooling Business Unit was awarded a Department of Energy grant (DE-EE0000412) to support the DOE-ITP goal of reducing industrial energy intensity and GHG emissions. The project proposed by Precision Cooling was to accelerate the development of a cooling technology for high heat generating electronics components. These components are specifically related to power electronics found in power drives focused on the inverter, converter and transformer modules. The proposed cooling system was expected to simultaneously remove heat from all three of the major modules listed above, while remaining dielectric under all operating conditions. Development of the cooling system to meet specific customer's requirements and constraints not only required a robust system design, but also new components to support long system functionality. Components requiring further development and testing during this project included pumps, fluid couplings, cold plates and condensers. All four of these major categories of components are required in every Precision Cooling system. Not only was design a key area of focus, but the process for manufacturing these components had to be determined and proven through the system development.

  1. Coherent electron cooling demonstration experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; Fedotov, A.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Mahler, G.; Marusic, A.; Meng, W.; McIntyre, G.; Minty, M.; Ptitsyn, V.; Pinayev, I.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Sheehy, B.; Tepikian, S.; Than, R.; Trbojevic, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Yakimenko, V.; Hutton, A.; Krafft, G.; Poelker, M.; Rimmer, R.; Bruhwiler, D.; Abell, D.T.; Nieter, C.; Ranjbar, V.; Schwartz, B.; Kholopov M.; Shevchenko, O.; McIntosh, P.; Wheelhouse, A.

    2011-09-04

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron-hadron and electron-hadron colliders. In a CEC system, a hadron beam interacts with a cooling electron beam. A perturbation of the electron density caused by ions is amplified and fed back to the ions to reduce the energy spread and the emittance of the ion beam. To demonstrate the feasibility of CEC we propose a proof-of-principle experiment at RHIC using SRF linac. In this paper, we describe the setup for CeC installed into one of RHIC's interaction regions. We present results of analytical estimates and results of initial simulations of cooling a gold-ion beam at 40 GeV/u energy via CeC. We plan to complete the program in five years. During first two years we will build coherent electron cooler in IP2 of RHIC. In parallel we will develop complete package of computer simulation tools for the start-to-end simulation predicting exact performance of a CeC. The later activity will be the core of Tech X involvement into the project. We will use these tools to predict the performance of our CeC device. The experimental demonstration of the CeC will be undertaken in years three to five of the project. The goal of this experiment is to demonstrate the cooling of ion beam and to compare its measured performance with predictions made by us prior to the experiments.

  2. Fermilab electron cooling project: Engineering aspects of cooling section

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry R. Leibfritz et al.

    2001-07-25

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling project involves interacting a 4.3 MeV, 0.5 A DC electron beam with 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the FNAL Recycler Ring. This interaction occurs through a 20-meter long cooling section consisting of 10 solenoid modules. This cooling process would lead to an increase in the Tevatron collider luminosity needed to support RunIIb parameters. There are several important engineering aspects of this cooling section including: solenoid design, vacuum system design, magnetic shielding, support system, and alignment methods. Details of the engineering issues related to each of these areas is discussed.

  3. Towards demonstration of electron cooling with bunched electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.

    2012-01-11

    All electron cooling systems which were in operation so far employed electron beam generated with an electrostatic electron gun in DC operating mode, immersed in a longitudinal magnetic field. At low energies magnetic field is also being used to transport electron beam through the cooling section from the gun to the collector. At higher energies (few MeV), it was shown that one can have simpler electron beam transport without continuous magnetic field. Because of a rather weak magnetic field on the cathode and in the cooling section the latter approach was referred to as 'non-magnetized cooling', since there was no suppression of the transverse angular spread of the electron beam with the magnetic field in the cooling section. Such a cooler successfully operated at FNAL (2005-11) at electron beam energy of 4.3 MeV. Providing cooling at even higher energies would be easier with RF acceleration of electron beam, and thus using bunched electron beam for cooling. Significant efforts were devoted to explore various aspects of such bunched electron beam cooling as part of R and D of high-energy electron cooling for RHIC. However, experimental studies of such cooling are still lacking. Establishing this technique experimentally would be extremely useful for future high-energy applications. Presently there is an ongoing effort to build Proof-of-Principle (PoP) experiment of Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC) at RHIC, which promises to be superior to conventional electron cooling for high energies. Since the CEC experiment is based on bunched electron beam and it has sections where electron beam co-propagates with the ion beam at the same velocity, it also provides a unique opportunity to explore experimentally conventional electron cooling but for the first time with a bunched electron beam. As a result, it allows us to explore techniques needed for the high-energy electron cooling such as 'painting' with a short electron beam and control of ion beam distribution under cooling which is essential if cooling is provided in a collider. The software needed for comparison with the experiments is already developed as part of the previous high-energy electron cooling studies for RHIC. Since electron beam will be non-magnetized and there will be no magnetic field in the cooling section it will be also a first demonstration of fully non-magnetized cooling. The purpose of these studies was to explore whether we would be able to observe conventional electron cooling with parameters expected in the CEC PoP experiment. Below we summarize requirements on electron beam and cooling section needed for such demonstration.

  4. Advanced optical concepts for electron cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbenev, Ya. S.

    2000-02-01

    The results of explorations of non-traditional solutions of beam transport which could raise the electron cooling rates and efficiency are presented. The proposed optical elements, methods, and conceptual designs are summarized in the following. (1) Magnetized electron beam acceleration and transport with discontinuous solenoid to provide matching between the electron gun and solenoid of the cooling section. These concepts allow the possibility to design and build economical, high beam quality accelerators for electron cooling over a wide energy range, up to that suited for hadron colliders. (2) A special beam adapter (skew quadrupole block) to transform between a magnetized and a flat beam state. This element meets a variety of uses in electron cooling trends. (3) Injectors with ring-shaped cathodes and resonance concentrators of hollow beams involving (optionally) beam adapters. (4) An isochronous (at no RF) electron recirculator ring with a solenoid in the cooling section and beam adapters. (5) Electron storage rings incorporating strong wigglers, solenoid in cooling section with beam adapters, non-coupled focusing outside the cooling section, and (optionally) a strong longitudinal optics for beam compression in wigglers. (6) Hadron beam optics in the cooling section with non-extended beams and dispersion introduced in order to maximize the transverse cooling rate. (7) Low-energy cooling with matched electron and hadron beams. (8) Low-energy cooling with hollow beams.

  5. MEIC Electron Cooling Simulation Using Betacool

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, He; Zhang, Yuhong

    2013-12-01

    Electron cooling of ion beams is the most critical R&D issue in Jefferson Lab's MEIC design. In the ion collider ring, a bunched electron beam driven by an energy-recovery SRF linac assisted by a circulate ring will be employed to cool protons or ions with energies up to 100 GeV/u, a parameter regime that electron cooling has never been applied. It is essential to understand how efficient the electron cooling is, particularly in the high energy range, to confirm the feasibility of the design. Electron cooling is also important in LEIC design although the ion energy is 25 GeV/u, lower than MEIC. In this paper, we will present first results of the simulation studies of electron cooling processes in the collider ring of both MEIC and LEIC using BETACOOL code.

  6. Experimental demonstration of relativistic electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, Alexey V.; Carlson, K.; Gattuso, C.; Hu, M.; Kazakevich, Grigory M.; Kroc, T.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Sutherland, M.; Schmidt, C.W.; Seletskiy, S.; Shemyakin, A.; Tupikov, V.; Warner, A.; /Fermilab /Novosibirsk, IYF /Rochester U.

    2005-11-01

    We report on an experimental demonstration of electron cooling of high-energy antiprotons circulating in a storage ring. In our experiments, electron cooling, a well-established method at low energies (< 500 MeV/nucleon), was carried out in a new region of beam parameters, requiring a multi-MeV dc electron beam and an unusual beam transport line. In this letter we present the results of the longitudinal cooling force measurements and compare them with theoretical predictions.

  7. Classical electromagnetic radiation of the Dirac electron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, G.

    1973-01-01

    A wave-function-dependent four-vector potential is added to the Dirac equation in order to achieve conservation of energy and momentum for a Dirac electron and its emitted electromagnetic field. The resultant equation contains solutions which describe transitions between different energy states of the electron. As a consequence it is possible to follow the space-time evolution of such a process. This evolution is shown in the case of the spontaneous emission of an electromagnetic field by an electron bound in a hydrogen-like atom. The intensity of the radiation and the spectral distribution are calculated for transitions between two eigenstates. The theory gives a self-consistent deterministic description of some simple radiation processes without using quantum electrodynamics or the correspondence principle.

  8. Sympathetic electromagnetically-induced-transparency laser cooling of motional modes in an ion chain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y; Gaebler, J P; Tan, T R; Bowler, R; Jost, J D; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2013-04-12

    We use electromagnetically-induced-transparency laser cooling to cool motional modes of a linear ion chain. As a demonstration, we apply electromagnetically-induced-transparency cooling on 24Mg+ ions to cool the axial modes of a 9Be+-24Mg+ ion pair and a 9Be+-24Mg+-24Mg+-9Be+ ion chain, thereby sympathetically cooling the 9Be+ ions. Compared to previous implementations of conventional Raman sideband cooling, we achieve approximately an order-of-magnitude reduction in the duration required to cool the modes to near the ground state and significant reduction in required laser intensity. PMID:25167259

  9. Direct Liquid Cooling for Electronic Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, Henry; Greenberg, Steve

    2014-03-01

    This report documents a demonstration of an electronic--equipment cooling system in the engineering prototype development stage that can be applied in data centers. The technology provides cooling by bringing a water--based cooling fluid into direct contact with high--heat--generating electronic components. This direct cooling system improves overall data center energy efficiency in three ways: High--heat--generating electronic components are more efficiently cooled directly using water, capturing a large portion of the total electronic equipment heat generated. This captured heat reduces the load on the less--efficient air--based data center room cooling systems. The combination contributes to the overall savings. The power consumption of the electronic equipment internal fans is significantly reduced when equipped with this cooling system. The temperature of the cooling water supplied to the direct cooling system can be much higher than that commonly provided by facility chilled water loops, and therefore can be produced with lower cooling infrastructure energy consumption and possibly compressor-free cooling. Providing opportunities for heat reuse is an additional benefit of this technology. The cooling system can be controlled to produce high return water temperatures while providing adequate component cooling. The demonstration was conducted in a data center located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. Thirty--eight servers equipped with the liquid cooling system and instrumented for energy measurements were placed in a single rack. Two unmodified servers of the same configuration, located in an adjacent rack, were used to provide a baseline. The demonstration characterized the fraction of heat removed by the direct cooling technology, quantified the energy savings for a number of cooling infrastructure scenarios, and provided information that could be used to investigate heat reuse opportunities. Thermal measurement data were used with data center energy use modeling software to estimate overall site energy use. These estimates show that an overall data center energy savings of approximately 20 percent can be expected if a center is retrofitted as specified in the models used. Increasing the portion of heat captured by this technology is an area suggested for further development.

  10. ELECTRON COOLING IN THE RECYCLER COOLER

    SciTech Connect

    SHEMYAKIN,A.; PROST, L.R.; FEDOTOV, A.; SIDORIN, A.

    2007-09-10

    A 0.1-0.5 A, 4.3 MeV DC electron beam provides cooling of 8 GeV antiprotons in Fermilab's Recycler storage ring. The most detailed information about the cooling properties of the electron beam comes from drag rate measurements. We find that the measured drag rate can significantly differ from the cooling force experienced by a single antiproton because the area of effective cooling is significantly smaller than the physical size of the electron beam and is comparable with the size of the antiproton beam used as a probe. Modeling by the BETACOOL code supports the conclusion about a large radial gradient of transverse velocities in the presently used electron beam.

  11. DETAILED STUDIES OF ELECTRON COOLING FRICTION FORCE.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; BRUHWILER, D.L.; ABELL, D.T.; SIDORIN, A.O.

    2005-09-18

    High-energy electron cooling for RHIC presents many unique features and challenges. An accurate estimate of the cooling times requires detailed simulation of the electron cooling process. The first step towards such calculations is to have an accurate description of the cooling force. Numerical simulations are being used to explore various features of the friction force which appear due to several effects, including the anisotropy of the electron distribution in velocity space and the effect of a strong solenoidal magnetic field. These aspects are being studied in detail using the VORFAL code, which explicitly resolves close binary collisions. Results are compared with available asymptotic and empirical formulas and also, using the BETACOOL code, with direct numerical integration of less approximate expressions over the specified electron distribution function.

  12. Simulation study of electron response amplification in coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Hao Y.; Litvinenko, V.N.

    2012-05-20

    In Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC), it is essential to study the amplification of electron response to a single ion in the FEL process, in order to proper align the electron beam and the ion beam in the kicker to maximize the cooling effect. In this paper, we use Genesis to simulate the amplified electron beam response of single ion in FEL amplification process, which acts as Green's function of the FEL amplifier.

  13. Microfluidic cooling for detectors and electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapelli, A.; Petagna, P.; Howell, K.; Nuessle, G.; Renaud, P.

    2012-01-01

    Micro-channel cooling is gaining considerable attention as an alternative technique for cooling of high energy physics detectors and front-end electronics. This technology is being evaluated for future tracking devices, where material budget limitations are a major concern. It is currently under investigation as an option for the cooling of the NA62 Gigatracker silicon pixel detector, where a micro-fabricated silicon cooling plate would stand directly in the beam. Other possible applications are also being studied in the context of LHC detectors upgrades. In this paper, the current status of this R&D at CERN is presented.

  14. Electron Forced Evaporative Cooling in Ultracold Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, Craig; Roberts, Jacob

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold plasmas (UCPs) are formed by photoionizing a collection of laser cooled atoms. Once formed, these plasmas expand, cooling over the course of their expansion. In theory, further cooling should be obtainable by forcibly inducing electron evaporation through applying DC electric fields to extract electrons. However, for many UCP parameters, UCP electrons are not fully thermalized until very late in the expansion. This creates complications in analyzing the UCP. This problem can be remedied by creating the ultracold plasma at substantially lower initial temperatures since thermalization rates increase with decreasing temperature. Unfortunately, traditional models of UCP dynamics tend to break down in cases of substantial non-neutrality when used in the limit of zero temperature. We have developed a theoretical model that calculates potential depth and expansion dynamics of non-neutral UCPs in the limit of zero temperature. Such a model will allow us to quantify the degree of cooling obtained by evaporation as measured experimentally. Supported by the AFOSR.

  15. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    DOEpatents

    Le, Khiet (Mission Viejo, CA); Ward, Terence G. (Redondo Beach, CA); Mann, Brooks S. (Redondo Beach, CA); Yankoski, Edward P. (Corona, CA); Smith, Gregory S. (Woodland Hills, CA)

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  16. Methods and apparatus for cooling electronics

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Shawn Anthony; Kopcsay, Gerard Vincent

    2014-12-02

    Methods and apparatus are provided for choosing an energy-efficient coolant temperature for electronics by considering the temperature dependence of the electronics' power dissipation. This dependence is explicitly considered in selecting the coolant temperature T.sub.0 that is sent to the equipment. To minimize power consumption P.sub.Total for the entire system, where P.sub.Total=P.sub.0+P.sub.Cool is the sum of the electronic equipment's power consumption P.sub.0 plus the cooling equipment's power consumption P.sub.Cool, P.sub.Total is obtained experimentally, by measuring P.sub.0 and P.sub.Cool, as a function of three parameters: coolant temperature T.sub.0; weather-related temperature T.sub.3 that affects the performance of free-cooling equipment; and computational state C of the electronic equipment, which affects the temperature dependence of its power consumption. This experiment provides, for each possible combination of T.sub.3 and C, the value T.sub.0* of T.sub.0 that minimizes P.sub.Total. During operation, for any combination of T.sub.3 and C that occurs, the corresponding optimal coolant temperature T.sub.0* is selected, and the cooling equipment is commanded to produce it.

  17. Method of fabricating a cooled electronic system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Gaynes, Michael A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Schultz, Mark D; Simco, Daniel P; Steinke, Mark E

    2014-02-11

    A method of fabricating a liquid-cooled electronic system is provided which includes an electronic assembly having an electronics card and a socket with a latch at one end. The latch facilitates securing of the card within the socket. The method includes providing a liquid-cooled cold rail at the one end of the socket, and a thermal spreader to couple the electronics card to the cold rail. The thermal spreader includes first and second thermal transfer plates coupled to first and second surfaces on opposite sides of the card, and thermally conductive extensions extending from end edges of the plates, which couple the respective transfer plates to the liquid-cooled cold rail. The extensions are disposed to the sides of the latch, and the card is securable within or removable from the socket using the latch without removing the cold rail or the thermal spreader.

  18. Single Pass Electron Cooling Simulations for MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G. I.; Pogorelov, I. V.; Schwartz, B. T.; Zhang, Yuhong; Zhang, He

    2013-12-01

    Cooling of medium energy protons is critical for the proposed Jefferson Lab Medium Energy Ion Collider (MEIC). We present simulations of electron cooling of protons up to 60 GeV. In the beam frame in which the proton and electrons are co-propagating, their motion is non-relativistic. We use a binary collision model which treats the cooling process as the sum of a large number of two-body collisions which are calculated exactly. This model can treat even very close collisions between an electron and ion with high accuracy. We also calculate dynamical friction using a delta-f PIC model. The code VSim (formerly Vorpal) is used to perform the simulations. We compare the friction rates with that obtained by a 3D integral over electron velocities which is used by BETACOOL.

  19. Thermoelectric Devices Cool, Power Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Nextreme Thermal Solutions Inc., based in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, licensed thermoelectric technology from NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This has allowed the company to develop cutting edge, thin-film thermoelectric coolers that effective remove heat generated by increasingly powerful and tightly packed microchip components. These solid-state coolers are ideal solutions for applications like microprocessors, laser diodes, LEDs, and even potentially for cooling the human body. Nextreme s NASA technology has also enabled the invention of thermoelectric generators capable of powering technologies like medical implants and wireless sensor networks.

  20. Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Wiles, R.; Ayers, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2008-12-23

    The goal of the Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate project is to reduce the size and weight of the heat sink for power electronics used in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The concept proposed in this project was to develop an innovative power electronics mounting structure, model it, and perform both thermal and mechanical finite-element analysis (FEA). This concept involved integrating cooling channels within the direct-bonded copper (DBC) substrate and strategically locating these channels underneath the power electronic devices. This arrangement would then be directly cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG), essentially eliminating the conventional heat sink and associated heat flow path. The concept was evaluated to determine its manufacturability, its compatibility with WEG, and the potential to reduce size and weight while directly cooling the DBC and associated electronics with a coolant temperature of 105 C. This concept does not provide direct cooling to the electronics, only direct cooling inside the DBC substrate itself. These designs will take into account issues such as containment of the fluid (separation from the electronics) and synergy with the whole power inverter design architecture. In FY 2008, mechanical modeling of substrate and inverter core designs as well as thermal and mechanical stress FEA modeling of the substrate designs was performed, along with research into manufacturing capabilities and methods that will support the substrate designs. In FY 2009, a preferred design(s) will be fabricated and laboratory validation testing will be completed. In FY 2010, based on the previous years laboratory testing, the mechanical design will be modified and the next generation will be built and tested in an operating inverter prototype.

  1. Analytical studies of coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Litvinenko, V.N.

    2009-05-04

    Under certain assumptions and simplifications, we studied a few physics processes of Coherent Electron Cooling using analytical approach. In the modulation process, the effect due to merging the ion beam with the electron beam is studied under single kick approximation. In the free electron laser (FEL) amplifier, we studied the amplification of the electron density modulation using 1D analytical approach. Both the electron charge density and the phase space density are derived in the frequency domain. The solutions are then transformed into the space domain through Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT).

  2. Electronic systems failures and anomalies attributed to electromagnetic interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, R. D. (editor); Alexander, M. B. (editor)

    1995-01-01

    The effects of electromagnetic interference can be very detrimental to electronic systems utilized in space missions. Assuring that subsystems and systems are electrically compatible is an important engineering function necessary to assure mission success. This reference publication will acquaint the reader with spacecraft electronic systems failures and anomalies caused by electromagnetic interference and will show the importance of electromagnetic compatibility activities in conjunction with space flight programs. It is also hoped that the report will illustrate that evolving electronic systems are increasingly sensitive to electromagnetic interference and that NASA personnel must continue to diligently pursue electromagnetic compatibility on space flight systems.

  3. Potential Refrigerants for Power Electronics Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, M.R.

    2005-10-24

    In the past, automotive refrigerants have conventionally been used solely for the purpose of air conditioning. However, with the development of hybrid-electric vehicles and the incorporation of power electronics (PEs) into the automobile, automotive refrigerants are taking on a new role. Unfortunately, PEs have lifetimes and functionalities that are highly dependent on temperature and as a result thermal control plays an important role in the performance of PEs. Typically, PEs are placed in the engine compartment where the internal combustion engine (ICE) already produces substantial heat. Along with the ICE heat, the additional thermal energy produced by PEs themselves forces designers to use different cooling methods to prevent overheating. Generally, heat sinks and separate cooling loops are used to maintain the temperature. Disturbingly, the thermal control system can consume one third of the total volume and may weigh more than the PEs [1]. Hence, other avenues have been sought to cool PEs, including submerging PEs in automobile refrigerants to take advantage of two-phase cooling. The objective of this report is to explore the different automotive refrigerants presently available that could be used for PE cooling. Evaluation of the refrigerants will be done by comparing environmental effects and some thermo-physical properties important to two-phase cooling, specifically measuring the dielectric strengths of potential candidates. Results of this report will be used to assess the different candidates with good potential for future use in PE cooling.

  4. Cooling of electronics in collider experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Richard P. Stanek et al.

    2003-11-07

    Proper cooling of detector electronics is critical to the successful operation of high-energy physics experiments. Collider experiments offer unique challenges based on their physical layouts and hermetic design. Cooling systems can be categorized by the type of detector with which they are associated, their primary mode of heat transfer, the choice of active cooling fluid, their heat removal capacity and the minimum temperature required. One of the more critical detector subsystems to require cooling is the silicon vertex detector, either pixel or strip sensors. A general design philosophy is presented along with a review of the important steps to include in the design process. Factors affecting the detector and cooling system design are categorized. A brief review of some existing and proposed cooling systems for silicon detectors is presented to help set the scale for the range of system designs. Fermilab operates two collider experiments, CDF & D0, both of which have silicon systems embedded in their detectors. A review of the existing silicon cooling system designs and operating experience is presented along with a list of lessons learned.

  5. Cavity cooling of a trapped atom using Electromagnetically-Induced Transparency

    E-print Network

    Marc Bienert; Giovanna Morigi

    2011-12-01

    A cooling scheme for trapped atoms is proposed, which combines cavity-enhanced scattering and electromagnetically induced transparency. The cooling dynamics exploits a three-photon resonance, which combines laser and cavity excitations. It is shown that relatively fast ground-state cooling can be achieved in the Lamb-Dicke regime and for large cooperativity. Efficient ground-state cooling is found for parameters of ongoing experiments.

  6. Two-Beam Instability in Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, Alexey V.; /Fermilab

    2006-04-01

    The drift motion of cooling electrons makes them able to respond to transverse perturbations of a cooled ion beam. This response may lead to dipole or quadrupole transverse instabilities at specific longitudinal wave numbers. While the dipole instabilities can be suppressed by a combination of the Landau damping, machine impedance, and the active damper, the quadrupole and higher order modes can lead to either emittance growth, or a lifetime degradation, or both. The growth rates of these instabilities are strongly determined by the machine x-y coupling. Thus, tuning out of the coupling resonance and/or reduction of the machine coupling can be an efficient remedy for these instabilities.

  7. ELECTRON COOLING SIMULATION FOR ARBITRARY DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    SIDORIN,A.; SMIRNOV, A.; FEDOTOV, A.; BEN-ZVI, I.; KAYRAN, D.

    2007-09-10

    Typically, several approximations are being used in simulation of electron cooling process, for example, density distribution of electrons is calculated using an analytical expression and distribution in the velocity space is assumed to be Maxwellian in all degrees of freedom. However, in many applications, accurate description of the cooling process based on realistic distribution of electrons is very useful. This is especially true for a high-energy electron cooling system which requires bunched electron beam produced by an Energy Recovery Linac (Em). Such systems are proposed, for instance, for RHIC and electron - ion collider. To address unique features of the RHIC-I1 cooler, new algorithms were introduced in BETACOOL code which allow us to take into account local properties of electron distribution as well as calculate friction force for an arbitrary velocity distribution. Here, we describe these new numerical models. Results based on these numerical models are compared with typical approximations using electron distribution produced by simulations of electron bunch through ERL of RHIC-II cooler.

  8. Electronic cooling in Weyl and Dirac semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Rex; Fiete, Gregory A.

    2015-09-01

    Energy transfer from electrons to phonons is an important consideration in any Weyl- or Dirac-semimetal-based application. In this work, we analytically calculate the cooling power of acoustic phonons, i.e., the energy relaxation rate of electrons which are interacting with acoustic phonons, for Weyl and Dirac semimetals in a variety of different situations. For cold Weyl or Dirac semimetals with the Fermi energy at the nodal points, we find that the electronic temperature Te decays in time as a power law. In the heavily doped regime, Te decays linearly in time far from equilibrium. In a heavily doped system with short-range disorder we predict that the cooling power of acoustic phonons is drastically increased because of an enhanced energy transfer between electrons and phonons. When an external magnetic field is applied to an undoped system, the cooling power is linear in magnetic field strength and Te has square-root decay in time, independent of magnetic-field strength over a range of values.

  9. Evaluation of Cooling Solutions for Outdoor Electronics

    E-print Network

    Mahendra Wankhede; V. Khaire; A. Goswami; S. D. Mahajan

    2008-01-07

    The thermal management of an outdoor electronic enclosure can be quite challenging due to the additional thermal load from the sun and the requirement of having an air-sealed enclosure. It is essential to consider the effect of solar heating loads in the design process; otherwise, it can shorten the life expectancy of the electronic product or lead to catastrophic failure. In this paper we analyze and compare the effectiveness of different cooling techniques used for outdoor electronics. Various cooling techniques were compared like special coatings and paints on the outer surface, radiation shields, double-walled vented enclosures, fans for internal air circulation and air-to-air heat exchangers. A highly simplified, typical outdoor system was selected for this study measuring approximately 300x300x400 mm (WxLxH). Solar radiation was incident on 3 sides of the enclosure. There were 8 equally spaced PCBs inside the enclosure dissipating 12.5W each uniformly (100 watts total). A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the system was built and analyzed. This was followed by building a mock-up of the system and conducting experiments to validate the CFD model. It was found that some of the simplest cooling techniques like white oil paint on the outer surface can significantly reduce the impact of solar loads. Adding internal circulation fans can also be very effective. Using air-to-air heat exchangers was found to be the most effective solution although it is more complex and costly.

  10. Ground state laser cooling using electromagnetically induced transparency

    E-print Network

    Giovanna Morigi; Juergen Eschner; Christoph H. Keitel

    2000-10-10

    A laser cooling method for trapped atoms is described which achieves ground state cooling by exploiting quantum interference in a driven Lambda-shaped arrangement of atomic levels. The scheme is technically simpler than existing methods of sideband cooling, yet it can be significantly more efficient, in particular when several motional modes are involved, and it does not impose restrictions on the transition linewidth. We study the full quantum mechanical model of the cooling process for one motional degree of freedom and show that a rate equation provides a good approximation.

  11. Controlled cooling of an electronic system based on projected conditions

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.

    2015-08-18

    Energy efficient control of a cooling system cooling an electronic system is provided based, in part, on projected conditions. The control includes automatically determining an adjusted control setting(s) for an adjustable cooling component(s) of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on projected power consumed by the electronic system at a future time and projected temperature at the future time of a heat sink to which heat extracted is rejected. The automatically determining operates to reduce power consumption of the cooling system and/or the electronic system while ensuring that at least one targeted temperature associated with the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range. The automatically determining may be based, at least in part, on an experimentally obtained model(s) relating the targeted temperature and power consumption of the adjustable cooling component(s) of the cooling system.

  12. ELECTRON COOLING AND ELECTRON-ION COLLIDERS AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.

    2007-10-03

    Superconducting Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) have significant potential uses in various fields, including High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is pursuing some of the potential applications in this area and the technology issues that are associated with these applications. The work addressed in this paper is carried out at BNL towards applications in electron cooling of high-energy hadron beams and electron-nucleon colliders. The common issues for these applications are the generation of high currents of polarized or high-brightness unpolarized electrons, high-charge per bunch and high-current. One must address the associated issue of High-Order Modes generation and damping. Superconducting ERLs have great advantages for these applications as will be outlined in the text.

  13. Two-Phase Cooling Method Using R134a Refrigerant to Cool Power Electronic Devices

    E-print Network

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    Two-Phase Cooling Method Using R134a Refrigerant to Cool Power Electronic Devices Jeremy B, TN 37932 Abstract This paper presents a two-phase cooling method using R134a refrigerant configuration. Second, experimental tests that included simultaneous operation with a mock automotive air

  14. Thermal Assessment of Naturally Cooled Electronic Enclosures With

    E-print Network

    Bahrami, Majid

    , telecommunications, micro- electronics, as well as heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Two used in air-cooled heat exchangers and electronic cooling. Although fins increase the surface area, Burnaby, BC, V3T0A3, Canada Passive heat transfer from enclosures with rectangular fins is stud- ied both

  15. Emittance Reduction between EBIS LINAC and Booster by Electron Beam Cooling; Is Single Pass Cooling Possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2008-04-01

    Electron beam cooling is examined as an option to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Electron beam parameters are based on experimental data (obtained at BNL) of electron beams extracted from a plasma cathode. Preliminary calculations indicate that single pass cooling is feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude in less than one meter.

  16. PROGRESS OF HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.V.

    2007-09-10

    The fundamental questions about QCD which can be directly answered at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) call for large integrated luminosities. The major goal of RHIC-I1 upgrade is to achieve a 10 fold increase in luminosity of Au ions at the top energy of 100 GeV/nucleon. Such a boost in luminosity for RHIC-II is achievable with implementation of high-energy electron cooling. The design of the higher-energy cooler for RHIC-II recently adopted a non-magnetized approach which requires a low temperature electron beam. Such electron beams will be produced with a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). Detailed simulations of the electron cooling process and numerical simulations of the electron beam transport including the cooling section were performed. An intensive R&D of various elements of the design is presently underway. Here, we summarize progress in these electron cooling efforts.

  17. Spectra of Electromagnetically Induced Absorption in Laser-Cooled Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying-Cheng; Liao, Yen-An; Chen, Yun-Wen; Su, Jung-Jung; Yu, Ite A.

    2001-05-01

    Electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) is the phenomenon that absorption of the probe field is enhanced by the presence of the coupling field in a two-level system. It is due to constructive interference between the coherence among degenerate Zeeman sublevels and the optical coherence driven by the probe field. The spectral profile of the EIA phenomenon is a sharp peak on top of the broader profile that is due to the direct probe transition between the ground and the excited states. Linewidth of the EIA peak can be very narrow and is determined by the relaxation rate of the coherence between degenerate Zeeman sublevels. We have systematically studied the EIA spectra in cold ^87Rb atoms produced by a magneto-optical trap (MOT). The frequency of the coupling field is fixed at the resonance of the 5S_1/2,F=2 to 5P_3/2,F=3 transition and the probe frequency is swept across the coupling frequency. Both fields are linearly polarized and their polarization directions are orthogonal. During the measurement of the spectrum, the laser and magnetic fields of the MOT are momentarily turned off. The experimental spectra are consistent with the theoretical predictions from the density-matrix calculation. The measured EIA linewidth can be as narrow as 90 kHz or 0.015?, where ? is the natural linewidth of the excited state. Our work demonstrates the EIA spectrum can be applied to temperature measurements of cold atoms and precision detection of magnetic fields. This work is supported by the National Science Council under the grant of NSC 89-2112-M-007-061.

  18. Cooling systems and hybrid A/C systems using an electromagnetic radiation-absorbing complex

    DOEpatents

    Halas, Nancy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Neumann, Oara

    2015-05-19

    A method for powering a cooling unit. The method including applying electromagnetic (EM) radiation to a complex, where the complex absorbs the EM radiation to generate heat, transforming, using the heat generated by the complex, a fluid to vapor, and sending the vapor from the vessel to a turbine coupled to a generator by a shaft, where the vapor causes the turbine to rotate, which turns the shaft and causes the generator to generate the electric power, wherein the electric powers supplements the power needed to power the cooling unit

  19. Electron cooling for low-energy RHIC program

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Pendzick, A.; Satogata, T.

    2009-08-31

    Electron cooling was proposed to increase luminosity of the RHIC collider for heavy ion beam energies below 10 GeV/nucleon. Providing collisions at such energies, termed RHIC 'low-energy' operation, will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about existence and location of critical point on the QCD phase diagram. The electron cooling system should deliver electron beam of required good quality over energies of 0.9-5 MeV. Several approaches to provide such cooling were considered. The baseline approach was chosen and design work started. Here we describe the main features of the cooling system and its expected performance. We have started design work on a low-energy RHIC electron cooler which will operate with kinetic electron energy range 0.86-2.8 (4.9) MeV. Several approaches to an electron cooling system in this energy range are being investigated. At present, our preferred scheme is to transfer the Fermilab Pelletron to BNL after Tevatron shutdown, and to use it for DC non-magnetized cooling in RHIC. Such electron cooling system can significantly increase RHIC luminosities at low-energy operation.

  20. The interaction of electromagnetic radiation with one-electron atoms

    E-print Network

    Landstreet, John D.

    The interaction of electromagnetic radiation with one-electron atoms January 21, 2002 1 Introduction We examine the interactions of radiation with a hydrogen-like atom as a simple ex- ample by passing radiation), spontaneous emission (radiation without any external stimulus), and the continuum

  1. The role of electron heating in electromagnetic collisionless shock formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkarev, S. G.; d'Humières, E.; Korneev, Ph.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2015-12-01

    The role of electron dynamics in the process of a collisionless shock formation is analyzed with particle-in-cell simulations, the test-particles method, and quasilinear theory. The model of electron stochastic heating in turbulent electromagnetic fields corresponding to the nonlinear stage of two-stream and Weibel instabilities is developed. The analysis of electron and field heating rates shows that the ion motion provides the energy supply for a significant continuous heating of electrons. Such a heating thus plays a role of a friction force for ions, leading to their deceleration and a shock formation.

  2. Electron beam injection during active experiments. I - Electromagnetic wave emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The wave emissions produced in Echo 7 experiment by active injections of electron beams were investigated to determine the properties of the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields for both the field-aligned and cross-field injection in such experiments and to evaluate the sources of free energy and relative efficiencies for the generation of the VLF and HF emissions. It is shown that, for typical beam energies in active experiments, electromagnetic effects do not substantially change the bulk properties of the beam, spacecraft charging, and plasma particle acceleration. Through simulations, beam-generated whistlers; fundamental z-mode and harmonic x-mode radiation; and electrostatic electron-cyclotron, upper-hybrid, Langmuir, and lower-hybrid waves were identified. The characteristics of the observed wave spectra were found to be sensitive to both the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the cyclotron frequency and the angle of injection relative to the magnetic field.

  3. Relativistic electromagnetic waves in an electron-ion plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chian, Abraham C.-L.; Kennel, Charles F.

    1987-01-01

    High power laser beams can drive plasma particles to relativistic energies. An accurate description of strong waves requires the inclusion of ion dynamics in the analysis. The equations governing the propagation of relativistic electromagnetic waves in a cold electron-ion plasma can be reduced to two equations expressing conservation of energy-momentum of the system. The two conservation constants are functions of the plasma stream velocity, the wave velocity, the wave amplitude, and the electron-ion mass ratio. The dynamic parameter, expressing electron-ion momentum conversation in the laboratory frame, can be regarded as an adjustable quantity, a suitable choice of which will yield self-consistent solutions when other plasma parameters were specified. Circularly polarized electromagnetic waves and electrostatic plasma waves are used as illustrations.

  4. Cooling of cryogenic electron bilayers via the Coulomb interaction

    E-print Network

    John King Gamble; Mark Friesen; Robert Joynt; S. N. Coppersmith

    2011-04-13

    Heat dissipation in current-carrying cryogenic nanostructures is problematic because the phonon density of states decreases strongly as energy decreases. We show that the Coulomb interaction can prove a valuable resource for carrier cooling via coupling to a nearby, cold electron reservoir. Specifically, we consider the geometry of an electron bilayer in a silicon-based heterostructure, and analyze the power transfer. We show that across a range of temperatures, separations, and sheet densities, the electron-electron interaction dominates the phonon heat-dissipation modes as the main cooling mechanism. Coulomb cooling is most effective at low densities, when phonon cooling is least effective in silicon, making it especially relevant for experiments attempting to perform coherent manipulations of single spins.

  5. HIGH-CURRENT ERL-BASED ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.

    2005-09-18

    The design of an electron cooler must take into account both electron beam dynamics issues as well as the electron cooling physics. Research towards high-energy electron cooling of RHIC is in its 3rd year at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The luminosity upgrade of RHIC calls for electron cooling of various stored ion beams, such as 100 GeV/A gold ions at collision energies. The necessary electron energy of 54 MeV is clearly out of reach for DC accelerator system of any kind. The high energy also necessitates a bunched beam, with a high electron bunch charge, low emittance and small energy spread. The Collider-Accelerator Department adopted the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) for generating the high-current, high-energy and high-quality electron beam. The RHIC electron cooler ERL will use four Superconducting RF (SRF) 5-cell cavities, designed to operate at ampere-class average currents with high bunch charges. The electron source will be a superconducting, 705.75 MHz laser-photocathode RF gun, followed up by a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). An R&D ERL is under construction to demonstrate the ERL at the unprecedented average current of 0.5 amperes. Beam dynamics performance and luminosity enhancement are described for the case of magnetized and non-magnetized electron cooling of RHIC.

  6. Attractors and chaos of electron dynamics in electromagnetic standing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Bulanov, Stepan S.; Koga, James K.; Kando, Masaki; Kondo, Kiminori; Rosanov, Nikolay N.; Korn, Georg; Bulanov, Sergei V.

    2015-09-01

    In an electromagnetic standing wave formed by two super-intense colliding laser pulses, radiation reaction totally modifies the electron motion. The quantum corrections to the electron motion and the radiation reaction force can be independently small or large, depending on the laser intensity and wavelength, thus dividing the parameter space into 4 domains. The electron motion evolves to limit cycles and strange attractors when radiation reaction dominates. This creates a new framework for high energy physics experiments on the interaction of energetic charged particle beams and colliding super-intense laser pulses.

  7. Coherent electron cooling proof of principle instrumentation design

    SciTech Connect

    Gassner D. M.; Litvinenko, V.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T.; Minty, M.; Pinayev, I.

    2012-04-15

    The goal of the Coherent Electron Cooling Proof-of-Principle (CeC PoP) experiment being designed at RHIC is to demonstrate longitudinal (energy spread) cooling before the expected CD-2 for eRHIC. The scope of the experiment is to longitudinally cool a single bunch of 40 GeV/u gold ions in RHIC. This paper will describe the instrumentation systems proposed to meet the diagnostics challenges. These include measurements of beam intensity, emittance, energy spread, bunch length, position, orbit stability, and transverse and temporal alignment of electron and ion beams.

  8. Cooling of hot electrons in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderhaghen, R.; Hulin, D.; Cuzeau, S.; White, J.O.

    1997-07-01

    Measurements of the cooling rate of hot carriers in amorphous silicon are made with a two-pump, one-probe technique. The experiment is simulated with a rate-equation model describing the energy transfer between a population of hot carriers and the lattice. An energy transfer rate proportional to the temperature difference is found to be consistent with the experimental data while an energy transfer independent of the temperature difference is not. This contrasts with the situation in crystalline silicon. The measured cooling rates are sufficient to explain the difficulty in observing avalanche effects in amorphous silicon.

  9. Emerging Two-Phase Cooling Technologies for Power Electronic Inverters

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.

    2005-08-17

    In order to meet the Department of Energy's (DOE's) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FVCT) goals for volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost, the cooling of the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical. Currently the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) are primarily cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG) mixture. The cooling fluid operates as a single-phase coolant as the liquid phase of the WEG does not change to its vapor phase during the cooling process. In these single-phase systems, two cooling loops of WEG produce a low temperature (around 70 C) cooling loop for the power electronics and motor/generator, and higher temperature loop (around 105 C) for the internal combustion engine. There is another coolant option currently available in automobiles. It is possible to use the transmission oil as a coolant. The oil temperature exists at approximately 85 C which can be utilized to cool the power electronic and electrical devices. Because heat flux is proportional to the temperature difference between the device's hot surface and the coolant, a device that can tolerate higher temperatures enables the device to be smaller while dissipating the same amount of heat. Presently, new silicon carbide (SiC) devices and high temperature direct current (dc)-link capacitors, such as Teflon capacitors, are available but at significantly higher costs. Higher junction temperature (175 C) silicon (Si) dies are gradually emerging in the market, which will eventually help to lower hardware costs for cooling. The development of high-temperature devices is not the only way to reduce device size. Two-phase cooling that utilizes the vaporization of the liquid to dissipate heat is expected to be a very effective cooling method. Among two-phase cooling methods, different technologies such as spray, jet impingement, pool boiling and submersion, etc. are being developed. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leading the research on a novel floating refrigerant loop that cools high-power electronic devices and the motor/generator with very low cooling energy. The loop can be operated independently or attached to the air conditioning system of the vehicle to share the condenser and other mutually needed components. The ability to achieve low cooling energy in the floating loop is attributable to the liquid refrigerant operating at its hot saturated temperature (around 50 C+). In an air conditioning system, the liquid refrigerant is sub-cooled for producing cool air to the passenger compartment. The ORNL floating loop avoids the sub-cooling of the liquid refrigerant and saves significant cooling energy. It can raise the coefficient of performance (COP) more than 10 fold from that of the existing air-conditioning system, where the COP is the ratio of the cooled power and the input power for dissipating the cooled power. In order to thoroughly investigate emerging two-phase cooling technologies, ORNL subcontracted three university/companies to look into three leading two-phase cooling technologies. ORNL's assessments on these technologies are summarized in Section I. Detailed descriptions of the reports by the three university/companies (subcontractors) are in Section II.

  10. Partially ferromagnetic electromagnet for trapping and cooling neutral atoms to quantum degeneracy

    SciTech Connect

    Fauquembergue, M.; Riou, J-F.; Guerin, W.; Rangwala, S.; Moron, F.; Villing, A.; Le Coq, Y.; Bouyer, P.; Aspect, A.; Lecrivain, M.

    2005-10-15

    We have developed a compact partially ferromagnetic electromagnet to produce an Ioffe-Pritchard trap for neutral atoms. Our structure permits strong magnetic confinement with low power consumption. Compared to the previous iron-core electromagnet [B. Desruelle, V. Boyer, P. Bouyer, G. Birkl, M. Lecrivain, F. Alves, C. Westbrook, and A. Aspect, Eur. Phys. J. D 1, 255 (1998)], it allows for easy compensation of remnant fields and very high stability, along with cost-effective realization and compactness. We describe and characterize our apparatus and demonstrate trapping and cooling of {sup 87}Rb atoms to quantum degeneracy. Pure Bose-Einstein condensates containing 10{sup 6} atoms are routinely realized on a half-minute cycle. In addition we test the stability of the magnetic trap by producing atom lasers.

  11. ELECTRON COOLING IN THE PRESENCE OF UNDULATOR FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.; BEN-ZVI, I.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The design of the higher-energy cooler for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) recently adopted a non-magnetized approach which requires a low temperature electron beam. However, to avoid significant loss of heavy ions due to recombination with electrons in the cooling section, the temperature of the electron beam should be high. These two contradictory requirements are satisfied in the design of the RWIC cooler with the help of the undulator fields. The model of the friction force in the presence of an undulator field was benchmarked vs. direct numerical simulations with an excellent agreement. Here, we discuss cooling dynamics simulations with a helical undulator, including recombination suppression and resulting luminosities.

  12. Electromagnetic instability in an electron beam-ion channel system

    SciTech Connect

    Su, D.; Tang, C. J.

    2009-05-15

    The transverse electromagnetic instability in the electron beam-ion channel system is investigated using kinetic theory. The equilibrium distribution function of a relativistic electron beam, which takes into account a strong ion channel effect, is obtained. The linearized Vlasov equation is solved and the dispersion relation of the system is derived by perturbing the equilibrium with a high frequency electromagnetic wave (EMW). Analysis of the dispersion relation shows that the coupling of the electron beam with the transverse high frequency EMW is achieved through the deflection of the beam electrons due to the synergistic effects of the transverse high frequency EMW and transverse betatron oscillation. The numerical calculation finds that a branch of slow wave instability (SWI) with a wide frequency band is excited. The attenuation index of the SWI increases and its frequency band broadens as the normalized beam radii increases. Besides, the SWI will be suppressed as the longitudinal velocity of the electron beam increases to a certain value; meanwhile, a bunch of fast wave instability (FWI) is excited, which is equal to the increase of the relativistic factor. Also both the SWI and the FWI reach maximum when the EMW frequency meets a resonance condition.

  13. Atom-membrane cooling and entanglement using cavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Genes, Claudiu; Ritsch, Helmut; Drewsen, Michael; Dantan, Aurelien

    2011-11-15

    We investigate a hybrid optomechanical system composed of a micromechanical oscillator as a movable membrane and an atomic three-level ensemble within an optical cavity. We show that a suitably tailored cavity field response via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the atomic medium allows for strong coupling of the membrane's mechanical oscillations to the collective atomic ground-state spin. This facilitates ground-state cooling of the membrane motion, quantum state mapping, and robust atom-membrane entanglement even for cavity widths larger than the mechanical resonance frequency.

  14. HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING BASED ON REALISTIC SIX-DIMENSIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.; BEN-ZVI, I.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The high-energy electron cooling system for RHIC-II is unique compared to standard coolers. It requires bunched electron beam. Electron bunches are produced by an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL), and cooling is planned without longitudinal magnetic field. To address unique features of the RHIC cooler, a generalized treatment of cooling force was introduced in BETACOOE code which allows us to calculate friction force for an arbitrary distribution of electrons. Simulations for RHIC cooler based on electron distribution from ERL are presented.

  15. Fermilab R&D program in medium energy electron cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLachlan, James A.

    1997-02-01

    Fermilab began an R&D program in medium energy electron cooling in April 1995 with the object of cooling 8 GeV antiprotons in a new 3.3 km permanent magnet storage ring (Recycler) to be built in the same tunnel as the Main Injector (MI). The MI is to be completed in 1998, and it is planned to install the Recycler by the end of 1997 to reduce interference during the final rush of MI installation. Although the Recycler will employ stochastic cooling initially, its potential for contributing and order of magnitude to Tevatron collider luminosity is tied to electron cooling. The short time scale and Fermilab's limited familiarity with low energy electron beams has given rise to a two-phase development plan. The first phase is to build a cooling system based on an electron beam of ?200 mA before the year 2000. The second phase of about three years is planned to reach an electron current of 2 A or more. This report describes the general scheme for high luminosity collider operation as well as the R&D plan and progress to date.

  16. Prospects for Doppler cooling of three-electronic-level molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, J. H. V.; Odom, B.

    2011-05-15

    Analogous to the extension of laser cooling techniques from two-level to three-level atoms, Doppler cooling of molecules with an intermediate electronic state is considered. In particular, we use a rate-equation approach to simulate cooling of SiO{sup +}, in which population buildup in the intermediate state is prevented by its short lifetime. We determine that Doppler cooling of SiO{sup +} can be accomplished without optically repumping from the intermediate state, at the cost of causing undesirable parity flips and rotational diffusion. Since the necessary repumping would require a large number of continuous-wave lasers, optical pulse shaping of a femtosecond laser is proposed as an attractive alternative. Other candidate three-electron-level molecules are also discussed.

  17. Nonlinear electromagnetic perturbations in a degenerate electron-positron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Taibany, W. F.; Mamun, A. A.; El-Shorbagy, Kh. H.

    2012-07-01

    Nonlinear propagation of fast and slow magnetosonic perturbation modes in an ultra-cold, degenerate (extremely dense) electron-positron (EP) plasma (containing non-relativistic, ultra-cold, degenerate electron and positron fluids) has been investigated by the reductive perturbation method. It is shown that due to the property of being equal mass of the plasma species (me=mp, where me and mp are electron and positron mass, respectively), the degenerate EP plasma system supports the K-dV solitons which are associated with either fast or slow magnetosonic perturbation modes. It is also found that the basic features of the electromagnetic solitary structures, which are found to exist in such a degenerate EP plasma, are significantly modified by the effects of degenerate electron and positron pressures. The applications of the results in an EP plasma medium, which occurs in compact astrophysical objects, particularly in white dwarfs, have been briefly discussed.

  18. Search for electron EDM with laser cooled radioactive atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, T.; Kawamura, H.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2013-05-01

    The permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the elementary particle has the sensitivity to the CP violation in the theories beyond the standard model (SM). The search for the EDM constitutes the stringent test to discriminate between the SM and beyond it. We plan to perform the electron EDM search by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom which has the largest enhancement factor of the electron EDM in the alkali atoms. In this paper, the present status of the laser cooled Fr factory that is being constructed at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University are reported.

  19. Electron cooling in a young radio supernova: SN 2012aw

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Naveen; Ray, Alak; Chakraborti, Sayan; Stockdale, Christopher; Chandra, Poonam; Smith, Randall; Roy, Rupak; Bose, Subhash; Dwarkadas, Vikram; Sutaria, Firoza; Pooley, David E-mail: akr@tifr.res.in

    2014-02-10

    We present the radio observations and modeling of an optically bright Type II-P supernova (SN), SN 2012aw which exploded in the nearby galaxy Messier 95 (M95) at a distance of 10 Mpc. The spectral index values calculated using C, X, and K bands are smaller than the expected values for the optically thin regime. During this time, the optical bolometric light curve stays in the plateau phase. We interpret the low spectral-index values to be a result of electron cooling. On the basis of comparison between the Compton cooling timescale and the synchrotron cooling timescale, we find that the inverse Compton cooling process dominates over the synchrotron cooling process. We therefore model the radio emission as synchrotron emission from a relativistic electron population with a high energy cutoff. The cutoff is determined by comparing the electron cooling timescale, t {sub cool}, and the acceleration timescale, t-tilde {sub acc}. We constrain the mass-loss rate in the wind ( M-dot ?1.9×10{sup ?6} M{sub ?} yr{sup ?1}) and the equipartition factor between relativistic electrons and the magnetic field ( ?-tilde =?{sub e}/?{sub B}?1.12×10{sup 2}) through our modeling of radio emission. Although the time of explosion is fairly well constrained by optical observations within about two days, we explore the effect of varying the time of explosion to best fit the radio light curves. The best fit is obtained for the explosion date as 2012 March 15.3 UT.

