Science.gov

Sample records for electromagnetics electron cooling

  1. Thermal transport: Cool electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jungwan; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2015-02-01

    Although heat removal in electronics at room temperature is typically governed by a hierarchy of conduction and convection phenomena, heat dissipation in cryogenic electronics can face a fundamental limit analogous to that of black-body emission of electromagnetic radiation.

  2. High energy electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  3. Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    DeFord, J.F.

    1993-03-01

    The Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics thrust area is a focal point for computer modeling activities in electronics and electromagnetics in the Electronics Engineering Department of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Traditionally, they have focused their efforts in technical areas of importance to existing and developing LLNL programs, and this continues to form the basis for much of their research. A relatively new and increasingly important emphasis for the thrust area is the formation of partnerships with industry and the application of their simulation technology and expertise to the solution of problems faced by industry. The activities of the thrust area fall into three broad categories: (1) the development of theoretical and computational models of electronic and electromagnetic phenomena, (2) the development of useful and robust software tools based on these models, and (3) the application of these tools to programmatic and industrial problems. In FY-92, they worked on projects in all of the areas outlined above. The object of their work on numerical electromagnetic algorithms continues to be the improvement of time-domain algorithms for electromagnetic simulation on unstructured conforming grids. The thrust area is also investigating various technologies for conforming-grid mesh generation to simplify the application of their advanced field solvers to design problems involving complicated geometries. They are developing a major code suite based on the three-dimensional (3-D), conforming-grid, time-domain code DSI3D. They continue to maintain and distribute the 3-D, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code TSAR, which is installed at several dozen university, government, and industry sites.

  4. Coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko,V.

    2009-05-04

    Cooling intense high-energy hadron beams remains a major challenge in modern accelerator physics. Synchrotron radiation is still too feeble, while the efficiency of two other cooling methods, stochastic and electron, falls rapidly either at high bunch intensities (i.e. stochastic of protons) or at high energies (e-cooling). In this talk a specific scheme of a unique cooling technique, Coherent Electron Cooling, will be discussed. The idea of coherent electron cooling using electron beam instabilities was suggested by Derbenev in the early 1980s, but the scheme presented in this talk, with cooling times under an hour for 7 TeV protons in the LHC, would be possible only with present-day accelerator technology. This talk will discuss the principles and the main limitations of the Coherent Electron Cooling process. The talk will describe the main system components, based on a high-gain free electron laser driven by an energy recovery linac, and will present some numerical examples for ions and protons in RHIC and the LHC and for electron-hadron options for these colliders. BNL plans a demonstration of the idea in the near future.

  5. Computational electronics and electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, C C

    1998-01-01

    The Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics thrust area serves as the focal point for Engineering R and D activities for developing computer-based design and analysis tools. Representative applications include design of particle accelerator cells and beamline components; design of transmission line components; engineering analysis and design of high-power (optical and microwave) components; photonics and optoelectronics circuit design; electromagnetic susceptibility analysis; and antenna synthesis. The FY-97 effort focuses on development and validation of (1) accelerator design codes; (2) 3-D massively parallel, time-dependent EM codes; (3) material models; (4) coupling and application of engineering tools for analysis and design of high-power components; and (5) development of beam control algorithms coupled to beam transport physics codes. These efforts are in association with technology development in the power conversion, nondestructive evaluation, and microtechnology areas. The efforts complement technology development in Lawrence Livermore National programs.

  6. MEIC electron cooling program

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is a high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.

  7. MEIC electron cooling program

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is amore » high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.« less

  8. Computational electronics and electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, C. C.

    1997-02-01

    The Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory serves as the focal point for engineering R&D activities for developing computer-based design, analysis, and tools for theory. Key representative applications include design of particle accelerator cells and beamline components; engineering analysis and design of high-power components, photonics, and optoelectronics circuit design; EMI susceptibility analysis; and antenna synthesis. The FY-96 technology-base effort focused code development on (1) accelerator design codes; (2) 3-D massively parallel, object-oriented time-domain EM codes; (3) material models; (4) coupling and application of engineering tools for analysis and design of high-power components; (5) 3-D spectral-domain CEM tools; and (6) enhancement of laser drilling codes. Joint efforts with the Power Conversion Technologies thrust area include development of antenna systems for compact, high-performance radar, in addition to novel, compact Marx generators. 18 refs., 25 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Electron Cooling of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    I. Ben-Zvi; D.S. Barton; D.B. Beavis; M. Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X.Y. Chang; R. Connolly; Yu.I. Eidelman; A.V. Fedotov; W. Fischer; D.M. Gassner; H. Hahn; M. Harrison; A. Hershcovitch; H.-C. Hseuh; A.K. Jain; P.D.J. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; V. Litvinenko; W.W. MacKay; G.J. Mahler; N. Malitsky; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; K.A.M. Mirabella; C. Montag; T.C.N. Nehring; T. Nicoletti; B. Oerter; G. Parzen; D. Pate; J. Rank; T. Rao; T. Roser; T. Russo; J. Scaduto; K. Smith; D. Trbojevic; G. Wang; J. Wei; N.W.W. Williams; K.-C. Wu; V. Yakimenko; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; D.T. Abell; D.L. Bruhwiler; H. Bluem; A. Burger; M.D. Cole; A.J. Favale; D. Holmes; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; A.V. Burov; S. Nagaitsev; J.R. Delayen; Y.S. Derbenev; L. W. Funk; P. Kneisel; L. Merminga; H.L. Phillips; J.P. Preble; I. Koop; V.V. Parkhomchuk; Y.M. Shatunov; A.N. Skrinsky; I. Koop; V.V. Parkhomchuk; Y.M. Shatunov; A.N. Skrinsky; J.S. Sekutowicz

    2005-05-16

    We report progress on the R&D program for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This electron cooler is designed to cool 100 GeV/nucleon at storage energy using 54 MeV electrons. The electron source will be a superconducting RF photocathode gun. The accelerator will be a superconducting energy recovery linac. The frequency of the accelerator is set at 703.75 MHz. The maximum electron bunch frequency is 9.38 MHz, with bunch charge of 20 nC. The R&D program has the following components: The photoinjector and its photocathode, the superconducting linac cavity, start-to-end beam dynamics with magnetized electrons, electron cooling calculations including benchmarking experiments and development of a large superconducting solenoid. The photoinjector and linac cavity are being incorporated into an energy recovery linac aimed at demonstrating ampere class current at about 20 MeV. A Zeroth Order Design Report is in an advanced draft state, and can be found on the web at http://www.agsrhichome.bnl.gov/eCool/.

  10. Electron Cooling Study for MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhang; Douglas, David R.; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    Electron cooling of the ion beams is one critical R&D to achieve high luminosities in JLab's MEIC proposal. In the present MEIC design, a multi-staged cooling scheme is adapted, which includes DC electron cooling in the booster ring and bunched beam electron cooling in the collider ring at both the injection energy and the collision energy. We explored the feasibility of using both magnetized and non-magnetized electron beam for cooling, and concluded that a magnetized electron beam is necessary. Electron cooling simulation results for the newly updated MEIC design is also presented.

  11. Electron microscopy of electromagnetic waveforms.

    PubMed

    Ryabov, A; Baum, P

    2016-07-22

    Rapidly changing electromagnetic fields are the basis of almost any photonic or electronic device operation. We report how electron microscopy can measure collective carrier motion and fields with subcycle and subwavelength resolution. A collimated beam of femtosecond electron pulses passes through a metamaterial resonator that is previously excited with a single-cycle electromagnetic pulse. If the probing electrons are shorter in duration than half a field cycle, then time-frozen Lorentz forces distort the images quasi-classically and with subcycle time resolution. A pump-probe sequence reveals in a movie the sample's oscillating electromagnetic field vectors with time, phase, amplitude, and polarization information. This waveform electron microscopy can be used to visualize electrodynamic phenomena in devices as small and fast as available. PMID:27463670

  12. Electron microscopy of electromagnetic waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, A.; Baum, P.

    2016-07-01

    Rapidly changing electromagnetic fields are the basis of almost any photonic or electronic device operation. We report how electron microscopy can measure collective carrier motion and fields with subcycle and subwavelength resolution. A collimated beam of femtosecond electron pulses passes through a metamaterial resonator that is previously excited with a single-cycle electromagnetic pulse. If the probing electrons are shorter in duration than half a field cycle, then time-frozen Lorentz forces distort the images quasi-classically and with subcycle time resolution. A pump-probe sequence reveals in a movie the sample’s oscillating electromagnetic field vectors with time, phase, amplitude, and polarization information. This waveform electron microscopy can be used to visualize electrodynamic phenomena in devices as small and fast as available.

  13. Dynamical backaction cooling with free electrons

    PubMed Central

    Niguès, A.; Siria, A.; Verlot, P.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to cool single ions, atomic ensembles, and more recently macroscopic degrees of freedom down to the quantum ground state has generated considerable progress and perspectives in fundamental and technological science. These major advances have been essentially obtained by coupling mechanical motion to a resonant electromagnetic degree of freedom in what is generally known as laser cooling. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the first self-induced coherent cooling mechanism that is not mediated by an electromagnetic resonance. Using a focused electron beam, we report a 50-fold reduction of the motional temperature of a nanowire. Our result primarily relies on the sub-nanometre confinement of the electron beam and generalizes to any delayed and spatially confined interaction, with important consequences for near-field microscopy and fundamental nanoscale dissipation mechanisms. PMID:26381454

  14. Dynamical backaction cooling with free electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niguès, A.; Siria, A.; Verlot, P.

    2015-09-01

    The ability to cool single ions, atomic ensembles, and more recently macroscopic degrees of freedom down to the quantum ground state has generated considerable progress and perspectives in fundamental and technological science. These major advances have been essentially obtained by coupling mechanical motion to a resonant electromagnetic degree of freedom in what is generally known as laser cooling. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the first self-induced coherent cooling mechanism that is not mediated by an electromagnetic resonance. Using a focused electron beam, we report a 50-fold reduction of the motional temperature of a nanowire. Our result primarily relies on the sub-nanometre confinement of the electron beam and generalizes to any delayed and spatially confined interaction, with important consequences for near-field microscopy and fundamental nanoscale dissipation mechanisms.

  15. Electron Cooling of Bunched Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Uesugi, T.; Noda, K.; Syresin, E.; Meshkov, I.; Shibuya, S.

    2006-03-20

    Experiments of electron cooling have been done with the HIMAC synchrotron in NIRS. Limitation on cooled beam-sizes in longitudianl and transverse spaces were measured. The effect of space-charge field and intra-beam scattering are investigated.

  16. Microscale technology electronics cooling overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golliher, Eric L.

    2002-01-01

    NASA requirements and subsequent technology solutions for high heat flux electronics are generally different that those for the terrestrial applications. Unlike terrestrial operations. NASA spacecraft have limited opportunities for air cooling, for example, and must rely on less efficient thermal radiation to reject heat to space. The terrestrial commercial electronics industry, as well as other Government agencies, is investing in advanced technologies for electronics cooling at the microscale. This paper gives a brief summary of metrics used in high heat flux electronics cooling, the difference between solutions developed for terrestrial requirements and those for space, and a short description of challenges as well as possible solutions for space-based high heat flux electronics cooling. The argument is made that high heat flux electronics cooling is indeed a core technology required by NASA, since the thermal and other environmental requirements are unique to NASA space missions and are not addressed by current terrestrial electronics cooling technology development projects. .

  17. Power electronics cooling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sanger, Philip Albert; Lindberg, Frank A.; Garcen, Walter

    2000-01-01

    A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

  18. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    DOEpatents

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  19. Cooling system for electronic components

    DOEpatents

    Anderl, William James; Colgan, Evan George; Gerken, James Dorance; Marroquin, Christopher Michael; Tian, Shurong

    2016-05-17

    Embodiments of the present invention provide for non interruptive fluid cooling of an electronic enclosure. One or more electronic component packages may be removable from a circuit card having a fluid flow system. When installed, the electronic component packages are coincident to and in a thermal relationship with the fluid flow system. If a particular electronic component package becomes non-functional, it may be removed from the electronic enclosure without affecting either the fluid flow system or other neighboring electronic component packages.

  20. Cooling system for electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderl, William James; Colgan, Evan George; Gerken, James Dorance; Marroquin, Christopher Michael; Tian, Shurong

    2015-12-15

    Embodiments of the present invention provide for non interruptive fluid cooling of an electronic enclosure. One or more electronic component packages may be removable from a circuit card having a fluid flow system. When installed, the electronic component packages are coincident to and in a thermal relationship with the fluid flow system. If a particular electronic component package becomes non-functional, it may be removed from the electronic enclosure without affecting either the fluid flow system or other neighboring electronic component packages.

  1. Electronic cooling using thermoelectric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebarjadi, M.

    2015-05-01

    Thermoelectric coolers or Peltier coolers are used to pump heat in the opposite direction of the natural heat flux. These coolers have also been proposed for electronic cooling, wherein the aim is to pump heat in the natural heat flux direction and from hot spots to the colder ambient temperature. In this manuscript, we show that for such applications, one needs to use thermoelectric materials with large thermal conductivity and large power factor, instead of the traditionally used high ZT thermoelectric materials. We further show that with the known thermoelectric materials, the active cooling cannot compete with passive cooling, and one needs to explore a new set of materials to provide a cooling solution better than a regular copper heat sink. We propose a set of materials and directions for exploring possible materials candidates suitable for electronic cooling. Finally, to achieve maximum cooling, we propose to use thermoelectric elements as fins attached to copper blocks.

  2. Electronic cooling using thermoelectric devices

    SciTech Connect

    Zebarjadi, M.

    2015-05-18

    Thermoelectric coolers or Peltier coolers are used to pump heat in the opposite direction of the natural heat flux. These coolers have also been proposed for electronic cooling, wherein the aim is to pump heat in the natural heat flux direction and from hot spots to the colder ambient temperature. In this manuscript, we show that for such applications, one needs to use thermoelectric materials with large thermal conductivity and large power factor, instead of the traditionally used high ZT thermoelectric materials. We further show that with the known thermoelectric materials, the active cooling cannot compete with passive cooling, and one needs to explore a new set of materials to provide a cooling solution better than a regular copper heat sink. We propose a set of materials and directions for exploring possible materials candidates suitable for electronic cooling. Finally, to achieve maximum cooling, we propose to use thermoelectric elements as fins attached to copper blocks.

  3. Cooling Shelf For Electronic Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanzer, Herbert J.

    1989-01-01

    Heat-pipe action cools and maintains electronics at nearly constant temperature. System designed to control temperatures of spacecraft shelves or baseplates by combining honeycomb sandwich panel with reservoir of noncondensable gas and processing resulting device as variable-conductance heat pipe. Device provides flat surface for mounting heat-dissipating electronics that is effectively cooled and maintained at nearly constant temperature. Potentially useful in freeze drying, refrigeration, and air conditioning.

  4. Optimization of electron cooling in the Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Shemyakin, A.; Burov, A.; Carlson, K.; Prost, L.R.; Sutherland, M.; Warner, A.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Antiprotons in Fermilab's Recycler ring are cooled by a 4.3 MeV, 0.1A DC electron beam (as well as by a stochastic cooling system). The paper describes electron cooling improvements recently implemented: adjustments of electron beam line quadrupoles to decrease the electron angles in the cooling section and better stabilization and control of the electron energy.

  5. Energy Efficient Electronics Cooling Project

    SciTech Connect

    Steve O'Shaughnessey; Tim Louvar; Mike Trumbower; Jessica Hunnicutt; Neil Myers

    2012-02-17

    Parker Precision Cooling Business Unit was awarded a Department of Energy grant (DE-EE0000412) to support the DOE-ITP goal of reducing industrial energy intensity and GHG emissions. The project proposed by Precision Cooling was to accelerate the development of a cooling technology for high heat generating electronics components. These components are specifically related to power electronics found in power drives focused on the inverter, converter and transformer modules. The proposed cooling system was expected to simultaneously remove heat from all three of the major modules listed above, while remaining dielectric under all operating conditions. Development of the cooling system to meet specific customer's requirements and constraints not only required a robust system design, but also new components to support long system functionality. Components requiring further development and testing during this project included pumps, fluid couplings, cold plates and condensers. All four of these major categories of components are required in every Precision Cooling system. Not only was design a key area of focus, but the process for manufacturing these components had to be determined and proven through the system development.

  6. Improved cooling of electromagnetics by directed airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fain, Adam Matthew

    The transformers in aircraft power conversion are often very heavy and represent a significant fuel or range penalty. Being thermally sized, improved cooling methods would allow downsizing and thereby reduced weight. Since the conductive paths in these metal "dense" devices are good, the controlling thermal resistance is typically the convective coefficient. The goal of this study was to optimize the convective air cooling across transformers by parametrically testing candidate shroud geometries to minimize average and hot spot surface temperatures with minimal fan power. A test set up was constructed that included a low velocity wind tunnel, fan, temperature and pressure sensors, DAQ system, and film heaters as well as the actual transformers. Experimental results from a low velocity wind tunnel were well predicted by CFD modeling, providing confidence in continued shroud development with only CFD or experimentally. Curved or bent types of shapes proved to be the most efficient shroud configurations in terms of maximizing heat transfer while reducing the energy requirement to achieve the desired level of cooling.

  7. The HESR Electron Cooling Proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Reistad, D.

    2006-03-20

    The maximum electron energy of the HESR electron cooling system has been decided to be 4.5 MeV, with a possible future upgrade to 8 MeV. Calculations with BETACOOL have been carried out; these include effects of imperfections of the electron beam as well as the internal hydrogen pellet target and intra-beam scattering. Design work is going on. This makes use of the experience gained at the FNAL Recycler and aims to result in a practical solution, which includes considerations for robustness as well as ease of assembly, bake-out, and to make use of proven solutions as much as possible.

  8. Coherent electron cooling demonstration experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; Fedotov, A.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Mahler, G.; Marusic, A.; Meng, W.; McIntyre, G.; Minty, M.; Ptitsyn, V.; Pinayev, I.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Sheehy, B.; Tepikian, S.; Than, R.; Trbojevic, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Yakimenko, V.; Hutton, A.; Krafft, G.; Poelker, M.; Rimmer, R.; Bruhwiler, D.; Abell, D.T.; Nieter, C.; Ranjbar, V.; Schwartz, B.; Kholopov M.; Shevchenko, O.; McIntosh, P.; Wheelhouse, A.

    2011-09-04

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron-hadron and electron-hadron colliders. In a CEC system, a hadron beam interacts with a cooling electron beam. A perturbation of the electron density caused by ions is amplified and fed back to the ions to reduce the energy spread and the emittance of the ion beam. To demonstrate the feasibility of CEC we propose a proof-of-principle experiment at RHIC using SRF linac. In this paper, we describe the setup for CeC installed into one of RHIC's interaction regions. We present results of analytical estimates and results of initial simulations of cooling a gold-ion beam at 40 GeV/u energy via CeC. We plan to complete the program in five years. During first two years we will build coherent electron cooler in IP2 of RHIC. In parallel we will develop complete package of computer simulation tools for the start-to-end simulation predicting exact performance of a CeC. The later activity will be the core of Tech X involvement into the project. We will use these tools to predict the performance of our CeC device. The experimental demonstration of the CeC will be undertaken in years three to five of the project. The goal of this experiment is to demonstrate the cooling of ion beam and to compare its measured performance with predictions made by us prior to the experiments.

  9. Towards demonstration of electron cooling with bunched electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.

    2012-01-11

    All electron cooling systems which were in operation so far employed electron beam generated with an electrostatic electron gun in DC operating mode, immersed in a longitudinal magnetic field. At low energies magnetic field is also being used to transport electron beam through the cooling section from the gun to the collector. At higher energies (few MeV), it was shown that one can have simpler electron beam transport without continuous magnetic field. Because of a rather weak magnetic field on the cathode and in the cooling section the latter approach was referred to as 'non-magnetized cooling', since there was no suppression of the transverse angular spread of the electron beam with the magnetic field in the cooling section. Such a cooler successfully operated at FNAL (2005-11) at electron beam energy of 4.3 MeV. Providing cooling at even higher energies would be easier with RF acceleration of electron beam, and thus using bunched electron beam for cooling. Significant efforts were devoted to explore various aspects of such bunched electron beam cooling as part of R and D of high-energy electron cooling for RHIC. However, experimental studies of such cooling are still lacking. Establishing this technique experimentally would be extremely useful for future high-energy applications. Presently there is an ongoing effort to build Proof-of-Principle (PoP) experiment of Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC) at RHIC, which promises to be superior to conventional electron cooling for high energies. Since the CEC experiment is based on bunched electron beam and it has sections where electron beam co-propagates with the ion beam at the same velocity, it also provides a unique opportunity to explore experimentally conventional electron cooling but for the first time with a bunched electron beam. As a result, it allows us to explore techniques needed for the high-energy electron cooling such as 'painting' with a short electron beam and control of ion beam distribution under

  10. MEIC Electron Cooling Simulation Using Betacool

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, He; Zhang, Yuhong

    2013-12-01

    Electron cooling of ion beams is the most critical R&D issue in Jefferson Lab's MEIC design. In the ion collider ring, a bunched electron beam driven by an energy-recovery SRF linac assisted by a circulate ring will be employed to cool protons or ions with energies up to 100 GeV/u, a parameter regime that electron cooling has never been applied. It is essential to understand how efficient the electron cooling is, particularly in the high energy range, to confirm the feasibility of the design. Electron cooling is also important in LEIC design although the ion energy is 25 GeV/u, lower than MEIC. In this paper, we will present first results of the simulation studies of electron cooling processes in the collider ring of both MEIC and LEIC using BETACOOL code.

  11. Experimental demonstration of relativistic electron cooling.

    PubMed

    Nagaitsev, Sergei; Broemmelsiek, Daniel; Burov, Alexey; Carlson, Kermit; Gattuso, Consolato; Hu, Martin; Kroc, Thomas; Prost, Lionel; Pruss, Stanley; Sutherland, Mary; Schmidt, Charles W; Shemyakin, Alexander; Tupikov, Vitali; Warner, Arden; Kazakevich, Grigory; Seletskiy, Sergey

    2006-02-01

    We report on an experimental demonstration of electron cooling of high-energy antiprotons circulating in a storage ring. In our experiments, electron cooling, a well-established method at low energies (<500 MeV/nucleon), was carried out in a new region of beam parameters, requiring a multi-MeV dc electron beam and an unusual beam transport line. In this Letter, we present the results of the longitudinal cooling force measurements and compare them with theoretical predictions. PMID:16486833

  12. Experimental demonstration of relativistic electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, Alexey V.; Carlson, K.; Gattuso, C.; Hu, M.; Kazakevich, Grigory M.; Kroc, T.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Sutherland, M.; Schmidt, C.W.; Seletskiy, S.; Shemyakin, A.; Tupikov, V.; Warner, A.; /Fermilab /Novosibirsk, IYF /Rochester U.

    2005-11-01

    We report on an experimental demonstration of electron cooling of high-energy antiprotons circulating in a storage ring. In our experiments, electron cooling, a well-established method at low energies (< 500 MeV/nucleon), was carried out in a new region of beam parameters, requiring a multi-MeV dc electron beam and an unusual beam transport line. In this letter we present the results of the longitudinal cooling force measurements and compare them with theoretical predictions.

  13. Classical electromagnetic radiation of the Dirac electron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, G.

    1973-01-01

    A wave-function-dependent four-vector potential is added to the Dirac equation in order to achieve conservation of energy and momentum for a Dirac electron and its emitted electromagnetic field. The resultant equation contains solutions which describe transitions between different energy states of the electron. As a consequence it is possible to follow the space-time evolution of such a process. This evolution is shown in the case of the spontaneous emission of an electromagnetic field by an electron bound in a hydrogen-like atom. The intensity of the radiation and the spectral distribution are calculated for transitions between two eigenstates. The theory gives a self-consistent deterministic description of some simple radiation processes without using quantum electrodynamics or the correspondence principle.

  14. Electron kinetics in a cooling plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, P.; Smith, H.; Fueloep, T.; Eriksson, L.-G.

    2004-12-01

    The distribution function of suprathermal electrons in a slowly cooling plasma is calculated by an asymptotic expansion in the cooling rate divided by the collision frequency. Since the collision frequency decreases with increasing velocity, a high-energy tail forms in the electron distribution function as the bulk population cools down. Under certain simplifying assumptions (slow cooling, constant density, Born approximation of cross sections), the distribution function evolves to a self-similar state where the tail is inversely proportional to the cube of the velocity. Its practical consequences are discussed briefly.

  15. VORPAL Simulations Relevant to Coherent Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Sobol, A.V.; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Litvinenko, Vladimir; Derbenev, Yaroslav

    2008-07-01

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC)* combines the best features of electron cooling and stochastic cooling, via free-electron laser technology**, to offer the possibility of cooling high-energy hadron beams with order-of-magnitude shorter cooling times. Many technical difficulties must be resolved via full-scale 3D simulations, before the CEC concept can be validated experimentally. VORPAL is the ideal code for simulating the â modulatorâ and â kickerâ regions, where the electron and hadron beams will co-propagate as in a conventional electron cooling section. Unlike previous VORPAL simulations*** of electron cooling physics, where dynamical friction on the ions was the key metric, it is the details of the electron density wake driven by each ion in the modulator section that must be understood, followed by strong amplification in the FEL. We present some initial simulation results. In particular, we compare the semi-analytic binary collision model with electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC).

  16. Direct Liquid Cooling for Electronic Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, Henry; Greenberg, Steve

    2014-03-01

    This report documents a demonstration of an electronic--equipment cooling system in the engineering prototype development stage that can be applied in data centers. The technology provides cooling by bringing a water--based cooling fluid into direct contact with high--heat--generating electronic components. This direct cooling system improves overall data center energy efficiency in three ways: High--heat--generating electronic components are more efficiently cooled directly using water, capturing a large portion of the total electronic equipment heat generated. This captured heat reduces the load on the less--efficient air--based data center room cooling systems. The combination contributes to the overall savings. The power consumption of the electronic equipment internal fans is significantly reduced when equipped with this cooling system. The temperature of the cooling water supplied to the direct cooling system can be much higher than that commonly provided by facility chilled water loops, and therefore can be produced with lower cooling infrastructure energy consumption and possibly compressor-free cooling. Providing opportunities for heat reuse is an additional benefit of this technology. The cooling system can be controlled to produce high return water temperatures while providing adequate component cooling. The demonstration was conducted in a data center located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. Thirty--eight servers equipped with the liquid cooling system and instrumented for energy measurements were placed in a single rack. Two unmodified servers of the same configuration, located in an adjacent rack, were used to provide a baseline. The demonstration characterized the fraction of heat removed by the direct cooling technology, quantified the energy savings for a number of cooling infrastructure scenarios, and provided information that could be used to investigate heat reuse opportunities. Thermal measurement data were used

  17. DETAILED STUDIES OF ELECTRON COOLING FRICTION FORCE.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; BRUHWILER, D.L.; ABELL, D.T.; SIDORIN, A.O.

