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Sample records for electron beam methods

  1. Electron beam directed energy device and methods of using same

    DOEpatents

    Retsky, Michael W.

    2007-10-16

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for an electron beam directed energy device. The device consists of an electron gun with one or more electron beams. The device includes one or more accelerating plates with holes aligned for beam passage. The plates may be flat or preferably shaped to direct each electron beam to exit the electron gun at a predetermined orientation. In one preferred application, the device is located in outer space with individual beams that are directed to focus at a distant target to be used to impact and destroy missiles. The aimings of the separate beams are designed to overcome Coulomb repulsion. A method is also presented for directing the beams to a target considering the variable terrestrial magnetic field. In another preferred application, the electron beam is directed into the ground to produce a subsurface x-ray source to locate and/or destroy buried or otherwise hidden objects including explosive devices.

  2. Electron-Beam Diagnostic Methods for Hypersonic Flow Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this work was the evaluation of the use of electron-bean fluorescence for flow measurements during hypersonic flight. Both analytical and numerical models were developed in this investigation to evaluate quantitatively flow field imaging concepts based upon the electron beam fluorescence technique for use in flight research and wind tunnel applications. Specific models were developed for: (1) fluorescence excitation/emission for nitrogen, (2) rotational fluorescence spectrum for nitrogen, (3) single and multiple scattering of electrons in a variable density medium, (4) spatial and spectral distribution of fluorescence, (5) measurement of rotational temperature and density, (6) optical filter design for fluorescence imaging, and (7) temperature accuracy and signal acquisition time requirements. Application of these models to a typical hypersonic wind tunnel flow is presented. In particular, the capability of simulating the fluorescence resulting from electron impact ionization in a variable density nitrogen or air flow provides the capability to evaluate the design of imaging instruments for flow field mapping. The result of this analysis is a recommendation that quantitative measurements of hypersonic flow fields using electron-bean fluorescence is a tractable method with electron beam energies of 100 keV. With lower electron energies, electron scattering increases with significant beam divergence which makes quantitative imaging difficult. The potential application of the analytical and numerical models developed in this work is in the design of a flow field imaging instrument for use in hypersonic wind tunnels or onboard a flight research vehicle.

  3. A method of forming a high-quality electron beam for free electron masers

    SciTech Connect

    Samsonov, S.V.; Bratman, V.L.; Manuilov, V.N.

    1995-12-31

    A large number of electron microwave devices require initially rectilinear high-quality electron beams for effective operation. In FEMS such beams are pumped up to sufficiently high operating-oscillation velocity and small initial particle oscillations (cyclotron oscillations if the beam is focused by an axial magnetic field) can lead to a rather large transverse velocity spread and, correspondingly, axial velocity spread. Thus, an acute problem for these devices (essentially more important than for Cherenkov-type devices) is the formation of a beam in which electrons initially move along the axis with minimum oscillations. A new method to form such a beam by a two-electrode axially-symmetrical gun of simple configuration immersed in a uniform axial magnetic field is discussed in this paper. This method allows to improve the quality of an electron beam passing through a narrow anode outlet. It is well-known that the anode aperture acts as an electrostatic lens and disperses the electron beam. In the presence of an axial magnetic field this unwanted dispersing action can be compensated simultaneously for all electrons of the paraxial electron beam by means of a magnetic field generated by a small additional coil placed down-stream from the anode aperture. If the coil length is equal to half the electron Larmor step, then the action of the border cod fields comes to two kicks which, being correctly phased, compensate the spurious rotary electron velocities. Computer simulations using the EPOSR-code intended for the calculation of electron guns both for the temperature- and space-charge-limited regimes prove the effectiveness of this method. In particular, for a version of field-emission gun the correcting coil reduces about five times the maximum transverse velocity in the beam. Positive effect from applying this method was proved at a realization of a high-efficiency CARM-oscillator.

  4. Device and method for electron beam heating of a high density plasma

    DOEpatents

    Thode, L.E.

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high density plasma in a small localized region are described. A relativistic electron beam generator produces a high voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10/sup 17/ to 10/sup 20/.

  5. Beam Conditioning for Free Electron Lasers:Consequences and Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wolski, A.; Penn, G.; Sessler, A.; Wurtele, J.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept.

    2010-12-14

    The consequences of beam conditioning in four example cases [VISA, a soft x-ray free-electron laser (FEL), LCLS, and a 'Greenfield' FEL] are examined. It is shown that in emittance limited cases, proper conditioning reduces sensitivity to the transverse emittance and, furthermore, allows for stronger focusing in the undulator. Simulations show higher saturation power, with gain lengths reduced by a factor of 2 or more. The beam dynamics in a general conditioning system are studied, with 'matching conditions' derived for achieving conditioning without growth in the effective emittance. Various conditioning lattices are considered, and expressions derived for the amount of conditioning provided in each case when the matching conditions are satisfied. These results show that there is no fundamental obstacle to producing beam conditioning, and that the problem can be reduced to one of proper lattice design. Nevertheless, beam conditioning will not be easy to implement in practice.

  6. Beam conditioning for free electron lasers: Consequences and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolski, A.; Penn, G.; Sessler, A.; Wurtele, J.

    2004-08-01

    The consequences of beam conditioning in four example cases [VISA, a soft x-ray free-electron laser (FEL), LCLS, and a “Greenfield” FEL] are examined. It is shown that in emittance limited cases, proper conditioning reduces sensitivity to the transverse emittance and, furthermore, allows for stronger focusing in the undulator. Simulations show higher saturation power, with gain lengths reduced by a factor of2 or more. The beam dynamics in a general conditioning system are studied, with “matching conditions” derived for achieving conditioning without growth in the effective emittance. Various conditioning lattices are considered, and expressions derived for the amount of conditioning provided in each case when the matching conditions are satisfied. These results show that there is no fundamental obstacle to producing beam conditioning, and that the problem can be reduced to one of proper lattice design. Nevertheless, beam conditioning will not be easy to implement in practice.

  7. Novel method for unambiguous ion identification in mixed ion beams extracted from an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Meissl, W.; Simon, M. C.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Tawara, H.; Ullrich, J.; Winter, HP.; Aumayr, F.

    2006-09-15

    A novel technique to identify small fluxes of mixed highly charged ion beams extracted from an electron beam ion trap is presented and practically demonstrated. The method exploits projectile charge state dependent potential emission of electrons as induced by ion impact on a metal surface to separate ions with identical or very similar mass-to-charge ratio.

  8. Simultaneous determination of electron beam profile and material response using self-consistent iterative method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Yudhishthir; Denbeaux, Gregory

    2016-08-01

    We develop a novel iterative method to accurately measure electron beam shape (current density distribution) and monotonic material response as a function of position. A common method is to scan an electron beam across a knife edge along many angles to give an approximate measure of the beam profile, however such scans are not easy to obtain in all systems. The present work uses only an electron beam and multiple exposed regions of a thin film of photoresist to measure the complete beam profile for any beam shape, where the material response is characterized externally. This simplifies the setup of new experimental tools. We solve for self-consistent photoresist thickness loss response to dose and the electron beam profile simultaneously by optimizing a novel functional iteratively. We also show the successful implementation of the method in a real world data set corrupted by noise and other experimental variabilities.

  9. Device and method for electron beam heating of a high density plasma

    DOEpatents

    Thode, Lester E.

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator produces a high voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target plasma is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region within the high density plasma target.

  10. Sheet electron beam tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, Alexander Grenbeaux

    The DARPA HiFIVE project uses a pulsed electron sheet beam gun to power a traveling wave tube amplifier operating at 220 GHz. Presented is a method for characterizing the high current density 0.1 mm by 1 mm sheet electron beam. A tungsten tipped probe was scanned through the cross section of the sheet electron beam inside of a vacuum vessel. The probe was controlled with sub-micron precision using stepper motors and LabView computer control while boxcar averaging hardware sampled the pulsed beam. Matlab algorithms were used to interpret the data, calculate beam dimensions and current density, and create 2-dimensional cross section images. Full characterization of two separate HiFIVE sheet electron guns was accomplished and is also presented.

  11. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Transverse electron-beam waves for microwave electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanke, Vladimir A.

    2005-09-01

    A brief discussion is given of the state of the art, challenges, and prospects in the application of transverse (cyclotron and synchronous) electron-beam waves in microwave electronic devices, including protectors, parametric and electrostatic amplifiers, tunable filters, circularly polarized traveling wave tubes, microwave/DC converters, and combined interaction klystrons.

  12. A method for evaluating aberration in the crossover image in mask irradiation optics of electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohda, Yasunari; Ohta, Hiroya; Saitou, Norio

    2002-02-01

    A method for evaluating aberration in the crossover image in a cell projection lithography system has been developed. In an electron-beam lithography system of projection-type such as a cell projection lithography system, the aberration in the crossover image causes the electron beam to pass off-axis in the electron optics. Optical simulation has quantitatively shown that the aberration in the crossover image causes an electron-beam blur and a positioning error on a writing sample. The evaluating method consists of four square apertures and a mark-detection function in a cell projection system. By measuring each position of the images of the four square apertures on the writing sample at difference focuses, the aberration can be calculated. The field curvature and the astigmatism in a cell projection system were evaluated by using this method. The field curvature agrees with the simulation. In addition, the measurement of the effect of beam alignment is also demonstrated. It is thus concluded that the method can effectively evaluate the aberration in the crossover image. This method is also useful for other projection-type lithographies of charged particles—like ion and electron beams.

  13. Relativistic electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

    1975-11-11

    A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

  14. Alternative method of using an electron beam for charge compensation during ultralow energy secondary-ion-mass spectroscopy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman de la Mata, B.; Dowsett, M.G.; Morris, R.J.H.

    2006-07-15

    Secondary-ion-mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis of insulators using positive primary beams is routinely performed by compensating the induced charge with a coincident electron beam. In the case of SIMS depth profiling, the established method consists of focusing an electron beam into the SIMS crater with a current well in excess of that of the primary ion beam. In this article we used both caesium and oxygen beams to bombard float glass, and intrinsic and doped diamond samples while varying the electron beam current and the area bombarded by electrons. We have studied how the electron beam to primary ion current density ratio modifies the charging conditions. We demonstrate that, for certain insulating and highly resistive materials, defocusing of the electron beam so as to cover the whole of the sample surface and part of the sample holder is extremely effective. It is also observed that the defocused electron beam works efficiently for an electron to primary ion current density ratio less than 1. We attribute this to the enhancement of surface conductivity through the creation of carriers in the conduction band, and observe similar effects when irradiating the surface with a laser diode. The ability to use a defocused electron beam will significantly aid profiling of insulating and highly resistive materials where alignment of the coincident electron and ion beams is problematic. Defocusing of the electron beam also offers the possible advantage of reducing or eliminating localized electron beam damage of certain material surfaces prior to and during profiling.

  15. Prospects for advanced electron cyclotron resonance and electron beam ion source charge breeding methods for EURISOL

    SciTech Connect

    Delahaye, P.; Jardin, P.; Maunoury, L.; Traykov, E.; Varenne, F.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.; Ban, G.; Celona, L.; Lunney, D.; Choinski, J.; Gmaj, P.; Jakubowski, A.; Steckiewicz, O.; Kalvas, T.; and others

    2012-02-15

    As the most ambitious concept of isotope separation on line (ISOL) facility, EURISOL aims at producing unprecedented intensities of post-accelerated radioactive isotopes. Charge breeding, which transforms the charge state of radioactive beams from 1+ to an n+ charge state prior to post-acceleration, is a key technology which has to overcome the following challenges: high charge states for high energies, efficiency, rapidity and purity. On the roadmap to EURISOL, a dedicated R and D is being undertaken to push forward the frontiers of the present state-of-the-art techniques which use either electron cyclotron resonance or electron beam ion sources. We describe here the guidelines of this R and D.

  16. Method to eliminate the impact of magnetic fields on the position of the electron beam during EBW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptenok, V. D.; Druzhinina, A. A.; Murygin, A. V.; Seregin, Yu N.

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents the approximate formulas for calculating the deflection angle and the misalignment of the electron beam from the optical axis of the electron gun caused by the action of magnetic fields during the electron beam welding. Mathematical model of the effect of magnetic field induced by thermoelectric currents on the electron beam position in the process of electron beam welding of dissimilar materials is presented. The method of monitoring of the misalignment of the scanning electron beam and its mathematical model are proposed. Monitoring of the misalignment of the scanning electron beam is based on the processing of the signal of the collimated X-ray sensor directed to the optical axis of the electron gun by synchronous detection method. The method of compensation of the effect of magnetic fields by passing through the welded seam the currents which compensate thermoelectric currents is considered.

  17. Electron beam focusing system

    SciTech Connect

    Dikansky, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    The high energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. Thus, the electron beam focusing system is very important for the performance of electron cooling. A system with and without longitudinal magnetic field is presented for discussion. Interaction of electron beam with the vacuum chamber as well as with the background ions and stored antiprotons can cause the coherent electron beam instabilities. Focusing system requirements needed to suppress these instabilities are presented.

  18. Method of automatic measurement and focus of an electron beam and apparatus therefor

    DOEpatents

    Giedt, Warren H.; Campiotti, Richard

    1996-01-01

    An electron beam focusing system, including a plural slit-type Faraday beam trap, for measuring the diameter of an electron beam and automatically focusing the beam for welding. Beam size is determined from profiles of the current measured as the beam is swept over at least two narrow slits of the beam trap. An automated procedure changes the focus coil current until the focal point location is just below a workpiece surface. A parabolic equation is fitted to the calculated beam sizes from which optimal focus coil current and optimal beam diameter are determined.

  19. Method of automatic measurement and focus of an electron beam and apparatus therefore

    DOEpatents

    Giedt, W.H.; Campiotti, R.

    1996-01-09

    An electron beam focusing system, including a plural slit-type Faraday beam trap, for measuring the diameter of an electron beam and automatically focusing the beam for welding is disclosed. Beam size is determined from profiles of the current measured as the beam is swept over at least two narrow slits of the beam trap. An automated procedure changes the focus coil current until the focal point location is just below a workpiece surface. A parabolic equation is fitted to the calculated beam sizes from which optimal focus coil current and optimal beam diameter are determined. 12 figs.

  20. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Video Gallery

    Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) is a process by which NASA hopes to build metal parts in zero gravity environments. It's a layer-additive process that uses an electron beam and a solid wi...

  1. Electron beam method and apparatus for obtaining uniform discharges in electrically pumped gas lasers

    DOEpatents

    Fenstermacher, Charles A.; Boyer, Keith

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus for obtaining uniform, high-energy, large-volume electrical discharges in the lasing medium of a gas laser whereby a high-energy electron beam is used as an external ionization source to ionize substantially the entire volume of the lasing medium which is then readily pumped by means of an applied potential less than the breakdown voltage of the medium. The method and apparatus are particularly useful in CO.sub.2 laser systems.

  2. Electron beam device

    DOEpatents

    Beckner, E.H.; Clauser, M.J.

    1975-08-12

    This patent pertains to an electron beam device in which a hollow target is symmetrically irradiated by a high energy, pulsed electron beam about its periphery and wherein the outer portion of the target has a thickness slightly greater than required to absorb the electron beam pulse energy. (auth)

  3. A Method to Improve Electron Density Measurement of Cone-Beam CT Using Dual Energy Technique

    PubMed Central

    Men, Kuo; Dai, Jian-Rong; Li, Ming-Hui; Chen, Xin-Yuan; Zhang, Ke; Tian, Yuan; Huang, Peng; Xu, Ying-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To develop a dual energy imaging method to improve the accuracy of electron density measurement with a cone-beam CT (CBCT) device. Materials and Methods. The imaging system is the XVI CBCT system on Elekta Synergy linac. Projection data were acquired with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively, to set up a basis material decomposition model. Virtual phantom simulation and phantoms experiments were carried out for quantitative evaluation of the method. Phantoms were also scanned twice with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively. The data were decomposed into projections of the two basis material coefficients according to the model set up earlier. The two sets of decomposed projections were used to reconstruct CBCT images of the basis material coefficients. Then, the images of electron densities were calculated with these CBCT images. Results. The difference between the calculated and theoretical values was within 2% and the correlation coefficient of them was about 1.0. The dual energy imaging method obtained more accurate electron density values and reduced the beam hardening artifacts obviously. Conclusion. A novel dual energy CBCT imaging method to calculate the electron densities was developed. It can acquire more accurate values and provide a platform potentially for dose calculation. PMID:26346510

  4. Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources

    DOEpatents

    Neil, G.R.

    1996-07-30

    A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  5. Apparatus and method for compensating for electron beam emittance in synchronizing light sources

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George R.

    1996-01-01

    A focused optical beam is used to change the path length of the core electrons in electron light sources thereby boosting their efficiency of conversion of electron beam energy to light. Both coherent light in the free electron laser and incoherent light in the synchrotron is boosted by this technique. By changing the path length of the core electrons by the proper amount, the core electrons are caused to stay in phase with the electrons in the outer distribution of the electron beam. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  6. Formation of Hard Surfacing Layers of WC-Co with Electron Beam Cladding Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Nobuyuki; Morimoto, Junji

    Hard surfacing layers of WC-Co/Ni-base self-fluxing alloy were successfully formed on a steel substrate using an electron beam cladding method. The WC particles were densely and homogenously dispersed within the Ni-base self-fluxing alloy without porosity. The effect of the electron beam conditions on layer formation was investigated, and the cladding layer properties were examined by hardness tests, abrasive wear tests and immersion corrosion tests. It was found that the cladding layers showed higher hardness and abrasion resistance with increasing WC-Co mixing ratio, however, corrosion resistance decreased with WC-Co mixing ratio. A coating layer having high abrasive and corrosion resistance simultaneously was achieved by multiple cladding of high WC-Co mixing ratio layers after low WC-Co mixing ratio layers.

  7. (Pulsed electron beam precharger)

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on electron beam guns: Precharger Modification; Installation of Charge vs. Radius Apparatus; High Concentration Aerosol Generation; and Data Acquisition and Analysis System.

  8. Device and method for creating Gaussian aberration-corrected electron beams

    DOEpatents

    McMorran, Benjamin; Linck, Martin

    2016-01-19

    Electron beam phase gratings have phase profiles that produce a diffracted beam having a Gaussian or other selected intensity profile. Phase profiles can also be selected to correct or compensate electron lens aberrations. Typically, a low diffraction order produces a suitable phase profile, and other orders are discarded.

  9. A fast high-order method to calculate wakefields in an electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Ji; Mitchell, Chad; Ryne, Robert D.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we report on a high-order fast method to numerically calculate wakefields in an electron beam given a wake function model. This method is based on a Newton-Cotes quadrature rule for integral approximation and an FFT method for discrete summation that results in an O(N log(N)) computational cost, where N is the number of grid points. Using the Simpson quadrature rule with an accuracy of O(h4), where h is the grid size, we present numerical calculation of the wakefields from a resonator wake function model and from a one-dimensional coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wake model. Besides the fast speed and high numerical accuracy, the calculation using the direct line density instead of the first derivative of the line density avoids numerical filtering of the electron density function for computing the CSR wakefield.

  10. A fast high-order method to calculate wakefield forces in an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Mitchell, Chad; Ryne, Robert D.

    2012-03-22

    In this paper we report on a high-order fast method to numerically calculate wakefield forces in an electron beam given a wake function model. This method is based on a Newton-Cotes quadrature rule for integral approximation and an FFT method for discrete summation that results in an O(Nlog(N)) computational cost, where N is the number of grid points. Using the Simpson quadrature rule with an accuracy of O(h4), where h is the grid size, we present numerical calculation of the wakefields from a resonator wake function model and from a one-dimensional coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wake model. Besides the fast speed and high numerical accuracy, the calculation using the direct line density instead of the first derivative of the line density avoids numerical filtering of the electron density function for computing the CSR wakefield force. I. INTRODUCTION

  11. Device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma to drive fast liners

    DOEpatents

    Thode, Lester E.

    1981-01-01

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, hydrogen boron or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy and momentum into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target. Fast liners disposed in the high-density target plasma are explosively or ablatively driven to implosion by a heated annular plasma surrounding the fast liner which is generated by an annular relativistic electron beam. An azimuthal magnetic field produced by axial current flow in the annular plasma, causes the energy in the heated annular plasma to converge on the fast liner.

  12. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Electron beam precharging of a high resistivity aerosol was successfully performed under a range of experimental conditions during Quarter Six of the contract. The initial E-beam particle precharging experiments completed this term were designed to extend the efficiency of particle charging and collection using a fine, monodisperse aerosol at relatively large loadings in the FSU Electron Beam Precipitator wind tunnel. There are several reasons for doing this: (1) to re-establish a baseline performance criterion for comparison to other runs, (2) to test several recently upgraded or repaired subsystems, and (3) to improve upon the collection efficiency of the electron beam precipitator when testing precharging effectiveness with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high dust concentration. In addition, these shakedown runs were used to determine a set of suitable operational parameters for the wind tunnel, the electrostatic collecting sections, and the MINACC E-beam accelerator. These parameters will normally be held constant while the precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge. The electron beam precharging investigation performed during the period covered by Quarter Six used virtually the same experimental apparatus and procedures as in previous contract work, and these are described for review in this report. This investigation was part of an experimental effort which ran nearly continuously for nine months, encompassing work on the electrostatic collecting section, electron beam precharger, and particle charge-to-radius measuring apparatus. A summary of the work on dc electron beam precipitation is presented here.