  20. Electromagnetic waves and electron anisotropies downstream of supercritical interplanetary shocks

    E-print Network

    Wilson, L B; Szabo, A; Breneman, A; Cattell, C A; Goetz, K; Kellogg, P J; Kersten, K; Kasper, J C; Maruca, B A; Pulupa, M

    2012-01-01

    We present waveform observations of electromagnetic lower hybrid and whistler waves with f_ci 1.01. Thus, the whistler mode waves appear to be driven by a heat flux instability and cause perpendicular heating of the halo electrons. The lower hybrid waves show a much weaker correlation between \\partialB and normalized heat flux magnitude and are often observed near magnetic field gradients. A third type of event shows fluctuations consistent with a mixture of both lower hybrid and whistler mode waves. These results suggest that whistler waves may indeed be regulating the electron heat flux and the halo temperature anisotropy, which is important for theories and simulations of electron distribution evolution from the sun to the earth.

  1. Passive Two-Phase Cooling of Automotive Power Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, G.; Jeffers, J. R.; Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.

    2014-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of a passive two-phase cooling strategy as a means of cooling automotive power electronics. The proposed cooling approach utilizes an indirect cooling configuration to alleviate some reliability concerns and to allow the use of conventional power modules. An inverter-scale proof-of-concept cooling system was fabricated, and tests were conducted using the refrigerants hydrofluoroolefin HFO-1234yf and hydrofluorocarbon HFC-245fa. Results demonstrated that the system can dissipate at least 3.5 kW of heat with 250 cm3 of HFC-245fa. An advanced evaporator design that incorporates features to improve performance and reduce size was conceived. Simulation results indicate its thermal resistance can be 37% to 48% lower than automotive dual side cooled power modules. Tests were also conducted to measure the thermal performance of two air-cooled condensers--plain and rifled finned tube designs. The results combined with some analysis were then used to estimate the required condenser size per operating conditions and maximum allowable system (i.e., vapor and liquid) temperatures.

  2. High density electronic packaging module with improved cooling assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, J. H.

    1971-01-01

    Cold plate increases heat transfer within high density electronic module. Tapered pins improve heat transfer process by providing larger surface pressure with increased planar area. Cooling technique increases thermal contact where planar area is limited, interface pressure increases the heat transfer coefficient.

  3. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-10-01

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves if the total density is large. We show that for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motion of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.

  4. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-06-29

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron EMIC waves if the total density is large. We show that, for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motion of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.

  5. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-06-29

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron EMIC waves if the total density is large. We show that, for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motionmore »of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.« less

  6. Nonlinear Electromagnetic Waves in a Degenerate Electron-Positron Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Labany, S. K.; El-Taibany, W. F.; El-Samahy, A. E.; Hafez, A. M.; Atteya, A.

    2015-08-01

    Using the reductive perturbation technique (RPT), the nonlinear propagation of magnetosonic solitary waves in an ultracold, degenerate (extremely dense) electron-positron (EP) plasma (containing ultracold, degenerate electron, and positron fluids) is investigated. The set of basic equations is reduced to a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for the lowest-order perturbed magnetic field and to a KdV type equation for the higher-order perturbed magnetic field. The solutions of these evolution equations are obtained. For better accuracy and searching on new features, the new solutions are analyzed numerically based on compact objects (white dwarf) parameters. It is found that including the higher-order corrections results as a reduction (increment) of the fast (slow) electromagnetic wave amplitude but the wave width is increased in both cases. The ranges where the RPT can describe adequately the total magnetic field including different conditions are discussed.

  7. ELECTRON HOLOGRAPHY OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS - RECENT THEORETICAL ADVANCES.

    SciTech Connect

    BELEGGIA,M.; POZZI, G.; TONOMURA, A.

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown in this work that the Fourier space approach can be fruitfully applied to the calculation of the fields and the associated electron optical phase shift of several magnetic and electrostatic structures, like superconducting vortices in conventional and high-T{sub c} superconductors, reverse biased p-n junctions, magnetic domains and nanoparticles. In all these cases, this novel approach has led to unexpected but extremely interesting results, very often expressed in analytical form, which allow the quantitative and reliable interpretation of the experimental data collected by means of electron holography or of more conventional Lorentz microscopy techniques. Moreover, it is worth recalling that whenever long-range electromagnetic fields are involved, a physical model of the object under investigation is necessary in order to take into account correctly the perturbation of the reference wave induced by the tail of the field protruding into the vacuum. For these reasons, we believe that the Fourier space approach for phase computations we have introduced and discussed in this chapter will represent an invaluable tool for the investigation of electromagnetic fields at the meso- and nano-scale.

  8. Progress on a cryogenically cooled RF gun polarized electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller, R.P., III; Edwards, H.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    RF guns have proven useful in multiple accelerator applications. An RF gun capable of producing polarized electrons is an attractive electron source for the ILC or an electron-ion collider. Producing such a gun has proven elusive. The NEA GaAs photocathode needed for polarized electron production is damaged by the vacuum environment in an RF gun. Electron and ion back bombardment can also damage the cathode. These problems must be mitigated before producing an RF gun polarized electron source. In this paper we report continuing efforts to improve the vacuum environment in a normal conducting RF gun by cooling it with liquid nitrogen after a high temperature vacuum bake out. We also report on a design of a cathode preparation chamber to produce bulk GaAs photocathodes for testing in such a gun. Future directions are also discussed.

  9. Mitigation of biofouling using electromagnetic fields in tubular heat exchangers-condensers cooled by seawater.

    PubMed

    Trueba, Alfredo; García, Sergio; Otero, Félix M

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) treatment is presented as an alternative physical treatment for the mitigation of biofouling adhered to the tubes of a heat exchanger-condenser cooled by seawater. During an experimental phase, a fouling biofilm was allowed to grow until experimental variables indicated that its growth had stabilised. Subsequently, EMF treatment was applied to seawater to eliminate the biofilm and to maintain the achieved cleanliness. The results showed that EMFs precipitated ions dissolved in the seawater. As a consequence of the application of EMFs, erosion altered the intermolecular bonding of extracellular polymers, causing the destruction of the biofilm matrix and its detachment from the inner surface of the heat exchanger-condenser tubes. This detachment led to the partial removal of a mature biofilm and a partial recovery of the efficiency lost in the heat transfer process by using a physical treatment that is harmless to the marine environment. PMID:24266611

  10. Part II/Addendum Electron Beam Cooling between EBIS LINAC and Booster; Is Single Pass Cooling Possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2008-07-01

    Due to some miscommunication, incomplete data was erroneously used in examining electron beam cooling for reducing momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Corrected calculations still indicate that single pass cooling is, in principle, feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by an order of magnitude in about one meter. Preliminary results suggest that this cooling deserves further consideration.

  11. Decoherence of electron beams by electromagnetic field fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Yehoshua

    2004-02-01

    Electromagnetic field fluctuations are responsible for the destruction of electron coherence (dephasing) in solids and in vacuum electron beam interference. The vacuum fluctuations are modified by conductors and dielectrics, as in the Casimir effect, and hence, bodies in the vicinity of the beams can influence the beam coherence. We calculate the quenching of interference of two beams moving in vacuum parallel to a thick plate with permittivity epsi(ohgr) = epsi0 + i4pgrsgr/ohgr. In the case of an ideal conductor or dielectric (|epsi| = infin) the dephasing is suppressed when the beams are close to the surface of the plate, because the random tangential electric field Et, responsible for dephasing, is zero at the surface. The situation is changed dramatically when epsi0 or sgr is finite. In this case there exists a layer near the surface, where the fluctuations of Et are strong due to evanescent near fields. The thickness of this near-field layer is of the order of the wavelength in the dielectric or the skin depth in the conductor, corresponding to a frequency which is the inverse electron time of flight from the emitter to the detector. When the beams are within this layer their dephasing is enhanced and slow enough electrons can be even stronger than far from the surface.

  12. Decoherence of electron beams by electromagnetic field fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Yehoshua

    2004-06-01

    Electromagnetic field fluctuations are responsible for the destruction of electron coherence (dephasing) in solids and in vacuum electron beam interference. The vacuum fluctuations are modified by conductors and dielectrics, as in the Casimir effect, and hence, bodies in the vicinity of the beams can influence the beam coherence. We calculate the quenching of interference of two beams moving in vacuum parallel to a thick plate with permittivity ?(?) = ?0 + i4??/?. In case of an ideal conductor or dielectric (|?|=?) the dephasing is suppressed when the beams are close to the surface of the plate, because the random tangential electric field Et, responsible for dephasing, is zero at the surface. The situation is changed dramatically when ?0 or ? are finite. In this case there exists a layer near the surface, where the fluctuations of Et are strong due to evanescent near fields. The thickness of this near-field layer is of the order of the wavelength in the dielectric or the skin depth in the conductor, corresponding to a frequency which is the inverse electron time of flight from the emitter to the detector. When the beams are within this layer their dephasing is enhanced and for slow enough electrons can be even stronger than far from the surface.

  13. Two-Phase Cooling Method Using R134a Refrigerant to Cool Power Electronic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Kirk T; Tolbert, Leon M; Ayers, Curtis William; Ozpineci, Burak; Campbell, Jeremy B

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a two-phase cooling method using R134a refrigerant to dissipate the heat energy (loss) generated by power electronics (PE) such as those associated with rectifiers, converters, and inverters for a specific application in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs). The cooling method involves submerging PE devices in an R134a bath, which limits the junction temperature of PE devices while conserving weight and volume of the heat sink without sacrificing equipment reliability. First, experimental tests that included an extended soak for more than 300 days were performed on a submerged IGBT and gate-controller card to study dielectric characteristics, deterioration effects, and heat flux capability of R134a. Results from these tests illustrate that R134a has high dielectric characteristics, no deterioration on electrical components, and a heat flux of 114 W/cm 2 for the experimental configuration. Second, experimental tests that included simultaneous operation with a mock automotive air-conditioner (A/C) system were performed on the same IGBT and gate controller card. Data extrapolation from these tests determined that a typical automotive A/C system has more than sufficient cooling capacity to cool a typical 30 kW traction inverter. Last, a discussion and simulation of active cooling of the IGBT junction layer with R134a refrigerant is given. This technique will drastically increase the forward current ratings and reliability of the PE device

  14. Feasibility of Electron Cooling for Low-Energy RHIC Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov,A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.; Pozdeyev, E.; Satogata, T.

    2008-04-01

    A concrete interest in running RHIC at low energies in a range of 2.5-25 GeV/nucleon total energy of a single beam has recently emerged. Providing collisions in this energy range, which in the RHIC case is termed 'low-energy' operation, will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about existence and location of a critical point on the QCD phase diagram. However, luminosity projections are relatively low for the lowest energy points of interest. Luminosity improvement can be provided with electron cooling applied directly in RHIC at low energies. This report summarizes the expected luminosity improvement with electron cooling, possible technical approaches and various limitations.

  15. Electromagnetic Waves and Bursty Electron Acceleration: Implications from Freja

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, Laila; Ivchenko, N.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Clemmons, J.; Gustavsson, B.; Eliasson, L.

    2000-01-01

    Dispersive Alfven wave activity is identified in four dayside auroral oval events measured by the Freja satellite. The events are characterized by ion injection, bursty electron precipitation below about I keV, transverse ion heating and broadband extremely low frequency (ELF) emissions below the lower hybrid cutoff frequency (a few kHz). The broadband emissions are observed to become more electrostatic towards higher frequencies. Large-scale density depletions/cavities, as determined by the Langmuir probe measurements, and strong electrostatic emissions are often observed simultaneously. A correlation study has been carried out between the E- and B-field fluctuations below 64 Hz (the dc instrument's upper threshold) and the characteristics of the precipitating electrons. This study revealed that the energization of electrons is indeed related to the broadband ELF emissions and that the electrostatic component plays a predominant role during very active magnetospheric conditions. Furthermore, the effect of the ELF electromagnetic emissions on the larger scale field-aligned current systems has been investigated, and it is found that such an effect cannot be detected. Instead, the Alfvenic activity creates a local region of field-aligned currents. It is suggested that dispersive Alfven waves set up these local field-aligned current regions and in turn trigger more electrostatic emissions during certain conditions. In these regions ions are transversely heated, and large-scale density depletions/cavities may be created during especially active periods.

  16. Nonlinear Generation of Electromagnetic Waves Through Scattering by Thermal Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejero, E. M.; Crabtree, C. E.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, B.; Mithaiwala, M.; Rudakov, L.; Ganguli, G.

    2014-12-01

    Nonlinear interactions involving whistler wave turbulence are important contributors to radiation belt dynamics, including the acceleration and loss of trapped electrons. Given sufficient whistler energy density, nonlinear scattering from thermal electrons can substantially change the wave normal angle, while inducing a small frequency shift [Ganguli et al., 2010]. This nonlinear process is being studied in the NRL Space Physics Simulation Chamber (SPSC) in scaled magnetospheric conditions. The plasma response as a function of transmitted lower hybrid wave amplitude is monitored with magnetic loop antennas. Measurements of the magnetic field vectors for the pump and daughter waves allow for the determination of wave distribution functions, which indicate the power distribution as a function of wave-normal angle and azimuthal angle. The wave distribution functions measured in the experiment demonstrate a dramatic change in propagation direction when the launched wave amplitude exceeds a small threshold (?B / B ~ 4 × 10-7). The experimental results support the theory of electromagnetic whistler wave generation through nonlinear scattering of electrostatic lower hybrid waves by thermal electrons in the Earth's magnetosphere [Crabtree et al, 2012].

  17. 49 CFR 236.8 - Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. 236.8 Section 236.8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. Signal apparatus, the functioning...

  18. 49 CFR 236.8 - Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. 236.8 Section 236.8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. Signal apparatus, the functioning...

  19. 49 CFR 236.8 - Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. 236.8 Section 236.8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. Signal apparatus, the functioning...

  20. 49 CFR 236.8 - Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. 236.8 Section 236.8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. Signal apparatus, the functioning...

  1. 49 CFR 236.8 - Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. 236.8 Section 236.8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. Signal apparatus, the functioning...

  2. Cooled electronic system with thermal spreaders coupling electronics cards to cold rails

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Gaynes, Michael A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Schultz, Mark D; Simco, Daniel P; Steinke, Mark E

    2013-07-23

    Liquid-cooled electronic systems are provided which include an electronic assembly having an electronics card and a socket with a latch at one end. The latch facilitates securing of the card within the socket or removal of the card from the socket. A liquid-cooled cold rail is disposed at the one end of the socket, and a thermal spreader couples the electronics card to the cold rail. The thermal spreader includes first and second thermal transfer plates coupled to first and second surfaces on opposite sides of the card, and thermally conductive extensions extending from end edges of the plates, which couple the respective transfer plates to the liquid-cooled cold rail. The thermally conductive extensions are disposed to the sides of the latch, and the card is securable within or removable from the socket using the latch without removing the cold rail or the thermal spreader.

  3. Proposal for hollow cathode electron gun for electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Krienen, F.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1984-09-01

    If we consider a magnetic shunt, an iron plate with a hole in it, sandwiched between two solenoids which are polarized in opposite direction, the resulting magnetic field would be shaped. If we put a voltage between the magnetic shunt and two conducting plates perpendicular to the z-axis in a symmetric fashion, we would obtain the same shape of the electric field, because both E and B may be derived as gradient of a potential. We propose to explore this simple physical system, in which E and B are everywhere parallel, to obtain low temperature, magnetically confined electron beams.

  4. Proposal for hollow cathode electron gun for electron cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krienen, F.; Herrmannsfeldt, W. B.

    1984-09-01

    A magnetic shunt, an iron plate with a hole in it, sandwiched between two solenoids which are polarized in opposite direction, can shape the resulting magnetic field. Putting a voltage between the magnetic shunt and two conducting plates perpendicular to the z axis in a symmetric fashion, produces the same shape of the electric field, because both E and B may be derived as gradient of a potential. This simple physical system, in which E and B are everywhere parallel is explored in an effort to obtain low temperature, magnetically confined electron beams.

  5. Influence of electron evaporative cooling on ultracold plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Truman; Chen, Wei-Ting; Roberts, Jacob

    2013-07-15

    The expansion of ultracold neutral plasmas (UCP) is driven primarily by the thermal pressure of the electron component and is therefore sensitive to the electron temperature. For typical UCP spatial extents, evaporative cooling has a significant influence on the UCP expansion rate at lower densities (less than 10{sup 8}/cm{sup 3}). We studied the effect of electron evaporation in this density range. Owing to the low density, the effects of three-body recombination were negligible. We modeled the expansion by taking into account the change in electron temperature owing to evaporation as well as adiabatic expansion and found good agreement with our data. We also developed a simple model for initial evaporation over a range of ultracold plasma densities, sizes, and electron temperatures to determine over what parameter range electron evaporation is expected to have a significant effect. We also report on a signal calibration technique, which relates the signal at our detector to the total number of ions and electrons in the ultracold plasma.

  6. Injection and stability of high-intensity ion beams in synchrotrons with electron cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syresin, E. M.

    2015-11-01

    The electron cooling-stacking injection is one of the most widely used injection methods applied in forming high-intensity cooled ion beams in the synchrotrons. The maximum available ion intensity in the synchrotron is determined by the lifetime of ions and the cooling-stacking efficiency. The formation of cooled high-intensity beams is constrained by instability, leading to a strong reduction in the ion lifetime. The results of experimental investigations and simulations of the cooling-stacking injection and stability of high-intensity cooled ion beams in synchrotrons with electron cooling are discussed.

  7. Competing Channels for Hot-Electron Cooling in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qiong; Gabor, Nathaniel M.; Andersen, Trond I.; Nair, Nityan L.; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo

    2014-06-01

    We report on temperature-dependent photocurrent measurements of high-quality dual-gated monolayer graphene p-n junction devices. A photothermoelectric effect governs the photocurrent response in our devices, allowing us to track the hot-electron temperature and probe hot-electron cooling channels over a wide temperature range (4 to 300 K). At high temperatures (T >T*), we found that both the peak photocurrent and the hot spot size decreased with temperature, while at low temperatures (Telectron cooling pathways: (a) (intrinsic) momentum-conserving normal collisions that dominates at low temperatures and (b) (extrinsic) disorder-assisted supercollisions that dominates at high temperatures. Gate control in our high-quality samples allows us to resolve the two processes in the same device for the first time. The peak temperature T* depends on carrier density and disorder concentration, thus allowing for an unprecedented way of controlling graphene's photoresponse.

  8. Hot electron cooling in graphite: Supercollision versus hot phonon decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stange, A.; Sohrt, C.; Yang, L. X.; Rohde, G.; Janssen, K.; Hein, P.; Oloff, L.-P.; Hanff, K.; Rossnagel, K.; Bauer, M.

    2015-11-01

    Disorder-assisted electron-phonon scattering processes (supercollision processes) have been reported to dominate the cooling of hot carriers in graphene. Here, we determine to what extent this type of relaxation mechanism governs the hot carrier dynamics in the parent compound graphite. Electron temperature transients derived from time- and angle-resolved extreme ultraviolet photoemission spectra are analyzed based on a three-temperature model which considers electron gas, optical phonons, and acoustic phonons as coupled subsystems. In the probed fluence regime of 0.035 -1.4 mJ /cm2 , we find no indications for supercollision processes being involved in the cooling of the hot carriers. The data are, by contrast, compatible with a hot phonon assisted mechanism involving anharmonic coupling between optical phonons and acoustic phonons, a process which has previously been suggested for graphite. We attribute the striking difference to the reported findings for (substrate-supported) graphene to the low defect density of highly ordered pyrolitic graphite.

  9. Weak and electromagnetic mechanisms of neutrino-pair photoproduction in a strongly magnetized electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, A. V.; Kerimov, B. K.; Sizin, P. E.

    2012-11-15

    Expressions for the power of neutrino radiation from a degenerate electron gas in a strong magnetic field are derived for the case of neutrino-pair photoproduction via the weak and electromagnetic interaction mechanisms (it is assumed that the neutrino possesses electromagnetic form factors). It is shown that the neutrino luminosity of a medium in the electromagnetic reaction channel may exceed substantially the luminosity in the weak channel. Relative upper bounds on the effective neutrino magnetic moment are obtained.

  10. Diffusion-Cooled Tantalum Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skalare, Anders; McGrath, William; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry

    2004-01-01

    A batch of experimental diffusion-cooled hot-electron bolometers (HEBs), suitable for use as mixers having input frequencies in the terahertz range and output frequencies up to about a gigahertz, exploit the superconducting/normal-conducting transition in a thin strip of tantalum. The design and operation of these HEB mixers are based on mostly the same principles as those of a prior HEB mixer that exploited the superconducting/normal- conducting transition in a thin strip of niobium and that was described elsewhere.

  11. Cryogenic heat pipe for cooling high temperature superconductors with application to Electromagnetic Formation Flight Satellites

    E-print Network

    Kwon, Daniel W., 1980-

    2009-01-01

    An emerging method of propellant-less formation flight propulsion is the use of electromagnets coupled with reaction wheels. This technique is called Electromagnetic Formation Flight (EMFF). In order to create a large ...

  12. Detecting and locating electronic devices using their unintended electromagnetic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagner, Colin Blake

    Electronically-initiated explosives can have unintended electromagnetic emissions which propagate through walls and sealed containers. These emissions, if properly characterized, enable the prompt and accurate detection of explosive threats. The following dissertation develops and evaluates techniques for detecting and locating common electronic initiators. The unintended emissions of radio receivers and microcontrollers are analyzed. These emissions are low-power radio signals that result from the device's normal operation. In the first section, it is demonstrated that arbitrary signals can be injected into a radio receiver's unintended emissions using a relatively weak stimulation signal. This effect is called stimulated emissions. The performance of stimulated emissions is compared to passive detection techniques. The novel technique offers a 5 to 10 dB sensitivity improvement over passive methods for detecting radio receivers. The second section develops a radar-like technique for accurately locating radio receivers. The radar utilizes the stimulated emissions technique with wideband signals. A radar-like system is designed and implemented in hardware. Its accuracy tested in a noisy, multipath-rich, indoor environment. The proposed radar can locate superheterodyne radio receivers with a root mean square position error less than 5 meters when the SNR is 15 dB or above. In the third section, an analytic model is developed for the unintended emissions of microcontrollers. It is demonstrated that these emissions consist of a periodic train of impulses. Measurements of an 8051 microcontroller validate this model. The model is used to evaluate the noise performance of several existing algorithms. Results indicate that the pitch estimation techniques have a 4 dB sensitivity improvement over epoch folding algorithms.

  13. Thermoelectric-enhanced, liquid-based cooling of a multi-component electronic system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Steinke, Mark E

    2015-05-12

    Apparatus and method are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The apparatus includes a liquid-cooled structure, a thermal conduction path coupling the electronic component and the liquid-cooled structure, a coolant loop in fluid communication with a coolant-carrying channel of the liquid-cooled structure, and an outdoor-air-cooled heat exchange unit coupled to facilitate heat transfer from the liquid-cooled structure via, at least in part, the coolant loop. The thermoelectric array facilitates transfer of heat from the electronic component to the liquid-cooled structure, and the heat exchange unit cools coolant passing through the coolant loop by dissipating heat from the coolant to outdoor ambient air. In one implementation, temperature of coolant entering the liquid-cooled structure is greater than temperature of the outdoor ambient air to which heat is dissipated.

  14. Thermoelectric-enhanced, liquid-based cooling of a multi-component electronic system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Steinke, Mark E

    2015-11-10

    Methods are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The methods include providing: a liquid-cooled structure, a thermal conduction path coupling the electronic component and the liquid-cooled structure, a coolant loop in fluid communication with a coolant-carrying channel of the liquid-cooled structure, and an outdoor-air-cooled heat exchange unit coupled to facilitate heat transfer from the liquid-cooled structure via, at least in part, the coolant loop. The thermoelectric array facilitates transfer of heat from the electronic component to the liquid-cooled structure, and the heat exchange unit cools coolant passing through the coolant loop by dissipating heat from the coolant to outdoor ambient air. In one implementation, temperature of coolant entering the liquid-cooled structure is greater than temperature of the outdoor ambient air to which heat is dissipated.

  15. Air Cooling for High Temperature Power Electronics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S.; Musselman, M.; King, C.

    2014-09-01

    Current emphasis on developing high-temperature power electronics, including wide-bandgap materials such as silicon carbide and gallium nitride, increases the opportunity for a completely air-cooled inverter at higher powers. This removes the liquid cooling system for the inverter, saving weight and volume on the liquid-to-air heat exchanger, coolant lines, pumps, and coolant, replacing them with just a fan and air supply ducting. We investigate the potential for an air-cooled heat exchanger from a component and systems-level approach to meet specific power and power density targets. A proposed baseline air-cooled heat exchanger design that does not meet those targets was optimized using a parametric computational fluid dynamics analysis, examining the effects of heat exchanger geometry and device location, fixing the device heat dissipation and maximum junction temperature. The CFD results were extrapolated to a full inverter, including casing, capacitor, bus bar, gate driver, and control board component weights and volumes. Surrogate ducting was tested to understand the pressure drop and subsequent system parasitic load. Geometries that met targets with acceptable loads on the system were down-selected for experimentation. Nine baseline configuration modules dissipated the target heat dissipation, but fell below specific power and power density targets. Six optimized configuration modules dissipated the target heat load, exceeding the specific power and power density targets. By maintaining the same 175 degrees C maximum junction temperature, an optimized heat exchanger design and higher device heat fluxes allowed a reduction in the number of modules required, increasing specific power and power density while still maintaining the inverter power.

  16. An electromagnetic energy harvester for powering consumer electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiyuan

    This thesis introduces an electromagnetic vibratory energy harvester to power consumer electronics by generating electricity from the strides taken during walking or jogging. The harvester consists of a magnetic pendulum oscillating between two fixed magnets. The pendulum behaves similar to a rotor in a DC generator, while the fixed magnets, which are poled opposite to the pendulum, provide magnetic restoring forces similar to mechanical springs. When attached to a person's arm, the swinging motion subjects the magnetic pendulum to base excitations. Consequently, the pendulum oscillates near a stator which has three poles of wound copper coils. The motion of the pendulum induces a time-varying magnetic field in the flux path which generates electricity in the coils as per Faraday's law. To better understand the response behavior of the device, the thesis presents a nonlinear electromechanical model that describes the interaction between the mechanical and electrical subsystems. Experimental system identification is then implemented to characterize several unknown design parameters, including the nonlinear magnetic restoring torque, the mechanical damping coefficient, and the electromechanical coupling. The derived nonlinear mathematical model, which mimics the behavior of a damped Duffing oscillator, is then solved analytically using the method of multiple scales and the results are compared to experimental data showing good agreement for the design parameters considered. The performance of the device in charging a small battery while jogging is investigated. The motion of a typical swinging arm in terms of frequency and acceleration is reproduced on an electrodynamic shaker and used to charge a 100 ?Ah battery yielding an estimated charging time of 12 minutes.

  17. Verification of electromagnetic fluid-kinetic hybrid electron model in global gyrokinetic particle simulation

    E-print Network

    Lin, Zhihong

    "electron noise." Extension to treat the collisionless tearing modes is currently underway.12 The fluidVerification of electromagnetic fluid-kinetic hybrid electron model in global gyrokinetic particle) The fluid-kinetic hybrid electron model is verified in global gyrokinetic particle simulation of linear

  18. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  19. Cooling of relativistic electron beams in chirped laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoffe, Samuel R.; Noble, Adam; Kravets, Yevgen; Jaroszynski, Dino A.

    2015-05-01

    The next few years will see next-generation high-power laser facilities (such as the Extreme Light Infrastructure) become operational, for which it is important to understand how interaction with intense laser pulses affects the bulk properties of a relativistic electron beam. At such high field intensities, we expect both radiation reaction and quantum effects to play a significant role in the beam dynamics. The resulting reduction in relative energy spread (beam cooling) at the expense of mean beam energy predicted by classical theories of radiation reaction depends only on the energy of the laser pulse. Quantum effects suppress this cooling, with the dynamics additionally sensitive to the distribution of energy within the pulse. Since chirps occur in both the production of high-intensity pulses (CPA) and the propagation of pulses in media, the effect of using chirps to modify the pulse shape has been investigated using a semi-classical extension to the Landau-Lifshitz theory. Results indicate that even large chirps introduce a significantly smaller change to final state predictions than going from a classical to quantum model for radiation reaction, the nature of which can be intuitively understood.

  20. Cooling of relativistic electron beams in chirped laser pulses

    E-print Network

    Yoffe, Samuel R; Kravets, Yevgen; Jaroszynski, Dino A

    2015-01-01

    The next few years will see next-generation high-power laser facilities (such as the Extreme Light Infrastructure) become operational, for which it is important to understand how interaction with intense laser pulses affects the bulk properties of a relativistic electron beam. At such high field intensities, we expect both radiation reaction and quantum effects to play a significant role in the beam dynamics. The resulting reduction in relative energy spread (beam cooling) at the expense of mean beam energy predicted by classical theories of radiation reaction depends only on the energy of the laser pulse. Quantum effects suppress this cooling, with the dynamics additionally sensitive to the distribution of energy within the pulse. Since chirps occur in both the production of high-intensity pulses (CPA) and the propagation of pulses in media, the effect of using chirps to modify the pulse shape has been investigated using a semi-classical extension to the Landau--Lifshitz theory. Results indicate that even la...

  1. A FIRST LOOK AT BEAM DIAGNOSTICS FOR THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLING PROJECT.

    SciTech Connect

    CAMERON, P.; BEN-ZVI, I.; KEWISCH, J.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-06-06

    High energy electron cooling [1] is essential to meet the luminosity specification for RHIC II [2]. In preparation for electron cooling, an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) test facility [3] is under construction at BNL. A preliminary description of Diagnostics for the ERL was presented at an earlier workshop [4]. A significant portion of the eCooling Diagnostics will be a simple extension of those developed for the ERL test facility. In this paper we present a preliminary report on eCooling Diagnostics. We summarize the planned conventional Diagnostics, and follow with more detailed descriptions of Diagnostics specialized to the requirements of high-energy magnetized cooling.

  2. Modeling Single-Phase and Boiling Liquid Jet Impingement Cooling in Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S. V. J.; Hassani, V.; Bharathan, D.

    2005-12-01

    Jet impingement has been an attractive cooling option in a number of industries over the past few decades. Over the past 15 years, jet impingement has been explored as a cooling option in microelectronics. Recently, interest has been expressed by the automotive industry in exploring jet impingement for cooling power electronics components. This technical report explores, from a modeling perspective, both single-phase and boiling jet impingement cooling in power electronics, primarily from a heat transfer viewpoint. The discussion is from the viewpoint of the cooling of IGBTs (insulated-gate bipolar transistors), which are found in hybrid automobile inverters.

  3. Cherenkov electromagnetic instability excited by an oscillating relativistic electron beam in ion channel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhenyu; Tang Changjian; Peng Xiaodong

    2010-08-15

    The Cherenkov electromagnetic instability excited by an oscillating relativistic electron beam in ion channel has been studied. It is shown that the complex boundary with beam-ion channel-plasma system and the perturbation of electrons induce several electromagnetic-electrostatic hybrid slow waves, which offer the possibility to excite the instability. Under such conditions, the electronic betatron motion plays a decisive role in exciting the instability. The necessary and sufficient conditions inducing the instability have been given, and related physical mechanisms have been discussed. Furthermore, the influence of the parameters, such as accelerating voltage, on the width of instability band and the growth rate of the instability has been given.

  4. Electromagnetic radiation and nonlinear energy flow in an electron beam-plasma system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whelan, D. A.; Stenzel, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the unstable electron-plasma waves of a beam-plasma system can generate electromagnetic radiation in a uniform plasma. The generation mechanism is a scattering of the unstable electron plasma waves off ion-acoustic waves, producing electromagnetic waves whose frequency is near the local plasma frequency. The wave vector and frequency matching conditions of the three-wave mode coupling are experimentally verified. The electromagnetic radiation is observed to be polarized with the electric field parallel to the beam direction, and its source region is shown to be localized to the unstable plasma wave region. The frequency spectrum shows negligible intensity near the second harmonic of the plasma frequency. These results suggest that the observed electromagnetic radiation of type III solar bursts may be generated near the local plasma frequency and observed downstream where the wave frequency is near the harmonic of the plasma frequency.

  5. Efficient regime of electromagnetic emission in a plasma with counterstreaming electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, I. V.; Annenkov, V. V.

    2014-08-15

    Efficiency of electromagnetic emission produced in a magnetized plasma with counterstreaming electron beams was investigated using both the linear kinetic theory and particle-in-cell simulations. We calculated the growth rate of the beam-plasma instability taking into account both kinetic and relativistic effects and showed that there exists a regime in which transversely propagating electromagnetic waves can be generated by the coupling of the most unstable oblique beam-driven modes. It was confirmed by numerical simulations that such a tune-up of system parameters for a specific nonlinear process can lead to a substantial increase in electromagnetic emission efficiency. It was found that electromagnetic radiation emerging from the plasma in such a regime is generated near the harmonics of the pump frequency that is determined by the typical eigenfrequency of the beam-driven modes. It was also shown that the peak emission power can reach 5% of the maximal power lost by beam electrons.

  6. An analog of the Feynman-Kac formula for Dirac's electron in electromagnetic field and the correspondence principle

    E-print Network

    A. A. Beilinson

    2015-06-12

    The article describes a relation between the fundamental solutions of Dirac's equations for free electron and electron in given electromagnetic field viewed as functionals on bump functions. We explain how classical relativistic mechanics of a charged particle in given electromagnetic field arises from quantum mechanics of Dirac's electron in that field.

  7. Electron cooling of 8-GeV antiprotons at Fermilab's Recycler: Results and operational implications

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, Alexey V.; Carlson, K.; Gattuso, C.; Hu, M.; Kroc, T.; Leibfritz, J.; Nagaitsev, S.; Pruss, S.; Saewert, G.; Schmidt, C.W.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Tupikov, V.; Warner, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    Electron cooling of 8 GeV antiprotons at Fermilab's Recycler storage ring is now routinely used in the collider operation. It requires a 0.1-0.5 A, 4.3 MeV dc electron beam and is designed to increase the longitudinal phase-space density of the circulating antiproton beam. This paper briefly describes the characteristics of the electron beam that were achieved to successfully cool antiprotons. Then, results from various cooling force measurements along with comparison to a nonmagnetized model are presented. Finally, operational aspects of the implementation of electron cooling at the Recycler are discussed, such as adjustments to the cooling rate and the influence of the electron beam on the antiproton beam lifetime.

  8. Status of the R&D Towards Electron Cooling of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    A. Favale; D. Holmes; J.J. Sredniawski; Hans Bluem; M.D. Cole; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; V.V. Parkhomchuk; V.B. Reva; J. Alduino; D.S. Barton; Dana Richard Beavis; I. Ben-Zvi; Michael Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; Andrew Burrill; Rama Calaga; P. Cameron; X. Chang; K.A. Drees; A.V. Fedotov; W. Fischer; G. Ganetis; D.M. Gassner; J.G. Grimes; Hartmut Hahn; L.R. Hammons; A. Hershcovitch; H.C. Hseuh; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; D.L. Lederle; Vladimir Litvinenko; C. Longo; W.W. MacKay; G.J. Mahler; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; B. Oerter; C. Pai; George Parzen; D. Pate; D. Phillips; S.R. Plate; Eduard Pozdeyev; Triveni Rao; J. Reich; Thomas Roser; A.G. Ruggiero; T. Russo; C. Schultheiss; Z. Segalov; J. Smedley; K. Smith; T. Tallerico; S. Tepikian; R. Than; R.J. Todd; Dejan Trbojevic; J.E. Tuozzolo; P. Wanderer; G. WANG; D. Weiss; Q. Wu; Kin Yip; A. Zaltsman; A. Burov; S. Nagaitsev; L.R. Prost; A.O. Sidorin; A.V. Smirnov; Yaroslav Derbenev; Peter Kneisel; John Mammosser; H. Phillips; Joseph Preble; Charles Reece; Robert Rimmer; Jeffrey Saunders; Mircea Stirbet; Haipeng Wang; A.V. Aleksandrov; D.L. Douglas; Y.W. Kang; D.T. Abell; G.I. Bell; David L. Bruhwiler; R. Busby; John R. Cary; D.A. Dimitrov; P. Messmer; Vahid Houston Ranjbar; D.S. Smithe; A.V. Sobol; P. Stoltz

    2007-08-01

    The physics interest in a luminosity upgrade of RHIC requires the development of a cooling-frontier facility. Detailed cooling calculations have been made to determine the efficacy of electron cooling of the stored RHIC beams. This has been followed by beam dynamics simulations to establish the feasibility of creating the necessary electron beam. Electron cooling of RHIC at collisions requires electron beam energy up to about 54 MeV at an average current of between 50 to 100 mA and a particularly bright electron beam. The accelerator chosen to generate this electron beam is a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) with a superconducting RF gun with a laser-photocathode. An intensive experimental R&D program engages the various elements of the accelerator: Photocathodes of novel design, superconducting RF electron gun of a particularly high current and low emittance, a very high-current ERL cavity and a demonstration ERL using these components.

  9. Medium energy electron cooling R and D at Fermilab -- Context and status

    SciTech Connect

    MacLachlan, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    Electron cooling at the proposed Recycler 8 GeV storage ring has been identified as a key element in exploiting the capacity of the Fermilab Main Injector for an additional factor of ten in Tevatron luminosity above the goal for the next collider run, ultimately to > 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. The most basic requirement for increased luminosity is a large stack of antiprotons cooled to emittance comparable to that of the proton beam. Although electron cooling is inferior to the stochastic technique for cooling large emittance beams, its rate is practically independent of the antiproton intensity. For cooling intense beams of low or moderate emittance, electron cooling excels. The realization of electron cooling for 8 GeV antiprotons requires major extension of existing practice in electron energy and length of the cooling interaction region. It will require 4.3 MeV dc electron beam maintaining high quality and precise collinearity with the antiprotons over a 66 m straight section. The initial goal of the R and D project is 200 mA electron current in about three years; the plan is to reach 2 A over the following three years.

  10. Cooling carbon nanotubes to the phononic ground state with constant electron current

    E-print Network

    Stefano Zippilli; Giovanna Morigi; Adrian Bachtold

    2009-03-06

    We present a quantum theory of cooling of a mechanical resonator using back-action with constant electron current. The resonator device is based on a doubly clamped nanotube, which mechanically vibrates and acts as a double quantum dot for electron transport. Mechanical vibrations and electrons are coupled electrostatically using an external gate. The fundamental eigenmode is cooled by absorbing phonons when electrons tunnel through the double quantum dot. We identify the regimes in which ground state cooling can be achieved for realistic experimental parameters.

  11. Trapping of electrons in troughs of self generated electromagnetic standing waves in a bounded plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Sahu, Debaprasad; Pandey, Shail; Chatterjee, Sanghomitro; Dey, Indranuj; Roy Chowdhury, Krishanu

    2014-01-15

    Observations and measurements are reported on electron trapping in troughs of self-generated electromagnetic standing waves in a bounded plasma column confined in a minimum-B field. The boundaries are smaller than the free space wavelength of the waves. Earlier work of researchers primarily focused upon electron localization effects induced by purely electrostatic perturbation. We demonstrate the possibility in the presence of electromagnetic standing waves generated in the bounded plasma column. The electron trapping is verified with electrostatic measurements of the plasma floating potential, electromagnetic measurements of the wave field profile, and optical intensity measurements of Argon ionic line at 488?nm. The experimental results show a reasonably good agreement with predictions of a Monte Carlo simulation code that takes into account all kinematical and dynamical effects in the plasma in the presence of bounded waves and external fields.

  12. Verification of electromagnetic fluid-kinetic hybrid electron model in global gyrokinetic particle simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Holod, I.; Lin, Z.

    2013-03-15

    The fluid-kinetic hybrid electron model is verified in global gyrokinetic particle simulation of linear electromagnetic drift-Alfvenic instabilities in tokamak. In particular, we have recovered the {beta}-stabilization of the ion temperature gradient mode, transition to collisionless trapped electron mode, and the onset of kinetic ballooning mode as {beta}{sub e} (ratio of electron kinetic pressure to magnetic pressure) increases.

  13. Electrons in a relativistic-intensity laser field: generation of zeptosecond electromagnetic pulses and energy spectrum of the accelerated electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, A A; Galkin, A L; Kalashnikov, M P; Korobkin, V V; Romanovsky, Mikhail Yu; Shiryaev, O B

    2011-08-31

    We study the motion of an electron and emission of electromagnetic waves by an electron in the field of a relativistically intense laser pulse. The dynamics of the electron is described by the Newton equation with the Lorentz force in the right-hand side. It is shown that the electrons may be ejected from the interaction region with high energy. The energy spectrum of these electrons and the technique of using the spectrum to assess the maximal intensity in the focus are analysed. It is found that electromagnetic radiation of an electron moving in an intense laser field occurs within a small angle around the direction of the electron trajectory tangent. The tangent quickly changes its direction in space; therefore, electromagnetic radiation of the electron in the far-field zone in a certain direction in the vicinity of the tangent is a short pulse with a duration as short as zeptoseconds. The calculation of the temporary and spectral distribution of the radiation field is carried out. (superintense laser fields)

  14. STATUS OF THE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT TOWARDS ELECTRON COOLING OF RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.; OZAKI, T.; YOSHIDA, T.; NANKAWA, T.; KOZAI, N.; SAKAMOTO, F.; SUZUKI, Y.

    2007-06-25

    The physics interest in a luminosity upgrade of RHIC requires the development of a cooling-frontier facility. Detailed calculations were made of electron cooling of the stored RHIC beams. This has been followed by beam dynamics simulations to establish the feasibility of creating the necessary electron beam. The electron beam accelerator will be a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). An intensive experimental R&D program engages the various elements of the accelerator, as described by 24 contributions to the 2007 PAC.

  15. Kinetic theory of the electron bounce instability in two dimensional current sheets—Full electromagnetic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Tur, A.; Fruit, G.; Louarn, P.

    2014-03-15

    In the general context of understanding the possible destabilization of a current sheet with applications to magnetospheric substorms or solar flares, a kinetic model is proposed for studying the resonant interaction between electromagnetic fluctuations and trapped bouncing electrons in a 2D current sheet. Tur et al. [A. Tur et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 102905 (2010)] and Fruit et al. [G. Fruit et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 022113 (2013)] already used this model to investigate the possibilities of electrostatic instabilities. Here, the model is completed for full electromagnetic perturbations. Starting with a modified Harris sheet as equilibrium state, the linearized gyrokinetic Vlasov equation is solved for electromagnetic fluctuations with period of the order of the electron bounce period. The particle motion is restricted to its first Fourier component along the magnetic field and this allows the complete time integration of the non local perturbed distribution functions. The dispersion relation for electromagnetic modes is finally obtained through the quasineutrality condition and the Ampere's law for the current density. It is found that for mildly strechted current, undamped modes oscillate at typical electron bounce frequency with wavelength of the order of the plasma sheet half thickness. As the stretching of the plasma sheet becomes more intense, the frequency of these normal modes decreases and beyond a certain threshold in ??=?B{sub z}/B{sub lobes}, the mode becomes explosive with typical growth rate of a few tens of seconds. The free energy contained in the bouncing motion of the electrons may trigger an electromagnetic instability able to disrupt the cross-tail current in a few seconds. This new instability–electromagnetic electron-bounce instability–may explain fast and global scale destabilization of current sheets as required to describe substorm phenomena.

  16. Kinetic theory of the electron bounce instability in two dimensional current sheets-Full electromagnetic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tur, A.; Fruit, G.; Louarn, P.; Yanovsky, V.

    2014-03-01

    In the general context of understanding the possible destabilization of a current sheet with applications to magnetospheric substorms or solar flares, a kinetic model is proposed for studying the resonant interaction between electromagnetic fluctuations and trapped bouncing electrons in a 2D current sheet. Tur et al. [A. Tur et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 102905 (2010)] and Fruit et al. [G. Fruit et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 022113 (2013)] already used this model to investigate the possibilities of electrostatic instabilities. Here, the model is completed for full electromagnetic perturbations. Starting with a modified Harris sheet as equilibrium state, the linearized gyrokinetic Vlasov equation is solved for electromagnetic fluctuations with period of the order of the electron bounce period. The particle motion is restricted to its first Fourier component along the magnetic field and this allows the complete time integration of the non local perturbed distribution functions. The dispersion relation for electromagnetic modes is finally obtained through the quasineutrality condition and the Ampere's law for the current density. It is found that for mildly strechted current, undamped modes oscillate at typical electron bounce frequency with wavelength of the order of the plasma sheet half thickness. As the stretching of the plasma sheet becomes more intense, the frequency of these normal modes decreases and beyond a certain threshold in ? = Bz/Blobes, the mode becomes explosive with typical growth rate of a few tens of seconds. The free energy contained in the bouncing motion of the electrons may trigger an electromagnetic instability able to disrupt the cross-tail current in a few seconds. This new instability-electromagnetic electron-bounce instability-may explain fast and global scale destabilization of current sheets as required to describe substorm phenomena.

  17. Electron trajectory and growth rate in a two-stream electromagnetically pumped free electron laser and axial guide field

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdian, H.; Saviz, S.

    2008-09-15

    The effects of two-stream on electromagnetic wiggler free electron lasers (TSEMWFEL) with an axial guiding magnetic field are studied. An analysis of the two-stream steady-state electron trajectories is given by solving the equation of motion in the axial guiding magnetic field and the electromagnetic wiggler. Numerical calculations are made to illustrate the effects of the dual electron beam on the trajectories. The dispersion relation is derived employing linear fluid theory. The characteristics of the dispersion relation are analyzed numerically. The result shows that the growth rate is considerably enhanced in comparison with single-stream. The maximum growth rate is studied numerically as a function of axial guiding magnetic field for multiple electron trajectories. It is shown that the maximum growth rate of TSEMWFEL increases and decreases with respect to the axial guiding field for different trajectories.

  18. Single pass electron beam cooling of gold ions between EBIS LINAC and booster is theoretically possible!

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.

    2011-01-01

    Electron beam cooling is examined as an option to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Electron beam parameters are based on experimental data (obtained at BNL) of electron beams extracted from a plasma cathode. Many issues, regarding a low energy high current electron beam that is needed for electron beam cooling to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster, were examined. Computations and some experimental data indicate that none of these issues is a show stopper. Preliminary calculations indicate that single pass cooling is feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude in about one meter. Hence, this option cooling deserves further more serious considerations.

  19. SRF photoinjector for proof-of-principle experiment of coherent electron cooling at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kayran D.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; et al

    2012-05-20

    Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC) based on Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifier promises to be a very good way to cool protons and ions at high energies. A proof of principle experiment to demonstrate cooling at 40 GeV/u is under construction at BNL. One of possible sources to provide sufficient quality electron beam for this experiment is a SRF photoinjector. In this paper we discuss design and simulated performance of the photoinjector based on existing 112 MHz SRF gun and newly designed single-cavity SRF linac operating at 704 MHz.

  20. EXTERNAL COMPTON EMISSION IN BLAZARS OF NONLINEAR SYNCHROTRON SELF-COMPTON-COOLED ELECTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharias, Michael; Schlickeiser, Reinhard E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de

    2012-12-20

    The origin of the high-energy component in spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of blazars is still something of a mystery. While BL Lac objects can be successfully modeled within the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) scenario, the SED of low-peaked flat spectrum radio quasars is more difficult to reproduce. Their high-energy component needs the abundance of strong external photon sources, giving rise to stronger cooling via the inverse Compton (IC) channel, and thus to a powerful component in the SED. Recently, we have been able to show that such a powerful inverse Compton component can also be achieved within the SSC framework. This, however, is only possible if the electrons cool by SSC, which results in a nonlinear process, since the cooling depends on an energy integral over the electrons. In this paper, we aim to compare the nonlinear SSC framework with the external Compton (EC) output by calculating analytically the EC component with the underlying electron distribution being either linearly or nonlinearly cooled. Due to the additional linear cooling of the electrons with the external photons, higher number densities of electrons are required to achieve nonlinear cooling, resulting in more powerful IC components. If the electrons initially cool nonlinearly, the resulting SED can exhibit a dominant SSC over the EC component. However, this dominance depends strongly on the input parameters. We conclude that, with the correct time-dependent treatment, the SSC component should be taken into account in modeling blazar flares.

  1. Heat transport and electron cooling in ballistic normal-metal/spin-filter/superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Shiro; Vasenko, Andrey S.; Ozaeta, Asier; Bergeret, Sebastian F.; Hekking, Frank W. J.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate electron cooling based on a clean normal-metal/spin-filter/superconductor junction. Due to the suppression of the Andreev reflection by the spin-filter effect, the cooling power of the system is found to be extremely higher than that for conventional normal-metal/nonmagnetic-insulator/superconductor coolers. Therefore we can extract large amount of heat from normal metals. Our results strongly indicate the practical usefulness of the spin-filter effect for cooling detectors, sensors, and quantum bits.

  2. Cyclotron-undulator cooling of a free-electron-laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Bandurkin, I. V.; Kuzikov, S. V.; Savilov, A. V.

    2014-08-18

    We propose methods of fast cooling of an electron beam, which are based on wiggling of particles in an undulator in the presence of an axial magnetic field. We use a strong dependence of the axial electron velocity on the oscillatory velocity, when the electron cyclotron frequency is close to the frequency of electron wiggling in the undulator field. The abnormal character of this dependence (when the oscillatory velocity increases with the increase of the input axial velocity) can be a basis of various methods for fast cooling of moderately relativistic (several MeV) electron beams.