    2005-09-18

    High-energy electron cooling for RHIC presents many unique features and challenges. An accurate estimate of the cooling times requires detailed simulation of the electron cooling process. The first step towards such calculations is to have an accurate description of the cooling force. Numerical simulations are being used to explore various features of the friction force which appear due to several effects, including the anisotropy of the electron distribution in velocity space and the effect of a strong solenoidal magnetic field. These aspects are being studied in detail using the VORFAL code, which explicitly resolves close binary collisions. Results are compared with available asymptotic and empirical formulas and also, using the BETACOOL code, with direct numerical integration of less approximate expressions over the specified electron distribution function.

  18. Detailed Studies of Electron Cooling Friction Force

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A. V.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Abell, D. T.; Sidorin, A. O.

    2006-03-20

    High-energy electron cooling for RHIC presents many unique features and challenges. An accurate estimate of the cooling times requires detailed simulation of the electron cooling process. The first step towards such calculations is to have an accurate description of the cooling force. Numerical simulations are being used to explore various features of the friction force which appear due to several effects, including the anisotropy of the electron distribution in velocity space and the effect of a strong solenoidal magnetic field. These aspects are being studied in detail using the VORPAL code, which explicitly resolves close binary collisions. Results are compared with available asymptotic and empirical formulas and also, using the BETACOOL code, with direct numerical integration of less approximate expressions over the specified electron distribution function.

  19. ELECTRON COOLING IN THE RECYCLER COOLER

    SciTech Connect

    SHEMYAKIN,A.; PROST, L.R.; FEDOTOV, A.; SIDORIN, A.

    2007-09-10

    A 0.1-0.5 A, 4.3 MeV DC electron beam provides cooling of 8 GeV antiprotons in Fermilab's Recycler storage ring. The most detailed information about the cooling properties of the electron beam comes from drag rate measurements. We find that the measured drag rate can significantly differ from the cooling force experienced by a single antiproton because the area of effective cooling is significantly smaller than the physical size of the electron beam and is comparable with the size of the antiproton beam used as a probe. Modeling by the BETACOOL code supports the conclusion about a large radial gradient of transverse velocities in the presently used electron beam.

  20. Simulation study of electron response amplification in coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Hao Y.; Litvinenko, V.N.

    2012-05-20

    In Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC), it is essential to study the amplification of electron response to a single ion in the FEL process, in order to proper align the electron beam and the ion beam in the kicker to maximize the cooling effect. In this paper, we use Genesis to simulate the amplified electron beam response of single ion in FEL amplification process, which acts as Green's function of the FEL amplifier.

  1. Thermoelectric Devices Cool, Power Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Nextreme Thermal Solutions Inc., based in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, licensed thermoelectric technology from NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This has allowed the company to develop cutting edge, thin-film thermoelectric coolers that effective remove heat generated by increasingly powerful and tightly packed microchip components. These solid-state coolers are ideal solutions for applications like microprocessors, laser diodes, LEDs, and even potentially for cooling the human body. Nextreme s NASA technology has also enabled the invention of thermoelectric generators capable of powering technologies like medical implants and wireless sensor networks.

  2. Electronic systems failures and anomalies attributed to electromagnetic interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, R. D. (Editor); Alexander, M. B. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The effects of electromagnetic interference can be very detrimental to electronic systems utilized in space missions. Assuring that subsystems and systems are electrically compatible is an important engineering function necessary to assure mission success. This reference publication will acquaint the reader with spacecraft electronic systems failures and anomalies caused by electromagnetic interference and will show the importance of electromagnetic compatibility activities in conjunction with space flight programs. It is also hoped that the report will illustrate that evolving electronic systems are increasingly sensitive to electromagnetic interference and that NASA personnel must continue to diligently pursue electromagnetic compatibility on space flight systems.

  3. Methods and apparatus for cooling electronics

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Shawn Anthony; Kopcsay, Gerard Vincent

    2014-12-02

    Methods and apparatus are provided for choosing an energy-efficient coolant temperature for electronics by considering the temperature dependence of the electronics' power dissipation. This dependence is explicitly considered in selecting the coolant temperature T.sub.0 that is sent to the equipment. To minimize power consumption P.sub.Total for the entire system, where P.sub.Total=P.sub.0+P.sub.Cool is the sum of the electronic equipment's power consumption P.sub.0 plus the cooling equipment's power consumption P.sub.Cool, P.sub.Total is obtained experimentally, by measuring P.sub.0 and P.sub.Cool, as a function of three parameters: coolant temperature T.sub.0; weather-related temperature T.sub.3 that affects the performance of free-cooling equipment; and computational state C of the electronic equipment, which affects the temperature dependence of its power consumption. This experiment provides, for each possible combination of T.sub.3 and C, the value T.sub.0* of T.sub.0 that minimizes P.sub.Total. During operation, for any combination of T.sub.3 and C that occurs, the corresponding optimal coolant temperature T.sub.0* is selected, and the cooling equipment is commanded to produce it.

  4. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    DOEpatents

    Le, Khiet; Ward, Terence G.; Mann, Brooks S.; Yankoski, Edward P.; Smith, Gregory S.

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  5. Method of fabricating a cooled electronic system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Gaynes, Michael A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Schultz, Mark D; Simco, Daniel P; Steinke, Mark E

    2014-02-11

    A method of fabricating a liquid-cooled electronic system is provided which includes an electronic assembly having an electronics card and a socket with a latch at one end. The latch facilitates securing of the card within the socket. The method includes providing a liquid-cooled cold rail at the one end of the socket, and a thermal spreader to couple the electronics card to the cold rail. The thermal spreader includes first and second thermal transfer plates coupled to first and second surfaces on opposite sides of the card, and thermally conductive extensions extending from end edges of the plates, which couple the respective transfer plates to the liquid-cooled cold rail. The extensions are disposed to the sides of the latch, and the card is securable within or removable from the socket using the latch without removing the cold rail or the thermal spreader.

  6. Single Pass Electron Cooling Simulations for MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G. I.; Pogorelov, I. V.; Schwartz, B. T.; Zhang, Yuhong; Zhang, He

    2013-12-01

    Cooling of medium energy protons is critical for the proposed Jefferson Lab Medium Energy Ion Collider (MEIC). We present simulations of electron cooling of protons up to 60 GeV. In the beam frame in which the proton and electrons are co-propagating, their motion is non-relativistic. We use a binary collision model which treats the cooling process as the sum of a large number of two-body collisions which are calculated exactly. This model can treat even very close collisions between an electron and ion with high accuracy. We also calculate dynamical friction using a delta-f PIC model. The code VSim (formerly Vorpal) is used to perform the simulations. We compare the friction rates with that obtained by a 3D integral over electron velocities which is used by BETACOOL.

  7. Radiative cooling of relativistic electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.

    1999-04-14

    Radiative cooling is a natural and effective method of phase-space cooling for stored electron beams. In electron storage rings the average effects of synchrotron radiation from the bending magnets cause the beam emittances in all three degrees of freedom to damp towards equilibria, determined by the fluctuating nature of quantum emissions. In this paper, they show that the radiation damping in a focusing system is fundamentally different from that in a bending system. Quantum excitation to the transverse dimensions is absent in a straight, continuous focusing channel, and is exponentially suppressed in a focusing-dominated ring. Thus, the transverse normalized emittances in such systems can in principle be damped to the Compton wavelength of the electron, limited only by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. In addition, they investigate methods of rapid damping such as radiative laser cooling. They propose a laser-electron storage ring (LESR) where the electron beam in a compact storage ring repetitively interacts with an intense laser pulse stored in an optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction gives rise to fast cooling of electron beams and can be used to overcome the space-charge effects encountered in a medium-energy circular machine. Applications to the designs of ultra-low-emittance damping rings and compact x-ray sources are also explored.

  8. Electron Cooling of Intense Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, J.; Kamerdjiev, V.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; Stein, J.; Stockhorst, H.; Korotaev, Yu.; Meshkov, I.; Sidorin, A.; Smirnov, A.

    2006-03-20

    Results of experimental studies of the electron cooling of a proton beam at COSY (Juelich, Germany) are presented. Intensity of the proton beam is limited by two general effects: particle loss directly after the injection and development of instability in a deep cooled ion beam. Results of the instability investigations performed at COSY during last years are presented in this report in comparison with previous results from HIMAC (Chiba, Japan) CELSIUS (Uppsala, Sweden) and LEAR (CERN). Methods of the instability suppression, which allow increasing the cooled beam intensity, are described. This work is supported by RFBR grant no. 05-02-16320 and INTAS grant no. 03-54-5584.

  9. Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Wiles, R.; Ayers, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2008-12-23

    The goal of the Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate project is to reduce the size and weight of the heat sink for power electronics used in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The concept proposed in this project was to develop an innovative power electronics mounting structure, model it, and perform both thermal and mechanical finite-element analysis (FEA). This concept involved integrating cooling channels within the direct-bonded copper (DBC) substrate and strategically locating these channels underneath the power electronic devices. This arrangement would then be directly cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG), essentially eliminating the conventional heat sink and associated heat flow path. The concept was evaluated to determine its manufacturability, its compatibility with WEG, and the potential to reduce size and weight while directly cooling the DBC and associated electronics with a coolant temperature of 105 C. This concept does not provide direct cooling to the electronics, only direct cooling inside the DBC substrate itself. These designs will take into account issues such as containment of the fluid (separation from the electronics) and synergy with the whole power inverter design architecture. In FY 2008, mechanical modeling of substrate and inverter core designs as well as thermal and mechanical stress FEA modeling of the substrate designs was performed, along with research into manufacturing capabilities and methods that will support the substrate designs. In FY 2009, a preferred design(s) will be fabricated and laboratory validation testing will be completed. In FY 2010, based on the previous years laboratory testing, the mechanical design will be modified and the next generation will be built and tested in an operating inverter prototype.

  10. Analytical studies of coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Litvinenko, V.N.

    2009-05-04

    Under certain assumptions and simplifications, we studied a few physics processes of Coherent Electron Cooling using analytical approach. In the modulation process, the effect due to merging the ion beam with the electron beam is studied under single kick approximation. In the free electron laser (FEL) amplifier, we studied the amplification of the electron density modulation using 1D analytical approach. Both the electron charge density and the phase space density are derived in the frequency domain. The solutions are then transformed into the space domain through Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT).

  11. Electron cooling rates characterization at Fermilab's Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Lionel R.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    A 0.1 A, 4.3 MeV DC electron beam is routinely used to cool 8 GeV antiprotons in Fermilab's Recycler storage ring [1]. The primary function of the electron cooler is to increase the longitudinal phase-space density of the antiprotons for storing and preparing high-density bunches for injection into the Tevatron. The longitudinal cooling rate is found to significantly depend on the transverse emittance of the antiproton beam. The paper presents the measured rates and compares them with calculations based on drag force data.

  12. Cooling of electronics in collider experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Richard P. Stanek et al.

    2003-11-07

    Proper cooling of detector electronics is critical to the successful operation of high-energy physics experiments. Collider experiments offer unique challenges based on their physical layouts and hermetic design. Cooling systems can be categorized by the type of detector with which they are associated, their primary mode of heat transfer, the choice of active cooling fluid, their heat removal capacity and the minimum temperature required. One of the more critical detector subsystems to require cooling is the silicon vertex detector, either pixel or strip sensors. A general design philosophy is presented along with a review of the important steps to include in the design process. Factors affecting the detector and cooling system design are categorized. A brief review of some existing and proposed cooling systems for silicon detectors is presented to help set the scale for the range of system designs. Fermilab operates two collider experiments, CDF & D0, both of which have silicon systems embedded in their detectors. A review of the existing silicon cooling system designs and operating experience is presented along with a list of lessons learned.

  13. Potential Refrigerants for Power Electronics Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, M.R.

    2005-10-24

    In the past, automotive refrigerants have conventionally been used solely for the purpose of air conditioning. However, with the development of hybrid-electric vehicles and the incorporation of power electronics (PEs) into the automobile, automotive refrigerants are taking on a new role. Unfortunately, PEs have lifetimes and functionalities that are highly dependent on temperature and as a result thermal control plays an important role in the performance of PEs. Typically, PEs are placed in the engine compartment where the internal combustion engine (ICE) already produces substantial heat. Along with the ICE heat, the additional thermal energy produced by PEs themselves forces designers to use different cooling methods to prevent overheating. Generally, heat sinks and separate cooling loops are used to maintain the temperature. Disturbingly, the thermal control system can consume one third of the total volume and may weigh more than the PEs [1]. Hence, other avenues have been sought to cool PEs, including submerging PEs in automobile refrigerants to take advantage of two-phase cooling. The objective of this report is to explore the different automotive refrigerants presently available that could be used for PE cooling. Evaluation of the refrigerants will be done by comparing environmental effects and some thermo-physical properties important to two-phase cooling, specifically measuring the dielectric strengths of potential candidates. Results of this report will be used to assess the different candidates with good potential for future use in PE cooling.

  14. Two-Beam Instability in Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, Alexey V.; /Fermilab

    2006-04-01

    The drift motion of cooling electrons makes them able to respond to transverse perturbations of a cooled ion beam. This response may lead to dipole or quadrupole transverse instabilities at specific longitudinal wave numbers. While the dipole instabilities can be suppressed by a combination of the Landau damping, machine impedance, and the active damper, the quadrupole and higher order modes can lead to either emittance growth, or a lifetime degradation, or both. The growth rates of these instabilities are strongly determined by the machine x-y coupling. Thus, tuning out of the coupling resonance and/or reduction of the machine coupling can be an efficient remedy for these instabilities.

  15. Electromagnetic Dissociation and Spacecraft Electronics Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    2016-01-01

    When protons or heavy ions from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) or solar particle events (SPE) interact with target nuclei in spacecraft, there can be two different types of interactions. The more familiar strong nuclear interaction often dominates and is responsible for nuclear fragmentation in either the GCR or SPE projectile nucleus or the spacecraft target nucleus. (Of course, the proton does not break up, except possibly to produce pions or other hadrons.) The less familiar, second type of interaction is due to the very strong electromagnetic fields that exist when two charged nuclei pass very close to each other. This process is called electromagnetic dissociation (EMD) and primarily results in the emission of neutrons, protons and light ions (isotopes of hydrogen and helium). The cross section for particle production is approximately defined as the number of particles produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions or other types of reactions. (There are various kinematic and other factors which multiply the particle number to arrive at the cross section.) Strong, nuclear interactions usually dominate the nuclear reactions of most interest that occur between GCR and target nuclei. However, for heavy nuclei (near Fe and beyond) at high energy the EMD cross section can be much larger than the strong nuclear interaction cross section. This paper poses a question: Are there projectile or target nuclei combinations in the interaction of GCR or SPE where the EMD reaction cross section plays a dominant role? If the answer is affirmative, then EMD mechanisms should be an integral part of codes that are used to predict damage to spacecraft electronics. The question can become more fine-tuned and one can ask about total reaction cross sections as compared to double differential cross sections. These issues will be addressed in the present paper.

  16. Electron beam size measurements in the Fermilab Electron Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T.K.; Burov, A.V.; Bolshakov, T.B.; Shemyakin, A.; Seletskiy, S.M.; /Rochester U.

    2005-09-01

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires a straight trajectory and constant beam size to provide maximum cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler. A measurement system was developed using movable apertures and steering bumps to measure the beam size in a 20m long, nearly continuous, solenoid. This paper will focus on results of these measurements of the beam size and the difficulties in making those measurements.

  17. Electron Beam Size Measurements in the Fermilab Electron Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T. K.; Burov, A. V.; Bolshakov, T. B.; Shemyakin, A.; Seletskiy, S. M.

    2006-03-20

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires a straight trajectory and constant beam size to provide maximum cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler. A measurement system was developed using movable apertures and steering bumps to measure the beam size in a 20m long, nearly continuous, solenoid. This paper will focus on results of these measurements of the beam size and the difficulties in making those measurements.

  18. Controlled cooling of an electronic system for reduced energy consumption

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.

    2016-08-09

    Energy efficient control of a cooling system cooling an electronic system is provided. The control includes automatically determining at least one adjusted control setting for at least one adjustable cooling component of a cooling system cooling the electronic system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on power being consumed by the cooling system and temperature of a heat sink to which heat extracted by the cooling system is rejected. The automatically determining operates to reduce power consumption of the cooling system and/or the electronic system while ensuring that at least one targeted temperature associated with the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range. The automatically determining may be based, at least in part, on one or more experimentally obtained models relating the targeted temperature and power consumption of the one or more adjustable cooling components of the cooling system.

  19. Survey and Alignment of the Fermilab Electron Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Oshinowo, Babatunde O'Sheg; Leibfritz, Jerry

    2006-09-01

    The goal of achieving the Tevatron luminosity of 3 x 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} requires Electron Cooling in the Recycler Ring to provide an increased flux of antiprotons. The Fermilab Electron Cooling system has been designed to assist accumulation of antiprotons for the Tevatron collider operations. The installation along with the survey and alignment of the Electron Cooling system in the Recycler Ring were completed in November 2004. The Electron Cooling system was fully commissioned in May 2005 and the first cooling of antiprotons was achieved in July 2005. This paper discusses the alignment methodology employed to survey and align the Electron Cooling system.

  20. Adiabatic cooling of solar wind electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandbaek, Ornulf; Leer, Egil

    1992-01-01

    In thermally driven winds emanating from regions in the solar corona with base electron densities of n0 not less than 10 exp 8/cu cm, a substantial fraction of the heat conductive flux from the base is transfered into flow energy by the pressure gradient force. The adiabatic cooling of the electrons causes the electron temperature profile to fall off more rapidly than in heat conduction dominated flows. Alfven waves of solar origin, accelerating the basically thermally driven solar wind, lead to an increased mass flux and enhanced adiabatic cooling. The reduction in electron temperature may be significant also in the subsonic region of the flow and lead to a moderate increase of solar wind mass flux with increasing Alfven wave amplitude. In the solar wind model presented here the Alfven wave energy flux per unit mass is larger than that in models where the temperature in the subsonic flow is not reduced by the wave, and consequently the asymptotic flow speed is higher.

  1. Cooled electronic system with liquid-cooled cold plate and thermal spreader coupled to electronic component

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2016-04-05

    Apparatus and method are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The apparatus includes a liquid-cooled cold plate and a thermal spreader associated with the cold plate. The cold plate includes multiple coolant-carrying channel sections extending within the cold plate, and a thermal conduction surface with a larger surface area than a surface area of the component to be cooled. The thermal spreader includes one or more heat pipes including multiple heat pipe sections. One or more heat pipe sections are partially aligned to a first region of the cold plate, that is, where aligned to the surface to be cooled, and partially aligned to a second region of the cold plate, which is outside the first region. The one or more heat pipes facilitate distribution of heat from the electronic component to coolant-carrying channel sections of the cold plate located in the second region of the cold plate.

  2. Cooled electronic system with liquid-cooled cold plate and thermal spreader coupled to electronic component

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2016-08-09

    Apparatus and method are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The apparatus includes a liquid-cooled cold plate and a thermal spreader associated with the cold plate. The cold plate includes multiple coolant-carrying channel sections extending within the cold plate, and a thermal conduction surface with a larger surface area than a surface area of the component to be cooled. The thermal spreader includes one or more heat pipes including multiple heat pipe sections. One or more heat pipe sections are partially aligned to a first region of the cold plate, that is, where aligned to the surface to be cooled, and partially aligned to a second region of the cold plate, which is outside the first region. The one or more heat pipes facilitate distribution of heat from the electronic component to coolant-carrying channel sections of the cold plate located in the second region of the cold plate.

  3. Electromagnetically-induced-transparency ground-state cooling of long ion strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Regina; Maier, Christine; Hempel, Cornelius; Jurcevic, Petar; Lanyon, Ben P.; Monz, Thomas; Brownnutt, Michael; Blatt, Rainer; Roos, Christian F.

    2016-05-01

    Electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) cooling is a ground-state cooling technique for trapped particles. EIT offers a broader cooling range in frequency space compared to more established methods. In this work, we experimentally investigate EIT cooling in strings of trapped atomic ions. In strings of up to 18 ions, we demonstrate simultaneous ground-state cooling of all radial modes in under 1 ms. This is a particularly important capability in view of emerging quantum simulation experiments with large numbers of trapped ions. Our analysis of the EIT cooling dynamics is based on a technique enabling single-shot measurements of phonon numbers, by rapid adiabatic passage on a vibrational sideband of a narrow transition.

  4. Controlled cooling of an electronic system based on projected conditions

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.

    2016-05-17

    Energy efficient control of a cooling system cooling an electronic system is provided based, in part, on projected conditions. The control includes automatically determining an adjusted control setting(s) for an adjustable cooling component(s) of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on projected power consumed by the electronic system at a future time and projected temperature at the future time of a heat sink to which heat extracted is rejected. The automatically determining operates to reduce power consumption of the cooling system and/or the electronic system while ensuring that at least one targeted temperature associated with the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range. The automatically determining may be based, at least in part, on an experimentally obtained model(s) relating the targeted temperature and power consumption of the adjustable cooling component(s) of the cooling system.

  5. Controlled cooling of an electronic system based on projected conditions

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.

    2015-08-18

    Energy efficient control of a cooling system cooling an electronic system is provided based, in part, on projected conditions. The control includes automatically determining an adjusted control setting(s) for an adjustable cooling component(s) of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on projected power consumed by the electronic system at a future time and projected temperature at the future time of a heat sink to which heat extracted is rejected. The automatically determining operates to reduce power consumption of the cooling system and/or the electronic system while ensuring that at least one targeted temperature associated with the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range. The automatically determining may be based, at least in part, on an experimentally obtained model(s) relating the targeted temperature and power consumption of the adjustable cooling component(s) of the cooling system.

  6. Laboratory Investigation of the Electromagnetic Electron-Ion Hybrid Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enloe, C. Lon; Tejero, Erik; Amatucci, Bill; Crabtree, Chris; Ganguli, Guru

    2015-11-01

    The electromagnetic to electrostatic transition of the electron-ion hybrid instability is currently being studied in the Space Physics Simulation Chamber at NRL. It has been shown by theory that strong gradients in plasma flows perpendicular to the magnetic field can drive electromagnetic waves in the whistler branch. Velocity-sheared flows of this type may naturally arise in the boundary layer between plasmas of different characteristics, such as in the plasma sheet in the Earth's magnetosphere and laser produced plasma expansions across a magnetic field. When the wave vector normalized to the electron skin depth is much larger than 1, the waves are predominantly electrostatic in character and electromagnetic otherwise. These waves are eigenmodes in the direction of the velocity shear and demonstrate a dramatic increase in width after transitioning to an electromagnetic wave. Results from recent experiments will be presented in which this transition is observed. Work supported by the Naval Research Laboratory Base Program.

  7. ELECTRON COOLING AND ELECTRON-ION COLLIDERS AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.

    2007-10-03

    Superconducting Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL) have significant potential uses in various fields, including High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is pursuing some of the potential applications in this area and the technology issues that are associated with these applications. The work addressed in this paper is carried out at BNL towards applications in electron cooling of high-energy hadron beams and electron-nucleon colliders. The common issues for these applications are the generation of high currents of polarized or high-brightness unpolarized electrons, high-charge per bunch and high-current. One must address the associated issue of High-Order Modes generation and damping. Superconducting ERLs have great advantages for these applications as will be outlined in the text.

  8. Cooling systems and hybrid A/C systems using an electromagnetic radiation-absorbing complex

    SciTech Connect

    Halas, Nancy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Neumann, Oara

    2015-05-19

    A method for powering a cooling unit. The method including applying electromagnetic (EM) radiation to a complex, where the complex absorbs the EM radiation to generate heat, transforming, using the heat generated by the complex, a fluid to vapor, and sending the vapor from the vessel to a turbine coupled to a generator by a shaft, where the vapor causes the turbine to rotate, which turns the shaft and causes the generator to generate the electric power, wherein the electric powers supplements the power needed to power the cooling unit

  9. Laser and electron cooling of relativistic stored beams

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, G.; Schroeder, S.; Klein, R.; Boos, N.; Grieser, R.; Hoog, I.; Krieg, M.; Merz, P. ); Kuehl, T.; Neumann, R. ); Balykin, V.; Grieser, M.; Habs, D.; Jaeschke, E.; Petrich, W.; Schwalm, D.; Steck, M.; Wanner, B.; Wolf, A. )

    1991-08-05

    Laser cooling of ions at relativistic energies was first observed at the TSR storage ring in Heidelberg. A {sup 7}Li{sup +} ion beam moving at 6.4% the speed of light was overlapped with resonant co- and counter-propagating laser beams. The longitudinal temperatures were found to pass below 190 mK. Limits and applications of laser cooled relativistic ion beams are discussed. Laser cooling and electron cooling of the ion beam were combined.

  10. Electron-ion collision operator in strong electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraiman, Gennadiy; Balakin, Alexey

    2012-10-01

    The pair electron-ion collision operator is found for the kinetic equation describing the one-particle drift distribution in strong electromagnetic fields [1]. The pair collisions are studied under the conditions when the oscillation velocity of an electron driven by an external electromagnetic wave is much larger than the electron drift velocity. The operator is presented in the Boltzmann form and describes collisions with both small and large changes of the particle momentum. In contrast with the Landau collision operator, which describes diffusion in the momentum space, the collision operator that we propose describes a new and very important effect, namely, Coulomb attraction of a wave-driven oscillating electron to an ion due to multiple returns of the electron to the same ion. This effect leads to a large increase of the collision cross-section of electron-ion collisions in strong laser fields, to increased efficiency of the Joule heating in plasma, to the generation of fast electrons through e-i collisions, etc. [4pt] [1] A. A. Balakin and G. M. Fraiman, Electron-ion collision operator in strong electromagnetic fields, EPL 93, 35001 (2011).