  13. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1989-01-01

    This is the fifth in a series of contracts and grants exploring the advanced particulate pollution control technology of electron beam precipitation. The chief goal of the current contract is to develop a laboratory scale electron beam precharger using a pulsed electric field to the proof-of-concept stage. Contract tasks leading to the achievement of this goal are generally divided up into two categories: tasks required to bring the Electron Beam Precipitator (EBP) test system up to an operational level for the contract work, and tasks concerning the actual experimental and analytical phase of the study. Not unexpectedly, the early portion of the contract duration will be devoted to the commissioning of the EBP and its many subsystems, while the latter portion will devote itself to testing the new pulsed electron beam precharger.

  14. Evaluation of a method to shield a welding electron beam from magnetic interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    It is known that electron beams are easily deflected by magnetic and electrostatic fields. Therefore, to prevent weld defects, stray electromagnetic fields are avoided in electron beam welding chambers if at all possible. The successful results of tests conducted at MSFC to evaluate a simple magnetic shield made from steel tubing are reported. Tests indicate that this shield was up to 85 percent effective in reducing magnetic effects on the electron beam of a welding machine. In addition, residual magnetic fields within the shield were so nearly uniform that the net effect on the beam alignment was negligible. It is concluded that the shield, with the addition of a tungsten liner, could be used in production welding.

  15. Methods of beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1996-02-01

    Diverse methods which are available for particle beam cooling are reviewed. They consist of some highly developed techniques such as radiation damping, electron cooling, stochastic cooling and the more recently developed, laser cooling. Methods which have been theoretically developed, but not yet achieved experimentally, are also reviewed. They consist of ionization cooling, laser cooling in three dimensions and stimulated radiation cooling.

  16. A method of determining narrow energy spread electron beams from a laser plasma wakefield accelerator using undulator radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gallacher, J. G.; Anania, M. P.; Brunetti, E.; Ersfeld, B.; Islam, M. R.; Reitsma, A. J. W.; Shanks, R. P.; Wiggins, S. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Budde, F.; Debus, A.; Haupt, K.; Schwoerer, H.; Jaeckel, O.; Pfotenhauer, S.; Rohwer, E.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.

    2009-09-15

    In this paper a new method of determining the energy spread of a relativistic electron beam from a laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerator by measuring radiation from an undulator is presented. This could be used to determine the beam characteristics of multi-GeV accelerators where conventional spectrometers are very large and cumbersome. Simultaneous measurement of the energy spectra of electrons from the wakefield accelerator in the 55-70 MeV range and the radiation spectra in the wavelength range of 700-900 nm of synchrotron radiation emitted from a 50 period undulator confirm a narrow energy spread for electrons accelerated over the dephasing distance where beam loading leads to energy compression. Measured energy spreads of less than 1% indicates the potential of using a wakefield accelerator as a driver of future compact and brilliant ultrashort pulse synchrotron sources and free-electron lasers that require high peak brightness beams.

  17. Two-Screen Method for Determining Electron Beam Energy and Deflection from Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, B B; Ross, J S; Tynan, G R; Divol, L; Glenzer, S H; Leurent, V; Palastro, J P; Ralph, J E; Froula, D H; Clayton, C E; Marsh, K A; Pak, A E; Wang, T L; Joshi, C

    2009-04-24

    Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) experiments have been performed at the Jupiter Laser Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In order to unambiguously determine the output electron beam energy and deflection angle at the plasma exit, we have implemented a two-screen electron spectrometer. This system is comprised of a dipole magnet followed by two image plates. By measuring the electron beam deviation from the laser axis on each plate, both the energy and deflection angle at the plasma exit are determined through the relativistic equation of motion.

  18. Study And Comparison Of Silver Mirrors Deposited On Different Substrates By Electron-Beam Gun Method

    SciTech Connect

    Asl, Jahanbakhsh Mashaiekhy; Shafieizadeh, Zahra; Sabbaghzadeh, Jamshid; Anaraki, Mahdi

    2010-12-23

    Choosing the right substrate is one of the important factors for improving quality parameters of thin films such as adhesion between layers and substrates. The selected substrate should have proper physical and chemical compatibility with deposited thin film. In this paper, we have been investigated four different types of high reflective laser mirrors that were produced in similar conditions on four different kinds of substrates including copper, stainless steel, brass, and nickel. We used electron-beam gun method for deposition of silver layers. At the end we compared theoretical results with practical results that were yielded by laser damage threshold test. It was shown that brass is the best choice for silver metal mirrors as a substrate.

  19. A new method for designing dual foil electron beam forming systems. II. Feasibility of practical implementation of the method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrich, Przemysław

    2016-05-01

    In Part I of this work a new method for designing dual foil electron beam forming systems was introduced. In this method, an optimal configuration of the dual foil system is found by means of a systematic, automatized scan of system performance in function of its parameters. At each point of the scan, Monte Carlo method is used to calculate the off-axis dose profile in water taking into account detailed and complete geometry of the system. The new method, while being computationally intensive, minimizes the involvement of the designer. In this Part II paper, feasibility of practical implementation of the new method is demonstrated. For this, a prototype software tools were developed and applied to solve a real life design problem. It is demonstrated that system optimization can be completed within few hours time using rather moderate computing resources. It is also demonstrated that, perhaps for the first time, the designer can gain deep insight into system behavior, such that the construction can be simultaneously optimized in respect to a number of functional characteristics besides the flatness of the off-axis dose profile. In the presented example, the system is optimized in respect to both, flatness of the off-axis dose profile and the beam transmission. A number of practical issues related to application of the new method as well as its possible extensions are discussed.

  20. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    Electrostatic collection of a high resistivity aerosol using the Electron Beam Precipitator (EBP) collecting section was demonstrated during this reporting period (Quarter Five). Collection efficiency experiments were designed to confirm and extend some of the work performed under the previous contract. The reason for doing this was to attempt to improve upon the collection efficiency of the precipitator alone when testing with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high concentration dust load. From the collector shakedown runs, a set of suitable operational parameters were determined for the downstream electrostatic collecting sections of the Electron Beam Precipitator wind tunnel. These parameters, along with those for the MINACC electron beam, will generally be held constant while the numerous precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge. The electrostatic collector experiments were part of a larger, comprehensive investigation on electron beam precharging of high resistivity aerosol particles performed during the period covered by Quarters Five, Six, and Seven. This body of work used the same experimental apparatus and procedures and the experimental run period lasted nearly continuously for six months. A summary of the Quarter Five work is presented in the following paragraphs. Section II-A of TPR 5 contains a report on the continuing effort which was expended on the modification and upgrade of the pulsed power supply and the monitoring systems prior to the initiation of the electron beam precharging experimental work.

  1. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Electron beam precharging of a high resistivity aerosol was successfully demonstrated during this reporting period (Quarters Five and Six). The initial E-beam particle precharging experiments completed this term were designed to confirm and extend some of the work performed under the previous contract. There are several reasons for doing this: (1) to re-establish a baseline performance criterion for comparison to other runs, (2) to test several recently upgraded or repaired subsystems, and (3) to improve upon the collection efficiency of the electron beam precipitator when testing precharging effectiveness with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high concentration dust load. In addition, these shakedown runs were used to determine a set of suitable operational parameters for the wind tunnel, the electrostatic collecting sections, and the MINACC E-beam accelerator. These parameters will generally be held constant while the precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge.

  2. A new method for designing dual foil electron beam forming systems. I. Introduction, concept of the method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrich, Przemysław

    2016-05-01

    In Part I of this work existing methods and problems in dual foil electron beam forming system design are presented. On this basis, a new method of designing these systems is introduced. The motivation behind this work is to eliminate the shortcomings of the existing design methods and improve overall efficiency of the dual foil design process. The existing methods are based on approximate analytical models applied in an unrealistically simplified geometry. Designing a dual foil system with these methods is a rather labor intensive task as corrections to account for the effects not included in the analytical models have to be calculated separately and accounted for in an iterative procedure. To eliminate these drawbacks, the new design method is based entirely on Monte Carlo modeling in a realistic geometry and using physics models that include all relevant processes. In our approach, an optimal configuration of the dual foil system is found by means of a systematic, automatized scan of the system performance in function of parameters of the foils. The new method, while being computationally intensive, minimizes the involvement of the designer and considerably shortens the overall design time. The results are of high quality as all the relevant physics and geometry details are naturally accounted for. To demonstrate the feasibility of practical implementation of the new method, specialized software tools were developed and applied to solve a real life design problem, as described in Part II of this work.

  3. Characterization of non-Gaussian mid-infrared free-electron laser beams by the knife-edge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yu; Nakajima, Takashi; Zen, Heishun; Wang, Xiaolong; Kii, Toshiteru; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2014-09-01

    We report the characterization of mid-infrared free-electron laser (FEL) beams at the wavelength of 11 μm by the knife-edge method. From the knife-edge data we find that the FEL beam has a non-Gaussian shape. To represent the non-Gaussian beam shape we employ two methods: fitting the knife-edge data to some analytical functions with a few free parameters and numerical smoothing of the knife-edge data. Both methods work equally well. Using those data we can reconstruct the two-dimensional (2D) beam profiles at different positions around the focus by assuming that the 2D intensity distribution function is separable in x (horizontal) and y (vertical) directions. Using the 2D beam profiles at different positions around the focus, we find that the beam propagation factor (M2 factor) is ∼1.1 in both x and y directions. As a cross-check, we also carry out the burn pattern experiment to find that the behavior of the focused FEL beam along the propagation is consistent with the results obtained by the knife-edge method.

  4. Improving the dimensional stability of natural fibers with the fiber polymer penetrant and electron beam method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Sean R.

    Cellulose-based material absorbs or releases moisture in relation to atmospheric conditions. This research looks to minimize dimensional change with the use of low molecular weight (LMW) monomers polymerized by electron beam (EB) ionizing radiation. Sisal, jute, coir, and hemp natural fibers with average natural swelling of 26.55%, 29.46%, 9.06%, and 32.69%, respectively, and glass fiber as control were used for analysis. Three LMW bulk monomers, hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA), hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), and polyethylene glycol diacrylate (EGDA), as well as an encapsulating agent, isodecyl acrylate, and cross-linker, ethoxylated trimethylolpropane triacrylate, were evaluated for resin formulation. In total, 1015 specimens were measured for swelling. Moisture uptake characteristics of the specimens were analyzed. A new method of measuring specimen dimensional changes by a light microscope and image analysis software was used. Results indicate dimensional stability improvement of 39.34% - 91.46% for hemp with HEA and cross-linker, and sisal with HEMA and cross-linker respectively.

  5. Method and apparatus for secondary laser pumping by electron beam excitation

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Krupke, William F.; Murray, John R.; Powell, Howard T.; Swingle, James C.; Turner, Jr., Charles E.; Rhodes, Charles K.

    1978-01-01

    An electron beam of energy typically 100 keV excites a fluorescer gas which emits ultraviolet radiation. This radiation excites and drives an adjacent laser gas by optical pumping or photolytic dissociation to produce high efficiency pulses. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, United States Energy Research and Development Administration Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48 with the University of California.

  6. Electron beam generation in Tevatron electron lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; Shiltsev, V.; Solyak, N.; Tiunov, M.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2006-08-01

    New type of high perveance electron guns with convex cathode has been developed. Three guns described in this article are built to provide transverse electron current density distributions needed for Electron Lenses for beam-beam compensation in the Tevatron collider. The current distribution can be controlled either by the gun geometry or by voltage on a special control electrode located near cathode. We present the designs of the guns and report results of beam measurements on the test bench. Because of their high current density and low transverse temperature of electrons, electron guns of this type can be used in electron cooling and beam-beam compensation devices.

  7. Electron beam modeling on LTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalkowski, Gregory; Majeski, Richard; Schmitt, John

    2014-10-01

    The lithium tokamak experiment (LTX) is a low aspect ratio tokamak with a steel clad copper shell that can be heated to 300-400 °C and coated with lithium. The lithium coating has been shown to decrease impurities in the plasma and decrease the recycling coefficient, improving plasma performance. The coating is applied to the walls by heating the shells, then using an electron beam to evaporate a pool of lithium located at the bottom of the shell. The beam is steered using the magnetic field generated by the field coils. This method allows for rapid evaporation of the lithium, producing a 50-100 nm coating in approximately 5 minutes. The current electron beam system can only coat half of the shell surface. A new electron beam system has been installed on LTX to coat the remaining shell surface. A model of this electron gun has been created using the AMaze program series (Field Precision LCC). The model will be used to find the magnetic fields needed to steer the electron beam produced by the gun to the lithium pool. The model will also show the electropotential produced both at the electron gun head and in the vessel. The model may also be used to find the dispersion of the beam and therefore the effective power density of the beam as it impacts the lithium pool. Supported by US DOE Contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-AC52-07NA27344 and in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship.

  8. Landsat electron beam recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosso, P. F.; Whitley, J. P.

    A minicomputer-controlled electron beam recorder (EBR) presently in use at the Brazilian Government's Institute De Pesquisas Espaclais (INPE) satellite ground station is described. This 5-in.-film-size EBR is used to record both Landsat and SPOT satellite imagery in South America. A brief electron beam recorder technology review is presented. The EBR is capable of recording both vector and text data from computer-aided design, publishing, and line art systems and raster data from image scanners, raster image processors (RIPS), halftone/screen generators, and remote image sensors. A variety of image formats may be recorded on numerous film sizes (16 mm, 35 mm, 70 mm, 105 mm, 5-in, 5.5-in., and 9.5-in.). These recordings are used directly or optically enlarged depending on the final product.

  9. New method of optimizing writing parameters in electron beam lithography systems for throughput improvement considering patterning fidelity constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Hoi-Tou; Shen, Yu-Tian; Chen, Sheng-Yung; Liu, Chun-Hung; Ng, Philip C. W.; Tsai, Kuen-Yu

    2012-07-01

    Low-energy electron beam lithography is one of the promising next-generation lithography technology solutions for the 21-nm half-pitch node and beyond because of fewer proximity effects, higher resist sensitivity, and less substrate damage compared with high-energy electron beam lithography. To achieve high-throughput manufacturing, low-energy electron beam lithography systems with writing parameters of larger beam size, larger grid size, and lower dosage are preferred. However, electron shot noise can significantly increase critical dimension deviation and line edge roughness. Its influence on patterning prediction accuracy becomes nonnegligible. To effectively maximize throughput while meeting patterning fidelity requirements according to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, a new method is proposed in this work that utilizes a new patterning prediction algorithm to rigorously characterize the patterning variability caused by the shot noise and a mathematical optimization algorithm to determine optimal writing parameters. The new patterning prediction algorithm can achieve a proper trade-off between computational effort and patterning prediction accuracy. Effectiveness of the new method is demonstrated on a static random-access memory circuit. The corresponding electrical performance is analyzed by using a gate-slicing technique and publicly available transistor models. Numerical results show that a significant improvement in the static noise margin can be achieved.

  10. A method for measuring dark current electron beams in an rf linac

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, X.K.; Fasanello, T.; Rietdyk, H.; Piestrup, M.A.; Rule, D.W.; Fiorito, R.B.

    1993-12-31

    X-ray fluorescence from thin foils inserted into the NPS linac has been used to measure the integrated electron beam intensity when the accelerator is operating with dark current. The measured x-ray flux, the known inner shell ionization cross sections and radiative transition probabilities are used to obtain measurements of dark currents of the order of 10{sup -14} amperes. The same arrangement allows continuous, in-situ energy calibration of our SiLi detector in the electromagnetic noise environment of the linac. This technique was orginally developed to perform absolute production efficiency measurements of parametric x-ray generation in the 5-50 keV range.

  11. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finney, W. C.

    A short review of electron beam particle precharging using a pulsed electric field is presented. The design and installation is detailed of a remote focusing gear train which will allow much greater control over the particle charge measurement capability of the charge vs. radius apparatus. Progress on the electrical shielding of the rotating spark gap power supply using a large Faraday cage is described. Efforts to prevent RFI interference from adversely affecting the Climet particle counter and the MicroMac current measurement device using a variety of techniques are also presented. The basic effort is to optimize the removal efficiency for fly ash particles.

  12. Depressed collector for electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ives, R. Lawrence (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A depressed collector for recovery of spent beam energy from electromagnetic sources emitting sheet or large aspect ration annular electron beams operating aver a broad range of beam voltages and currents. The collector incorporates a trap for capturing and preventing the return of reflected and secondary electrons.

  13. Thin films' thickness uniformity associated with the method of electron beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Zhilin; Xue, Yiyu; Guo, Peitao; Li, Zhangwang

    2009-08-01

    Coating material has been considered as being made up of a lot of small tablets. These tablets have plane surface during the whole film preparation process. Based on the assumption that a column etching pit will form in coating material when electron beam is used for heating, influences of the etching pit's dimension and the internal structure of the vacuum chamber on films thickness uniformity have been investigated. Results reflect that the appearance of etching pit does not always cause negative influence on films thickness uniformity. The negative impact of etching on films thickness uniformity can be reduced by optimizing the internal structure of the vacuum chamber and preparation technical parameters. But, it is difficult to achieve the beneficial action. This investigation is useful to help us understand physical meaning of the emission characteristics of the evaporation particle and design experimental scheme.

  14. A method to restrain the charging effect on an insulating substrate in high energy electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingyan, Yu; Shirui, Zhao; Yupeng, Jing; Yunbo, Shi; Baoqin, Chen

    2014-12-01

    Pattern distortions caused by the charging effect should be reduced while using the electron beam lithography process on an insulating substrate. We have developed a novel process by using the SX AR-PC 5000/90.1 solution as a spin-coated conductive layer, to help to fabricate nanoscale patterns of poly-methyl-methacrylate polymer resist on glass for phased array device application. This method can restrain the influence of the charging effect on the insulating substrate effectively. Experimental results show that the novel process can solve the problems of the distortion of resist patterns and electron beam main field stitching error, thus ensuring the accuracy of the stitching and overlay of the electron beam lithography system. The main characteristic of the novel process is that it is compatible to the multi-layer semiconductor process inside a clean room, and is a green process, quite simple, fast, and low cost. It can also provide a broad scope in the device development on insulating the substrate, such as high density biochips, flexible electronics and liquid crystal display screens.

  15. Electron Cooling of Bunched Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Uesugi, T.; Noda, K.; Syresin, E.; Meshkov, I.; Shibuya, S.

    2006-03-20

    Experiments of electron cooling have been done with the HIMAC synchrotron in NIRS. Limitation on cooled beam-sizes in longitudianl and transverse spaces were measured. The effect of space-charge field and intra-beam scattering are investigated.

  16. Electron Beam Materials Irradiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Marshall R.

    2012-06-01

    Radiation processing is a well established method for enhancing the properties of materials and commercial products by treating them with ionizing energy in the form of high-energy electrons, X-rays, and gamma rays. Beneficial effects include polymerizing, cross-linking, grafting and degrading plastics, sterilizing single-use medical devices, disinfecting and disinfesting fresh foods, purifying drinking water, treating wastewater and other toxic waste materials that harm the environment, and many other applications that are still being evaluated. Industrial electron accelerators of several types have been developed and are being used for these applications. More than 1800 electron accelerators are presently installed in facilities worldwide for these purposes.

  17. Electron beam sterilisation of heterogeneous medical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadat, T.; Morisseau, MrD.; Ross, MissA.

    1993-07-01

    Electron beam radiation is used in the sterilisation of medical disposable devices. High energy, 10 MeV, electron beam linear accelerators are in use worldwide for this purpose. The dose distribution achieved in the products treated influences the efficiency of treatment. This paper looks at the dose distribution achieved with such machines and the methods used to define it in heterogeneous products.

  18. Properties of Electron-Beam Irradiated CuInSe2 Layers by Multi-Step Sputtering Method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chae-Woong; Kim, Jin Hyeok; Jeong, Chaehwan

    2015-10-01

    Typically, CuInSe2 (CIS) based thin films for photovoltaic devices are deposited by co-evaporation or by deposition of the metals, followed by treatment in a selenium environment. This article describes CIS films that are instead deposited by DC and RF magnetron sputtering from binary Cu2Se and In2Se3 targets without the supply of selenium. As a novel method, electron beam annealing was used for crystallization of Cu2Se/In2Se3 stacked precursors. The surface, cross-sectional morphology, and compositional ratio of CIS films were investigated to confirm the possibility in crystallization without any addition of selenium. Our work demonstrates that the e-beam annealing method can be a good candidate for the rapid crystallization of Cu-In-Se sputtered precursors. PMID:26726419

  19. Electron beam cutting

    DOEpatents

    Mochel, Margaret E.; Humphreys, Colin J.