  3. A robust platform cooled by superconducting electronic refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H. Q.; Meschke, M.; Pekola, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    A biased tunnel junction between a superconductor and a normal metal can cool the latter electrode. Based on a recently developed cooler with high power and superior performance, we have integrated it with a dielectric silicon nitride membrane, and cooled phonons from 305 mK down to 200 mK. Without perforation and covered under a thin alumina layer, the membrane is rigorously transformed into a cooling platform that is robust and versatile for multiple practical purposes. We discussed our results and possibilities to further improve the device.

  4. Guiding and collimating fast electron beam by the quasi-static electromagnetic field array

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Zhao, Z. Q.; He, W. H.; Dong, K. G.; Wu, Y. C.; Zhu, B.; Zhang, T. K.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, Z. M.; Gu, Y. Q.; Cao, L. H.

    2014-10-15

    A guidance and collimation scheme for fast electron beam in a traverse periodic quasi-static electromagnetic field array is proposed with the semi-analytic method and the particle-in-cell simulation. The sheath electric fields on the surfaces of nanowires and the magnetic fields around the nanowires form a traverse periodic quasi-static electromagnetic field array. Therefore, most of the fast electrons are confined at the nanowire surfaces and transport forward. More importantly, due to the divergent property of the beams, the magnitudes of the generated fields decrease with the target depth. The lateral momenta of the electrons convert into the forward momenta through Lorenz force, and they cannot recover their initial values. Therefore, the fast electrons can be guided and collimated efficiently in the gaps between the nanowires. In our particle-in-cell simulations, the observed guiding efficiency exceeds 80% compared with the reference target.

  5. Electromagnetic waves destabilized by runaway electrons in near-critical electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Komar, A.; Pokol, G. I.; Fueloep, T.

    2013-01-15

    Runaway electron distributions are strongly anisotropic in velocity space. This anisotropy is a source of free energy that may destabilize electromagnetic waves through a resonant interaction between the waves and the energetic electrons. In this work, we investigate the high-frequency electromagnetic waves that are destabilized by runaway electron beams when the electric field is close to the critical field for runaway acceleration. Using a runaway electron distribution appropriate for the near-critical case, we calculate the linear instability growth rate of these waves and conclude that the obliquely propagating whistler waves are most unstable. We show that the frequencies, wave numbers, and propagation angles of the most unstable waves depend strongly on the magnetic field. Taking into account collisional and convective damping of the waves, we determine the number density of runaways that is required to destabilize the waves and show its parametric dependences.

  6. 2008 IEEE Electrical Performance of Electronic Packaging Suppression of Vertical Coupling using Electromagnetic Band Gap Structures

    E-print Network

    Swaminathan, Madhavan

    2008 IEEE Electrical Performance of Electronic Packaging Suppression of Vertical Coupling using Electromagnetic Band Gap Structures Nithya Sankaran, Suzanne Huh, Madhavan Swaminathan and Rao Tummala Packaging are presented. I. Introduction Multilayer packaging plays a vital role in producing highly miniaturized, low

  7. Dynamic chaotisation of the electronic subsystem in a graphene superlattice subjected to the electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryuchkov, S. V.; Kukhar', E. I.

    2015-09-01

    The chaotic behaviour of the electron subsystem in a graphene superlattice is studied by the Melnikov method. The dynamic chaos of electrons in a graphene superlattice is shown to appear for certain intervals of frequencies of incident electromagnetic radiation. The frequency dependence of the radiation critical amplitude which determines the bound of chaos appearance is investigated. The values of radiation frequency at which the critical amplitude increases indefinitely were found.

  8. The nonextensive parameter for nonequilibrium electron gas in an electromagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Haining; Du, Jiulin

    2014-11-15

    The nonextensive parameter for nonequilibrium electron gas of the plasma in an electromagnetic field is studied. We exactly obtained an expression of the q-parameter based on Boltzmann kinetic theories for plasmas, where Coulombian interactions and Lorentz forces play dominant roles. We show that the q-parameter different from unity is related by an equation to temperature gradient, electric field strength, magnetic induction as well as overall bulk velocity of the gas. The effect of the magnetic field on the q-parameter depends on the overall bulk velocity. Thus the q-parameter for the electron gas in an electromagnetic field represents the nonequilibrium nature or nonisothermal configurations of the plasma with electromagnetic interactions. - Highlights: • An expression of the q-parameter is obtained for nonequilibrium plasma with electromagnetic interactions. • The q-parameter is related to temperature gradient, electric field strength, magnetic induction as well as overall bulk velocity of the plasma. • The q-parameter represents the nonequilibrium nature of the complex plasma with electromagnetic interactions.

  9. Steady-state electron trajectories and growth rate in electromagnetically pumped free-electron laser with specific nonuniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdian, H.; Jafari, S.; Hasanbeigi, A.

    2008-07-15

    A theory of the dispersion relation for electromagnetically pumped free-electron laser in the presence of a special tapered axial guide magnetic field is presented. An analysis of the steady-state electron trajectories is obtained by solving the equations of motion. Next an eleventh-degree polynomial equation for electromagnetic and space-charge wave is derived. Numerical solution of the polynomial equation of the dispersion relation yield the complex wave number as a function of the frequency of the waves. These results are used to illustrate the dependence of growth rate curves on the axial guide field frequency. It is found that the tapered guide field shifts electron trajectories and enhances the growth rate in the comparison of employing uniform axial magnetic field, without needing a strong guide magnetic field.

  10. High-Current ERL-Based Electron Cooling System for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2006-03-20

    The design of an electron cooler must take into account both electron beam dynamics issues as well as the electron cooling physics. Research towards high-energy electron cooling of RHIC is in its 3rd year at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The luminosity upgrade of RHIC calls for electron cooling of various stored ion beams, such as 100 GeV/A gold ions at collision energies. The necessary electron energy of 54 MeV is clearly out of reach for DC accelerator system of any kind. The high energy also necessitates a bunched beam, with a high electron bunch charge, low emittance and small energy spread. The Collider-Accelerator Department adopted the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) for generating the high-current, high-energy and high-quality electron beam. The RHIC electron cooler ERL will use four Superconducting RF (SRF) 5-cell cavities, designed to operate at ampere-class average currents with high bunch charges. The electron source will be a superconducting, 705.75 MHz laser-photocathode RF gun, followed up by a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). An R and D ERL is under construction to demonstrate the ERL at the unprecedented average current of 0.5 amperes. Beam dynamics performance and luminosity enhancement are described for the case of magnetized and non-magnetized electron cooling of RHIC.

  11. Experimental search for the electron electric dipole moment with laser cooled francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Kawamura, H.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Asahi, K.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Yoshimi, A.; Sakemi, Y.

    2015-04-01

    A laser cooled heavy atom is one of the candidates to search for the permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron due to the enhancement mechanism and its long coherence time. The laser cooled francium (Fr) factory has been constructed to perform the electron EDM search at the Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The present status of Fr production and the EDM measurement system is presented.

  12. Evaluation of Electromagnetic Fields in a Hospital for Safe Use of Electronic Medical Equipment.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kai; Fujioka, Tomomi; Endo, Tetsuo; Hosokawa, Ren; Fujisaki, Tetsushi; Yoshino, Ryoji; Hirose, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Establishment of electromagnetic compatibility is important in use of electronic medical equipment in hospitals. To evaluate the electromagnetic environment, the electric field intensity induced by electromagnetic radiation in broadcasting spectra coming from outside the hospital was measured in a new hospital building before any patients visited the hospital and 6 months after the opening of the hospital. Various incoming radio waves were detected on the upper floors, with no significant difference in measured levels before and after opening of the hospital. There were no cellphone terminal signals before the hospital opened, but these signals were strongly detected at 6 months thereafter. Cellphone base stations signals were strongly detected on the upper floors, but there were no signals at most locations in the basement and in the center of the building on the lower floors. A maximum electrical intensity of 0.28 V/m from cellphone base stations (2.1 GHz) was detected at the south end of the 2nd floor before the hospital opened. This value is lower than the EMC marginal value for general electronic medical equipment specified in IEC 60601-1-2 (3 V/m). Therefore, electromagnetic interference with electronic medical equipment is unlikely in this situation. However, cellphone terminal signals were frequently detected in non-base station signal areas. This is a concern, and understanding signal strength from cellphone base stations at a hospital is important for promotion of greater safety. PMID:26643076

  13. Modulational instability of electromagnetic electron-cyclotron wave packets in the magnetosphere with non-Maxwellian electron distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, H.; Hakimi Pajouh, H.

    2008-09-15

    The satellite observations of the magnetosphere in the low-frequency ion dynamics revealed several facts: (1) localized structures for electric field signal parallel to the magnetic field; (2) anisotropy for the electron velocity distribution such that T{sub perpendicular}<electrons. Based on these evidences, a nonlinear model is presented to develop the electromagnetic electron-cyclotron (EMEC) theory to the non-Maxwellian plasmas. Then, the modulational instability analysis of EMEC waves is investigated.

  14. Inhibition of electron thermal conduction by electromagnetic instabilities. [in stellar coronas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, Amir; Eichler, David

    1992-01-01

    Heat flux inhibition by electromagnetic instabilities in a hot magnetized plasma is investigated. Low-frequency electromagnetic waves become unstable due to anisotropy of the electron distribution function. The chaotic magnetic field thus generated scatters the electrons with a specific effective mean free path. Saturation of the instability due to wave-wave interaction, nonlinear scattering, wave propagation, and collisional damping is considered. The effective mean free path is found self-consistently, using a simple model to estimate saturation level and scattering, and is shown to decrease with the temperature gradient length. The results, limited to the assumptions of the model, are applied to astrophysical systems. For some interstellar clouds the instability is found to be important. Collisional damping stabilizes the plasma, and the heat conduction can be dominated by superthermal electrons.

  15. The integration of liquid cryogen cooling and cryocoolers withsuperconducting electronic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-07-09

    The need for cryogenic cooling has been a critical issuethat has kept superconducting electronic devices from reaching the marketplace. Even though the performance of many of the superconductingcircuits is superior to silicon electronics, the requirement forcryogenic cooling has put the superconducting devices at a seriousdisadvantage. This report discusses the process of refrigeratingsuperconducting devices with cryogenic liquids and small cryocoolers.Three types of cryocoolers are compared for vibration, efficiency, andreliability. The connection of a cryocooler to the load is discussed. Acomparison of using flexible copper straps to carry the heat load andusing heat pipe is shown. The type of instrumentation needed formonitoring and controlling the cooling is discussed.

  16. Laser cooling of mechanical modes in a semiconductor nanomembrane via electron-hole generation

    E-print Network

    Usami, K; Bagci, T; Nielsen, B Melholt; Liu, J; Stobbe, S; Lodahl, P; Polzik, E S

    2010-01-01

    Optical cavity cooling of mechanical resonators has recently become a research frontier. The cooling has been realized with a metal-coated silicon microlever via photo-thermal force and subsequently with dielectric objects via radiation pressure. Here we report cavity cooling with a crystalline semiconductor membrane via a new mechanism, in which the cooling force arises from the interaction between the photo-induced electron-hole pairs and the mechanical modes through the deformation potential coupling. The new mechanism is so efficient as to cool a mode down to 4 K from room temperature with just 50 uW of light and a cavity with a finesse of 10 consisting of a standard mirror and the sub-wavelength-thick semiconductor membrane itself. The laser-cooled narrow-band phonon bath realized with semiconductor mechanical resonators may open up a new avenue for photonics and spintronics devices.

  17. Recycler Electron Cooling Project: Mechanical vibrations in the Pelletron and their effect on the beam

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakevich, Grigory M.; Burov, A.; Boffo, C.; Joireman, P.; Saewert, G.; Schmidt, C.W.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    The Fermilab's Recycler ring will employ an electron cooler to cool stored 8.9 GeV antiprotons [1]. The cooler is based on an electrostatic accelerator, Pelletron [2], working in an energy-recovery regime. A full-scale prototype of the cooler has been assembled and commissioned in a separate building [3]. The main goal of the experiments with the prototype was to demonstrate stable operation with a 3.5 MeV, 0.5 A DC electron beam while preserving a high beam quality in the cooling section. The quality is characterized, first of all, by a spread of electron velocities in the cooling section, which may be significantly affected by mechanical vibration of the Pelletron elements. This paper describes the results of vibration measurements in the Pelletron terminal and correlates them with the beam motion in the cooling section.

  18. Investigation of the heat pipe arrays for convective electronic cooling 

    E-print Network

    Howard, Alicia Ann Harris

    1993-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to evaluate a heat pipe convective cooling device consisting of sixteen small copper/water heat pipes mounted vertically in a 4x4 array 25.4 mm square. The analytical portion...

  19. Modulation of a compressional electromagnetic wave in a magnetized electron-positron quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, M. R.

    2015-09-01

    Amplitude modulation of a compressional electromagnetic wave in a strongly magnetized electron-positron pair plasma is considered in the quantum magnetohydrodynamic regime. The important ingredients of this study are the inclusion of the external strong magnetic field, Fermi quantum degeneracy pressure, particle exchange potential, quantum diffraction effects via the Bohm potential, and dissipative effect due to collision of the charged carriers. A modified-nonlinear Schödinger equation is developed for the compressional magnetic field of the electromagnetic wave by employing the standard reductive perturbation technique. The linear and nonlinear dispersions of the electromagnetic wave are discussed in detail. For some parameter ranges, relevant to dense astrophysical objects such as the outer layers of white dwarfs, neutron stars, and magnetars, etc., it is found that the compressional electromagnetic wave is modulationally unstable and propagates as a dissipated electromagnetic wave. It is also found that the quantum effects due to the particle exchange potential and the Bohm potential are negligibly small in comparison to the effects of the Fermi quantum degeneracy pressure. The numerical results on the growth rate of the modulation instability is also presented.

  20. Stability of relativistic electron trapping by strong whistler or electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Mourenas, D.; Agapitov, O. V.; Vainchtein, D. L.; Mozer, F. S.; Krasnoselskikh, V.

    2015-08-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the trapping of relativistic electrons by intense whistler-mode waves or electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the Earth's radiation belts. We consider the non-resonant impact of additional, lower amplitude magnetic field fluctuations on the stability of electron trapping. We show that such additional non-resonant fluctuations can break the adiabatic invariant corresponding to trapped electron oscillations in the effective wave potential. This destruction results in a diffusive escape of electrons from the trapped regime of motion and thus can lead to a significant reduction of the efficiency of electron acceleration. We demonstrate that when energetic electrons are trapped by intense parallel or very oblique whistler-mode waves, non-resonant magnetic field fluctuations in the whistler-mode frequency range with moderate amplitudes around 3 -15 pT (much less intense than the primary waves) can totally disrupt the trapped motion. However, the trapping of relativistic electrons by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves is noticeably more stable. We also discuss how the proposed approach can be used to estimate the effects of wave amplitude modulations on the motion of trapped particles.

  1. Final Report for 'ParSEC-Parallel Simulation of Electron Cooling"

    SciTech Connect

    David L Bruhwiler

    2005-09-16

    The Department of Energy has plans, during the next two or three years, to design an electron cooling section for the collider ring at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) [1]. Located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), RHIC is the premier nuclear physics facility. The new cooling section would be part of a proposed luminosity upgrade [2] for RHIC. This electron cooling section will be different from previous electron cooling facilities in three fundamental ways. First, the electron energy will be 50 MeV, as opposed to 100's of keV (or 4 MeV for the electron cooling system now operating at Fermilab [3]). Second, both the electron beam and the ion beam will be bunched, rather than being essentially continuous. Third, the cooling will take place in a collider rather than in a storage ring. Analytical work, in combination with the use and further development of the semi-analytical codes BETACOOL [4,5] and SimCool [6,7] are being pursued at BNL [8] and at other laboratories around the world. However, there is a growing consensus in the field that high-fidelity 3-D particle simulations are required to fully understand the critical cooling physics issues in this new regime. Simulations of the friction coefficient, using the VORPAL code [9], for single gold ions passing once through the interaction region, have been compared with theoretical calculations [10,11], and the results have been presented in conference proceedings papers [8,12,13,14] and presentations [15,16,17]. Charged particles are advanced using a fourth-order Hermite predictor corrector algorithm [18]. The fields in the beam frame are obtained from direct calculation of Coulomb's law, which is more efficient than multipole-type algorithms for less than {approx} 10{sup 6} particles. Because the interaction time is so short, it is necessary to suppress the diffusive aspect of the ion dynamics through the careful use of positrons in the simulations, and to run 100's of simulations with the same physical parameters but with different ''seeds'' for the particle loading. VORPAL can now be used to simulate other electron cooling facilities around the world, and it is also suitable for other accelerator modeling applications of direct interest to the Department of Energy. For example: (a) the Boersch effect in transport of strongly-magnetized electron beams for electron cooling sections, (b) the intrabeam scattering (IBS) effect in heavy ion accelerators, (c) the formation of crystalline beams and (d) target physics for heavy-ion fusion (HIF).

  2. Evidence of local power deposition and electron heating by a standing electromagnetic wave in electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma.

    PubMed

    Durocher-Jean, A; Stafford, L; Dap, S; Makasheva, K; Clergereaux, R

    2014-09-01

    Microwave plasmas excited at electron-cyclotron resonance were studied in the 0.5-15 mTorr pressure range. In contrast with low-limit pressure conditions where the plasma emission highlights a fairly homogeneous spatial structure, a periodic spatial modulation (period ?6.2 cm) appeared as pressure increased. This feature is ascribed to a local power deposition (related to the electron density) due to the presence of a standing electromagnetic wave created by the feed electromagnetic field (2.45 GHz) in the cavity formed by the reactor walls. Analysis of the electron energy probability function by Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy further revealed the presence of a high-energy tail that showed strong periodic spatial modulation at higher pressure. The spatial evolution of the electron density and of the characteristic temperature of these high-energy electrons coincides with the nodes (maximum) and antinodes (minimum) of the standing wave. These spatially-modulated power deposition and electron heating mechanisms are then discussed. PMID:25314546

  3. Electron-positron pair production in inhomogeneous electromagnetic fields

    E-print Network

    Kohlfürst, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The process of electron-positron pair production is investigated within the phase-space Wigner formalism. The similarities between atomic ionization and pair production for homogeneous, but time-dependent linearly polarized electric fields are examined mainly in the regime of multiphoton absorption (field-dependent threshold, above-threshold pair production). Characteristic signatures in the particle spectra are identified (effective mass, channel closing). The non-monotonic dependence of the particle yield on the carrier frequency is discussed as well. The investigations are then extended to spatially inhomogeneous electric fields. New effects arising due to the spatial dependence of the effective mass are discussed in terms of a semi-classical interpretation. An increase in the normalized particle yield is found for various field configurations. Pair production in inhomogeneous electric and magnetic fields is also studied. The influence of a time-dependent spatially inhomogeneous magnetic field on the momen...

  4. Equations of motion for a free-electron laser with an electromagnetic pump field and an axial electrostatic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiddleston, H. R.; Segall, S. B.

    1981-01-01

    The equations of motion for a free-electron laser (FEL) with an electromagnetic pump field and a static axial electric field are derived using a Hamiltonian formalism. Equations governing the energy transfer between the electron beam and each of the electromagnetic fields are given, and the phase shift for each of the electromagnetic fields is derived from a linearized Maxwell wave equation. The relation between the static axial electric field and the resonant phase is given. Laser gain and the fraction of the electron energy converted to photon energy are determined using a simplified resonant particle model. These results are compared to those of a more exact particle simulation code.

  5. Proton cooling in ultracold low-density electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, A. A.; Bronin, S. Y.; Manykin, E. A.; Zelener, B. B.; Zelener, B. V.; Khikhlukha, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A sole proton energy loss processes in an electron gas and the dependence of these processes on temperature and magnetic field are studied using molecular dynamics techniques in present work. It appears that for electron temperatures less than 100 K many body collisions affect the proton energy loss and these collisions must be taken into account. The influence of a strong magnetic field on the relaxation processes is also considered in this work. Calculations were performed for electron densities 10 cm-3, magnetic field 1-3 Tesla, electron temperatures 10-50 K, initial proton energies 100-10000 K.

  6. Electromagnetic levitation facility incorporating electron beam. [for vacuum heating and melting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wouch, G.; Okress, E. C.; Frost, R. T.; Rutecki, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    An electromagnetic levitation apparatus incorporating an electron beam for auxiliary heating and melting has been developed for experiments on containerless vacuum purification and undercooled solidification of high melting materials. Stable levitation of 10-g specimens of molten tungsten has been achieved and a variety of containerless solidification experiments is being performed, including pure polycrystalline castings and single tungsten crystals grown from the undercooled levitated melts.

  7. Free-electron laser harmonic generation in an electromagnetic-wave wiggler and ion channel guiding

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdian, H.; Hasanbeigi, A.; Jafari, S.

    2010-02-15

    A theoretical study of electron trajectories, harmonic generation, and gain in a free-electron laser (FEL) with a linearly polarized electromagnetic-wave wiggler is presented for axial injection of electron beam. The relativistic equation of motion for a single electron has been derived and solved numerically. It is found that the trajectories consist of two regimes. The stability of these regimes has been investigated. The results show that the trajectories are stable except for some parts of the regime one. The effects of interaction on the transverse velocity of the electron are a superposition of two oscillation terms, one at the wiggler frequency and the other at the betatron ion-channel frequency. A detailed analysis of the gain equation in the low-gain-per-pass limit has been employed to investigate FEL operation in higher harmonics generation. The possibility of wave amplification at both wiggler frequency and betatron ion-channel frequency for their odd harmonics has been illustrated.

  8. Collisionless electron cooling on magnetized plasma expansions: advances on modelling

    E-print Network

    Carlos III de Madrid, Universidad

    -117/ISTS-2015-b-117 Presented at Joint Conference of 30th International Symposium on Space Technology through a magnetic nozzle channel (quasi-1D). At the plasma reservoir, far upstream from the magnetic nozzle throat, electrons and ions are considered fully Maxwellian. Ion and electron distribution

  9. Longitudinal and transverse cooling of relativistic electron beams in intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoffe, Samuel R.; Kravets, Yevgen; Noble, Adam; Jaroszynski, Dino A.

    2015-05-01

    With the emergence in the next few years of a new breed of high power laser facilities, it is becoming increasingly important to understand how interacting with intense laser pulses affects the bulk properties of a relativistic electron beam. A detailed analysis of the radiative cooling of electrons indicates that, classically, equal contributions to the phase space contraction occur in the transverse and longitudinal directions. In the weakly quantum regime, in addition to an overall reduction in beam cooling, this symmetry is broken, leading to significantly less cooling in the longitudinal than the transverse directions. By introducing an efficient new technique for studying the evolution of a particle distribution, we demonstrate the quantum reduction in beam cooling, and find that it depends on the distribution of energy in the laser pulse, rather than just the total energy as in the classical case.

  10. Charge Symmetry Breaking in Electromagnetic Nucleon Form Factors in Elastic Parity-Violating Electron-Nucleus Scattering

    E-print Network

    Gerald A. Miller

    2014-12-17

    The effects of charge symmetry breaking in nucleon electromagnetic form factors on parity- violating elastic electron-12C scattering is studied, and found to be much smaller than other known effects. The analysis of a planned experiment is discussed.

  11. Bohr quantum theory of the magnetic monopoles and classical electron electromagnetic mass problem

    E-print Network

    Vladan Pankovic

    2015-08-28

    In the first part of this work we apply Bohr (old or naive quantum atomic) theory for analysis of the remarkable electro-dynamical problem of magnetic monopoles. We reproduce formally exactly some basic elements of the Dirac magnetic monopoles theory, especially Dirac electric/magnetic charge quantization condition. It follows after application of Bohr theory at the system, simply called magnetic monopole "atom", consisting of the practically standing, massive magnetic monopole as the "nucleus" and electron rotating stable around magnetic monopole under magnetic and electrostatic interactions. Also, in the second part of this work we suggest a simple solution of the classical electron electromagnetic mass problem.

  12. Development of a fast electromagnetic shutter for compressive sensing imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    E-print Network

    Béché, Armand; Freitag, Bert; Verbeeck, Jo

    2015-01-01

    The concept of compressive sensing was recently proposed to significantly reduce the electron dose in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) while still maintaining the main features in the image. Here, an experimental setup based on an electromagnetic shutter placed in the condenser plane of a STEM is proposed. The shutter blanks the beam following a random pattern while the scanning coils are moving the beam in the usual scan pattern. Experimental images at both medium scale and high resolution are acquired and then reconstructed based on a discrete cosine algorithm. The obtained results confirm the predicted usefulness of compressive sensing in experimental STEM even though some remaining artifacts need to be resolved.

  13. Electronic cooling via interlayer Coulomb coupling in multilayer epitaxial graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihnev, Momchil T.; Tolsma, John R.; Divin, Charles J.; Sun, Dong; Asgari, Reza; Polini, Marco; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walt A.; MacDonald, Allan H.; Norris, Theodore B.

    2015-09-01

    In van der Waals bonded or rotationally disordered multilayer stacks of two-dimensional (2D) materials, the electronic states remain tightly confined within individual 2D layers. As a result, electron-phonon interactions occur primarily within layers and interlayer electrical conductivities are low. In addition, strong covalent in-plane intralayer bonding combined with weak van der Waals interlayer bonding results in weak phonon-mediated thermal coupling between the layers. We demonstrate here, however, that Coulomb interactions between electrons in different layers of multilayer epitaxial graphene provide an important mechanism for interlayer thermal transport, even though all electronic states are strongly confined within individual 2D layers. This effect is manifested in the relaxation dynamics of hot carriers in ultrafast time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. We develop a theory of interlayer Coulomb coupling containing no free parameters that accounts for the experimentally observed trends in hot-carrier dynamics as temperature and the number of layers is varied.

  14. Electronic cooling via interlayer Coulomb coupling in multilayer epitaxial graphene

    PubMed Central

    Mihnev, Momchil T.; Tolsma, John R.; Divin, Charles J.; Sun, Dong; Asgari, Reza; Polini, Marco; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walt A.; MacDonald, Allan H.; Norris, Theodore B.

    2015-01-01

    In van der Waals bonded or rotationally disordered multilayer stacks of two-dimensional (2D) materials, the electronic states remain tightly confined within individual 2D layers. As a result, electron–phonon interactions occur primarily within layers and interlayer electrical conductivities are low. In addition, strong covalent in-plane intralayer bonding combined with weak van der Waals interlayer bonding results in weak phonon-mediated thermal coupling between the layers. We demonstrate here, however, that Coulomb interactions between electrons in different layers of multilayer epitaxial graphene provide an important mechanism for interlayer thermal transport, even though all electronic states are strongly confined within individual 2D layers. This effect is manifested in the relaxation dynamics of hot carriers in ultrafast time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. We develop a theory of interlayer Coulomb coupling containing no free parameters that accounts for the experimentally observed trends in hot-carrier dynamics as temperature and the number of layers is varied. PMID:26399955

  15. Electronic Cooling via Interlayer Coulomb Coupling in Multilayer Epitaxial Graphene

    E-print Network

    Mihnev, Momchil T; Divin, Charles J; Sun, Dong; Asgari, Reza; Polini, Marco; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walt A; MacDonald, Allan H; Norris, Theodore B

    2015-01-01

    In van der Waals bonded or rotationally disordered multilayer stacks of two-dimensional (2D) materials, the electronic states remain tightly confined within individual 2D layers. As a result, electron-phonon interactions occur primarily within layers and interlayer electrical conductivities are low. In addition, strong covalent in-plane intralayer bonding combined with weak van der Waals interlayer bonding results in weak phonon-mediated thermal coupling between the layers. We demonstrate here, however, that Coulomb interactions between electrons in different layers of multilayer epitaxial graphene provide an important mechanism for interlayer thermal transport even though all electronic states are strongly confined within individual 2D layers. This effect is manifested in the relaxation dynamics of hot carriers in ultrafast time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. We develop a theory of interlayer Coulomb coupling containing no free parameters that accounts for the experimentally observed trends in hot-carrier ...

  16. IEEE JOURNAL OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. QE-23, NO. 1, JANUARY 1987 103 Principles of Gyrotron Powered Electromagnetic

    E-print Network

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Abstract-The operation of free-electron lasers (FEL's) with axial electron beams and high-power electromagnetic wiggler fields such as those produced by high-power gyrotrons is discussed. The use of short electron beam voltages, resulting in compact FEL's. Gain calculations in the low- and high-gain Comp- ton

  17. Femtosecond cooling of hot electrons in CdSe quantum-well platelets.

    PubMed

    Sippel, Philipp; Albrecht, Wiebke; van der Bok, Johanna C; Van Dijk-Moes, Relinde J A; Hannappel, Thomas; Eichberger, Rainer; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Semiconductor quantum wells are ubiquitous in high-performance optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and lasers. Understanding and controlling of the (hot) carrier dynamics is essential to optimize their performance. Here, we study hot electron cooling in colloidal CdSe quantum-well nanoplatelets using ultrafast two-photon photoemission spectroscopy at low excitation intensities, resulting typically in 1-5 hot electrons per platelet. We observe initial electron cooling in the femtosecond time domain that slows down with decreasing electron energy and is finished within 2 ps. The cooling is considerably faster at cryogenic temperatures than at room temperature, and at least for the systems that we studied, independent of the thickness of the platelets (here 3-5 CdSe units) and the presence of a CdS shell. The cooling rates that we observe are orders of magnitude faster than reported for similar CdSe platelets under strong excitation. Our results are understood by a classic cooling mechanism with emission of longitudinal optical phonons without a significant influence of the surface. PMID:25764379

  18. Hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for scavenging biomechanical energy for sustainably powering wearable electronics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kewei; Wang, Xue; Yang, Ya; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-04-28

    We report a hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for highly efficient scavenging of biomechanical energy to sustainably power wearable electronics by human walking. Based on the effective conjunction of triboelectrification and electromagnetic induction, the hybridized nanogenerator, with dimensions of 5 cm × 5 cm × 2.5 cm and a light weight of 60 g, integrates a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) that can deliver a peak output power of 4.9 mW under a loading resistance of 6 M? and an electromagnetic generator (EMG) that can deliver a peak output power of 3.5 mW under a loading resistance of 2 k?. The hybridized nanogenerator exhibits a good stability for the output performance and a much better charging performance than that of an individual energy-harvesting unit (TENG or EMG). Furthermore, the hybridized nanogenerator integrated in a commercial shoe has been utilized to harvest biomechanical energy induced by human walking to directly light up tens of light-emitting diodes in the shoe and sustainably power a smart pedometer for reading the data of a walking step, distance, and energy consumption. A wireless pedometer driven by the hybrid nanogenerator can work well to send the walking data to an iPhone under the distance of 25 m. This work pushes forward a significant step toward energy harvesting from human walking and its potential applications in sustainably powering wearable electronics. PMID:25687592

  19. Excitation threshold of Stimulated Electromagnetic Emissions SEEs generated at pump frequency near the third electron gyroharmonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudian, A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Scales, W.

    2012-12-01

    The High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) in Gakona, Alaska provides effective radiated powers in the megawatt range that have allowed researchers to study many non-linear effects of wave-plasma interactions. Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) is of interest to the ionospheric community for its diagnostic purposes. In recent HAARP heating experiments, it has been shown that during the Magnetized Stimulated Brillouin Scattering MSBS instability, the pumped electromagnetic wave may decay into an electromagnetic wave and a low frequency electrostatic wave (either ion acoustic IA wave or electrostatic ion cyclotron EIC wave). Using Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) spectral features, side bands which extend above and below the pump frequency can yield significant diagnostics for the modified ionosphere. It has been shown that the IA wave frequency offsets can be used to measure electron temperature in the heated ionosphere and EIC wave offsets can be used as a sensitive method to determine the ion species by measuring ion mass using the ion gyro-frequency offset. The threshold of each emission line has been measured by changing the amplitude of pump wave. The experimental results aimed to show the threshold for transmitter power to excite IA wave propagating along the magnetic field lines as well as for EIC wave excited at an oblique angle relative to the background magnetic field. Another parametric decay instability studied is the ion Bernstein decay instability that has been attributed to the simultaneous parametric decay of electron Bernstein waves into multiple electron Bernstein and ion Bernstein waves. The SIB process is thought to involve mode conversion from EM to EB waves followed by parametric decay of the EB wave to multiple EB and IB waves. The parametric decay instability of ion Bernstein modes has been observed simultaneously for the first time at the third electron gyroharmonics during 2011 Summer Student Research Campaign SSRC at HAARP. The analytical results for the SIB waves at the 3rd and 4th gyroharmonics will be presented which shows good agreement with experimental data. The variation of Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) spectrum during generation of the artificial plasma layer by HAARP transmitter has been studied during 2012 PARS campaign. It turns out that SEE features observed during the formation of artificial plasma layers may be used as a diagnostic tool to investigate the generation source of these artificial layers. Both experimental data and analytical results will be presented.

  20. Electromagnetic solitons in fully relativistic electron-positron plasmas with finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nam C.

    2011-06-15

    The existence of localized structure of electromagnetic waves in relativistic electron-positron plasmas is investigated based on the pseudo-potential theory, without making any assumptions on the magnitudes of the flow velocity and temperature of the medium. The conditions for the localization of electromagnetic wave in the form of dark (dip type) soliton are found. In the small amplitude approximation, it is found that the dip becomes deeper and narrower as the temperature is raised. In low temperature T << mc{sup 2}, localized solution exists only if the equilibrium longitudinal fluid velocity (parallel to the direction of propagation) in the wave frame is larger than the classical thermal velocity {radical}(T/m) of the plasma. For ultra-relativistically high temperature T >> mc{sup 2}, it is shown that dark soliton can exist if the equilibrium longitudinal velocity is larger than c/{radical}(3).

  1. Control of spin dynamics in a two-dimensional electron gas by electromagnetic dressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervishko, A. A.; Kibis, O. V.; Morina, S.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    We solved the Schrödinger problem for a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) with the Rashba spin-orbit interaction in the presence of a strong high-frequency electromagnetic field (dressing field). The found eigenfunctions and eigenenergies of the problem are used to describe the spin dynamics of the dressed 2DEG within the formalism of the density matrix response function. Solving the equations of spin dynamics, we show that the dressing field can switch the spin relaxation in the 2DEG between the cases corresponding to the known Elliott-Yafet and D'yakonov-Perel' regimes. As a result, the spin properties of the 2DEG can be tuned by a high-frequency electromagnetic field. The present effect opens an unexplored way for controlling the spin with light and, therefore, forms the physical prerequisites for creating light-tuned spintronics devices.

  2. Two-dimensional electromagnetic Child-Langmuir law of a short-pulse electron flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. H.; Tai, L. C.; Liu, Y. L.; Ang, L. K.; Koh, W. S.

    2011-02-15

    Two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations were performed to study the effect of the displacement current and the self-magnetic field on the space charge limited current density or the Child-Langmuir law of a short-pulse electron flow with a propagation distance of {zeta} and an emitting width of W from the classical regime to the relativistic regime. Numerical scaling of the two-dimensional electromagnetic Child-Langmuir law was constructed and it scales with ({zeta}/W) and ({zeta}/W){sup 2} at the classical and relativistic regimes, respectively. Our findings reveal that the displacement current can considerably enhance the space charge limited current density as compared to the well-known two-dimensional electrostatic Child-Langmuir law even at the classical regime.

  3. Simulations of electromagnetic emissions produced in a thin plasma by a continuously injected electron beam

    E-print Network

    Annenkov, V V; Volchok, E P

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, electromagnetic emissions produced in a thin beam-plasma system are studied using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. For the first time, the problem of emission generation in such a system is considered in the realistic formulation allowing for the continuous injection of a relativistic electron beam through the plasma boundary. Specific attention is given to the thin plasma case in which the transverse plasma size is comparable to the typical wavelength of beam-driven oscillations. Such a case is often implemented in laboratory beam-plasma experiments and has a number of peculiarities. Emission from a thin plasma does not require intermediate generation of electromagnetic plasma eigenmodes, as in the infinite case, and is more similar to the regular antenna radiation. In this work, we determine how efficiently the fundamental and second harmonic emissions can be generated in previously modulated and initially homogeneous plasmas.

  4. Metamorphic materials: bulk electromagnetic transitions realized in electronically reconfigurable composite media.

    PubMed

    Kyriazidou, Chryssoula A; Contopanagos, Harry F; Alexopoulos, Nicolaos G

    2006-11-01

    We present what we believe is a new class of composite electromagnetic materials characterized by the concept of metamorphism, which we define in general terms. Metamorphic materials exhibit bulk electromagnetic transitions among states characterized by distinct ranges of values of their reflection coefficient. Each such state has unique physical properties induced by the corresponding values of the reflection coefficient. We present a variety of physical realizations of the concept of metamorphic materials in microwave frequencies, showing with specific metallodielectric designs how transitions among metamorphic states can be obtained at the same frequency, for fixed material geometries, by electronic reconfigurability. We further show how a given material exhibiting certain metamorphic states at a given frequency can transform into a different combination of metamorphic states at different frequencies; i.e., metamorphic materials have a useful dispersive degree of freedom. PMID:17047724

  5. Enhancement in Cooling of Electronic Components by Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatak, Pankaj; Jakhar, Rahul; Kumar, Mahesh

    2015-04-01

    In this study, heat transfer during spray cooling was studied experimentally using water and ZnO nanofluid. Various experiments were performed using a spray nozzle impinging fluid normal to the flat end of a copper heated surface (copper cylinder 20 mm diameter). The heat flux and surface temperature have been calculated by measuring temperature gradients along the target length under steady state conditions. In this experimental study, water flow rate was varied from 15 to 25 ml/min. In the same test conditions to compare water results with nanofluids, ZnO nanofluid was sprayed at a flow rate of 20 ml/min. It can be observed that a surface temperature 74.1 °C was obtained with maximum heat flux of 102.40 W/cm2 under the test condition for heater power 140 W and a water flow rate 25 ml/min. The use of ZnO nanofluid as a coolant is observed to increase the heat flux by about 20.2 % and decrease surface temperature of the test specimen by about 15 % at 180 W heat input and flow rate of 20 ml/min. The uncertainty in heat flux is observed to vary from 8.63 to 10.93 %.

  6. Pump-probe spectroscopy of interminiband relaxation and electron cooling in doped superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehr, D.; Winnerl, S.; Helm, M.; Dekorsy, T.; Roch, T.; Strasser, G.

    2006-04-01

    The picosecond dynamics of electrons in a doped GaAs /AlGaAs superlattice have been investigated by pump-probe experiments using an infrared free-electron laser. We observe a fast bleaching of the interminiband absorption followed by thermalization and a slower cooling component. The latter can lead to a positive or negative transmission change, resulting from the temperature dependence of the linear absorption spectrum at the respective wavelength. We show that the superlattice in contrast to quantum wells provides a unique picosecond thermometer for the electron temperature based on the dependence of the absorption on the electron distribution function.

  7. Nonlinear Generation of Electromagnetic Waves Through Induced Scattering by Thermal Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejero, Erik; Crabtree, Chris; Blackwell, David; Amatucci, Bill; Mithaiwala, Manish; Ganguli, Guru; Rudakov, Leonid

    2014-10-01

    Nonlinear interactions involving whistler wave turbulence are important contributors to radiation belt dynamics. Given sufficient whistler energy density, nonlinear scattering from thermal electrons can substantially change the wave normal angle, while inducing a small frequency shift. This nonlinear process is being studied in the NRL Space Physics Simulation Chamber (SPSC) in scaled magnetospheric conditions. Experiments conducted in the SPSC have demonstrated induced nonlinear scattering of quasi-electrostatic pump waves by thermal electrons. Measurements of the magnetic field vectors for the pump and daughter waves allow for the determination of wave distribution functions, which indicate the direction of propagation for each of these waves. The experiment supports the theory of electromagnetic whistler wave generation through nonlinear scattering of electrostatic lower hybrid waves by thermal electrons in the Earth's magnetosphere. This work is supported by the NRL base program.

  8. Nonlinear interaction of intense electromagnetic waves with a magnetoactive electron-positron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M.; Rastbood, E.; Zeinaddini Meymand, H.; Niknam, A. R.

    2013-08-15

    The nonlinear coupling between circularly polarized electromagnetic (CPEM) waves and acoustic-like waves in a magnetoactive electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasma is studied, taking into account the relativistic motion of electrons and positrons. The possibility of modulational instability and its growth rate as well as the envelope soliton formation and its characteristics in such plasmas are investigated. It is found that the growth rate of modulation instability increases in the case that ?{sub c}/?<1 (?{sub c} and ? are the electron gyrofrequency and the CPEM wave frequency, respectively) and decreases in the case that ?{sub c}/?>1. It is also shown that in a magnetoactive e-p-i plasma, the width of bright soliton increases/decreases in case of (?{sub c}/?)<1/(?{sub c}/?)>1 by increasing the magnetic field strength.

  9. NREL Helps Cool the Power Electronics in Electric Vehicles (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are developing and demonstrating innovative heat-transfer technologies for cooling power electronics devices in hybrid and electric vehicles. In collaboration with 3M and Wolverine Tube, Inc., NREL is using surface enhancements to dissipate heat more effectively, permitting a reduction in the size of power electronic systems and potentially reducing the overall costs of electric vehicles.

  10. Nonlinear electromagnetic perturbations in a degenerate ultrarelativistic electron-positron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Taibany, W. F.; Mamun, A. A.

    2012-02-01

    Nonlinear propagation of fast and slow magnetosonic perturbation modes in an ultrarelativistic, ultracold, degenerate (extremely dense) electron positron (EP) plasma (containing ultrarelativistic, ultracold, degenerate electron and positron fluids) has been investigated by the reductive perturbation method. The Alfvén wave velocity is modified due to the presence of the enthalpy correction in the fluid equations of motion. The degenerate EP plasma system (under consideration) supports the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) solitons, which are associated with either fast or slow magnetosonic perturbation modes. It is found that the ultrarelativistic model leads to compressive (rarefactive) electromagnetic solitons corresponding to the fast (slow) wave mode. There are certain critical angles, ?c, at which no soliton solution is found corresponding to the fast wave mode. For the slow mode, the magnetic-field intensity affects both the soliton amplitude and width. It is also illustrated that the basic features of the electromagnetic solitary structures, which are found to exist in such a degenerate EP plasma, are significantly modified by the effects of enthalpy correction, electron and positron degeneracy, magnetic-field strength, and the relativistic effect. The applications of the results in a pair-plasma medium, which occurs in many astrophysical objects (e.g., pulsars, white dwarfs, and neutron stars) are briefly discussed.

  11. Nonlinear electromagnetic perturbations in a degenerate ultrarelativistic electron-positron plasma.

    PubMed

    El-Taibany, W F; Mamun, A A

    2012-02-01

    Nonlinear propagation of fast and slow magnetosonic perturbation modes in an ultrarelativistic, ultracold, degenerate (extremely dense) electron positron (EP) plasma (containing ultrarelativistic, ultracold, degenerate electron and positron fluids) has been investigated by the reductive perturbation method. The Alfvén wave velocity is modified due to the presence of the enthalpy correction in the fluid equations of motion. The degenerate EP plasma system (under consideration) supports the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) solitons, which are associated with either fast or slow magnetosonic perturbation modes. It is found that the ultrarelativistic model leads to compressive (rarefactive) electromagnetic solitons corresponding to the fast (slow) wave mode. There are certain critical angles, ?(c), at which no soliton solution is found corresponding to the fast wave mode. For the slow mode, the magnetic-field intensity affects both the soliton amplitude and width. It is also illustrated that the basic features of the electromagnetic solitary structures, which are found to exist in such a degenerate EP plasma, are significantly modified by the effects of enthalpy correction, electron and positron degeneracy, magnetic-field strength, and the relativistic effect. The applications of the results in a pair-plasma medium, which occurs in many astrophysical objects (e.g., pulsars, white dwarfs, and neutron stars) are briefly discussed. PMID:22463336

  12. Optimal thermal operation of liquid-cooled electronic chips Chander Shekhar Sharma a

    E-print Network

    Daraio, Chiara

    and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland b Advanced Thermal Packaging, IBM Zurich the microprocessor industry has managed to keep pace with Moore's law of increasing transistor density on a single of electronics. Single phase li- quid cooling for microprocessors has been long recognized as an effective method

  13. High-Coherence Electron and Ion Bunches from Laser-Cooled Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulloch, A. J.; Sheludko, D. V.; Putkunz, C. T.; Saliba, S. D.; Thompson, D. J.; Speirs, R. W.; Murphy, D.; Torrance, J.; Sparkes, B. M.; Scholten, R. E.

    2014-04-01

    Cold atom electron and ion sources produce electron bunches and ion beams by photoionisation of laser cooled atoms. They offer high coherence and the potential for high brightness, with applications including ultrafast electron diffractive imaging of dynamic processes at the nanoscale. Here we present our cold atom electron/ion source, with an electron temperature of less than 10 K and a transverse coherence length of 10 nm. We also discuss experiments investigating space-charge effects with ions and the production of ultra-fast electron bunches using a femto-second laser. In the latter experiment we show that it is possible to produce both cold and fast electron bunches with our source.

  14. Linear and nonlinear electromagnetic waves in a magnetized quantum electron-positron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Mahdi

    2015-11-01

    The linear and nonlinear properties of the electromagnetic waves are investigated in a magnetized quantum electron-positron (e-p) plasma by employing the quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model. It is found that the quantum dispersion relation in comparison with the classical version is modified by the quantum corrections through quantum diffraction and statistics. The standard reductive perturbation technique is used to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation. The exact soliton solutions and the existence regions of the solitary waves are also defined precisely. It is also shown that the results are affected by the quantum corrections.

  15. Reflection of electromagnetic radiation from plasma with an anisotropic electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Vagin, K. Yu. Uryupin, S. A.

    2013-08-15

    The reflection of a test electromagnetic pulse from the plasma formed as a result of tunnel ionization of atoms in the field of a circularly polarized high-power radiation pulse is analyzed using the kinetic approach to describe electron motion. It is shown that the reflected pulse is significantly amplified due to the development of Weibel instability. The amplification efficiency is determined by the maximum value of the instability growth rate, which depends on the degree of anisotropy of the photoelectron distribution function.

  16. A passive opto-electronic lightning sensor based on electromagnetic field detection for utilities applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosolem, J. B.; Barbosa, C. F.; Floridia, C.; Bezerra, E. W.

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a passive optical lightning sensor for utilities applications. The main sensor application is for the location of lightning strikes in overhead power lines, but it can also be used in substations or in power generation plants. The proposed sensor detects lightning indirectly by means of detecting lightning electromagnetic pulses, which are used to modulate directly a semiconductor laser coupled to a fibre optic pigtail. No solar panels, batteries or electronic control circuits are necessary to implement this sensing technique. This paper shows the results of the sensor characterization made only in laboratory and the possibilities of its use in an optical WDM sensor network.

  17. Combined local microchannel-scale CFD modeling and global chip scale network modeling for electronics cooling design

    E-print Network

    Daraio, Chiara

    . In Brunschwiler et al. [3] direct water jet impingement with 50,000 nozzles arranged in a hierar- chical manner for electronics cooling design R. Wälchli a,b,*, T. Brunschwiler a , B. Michel a , D. Poulikakos b a IBM Research online 11 December 2009 Keywords: Microchannel Liquid cooling Heat transfer in electronics a b s t r a c

  18. Electronic states and spin-forbidden cooling transitions of AlH and AlF.

    PubMed

    Wells, Nathan; Lane, Ian C

    2011-11-14

    The feasibility of laser cooling AlH and AlF is investigated using ab initio quantum chemistry. All the electronic states corresponding to the ground and lowest two excited states of the Al atom are calculated using multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) and the large AV6Z basis set for AlH. The smaller AVQZ basis set is used to calculate the valence electronic states of AlF. Theoretical Franck-Condon factors are determined for the A(1)?? X(1)?(+) transitions in both radicals and found to agree with the highly diagonal factors found experimentally, suggesting computational chemistry is an effective method for screening suitable laser cooling candidates. AlH does not appear to have a transition quite as diagonal as that in SrF (which has been laser cooled) but the A(1)?? X(1)?(+) transition transition of AlF is a strong candidate for cooling with just a single laser, though the cooling frequency is deep in the UV. Furthermore, the a(3)?? X(1)?(+) transitions are also strongly diagonal and in AlF is a practical method for obtaining very low final temperatures around 3 ?K. PMID:21842049

  19. Terahertz electromagnetic wave generation and amplification by an electron beam in the elliptical plasma waveguides with dielectric rod

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmani, Z. Jazi, B.; Heidari-Semiromi, E.

    2014-09-15

    The propagation of electromagnetic waves in an elliptical plasma waveguide including strongly magnetized plasma column and a dielectric rod is investigated. The dispersion relation of guided hybrid electromagnetic waves is obtained. Excitation of the waves by a thin annular relativistic elliptical electron beam will be studied. The time growth rate of electromagnetic waves is obtained. The effects of relative permittivity constant of dielectric rod, radius of dielectric rod, accelerating voltage, and current density of the annular elliptical beam on the growth rate and the frequency spectra are numerically presented.

  20. Cryogenic systems for proof of the principle experiment of coherent electron cooling at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yuenian; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Brutus, Jean Clifford; Lederle, Dewey; Orfin, Paul; Skaritka, John; Soria, Victor; Tallerico, Thomas; Than, Roberto

    2014-01-29

    The Coherent electron Cooling (CeC) Proof of Principle (PoP) experiment is proposed to be installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to demonstrate proton and ion beam cooling with this new technique that may increase the beam luminosity in certain cases, by as much as tenfold. Within the scope of this project, a 112 MHz, 2MeV Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) electron gun and a 704 MHz 20MeV 5-cell SRF cavity will be installed at IP2 in the RHIC ring. The superconducting RF electron gun will be cooled in a liquid helium bath at 4.4 K. The 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity will be cooled in a super-fluid helium bath at 2.0 K. This paper discusses the cryogenic systems designed for both cavities. For the 112 MHz cavity cryogenic system, a condenser/boiler heat exchanger is used to isolate the cavity helium bath from pressure pulses and microphonics noise sources. For the 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity, a heat exchanger is also used to isolate the SRF cavity helium bath from noise sources in the sub-atmospheric pumping system operating at room temperature. Detailed designs, thermal analyses and discussions for both systems will be presented in this paper.