  11. Field measurements in the Fermilab electron cooling solenoid prototype

    SciTech Connect

    A. C. Crawford et al.

    2003-10-02

    To increase the Tevatron luminosity, Fermilab is developing a high-energy electron cooling system [1] to cool 8.9-GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring. The schematic layout of the Recycler Electron Cooling (REC) system is shown in Figure 1. Cooling of antiprotons requires a round electron beam with a small angular spread propagating through a cooling section with a kinetic energy of 4.3 MeV. To confine the electron beam tightly and to keep its transverse angles below 10{sup -4} rad, the cooling section will be immersed into a solenoidal field of 50-150G. As part of the R&D effort, a cooling section prototype consisting of 9 modules (90% of the total length of a future section) was assembled and measured. This paper describes the technique of measuring and adjusting the magnetic field quality in the cooling section and presents preliminary results of solenoid prototype field measurements. The design of the cooling section solenoid is discussed in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 describes details of a dedicated measurement system, capable of measuring small transverse field components, while the system's measurement errors are analyzed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains measured field distributions of individual elements of the cooling section as well as an evaluation of the magnetic shielding efficiency. An algorithm of field adjustments for providing lowest possible electron trajectory perturbations is proposed in Chapter 6; also, this chapter shows the results of our first attempts of implementing the algorithm.

  12. Progress with FEL-based coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko,V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Pozdeyev, E.; Wang, G.; Bell, G.; Bruhwiler, D.; Sobol, A.; Shevchenko, O.; Vinokurov, N.A.; Derbenev, Y.; Reiche, S.

    2008-08-24

    Cooling intense high-energy hadron beams remains a major challenge for accelerator physics. Synchrotron radiation is too feeble, while efficiency of two other cooling methods falls rapidly either at high bunch intensities (i.e. stochastic cooling of protons) or at high energies (i.e. e-cooling). The possibility of coherent electron cooling, based on high-gain FEL and ERL, was presented at last FEL conference [1]. This scheme promises significant increases in luminosities of modern high-energy hadron and electron-hadron colliders, such as LHC and eRHIC. In this paper we report progress made in the past year on the development of this scheme of coherent electron cooling (CeC), results of analytical and numerical evaluation of the concept as well our prediction for LHC and RHIC. We also present layout for proof-of-principle experiment at RHIC using our R&D ERL which is under construction.

  13. Emittance Reduction between EBIS LINAC and Booster by Electron Beam Cooling; Is Single Pass Cooling Possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2008-04-01

    Electron beam cooling is examined as an option to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Electron beam parameters are based on experimental data (obtained at BNL) of electron beams extracted from a plasma cathode. Preliminary calculations indicate that single pass cooling is feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude in less than one meter.

  14. PROGRESS OF HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.V.

    2007-09-10

    The fundamental questions about QCD which can be directly answered at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) call for large integrated luminosities. The major goal of RHIC-I1 upgrade is to achieve a 10 fold increase in luminosity of Au ions at the top energy of 100 GeV/nucleon. Such a boost in luminosity for RHIC-II is achievable with implementation of high-energy electron cooling. The design of the higher-energy cooler for RHIC-II recently adopted a non-magnetized approach which requires a low temperature electron beam. Such electron beams will be produced with a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). Detailed simulations of the electron cooling process and numerical simulations of the electron beam transport including the cooling section were performed. An intensive R&D of various elements of the design is presently underway. Here, we summarize progress in these electron cooling efforts.

  15. Path integral approach to electron scattering in classical electromagnetic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Xu; Feng, Feng; Ying-Jun, Li

    2016-05-01

    As is known to all, the electron scattering in classical electromagnetic potential is one of the most widespread applications of quantum theory. Nevertheless, many discussions about electron scattering are based upon single-particle Schrodinger equation or Dirac equation in quantum mechanics rather than the method of quantum field theory. In this paper, by using the path integral approach of quantum field theory, we perturbatively evaluate the scattering amplitude up to the second order for the electron scattering by the classical electromagnetic potential. The results we derive are convenient to apply to all sorts of potential forms. Furthermore, by means of the obtained results, we give explicit calculations for the one-dimensional electric potential. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374360, 11405266, and 11505285) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CBA01504).

  16. Control of electronic transport in graphene by electromagnetic dressing.

    PubMed

    Kristinsson, K; Kibis, O V; Morina, S; Shelykh, I A

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated theoretically that the renormalization of the electron energy spectrum near the Dirac point of graphene by a strong high-frequency electromagnetic field (dressing field) drastically depends on polarization of the field. Namely, linear polarization results in an anisotropic gapless energy spectrum, whereas circular polarization leads to an isotropic gapped one. As a consequence, the stationary (dc) electronic transport in graphene strongly depends on parameters of the dressing field: A circularly polarized field monotonically decreases the isotropic conductivity of graphene, whereas a linearly polarized one results in both giant anisotropy of conductivity (which can reach thousands of percents) and the oscillating behavior of the conductivity as a function of the field intensity. Since the predicted phenomena can be observed in a graphene layer irradiated by a monochromatic electromagnetic wave, the elaborated theory opens a substantially new way to control electronic properties of graphene with light. PMID:26838371

  17. Electromagnetic particle simulation of electron cyclotron resonance microwave discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Wook Hee; Choi, Nak Heon; Choi, Duk In; Oh, Yong Ho

    1993-05-01

    We present a numerical model to study the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave discharge using a one-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision method [C. K. Birdsall, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 19, 65 (1991)]. In our model, the electromagnetic wave is polarized circularly and propagates along an external static magnetic field and elastic, excitational, and ionizing electron-neutral collisions and elastic and charge exchange ion-neutral collisions are included. The discharge for helium gas is simulated and the simulation results explain well the physical properties of the ECR discharge which include the energy absorption of electrons through ECR coupling, the propagation of microwave, the transports of the charged particles, and the effect of divergent external magnetic field.

  18. Relativistic electromagnetic waves in an electron-ion plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chian, Abraham C.-L.; Kennel, Charles F.

    1987-01-01

    High power laser beams can drive plasma particles to relativistic energies. An accurate description of strong waves requires the inclusion of ion dynamics in the analysis. The equations governing the propagation of relativistic electromagnetic waves in a cold electron-ion plasma can be reduced to two equations expressing conservation of energy-momentum of the system. The two conservation constants are functions of the plasma stream velocity, the wave velocity, the wave amplitude, and the electron-ion mass ratio. The dynamic parameter, expressing electron-ion momentum conversation in the laboratory frame, can be regarded as an adjustable quantity, a suitable choice of which will yield self-consistent solutions when other plasma parameters were specified. Circularly polarized electromagnetic waves and electrostatic plasma waves are used as illustrations.

  19. Electron beam injection during active experiments. I - Electromagnetic wave emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Kellogg, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The wave emissions produced in Echo 7 experiment by active injections of electron beams were investigated to determine the properties of the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields for both the field-aligned and cross-field injection in such experiments and to evaluate the sources of free energy and relative efficiencies for the generation of the VLF and HF emissions. It is shown that, for typical beam energies in active experiments, electromagnetic effects do not substantially change the bulk properties of the beam, spacecraft charging, and plasma particle acceleration. Through simulations, beam-generated whistlers; fundamental z-mode and harmonic x-mode radiation; and electrostatic electron-cyclotron, upper-hybrid, Langmuir, and lower-hybrid waves were identified. The characteristics of the observed wave spectra were found to be sensitive to both the ratio of the electron plasma frequency to the cyclotron frequency and the angle of injection relative to the magnetic field.

  20. Control of electronic transport in graphene by electromagnetic dressing

    PubMed Central

    Kristinsson, K.; Kibis, O. V.; Morina, S.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated theoretically that the renormalization of the electron energy spectrum near the Dirac point of graphene by a strong high-frequency electromagnetic field (dressing field) drastically depends on polarization of the field. Namely, linear polarization results in an anisotropic gapless energy spectrum, whereas circular polarization leads to an isotropic gapped one. As a consequence, the stationary (dc) electronic transport in graphene strongly depends on parameters of the dressing field: A circularly polarized field monotonically decreases the isotropic conductivity of graphene, whereas a linearly polarized one results in both giant anisotropy of conductivity (which can reach thousands of percents) and the oscillating behavior of the conductivity as a function of the field intensity. Since the predicted phenomena can be observed in a graphene layer irradiated by a monochromatic electromagnetic wave, the elaborated theory opens a substantially new way to control electronic properties of graphene with light. PMID:26838371

  1. Kinetics of electron cooling of positrons in a storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Men'shikov, L. I.

    2008-06-15

    Kinetic equations are derived for the positron velocity distribution in storage rings with electron cooling. Both drag force and components of the velocity diffusion tensor are calculated. The mechanism of approach to a steady-state positron velocity distribution via electron cooling is discussed. It is shown that the resulting steady-state positron distribution is very close to the electron distribution when the magnetic field is sufficiently strong.

  2. Electron cooling for low-energy RHIC program

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Pendzick, A.; Satogata, T.

    2009-08-31

    Electron cooling was proposed to increase luminosity of the RHIC collider for heavy ion beam energies below 10 GeV/nucleon. Providing collisions at such energies, termed RHIC 'low-energy' operation, will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about existence and location of critical point on the QCD phase diagram. The electron cooling system should deliver electron beam of required good quality over energies of 0.9-5 MeV. Several approaches to provide such cooling were considered. The baseline approach was chosen and design work started. Here we describe the main features of the cooling system and its expected performance. We have started design work on a low-energy RHIC electron cooler which will operate with kinetic electron energy range 0.86-2.8 (4.9) MeV. Several approaches to an electron cooling system in this energy range are being investigated. At present, our preferred scheme is to transfer the Fermilab Pelletron to BNL after Tevatron shutdown, and to use it for DC non-magnetized cooling in RHIC. Such electron cooling system can significantly increase RHIC luminosities at low-energy operation.

  3. Electron Cooling of Ions and Antiprotons in Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Zwicknagel, Guenter

    2006-03-20

    For a theoretical description of electron cooling of ions or antiprotons in traps we have investigated the energy loss and cooling force in a strongly magnetized electron plasma employing both perturbation approaches and more complete numerical simulations. Some characteristic features for cooling under conditions prevailing in Penning traps are presented. One particular feature is, that the energy loss in strongly magnetized electrons, which tend to move along the field lines like beads on a wire, strongly depends on the sign of the interaction. The energy loss can be significantly larger for antiprotons than for protons. Special attention is paid to the cooling of highly charged ions, here bare Uranium, in HITRAP. The time evolution of the energy distribution of the trapped ions is studied within a simplified model which takes into account the related heating of the electrons. The feedback of this heating on the energy loss results in an intricate dependency of the cooling times on the density of the electrons and the ratio of the number of ions to the number of electrons in the trap. From this analysis we find that cooling times less than about a second are feasible for electron cooling of bare Uranium in HITRAP.

  4. Partially ferromagnetic electromagnet for trapping and cooling neutral atoms to quantum degeneracy

    SciTech Connect

    Fauquembergue, M.; Riou, J-F.; Guerin, W.; Rangwala, S.; Moron, F.; Villing, A.; Le Coq, Y.; Bouyer, P.; Aspect, A.; Lecrivain, M.

    2005-10-15

    We have developed a compact partially ferromagnetic electromagnet to produce an Ioffe-Pritchard trap for neutral atoms. Our structure permits strong magnetic confinement with low power consumption. Compared to the previous iron-core electromagnet [B. Desruelle, V. Boyer, P. Bouyer, G. Birkl, M. Lecrivain, F. Alves, C. Westbrook, and A. Aspect, Eur. Phys. J. D 1, 255 (1998)], it allows for easy compensation of remnant fields and very high stability, along with cost-effective realization and compactness. We describe and characterize our apparatus and demonstrate trapping and cooling of {sup 87}Rb atoms to quantum degeneracy. Pure Bose-Einstein condensates containing 10{sup 6} atoms are routinely realized on a half-minute cycle. In addition we test the stability of the magnetic trap by producing atom lasers.

  5. Cooling of hot electrons in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderhaghen, R.; Hulin, D.; Cuzeau, S.; White, J.O.

    1997-07-01

    Measurements of the cooling rate of hot carriers in amorphous silicon are made with a two-pump, one-probe technique. The experiment is simulated with a rate-equation model describing the energy transfer between a population of hot carriers and the lattice. An energy transfer rate proportional to the temperature difference is found to be consistent with the experimental data while an energy transfer independent of the temperature difference is not. This contrasts with the situation in crystalline silicon. The measured cooling rates are sufficient to explain the difficulty in observing avalanche effects in amorphous silicon.

  6. Motion of trapped electrons in gyro-resonant electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafizi, B.; Aamodt, R. E.

    1987-12-01

    It is shown that the phase space of magnetically trapped electrons in plasmas interacting with gyro-resonant electromagnetic waves is divided into two parts. In one, as a particle gains energy its turning point moves towards the region of weaker magnetic field; in the other, energy gain results in the turning point moving towards the region of stronger magnetic field, with possible detrapping. Present address: Lodestar Research Corporation, P.O. Box 4545, Boulder, CO 80306, USA

  7. Atom-membrane cooling and entanglement using cavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Genes, Claudiu; Ritsch, Helmut; Drewsen, Michael; Dantan, Aurelien

    2011-11-15

    We investigate a hybrid optomechanical system composed of a micromechanical oscillator as a movable membrane and an atomic three-level ensemble within an optical cavity. We show that a suitably tailored cavity field response via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the atomic medium allows for strong coupling of the membrane's mechanical oscillations to the collective atomic ground-state spin. This facilitates ground-state cooling of the membrane motion, quantum state mapping, and robust atom-membrane entanglement even for cavity widths larger than the mechanical resonance frequency.

  8. Use of an Electron Beam for Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroslave Derbenev

    2007-09-10

    Microwave instability of an electron beam can be used for a multiple increase in the collective response for the perturbation caused by a particle of a co-moving ion beam, i.e. for enhancement of friction force in electron cooling method. The low scale (hundreds GHz and higher frequency range) space charge or FEL type instabilities can be produced (depending on conditions) by introducing an alternating magnetic fields along the electron beam path. Beams’ optics and noise conditioning for obtaining a maximal cooling effect and related limitations will be discussed. The method promises to increase by a few orders of magnitude the cooling rate for heavy particle beams with a large emittance for a wide energy range with respect to either electron and conventional stochastic cooling.

  9. Cooling of cryogenic electron bilayers via the Coulomb interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, John King; Friesen, Mark; Joynt, Robert; Coppersmith, S. N.

    2011-09-01

    Heat dissipation in current-carrying cryogenic nanostructures is problematic because the phonon density of states decreases strongly as energy decreases. We show that the Coulomb interaction can prove a valuable resource for carrier cooling via coupling to a nearby cold electron reservoir. Specifically, we consider the geometry of an electron bilayer in a silicon-based heterostructure and analyze the power transfer. We show that, across a range of temperatures, separations, and sheet densities, the electron-electron interaction dominates the phonon heat-dissipation modes as the main cooling mechanism. Coulomb cooling is most effective at low densities, when phonon cooling is least effective in silicon, making it especially relevant for experiments attempting to perform coherent manipulations of single spins.

  10. Progress on Analytical Modeling of Coherent Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Litvinenko, V.; Webb, S.

    2010-05-23

    We report recent progresses on analytical studies of Coherent Electron Cooling. The phase space electron beam distribution obtained from the 1D FEL amplifier is applied to an infinite electron plasma model and the electron density evolution inside the kicker is derived. We also investigate the velocity modulation in the modulator and obtain a closed form solution for the current density evolution for infinite homogeneous electron plasma.

  11. The integration of cryogenic cooling systems with superconducting electronic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-07-01

    The need for cryogenic cooling has been critical issue that has kept superconducting electronic devices from reaching the market place. Even though the performance of the superconducting circuit is superior to silicon electronics, the requirement for cryogenic cooling has put the superconducting devices at a disadvantage. This report will talk about the various methods for refrigerating superconducting devices. Cryocooler types will be compared for vibration, efficiency, and cost. Some solutions to specific problems of integrating cryocoolers to superconducting devices are presented.

  12. HIGH-CURRENT ERL-BASED ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.

    2005-09-18

    The design of an electron cooler must take into account both electron beam dynamics issues as well as the electron cooling physics. Research towards high-energy electron cooling of RHIC is in its 3rd year at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The luminosity upgrade of RHIC calls for electron cooling of various stored ion beams, such as 100 GeV/A gold ions at collision energies. The necessary electron energy of 54 MeV is clearly out of reach for DC accelerator system of any kind. The high energy also necessitates a bunched beam, with a high electron bunch charge, low emittance and small energy spread. The Collider-Accelerator Department adopted the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) for generating the high-current, high-energy and high-quality electron beam. The RHIC electron cooler ERL will use four Superconducting RF (SRF) 5-cell cavities, designed to operate at ampere-class average currents with high bunch charges. The electron source will be a superconducting, 705.75 MHz laser-photocathode RF gun, followed up by a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). An R&D ERL is under construction to demonstrate the ERL at the unprecedented average current of 0.5 amperes. Beam dynamics performance and luminosity enhancement are described for the case of magnetized and non-magnetized electron cooling of RHIC.

  13. Self-Consistent Electromagnetic Modeling of Electron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Mark

    2006-11-27

    The modeling of high-brightness electron sources, such as photoinjectors, requires a self-consistent technique for including the electromagnetics of tight electron bunches, as well as, the appropriate conductor boundary conditions of the source. A novel and effective technique for incorporating both of these effects utilizes time-dependent Green's functions. The advantages of this method are that Green's functions are generated by Delta function sources (making them ideal for tight bunch modeling) while simultaneously satisfying the conductor boundary condition. We demonstrate how these methods are used in a newly developed code called IRPSS (Indiana Rf Photocathode Source Simulator), and show initial simulations using IRPSS.

  14. Electromagnetic and thermal analysis of distributed cooled high power millimeter wave windows

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.D.; Reitter, T.; Caplan, M.

    1995-05-12

    The sectional high-frequency internally-cooled window, as proposed by General Atomics, has unique potential for allowing microwave sources to reach multi-megawatt CW levels with application to ECRH. Designs are being investigated using computational electromagnetic (EM), thermal, and mechanical codes at 110 GHz and 170 GHz to examine the design tradeoffs between RF performance and thermal mechanical safety margins. The EM analyses are for the window, under vacuum at one MW and includes variations in the shapes of the cooling fins, the surface treatment of the window elements themselves, the cooling fin tip treatment, the window pitch angle, and the waveguide effects. One advantage of the distributed cooled window is it`s extensibility to higher power levels. Results in the modeling efforts are presented showing the EM field concentrations (which then will feed into the thermal analysis), the energy scattering/reflection, the transmitted launch angle variation as a function of physical geometry, and the spatial energy distribution and loss as a function of time and position.

  15. Hole Cooling Is Much Faster than Electron Cooling in PbSe Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Spoor, Frank C M; Kunneman, Lucas T; Evers, Wiel H; Renaud, Nicolas; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Houtepen, Arjan J; Siebbeles, Laurens D A

    2016-01-26

    In semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), charge carrier cooling is in direct competition with processes such as carrier multiplication or hot charge extraction that may improve the light conversion efficiency of photovoltaic devices. Understanding charge carrier cooling is therefore of great interest. We investigate high-energy optical transitions in PbSe QDs using hyperspectral transient absorption spectroscopy. We observe bleaching of optical transitions involving higher valence and conduction bands upon band edge excitation. The kinetics of rise of the bleach of these transitions after a pump laser pulse allow us to monitor, for the first time, cooling of hot electrons and hot holes separately. Our results show that holes cool significantly faster than electrons in PbSe QDs. This is in contrast to the common assumption that electrons and holes behave similarly in Pb chalcogenide QDs and has important implications for the utilization of hot charge carriers in photovoltaic devices. PMID:26654878

  16. Coherent electron cooling proof of principle instrumentation design

    SciTech Connect

    Gassner D. M.; Litvinenko, V.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T.; Minty, M.; Pinayev, I.

    2012-04-15

    The goal of the Coherent Electron Cooling Proof-of-Principle (CeC PoP) experiment being designed at RHIC is to demonstrate longitudinal (energy spread) cooling before the expected CD-2 for eRHIC. The scope of the experiment is to longitudinally cool a single bunch of 40 GeV/u gold ions in RHIC. This paper will describe the instrumentation systems proposed to meet the diagnostics challenges. These include measurements of beam intensity, emittance, energy spread, bunch length, position, orbit stability, and transverse and temporal alignment of electron and ion beams.

  17. Laser cooling of electron beams for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Telnov, V.

    1996-10-01

    A novel method of electron beam cooling is considered which can be used for linear colliders. The electron beam is cooled during collision with focused powerful laser pulse. With reasonable laser parameters (laser flash energy about 10 J) one can decrease transverse beam emittances by a factor about 10 per one stage. The ultimate transverse emittances are much below that given by other methods. Depolarization of a beam during the cooling is about 5--15% for one stage. This method is especially useful for photon colliders and open new possibilities for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders and x-ray FEL based on high energy linacs.

  18. Longitudinal electron cooling experiments at HIRFL-CSRe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, L. J.; Zhao, H.; Yang, X. D.; Li, J.; Yang, J. C.; Yuan, Y. J.; Parkhomchuk, V. V.; Reva, V. B.; Ma, X. M.; Yan, T. L.; Tang, M. T.; Xia, J. W.

    2016-02-01

    At the heavy ion storage ring HIRFL-CSRe an electron cooler is operated to improve the beam conditions for experiments. The properties of cooled beams have been studied. The longitudinal beam dynamics during the cooling process was measured by a resonant Schottky detector. The dependencies of the parameters electron beam density and profile on cooling times were investigated. The friction force was measured directly with the aid of the high voltage system of the cooler and with the application of the beam bunching system as well. An experiment with bunched cold beam showed a dependence of the bunch length on the beam density.

  19. Testing aspects of advanced coherent electron cooling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.; Jing, Y.; Pinayev, I.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Ratner, D.

    2015-05-03

    An advanced version of the Coherent-electron Cooling (CeC) based on the micro-bunching instability was proposed. This approach promises significant increase in the bandwidth of the CeC system and, therefore, significant shortening of cooling time in high-energy hadron colliders. In this paper we present our plans of simulating and testing the key aspects of this proposed technique using the set-up of the coherent-electron-cooling proof-of-principle experiment at BNL.

  20. Electromagnetic instability in an electron beam-ion channel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, D.; Tang, C. J.

    2009-05-01

    The transverse electromagnetic instability in the electron beam-ion channel system is investigated using kinetic theory. The equilibrium distribution function of a relativistic electron beam, which takes into account a strong ion channel effect, is obtained. The linearized Vlasov equation is solved and the dispersion relation of the system is derived by perturbing the equilibrium with a high frequency electromagnetic wave (EMW). Analysis of the dispersion relation shows that the coupling of the electron beam with the transverse high frequency EMW is achieved through the deflection of the beam electrons due to the synergistic effects of the transverse high frequency EMW and transverse betatron oscillation. The numerical calculation finds that a branch of slow wave instability (SWI) with a wide frequency band is excited. The attenuation index of the SWI increases and its frequency band broadens as the normalized beam radii increases. Besides, the SWI will be suppressed as the longitudinal velocity of the electron beam increases to a certain value; meanwhile, a bunch of fast wave instability (FWI) is excited, which is equal to the increase of the relativistic factor. Also both the SWI and the FWI reach maximum when the EMW frequency meets a resonance condition.

  1. Emerging Two-Phase Cooling Technologies for Power Electronic Inverters

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.

    2005-08-17

    In order to meet the Department of Energy's (DOE's) FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (FVCT) goals for volume, weight, efficiency, reliability, and cost, the cooling of the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators is critical. Currently the power electronic devices, traction motors, and generators in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) are primarily cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG) mixture. The cooling fluid operates as a single-phase coolant as the liquid phase of the WEG does not change to its vapor phase during the cooling process. In these single-phase systems, two cooling loops of WEG produce a low temperature (around 70 C) cooling loop for the power electronics and motor/generator, and higher temperature loop (around 105 C) for the internal combustion engine. There is another coolant option currently available in automobiles. It is possible to use the transmission oil as a coolant. The oil temperature exists at approximately 85 C which can be utilized to cool the power electronic and electrical devices. Because heat flux is proportional to the temperature difference between the device's hot surface and the coolant, a device that can tolerate higher temperatures enables the device to be smaller while dissipating the same amount of heat. Presently, new silicon carbide (SiC) devices and high temperature direct current (dc)-link capacitors, such as Teflon capacitors, are available but at significantly higher costs. Higher junction temperature (175 C) silicon (Si) dies are gradually emerging in the market, which will eventually help to lower hardware costs for cooling. The development of high-temperature devices is not the only way to reduce device size. Two-phase cooling that utilizes the vaporization of the liquid to dissipate heat is expected to be a very effective cooling method. Among two-phase cooling methods, different technologies such as spray, jet impingement, pool boiling and submersion, etc. are being developed. The Oak Ridge

  2. ELECTRON COOLING IN THE PRESENCE OF UNDULATOR FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.; BEN-ZVI, I.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The design of the higher-energy cooler for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) recently adopted a non-magnetized approach which requires a low temperature electron beam. However, to avoid significant loss of heavy ions due to recombination with electrons in the cooling section, the temperature of the electron beam should be high. These two contradictory requirements are satisfied in the design of the RWIC cooler with the help of the undulator fields. The model of the friction force in the presence of an undulator field was benchmarked vs. direct numerical simulations with an excellent agreement. Here, we discuss cooling dynamics simulations with a helical undulator, including recombination suppression and resulting luminosities.

  3. Direct electronic measurement of Peltier cooling and heating in graphene

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Marun, I. J.; van den Berg, J. J.; Dejene, F. K.; van Wees, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric effects allow the generation of electrical power from waste heat and the electrical control of cooling and heating. Remarkably, these effects are also highly sensitive to the asymmetry in the density of states around the Fermi energy and can therefore be exploited as probes of distortions in the electronic structure at the nanoscale. Here we consider two-dimensional graphene as an excellent nanoscale carbon material for exploring the interaction between electronic and thermal transport phenomena, by presenting a direct and quantitative measurement of the Peltier component to electronic cooling and heating in graphene. Thanks to an architecture including nanoscale thermometers, we detected Peltier component modulation of up to 15 mK for currents of 20 μA at room temperature and observed a full reversal between Peltier cooling and heating for electron and hole regimes. This fundamental thermodynamic property is a complementary tool for the study of nanoscale thermoelectric transport in two-dimensional materials. PMID:27161186

  4. Direct electronic measurement of Peltier cooling and heating in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera-Marun, I. J.; van den Berg, J. J.; Dejene, F. K.; van Wees, B. J.