    1985-04-02

    A method for the cutting of holes 20 Angstroms in diameter, or lines 20 Angstroms wide in a material having positive ionic conduction by the use of a focused electron probe is described. The holes and lines are stable under ambient conditions.

  20. Electron beam cutting

    DOEpatents

    Mochel, M.E.; Humphreys, C.J.

    1985-04-02

    A method for the cutting of holes 20 Angstroms in diameter, or lines 20 Angstroms wide in a material having positive ionic conduction by the use of a focused electron probe is described. The holes and lines are stable under ambient conditions. 2 figs.

  1. Electron Beam Ablation and Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Ang, L. K.; Lau, Y. Y.

    1997-11-01

    Ablation of fused silica, titanium nitride, and boron nitride with a channel spark electron beam is being studied. The channel spark is a low energy (15-20kV), high current (1600A) electron beam source developed at KFK(G. Muller and C. Schultheiss, Proc. of Beams `94, Vol. II, p833). This is a pseudospark device which operates in the ion focused regime of electron beam transport. For this reason, a low pressure (10-15mTorr of Ar) background gas is used to provide electron beam focusing. Plume composition and excitation has been studied via optical emission spectroscopy. Ablation has also been imaged photographically. Electron density gradients and densities are being studied through laser deflection. Film deposition experiments are also being performed. Electron transport and energy deposition in metals are being simulated in the ITS-TIGER code(Sandia Report No. SAND 91-1634).

  2. Focusing Electron Beams at SLAC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the development of a set of magnets that focus high-energy electron and positron beams causing them to collide, annihilate each other, and generate new particles. Explains how dipoles bend the beam, how quadrupoles focus the beam, how the focal length is calculated, and the superconducting final focus. (MDH)

  3. A beam branching method for timing and spectral characterization of hard X-ray free-electron lasers

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Tetsuo; Owada, Shigeki; Togashi, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Karvinen, Petri; Vartiainen, Ismo; Eronen, Anni; David, Christian; Sato, Takahiro; Nakajima, Kyo; Joti, Yasumasa; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-01-01

    We report a method for achieving advanced photon diagnostics of x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) under a quasi-noninvasive condition by using a beam-splitting scheme. Here, we used a transmission grating to generate multiple branches of x-ray beams. One of the two primary diffracted branches (+1st-order) is utilized for spectral measurement in a dispersive scheme, while the other (−1st-order) is dedicated for arrival timing diagnostics between the XFEL and the optical laser pulses. The transmitted x-ray beam (0th-order) is guided to an experimental station. To confirm the validity of this timing-monitoring scheme, we measured the correlation between the arrival timings of the −1st and 0th branches. The observed error was as small as 7.0 fs in root-mean-square. Our result showed the applicability of the beam branching scheme to advanced photon diagnostics, which will further enhance experimental capabilities of XFEL. PMID:26958586

  4. A beam branching method for timing and spectral characterization of hard X-ray free-electron lasers.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Tetsuo; Owada, Shigeki; Togashi, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Karvinen, Petri; Vartiainen, Ismo; Eronen, Anni; David, Christian; Sato, Takahiro; Nakajima, Kyo; Joti, Yasumasa; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-05-01

    We report a method for achieving advanced photon diagnostics of x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) under a quasi-noninvasive condition by using a beam-splitting scheme. Here, we used a transmission grating to generate multiple branches of x-ray beams. One of the two primary diffracted branches (+1st-order) is utilized for spectral measurement in a dispersive scheme, while the other (-1st-order) is dedicated for arrival timing diagnostics between the XFEL and the optical laser pulses. The transmitted x-ray beam (0th-order) is guided to an experimental station. To confirm the validity of this timing-monitoring scheme, we measured the correlation between the arrival timings of the -1st and 0th branches. The observed error was as small as 7.0 fs in root-mean-square. Our result showed the applicability of the beam branching scheme to advanced photon diagnostics, which will further enhance experimental capabilities of XFEL. PMID:26958586

  5. Electron beam coherence measurements using diffracted beam interferometry/holography.

    PubMed

    Herring, Rodney A

    2009-06-01

    The intensity and coherence of elastically and inelastically scattered electrons have been studied by the interference of electron-diffracted beams using a method of diffracted beam interferometry/holography (DBI/H). In the interferograms produced, fringes were found to exist from low to high scattering angles. The intensity and coherence of the fringes are useful for understanding the contrast mismatch between experimental and simulated images found in atomic resolution images of crystals produced by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and annular dark-field (ADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The fringes disappear when the interfering beams are separated from an exact overlay position, which produces a measurement of the beam's lateral coherence and holds promise for measuring the coherence of the respective quasi-particles associated with the energy loss electrons. PMID:19141592

  6. Collimation with hollow electron beams.

    PubMed

    Stancari, G; Valishev, A; Annala, G; Kuznetsov, G; Shiltsev, V; Still, D A; Vorobiev, L G

    2011-08-19

    A novel concept of controlled halo removal for intense high-energy beams in storage rings and colliders is presented. It is based on the interaction of the circulating beam with a 5-keV, magnetically confined, pulsed hollow electron beam in a 2-m-long section of the ring. The electrons enclose the circulating beam, kicking halo particles transversely and leaving the beam core unperturbed. By acting as a tunable diffusion enhancer and not as a hard aperture limitation, the hollow electron beam collimator extends conventional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable losses. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. The first results on the collimation of 980-GeV antiprotons are presented. PMID:21929171

  7. Comparative analysis of electrophysical properties of ceramic tantalum pentoxide coatings, deposited by electron beam evaporation and magnetron sputtering methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donkov, N.; Mateev, E.; Safonov, V.; Zykova, A.; Yakovin, S.; Kolesnikov, D.; Sudzhanskaya, I.; Goncharov, I.; Georgieva, V.

    2014-12-01

    Ta2O5 ceramic coatings have been deposited on glass substrates by e-beam evaporation and magnetron sputtering methods. For the magnetron sputtering process Ta target was used. X-ray diffraction measurements show that these coatings are amorphous. XPS survey spectra of the ceramic Ta2O5 coatings were obtained. All spectra consist of well-defined XPS lines of Ta 4f, 4d, 4p and 4s; O 1s; C 1s. Ta 4f doublets are typical for Ta2O5 coatings with two main peaks. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images of the e-beam evaporated and magnetron sputtered Ta2O5 ceramic coatings have revealed a relatively flat surface with no cracks. The dielectric properties of the tantalum pentoxide coatings have been investigated in the frequency range of 100 Hz to 1 MHz. The electrical behaviour of e-beam evaporated and magnetron sputtered Ta2O5 ceramic coatings have also been compared. The deposition process conditions principally effect the structure parameters and electrical properties of Ta2O5 ceramic coatings. The coatings deposited by different methods demonstrate the range of dielectric parameters due to the structural and stoichiometric composition changes

  8. Electron Beam Dump Particle Search

    SciTech Connect

    Crisler, M.; Fenker, H.; Leedom, I.; Pordes, S.; /Fermilab

    1986-05-30

    The debate over the existence of a new particle postulated to explain the narrow positron spectra seen in heavy ion collisions has focused attention on a region of mass/lifetime where such a particle may exist and yet would not have been seen. To obtain the best possible sensitivity to elementary particles coupling to the electron in this unexplored region, we propose an electron beam dump experiment which will make parasitic use of the newly constructed wide band electron beam.

  9. Synthesis of carbon-supported PtRh random alloy nanoparticles using electron beam irradiation reduction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yoshiyuki; Seino, Satoshi; Okazaki, Tomohisa; Akita, Tomoki; Nakagawa, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takao A.

    2016-05-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts of PtRh supported on carbon were synthesized using an electron beam irradiation reduction method. The PtRh nanoparticle catalysts were composed of particles 2-3 nm in size, which were well dispersed on the surface of the carbon support nanoparticles. Analyses of X-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that the PtRh nanoparticles have a randomly alloyed structure. The lattice constant of the PtRh nanoparticles showed good correlation with Vegard's law. These results are explained by the radiochemical formation process of the PtRh nanoparticles. Catalytic activities of PtRh/C nanoparticles for ethanol oxidation reaction were found to be higher than those obtained with Pt/C.

  10. Generation of electron Airy beams.

    PubMed

    Voloch-Bloch, Noa; Lereah, Yossi; Lilach, Yigal; Gover, Avraham; Arie, Ady

    2013-02-21

    Within the framework of quantum mechanics, a unique particle wave packet exists in the form of the Airy function. Its counterintuitive properties are revealed as it propagates in time or space: the quantum probability wave packet preserves its shape despite dispersion or diffraction and propagates along a parabolic caustic trajectory, even though no force is applied. This does not contradict Newton's laws of motion, because the wave packet centroid propagates along a straight line. Nearly 30 years later, this wave packet, known as an accelerating Airy beam, was realized in the optical domain; later it was generalized to an orthogonal and complete family of beams that propagate along parabolic trajectories, as well as to beams that propagate along arbitrary convex trajectories. Here we report the experimental generation and observation of the Airy beams of free electrons. These electron Airy beams were generated by diffraction of electrons through a nanoscale hologram, which imprinted on the electrons' wavefunction a cubic phase modulation in the transverse plane. The highest-intensity lobes of the generated beams indeed followed parabolic trajectories. We directly observed a non-spreading electron wavefunction that self-heals, restoring its original shape after passing an obstacle. This holographic generation of electron Airy beams opens up new avenues for steering electronic wave packets like their photonic counterparts, because the wave packets can be imprinted with arbitrary shapes or trajectories. PMID:23426323

  11. Application of filter method for detection of secondary electron emission in the auto-oscillating mode of beam plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balovnev, A. V.; Vizgalov, I. V.; Salahutdinov, G. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we studied the non-self mode of the auto-oscillation secondary- emission discharge (ASED) in a longitudinal magnetic field with autonomous electron gun to ignite the primary beam-plasma discharge (PPD).

  12. Diffractive optics fabricated by direct write methods with an electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kress, Bernard; Zaleta, David; Daschner, Walter; Urquhart, Kris; Stein, Robert; Lee, Sing H.

    1993-01-01

    State-of-the-art diffractive optics are fabricated using e-beam lithography and dry etching techniques to achieve multilevel phase elements with very high diffraction efficiencies. One of the major challenges encountered in fabricating diffractive optics is the small feature size (e.g. for diffractive lenses with small f-number). It is not only the e-beam system which dictates the feature size limitations, but also the alignment systems (mask aligner) and the materials (e-beam and photo resists). In order to allow diffractive optics to be used in new optoelectronic systems, it is necessary not only to fabricate elements with small feature sizes but also to do so in an economical fashion. Since price of a multilevel diffractive optical element is closely related to the e-beam writing time and the number of etching steps, we need to decrease the writing time and etching steps without affecting the quality of the element. To do this one has to utilize the full potentials of the e-beam writing system. In this paper, we will present three diffractive optics fabrication techniques which will reduce the number of process steps, the writing time, and the overall fabrication time for multilevel phase diffractive optics.

  13. Electron Beam Ablation of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleski, S. D.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Rintamaki, J. I.; Ang, L. K.; Spindler, H. L.; Cohen, W. E.; Lau, Y. Y.; Lash, J. S.

    1996-10-01

    An experiment has recently been devised for material ablation using a channelspark electron beam. The ultimate goal of this experiment is to deposit thin films by electron beam ablation. The channelspark is a pseudospark device developed by Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (G. Muller, C. Schultheiss, Proc. of Beams, 2, 833(1994)) for production of high current, low energy electron beams. The channelspark has the following operating parameters: a 15-20kV accelerating potential and measured source current of <2000A. Initial experiments have concentrated on characterizing ion-focused electron beam current transport through the necessary background fill gas (typically 5-50 mTorr of Argon). Ablation of Al, Fe, and Ti is being studied with spectroscopy and electron beam current diagnostics. Physical beam target damage is also being investigated and compared to laser ablated targets. Simulations of electron transport and energy deposition are being conducted via the ITS-TIGER code (Sandia Report No. SAND 91-1634) developed at Sandia National Laboratory.

  14. Repetitively pumped electron beam device

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, L.G.

    1979-07-24

    Disclosed is an apparatus for producing fast, repetitive pulses of controllable length of an electron beam by phased energy storage in a transmission line of length matched to the number of pulses and specific pulse lengths desired. 12 figs.

  15. Further remarks on electron beam pumping of laser materials.

    PubMed

    Klein, C A

    1966-12-01

    This article demonstrates that recently completed studies on the energy dissipation of kilovolt electron beams in solids provide readily applicable methods for assessing the situation in electron beam pumped lasers. PMID:20057662

  16. Non-ambipolar radio-frequency plasma electron source and systems and methods for generating electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershkowitz, Noah (Inventor); Longmier, Benjamin (Inventor); Baalrud, Scott (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An electron generating device extracts electrons, through an electron sheath, from plasma produced using RF fields. The electron sheath is located near a grounded ring at one end of a negatively biased conducting surface, which is normally a cylinder. Extracted electrons pass through the grounded ring in the presence of a steady state axial magnetic field. Sufficiently large magnetic fields and/or RF power into the plasma allow for helicon plasma generation. The ion loss area is sufficiently large compared to the electron loss area to allow for total non-ambipolar extraction of all electrons leaving the plasma. Voids in the negatively-biased conducting surface allow the time-varying magnetic fields provided by the antenna to inductively couple to the plasma within the conducting surface. The conducting surface acts as a Faraday shield, which reduces any time-varying electric fields from entering the conductive surface, i.e. blocks capacitive coupling between the antenna and the plasma.

  17. Non-ambipolar radio-frequency plasma electron source and systems and methods for generating electron beams

    DOEpatents

    Hershkowitz, Noah; Longmier, Benjamin; Baalrud, Scott

    2009-03-03

    An electron generating device extracts electrons, through an electron sheath, from plasma produced using RF fields. The electron sheath is located near a grounded ring at one end of a negatively biased conducting surface, which is normally a cylinder. Extracted electrons pass through the grounded ring in the presence of a steady state axial magnetic field. Sufficiently large magnetic fields and/or RF power into the plasma allow for helicon plasma generation. The ion loss area is sufficiently large compared to the electron loss area to allow for total non-ambipolar extraction of all electrons leaving the plasma. Voids in the negatively-biased conducting surface allow the time-varying magnetic fields provided by the antenna to inductively couple to the plasma within the conducting surface. The conducting surface acts as a Faraday shield, which reduces any time-varying electric fields from entering the conductive surface, i.e. blocks capacitive coupling between the antenna and the plasma.

  18. Non-ambipolar radio-frequency plasma electron source and systems and methods for generating electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hershkowitz, Noah (Inventor); Longmier, Benjamin (Inventor); Baalrud, Scott (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electron generating device extracts electrons, through an electron sheath, from plasma produced using RF fields. The electron sheath is located near a grounded ring at one end of a negatively biased conducting surface, which is normally a cylinder. Extracted electrons pass through the grounded ring in the presence of a steady state axial magnetic field. Sufficiently large magnetic fields and/or RF power into the plasma allow for helicon plasma generation. The ion loss area is sufficiently large compared to the electron loss area to allow for total non-ambipolar extraction of all electrons leaving the plasma. Voids in the negatively-biased conducting surface allow the time-varying magnetic fields provided by the antenna to inductively couple to the plasma within the conducting surface. The conducting surface acts as a Faraday shield, which reduces any time-varying electric fields from entering the conductive surface, i.e. blocks capacitive coupling between the antenna and the plasma.

  19. Temperature-dependent recombination velocity analysis on artificial small angle grain boundaries using electron beam induced current method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Takuto; Tachibana, Tomihisa; Ohshita, Yoshio; Prakash, Ronit R.; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2016-02-01

    The details of the process of carrier recombination via the Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) defect level, at the grain boundaries of multicrystalline silicon, were investigated. For this, the temperature-dependent recombination velocities, as determined by experiments, were analyzed by the application of an electron beam induced current method. For the model, the misorientation angles at the grain boundaries were defined using a multi-seed casting-growth method. The results of our experiments indicated different temperature behaviors at low and high temperatures. These can be explained by controlling the process anticipated by the SRH model, that is, the process whereby minority carriers (electrons) are captured at lower temperatures, followed by the reemission of the carriers before recombination with Arrhenius behavior at higher temperatures. The minority capture process appeared to conform to the power law T-α temperature behavior. Thus, there are two candidate electron capture mechanisms, namely, cascade phonon emission capture for shallow centers and excitonic-Auger capture for deep centers. The activation energy for the reemission of carriers was around 0.1 eV. These findings regarding the temperature dependence are essentially independent of the misorientation angles, suggesting a common defect level and recombination mechanism. The difference in the recombination velocities can be regarded as being derived from the difference in the density at the defect level.

  20. Electron beam pumped semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Electron-beam-pumped semiconductor ultra-violet optical sources (ESUVOSs) are disclosed that use ballistic electron pumped wide bandgap semiconductor materials. The sources may produce incoherent radiation and take the form of electron-beam-pumped light emitting triodes (ELETs). The sources may produce coherent radiation and take the form of electron-beam-pumped laser triodes (ELTs). The ELTs may take the form of electron-beam-pumped vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (EVCSEL) or edge emitting electron-beam-pumped lasers (EEELs). The semiconductor medium may take the form of an aluminum gallium nitride alloy that has a mole fraction of aluminum selected to give a desired emission wavelength, diamond, or diamond-like carbon (DLC). The sources may be produced from discrete components that are assembled after their individual formation or they may be produced using batch MEMS-type or semiconductor-type processing techniques to build them up in a whole or partial monolithic manner, or combination thereof.

  1. Electron Cooling of Intense Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, J.; Kamerdjiev, V.; Maier, R.; Prasuhn, D.; Stein, J.; Stockhorst, H.; Korotaev, Yu.; Meshkov, I.; Sidorin, A.; Smirnov, A.

    2006-03-20

    Results of experimental studies of the electron cooling of a proton beam at COSY (Juelich, Germany) are presented. Intensity of the proton beam is limited by two general effects: particle loss directly after the injection and development of instability in a deep cooled ion beam. Results of the instability investigations performed at COSY during last years are presented in this report in comparison with previous results from HIMAC (Chiba, Japan) CELSIUS (Uppsala, Sweden) and LEAR (CERN). Methods of the instability suppression, which allow increasing the cooled beam intensity, are described. This work is supported by RFBR grant no. 05-02-16320 and INTAS grant no. 03-54-5584.

  2. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Reinard; Kester, Oliver

    2010-02-15

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not ''sorcery'' but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future.

  3. Beam Studies with Electron Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Kuznetsov, G.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Romanov, A.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2009-04-01

    We report preliminary results of experimental studies of 'electron columns' in the Tevatron and in a specialized test setup. In the Tevatron, a beam of 150 GeV protons ionizes residual gas and ionization electrons are stored in an electrostatic trap immersed into strong longitudinal magnetic field. Shifts of proton betatron frequencies are observed. In the test setup, we observe effects pointing to accumulation and escape of ionization electrons.

  4. Electron beam controller. [using magnetic field to refocus spent electron beam in microwave oscillator tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An electron beam device which extracts energy from an electron beam before the electrons of the beam are captured by a collector apparatus is described. The device produces refocusing of a spent electron beam by minimizing tranverse electron velocities in the beam where the electrons, having a multiplicity of axial velocities, are sorted at high efficiency by collector electrodes.

  5. Electron beam ion sources and traps (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Reinard

    2000-02-01

    The electron beam method of stepwise ionization to highest charge states has found applications in electron beam ion sources (EBISs) for accelerators and atomic physics collision experiments as well as in electron beam ion traps (EBITs) for x-ray and mass spectroscopy. A dense and almost monoenergetic electron beam provides a unique tool for ionization, because radiative recombination by slow electrons is negligible and charge exchange is almost avoided in ultrahigh vacua. These are essential differences to electron cyclotron resonance ion sources with inevitable low energy electrons and comparatively high gas pressure. The distinction between EBIS and EBIT as genuine devices has become meaningless, because EBISs may work as traps and almost all EBITs are feeding beamlines for external experiments. More interesting is to note the diversification of these devices, which demonstrates that a matured technology is finding dedicated answers for different applications. At present we may distinguish six major lines of development and application: high current EBISs for upcoming hadron colliders, super EBITs in the energy range above 300 keV for quantum electrondynamics tests, inexpensive and small EBISTs for atomic physics studies, a highly efficient EBIS with oscillating electrons, MEDEBIS for tumor therapy with C6+, and charge breeding in facilities for exotic radioactive beams.

  6. Cylindrical electron beam diode

    DOEpatents

    Bolduc, Paul E.

    1976-01-01

    A diode discharge device may include a tubular anode concentrically encircled by and spaced from a tubular cathode electrode with ends intermediate the ends of said anode electrode, and a metal conductive housing having a tubular wall disposed around the cathode electrode with end walls connected to the anode electrode. High energy electron current coupling is through an opening in the housing tubular wall to a portion of the cathode electrode intermediate its ends. Suitable utilization means may be within the anode electrode at positions to be irradiated by electrons emitted from the cathode electrode and transmitted through the anode walls.