  1. Effects of Electrons on the Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Instability: Solar Wind Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaaban, S. M.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.; Elhanbaly, A.

    2015-11-01

    In diffuse plasmas in space, particle–particle collisions are rare and inefficient, such that a plausible mechanism for constraining the temperature anisotropy of plasma particles may be provided by the resulting instabilities. The implication of the electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) instability in the solar wind is still unclear because this instability is fast enough to relax the proton temperature anisotropy, but the 1 AU measurements do not conform to the instability thresholds predicted by the existing theories, which ignore the kinetic effects of electrons, assuming them to be isotropic. This paper presents a refined analysis of the EMIC instability in the presence of a temperature (T) anisotropy of electron (subscript “e”) population, i.e., {A}{{e}}={T}{{e},\\perp }/{T}{{e},\\parallel }\

  2. Nonlinear evolution of the electromagnetic electron-cyclotron instability in bi-Kappa distributed plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Eliasson, B.; Lazar, M.

    2015-06-15

    This paper presents a numerical study of the linear and nonlinear evolution of the electromagnetic electron-cyclotron (EMEC) instability in a bi-Kappa distributed plasma. Distributions with high energy tails described by the Kappa power-laws are often observed in collision-less plasmas (e.g., solar wind and accelerators), where wave-particle interactions control the plasma thermodynamics and keep the particle distributions out of Maxwellian equilibrium. Under certain conditions, the anisotropic bi-Kappa distribution gives rise to plasma instabilities creating low-frequency EMEC waves in the whistler branch. The instability saturates nonlinearly by reducing the temperature anisotropy until marginal stability is reached. Numerical simulations of the Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations show excellent agreement with the growth-rate and real frequency of the unstable modes predicted by linear theory. The wave-amplitude of the EMEC waves at nonlinear saturation is consistent with magnetic trapping of the electrons.

  3. Nonlinear evolution of the electromagnetic electron-cyclotron instability in bi-Kappa distributed plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, B.; Lazar, M.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the linear and nonlinear evolution of the electromagnetic electron-cyclotron (EMEC) instability in a bi-Kappa distributed plasma. Distributions with high energy tails described by the Kappa power-laws are often observed in collision-less plasmas (e.g., solar wind and accelerators), where wave-particle interactions control the plasma thermodynamics and keep the particle distributions out of Maxwellian equilibrium. Under certain conditions, the anisotropic bi-Kappa distribution gives rise to plasma instabilities creating low-frequency EMEC waves in the whistler branch. The instability saturates nonlinearly by reducing the temperature anisotropy until marginal stability is reached. Numerical simulations of the Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations show excellent agreement with the growth-rate and real frequency of the unstable modes predicted by linear theory. The wave-amplitude of the EMEC waves at nonlinear saturation is consistent with magnetic trapping of the electrons.

  4. Electromagnetic surface modes in a magnetized quantum electron-hole plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, A. P.

    2011-05-15

    The propagation of surface electromagnetic waves along a uniform magnetic field is studied in a quantum electron-hole semiconductor plasma. A forward propagating mode is found by including the effect of quantum tunneling. In the classical limit (({h_bar}/2{pi}){yields}0), one of the low-frequency modes found is similar to an experimentally observed one in n-type InSb at room temperature. The surface modes are shown to be significantly modified in the case of high-conductivity semiconductor plasmas where electrons and holes may be degenerate. The effects of the external magnetic field and the quantum tunneling on the surface wave modes are discussed.

  5. Comment on ''Chaotic electron trajectories in an electromagnetic wiggler free-electron laser with ion-channel guiding'' [Phys. Plasmas 17, 093103 (2010)

    SciTech Connect

    Nasr, N.; Hasanbeigi, A.

    2011-05-15

    The chaotic electron dynamics in a free-electron laser with electromagnetic-wave wiggler and ion-channel has been recently reported by A. Taghavi et al.[Phys. Plasmas 17, 093103 (2010)]. We comment on the authors use of a set of initial condition that is not correct based on the dispersion relation and steady-state orbits.

  6. Attosecond Electro-Magnetic Forces Acting on Metal Nanospheres Induced By Relativistic Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, M. J.; Batson, P. E.; Reyes-Coronado, A.; Echenique, P. M.; Aizpurua, J.

    2014-03-01

    Swift electron scattering near nanoscale materials provides information about light-matter behavior, including induced forces. We calculate time-dependent electromagnetic forces acting on 1-1.5 nm metal nanospheres induced by passing swift electrons, finding both impulse-like and oscillatory response forces. Initially, impulse-like forces are generated by a competition between attractive electric forces and repulsive magnetic forces, lasting a few attoseconds (5-10 as). Oscillatory, plasmonic response forces take place later in time, last a few femtoseconds (1- 5 fs), and apparently rely on photon emission by decay of the electron-induced surface plasmons. A comparison of the strength of these two forces suggests that the impulse-like behavior dominates the process, and can transfer significant linear momentum to the sphere. Our results advance understanding of the physics behind the observation of both attractive and repulsive behavior of gold nano-particles induced by electron beams in aberration-corrected electron microscopy. Work supported under DOE, Award # DE-SC0005132, Basque Gov. project ETORTEK inano, Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion, No. FIS2010-19609-C02-01.

  7. Simultaneous observations of subauroral electron temperature enhancements and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlandson, R. E.; Aggson, T. L.; Hogey, W. R.; Slavin, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Observational results from an investigation of LF (0.5-4.0 Hz) electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves and subauroral electron temperature enhancements recorded from the DE-2 satellite are presented. Four different wave events were analyzed, all recorded at magnetic latitudes from 57-60 deg, magnetic local times from 8-14 hr, and altitudes from 600-900 km. The peak wave amplitudes during the events ranged from 8-70 nT and 5-30 mV/m in the magnetic and electric field, respectively. Te enhancements at the time of the waves were observed in three of four events. A linear relationship between the wave magnetic field spectral density and Te enhancements was found for these events. The Te enhancements were also correlated with an enhanced flux of low energy electrons. During one event (82104) an enhanced flux of electrons were observed at energies up to 50 eV and at nearly all pitch angles, although the flux was largest in the precipitating and upflowing directions. It is suggested that the waves are responsible for heating the low energy electrons which precipitate to the ionosphere and produce the observed Te enhancements. The upflowing electron population appears to be heated at ionospheric altitudes, below the DE-2 satellite.

  8. Proof-of-principle experiment for FEL-based coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; Fedotov, A.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Mahler, G.; Marusic, A.; Meng, W.; McIntyre, G.; Minty, M.; Ptitsyn, V.; Pinayev, I.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Sheehy, B.; Tepikian, S.; Than, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Yakimenko, V.; Poelker, M.; Hutton, A.; Kraft, G.; Rimmer, R.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Abell, D.T.; Nieter, C.; Ranjbar, V.; Schwartz, B.T.; Vobly, P.; Kholopov, M.; Shevchenko, O.; Mcintosh, P.; Wheelhouse, A.

    2011-08-21

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron-hadron and electron-hadron colliders. In a CEC system, a hadron beam interacts with a cooling electron beam. A perturbation of the electron density caused by ions is amplified and fed back to the ions to reduce the energy spread and the emittance of the ion beam. To demonstrate the feasibility of CEC we propose a proof-of-principle experiment at RHIC using SRF linac. In this paper, we describe the setup for CeC installed into one of RHIC's interaction regions. We present results of analytical estimates and results of initial simulations of cooling a gold-ion beam at 40 GeV/u energy via CeC. We plan to complete the program in five years. During first two years we will build coherent electron cooler in IP2 of RHIC. In parallel we will develop complete package of computer simulation tools for the start-to-end simulation predicting exact performance of a CeC. The later activity will be the core of Tech X involvement into the project. We will use these tools to predict the performance of our CeC device. The experimental demonstration of the CeC will be undertaken in years three to five of the project. The goal of this experiment is to demonstrate the cooling of ion beam and to compare its measured performance with predictions made by us prior to the experiments.

  9. Enhanced nonlinear interaction of powerful electromagnetic waves with ionospheric plasma near the second electron gyroharmonic

    SciTech Connect

    Istomin, Ya. N.; Leyser, T. B.

    2013-05-15

    Plasma experiments in which a powerful electromagnetic pump wave is transmitted into the ionosphere from the ground give access to a rich range of phenomena, including gyroharmonic effects when the pump frequency is near an harmonic of the ionospheric electron gyrofrequency. For pump frequencies close to the second gyroharmonic, experiments show a strong enhancement, as observed in radar scatter from pump-induced geomagnetic field-aligned density striations and optical emissions. This is in contrast to the case at the third harmonic and higher at which most of the effects are instead suppressed. We show theoretically that electrostatic oscillations can be localized in density inhomogeneities associated with small scale striations. The localized field is a mixture of the electron Bernstein and upper hybrid modes when the pump frequency is near the second gyroharmonic. The coupling of the modes is enabled by a symmetry feature of the linear electron Bernstein and upper hybrid dispersion properties that occur only near the second gyroharmonic. Electron acceleration inside the density inhomogeneities by localized azimuthal electrostatic oscillations is more efficient near the second gyroharmonic than at higher frequencies, consistent with the observed enhancements.

  10. Hybridized Electromagnetic-Triboelectric Nanogenerator for a Self-Powered Electronic Watch.

    PubMed

    Quan, Ting; Wang, Xue; Wang, Zhong Lin; Yang, Ya

    2015-12-22

    We report a hybridized nanogenerator including a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) and six electromagnetic generators (EMGs) that can effectively scavenge biomechanical energy for sustainably powering an electronic watch. Triggered by the natural motions of the wearer's wrist, a magnetic ball at the center in an acrylic box with coils on each side will collide with the walls, resulting in outputs from both the EMGs and the TENG. By using the hybridized nanogenerator to harvest the biomechanical energy, the electronic watch can be continuously powered under different motion types of the wearer's wrist, where the best approach is to charge a 100 ?F capacitor in 39 s to maintain the continuous operation of the watch for 456 s. To increase the working time of the watch further, a homemade Li-ion battery has been utilized as the energy storage unit for realizing the continuous working of the watch for about 218 min by using the hybridized nanogenerator to charge the battery within 32 min. This work will provide the opportunities for developing a nanogenerator-based built-in power source for self-powered wearable electronics such as an electronic watch. PMID:26565597

  11. Radiation of de-excited electrons at large times in a strong electromagnetic plane wave

    SciTech Connect

    Kazinski, P.O.

    2013-12-15

    The late time asymptotics of the physical solutions to the Lorentz–Dirac equation in the electromagnetic external fields of simple configurations–the constant homogeneous field, the linearly polarized plane wave (in particular, the constant uniform crossed field), and the circularly polarized plane wave–are found. The solutions to the Landau–Lifshitz equation for the external electromagnetic fields admitting a two-parametric symmetry group, which include as a particular case the above mentioned field configurations, are obtained. Some general properties of the total radiation power of a charged particle are established. In particular, for a circularly polarized wave and constant uniform crossed fields, the total radiation power in the asymptotic regime is independent of the charge and the external field strength, when expressed in terms of the proper-time, and equals a half the rest energy of a charged particle divided by its proper-time. The spectral densities of the radiation power formed on the late time asymptotics are derived for a charged particle moving in the external electromagnetic fields of the simple configurations pointed above. This provides a simple method to verify experimentally that the charged particle has reached the asymptotic regime. -- Highlights: •Late time asymptotics of the solutions to the Lorentz–Dirac equation are studied. •General properties of the total radiation power of electrons are established. •The total radiation power equals a half the rest energy divided by the proper-time. •Spectral densities of radiation formed on the late time asymptotics are derived. •Possible experimental verification of the results is proposed.

  12. Electron-emission-induced cooling of boundary region in fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sanjay K.; Avinash, K.; Kaw, Predhiman; Kaw

    2014-12-01

    In this brief communication we have explored whether the electron emission from the boundary region surfaces (or from additional fine structured dust particles/droplets of some benign material put purposely in the area surrounding the surfaces) can act as an efficient cooling mechanism for boundary region surfaces/dust electrons and hence the lattice. In order to estimate the contribution of this cooling process a simple kinetic model based on charge flux balance and associated energetics has been established. Along with some additional sophistication like suitable choice of material and modification in the work function via surface coating, the estimates show that it is possible to keep the temperature of the plate/particles well within the critical limit, i.e. melting/sublimation point for the desired regime of incident heat flux.

  13. Low Noise in a Diffusion-Cooled Hot-Electron Mixer at 2.5 THz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, B. S.; Gaidis, M. C.; McGrath, W. R.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.

    1997-01-01

    The noise performance of a Nb hot-electron bolometer mixer at 2.5 THz has been investigated. The devices are fabricated from a 12-nm-thick Nb film, and have a 0.30 micrometer x 0.15 micrometer in-plane size, thus exploiting diffusion as the electron cooling mechanism. The rf coupling was provided by a twin-slot planar antenna on an elliptical Si lens. The experimentally measured double sideband noise temperature of the receiver was as low as 2750 +/- 250 K with an estimated mixer noise temperature of approximately equal 900 K. The mixer bandwidth derived from both noise bandwidth and IF impedance measurements was approximately equal 1.4 GHz. These results demonstrate the low-noise operation of the diffusion-cooled bolometer mixer above 2 THz.

  14. Status of Proof-of-principle Experiment for Coherent Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Pinayev, I; Ben-Zvi, I; Bengtsson, J; Elizarov, A; Fedotov, A V; Gassner, D M; Hao, Y; Kayran, D; Litvinenko, V; Mahler, G J; Meng, W; Roser, T; Sheehy, B; Than, R; Tuozzolo, J E; Wang, G; Webb, S D; Yakimenko, V; Bell, G I; Bruhwiler, D L; Ranjbar, V H; Schwartz, B T; Hutton, A; Krafft, G A; Poelker, M; Rimmer, R A; Kholopov, M A

    2012-07-01

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron colliders. To verify the concept we conduct proof-of-the-principle experiment at RHIC. In this paper, we describe the current experimental setup to be installed into 2 o'clock RHIC interaction regions. We present current design, status of equipment acquisition and estimates for the expected beam parameters.

  15. The design of an asymmetric bionic branching channel for electronic chips cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shanglong; Qin, Jie; Guo, Wei; Fang, Kuang

    2013-06-01

    Inspired by the wing vein of Lepidoptera, a designment of asymmetric bionic branching channel for electronic chips cooling is developed. Lepidoptera vein D was chosen to measure the angle of first and second branch level. Based on these regular patterns, an asymmetric bionic branching channel is designed in a 35 mm × 35 mm chip. Comparing with fractal-like branching channel, it provides a stronger heat transfer capability, lower pressure drop and lower flow resistance in the experiment.

  16. Towards the measurement of the electron EDM with laser cooled francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Hirokazu; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Sakamoto, K.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Yoshida, H. P.; Wakasa, T.; Sakemi, Y.

    2014-09-01

    The electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle is a probe into new physics beyond the standard model. The electron EDM might be observed with an enhancement in heavier paramagnetic atoms. Francium (Fr), whose electron structure is useful for laser-cooling and trapping, has a large enhancement factor. Fr produced at high temperature via a fusion reaction will be laser-cooled and trapped in an optical lattice where the EDM is measured. The magneto-optical trapping of Fr is required in advance of the lattice trapping. The technique observing a small number of atoms makes it easy to search for the resonant frequency of Fr. The improvement of the beam purity should lead to a more efficient trap. The techniques towards Fr trapping and EDM measurement have been developed. The electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle is a probe into new physics beyond the standard model. The electron EDM might be observed with an enhancement in heavier paramagnetic atoms. Francium (Fr), whose electron structure is useful for laser-cooling and trapping, has a large enhancement factor. Fr produced at high temperature via a fusion reaction will be laser-cooled and trapped in an optical lattice where the EDM is measured. The magneto-optical trapping of Fr is required in advance of the lattice trapping. The technique observing a small number of atoms makes it easy to search for the resonant frequency of Fr. The improvement of the beam purity should lead to a more efficient trap. The techniques towards Fr trapping and EDM measurement have been developed. Supported by MEXT/JSPS KAKENHI Grants (21104005, 25610112 and 26220705) and Tohoku University's Focused Research Project.

  17. Semianalytical description of the modulator section of the coherent electron cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizarov, Andrey; Litvinenko, Vladimir

    2013-12-01

    In the coherent electron cooling, the modern hadron beam cooling technique, each hadron receives an individual kick from the electric field of the amplified electron density perturbation created in the modulator by this hadron in a copropagating electron beam. We developed a method for computing the dynamics of these density perturbations in an infinite electron plasma with any equilibrium velocity distribution—a possible model for the modulator. We derived analytical expressions for the dynamics of the density perturbations in the Fourier-Laplace domain for a variety of 1D, 2D, and 3D equilibrium distributions of the electron beam. To obtain the space-time dynamics, we employed the fast Fourier transform algorithm. We also found an analytical solution in the space-time domain for the 1D Cauchy equilibrium distribution, which serves as a benchmark for our general approach based on numerical evaluation of the integral transforms and as a fast alternative to the numerical computations. We tested the method for various distributions and initial conditions.

  18. Electron lenses and cooling for the Fermilab Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    E-print Network

    Stancari, G; Lebedev, V; Nagaitsev, S; Prebys, E; Valishev, A

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the study of integrable Hamiltonian systems has led to nonlinear accelerator lattices with one or two transverse invariants and wide stable tune spreads. These lattices may drastically improve the performance of high-intensity machines, providing Landau damping to protect the beam from instabilities, while preserving dynamic aperture. The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is being built at Fermilab to study these concepts with 150-MeV pencil electron beams (single-particle dynamics) and 2.5-MeV protons (dynamics with self fields). One way to obtain a nonlinear integrable lattice is by using the fields generated by a magnetically confined electron beam (electron lens) overlapping with the circulating beam. The required parameters are similar to the ones of existing devices. In addition, the electron lens will be used in cooling mode to control the brightness of the proton beam and to measure transverse profiles through recombination. More generally, it is of great interest to investigate whet...

  19. Production and ion-ion cooling of highly charged ions in electron string ion source.

    PubMed

    Donets, D E; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Salnikov, V V; Shutov, V B; Syresin, E M

    2009-06-01

    The scheme of an internal injection of Au atoms into the working space of the "Krion-2" electron string ion source (ESIS) was applied and tested. In this scheme Au atoms are evaporated from the thin tungsten wire surface in vicinity of the source electron string. Ion beams with charge states up to Au51+ were produced. Ion-ion cooling with use of C and O coolant ions was studied. It allowed increasing of the Au51+ ion yield by a factor of 2. Ions of Kr up to charge state 28+ were also produced in the source. Electron strings were first formed with injection electron energy up to 6 keV. Methods to increase the ESIS ion output are discussed. PMID:19566200

  20. New method of modeling electronic circuits coupled with 3D electromagnetic finite element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, J. R.; MacNeal, B. E.; Larkin, L. A.; Overbye, V. D.

    1991-09-01

    New zero-dimensional or scalar electromagnetic finite elements taht have the time integral of electric scalar potential as their nodal variable are presented. There are three zero-dimensional element types, representing resistors, capacitors, and inductors. These elements can be easily combined with two- or three-dimensional elements, with three components of magnetic vector potential and the time integral of electric scalar potential as nodal variables. Constant current sources are directly modeled by inhomogeneous Neumann excitations, and constant voltage sources are modeled by use of Norton's theorem. By the addition of dependent current and voltage sources, electronic circuits can be modeled. Example finite-element analyses include an R-L circuit, a transistor circuit driving a wire loop modeled with three-dimensional finite elements, and a circuit impedance on the secondary of a saturable three-dimensional transformer model.

  1. Nonlinear dispersion and transverse profile of intense electromagnetic waves, propagating through electron-positron-ion hot magnetoplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javan, N. Sepehri; Homami, S. H. H.

    2015-02-01

    Self-guided nonlinear propagation of intense circularly-polarized electromagnetic waves in a hot electron-positron-ion magnetoplasma is studied. Using a relativistic fluid model, a nonlinear equation is derived, which describes the interaction of the electromagnetic wave with the plasma in the quasi-neutral approximation. Transverse Eigen modes, the nonlinear dispersion relation and the group velocity are obtained. Results show that the transverse profile in the case of magnetized plasma with cylindrical symmetry has a radially damping oscillatory form. Effect of applying external magnetic fields, existence of the electron-positron pairs, changing the amplitude of the electromagnetic wave, and its polarization on the nonlinear dispersion relation and Eigen modes are studied.

  2. Interaction of a two-dimensional electromagnetic breather with an electron inhomogeneity in an array of carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, Alexander V. Bouffanais, Roland; Fedorov, E. G.; Belonenko, Mikhail B.

    2014-05-28

    Propagation of ultrashort laser pulses through various nano-objects has recently became an attractive topic for both theoretical and experimental studies due to its promising perspectives in a variety of problems of modern nanoelectronics. Here, we study the propagation of extremely short two-dimensional bipolar electromagnetic pulses in a heterogeneous array of semiconductor carbon nanotubes. Heterogeneity is defined as a region of enhanced electron density. The electromagnetic field in an array of nanotubes is described by Maxwell's equations, reduced to a multidimensional wave equation. Our numerical analysis shows the possibility of stable propagation of an electromagnetic pulse in a heterogeneous array of nanotubes. Furthermore, we establish that, depending on its speed of propagation, the pulse can pass through the area of increased electron concentration or be reflected therefrom.

  3. Observation of electron plasma waves inside large amplitude electromagnetic pulses in a temporally growing plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Shail; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Sahu, Debaprasad

    2012-01-15

    Observation of electron plasma waves excited inside high power ({approx}10 kW) short pulse ({approx}20 {mu}s) electromagnetic (em) waves interacting with a gaseous medium (argon) in the pressure range 0.2-2.5 mTorr is reported. The waves have long wavelength ({approx}13 cm) and get damped at time scales slower ({approx}3 {mu}s) than the plasma period (0.1-0.3 {mu}s), the energy conveyed to the medium lead to intense ionization (ion density n{sub i} {approx} 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and electron temperature T{sub e} {approx} 6-8 eV) and rapid growth of the plasma ({approx}10{sup 5} s{sup -1}) beyond the waves. Time frequency analysis of the generated oscillations indicate the presence of two principal frequencies centered around 3.8 MHz and 13.0 MHz with a spread {Delta}f {approx} 4 MHz, representing primarily two population of electrons in the plasma wave. The experimental results are in reasonable agreement with a model that considers spatiotemporal forces of the em wave on the medium, space charges and diffusion.

  4. Cool and Quiet: Partnering to Enhance the Aerodynamic and Acoustic Performance of Installed Electronics Cooling Fans: A White Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. Danielle; VanZante, Dale E.

    2006-01-01

    Breathtaking images of distant planets. Spacewalks to repair a telescope in orbit. Footprints on the moon. The awesome is made possible by the mundane. Every achievement in space exploration has relied on solid, methodical advances in engineering. Space exploration fuels economic development like no other endeavor can. But which advances will make their way into our homes and businesses? And how long will it take? Answers to these questions are dependent upon industrial involvement in government sponsored research initiatives, market demands, and timing. Recognizing an opportunity is half the battle. This proposal describes the framework for a collaborative research program aimed at improving the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of electronics cooling fans. At its best, the program would involve NASA and academic researchers, as well as corporate researchers representing the Information Technology (IT) and fan manufacturing industries. The momentum of space exploration, the expertise resultant from the nation's substantial investment in turbofan noise reduction research, and the competitiveness of the IT industry are intended to be catalysts of innovation.

  5. An Electromagnetic Spectrum for Millennial Students: Teaching Light, Color, Energy, and Frequency Using the Electronic Devices of Our Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Maureen Kendrick

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a comparison of student learning outcomes is made in sophomore-level physical science classes using a "traditional" pedagogical approach versus a "modern" approach. Specifically, when students were taught the electromagnetic spectrum using diagrams and examples that incorporate technological advances and electronic devices of our…

  6. Laser Cooled Francium Factory for the Electron Electric Dipole Moment Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ezure, Saki; Harada, Ken-ichi; Inoue, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kato, Tomohiro; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Sato, Tomoya; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takahiro; Kato, Ko; Uchiyama, Aiko; Aoki, Takatoshi; Furukawa, Takeshi; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Imai, Kenichi; Murakami, Tetsuya; Nataraj, Huliyar; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Wakasa, Tomotsugu; Yoshida, Hidetomo; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of an elementary particle is a candidate observable exhibiting CP violation beyond the standard model. In the present study, we plan to search for the electron EDM in francium (Fr), which is the heaviest alkali atom, captured in a far-off resonance optical trap. Since the number of Fr atoms is essential to high precision measurements, we have developed a cold Fr source called "Laser cooled Fr factory" in order to trap the radioactive Fr produced through a nuclear fusion reaction. The Fr produced was released as an ion from a gold production target in a Fr ion source, transported as an ion beam, and converted from ion to atom in a neutralizer. The neutralized Fr atom will be trapped in a magneto-optical trap(MOT) and then be transferred to an optical dipole trap. The rate of Fr atoms so far achieved was 1 × 106 ions/sec from the ion source and 1 atom/sec of the neutralized Fr atom from the neutralizer. In order to optimize performance of the Fr beam line, Rb atoms were trapped in the MOT. In addition to the beam-line experiment, in an off-line MOT system, polarization gradient cooling was applied to the trapped Rb atoms to cool them down to temperatures lower than the Rb Doppler-cooling limit. In this paper, we describe the present status of this experimental apparatus.

  7. Theoretical study of electromagnetic electron cyclotron waves in the presence of AC field in Uranian magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, R. S.; Kaur, Rajbir

    2015-10-01

    Electromagnetic electron cyclotron (EMEC) waves with temperature anisotropy in the magnetosphere of Uranus have been studied in present work. EMEC waves are investigated using method of characteristic solution by kinetic approach, in presence of AC field. In 1986, Voyager 2 encounter with Uranus revealed that magnetosphere of Uranus exhibit non-Maxwellian high-energy tail distribution. So, the dispersion relation, real frequency and growth rate are evaluated using Lorentzian Kappa distribution function. Effect of temperature anisotropy, AC frequency and number density of particles is found. The study is also extended to oblique propagation of EMEC waves in presence and absence of AC field. Through comprehensive mathematical analysis it is found that when EMEC wave propagates parallel to intrinsic magnetic field of Uranus, its growth is more enhanced than in case of oblique propagation. Results are also discussed in context to magnetosphere of Earth and also gives theoretical explanation to existence of high energetic particles observed by Voyager 2 in the magnetosphere of Uranus. The results can present a further insight into the nature of electron-cyclotron instability condition for the whistler mode waves in the outer radiation belts of Uranus or other space plasmas.

  8. Floating Refrigerant Loop Based on R-134a Refrigerant Cooling of High-Heat Flux Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, K.T.

    2005-10-07

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) have been developing technologies to address the thermal issues associated with hybrid vehicles. Removal of the heat generated from electrical losses in traction motors and their associated power electronics is essential for the reliable operation of motors and power electronics. As part of a larger thermal control project, which includes shrinking inverter size and direct cooling of electronics, ORNL has developed U.S. Patent No. 6,772,603 B2, ''Methods and Apparatus for Thermal Management of Vehicle Systems and Components'' [1], and patent pending, ''Floating Loop System for Cooling Integrated Motors and Inverters Using Hot Liquid Refrigerant'' [2]. The floating-loop system provides a large coefficient of performance (COP) for hybrid-drive component cooling. This loop (based on R-134a) is integrated with a vehicle's existing air-conditioning (AC) condenser, which dissipates waste heat to the ambient air. Because the temperature requirements for cooling of power electronics and electric machines are not as low as that required for passenger compartment air, this adjoining loop can operate on the high-pressure side of the existing AC system. This arrangement also allows the floating loop to run without the need for the compressor and only needs a small pump to move the liquid refrigerant. For the design to be viable, the loop must not adversely affect the existing system. The loop should also provide a high COP, a flat-temperature profile, and low-pressure drop. To date, the floating-loop test prototype has successfully removed 2 kW of heat load in a 9 kW automobile passenger AC system with and without the automotive AC system running. The COP for the tested floating-loop system ranges from 40-45, as compared to a typical AC system COP of about 2-4. The estimated required waste-heat load for future hybrid applications is 5.5 kW and the existing system could be easily scaleable for this larger load.

  9. Electromagnetic Abdulaziz Hanif

    E-print Network

    Masoudi, Husain M.

    Electromagnetic Propulsion Abdulaziz Hanif Electrical Engineering Department King Fahd University of spacecraft, which would be jolted through space by electromagnets, could take us farther than any of these other methods. When cooled to extremely low temperatures, electromagnets demonstrate an unusual behavior

  10. The influence of longitudinal space charge fields on the modulation process of coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Litvinenko, V. N.

    2014-05-21

    Initial modulation in Coherent electron cooling (CeC) scheme relies on ion charge screening by electrons. In a CeC system with bunched electron beam, the long-range longitudinal space charge force is inevitably induced. For a relatively dense electron beam, it can be comparable or even greater than the attractive force from the ion. Hence, space-charge field influence to the modulation process could be important. If the longitudinal Debye length is much smaller than the electron bunch length, the modulation induced by the ion happens locally. In this case, the long-range longitudinal space charge field can be approximated as a uniform electric field across the region. In this paper we developed an analytical model to study the dynamics of ion shielding in the presence of a uniform electric field. We are solving the coupled Vlasov-Poisson equation system for infinite anisotropic electron plasma and estimate the influences of the longitudinal space charge field to the modulation process. We present numerical estimates for a case of the proof of CeC principle experiment at RHIC.

  11. Issues concerning high current lower energy electron beams required for ion cooling between EBIS LINAC and booster

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2009-03-01

    Some issues, regarding a low energy high current electron beam that will be needed for electron beam cooling to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster, are examined. Options for propagating such an electron beam, as well as the effect of neutralizing background plasma on electron and ion beam parameters are calculated. Computations and some experimental data indicate that none of these issues is a show stopper.

  12. Ion acoustic solitons and supersolitons in a magnetized plasma with nonthermal hot electrons and Boltzmann cool electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rufai, O. R. Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V. Lakhina, G. S.

    2014-08-15

    Arbitrary amplitude, ion acoustic solitons, and supersolitons are studied in a magnetized plasma with two distinct groups of electrons at different temperatures. The plasma consists of a cold ion fluid, cool Boltzmann electrons, and nonthermal energetic hot electrons. Using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential technique, the effect of nonthermal hot electrons on soliton structures with other plasma parameters is studied. Our numerical computation shows that negative potential ion-acoustic solitons and double layers can exist both in the subsonic and supersonic Mach number regimes, unlike the case of an unmagnetized plasma where they can only exist in the supersonic Mach number regime. For the first time, it is reported here that in addition to solitions and double layers, the ion-acoustic supersoliton solutions are also obtained for certain range of parameters in a magnetized three-component plasma model. The results show good agreement with Viking satellite observations of the solitary structures with density depletions in the auroral region of the Earth's magnetosphere.

  13. Status of proof-of-principle experiment for coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Pinayev I.; Belomestnykh, S.; Bengtsson, J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Elizarov, A. et al

    2012-05-20

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron colliders. To verify the concept we conduct proof-of-the-principle experiment at RHIC. In this paper, we describe the current experimental setup to be installed into 2 o'clock RHIC interaction regions. We present current design, status of equipment acquisition and estimates for the expected beam parameters. We use a dogleg to merge the electron and ion beams. The ions 'imprint' their distribution into the electron beam via a space charge density modulation. The modulation is amplified in an FEL comprised of a 7-m long helical wiggler. The ions are co-propagating with electron beam through the FEL. The ion's average velocity is matched to the group velocity of the wave-packet of e-beam density modulation in the FEL. A three-pole wiggler at the exit of the FEL tune the phase of the wave-packet so the ion with the central energy experience the maximum of the e-beam density modulation, where electric field is zero. The time-of-flight dependence on ion's provides for the electrical field caused by the density modulation to reduce energy spread of the ion beam. The used electron beam is bent off the ion path and damped.

  14. Frequency-Domain Analysis of Diffusion-Cooled Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skalare, A.; McGrath, W. R.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.

    1998-01-01

    A new theoretical model is introduced to describe heterodyne mixer conversion efficiency and noise (from thermal fluctuation effects) in diffusion-cooled superconducting hot-electron bolometers. The model takes into account the non-uniform internal electron temperature distribution generated by Wiedemann-Franz heat conduction, and accepts for input an arbitrary (analytical or experimental) superconducting resistance-versus- temperature curve. A non-linear large-signal solution is solved iteratively to calculate the temperature distribution, and a linear frequency-domain small-signal formulation is used to calculate conversion efficiency and noise. In the small-signal solution the device is discretized into segments, and matrix algebra is used to relate the heating modulation in the segments to temperature and resistance modulations. Matrix expressions are derived that allow single-sideband mixer conversion efficiency and coupled noise power to be directly calculated. The model accounts for self-heating and electrothermal feedback from the surrounding bias circuit.

  15. The design and implementation of the machine protection system for the Fermilab electron cooling facility

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, A.; Carmichael, L.; Carlson, K.; Crisp, J.; Goodwin, R.; Prost, L.; Saewert, G.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The Fermilab Recycler ring employs an electron cooler to store and cool 8.9-GeV antiprotons. The cooler is based on a 4.3-MV, 0.1-A, DC electrostatic accelerator for which current losses have to remain low ({approx}10{sup -5}) in order to operate reliably. The Machine Protection System (MPS) has been designed to interrupt the beam in a matter of 1-2 {micro}s when losses higher than a safe limit are detected, either in the accelerator itself or in the beam lines. This paper highlights the various diagnostics, electronics and logic that the MPS relies upon to successfully ensure that no damage be sustained to the cooler or the Recycler ring.

  16. Cool Timepix - Electronic noise of the Timepix readout chip down to -125 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schön, R.; Alfonsi, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; Koffeman, E.

    2015-01-01

    The Timepix readout chip with its 65k pixels on a sensitive area of 14 mm×14 mm provides a fine spatial resolution for particle tracking or medical imaging. We explore the operation of Timepix in a dual-phase xenon environment (around -110 °C). Used in dual-phase xenon time projection chambers, e.g. for dark matter search experiments, the readout must have a sufficiently low detection limit for small energy deposits. We measured the electronic pixel noise of three bare Timepix chips. For the first time Timepix readout chips were cooled to temperatures as low as -125 °C. In this work, we present the results of analysing noise transition curves recorded while applying a well-defined charge to the pixel's input. The electronic noise reduces to an average of 99e-, a reduction of 23% compared to operation at room temperature.

  17. Oblique electromagnetic electron cyclotron waves for Kappa distribution with AC field in planetary magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, R. S.; Kaur, Rajbir

    2015-08-01

    The dispersion relation for obliquely propagating relativistic electromagnetic electron cyclotron (EMEC) waves in collision-less magnetoplasma is obtained. Investigations for EMEC waves in magnetosphere of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus have been done, in presence of perpendicular AC electric field for Kappa distribution function. The relativistic temporal growth rate is calculated using method of characteristic solution. Using the data provided by spacecrafts like Cassini, Voyager 1 and 2, while exploring the magnetosphere of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus, is used to plot graphs showing growth rate being effected by various parameters. Comprehensive parametric analysis have been done at different radial distances of the planets. It is concluded that beside huge difference in magnetospheric configuration, temperature anisotropy remains the main source of energy in case of Jupiter and Uranus. While studying EMEC waves in magnetosphere of Saturn, it is inferred that growth rate attains maximum magnitude when angle of propagation increases. Also, the results and its interpretations explain how the growth of EMEC wave modifies in different magnetospheric conditions.

  18. Standing electromagnetic solitons in hot ultra-relativistic electron-positron plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Heidari, E.; Aslaninejad, M.; Eshraghi, H.; Rajaee, L.

    2014-03-15

    Using a one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model, we investigate standing relativistic bright solitons in hot electron-positron plasmas. The positron dynamics is taken into account. A set of nonlinear coupled differential equations describing the evolution of electromagnetic waves in fully relativistic two-fluid plasma is derived analytically and solved numerically. As a necessary condition for the existence of standing solitons the system should be relativistic. For the case of ultra-relativistic plasma, we investigate non-drifting bright solitary waves. Detailed discussions of the acceptable solutions are presented. New single hump non-trivial symmetric solutions for the scalar potential were found, and single and multi-nodal symmetric and anti-symmetric solutions for the vector potential are presented. It is shown that for a fixed value of the fluid velocity excited modes with more zeros in the profile of the vector potential show a higher magnitude for the scalar potential. An increase in the plasma fluid velocity also increases the magnitude of the scalar potential. Furthermore, the Hamiltonian and the first integral of the system are given.

  19. Superconducting Tunnel Junction Refrigerators for Sub-Kelvin Cooling of Electrons, Phonons, and Arbitrary, User-Supplied Payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, Peter Joseph

    Modern science often requires measurements at sub-Kelvin temperatures. Temperatures of 300 mK can be reached by using liquid 3He, but reaching lower temperatures requires the use of adiabatic demagnetization and dilution refrigerators which are complex, large, and costly. Normal-metalInsulatorSuperconductor (NIS) tunnel junctions provide an alternative refrigeration method that is simple to use, compact, and provides continuous cooling power that has the potential to expand the accessibility of these sub-Kelvin temperatures. When properly biased, the electron system in the normal metal of an NIS junction is cooled since the hottest electrons preferentially tunnel from the normal metal to the superconductor, transferring heat in the process. When the normal metal is extended onto a thermally isolated membrane, the cold electrons cool the phonons in the membrane through electron-phonon coupling. In previous work, NIS junctions have been used to cool detectors and bulk objects that were integrated with the membrane, but could not be considered a general-purpose refrigerator since they could not cool arbitrary objects. The goal of this work has been to demonstrate a general-purpose NIS refrigerator to which a user can attach arbitrary bulk objects. First, we discuss NIS refrigeration and then develop a model to predict phonon cooling. We fabricated and tested NIS refrigerators capable of cooling bulk objects and used the model to explain the results. The devices were able to cool phonons from 300 mK to 154 mK with 100 pW of cooling power at 200 mK. With these devices, we were able to cool a 2 cm3 piece of copper from 290 mK to 256 mK with 700 pW of cooling power at 290 mK. This demonstration marks the emergence of NIS refrigerators as a true, general-purpose refrigerator since users can attach arbitrary objects. Measurements of Andreev reflections in the devices and next-generation refrigerators that cool electrons from 100 mK to below 50 mK are also presented.

  20. Influence of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser-irradiated metallic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Ziyu; Li Jianfeng; Yu Yong; Li Xiaoya; Peng Qixian; Zhu Wenjun; Wang Jiaxiang

    2012-11-15

    The influences of lateral target size on hot electron production and electromagnetic pulse emission from laser interaction with metallic targets have been investigated. Particle-in-cell simulations at high laser intensities show that the yield of hot electrons tends to increase with lateral target size, because the larger surface area reduces the electrostatic field on the target, owing to its expansion along the target surface. At lower laser intensities and longer time scales, experimental data characterizing electromagnetic pulse emission as a function of lateral target size also show target-size effects. Charge separation and a larger target tending to have a lower target potential have both been observed. The increase in radiation strength and downshift in radiation frequency with increasing lateral target size can be interpreted using a simple model of the electrical capacity of the target.

  1. Observation of Ultra-narrow Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Slow Light using Purely Electronic Spins in a Hot Atomic Vapor

    E-print Network

    F. Goldfarb; J. Ghosh; M. David; J. Ruggiero; T. Chanelière; J. -L. Le Gouët; H. Gilles; R. Ghosh; F. Bretenaker

    2008-03-17

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is observed in gaseous 4He at room temperature. Ultra-narrow (less than 10 kHz) EIT windows are obtained for the first time for purely electronic spins in the presence of Doppler broadening. The positive role of collisions is emphasized through measurements of the power dependence of the EIT resonance. Measurement of slow light opens up possible ways to applications.

  2. Strong neutrino cooling by cycles of electron capture and ?- decay in neutron star crusts.

    PubMed

    Schatz, H; Gupta, S; Möller, P; Beard, M; Brown, E F; Deibel, A T; Gasques, L R; Hix, W R; Keek, L; Lau, R; Steiner, A W; Wiescher, M

    2014-01-01

    The temperature in the crust of an accreting neutron star, which comprises its outermost kilometre, is set by heating from nuclear reactions at large densities, neutrino cooling and heat transport from the interior. The heated crust has been thought to affect observable phenomena at shallower depths, such as thermonuclear bursts in the accreted envelope. Here we report that cycles of electron capture and its inverse, ?(-) decay, involving neutron-rich nuclei at a typical depth of about 150?metres, cool the outer neutron star crust by emitting neutrinos while also thermally decoupling the surface layers from the deeper crust. This 'Urca' mechanism has been studied in the context of white dwarfs and type Ia supernovae, but hitherto was not considered in neutron stars, because previous models computed the crust reactions using a zero-temperature approximation and assumed that only a single nuclear species was present at any given depth. The thermal decoupling means that X-ray bursts and other surface phenomena are largely independent of the strength of deep crustal heating. The unexpectedly short recurrence times, of the order of years, observed for very energetic thermonuclear superbursts are therefore not an indicator of a hot crust, but may point instead to an unknown local heating mechanism near the neutron star surface. PMID:24291788

  3. Electron cooling and finite potential drop in a magnetized plasma expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Navarro-Cavallé, J.; Ahedo, E.

    2015-05-01

    The steady, collisionless, slender flow of a magnetized plasma into a surrounding vacuum is considered. The ion component is modeled as mono-energetic, while electrons are assumed Maxwellian upstream. The magnetic field has a convergent-divergent geometry, and attention is restricted to its paraxial region, so that 2D and drift effects are ignored. By using the conservation of energy and magnetic moment of particles and the quasi-neutrality condition, the ambipolar electric field and the distribution functions of both species are calculated self-consistently, paying attention to the existence of effective potential barriers associated to magnetic mirroring. The solution is used to find the total potential drop for a set of upstream conditions, plus the axial evolution of various moments of interest (density, temperatures, and heat fluxes). The results illuminate the behavior of magnetic nozzles, plasma jets, and other configurations of interest, showing, in particular, in the divergent plasma the collisionless cooling of electrons, and the generation of collisionless electron heat fluxes.

  4. Electron cooling and finite potential drop in a magnetized plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Navarro-Cavallé, J.; Ahedo, E.

    2015-05-15

    The steady, collisionless, slender flow of a magnetized plasma into a surrounding vacuum is considered. The ion component is modeled as mono-energetic, while electrons are assumed Maxwellian upstream. The magnetic field has a convergent-divergent geometry, and attention is restricted to its paraxial region, so that 2D and drift effects are ignored. By using the conservation of energy and magnetic moment of particles and the quasi-neutrality condition, the ambipolar electric field and the distribution functions of both species are calculated self-consistently, paying attention to the existence of effective potential barriers associated to magnetic mirroring. The solution is used to find the total potential drop for a set of upstream conditions, plus the axial evolution of various moments of interest (density, temperatures, and heat fluxes). The results illuminate the behavior of magnetic nozzles, plasma jets, and other configurations of interest, showing, in particular, in the divergent plasma the collisionless cooling of electrons, and the generation of collisionless electron heat fluxes.

  5. Injection method of barrier bucket supported by misaligned electron cooling for CRing

    E-print Network

    Shen, Guo-Dong; Xia, Jia-Wen; Mao, Li-Jun; Yin, Da-Yu; Chai, Wei-Ping; Shi, Jian; Sheng, Li-Na; Smirnov, A; Wu, Bo; Zhao, He

    2016-01-01

    A new accelerator complex HIAF (the High Intensity Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility) is approved in China. It is designed to provide intense primary and radioactive ion beams for researches in high energy density physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics as well as other applications. In order to achieve a high intensity up to 5e11ppp 238U34+, CRing needs to stack more than 5 bunches transferred from BRing. However, the normal bucket to bucket injection scheme can only achieve an intensity gain of 2, so an injection method, fixed barrier bucket (BB) supported by electron cooling, is proposed. To suppress the severe space charge effect during the stacking process, misalignment is adopted in the cooler to control the transverse emittance. In this paper the simulation and optimization with BETACOOL program are presented.

  6. Air-Cooled Heat Exchanger for High-Temperature Power Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S. K.; Lustbader, J.; Musselman, M.; King, C.

    2015-05-06

    This work demonstrates a direct air-cooled heat exchanger strategy for high-temperature power electronic devices with an application specific to automotive traction drive inverters. We present experimental heat dissipation and system pressure curves versus flow rate for baseline and optimized sub-module assemblies containing two ceramic resistance heaters that provide device heat fluxes. The maximum allowable junction temperature was set to 175 deg.C. Results were extrapolated to the inverter scale and combined with balance-of-inverter components to estimate inverter power density and specific power. The results exceeded the goal of 12 kW/L and 12 kW/kg for power density and specific power, respectively.

  7. Thermal analysis and design of air cooled electronic circuit boards using a desktop computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltz, R. A.

    1980-06-01

    A thermal design procedure for air cooled electronic circuit boards has been developed for the Hewlett-Packard Model 9845 desktop computer. The system of interactive programs, called THERMELEX, performs thermal analysis of printed circuit boards to predict either junction temperatures for given power dissipation levels or the maximum power levels for given junction temperature limits. The system includes the following features: totally interactive with all input in question and answer format; simple data verification and correction capabilities; ability to store and retrieve circuit board descriptive data totally under program control; and wide variety of output formats including tabular and graphical. By using internal selection of heat transfer correlations, the THERMELEX system depends only on input of physical parameters for thermal predictions.

  8. Experimental observations of nonlinearly enhanced 2omega-UH electromagnetic radiation excited by steady-state colliding electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intrator, T.; Hershkowitz, N.; Chan, C.

    1984-01-01

    Counterstreaming large-diameter electron beams in a steady-state laboratory experiment are observed to generate transverse radiation at twice the upper-hybrid frequency (2omega-UH) with a quadrupole radiation pattern. The electromagnetic wave power density is nonlinearly enhanced over the power density obtained from a single beam-plasma system. Electromagnetic power density scales exponentially with beam energy and increases with ion mass. Weak turbulence theory can predict similar (but weaker) beam energy scaling but not the high power density, or the predominance of the 2omega-UH radiation peak over the omega-UH peak. Significant noise near the upper-hybrid and ion plasma frequencies is also measured, with normalized electrostatic wave energy density W(ES)/n(e)T(e) approximately 0.01.

  9. Measurement of the radiative cooling rates for high-ionization species of krypton using an electron beam ion trap

    PubMed

    Radtke; Biedermann; Fuchs; Fussmann; Beiersdorfer

    2000-02-01

    We describe a measurement of the radiative cooling rate for krypton made at the Berlin electron beam ion trap (EBIT). The EBIT was tuned to a charge-state distribution approaching the ionization balance of a plasma at a temperature of about 5 keV. To determine the cooling rate, we made use of EBIT's capabilities to sample a wide range of electron-beam energies and distinguish between different radiation channels. We have measured the x-ray emission from bremsstrahlung, radiative recombination, dielectronic recombination, and line radiation following electron-impact excitation. The dominant contribution to the cooling rate is made by the n=3-2, n=4-2, ellipsis x rays of the L-shell spectra of krypton, which produce more than 75% of the total radiation loss. A difference with theoretical calculations is noted for the measured total cooling rate. The predicted values are lower by a factor of 1.5-2, depending on the theoretical model. For our measurement of the cooling rate, we estimate an uncertainty interval of 22-30 %. PMID:11046483

  10. Gamma ray signatures of ultra high energy cosmic ray accelerators: electromagnetic cascade versus synchrotron radiation of secondary electrons

    E-print Network

    Stefano Gabici; Felix A. Aharonian

    2006-10-12

    We discuss the possibility of observing ultra high energy cosmic ray sources inhigh energy gamma rays. Protons propagating away from their accelerators produce secondary electrons during interactions with cosmic microwave background photons. These electrons start an electromagnetic cascade that results in a broad band gamma ray emission. We show that in a magnetized Universe ($B \\gtrsim 10^{-12}$ G) such emission is likely to be too extended to be detected above the diffusebackground. A more promising possibility comes from the detection of synchrotron photons from the extremely energetic secondary electrons. Although this emission is produced in a rather extended region of size $\\sim 10Mpc$, it is expected to be point-like and detectable at GeV energies if the intergalactic magnetic field is at the nanogauss level.

  11. Amplification of electromagnetic field in electron scattering by ions in a weak light field: general relativistic case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsybul'nik, V. A.; Roshchupkin, S. P.

    2013-10-01

    The gain coefficient for a weak electromagnetic field in the scattering of electrons by ions in an elliptically polarized light wave is theoretically studied in the general relativistic case. A simple analytical expression for the field amplification constant in a logarithmic approach is obtained. It is shown that the gain coefficient for ultrarelativistic electron energies depends on the energy as a cubic power of energy and can be significantly large. This effect results in an increase of the gain coefficient up to quantities of order ? ˜ (1-10) cm-1 for electron energies Ei ˜ (10-20) GeV. The obtained results may be experimentally verified, for example, by the scientific facilities at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR; Darmstadt, Germany).

  12. Effects of impurity seeding and charge non-neutrality on electromagnetic electron temperature gradient modes in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Tangri, Varun; Singh, Raghvendra; Kaw, Predhiman

    2005-07-15

    A linear theory of toroidal electromagnetic electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode is reported. The effects such as Debye shielding, impurities, magnetic flutter perturbations {delta}B{sub perpendicular} and compressible parallel magnetic field perturbations {delta}B{sub parallel} are included in a fluid model. An eigenvalue equation is derived and solved analytically in local and semilocal limits. In the nonlocal limit, the eigenvalue equations are solved numerically. A comparison is also made of the linear thresholds obtained from this simple fluid model with previous gyrokinetic simulations. It is shown that the simple fluid theory results compare well with the thresholds obtained from gyrokinetic simulations.