    2016-05-01

    Thermoelectric effects allow the generation of electrical power from waste heat and the electrical control of cooling and heating. Remarkably, these effects are also highly sensitive to the asymmetry in the density of states around the Fermi energy and can therefore be exploited as probes of distortions in the electronic structure at the nanoscale. Here we consider two-dimensional graphene as an excellent nanoscale carbon material for exploring the interaction between electronic and thermal transport phenomena, by presenting a direct and quantitative measurement of the Peltier component to electronic cooling and heating in graphene. Thanks to an architecture including nanoscale thermometers, we detected Peltier component modulation of up to 15 mK for currents of 20 μA at room temperature and observed a full reversal between Peltier cooling and heating for electron and hole regimes. This fundamental thermodynamic property is a complementary tool for the study of nanoscale thermoelectric transport in two-dimensional materials.

  5. Direct electronic measurement of Peltier cooling and heating in graphene.

    PubMed

    Vera-Marun, I J; van den Berg, J J; Dejene, F K; van Wees, B J

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectric effects allow the generation of electrical power from waste heat and the electrical control of cooling and heating. Remarkably, these effects are also highly sensitive to the asymmetry in the density of states around the Fermi energy and can therefore be exploited as probes of distortions in the electronic structure at the nanoscale. Here we consider two-dimensional graphene as an excellent nanoscale carbon material for exploring the interaction between electronic and thermal transport phenomena, by presenting a direct and quantitative measurement of the Peltier component to electronic cooling and heating in graphene. Thanks to an architecture including nanoscale thermometers, we detected Peltier component modulation of up to 15 mK for currents of 20 μA at room temperature and observed a full reversal between Peltier cooling and heating for electron and hole regimes. This fundamental thermodynamic property is a complementary tool for the study of nanoscale thermoelectric transport in two-dimensional materials. PMID:27161186

  6. Cooling of Electronics with Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, S. K.; Dutta, P.

    2010-10-01

    This paper deals with phase change materials (PCMs), used in conjunction with thermal conductivity enhancer (TCE), as means of thermal management of electronic systems. This work was motivated by the need for short term thermal management of high packing density equipments (such as in avionics). Eicosane is used as PCM, while aluminium pin or plate fins are used as TCE. The test section considered in all cases is 42×42 mm square base with TCE height of 25 mm. An electronic heater producing 4, 6 and 8 W was used to simulate the heat generation of electronic chips. Various volumetric percentages of TCE in the conglomerate of PCM and TCE were considered, namely, 0, 2, 8, 18 and 27%. The case with 8% volumetric percentage of TCE was found to have the best thermal performance. A numerical model was developed to enable interpretation of experimental results and to perform parametric studies.

  7. HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING BASED ON REALISTIC SIX-DIMENSIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV,A.; BEN-ZVI, I.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The high-energy electron cooling system for RHIC-II is unique compared to standard coolers. It requires bunched electron beam. Electron bunches are produced by an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL), and cooling is planned without longitudinal magnetic field. To address unique features of the RHIC cooler, a generalized treatment of cooling force was introduced in BETACOOE code which allows us to calculate friction force for an arbitrary distribution of electrons. Simulations for RHIC cooler based on electron distribution from ERL are presented.

  8. Mitigation of biofouling using electromagnetic fields in tubular heat exchangers-condensers cooled by seawater.

    PubMed

    Trueba, Alfredo; García, Sergio; Otero, Félix M

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) treatment is presented as an alternative physical treatment for the mitigation of biofouling adhered to the tubes of a heat exchanger-condenser cooled by seawater. During an experimental phase, a fouling biofilm was allowed to grow until experimental variables indicated that its growth had stabilised. Subsequently, EMF treatment was applied to seawater to eliminate the biofilm and to maintain the achieved cleanliness. The results showed that EMFs precipitated ions dissolved in the seawater. As a consequence of the application of EMFs, erosion altered the intermolecular bonding of extracellular polymers, causing the destruction of the biofilm matrix and its detachment from the inner surface of the heat exchanger-condenser tubes. This detachment led to the partial removal of a mature biofilm and a partial recovery of the efficiency lost in the heat transfer process by using a physical treatment that is harmless to the marine environment. PMID:24266611

  9. Cooling of electrons in a silicon inversion layer.

    PubMed

    Prus, O; Reznikov, M; Sivan, U; Pudalov, V

    2002-01-01

    Low temperature cooling of two-dimensional electrons in silicon-metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors is studied experimentally and found to be more effective than expected from the bulk electron-phonon coupling in silicon. The extracted heat transfer rate to phonons depends cubically on electron temperature, suggesting that piezoelectric coupling, which is absent in bulk silicon, dominates over deformation potential. As a result, at 100 mK, electrons farther than approximately 100 microm from the contacts are mostly cooled by phonons. Using long devices and low excitation voltage we measure electron resistivity down to approximately 100 mK and find that some of the "metallic" curves turn insulating below approximately 300 mK. PMID:11800976

  10. Electron-phonon cooling in large monolayer graphene devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKitterick, Christopher B.; Prober, Daniel E.; Rooks, Michael J.

    2016-02-01

    We present thermal measurements of large-area (over 1000 μ m2 ) monolayer graphene samples at cryogenic temperatures to study the electron-phonon thermal conductivity of graphene. By using two large samples with areas which differ by a factor of 10, we are able to clearly show the area dependence of the electron-phonon cooling. We find that, at temperatures far below the Bloch-Grüneisen temperature TBG, the electron-phonon cooling power is accurately described by the T4 temperature dependence predicted for clean samples. Using this model, we are able to extract a value for the electron-phonon coupling constant as a function of gate voltage and the graphene electron-lattice deformation potential.

  11. Search for electron EDM with laser cooled radioactive atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, T.; Kawamura, H.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2013-05-01

    The permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the elementary particle has the sensitivity to the CP violation in the theories beyond the standard model (SM). The search for the EDM constitutes the stringent test to discriminate between the SM and beyond it. We plan to perform the electron EDM search by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom which has the largest enhancement factor of the electron EDM in the alkali atoms. In this paper, the present status of the laser cooled Fr factory that is being constructed at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University are reported.

  12. Electron Cooling in a Young Radio Supernova: SN 2012aw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Naveen; Ray, Alak; Chakraborti, Sayan; Stockdale, Christopher; Chandra, Poonam; Smith, Randall; Roy, Rupak; Bose, Subhash; Dwarkadas, Vikram; Sutaria, Firoza; Pooley, David

    2014-02-01

    We present the radio observations and modeling of an optically bright Type II-P supernova (SN), SN 2012aw which exploded in the nearby galaxy Messier 95 (M95) at a distance of 10 Mpc. The spectral index values calculated using C, X, and K bands are smaller than the expected values for the optically thin regime. During this time, the optical bolometric light curve stays in the plateau phase. We interpret the low spectral-index values to be a result of electron cooling. On the basis of comparison between the Compton cooling timescale and the synchrotron cooling timescale, we find that the inverse Compton cooling process dominates over the synchrotron cooling process. We therefore model the radio emission as synchrotron emission from a relativistic electron population with a high energy cutoff. The cutoff is determined by comparing the electron cooling timescale, t cool, and the acceleration timescale, \\tilde{t}_{acc}. We constrain the mass-loss rate in the wind (\\dot{M}\\sim 1.9\\times 10^{-6}\\ M_{\\odot }\\,yr^{-1}) and the equipartition factor between relativistic electrons and the magnetic field (\\tilde{\\alpha }=\\epsilon _e/\\epsilon _B\\sim 1.12\\times 10^2) through our modeling of radio emission. Although the time of explosion is fairly well constrained by optical observations within about two days, we explore the effect of varying the time of explosion to best fit the radio light curves. The best fit is obtained for the explosion date as 2012 March 15.3 UT.

  13. Electron cooling in a young radio supernova: SN 2012aw

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Naveen; Ray, Alak; Chakraborti, Sayan; Stockdale, Christopher; Chandra, Poonam; Smith, Randall; Roy, Rupak; Bose, Subhash; Dwarkadas, Vikram; Sutaria, Firoza; Pooley, David E-mail: akr@tifr.res.in

    2014-02-10

    We present the radio observations and modeling of an optically bright Type II-P supernova (SN), SN 2012aw which exploded in the nearby galaxy Messier 95 (M95) at a distance of 10 Mpc. The spectral index values calculated using C, X, and K bands are smaller than the expected values for the optically thin regime. During this time, the optical bolometric light curve stays in the plateau phase. We interpret the low spectral-index values to be a result of electron cooling. On the basis of comparison between the Compton cooling timescale and the synchrotron cooling timescale, we find that the inverse Compton cooling process dominates over the synchrotron cooling process. We therefore model the radio emission as synchrotron emission from a relativistic electron population with a high energy cutoff. The cutoff is determined by comparing the electron cooling timescale, t {sub cool}, and the acceleration timescale, t-tilde {sub acc}. We constrain the mass-loss rate in the wind ( M-dot ∼1.9×10{sup −6} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) and the equipartition factor between relativistic electrons and the magnetic field ( α-tilde =ϵ{sub e}/ϵ{sub B}∼1.12×10{sup 2}) through our modeling of radio emission. Although the time of explosion is fairly well constrained by optical observations within about two days, we explore the effect of varying the time of explosion to best fit the radio light curves. The best fit is obtained for the explosion date as 2012 March 15.3 UT.

  14. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-06-29

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron EMIC waves if the total density is large. We show that, for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motion of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.

  15. Resonance of relativistic electrons with electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Denton, R. E.; Jordanova, V. K.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-06-29

    Relativistic electrons have been thought to more easily resonate with electromagnetic ion cyclotron EMIC waves if the total density is large. We show that, for a particular EMIC mode, this dependence is weak due to the dependence of the wave frequency and wave vector on the density. A significant increase in relativistic electron minimum resonant energy might occur for the H band EMIC mode only for small density, but no changes in parameters significantly decrease the minimum resonant energy from a nominal value. The minimum resonant energy depends most strongly on the thermal velocity associated with the field line motionmore » of the hot ring current protons that drive the instability. High density due to a plasmasphere or plasmaspheric plume could possibly lead to lower minimum resonance energy by causing the He band EMIC mode to be dominant. We demonstrate these points using parameters from a ring current simulation.« less

  16. Passive Two-Phase Cooling of Automotive Power Electronics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, G.; Jeffers, J. R.; Narumanchi, S.; Bennion, K.

    2014-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of a passive two-phase cooling strategy as a means of cooling automotive power electronics. The proposed cooling approach utilizes an indirect cooling configuration to alleviate some reliability concerns and to allow the use of conventional power modules. An inverter-scale proof-of-concept cooling system was fabricated, and tests were conducted using the refrigerants hydrofluoroolefin HFO-1234yf and hydrofluorocarbon HFC-245fa. Results demonstrated that the system can dissipate at least 3.5 kW of heat with 250 cm3 of HFC-245fa. An advanced evaporator design that incorporates features to improve performance and reduce size was conceived. Simulation results indicate its thermal resistance can be 37% to 48% lower than automotive dual side cooled power modules. Tests were also conducted to measure the thermal performance of two air-cooled condensers--plain and rifled finned tube designs. The results combined with some analysis were then used to estimate the required condenser size per operating conditions and maximum allowable system (i.e., vapor and liquid) temperatures.

  17. Low Frequency Electromagnetic Background Radiation From Electron Acceleration Above Thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, Martin; Mezentsev, Andrew; Soula, Serge; van der Velde, Oscar; Farges, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    It was recently proposed that the acceleration of electrons during the growth and branching of streamers above thunderclouds initiated by intense lightning discharges could result in detectable low frequency electromagnetic radiation from several tens of kHz up to several hundreds of kHz (Qin et al., GRL, 2012). The intensity of the predicted radiation scales with the streamer density which is particularly large during spectacular sprite occurrences such as jellyfish sprites and/or dancing sprites. Dancing sprites are up to one second long sequences of consecutive sprites or sprite groups which are typically separated by some hundreds of milliseconds and which tend to follow the spatial development of large scale intracloud lightning discharges. A particularly spectacular series of 10 dancing sprite events over a Mediterranean mesoscale convective system was recorded with a low light video camera in south-eastern France during the early morning hours of August 31, 2012. Each dancing sprite event was composed of ~3-4 consecutive sprites or groups of sprites. All of these sprite occurrences were associated with a sudden enhancement ~2 uV/m/Hz-1/2 of the low frequency electromagnetic background radiation as measured with a radio receiver in south-west England. It is estimated that ~1000 streamers at a height of ~40 km are necessary to epxlain the observed electric field strengths. These sudden enhancements are superimposed on a more continuous low frequency electromagnetic background radiation which accompanies each dancing sprite event. It is speculated that this low frequency 'radio glow' results from filamentary streamers near the cloud top as a result of the large scale electrostatic charging of the thundercloud and that it may be used as an indicator for sprite occurrences in future studies.

  18. Cooling electronic equipment at simulated high altitude in hypobaric chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, James A.

    1987-08-01

    An air cooling system has been designed to minimize electronic equipment failures during simulated exposures to 9,000 meters (29,000 ft) in hypobaric chambers. Air density, critical to convective heat transfer during electronic equipment operations, diminishes rapidly below 830 grams cubic meter (16,000 ft, 5,000 meters) resulting in equipment failures. Forced convection, using fans, can be effective up to 6,000meters but extensive equipment failures occur at higher altitudes. A newly designed cooling system incorporates a micrometer-like air flow control nozzle that directs compressed air onto the subject area. The design also accelerates surrounding air molecules to create a highly amplified flow by adding the entrained ambient air to the compressed air. Air flows may be directed on heat exchangers, power supplies, through ventilation ports, ports, to assist fan units, and for general in-cabinet cooling.

  19. Cold molecules: Formation, ro-vibrational cooling and electronic conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horchani, R.

    2016-05-01

    The possibility of controlling all the motion as well as the internal quantum state of a sample of molecules is a long term goal in the cold molecules field. Although many different techniques have been used to produce ultra-cold molecules, in this paper, we will concentrate on the optical pumping technique successfully used to achieve rotational and vibrational cooling of Cs2 molecules. We will review the different photo-association schemes for molecule formation, the detection schemes through photoionization, the ro-vibrational cooling into a single level and finally the electronic conversion. In addition, we will present a theoretical model for both ro-vibrational cooling and electronic conversion that can be used for the preparation of different experiments.

  20. Physical installation of Pelletron and electron cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Hurh, P.

    1997-09-01

    Bremsstrahlung of 5 MeV electrons at a loss current of 50 microamp in the acceleration region is estimated to produce X-ray intensities of 7 Rad/sec. Radiation losses due to a misteer or sudden obstruction will of course be much higher still (estimated at 87,500 Rad/hr for a 0.5 mA beam current). It is estimated that 1.8 meters of concrete will be necessary to adequately shield the surrounding building areas at any possible Pelletron installation site. To satisfy our present electron cooling development plan, two Pelletron installations are required, the first at our development lab in the Lab B/NEF Enclosure area and the second at the operational Main Injector service building, MI-30, in the main Injector ring. The same actual Pelletron and electron beam-line components will be used at both locations. The Lab B installation will allow experimentation with actual high energy electron beam to develop the optics necessary for the cooling straight while Main Injector/Recycler commissioning is taking place. The MI-30 installation is obviously the permanent home for the Pelletron when electron cooling becomes operational. Construction plans for both installations will be discussed here.

  1. Hot Electron Cooling by Acoustic Phonons in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, A. C.; Vialla, F.; Brunel, D.; Voisin, C.; Picher, M.; Cavanna, A.; Madouri, A.; Fève, G.; Berroir, J.-M.; Plaçais, B.; Pallecchi, E.

    2012-08-01

    We have investigated the energy loss of hot electrons in metallic graphene by means of GHz noise thermometry at liquid helium temperature. We observe the electronic temperature T∝V at low bias in agreement with the heat diffusion to the leads described by the Wiedemann-Franz law. We report on T∝V behavior at high bias, which corresponds to a T4 dependence of the cooling power. This is the signature of a 2D acoustic phonon cooling mechanism. From a heat equation analysis of the two regimes we extract accurate values of the electron-acoustic phonon coupling constant Σ in monolayer graphene. Our measurements point to an important effect of lattice disorder in the reduction of Σ, not yet considered by theory. Moreover, our study provides a strong and firm support to the rising field of graphene bolometric detectors.

  2. Hot electron cooling by acoustic phonons in graphene.

    PubMed

    Betz, A C; Vialla, F; Brunel, D; Voisin, C; Picher, M; Cavanna, A; Madouri, A; Fève, G; Berroir, J-M; Plaçais, B; Pallecchi, E

    2012-08-01

    We have investigated the energy loss of hot electrons in metallic graphene by means of GHz noise thermometry at liquid helium temperature. We observe the electronic temperature T ∝ V at low bias in agreement with the heat diffusion to the leads described by the Wiedemann-Franz law. We report on T ∝ √V behavior at high bias, which corresponds to a T(4) dependence of the cooling power. This is the signature of a 2D acoustic phonon cooling mechanism. From a heat equation analysis of the two regimes we extract accurate values of the electron-acoustic phonon coupling constant Σ in monolayer graphene. Our measurements point to an important effect of lattice disorder in the reduction of Σ, not yet considered by theory. Moreover, our study provides a strong and firm support to the rising field of graphene bolometric detectors. PMID:23006198

  3. Electron diffusion in tokamaks due to electromagnetic fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Choi, D.I.; Yushmanov, P.N.; Parail, V.V.

    1986-05-01

    Calculations for the stochastic diffusion of electrons in tokamaks due to a spectrum of electromagnetic drift fluctuations are presented. The parametric dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the amplitude and phase velocity of the spectrum, and the bounce frequency for the electrons is studied. The wavenumber spectrum is taken to be a low order (5 x 5) randomly-phased, isotropic, Monotonic spectrum extending from k /sub perpendicular min/ approx. = ..omega../sub ci//c/sub s/ to k/sub perpendicular max/ approx. = 3..omega../sub pe//c with different power laws of decrease phi k approx. = phi 1/k/sup m/, 1 less than or equal to m less than or equal to 3. A nonlinear Ohm's law is derived for the self-consistent relation between the electrostatic and parallel vector potentials. The parallel structure of the fluctuations is taken to be such that k parallel/sup nl/upsilon/sub e/ < w/sub k/ due to the nonlinear perpendicular motion of the electrons described in the nonlinear Ohm's law. The diffusion coefficient scales approximately as the neo-Alcator and Merezhkin-Mukhovatoc empirical formulas for plasma densities above a critical density.

  4. Electromagnetic Waves and Bursty Electron Acceleration: Implications from Freja

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersson, Laila; Ivchenko, N.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Clemmons, J.; Gustavsson, B.; Eliasson, L.

    2000-01-01

    Dispersive Alfven wave activity is identified in four dayside auroral oval events measured by the Freja satellite. The events are characterized by ion injection, bursty electron precipitation below about I keV, transverse ion heating and broadband extremely low frequency (ELF) emissions below the lower hybrid cutoff frequency (a few kHz). The broadband emissions are observed to become more electrostatic towards higher frequencies. Large-scale density depletions/cavities, as determined by the Langmuir probe measurements, and strong electrostatic emissions are often observed simultaneously. A correlation study has been carried out between the E- and B-field fluctuations below 64 Hz (the dc instrument's upper threshold) and the characteristics of the precipitating electrons. This study revealed that the energization of electrons is indeed related to the broadband ELF emissions and that the electrostatic component plays a predominant role during very active magnetospheric conditions. Furthermore, the effect of the ELF electromagnetic emissions on the larger scale field-aligned current systems has been investigated, and it is found that such an effect cannot be detected. Instead, the Alfvenic activity creates a local region of field-aligned currents. It is suggested that dispersive Alfven waves set up these local field-aligned current regions and in turn trigger more electrostatic emissions during certain conditions. In these regions ions are transversely heated, and large-scale density depletions/cavities may be created during especially active periods.

  5. Two-Phase Cooling Method Using R134a Refrigerant to Cool Power Electronic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Kirk T; Tolbert, Leon M; Ayers, Curtis William; Ozpineci, Burak; Campbell, Jeremy B

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a two-phase cooling method using R134a refrigerant to dissipate the heat energy (loss) generated by power electronics (PE) such as those associated with rectifiers, converters, and inverters for a specific application in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs). The cooling method involves submerging PE devices in an R134a bath, which limits the junction temperature of PE devices while conserving weight and volume of the heat sink without sacrificing equipment reliability. First, experimental tests that included an extended soak for more than 300 days were performed on a submerged IGBT and gate-controller card to study dielectric characteristics, deterioration effects, and heat flux capability of R134a. Results from these tests illustrate that R134a has high dielectric characteristics, no deterioration on electrical components, and a heat flux of 114 W/cm 2 for the experimental configuration. Second, experimental tests that included simultaneous operation with a mock automotive air-conditioner (A/C) system were performed on the same IGBT and gate controller card. Data extrapolation from these tests determined that a typical automotive A/C system has more than sufficient cooling capacity to cool a typical 30 kW traction inverter. Last, a discussion and simulation of active cooling of the IGBT junction layer with R134a refrigerant is given. This technique will drastically increase the forward current ratings and reliability of the PE device

  6. ELECTROMAGNETIC THERMAL INSTABILITY WITH MOMENTUM AND ENERGY EXCHANGE BETWEEN ELECTRONS AND IONS IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Anatoly K. E-mail: anekrasov@ifz.ru

    2011-10-01

    Thermal instability in an electron-ion magnetized plasma, which is relevant in the intragalactic medium of galaxy clusters, solar corona, and other two-component plasma objects, is investigated. We apply the multicomponent plasma approach where the dynamics of all species are considered separately through electric field perturbations. General expressions for the dynamical variables obtained in this paper can be applied over a wide range of astrophysical and laboratory plasmas also containing neutrals and dust grains. We assume that background temperatures of electrons and ions are different and include the energy exchange in thermal equations for electrons and ions along with the collisional momentum exchange in equations of motion. We take into account the dependence of collision frequency on density and temperature perturbations. The cooling-heating functions are taken for both electrons and ions. A condensation mode of thermal instability has been studied in the fast sound speed limit. We derive a new dispersion relation including different electron and ion cooling-heating functions and other effects mentioned above and find its simple solutions for growth rates in limiting cases. We show that the perturbations have an electromagnetic nature and demonstrate the crucial role of the electric field perturbation along the background magnetic field in the fast sound speed limit. We find that at the conditions under consideration, condensation must occur along the magnetic field while the transverse scale sizes can be both larger and smaller than the longitudinal ones. The results obtained can be useful for interpretating observations of dense cold regions in astrophysical objects.

  7. Part II/Addendum Electron Beam Cooling between EBIS LINAC and Booster; Is Single Pass Cooling Possible?

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2008-07-01

    Due to some miscommunication, incomplete data was erroneously used in examining electron beam cooling for reducing momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Corrected calculations still indicate that single pass cooling is, in principle, feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by an order of magnitude in about one meter. Preliminary results suggest that this cooling deserves further consideration.

  8. 49 CFR 236.8 - Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. 236.8 Section 236.8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. Signal apparatus, the functioning...

  9. 49 CFR 236.8 - Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. 236.8 Section 236.8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. Signal apparatus, the functioning...

  10. 49 CFR 236.8 - Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. 236.8 Section 236.8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. Signal apparatus, the functioning...

  11. 49 CFR 236.8 - Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. 236.8 Section 236.8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. Signal apparatus, the functioning...

  12. 49 CFR 236.8 - Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. 236.8 Section 236.8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or electrical apparatus. Signal apparatus, the functioning...

  13. Cold electron sources using laser-cooled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulloch, Andrew J.; Sparkes, Ben M.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2016-08-01

    Since the first observation of electron diffraction in 1927, electrons have been used to probe the structure of matter. High-brightness sources of thermal electrons have recently emerged that are capable of simultaneously providing high spatial resolving power along with ultrafast temporal resolution, however they are yet to demonstrate the holy grail of single-shot diffraction of non-crystalline objects. The development of the cold atom electron source, based around the ionisation of laser cooled atoms, has the potential to contribute to this goal. Electron generation from laser cooled atoms is in its infancy, but in just ten years has moved from a proposal to a source capable of performing single-shot diffraction imaging of crystalline structures. The high brightness, high transverse coherence length, and small energy spread of cold electron sources are also potentially advantageous for applications ranging from seeding of x-ray free-electron lasers and synchrotrons to coherent diffractive imaging and microscopy. In this review we discuss the context which motivates the development of these sources, the operating principles of the source, and recent experimental results. The achievements demonstrated thus far combined with theoretical proposals to alleviate current bottlenecks in development promise a bright future for these sources.

  14. The interference of electronic implants in low frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Silny, J

    2003-04-01

    Electronic implants such as cardiac pacemakers or nerve stimulators can be impaired in different ways by amplitude-modulated and even continuous electric or magnetic fields of strong field intensities. For the implant bearer, possible consequences of a temporary electromagnetic interference may range from a harmless impairment of his well-being to a perilous predicament. Electromagnetic interferences in all types of implants cannot be covered here due to their various locations in the body and their different sensing systems. Therefore, this presentation focuses exemplarily on the most frequently used implant, the cardiac pacemaker. In case of an electromagnetic interference the cardiac pacemaker reacts by switching to inhibition mode or to fast asynchronous pacing. At a higher disturbance voltage on the input of the pacemaker, a regular asynchronous pacing is likely to arise. In particular, the first-named interference could be highly dangerous for the pacemaker patient. The interference threshold of cardiac pacemakers depends in a complex way on a number of different factors such as: electromagnetic immunity and adjustment of the pacemaker, the composition of the applied low-frequency fields (only electric or magnetic fields or combinations of both), their frequencies and modulations, the type of pacemaker system (bipolar, unipolar) and its location in the body, as well as the body size and orientation in the field, and last but not least, certain physiological conditions of the patient (e.g. inhalation, exhalation). In extensive laboratory studies we have investigated the interference mechanisms in more than 100 cardiac pacemakers (older types as well as current models) and the resulting worst-case conditions for pacemaker patients in low-frequency electric and magnetic fields. The verification of these results in different practical everyday-life situations, e.g. in the fields of high-voltage overhead lines or those of electronic article surveillance systems is

  15. Dynamics of R.F. Captured Electron Cooled Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kells, W.; Mills, F.;

    1983-01-01

    In the course of electron cooling experiments at the Electron Cooling Ring (ECR) at Fermilab, several peculiar features of the longitudinal phase space of cold protons (200 MeV) captured in R.F. buckets were observed. Here we present the experimental facts, present a simple theory, and summarize computer simulation results which support the theory and facts. The experimental apparatus and measurement techniques have been described elsewhere. R.F. bunching was achieved with a single PPA, loaded cavity gap driven at harmonic number 6({approx} 7.56 MHz) of the revolution frequency. R.F. voltage could be developed across this gap sufficient to entirely capture even the uncooled circulating proton beam ({delta}p/p FWHM = 0.17%).