  7. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; O'Brien, Dennis W.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: 1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and 2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1000 .mu.m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 .mu.m diameter of laser drilling.

  8. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, J.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1996-07-09

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: (1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and (2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1,000 {micro}m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 {micro}m diameter of laser drilling. 5 figs.

  9. Vortices in relativistic electron beams

    PubMed

    Jovanovic; Fedele; Shukla

    2000-08-01

    We demonstrate that a relativistic electron beam is properly described in the moving frame by the electron-magnetohydrodynamic equations of plasma physics. For large beam currents, the accelerator magnetic field is expected to be unstable to the fast magnetic reconnection. We present a plausible saturated state of the fast reconnection, in the form of a complex vortex pattern. The nonlinear dispersion equations of the vortex are derived and the relationship between the vortex structure and the background magnetic field is discussed. PMID:11088759

  10. Shimmed electron beam welding process

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Ganjiang; Nowak, Daniel Anthony; Murphy, John Thomas

    2002-01-01

    A modified electron beam welding process effects welding of joints between superalloy materials by inserting a weldable shim in the joint and heating the superalloy materials with an electron beam. The process insures a full penetration of joints with a consistent percentage of filler material and thereby improves fatigue life of the joint by three to four times as compared with the prior art. The process also allows variable shim thickness and joint fit-up gaps to provide increased flexibility for manufacturing when joining complex airfoil structures and the like.

  11. Effective Electron Beam Injection With Broad Energy Initial Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, J.H.; Hubbard, R.F.; Gordon, D.F.; Ting, A.; Sprangle, P.; Zigler, A.

    2004-12-07

    Laser Wakefield Accelerators (LWFA), in the resonant regime, require use of an injected electron beam. Several optical methods for generating electron bunches exist e.g., Laser Ionization and Ponderomotive Acceleration (LIPA) and Self-Modulated LWFA among others. Each of these schemes produces an electron bunch with a characteristic energy distribution. We examine the trapping characteristics in a resonant LWFA for an injection electron beam with a broad energy spread that can be characterized using a Boltzmann distribution with an 'effective temperature'. We present results of both analytic calculations and simulations which provide a methodology for optimizing the resulting accelerated electron bunch characteristics i.e., energy and energy spread, for a given LWFA configuration.

  12. Comparison of optical resistance of ion assisted deposition and standard electron beam deposition methods for high reflectance dielectric coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melninkaitis, A.; Maciulevicius, M.; Rakickas, T.; Miksys, D.; Grigonis, R.; Sirutkaitis, V.; Skrebutenas, A.; Buzelis, R.; Drazdys, R.; Abromavicius, G.

    2005-09-01

    The ion assisted thin film deposition (IAD) method has been used extensively for more than two decades, but questions about possibility of improving of the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) by this method compared with the conventional electron-beam evaporation (non-IAD) method are still not fully answered. A more complete understanding of different factors that can influence laser-induced damage threshold is necessary for continued development of multilayer dielectric coatings optimized for high-power laser applications. To clarify these factors we performed comparison of LIDT for IAD and non-IAD coatings in nanosecond and femtosecond pulse ranges. High reflectance mirrors at 800 nm and 532 nm were tested. Mirror coatings were made of ZrO2 and SiO2. Automated LIDT measurements were performed according to the requirements of current ISO 11254-2 standard. Two lasers were used for the measurements: Nd:YAG (λ = 532 nm, τ = 5 ns) and Ti:Sapphire (λ = 800 nm, τ = 130 fs). Measurements at 800 nm and 532 nm were performed at 1-kHz and 10 Hz pulse repetition rate respectively (S-on-1 test). The damage morphology of coatings was characterized by Nomarski microscopy and relation of LIDT with coating parameters was analyzed.

  13. Green coffee decontamination by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemtanu, Monica R.; Brasoveanu, Mirela; Grecu, Maria Nicoleta; Minea, R.

    2005-10-01

    Microbiological load of green coffee is a real problem considering that it is extremely sensitive to contamination. Irradiation is a decontamination method for a lot of foodstuffs, being a feasible, very effective and environment friendly one. Beans and ground green coffee were irradiated with electron beams up to 40 kGy. Microbial load, rheological behavior, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and visible spectroscopy were carried out. The results show that electron beam irradiation of green coffee could decontaminate it without severe changes in its properties.

  14. Radiative cooling of relativistic electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.

    1999-04-14

    Radiative cooling is a natural and effective method of phase-space cooling for stored electron beams. In electron storage rings the average effects of synchrotron radiation from the bending magnets cause the beam emittances in all three degrees of freedom to damp towards equilibria, determined by the fluctuating nature of quantum emissions. In this paper, they show that the radiation damping in a focusing system is fundamentally different from that in a bending system. Quantum excitation to the transverse dimensions is absent in a straight, continuous focusing channel, and is exponentially suppressed in a focusing-dominated ring. Thus, the transverse normalized emittances in such systems can in principle be damped to the Compton wavelength of the electron, limited only by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. In addition, they investigate methods of rapid damping such as radiative laser cooling. They propose a laser-electron storage ring (LESR) where the electron beam in a compact storage ring repetitively interacts with an intense laser pulse stored in an optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction gives rise to fast cooling of electron beams and can be used to overcome the space-charge effects encountered in a medium-energy circular machine. Applications to the designs of ultra-low-emittance damping rings and compact x-ray sources are also explored.

  15. Structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of Cu0.87Se thin films coated by electron beam evaporation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuvaneswari, P. V.; Ramamurthi, K.; Ramesh Babu, R.; Moorthy Babu, S.

    2015-09-01

    Copper selenide powder was synthesized adopting a two-step chemical route. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the synthesized material consists of mixed phases of Cu3Se2, Cu7Se4 and Cu0.87Se. Synthesized material was used to deposit thin films at the substrate temperature of 200, 300, 400 and 500 °C by electron beam evaporation method. The substrate temperature of 200 °C yielded amorphous film, whereas the substrate temperature of 300, 400 and 500 °C produced Cu0.87Se single-phase thin film. Atomic force microscopic studies showed that the film coated at 400 °C possesses relatively lower average roughness. The direct band gap of Cu0.87Se varies from 1.67 to 1.81 eV. Thin film coated at 400 °C shows the minimum resistivity of 5.2 × 10-4 Ω cm, whereas the film coated at 300 °C possesses the maximum mobility of 8.2 cm2/Vs.

  16. Use of beam deflection to control an electron beam wire deposition process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M. (Inventor); Hofmeister, William H. (Inventor); Hafley, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for controlling an electron beam process wherein a wire is melted and deposited on a substrate as a molten pool comprises generating the electron beam with a complex raster pattern, and directing the beam onto an outer surface of the wire to thereby control a location of the wire with respect to the molten pool. Directing the beam selectively heats the outer surface of the wire and maintains the position of the wire with respect to the molten pool. An apparatus for controlling an electron beam process includes a beam gun adapted for generating the electron beam, and a controller adapted for providing the electron beam with a complex raster pattern and for directing the electron beam onto an outer surface of the wire to control a location of the wire with respect to the molten pool.

  17. Light modulated electron beam driven radiofrequency emitter

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.

    1979-10-10

    The disclosure relates to a light modulated electron beam-driven radiofrequency emitter. Pulses of light impinge on a photoemissive device which generates an electron beam having the pulse characteristics of the light. The electron beam is accelerated through a radiofrequency resonator which produces radiofrequency emission in accordance with the electron, hence, the light pulses.

  18. A unified description of two voltage-varying methods for evaluating surface recombination velocity from electron-beam-induced current: Application to normal- and planar-collector configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, Keung L.

    1996-03-01

    Ever since their respective appearance in the literature, the Watanable-Actor-Gatos (WAG) and Berz-Kuiken (BK) methods—two voltage-varying methods for determining the ratio of surface recombination velocity over diffusion coefficient (sT/D) from electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) data measured as a function of beam voltage—have coexisted as separate, independent methods. Judged by the frequency of its citations in the literature and endorsements in review articles, the WAG method appears to be the method of choice. In this article it is shown that these two methods have a common origin and that in fact they are identical when the EBIC is linearly related to the effective beam penetration depth. Unifying these methods leads to the development of a more general method, named here as the slope-extrapolated-intercepts or SEIs method. To demonstrate its generality, the SEIs method is used to investigate a variety of situations: normal- and planar-collector geometries, Gaussian and point sources, and a wide range of values of material parameters and effective beam penetration depth. It is found that the SEIs method, or the simpler but less general and less accurate BK method, and not the WAG method, should be the method of choice to evaluate sT/D from voltage-varying EBIC data.

  19. REBL nanowriter: Reflective Electron Beam Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petric, Paul; Bevis, Chris; Brodie, Alan; Carroll, Allen; Cheung, Anthony; Grella, Luca; McCord, Mark; Percy, Henry; Standiford, Keith; Zywno, Marek

    2009-03-01

    REBL (Reflective Electron Beam Lithography) is being developed for high throughput electron beam direct write maskless lithography. The system is specifically targeting 5 to 7 wafer levels per hour throughput on average at the 45 nm node, with extendibility to the 32 nm node and beyond. REBL incorporates a number of novel technologies to generate and expose lithographic patterns at estimated throughputs considerably higher than electron beam lithography has been able to achieve as yet. A patented reflective electron optic concept enables the unique approach utilized for the Digital Pattern Generator (DPG). The DPG is a CMOS ASIC chip with an array of small, independently controllable cells or pixels, which act as an array of electron mirrors. In this way, the system is capable of generating the pattern to be written using massively parallel exposure by ~1 million beams at extremely high data rates (~ 1Tbps). A rotary stage concept using a rotating platen carrying multiple wafers optimizes the writing strategy of the DPG to achieve the capability of high throughput for sparse pattern wafer levels. The exposure method utilized by the DPG was emulated on a Vistec VB-6 in order to validate the gray level exposure method used in REBL. Results of these exposure tests are discussed.

  20. Practical Teaching about Electron Beams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawson, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    If you have seen tubes like the ones we describe here in the back of a cupboard but have been reluctant to use them, now is the time to get them out. The aim of this article is to record the history of teaching about electron beams, particularly with Teltron equipment, and in doing so encourage those schools that are equipped with these tubes to…

  1. APPARATUS FOR ELECTRON BEAM HEATING CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Jones, W.H.; Reece, J.B.

    1962-09-18

    An improved electron beam welding or melting apparatus is designed which utilizes a high voltage rectifier operating below its temperature saturation region to decrease variations in electron beam current which normally result from the gas generated in such apparatus. (AEC)

  2. Absolute cascade-free cross-sections for the 2S to 2P transition in Zn(+) using electron-energy-loss and merged-beams methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Man, K.-F.; Chutjian, A.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Williams, I. D.

    1991-01-01

    Absolute cascade-free excitation cross-sections in an ion have been measured for the resonance 2S to 2P transition in Zn(+) using electron-energy-loss and merged electron-ion beams methods. Measurements were carried out at electron energies of below threshold to 6 times threshold. Comparisons are made with 2-, 5-, and 15-state close-coupling and distorted-wave theories. There is good agreement between experiment and the 15-state close-coupling cross-sections over the energy range of the calculations.

  3. Longitudinal Diagnostics for Short Electron Beam Bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, H.; /SLAC

    2010-06-11

    Single-pass free electron lasers require high peak currents from ultra-short electron bunches to reach saturation and an accurate measurement of bunch length and longitudinal bunch profile is necessary to control the bunch compression process from low to high beam energy. The various state-of-the-art diagnostics methods from ps to fs time scales using coherent radiation detection, RF deflection, and other techniques are presented. The use of linear accelerators as drivers for free electron lasers (FEL) and the advent of single-pass (SASE) FELs has driven the development of a wide range of diagnostic techniques for measuring the length and longitudinal distribution of short and ultra-short electron bunches. For SASE FELs the radiation power and the length of the undulator needed to achieve saturation depend strongly on the charge density of the electron beam. In the case of X-ray FELs, this requires the accelerator to produce ultra-high brightness beams with micron size transverse normalized emittances and peak currents of several kA through several stages of magnetic bunch compression. Different longitudinal diagnostics are employed to measure the peak current and bunch profile along these stages. The measurement techniques can be distinguished into different classes. Coherent methods detect the light emitted from the beam by some coherent radiation process (spectroscopic measurement), or directly measure the Coulomb field traveling with the beam (electro-optic). Phase space manipulation techniques map the time coordinate onto a transverse dimension and then use conventional transverse beam diagnostics (transverse deflector, rf zero-phasing). Further methods measure the profile or duration of an incoherent light pulse emitted by the bunch at wavelengths much shorted than the bunch length (streak camera, fluctuation technique) or modulate the electron beam at an optical wavelength and then generate a narrow bandwidth radiation pulse with the longitudinal profile of

  4. Free electron laser for a mildly relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, H.S.

    1983-08-01

    One of the most basic instabilities which characterize a relativistic electron beam propagating through a helical wiggler (or undulator) magnetic field is the free electron laser instability. This instability has been extensively investigated in recent years with particular emphasis on applications involving high power microwave radiation. Previous theoretical studies of this instability have tended to result in the conclusion that high energy beams with a relativistic factor much greater than 1 are required to generate high frequency microwave radiation. Beams with this high a relativistic factor have proven to be highly unsuited, however, to compact and practical microwave tubes. To this end, for a relativistic electron beam propagating through a dielectric loaded waveguide, this paper presents a method for the bandwidth and frequency enhancement of the free electron laser instability which makes use of a mild (less than 1.5) relativistic factor. It demonstrates that the instability bandwidth and frequency can be greatly enhanced for specified values of the beam energy and wiggler wavelength if the dielectric constant and the thickness of the dielectric material are appropriately selected. The paper also presents a new scheme for a broad bandwidth microwave amplifier.

  5. A range-based method to calibrate a magnetic spectrometer measuring the energy spectrum of the backward electron beam of a plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccolini, E.; Mostacci, D.; Sumini, M.; Rocchi, F.; Tartari, A.

    2011-08-15

    The electron beam emitted from the back of plasma focus devices is being studied as a radiation source for intraoperative radiation therapy applications. A plasma focus device is being developed for this purpose, and there is a need for characterizing its electron beam, particularly, insofar as the energy spectrum is concerned. The instrument used is a magnetic spectrometer. To calibrate this spectrometer, a procedure relying on the energy-range relation in Mylar has been devised and applied. By measuring the transmission through increasing thicknesses of the material, electron energies could be assessed and compared to the spectrometer readings. Thus, the original calibration of the instrument has been extended to higher energies and also to better accuracy. Methods and results are presented.

  6. A range-based method to calibrate a magnetic spectrometer measuring the energy spectrum of the backward electron beam of a plasma focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccolini, E.; Rocchi, F.; Mostacci, D.; Sumini, M.; Tartari, A.

    2011-08-01

    The electron beam emitted from the back of plasma focus devices is being studied as a radiation source for intraoperative radiation therapy applications. A plasma focus device is being developed for this purpose, and there is a need for characterizing its electron beam, particularly, insofar as the energy spectrum is concerned. The instrument used is a magnetic spectrometer. To calibrate this spectrometer, a procedure relying on the energy-range relation in Mylar® has been devised and applied. By measuring the transmission through increasing thicknesses of the material, electron energies could be assessed and compared to the spectrometer readings. Thus, the original calibration of the instrument has been extended to higher energies and also to better accuracy. Methods and results are presented.

  7. Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, Rodion

    2006-04-01

    We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*{sub 01} mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

  8. Beam/seam alignment control for electron beam welding

    DOEpatents

    Burkhardt, Jr., James H.; Henry, J. James; Davenport, Clyde M.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a dynamic beam/seam alignment control system for electron beam welds utilizing video apparatus. The system includes automatic control of workpiece illumination, near infrared illumination of the workpiece to limit the range of illumination and camera sensitivity adjustment, curve fitting of seam position data to obtain an accurate measure of beam/seam alignment, and automatic beam detection and calculation of the threshold beam level from the peak beam level of the preceding video line to locate the beam or seam edges.

  9. Unveiling orbital angular momentum and acceleration of light beams and electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arie, Ady

    Special beams, such as the vortex beams that carry orbital angular momentum (OAM) and the Airy beam that preserves its shape while propagating along parabolic trajectory, have drawn significant attention recently both in light optics and in electron optics experiments. In order to utilize these beams, simple methods are needed that enable to easily quantify their defining properties, namely the OAM for the vortex beams and the nodal trajectory acceleration coefficient for the Airy beam. Here we demonstrate a straightforward method to determine these quantities by astigmatic Fourier transform of the beam. For electron beams in a transmission electron microscope, this transformation is easily realized using the condenser and objective stigmators, whereas for light beam this can be achieved using a cylindrical lens. In the case of Laguerre-Gauss vortex beams, it is already well known that applying the astigmatic Fourier transformation converts them to Hermite-Gauss beams. The topological charge (and hence the OAM) can be determined by simply counting the number of dark stripes of the Hermite-Gauss beam. We generated a series of electron vortex beams and managed to determine the topological charge up to a value of 10. The same concept of astigmatic transformation was then used to unveil the acceleration of an electron Airy beam. The shape of astigmatic-transformed depends only on the astigmatic measure and on the acceleration coefficient. This method was experimentally verified by generating electron Airy beams with different known acceleration parameters, enabling direct comparison to the deduced values from the astigmatic transformation measurements. The method can be extended to other types of waves. Specifically, we have recently used it to determine the acceleration of an optical Airy beams and the topological charge of so-called Airy-vortex light beam, i.e. an Airy light beam with an embedded vortex. This work was supported by DIP and the Israel Science

  10. Electron beam facility for divertor target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, A.; Gagen-Torn, V.; Giniyatulin, R.N.

    1994-12-31

    To test different concepts of divertor targets and bumpers an electron beam facility was assembled in Efremov Institute. It consists of a vacuum chamber (3m{sup 3}), vacuum pump, electron beam gun, manipulator to place and remove the samples, water loop and liquid metal loop. The following diagnostics of mock-ups is stipulated: (1) temperature distribution on the mock-up working surface (scanning pyrometer and infra-red imager); (2) temperature distribution over mocked-up thickness in 3 typical cross-sections (thermo-couples); (3) cracking dynamics during thermal cycling (acoustic-emission method), (4) defects in the mock-up before and after tests (ultra-sonic diagnostics, electron and optical microscopes). Carbon-based and beryllium mock-ups are made for experimental feasibility study of water and liquid-metal-cooled divertor/bumper concepts.

  11. Electron beam parallel X-ray generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, P.

    1967-01-01

    Broad X ray source produces a highly collimated beam of low energy X rays - a beam with 2 to 5 arc minutes of divergence at energies between 1 and 6 keV in less than 5 feet. The X ray beam is generated by electron bombardment of a target from a large area electron gun.

  12. Modern developments in electron-beam fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattolica, Robert J.

    Recent developments in the area of electron-beam fluorescence are discussed with special attention given to the experience in the use of the electron-beam fluorescence in flight research. A new measurement approach, called electron-photon fluorescence (EPF), is described, and it is shown that EPF offers the potential of overcoming some of the disadvantages of electron-beam fluorescence in high-density flows. Examples of using the EPF technique are presented.

  13. Modern developments in electron-beam fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattolica, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Recent developments in the area of electron-beam fluorescence are discussed with special attention given to the experience in the use of the electron-beam fluorescence in flight research. A new measurement approach, called electron-photon fluorescence (EPF), is described, and it is shown that EPF offers the potential of overcoming some of the disadvantages of electron-beam fluorescence in high-density flows. Examples of using the EPF technique are presented.

  14. Rippled beam free electron laser amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a TM.sub.0n mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and, a solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  15. Rippled beam free electron Laser Amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, Bruce E.

    1998-04-21

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a T{sub 0n} mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and . A solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  16. Plasma and ion barrier for electron beam spot stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Thomas J. T.; Snell, Charles M.

    2000-03-01

    High-current electron beams of small spot size are used for high-resolution x-ray radiography of dense objects. Intense energy deposition in the bremsstrahlung target causes generation of ions which can propagate upstream and disrupt the electron beam. We have investigated the use of a thin beryllium foil placed 1-2 cm in front of the target, which serves as a barrier for the ions but is essentially transparent to the incoming electron beam. Analysis and computer simulations confirm that this confinement method will halt ion propagation and preserve the spot size stability of the electron beam. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Preventing Contamination In Electron-Beam Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodin, Wesley D.; Gulbrandsen, Kevin A.; Oleksiak, Carl

    1990-01-01

    Simple expedient eliminates time-consuming, expensive manual hand grinding. Use of groove and backup tube greatly reduces postweld cleanup in some electron-beam welding operations. Tube-backup method developed for titanium parts, configurations of which prevents use of solid-block backup. In new welding configuration, tube inserted in groove to prevent contact between alumina beads and molten weld root. When welding complete and beads and tube removed, only minor spatter remains and is ground away easily.