  13. Feasibility and electromagnetic compatibility study of the ClearPEM front-end electronics for simultaneous PET-MR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, J. A.; Bugalho, R.; Gruetter, R.; Magill, A. W.; Ortigão, C.; Silva, J. C.; Silva, R.; Varela, J.

    2013-02-01

    In this work we present a first feasibility study of the ClearPEM technology for simultaneous PET-MR imaging. The mutual electromagnetic interference (EMI) effects between both systems were evaluated on a 7 T magnet by characterizing the response behavior of the ClearPEM detectors and front-end electronics to pulsed RF power and switched magnetic field gradients; and by analyzing the MR system performance degradation from noise pickup into the RF receiver chain, and from magnetic susceptibility artifacts caused by PET front-end materials.

  14. FULL ELECTROMAGNETIC SIMULATION OF FREE-ELECTRON LASER AMPLIFIER PHYSICS VIA THE LORENTZ-BOOSTED FRAME APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, William M; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2009-04-29

    Numerical simulation of some systems containing charged particles with highly relativistic directed motion can by speeded up by orders of magnitude by choice of the proper Lorentz-boosted frame[1]. A particularly good example is that of short wavelength free-electron lasers (FELs) in which a high energy electron beam interacts with a static magnetic undulator. In the optimal boost frame with Lorentz factor gamma_F , the red-shifted FEL radiation and blue shifted undulator have identical wavelengths and the number of required time-steps (presuming the Courant condition applies) decreases by a factor of 2(gamma_F)**2 for fully electromagnetic simulation. We have adapted the WARP code [2]to apply this method to several FEL problems involving coherent spontaneous emission (CSE) from pre-bunched ebeams, including that in a biharmonic undulator.

  15. Electron acceleration by an obliquely propagating electromagnetic wave in the regime of validity of the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hizanidis, Kyriakos; Vlahos, L.; Polymilis, C.

    1989-01-01

    The relativistic motion of an ensemble of electrons in an intense monochromatic electromagnetic wave propagating obliquely in a uniform external magnetic field is studied. The problem is formulated from the viewpoint of Hamiltonian theory and the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov approach analyzed by Hizanidis (1989), leading to a one-dimensional diffusive acceleration along paths of constant zeroth-order generalized Hamiltonian. For values of the wave amplitude and the propagating angle inside the analytically predicted stochastic region, the numerical results suggest that the diffusion probes proceeds in stages. In the first stage, the electrons are accelerated to relatively high energies by sampling the first few overlapping resonances one by one. During that stage, the ensemble-average square deviation of the variable involved scales quadratically with time. During the second stage, they scale linearly with time. For much longer times, deviation from linear scaling slowly sets in.

  16. Spontaneous Electromagnetic Fluctuations in a Relativistic Magnetized Electron-Positron Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Rodrigo A.; Navarro, Roberto E.; Moya, Pablo S.; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Araneda, Jaime A.; Muñoz, Víctor; Alejandro Valdivia, J.

    2015-09-01

    Spontaneous fluctuations are a robust phenomenon of plasmas near equilibrium, which does not depend on the existence of instabilities, and their characterization provides valuable information about the role of the relativistic temperatures T˜ {{mc}}2 in relativistic regimes. In this paper, we study the broadband spontaneous electromagnetic fluctuations in a relativistic and magnetized pair plasma described by Maxwell-Jüttner distribution functions, based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that the transverse electromagnetic fluctuations are constrained by a temperature-independent critical frequency {? }{{c}}=\\sqrt{{{{? }}}{{c}}2+{({ck})}2}, which separates the collisionless damping regime (| ? | \\lt {? }{{c}}) from the case where the waves can propagate without damping (| ? | \\gt {? }{{c}}). Further, relativistic simulations show an excellent agreement between analytical and numerical results. We expect this formalism to contribute to obtaining useful physical information about the state of relativistic plasmas.

  17. Apparatus and method for detecting electromagnetic radiation using electron photoemission in a micromechanical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G. (Knoxville, TN); Rajic, Slobodan (Knoxville, TN); Datskou, Irene C. (Knoxville, TN); Egert, Charles M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-01-01

    A micromechanical sensor and method for detecting electromagnetic radiation involve producing photoelectrons from a metal surface in contact with a semiconductor. The photoelectrons are extracted into the semiconductor, which causes photo-induced bending. The resulting bending is measured, and a signal corresponding to the measured bending is generated and processed. A plurality of individual micromechanical sensors can be arranged in a two-dimensional matrix for imaging applications.

  18. Radiation of de-excited electrons at large times in a strong electromagnetic plane wave

    E-print Network

    P. O. Kazinski

    2013-06-06

    The late time asymptotics of the physical solutions to the Lorentz-Dirac equation in the electromagnetic external fields of simple configurations -- the constant homogeneous field, the linearly polarized plane wave (in particular, the constant uniform crossed field), and the circularly polarized plane wave -- are found. The solutions to the Landau-Lifshitz equation for the external electromagnetic fields admitting a two-parametric symmetry group, which include as a particular case the above mentioned field configurations, are obtained. General properties of the total radiation power of a charged particle are established. In particular, for a circularly polarized wave and constant uniform crossed fields, the total radiation power in the asymptotic regime is independent of the charge and the external field strength, when expressed in terms of the proper-time, and equals a half of the rest energy of a charged particle divided by its proper-time. The spectral densities of the radiation power formed on the late time asymptotics are derived for a charged particle moving in the external electromagnetic fields of the simple configurations pointed above.

  19. I. IONIZATION COOLING A. Introduction

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    for beam cooling. Cooling by synchrotron radiation, conventional stochastic cooling and conventional electron cooling are all too slow. Optical stochastic cooling [1], electron cooling in a plasma discharge transverse emittance, fi ? is the betatron function at the absorber, dE ¯ =ds is the energy loss, and LR

  20. Blazar synchrotron emission of instantaneously power-law injected electrons under linear synchrotron, non-linear SSC, and combined synchrotron-SSC cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, M.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2010-12-01

    Context. The broadband spectral energy distributions (SED) of blazars show two distinct components which in leptonic models are associated with synchrotron and synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission of highly relativistic electrons. In some sources the SSC component dominates the synchrotron peak by one or more orders of magnitude implying that the electrons mainly cool by inverse Compton collisions with their self-made synchrotron photons. Therefore, the linear synchrotron loss of electrons, which is normally invoked in emission models, has to be replaced by a nonlinear loss rate depending on an energy integral of the electron distribution. This modified electron cooling changes significantly the emerging radiation spectra. Aims: It is the purpose of this work to apply this new cooling scenario to relativistic power-law distributed electrons, which are injected instantaneously into the jet. Methods: We assume a spherical, uniform, nonthermal source, where the distribution of the electrons is spatially and temporally isotropic throughout the source. We will first solve the differential equation of the volume-averaged differential number density of the electrons, and then discuss their temporal evolution. Since any non-linear cooling will turn into linear cooling after some time, we also calculated the electron number density for a combined cooling scenario consisting of both the linear and non-linear cooling. For all cases, we will also calculate analytically the emerging optically thin time-integrated synchrotron intensity spectrum, also named the fluence, and compare it to a numerical solution. Results: The first result is that the combined cooling scenario depends critically on the value of the injection parameter ?0. For values ?0 ? 1 the electrons cool mainly linear, while in the opposite case the cooling begins non-linear and becomes linear for later times. Secondly, in all cased we find that for small normalized frequencies f < 1 the fluence spectra F(f) exhibit power-laws with constant spectral indices F(f) f-\\vartheta. We find for purely linear cooling \\vartheta_SYN = 1/2, and for purely non-linear cooling \\vartheta_SSC = 3/2. In the combined cooling scenario we obtain for the small injection parameter \\vartheta_1 = 1/2, and for the large injection parameter \\vartheta_2 = 3/2, which becomes \\vartheta_1 = 1/2 for very small frequencies. These identical behaviors, as compared to the existing calculations for monoenergetically injected electrons, prove that the spectral behavior of the total synchrotron fluence is independent from the functional form of the energy injection spectrum. Appendices are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Theory of hysteresis during electron heating of electromagnetic wave scattering by self-organized dust structures in complex plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsytovich, Vadim; Gusein-zade, Namik; Ignatov, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    Dust structuring is a natural and universal process in complex plasmas. The scattering of electromagnetic waves by dust structures is governed by the factor of coherency, i.e., the total number of coherent electrons in a single structure. In the present paper, we consider how the factor of coherency changes due to additional pulse electron heating and show that it obeys a hysteresis. After the end of the pulse heating, the scattering intensity differs substantially from that before heating. There are three necessary conditions for scattering hysteresis: first, the radiation wavelength should be larger than the pattern (structure) size; second, the total number of coherent electrons confined by the structure should be large; and third, the heating pulse duration should be shorter than the characteristic time of dust structure formation. We present the results of numerical calculations using existing models of self-consistent dust structures with either positively or negatively charged dust grains. It is shown that, depending on the grain charge and the ionization rate, two types of hysteresis are possible: one with a final increase of the scattering and the other with a final decrease of the scattering. It is suggested that the hysteresis of coherent scattering can be used as a tool in laboratory experiments and that it can be a basic mechanism explaining the observed hysteresis in radar scattering by noctilucent clouds during active experiments on electron heating in mesosphere.

  2. HIGH-ORDER MODELING OF AN ERL FOR ELECTRON COOLING IN THE RHIC LUMINOSITY UPGRADE USING MARYLIE/IMPACT.

    SciTech Connect

    RANJBAR,V.; BEN-ZVI,I.; PAUL, K.; ABELL, D.T.; TECH-X CORP.; KEWISCH, J.; RYNE, R.D.; QIANG, J.

    2007-06-25

    Plans for the RHIC luminosity upgrade call for an electron cooling system that will place substantial demands on the energy, current, brightness, and beam quality of the electron beam. In particular, the requirements demand a new level of fidelity in beam dynamics simulations. New developments in MARYLIE/IMPACT have improved both the space charge computations for beams with large aspect ratios and the beam dynamic computations for rf cavities. We present the results of beam dynamics simulations that include the effects of space charge and nonlinearities, and aim to assess the tolerance for errors and nonlinearities on current designs for a super-conducting ERL.

  3. Giant electromagnetic vortex and MeV monoenergetic electrons generated by short laser pulses in underdense plasma near quarter critical density region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhidkov, Alexei; Nemoto, Koshichi; Nayuki, Takuya; Oishi, Yuji; Fuji, Takashi

    2007-07-01

    Very efficient generation of monoenergetic, about 1MeV , electrons from underdense plasma with its electron density close to the critical, when irradiated by an intense femtosecond laser pulse, is found via two dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The stimulated Raman scattering of a laser pulse with frequency ??2?plmax gives rise to a giant electromagnetic vortex. In contrast to electron acceleration by the well-known laser pulse wake, injected plasma electrons are accelerated up to vortex ponderomotive potential forming a quite monoenergetic distribution. A relatively high charge of such an electron source makes very efficient generation of soft ? rays with h?>300keV .

  4. Electromagnetic simulation of electronic packaging designs (95-ERP-003). 1995 LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swegle, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    The primary focus of the project summarized in this report has been to evaluate the performance of the 3D, time-domain electromagnetic code DS13D in the simulation of structures used in microwave microelectronics circuits. We`ve adopted two test cases, coaxial and stripline transmission lines, for which well-known results are available so that results obtained with DS13D could be easily and accurately checked. Our goals have been three-fold: (1) To develop specialized mode-launching capabilities for single-mode signals typically found in test geometries and the diagnostics necessary to evaluate the performance of the code in modeling the propagation of those signals. (2) To analyze the effect of different zoning schemes on the accuracy with which the code models the propagation of signals through the geometries by checking against known analytic results and calculations performed with other codes. (3) To examine the effect of code modifications aimed at enhancing the accuracy of the simulations. The calculated transmission line impedance was chosen as the primary means of evaluating code performance. Since the lowest-order propagating modes for the test cases were transverse electromagnetic (TEM) modes, the computation of impedance was reasonably straightforward. Both time- and frequency-domain values (the latter obtained from the code output by post-processing with a discrete Fourier transform) were obtained and compared.

  5. Particle-in-cell simulations of velocity scattering of an anisotropic electron beam by electrostatic and electromagnetic instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, X. R. Cowee, M. M.; Winske, D.; Liu, K.; Peter Gary, S.

    2014-04-15

    The velocity space scattering of an anisotropic electron beam (T{sub ?b}/T{sub ?b}>1) flowing along a background magnetic field B{sub 0} through a cold plasma is investigated using both linear theory and 2D particle-in-cell simulations. Here, ? and ? represent the directions perpendicular and parallel to B{sub 0}, respectively. In this scenario, we find that two primary instabilities contribute to the scattering in electron pitch angle: an electrostatic electron beam instability and a predominantly parallel-propagating electromagnetic whistler anisotropy instability. Our results show that at relative beam densities n{sub b}/n{sub e}?0.05 and beam temperature anisotropies T{sub b?}/T{sub b?}?25, the electrostatic beam instability grows much faster than the whistler instabilities for a reasonably fast hot beam. The enhanced fluctuating fields from the beam instability scatter the beam electrons, slowing their average speed and increasing their parallel temperature, thereby increasing their pitch angles. In an inhomogeneous magnetic field, such as the geomagnetic field, this could result in beam electrons scattered out of the loss cone. After saturation of the electrostatic instability, the parallel-propagating whistler anisotropy instability shows appreciable growth, provided that the beam density and late-time anisotropy are sufficiently large. Although the whistler anisotropy instability acts to pitch-angle scatter the electrons, reducing perpendicular energy in favor of parallel energy, these changes are weak compared to the pitch-angle increases resulting from the deceleration of the beam due to the electrostatic instability.

  6. Relativistic electron precipitation events driven by electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazanov, G.; Sibeck, D.; Tel'nikhin, A.; Kronberg, T.

    2014-08-01

    We adopt a canonical approach to describe the stochastic motion of relativistic belt electrons and their scattering into the loss cone by nonlinear EMIC waves. The estimated rate of scattering is sufficient to account for the rate and intensity of bursty electron precipitation. This interaction is shown to result in particle scattering into the loss cone, forming ˜10 s microbursts of precipitating electrons. These dynamics can account for the statistical correlations between processes of energization, pitch angle scattering, and relativistic electron precipitation events, that are manifested on large temporal scales of the order of the diffusion time ˜tens of minutes.

  7. Relativistic Electron Precipitation Events Driven by Electromagnetic Ion-Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G.; Sibeck, D.; Tel’nikhin, A.; Kronberg, T.

    2014-01-01

    We adopt a canonical approach to describe the stochastic motion of relativistic belt electrons and their scattering into the loss cone by nonlinear EMIC waves. The estimated rate of scattering is sufficient to account for the rate and intensity of bursty electron precipitation. This interaction is shown to result in particle scattering into the loss cone, forming approx.10 s microbursts of precipitating electrons. These dynamics can account for the statistical correlations between processes of energization, pitch angle scattering, and relativistic electron precipitation events, that are manifested on large temporal scales of the order of the diffusion time approx. tens of minutes.

  8. Relativistic electron precipitation events driven by electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    Khazanov, G. Sibeck, D.; Tel'nikhin, A.; Kronberg, T.

    2014-08-15

    We adopt a canonical approach to describe the stochastic motion of relativistic belt electrons and their scattering into the loss cone by nonlinear EMIC waves. The estimated rate of scattering is sufficient to account for the rate and intensity of bursty electron precipitation. This interaction is shown to result in particle scattering into the loss cone, forming ?10?s microbursts of precipitating electrons. These dynamics can account for the statistical correlations between processes of energization, pitch angle scattering, and relativistic electron precipitation events, that are manifested on large temporal scales of the order of the diffusion time ?tens of minutes.

  9. Interaction of a two-dimensional electromagnetic pulse with an electron inhomogeneity in an array of carbon nanotubes in the presence of field inhomogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Alexander V.; Bouffanais, Roland; Leblond, Hervé; Mihalache, Dumitru; Fedorov, Eduard G.; Belonenko, Mikhail B.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we address the challenging problem of propagation of infrared electromagnetic two-dimensional bipolar pulses of extremely short duration in a heterogeneous array of semiconductor carbon nanotubes. Heterogeneity is defined here as a region of high electron density. The evolutions of the electromagnetic field and charge density in the sample are described by Maxwell's equations and the continuity equation respectively, wherein the inhomogeneity of the field along the nanotube axis is integrated and incorporated into the modeling framework. Our numerical solution to this problem shows the possibility of a stable propagation of two-dimensional electromagnetic pulses through a heterogeneous array of carbon nanotubes. This propagation of electromagnetic pulses is accompanied by a redistribution of the electron density in the sample. For the first time to the best of our knowledge, this latter effect is fully accounted for in our study. Specifically, we demonstrate that depending on the initial speed of the electromagnetic pulse two possible outcomes might ensue: either (i) the pulse overcomes the region of increased electron concentration, or alternatively (ii) it is reflected therefrom. As a result, a near-infrared pulse is transmitted, while the long-wavelength infrared pulse is reflected, on an obstacle that is much smaller than its wavelength.

  10. Random walk study of electron motion in helium in crossed electromagnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, G. W.

    1972-01-01

    Random walk theory, previously adapted to electron motion in the presence of an electric field, is extended to include a transverse magnetic field. In principle, the random walk approach avoids mathematical complexity and concomitant simplifying assumptions and permits determination of energy distributions and transport coefficients within the accuracy of available collisional cross section data. Application is made to a weakly ionized helium gas. Time of relaxation of electron energy distribution, determined by the random walk, is described by simple expressions based on energy exchange between the electron and an effective electric field. The restrictive effect of the magnetic field on electron motion, which increases the required number of collisions per walk to reach a terminal steady state condition, as well as the effect of the magnetic field on electron transport coefficients and mean energy can be quite adequately described by expressions involving only the Hall parameter.

  11. Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac versus Landau-Lifshitz radiation friction force in the ultrarelativistic electron interaction with electromagnetic wave (exact solutions)

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Sergei V.; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki; Koga, James K.; Bulanov, Stepan S.

    2011-11-15

    When the parameters of electron-extreme power laser interaction enter the regime of dominated radiation reaction, the electron dynamics changes qualitatively. The adequate theoretical description of this regime becomes crucially important with the use of the radiation friction force either in the Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac form, which possesses unphysical runaway solutions, or in the Landau-Lifshitz form, which is a perturbation valid for relatively low electromagnetic wave amplitude. The goal of the present paper is to find the limits of the Landau-Lifshitz radiation force applicability in terms of the electromagnetic wave amplitude and frequency. For this, a class of the exact solutions to the nonlinear problems of charged particle motion in the time-varying electromagnetic field is used.

  12. Progress of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source using evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W.; Xiong, B.; Guo, S. Q.; Cao, R.; Ruan, L.; Zhang, X. Z.; Sun, L. T.; Feng, Y. C.; Ma, B. H.; Zhao, H. W.

    2014-02-15

    A new room temperature ECR ion source, Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No. 4 (LECR4, previously named DRAGON), is under intense construction at Institute of Modern Physics. LECR4 is designed to operate with 18 GHz microwave frequency. The maximum axial magnetic fields are 2.3 T at injection and 1.3 T at extraction, and the radial field at the plasma chamber wall of 76 mm inner diameter is 1.0–1.2 T. One of the unique features for LECR4 is that its axial solenoids are winded with solid square copper wires which are immersed in a kind of special evaporative cooling medium for cooling purpose. Till now, a prototype of the cooling system has been successfully constructed and tested, which has demonstrated that the cooling efficiency of the designed system could meet the requirements of LECR4 under the routine operation conditions. All the main components of the ion source have been completed. Assembly and commissioning is ongoing. The latest developments and test results will be presented in this paper.

  13. Coupling of electrons to the electromagnetic field in a localized basis 

    E-print Network

    Allen, Roland E.

    2008-01-01

    -Oppenheimer expansion: ?tot?Xn,xe,t? = i ?i?Xn,t??i?xe,Xn? . ?38? The basis functions ?i are the electronic eigenstates at fixed Xn with the electron-nuclei and nuclei-nuclei interactions in- cluded in the electronic Hamiltonian He: He?Xn??i?xe,Xn? = Ei...?Xn??i?xe,Xn? . ?39? Substitution into the Schr?dinger equation, i? ? ?tot/?t = H?tot, H = Tn + He, ?40? where Tn is the nuclear kinetic-energy operator, gives an equation of the form28,29 i? ? ?t ?i = ?Tn + Ei??i ? j ?ij? j , ?41? ?ij = ?2 2Mn ?2Fij...

  14. Three-dimensional structure of the seismo-electromagnetic ionospheric electron density disturbances

    E-print Network

    Karpov, M I; Zolotov, O V

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the three-dimensional structure of the ionospheric electron density disturbances triggered by the vertical electric currents flowing between the Earth and ionosphere over the faults before the strong earthquakes. The results were obtained using the global numerical Earth's Upper Atmosphere Model (UAM). The vertical electric currents flowing between the Earth and ionosphere over the faults were used as lower boundary conditions for the UAM electric potential equation. The UAM calculated 3D structure of the ionospheric electron density disturbances demonstrates an importance of all three ionospheric plasma drift directions (movements) - vertical, meridional and zonal but not only vertical one.

  15. Electromagnetic interchange-like mode and zonal flow in electron-magnetohydrodynamic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Nikhil; Horiuchi, Ritoku

    2006-10-15

    A numerical simulation of the nonlinear state of interchange instability associated with electron inertia in an unmagnetized plasma is studied. It is shown that a self-consistent sheared transverse electron current flow is generated due to nonlinear mechanisms. This zonal flow can reduce the growth rate of the magnetic interchange-like instability and reach a steady state. The zonal flow generation mechanisms are discussed by truncated Fourier mode representation. In the truncated model, three mode equations are considered that have an exact analytic solution that matches well with the numerical solution. The effect of different boundary conditions in such investigations is also discussed.

  16. Numerical calculation of dynamical friction in electron cooling systems, including magnetic field perturbations and finite time effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sobol, A.V.; Fedotov, A.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Bell, G.I.; Litvinenko, V.

    2010-09-24

    The orders-of-magnitude higher luminosities required by future electron-ion collider concepts require a dissipative force to counteract the numerous factors acting to gradually increase the phase space volume of relativistic ion beams. High-energy electron cooling systems could provide the necessary dissipation via dynamical friction, but will have to be designed for new parameter regimes. It is expected that magnetic field errors, finite interaction time and other effects will reduce the dynamical friction and hence increase the cooling time, so improved understanding of the underlying dynamics is important. We present a generalized form of the classical field-free friction force equation, which conveniently captures some of these effects. Previous work (Bell et al 2008 J. Comput. Phys. 227 8714) shows both numerical and conceptual subtleties associated with undersampling of strong collisions, and we present a rigorous mathematical treatment of such difficulties, based on the use of a modified Pareto distribution for the electron-ion impact parameters. We also present a very efficient numerical algorithm for calculating the dynamical friction on a single ion in the field free case. For the case of arbitrary magnetic field errors, we present numerical simulation results, showing agreement with our generalized friction force formula.

  17. Single and Multiple Volume Reflections of Ultra-Relativistic Electrons in a Bent Crystal as Tools for Intense Production of Electromagnetic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandiera, L.; Mazzolari, A.; Bagli, E.; Berra, A.; Lietti, D.; De Salvador, D.; Guidi, V.; Prest, M.; Tikhomirov, V.; Vallazza, E.

    2014-05-01

    Electromagnetic radiation emitted by ultrarelativistic volume-reflected and multi-volume-reflected electrons in a bent crystal is very intense and takes place over a broad angular range of the incident beam. Such radiation results to be nearly independent from the particles trajectory and charge. This paper describes the possible applications these features allow, from the production of a gamma or a positron source to the crystal-assisted collimation of future linear e+/e- colliders and crystal-based electromagnetic calorimeters.

  18. Efficiency of optimized bifurcating tree-like and parallel microchannel networks in the cooling of electronics

    E-print Network

    Daraio, Chiara

    Efficiency of optimized bifurcating tree-like and parallel microchannel networks in the cooling channel, which bifurcates over several levels to uniformly distributed microchannels that are vertically. The performance of the bifurcating network is compared with that of a parallel microchannel cold plate branching

  19. Integrated three-dimensional module heat exchanger for power electronics cooling

    DOEpatents

    Bennion, Kevin; Lustbader, Jason

    2013-09-24

    Embodiments discussed herein are directed to a power semiconductor packaging that removes heat from a semiconductor package through one or more cooling zones that are located in a laterally oriented position with respect to the semiconductor package. Additional embodiments are directed to circuit elements that are constructed from one or more modular power semiconductor packages.

  20. Cooling and Self-Excitation of a One-Electron A thesis presented

    E-print Network

    Gabrielse, Gerald

    by a dilution refrigerator. This experimental setup requires extremely low-noise and low-power cryogenic frequency. These techniques for cooling and measuring the axial frequency may contribute to an improved Frequency Monitoring Techniques . . . . 27 2.3 DC Trap Biasing

  1. Structure of lateral two-electron quantum dot molecules in electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popsueva, V.; Nepstad, R.; Birkeland, T.; Førre, M.; Hansen, J. P.; Lindroth, E.; Waltersson, E.

    2007-07-01

    The energy levels of laterally coupled parabolic double quantum dots are calculated for varying interdot distances. Electron-electron interaction is shown to dominate the spectra: In the diatomic molecule limit of large interdot separation, the two nearly degenerate singlet and triplet ground states are followed by a narrow band of four singlet and four triplet states. The energy spacing between the ground state and the first band of excited states scales directly with the confinement strength of the quantum wells. Similar level separation and band structure are found when the double dot is exposed to a perpendicular magnetic field. Conversely, an electric field parallel to the interdot direction results in a strong level mixing and a narrow transition from a localized state to a covalent diatomic molecular state.

  2. Cyclotron radiation cooling of a short electron bunch kicked in an undulator with guiding magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandurkin, I. V.; Osharin, I. V.; Savilov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    We propose to use of an undulator with the guiding axial magnetic field as a "kicker" forming a bunch of electron gyro-oscillators with a small spread in the axial velocity. The cyclotron emission from the bunch leads to losing oscillatory velocity of electron gyrorotation, but it does not perturb the axial electron velocity. This effect can be used for transformation of minimization of the spread in electron axial velocity in the undulator section into minimization of the spread in electron energy in the cyclotron radiation section.

  3. Formation of very hard electron and gamma-ray spectra of flat spectrum radio quasar in fast-cooling regime

    E-print Network

    Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2015-01-01

    In external Compton scenario, we investigate the formation of the very hard electron spectrum in the fast-cooling regime, using a time-dependent emission model. It is shown that a very hard electron distribution $N'_{\\rm e}(\\gp)\\propto\\gp^{-p}$ with the spectral index $p\\sim1.3$ is formed below the minimum energy of injection electron when inverse Compton scattering takes place in the Klein-Nishina regime, i.e., inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons on broad-line region radiation in flat spectrum radio quasars. This produces a very hard gamma-ray spectrum, and can reasonably explain the very hard \\emph{Fermi}-LAT spectrum of the flat spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 during the extreme gamma-ray flare in 2013 December. We examine the impact of gamma-ray emission site on the evolution of electron distribution and their radiative output in detail. We find that such hard \\emph{Fermi}-LAT spectrum and simultaneous X-ray observations can put a stringent constraint on the gamma-ray emission site. Variabil...

  4. Effect of Oblique Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves on Relativistic Electron Scattering: CRRES Based Calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamayunov, K. V.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2007-01-01

    We consider the effect of oblique EMIC waves on relativistic electron scattering in the outer radiation belt using simultaneous observations of plasma and wave parameters from CRRES. The main findings can be s ummarized as follows: 1. In 1comparison with field-aligned waves, int ermediate and highly oblique distributions decrease the range of pitc h-angles subject to diffusion, and reduce the local scattering rate b y an order of magnitude at pitch-angles where the principle absolute value of n = 1 resonances operate. Oblique waves allow the absolute va lue of n > 1 resonances to operate, extending the range of local pitc h-angle diffusion down to the loss cone, and increasing the diffusion at lower pitch angles by orders of magnitude; 2. The local diffusion coefficients derived from CRRES data are qualitatively similar to the local results obtained for prescribed plasma/wave parameters. Conseq uently, it is likely that the bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients, if estimated from concurrent data, will exhibit the dependencies similar to those we found for model calculations; 3. In comparison with f ield-aligned waves, intermediate and highly oblique waves decrease th e bounce-averaged scattering rate near the edge of the equatorial lo ss cone by orders of magnitude if the electron energy does not excee d a threshold (approximately equal to 2 - 5 MeV) depending on specified plasma and/or wave parameters; 4. For greater electron energies_ ob lique waves operating the absolute value of n > 1 resonances are more effective and provide the same bounce_averaged diffusion rate near the loss cone as fiel_aligned waves do.

  5. Electromagnetic acceleration of material from a plate hit by a pulsed electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.

    1998-04-16

    An intense pulsed electron beam traversing a thin metal plate creates a volume of dense plasma. Current flows in this plasma as a result of the charge and magnetic field introduced by the relativistic electrons. A magnetic field may linger after the electron beam pulse because of the conductivity of the material. This field decays by both diffusing out of the conducting matter and causing it to expand. If the magnetized matter is of low density and high conductivity it may expand quickly. Scaling laws for this acceleration are sought by analyzing the idealization of a steady axisymmetric flow. This case simplifies a general formulation based on both Euler`s and Maxwell`s equations. As an example, fluid with conductivity {sigma} = 8 x 10{sup 4} Siemens/m, density {rho} = 8 x 10{sup -3} kg/m{sup 3}, and initially magnetized to B = 1 Tesla can accelerate to v = 10{sup 4} m/s within a distance comparable to L = 1 mm and a time comparable to {sigma}{mu}L{sup 2} = 100 ns, which is the magnetic diffusion time. If instead, {sigma} = 8 x 10{sup 3} Siemens/m and {rho} = 8 x 10{sup -5} kg/m{sup 3} then v = 10{sup 5} m/s with a magnetic diffusion time {sigma}{mu}L{sup 2} = 10 ns. These idealized flows have R{sub M} = {sigma}{mu}vL = 1, where R{sub M} is the magnetic Reynolds number. The target magnetizes by a thermal electric effect.

  6. The theory of electro-magnetic radiation of electron transiting through the resonance-tunnel structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tkach, M.; Seti, Ju.; Voitsekhivska, O.; Fartushynsky, R.

    2009-12-14

    The quasi-stationary electron states are studied in the three-barrier resonance-tunnel structure which is the basic element of coherent quantum cascade lasers. In the models of rectangular and delta-barrier potentials there is established theory of evolution and collapse of double resonance complexes in a symmetric resonance-tunnel structure. The induced conductivity of nano-system is calculated within the both models. It is shown that the negative induced conductivity of three-barrier resonance-tunnel structure in delta-barrier model is dozens times smaller than more realistic magnitudes obtained within the rectangular potentials model.

  7. Adsorption behavior of beryllium(II) on copper-oxide nanoparticles dispersed in water: A model for (7)Be colloid formation in the cooling water for electromagnets at high-energy accelerator facilities.

    PubMed

    Bessho, Kotaro; Kanaya, Naoki; Shimada, Saki; Katsuta, Shoichi; Monjushiro, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of Be(II) on CuO nanoparticles dispersed in water was studied as a model for colloid formation of radioactive (7)Be nuclides in the cooling water used for electromagnets at high-energy proton accelerator facilities. An aqueous Be(II) solution and commercially available CuO nanoparticles were mixed, and the adsorption of Be(II) on CuO was quantitatively examined. From a detailed analysis of the adsorption data measured as a function of the pH, it was confirmed that Be(II) is adsorbed on the CuO nanoparticles by complex formation with the hydroxyl groups on the CuO surface (>S-OH) according to the following equation: n > S-OH + Be(2+) ? (>S-O)n Be((2-n)+) + nH(+) (n = 2, 3) S : solid surface. The surface-complexation constants corresponding to the above equilibrium, ?(s,2) and ?(s,3), were determined for four types of CuO nanoparticles. The ?(s,2) value was almost independent of the type of nanoparticle, whereas the ?(s,3) values varied with the particle size. These complexation constants successfully explain (7)Be colloid formation in the cooling water used for electromagnets at the 12-GeV proton accelerator facility. PMID:25382043

  8. Investigation of the Electromagnetic Radiation Emitted by Sub-GeV Electrons in a Bent Crystal.

    PubMed

    Bandiera, L; Bagli, E; Germogli, G; Guidi, V; Mazzolari, A; Backe, H; Lauth, W; Berra, A; Lietti, D; Prest, M; De Salvador, D; Vallazza, E; Tikhomirov, V

    2015-07-10

    The radiation emitted by 855 MeV electrons via planar channeling and volume reflection in a 30.5-?m-thick bent Si crystal has been investigated at the MAMI (Mainzer Mikrotron) accelerator. The spectral intensity was much more intense than for an equivalent amorphous material, and peaked in the MeV range in the case of channeling radiation. Differently from a straight crystal, also for an incidence angle larger than the Lindhard angle, the spectral intensity remains nearly as high as for channeling. This is due to volume reflection, for which the intensity remains high at a large incidence angle over the whole angular acceptance, which is equal to the bending angle of the crystal. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated that incoherent scattering significantly influences both the radiation spectrum and intensity, either for channeling or volume reflection. In the latter case, it has been shown that incoherent scattering increases the radiation intensity due to the contribution of volume-captured particles. As a consequence, the experimental spectrum becomes a mixture of channeling and pure volume reflection radiations. These results allow a better understanding of the radiation emitted by electrons subjected to coherent interactions in bent crystals within a still-unexplored energy range, which is relevant for possible applications for innovative and compact x-ray or ?-ray sources. PMID:26207480

  9. Investigation of the Electromagnetic Radiation Emitted by Sub-GeV Electrons in a Bent Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandiera, L.; Bagli, E.; Germogli, G.; Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A.; Backe, H.; Lauth, W.; Berra, A.; Lietti, D.; Prest, M.; De Salvador, D.; Vallazza, E.; Tikhomirov, V.

    2015-07-01

    The radiation emitted by 855 MeV electrons via planar channeling and volume reflection in a 30.5 -? m -thick bent Si crystal has been investigated at the MAMI (Mainzer Mikrotron) accelerator. The spectral intensity was much more intense than for an equivalent amorphous material, and peaked in the MeV range in the case of channeling radiation. Differently from a straight crystal, also for an incidence angle larger than the Lindhard angle, the spectral intensity remains nearly as high as for channeling. This is due to volume reflection, for which the intensity remains high at a large incidence angle over the whole angular acceptance, which is equal to the bending angle of the crystal. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated that incoherent scattering significantly influences both the radiation spectrum and intensity, either for channeling or volume reflection. In the latter case, it has been shown that incoherent scattering increases the radiation intensity due to the contribution of volume-captured particles. As a consequence, the experimental spectrum becomes a mixture of channeling and pure volume reflection radiations. These results allow a better understanding of the radiation emitted by electrons subjected to coherent interactions in bent crystals within a still-unexplored energy range, which is relevant for possible applications for innovative and compact x-ray or ? -ray sources.

  10. Electromagnetic envelope solitons in ultrarelativistic inhomogeneous electron-positron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Hong-E; Cheng, Li-Hong; Yu, Zi-Fa; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2014-08-15

    The nonlinear interaction of ultra-intense short laser beam and homogeneous/inhomogeneous electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasma is investigated. It is found that soliton solutions can exist in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous e-p-i plasma. The influence of the positron density, the phase velocity, the inhomogeneity nature, and the Hamiltonian of the system on the soliton structure is investigated. The evolution of envelope solitons in homogeneous e-p-i plasma is analyzed analytically by using a two-time-scale method and confirmed by numerical simulations. However, the soliton solutions can exist in inhomogeneous e-p-i plasma only when the positron density is high enough. Furthermore, the phase diagram for existing envelope soliton in positron density and phase velocity of the wave plane is obtained.

  11. The Segmented Beamformer for Electromagnetic Waves of the Terahertz Free Electron Laser

    E-print Network

    Bogomolov, G D; Letunov, A A; Zavyalov, V V

    2015-01-01

    The quasi-optical segmented mirror for a formation of the target irradiation field was manufactured and investigated. It was designed for the high power THz beam of the free electron laser (FEL) using as a target a dust particle cloud, simulating cosmic dust. Numerical calculation of the beam shape and its low power laboratory measurements was made in the spectral region 1 - 3 THz of the first phase of the Novosibirsk FEL construction. The theoretical calculations of the diffraction effects reveal a speckle structure of a target spot, which was confirmed by the laboratory experiment. The beamformer technology was adapted for manufacturing and such device could be widely used for a concentration of powerful terahertz radiation.

  12. Electromagnetic probes of molecular motors in the electron transport chains of mitochondria and chloroplasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. H., Jr.; Nawarathna, D.; Vajrala, V.; Gardner, J.; Widger, W. R.

    2005-12-01

    We report on measurements of harmonics generated by whole cells, mitochondria, and chloroplasts in response to applied sinusoidal electric fields. The frequency- and amplitude-dependence of the induced harmonics exhibit features that correlate with physiological processes. Budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) cells produce numerous harmonics, the amplitudes of which depend strongly on frequency. When the second or third harmonic amplitude is plotted vs. applied frequency, we observe two peaks, around 3 kHz and 12 kHz, which are suppressed by respiratory inhibitors. We observe similar peaks when measuring the harmonic response of B. indicas, a relative of the mitochondrial ancestor. In uncoupled mitochondria, in which most of the electron transport chain is active but the ATP-synthase molecular turbine is inactive, only one (lower frequency) of the two peaks is present. Finally, we find that harmonics generated by chloroplasts depend dramatically on incident light, and vanish in the absence of light.

  13. Tunability enhanced electromagnetic wiggler

    DOEpatents

    Schlueter, R.D.; Deis, G.A.

    1992-03-24

    The invention discloses a wiggler used in synchrotron radiation sources and free electron lasers, where each pole is surrounded by at least two electromagnetic coils. The electromagnetic coils are energized with different amounts of current to provide a wide tunable range of the on-axis magnetic flux density, while preventing magnetic saturation of the poles. 14 figs.

  14. Tunability enhanced electromagnetic wiggler

    DOEpatents

    Schlueter, Ross D. (Albany, CA); Deis, Gary A. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    The invention discloses a wiggler used in synchrotron radiation sources and free electron lasers, where each pole is surrounded by at least two electromagnetic coils. The electromagnetic coils are energized with different amounts of current to provide a wide tunable range of the on-axis magnetic flux density, while preventing magnetic saturation of the poles.

  15. Simulation of Multi-Spacecraft Observed Energetic Electron Injection By the Electromagnetic Field of a Transient, Localized Dipolarizing Flux Bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielse, C.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.; Turner, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Energetic particle injections in the near-Earth plasma sheet are critical for supplying particles and energy to the radiation belts and ring current. Their origin, however, has been elusive due to the lack of equatorial, multi-point observations. After the launch of NASA's Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) mission in 2007, intense electric fields and elevated energetic particle fluxes have been observed to accompany localized (1-4 RE wide) bursty bulk flows and to propagate from the mid-tail regions (at geocentric radial distances R > 25RE) towards Earth, up to and at times inside of geosynchronous orbit (GEO, R=6.6RE). Motivated by these observations, we model simultaneous multi-point observations of electron injections using guiding center approximation in prescribed but realistic electric and magnetic fields to better understand the nature of their acceleration. Modeling of electron injections assuming a localized, impulsive, dipolarizing flux bundle and its accompanying electric field transported from mid-tail to near-Earth at bursty flow speeds successfully reproduces the observations at multiple spacecraft. The impulsive, localized nature of the earthward-propagating electromagnetic pulse with attending vortical/tailward flow is what makes this model particularly effective in reproducing both the injection and the dispersed decrease in energy flux often observed simultaneously with the injection but at lower energies (~10-30 keV). The results suggest that particle acceleration and transport towards the inner magnetosphere can be thought of as a superposition of individual bursts of varying intensity and cadence depending on global geomagnetic activity levels.

  16. Development of an electric field application system with transparent electrodes towards the electron EDM measurement with laser-cooled Fr atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Taisuke; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takahiro; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Inoue, Takeshi; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Kato, Ko; Sakamoto, Kosuke; Uchiyama, Aiko; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    The permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of elementary particles is a good probe for new physics beyond the standard model. Since the francium (Fr) atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and laser-cooled atoms can have long coherence times, we plan to utilize laser-cooled Fr atoms for the electron EDM search experiment. Besides, a strong electric field is one of key issues for the EDM experiment. Recently, we have embarked on a development of the electric field application system with transparent electrodes coated by tin-doped indium oxide (ITO). The ITO electrodes break the difficulty in the coexistence of electrodes with several cooling laser lights. The actual electric field applied to the atom is evaluated by measuring the dc Stark shift for the laser-cooled rubidium atoms. In this presentation, the present status of the electric field application system will be reported. The permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of elementary particles is a good probe for new physics beyond the standard model. Since the francium (Fr) atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and laser-cooled atoms can have long coherence times, we plan to utilize laser-cooled Fr atoms for the electron EDM search experiment. Besides, a strong electric field is one of key issues for the EDM experiment. Recently, we have embarked on a development of the electric field application system with transparent electrodes coated by tin-doped indium oxide (ITO). The ITO electrodes break the difficulty in the coexistence of electrodes with several cooling laser lights. The actual electric field applied to the atom is evaluated by measuring the dc Stark shift for the laser-cooled rubidium atoms. In this presentation, the present status of the electric field application system will be reported. This work is supported by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No. 26220705) and Tohoku University's Focused Research Project.

  17. High frequency electromagnetic modes in a weakly magnetized relativistic electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Gohar; Murtaza, G.; Kingham, R. J.

    2010-07-01

    Using the linearized Vlasov-Maxwell model, the polarization tensor for a weakly magnetized electron plasma is derived. For isotropic relativistic Maxwellian velocity distribution function, dispersion relations are obtained for both parallel and perpendicular propagations. The integrals (called Meijer G functions) that arise due to relativistic effects are examined in various limits and dispersion relations are derived for the nonrelativistic, weakly, strongly, and ultrarelativistic Maxwellian velocity distributions. It is generally observed that the propagation domains of the modes are enlarged as one proceeds from the nonrelativistic to the highly relativistic regime. Resultantly, due to the relativistic effects, the Whistler mode is suppressed in the R-wave, the nonpropagation band of X-mode is reduced, and the X-mode itself approaches the O-mode. Further, the results derived in the ultra- and nonrelativistic limits found to be in agreement with the earlier calculations [G. Abbas et al. Phys. Scr. 76, 649 (2007); F. F. Chen, Introduction to Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (Plenum, New York, 1984), Vol. 1].

  18. Statistics of electromagnetic transitions as a signature of chaos in many-electron atoms

    E-print Network

    V. V. Flambaum; A. A. Gribakina; G. F. Gribakin

    1998-02-01

    Using a configuration interaction approach we study statistics of the dipole matrix elements (E1 amplitudes) between the 14 lower odd states with J=4 and 21st to 100th even states with J=4 in the Ce atom (1120 lines). We show that the distribution of the matrix elements is close to Gaussian, although the width of the Gaussian distribution, i.e. the root-mean-square matrix element, changes with the excitation energy. The corresponding line strengths are distributed according to the Porter-Thomas law which describes statistics of transition strengths between chaotic states in compound nuclei. We also show how to use a statistical theory to calculate mean squared values of the matrix elements or transition amplitudes between chaotic many-body states. We draw some support for our conclusions from the analysis of the 228 experimental line strengths in Ce [J. Opt. Soc. Am. v. 8, p. 1545 (1991)], although direct comparison with the calculations is impeded by incompleteness of the experimental data. Nevertheless, the statistics observed evidence that highly excited many-electron states in atoms are indeed chaotic.

  19. Microslots : scalable electromagnetic instrumentation

    E-print Network

    Maguire, Yael G., 1975-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis explores spin manipulation, fabrication techniques and boundary conditions of electromagnetism to bridge the macroscopic and microscopic worlds of biology, chemistry and electronics. This work is centered around ...

  20. Tests of the module array of the ECAL0 electromagnetic calorimeter for the COMPASS experiment with the electron beam at ELSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anfimov, N.; Anosov, V.; Barth, J.; Chalyshev, V.; Chirikov-Zorin, I.; Dziewiecki, M.; Elsner, D.; Frolov, V.; Frommberger, F.; Guskov, A.; Hillert, W.; Klein, F.; Krumshteyn, Z.; Kurjata, R.; Marzec, J.; Nagaytsev, A.; Olchevski, A.; Orlov, I.; Rezinko, T.; Rybnikov, A.; Rychter, A.; Selyunin, A.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.

    2015-07-01

    The array of 3 × 3 modules of the electromagnetic calorimeter ECAL0 of the COMPASS experiment at CERN has been tested with an electron beam of the ELSA (Germany) facility. The dependence of the response and the energy resolution of the calorimeter from the angle of incidence of the electron beam has been studied. A good agreement between the experimental data and the results of Monte Carlo simulation has been obtained. It will significantly expand the use of simulation to optimize event reconstruction algorithms.

  1. Contributions to the second workshop on medium energy electron cooling - MEEC96

    SciTech Connect

    MacLachlan, J.

    1997-09-01

    MEEC96 was a workshop devoted primarily to discussion within four working groups, not a mini-conference of prepared reports. Therefore, although there are contributions bearing the name of a single author, much of what was learned came in extemporaneous discussion of the issues posed to the participants. The original plan to produce formal proceedings has been dropped because of the limited number of participants willing to write up their own contributions and because of the difficulty of converting free-wheeling discussion to the written word. The premsise for the 1996 gathering was to set a critique of Fermilab`s R&D effort at cooling a ring of 8 GeV {bar p}`s. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the energy database for contributions to this workshop.

  2. Combining nanocalorimetry and dynamic transmission electron microscopy for in situ characterization of materials processes under rapid heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Grapes, Michael D.; LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Friedman, Lawrence H.; LaVan, David A.; Weihs, Timothy P.

    2014-08-15

    Nanocalorimetry is a chip-based thermal analysis technique capable of analyzing endothermic and exothermic reactions at very high heating and cooling rates. Here, we couple a nanocalorimeter with an extremely fast in situ microstructural characterization tool to identify the physical origin of rapid enthalpic signals. More specifically, we describe the development of a system to enable in situ nanocalorimetry experiments in the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM), a time-resolved TEM capable of generating images and electron diffraction patterns with exposure times of 30 ns–500 ns. The full experimental system consists of a modified nanocalorimeter sensor, a custom-built in situ nanocalorimetry holder, a data acquisition system, and the DTEM itself, and is capable of thermodynamic and microstructural characterization of reactions over a range of heating rates (10{sup 2} K/s–10{sup 5} K/s) accessible by conventional (DC) nanocalorimetry. To establish its ability to capture synchronized calorimetric and microstructural data during rapid transformations, this work describes measurements on the melting of an aluminum thin film. We were able to identify the phase transformation in both the nanocalorimetry traces and in electron diffraction patterns taken by the DTEM. Potential applications for the newly developed system are described and future system improvements are discussed.

  3. Neutrinos from SN 1987A - Implications for cooling of the nascent neutron star and the mass of the electron antineutrino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loredo, Thomas J.; Lamb, Don Q.

    1989-01-01

    Data on neutrinos from SN 1987A are compared here with parameterized models of the neutrino emission using a consistent and straightforward statistical methodology. The empirically measured detector background spectra are included in the analysis, and the data are compared with a much wider variety of neutrino emission models than was explored previously. It is shown that the inferred neutrino emission model parameters are strongly correlated. The analysis confirms that simple models of the neutrino cooling of the nascent neutron star formed by the SN adequately explain the data. The inferred radius and binding energy of the neutron star are in excellent agreement with model calculations based on a wide range of equations of state. The results also raise the upper limit of the electron antineutrino rest mass to roughly 25 eV at the 95 percent confidence level, roughly 1.5-5 times higher than found previously.

  4. The development of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) with evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W. Sun, L. T.; Qian, C.; Feng, Y. C.; Ma, H. Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Ma, B. H.; Zhao, H. W.; Guo, J. W.; Fang, X.; Yang, Y.; Xiong, B.; Guo, S. Q.; Ruan, L.

    2015-04-15

    LECR4 (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) has been successfully constructed at IMP and has also been connected with the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) systems. These source magnet coils are cooled through evaporative cooling technology, which is the first attempt with an ECR ion source in the world. The maximum mirror field is 2.5 T (with iron plug) and the effective plasma chamber volume is 1.2 l. It was designed to be operated at 18 GHz and aimed to produce intense multiple charge state heavy ion beams for the linear injector project SSC-Linac at IMP. In February 2014, the first analyzed beam at 18 GHz was extracted. During about three months’ commissioning, some outstanding results have been achieved, such as 1.97 emA of O{sup 6+}, 1.7 emA of Ar{sup 8+}, 1.07 emA of Ar{sup 9+}, and 118 euA of Bi{sup 28+}. The source has also successfully delivered O{sup 5+} and Ar{sup 8+} ion beams for RFQ commissioning in April 2014. This paper will give a brief overview of the design of LECR4. Then, the latest results of this source at 18 GHz will be presented.

  5. The development of a room temperature electron cyclotron resonance ion source (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) with evaporative cooling technology at Institute of Modern Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W.; Sun, L. T.; Qian, C.; Guo, J. W.; Fang, X.; Feng, Y. C.; Yang, Y.; Ma, H. Y.; Zhang, X. Z.; Ma, B. H.; Xiong, B.; Guo, S. Q.; Ruan, L.; Zhao, H. W.