  16. Feasibility of Electron Cooling for Low-Energy RHIC Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov,A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.; Pozdeyev, E.; Satogata, T.

    2008-04-01

    A concrete interest in running RHIC at low energies in a range of 2.5-25 GeV/nucleon total energy of a single beam has recently emerged. Providing collisions in this energy range, which in the RHIC case is termed 'low-energy' operation, will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about existence and location of a critical point on the QCD phase diagram. However, luminosity projections are relatively low for the lowest energy points of interest. Luminosity improvement can be provided with electron cooling applied directly in RHIC at low energies. This report summarizes the expected luminosity improvement with electron cooling, possible technical approaches and various limitations.

  17. Properties of electrons scattered by a strong plane electromagnetic wave with a linear polarization: Semiclassical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, O. V.; Kazinski, P. O.

    2015-02-01

    The problem of scattering of ultrarelativistic electrons by a strong plane electromagnetic wave of a low (optical) frequency and linear polarization is solved in the semiclassical approximation, when the electron wave packet size is much smaller than the wavelength of electromagnetic wave. The exit momenta of ultrarelativistic electrons scattered are found using the exact solutions to the equations of motion with radiation reaction included (the Landau-Lifshitz equation). It is found that the momentum components of electrons traversed the electromagnetic wave depend weakly on the initial values of momenta. These electrons are mostly scattered at small angles to the propagation direction of the electromagnetic wave. The maximum Lorentz factor of electrons crossed the electromagnetic wave is proportional to the work done by the electromagnetic field and is independent of the initial momentum. The momentum component parallel to the electric field vector of the electromagnetic wave is determined solely by the laser beam diameter measured in the units of the classical electron radius. As for the reflected electrons, they for the most part lose the energy, but remain relativistic. A reflection law that relates the incident and reflection angles and is independent of any parameters is found.

  18. A large area cooled-CCD detector for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruqi, A. R.; Andrews, H. N.; Raeburn, C.

    1994-09-01

    Large area cooled-CCDs are an excellent medium for (indirectly) recording electron images and electron diffraction patterns in real time and for use in electron tomography; real-time imaging is extremely useful in making rapid adjustments in the electron microscope. CCDs provide high sensitivity (useful for minimising dosage to radiation-sensitive biological specimen), good resolution, stable performance, excellent dynamic range and linearity and a reasonably fast readout. We have built an electron imaging device based on the EEV 1152 by 814 pixel CCD which is controlled from a unix based SUN Sparestation operating under X-Windows. The incident 100 kV electrons are converted to visible light in a 0.5 mm thick YAG single crystal which is imaged through a lens on to the CCD. The CCD electronics is designed to be as flexible as possible and allows a wide variation in the readout speed to cater for the relatively fast application where readout noise is less critical and low readout noise applications where the extra few seconds of readout time are not significant. The CCD electronics is built in VME format which is controlled through a S-bus to VME driver. With two parallel channels of readout the whole image can be read out in ˜ 1 s (using the faster readout speed) with 16 bit precision and the image is displayed under X-Windows in a few seconds. The present readout works at 500 kHz and has a noise of ˜ 30 e rms per pixel. With a Peltier cooling device we can operate the CCD at ˜ -40°C which reduces the dark current adequately to allow exposures of up to several minutes. Several examples of patterns collected with the system on a Philips CM12 microscope will be presented.

  19. The noise-cooling tradeoff in electronic equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Richard H.

    2001-05-01

    The noise produced by cooling air passing through electronics packages arises from two sources. One source is the noise of the air-moving fan of either an axial or centrifugal type. This noise may have tonal components and both those components and the broad band noise are dependent on the way that the fan is placed in the unit and on how close the operation is to the design operating point. Often, this can be the dominant noise source. The other source produces random noise due to the turbulent flow of air through the unit. Because the turbulent airflow is also responsible for heat transfer between the components and the air stream, we can regard this part of the noise as the irreducible noise due to cooling. If fan noise were eliminated, this part of the noise must remain. There is a relation therefore between the irreducible noise and the cooling of the unit. But the fan noise must also be considered. The relation between total airflow related noise and cooling requirements is developed in this paper.

  20. Electron Weibel Instability Mediated Laser Driven Electromagnetic Collisionless Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qing; Mima, Kunioki; Cai, Hong-Bo; Taguchi, Toshihiro; Nagatomo, Hideo; He, X. T.

    2015-11-01

    As a fundamental nonlinear structure, collisionless shock is widely studied in astrophysics. Recently, the rapidly-developing laser technology provides a good test-bed to study such shock physics in laboratory. In addition, the laser driven shock ion acceleration is also interested due to its potential applications. We explore the effect of external parallel magnetic field on the collisionless shock formation and resultant particle acceleration by using the 2D3V PIC simulations. We show that unlike the electrostatic shock generated in the unmagnetized plasma, the shock generated in the weakly-magnetized laser-driven plasma is mostly electromagnetic (EM)-like with higher Mach number. The generation mechanism is due to the stronger transverse magnetic field self-generated at the nonlinear stage of the electron Weibel instability which drastically scatters particles and leads to higher energy dissipation. Simulation results also suggest more ions are reflected by this EM shock and results in larger energy transfer rate from the laser to ions, which is of advantage for applications such as neutron production and ion fast ignition.

  1. Weak and electromagnetic mechanisms of neutrino-pair photoproduction in a strongly magnetized electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, A. V.; Kerimov, B. K.; Sizin, P. E.

    2012-11-15

    Expressions for the power of neutrino radiation from a degenerate electron gas in a strong magnetic field are derived for the case of neutrino-pair photoproduction via the weak and electromagnetic interaction mechanisms (it is assumed that the neutrino possesses electromagnetic form factors). It is shown that the neutrino luminosity of a medium in the electromagnetic reaction channel may exceed substantially the luminosity in the weak channel. Relative upper bounds on the effective neutrino magnetic moment are obtained.

  2. Detecting and locating electronic devices using their unintended electromagnetic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagner, Colin Blake

    Electronically-initiated explosives can have unintended electromagnetic emissions which propagate through walls and sealed containers. These emissions, if properly characterized, enable the prompt and accurate detection of explosive threats. The following dissertation develops and evaluates techniques for detecting and locating common electronic initiators. The unintended emissions of radio receivers and microcontrollers are analyzed. These emissions are low-power radio signals that result from the device's normal operation. In the first section, it is demonstrated that arbitrary signals can be injected into a radio receiver's unintended emissions using a relatively weak stimulation signal. This effect is called stimulated emissions. The performance of stimulated emissions is compared to passive detection techniques. The novel technique offers a 5 to 10 dB sensitivity improvement over passive methods for detecting radio receivers. The second section develops a radar-like technique for accurately locating radio receivers. The radar utilizes the stimulated emissions technique with wideband signals. A radar-like system is designed and implemented in hardware. Its accuracy tested in a noisy, multipath-rich, indoor environment. The proposed radar can locate superheterodyne radio receivers with a root mean square position error less than 5 meters when the SNR is 15 dB or above. In the third section, an analytic model is developed for the unintended emissions of microcontrollers. It is demonstrated that these emissions consist of a periodic train of impulses. Measurements of an 8051 microcontroller validate this model. The model is used to evaluate the noise performance of several existing algorithms. Results indicate that the pitch estimation techniques have a 4 dB sensitivity improvement over epoch folding algorithms.

  3. Electron guns and collectors developed at INP for electron cooling devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sharapa, A.N.; Shemyakin, A.V.

    1997-09-01

    Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) has a rich experience in designing electron guns and collectors for electron cooling devices. This paper is a review of the experience of several INP research groups in this field. Some results obtained at INP for systems without a guiding magnetic field are also discussed.

  4. Cooled electronic system with thermal spreaders coupling electronics cards to cold rails

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Gaynes, Michael A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Schultz, Mark D; Simco, Daniel P; Steinke, Mark E

    2013-07-23

    Liquid-cooled electronic systems are provided which include an electronic assembly having an electronics card and a socket with a latch at one end. The latch facilitates securing of the card within the socket or removal of the card from the socket. A liquid-cooled cold rail is disposed at the one end of the socket, and a thermal spreader couples the electronics card to the cold rail. The thermal spreader includes first and second thermal transfer plates coupled to first and second surfaces on opposite sides of the card, and thermally conductive extensions extending from end edges of the plates, which couple the respective transfer plates to the liquid-cooled cold rail. The thermally conductive extensions are disposed to the sides of the latch, and the card is securable within or removable from the socket using the latch without removing the cold rail or the thermal spreader.

  5. Influence of electron evaporative cooling on ultracold plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Truman; Chen, Wei-Ting; Roberts, Jacob

    2013-07-15

    The expansion of ultracold neutral plasmas (UCP) is driven primarily by the thermal pressure of the electron component and is therefore sensitive to the electron temperature. For typical UCP spatial extents, evaporative cooling has a significant influence on the UCP expansion rate at lower densities (less than 10{sup 8}/cm{sup 3}). We studied the effect of electron evaporation in this density range. Owing to the low density, the effects of three-body recombination were negligible. We modeled the expansion by taking into account the change in electron temperature owing to evaporation as well as adiabatic expansion and found good agreement with our data. We also developed a simple model for initial evaporation over a range of ultracold plasma densities, sizes, and electron temperatures to determine over what parameter range electron evaporation is expected to have a significant effect. We also report on a signal calibration technique, which relates the signal at our detector to the total number of ions and electrons in the ultracold plasma.

  6. Principles of gyrotron powered electromagnetic wigglers for free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, B.G.; Bekefi, G.; Davidson, R.C.; Temkin, R.J.; Tran, T.M.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    The operation of free-electron lasers (FEL's) with axial electron beams and high-power electromagnetic wiggler fields such as those produced by high-power gyrotrons is discussed. The use of short wavelength electromagnetic wigglers in waveguides and resonant cavities can significantly reduce required electron beam voltages, resulting in compact FEL's. Gain calculations in the low- and high-gain Compton regime are presented, including the effects of emittance, transverse wiggler gradient, and electron temperature. Optimized scaling laws for the FEL gain and the required electromagnetic wiggler field power are discussed. Several possible configurations for FEL's with electromagnetic wigglers powered by millimeter wavelength gyrotrons are presented. Gyrotron powered wigglers appear promising for operation of compact FEL's in the infrared regime using moderate energy (<10 MeV) electron beams.

  7. Stimulated Raman up-conversion of electromagnetic waves by a gyrating electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, O. P.; Patel, V. L.

    1983-01-01

    A gyrating electron beam supports negative energy modes near the harmonics of electron-cyclotron frequency. An electromagnetic wave passing through such a beam parametrically up-converts into high-frequency electromagnetic modes separated from the pump frequency by the electron-cyclotron harmonics. The growth rate for this process varies directly as the oscillatory velocity of beam electrons caused by the pump and as square root of the beam density. It has a maximum at values of scattering angle close to 180 deg and is also implicitly dependent on the beam veocity and the cyclotron frequency of electrons. The effect of a cold electron component is to reduce the growth rate.

  8. Using electron-tunneling refrigerators to cool electrons, membranes, and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Nathan A.

    Many cryogenic devices require temperatures near 100 mK for optimal performance, such as thin-film, superconducting detectors. Examples include the submillimeter SCUBA camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, high-resolution X-ray sensors for semiconductor defect analysis, and a planned satellite to search for polarization in the cosmic microwave background. The cost, size, and complexity of refrigerators used to reach 100 mK (dilution and adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators) are significant and alternative technologies are desirable. We demonstrate work on developing a new option for cooling detectors to 100 mK bath temperatures. Solid-state refrigerators based on Normal metal/Insulator/Superconductor (NIS) tunnel junctions can provide cooling from pumped 3He bath temperatures (˜300 mK) to 100 mK. The cooling mechanism is the preferential tunneling of the highest energy (hottest) electrons from the normal metal through the biased tunnel junctions into the superconductor. When NIS refrigerators are combined with a micro-machined membrane, both the electrons and phonons of the membrane can be cooled. We have developed NIS-cooled membranes with both large temperature reductions and large cooling powers. We have shown the first cooling of a bulk material by cooling a neutron transmutation doped (NTD) thermistor. The fabrication of NIS refrigerators can be integrated with existing detector technology. For the first time, we have successfully integrated NIS refrigerators with both mm-wave and X-ray detectors. In particular, we have cooled X-ray detectors by more than 100 mK and have achieved a resolution of <10 eV at 6 keV at a bath temperature 85 mK above the transition temperature of the detector. The use of integrated NIS refrigerators makes the remarkable performance of cryogenic detectors available from 300 mK platforms. We have also performed preliminary work towards building a general-purpose cooling platform for microelectronics devices on separate

  9. Diffusion-Cooled Tantalum Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skalare, Anders; McGrath, William; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry

    2004-01-01

    A batch of experimental diffusion-cooled hot-electron bolometers (HEBs), suitable for use as mixers having input frequencies in the terahertz range and output frequencies up to about a gigahertz, exploit the superconducting/normal-conducting transition in a thin strip of tantalum. The design and operation of these HEB mixers are based on mostly the same principles as those of a prior HEB mixer that exploited the superconducting/normal- conducting transition in a thin strip of niobium and that was described elsewhere.

  10. THz electromagnetic radiation driven by intense relativistic electron beam based on ion focus regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qing; Yang, Shengpeng; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Wenchao; Tang, Changjian; Duan, Zhaoyun; Gong, Yubin

    2016-06-01

    The simulation study finds that the relativistic electron beam propagating through the plasma background can produce electromagnetic (EM) radiation. With the propagation of the electron beam, the oscillations of the beam electrons in transverse and longitudinal directions have been observed simultaneously, which provides the basis for the electromagnetic radiation. The simulation results clearly show that the electromagnetic radiation frequency can reach up to terahertz (THz) wave band which may result from the filter-like property of plasma background, and the electromagnetic radiation frequency closely depends on the plasma density. To understand the above simulation results physically, the dispersion relation of the beam-plasma system has been derived using the field-matching method, and the dispersion curves show that the slow wave modes can couple with the electron beam effectively in THz wave band, which is an important theoretical evidence of the EM radiation.

  11. SIMULATIONS OF RHIC COHERENT STABILITIES DUE TO WAKEFIELD AND ELECTRON COOLING

    SciTech Connect

    WANG,G.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.

    2007-06-25

    The Electron cooling beam has both coherent and incoherent effects to the circulating ion beam. The incoherent longitudinal cooling could reduce the ion beam energy spread and hence cause 'over-cooling' of the ion beam. Depending on the beam densities and cooling length, the coherent interaction between the ion and electron beam could either damp or anti-damp the ion coherent motions. Using the tracking codes, TRANFT, the threshold for 'over-cooling' has been found and compared with theoretical estimation. The transverse coherent effect of electron cooling has been implemented into the codes and its effect for the bunched ion beam is shown.

  12. Air Cooling for High Temperature Power Electronics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S.; Musselman, M.; King, C.

    2014-09-01

    Current emphasis on developing high-temperature power electronics, including wide-bandgap materials such as silicon carbide and gallium nitride, increases the opportunity for a completely air-cooled inverter at higher powers. This removes the liquid cooling system for the inverter, saving weight and volume on the liquid-to-air heat exchanger, coolant lines, pumps, and coolant, replacing them with just a fan and air supply ducting. We investigate the potential for an air-cooled heat exchanger from a component and systems-level approach to meet specific power and power density targets. A proposed baseline air-cooled heat exchanger design that does not meet those targets was optimized using a parametric computational fluid dynamics analysis, examining the effects of heat exchanger geometry and device location, fixing the device heat dissipation and maximum junction temperature. The CFD results were extrapolated to a full inverter, including casing, capacitor, bus bar, gate driver, and control board component weights and volumes. Surrogate ducting was tested to understand the pressure drop and subsequent system parasitic load. Geometries that met targets with acceptable loads on the system were down-selected for experimentation. Nine baseline configuration modules dissipated the target heat dissipation, but fell below specific power and power density targets. Six optimized configuration modules dissipated the target heat load, exceeding the specific power and power density targets. By maintaining the same 175 degrees C maximum junction temperature, an optimized heat exchanger design and higher device heat fluxes allowed a reduction in the number of modules required, increasing specific power and power density while still maintaining the inverter power.

  13. Beam-Based Alignment of Magnetic Field in the Fermilab Electron Cooler Cooling Section

    SciTech Connect

    Seletskiy, S. M.; Tupikov, V.

    2006-03-20

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires low effective anglular spread of electrons in the cooling section. One of the main components of the effective electron angles is an angle of electron beam centroid with respect to antiproton beam. This angle is caused by the poor quality of magnetic field in the 20 m long cooling section solenoid and by the mismatch of the beam centroid to the entrance of the cooling section. This paper focuses on the beam-based procedure of the alignment of the cooling section field and beam centroid matching. The discussed procedure allows to suppress the beam centroid angles below the critical value of 0.1 mrad.

  14. Electron beam electromagnetic field interaction in one-dimensional coaxial vircator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Liu, G. Z.; Yang, Z. F.

    2005-10-01

    A one-dimensional model of the interaction between an injected electron beam and an electromagnetic (EM) field inside a coaxial vircator is presented. The effects of the injected electron beam energy spread, anode absorption rate, feedback and injected current premodulation are analyzed. The EM-gains of interaction between the electron beam and TM01, TE11 modes are derived and discussed.

  15. Thermoelectric-enhanced, liquid-based cooling of a multi-component electronic system

    SciTech Connect

    Chainer, Timothy J; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Steinke, Mark E

    2015-05-12

    Apparatus and method are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The apparatus includes a liquid-cooled structure, a thermal conduction path coupling the electronic component and the liquid-cooled structure, a coolant loop in fluid communication with a coolant-carrying channel of the liquid-cooled structure, and an outdoor-air-cooled heat exchange unit coupled to facilitate heat transfer from the liquid-cooled structure via, at least in part, the coolant loop. The thermoelectric array facilitates transfer of heat from the electronic component to the liquid-cooled structure, and the heat exchange unit cools coolant passing through the coolant loop by dissipating heat from the coolant to outdoor ambient air. In one implementation, temperature of coolant entering the liquid-cooled structure is greater than temperature of the outdoor ambient air to which heat is dissipated.

  16. Thermoelectric-enhanced, liquid-based cooling of a multi-component electronic system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Steinke, Mark E

    2015-11-10

    Methods are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The methods include providing: a liquid-cooled structure, a thermal conduction path coupling the electronic component and the liquid-cooled structure, a coolant loop in fluid communication with a coolant-carrying channel of the liquid-cooled structure, and an outdoor-air-cooled heat exchange unit coupled to facilitate heat transfer from the liquid-cooled structure via, at least in part, the coolant loop. The thermoelectric array facilitates transfer of heat from the electronic component to the liquid-cooled structure, and the heat exchange unit cools coolant passing through the coolant loop by dissipating heat from the coolant to outdoor ambient air. In one implementation, temperature of coolant entering the liquid-cooled structure is greater than temperature of the outdoor ambient air to which heat is dissipated.

  17. Electron Cooling for Cold Beam Synchrotron for Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grishanov, B.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Rastigeev, S.; Reva, V.; Vostrikov, V.; Kumada, M.

    2006-03-20

    A wide usage of carbon ions for cancer therapy is limited mostly due to technical difficulties, resulting in higher cost. This cost problem can be solved by our CBS (Cold Beam Synchrotron) proposal. In this paper a conceptual design of the facility for the carbon beam cancer therapy using a high precise active beam scanning system of synchronizing with respiration. The main feature of the CBS facility is an application of electron cooling device. The use of cold ion beam allows to decrease the aperture of synchrotron and components of high energy beam transport lines, significantly. The precise ion beam energy variation and two unique schemes of beam extraction ('pellet' extraction and extraction on recombination) enclose the list of possibilities appearing with EC applying.

  18. Efficient regime of electromagnetic emission in a plasma with counterstreaming electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, I. V.; Annenkov, V. V.

    2014-08-15

    Efficiency of electromagnetic emission produced in a magnetized plasma with counterstreaming electron beams was investigated using both the linear kinetic theory and particle-in-cell simulations. We calculated the growth rate of the beam-plasma instability taking into account both kinetic and relativistic effects and showed that there exists a regime in which transversely propagating electromagnetic waves can be generated by the coupling of the most unstable oblique beam-driven modes. It was confirmed by numerical simulations that such a tune-up of system parameters for a specific nonlinear process can lead to a substantial increase in electromagnetic emission efficiency. It was found that electromagnetic radiation emerging from the plasma in such a regime is generated near the harmonics of the pump frequency that is determined by the typical eigenfrequency of the beam-driven modes. It was also shown that the peak emission power can reach 5% of the maximal power lost by beam electrons.

  19. Electromagnetic radiation and nonlinear energy flow in an electron beam-plasma system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whelan, D. A.; Stenzel, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the unstable electron-plasma waves of a beam-plasma system can generate electromagnetic radiation in a uniform plasma. The generation mechanism is a scattering of the unstable electron plasma waves off ion-acoustic waves, producing electromagnetic waves whose frequency is near the local plasma frequency. The wave vector and frequency matching conditions of the three-wave mode coupling are experimentally verified. The electromagnetic radiation is observed to be polarized with the electric field parallel to the beam direction, and its source region is shown to be localized to the unstable plasma wave region. The frequency spectrum shows negligible intensity near the second harmonic of the plasma frequency. These results suggest that the observed electromagnetic radiation of type III solar bursts may be generated near the local plasma frequency and observed downstream where the wave frequency is near the harmonic of the plasma frequency.

  20. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  1. Smart interactive electronic system for monitoring the electromagnetic activities of biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Sorin G.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2001-08-01

    A novel electronic device capable of sensing and monitoring the myoelectric, polarization wave and electromagnetic activities of the biological systems and in particular the human body is presented. It is known that all the physical and chemical processes within biological systems are associated with polarization, depolarization waves from the brain, neural signals and myoelectric processes that manifest themselves in ionic and dipole motion. The technology developed in our laboratory is based on certain charge motion sensitive electronics. The electronic system developed is capable of sensing the electromagnetic activities of biological systems. The information obtained is then processed by specialized software in order to interpret it from physical and chemical point of view.

  2. The Screening Effect in Electromagnetic Production of Electron Positron Pairs in Relativistic Nucleus-Atom Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jianshi; Derrickson, J. H.; Parnell, T. A.; Strayer, M. R.

    1999-01-01

    We study the screening effects of the atomic electrons in the electromagnetic production of electron-positron pairs in relativistic nucleus-atom collisions for fixed target experiments. Our results are contrasted with those obtained in bare collisions, with particular attention given to its dependence on the beam energy and the target atom.

  3. Modeling Single-Phase and Boiling Liquid Jet Impingement Cooling in Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S. V. J.; Hassani, V.; Bharathan, D.

    2005-12-01

    Jet impingement has been an attractive cooling option in a number of industries over the past few decades. Over the past 15 years, jet impingement has been explored as a cooling option in microelectronics. Recently, interest has been expressed by the automotive industry in exploring jet impingement for cooling power electronics components. This technical report explores, from a modeling perspective, both single-phase and boiling jet impingement cooling in power electronics, primarily from a heat transfer viewpoint. The discussion is from the viewpoint of the cooling of IGBTs (insulated-gate bipolar transistors), which are found in hybrid automobile inverters.

  4. A FIRST LOOK AT BEAM DIAGNOSTICS FOR THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLING PROJECT.

    SciTech Connect

    CAMERON, P.; BEN-ZVI, I.; KEWISCH, J.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-06-06

    High energy electron cooling [1] is essential to meet the luminosity specification for RHIC II [2]. In preparation for electron cooling, an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) test facility [3] is under construction at BNL. A preliminary description of Diagnostics for the ERL was presented at an earlier workshop [4]. A significant portion of the eCooling Diagnostics will be a simple extension of those developed for the ERL test facility. In this paper we present a preliminary report on eCooling Diagnostics. We summarize the planned conventional Diagnostics, and follow with more detailed descriptions of Diagnostics specialized to the requirements of high-energy magnetized cooling.

  5. Trapping of electrons in troughs of self generated electromagnetic standing waves in a bounded plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Sahu, Debaprasad; Pandey, Shail; Chatterjee, Sanghomitro; Dey, Indranuj; Roy Chowdhury, Krishanu

    2014-01-15

    Observations and measurements are reported on electron trapping in troughs of self-generated electromagnetic standing waves in a bounded plasma column confined in a minimum-B field. The boundaries are smaller than the free space wavelength of the waves. Earlier work of researchers primarily focused upon electron localization effects induced by purely electrostatic perturbation. We demonstrate the possibility in the presence of electromagnetic standing waves generated in the bounded plasma column. The electron trapping is verified with electrostatic measurements of the plasma floating potential, electromagnetic measurements of the wave field profile, and optical intensity measurements of Argon ionic line at 488 nm. The experimental results show a reasonably good agreement with predictions of a Monte Carlo simulation code that takes into account all kinematical and dynamical effects in the plasma in the presence of bounded waves and external fields.

  6. Efficiency of combined cyclotron--[hacek C]erenkov interaction between electrons and electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Nusinovich, G.S.; Vlasov, A.N. )

    1993-02-01

    A theory is presented describing the electron cyclotron interaction at frequencies near cutoff, followed by a [hacek C]erenkov interaction region. In such a case, the cyclotron interaction withdraws only the orbital component of electron momentum, while in the [hacek C]erenkov interaction the electrons lose their axial momentum. It is shown that the addition of the [hacek C]erenkov interaction significantly enhances the total electronic efficiency. Since both kinds of operation are relatively insensitive to electron velocity spread, the efficiency of the combined interaction is also rather tolerant to velocity spread. Thus, rather efficient sources of electromagnetic radiation based on poor quality electron beams may be developed.