  18. Method of fabricating conducting oxide-silicon solar cells utilizing electron beam sublimation and deposition of the oxide

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1979-01-01

    In preparing tin oxide and indium tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells by electron beam sublimation of the oxide and subsequent deposition thereof on the silicon, the engineering efficiency of the resultant cell is enhanced by depositing the oxide at a predetermined favorable angle of incidence. Typically the angle of incidence is between 40.degree. and 70.degree. and preferably between 55.degree. and 65.degree. when the oxide is tin oxide and between 40.degree. and 70.degree. when the oxide deposited is indium tin oxide. gi The Government of the United States of America has rights in this invention pursuant to Department of Energy Contract No. EY-76-C-03-1283.

  19. Transverse Mode Electron Beam Microwave Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, Lawrence E.

    1994-01-01

    An electron beam microwave device having an evacuated interaction chamber to which are coupled a resonant cavity which has an opening between the resonant cavity and the evacuated interaction chamber and an electron gun which causes a narrow beam of electrons to traverse the evacuated interaction chamber. The device also contains a mechanism for feeding back a microwave electromagnetic field from the resonant cavity to the evacuated interaction chamber in such a way as to modulate the direction of propagation of the electron beam, thereby further amplifyjng the microwave electromagnetic field. Furthermore, provision is made for coupling the electromagnetic field out of the electron beam microwave device.

  20. Beam rotation and shear in a large electron beam diode

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, C.R.; Oona, H.; Shurter, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    The time averaged electron beam current distribution of one of the electron guns of the Large Aperture Module (LAM) of the Aurora laser was measured as part of a larger set of experiments designed to study the electron beam transport to and energy deposition in the LAM laser chamber. The LAM laser chamber has a 1-m {times} 1-m aperture and is pumped from two sides along a 2-m length. A 10 ga. stainless steel sheet was placed inside the laser chamber and served multiple purposes. First, it was used to convert high energy electrons into X-rays in order to make radiograms of the electron beam. Second, the sheet was used as a Faraday cup to measure the total beam current. Third, individual Faraday cups were mounted on the plate to sample the time history of the electron beam at various positions. Each of the LAM electron gun diodes produces a beam of 750 kV electrons with a total current of about 500 kA which is relatively uniform over the cathode area of 1 m {times} 2 m. An applied magnetic field of about 1300 Gauss is used to prevent pinch of the beam during beam transport.

  1. Electron beam enhanced surface modification for making highly resolved structures

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J.R.

    1984-10-10

    A method for forming high resolution submicron structures on a substrate is provided by direct writing with a submicron electron beam in a partial pressure of a selected gas phase characterized by the ability to dissociate under the beam into a stable gaseous leaving group and a reactant fragment that combines with the substrate material under beam energy to form at least a surface compound. Variations of the method provide semiconductor device regions on doped silicon substrates, interconnect lines between active sites, three dimensional electronic chip structures, electron beam and optical read mass storage devices that may include color differentiated data areas, and resist areas for use with selective etching techniques.

  2. Electron beam enhanced surface modification for making highly resolved structures

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A method for forming high resolution submicron structures on a substrate is provided by direct writing with a submicron electron beam in a partial pressure of a selected gas phase characterized by the ability to dissociate under the beam into a stable gaseous leaving group and a reactant fragment that combines with the substrate material under beam energy to form at least a surface compound. Variations of the method provide semiconductor device regions on doped silicon substrates, interconnect lines between active sites, three dimensional electronic chip structures, electron beam and optical read mass storage devices that may include color differentiated data areas, and resist areas for use with selective etching techniques.

  3. Electron beam induced conductivity effect of polymer resists and charging induced electron beam deflection simulation in electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwu, Justin Jia-Jen

    2000-10-01

    The electron beam induced conductivity (EBIC) effect of polymer materials was investigated and three electron beam resists, PBS, EBR900, and ZEP7000, were used as target materials in this research. An external bias method was applied for the direct measurements of EBIC current and the EBIC conductivity was then derived. The temperature effect on EBIC was illustrated by EBR900 and a simple single trap level analysis gave good agreement in explanation of initial state conductivity dependence on temperature change. The dependence of initial state EBIC values on dose rates and bias was also determined and an empirical from of EBIC-bias relationship was established for the electron beam deflection modeling. The long term EBIC characteristics of resists were investigated under different dose rates. The variation of EBIC versus time was explained by a transient theory that considers rates of carrier generation, carrier trapping, carrier detrapping, and carrier recombination contribution. The trapping model analysis on steady state EBIC results revealed that PBS has a uniform distribution of traps, while EBR900 and ZEP7000 fall in the same category that has exponential distribution of traps. The steady state EBIC gain was also determined for the three resists and the onset of the plasma region was observed for EBR900 and ZEP7000. A simulation model for the calculation of electron beam deflection owing to resist charging was developed in the second part of this research. Charging patterns of circles and squares of different dimensions were considered. Both SIMION and MATHEMATICA were used as simulation tools and the limitation of SIMION was illustrated and discussed. The model programmed in MATHEMATICA simulated electron beam deflection during e-beam writing. With the combination of the empirical EBIC-bias relationship of EBR900, the model simulated surface potential decay after irradiation and the results showed good agreement with literature values. The extent of

  4. Electron beam effects in a UV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.K.; Blau, J.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    At the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), a free electron laser (FEL) is designed to produce ultraviolet (UV) light. A four-dimensional FEL simulation studies the effects of betatron oscillations, external focusing, and longitudinal pulse compression of the electron beam on the FEL performance.

  5. Towards demonstration of electron cooling with bunched electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.

    2012-01-11

    All electron cooling systems which were in operation so far employed electron beam generated with an electrostatic electron gun in DC operating mode, immersed in a longitudinal magnetic field. At low energies magnetic field is also being used to transport electron beam through the cooling section from the gun to the collector. At higher energies (few MeV), it was shown that one can have simpler electron beam transport without continuous magnetic field. Because of a rather weak magnetic field on the cathode and in the cooling section the latter approach was referred to as 'non-magnetized cooling', since there was no suppression of the transverse angular spread of the electron beam with the magnetic field in the cooling section. Such a cooler successfully operated at FNAL (2005-11) at electron beam energy of 4.3 MeV. Providing cooling at even higher energies would be easier with RF acceleration of electron beam, and thus using bunched electron beam for cooling. Significant efforts were devoted to explore various aspects of such bunched electron beam cooling as part of R and D of high-energy electron cooling for RHIC. However, experimental studies of such cooling are still lacking. Establishing this technique experimentally would be extremely useful for future high-energy applications. Presently there is an ongoing effort to build Proof-of-Principle (PoP) experiment of Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC) at RHIC, which promises to be superior to conventional electron cooling for high energies. Since the CEC experiment is based on bunched electron beam and it has sections where electron beam co-propagates with the ion beam at the same velocity, it also provides a unique opportunity to explore experimentally conventional electron cooling but for the first time with a bunched electron beam. As a result, it allows us to explore techniques needed for the high-energy electron cooling such as 'painting' with a short electron beam and control of ion beam distribution under

  6. Plasma lenses for focusing relativistic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Govil, R.; Wheeler, S.; Leemans, W.

    1997-04-01

    The next generation of colliders require tightly focused beams with high luminosity. To focus charged particle beams for such applications, a plasma focusing scheme has been proposed. Plasma lenses can be overdense (plasma density, n{sub p} much greater than electron beam density, n{sub b}) or underdense (n{sub p} less than 2 n{sub b}). In overdense lenses the space-charge force of the electron beam is canceled by the plasma and the remaining magnetic force causes the electron beam to self-pinch. The focusing gradient is nonlinear, resulting in spherical aberrations. In underdense lenses, the self-forces of the electron beam cancel, allowing the plasma ions to focus the beam. Although for a given beam density, a uniform underdense lens produces smaller focusing gradients than an overdense lens, it produces better beam quality since the focusing is done by plasma ions. The underdense lens can be improved by tapering the density of the plasma for optimal focusing. The underdense lens performance can be enhanced further by producing adiabatic plasma lenses to avoid the Oide limit on spot size due to synchrotron radiation by the electron beam. The plasma lens experiment at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) is designed to study the properties of plasma lenses in both overdense and underdense regimes. In particular, important issues such as electron beam matching, time response of the lens, lens aberrations and shot-to-shot reproducibility are being investigated.

  7. Rippled-beam free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-10-01

    The authors describe a new microwave generation mechanism involving a scalloping annular electron beam. The beam interacts with the axial electric field of a TM{sub 0n} mode in a smooth circular waveguide through the axial free-electron laser interaction, in which the beam ripple period is synchronous with the phase slippage of the rf mode relative to the electron beam. Due to nonlinearities in the orbit equation, the interaction can be made autoresonant, where the phase and amplitude of the gain is independent of the beam energy.

  8. Susceptor heating device for electron beam brazing

    DOEpatents

    Antieau, Susan M.; Johnson, Robert G. R.

    1999-01-01

    A brazing device and method are provided which locally apply a controlled amount of heat to a selected area, within a vacuum. The device brazes two components together with a brazing metal. A susceptor plate is placed in thermal contact with one of the components. A serrated pedestal supports the susceptor plate. When the pedestal and susceptor plate are in place, an electron gun irradiates an electron beam at the susceptor plate such that the susceptor plate is sufficiently heated to transfer heat through the one component and melt the brazing metal.

  9. Implementation of a compact magnetic electron energy spectrometer for intense relativistic electron beams. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Gregor, J.A.; Antoniades, J.A.

    1993-11-05

    A diagnostic used for measuring the energy of 1 to 5 MEV pulsed electron beams by means independent of the beam generating device is investigated. The method employed is capable of collecting the required data optically in a single pulse. The beam energy is measured using a magnetic electron spectrometer coupled with a scintillating material. Using a polaroid camera to collect data, the energy of electron beams from two field emission diode accelerators is measured. The first is a nominal 1 MEV, 16 kA, 25 ns FWHM electron beam and the second is a nominal 5 MEV, 20 kA, 50 ns FWHM electron beam. A detailed study of measurement accuracy and possible sources of error was accomplished. Energy, Relativistic, Electron beam. Electron, Spectrometer.

  10. Coherent Radiation from Relativistic Electron Beams.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuan-Ren

    Two new laser concepts, the Ion-Ripple Laser (IRL) and the Ion-Channel Laser (ICL), are proposed. A unified theory for coherent radiation from relativistic electron beams devices is developed; the theory not only links the physics of Cyclotron Masers (CMs) and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) but covers the physics of the IRLs and the ICLs. We have also invented a new numerical method, the Neo-Finite -Difference (NFD) method, for electromagnetic plasma simulations and applied it to studies of these lasers. The unified amplification theory compares the growth mechanisms. Two bunching mechanisms (both axial and azimuthal) exist, not only for the noncollective single electron resonance regime, but also in the collective gain regime. Competition or reinforcement between the two bunching mechanisms is determined by the q value (a parameter that determines how the electron oscillation frequency depends on energy), the electron axial velocity, and the wave phase velocity. The unified theory concludes that, for wave amplification, the sign of the electron mismatch frequency is required to be the same as the sign of a bunching parameter that is determined by the total bunching. In an IRL, a relativistic electron beam propagates obliquely through an ion ripple in a plasma. The radiation frequency depends on the beam energy, the ripple wave number, and the angle: omega ~ 2gamma ^{2}k_{ir}ccos theta. By proper choice of device parameters, sources of microwaves, optical, and perhaps even X-rays can be made. The dispersion relation for wave coupling is derived and used to calculate the radiation frequency and linear growth rate. The nonlinear saturation mechanism is explored. Computer simulation is used to verify the ideas, scaling laws and nonlinear mechanisms. In an ICL, the ion focusing force causes the electrons to oscillate about the channel axis and plays a similar role to the magnetic field in a CM. This electron motion is nonlinear and is studied. Simulations were performed

  11. Quantitative experiments with electrons in a positively charged beam

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Vay, J; Covo, M K; Cohen, R; Baca, D; Bieniosek, F; Friedman, A; Leister, C; Lund, S M; Seidl, P; Sharp, W

    2006-12-06

    Intense ion beams are difficult to maintain as non-neutral plasmas. Experiments and simulations are used to study the complex interactions between beam ions and (unwanted) electrons. Such ''electron clouds'' limit the performance of many accelerators. To characterize electron clouds, a number of parameters are measured including: total and local electron production and loss for each of three major sources, beam potential versus time, electron line-charge density, and gas pressure within the beam. Electron control methods include surface treatments to reduce electron and gas emission, and techniques to remove electrons from the beam, or block their capture by the beam. Detailed, self-consistent simulations include beam-transport fields, and electron and gas generation and transport; these compute unexpectedly rich behavior, much of which is confirmed experimentally. For example, in a quadrupole magnetic field, ion and dense electron plasmas interact to produce multi-kV oscillations in the electron plasma and distortions of the beam velocity space distribution, without the system becoming homogeneous or locally neutral.

  12. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOEpatents

    Daly, Thomas P.; Moses, Edward I.; Patterson, Ralph W.; Sawicki, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse (20) using one or more delay loops (10). The delay loops (10) have a partially reflective beam splitter (12) and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors (14) arranged such that the laser beam pulse (20) enters into the delay loop (10) through the beam splitter (12) and circulates therein along a delay loop length (24) defined by the mirrors (14). As the laser beam pulse (20) circulates within the delay loop (10) a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse (20) strikes the beam splitter (12). The laser beam pulse (20) is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56). The delay loops (10) are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56) using additive waveform synthesis.

  13. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOEpatents

    Daly, T.P.; Moses, E.I.; Patterson, R.W.; Sawicki, R.H.

    1994-08-09

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse using one or more delay loops is disclosed. The delay loops have a partially reflective beam splitter and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors arranged such that the laser beam pulse enters into the delay loop through the beam splitter and circulates therein along a delay loop length defined by the mirrors. As the laser beam pulse circulates within the delay loop a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse strikes the beam splitter. The laser beam pulse is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses. The delay loops are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses using additive waveform synthesis. 8 figs.

  14. Laser cooling of electron beams for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Telnov, V.

    1996-10-01

    A novel method of electron beam cooling is considered which can be used for linear colliders. The electron beam is cooled during collision with focused powerful laser pulse. With reasonable laser parameters (laser flash energy about 10 J) one can decrease transverse beam emittances by a factor about 10 per one stage. The ultimate transverse emittances are much below that given by other methods. Depolarization of a beam during the cooling is about 5--15% for one stage. This method is especially useful for photon colliders and open new possibilities for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders and x-ray FEL based on high energy linacs.

  15. Optics of electron beam in the Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, Alexey V.; Kazakevich, G.; Kroc, T.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Tiunov, M.; Warner, A.; /Fermilab /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2005-11-01

    Electron cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring (Fermilab) requires high current and good quality of the DC electron beam. Electron trajectories of {approx}0.2 A or higher DC electron beam have to be parallel in the cooling section, within {approx}0.2 mrad, making the beam envelope cylindrical. These requirements yielded a specific scheme of the electron transport from a gun to the cooling section, with electrostatic acceleration and deceleration in the Pelletron. Recuperation of the DC beam limits beam losses at as tiny level as {approx}0.001%, setting strict requirements on the return electron line to the Pelletron and a collector. To smooth the beam envelope in the cooling section, it has to be linear and known at the transport start. Also, strength of the relevant optic elements has to be measured with good accuracy. Beam-based optic measurements are being carried out and analyzed to get this information. They include beam simulations in the Pelletron, differential optic (beam response) measurements and simulation, beam profile measurements with optical transition radiation, envelope measurements and analysis with orifice scrapers. Current results for the first half-year of commissioning are presented. Although electron cooling is already routinely used for pbar stacking, its efficiency is expected to be improved.

  16. Optics of Electron Beam in the Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; Kroc, T.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Warner, A.; Kazakevich, G.; Tiunov, M.

    2006-03-20

    Electron cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring (Fermilab) requires high current and good quality of the DC electron beam. Electron trajectories of {approx}0.2 A or higher DC electron beam have to be parallel in the cooling section, within {approx} 0.2 mrad, making the beam envelope cylindrical. These requirements yielded a specific scheme of the electron transport from a gun to the cooling section, with electrostatic acceleration and deceleration in the Pelletron. Recuperation of the DC beam limits beam losses at as tiny level as {approx}0.001%, setting strict requirements on the return electron line to the Pelletron and a collector. To smooth the beam envelope in the cooling section, it has to be linear and known at the transport start. Also, strength of the relevant optic elements has to be measured with good accuracy. Beam-based optic measurements are being carried out and analysed to get this information. They include beam simulations in the Pelletron, differential optic (beam response) measurements and simulation, beam profile measurements with optical transition radiation, envelope measurements and analysis with orifice scrapers. Current results for the first half-year of commissioning are presented. Although electron cooling is already routinely used for pbar stacking, its efficiency is expected to be improved.

  17. Focused electron and ion beam systems

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Persaud, Arun; Ji, Qing; Jiang, Ximan

    2004-07-27

    An electron beam system is based on a plasma generator in a plasma ion source with an accelerator column. The electrons are extracted from a plasma cathode in a plasma ion source, e.g. a multicusp plasma ion source. The beam can be scanned in both the x and y directions, and the system can be operated with multiple beamlets. A compact focused ion or electron beam system has a plasma ion source and an all-electrostatic beam acceleration and focusing column. The ion source is a small chamber with the plasma produced by radio-frequency (RF) induction discharge. The RF antenna is wound outside the chamber and connected to an RF supply. Ions or electrons can be extracted from the source. A multi-beam system has several sources of different species and an electron beam source.

  18. Precision Absolute Beam Current Measurement of Low Power Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, M. M.; Bevins, M. E.; Degtiarenko, P.; Freyberger, A.; Krafft, G. A.

    2012-11-01

    Precise measurements of low power CW electron beam current for the Jefferson Lab Nuclear Physics program have been performed using a Tungsten calorimeter. This paper describes the rationale for the choice of the calorimeter technique, as well as the design and calibration of the device. The calorimeter is in use presently to provide a 1% absolute current measurement of CW electron beam with 50 to 500 nA of average beam current and 1-3 GeV beam energy. Results from these recent measurements will also be presented.

  19. Redesigned Electron-Beam Furnace Boosts Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Gary A.

    1995-01-01

    Redesigned electron-beam furnace features carousel of greater capacity so more experiments conducted per loading, and time spent on reloading and vacuum pump-down reduced. Common mounting plate for electron source and carousel simplifies installation and reduces vibration.

  20. Feasibility study for mega-electron-volt electron beam tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hampel, U.; Baertling, Y.; Hoppe, D.; Kuksanov, N.; Fadeev, S.; Salimov, R.

    2012-09-15

    Electron beam tomography is a promising imaging modality for the study of fast technical processes. But for many technical objects of interest x rays of several hundreds of keV energy are required to achieve sufficient material penetration. In this article we report on a feasibility study for fast electron beam computed tomography with a 1 MeV electron beam. The experimental setup comprises an electrostatic accelerator with beam optics, transmission target, and a single x-ray detector. We employed an inverse fan-beam tomography approach with radiographic projections being generated from the linearly moving x-ray source. Angular projections were obtained by rotating the object.

  1. Electron beam coupling to a metamaterial structure

    SciTech Connect

    French, David M.; Shiffler, Don; Cartwright, Keith

    2013-08-15

    Microwave metamaterials have shown promise in numerous applications, ranging from strip lines and antennas to metamaterial-based electron beam driven devices. In general, metamaterials allow microwave designers to obtain electromagnetic characteristics not typically available in nature. High Power Microwave (HPM) sources have in the past drawn inspiration from work done in the conventional microwave source community. In this article, the use of metamaterials in an HPM application is considered by using an effective medium model to determine the coupling of an electron beam to a metamaterial structure in a geometry similar to that of a dielectric Cerenkov maser. Use of the effective medium model allows for the analysis of a wide range of parameter space, including the “mu-negative,”“epsilon-negative,” and “double negative” regimes of the metamaterial. The physics of such a system are modeled analytically and by utilizing the particle-in-cell code ICEPIC. For this geometry and effective medium representation, optimum coupling of the electron beam to the metamaterial, and thus the optimum microwave or RF production, occurs in the epsilon negative regime of the metamaterial. Given that HPM tubes have been proposed that utilize a metamaterial, this model provides a rapid method of characterizing a source geometry that can be used to quickly understand the basic physics of such an HPM device.

  2. BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR THE ERHIC ELECTRON RING.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG, C.

    2005-05-16

    To study collisions between polarized electrons and heavy ions or polarized protons at high energy, adding a 10 GeV electron storage ring to the existing RHIC facility is currently under consideration. To achieve high luminosities of several 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} range, a vertical beam-beam tuneshift parameter of {zeta}{sub y} = 0.08 is required for the electron beam. Simulation studies are being performed to study the feasibility of this high tuneshift parameter and explore the potential for even higher tuneshifts. Recent results of these studies are presented.

  3. Determination of ionisation chamber collection efficiency in a swept electron beam by means of thermoluminescent detectors and the "two-voltage" method.