    2015-04-01

    LECR4 (Lanzhou electron cyclotron resonance ion source No. 4) has been successfully constructed at IMP and has also been connected with the Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) systems. These source magnet coils are cooled through evaporative cooling technology, which is the first attempt with an ECR ion source in the world. The maximum mirror field is 2.5 T (with iron plug) and the effective plasma chamber volume is 1.2 l. It was designed to be operated at 18 GHz and aimed to produce intense multiple charge state heavy ion beams for the linear injector project SSC-Linac at IMP. In February 2014, the first analyzed beam at 18 GHz was extracted. During about three months' commissioning, some outstanding results have been achieved, such as 1.97 emA of O6+, 1.7 emA of Ar8+, 1.07 emA of Ar9+, and 118 euA of Bi28+. The source has also successfully delivered O5+ and Ar8+ ion beams for RFQ commissioning in April 2014. This paper will give a brief overview of the design of LECR4. Then, the latest results of this source at 18 GHz will be presented.

  6. Photodetachment, electron cooling, and recombination, in a series of neat aliphatic room temperature ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molins i Domenech, Francesc; Healy, Andrew T.; Blank, David A.

    2015-08-01

    Transient absorption following photodetachment of a series of neat methyl-alkyl-pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amides at 6.20 eV was measured with sub-picosecond time resolution in the visible and near-IR portions of the spectrum. This series spans the onset of structuring in the liquids in the form of polarity alternation. Excitation promotes the electron into a delocalized state with a very large reactive radius. Strong transient absorption is observed in the visible spectrum with a ˜700 fs lifetime, and much weaker, long-lived absorption is observed in the near-IR spectrum. Absorption in the visible is shown to be consistent with the hole, and absorption in the near-IR is assigned to the free solvated electron. Yield of free electrons is estimated at ˜4%, is insensitive to the size of the cation, and is determined in less than 1 ps. Solvation of free electrons depends strongly on the size of the cation and correlates well with the viscosity of the liquid. In addition to radiolytic stability of the aliphatic cations, ultrafast, efficient recombination of separated charge in NTf2 - based ionic liquids following photo-excitation near the band-gap may prevent subsequent reactive damage associated with anions.

  7. A modified Bitter-type electromagnet and control system for cold atom experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Tian; Zhou, Tianwei; Chen, Xuzong; Ma, Zhaoyuan

    2014-02-15

    We present a modified Bitter-type electromagnet which features high magnetic field, fine electronic properties and efficient heat removal. The electromagnet is constructed from a stack of copper layers separated by mica layers that have the same shape. A distinctive design of cooling channels on the insulating layers and the parallel ducts between the layers ensures low resistance for cooling water to flow. A continuous current control system is also made to regulate the current through the electromagnet. In our experiment, versatile electromagnets are applied to generate magnetic field and gradient field. From our measurements, a peak magnetic field of 1000 G and a peak gradient field of 80 G/cm are generated in the center of the apparatuses which are 7 cm and 5 cm away from the edge of each electromagnet with a current of 230 A and 120 A, respectively. With the effective feedback design in the current control system and cooling water flow of 3.8 l/min, the stability of the current through the electromagnets can reach 10{sup ?5}.

  8. A multi-band, multi-level, multi-electron model for efficient FDTD simulations of electromagnetic interactions with semiconductor quantum wells

    E-print Network

    Ravi, Koustuban; Ho, Seng-Tiong

    2015-01-01

    We report a new computational model for simulations of electromagnetic interactions with semiconductor quantum well(s) (SQW) in complex electromagnetic geometries using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The presented model is based on an approach of spanning a large number of electron transverse momentum states in each SQW sub-band (multi-band) with a small number of discrete multi-electron states (multi-level, multi-electron). This enables accurate and efficient two dimensional (2-D) and 3-D simulations of nanophotonic devices with SQW active media. The model includes the following features: (1) Optically induced interband transitions between various SQW conduction and heavy-hole or light-hole sub-bands are considered. (2) Novel intra sub-band and inter sub-band transition terms are derived to thermalize the electron and hole occupational distributions to the correct Fermi-Dirac distributions. (3) The terms in (2) result in an explicit update scheme which circumvents numerically cumbersome ite...

  9. Neutrino Signal of Electron-Capture Supernovae from Core Collapse to Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Huedepohl, L.; Mueller, B.; Janka, H.-T.; Marek, A.; Raffelt, G. G.

    2010-06-25

    An 8.8M{sub {center_dot}}electron-capture supernova was simulated in spherical symmetry consistently from collapse through explosion to essentially complete deleptonization of the forming neutron star. The evolution time ({approx}9 s) is short because high-density effects suppress our neutrino opacities. After a short phase of accretion-enhanced luminosities ({approx}200 ms), luminosity equipartition among all species becomes almost perfect and the spectra of {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu},{tau}}very similar, ruling out the neutrino-driven wind as r-process site. We also discuss consequences for neutrino flavor oscillations.

  10. Neutrino signal of electron-capture supernovae from core collapse to cooling.

    PubMed

    Hüdepohl, L; Müller, B; Janka, H-T; Marek, A; Raffelt, G G

    2010-06-25

    An 8.8M{?} electron-capture supernova was simulated in spherical symmetry consistently from collapse through explosion to essentially complete deleptonization of the forming neutron star. The evolution time (?9??s) is short because high-density effects suppress our neutrino opacities. After a short phase of accretion-enhanced luminosities (?200??ms), luminosity equipartition among all species becomes almost perfect and the spectra of ?{e} and ?{?,?} very similar, ruling out the neutrino-driven wind as r-process site. We also discuss consequences for neutrino flavor oscillations. PMID:20867357

  11. Effects of nonlocal plasmons in gapped graphene micro-ribbon array and two-dimensional electron gas on near-field electromagnetic response in the deep subwavelength regime.

    PubMed

    Huang, Danhong; Gumbs, Godfrey; Roslyak, Oleksiy

    2013-02-01

    A self-consistent theory involving Maxwell's equations and a density-matrix linear-response theory is solved for an electromagnetically coupled doped graphene micro-ribbon array (GMRA) and a quantum well (QW) electron gas sitting at an interface between a half-space of air and another half-space of a doped semiconductor substrate, which supports a surface-plasmon mode in our system. The coupling between a spatially modulated total electromagnetic (EM) field and the electron dynamics in a Dirac-cone of a graphene ribbon, as well as the coupling of the far-field specular and near-field higher-order diffraction modes, are included in the derived electron optical-response function. Full analytical expressions are obtained with nonlocality for the optical-response functions of a two-dimensional electron gas and a graphene layer with an induced bandgap, and are employed in our numerical calculations beyond the long-wavelength limit (Drude model). Both the near-field transmissivity and reflectivity spectra, as well as their dependence on different configurations of our system and on the array period, ribbon width, graphene chemical potential of QW electron gas and bandgap in graphene, are studied. Moreover, the transmitted E-field intensity distribution is calculated to demonstrate its connection to the mixing of specular and diffraction modes of the total EM field. An externally tunable EM coupling among the surface, conventional electron-gas and massless graphene intraband plasmon excitations is discovered and explained. Furthermore, a comparison is made between the dependence of the graphene-plasmon energy on the ribbon's width and chemical potential in this paper and the recent experimental observation given by [Nat. Nanotechnol.6, 630-634 (2011)] for a GMRA in the terahertz-frequency range. PMID:23385917

  12. Electromagnetic radiation from positive-energy bound electrons in the Coulomb field of a nucleus at rest in a strong uniform magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenyev, S. A.; Koryagin, S. A.

    2012-06-15

    A classical analysis is presented of the electromagnetic radiation emitted by positive-energy electrons performing bound motion in the Coulomb field of a nucleus at rest in a strong uniform magnetic field. Bounded trajectories exist and span a wide range of velocity directions near the nucleus (compared to free trajectories with similar energies) when the electron Larmor radius is smaller than the distance at which the electron-nucleus Coulomb interaction energy is equal to the mechanical energy of an electron. The required conditions occur in magnetic white dwarf photospheres and have been achieved in experiments on production of antihydrogen. Under these conditions, the radiant power per unit volume emitted by positive-energy bound electrons is much higher than the analogous characteristic of bremsstrahlung (in particular, in thermal equilibrium) at frequencies that are below the electron cyclotron frequency but higher than the inverse transit time through the interaction region in a close collision in the absence of a magnetic field. The quantum energy discreteness of positive-energy bound states restricts the radiation from an ensemble of bound electrons (e.g., in thermal equilibrium) to nonoverlapping spectral lines, while continuum radiative transfer is dominated by linearly polarized bremsstrahlung.

  13. Influence of the photonuclear effect on electron-neutrino-induced electromagnetic cascades under the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal regime in standard rock

    E-print Network

    Mathieu Tartare; Didier Lebrun; François Montanet

    2012-11-29

    The observation of earth skimming neutrinos has been proposed as a rather sensitive method to detect ultra-high energy (UHE) cosmic neutrinos. Energetic cosmic neutrinos can interact inside the rock and produce leptons via a charged current interaction. In the case of an incoming electron neutrino undergoing a charged current interaction, the produced UHE electron will induce an underground electromagnetic shower. At high energy (above 7.7 TeV in standard rock), such showers are subject to LPM (Landau, Pomeranchuk and Migdal) suppression of the radiative processes cross sections (bremsstrahlung and pair production). The consequence of this suppression is that showers are elongated. This effect will increase the detection probability of such events allowing deeper showers to emerge with detectable energies. On the other hand, the photonuclear processes which are usually neglected in electromagnetic showers with respect to radiative processes, turn out to become dominant in the LPM regime and will reduce the shower length. In this work, we have performed a complete Monte Carlo study of an underground shower induced by UHE electrons by taking into account both the LPM suppression and the photonuclear interaction. We will discuss the effects of both of these processes on the shower length and on the detectability of such events by ground arrays or fluorescence telescopes. We show that limits on neutrino fluxes that were obtained using simulations that were obviously neglecting photonuclear processes are overoptimistic and should be corrected.

  14. Experimental investigation of the ionospheric hysteresis effect on the threshold excitation level of the Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) during heating at the second electron gyro-harmonic frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samimi, A.; Scales, W.; Cruz, M.; Isham, B.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    Recent experimental observations of the stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) spectrum during heating at the second electron gyro-harmonic show structures ordered by ion gyro-frequency. The proposed generation mechanism considers parametric decay of a pump upper hybrid/electron Bernstein (UH/EB) wave into another UH/EB and a group of neutralized ion Bernstein waves. The presumption of the proposed mechanism is that the pump electromagnetic wave is converted into the UH/EB wave. This conversion process generates field aligned irregularity which exhibits hysteresis effect. The predicted ionospheric hysteresis effect is studied during the PARS 2012 at HAARP. The preliminary results are presented for the first time. Also, experimental study of the effects of 1) the transmitter beam angle and 2) the transmitter frequency offset relative to the second electron gyro-harmonic frequency on the ion gyro-harmonic structures in the SEE spectrum are provided. The aforementioned observations are compared to the predictions of the analytical model. Possible connection of the SEE spectral features and artificially generated ionospheric descending layer is also discussed

  15. Anomalous electron cooling observed by the eiscat within the dusty nightside auroral dynamo layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, Evgeny; Kangas, Jorma; Vallinkoski, Matti; Shalimov, Sergey

    In the present study we analyze parameters of the lower ionosphere, measured by the EISCAT radar facility at the zenith of Tromsø auroral observatory during the ERRRIS campaign. Data used consists of 20 different nights of observations and includes approximately 2000 measurements. At that 75% and 25% of the data corresponds to measured ionospheric electric field that is below and above the threshold of the Farley-Buneman instability (which is 15-20 mV/m), respectively. In the first part of our analysis the height profiles of the electron and ion temperature difference (Te-Ti) (including standard deviation, STD) for both, small and large electric fields were calculated using the superimposed epoch method. It was shown that: 1) for the large electric fields the profile (Te-Ti) with Te>Ti takes the maximum (60-70 K) at 115 km in agreement with the standard conception; 2) for the small electric fields the thermal anomaly was revealed when Teelectron temperature can decrease whilst the ion temperature increases.

  16. Amplification of an electromagnetic field at the scattering of the nonrelativistic electron by an ion in the external field of medium intensity for an arbitrary angle of the initial electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsybul'nik, V. A.; Roshchupkin, S. P.

    2014-08-01

    We theoretically study the gain coefficient for a electromagnetic field, in the scattering of nonrelativistic electrons by ions in a elliptically polarized light wave. We obtain a simple analytical expression for a field amplification constant in logarithmic approach to an arbitrary angle of the initial electron. The formula supplements and extends the domain of applicability of the known Marcuse formula for the linear polarization in the presence of a weak field. It is demonstrated that the maximum gain is reached when the initial electron velocity directs along the major semi-axis of the polarization ellipse. In the range of optical frequencies, the gain coefficient of the laser radiation can be significant for relatively high powers of electron beams. Obtained results may be experimentally verified, for example, by the scientific facilities at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, Darmstadt, Germany).

  17. Observation of the A-X Electronic Transition of the Jet-Cooled Methyl Peroxy Radical by High Resolution CRDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupré, Patrick; Wu, Shenghai; Rupper, Patrick; Miller, Terry

    2007-03-01

    Reactive intermediates are of crucial importance both for combustion and atmospheric chemistry. By using our new home made Fourier Transform limited (10--30 MHz) Ti:Sa laser source we have probed the vibrationless level of the first electronic state (in the near-IR range) of both CH3OO and CD3OO radical species. The radicals are formed inside a Ne/He/O2/CH3I plasma created by a DC or a RF electrical discharge. The supersonic jet expansion necessary for the rotational cooling (˜20,) is obtained by a pulsed slit nozzle (˜50x0.5,^2). The near-IR radiation, obtained by Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) is injected inside a high finesse cavity. A sensitivity of the order of ˜20x10-9,pass/?Hz is currently obtained. Spectrum with a resolution ˜350, for CD3OO clearly shows rotational and spin-rotation structure with effects of the internal methyl group rotation possibly evolved.

  18. Stimulated electromagnetic emission and plasma line during pump wave frequency stepping near 4th electron gyroharmonic at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grach, Savely; Sergeev, Evgeny; Shindin, Alexey; Mishin, Evgeny; Watkins, Brenton

    Concurrent observations of stimulated (secondary) electromagnetic emissions (SEE) and incoherent plasma line (PL) backscatter from the MUIR radar during HF pumping of the ionosphere by the HAARP heating facility (62.4(°) °N, 145.15(°) W, magnetic inclination ? = 75.8^circ) with the pump wave (PW) frequency sweeps about the fourth electron gyroharmonic (4f_c) are presented. The PW frequency f0 was changed every 0.2 s in a 1-kHz step, i.e. with the rate of r_{f_0}=5 kHz/s. PW was transmitted at the magnetic zenith (MZ). Prior to sweeping, PW was transmitted continuously (CW) during 2 min at f_0 = 5730 kHz <4f_c to create the “preconditioned” ionosphere with small-scale magnetic field-aligned irregularities. During CW pumping, a typical SEE spectrum for f_0<4f_c, containing the prominent downshifted maxi?m (DM) shifted by Delta f_{DM} = f_{DM}-f_0approx-9 kHz, developed in 5-10 s after PW turn on. The PL echoes were observed during 2-3 s from the range dsim 220 km corresponding to the altitude slightly above PW reflection height. After sim5 s the PL echoes descended to dsim 210-212 km corresponding to the height h = d / (sinalpha) by sim 7 km below the height where f_0 = 4f_c. During frequency sweeps, two upshifted features appeared in the SEE spectrum for f_0> 4f_c, namely BUM_S and BUM_D. The former (stationary broad upshifted maxi?m) peaks at Delta f_{BUMs} approx f0 - nfc (d) + 15-20 kHz and is a typical SEE spectral feature. The latter, the dynamic BUM_D at smaller Delta f, is observed only at high pump powers (ERP=1.7 GW) and corresponds to artificial descending plasma layers created in the F-region ionosphere [1]. In the experiment in question, the BUM_D was present for f_0> f^*, where f^* was 5805-5815 kHz during stepping up and sim 10 kHz less for stepping down, and located 8-10 km below the background F-layer. The mini?m DM which indicated that f_0=4f_c=f_{uh} in the background ionospheric plasma, was sim 5760 kHz. The PL was observed only for f_0< f^* and mainly from altitudes h where f_0 <4f_c. The height h decreased with increasing f_0 in accordance with the altitude dependence 4f_c(h), the difference Delta f_g = f_0 - 4f_c was kept constant during either sweeping up [-(4-8 kHz)] or sweeping down [-(18-22 kHz)]. This corresponds to the difference between the altitude where f_0=4f_c and the PL generation altitude by Delta h sim 1.5-3 km and 7-8 km, respectively. During stepping up, the PL was observed also from the ranges where f_0 > 4f_c. In this case we obtained Delta f_g sim 8-13 kHz corresponding to Delta h sim - 4 km. The PL has never been observed for f_0>f^*$. \\ 1. Sergeev E., Grach S., et al. //Phys. Rev. Lett., 110 (2013), 065002.

  19. Cooling of the plasma chamber for the AECR-U type electron cyclotron resonance ion source ARTEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koivisto, H.; DeKamp, J.; Zeller, A.

    2001-04-01

    The temperature distribution inside the ECRIS plasma chamber has been studied using finite element analysis. The main goal of these studies was to find out the safest cooling design for the temperature sensitive permanent magnets. In ECR ion sources they are used to provide the hexapole field. Two different designs for the cooling of the magnets were investigated. The temperature distribution on the surface of the plasma electrode was also studied. With the aid of the cooling simulations the most efficient cooling for the new ECR ion source was found. As a result of which, safety and higher reliability of operation can be reached.

  20. Neutron electromagnetic form factors and inclusive scattering of polarized electrons by polarized $^{3}$He and $^{3}$H targets

    E-print Network

    A. Kievsky; E. Pace; G. Salme`; M. Viviani

    1997-04-23

    The electromagnetic inclusive responses of polarized $^{3}$He and $^{3}$H are thoroughly investigated at the quasielastic peak for squared momentum transfers up to $2 (GeV/c)^2$, within the plane wave impulse approximation. Great emphasys is put on the effects in the bound-state due to different two- and three-body nuclear forces, and to the Coulomb interaction as well. A careful analysis of the polarized responses allows to select possible experiments for minimizing the model dependence in the extraction of the neutron electromagnetic form factors. In particular, the relevant role played by the proton in the transverse-longitudinal response of polarized $^{3}$He, at low momentum transfer, can be utilized for obtaining valuable information on the proton contribution to the total polarized response and eventually on the neutron charge form factor.

  1. Generation and propagation of an electromagnetic pulse in the Trigger experiment and its possible role in electron acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Kintner, P. M.; Kudeki, E.; Holmgren, G.; Bostrom, R.; Fahleson, U. V.

    1980-01-01

    Instruments onboard the Trigger payload detected a large-amplitude, low-frequency, electric field pulse which was observed with a time delay consistent only with an electromagnetic wave. A model for this perturbation is constructed, and the associated field-aligned current is calculated as a function of altitude. This experiment may simulate the acceleration mechanism which results in the formation of auroral arcs, and possibly even other events in cosmic plasmas.

  2. Trapping of high-energy electrons into regime of surfatron acceleration by electromagnetic waves in space plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Erokhin, A. N.; Erokhin, N. S.; Milant'ev, V. P.

    2012-05-15

    The phenomenon of trapping of weakly relativistic charged particles (with kinetic energies on the order of mc{sup 2}) into a regime of surfatron acceleration by an electromagnetic wave that propagates in plasma across a weak external magnetic field has been studied using nonlinear numerical calculations based on a solution of the relativistic equations of motion. Analysis showed that, for the wave amplitude above a certain threshold value and the initial wave phase outside the interval favorable for the surfing regime, the trajectory of a charged particle initially corresponds to its cyclotron rotation in the external magnetic field. For the initial particle energies studied, the period of this rotation is relatively short. After a certain number (from several dozen to several thousand and above) of periods of rotation, the wave phase takes a value that is favorable for trapping of the charged particle on its trajectory by the electromagnetic wave, provided the Cherenkov resonance conditions are satisfied. As a result, the wave traps the charged particle and imparts it an ultrarelativistic acceleration. In momentum space, the region of trapping into the regime of surfing on an electromagnetic wave turns out to be rather large.

  3. Electromagnetic Theory 1 /56 Electromagnetic Theory

    E-print Network

    Bicknell, Geoff

    Electromagnetic Theory 1 /56 Electromagnetic Theory Summary: · Maxwell's equations · EM Potentials · Equations of motion of particles in electromagnetic fields · Green's functions · Lienard-Weichert potentials · Spectral distribution of electromagnetic energy from an arbitrarily moving charge #12;Electromagnetic

  4. Refrigerant directly cooled capacitors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Seiber, Larry E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marlino, Laura D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN)

    2007-09-11

    The invention is a direct contact refrigerant cooling system using a refrigerant floating loop having a refrigerant and refrigeration devices. The cooling system has at least one hermetic container disposed in the refrigerant floating loop. The hermetic container has at least one electronic component selected from the group consisting of capacitors, power electronic switches and gating signal module. The refrigerant is in direct contact with the electronic component.

  5. Comparison of Electromagnetic Field Signatures in Regions of Dispersive and Quasi-Static Electron Precipitation During the GREECE Sounding Rocket Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnell, J. W.; Carruth, N.; Slagle, A.; Samara, M.; Michell, R.; Grubbs, G. A., II; Ogasawara, K.; Jahn, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA GREECE (Ground-to-Rocket Electrodynamics-Electrons Corelative Experiment) sounding rocket flew through two regions of electron precipitation associated with dynamic visual aurora on 03 Mar 2014. The first weaker precipitation region showed evidence of energy-time dispersion in the softer and weaker electron precipitation, while the later precipitation region showed evidence of quasi-static monoenergetic peaks in the somewhat harder precipitating electron spectra.Comparisons between the observed electromagnetic (EM) field (quasi-DC) and wave properties (0.1-8 kHz) in the two precipitation regions will be shown, including: measured plasma density; estimated spectral densities of E and B; derived polarization, cross-spectral phase and coherence, and parallel Poynting flux.The measured EM field parameters will be compared against extant models of static and dynamic coupling of the high- and low-altitude ionosphere in regions of active small-scale auroral features and precipitation to discriminate between viable models of the two sorts of auroral precipitation and acceleration.

  6. Electromagnetic direct implicit PIC simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Langdon, A.B.

    1983-03-29

    Interesting modelling of intense electron flow has been done with implicit particle-in-cell simulation codes. In this report, the direct implicit PIC simulation approach is applied to simulations that include full electromagnetic fields. The resulting algorithm offers advantages relative to moment implicit electromagnetic algorithms and may help in our quest for robust and simpler implicit codes.

  7. Assessment of Electromagnetic Interference with Active Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIEDs) Caused by the Qi A13 Design Wireless Charging Board

    PubMed Central

    Seckler, Tobias; Jagielski, Kai; Stunder, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference is a concern for people wearing cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). The aim of this study was to assess the electromagnetic compatibility between CIEDs and the magnetic field of a common wireless charging technology. To do so the voltage induced in CIEDs by Qi A13 design magnetic fields were measured and compared with the performance limits set by ISO 14117. In order to carry this out a measuring circuit was developed which can be connected with unipolar or bipolar pacemaker leads. The measuring system was positioned at the four most common implantation sites in a torso phantom filled with physiological saline solution. The phantom was exposed by using Helmholtz coils from 5 µT to 27 µT with 111 kHz sine-bursts or by using a Qi A13 design wireless charging board (Qi-A13-Board) in two operating modes “power transfer” and “pinging”. With the Helmholtz coils the lowest magnetic flux density at which the performance limit was exceeded is 11 µT. With the Qi-A13-Board in power transfer mode 10.8% and in pinging mode 45.7% (2.2% at 10 cm distance) of the performance limit were reached at maximum. In neither of the scrutinized cases, did the voltage induced by the Qi-A13-Board exceed the performance limits. PMID:26024360

  8. Assessment of Electromagnetic Interference with Active Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices (CIEDs) Caused by the Qi A13 Design Wireless Charging Board.

    PubMed

    Seckler, Tobias; Jagielski, Kai; Stunder, Dominik

    2015-06-01

    Electromagnetic interference is a concern for people wearing cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). The aim of this study was to assess the electromagnetic compatibility between CIEDs and the magnetic field of a common wireless charging technology. To do so the voltage induced in CIEDs by Qi A13 design magnetic fields were measured and compared with the performance limits set by ISO 14117. In order to carry this out a measuring circuit was developed which can be connected with unipolar or bipolar pacemaker leads. The measuring system was positioned at the four most common implantation sites in a torso phantom filled with physiological saline solution. The phantom was exposed by using Helmholtz coils from 5 µT to 27 µT with 111 kHz sine?bursts or by using a Qi A13 design wireless charging board (Qi?A13?Board) in two operating modes "power transfer" and "pinging". With the Helmholtz coils the lowest magnetic flux density at which the performance limit was exceeded is 11 µT. With the Qi?A13?Board in power transfer mode 10.8% and in pinging mode 45.7% (2.2% at 10 cm distance) of the performance limit were reached at maximum. In neither of the scrutinized cases, did the voltage induced by the Qi?A13?Board exceed the performance limits. PMID:26024360

  9. Corona driven air propulsion for cooling of electronics F. Yang, N.E. Jewell-Larsen, D.L. Brown, K. Pendergrass, D.A. Parker, I.A. Krichtafovitch*, A.V. Mamishev

    E-print Network

    Mamishev, Alexander

    Corona driven air propulsion for cooling of electronics F. Yang, N.E. Jewell-Larsen, D.L. Brown, K of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105, USA *Chief Scientific Officer, Kronos Air Technologies, Redmond, WA 98052, USA Abstract: The possibility of building a high voltage electrostatic air pump for cooling of microelectronics

  10. Cooling for a rotating anode X-ray tube

    DOEpatents

    Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for cooling a rotating anode X-ray tube. An electromagnetic motor is provided to rotate an X-ray anode with cooling passages in the anode. These cooling passages are coupled to a cooling structure located adjacent the electromagnetic motor. A liquid metal fills the passages of the cooling structure and electrical power is provided to the motor to rotate the anode and generate a rotating magnetic field which moves the liquid metal through the cooling passages and cooling structure.

  11. Electromagnetics from Simulation to Optimal Design

    E-print Network

    Grohs, Philipp

    1 Electromagnetics from Simulation to Optimal Design Christian Hafner Laboratory for Electromagnetic Fields and Microwave Electronics (IFH) ETH Zurich (Switzerland) Lab: http://www.ifh.ee.ethz.ch COG 23, 2013 #12;2 IFH courses · Advanced engineering electromagnetics (Leuchtmann, start spring 2014

  12. Electromagnetic Attraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milson, James L.

    1990-01-01

    Three activities involving electromagnetism are presented. Discussed are investigations involving the construction of an electromagnet, the effect of the number of turns of wire in the magnet, and the effect of the number of batteries in the circuit. Extension activities are suggested. (CW)

  13. Cooling of a multichip electronic module by means of confined two-dimensional jets of dielectric liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, D.C.; Mudawar, I. )

    1990-11-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate single-phase heat transfer froma smooth 12.7 {times} 12.7 mm{sup 2} simulated chip to a two-dimensional jet of dielectric Fluorinert FC-72 liquid issuing from a thin rectangular slot into a channel confined between the chip surface and nozzle plate. The effects of jet width, confined channel height, and impingement velocity have been examined. Channel height had a negligible effect ont eh theat transfer performance of the jet for the conditions of the present study. A correlation for the convective heat transfer coefficient is presented as a function of jet, width, heat length, flow velocity, and fluid properties. A self-contained multichip cooling module consisting of a 3 {times} 3 array of heat sources confirmed the uniformity and predictability of cooling for each of the nine chips, and proved the cooling module is well suited for packaging large arrays of high-power density chips.

  14. Cooling of a multichip electronic module by means of confined two-dimensional jets of dielectric liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, D. C.; Mudawar, I.

    1990-11-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate single-phase heat transfer from a smooth 12.7 x 12.7-sq-mm simulated chip to a two-dimensional jet of dielectric FC-72 liquid issuing from a thin rectangular slot into a channel confined between the chip surface and nozzle plate. The effects of jet width, confinement channel height, and impingement velocity have been examined. Channel height had a negligible effect on the heat-transfer performance of the jet. A correlation for the convective heat-transfer coefficient is presented as a function of jet width, heater length, flow velocity, and fluid properties. A self-contained multichip cooling module consisting of a 3 x 3 array of heat sources confirmed the uniformity and predictability of cooling for each of the nine chips, and proved the cooling module is well suited for packaging large arrays of high-power-density chips.

  15. Self-consistent Model of Magnetospheric Ring Current and Propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves. 2. Wave Induced Ring Current Precipitation and Thermal Electron Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.; Kozyra, J. U.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    This paper continues presentation and discussion of the results from our new global self-consistent theoretical model of interacting ring current ions and propagating electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves [Khazanov et al., 2006]. To study the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave propagation and refraction on the wave induced ring current precipitation and heating of the thermal plasmaspheric electrons, we simulate the May 1998 storm. The main findings after a simulation can be summarized as follows. Firstly, the wave induced ring current precipitation exhibits quite a lot of fine structure, and is highly organized by location of the plasmapause gradient. The strongest fluxes of about 4 x 10(exp 6) (cm(raised dot) s(raised dot) sr(raised dot) (sup -1)) are observed during the maill and early recovery phases of the storm. The very interesting and probably more important finding is that in a number of cases the most intense precipitating fluxes are not connected to the most intense waves in simple manner. The characteristics of the wave power spectral density distribution over the wave normal angle are extremely crucial for the effectiveness of the ring current ion scattering. Secondly, comparison of the global proton precipitating patterns with the results from RAM [Kozyra et al., 1997a] reveals that although we observe a qualitative agreement between the localizations of the wave induced precipitations in the models, there is no quantitative agreement between the magnitudes of the fluxes. The quantitative differences are mainly due to a qualitative difference between the characteristics of the wave power spectral density distributions over the wave normal angle in RAM and in our model. Thirdly, the heat fluxes to plasmaspheric electrons caused by Landau resonate energy absorption from electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves are observed in the postnoon-premidnight MLT sector, and can reach the magnitude of 10(exp 11) eV/(cm(sup 2)(raised dot)s). The Coulomb energy degradation of the RC H(+) and O(+) ions maximizes at about 10(exp 11) (eV/(cm(sup 2) (raised dot) s), and typically leads to electron energy deposition rates of about 2(raised dot) 10(exp 10) (eV/(cm(sup 2)(raised dot)s) which are observed during two periods; 32-48 hours, and 76-86 hours after 1 May, 0000 UT. The theoretically derived spatial structure of the thermal electron heating caused by interaction of the ring current with the plasmasphere is strongly supported by concurrent and conjugate plasma measurements from the plasmasphere, ring current, and topside ionosphere [Gurgiolo et al., 2005]. Finally, the wave induced intense electron heating has a structure of the spot-like patches along the most enhanced density gradients in the plasmasphere boundary layer and can be a possible driver to the observed but still not explained small-scale structures of enhanced emissions in the stable auroral red arcs.

  16. Information Security due to Electromagnetic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Hidenori; Seto, Shinji

    Generally, active electronic devices emit slightly unintentional electromagnetic noise. From long ago, electromagnetic emission levels have been regulated from the aspect of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). Also, it has been known the electromagnetic emissions have been generated from the ON/OFF of signals in the device. Recently, it becomes a topic of conversation on the information security that the ON/OFF on a desired signal in the device can be reproduced or guessed by receiving the electromagnetic emission. For an example, a display image on a personal computer (PC) can be reconstructed by receiving and analyzing the electromagnetic emission. In sum, this fact makes known information leakage due to electromagnetic emission. “TEMPEST" that has been known as a code name originated in the U. S. Department of Defense is to prevent the information leakage caused by electromagnetic emissions. This paper reports the brief summary of the information security due to electromagnetic emissions from information technology equipments.

  17. Electromagnetic effects on geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, M. F.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Elfimov, A. G.; Melnikov, A. V.; Murtaza, G.

    2014-08-15

    By using the full electromagnetic drift kinetic equations for electrons and ions, the general dispersion relation for geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) is derived incorporating the electromagnetic effects. It is shown that m?=?1 harmonic of the GAM mode has a finite electromagnetic component. The electromagnetic corrections appear for finite values of the radial wave numbers and modify the GAM frequency. The effects of plasma pressure ?{sub e}, the safety factor q, and the temperature ratio ? on GAM dispersion are analyzed.

  18. Heat bath algorithmic cooling using electron-nuclear spin ensemble in the solid state: characterization of the open quantum system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyungdeock; Darabad, Robabeh; Feng, Guanru; Labruyere, Stephane; Baugh, Jonathan; Laflamme, Raymond

    2015-03-01

    The ability to perform multiple rounds of Quantum Error Correction (QEC) is an essential task for scalable quantum information processing, but experimental realizations of it are still in their infancy. Key requirements for QEC are high control fidelity and the ability to extract entropy from ancilla qubits. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) quantum processors have demonstrated high control fidelity with up to 12 qubits. A remaining challenge is to prepare nearly pure ancilla qubits to enable QEC. Heat Bath Algorithmic Cooling (HBAC) is an efficient tool for extracting entropy from qubits that interact with a heat bath, allowing cooling below the bath temperature. For implementing HBAC with spins, a hyperfine coupled electron-nuclear system in a single crystal is more advantageous than conventional NMR systems since the electron, with higher polarization and faster relaxation, can act as a heat bath. We characterize 3 and 5 qubit spin systems in gamma-irradiated malonic acid and present simulation and experimental results of HBAC to benchmark our quantum control. Two control schemes are compared: electron nuclear double resonance and indirect control of nuclei via the anisotropic hyperfine interaction.

  19. Quench Cooling Slow Cooling

    E-print Network

    Hasegawa, Shuji

    0.76 ML -!3 !3 !3 !3 !3 !3 !3 DW Domain Wall 18 19 DW -!3 DW Au 19 1.0 ML DW -!3 Fig. 1 c -!3 STM !3 !3 !3 !3 Fig. 1 d STM d !3 !3 LEED 19 20 -!3 650 DW 19 30 Slow Cooling DW 6 6 18 19 Fig. 1 a 6 6 STM 6 6 6 6 -!3 Fig. 1 b a 6 6 6 6 650 Quench Cooling -!3 DW 2 -!3 2 6 6 Fig. 1. (a) A filled

  20. Electromagnetic fasteners

    DOEpatents

    Crane, Randolph W.; Marts, Donna J.

    1994-11-01

    An electromagnetic fastener for manipulating objects in space uses the matic attraction of various metals. An end effector is attached to a robotic manipulating system having an electromagnet such that when current is supplied to the electromagnet, the object is drawn and affixed to the end effector, and when the current is withheld, the object is released. The object to be manipulated includes a multiplicity of ferromagnetic patches at various locations to provide multiple areas for the effector on the manipulator to become affixed to the object. The ferromagnetic patches are sized relative to the object's geometry and mass.

  1. Electromagnetic fasteners

    DOEpatents

    Crane, Randolph W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Marts, Donna J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01

    An electromagnetic fastener for manipulating objects in space uses the matic attraction of various metals. An end effector is attached to a robotic manipulating system having an electromagnet such that when current is supplied to the electromagnet, the object is drawn and affixed to the end effector, and when the current is withheld, the object is released. The object to be manipulated includes a multiplicity of ferromagnetic patches at various locations to provide multiple areas for the effector on the manipulator to become affixed to the object. The ferromagnetic patches are sized relative to the object's geometry and mass.

  2. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-01-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.

  3. Electromagnetic particle simulation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    Electromagnetic particle simulations solve the full set of Maxwell's equations. They thus include the effects of self-consistent electric and magnetic fields, magnetic induction, and electromagnetic radiation. The algorithms for an electromagnetic code which works directly with the electric and magnetic fields are described. The fields and current are separated into transverse and longitudinal components. The transverse E and B fields are integrated in time using a leapfrog scheme applied to the Fourier components. The particle pushing is performed via the relativistic Lorentz force equation for the particle momentum. As an example, simulation results are presented for the electron cyclotron maser instability which illustrate the importance of relativistic effects on the wave-particle resonance condition and on wave dispersion.

  4. Conduction cooling: multicrate fastbus hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Makowiecki, D.; Sims, W.; Larsen, R.

    1980-11-01

    Described is a new and novel approach for cooling nuclear instrumentation modules via heat conduction. The simplicity of liquid cooled crates and ease of thermal management with conduction cooled modules are described. While this system was developed primarily for the higher power levels expected with Fastbus electronics, it has many general applications.

  5. Electron beam dynamics and self-cooling up to PeV level due to betatron radiation in plasma-based accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Aihua; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Liu, Jiansheng; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Yu, Yahong; Li, Wentao; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2012-08-01

    In plasma-based accelerators, electrons are accelerated by ultrahigh gradient of 1-100GV/m and undergo the focusing force with the same order as the accelerating force. Heated electrons are injected in a plasma wake and exhibit the betatron oscillation that generates synchrotron radiation. Intense betatron radiation from laser-plasma accelerators is attractive x-ray/gamma-ray sources, while it produces radiation loss and significant effects on energy spread and transverse emittance via the radiation reaction force. In this article, electron beam dynamics on transverse emittance and energy spread with considering radiation reaction effects are studied numerically. It is found that the emittance growth and the energy spread damping initially dominate and balance with radiative damping due to the betatron radiation. Afterward the emittance turns to decrease at a constant rate and leads to the equilibrium at a nanometer radian level with growth due to Coulomb scattering at PeV-level energies. A constant radiation loss rate RT=2/3 is found without regard to the electron beam and plasma conditions. Self-cooling of electron beams due to betatron radiation may guarantee TeV-range linear colliders and give hints on astrophysical ultrahigh-energy phenomena.

  6. Electromagnetic Fields

    MedlinePLUS

    Electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) are areas of energy that surround electrical devices. Everyday sources of EMFs ... phones cause cancer. They give off radio-frequency energy (RF), a form of electromagnetic radiation. Scientists need ...

  7. Extraction of electromagnetic neutron form factors through inclusive and exclusive polarized electron scattering on polarized 3He target

    E-print Network

    J. Golak; G. Ziemer; H. Kamada; H. Witala; W. Gloeckle

    2000-08-04

    Inclusive 3He(e,e') and exclusive 3He(e,e'n) processes with polarized electrons and 3He have been theoretically analyzed and values for the magnetic and electric neutron form factors have been extracted. In both cases the form factor values agree well with the ones extracted from processes on the deuteron. Our results are based on Faddeev solutions, modern NN forces and partially on the incorporation of mesonic exchange currents.

  8. Research Investigation Directed Toward Extending the Useful Range of the Electromagnetic Spectrum. [atomic spectra and electronic structure of alkali metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, S. R.; Happer, W.

    1974-01-01

    The report discusses completed and proposed research in atomic and molecular physics conducted at the Columbia Radiation Laboratory from July 1972 to June 1973. Central topics described include the atomic spectra and electronic structure of alkali metals and helium, molecular microwave spectroscopy, the resonance physics of photon echoes in some solid state systems (including Raman echoes, superradiance, and two photon absorption), and liquid helium superfluidity.

  9. 3D printed electromagnetic transmission and electronic structures fabricated on a single platform using advanced process integration techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffenbaugh, Paul Issac

    3D printing has garnered immense attention from many fields including in-office rapid prototyping of mechanical parts, outer-space satellite replication, garage functional firearm manufacture, and NASA rocket engine component fabrication. 3D printing allows increased design flexibility in the fabrication of electronics, microwave circuits and wireless antennas and has reached a level of maturity which allows functional parts to be printed. Much more work is necessary in order to perfect the processes of 3D printed electronics especially in the area of automation. Chapter 1 shows several finished prototypes of 3D printed electronics as well as newly developed techniques in fabrication. Little is known about the RF and microwave properties and applications of the standard materials which have been developed for 3D printing. Measurement of a wide variety of materials over a broad spectrum of frequencies up to 10 GHz using a variety of well-established measurement methods is performed throughout chapter 2. Several types of high frequency RF transmission lines are fabricated and valuable model-matched data is gathered and provided in chapter 3 for future designers' use. Of particular note is a fully 3D printed stripline which was automatically fabricated in one process on one machine. Some core advantages of 3D printing RF/microwave components include rapid manufacturing of complex, dimensionally sensitive circuits (such as antennas and filters which are often iteratively tuned) and the ability to create new devices that cannot be made using standard fabrication techniques. Chapter 4 describes an exemplary fully 3D printed curved inverted-F antenna.

  10. Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  11. Electromagnetic effects on quasilinear turbulent particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, Annika; Weiland, Jan

    2005-09-15

    It is well known that a nonadiabatic part of the electron density response is needed for particle transport in tokamaks. Such main reactive effects are electron trapping and electromagnetic induction. Although electron trapping has been studied rather extensively, electromagnetic effects have hardly been studied at all although they are already included in transport codes. Here the electromagnetic effects have been analyzed and parameter studies have been performed, showing that an electromagnetic particle pinch may appear in the flat density regime, just as for the case of electron trapping although the conditions are more restrictive. The particle pinch is particularly sensitive to the direction of propagation of the eigenmode. The electromagnetic particle flux is found to be outward for modes propagating in the ion drift direction and inward for modes propagating in the electron drift direction. A pinch may be obtained rather close to the axis for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor simulation data.

  12. Direct observation of transition to electron Bernstein waves from electromagnetic mode by three mode-conversion scenarios in the dipole confinement torus plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchijima, K.; Takemoto, T.; Morikawa, J.; Ogawa, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Direct measurement experiments on the mode conversion to the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) have been conducted in dipole confinement torus plasmas for three excitation scenarios; i.e. perpendicular injections of an eXtraordinary mode (X-mode) from the low- and high-magnetic-field sides, and the oblique injection of an Ordinary mode (O-mode) from the low-magnetic-field side. By inserting probe antennas into plasmas, wave propagation has been directly measured. At plasma conditions for the EBW excitation, several characteristics which indicate the mode conversion to the EBWs have been observed; i.e. a short wavelength wave, an electrostatic and longitudinal mode, backward propagation at the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) region. Meanwhile, the wavelengths experimentally observed might be slightly longer than those of theoretical prediction. In the case of the oblique injection of the O-mode, it has been identified that the window of the injection angle for the excitation of the EBW would be quite limited, and the optimum angle seems to be roughly in agreement with theory. These experimental results might support that the electromagnetic waves injected outside of torus plasmas reach to the UHR region and convert wave characteristics to the EBWs for three excitation scenarios.

  13. Electromagnetic Signals from Bacterial DNA

    E-print Network

    A. Widom; J. Swain; Y. N. Srivastava; S. Sivasubramanian

    2012-02-09

    Chemical reactions can be induced at a distance due to the propagation of electromagnetic signals during intermediate chemical stages. Although is is well known at optical frequencies, e.g. photosynthetic reactions, electromagnetic signals hold true for muck lower frequencies. In E. coli bacteria such electromagnetic signals can be generated by electric transitions between energy levels describing electrons moving around DNA loops. The electromagnetic signals between different bacteria within a community is a "wireless" version of intercellular communication found in bacterial communities connected by "nanowires". The wireless broadcasts can in principle be of both the AM and FM variety due to the magnetic flux periodicity in electron energy spectra in bacterial DNA orbital motions.

  14. Gravitation and Electromagnetism

    E-print Network

    B. G. Sidharth

    2001-06-16

    The realms of gravitation, belonging to Classical Physics, and Electromagnetism, belonging to the Theory of the Electron and Quantum Mechanics have remained apart as two separate pillars, inspite of a century of effort by Physicists to reconcile them. In this paper it is argued that if we extend ideas of Classical spacetime to include in addition to non integrability non commutavity also, then such a reconcilation is possible.

  15. Gravitation and Electromagnetism

    E-print Network

    B. G. Sidharth

    2015-12-24

    The realms of gravitation, belonging to Classical Physics, and Electromagnetism, belonging to the Theory of the Electron and Quantum Mechanics have remained apart as two separate pillars, inspite of a century of effort by Physicists to reconcile them. In this paper it is argued that if we extend ideas of Classical spacetime to include in addition to non integrability non commutavity also, then such a reconcilation is possible.

  16. Experimental investigation for enhancement of heat transfer from cooling of electronic components by circular air jet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwarullah, M.; Vasudeva Rao, V.; Sharma, K. V.

    2012-09-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out to study the enhancement of heat transfer from surface of the electronic components by impingement of a circular air jet. Local and stagnation Nusselt number on the impinged surface of the electronic components are presented for different nozzle configurations. Reynolds number, based on nozzle diameter ( d) is varied between 5,500 and 28,500 and nozzle-to-electronic component spacing from 2 to 10 nozzle diameters. The measured data were correlated into a simple equation and compared to the predictions of several other correlations proposed by other researchers. The heat transfer mechanisms involved in the enhanced performance are discussed. The study provides a lot of useful information for the application of impinging jet heat transfer in electronic industry.

  17. Electromagnetic Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The design and development of an Electromagnetic Propulsion is discussed. Specific Electromagnetic Propulsion Topics discussed include: (1) Technology for Pulse Inductive Thruster (PIT), to design, develop, and test of a multirepetition rate pulsed inductive thruster, Solid-State Switch Technology, and Pulse Driver Network and Architecture; (2) Flight Weight Magnet Survey, to determine/develop light weight high performance magnetic materials for potential application Advanced Space Flight Systems as these systems develop; and (3) Magnetic Flux Compression, to enable rapid/robust/reliable omni-planetary space transportation within realistic development and operational costs constraints.

  18. Electromagnetic casting

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.W.; Kageyama, R.; Deepak; Cook, D.P.; Prasso, D.C.; Nishioka, S.

    1995-12-31

    Electromagnetic casting (EMC) is a technology that is used extensively in the aluminum industry to cast ingots with good surface finish for subsequent rolling into consumer product. The paper reviews briefly some investigations from the eighties wherein models for EMC were developed. Then more recent work is examined wherein more realistic 3D models have been developed, the traditional studies of electromagnetic and magnetohydrodynamic phenomena have been supplemented with research on heat transport, and the stability of the metal free surface has been examined. The paper concludes with three generalizations concerning modeling that may have wider applicability than EMC.

  19. Electromagnetic Geometry

    E-print Network

    M. Novello; F. T. Falciano; E. Goulart

    2011-11-08

    We show that Maxwell's electromagnetism can be mapped into the Born-Infeld theory in a curved space-time, which depends only on the electromagnetic field in a specific way. This map is valid for any value of the two lorentz invariants $F$ and $G$ confirming that we have included all possible solutions of Maxwell's equations. Our result seems to show that specifying the dynamics and the space-time structure of a given theory can be viewed merely as a choice of representation to describe the physical system.

  20. Electron Emission Rates and Target Current for a Cooled LiNbO-3 Crystal vs. Time, Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafroth, S. M.; Bedair, Sarah; Karwowski, Hugon; Brownridge, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    To compliment the comprehensive study of X-Ray Generation, crystal surface charge and light production vs. time and temperature for different pyroelectric crystals by Brownridge and Raboy^1,we have observed electron emission^2 vs pressure and temperature for a 4 mm diam x 10 mm long cylindrical LiNbO-3 crystal using the cubical chamber and LaBVIEW program described in the previous abstract. The experimental arrangement at Chapel Hill for studying the electron emission rate consists of an insulated target rod and a target of copper evaporated onto a thin Al foil with a pin-hole in the center to allow electrons to reach the surface barrier detector (necessary to avoid swamping the electron detector). Typical electron production rate as well as target current vs. time for different maximum temperatures and pressures for air will be presented and the relationship with the data of Brownridge and Raboy where possible will be discussed. 1. J.D. Brownridge, and S. Raboy, J. Appl. Phys. 86, 640 (1999) 2. 1 J.D. Brownridge, S. M. Shafroth, D. Trott, B. Stoner, W. Hooke, Appl. Phys. Lett, 79, 3364 (2001)

  1. Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Magnetic Anomalies: Ion and Electron Dynamics Under Varying Solar Wind Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Divin, A. V.; Lapenta, G.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.; Horanyi, M.

    2014-12-01

    We present three-dimensional fully kinetic and electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier MHD and hybrid simulations, the fully kinetic nature of iPic3D allows to investigate the space charge effects and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe the general picture of the interaction of a dipole model centered just below the lunar surface under various solar wind and plasma conditions, and focus afterwards on the ion and electron kinetic behavior of the system. It is shown that the configuration is dominated by electron motion, because the LMA scale size is small with respect to the gyroradius of the solar wind ions. The dominant LMA interaction mechanism is also highly dependent on the solar wind and IMF conditions. Driven by strong pressure anisotropies, the mini-magnetosphere is also unstable over time, leading to only temporal shielding of the surface underneath. Our work opens new frontiers of research toward a deeper understanding of LMAs and is ideally suited to be compared with field or particle observations from spacecraft such as Kaguya (SELENE), Lunar Prospector or ARTEMIS. The ability to evaluate the implications for future lunar exploration as well as lunar science in general hinges on a better understanding of LMAs. This research has received funding from the European Commission's FP7 Program with the grant agreement SWIFF (project 2633430, swiff.eu) and EHEROES (project 284461, www.eheroes.eu). The simulations were conducted on the computational resources provided by the PRACE Tier-0 project 2011050747 (Curie) and 2013091928 (SuperMUC). This research was supported by the Swedish National Space Board, Grant No. 136/11. JD has received support through the HPC-Europa2 visitor programme (project HPC08SSG85) and the KuLeuven Junior Mobility Programme Special Research Fund.

  2. ECE 341: Electromagnetic Fields I EM devices and systems

    E-print Network

    Connors, Daniel A.

    in material media - Electromagnetic induction - Inductance - Magnetic energy Applications: - ElectronicsECE 341: Electromagnetic Fields I EM devices and systems - Can compute and analyze potentials compositions - Can evaluate capacitance, inductance, resistance, and conductance of EM structures - Understands

  3. Dynamic changes of emitting electron distribution in the jet of 3C 279: signatures of acceleration and cooling

    E-print Network

    Yan, Dahai; Liao, Jinyuan; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2015-01-01

    We study the dynamic changes of electron energy distribution (EED) through systematically analysing the quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the flat spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 in different states. With Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique we model fourteen SEDs of 3C 279 using a leptonic model with a three-parameter log-parabola electron energy distribution (EED). The 14 SEDs can be satisfactorily fitted with the one-zone leptonic model. The observed $\\gamma$ rays in 13 states are attributed to Compton scattering of external infrared photons from a surrounding dusty torus. The curved $\\gamma$-ray spectrum observed during 2-8 April 2014 is well explained by the external Compton of dust radiation. It is found that there is a clear positive correlation between the curvature parameter $b$ of the EED and the electron peak energy $\\gamma'_{\\rm pk}$. No clear correlation between $b$ and the synchrotron peak frequency $\

  4. Electromagnetic Survey

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A USGS hydrologist conducts a near-surface electromagnetic induction survey to characterize the shallow earth. The survey was conducted as part of an applied research effort by the USGS Office of Groundwater Branch of Geophysics at Camp Rell, Connecticut, in 2008....