  7. Verification of electromagnetic fluid-kinetic hybrid electron model in global gyrokinetic particle simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Holod, I.; Lin, Z.

    2013-03-15

    The fluid-kinetic hybrid electron model is verified in global gyrokinetic particle simulation of linear electromagnetic drift-Alfvenic instabilities in tokamak. In particular, we have recovered the {beta}-stabilization of the ion temperature gradient mode, transition to collisionless trapped electron mode, and the onset of kinetic ballooning mode as {beta}{sub e} (ratio of electron kinetic pressure to magnetic pressure) increases.

  8. A Silicon-Tungsten Electromagnetic Calorimeter with Integrated Electronics for the International Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brau, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Frey, R.; Freytag, D.; Gallagher, C.; Graf, N.; Haller, G.; Herbst, R.; Holbrook, B.; Jaros, J.; Lander, R.; Radloff, P.; Strom, D.; Tripathi, M.; Woods, M.

    2012-12-01

    We present an update of the development of an electromagnetic calorimeter for the Silicon Detector concept for a future linear electron-positron collider. After reviewing the design criteria and related simulation studies, we discuss progress in the research and development of the detector. This concept has from the outset made the case for highly integrated electronic readout with small (1 mm) readout gaps in order to maintain a small Moliere radius for electromagnetic showers and to avoid active heat removal. We now have fully functioning 1024-channel readout chips which have been successfully bonded to 15 cm silicon sensors. We present initial results from these assemblies.

  9. Design and optimization of hydrogen cooled pulsed storage inductors for electromagnetic launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Eyssa, Y.M.; Abdelsalam, M.K.; Boom, R.W.; Huang, X. . Applied Superconductivity Center); McIntosh, G.E. ); Waynert, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Cryoresistive magnetic energy storage systems that can deliver Meg-Amp Kilo-Volt levels of pulsed power for a short time (200-1000 s) have important potential applications in space-based strategic defense systems. Hydrogen cooled aluminum cryoresistive coils operating at frequencies > 1 H/sub z/ are efficient and light weight (/sub {Delta}/E/M = 20-50 J/g). In this paper the authors report on: analysis of eddy current losses; the use of aluminum inductors at 15 {Kappa} < T < 30 {Kappa} in fields B < 10 T; inductor cooling; optimization of energy stored per unit mass; and conceptual designs of 300 MJ hydrogen cooled cryoresistive toroids and solenoids.

  10. Spray cooling characteristics of nanofluids for electronic power devices.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shou-Shing; Leu, Hsin-Yuan; Liu, Hao-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a single spray for electronic power devices using deionized (DI) water and pure silver (Ag) particles as well as multi-walled carbon nanotube (MCNT) particles, respectively, is studied herein. The tests are performed with a flat horizontal heated surface using a nozzle diameter of 0.5 mm with a definite nozzle-to-target surface distance of 25 mm. The effects of nanoparticle volume fraction and mass flow rate of the liquid on the surface heat flux, including critical heat flux (CHF), are explored. Both steady state and transient data are collected for the two-phase heat transfer coefficient, boiling curve/ cooling history, and the corresponding CHF. The heat transfer removal rate can reach up to 274 W/cm(2) with the corresponding CHF enhancement ratio of 2.4 for the Ag/water nanofluids present at a volume fraction of 0.0075% with a low mass flux of 11.9 × 10(-4) kg/cm(2)s. PMID:25852429

  11. Spray cooling characteristics of nanofluids for electronic power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Shou-Shing; Leu, Hsin-Yuan; Liu, Hao-Hsiang

    2015-03-01

    The performance of a single spray for electronic power devices using deionized (DI) water and pure silver (Ag) particles as well as multi-walled carbon nanotube (MCNT) particles, respectively, is studied herein. The tests are performed with a flat horizontal heated surface using a nozzle diameter of 0.5 mm with a definite nozzle-to-target surface distance of 25 mm. The effects of nanoparticle volume fraction and mass flow rate of the liquid on the surface heat flux, including critical heat flux (CHF), are explored. Both steady state and transient data are collected for the two-phase heat transfer coefficient, boiling curve/ cooling history, and the corresponding CHF. The heat transfer removal rate can reach up to 274 W/cm2 with the corresponding CHF enhancement ratio of 2.4 for the Ag/water nanofluids present at a volume fraction of 0.0075% with a low mass flux of 11.9 × 10-4 kg/cm2s.

  12. Nano-PCMs for passive electronic cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colla, L.; Fedele, L.; Mancin, S.; Buonomo, B.; Ercole, D.; Manca, O.

    2015-11-01

    The present work aims at investigating a new challenging use of oxide (TiO2, Al2O3, etc.) nanoparticles to enhance the thermal properties: thermal conductivity, specific heat, and latent heat of pure paraffin waxes to obtain a new class of Phase Change Materials (PCMs), the so-called nano-PCMs. The nano-PCMs were obtained by seeding different amounts of oxide nanoparticles in a paraffin wax having a melting temperature of 45°C. The thermophysical properties such as latent heat and thermal conductivity were then measured to understand the effects of the nanoparticles on the thermal properties of both the solid and liquid PCM. Finally, a numerical comparison between the use of the pure paraffin wax and the nano-PCM in a typical electronics passive cooling device was implemented. Numerical simulations were carried out using the Ansys-Fluent 15.0 code. Results in terms of solid and liquid phase temperatures, melting time and junction temperature were reported. Moreover, a comparison with experimental results was also performed.

  13. Commissioning of Fermilab's electron cooling system for 8-GeV antiprotons

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, A.; Carlson, K.; Gattuso, C.; Hu, M.; Kramper, B.; Kroc, T.; Leibfritz, J.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Saewert, G.; Schmidt, C.W.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Tupikov, V.; Warner, A.; Seletsky, S.; Gai, W.; Kazakevich, Grigory M.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2005-05-01

    A 4.3-MeV electron cooling system [1] has been installed at Fermilab in the Recycler antiproton storage ring and is currently being commissioned. The cooling system is designed to assist accumulation of 8.9-GeV/c antiprotons for the Tevatron collider operations. This paper reports on the progress of the electron beam commissioning effort as well as on detailed plans of demonstrating the cooling of antiprotons.

  14. Electrons in a relativistic-intensity laser field: generation of zeptosecond electromagnetic pulses and energy spectrum of the accelerated electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, A A; Galkin, A L; Kalashnikov, M P; Korobkin, V V; Romanovsky, Mikhail Yu; Shiryaev, O B

    2011-08-31

    We study the motion of an electron and emission of electromagnetic waves by an electron in the field of a relativistically intense laser pulse. The dynamics of the electron is described by the Newton equation with the Lorentz force in the right-hand side. It is shown that the electrons may be ejected from the interaction region with high energy. The energy spectrum of these electrons and the technique of using the spectrum to assess the maximal intensity in the focus are analysed. It is found that electromagnetic radiation of an electron moving in an intense laser field occurs within a small angle around the direction of the electron trajectory tangent. The tangent quickly changes its direction in space; therefore, electromagnetic radiation of the electron in the far-field zone in a certain direction in the vicinity of the tangent is a short pulse with a duration as short as zeptoseconds. The calculation of the temporary and spectral distribution of the radiation field is carried out. (superintense laser fields)

  15. Kinetic theory of the electron bounce instability in two dimensional current sheets—Full electromagnetic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Tur, A.; Fruit, G.; Louarn, P.

    2014-03-15

    In the general context of understanding the possible destabilization of a current sheet with applications to magnetospheric substorms or solar flares, a kinetic model is proposed for studying the resonant interaction between electromagnetic fluctuations and trapped bouncing electrons in a 2D current sheet. Tur et al. [A. Tur et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 102905 (2010)] and Fruit et al. [G. Fruit et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 022113 (2013)] already used this model to investigate the possibilities of electrostatic instabilities. Here, the model is completed for full electromagnetic perturbations. Starting with a modified Harris sheet as equilibrium state, the linearized gyrokinetic Vlasov equation is solved for electromagnetic fluctuations with period of the order of the electron bounce period. The particle motion is restricted to its first Fourier component along the magnetic field and this allows the complete time integration of the non local perturbed distribution functions. The dispersion relation for electromagnetic modes is finally obtained through the quasineutrality condition and the Ampere's law for the current density. It is found that for mildly strechted current, undamped modes oscillate at typical electron bounce frequency with wavelength of the order of the plasma sheet half thickness. As the stretching of the plasma sheet becomes more intense, the frequency of these normal modes decreases and beyond a certain threshold in ε = B{sub z}/B{sub lobes}, the mode becomes explosive with typical growth rate of a few tens of seconds. The free energy contained in the bouncing motion of the electrons may trigger an electromagnetic instability able to disrupt the cross-tail current in a few seconds. This new instability–electromagnetic electron-bounce instability–may explain fast and global scale destabilization of current sheets as required to describe substorm phenomena.

  16. Electron cooling of 8-GeV antiprotons at Fermilab's Recycler: Results and operational implications

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, Alexey V.; Carlson, K.; Gattuso, C.; Hu, M.; Kroc, T.; Leibfritz, J.; Nagaitsev, S.; Pruss, S.; Saewert, G.; Schmidt, C.W.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Tupikov, V.; Warner, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    Electron cooling of 8 GeV antiprotons at Fermilab's Recycler storage ring is now routinely used in the collider operation. It requires a 0.1-0.5 A, 4.3 MeV dc electron beam and is designed to increase the longitudinal phase-space density of the circulating antiproton beam. This paper briefly describes the characteristics of the electron beam that were achieved to successfully cool antiprotons. Then, results from various cooling force measurements along with comparison to a nonmagnetized model are presented. Finally, operational aspects of the implementation of electron cooling at the Recycler are discussed, such as adjustments to the cooling rate and the influence of the electron beam on the antiproton beam lifetime.

  17. Status of the R&D Towards Electron Cooling of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    A. Favale; D. Holmes; J.J. Sredniawski; Hans Bluem; M.D. Cole; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; V.V. Parkhomchuk; V.B. Reva; J. Alduino; D.S. Barton; Dana Richard Beavis; I. Ben-Zvi; Michael Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; Andrew Burrill; Rama Calaga; P. Cameron; X. Chang; K.A. Drees; A.V. Fedotov; W. Fischer; G. Ganetis; D.M. Gassner; J.G. Grimes; Hartmut Hahn; L.R. Hammons; A. Hershcovitch; H.C. Hseuh; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; D.L. Lederle; Vladimir Litvinenko; C. Longo; W.W. MacKay; G.J. Mahler; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; B. Oerter; C. Pai; George Parzen; D. Pate; D. Phillips; S.R. Plate; Eduard Pozdeyev; Triveni Rao; J. Reich; Thomas Roser; A.G. Ruggiero; T. Russo; C. Schultheiss; Z. Segalov; J. Smedley; K. Smith; T. Tallerico; S. Tepikian; R. Than; R.J. Todd; Dejan Trbojevic; J.E. Tuozzolo; P. Wanderer; G. WANG; D. Weiss; Q. Wu; Kin Yip; A. Zaltsman; A. Burov; S. Nagaitsev; L.R. Prost; A.O. Sidorin; A.V. Smirnov; Yaroslav Derbenev; Peter Kneisel; John Mammosser; H. Phillips; Joseph Preble; Charles Reece; Robert Rimmer; Jeffrey Saunders; Mircea Stirbet; Haipeng Wang; A.V. Aleksandrov; D.L. Douglas; Y.W. Kang; D.T. Abell; G.I. Bell; David L. Bruhwiler; R. Busby; John R. Cary; D.A. Dimitrov; P. Messmer; Vahid Houston Ranjbar; D.S. Smithe; A.V. Sobol; P. Stoltz

    2007-08-01

    The physics interest in a luminosity upgrade of RHIC requires the development of a cooling-frontier facility. Detailed cooling calculations have been made to determine the efficacy of electron cooling of the stored RHIC beams. This has been followed by beam dynamics simulations to establish the feasibility of creating the necessary electron beam. Electron cooling of RHIC at collisions requires electron beam energy up to about 54 MeV at an average current of between 50 to 100 mA and a particularly bright electron beam. The accelerator chosen to generate this electron beam is a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) with a superconducting RF gun with a laser-photocathode. An intensive experimental R&D program engages the various elements of the accelerator: Photocathodes of novel design, superconducting RF electron gun of a particularly high current and low emittance, a very high-current ERL cavity and a demonstration ERL using these components.

  18. The nonextensive parameter for nonequilibrium electron gas in an electromagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Haining; Du, Jiulin

    2014-11-15

    The nonextensive parameter for nonequilibrium electron gas of the plasma in an electromagnetic field is studied. We exactly obtained an expression of the q-parameter based on Boltzmann kinetic theories for plasmas, where Coulombian interactions and Lorentz forces play dominant roles. We show that the q-parameter different from unity is related by an equation to temperature gradient, electric field strength, magnetic induction as well as overall bulk velocity of the gas. The effect of the magnetic field on the q-parameter depends on the overall bulk velocity. Thus the q-parameter for the electron gas in an electromagnetic field represents the nonequilibrium nature or nonisothermal configurations of the plasma with electromagnetic interactions. - Highlights: • An expression of the q-parameter is obtained for nonequilibrium plasma with electromagnetic interactions. • The q-parameter is related to temperature gradient, electric field strength, magnetic induction as well as overall bulk velocity of the plasma. • The q-parameter represents the nonequilibrium nature of the complex plasma with electromagnetic interactions.

  19. Guiding and collimating fast electron beam by the quasi-static electromagnetic field array

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Zhao, Z. Q.; He, W. H.; Dong, K. G.; Wu, Y. C.; Zhu, B.; Zhang, T. K.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, Z. M.; Gu, Y. Q.; Cao, L. H.

    2014-10-15

    A guidance and collimation scheme for fast electron beam in a traverse periodic quasi-static electromagnetic field array is proposed with the semi-analytic method and the particle-in-cell simulation. The sheath electric fields on the surfaces of nanowires and the magnetic fields around the nanowires form a traverse periodic quasi-static electromagnetic field array. Therefore, most of the fast electrons are confined at the nanowire surfaces and transport forward. More importantly, due to the divergent property of the beams, the magnitudes of the generated fields decrease with the target depth. The lateral momenta of the electrons convert into the forward momenta through Lorenz force, and they cannot recover their initial values. Therefore, the fast electrons can be guided and collimated efficiently in the gaps between the nanowires. In our particle-in-cell simulations, the observed guiding efficiency exceeds 80% compared with the reference target.

  20. Low frequency electromagnetic oscillations in dense degenerate electron-positron pair plasma, with and without ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. A.; Ayub, M. K.; Ahmad, Ali

    2012-10-01

    Quantum plasma oscillations are studied in a strongly magnetized, ultra-dense plasma with degenerate electrons and positrons. The dispersive role of electron and positron quantum effects on low frequency (in comparison to electron cyclotron frequency) shear electromagnetic wave is investigated by employing hydrodynamic formulation. In the presence of ions, the density balance changes, and the electromagnetic wave (with frequency lower than the ion cyclotron frequency) is shown to couple with electrostatic ion mode under certain conditions. For such low frequency waves, it is also seen that the contribution of electron and positron degeneracy pressure is dominant as compared to their diffraction effects. The results are analyzed numerically for illustrative purpose pointing out their relevance to the dense laboratory (e.g., super-intense laser-dense matter interactions) and astrophysical plasmas.

  1. Low frequency electromagnetic oscillations in dense degenerate electron-positron pair plasma, with and without ions

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, S. A.; Ayub, M. K.; Ahmad, Ali

    2012-10-15

    Quantum plasma oscillations are studied in a strongly magnetized, ultra-dense plasma with degenerate electrons and positrons. The dispersive role of electron and positron quantum effects on low frequency (in comparison to electron cyclotron frequency) shear electromagnetic wave is investigated by employing hydrodynamic formulation. In the presence of ions, the density balance changes, and the electromagnetic wave (with frequency lower than the ion cyclotron frequency) is shown to couple with electrostatic ion mode under certain conditions. For such low frequency waves, it is also seen that the contribution of electron and positron degeneracy pressure is dominant as compared to their diffraction effects. The results are analyzed numerically for illustrative purpose pointing out their relevance to the dense laboratory (e.g., super-intense laser-dense matter interactions) and astrophysical plasmas.

  2. Electromagnetic waves destabilized by runaway electrons in near-critical electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Komar, A.; Pokol, G. I.; Fueloep, T.

    2013-01-15

    Runaway electron distributions are strongly anisotropic in velocity space. This anisotropy is a source of free energy that may destabilize electromagnetic waves through a resonant interaction between the waves and the energetic electrons. In this work, we investigate the high-frequency electromagnetic waves that are destabilized by runaway electron beams when the electric field is close to the critical field for runaway acceleration. Using a runaway electron distribution appropriate for the near-critical case, we calculate the linear instability growth rate of these waves and conclude that the obliquely propagating whistler waves are most unstable. We show that the frequencies, wave numbers, and propagation angles of the most unstable waves depend strongly on the magnetic field. Taking into account collisional and convective damping of the waves, we determine the number density of runaways that is required to destabilize the waves and show its parametric dependences.

  3. A robust platform cooled by superconducting electronic refrigerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H. Q.; Meschke, M.; Pekola, J. P.

    2015-01-05

    A biased tunnel junction between a superconductor and a normal metal can cool the latter electrode. Based on a recently developed cooler with high power and superior performance, we have integrated it with a dielectric silicon nitride membrane, and cooled phonons from 305 mK down to 200 mK. Without perforation and covered under a thin alumina layer, the membrane is rigorously transformed into a cooling platform that is robust and versatile for multiple practical purposes. We discussed our results and possibilities to further improve the device.

  4. STATUS OF THE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT TOWARDS ELECTRON COOLING OF RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.; OZAKI, T.; YOSHIDA, T.; NANKAWA, T.; KOZAI, N.; SAKAMOTO, F.; SUZUKI, Y.

    2007-06-25

    The physics interest in a luminosity upgrade of RHIC requires the development of a cooling-frontier facility. Detailed calculations were made of electron cooling of the stored RHIC beams. This has been followed by beam dynamics simulations to establish the feasibility of creating the necessary electron beam. The electron beam accelerator will be a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). An intensive experimental R&D program engages the various elements of the accelerator, as described by 24 contributions to the 2007 PAC.

  5. Status of the R&D towards electron cooling of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Alduino, J.; Barton, D.; Beavis, D.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Burrill, A.; Calaga, R.; Cameron, P.; Chang, X.; Drees, K.; /Brookhaven /AES, Medford /Novosibirsk, IYF /Fermilab /Dubna, JINR /Jefferson Lab /Oak Ridge /NIST, Boulder

    2007-06-01

    The physics interest in a luminosity upgrade of RHIC requires the development of a cooling-frontier facility. Detailed calculations were made of electron cooling of the stored RHIC beams. This has been followed by beam dynamics simulations to establish the feasibility of creating the necessary electron beam. The electron beam accelerator will be a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). An intensive experimental R&D program engages the various elements of the accelerator, as described by 24 contributions to the 2007 PAC.

  6. Nonlinear propagation of broadband intense electromagnetic waves in an electron-positron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Marklund, M.; Eliasson, B.; Shukla, P. K.

    2006-08-15

    A kinetic equation describing the nonlinear evolution of intense electromagnetic pulses in electron-positron (e-p) plasmas is presented. The modulational instability is analyzed for a relativistically intense partially coherent pulse, and it is found that the modulational instability is inhibited by the spectral pulse broadening. A numerical study for the one-dimensional kinetic photon equation is presented. Computer simulations reveal a Fermi-Pasta-Ulam-type recurrence phenomenon for localized broadband pulses. The results should be of importance in understanding the nonlinear propagation of broadband intense electromagnetic pulses in e-p plasmas in laser-plasma systems as well as in astrophysical plasma settings.

  7. Electrostatic and electromagnetic gyroharmonic emissions due to energetic electrons in magnetospheric plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, S. A.; Wu, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    The paper derives the growth rates and growth lengths of the electrostatic emission for spatially homogeneous and inhomogeneous energetic electrons, and numerically evaluates the growth rate and growth length spectra for several parameter sets representative of magnetospheric plasmas. In addition, the growth rates are derived for the case of electromagnetic emission modeled by the ordinary mode. The numerical results of the electromagnetic and electrostatic cases are compared with observations made by satellites in the earth's magnetosphere. It is concluded that the electrostatic gyroharmonic excitation is possible without the cold composition of plasma which is often postulated in the existing literature.

  8. Evaluation of Electromagnetic Fields in a Hospital for Safe Use of Electronic Medical Equipment.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kai; Fujioka, Tomomi; Endo, Tetsuo; Hosokawa, Ren; Fujisaki, Tetsushi; Yoshino, Ryoji; Hirose, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Establishment of electromagnetic compatibility is important in use of electronic medical equipment in hospitals. To evaluate the electromagnetic environment, the electric field intensity induced by electromagnetic radiation in broadcasting spectra coming from outside the hospital was measured in a new hospital building before any patients visited the hospital and 6 months after the opening of the hospital. Various incoming radio waves were detected on the upper floors, with no significant difference in measured levels before and after opening of the hospital. There were no cellphone terminal signals before the hospital opened, but these signals were strongly detected at 6 months thereafter. Cellphone base stations signals were strongly detected on the upper floors, but there were no signals at most locations in the basement and in the center of the building on the lower floors. A maximum electrical intensity of 0.28 V/m from cellphone base stations (2.1 GHz) was detected at the south end of the 2nd floor before the hospital opened. This value is lower than the EMC marginal value for general electronic medical equipment specified in IEC 60601-1-2 (3 V/m). Therefore, electromagnetic interference with electronic medical equipment is unlikely in this situation. However, cellphone terminal signals were frequently detected in non-base station signal areas. This is a concern, and understanding signal strength from cellphone base stations at a hospital is important for promotion of greater safety. PMID:26643076

  9. Single pass electron beam cooling of gold ions between EBIS LINAC and booster is theoretically possible!

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.

    2011-01-01

    Electron beam cooling is examined as an option to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster. Electron beam parameters are based on experimental data (obtained at BNL) of electron beams extracted from a plasma cathode. Many issues, regarding a low energy high current electron beam that is needed for electron beam cooling to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster, were examined. Computations and some experimental data indicate that none of these issues is a show stopper. Preliminary calculations indicate that single pass cooling is feasible; momentum spread can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude in about one meter. Hence, this option cooling deserves further more serious considerations.

  10. SRF photoinjector for proof-of-principle experiment of coherent electron cooling at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kayran D.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; et al

    2012-05-20

    Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC) based on Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifier promises to be a very good way to cool protons and ions at high energies. A proof of principle experiment to demonstrate cooling at 40 GeV/u is under construction at BNL. One of possible sources to provide sufficient quality electron beam for this experiment is a SRF photoinjector. In this paper we discuss design and simulated performance of the photoinjector based on existing 112 MHz SRF gun and newly designed single-cavity SRF linac operating at 704 MHz.

  11. Inhibition of electron thermal conduction by electromagnetic instabilities. [in stellar coronas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, Amir; Eichler, David

    1992-01-01

    Heat flux inhibition by electromagnetic instabilities in a hot magnetized plasma is investigated. Low-frequency electromagnetic waves become unstable due to anisotropy of the electron distribution function. The chaotic magnetic field thus generated scatters the electrons with a specific effective mean free path. Saturation of the instability due to wave-wave interaction, nonlinear scattering, wave propagation, and collisional damping is considered. The effective mean free path is found self-consistently, using a simple model to estimate saturation level and scattering, and is shown to decrease with the temperature gradient length. The results, limited to the assumptions of the model, are applied to astrophysical systems. For some interstellar clouds the instability is found to be important. Collisional damping stabilizes the plasma, and the heat conduction can be dominated by superthermal electrons.

  12. Production of flickering aurora and field-aligned electron flux by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temerin, M.; Mcfadden, J.; Boehm, M.; Carlson, C. W.; Lotko, W.

    1986-01-01

    Recent observations have suggested that flickering aurora is produced by a modulation of the field-aligned component of the electron flux within an auroral arc. It is proposed that a portion of the field-aligned electrons are of ionospheric origin and that these electrons are accelerated and their flux modulated by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves that occur below the main acceleration region on auroral arc field lines. A model of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave shows that the parallel phase velocity of the wave increase as the wave propagates toward the ionosphere. A test particle calculation shows that ionospheric electrons trapped or reflected by the wave are accelerated to energies of several keV and that their flux is modulated at the wave frequency. The relative amplitudes of the model wave electric fields are consistent with the observations of small-scale low-frequency ionospheric and magnetospheric electric fields near auroral arcs of approximately 10 mV/m and 100 mV/m, respectively. The large-amplitude ion cyclotron waves also produce a ponderomotive force and a self-consistent ambipolar electric field. Energy considerations show that the downward energy flux in the electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave can be several percent of the total downward auroral electron energy flux.

  13. Electromagnetic solitary structures in dense electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Hussain, S.; Rizvi, H.; Mushtaq, A.; Ayub, M.

    2010-12-01

    The linear and nonlinear propagation characteristics of low-frequency obliquely propagating magnetoacoustic waves in dense electron-positron-ion magnetoplasmas are studied in this paper by using the quantum magnetohydrodynamic (QMHD) model. A quantum Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation is derived by using the reductive perturbation technique. The dependence of the fast and slow magnetoacoustic solitary waves on the positron concentration, the obliqueness parameter θ and the magnetic field is also investigated. The present investigation may have relevance to dense astrophysical environments where the quantum effects are expected to dominate.

  14. A Unique Approach to Power Electronics and Motor Cooling in a Hybrid Electric Vehicle Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, Curtis William; Hsu, John S; Lowe, Kirk T; Conklin, Jim

    2007-01-01

    An innovative system for cooling the power electronics of hybrid electric vehicles is presented. This system uses a typical automotive refrigerant R-134a (1,1,1,2 tetrafluoroethane) as the cooling fluid in a system that can be used as either part of the existing vehicle passenger air conditioning system or separately and independently of the existing air conditioner. Because of the design characteristics, the cooling coefficient of performance is on the order of 40. Because liquid refrigerant is used to cool the electronics directly, high heat fluxes can result while maintaining an electronics junction temperature at an acceptable value. In addition, an inverter housing that occupies only half the volume of a conventional inverter has been designed to take advantage of this cooling system. Planned improvements should result in further volume reductions while maintaining a high power level.