    PubMed

    Van Dam, J; Rijnders, A; Ang, K K; Mellaerts, M; Grobet, P

    1985-06-01

    Two methods for determining the collection efficiency of a 0.6 cm3 thimble ionisation chamber exposed to the swept electron beam of a linear accelerator Therac 20 Saturne (CGR MeV) have been compared. In one method the chamber signal has been compared to that of simultaneously exposed thermoluminescent LiF dosemeters (TLD), in the other the "two-voltage" method of Boag, adapted for swept beams, has been used. By variation of the electron energy between 20 and 13 MeV, of the focus-skin-distance (FSD) between 200 and 100 cm and of the monitor rate between 400 monitor units (m.u.) and 100 m.u. per minute, different values could be produced for the peak charge density M. The collection efficiency of the chamber, operating at a standard voltage of 250 V, decreases from 0.99 to 0.84 for a charge density increasing from 0.3 X 10(-4) C/m3 to 7.5 X 10(-4) C/m3, respectively. The maximum deviation observed between the TLD and the "two-voltage" method adopted for similar M is never more than 2% and mostly smaller than 1%. It can be concluded that, under the present experimental conditions, the calculated ionisation chamber collection efficiency is confirmed by the experimental method using TL dosimetry. PMID:3925506

  4. Electron Beam-Cure Polymer Matrix Composites: Processing and Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrenn, G.; Frame, B.; Jensen, B.; Nettles, A.

    2001-01-01

    Researchers from NASA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are evaluating a series of electron beam curable composites for application in reusable launch vehicle airframe and propulsion systems. Objectives are to develop electron beam curable composites that are useful at cryogenic to elevated temperatures (-217 C to 200 C), validate key mechanical properties of these composites, and demonstrate cost-saving fabrication methods at the subcomponent level. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites is an enabling capability for production of aerospace structures in a non-autoclave process. Payoffs of this technology will be fabrication of composite structures at room temperature, reduced tooling cost and cure time, and improvements in component durability. This presentation covers the results of material property evaluations for electron beam-cured composites made with either unidirectional tape or woven fabric architectures. Resin systems have been evaluated for performance in ambient, cryogenic, and elevated temperature conditions. Results for electron beam composites and similar composites cured in conventional processes are reviewed for comparison. Fabrication demonstrations were also performed for electron beam-cured composite airframe and propulsion piping subcomponents. These parts have been built to validate manufacturing methods with electron beam composite materials, to evaluate electron beam curing processing parameters, and to demonstrate lightweight, low-cost tooling options.

  5. Chemical characterization of extra layers at the interfaces in MOCVD InGaP/GaAs junctions by electron beam methods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Electron beam methods, such as cathodoluminescence (CL) that is based on an electron-probe microanalyser, and (200) dark field and high angle annular dark field (HAADF) in a scanning transmission electron microscope, are used to study the deterioration of interfaces in InGaP/GaAs system with the GaAs QW on top of InGaP. A CL emission peak different from that of the QW was detected. By using HAADF, it is found that the GaAs QW does not exist any longer, being replaced by extra interlayer(s) that are different from GaAs and InGaP because of atomic rearrangements at the interface. The nature and composition of the interlayer(s) are determined by HAADF. Such changes of the nominal GaAs QW can account for the emission observed by CL. PMID:21711707

  6. Quantitative Experiments With Electrons in a Positively Charged Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Vay, J; Covo, M K; Cohen, R; Baca, D; Bieniosek, F; Friedman, A; Leister, C; Lund, S M; Seidl, P; Sharp, W

    2006-10-27

    Intense ion beams are an extreme example of, and difficult to maintain as, a non-neutral plasma. Experiments and simulations are used to study the complex interactions between beam ions and (unwanted) electrons. Such ''electron clouds'' limit the performance of many accelerators. To characterize electron clouds, a number of parameters are measured including: total and local electron production and loss for each of three major sources, beam potential versus time, electron line-charge density, and gas pressure within the beam. Electron control methods include surface treatments to reduce electron and gas emission, and techniques to remove, or block, electrons from the beam. Detailed, self-consistent simulations include beam-transport fields, and electron and gas generation and consistent transport, to compute unexpectedly rich behavior, much of which is confirmed experimentally. For example, in a quadrupole magnetic field, ion and dense electron plasmas interact to produce multi-kV oscillations in the electron plasma and distortions of the beam velocity space distribution, without becoming homogenous or locally neutral.

  7. Plasma charge current for controlling and monitoring electron beam welding with beam oscillation.

    PubMed

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Belenkiy, Vladimir; Shchavlev, Valeriy; Piskunov, Anatoliy; Abdullin, Aleksandr; Mladenov, Georgy

    2012-01-01

    Electron beam welding (EBW) shows certain problems with the control of focus regime. The electron beam focus can be controlled in electron-beam welding based on the parameters of a secondary signal. In this case, the parameters like secondary emissions and focus coil current have extreme relationships. There are two values of focus coil current which provide equal value signal parameters. Therefore, adaptive systems of electron beam focus control use low-frequency scanning of focus, which substantially limits the operation speed of these systems and has a negative effect on weld joint quality. The purpose of this study is to develop a method for operational control of the electron beam focus during welding in the deep penetration mode. The method uses the plasma charge current signal as an additional informational parameter. This parameter allows identification of the electron beam focus regime in electron-beam welding without application of additional low-frequency scanning of focus. It can be used for working out operational electron beam control methods focusing exactly on the welding. In addition, use of this parameter allows one to observe the shape of the keyhole during the welding process. PMID:23242276

  8. Plasma Charge Current for Controlling and Monitoring Electron Beam Welding with Beam Oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Belenkiy, Vladimir; Shchavlev, Valeriy; Piskunov, Anatoliy; Abdullin, Aleksandr; Mladenov, Georgy

    2012-01-01

    Electron beam welding (EBW) shows certain problems with the control of focus regime. The electron beam focus can be controlled in electron-beam welding based on the parameters of a secondary signal. In this case, the parameters like secondary emissions and focus coil current have extreme relationships. There are two values of focus coil current which provide equal value signal parameters. Therefore, adaptive systems of electron beam focus control use low-frequency scanning of focus, which substantially limits the operation speed of these systems and has a negative effect on weld joint quality. The purpose of this study is to develop a method for operational control of the electron beam focus during welding in the deep penetration mode. The method uses the plasma charge current signal as an additional informational parameter. This parameter allows identification of the electron beam focus regime in electron-beam welding without application of additional low-frequency scanning of focus. It can be used for working out operational electron beam control methods focusing exactly on the welding. In addition, use of this parameter allows one to observe the shape of the keyhole during the welding process. PMID:23242276

  9. Electron beam selectively seals porous metal filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, J. A.; Tulisiak, G.

    1968-01-01

    Electron beam welding selectively seals the outer surfaces of porous metal filters and impedances used in fluid flow systems. The outer surface can be sealed by melting a thin outer layer of the porous material with an electron beam so that the melted material fills all surface pores.

  10. Separating Isotopes With Laser And Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, Sandor

    1989-01-01

    Need for second laser eliminated. In scheme for separation of isotopes, electrons of suitable kinetic energy ionize specific isotope excited by laser beam in magnetic field. Ionization by electron beams cheap and efficient in comparison to ionization by laser beams, and requires no special technical developments. Feasibility of new scheme demonstrated in selective ionization of Ba138, making possible separation of isotope from Ba isotopes of atomic weight 130, 132, 134, 135, 136, and 137.

  11. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.; Wheeler, D.; Saunders, C.

    1998-01-08

    The purpose of the CRADA was to conduct research and development activities to better understand and utilize the electron beam PMC curing technology. This technology will be used to replace or supplement existing PMC thermal curing processes in Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) projects and American aircraft and aerospace industries. This effort involved Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc./Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. (Contractor), Sandia National Laboratories, and ten industrial Participants including four major aircraft and aerospace companies, three advanced materials companies, and three electron beam processing organizations. The technical objective of the CRADA was to synthesize and/or modify high performance, electron beam curable materials that meet specific end-use application requirements. There were six tasks in this CRADA including: Electron beam materials development; Electron beam database development; Economic analysis; Low-cost Electron Beam tooling development; Electron beam curing systems integration; and Demonstration articles/prototype structures development. The contractor managed, participated and integrated all the tasks, and optimized the project efforts through the coordination, exchange, and dissemination of information to the project participants. Members of the Contractor team were also the principal inventors on several electron beam related patents and a 1997 R and D 100 Award winner on Electron-Beam-Curable Cationic Epoxy Resins. The CRADA achieved a major breakthrough for the composites industry by having successfully developed high-performance electron beam curable cationic epoxy resins for use in composites, adhesives, tooling compounds, potting compounds, syntactic foams, etc. UCB Chemicals, the world`s largest supplier of radiation-curable polymers, has acquired a license to produce and sell these resins worldwide.

  12. Spin transport in tilted electron vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Banasri; Chowdhury, Debashree

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we have enlightened the spin related issues of tilted Electron vortex beams. We have shown that in the skyrmionic model of electron we can have the spin Hall current considering the tilted type of electron vortex beam. We have considered the monopole charge of the tilted vortex as time dependent and through the time variation of the monopole charge we can explain the spin Hall effect of electron vortex beams. Besides, with an external magnetic field we can have a spin filter configuration.

  13. Intense steady state electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Kovarik, Vincent J.; Prelec, Krsto

    1990-01-01

    An intense, steady state, low emittance electron beam generator is formed by operating a hollow cathode discharge plasma source at critical levels in combination with an extraction electrode and a target electrode that are operable to extract a beam of fast primary electrons from the plasma source through a negatively biased grid that is critically operated to repel bulk electrons toward the plasma source while allowing the fast primary electrons to move toward the target in the desired beam that can be successfully transported for relatively large distances, such as one or more meters away from the plasma source.

  14. Intense steady state electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.; Kovarik, V.J.; Prelec, K.

    1990-07-17

    An intense, steady state, low emittance electron beam generator is formed by operating a hollow cathode discharge plasma source at critical levels in combination with an extraction electrode and a target electrode that are operable to extract a beam of fast primary electrons from the plasma source through a negatively biased grid that is critically operated to repel bulk electrons toward the plasma source while allowing the fast primary electrons to move toward the target in the desired beam that can be successfully transported for relatively large distances, such as one or more meters away from the plasma source. 2 figs.

  15. Single electron beam rf feedback free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, C.A.; Stein, W.E.; Rockwood, S.D.

    1981-02-11

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which uses rf feedback to enhance efficiency are described. Rf energy is extracted from a single electron beam by decelerating cavities and energy is returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns, such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, resonant feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to reduce the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  16. Generation of Nondiffracting Electron Bessel Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Karimi, Ebrahim; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Frabboni, Stefano; Dennis, Mark R.; Boyd, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Almost 30 years ago, Durnin discovered that an optical beam with a transverse intensity profile in the form of a Bessel function of the first order is immune to the effects of diffraction. Unlike most laser beams, which spread upon propagation, the transverse distribution of these Bessel beams remains constant. Electrons also obey a wave equation (the Schrödinger equation), and therefore Bessel beams also exist for electron waves. We generate an electron Bessel beam by diffracting electrons from a nanoscale phase hologram. The hologram imposes a conical phase structure on the electron wave-packet spectrum, thus transforming it into a conical superposition of infinite plane waves, that is, a Bessel beam. We verify experimentally that these beams can propagate for 0.6 m without measurable spreading and can also reconstruct their intensity distributions after being partially obstructed by an obstacle. Finally, we show by numerical calculations that the performance of an electron microscope can be increased dramatically through use of these beams.

  17. Optimizing the electron beam parameters for head-on beam-beam compensation in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Pikin, A.; Gu, X.

    2011-03-28

    Head-on beam-beam compensation is adopted to compensate the large beam-beam tune spread from the protonproton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Two e-lenses are being built and to be in stalled near IP10 in the end of 2011. In this article we perform numeric simulation to investigate the effect of the electron beam parameters on the proton dynamics. The electron beam parameters include its transverse profile, size, current, offset and random errors in them. In this article we studied the effect of the electron beam parameters on the proton dynamics. The electron beam parameters include its transverse shape, size, current, offset and their random errors. From the study, we require that the electron beam size can not be smaller than the proton beam's. And the random noise in the electron current should be better than 0.1%. The offset of electron beam w.r.t. the proton beam center is crucial to head-on beam-beam compensation. Its random errors should be below {+-}8{micro}m.

  18. Survey on electron beam processing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, S.; Sunabe, K.; Inaba, T.

    1990-06-01

    The developing situation is studied of electron beam processing technologies and the future problems are shown when these are utilized for electric power utilities. When an electron beam is used as a heating source by focussing, the electron beam has features of high focusability, high controllability and high energy density, so that the electron beam is used for parts requiring high quality processing from micro machining, case hardening, and welding to melting furnaces of metals of high melting point. Presently is necessary to hold ultra high voltage for acceleration and high vacuum because of lower current. Since the processing capability with high energy density is high and the energy consumption efficiency is also high for the chemical field using the high energy density of the electron beam, the application are researched in the field from sterilization of medical instruments, sterilization of sludge, through food processing, improvement of thermal resistance of insulated wires to flue gas irradiation to desulfurize and denitrify. But a practical use is not yet realized because of small current of electron beam. Therefore, the largest technological problem may be the development of high current electron gun and the beam control systems.

  19. Low temperature and self catalytic growth of ultrafine ITO nanowires by electron beam evaporation method and their optical and electrical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R. Rakesh; Rao, K. Narasimha; Rajanna, K.; Phani, A.R.

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • ITO nanowires were grown by e-beam evaporation method. • ITO nanowires growth done at low substrate temperature of 350 °C. • Nanowires growth was carried out without use of catalyst and reactive oxygen gas. • Nanowires growth proceeds via self catalytic VLS growth. • Grown nanowires have diameter 10–20 nm and length 1–4 μm long. • ITO nanowire films have shown good antireflection property. - Abstract: We report the self catalytic growth of Sn-doped indium oxide (ITO) nanowires (NWs) over a large area glass and silicon substrates by electron beam evaporation method at low substrate temperatures of 250–400 °C. The ITO NWs growth was carried out without using an additional reactive oxygen gas and a metal catalyst particle. Ultrafine diameter (∼10–15 nm) and micron long ITO NWs growth was observed in a temperature window of 300–400 °C. Transmission electron microscope studies confirmed single crystalline nature of the NWs and energy dispersive spectroscopy studies on the NWs confirmed that the NWs growth proceeds via self catalytic vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism. ITO nanowire films grown on glass substrates at a substrate temperature of 300–400 °C have shown ∼2–6% reflection and ∼70–85% transmission in the visible region. Effect of deposition parameters was systematically investigated. The large area growth of ITO nanowire films would find potential applications in the optoelectronic devices.

  20. REVIEW: Review of electron beam therapy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Almond, Peter R.

    2006-07-01

    For over 50 years, electron beams have been an important modality for providing an accurate dose of radiation to superficial cancers and disease and for limiting the dose to underlying normal tissues and structures. This review looks at many of the important contributions of physics and dosimetry to the development and utilization of electron beam therapy, including electron treatment machines, dose specification and calibration, dose measurement, electron transport calculations, treatment and treatment-planning tools, and clinical utilization, including special procedures. Also, future changes in the practice of electron therapy resulting from challenges to its utilization and from potential future technology are discussed.

  1. Plasma heating with crossing relativistic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratan, Naren; Sircombe, Nathan; Ceurvorst, Luke; Kasim, Muhammad; Sadler, James; Bingham, Robert; Trines, Raoul; Norreys, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Plasma heating by relativistic electron beams is a powerful tool with applications including the heating of inertial confinement fusion targets and the study of matter in extreme conditions. We discuss the use of two relativistic electron beams to efficiently heat the plasma ions where the beams cross by using beam-plasma instabilities and non-linear wave coupling between Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves. Energy from the electron beams is coupled to the plasma ions as the beams become unstable and drive Langmuir waves which couple non-linearly to ion-acoustic waves which are then damped . Results of linear growth rate calculations are presented for the system of two crossing electron beams demonstrating a broad spectrum of unstable modes. Relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell simulations in two space and two momentum dimensions have been performed which demonstrate the non-linear coupling of the electron beam energy into ion-acoustic waves and the energy cascade to the background ions. Time-frequency analysis is applied to analyze the non-linear coupling between Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves in wave phase space. Structural properties of the strong turbulence produced at late times are analyzed.

  2. Electron Beam Scanning in Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongen, Yves; Herer, Arnold

    1996-05-01

    Scanned electron beams are used within many industries for applications such as sterilization of medical disposables, crosslinking of wire and cables insulating jackets, polymerization and degradation of resins and biomaterials, modification of semiconductors, coloration of gemstones and glasses, removal of oxides from coal plant flue gasses, and the curing of advanced composites and other molded forms. X-rays generated from scanned electron beams make yet other applications, such as food irradiation, viable. Typical accelerators for these applications range in beam energy from 0.5MeV to 10 MeV, with beam powers between 5 to 500kW and scanning widths between 20 and 300 cm. Since precise control of dose delivery is required in many of these applications, the integration of beam characteristics, product conveyance, and beam scanning mechanisms must be well understood and optimized. Fundamental issues and some case examples are presented.

  3. Non-Vacuum Electron Beam Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2007-01-31

    Original objectives of CRADA number BNL-01-03 between BNL and Acceleron, Inc., were to further develop the Plasma Window concept (a BNL invention covered by US Patent number 5,578,831), mate the Plasma Window to an existing electron beam welder to perform in-air electron beam welding, and mount the novel nonvacuum electron beam welder on a robot arm. Except for the last objective, all other goals were met or exceeded. Plasma Window design and operation was enhanced during the project, and it was successfully mated to a conventional4 kW electron beam welder. Unprecedented high quality non-vacuum electron beam . welding was demonstrated. Additionally, a new invention the Plasma Shield (US Patent number 7,075,030) that chemically and thermally shields a target object was set forth. Great interest in the new technology was shown by a number of industries and three arcs were sold for experimental use. However, the welding industry requested demonstration of high speed welding, which requires 100 kW electron beam welders. The cost of such a welder involved the need for additional funding. Therefore, some of the effort was directed towards Plasma Shield development. Although relatively a small portion of the R&D effort was spent on the Plasma Shield, some very encouraging results were obtained. Inair Plasma Shield was demonstrated. With only a partial shield, enhanced vacuum separation and cleaner welds were realized. And, electron beam propagation in atmosphere improved by a factor of about 3. Benefits to industry are the introduction of two new technologies. BNL benefited from licensing fee cash, from partial payment for employee salary, and from a new patent In addition to financial benefits, a new technology for physics studies was developed. Recommendations for future work are to develop an under-water plasma shield, perform welding with high-power electron beam:s, carry out other plasma shielded electron beam and laser processes. Potential benefits from further R

  4. Non-invasive measurments of intense relativistic electron beam size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekdahl, Carl; McCuistian, Trent; Moir, David; Rodriguez, Patrick; Broste, William; Johnson, Jeff

    2000-10-01

    To understand relativistic electron beam transport dynamics the size of the beam is often measured using invasive techniques such as imaging the Cerenkov or OTR light emitted from a screen inserted into the beam. These techniques would completely disrupt the DARHT 2 beam, so we are developing a non-invasive method using diamagnetic loops. We show that through conservation of canonical angular momentum the RMS radius of the beam can be found by measuring the magnetic flux excluded by the diamagnetic beam. Furthermore, this measurement is shown to be independent of the details of the beam radial current profile for DARHT 2 parameters. We present results from our test and calibration experiments, as well as results of beam radius measurements on the 20-MeV DARHT 1 accelerator.

  5. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Changbiao

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically transported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron`s relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value.

  6. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically imported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron`s relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value.

  7. Runaway electron beam in atmospheric pressure discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshkin, E. V.; Barengolts, S. A.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    A numerical simulation was performed to study the formation of a runaway electron (RAE) beam from an individual emission zone in atmospheric pressure air discharges with a highly overvolted interelectrode gap. It is shown that the formation of a RAE beam in discharges at high overvoltages is much contributed by avalanche processes.

  8. Emittance growth from electron beam modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2009-12-01

    In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.

  9. Scrap uranium recycling via electron beam melting

    SciTech Connect

    McKoon, R.

    1993-11-01

    A program is underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to recycle scrap uranium metal. Currently, much of the material from forging and machining processes is considered radioactive waste and is disposed of by oxidation and encapsulation at significant cost. In the recycling process, uranium and uranium alloys in various forms will be processed by electron beam melting and continuously cast into ingots meeting applicable specifications for virgin material. Existing vacuum processing facilities at LLNL are in compliance with all current federal and state environmental, safety and health regulations for the electron beam melting and vaporization of uranium metal. One of these facilities has been retrofitted with an auxiliary electron beam gun system, water-cooled hearth, crucible and ingot puller to create an electron beam melt furnace. In this furnace, basic process R&D on uranium recycling will be performed with the goal of eventual transfer of this technology to a production facility.

  10. Photon-Electron Interaction and Condense Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1998-11-01

    We discuss beams of charged particles and radiation from multiple perspectives. These include fundamental acceleration and radiation mechanisms, underlying electron-photon interaction, various classical and quantum phase-space concepts and fluctuational interpretations.