  5. Electromagnetic Survey

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS hydrologist conducts a broadband electromagnetic survey in New Orleans, Louisiana. The survey was one of several geophysical methods used during USGS applied research on the utility of the multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) seismic method for non-invasive assessment of earthen levee...

  6. Development of the Measurement System for the Search of an Electric Dipole Moment of the Electron with Laser-Cooled Francium Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Kato, T.; Kawamura, H.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2014-03-01

    We plan to measure the permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron, which has the sensitivity to the CP violation in theories beyond the standard model by using the laser-cooled francium (Fr) atom. This paper reports the present status of the EDM measurement system. A high voltage application system was constructed in order to produce the strong electric field (100 kV/cm) needed for the experiment. After conditioning, the leakage current was 10 pA when a high voltage of 43 kV was applied. Also, a drift of an environmental field was measured at the planned location of the Fr-EDM experiment. The drift is suppressed at present down to the level of 10 pT by installing a 4-layermagnetic shield. Improvements are still needed to reach the required field stability of 1 fT.

  7. Multi-objective Optimizations of a Novel Cryo-cooled DC Gun Based Ultra Fast Electron Diffraction Beamline

    E-print Network

    Gulliford, C; Bazarov, I

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of multi-objective genetic algorithm optimizations of a potential single shot ultra fast electron diffraction beamline utilizing a 225 kV dc gun with a novel cryocooled photocathode system and buncher cavity. Optimizations of the transverse projected emittance as a function of bunch charge are presented and discussed in terms of the scaling laws derived in the charge saturation limit. Additionally, optimization of the transverse coherence length as a function of final rms bunch length at sample location have been performed for three different sample radii: 50, 100, 200 microns, for two final bunch charges: 100k and 1000k electrons. Analysis of the solutions is discussed, as are the effects of disorder induced heating. In particular, a coherence length per rms spot size of 0.27 nm/micron was obtained for a final bunch charge of 100k electrons and final rms bunch length of approximately 100 fs. For a final charge of 1000k electrons the cryogun produces a coherence length per rms spot size...

  8. Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Motors Annual Report -- 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.; DeVoto, D.; Moreno, G.; Rugh, J.; Waye, S.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the research into advanced liquid cooling, integrated power module cooling, high temperature air cooled power electronics, two-phase cooling for power electronics, and electric motor thermal management by NREL's Power Electronics group in FY13.

  9. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Modeling and Computing Example for Effective Electromagnetic Parameters of Multiphase Composite Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei-Li; Yuan, Jie; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2009-05-01

    A method using strong fluctuation theory (SFT) to compute the effective electromagnetic parameters of multiphase composite media, and common materials used to design radar-absorbing materials, is demonstrated. The effective electromagnetic parameters of ultrafine carbonyl-iron (DT-50) and fiber fabric, which are both multiphase composite media and represent coated and structured radar absorbing materials, respectively, are investigated, and the corresponding equations of electromagnetic parameters by using the SFT are attained. Moreover, we design a program to simplify the solutions, and the results are discussed.

  10. Bremsstrahlung in the scattering of low-energy electrons by neutral atomic systems. [in atmosphere of sun and cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    By elementary methods, the cross section for electron-atom and electron-molecule bremsstrahlung is computed in the limit when the incident electron energy is much less than Ry. The procedure employs the classical soft-photon emission probability formula for general (h/2pi)(omega), yielding a simple expression for the bremsstrahlung cross section in terms of the total elastic scattering cross section. The validity of the method is discussed, and results are compared with more elaborate and accurate calculations. Comparison is made with ('free-free') opacity calculations for the associated process at the temperature (6300 K) of the solar atmosphere. For chi sub omega = (h/2pi)(omega)/kT = 1, the computed absorption coefficient is within 2, 7, and 12 percent of accurate calculations for scatterings by H, He, and H2, respectively. The general dependence of the opacity on chi sub omega is described well by the simple formula, although the error is larger for higher chi sub omega; it is suggested that the inaccuracy at high frequencies is due to the failure of the soft-photon approximation.

  11. Anisotropic conducting films for electromagnetic radiation applications

    DOEpatents

    Cavallo, Francesca; Lagally, Max G.; Rojas-Delgado, Richard

    2015-06-16

    Electronic devices for the generation of electromagnetic radiation are provided. Also provided are methods for using the devices to generate electromagnetic radiation. The radiation sources include an anisotropic electrically conducting thin film that is characterized by a periodically varying charge carrier mobility in the plane of the film. The periodic variation in carrier mobility gives rise to a spatially varying electric field, which produces electromagnetic radiation as charged particles pass through the film.

  12. Electromagnetic interactions at RHIC and LHC

    E-print Network

    M. C. Guclu

    2008-11-15

    At LHC energies the Lorentz factor will be 3400 for the Pb + Pb collisions and the electromagnetic interactions will play important roles. Cross sections for the electromagnetic particle productions are very large and can not be ignored for the lifetimes of the beams and background. In this article, we are going to study some of the electromagnetic processes at RHIC and LHC and show the cross section calculations of the electron-positron pair production with the giant dipole resonance of the ions.

  13. Electromagnetic Reciprocity.

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, David F.

    2014-11-01

    A reciprocity theorem is an explicit mathematical relationship between two different wavefields that can exist within the same space - time configuration. Reciprocity theorems provi de the theoretical underpinning for mod ern full waveform inversion solutions, and also suggest practical strategies for speed ing up large - scale numerical modeling of geophysical datasets . In the present work, several previously - developed electromagnetic r eciprocity theorems are generalized to accommodate a broader range of medi um, source , and receiver types. Reciprocity relations enabling the interchange of various types of point sources and point receivers within a three - dimensional electromagnetic model are derived. Two numerical modeling algorithms in current use are successfully tested for adherence to reciprocity. Finally, the reciprocity theorem forms the point of departure for a lengthy derivation of electromagnetic Frechet derivatives. These mathe matical objects quantify the sensitivity of geophysical electromagnetic data to variatio ns in medium parameters, and thus constitute indispensable tools for solution of the full waveform inverse problem. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sandia National Labor atories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE - AC04 - 94AL85000. Signif icant portions of the work reported herein were conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and CARBO Ceramics Incorporated. The author acknowledges Mr. Chad Cannan and Mr. Terry Pa lisch of CARBO Ceramics, and Ms. Amy Halloran, manager of SNL's Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences Department, for their interest in and encouragement of this work. Special thanks are due to Dr . Lewis C. Bartel ( recently retired from Sandia National Labo ratories and now a geophysical consultant ) and Dr. Chester J. Weiss (recently rejoined with Sandia National Laboratories) for many stimulating (and reciprocal!) discussions regar ding the topic at hand.

  14. Pulsed WIP electron gun. Fabrication phase 1 x 40 cm and 1 x 70 cm cooled WIP electron gun. Final report, March 1979-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Wakalopulos, G.

    1980-01-01

    An electron gun capable of long-run operation at 10 KHz and 1 A/cm/sup 2/ has been fabricated and tested. Pulse widths of 200 to 600 nsec and a total life of greater than 10/sup 7/ shots have been demonstrated. During the acceptance tests, the electron gun was operated at a total average power of 20 KW for 30 minutes. This basically satisfied the contract requirements. To establish some upper limit of the gun's capability, the device was operated at a repetition rate of 3.5 KHz at a total average power of 54.5 KW for greater than 10 minutes. During these tests, no high voltage breakdown occurred after the device was processed. The beam uniformity at high repetition rates is +-10% and the efficiency is 50%.

  15. Noise and Bandwidth Measurements of Diffusion-Cooled Nb Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers at Frequencies Above the Superconductive Energy Gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyss, R. A.; Karasik, B. S.; McGrath, W. R.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H.

    1999-01-01

    Diffusion-cooled Nb hot-electron bolometer (HEB) mixers have the potential to simultaneously achieve high intermediate frequency (IF) bandwidths and low mixer noise temperatures for operation at THz frequencies (above the superconductive gap energy). We have measured the IF signal bandwidth at 630 GHz of Nb devices with lengths L = 0.3, 0.2, and 0.1 micrometer in a quasioptical mixer configuration employing twin-slot antennas. The 3-dB EF bandwidth increased from 1.2 GHz for the 0.3 gm long device to 9.2 GHz for the 0.1 gm long device. These results demonstrate the expected 1/L squared dependence of the IF bandwidth at submillimeter wave frequencies for the first time, as well as the largest EF bandwidth obtained to date. For the 0.1 gm device, which had the largest bandwidth, the double sideband (DSB) noise temperature of the receiver was 320-470 K at 630 GHz with an absorbed LO power of 35 nW, estimated using the isothermal method. A version of this mixer with the antenna length scaled for operation at 2.5 THz has also been tested. A DSB receiver noise temperature of 1800 plus or minus 100 K was achieved, which is about 1,000 K lower than our previously reported results. These results demonstrate that large EF bandwidth and low-noise operation of a diffusion-cooled HEB mixer is possible at THz frequencies with the same device geometry.

  16. Ultrashort electromagnetic pulses in graphene with disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konobeeva, N. N.; Belonenko, M. B.

    2015-08-01

    Maxwell's equations describing an electromagnetic field propagating in graphene with disorder are analyzed. The spectrum of electrons for the graphene subsystem is chosen based on the renormalization group approach. An effective equation governing the vector potential of the electromagnetic field is derived and solved numerically. The dependence of the pulse shape on parameters of the problem is investigated.

  17. Self-Consistent Model of Magnetospheric Ring Current and Propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves. 2; Waves, Precipitating Ring Current Ions, and Thermal Electron Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Gallagher, D. L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to further presentations and discussions of the results from our new global self-consistent theoretical model of interacting ring current ions and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves [Khazanov et al., 2006; here referred to as Paper 1]. In order to adequately take into account the wave propagation and refraction in a multi-ion plasmasphere, we explicitly include the ray tracing equations in our previous self-consistent model and use the general form of the wave kinetic equation [for details see Paper 1]. To demonstrate the effects of the EMIC wave propagation and refraction on the RC proton precipitations and heating of the thermal plasmaspheric electrons we simulate the May 1998 storm. The main findings of our simulation can be summarized as follows. Firstly, the wave induced precipitations have a quite fine structure, and are highly organized by location of the plasmapause gradient. The strongest fluxes of about 4 (raised dot) 10(exp 6) [(cm (raised dot) s (raised dot) sr)(sup -l)] are observed during the main and early recovery phases of the storm. The very interesting and probably more important finding is that in a number of cases the most intense precipitating fluxes are not simply connected to the most intense EMIC waves. The character of the EMIC wave power spectral density distribution over the equatorial wave normal angle is an extremely crucial for the effectiveness of the RC ion scattering. Secondly, comparison of the global proton precipitating patterns with the results from other ring current model [Kozyra et al., 1997] reveals that although we observe a qualitative agreement between localizations of the wave induced fluxes in the models, there is no quantitative agreement between the magnitudes of these fluxes. These differences are mainly due to a qualitative difference between the characters of the EMIC wave power spectral density distributions over the equatorial wave normal angle. Finally, the two energy sources to the plasmaspheric electrons are considered; (i) the heat fluxes caused by the EMIC wave energy absorption due to Landau resonance, and (ii) the heat fluxes due to Coulomb energy degradation of the RC o(+) ions. The heat fluxes caused by the EMIC wave energy absorption due to Landau resonance are observed in the postnoon-premidnight MLT sector, and maximize at the magnitude of 10l1 (eV/(cm(sup 2)(raised dot) s) at L=3.25, MLT=22 at 3400 UT after 1 May, 0000 UT. The greatest Coulomb energy deposition rates are about 2 (raised dot) 10(sup 10)(eV/(cm(sup 2)(raised dot) s) and observed during two periods; 32-48 hours, and 76-86 hours after 1 May, 0000 UT. The theoretically derived spatial structure of the thermal electron heating caused by interaction of the RC with plasmasphere is strongly supported by concurrent and conjugate plasma measurements from the plasmasphere, the RC, and the topside ionosphere [Gurgiolo et al., 20051.

  18. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  19. Colouring cryo-cooled crystals: online microspectrophotometry

    PubMed Central

    McGeehan, John; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Murray, James W.; Owen, Robin Leslie; Cipriani, Florent; McSweeney, Sean; Weik, Martin; Garman, Elspeth F.

    2009-01-01

    X-rays can produce a high concentration of radicals within cryo-cooled macromolecular crystals. Some radicals have large extinction coefficients in the visible (VIS) range of the electromagnetic spectrum, and can be observed optically and spectrally. An online microspectrophotometer with high temporal resolution has been constructed that is capable of measuring UV/VIS absorption spectra (200–1100?nm) during X-ray data collection. The typical X-ray-induced blue colour that is characteristic of a wide range of cryo-conditions has been identified as trapped solvated electrons. Disulphide-containing proteins are shown to form disulphide radicals at millimolar concentrations, with absorption maxima around 400?nm. The solvated electrons and the disulphide radicals seem to have a lifetime in the range of seconds up to minutes at 100?K. The temperature dependence of the kinetics of X-ray-induced radical formation is different for the solvated electrons compared with the disulphide radicals. The online microspectrophotometer provides a technique complementary to X-ray diffraction for analysing and characterizing intermediates and redox states of proteins and enzymes. PMID:19240328

  20. Cool Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Amid climbing energy costs and tightening budgets, administrators at school districts, colleges and universities are looking for all avenues of potential savings while promoting sustainable communities. Cool metal roofing can save schools money and promote sustainable design at the same time. Cool metal roofing keeps the sun's heat from collecting…

  1. Carbon nanotube-copper exhibiting metal-like thermal conductivity and silicon-like thermal expansion for efficient cooling of electronics.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Chandramouli; Yasuda, Yuzuri; Takeya, Satoshi; Ata, Seisuke; Nishizawa, Ayumi; Futaba, Don; Yamada, Takeo; Hata, Kenji

    2014-03-01

    Increasing functional complexity and dimensional compactness of electronic devices have led to progressively higher power dissipation, mainly in the form of heat. Overheating of semiconductor-based electronics has been the primary reason for their failure. Such failures originate at the interface of the heat sink (commonly Cu and Al) and the substrate (silicon) due to the large mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients (?300%) of metals and silicon. Therefore, the effective cooling of such electronics demands a material with both high thermal conductivity and a similar coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) to silicon. Addressing this demand, we have developed a carbon nanotube-copper (CNT-Cu) composite with high metallic thermal conductivity (395 W m(-1) K(-1)) and a low, silicon-like CTE (5.0 ppm K(-1)). The thermal conductivity was identical to that of Cu (400 W m(-1) K(-1)) and higher than those of most metals (Ti, Al, Au). Importantly, the CTE mismatch between CNT-Cu and silicon was only ?10%, meaning an excellent compatibility. The seamless integration of CNTs and Cu was achieved through a unique two-stage electrodeposition approach to create an extensive and continuous interface between the Cu and CNTs. This allowed for thermal contributions from both Cu and CNTs, resulting in high thermal conductivity. Simultaneously, the high volume fraction of CNTs balanced the thermal expansion of Cu, accounting for the low CTE of the CNT-Cu composite. The experimental observations were in good quantitative concurrence with the theoretically described 'matrix-bubble' model. Further, we demonstrated identical in-situ thermal strain behaviour of the CNT-Cu composite to Si-based dielectrics, thereby generating the least interfacial thermal strain. This unique combination of properties places CNT-Cu as an isolated spot in an Ashby map of thermal conductivity and CTE. Finally, the CNT-Cu composite exhibited the greatest stability to temperature as indicated by its low thermal distortion parameter (TDP). Thus, this material presents a viable and efficient alternative to existing materials for thermal management in electronics. PMID:24441433

  2. Electromagnetic Transport from Microtearing Mode Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Bell, R. E.; Hammett, G. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Candy, J.; Nevins, W. M.; Wang, E.; Yuh, H.

    2011-04-15

    This Letter presents nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing mode turbulence. The simulations include collisional and electromagnetic effects and use experimental parameters from a high-{beta} discharge in the National Spherical Torus Experiment. The predicted electron thermal transport is comparable to that given by experimental analysis, and it is dominated by the electromagnetic contribution of electrons free-streaming along the resulting stochastic magnetic field line trajectories. Experimental values of flow shear can significantly reduce the predicted transport.

  3. Electromagnetic Transport From Microtearing Mode Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Guttenfelder, W; Kaye, S M; Nevins, W M; Wang, E; Bell, R E; Hammett, G W; LeBlanc, B P; Mikkelsen, D R

    2011-03-23

    This Letter presents non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing mode turbulence. The simulations include collisional and electromagnetic effects and use experimental parameters from a high beta discharge in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The predicted electron thermal transport is comparable to that given by experimental analysis, and it is dominated by the electromagnetic contribution of electrons free streaming along the resulting stochastic magnetic field line trajectories. Experimental values of flow shear can significantly reduce the predicted transport.

  4. k-space drift due to the density variation as a cause of electromagnetic emission generation of type III solar radio bursts by a non-gyrotropic electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklauri, David; Schmitz, Holger

    2013-04-01

    It is widely accepted that there is a correlation between super-thermal electron beams and type III solar radio bursts. Whilst the correlation is an established fact, the actual mechanism that generates the type III burst emission is not yet fully determined. The main source of the uncertainty is current inability to send in-situ probes at distances 0.15 - 1.5Rsun from the solar surface (photosphere). The most widely accepted mechanism, that historically appeared first is the plasma emission. In plasma emission mechanism quasilinear theory, kinetic Fokker-Planck type equation for describing the dynamics of an electron beam is used, in conjunction with the spectral energy density evolutionary equations for Langmuir and ion-sound waves. Further, non-linear wave-wave interactions between Langmuir, ion-acoustic and EM waves produce emission at electron plasma frequency, ?pe or the second harmonic, 2?pe. A variant of the plasma emission mechanism is the stochastic growth theory, where density irregularities produce a random growth, in such a way that Langmuir waves are generated stochastically and quasilinear interactions within the Langmuir clumps cause the beam to fluctuate about marginal stability. The latter models have been used for producing the solar type III burst observable parameters. Other possible mechanisms include: linear mode conversion, antenna radiation and non-gyrotropic electron beam emission [1]. Recent works [2,3] elucidated further the non-gyrotropic electron beam emission, first proposed in Ref.[1]. In particular, the effect of electron beam pitch angle and density gradient on solar type III radio bursts was studied [2] and the role of electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission with a possible mode coupling to the z-mode was explored [3]. In this contribution and paper [4], using large-scale Particle-In-Cell simulations, we explore the non-gyrotropic electron beam emission mechanism by studying the effects of electron beam kinetics and k-space drift, in long term evolution of electromagnetic emission generation of type III solar radio bursts. The following improvements and progress in understanding of the radio emission mechanism are made: (i) Improved numerical simulations with larger spatial domain and longer end-simulation times; (ii) The electron beam injection on a density plateau followed by a decreasing density gradient that mimics the Sun-earth system; (iii) Consideration of a ring and shifted ring electron initial velocity distribution functions; (iv) The role of the k-space drift in the radio emission; (v) Estimation of the ECM growth rate and its role in the emission generation. It is worthwhile to note that Ref.[3] proposed mode coupling on the density gradient as a source of radio emission as opposed to the k-space drift advocated in the present work. The situation is analogous to the auroral waves emitted near the plasma frequency in Earth auroral ionosphere [A. Layden, I. H. Cairns, P. A. Robinson, and J. LaBelle, J. Geophys. Res. 116, A12328 (2011)]. [1] D. Tsiklauri, "An alternative to the plasma emission model: Particle-In-Cell, self-consistent electromagnetic wave emission simulations of solar type III radio bursts", Physics of Plasmas 18, 052903 (2011) [2] R. Pechhacker, D. Tsiklauri, "The effect of electron beam pitch angle and density gradient on solar type III radio bursts", Phys. Plasmas 19, 112903 (2012) [3] R. Pechhacker, D. Tsiklauri, "Electron cyclotron maser emission mode coupling to the z-mode on a longitudinal density gradient in the context of solar type III bursts", Phys. Plasmas 19, 110702 (2012) [4] H. Schmitz, D. Tsiklauri, "k-space drift due to the density variation as a cause of electromagnetic emission generation of type III solar radio bursts by a non-gyrotropic electron beam", Phys. Plasmas, in preparation, (2013)

  5. Effectiveness-weighted control of cooling system components

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Levi A.; Chu, Richard C.; David, Milnes P.; Ellsworth Jr., Michael J.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Simons, Robert E.

    2015-12-22

    Energy efficient control of cooling system cooling of an electronic system is provided based, in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components. The control includes automatically determining speed control settings for multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components of the cooling system, and the determining operates to limit power consumption of at least the cooling system, while ensuring that a target temperature associated with at least one of the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range by provisioning, based on the weighted cooling effectiveness, a desired target temperature change among the multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The provisioning includes provisioning applied power to the multiple adjustable cooling components via, at least in part, the determined control settings.

  6. Effectiveness-weighted control method for a cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Levi A.; Chu, Richard C.; David, Milnes P.; Ellsworth Jr., Michael J.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Simons, Robert E.

    2015-12-15

    Energy efficient control of cooling system cooling of an electronic system is provided based, in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components. The control includes automatically determining speed control settings for multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components of the cooling system, and the determining operates to limit power consumption of at least the cooling system, while ensuring that a target temperature associated with at least one of the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range by provisioning, based on the weighted cooling effectiveness, a desired target temperature change among the multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The provisioning includes provisioning applied power to the multiple adjustable cooling components via, at least in part, the determined control settings.

  7. Stability of cooled beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosser, J.; Carli, C.; Chanel, M.; Madsen, N.; Maury, S.; Möhl, D.; Tranquille, G.

    2000-02-01

    Because of their high density together with extremely small spreads in betatron frequency and momentum, cooled beams are very vulnerable to incoherent and coherent space-charge effects and instabilities. Moreover, the cooling system itself, i.e. the electron beam in the case of e-cooling, presents large linear and non-linear "impedances" to the circulating ion beam, in addition to the usual beam-environment coupling impedances of the storage ring. Beam blow-up and losses, attributed to such effects, have been observed in virtually all the existing electron cooling rings. The adverse effects seem to be more pronounced in those rings, like CELSIUS, that are equipped with a cooler capable of reaching the presently highest energy (100-300 keV electrons corresponding to 180-560 MeV protons). The stability conditions will be revisited with emphasis on the experience gained at LEAR. It will be argued that for all present coolers, three conditions are necessary (although probably not sufficient) for the stability of intense cold beams: (i) operation below transition energy, (ii) active damping to counteract coherent instability, and (iii) careful control of the e-beam neutralisation. An extrapolation to the future "medium energy coolers", planned to work for (anti)protons of several GeV, will also be attempted.

  8. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, William F. (Austin, TX)

    1996-01-01

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

  9. Cool Vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    ILC, Dover Division's lightweight cooling garment, called Cool Vest was designed to eliminate the harmful effects of heat stress; increases tolerance time in hot environments by almost 300 percent. Made of urethane-coated nylon used in Apollo, it works to keep the body cool, circulating chilled water throughout the lining by means of a small battery-powered pump. A pocket houses the pump, battery and the coolant which can be ice or a frozen gel, a valve control allows temperature regulation. One version is self-contained and portable for unrestrained movement, another has an umbilical line attached to an external source of coolant, such as standard tap water, when extended mobility is not required. It is reported from customers that the Cool Vest pays for itself in increased productivity in very high temperatures.

  10. Ventilative cooling

    E-print Network

    Graça, Guilherme Carrilho da, 1972-

    1999-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the performance of daytime and nighttime passive ventilation cooling strategies for Beijing, Shanghai and Tokyo. A new simulation method for cross-ventilated wind driven airflow is presented . This ...

  11. Electromagnetic radiation from beam-plasma instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Whelan, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism by which unstable electrostatic waves of an electron-beam plasma system are converted into observed electromagnetic waves is of great current interest in space plasma physics. Electromagnetic radiation arises from both natural beam-plasma systems, e.g., type III solar bursts and kilometric radiation, and from man-made electron beams injected from rockets and spacecraft. In the present investigation the diagnostic difficulties encountered in space plasmas are overcome by using a large laboratory plasma. A finite diameter (d approximately equal to 0.8 cm) electron beam is injected into a uniform quiescent magnetized afterglow plasma of dimensions large compared with electromagnetic wavelength. Electrostatic waves grow, saturate and decay within the uniform central region of the plasma volume so that linear mode conversion on density gradients can be excluded as a possible generation mechanism for electromagnetic waves.

  12. Advance in MEIC cooling studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuhong; Derbenev, Ya.; Douglas, D.; Hutton, A.; Kimber, A.; Li, R.; Nissen, E.; Tennant,; Zhang, H.

    2013-06-01

    Cooling of ion beams is essential for achieving a high luminosity for MEIC at Jefferson Lab. In this paper, we present the design concept of the electron cooling system for MEIC. In the design, two facilities are required for supporting a multi-staged cooling scheme; one is a 2 MeV DC cooler in the ion pre-booster; the other is a high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) ERL-circulator cooler in the collider ring. The simulation studies of beam dynamics in an ERL-circulator cooler are summarized and followed by a report on technology development for this cooler. We also discuss two proposed experiments for demonstrating high energy cooling with a bunched electron beam and the ERL-circulator cooler.

  13. Narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-11-19

    A narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method of sensing a characteristic of an object provide the capability to realize a characteristic of an object such as density, thickness, or presence, for any desired coordinate position on the object. One application is imaging. The sensor can also be used as an obstruction detector or an electronic trip wire with a narrow field without the disadvantages of impaired performance when exposed to dirt, snow, rain, or sunlight. The sensor employs a transmitter for transmitting a sequence of electromagnetic signals in response to a transmit timing signal, a receiver for sampling only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while excluding all other electromagnetic signals in response to a receive timing signal, and a signal processor for processing the sampled direct RF path electromagnetic signal and providing an indication of the characteristic of an object. Usually, the electromagnetic signal is a short RF burst and the obstruction must provide a substantially complete eclipse of the direct RF path. By employing time-of-flight techniques, a timing circuit controls the receiver to sample only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while not sampling indirect path electromagnetic signals. The sensor system also incorporates circuitry for ultra-wideband spread spectrum operation that reduces interference to and from other RF services while allowing co-location of multiple electronic sensors without the need for frequency assignments. 12 figs.

  14. Narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method of sensing a characteristic of an object provide the capability to realize a characteristic of an object such as density, thickness, or presence, for any desired coordinate position on the object. One application is imaging. The sensor can also be used as an obstruction detector or an electronic trip wire with a narrow field without the disadvantages of impaired performance when exposed to dirt, snow, rain, or sunlight. The sensor employs a transmitter for transmitting a sequence of electromagnetic signals in response to a transmit timing signal, a receiver for sampling only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while excluding all other electromagnetic signals in response to a receive timing signal, and a signal processor for processing the sampled direct RF path electromagnetic signal and providing an indication of the characteristic of an object. Usually, the electromagnetic signal is a short RF burst and the obstruction must provide a substantially complete eclipse of the direct RF path. By employing time-of-flight techniques, a timing circuit controls the receiver to sample only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while not sampling indirect path electromagnetic signals. The sensor system also incorporates circuitry for ultra-wideband spread spectrum operation that reduces interference to and from other RF services while allowing co-location of multiple electronic sensors without the need for frequency assignments.

  15. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, W.F.

    1996-05-07

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers. 10 figs.

  16. PERFORMANCE OF THE CONDUCTION-COOLED LDX LEVITATION COIL

    E-print Network

    the weight of the F-coil and controls its vertical position within the vacuum chamber. The use of high-temperature leads consist of conduction-cooled copper running from room temperature to 80 K and a pair Dipole Experiment (LDX), the Levitation Coil (L-coil) was a water-cooled, resistive electromagnet [1

  17. An Assessment of Hazards Caused by Electromagnetic Interaction on Humans Present near Short-Wave Physiotherapeutic Devices of Various Types Including Hazards for Users of Electronic Active Implantable Medical Devices (AIMD)

    PubMed Central

    Gryz, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Leakage of electromagnetic fields (EMF) from short-wave radiofrequency physiotherapeutic diathermies (SWDs) may cause health and safety hazards affecting unintentionally exposed workers (W) or general public (GP) members (assisting patient exposed during treatment or presenting there for other reasons). Increasing use of electronic active implantable medical devices (AIMDs), by patients, attendants, and workers, needs attention because dysfunctions of these devices may be caused by electromagnetic interactions. EMF emitted by 12 SWDs (with capacitive or inductive applicators) were assessed following international guidelines on protection against EMF exposure (International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection for GP and W, new European directive 2013/35/EU for W, European Recommendation for GP, and European Standard EN 50527-1 for AIMD users). Direct EMF hazards for humans near inductive applicators were identified at a distance not exceeding 45?cm for W or 62?cm for GP, but for AIMD users up to 90?cm (twice longer than that for W and 50% longer than that for GP because EMF is pulsed modulated). Near capacitive applicators emitting continuous wave, the corresponding distances were: 120?cm for W or 150?cm for both—GP or AIMD users. This assessment does not cover patients who undergo SWD treatment (but it is usually recommended for AIMD users to be careful with EMF treatment). PMID:24089662

  18. Electromagnetically controlled multiferroic thermal diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotorlishvili, L.; Etesami, S. R.; Berakdar, J.; Khomeriki, R.; Ren, Jie

    2015-10-01

    We propose an electromagnetically tunable thermal diode based on a two-phase multiferroic composite. Analytical and full numerical calculations for a prototypical heterojunction composed of iron on barium titanate in the tetragonal phase demonstrate a strong heat rectification effect that can be controlled externally by a moderate electric field. This finding is important for thermally based information processing and sensing and can also be integrated in (spin) electronic circuits for heat management and recycling.

  19. Development of a strong electromagnet wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, M.J.; Deis, G.A.; Holmes, R.H.; Van Maren, R.D.; Halbach, K.

    1987-01-01

    The Strong Electromagnet (SEM) wiggler is a permanent magnet-assisted electromagnet under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Induction Linac Free-Electron-Laser (IFEL) program. This concept uses permanent magnets within the wiggler to provide a reverse bias flux in the iron and thus delay the onset of magnetic saturation. The electromagnet coils determine the wiggler field and operate at low current densities by virtue of their placement away from the midplane. We describe here the design approach used and test data from a 7-period wiggler prototype that includes curved pole tips to provide wiggle-plane focusing. 7 refs.

  20. Development of the strong electromagnet wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, M.J.; Deis, G.A.; Holmes, R.H.; Van Maren, R.D.; Halbach, K.

    1988-03-01

    The Strong Electromagnet (SEM) wiggler is a permanent magnet-assisted electromagnet under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Induction Linac Free-Electron-Laser (IFEL) program. This concept uses permanent magnets within the wiggler to provide a reverse bias flux in the iron and thus delay the onset of magnetic saturation. The electromagnet coils determine th4e wiggler field and operate at low current densities by virtue of their placement away from the midplane. The authors describe the design approach used and test data from a 7-period wiggler prototype that includes curved pole tips to provide wiggler-plane focusing.

  1. Electromagnetic Calorimeter for HADES

    E-print Network

    W. Czyzycki; E. Epple; L. Fabbietti; M. Golubeva; F. Guber; A. Ivashkin; M. Kajetanowicz; A. Krasa; F. Krizek; A. Kugler; K. Lapidus; E. Lisowski; J. Pietraszko; A. Reshetin; P. Salabura; Y. Sobolev; J. Stanislav; P. Tlusty; T. Torrieri; M. Traxler

    2011-11-28

    We propose to build the Electromagnetic calorimeter for the HADES di-lepton spectrometer. It will enable to measure the data on neutral meson production from nucleus-nucleus collisions, which are essential for interpretation of dilepton data, but are unknown in the energy range of planned experiments (2-10 GeV per nucleon). The calorimeter will improve the electron-hadron separation, and will be used for detection of photons from strange resonances in elementary and HI reactions. Detailed description of the detector layout, the support structure, the electronic readout and its performance studied via Monte Carlo simulations and series of dedicated test experiments is presented. The device will cover the total area of about 8 m^2 at polar angles between 12 and 45 degrees with almost full azimuthal coverage. The photon and electron energy resolution achieved in test experiments amounts to 5-6%/sqrt(E[GeV]) which is sufficient for the eta meson reconstruction with S/B ratio of 0.4% in Ni+Ni collisions at 8 AGeV. A purity of the identified leptons after the hadron rejection, resulting from simulations based on the test measurements, is better than 80% at momenta above 500 MeV/c, where time-of-flight cannot be used.

  2. Motion of charged particles in an electromagnetic knot

    E-print Network

    M. Arrayás; J. L. Trueba

    2010-01-27

    In this paper we consider the classical relativistic motion of charged particles in a knotted electromagnetic field. After reviewing how to construct electromagnetic knots from maps between the three-sphere and the two-sphere, we introduce a mean quadratic radius of the energy density distribution in order to study some properties of this field. We study the classical relativistic motion of electrons in the electromagnetic field of the Hopf map, and compute their trajectories. It is observed that these electrons initially at rest are strongly accelerated by the electromagnetic force, becoming ultrarelativistic in a period of time that depends on the knot energy and size.

  3. Electromagnetic induction methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electromagnetic induction geophysical methods are finding greater and greater use for agricultural purposes. Electromagnetic induction methods measure the electrical conductivity (or resistivity) for a bulk volume of soil directly beneath the surface. An instrument called a ground conductivity meter...

  4. Electromagnetic properties of neutrinos

    E-print Network

    Carlo Giunti; Alexander Studenikin

    2010-06-08

    A short review on electromagnetic properties of neutrinos is presented. In spite of many efforts in the theoretical and experimental studies of neutrino electromagnetic properties, they still remain one of the main puzzles related to neutrinos.

  5. Investigation of electromagnetic welding

    E-print Network

    Pressl, Daniel G. (Daniel Gerd)

    2009-01-01

    We propose several methodologies to study and optimize the electromagnetic process for Electromagnetic Forming (EMF) and Welding (EMW), thereby lowering the necessary process energy up to a factor of three and lengthening ...

  6. Electromagnetic effects on transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.E.; Dinallo, M.A.

    1996-05-01

    Electronic and electrical system protection design can be used to eliminate deleterious effects from lightning, electromagnetic interference, and electrostatic discharges. Evaluation of conventional lightning protection systems using advanced computational modeling in conjunction with rocket-triggered lightning tests suggests that currently used lightning protection system design rules are inadequate and that significant improvements in best practices used for electronic and electrical system protection designs are possible. A case study of lightning induced upset and failure of a railway signal and control system is sketched.

  7. Electromagnetic space-time crystals. III. Dispersion relations for partial solutions

    E-print Network

    G. N. Borzdov

    2014-10-21

    Partial solutions of the Dirac equation describing an electron motion in electromagnetic crystals created by plane waves with linear and circular polarizations are treated. It is shown that the electromagnetic crystal formed by circularly polarized waves possesses the spin birefringence.

  8. 21 CFR 1000.15 - Examples of electronic products subject to the Radiation Control for Health and Safety Act of 1968.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...x-rays and other ionizing electromagnetic radiation, electrons, neutrons, and other particulate radiation include: Ionizing electromagnetic...ionizing electromagnetic radiation: Electron microscopes. Neutron generators. (b) Examples of electronic products...

  9. 21 CFR 1000.15 - Examples of electronic products subject to the Radiation Control for Health and Safety Act of 1968.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...x-rays and other ionizing electromagnetic radiation, electrons, neutrons, and other particulate radiation include: Ionizing electromagnetic...ionizing electromagnetic radiation: Electron microscopes. Neutron generators. (b) Examples of electronic products...

  10. 21 CFR 1000.15 - Examples of electronic products subject to the Radiation Control for Health and Safety Act of 1968.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...x-rays and other ionizing electromagnetic radiation, electrons, neutrons, and other particulate radiation include: Ionizing electromagnetic...ionizing electromagnetic radiation: Electron microscopes. Neutron generators. (b) Examples of electronic products...

  11. 21 CFR 1000.15 - Examples of electronic products subject to the Radiation Control for Health and Safety Act of 1968.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...x-rays and other ionizing electromagnetic radiation, electrons, neutrons, and other particulate radiation include: Ionizing electromagnetic...ionizing electromagnetic radiation: Electron microscopes. Neutron generators. (b) Examples of electronic products...

  12. 21 CFR 1000.15 - Examples of electronic products subject to the Radiation Control for Health and Safety Act of 1968.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...x-rays and other ionizing electromagnetic radiation, electrons, neutrons, and other particulate radiation include: Ionizing electromagnetic...ionizing electromagnetic radiation: Electron microscopes. Neutron generators. (b) Examples of electronic products...

  13. Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Robin

    Mesoscopic Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in Ultracold Atomic Gases Robin Kaiser and Mark D. Havey Mesoscopic Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in Ultracold Atomic Gases #12;39 E xperimental developments permit in the transport proper- ties of electromagnetic radiation in strongly scattering random media. Even in weakly

  14. Electromagnetic Measurements at RHIC

    E-print Network

    Hamagaki, Hideki

    Electromagnetic Measurements at RHIC Hideki Hamagaki Center for Nuclear Study University of Tokyo #12;2/10/2005 "Electromagnetic measurements at RHIC"@ICPAQGP 05 Hideki Hamagaki 2 Prologue · EM probe and where they are produced; #12;2/10/2005 "Electromagnetic measurements at RHIC"@ICPAQGP 05 Hideki Hamagaki

  15. Electromagnetic Measurements at RHIC

    E-print Network

    Hamagaki, Hideki

    Electromagnetic Measurements at RHIC Hideki Hamagaki Center for Nuclear Study Graduate School of Science the University of Tokyo #12;2006/06/29 "Electromagnetic measurements at RHIC"@ATHIC 2006 Hideki;2006/06/29 "Electromagnetic measurements at RHIC"@ATHIC 2006 Hideki Hamagaki 3 Prologue ­ scope of EM measurements · EM

  16. Electromagnetic pulses bone healing booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sintea, S. R.; Pomazan, V. M.; Bica, D.; Grebenisan, D.; Bordea, N.

    2015-11-01

    Posttraumatic bone restoration triggered by the need to assist and stimulate compensatory bone growth in periodontal condition. Recent studies state that specific electromagnetic stimulation can boost the bone restoration, reaching up to 30% decrease in recovery time. Based on the existing data on the electromagnetic parameters, a digital electronic device is proposed for intra oral mounting and bone restoration stimulation in periodontal condition. The electrical signal is applied to an inductive mark that will create and impregnate magnetic field in diseased tissue. The device also monitors the status of the electromagnetic field. Controlled wave forms and pulse frequency signal at programmable intervals are obtained with optimized number of components and miniaturized using surface mounting devices (SMD) circuits and surface mounting technology (SMT), with enhanced protection against abnormal current growth, given the intra-oral environment. The system is powered by an autonomous power supply (battery), to limit the problems caused by powering medical equipment from the main power supply. Currently the device is used in clinical testing, in cycles of six up to twelve months. Basic principles for the electrical scheme and algorithms for pulse generation, pulse control, electromagnetic field control and automation of current monitoring are presented, together with the friendly user interface, suitable for medical data and patient monitoring.

  17. Cryogenic Heat Pipe for Cooling High Temperature Superconductors with Application to

    E-print Network

    Cryogenic Heat Pipe for Cooling High Temperature Superconductors with Application;#12;Cryogenic Heat Pipe for Cooling High Temperature Superconductors with Application to Electromagnetic at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 3 #12;#12;5 Cryogenic Heat Pipe for Cooling High Temperature

  18. Electromagnetically driven dwarf tornados in turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenjereš, Saša

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the concept of interdependency of turbulent flow and electromagnetic fields inside the spiraling galaxies, we explored the possibilities of generating a localized Lorentz force that will produce a three-dimensional swirling flow in weakly conductive fluids. Multiple vortical flow patterns were generated by combining arrays of permanent magnets and electrodes with supplied dc current. This concept was numerically simulated and applied to affect natural convection flow, turbulence, and heat transfer inside a rectangular enclosure heated from below and cooled from above over a range of Rayleigh numbers (104<=Ra<=5×109). The large-eddy simulations revealed that for low- and intermediate-values of Ra, the heat transfer was increased more than five times when an electromagnetic forcing was activated. In contrast to the generally accepted view that electromagnetic forcing will suppress velocity fluctuations and will increase anisotropy of turbulence, we demonstrated that localized forcing can enhance turbulence isotropy of thermal convection compared to its neutral state.

  19. Electromagnetic processes in the atmosphere of pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yukhimuk, A. K.

    1974-01-01

    The work consists of two parts. The first deals with the fine structure of radio pulses. Based on kinetic theory, processes occurring in the plasma shell of a pulsar when external electromagnetic radiation is present are investigated. It is shown that electromagnetic waves cause electrons to drift relative to ions, and initiate longitudinal oscillations. A dispersion equation describing the longitudinal oscillations in magnetized plasma is derived. Conditions for excitation of oscillations are found. Correlation functions of electron density are calculated, along with the coefficients of electromagnetic wave scattering. It is shown that variations in the amplitude of pulsar pulses are associated with scintillations caused by fluctuations in the plasma electron density. The second part of the study presents a mechanism for the radio emission of pulsars. The model of a rotating and a pulsating star, a neutron star with dipolar or more complex magnetic field, is examined.

  20. Compton Sources of Electromagnetic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft,Gerd Priebe

    2011-01-01

    When a relativistic electron beam interacts with a high-field laser beam, intense and highly collimated electromagnetic radiation will be generated through Compton scattering. Through relativistic upshifting and the relativistic Doppler effect, highly energetic polarized photons are radiated along the electron beam motion when the electrons interact with the laser light. For example, X-ray radiation can be obtained when optical lasers are scattered from electrons of tens-of-MeV beam energy. Because of the desirable properties of the radiation produced, many groups around the world have been designing, building, and utilizing Compton sources for a wide variety of purposes. In this review article, we discuss the generation and properties of the scattered radiation, the types of Compton source devices that have been constructed to date, and the prospects of radiation sources of this general type. Due to the possibilities of producing hard electromagnetic radiation in a device that is small compared to the alternative storage ring sources, it is foreseen that large numbers of such sources may be constructed in the future.

  1. Electromagnetic formulation of global gyrokinetic particle simulation in toroidal geometry

    E-print Network

    Lin, Zhihong

    online 9 December 2009 The fluid-kinetic hybrid electron model for global electromagnetic gyrokinetic and their efficient use of the state-of-the-art computational resources.2 Three dimensional electrostatic PIC ,20 kinetic ballooning mode,21 etc. Electromagnetic simulations22,23 are computationally more

  2. Electromagnetic shielding. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, W. E.

    1980-06-01

    The bibliography presents research on electromagnetic shielding of electronic and electrical equipment personnel, and ordnance. The shielding effectiveness of materials and structures is covered. Nuclear electromagnetic pulse shielding is included. This updated bibliography contains 301 abstracts, 19 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  3. Electromagnetically Clean Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stem, Theodore G.; Kenniston, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    The term 'electromagnetically clean solar array' ('EMCSA') refers to a panel that contains a planar array of solar photovoltaic cells and that, in comparison with a functionally equivalent solar-array panel of a type heretofore used on spacecraft, (1) exhibits less electromagnetic interferences to and from other nearby electrical and electronic equipment and (2) can be manufactured at lower cost. The reduction of electromagnetic interferences is effected through a combination of (1) electrically conductive, electrically grounded shielding and (2) reduction of areas of current loops (in order to reduce magnetic moments). The reduction of cost is effected by designing the array to be fabricated as a more nearly unitary structure, using fewer components and fewer process steps. Although EMCSAs were conceived primarily for use on spacecraft they are also potentially advantageous for terrestrial applications in which there are requirements to limit electromagnetic interference. In a conventional solar panel of the type meant to be supplanted by an EMCSA panel, the wiring is normally located on the back side, separated from the cells, thereby giving rise to current loops having significant areas and, consequently, significant magnetic moments. Current-loop geometries are chosen in an effort to balance opposing magnetic moments to limit far-0field magnetic interactions, but the relatively large distances separating current loops makes full cancellation of magnetic fields problematic. The panel is assembled from bare photovoltaic cells by means of multiple sensitive process steps that contribute significantly to cost, especially if electomagnetic cleanliness is desired. The steps include applying a cover glass and electrical-interconnect-cell (CIC) sub-assemble, connecting the CIC subassemblies into strings of series-connected cells, laying down and adhesively bonding the strings onto a panel structure that has been made in a separate multi-step process, and mounting the wiring on the back of the panel. Each step increases the potential for occurrence of latent defects, loss of process control, and attrition of components. An EMCSA panel includes an integral cover made from a transparent material. The silicone cover supplants the individual cover glasses on the cells and serves as an additional unitary structural support that offers the advantage, relative to glass, of the robust, forgiving nature of the silcone material. The cover contains pockets that hold the solar cells in place during the lamination process. The cover is coated with indium tin oxide to make its surface electrically conductive, so that it serves as a contiguous, electrically grounded shield over the entire panel surface. The cells are mounted in proximity to metallic printed wiring. The painted-wiring layer comprises metal-film traces on a sheet of Kapton (or equivalent) polyimide. The traces include contact pads on one side of the sheet for interconnecting the cells. Return leads are on the opposite side of the sheet, positioned to form the return currents substantially as mirror images of, and in proximity to, the cell sheet currents, thereby minimizing magnetic moments. The printed-wiring arrangement mimics the back-wiring arrangement of conventional solar arrays, but the current-loop areas and the resulting magnetic moments are much smaller because the return-current paths are much closer to the solar-cell sheet currents. The contact pads are prepared with solder fo electrical and mechanical bonding to the cells. The pocketed cover/shield, the solar cells, the printed-wiring layer, an electrical bonding agent, a mechanical-bonding agent, a composite structural front-side face sheet, an aluminum honeycomb core, and a composite back-side face sheet are all assembled, then contact pads are soldered to the cells and the agents are cured in a single lamination process.

  4. Excitation of high-frequency electromagnetic waves by energetic electrons with a loss cone distribution in a field-aligned potential drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    1994-01-01

    The electron cyclotron maser instability (CMI) driven by momentum space anisotropy (df/dp (sub perpendicular) greater than 0) has been invoked to explain many aspects, such as the modes of propagation, harmonic emissions, and the source characteristics of the auroral kilometric radiation (AKR). Recent satellite observations of AKR sources indicate that the source regions are often imbedded within the auroral acceleration region characterized by the presence of a field-aligned potential drop. In this paper we investigate the excitation of the fundamental extraordinary mode radiation due to the accelerated electrons. The momentum space distribution of these energetic electrons is modeled by a realistic upward loss cone as modified by the presence of a parallel potential drop below the observation point. On the basis of linear growth rate calculations we present the emission characteristics, such as the frequency spectrum and the emission angular distribution as functions of the plasma parameters. We will discuss the implication of our results on the generation of the AKR from the edges of the auroral density cavities.

  5. Dark state cooling of a trapped ion using microwave coupling

    E-print Network

    Yong Lu; Jian-Qi Zhang; Jin-Ming Cui; Dong-Yang Cao; Shuo Zhang; Yun-Feng Huang; Chuan-Feng Li; Guang-Can Guo

    2015-07-09

    We propose a new dark-state cooling method of trapped ion systems in the Lamb-Dicke limit. With application of microwave dressing the ion, we can obtain two electromagnetically induced transparency structures. The heating effects caused by the carrier and the blue sideband transition vanish due to the EIT effects and the final mean phonon numbers can be much less than the recoil limit. Our scheme is robust to fluctuations of microwave power and laser intensities which provides a broad cooling bandwidth to cool motional modes of a linear ion chain. Moreover, it is more suitable to cool four-level ions on a large-scale ion chip.

  6. Electromagnetic structure of pion

    SciTech Connect

    Mello, Clayton S.; Cruz Filho, Jose P.; Da Silva, Edson O.; El-Bennich, Bruno; De Melo, J. P.; Filho, Victo S.

    2013-03-25

    In this work, we analyze the electromagnetic structure of the pion, an elementary particle composed by a quark-antiquark bound state, by considering the calculation of its electromagnetic radius and its electromagnetic form factor in low and intermediate energy range. Such observables are determined by means of a theoretical model that takes into account the constituent quark and antiquark of the pion, in the formalism of the light-front field theory. In particular, it is considered a nonsymmetrical vertex for such a model, in which we have calculated the electromagnetic form factor of the pion in an optimized way, by varying its regulator mass, so that we can obtain the best value for the pion electromagnetic radius when compared with the experimental one. The theoretical calculations are also compared with the most recent experimental data involving the pion electromagnetic form factor and the results show very good agreement.

  7. Spin bath maser in a cryogenically cooled sapphire whispering gallery mode resonator

    E-print Network

    Bourhill, J; Goryachev, M; Creedon, D L; Farr, W G; Tobar, M E

    2013-01-01

    We report the observation of a mechanism of maser generation in an ensemble of inter-coupled, inhomogeneously broadened two-level systems, enhanced by high quality factor electromagnetic cavity modes. In this previously unobserved form of population inversion, an inseparable quantum system leads to cavity-enhanced stimulated emission arising from interactions within an ensemble of two-level systems, as opposed to a traditional ensemble of noninteracting identical three level systems. The effect is observed in a cryogenically cooled whispering gallery mode sapphire resonator containing dilute Fe$^{3+}$ impurity ions. These ions exhibit strong spin-lattice interaction, leading to both electron spin resonance broadening and phonon mediated spin-spin coupling. The maser effect is due to a $\\left|1/2\\right\\rangle \\rightarrow \\left|3/2\\right\\rangle$ energy transition in electron spin angular momentum observed at zero external magnetic field. Both continuous and oscillating regimes are observed with corresponding th...