  15. Modulational instability of electromagnetic electron-cyclotron wave packets in the magnetosphere with non-Maxwellian electron distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, H.; Hakimi Pajouh, H.

    2008-09-15

    The satellite observations of the magnetosphere in the low-frequency ion dynamics revealed several facts: (1) localized structures for electric field signal parallel to the magnetic field; (2) anisotropy for the electron velocity distribution such that T{sub perpendicular}<electrons. Based on these evidences, a nonlinear model is presented to develop the electromagnetic electron-cyclotron (EMEC) theory to the non-Maxwellian plasmas. Then, the modulational instability analysis of EMEC waves is investigated.

  16. Cyclotron-undulator cooling of a free-electron-laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Bandurkin, I. V.; Kuzikov, S. V.; Savilov, A. V.

    2014-08-18

    We propose methods of fast cooling of an electron beam, which are based on wiggling of particles in an undulator in the presence of an axial magnetic field. We use a strong dependence of the axial electron velocity on the oscillatory velocity, when the electron cyclotron frequency is close to the frequency of electron wiggling in the undulator field. The abnormal character of this dependence (when the oscillatory velocity increases with the increase of the input axial velocity) can be a basis of various methods for fast cooling of moderately relativistic (several MeV) electron beams.

  17. 3D electromagnetic simulation of spatial autoresonance acceleration of electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugar-Zhabon, V. D.; González, J. D.; Orozco, E. A.

    2016-02-01

    The results of full electromagnetic simulations of the electron beam acceleration by a TE 112 linear polarized electromagnetic field through Space Autoresonance Acceleration mechanism are presented. In the simulations, both the self-sustaned electric field and selfsustained magnetic field produced by the beam electrons are included into the elaborated 3D Particle in Cell code. In this system, the space profile of the magnetostatic field maintains the electron beams in the acceleration regime along their trajectories. The beam current density evolution is calculated applying the charge conservation method. The full magnetic field in the superparticle positions is found by employing the trilinear interpolation of the mesh node data. The relativistic Newton-Lorentz equation presented in the centered finite difference form is solved using the Boris algorithm that provides visualization of the beam electrons pathway and energy evolution. A comparison between the data obtained from the full electromagnetic simulations and the results derived from the motion equation depicted in an electrostatic approximation is carried out. It is found that the self-sustained magnetic field is a factor which improves the resonance phase conditions and reduces the beam energy spread.

  18. Experimental search for the electron electric dipole moment with laser cooled francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Kawamura, H.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Asahi, K.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Yoshimi, A.; Sakemi, Y.

    2015-04-01

    A laser cooled heavy atom is one of the candidates to search for the permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron due to the enhancement mechanism and its long coherence time. The laser cooled francium (Fr) factory has been constructed to perform the electron EDM search at the Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The present status of Fr production and the EDM measurement system is presented.

  19. Kinetic Electron Closures for Electromagnetic Simulation of Drift and Shear-Alfven Waves (II)

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B I; Dimits, A M; Nevins, W M; Chen, Y; Parker, S

    2001-10-11

    An electromagnetic hybrid scheme (fluid electrons and gyrokinetic ions) is elaborated in example calculations and extended to toroidal geometry. The scheme includes a kinetic electron closure valid for {beta}{sub e} > m{sub e}/m{sub i} ({beta}{sub e} is the ratio of the plasma electron pressure to the magnetic field energy density). The new scheme incorporates partially linearized ({delta}f) drift-kinetic electrons whose pressure and number density moments are used to close the fluid momentum equation for the electron fluid (Ohm's law). The test cases used are small-amplitude kinetic shear-Alfven waves with electron Landau damping, the ion-temperature-gradient instability, and the collisionless drift instability (universal mode) in an unsheared slab as a function of the plasma {beta}{sub e}. Attention is given to resolution and convergence issues in simulations of turbulent steady states.

  20. Stability of relativistic electron trapping by strong whistler or electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Mourenas, D.; Agapitov, O. V.; Vainchtein, D. L.; Mozer, F. S.; Krasnoselskikh, V.

    2015-08-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the trapping of relativistic electrons by intense whistler-mode waves or electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the Earth's radiation belts. We consider the non-resonant impact of additional, lower amplitude magnetic field fluctuations on the stability of electron trapping. We show that such additional non-resonant fluctuations can break the adiabatic invariant corresponding to trapped electron oscillations in the effective wave potential. This destruction results in a diffusive escape of electrons from the trapped regime of motion and thus can lead to a significant reduction of the efficiency of electron acceleration. We demonstrate that when energetic electrons are trapped by intense parallel or very oblique whistler-mode waves, non-resonant magnetic field fluctuations in the whistler-mode frequency range with moderate amplitudes around 3 -15 pT (much less intense than the primary waves) can totally disrupt the trapped motion. However, the trapping of relativistic electrons by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves is noticeably more stable. We also discuss how the proposed approach can be used to estimate the effects of wave amplitude modulations on the motion of trapped particles.

  1. High-Current ERL-Based Electron Cooling System for RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2006-03-01

    The design of an electron cooler must take into account both electron beam dynamics issues as well as the electron cooling physics. Research towards high-energy electron cooling of RHIC is in its 3rd year at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The luminosity upgrade of RHIC calls for electron cooling of various stored ion beams, such as 100 GeV/A gold ions at collision energies. The necessary electron energy of 54 MeV is clearly out of reach for DC accelerator system of any kind. The high energy also necessitates a bunched beam, with a high electron bunch charge, low emittance and small energy spread. The Collider-Accelerator Department adopted the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) for generating the high-current, high-energy and high-quality electron beam. The RHIC electron cooler ERL will use four Superconducting RF (SRF) 5-cell cavities, designed to operate at ampere-class average currents with high bunch charges. The electron source will be a superconducting, 705.75 MHz laser-photocathode RF gun, followed up by a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). An R&D ERL is under construction to demonstrate the ERL at the unprecedented average current of 0.5 amperes. Beam dynamics performance and luminosity enhancement are described for the case of magnetized and non-magnetized electron cooling of RHIC.

  2. High-Current ERL-Based Electron Cooling System for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2006-03-20

    The design of an electron cooler must take into account both electron beam dynamics issues as well as the electron cooling physics. Research towards high-energy electron cooling of RHIC is in its 3rd year at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The luminosity upgrade of RHIC calls for electron cooling of various stored ion beams, such as 100 GeV/A gold ions at collision energies. The necessary electron energy of 54 MeV is clearly out of reach for DC accelerator system of any kind. The high energy also necessitates a bunched beam, with a high electron bunch charge, low emittance and small energy spread. The Collider-Accelerator Department adopted the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) for generating the high-current, high-energy and high-quality electron beam. The RHIC electron cooler ERL will use four Superconducting RF (SRF) 5-cell cavities, designed to operate at ampere-class average currents with high bunch charges. The electron source will be a superconducting, 705.75 MHz laser-photocathode RF gun, followed up by a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). An R and D ERL is under construction to demonstrate the ERL at the unprecedented average current of 0.5 amperes. Beam dynamics performance and luminosity enhancement are described for the case of magnetized and non-magnetized electron cooling of RHIC.

  3. Evidence of local power deposition and electron heating by a standing electromagnetic wave in electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma.

    PubMed

    Durocher-Jean, A; Stafford, L; Dap, S; Makasheva, K; Clergereaux, R

    2014-09-01

    Microwave plasmas excited at electron-cyclotron resonance were studied in the 0.5-15 mTorr pressure range. In contrast with low-limit pressure conditions where the plasma emission highlights a fairly homogeneous spatial structure, a periodic spatial modulation (period ∼6.2 cm) appeared as pressure increased. This feature is ascribed to a local power deposition (related to the electron density) due to the presence of a standing electromagnetic wave created by the feed electromagnetic field (2.45 GHz) in the cavity formed by the reactor walls. Analysis of the electron energy probability function by Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy further revealed the presence of a high-energy tail that showed strong periodic spatial modulation at higher pressure. The spatial evolution of the electron density and of the characteristic temperature of these high-energy electrons coincides with the nodes (maximum) and antinodes (minimum) of the standing wave. These spatially-modulated power deposition and electron heating mechanisms are then discussed. PMID:25314546

  4. New fine structure cooling rate. [electron impact transitions in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    One of the dominant electron cooling processes in the ionosphere is caused by electron impact induced fine structure transitions among the ground state levels of atomic oxygen. This fine structure cooling rate is based on theoretical cross sections. Recent advances in the numerical cross section determinations to include polarization effects and more accurate representations of the atomic target result in new lower values. These cross sections are employed in this paper to derive a new fine structure cooling rate which is between 40% and 60% of the currently used rate. A new generalized formula is presented for the cooling rate (from which the fine structure cooling rate is derived), valid for arbitrary mass and temperature difference of the colliding particles and arbitrary inelastic energy difference.

  5. Combined Laser and Electron Cooling of Bunched C3+ Ion Beams at the Storage Ring ESR

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, U.; Bussmann, M.; Habs, D.; Kuehl, T.; Beller, P.; Franzke, B.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Saathoff, G.; Reinhardt, S.; Karpuk, S.

    2006-03-20

    We report on first laser cooling studies of bunched beams of triply charged carbon ions stored at an energy of 1.46 GeV at the ESR (GSI). Despite for the high beam energy and charge state laser cooling provided a reduction of the momentum spread of one order of magnitude in space-charge dominated bunches as compared to electron cooling. For ion currents exceeding 10 {mu}A intra-beam-scattering losses could not be compensated by the narrow band laser system presently in use. Yet, no unexpected problems occurred encouraging the envisaged extension of the laser cooling to highly relativistic beams. At ESR, especially the combination with modest electron cooling provided three-dimensionally cold beams in the plasma parameter range of unity, where ordering effects can be expected and a still unexplained signal reduction of the Schottky signal is observed.

  6. Sub-50-mK Electronic Cooling with Large-Area Superconducting Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H. Q.; Meschke, M.; Courtois, H.; Pekola, J. P.

    2014-11-01

    In electronic cooling with superconducting tunnel junctions, the cooling power is counterbalanced by the interaction with phonons and by the heat flow from the overheated leads. We study aluminum-based coolers that are equipped with a suspended normal metal and an efficient quasiparticle drain. At intermediate temperatures, the phonon bath of the suspended normal metal is cooled. By adjusting the junction transparency, we control the injection current and, thus, the temperature of the superconducting lead at the optimum cooling point. The best device shows remarkable cooling from 150 mK down to about 30 mK, a factor of 5 in temperature at a power of 40 pW. We discuss heat transport in our device and the reasons for cooling saturation at the low-temperature end.

  7. The integration of liquid cryogen cooling and cryocoolers withsuperconducting electronic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-07-09

    The need for cryogenic cooling has been a critical issuethat has kept superconducting electronic devices from reaching the marketplace. Even though the performance of many of the superconductingcircuits is superior to silicon electronics, the requirement forcryogenic cooling has put the superconducting devices at a seriousdisadvantage. This report discusses the process of refrigeratingsuperconducting devices with cryogenic liquids and small cryocoolers.Three types of cryocoolers are compared for vibration, efficiency, andreliability. The connection of a cryocooler to the load is discussed. Acomparison of using flexible copper straps to carry the heat load andusing heat pipe is shown. The type of instrumentation needed formonitoring and controlling the cooling is discussed.

  8. One-dimenssional electromagnetic simulation of multiple electron beams propagating in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, F. J. R.; Alves, M. V.; Gaelzer, R.

    2010-06-01

    It is by now well known that electron beams play an important role in generating radio emissions such as type II and type III radio bursts, commonly observed by spacecraft in the interplanetary medium. Electron beams streaming back from Earth's bow shock into the solar wind have been proposed as a possible source for the electron plasma waves observed by spacecraft in the electron foreshock. Recent observations suggest that during the natural evolution of the foreshock plasma, multiple electron beams could be injected over a period of time, losing their individual identity to coalesce into a single beam. In this work, we use an electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code “KEMPO 1D, adapted” to simulate two electron beams that are injected into a plasma at different times. The first beam disturbs the background plasma and generates Langmuir waves by electron beam-plasma interaction. Subsequently, another beam is inserted into the system and interacts with the first one and with the driven Langmuir waves to produce electromagnetic radiation. The results of our simulation show that the first beam can produce electrostatic harmonics of the plasma frequency, while the second beam intensifies the emission at the harmonics that is produced by the first one. The behavior of the second beam is strongly determined by the preexisting Langmuir wave electric fields. The simulations also show, as a result of the interaction between both beams, a clear nonlinear frequency shift of the harmonic modes as well as an increase of electromagnetic and kinetic energies of the wave-particle system.

  9. On the continuous spectrum electromagnetic radiation in electron-fullerene collision

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M.Y.

    1995-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the electromagnetic radiation spectrum in electron-fullerene collisions is dominated by a huge maximum of multielectron nature, similar to that already predicted and observed in photoabsorption. Due to coherence, the intensity of this radiation is much stronger than the sum of the intensities of isolated atoms. Experimental detection of such radiation would be of great importance for understanding the mechanism of its formation and for investigating fullerene structures. A paper describing these results was published.

  10. Comparison of Hybrid Electric Vehicle Power Electronics Cooling Options

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, M.; Bennion, K.

    2008-01-01

    This study quantifies the heat dissipation potential of three inverter package configurations over a range of control factors. These factors include coolant temperature, number of sides available for cooling, effective heat transfer coefficient, maximum semiconductor junction temperature, and interface material thermal resistance. Heat dissipation potentials are examined in contrast to a research goal to use 105..deg..C coolant and dissipate 200 W/cm2 heat across the insulated gate bipolar transistor and diode silicon area. Advanced double-sided cooling configurations with aggressive heat transfer coefficients show the possibility of meeting these targets for a 125..deg..C maximum junction temperature, but further investigation is needed. Even with maximum tolerable junction temperatures of 200..deg..C, effective heat transfer coefficients of 5,000 to 10,000 W/m2-K will be needed for coolant temperatures of 105..deg..C or higher.

  11. Use of LHP for cooling power electronic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smitka, M.; Malcho, M.; Nemec, P.; Kolková, Z.

    2013-04-01

    The paper deals with use of cooling equipment build on basis two phase thermosyphon loop. This device belongs to a group of loop heat pipe (LHP). This LHP is a two-phase device with extremely high effective thermal conductivity that utilizes the thermodynamic pressure difference to circulate fluid. It was invented in Russia in the early 1980´s. Thermosyphon loop is similar as LHP but it doesn't contain wick and circulation of the fluid using gravitation force instead of capillary pressure as it is in LHP. The work deals with the cooling insulated gate bipolar transistor with 370 W. The paper describes the course of the heat dissipation using ribbed cooler for natural convection and using fin for forced convection. The results are compared with heat dissipation through thermosyphon loop.

  12. Recycler Electron Cooling Project: Mechanical vibrations in the Pelletron and their effect on the beam

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakevich, Grigory M.; Burov, A.; Boffo, C.; Joireman, P.; Saewert, G.; Schmidt, C.W.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    The Fermilab's Recycler ring will employ an electron cooler to cool stored 8.9 GeV antiprotons [1]. The cooler is based on an electrostatic accelerator, Pelletron [2], working in an energy-recovery regime. A full-scale prototype of the cooler has been assembled and commissioned in a separate building [3]. The main goal of the experiments with the prototype was to demonstrate stable operation with a 3.5 MeV, 0.5 A DC electron beam while preserving a high beam quality in the cooling section. The quality is characterized, first of all, by a spread of electron velocities in the cooling section, which may be significantly affected by mechanical vibration of the Pelletron elements. This paper describes the results of vibration measurements in the Pelletron terminal and correlates them with the beam motion in the cooling section.

  13. Proton cooling in ultracold low-density electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, A. A.; Bronin, S. Y.; Manykin, E. A.; Zelener, B. B.; Zelener, B. V.; Khikhlukha, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A sole proton energy loss processes in an electron gas and the dependence of these processes on temperature and magnetic field are studied using molecular dynamics techniques in present work. It appears that for electron temperatures less than 100 K many body collisions affect the proton energy loss and these collisions must be taken into account. The influence of a strong magnetic field on the relaxation processes is also considered in this work. Calculations were performed for electron densities 10 cm-3, magnetic field 1-3 Tesla, electron temperatures 10-50 K, initial proton energies 100-10000 K.

  14. Final Report for 'ParSEC-Parallel Simulation of Electron Cooling"

    SciTech Connect

    David L Bruhwiler

    2005-09-16

    The Department of Energy has plans, during the next two or three years, to design an electron cooling section for the collider ring at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) [1]. Located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), RHIC is the premier nuclear physics facility. The new cooling section would be part of a proposed luminosity upgrade [2] for RHIC. This electron cooling section will be different from previous electron cooling facilities in three fundamental ways. First, the electron energy will be 50 MeV, as opposed to 100's of keV (or 4 MeV for the electron cooling system now operating at Fermilab [3]). Second, both the electron beam and the ion beam will be bunched, rather than being essentially continuous. Third, the cooling will take place in a collider rather than in a storage ring. Analytical work, in combination with the use and further development of the semi-analytical codes BETACOOL [4,5] and SimCool [6,7] are being pursued at BNL [8] and at other laboratories around the world. However, there is a growing consensus in the field that high-fidelity 3-D particle simulations are required to fully understand the critical cooling physics issues in this new regime. Simulations of the friction coefficient, using the VORPAL code [9], for single gold ions passing once through the interaction region, have been compared with theoretical calculations [10,11], and the results have been presented in conference proceedings papers [8,12,13,14] and presentations [15,16,17]. Charged particles are advanced using a fourth-order Hermite predictor corrector algorithm [18]. The fields in the beam frame are obtained from direct calculation of Coulomb's law, which is more efficient than multipole-type algorithms for less than {approx} 10{sup 6} particles. Because the interaction time is so short, it is necessary to suppress the diffusive aspect of the ion dynamics through the careful use of positrons in the simulations, and to run 100's of simulations with the same

  15. Materials selection for electronic enclosures in space environment considering electromagnetic interference effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayazbakhsh, K.; Abedian, A.

    2012-02-01

    Using low power electronic devices for space applications to reduce the mass and energy consumption has lead to electromagnetic interference (EMI) problem. Electronic enclosures are used to shield electronic devices against EMI. In the past, electromagnetic shielding has been mainly the only criteria considered in electronic enclosure design. However, there are several structural and thermal requirements for selection of shielding materials which should also be taken into account. In this research work, three quantitative materials selection methods, i.e. Digital Logic (DL), Modified Digital Logic (MDL), and Z-transformation, are employed to select the best material from among a list of candidate materials. Composite and metallic electronic enclosures are explored and the best material is selected. Z-transformation method is applicable to both of the considered case studies while DL and MDL can only be used for solving one of them. Z-transformation method ranks aluminum as the first choice among various metallic materials. The wide range of Z-transformation application and its practical results confirm the superiority of Z-transformation method over DL and MDL methods.

  16. Hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for scavenging biomechanical energy for sustainably powering wearable electronics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kewei; Wang, Xue; Yang, Ya; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-01

    We report a hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for highly efficient scavenging of biomechanical energy to sustainably power wearable electronics by human walking. Based on the effective conjunction of triboelectrification and electromagnetic induction, the hybridized nanogenerator, with dimensions of 5 cm × 5 cm × 2.5 cm and a light weight of 60 g, integrates a triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) that can deliver a peak output power of 4.9 mW under a loading resistance of 6 MΩ and an electromagnetic generator (EMG) that can deliver a peak output power of 3.5 mW under a loading resistance of 2 kΩ. The hybridized nanogenerator exhibits a good stability for the output performance and a much better charging performance than that of an individual energy-harvesting unit (TENG or EMG). Furthermore, the hybridized nanogenerator integrated in a commercial shoe has been utilized to harvest biomechanical energy induced by human walking to directly light up tens of light-emitting diodes in the shoe and sustainably power a smart pedometer for reading the data of a walking step, distance, and energy consumption. A wireless pedometer driven by the hybrid nanogenerator can work well to send the walking data to an iPhone under the distance of 25 m. This work pushes forward a significant step toward energy harvesting from human walking and its potential applications in sustainably powering wearable electronics. PMID:25687592

  17. FEL-based coherent electron cooling for high-energy hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko,V.N.; Derbenev, Y.S.

    2008-06-23

    Cooling intense high-energy hadron beams is a major challenge in modern accelerator physics. Synchrotron radiation is too feeble and two common methods--stochastic and electron cooling--are not efficient in providing significant cooling for high energy, high intensity proton colliders. In this paper they discuss a practical scheme of Coherent Electron Cooling (CeC), which promises short cooling times (below one hour) for intense proton beams in RHIC at 250 GeV or in LHC at 7 TeV. A possibility of CeC using various microwave instabilities was discussed since 1980s. In this paper, they present first evaluation of specific CeC scheme based on capabilities of present-day accelerator technology, ERLs, and high-gain Free-Electron lasers (FELs). They discuss the principles, the main limitations of this scheme and present some predictions for Coherent Electron Cooling in RHIC and the LHC operating with ions or protons, summarized in Table 1.

  18. Electron cooling for the Fermilab recycler: Present concept and provisional parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.

    1997-09-01

    In all scenarios of the possible Tevatron upgrades, luminosity is essentially proportional to the number of antiprotons. Thus, a tenfold increase in luminosity could be achieved by putting five times more protons on the antiproton production target and gaining an additional factor of two from recycling antiprotons left over from the previous store. Stacking and storing ten times more antiprotons puts an unbearable burden on the stochastic cooling system of the existing Accumulator Ring. Thus, one is led to consider an additional stage of antiproton storage the so called Recycler Ring. Electron cooling of the 8 GeV antiprotons in the Recycler could provide an attractive way around the problems of large stacks. Such a system would look much like the IUCF proposal to cool 12 GeV protons in the SSC Medium Energy Booster. Although electron cooling has now become a routine tool in many laboratories, its use has been restricted to lower energy accelerators (< 500 MeV/nucleon). An R&D program is currently underway at Fermilab to extend electron cooling technology to the GeV range. This paper describes the electron cooling system design as well as the Recycler ring parameters required to accommodate this system.

  19. Excitation threshold of Stimulated Electromagnetic Emissions SEEs generated at pump frequency near the third electron gyroharmonic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudian, A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Scales, W.

    2012-12-01

    The High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) in Gakona, Alaska provides effective radiated powers in the megawatt range that have allowed researchers to study many non-linear effects of wave-plasma interactions. Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) is of interest to the ionospheric community for its diagnostic purposes. In recent HAARP heating experiments, it has been shown that during the Magnetized Stimulated Brillouin Scattering MSBS instability, the pumped electromagnetic wave may decay into an electromagnetic wave and a low frequency electrostatic wave (either ion acoustic IA wave or electrostatic ion cyclotron EIC wave). Using Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE) spectral features, side bands which extend above and below the pump frequency can yield significant diagnostics for the modified ionosphere. It has been shown that the IA wave frequency offsets can be used to measure electron temperature in the heated ionosphere and EIC wave offsets can be used as a sensitive method to determine the ion species by measuring ion mass using the ion gyro-frequency offset. The threshold of each emission line has been measured by changing the amplitude of pump wave. The experimental results aimed to show the threshold for transmitter power to excite IA wave propagating along the magnetic field lines as well as for EIC wave excited at an oblique angle relative to the background magnetic field. Another parametric decay instability studied is the ion Bernstein decay instability that has been attributed to the simultaneous parametric decay of electron Bernstein waves into multiple electron Bernstein and ion Bernstein waves. The SIB process is thought to involve mode conversion from EM to EB waves followed by parametric decay of the EB wave to multiple EB and IB waves. The parametric decay instability of ion Bernstein modes has been observed simultaneously for the first time at the third electron gyroharmonics during 2011 Summer Student Research

  20. Proof-of-Principle Experiment for FEL-based Coherent Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V; Bengtsson, J; Fedotov, A V; Hao, Y; Kayran, D; Mahler, G J; Meng, W; Roser, T; Sheehy, B; Than, R; Tuozzolo, J E; Wang, G; Webb, S D; Yakimenko, V; Bell, G I; Bruhwiler, D L; Schwartz, B T; Hutton, A; Krafft, G A; Poelker, M

    2011-03-01

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron-hadron and electron-hadron colliders*. In a CEC system, a hadron beam interacts with a cooling electron beam. A perturbation of the electron density caused by ions is amplified and fed back to the ions to reduce the energy spread and the emittance of the ion beam. To demonstrate the feasibility of CEC we propose a proof-of-principle experiment at RHIC using one of JLab’s SRF cryo-modules. In this paper, we describe the experimental setup for CeC installed into one of RHIC's interaction regions. We present results of analytical estimates and results of initial simulations of cooling a gold-ion beam at 40 GeV/u energy via CeC.

  1. Hybrid two-dimensional electron transport in self-consistent electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.J.; Cranfill, C.W.

    1986-02-01

    The paper outlines features of the implicit hybrid simulation code ANTHEM, which uniquely provides histories for the transport and deposition of suprathermal and thermal electrons in laser-produced plasmas. The code models two-dimensional electron transport through steep density gradients and across contiguous collisional and collisionless target regions with the plasma dynamics dominated by self-consistent EPSILON and BETA fields. ANTHEM employs separate Eulerian fluid ion and thermal electron treatments and models suprathermal electrons as either a third fluid or as a set of collisional particle-in-cell (PIC) particles. The authors outline new techniques required to obtain implicit electromagnetic fields in two spatial dimensions permitting time steps well in excess of the local plasma period. A new implicit scattering model is discussed. The utility of our approach is demonstrated with sample applications to collisional surface transport on foil targets.

  2. Two-dimensional electromagnetic Child-Langmuir law of a short-pulse electron flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. H.; Tai, L. C.; Liu, Y. L.; Ang, L. K.; Koh, W. S.

    2011-02-15

    Two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations were performed to study the effect of the displacement current and the self-magnetic field on the space charge limited current density or the Child-Langmuir law of a short-pulse electron flow with a propagation distance of {zeta} and an emitting width of W from the classical regime to the relativistic regime. Numerical scaling of the two-dimensional electromagnetic Child-Langmuir law was constructed and it scales with ({zeta}/W) and ({zeta}/W){sup 2} at the classical and relativistic regimes, respectively. Our findings reveal that the displacement current can considerably enhance the space charge limited current density as compared to the well-known two-dimensional electrostatic Child-Langmuir law even at the classical regime.