  11. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  12. The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-06-09

    Brookhaven National Lab has successfully developed a new pre-injector system, called the Electron Beam Ion Source, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory science programs. The first of several planned improvemen

  13. Characterization Of A Wakefield Accelerated Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guèye, Paul; Keppel, Cynthia; Lane, Bianca; Owens, Judy; Torrence, Rickey; Saleh, Ned; Umstadter, Don; Zhang, Ping; Ent, Rolf; Assamagan, Kétévi

    2001-10-01

    With the advancement of femtosecond Terawatt lasers, there has been great interest in their ability of accelerating electrons to high energy within short distances; this effect originating from the GeV/cm gradient created in the plasma (compared to conventional RF systems). We report on new experimental results obtained from a 400 fs/4 J-laser plasma driven electron beam. The data were collected by means of a ~ 3 m QQ¯QD spectrometer especially designed for that experiment. A 32× 16 fiber array detector, along with a scintillating LANEX screen and a Faraday cup were used to detect the electrons, and for charge monitoring. The momentum and spatial distributions of the beam were reconstructed. The results are consistent with a previous experiment, and compatible with a GEANT simulation used for background estimation due primarily to secondaries induced by electron-beam pipe collisions. We also report on the extracted emittance of the beam for the corresponding momentum range.

  14. Technical Seminar: Electron Beam Forming Fabrication

    NASA Video Gallery

    EBF³ uses a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment to create a molten pool on a metallic substrate. This layer-additive process enables fabrication of parts directly from CAD drawings. The ...

  15. Use of an Electron Beam for Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroslave Derbenev

    2007-09-10

    Microwave instability of an electron beam can be used for a multiple increase in the collective response for the perturbation caused by a particle of a co-moving ion beam, i.e. for enhancement of friction force in electron cooling method. The low scale (hundreds GHz and higher frequency range) space charge or FEL type instabilities can be produced (depending on conditions) by introducing an alternating magnetic fields along the electron beam path. Beams’ optics and noise conditioning for obtaining a maximal cooling effect and related limitations will be discussed. The method promises to increase by a few orders of magnitude the cooling rate for heavy particle beams with a large emittance for a wide energy range with respect to either electron and conventional stochastic cooling.

  16. Electron beam, laser beam and plasma arc welding studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banas, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    This program was undertaken as an initial step in establishing an evaluation framework which would permit a priori selection of advanced welding processes for specific applications. To this end, a direct comparison of laser beam, electron beam and arc welding of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was undertaken. Ti-6Al-4V was selected for use in view of its established welding characteristics and its importance in aerospace applications.

  17. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B.; International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY . Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1989-01-01

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  18. Electron-beam furnace with magnetic stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Harker, H.R.; Knecht, J.A. II

    1986-10-07

    This patent describes an electron-beam comprising: a. An evacuable chamber having a port for coupling the chamber to vacuum pump means; b. a trough-shaped hearth within the chamber for holding material to be melted, the hearth having a spout for issuing a flow of molten material therefrom; c. a crucible positioned within the chamber for receiving molten material flowing from the hearth; d. one or more electron guns each for producing an energetic beam of electrons, each electron gun being positioned a relatively large distance away from the hearth and the crucible; e. magnetic beam deflection means forming an integral part of each electron gun for scanning and shaping the beam produced thereby across the hearth or the crucible; and f. magnetic means adjacent to the hearth and the crucible for producing a relatively weak magnetic field in the vicinity of the hearth and the crucible for preventing erratic deflections of the scanning electron beams without significantly altering the trajectories of such beams.

  19. A reflex electron beam discharge as a plasma source for electron beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, C.S.; Rocca, J.J.; Szapiro, B. )

    1988-10-01

    A reflex electron beam glow discharge has been used as a plasma source for the generation of broad-area electron beams. An electron current of 120 A (12 A/cm/sup 2/) was extracted from the plasma in 10 ..mu..s pulses and accelerated to energies greater than 1 keV in the gap between two grids. The scaling of the scheme for the generation of multikiloamp high-energy beams is discussed.

  20. Control and Manipulation of Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe

    2009-01-22

    The concepts of the advanced accelerators and light source rely on the production of bright electron beams. The rms areas of the beam phase space often need to be tailored to the specific applications. Furthermore, a new class of the forefront research calls for detailed specific distribution such as the particle density in the time coordinate. Several groups are tackling these various challenges and in this report we attempt to give a review of the state-of-the-art of the control and manipulation of the electron beams.

  1. A conceptual design for an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M

    1999-02-15

    This report is a brief description of a model electron beam, which is meant to serve as a pulsed heat source that vaporizes a metal fleck into an ''under-dense'' cloud. See Reference 1. The envelope of the electron beam is calculated from the paraxial ray equation, as stated in Reference 2. The examples shown here are for 5 A, 200 keV beams that focus to waists of under 0.4 mm diameter, within a cylindrical volume of 10 cm radius and length. The magnetic fields assumed in the examples are moderate, 0.11 T and 0.35 T, and can probably be created by permanent magnets.

  2. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, C.L.

    1984-03-16

    A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  3. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Craig L.

    1987-01-01

    A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  4. Control and manipulation of electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe; /NICADD, DeKalb /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    The concepts of the advanced accelerators and light source rely on the production of bright electron beams. The rms areas of the beam phase space often need to be tailored to the specific applications. Furthermore, a new class of the forefront research calls for detailed specific distribution such as the particle density in the time coordinate. Several groups are tackling these various challenges and in this report we attempt to give a review of the state-of-the-art of the control and manipulation of the electron beams.

  5. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Changbiao.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically transported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron's relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value.

  6. Conditioner for a helically transported electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.

    1992-05-01

    The kinetic theory is developed to investigate a conditioner for a helically imported electron beam. Linear expressions for axial velocity spread are derived. Numerical simulation is used to check the theoretical results and examine nonlinear aspects of the conditioning process. The results show that in the linear regime the action of the beam conditioner on a pulsed beam mainly depends on the phase at which the beam enters the conditioner and depends only slightly on the operating wavelength. In the nonlinear regime, however, the action of the conditioner strongly depends on the operating wavelength and only slightly upon the entrance phase. For a properly chosen operating wavelength, a little less than the electron's relativistic cyclotron wavelength, the conditioner can decrease the axial velocity spread of a pulsed beam down to less than one-third of its initial value.

  7. Nonlinear wave scattering and electron beam relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muschietti, L.; Dum, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    The role played by nonlinear scattering during the relaxation of a warm electron beam is investigated through a numerical code based on kinetic equations. The code encompasses the quasi-linear wave-electron interaction and wave-wave scattering off ion clouds. Ions with velocities 2 nu sub i (nu sub i being the ion thermal velocity) are found to be the most efficient for scattering the Langmuir waves off their polarization clouds. The transfer rate of the spectrum out of resonance with the beam is larger by a factor 3 compared to usual estimates. The changes produced in the dispersion relation by the presence of the beam electrons dramatically alter the characteristics of the secondary spectrum. In a late phase the classic condensate K of about 0 is depleted, with the formation of a new condensate in resonance with the flat-topped beam distribution, which follows from the fact that the mere presence of the beam electrons creates a minimum in the frequency-wave-number relation. For strong and slow beams, the predictions of the code are found to be in excellent agreement with the results of the particle simulation if a dispersion relation that includes the beam is used.

  8. Electron beam EUV patterned mask inspection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Keizo; Kitayama, Yasunobu; Fiekowsky, Peter

    2011-11-01

    EUV lithography is expected to begin production in 2014. Production of successful EUV photomasks requires patterned mask inspection (PMI). The ultimate PMI tool is expected to utilize actinic (EUV) illumination. Development of such a tool is expected to require three years after funding. Current test EUV masks, such as 22 nm, can be inspected using 193 nm wavelength deep UV (DUV) inspection tools similar to those currently being used for DUV masks. The DUV inspection tools may be extended for the 16 nm node. However EUV production is expected to start with 11 nm node masks which cannot be inspected with proposed DUV inspection tools. Therefore E-beam inspection (EBI) is discussed as the interim PMI method. EBI has the advantage of high resolution and the disadvantages of low inspection speed and relative insensitivity to ML defects (in the multi-layer material). EBI inspection speed is limited by the pixel size, pixel capture rate and the number of electron columns. The pixel rate is limited by the detector time-resolution, the beam current, and the detection efficiency. Technical improvements in beam focus, secondary electron detection, and defect detection and analysis provide good performance for 22 nm node masks. We discuss the advances and show that performance can be extrapolated for 16 and 11 nm node patterned mask inspections. We present sensitivity and false-defect frequency results of using the Holon EBI tool on 22 nm test masks and a roadmap for extending its operation for use on 16 and 11 nm node masks for inspections requiring 2-5 hours per mask.

  9. Electron beam size measurements in the Fermilab Electron Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T.K.; Burov, A.V.; Bolshakov, T.B.; Shemyakin, A.; Seletskiy, S.M.; /Rochester U.

    2005-09-01

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires a straight trajectory and constant beam size to provide maximum cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler. A measurement system was developed using movable apertures and steering bumps to measure the beam size in a 20m long, nearly continuous, solenoid. This paper will focus on results of these measurements of the beam size and the difficulties in making those measurements.

  10. Electron Beam Size Measurements in the Fermilab Electron Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T. K.; Burov, A. V.; Bolshakov, T. B.; Shemyakin, A.; Seletskiy, S. M.

    2006-03-20

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires a straight trajectory and constant beam size to provide maximum cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler. A measurement system was developed using movable apertures and steering bumps to measure the beam size in a 20m long, nearly continuous, solenoid. This paper will focus on results of these measurements of the beam size and the difficulties in making those measurements.

  11. Correlation in a coherent electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, Tetsuji; Osakabe, Nobuyuki; Tonomura, Akira

    2011-06-15

    Correlations between successive detections in beams of free electrons are studied with a transmission electron microscope. For incoherent illumination of the detectors, a certain random coincidence probability is observed, indicative for uncorrelated arrival times of the electrons. When the illumination is changed from incoherent to coherent, a reduction of the random coincidence probability is observed, indicative for antibunching in the arrival times of the electrons. However, the amount of reduction is larger than the theoretically expected value calculated from the Pauli principle, forbidding more than one identical fermion to occupy the same quantum state. For a certain coherent illumination of the detectors, where we use magnetic lenses in electron microscopes for magnifications of the coherence length, we find an enhanced coincidence probability, indicative for bunching in the arrival times of the electrons. This originates from correlations in beams of free electrons due to Coulomb interactions.

  12. Electron-beam multicharge ion source IMI-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul'manov, V. G.; Dement'ev, E. N.; Miginskaya, E. G.; Mironenko, L. A.; Pirogov, O. V.; Tomilov, V. P.; Tsukanov, V. M.

    2000-08-01

    The main parameters of the electron beam multicharge ion source IMI-2 are given. Experimental results are also given. The IMI-2 electron-beam system (EBS) includes a short-focus electron gyn with a spherical cathode of diameter 16 mm and curvature radius of 9.5 mm. The perveance of the gun is 1,6 (mu) A/V3/2. The electron beam current can reach 2.5 A. An electrostatic and magnetic beam compression of ~103 allows one to obtain a density of the electron beam of not less than ~103 A/cm2 on a 30 cm length. A specific method of dosed injection of the atoms of solid-state elements to an ion trap by means of local pulse deflection of the electron beam was used in the facility 1. The electron-beam ion source (EBIS) IMI-2, Fig. 1, has a vertical design with an electron gun in the top section. The electron gun is mounted in a vacuum chamber of diameter 160 mm and length 500 mm. The vacuum chamber having a drift structure is inside the classical water-cooled solenoid with a completely closed magnetic circuit. An electron collector, an ion line, and a magnetic analyzer are located in the lower section of the facility. Like IMI-1 7-9, IMI-2 2-6 was also designed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics for production of multicharge beams of gaseous and solid elements. In the EBS parameters, IMI-2 is intermediate between first-generation EBIS and those that can be used at acceleration complexes developed at the present time.

  13. Curing Composite Materials Using Lower-Energy Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, Catherine A.; Bykanov, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    In an improved method of fabricating composite-material structures by laying up prepreg tapes (tapes of fiber reinforcement impregnated by uncured matrix materials) and then curing them, one cures the layups by use of beams of electrons having kinetic energies in the range of 200 to 300 keV. In contrast, in a prior method, one used electron beams characterized by kinetic energies up to 20 MeV. The improved method was first suggested by an Italian group in 1993, but had not been demonstrated until recently. With respect to both the prior method and the present improved method, the impetus for the use of electron- beam curing is a desire to avoid the high costs of autoclaves large enough to effect thermal curing of large composite-material structures. Unfortunately, in the prior method, the advantages of electron-beam curing are offset by the need for special walls and ceilings on curing chambers to shield personnel from x rays generated by impacts of energetic electrons. These shields must be thick [typically 2 to 3 ft (about 0.6 to 0.9 m) if made of concrete] and are therefore expensive. They also make it difficult to bring large structures into and out of the curing chambers. Currently, all major companies that fabricate composite-material spacecraft and aircraft structures form their layups by use of automated tape placement (ATP) machines. In the present improved method, an electron-beam gun is attached to an ATP head and used to irradiate the tape as it is pressed onto the workpiece. The electron kinetic energy between 200 and 300 keV is sufficient for penetration of the ply being laid plus one or two of the plies underneath it. Provided that the electron-beam gun is properly positioned, it is possible to administer the required electron dose and, at the same time, to protect personnel with less shielding than is needed in the prior method. Adequate shielding can be provided by concrete walls 6 ft (approximately equal to 1.8 m) high and 16 in. (approximately

  14. Theory of helical electron beams in gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kuftin, A.N.; Lygin, V.K.; Manuilov, V.N.; Raisky, B.V.; Solujanova, E.A.; Tsimring, S.E.

    1993-04-01

    Helical electron beams (HEB) with disturbed axial symmetry of currents density and HEB with locking electrons in magnetic trap are described. The theory of magnetron injection gun (MIG) in space-charge limited current is developed. Systems on permanent magnets forming HEB are considered. 30 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Holographic generation of highly twisted electron beams.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Mafakheri, Erfan; Frabboni, Stefano; Karimi, Ebrahim; Boyd, Robert W

    2015-01-23

    Free electrons can possess an intrinsic orbital angular momentum, similar to those in an electron cloud, upon free-space propagation. The wave front corresponding to the electron's wave function forms a helical structure with a number of twists given by the angular speed. Beams with a high number of twists are of particular interest because they carry a high magnetic moment about the propagation axis. Among several different techniques, electron holography seems to be a promising approach to shape a conventional electron beam into a helical form with large values of angular momentum. Here, we propose and manufacture a nanofabricated phase hologram for generating a beam of this kind with an orbital angular momentum up to 200ℏ. Based on a novel technique the value of orbital angular momentum of the generated beam is measured and then compared with simulations. Our work, apart from the technological achievements, may lead to a way of generating electron beams with a high quanta of magnetic moment along the propagation direction and, thus, may be used in the study of the magnetic properties of materials and for manipulating nanoparticles. PMID:25659003

  16. Parameterization of electron beam output factor.

    PubMed

    Akino, Yuichi; Zhu, Timothy C; Das, Indra J

    2015-06-01

    Electron beam dose distribution is dependent on the beam energy and complicated trajectory of particles. Recent treatment planning systems using Monte Carlo calculation algorithm provide accurate dose calculation. However, double check of monitor units (MUs) based on an independent algorithm is still required. In this study, we have demonstrated single equation that reproduces the measured relative output factor (ROF) that can be used for MU calculation for electron radiotherapy. Electron beams generated by an iX (Varian Medical Systems) and a PRIMUS (Siemens) accelerator were investigated. For various energies of electron beams, the ROF at respective dmax were measured using diode detector in a water phantom at SSD of 100 cm. Curve fitting was performed with an exponential generalized equation ROF = α(β - e(-γR)) including three variables (α, β, γ) as a function of field radius and electron energy. The correlation coefficients between the ROF measured and that calculated by the equation were greater than 0.998. For ROF of Varian electron beams, the average values of all fitting formulas were applied for two of the constants; α and β. The parameter γ showed good agreement with the quadratic approximation as a function of mean energy at surface (E0). The differences between measured and calculated ROF values were within ± 3% for beams with cutout radius of ≥ 1.5 cm for electron beams with energies from 6 MeV to 15 MeV. The proposed formula will be helpful for double-check of MUs, as it requires minimal efforts for MU calculation. PMID:25726475

  17. Optimization of electron beam crosslinking of wire and cable insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimek, Zbigniew; Przybytniak, Grażyna; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2012-09-01

    The computer simulations based on Monte Carlo (MC) method and the ModeCEB software were carried out in connection with electron beam (EB) radiation set-up for crosslinking of electric wire and cable insulation. The theoretical predictions for absorbed dose distribution in irradiated electric insulation induced by scanned EB were compared to the experimental results of irradiation that was carried out in the experimental set-up based on ILU 6 electron accelerator with electron energy 0.5-2.0 MeV. The computer simulation of the dose distributions in two-sided irradiation system by a scanned electron beam in multilayer circular objects was performed for various process parameters, namely electric wire and cable geometry (thickness of insulation layers and copper wire diameter), type of polymer insulation, electron energy, energy spread and geometry of electron beam, electric wire and cable layout in irradiation zone. The geometry of electron beam distribution in the irradiation zone was measured using CTA and PVC foil dosimeters for available electron energy range. The temperature rise of the irradiated electric wire and irradiation homogeneity were evaluated for different experimental conditions to optimize technological process parameters. The results of computer simulation are consistent with the experimental data of dose distribution evaluated by gel-fraction measurements. Such conformity indicates that ModeCEB computer simulation is reliable and sufficient for optimization absorbed dose distribution in the multi-layer circular objects irradiated with scanned electron beams.

  18. Modelling of electron beam induced nanowire attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitzer, Lucas A.; Speich, Claudia; Schäfer, David; Erni, Daniel; Prost, Werner; Tegude, Franz J.; Benson, Niels; Schmechel, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM) induced nanowire (NW) attraction or bundling is a well known effect, which is mainly ascribed to structural or material dependent properties. However, there have also been recent reports of electron beam induced nanowire bending by SEM imaging, which is not fully explained by the current models, especially when considering the electro-dynamic interaction between NWs. In this article, we contribute to the understanding of this phenomenon, by introducing an electro-dynamic model based on capacitor and Lorentz force interaction, where the active NW bending is stimulated by an electromagnetic force between individual wires. The model includes geometrical, electrical, and mechanical NW parameters, as well as the influence of the electron beam source parameters and is validated using in-situ observations of electron beam induced GaAs nanowire (NW) bending by SEM imaging.

  19. Acceleration of electrons by a tightly focused intense laser beam.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Xing; Zang, Wei-Ping; Li, Ya-Dong; Tian, Jian-Guo

    2009-07-01

    The recent proposal to use Weinger transformation field (WTF) [Opt. Express 17, 4959-4969 (2009)] for describing tightly focused laser beams is investigated here in detail. In order to validate the accuracy of WTF, we derive the numerical field (NF) from the plane wave spectrum method. WTF is compared with NF and Lax series field (LSF). Results show that LSF is accurate close to the beam axis and divergent far from the beam axis, and WTF is always accurate. Moreover, electron dynamics in a tightly focused intense laser beam are simulated by LSF, WTF and NF, respectively. The results obtained by WTF are shown to be accurate. PMID:19582099

  20. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Electron Diffraction with Megavolt Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, J.B.; Rudakov, F.M.; Dowell, D.H.; Schmerge, J.F.; Cardoza, J.D.; Castro, J.M.; Gierman, S.M.; Loos, H.; Weber, P.M.; /Brown U.

    2006-10-24

    An rf photocathode electron gun is used as an electron source for ultrafast time-resolved pump-probe electron diffraction. We observed single-shot diffraction patterns from a 160 nm Al foil using the 5.4 MeV electron beam from the Gun Test Facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator. Excellent agreement with simulations suggests that single-shot diffraction experiments with a time resolution approaching 100 fs are possible.

  1. Probing the mechanical properties and microstructure of WSi2/SixGe1-x multiphase thermoelectric material by nanoindentation, electron and focused ion beam microscopy methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, Francisco; Dynys, Frederick

    2015-03-01

    Silicon germanium (SiGe) thermoelectric (TE) alloys have been traditionally used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) NASA applications. While RTG applications is the main driver of our current research, we are exploring other applications in the energy harvesting arena. There is still a need to improve the TE figure of merit (ZT) of SiGe based TE alloys and we have been working on ways to improve it by incorporating tungsten di-silicide (WSi2) phases in to the matrix by directional solidification process. Considerable efforts have been focused until now in microstructural engineering methods that can lead to ZT improvement by microstructure optimization. Although critical for the previous mentioned applications, work pertinent to the mechanical integrity of WSi2/SiGe based TE materials is lacking. In this presentation, we report local mechanical properties (hardness, modulus and fracture toughness) and microstructure of WSi2/SiGe multiphase thermoelectric material by nanoindentation, scanning electron microscopy, focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy methods.