  8. Semiconductor cooling by thin-film thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tick, P. A.; Vilcans, J.

    1970-01-01

    Thin-film, metal alloy thermocouple junctions do not rectify, change circuit impedance only slightly, and require very little increase in space. Although they are less efficient cooling devices than semiconductor junctions, they may be applied to assist conventional cooling techniques for electronic devices.

  9. Writing about Cool: Teaching Hypertext as Juxtaposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Frames a rhetoric of "cool" by describing how temporal events in the respective fields of writing, technology, and cultural studies seen in juxtaposition provide a model for electronic research. Examines how students working with hypertext, drawing from these works and juxtapositions, are able to not only write about cool, but are able to write…

  10. Ultrarelativistic electromagnetic pulses in plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Leboeuf, J. N.; Tajima, T.; Dawson, J. M.; Kennel, C. F.

    1981-01-01

    The physical processes of a linearly polarized electromagnetic pulse of highly relativistic amplitude in an underdense plasma accelerating particles to very high energies are studied through computer simulation. An electron-positron plasma is considered first. The maximum momenta achieved scale as the square of the wave amplitude. This acceleration stops when the bulk of the wave energy is converted to particle energy. The pulse leaves behind as a wake a vacuum region whose length scales as the amplitude of the wave. The results can be explained in terms of a snow plow or piston-like action of the radiation on the plasma. When a mass ratio other than unity is chosen and electrostatic effects begin to play a role, first the ion energy increases faster than the electron energy and then the electron energy catches up later, eventually reaching the same value.

  11. Drift effects on electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgalla, R. J. F.

    2015-02-01

    A two fluid model with parallel viscosity is employed to derive the dispersion relation for electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) in the presence of drift (diamagnetic) effects. Concerning the influence of the electron dynamics on the high frequency GAM, it is shown that the frequency of the electromagnetic GAM is independent of the equilibrium parallel current but, in contrast with purely electrostatic GAMs, significantly depends on the electron temperature gradient. The electromagnetic GAM may explain the discrepancy between the f ˜ 40 kHz oscillation observed in tokamak TCABR [Yu. K. Kuznetsov et al., Nucl. Fusion 52, 063044 (2012)] and the former prediction for the electrostatic GAM frequency. The radial wave length associated with this oscillation, estimated presently from this analytical model, is ?r ˜ 25 cm, i.e., an order of magnitude higher than the usual value for zonal flows (ZFs).

  12. Drift effects on electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Sgalla, R. J. F.

    2015-02-15

    A two fluid model with parallel viscosity is employed to derive the dispersion relation for electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) in the presence of drift (diamagnetic) effects. Concerning the influence of the electron dynamics on the high frequency GAM, it is shown that the frequency of the electromagnetic GAM is independent of the equilibrium parallel current but, in contrast with purely electrostatic GAMs, significantly depends on the electron temperature gradient. The electromagnetic GAM may explain the discrepancy between the f???40?kHz oscillation observed in tokamak TCABR [Yu. K. Kuznetsov et al., Nucl. Fusion 52, 063044 (2012)] and the former prediction for the electrostatic GAM frequency. The radial wave length associated with this oscillation, estimated presently from this analytical model, is ?{sub r}???25?cm, i.e., an order of magnitude higher than the usual value for zonal flows (ZFs)

  13. Meson electromagnetic form factors

    E-print Network

    Stanislav Dubnicka; Anna Z. Dubnickova

    2012-10-23

    The electromagnetic structure of the pseudoscalar meson nonet is completely described by the sophisticated Unitary&Analytic model, respecting all known theoretical properties of the corresponding form factors.

  14. Electromagnetic modes in a parallel plane waveguide filled with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashar, Jetendra; Chauhan, Santosh

    2015-06-01

    Propagation characteristics of an electromagnetic wave through parallel plane waveguide filled with nanoparticles is studied. The dispersion relation reveals two modes, a surface plasmon like mode for ???pe ?3 pe ??? , (? is electromagnetic wave frequency and ?pe is electron plasma frequency of nanoparticles) and another normal electromagnetic mode for ???pe ?3 . The plasmon like mode is sensitive to plate separation and the excitation frequency is higher for smaller plate separation. The cutoff frequency of electromagnetic mode can be varied by changing the concentration or size of the nanoparticles and also the plate separation.

  15. Formation process of quantized states in electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morifuji, Masato; Kato, Katsuhiko

    2003-07-01

    We theoretically investigate formation process of quantized electronic states in electromagnetic fields. By using the path-integration theory, we first follow time-evolution of an electronic state which is initially regarded as an extended band state. Next, we show that an eigenstate in an electromagnetic field is expressed as a superposition of states which the electron has undergone. We may regard this effect as an afterimage, i.e., an electronic state is a time average over the path of history. This is a viewpoint that reflects the nature of electrons. We show that the Landau states and Stark ladders are formed as a consequence of the afterimage effect.

  16. Dark-state cooling of a trapped ion using microwave coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yong; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Cui, Jin-Ming; Cao, Dong-Yang; Zhang, Shuo; Huang, Yun-Feng; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-08-01

    We propose a dark-state cooling method of trapped ion systems in the Lamb-Dicke limit. By microwave dressing the ion, we can obtain two electromagnetically induced transparency structures. The heating effects caused by the carrier and the blue sideband transition vanish due to electromagnetically induced transparency effects and the final mean phonon numbers can be much lower than the recoil limit. Our scheme is robust to fluctuations of microwave power and laser intensities, which provides a broad cooling bandwidth to cool motional modes of a linear ion chain. Moreover, it is more suitable to cool four-level ions on a large-scale ion chip.

  17. Electromagnetism Adapted for Life Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurr, F. M.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Describes the study of electronics as a terminal course in electromagnetism. A lecture-laboratory approach is used with a strong emphasis on practical experience. Outlines the major topics of the lecture program and describes the activities used in the laboratory. (GS)

  18. Metallic Glass Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A sample of advanced metallic glass alloy cools down during an experiment with the TEMPUS furnace on STS-94, July 7, 1997, MET:5/23:35 (approximate). The sequence shows the sample glowing, then fading to black as scientists began the process of preserving the liquid state, but lowering the temperature below the normal solidification temperature of the alloy. This process is known as undercooling. (10 second clip covering approximately 50 seconds.) TEMPUS (stands for Tiegelfreies Elektromagnetisches Prozessiere unter Schwerelosigkeit (containerless electromagnetic processing under weightlessness). It was developed by the German Space Agency (DARA) for flight aboard Spacelab. The DARA project scientist was Igon Egry. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). DARA and NASA are exploring the possibility of flying an advanced version of TEMPUS on the International Space Station. (354KB JPEG, 2700 x 2038 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300189.html.

  19. Full-wave algorithms for model order reduction and electromagnet analysis of impedance and scattering

    E-print Network

    Klemas, Thomas J. (Thomas Jonas)

    2005-01-01

    As technology advances and sophisticated electronic systems achieve ubiquity, the demand for thorough, efficient Electromagnetic (EM) analysis continues to rise. The prohibitive costs of constructing and maintaining ...

  20. Electromagnetically confined plasma target for interaction studies with intense laser fields

    E-print Network

    Electromagnetically confined plasma target for interaction studies with intense laser fields D electromagnetic charged particle trap, with the mag- netic confinement field of 1­3 T maintained-ray free electron lasers'' (XFEL)) provide strong time varying electromagnetic fields (>1012 V/cm in femto

  1. Constraining scenarios of the soft/hard transition for the pion electromagnetic form factor with expected data of 12-GeV Jefferson Lab experiments and of the Electron-Ion Collider

    E-print Network

    S. V. Troitsky; V. E. Troitsky

    2015-03-03

    It has been shown previously [PRD 88 (2013) 093005, arXiv:1310.1770] that a non-perturbative relativistic constituent-quark model for the pi-meson electromagnetic form factor allows for a quantitative description of the soft/hard transition, resulting in the correct Quantum-Chromodynamical asymptotics, including normalization, from the low-energy data without further parameter tuning. This happens universally whenever the constituent-quark mass is switched off. The energy range where the transition happens is therefore determined by the quark-mass running at intermediate energies and is not tightly constrained theoretically. Here we consider possible ways to pin down this energy range with coming experimental data. We demonstrate that expected experimental uncertainties of the 12-GeV Jefferson-Lab data are larger than the span of predictions of the model, so these data might be used for testing the model but not for determination of the soft/hard transition scale. Contrary, the projected Electron-Ion Collider will be capable of pinning down the scale.

  2. NISTHB 150-11 Electromagnetic

    E-print Network

    NISTHB 150-11 NVLAP Electromagnetic Compatibility and Telecommunications Bethany Hackett Bradley. #12;NISTHB 150-11 NVLAP Electromagnetic Compatibility and Telecommunications Bethany Hackett Bradley Programs Dennis Camell Electromagnetics Division Physical Measurement Laboratory http://dx.doi.org/10

  3. "Hearing" Electromagnetic Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojo, Marta; Munoz, Juan

    2014-01-01

    In this work, an educational experience is described in which a microwave communication link is used to make students aware that all electromagnetic waves have the same physical nature and properties. Experimental demonstrations are linked to theoretical concepts to increase comprehension of the physical principles underlying electromagnetic

  4. Introducing Electromagnetic Field Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    I describe an elementary way of introducing electromagnetic field momentum. By considering a system of a long solenoid and line charge, the dependence of the field momentum on the electric and magnetic fields can be deduced. I obtain the electromagnetic angular momentum for a point charge and magnetic monopole pair partially through dimensional…

  5. electromagnetism electrostatics Bohr Model of the Hydrogen Atom

    E-print Network

    electromagnetism electrostatics Bohr Model of the Hydrogen Atom In 1915, Niels Bohr presented of the electron in orbit? Bohr made one further assumption ­ that the angular momentum of the electron was somehowV (electron volts)? As you likely know from high school physics and/or chemistry courses, the Bohr model

  6. Electromagnetism, Second Edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, I. S.; Phillips, W. R.

    2003-09-01

    The Manchester Physics Series General Editors: D. J. Sandiford; F. Mandl; A. C. Phillips Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester Properties of Matter B. H. Flowers and E. Mendoza Optics Second Edition F. G. Smith and J. H. Thomson Statistical Physics Second Edition F. Mandl Electromagnetism Second Edition I. S. Grant and W. R. Phillips Statistics R. J. Barlow Solid State Physics Second Edition J. R. Hook and H. E. Hall Quantum Mechanics F. Mandl Particle Physics Second Edition B. R. Martin and G. Shaw the Physics of Stars Second Edition A. C. Phillips Computing for Scientists R. J. Barlow and A. R. Barnett Electromagnetism, Second Edition is suitable for a first course in electromagnetism, whilst also covering many topics frequently encountered in later courses. The material has been carefully arranged and allows for flexi-bility in its use for courses of different length and structure. A knowledge of calculus and an elementary knowledge of vectors is assumed, but the mathematical properties of the differential vector operators are described in sufficient detail for an introductory course, and their physical significance in the context of electromagnetism is emphasised. In this Second Edition the authors give a fuller treatment of circuit analysis and include a discussion of the dispersion of electromagnetic waves. Electromagnetism, Second Edition features: The application of the laws of electromagnetism to practical problems such as the behaviour of antennas, transmission lines and transformers. Sets of problems at the end of each chapter to help student understanding, with hints and solutions to the problems given at the end of the book. Optional "starred" sections containing more specialised and advanced material for the more ambitious reader. An Appendix with a thorough discussion of electromagnetic standards and units. Recommended by many institutions. Electromagnetism. Second Edition has also been adopted by the Open University as the course book for its third level course on electromagnetism.

  7. Electromagnetic Observables in Few-Nucleon Systems

    E-print Network

    Sonia Bacca

    2012-10-10

    The electromagnetic probe is a very valuable tool to study the dynamics of few nucleons. It can be very helpful in shedding light on the not yet fully understood three-nucleon forces. We present an update on the theoretical studies of electromagnetic induced reactions, such as photo-disintegration and electron scattering off 4He. We will show that they potentially represent a tool to discriminate among three-nucleon forces. Then, we will discuss the charge radius and the nuclear electric polarizability of the 6He halo nucleus.

  8. The radiative potential method for calculations of QED radiative corrections to energy levels and electromagnetic amplitudes in many-electron atoms

    E-print Network

    V. V. Flambaum; J. S. M. Ginges

    2005-07-08

    We derive an approximate expression for a "radiative potential" which can be used to calculate QED strong Coulomb field radiative corrections to energies and electric dipole (E1) transition amplitudes in many-electron atoms with an accuracy of a few percent. The expectation value of the radiative potential gives radiative corrections to the energies. Radiative corrections to E1 amplitudes can be expressed in terms of the radiative potential and its energy derivative (the low-energy theorem): the relative magnitude of the radiative potential contribution is ~alpha^3 Z^2 ln(1/(alpha^2 Z^2)), while the sum of other QED contributions is ~alpha^3 (Z_i+1)^2, where Z_i is the ion charge; that is, for neutral atoms (Z_i=0) the radiative potential contribution exceeds other contributions ~Z^2 times. The advantage of the radiative potential method is that it is very simple and can be easily incorporated into many-body theory approaches: relativistic Hartree-Fock, configuration interaction, many-body perturbation theory, etc. As an application we have calculated the radiative corrections to the energy levels and E1 amplitudes as well as their contributions (-0.33% and 0.42%, respectively) to the parity non-conserving (PNC) 6s-7s amplitude in neutral cesium (Z=55). Combining these results with the QED correction to the weak matrix elements (-0.41%) we obtain the total QED correction to the PNC 6s-7s amplitude, (-0.32 +/- 0.03)%. The cesium weak charge Q_W=-72.66(29)_{exp}(36)_{theor} agrees with the Standard Model value Q_W^{SM}=-73.19(13), the difference is 0.53(48).

  9. Recent advances in laser cooling of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemova, Galina; Kashyap, Raman

    2013-10-01

    The recent achievements devoted to cooling of solids with a laser are presented in this paper. We discuss the latest results of traditional laser cooling of solids based on rare earth ions and new techniques based on colloidal lead-salt quantum dots doped in a glass host, laser cooling in Tm3+-doped oxy-fluoride glass ceramic. Relatively short (microsecond) lifetime of the excited level of the PbSe QDs compared to the millisecond lifetime of the excited level of RE ions allows an acceleration of the cooling process and provides an opportunity to use new materials with higher phonon energy as hosts, which are normally considered unsuitable for cooling with RE ions. Another new approach to the laser cooling problem based on super-radiance has been considered in this paper. The advantages of optical refrigeration with rare earth doped semiconductors, in which not only optically active electrons of the 4f shell but the valence and conduction bands of the host material are involved in cooling cycle is discussed. It is shown that involving the valence and conduction bands of the host in the cooling cycle allows the pump wavelength to be shorter than mean fluorescence wavelength. Raman laser cooling of solids as well as observation of spontaneous Brillouin cooling have been presented.

  10. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2015-07-28

    A method is provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The method includes: monitoring a variable associated with at least one of the coolant-cooled cold plate or one or more electronic components being cooled by the cold plate; and dynamically varying, based on the monitored variable, a physical configuration of the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the one or more electronic components, and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the coolant-cooled cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  11. Nonlinear spring-less electromagnetic vibration energy harvesting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, Z.; Ondrusek, C.

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with a description and modelling of a spring-less electromagnetic vibration energy harvesting system. The presented unique electromagnetic vibration energy harvester consists of a nonlinear resonance mechanism, magnetic circuit with a coil and an electronic load. The mechanical vibrations excite the nonlinear resonance mechanism and the relative movement of the magnetic circuit against fixed coil induces voltage due to Faraday's Law. When the electronics is connected the current flows through the load and output power is harvested. There are several nonlinearities which affects operations of the presented electromagnetic energy harvesting system. The significant nonlinearity of the system is stiffness of the resonance mechanism and it causes extending of an operation bandwidth. The harvesting of electrical energy from mechanical vibrations provides electromagnetic damping feedbacks of the coil to moving magnetic circuit. The feedback depends on the current flow through the electronic load and coil. The using of modern power management circuit with optimal power point provides other nonlinear operation.

  12. The state of the art in hadron beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Derwent, P.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    Cooling of hadron beams (including heavy-ions) is a powerful technique by which accelerator facilities around the world achieve the necessary beam brightness for their physics research. In this paper, we will give an overview of the latest developments in hadron beam cooling, for which high energy electron cooling at Fermilab's Recycler ring and bunched beam stochastic cooling at Brookhaven National Laboratory's RHIC facility represent two recent major accomplishments. Novel ideas in the field will also be introduced.

  13. Stochastic cooling of 200 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Lambertson, G.; Bisognano, J.; Flood, W.; Laslett, L.J.; Leemann, C.; Leskovar, B.; Lo, C.C.; Main, R.; Smith, L.; Staples, J.

    1980-07-01

    Vertical and longitudinal cooling has been achieved at the FNAL 200 MeV cooling ring. Initial longitudinal cooling times of 20 seconds for 1.5 x 10/sup 6/ circulating protons are in approximate agreement with calculations based on measured system parameters. The cooling systems have an electronic bandwidth of approx. 300 MHz, travelling wave pickups and kickers and a notch filter using flexible cable. The TW structures provide a good signal-to-noise ratio and reduce output power requirements.

  14. Strong Scalar QED in Inhomogeneous Electromagnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Sang Pyo Kim

    2008-02-06

    Strong QED has attracted attention recently partly because many astrophysical phenomena have been observed to involve electromagnetic fields beyond the critical strength for electron-positron pair production and partly because terrestrial experiments will generate electromagnetic fields above or near the critical strength in the near future. In this talk we critically review QED phenomena involving strong external electromagnetic fields. Strong QED is characterized by vacuum polarization due to quantum fluctuations and pair production due to the vacuum instability. A canonical method is elaborated for pair production at zero or finite temperature by inhomogeneous electric fields. An algorithm is advanced to calculate pair production rate for electric fields acting for finite periods of time or localized in space or oscillating electric fields. Finally, strong QED is discussed in astrophysics, in particular, strange stars.

  15. Electromagnetic Radiations as a Fluid Flow

    E-print Network

    Daniele Funaro

    2009-11-25

    We combine Maxwell's equations with Eulers's equation, related to a velocity field of an immaterial fluid, where the density of mass is replaced by a charge density. We come out with a differential system able to describe a relevant quantity of electromagnetic phenomena, ranging from classical dipole waves to solitary wave-packets with compact support. The clue is the construction of an energy tensor summing up both the electromagnetic stress and a suitable mass tensor. With this right-hand side, explicit solutions of the full Einstein's equation are computed for a wide class of wave phenomena. Since our electromagnetic waves may behave and interact exactly as a material fluid, they can create vortex structures. We then explicitly analyze some vortex ring configurations and examine the possibility to build a model for the electron.

  16. Cooling of gram scale objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavalvala, Nergis

    2008-05-01

    Laser cooling of macroscopic mechanical oscillators has applications in high precision measurements, gravitational wave detectors, and exploration of the classical-quantum transition. We describe a series of cooling experiments, inspired by gravitational wave detectors, to trap and cool gram scale mirror oscillators. To approach quantum limits of oscillators with such a high mass requires the use of a variety of cooling techniques that employ frictionless forces, both to trap the mirror by increasing its effective mechanical resonant frequency, and to cool the mirror by damping its motion within the trap. The frictionless forces are created from either radiation pressure in a detuned optical resonator, or from electronic feedback forces in an active servo. As the experiments approach the quantum regime, an assortment of non-classical behavior and effects should become evident, such as quantum radiation pressure noise, and squeezing and entanglement of the light and mirror states. We will discuss the prospects for observation of these effects in our current apparatus, and also with expected upgrades.

  17. Electromagnetism in the Movies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everitt, Lori R.; Patterson, Evelyn T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes how the authors used portions of popular movies to help students review concepts related to electromagnetism. Movies used and concepts covered in the review are listed, and a sample activity is described. (WRM)

  18. Purely electromagnetic spacetimes

    E-print Network

    B. V. Ivanov

    2007-12-15

    Electrovacuum solutions devoid of usual mass sources are classified in the case of one, two and three commuting Killing vectors. Three branches of solutions exist. Electromagnetically induced mass terms appear in some of them.

  19. An opening electromagnetic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yanhua; Kang, Yihua

    2013-12-01

    Tubular solenoids have been widely used without any change since an electrical wire was discovered to create magnetic fields by Hans Christian Oersted in 1820 and thereby the wire was first coiled as a helix into a solenoid coil by William Sturgeon in 1823 and was improved by Joseph Henry in 1829 [see http://www.myetymology.com/encyclopedia/History_of_the_electricity.html; J. M. D. Coey, Magnetism and Magnetic Materials (Cambridge University Press, New York, 2010); and F. Winterberg, Plasma Phys. 8, 541553 (1996)]. A magnetic control method of C-shaped carrying-current wire is proposed, and thereby a new opening electromagnetic transducer evidently differing from the traditional tubular solenoid is created, capable of directly encircling and centering the acted objects in it, bringing about convenient and innovative electromagnetic energy conversion for electromagnetic heating, electromagnetic excitation, physical information capture, and electro-mechanical motion used in science research, industry, and even biomedical activities.

  20. Amplified Thermionic Cooling Using Arrays of Nanowires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok; Choi, Daniel; Shcheglov, Kirill; Hishinuma, Yoshikazu

    2007-01-01

    A class of proposed thermionic cooling devices would incorporate precise arrays of metal nanowires as electron emitters. The proposed devices could be highly miniaturized, enabling removal of heat from locations, very close to electronic devices, that have previously been inaccessible for heat-removal purposes. The resulting enhancement of removal of heat would enable operation of the devices at higher power levels and higher clock speeds. Moreover, the mass, complexity, and bulk of electronic circuitry incorporating these highly miniaturized cooling devices could be considerably reduced, relative to otherwise equivalent circuitry cooled by conventional electromechanical, thermoelectric, and fluidic means. In thermionic cooling, one exploits the fact that because only the highest-energy electrons are thermionically emitted, collecting those electrons to prevent their return to the emitting electrode results in the net removal of heat from that electrode. Collection is effected by applying an appropriate positive bias potential to another electrode placed near the emitting electrode. The concept underlying the proposal is that the thermionic-emission current and, hence, the cooling effect attainable by use of an array of nanowires could be significantly greater than that attainable by use of a single emitting electrode or other electron- emitting surface. The wires in an array according to the proposal would protrude perpendicularly from a planar surface and their heights would be made uniform to within a sub-nanometer level of precision

  1. Assessment of Alphamagnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Upper Experiment Structural Configuration Shielding Effectiveness Associated with Change from Cryo-Cooled Magnet to Permanent Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In the spring of 2010, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer 2 (AMS-02) underwent a series of system level electromagnetic interference control measurements, followed by thermal vacuum testing. Shortly after completion of the thermal vacuum testing, the project decided to remove the cryogenically cooled superconducting magnet, and replace it with the original permanent magnet design employed in the earlier AMS- 01 assembly. Doing so necessitated several structural changes, as well as removal or modification of numerous electronic and thermal control devices and systems. At this stage, the project was rapidly approaching key milestone dates for hardware completion and delivery for launch, and had little time for additional testing or assessment of any impact to the electromagnetic signature of the AMS-02. Therefore, an analytical assessment of the radiated emissions behavioural changes associated with the system changes was requested.

  2. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  3. Reaching the quantum limit of sensitivity in electron spin resonance

    E-print Network

    A. Bienfait; J. J. Pla; Y. Kubo; M. Stern; X. Zhou; C. C. Lo; C. D. Weis; T. Schenkel; M. L. W. Thewalt; D. Vion; D. Esteve; B. Julsgaard; K. Moelmer; J. J. L. Morton; P. Bertet

    2015-07-24

    We report pulsed electron-spin resonance (ESR) measurements on an ensemble of Bismuth donors in Silicon cooled at 10mK in a dilution refrigerator. Using a Josephson parametric microwave amplifier combined with high-quality factor superconducting micro-resonators cooled at millikelvin temperatures, we improve the state-of-the-art sensitivity of inductive ESR detection by nearly 4 orders of magnitude. We demonstrate the detection of 1700 bismuth donor spins in silicon within a single Hahn echo with unit signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio, reduced to just 150 spins by averaging a single Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence. This unprecedented sensitivity reaches the limit set by quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field instead of thermal or technical noise, which constitutes a novel regime for magnetic resonance.

  4. COOLING FORCE MEASUREMENTS IN CELSIUS.

    SciTech Connect

    GALNANDER, B.; FEDOTOV, A.V.; LITVINENKO, V.N.; ET AL.

    2005-09-18

    The design of future high energy coolers relies heavily on extending the results of cooling force measurements into new regimes by using simulation codes. In order to carefully benchmark these codes we have accurately measured the longitudinal friction force in CELSIUS by recording the phase shift between the beam and the RF voltage while varying the RF frequency. Moreover, parameter dependencies on the electron current, solenoid magnetic field and magnetic field alignment were carried out.

  5. From Electromagnetic Neutrinos to New Electromagnetic Radiation Mechanism in Neutrino Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balantsev, Ilya; Studenikin, Alexander

    A massive neutrino has nonzero magnetic moment and is involved in the electromagnetic interactions with external fields and photons. The electromagnetic neutrino moving in matter can emit the spin light (SL?) in the process of transition between two quantum states in matter. In quite resembling way an electron can emit spin light in moving background composed of neutrinos, that is "the spin light of an electron in neutrino flux" (SLe?). In this paper we obtain the exact solution for the wave function and energy spectrum for an electron moving in a neutrino flux and consider the SLe? as the transition process between two electron quantum states in the background. The SLe? radiation rate, power and emitted photon energy are calculated. Notably, the energy spectrum of the emitted SLe? photons can span up to gamma-rays. We argue that the considered SLe? can be of interest for astrophysical applications, for supernovae processes in particular.

  6. Electromagnetic Effects in SDF Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H; Neuwald, P; Kuhl, A L

    2010-02-12

    The notion of high ion and electron concentrations in the detonation of aluminized explosive mixtures has aroused some interest in electro-magnetic effects that the SDF charges might generate when detonated. Motivated by this interest we have started to investigate whether significant electro-magnetic effects show up in our small-scale experiments. However, the design of instrumentation for this purpose is far from straightforward, since there are a number of open questions. Thus the main aim of the feasibility tests is to find - if possible - a simple and reliable method that can be used as a diagnostic tool for electro-magnetic effects. SDF charges with a 0.5-g PETN booster and a filling of 1 g aluminum flakes have been investigated in three barometric bomb calorimeters with volumes ranging from 6.3 l to of 6.6 l. Though similar in volume, the barometric bombs differed in the length-to-diameter ratio. The tests were carried out with the bombs filled with either air or nitrogen at ambient pressure. The comparison of the test in air to those in nitrogen shows that the combustion of TNT detonation products or aluminum generates a substantial increase of the quasi-steady overpressure in the bombs. Repeated tests in the same configuration resulted in some scatter of the experimental results. The most likely reason is that the aluminum combustion in most or all cases is incomplete and that the amount of aluminum actually burned varies from test to test. The mass fraction burned apparently decreases with increasing aspect ratio L/D. Thus an L/D-ratio of about 1 is optimal for the performance of shock-dispersed-fuel combustion. However, at an L/D-ratio of about 5 the combustion still yields appreciable overpressure in excess of the detonation. For a multi-burst scenario in a tunnel environment with a number of SDF charges distributed along a tunnel section a spacing of 5 tunnel diameter and a fuel-specific volume of around 7 l/g might provide an acceptable compromise between optimizing the combustion performance and keeping the number of elementary charges low. Further tests in a barometric bomb calorimeter of 21.2 l volume were performed with four types of aluminum. The mass fraction burned in this case appeared to depend on the morphology of the aluminum particles. Flake aluminum exhibited a better performance than granulated aluminum with particle sizes ranging from below 25 {micro}m to 125 {micro}m for the coarsest material. In addition, a feasibility study on electro-magnetic effects from SDF charges detonated in a tunnel has been performed. A method was developed to measure the local, unsteady electro-conductivity in the detonation/combustion products cloud. This method proved to yield reproducible results. A variety of methods were tested with regard to probing electro-magnetic pulses from the detonation of SDF charges. The results showed little reproducibility and were small compared to the effect from pulsed high voltage discharges of comparatively small energy (around 32 J). Thus either no significant electromagnetic pulse is generated in our small-scale tests or the tested techniques have to be discarded as too insensitive or too limited in bandwidth to detect possibly very high frequency electro-magnetic disturbances.

  7. Equilibrium temperature of laser cooled atoms in squeezed vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevy, Y.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that by squeezing the vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field the quantum fluctuations of the optical forces exerted on laser cooled two-level atoms, can be dramatically modified. Under certain conditions, this modification in concert with the enhanced average forces can lead to equilibrium temperatures below those attained under normal vacuum fluctuations.

  8. Designing tokamaks to withstand electromagnetic disruption loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, Jeffrey Arnold

    1999-11-01

    Tokamaks, the toroidal plasma confinement devices used to study fusion energy, operate by driving a multi-MA current in the plasma while creating a strong confining magnetic field. In experimental tokamaks under some conditions, the plasma can become unstable, escape its magnetic confines and rapidly cool off. On a time scale of milliseconds, the plasma current decays away in the resulting cold and highly resistive plasma. In these events, called disruptions, the rapid change in plasma current induces large currents in the surrounding conducting structures. The induced currents, flowing in the presence of a strong magnetic field, can apply substantial electromagnetic forces. Some experimental devices, such as the JET facility, have experienced extensive damage from these events. In future power reactors, even greater loads must be absorbed by components also subject to neutron embrittlement. This study models the electromagnetic and structural behavior of conceptual designs of the first generation of power-producing tokamaks to identify the components that are at risk and illuminate design options which mitigate these loads. The problem is a coupled one: the geometry and resistivity of the structure affects the induced currents while the induced currents and resulting loads place demands on the structure. Several new analytical and computational tools for the evaluation of these systems are discussed including a dual-solution technique for taking advantage of the complex electromagnetic symmetries in a typical tokamak design. The finite element method with a differential formulation and an integral method using a Green's function have been applied to 2D and 3D electromagnetic models of tokamaks. The differential formulation was found to be superior in these highly symmetric systems. The most significant design issues arise with the components most proximate to the plasma. Despite toroidal segmentation, damaging electromagnetic loads threaten the first wall and blanket structures. Supporting these against disruption loads without causing excessive thermal stress is a significant design challenge.

  9. FOURFOUR--QUADRANT POWER SUPPLIESQUADRANT POWER SUPPLIES FOR STEERING ELECTROMAGNETSFOR STEERING ELECTROMAGNETS

    E-print Network

    Kozak, Victor R.

    ELECTROMAGNETS FOR ELECTRONFOR ELECTRON--POSITRON COLLIDERPOSITRON COLLIDER O.O. BelikovBelikov V.V. KozakKozak A ELECTROMAGNETS FOR ELECTRONFOR ELECTRON--POSITRON COLLIDERPOSITRON COLLIDER O.O. BelikovBelikov V.V. KozakKozak A

  10. Natural Cooling Retrofit 

    E-print Network

    Fenster, L. C.; Grantier, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    chilled water, but not with 42 degree chi lIed water. The following is a description of three meth ods of water-side Natural Cool ing: Tower Water Injection, Heat Exchanger, and C:entrifugal Natural Cool ing. TOWER WATER INJECTION Tower Water... Injection Cool ing is a method of providing natural cool ing by injecting condenser water from a cool ing tower directly into a chilled water system, as dictated by outdoor air wet bulb temperature (see Figure V). Tower Water Injection Natural Cool ing...

  11. Dynamically limiting energy consumed by cooling apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Chainer, Timothy J.; David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-06-09

    Cooling methods are provided which include providing: one or more coolant-cooled structures associated with an electronics rack, a coolant loop coupled in fluid communication with one or more passages of the coolant-cooled structure(s), one or more heat exchange units coupled to facilitate heat transfer from coolant within the coolant loop, and N controllable components associated with the coolant loop or the heat exchange unit(s), wherein N.gtoreq.1. The N controllable components facilitate circulation of coolant through the coolant loop or transfer of heat from the coolant via the heat exchange unit(s). A controller is also provided to dynamically adjust operation of the N controllable components, based on Z input parameters and one or more specified constraints, and provide a specified cooling to the coolant-cooled structure(s), while limiting energy consumed by the N controllable components, wherein Z.gtoreq.1.

  12. Dynamically limiting energy consumed by cooling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-05-26

    Cooling apparatuses and methods are provided which include one or more coolant-cooled structures associated with an electronics rack, a coolant loop coupled in fluid communication with one or more passages of the coolant-cooled structure(s), one or more heat exchange units coupled to facilitate heat transfer from coolant within the coolant loop, and N controllable components associated with the coolant loop or the heat exchange unit(s), wherein N.gtoreq.1. The N controllable components facilitate circulation of coolant through the coolant loop or transfer of heat from the coolant via the heat exchange unit(s). A controller is coupled to the N controllable components, and dynamically adjusts operation of the N controllable components, based on Z input parameters and one or more specified constraints, to provide a specified cooling to the coolant-cooled structure(s), while limiting energy consumed by the N controllable components, wherein Z.gtoreq.1.

  13. Electromagnetically Induced Transparency from a Single Atom in Free Space

    E-print Network

    L. Slodicka; G. Hetet; S. Gerber; M. Hennrich; R. Blatt

    2010-05-18

    We report an absorption spectroscopy experiment and the observation of electromagnetically induced transparency from a single trapped atom. We focus a weak and narrowband Gaussian light beam onto an optically cooled Barium ion using a high numerical aperture lens. Extinction of this beam is observed with measured values of up to 1.3 %. We demonstrate electromagnetically induced transparency of the ion by tuning a strong control beam over a two-photon resonance in a three-level lambda-type system. The probe beam extinction is inhibited by more than 75 % due to population trapping.

  14. Fast optical cooling of nanomechanical cantilever with the dynamical Zeeman effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Zou, Jin-Hua; Chen, Liang; Yang, Wen; Li, Yong; Feng, Mang

    2013-12-01

    We propose an efficient optical electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) cooling scheme for a cantilever with a nitrogen-vacancy center attached in a non-uniform magnetic field using dynamical Zeeman effect. In our scheme, the Zeeman effect combined with the quantum interference effect enhances the desired cooling transition and suppresses the undesired heating transitions. As a result, the cantilever can be cooled down to nearly the vibrational ground state under realistic experimental conditions within a short time. This efficient optical EIT cooling scheme can be reduced to the typical EIT cooling scheme under special conditions. PMID:24514521

  15. Fast optical cooling of nanomechanical cantilever with the dynamical Zeeman effect

    E-print Network

    Jian-Qi Zhang; Shuo Zhang; Jin-Hua Zou; Liang Chen; Wen Yang; Yong Li; Mang Feng

    2013-11-15

    We propose an efficient optical electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) cooling scheme for a cantilever with a nitrogen-vacancy center attached in a non-uniform magnetic field using dynamical Zeeman effect. In our scheme, the Zeeman effect combined with the quantum interference effect enhances the desired cooling transition and suppresses the undesired heating transitions. As a result, the cantilever can be cooled down to nearly the vibrational ground state under realistic experimental conditions within a short time. This efficient optical EIT cooling scheme can be reduced to the typical EIT cooling scheme under special conditions.

  16. Electromagnetic attachment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G., Jr. (inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic attachment mechanism is disclosed for use as an end effector of a remote manipulator system. A pair of electromagnets, each with a U-shaped magnetic core with a pull-in coil and two holding coils, are mounted by a spring suspension system on a base plate of the mechanism housing with end pole pieces adapted to move through openings in the base plate when the attractive force of the electromagnets is exerted on a strike plate of a grapple fixture affixed to a target object. The pole pieces are spaced by an air gap from the strike plate when the mechanism first contacts the grapple fixture. An individual control circuit and power source is provided for the pull-in coil and one holding coil of each electromagnet. A back-up control circuit connected to the two power sources and a third power source is provided for the remaining holding coils. When energized, the pull-in coils overcome the suspension system and air gap and are automatically de-energized when the pole pieces move to grapple and impose a preload force across the grapple interface. A battery backup is a redundant power source for each electromagnet in each individual control circuit and is automatically connected upon failure of the primary source. A centerline mounted camera and video monitor are used in cooperation with a target pattern on the reflective surface of the strike plate to effect targeting and alignment.

  17. Observation of Unidirectional Backscattering-immune Topological Electromagnetic States

    E-print Network

    Soljaèiæ, Marin

    1 Observation of Unidirectional Backscattering-immune Topological Electromagnetic States Zheng Wang in condensed-matter physics is the Quantum Hall Effect (QHE) arising in two-dimensional electron gases1 of states with unparalleled properties that have only been observed in electronic systems. Here we report

  18. Cooling Water System Optimization 

    E-print Network

    Aegerter, R.

    2005-01-01

    During summer months, many manufacturing plants have to cut back in rates because the cooling water system is not providing sufficient cooling to support higher production rates. There are many low/no-cost techniques available to improve tower...

  19. Debuncher cooling performance

    SciTech Connect

    Derwent, P.F.; McGinnis, David; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Vander Meulen, David; Werkema, Steven; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    We present measurements of the Fermilab Debuncher momentum and transverse cooling systems. These systems use liquid helium cooled waveguide pickups and slotted waveguide kickers covering the frequency range 4-8 GHz.

  20. Debuncher Cooling Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Derwent, P. F.; McGinnis, David; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Vander Meulen, David; Werkema, Steven

    2006-03-20

    We present measurements of the Fermilab Debuncher momentum and transverse cooling systems. These systems use liquid helium cooled waveguide pickups and slotted waveguide kickers covering the frequency range 4-8 GHz.

  1. Liquid cooled garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Liquid cooled garments employed in several applications in which severe heat is encountered are discussed. In particular, the use of the garments to replace air line cooling units in a variety of industrial processing situations is discussed.

  2. SUMMARY OF BEAM COOLING AND INTRABEAM SCATTERING.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; MESHKOV, I.N.; WEI, J.

    2006-05-26

    For heavy-particle beams in storage rings where there is no significant synchrotron radiation damping, beam cooling is an essential tool in obtaining high phase-space density high brightness beams. Advances in various types of cooling such as electron, stochastic, laser and muon cooling are covered in dedicated Conferences. In this series of Workshops (HB2002-06), discussions are aimed only at a few specific subjects which are crucial for future projects. The discussion topics in our session closely followed those discussed during the HB2004 workshop [1]. Specifically, we concentrated on the topics of electron cooling and intrabeam scattering, motivated by the design of the future high-energy coolers [2,3,4]. These cooling projects at high-energy require accurate numerical modeling and experimental verification. A variety of tasks were put together at HB2004 [1]. In our working group we discussed a progress in addressing these tasks. We had 10 presentations [5]-[14] (with additional presentations in the joint sessions) which followed by dedicated discussions. Our main topics of discussions: intrabeam scattering (IBS), electron cooling, and beam stability are summarized.

  3. Electromagnetic properties of baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Ledwig, T.; Pascalutsa, V.; Vanderhaeghen, M.; Martin-Camalich, J.

    2011-10-21

    We discuss the chiral behavior of the nucleon and {Delta}(1232) electromagnetic properties within the framework of a SU(2) covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory. Our one-loop calculation is complete to the order p{sup 3} and p{sup 4}/{Delta} with {Delta} as the {Delta}(1232)-nucleon energy gap. We show that the magnetic moment of a resonance can be defined by the linear energy shift only when an additional relation between the involved masses and the applied magnetic field strength is fulfilled. Singularities and cusps in the pion mass dependence of the {Delta}(1232) electromagnetic moments reflect a non-fulfillment. We show results for the pion mass dependence of the nucleon iso-vector electromagnetic quantities and present preliminary results for finite volume effects on the iso-vector anomalous magnetic moment.

  4. Data center cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Dang, Hien P; Parida, Pritish R; Schultz, Mark D; Sharma, Arun

    2015-03-17

    A data center cooling system may include heat transfer equipment to cool a liquid coolant without vapor compression refrigeration, and the liquid coolant is used on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack housed in the data center. The system may also include a controller-apparatus to regulate the liquid coolant flow to the liquid cooled information technology equipment rack through a range of liquid coolant flow values based upon information technology equipment temperature thresholds.

  5. Cooling Dry Cows 

    E-print Network

    Stokes, Sandra R.

    2000-07-17

    - search reports that rectal tem- perature respiration rate and calf birth weight respond consistently and positively to prepartum cool- ing. Responses in postpartum milk production and reproductive measures have been variable and are less defined... produc- tion. yeast, etc.). Management consid- erations include installing cool- ing systems. Although much of the diet adjustment is made with a nutritional consultant, it is typ- ically the dairy producer who decides on the cooling system. Cooling...

  6. Quantum electromagnetic wormholes and geometrical description of the electric charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaglià, Marco

    1994-10-01

    I present and discuss a class of solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation describing wormholes generated by coupling of gravity to the electromagnetic field for Kantowski-Sachs and Bianchi type-I spacetimes. Since the electronic charge can be viewed as electric lines of force trapped in a finite region of spacetime, these solutions can be interpreted as the quantum corresponding to the Einstein-Rosen-Misner-Wheeler electromagnetic geon.

  7. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan,J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M. M.; Severino, F.

    2009-05-04

    After the success of longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched heavy ion beam in RHIC, transverse stochastic cooling in the vertical plane of Yellow ring was installed and is being commissioned with proton beam. This report presents the status of the effort and gives an estimate, based on simulation, of the RHIC luminosity with stochastic cooling in all planes.

  8. Cooling load estimation methods

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    Ongoing research on quantifying the cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described. Correlations are described that permit auxiliary cooling estimates from monthly average insolation and weather data. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in design, to estimate the annual cooling energy required of a given building.

  9. Electromagnetic propulsion test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooder, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    A test facility for the exploration of electromagnetic propulsion concept is described. The facility is designed to accommodate electromagnetic rail accelerators of various lengths (1 to 10 meters) and to provide accelerating energies of up to 240 kiloJoules. This accelerating energy is supplied as a current pulse of hundreds of kiloAmps lasting as long as 1 millisecond. The design, installation, and operating characteristics of the pulsed energy system are discussed. The test chamber and its operation at pressures down to 1300 Pascals (10 mm of mercury) are described. Some aspects of safety (interlocking, personnel protection, and operating procedures) are included.

  10. Improved Electromagnetic Brake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Toby B.

    2004-01-01

    A proposed design for an electromagnetic brake would increase the reliability while reducing the number of parts and the weight, relative to a prior commercially available electromagnetic brake. The reductions of weight and the number of parts could also lead to a reduction of cost. A description of the commercial brake is prerequisite to a description of the proposed electromagnetic brake. The commercial brake (see upper part of figure) includes (1) a permanent magnet and an electromagnet coil on a stator and (2) a rotor that includes a steel contact plate mounted, with tension spring loading, on an aluminum hub. The stator is mounted securely on a stationary object, which would ordinarily be the housing of a gear drive or a motor. The rotor is mounted on the shaft of the gear drive or motor. The commercial brake nominally operates in a fail-safe (in the sense of normally braking) mode: In the absence of current in the electromagnet coil, the permanent magnet pulls the contact plate, against the spring tension, into contact with the stator. To release the brake, one excites the electromagnet with a current of the magnitude and polarity chosen to cancel the magnetic flux of the permanent magnet, thereby enabling the spring tension to pull the contact plate out of contact with the stator. The fail-safe operation of the commercial brake depends on careful mounting of the rotor in relation to the stator. The rotor/stator gap must be set with a tolerance between 10 and 15 mils (between about 0.25 and about 0.38 mm). If the gap or the contact pad is thicker than the maximum allowable value, then the permanent magnetic field will not be strong enough to pull the steel plate across the gap. (For this reason, any contact pad between the contact plate and the stator must also be correspondingly thin.) If the gap exceeds the maximum allowable value because of shaft end play, it becomes impossible to set the brake by turning off the electromagnet current. Although it may still be possible to set the brake by applying an electromagnet current to aid the permanent magnetic field instead of canceling it, this action can mask an out-of-tolerance condition in the brake and it does not restore the fail-safe function of setting the brake when current is lost.

  11. Liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Duncombe, E.; Thatcher, G.

    1980-05-13

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactor is described wherein the fuel assembly is submerged in a pool of liquid metal coolant in a primary vessel which is housed in a concrete vault. The fuel assembly, which comprises a multiplicity of elongate fuel pins, is sub-divided into a plurality of elongate subassembly constructions which upstand side-by-side. The fuel assembly has an inner zone comprised mainly of fissile material and a surrounding outer zone comprised mainly of breeder material. The sub-assemblies in the outer zone include electromagnetic braking devices for regulating the flow of coolant through the sub-assemblies and the magnetic fields of the electro -magnetic braking devices are temperature sensitive being arranged so that, as the power output of the breeder subassemblies increases, the electro-magnetic resistance to coolant flow is reduced, thereby maintaining the temperature of the coolant outlets from the sub-assemblies substantially constant.

  12. Inverter power module with distributed support for direct substrate cooling

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David Harold (San Pedro, CA); Korich, Mark D. (Chino Hills, CA); Ward, Terence G. (Redondo Beach, CA); Mann, Brooks S. (Redondo Beach, CA)

    2012-08-21

    Systems and/or methods are provided for an inverter power module with distributed support for direct substrate cooling. An inverter module comprises a power electronic substrate. A first support frame is adapted to house the power electronic substrate and has a first region adapted to allow direct cooling of the power electronic substrate. A gasket is interposed between the power electronic substrate and the first support frame. The gasket is configured to provide a seal between the first region and the power electronic substrate. A second support frame is adapted to house the power electronic substrate and joined to the first support frame to form the seal.

  13. Electromagnetically Induced Flows Michiel de Reus

    E-print Network

    Vuik, Kees

    Electromagnetically Induced Flows in Water Michiel de Reus 8 maart 2013 () Electromagnetically Conclusion and future research () Electromagnetically Induced Flows 2 / 56 #12;1 Introduction 2 Maxwell Navier Stokes equations 5 Simulations 6 Conclusion and future research () Electromagnetically Induced

  14. Electromagnetic Radiation REFERENCE: Remote Sensing of

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    1 CHAPTER 2: Electromagnetic Radiation Principles REFERENCE: Remote Sensing of the Environment John;2 Electromagnetic Energy Interactions Energy recorded by remote sensing systems undergoes fundamental interactions, creating convectional currents in the atmosphere. c) Electromagnetic energy in the form of electromagnetic

  15. Cooling water distribution system

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  16. Two-fluid electromagnetic simulations of plasma-jet acceleration with detailed equation-of-state

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D. R.; Clark, R. E.; Bruner, N.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I. E.

    2011-10-15

    We describe a new particle-based two-fluid fully electromagnetic algorithm suitable for modeling high density (n{sub i} {approx} 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) and high Mach number laboratory plasma jets. In this parameter regime, traditional particle-in-cell (PIC) techniques are challenging due to electron timescale and lengthscale constraints. In this new approach, an implicit field solve allows the use of large timesteps while an Eulerian particle remap procedure allows simulations to be run with very few particles per cell. Hall physics and charge separation effects are included self-consistently. A detailed equation of state (EOS) model is used to evolve the ion charge state and introduce non-ideal gas behavior. Electron cooling due to radiation emission is included in the model as well. We demonstrate the use of these new algorithms in 1D and 2D Cartesian simulations of railgun (parallel plate) jet accelerators using He and Ar gases. The inclusion of EOS and radiation physics reduces the electron temperature, resulting in higher calculated jet Mach numbers in the simulations. We also introduce a surface physics model for jet accelerators in which a frictional drag along the walls leads to axial spreading of the emerging jet. The simulations demonstrate that high Mach number jets can be produced by railgun accelerators for a variety of applications, including high energy density physics experiments.

  17. Differential Forms in Electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindell, Ismo V.

    2004-04-01

    An introduction to multivectors, dyadics, and differential forms for electrical engineers While physicists have long applied differential forms to various areas of theoretical analysis, dyadic algebra is also the most natural language for expressing electromagnetic phenomena mathematically. George Deschamps pioneered the application of differential forms to electrical engineering but never completed his work. Now, Ismo V. Lindell, an internationally recognized authority on differential forms, provides a clear and practical introduction to replacing classical Gibbsian vector calculus with the mathematical formalism of differential forms. In Differential Forms in Electromagnetics, Lindell simplifies the notation and adds memory aids in order to ease the reader's leap from Gibbsian analysis to differential forms, and provides the algebraic tools corresponding to the dyadics of Gibbsian analysis that have long been missing from the formalism. He introduces the reader to basic EM theory and wave equations for the electromagnetic two-forms, discusses the derivation of useful identities, and explains novel ways of treating problems in general linear (bi-anisotropic) media. Clearly written and devoid of unnecessary mathematical jargon, Differential Forms in Electromagnetics helps engineers master an area of intense interest for anyone involved in research on metamaterials.

  18. Electromagnetic wormhole vertex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowker, H. F.

    1990-02-01

    It is shown that wormholes cause discrete effective interactions between photons and their form is calculated. The leading term is proportional to F??F?? and hence amounts to a renormalisation of the charge of any charged field coupled to electromagnetism. It is also shown that wormholes containing two conformal scalar particles in the lowest inhomogeneous mode give an effective interaction term proportional to ? ??? ??.

  19. Superconductive electromagnet apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mine, S.

    1982-12-14

    Disclosed is a superconductive electromagnet apparatus having a coil with a coiled conductor with a channel between adjacently disposed the paths of the coil conductor of which width is selected in accordance with amounts of heat produced at the corresponding portions of the coil section as viewed in cross section.

  20. Simple Superconducting "Permanent" Electromagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelson, Ulf E.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed short tube of high-temperature-superconducting material like YBa2Cu3O7 acts as strong electromagnet that flows as long as magnetic field remains below critical value and temperature of cylinder maintained sufficiently below superconducting-transition temperature. Design exploits maximally anisotropy of high-temperature-superconducting material.