  3. Simulations of electromagnetic emissions produced in a thin plasma by a continuously injected electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annenkov, V. V.; Timofeev, I. V.; Volchok, E. P.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, electromagnetic emissions produced in a thin beam-plasma system are studied using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. For the first time, the problem of emission generation in such a system is considered in a realistic formulation allowing for the continuous injection of a relativistic electron beam through a plasma boundary. Specific attention is given to the thin plasma case in which the transverse plasma size is comparable to the typical wavelength of beam-driven oscillations. Such a case is often implemented in laboratory beam-plasma experiments and has a number of peculiarities. Emission from a thin plasma does not require intermediate generation of the electromagnetic plasma eigenmodes, as in an infinite case, and is more similar to the regular antenna radiation. In this work, we determine how efficiently the fundamental and the second harmonic emissions can be generated in previously modulated and initially homogeneous plasmas.

  4. Control of spin dynamics in a two-dimensional electron gas by electromagnetic dressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervishko, A. A.; Kibis, O. V.; Morina, S.; Shelykh, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    We solved the Schrödinger problem for a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) with the Rashba spin-orbit interaction in the presence of a strong high-frequency electromagnetic field (dressing field). The found eigenfunctions and eigenenergies of the problem are used to describe the spin dynamics of the dressed 2DEG within the formalism of the density matrix response function. Solving the equations of spin dynamics, we show that the dressing field can switch the spin relaxation in the 2DEG between the cases corresponding to the known Elliott-Yafet and D'yakonov-Perel' regimes. As a result, the spin properties of the 2DEG can be tuned by a high-frequency electromagnetic field. The present effect opens an unexplored way for controlling the spin with light and, therefore, forms the physical prerequisites for creating light-tuned spintronics devices.

  5. Metamorphic materials: bulk electromagnetic transitions realized in electronically reconfigurable composite media.

    PubMed

    Kyriazidou, Chryssoula A; Contopanagos, Harry F; Alexopoulos, Nicolaos G

    2006-11-01

    We present what we believe is a new class of composite electromagnetic materials characterized by the concept of metamorphism, which we define in general terms. Metamorphic materials exhibit bulk electromagnetic transitions among states characterized by distinct ranges of values of their reflection coefficient. Each such state has unique physical properties induced by the corresponding values of the reflection coefficient. We present a variety of physical realizations of the concept of metamorphic materials in microwave frequencies, showing with specific metallodielectric designs how transitions among metamorphic states can be obtained at the same frequency, for fixed material geometries, by electronic reconfigurability. We further show how a given material exhibiting certain metamorphic states at a given frequency can transform into a different combination of metamorphic states at different frequencies; i.e., metamorphic materials have a useful dispersive degree of freedom. PMID:17047724

  6. A practical procedure to prevent electromagnetic interference with electronic medical equipment.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Eisuke; Takano, Kyoko; Antoku, Yasuaki; Matsumura, Kouji; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Nose, Yoshiaki

    2002-02-01

    Problems involving electromagnetic interference (EMI) with electronic medical equipment are well-documented. However, no systematic investigation of EMI has been done. We have systematically investigated the causes of EMI. The factors involved in EMI were determined as follows: 1) Electric-field intensity induced by invasive radio waves from outside a hospital. 2) Residual magnetic-flux density at welding points in a building. 3) Electric-field intensity induced by conveyance systems with a linear motor. 4) The shielding capacity of hospital walls. 5) The shielding capacity of commercial shields against a wide range frequency radio waves. 6) The immunity of electronic medical equipment. 7) EMI by cellular telephone and personal handy-phone system handsets. From the results of our investigation, we developed a following practical procedure to prevent EMI. 1) Measurement of electric-field intensity induced by invasive radio waves from outside the hospital and industrial systems in the hospital. 2) Measurement of residual magnetic-flux density at electric welding points of hospital buildings with steel frame structures. 3) Control of the electromagnetic environment by utilizing the shielding capacity of walls. 4) Measurement of the immunity of electronic medical equipment. And 5) Installation of electronic gate equipment at the building entrance to screen for handsets. PMID:11777312

  7. Electronic cooling via interlayer Coulomb coupling in multilayer epitaxial graphene

    PubMed Central

    Mihnev, Momchil T.; Tolsma, John R.; Divin, Charles J.; Sun, Dong; Asgari, Reza; Polini, Marco; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walt A.; MacDonald, Allan H.; Norris, Theodore B.

    2015-01-01

    In van der Waals bonded or rotationally disordered multilayer stacks of two-dimensional (2D) materials, the electronic states remain tightly confined within individual 2D layers. As a result, electron–phonon interactions occur primarily within layers and interlayer electrical conductivities are low. In addition, strong covalent in-plane intralayer bonding combined with weak van der Waals interlayer bonding results in weak phonon-mediated thermal coupling between the layers. We demonstrate here, however, that Coulomb interactions between electrons in different layers of multilayer epitaxial graphene provide an important mechanism for interlayer thermal transport, even though all electronic states are strongly confined within individual 2D layers. This effect is manifested in the relaxation dynamics of hot carriers in ultrafast time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. We develop a theory of interlayer Coulomb coupling containing no free parameters that accounts for the experimentally observed trends in hot-carrier dynamics as temperature and the number of layers is varied. PMID:26399955

  8. The Hopf's limiting cycle -- A method to measure the electron cooling force

    SciTech Connect

    King-Yuen Ng

    2002-09-30

    The longitudinal phase space structure of protons in the presence of an electron drag force is studied. Depending on the relative difference in average proton velocity and electron velocity, the fixed point near the center of the phase space can be stable or unstable. When it is unstable, a stable Hopf's limit cycle exists. By measuring the appearance and size of the Hopf's limit cycle, the electron cooling force can be deduced.

  9. Electron kinetic effects in atmosphere breakdown by an intense electromagnetic pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovyev, A. A.; Terekhin, V. A.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Altgilbers, L. L.

    1999-12-01

    A physical model is proposed for description of electron kinetics driven by a powerful electromagnetic pulse in the Earth's atmosphere. The model is based on a numerical solution to the Boltzmann kinetic equation for two groups of electrons. Slow electrons (with energies below a few keV) are described in a two-term approximation assuming a weak anisotropy of the electron distribution function. Fast electrons (with energies above a few keV) are described by a modified macroparticle method, taking into account the electron acceleration in the electric field, energy losses in the continuous deceleration approximation, and the multiple pitch angle scattering. The model is applied to a problem of the electric discharge in a nitrogen, which is preionized by an external gamma-ray source. It is shown that the runaway electrons have an important effect on the energy distribution of free electrons, and on the avalanche ionization rate. This mechanism might explain the observation of multiple lightning discharges observed in the Ivy-Mike thermonuclear test in the early 1950's.

  10. Zitterbewegung, internal momentum and spin of the circular travelling-wave electromagnetic model electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asif, Malik Mohammad; Khan, Salman

    2016-02-01

    This study demonstrates that an electron, going round, with tangential velocity c , in a circle of radius equal to half the reduced Compton wavelength of the electron, has Dirac-delta-like internal momentum (u,overrightarrow{p}_{θ}). The circular momentum overrightarrow{p}_{θ} and energy u emanate from the circular Dirac-delta-type rotating monochromatic electromagnetic (EM) wave, which travels itself in another circle having radius equal to the reduced Compton wavelength of the electron. The phenomenon of Zitterbewegung and the spin of the electron are natural consequences of the model. The spin is associated with the internal circulating momentum of the electron in terms of a four-component spinor, which leads to the Dirac equation linking the EM electron model with quantum-mechanical theory. Our model accurately explains the experimental results of the electron channelling experiment (P. Catillon et al., Found. Phys. 38, 659 (2008)), in which the momentum resonance is observed at 161.784MeV/ c corresponding to a Zitterbewegung frequency of 80.874MeV/ c electron beam.

  11. Electron kinetic effects in atmosphere breakdown by an intense electromagnetic pulse.

    PubMed

    Solovyev, A A; Terekhin, V A; Tikhonchuk, V T; Altgilbers, L L

    1999-12-01

    A physical model is proposed for description of electron kinetics driven by a powerful electromagnetic pulse in the Earth's atmosphere. The model is based on a numerical solution to the Boltzmann kinetic equation for two groups of electrons. Slow electrons (with energies below a few keV) are described in a two-term approximation assuming a weak anisotropy of the electron distribution function. Fast electrons (with energies above a few keV) are described by a modified macroparticle method, taking into account the electron acceleration in the electric field, energy losses in the continuous deceleration approximation, and the multiple pitch angle scattering. The model is applied to a problem of the electric discharge in a nitrogen, which is preionized by an external gamma-ray source. It is shown that the runaway electrons have an important effect on the energy distribution of free electrons, and on the avalanche ionization rate. This mechanism might explain the observation of multiple lightning discharges observed in the Ivy-Mike thermonuclear test in the early 1950's. PMID:11970682

  12. Enhancement in Cooling of Electronic Components by Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatak, Pankaj; Jakhar, Rahul; Kumar, Mahesh

    2015-04-01

    In this study, heat transfer during spray cooling was studied experimentally using water and ZnO nanofluid. Various experiments were performed using a spray nozzle impinging fluid normal to the flat end of a copper heated surface (copper cylinder 20 mm diameter). The heat flux and surface temperature have been calculated by measuring temperature gradients along the target length under steady state conditions. In this experimental study, water flow rate was varied from 15 to 25 ml/min. In the same test conditions to compare water results with nanofluids, ZnO nanofluid was sprayed at a flow rate of 20 ml/min. It can be observed that a surface temperature 74.1 °C was obtained with maximum heat flux of 102.40 W/cm2 under the test condition for heater power 140 W and a water flow rate 25 ml/min. The use of ZnO nanofluid as a coolant is observed to increase the heat flux by about 20.2 % and decrease surface temperature of the test specimen by about 15 % at 180 W heat input and flow rate of 20 ml/min. The uncertainty in heat flux is observed to vary from 8.63 to 10.93 %.

  13. Perpendicular propagating electromagnetic envelope solitons in electron-positron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jehan, Nusrat; Salahuddin, M.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2010-05-15

    The nonlinear amplitude modulation of electromagnetic waves propagating perpendicular to the direction of ambient magnetic field in a uniform collisionless magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma is studied. The Krylov-Bogoliubov-Mitropolsky perturbation method is employed to derive nonlinear Schroedinger equation, which describes the amplitude dynamics of perturbed magnetic field. The modulation instability criterion reveals that the low frequency mode is always stable, whereas the high frequency mode becomes modulationally unstable for certain ranges of wave number and positron-to-electron density ratio. Furthermore, the positron-to-electron density ratio as well as the strength of ambient magnetic field is found to have significant effect on the solitary wave solutions of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation, namely, dark and bright envelope solitons.

  14. Amplification of ultrashort electromagnetic pulses propagating along quasi-continuous electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshev, V. R.; Ginzburg, N. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Sergeev, A. S.; Rozental, R. M.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2009-01-01

    Specific features of amplification of short electromagnetic pulses propagating along steady-state nonequilibrium electron flows with a group velocity differing from the translational velocity of particles are analyzed. It is shown that an amplitude level substantially higher than the saturation level in amplification of quasi-continuous signals can be attained by permanent injection of electrons without initial modulation to one of the pulse fronts. The effective duration of the pulse being amplified is reduced simultaneously. The Cherenkov and undulator interaction mechanisms are considered. Analysis is carried out using a simple 1D model based on the averaged description of the electron-wave interaction, as well as direct numerical simulation based on the KARAT code taking into account the parameters of planned experiments on observation of this effect.

  15. Nonlinear interaction of intense electromagnetic waves with a magnetoactive electron-positron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M.; Rastbood, E.; Zeinaddini Meymand, H.; Niknam, A. R.

    2013-08-15

    The nonlinear coupling between circularly polarized electromagnetic (CPEM) waves and acoustic-like waves in a magnetoactive electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasma is studied, taking into account the relativistic motion of electrons and positrons. The possibility of modulational instability and its growth rate as well as the envelope soliton formation and its characteristics in such plasmas are investigated. It is found that the growth rate of modulation instability increases in the case that ω{sub c}/ω<1 (ω{sub c} and ω are the electron gyrofrequency and the CPEM wave frequency, respectively) and decreases in the case that ω{sub c}/ω>1. It is also shown that in a magnetoactive e-p-i plasma, the width of bright soliton increases/decreases in case of (ω{sub c}/ω)<1/(ω{sub c}/ω)>1 by increasing the magnetic field strength.

  16. Nonlinear interactions between electromagnetic waves and electron plasma oscillations in quantum plasmas.

    PubMed

    Shukla, P K; Eliasson, B

    2007-08-31

    We consider nonlinear interactions between intense circularly polarized electromagnetic (CPEM) waves and electron plasma oscillations (EPOs) in a dense quantum plasma, taking into account the electron density response in the presence of the relativistic ponderomotive force and mass increase in the CPEM wave fields. The dynamics of the CPEM waves and EPOs is governed by the two coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations and Poisson's equation. The nonlinear equations admit the modulational instability of an intense CPEM pump wave against EPOs, leading to the formation and trapping of localized CPEM wave pipes in the electron density hole that is associated with a positive potential distribution in our dense plasma. The relevance of our investigation to the next generation intense laser-solid density plasma interaction experiments is discussed. PMID:17931024

  17. Nonlinear Interactions between Electromagnetic Waves and Electron Plasma Oscillations in Quantum Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P. K.; Eliasson, B.

    2007-08-31

    We consider nonlinear interactions between intense circularly polarized electromagnetic (CPEM) waves and electron plasma oscillations (EPOs) in a dense quantum plasma, taking into account the electron density response in the presence of the relativistic ponderomotive force and mass increase in the CPEM wave fields. The dynamics of the CPEM waves and EPOs is governed by the two coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations and Poisson's equation. The nonlinear equations admit the modulational instability of an intense CPEM pump wave against EPOs, leading to the formation and trapping of localized CPEM wave pipes in the electron density hole that is associated with a positive potential distribution in our dense plasma. The relevance of our investigation to the next generation intense laser-solid density plasma interaction experiments is discussed.

  18. Propagation of ultra-intense electromagnetic waves through electron-positron-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozina, Ch.; Tsintsadze, N. L.; Jamil, M.

    2016-07-01

    A kinetic approach is used to study the propagation of ultrarelativistic (amplitude) electromagnetic waves through electron-positron-ion plasma. For our purposes, we formulate a new plasma particle distribution function in the presence of ultrarelativistically intense circularly polarized electromagnetic (EM) waves. An effective dispersion relation of constant amplitude ultrarelativistic EM wave is derived, skin depth is calculated in particular, frequency regimes and has shown numerically that the penetration depth increases with the amplitude of ultra-intense electromagnetic waves, λ s k ˜ a /1 2 , i.e., plasma will be heated more in the region of skin depth. Next, we have found that the nonlinear interaction of ultrarelativistically intense EM waves of time and space varying amplitude leads to construct kinetic nonlinear Schrödinger equation (KNSE), containing both local and non-local nonlinear terms, where nonlocal nonlinear term appears due to density perturbations of plasma species. Taking the effects of the latter into consideration, nonlinear Landau damping is discussed for KNSE, damping rate is computed, and numerically ultrarelativistic EM waves are shown to decay exponentially. The present results should be helpful to understand the specific properties of the ultrarelativistic EM waves in astrophysical plasmas, e.g., pulsars, black holes, and neutron stars.

  19. Femtosecond cooling of hot electrons in CdSe quantum-well platelets.

    PubMed

    Sippel, Philipp; Albrecht, Wiebke; van der Bok, Johanna C; Van Dijk-Moes, Relinde J A; Hannappel, Thomas; Eichberger, Rainer; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Semiconductor quantum wells are ubiquitous in high-performance optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and lasers. Understanding and controlling of the (hot) carrier dynamics is essential to optimize their performance. Here, we study hot electron cooling in colloidal CdSe quantum-well nanoplatelets using ultrafast two-photon photoemission spectroscopy at low excitation intensities, resulting typically in 1-5 hot electrons per platelet. We observe initial electron cooling in the femtosecond time domain that slows down with decreasing electron energy and is finished within 2 ps. The cooling is considerably faster at cryogenic temperatures than at room temperature, and at least for the systems that we studied, independent of the thickness of the platelets (here 3-5 CdSe units) and the presence of a CdS shell. The cooling rates that we observe are orders of magnitude faster than reported for similar CdSe platelets under strong excitation. Our results are understood by a classic cooling mechanism with emission of longitudinal optical phonons without a significant influence of the surface. PMID:25764379

  20. Nonlinear electromagnetic perturbations in a degenerate ultrarelativistic electron-positron plasma.

    PubMed

    El-Taibany, W F; Mamun, A A

    2012-02-01

    Nonlinear propagation of fast and slow magnetosonic perturbation modes in an ultrarelativistic, ultracold, degenerate (extremely dense) electron positron (EP) plasma (containing ultrarelativistic, ultracold, degenerate electron and positron fluids) has been investigated by the reductive perturbation method. The Alfvén wave velocity is modified due to the presence of the enthalpy correction in the fluid equations of motion. The degenerate EP plasma system (under consideration) supports the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) solitons, which are associated with either fast or slow magnetosonic perturbation modes. It is found that the ultrarelativistic model leads to compressive (rarefactive) electromagnetic solitons corresponding to the fast (slow) wave mode. There are certain critical angles, θ(c), at which no soliton solution is found corresponding to the fast wave mode. For the slow mode, the magnetic-field intensity affects both the soliton amplitude and width. It is also illustrated that the basic features of the electromagnetic solitary structures, which are found to exist in such a degenerate EP plasma, are significantly modified by the effects of enthalpy correction, electron and positron degeneracy, magnetic-field strength, and the relativistic effect. The applications of the results in a pair-plasma medium, which occurs in many astrophysical objects (e.g., pulsars, white dwarfs, and neutron stars) are briefly discussed. PMID:22463336

  1. Reflection of electromagnetic radiation from plasma with an anisotropic electron velocity distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Vagin, K. Yu. Uryupin, S. A.

    2013-08-15

    The reflection of a test electromagnetic pulse from the plasma formed as a result of tunnel ionization of atoms in the field of a circularly polarized high-power radiation pulse is analyzed using the kinetic approach to describe electron motion. It is shown that the reflected pulse is significantly amplified due to the development of Weibel instability. The amplification efficiency is determined by the maximum value of the instability growth rate, which depends on the degree of anisotropy of the photoelectron distribution function.

  2. Single-molecule electronics: Cooling individual vibrational modes by the tunneling current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Romano, Giuseppe; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C.

    2016-03-01

    Electronic devices composed of single molecules constitute the ultimate limit in the continued downscaling of electronic components. A key challenge for single-molecule electronics is to control the temperature of these junctions. Controlling heating and cooling effects in individual vibrational modes can, in principle, be utilized to increase stability of single-molecule junctions under bias, to pump energy into particular vibrational modes to perform current-induced reactions, or to increase the resolution in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy by controlling the life-times of phonons in a molecule by suppressing absorption and external dissipation processes. Under bias the current and the molecule exchange energy, which typically results in heating of the molecule. However, the opposite process is also possible, where energy is extracted from the molecule by the tunneling current. Designing a molecular "heat sink" where a particular vibrational mode funnels heat out of the molecule and into the leads would be very desirable. It is even possible to imagine how the vibrational energy of the other vibrational modes could be funneled into the "cooling mode," given the right molecular design. Previous efforts to understand heating and cooling mechanisms in single molecule junctions have primarily been concerned with small models, where it is unclear which molecular systems they correspond to. In this paper, our focus is on suppressing heating and obtaining current-induced cooling in certain vibrational modes. Strategies for cooling vibrational modes in single-molecule junctions are presented, together with atomistic calculations based on those strategies. Cooling and reduced heating are observed for two different cooling schemes in calculations of atomistic single-molecule junctions.

  3. Single-molecule electronics: Cooling individual vibrational modes by the tunneling current.

    PubMed

    Lykkebo, Jacob; Romano, Giuseppe; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C

    2016-03-21

    Electronic devices composed of single molecules constitute the ultimate limit in the continued downscaling of electronic components. A key challenge for single-molecule electronics is to control the temperature of these junctions. Controlling heating and cooling effects in individual vibrational modes can, in principle, be utilized to increase stability of single-molecule junctions under bias, to pump energy into particular vibrational modes to perform current-induced reactions, or to increase the resolution in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy by controlling the life-times of phonons in a molecule by suppressing absorption and external dissipation processes. Under bias the current and the molecule exchange energy, which typically results in heating of the molecule. However, the opposite process is also possible, where energy is extracted from the molecule by the tunneling current. Designing a molecular "heat sink" where a particular vibrational mode funnels heat out of the molecule and into the leads would be very desirable. It is even possible to imagine how the vibrational energy of the other vibrational modes could be funneled into the "cooling mode," given the right molecular design. Previous efforts to understand heating and cooling mechanisms in single molecule junctions have primarily been concerned with small models, where it is unclear which molecular systems they correspond to. In this paper, our focus is on suppressing heating and obtaining current-induced cooling in certain vibrational modes. Strategies for cooling vibrational modes in single-molecule junctions are presented, together with atomistic calculations based on those strategies. Cooling and reduced heating are observed for two different cooling schemes in calculations of atomistic single-molecule junctions. PMID:27004879

  4. Terahertz electromagnetic wave generation and amplification by an electron beam in the elliptical plasma waveguides with dielectric rod

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmani, Z. Jazi, B.; Heidari-Semiromi, E.

    2014-09-15

    The propagation of electromagnetic waves in an elliptical plasma waveguide including strongly magnetized plasma column and a dielectric rod is investigated. The dispersion relation of guided hybrid electromagnetic waves is obtained. Excitation of the waves by a thin annular relativistic elliptical electron beam will be studied. The time growth rate of electromagnetic waves is obtained. The effects of relative permittivity constant of dielectric rod, radius of dielectric rod, accelerating voltage, and current density of the annular elliptical beam on the growth rate and the frequency spectra are numerically presented.

  5. The spectral-angular and polarization characteristics of radiation from an electron beam traversing an inhomogeneous electromagnetic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Koltsov, A.V.; Serov, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    The generation of frequency harmonics of a radiation when the electron beam traverse the inhomogeneous electromagnetic wave was investigated. The electromagnetic wave are linearly polarized. The plane beam of particles enters the wave at right angle with respect to the direction of propogation of the wave and the vector E of the wave. The spartial distribution of radiation from the higher harmonics and the power density contours are caculated.

  6. Electromagnetic cascade in high-energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-06-01

    The interaction of high-energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high-energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when three-dimensional effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and photons are calculated for the case of a high-energy e-beam interacting with a counterstreaming, short intense laser pulse. The energy loss of the e-beam, which requires a self-consistent quantum description, plays an important role in this process, as well as provides a clear experimental observable for the transition from the classical to quantum regime of interaction.

  7. Ion-Electron-Conducting Polymer Composites: Promising Electromagnetic Interference Shielding Material.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Manoj Kumar; Chandra, Amita

    2016-07-20

    Polymer nanocomposites consisting of poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) PVdF-HFP, inorganic salt (LiBF4), organic salt (EMIMBF4), multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and Fe3O4 nanoparticles were prepared as electromagnetic shield material. Improvement in conductivity and dielectric property due to the introduction of EMIMBF4, LiBF4, and MWCNTs was confirmed by complex impedance spectroscopy. The highest conductivity obtained is ∼1.86 mS/cm. This is attributed to the high ionic conductivity of the ionic liquids and the formation of a connecting network by the MWCNTs facilitating electron conduction. The total electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness has a major contribution to it due to absorption. Although the total shielding effectiveness in the Ku band (12.4-18 GHz) of pure ion-conducting system was found to be ∼19 dB and that for the polymer composites which are mixed (ion + electron) conductors is ∼46 dB, the contributions due to absorption are ∼16 and ∼42 dB, respectively. PMID:27351810

  8. Nonlinear evolution of the electromagnetic electron-cyclotron instability in bi-Kappa distributed plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Eliasson, B.; Lazar, M.

    2015-06-15

    This paper presents a numerical study of the linear and nonlinear evolution of the electromagnetic electron-cyclotron (EMEC) instability in a bi-Kappa distributed plasma. Distributions with high energy tails described by the Kappa power-laws are often observed in collision-less plasmas (e.g., solar wind and accelerators), where wave-particle interactions control the plasma thermodynamics and keep the particle distributions out of Maxwellian equilibrium. Under certain conditions, the anisotropic bi-Kappa distribution gives rise to plasma instabilities creating low-frequency EMEC waves in the whistler branch. The instability saturates nonlinearly by reducing the temperature anisotropy until marginal stability is reached. Numerical simulations of the Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations show excellent agreement with the growth-rate and real frequency of the unstable modes predicted by linear theory. The wave-amplitude of the EMEC waves at nonlinear saturation is consistent with magnetic trapping of the electrons.

  9. Fokker-Planck electron diffusion caused by an obliquely propagating electromagnetic wave packet of narrow bandwidth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hizanidis, Kyriakos

    1989-01-01

    The relativistic motion of electrons in an intense electromagnetic wave packet propagating obliquely to a uniform magnetic field is analytically studied on the basis of the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov (FPK) approach. The wavepacket consists of circularly polarized electron-cyclotron waves. The dynamical system in question is shown to be reducible to one with three degrees of freedom. Within the framework of the Hamiltonian analysis the nonlinear diffusion tensor is derived, and it is shown that this tensor can be separated into zeroth-, first-, and second-order parts with respect to the relative bandwidth. The zeroth-order part describes diffusive acceleration along lines of constant unperturbed Hamiltonian. The second-order part, which corresponds to the longest time scale, describes diffusion across those lines. A possible transport theory is outlined on the basis of this separation of the time scales.

  10. New electronics of the spectrometric channel for the SND detector electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achasov, M. N.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Korol, A. A.; Koshuba, S. V.; Kovrizhin, D. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Surin, I. K.; Tekut`ev, A. I.; Usov, Yu. V.

    2016-07-01

    The Spherical Neutral Detector (SND) is intended for study of electron-positron annihilation at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider (BINP, Novosibirsk) in the center-of-mass energy region below 2 GeV. The main part of the detector is a three-layer electromagnetic calorimeter based on NaI(Tl) crystals. The physics program of the SND experiment includes a high statistics study of neutron-antineutron production near threshold, for which time measurements in the calorimeter are required. In this paper we describe new shaping and digitizing calorimeter electronics, which allow to reach a time resolution of about 1 ns for 100 MeV signal and an amplitude resolution of about 250 keV.