  2. Effect of Crystal Defects on Minority Carrier Diffusion Length in 6H SiC Measured Using the Electron Beam Induced Current Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabib-Azar, Massood

    1997-01-01

    We report values of minority carrier diffusion length in n-type 6H SiC measured using a planar Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) method. Values of hole diffusion length in defect free regions of n-type 6H SiC, with a doping concentration of 1.7El7 1/cu cm, ranged from 1.46 microns to 0.68 microns. We next introduce a novel variation of the planar method used above. This 'planar mapping' technique measured diffusion length along a linescan creating a map of diffusion length versus position. This map is then overlaid onto the EBIC image of the corresponding linescan, allowing direct visualization of the effect of defects on minority carrier diffusion length. Measurements of the above n-type 6H SiC resulted in values of hole diffusion length ranging from 1.2 micron in defect free regions to below 0.1 gm at the center of large defects. In addition, measurements on p-type 6H SiC resulted in electron diffusion lengths ranging from 1.42 micron to 0.8 micron.

  3. High-brightness electron beam diagnostics at the ATF

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1996-07-01

    The Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) is a dedicated user facility for accelerator physicists. Its design is optimized to explore laser acceleration and coherent radiation production. To characterize the low-emittance, picoseconds long electron beam produced by the ATF`s photocathode RF gun, we have installed electron beam profile monitors for transverse emittance measurement, and developed a new technique to measure electron beam pulse length by chirping the electron beam energy. We have also developed a new technique to measure the ps slice emittance of a 10 ps long electron beam. Stripline beam position monitors were installed along the beam to monitor the electron beam position and intensity. A stripline beam position monitor was also used to monitor the timing jitter between the RF system and laser pulses. Transition radiation was used to measure electron beam energy, beam profile and electron beam bunch length.

  4. Virtual mask digital electron beam lithography

    DOEpatents

    Baylor, L.R.; Thomas, C.E.; Voelkl, E.; Moore, J.A.; Simpson, M.L.; Paulus, M.J.

    1999-04-06

    Systems and methods for direct-to-digital holography are described. An apparatus includes a laser; a beamsplitter optically coupled to the laser; a reference beam mirror optically coupled to the beamsplitter; an object optically coupled to the beamsplitter, a focusing lens optically coupled to both the reference beam mirror and the object; and a digital recorder optically coupled to the focusing lens. A reference beam is incident upon the reference beam mirror at a non-normal angle, and the reference beam and an object beam are focused by the focusing lens at a focal plane of the digital recorder to form an image. The systems and methods provide advantages in that computer assisted holographic measurements can be made. 5 figs.

  5. Virtual mask digital electron beam lithography

    DOEpatents

    Baylor, Larry R.; Thomas, Clarence E.; Voelkl, Edgar; Moore, James A.; Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods for direct-to-digital holography are described. An apparatus includes a laser; a beamsplitter optically coupled to the laser; a reference beam mirror optically coupled to the beamsplitter; an object optically coupled to the beamsplitter, a focusing lens optically coupled to both the reference beam mirror and the object; and a digital recorder optically coupled to the focusing lens. A reference beam is incident upon the reference beam mirror at a non-normal angle, and the reference beam and an object beam are focused by the focusing lens at a focal plane of the digital recorder to form an image. The systems and methods provide advantages in that computer assisted holographic measurements can be made.

  6. Ion acceleration mechanism in electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A.F.

    1982-07-01

    Analysis of experimental data reveals that several processes observed in diodes and during the transport of intense electron beams in a neutral gas result from polarization of a plasma in an electric field. Under certain conditions this effect gives rise to a high-field region at the boundary of a plasma column. The electron beam is strongly focused in this region. As a result, a two-dimensional potential well forms at the crossover point of a strongly focused beam. The electric field at this well can reach several megavolts per centimeter. The crossover point moves as a result of expansion of the plasma cloud. The ions trapped in the potential well are accelerated. There is effective acceleration over a distance of the order of a few times the beam radius. A new physical model gives a satisfactory explanation of the experimental results.

  7. Characterization of electron contamination in megavoltage photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Medina, Antonio Lopez; Teijeiro, Antonio; Garcia, Juan; Esperon, Jorge; Terron, J. Antonio; Ruiz, Diego P.; Carrion, Maria C.

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of the present study is to characterize electron contamination in photon beams in different clinical situations. Variations with field size, beam modifier (tray, shaping block) and source-surface distance (SSD) were studied. Percentage depth dose measurements with and without a purging magnet and replacing the air by helium were performed to identify the two electron sources that are clearly differentiated: air and treatment head. Previous analytical methods were used to fit the measured data, exploring the validity of these models. Electrons generated in the treatment head are more energetic and more important for larger field sizes, shorter SSD, and greater depths. This difference is much more noticeable for the 18 MV beam than for the 6 MV beam. If a tray is used as beam modifier, electron contamination increases, but the energy of these electrons is similar to that of electrons coming from the treatment head. Electron contamination could be fitted to a modified exponential curve. For machine modeling in a treatment planning system, setting SSD at 90 cm for input data could reduce errors for most isocentric treatments, because they will be delivered for SSD ranging from 80 to 100 cm. For very small field sizes, air-generated electrons must be considered independently, because of their different energetic spectrum and dosimetric influence.

  8. Beam Charge Asymmetry Monitors for Low Intensity Continuous Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Claude Denard; Arne P. Freyberger; Youri Sharabian

    2001-05-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Lab typically operates with CW electron beam currents in the range of 1 - 10 nA. This low beam current coupled with a 30 Hz flip rate of the beam helicity required the development of new devices to measure and monitor the beam charge asymmetry. We have developed four independent devices with sufficient bandwidth for readout at 30 Hz rate: a synchrotron light monitor (SLM), two backward optical transition radiation monitors (OTR) and a Faraday Cup. Photomultipliers operating in current mode provided the readout of the light from the SLM and the OTRs, while high bandwidth electronics provided the readout from the Faraday cup. Using {approximately}6 helicity pairs, we measured the beam charge asymmetry to a statistically accuracy which is better than 0.05%. We present the results from the successful operation of these devices during the fall 2000 physics program. The reliability and the bandwidth of the devices allowed us to control the gain on the source laser by means of a feedback loop.

  9. Interfacial Properties of Electron Beam Cured Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, C.C.

    1999-12-30

    The objectives of the CRADA are to: Confirm that fiber-resin adhesion is responsible for the observed poor shear properties; Determine the mechanism(s) responsible for poor adhesion between carbon fibers and epoxy resins after e-beam curing; Develop and evaluate resin systems and fiber treatments to improve the properties of e-beam cured, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites; and Develop refined methods for processing e-beam cured, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites.

  10. PEPPo: Using a Polarized Electron Beam to Produce Polarized Positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyemi, Adeleke H.

    2015-09-01

    Polarized positron beams have been identified as either an essential or a significant ingredient for the experimental program of both the present and next generation of lepton accelerators (JLab, Super KEK B, ILC, CLIC). An experiment demonstrating a new method for producing polarized positrons has been performed at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Lab. The PEPPo (Polarized Electrons for Polarized Positrons) concept relies on the production of polarized e⁻/e⁺ pairs from the bremsstrahlung radiation of a longitudinally polarized electron beam interacting within a high-Z conversion target. PEPPo demonstrated the effective transfer of spin-polarization of an 8.2 MeV/c polarized (P~85%) electron beam to positrons produced in varying thickness tungsten production targets, and collected and measured in the range of 3.1 to 6.2 MeV/c. In comparison to other methods this technique reveals a new pathway for producing either high-energy or thermal polarized positron beams using a relatively low polarized electron beam energy (~10MeV) .This presentation will describe the PEPPo concept, the motivations of the experiment and high positron polarization achieved.

  11. Medulloblastoma therapy using electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, S.; Muller-Runkel, R.

    1985-11-01

    The use of megavoltage photons for the spinal component of cerebrospinal axis irradiation is responsible for most of the long-term sequelae in children with medulloblastomas who undergo this procedure. The technique and advantages of using electrons for this component of the procedure are described.

  12. LOW EMITTANCE ELECTRON BEAMS FOR THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER

    SciTech Connect

    KEWISCH,J.; CHANG, X.

    2007-06-25

    An electron cooler, based on an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is under development for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RMIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will be the first electron cooler operating at high energy with bunched beams. In order to achieve sufficient cooling of the ion beams the electron have to have a charge of 5 nC and a normalized emittance less than 4 {mu}. This paper presents the progress in optimizing the injector and the emittance improvements from shaping the charge distribution in the bunch.

  13. Electron beam induced growth of tin whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Vasko, A. C.; Karpov, V. G.; Warrell, G. R.; Parsai, E. I.; Shvydka, Diana

    2015-09-28

    We have investigated the influence of electron irradiation on tin whisker growth. Sputtered tin samples exposed to electron beam of 6 MeV energy exhibited fast whisker growth, while control samples did not grow any whiskers. The statistics of e-beam induced whiskers was found to follow the log-normal distribution. The observed accelerated whisker growth is attributed to electrostatic effects due to charges trapped in an insulating substrate. These results offer promise for establishing whisker-related accelerated life testing protocols.

  14. Electron beam induced growth of tin whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasko, A. C.; Warrell, G. R.; Parsai, E. I.; Karpov, V. G.; Shvydka, Diana

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the influence of electron irradiation on tin whisker growth. Sputtered tin samples exposed to electron beam of 6 MeV energy exhibited fast whisker growth, while control samples did not grow any whiskers. The statistics of e-beam induced whiskers was found to follow the log-normal distribution. The observed accelerated whisker growth is attributed to electrostatic effects due to charges trapped in an insulating substrate. These results offer promise for establishing whisker-related accelerated life testing protocols.

  15. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Gruhn, Charles R.; Hammond, Robert B.

    1981-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  16. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Gruhn, C.R.; Hammond, R.B.

    The disclosure related to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  17. The electron-beam FGT process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Norman W.; Hirano, Shinichi

    The electron-beam process is one of the most effective methods of removing SO 2 and NO x from industrial flue gases. This flue gas treatment consists of adding a small amount of ammonia to the flue gas and irradiating the gas by means of an electron beam, thereby causing reactions which convert the SO 2 and NO x to ammonium sulfate and ammonium-sulfate nitrate. These salts may then be collected from the flue gas by means of such conventional collectors as an elecrtostatic precipitator or baghouse. This process has numerous advantages over currently-used conventional processes as follows: 1) The process simultaneously removes SO 2 and NO x from flue gas at high efficiency levels; 2) It is a dry process which is easily controlled and has excellent load-following capability; 3) Stock-gas reheat is not required; 4) The pollutants are converted into a salable agricultural fertilizer; 5) The process has low capital and operating cost requirements. Test results from the most recent pilot plant in Indianapolis, Indiana, will be discussed showing various characteristics of process control, temperature relationships, radiation dosage, pollution removals at various conditions, and by-product collection usage evaluations. The results will show what will be required in future commercial installations and what accelerator equipment will be required, including various configuration of irradiation zone process design. The economic evaluation will include studies of cost sensitivity and by-product pay back. Various designs for large scale plants indicate the process will have a place in the future clean-up of environmental pollutants.

  18. Electron-beam-assisted dry etching for GaAs using electron cyclotron resonance plasma electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Heiji; Matsui, Shinji

    1992-12-01

    Electron-beam (EB)-assisted dry etching of GaAs using Ar electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma as an electron shower source is developed to achieve a low energy and high current density electron beam (EB). The rate of EB-assisted dry etching is more than ten times larger than for Cl2 gas etching.It is confirmed, through photoluminescence measurement, that this etching method causes less damage than ion beam techniques and is very effective for damaged layer removal. Using this technique, a 0.4 μm linewidth low-damage fine structure of GaAs was fabricated.

  19. Prototype electron lens set-up for the Tevatron beam-beam compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Saewert, G.; Santucci, J.; Sery, A.; Shemyakin, A.; Shiltsev, V.; Wildman, D.; Aleksandrov, A.; Arapov, L.; Kuznetsov, G.; Logachov, P.; Sharapa, A.; Skarbo, B.; Sukhina, B.

    1999-05-17

    A prototype "electron lens" for the Tevatron beam-beam compensation project is commissioned at Fermilab. We de-scribe the set-up, report results of the first tests of the elec-tron beam, and discuss future plans.

  20. Positron beam position measurement for a beam containing both positrons and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sereno, N.S.; Fuja, R.

    1996-08-01

    Positron beam position measurement for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linac beam is affected by the presence of electrons that are also captured and accelerated along with the positrons. This paper presents a method of measuring positron position in a beam consisting of alternating bunches of positrons and electrons. The method is based on Fourier analysis of a stripline signal at the bunching and first harmonic frequencies. In the presence of a mixed species beam, a certain linear combination of bunching and first harmonic signals depends only on the position and charge of one specie of particle. A formula is derived for the stripline signal at all harmonics of the bunching frequency and is used to compute expected signal power at the bunching and first harmonic frequencies for typical electron and positron bunch charges. The stripline is calibrated by measuring the signal power content at the bunching and first harmonic frequencies for a single species beam. A circuit is presented that will be used with an APS positron linac stripline beam position monitor to detect the bunching and first harmonic signals for a beam of positrons and electrons.

  1. Electron beams in research and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehnert, R.

    1995-11-01

    Fast electrons lose their energy by inelastic collisions with electrons of target molecules forming secondary electrons and excited molecules. Coulomb interaction of secondary electrons with valence electrons of neighboring molecules leads to the formation of radical cations, thermalized electrons, excited molecular states and radicals. The primary reactive species initiate chemical reactions in the materials irradiated. Polymer modifications using accelerated electrons such as cross-linking of cable insulation, tubes, pipes and moldings, vulcanization of elastomers, grafting of polymer surfaces, processing of foamed plastics and heat shrinkable materials have gained wide industrial acceptance. A steadily growing electron beam technology is curing of paints, lacquers, printing inks and functional coatings. Electron beam processing offers high productivity, the possibility to treat the materials at normal temperature and pressure, excellent process control and clean production conditions. On an industrial scale the most important application of fast electrons is curing of 100% reactive monomer/prepolymer systems. Mainly acrylates and epoxides are used to formulate functional coatings on substrates such as paper, foil, wood, fibre board and high pressure laminates. A survey is given about the reaction mechanism of curing, the characterization of cured coatings, and of some industrial application.

  2. Plasma and ion barrier for electron beam spot stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1999-04-01

    The concept of a self-biased target to spatially confine the ions generated by the bombardment of intense electron beams on bremsstrahlung conversion targets has been predicted by computer simulation and further verified by experiments at the Integrated Test Stand for DARHT at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This technical article reports an alternative method of containing the plasmas and ions from the bremsstrahlung conversion target if the energy density of the electron beam is below a certain threshold. With the proposed changes of the electron beam parameters of the second axis of DARHT, the authors are able to show that a thin (0.5 mm) metallic barrier such as pure beryllium, or boron carbide with desirable thermal properties, is sufficiently transparent to the 20 MeV DARHT beam and at the same time able to confine the ions between the target and the barrier foil. The temperature rise in the foil due to energy deposited by the electron beam is expected to be below the melting point of the materials for the first three pulses. More important, they have shown in their time dependent particle-in-cell simulations that the deployment of a barrier situated 1 to 2 cm away from the converter target can achieve the ion confinement needed for the stability of the electron beam spot.

  3. Effect of Backscattered Electrons on Electron Beam Focus

    SciTech Connect

    Falabella, S; Chen, Y-J; Houck, T; McCarrick, J; Sampayan, S; Weir, J

    2000-08-10

    Using an induction linac, ETA-II, we are studying the interaction of a 2 kA, 6 MeV electron beam focused to a <2 mm diameter spot on high-Z foils. A focus shift was noticed when changing from 5 mil to 40 mil tantalum foil targets. This shift was subsequently attributed to the effect of a substantial fraction of the incident electron beam backscattering from the target, reducing the net beam current. This fraction varies with the thickness and density of the target. The presence and magnitude of the backscattered component was confirmed using Faraday cup collectors and beam current monitors. Calculations confirm the magnitude of the focus shift is consistent with the observed backscattered fraction.

  4. Electron beam switched discharge for rapidly pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Pleasance, Lyn D.; Murray, John R.; Goldhar, Julius; Bradley, Laird P.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for electrical excitation of a laser gas by application of a pulsed voltage across the gas, followed by passage of a pulsed, high energy electron beam through the gas to initiate a discharge suitable for laser excitation. This method improves upon current power conditioning techniques and is especially useful for driving rare gas halide lasers at high repetition rates.

  5. Proposed LLNL electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R.E.; Egan, P.O.; Proctor, I.; Levine, M.A.; Hansen, L.; Kajiyama, Y.; Wolgast, R.

    1985-07-02

    The interaction of energetic electrons with highly charged ions is of great importance to several research fields such as astrophysics, laser fusion and magnetic fusion. In spite of this importance there are almost no measurements of electron interaction cross sections for ions more than a few times ionized. To address this problem an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) is being developed at LLNL. The device is essentially an EBIS except that it is not intended as a source of extracted ions. Instead the (variable energy) electron beam interacting with the confined ions will be used to obtain measurements of ionization cross sections, dielectronic recombination cross sections, radiative recombination cross sections, energy levels and oscillator strengths. Charge-exchange recombinaion cross sections with neutral gasses could also be measured. The goal is to produce and study elements in many different charge states up to He-like xenon and Ne-like uranium. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Electron beam diagnostic for profiling high power beams

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; Palmer, Todd A.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2008-03-25

    A system for characterizing high power electron beams at power levels of 10 kW and above is described. This system is comprised of a slit disk assembly having a multitude of radial slits, a conducting disk with the same number of radial slits located below the slit disk assembly, a Faraday cup assembly located below the conducting disk, and a start-stop target located proximate the slit disk assembly. In order to keep the system from over-heating during use, a heat sink is placed in close proximity to the components discussed above, and an active cooling system, using water, for example, can be integrated into the heat sink. During use, the high power beam is initially directed onto a start-stop target and after reaching its full power is translated around the slit disk assembly, wherein the beam enters the radial slits and the conducting disk radial slits and is detected at the Faraday cup assembly. A trigger probe assembly can also be integrated into the system in order to aid in the determination of the proper orientation of the beam during reconstruction. After passing over each of the slits, the beam is then rapidly translated back to the start-stop target to minimize the amount of time that the high power beam comes in contact with the slit disk assembly. The data obtained by the system is then transferred into a computer system, where a computer tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct the power density distribution of the beam.

  7. Electron beam experiments at high altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments with the electron gun on the SCATHA satellite produced evidence of beam-plasma interactions, and heating of the low energy electrons around the satellite. These experiments were conducted near geosynchronous orbit, in the dusk bulge, and plasma sheet, with one short operation in the lobe regions, providing a range of ambient plasma densities. The electron gun was operated at 50 eV, with beam currents of 1, 10, and 100 micro-A. Data from electrostatic analyzers and the dc electric field experiment show that the satellite charged to near the beam energy in sunlight, if the beam current was sufficient. Higher ambient densities required higher beam currents. The electrostatic analyzers showed distribution functions which had peaks, or plateaus, at energies greater than the satellite potential. These measurements indicate heating of the ambient plasma at several Debye lengths from the satellite, with the heated plasma then accelerated into the satellite. It is likely that the ambient plasma is in fact the photoelectron sheath generated by the satellite.

  8. Electron beam experiments at high altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, R. C.; Cohen, H. A.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments with the electron gun on the SCATHA satellite produced evidence of beam-plasma interactions, and heating of the low energy electrons around the satellite. These experiments were conducted near geosynchronous orbit, in the dusk bulge, and plasma sheet, with one short operation in the lobe regions, providing a range of ambient plasma densities. The electron gun was operated at 50 eV, with beam currents of 1, 10, and 100 micro-A. Data from electrostatic analyzers and the DC electric field experiment show that the satellite charged to near the beam energy in sunlight, if the beam current was sufficient. Higher ambient densities required higher beam currents. The electrostatic analyzers showed distribution functions which had peaks, or plateaus, at energies greater than the satellite potential. These measurements indicate heating of the ambient plasma at several Debye lengths from the satellite, with the heated plasma then accelerated into the satellite. It is likely that the ambient plasma is in fact the photoelectron sheath generated by the satellite.

  9. Dual scattering foil design for poly-energetic electron beams.

    PubMed

    Kainz, K K; Antolak, J A; Almond, P R; Bloch, C D; Hogstrom, K R

    2005-03-01

    The laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) mechanism can accelerate electrons to energies within the 6-20 MeV range desired for therapy application. However, the energy spectrum of LWFA-generated electrons is broad, on the order of tens of MeV. Using existing laser technology, the therapeutic beam might require a significant energy spread to achieve clinically acceptable dose rates. The purpose of this work was to test the assumption that a scattering foil system designed for a mono-energetic beam would be suitable for a poly-energetic beam with a significant energy spread. Dual scattering foil systems were designed for mono-energetic beams using an existing analytical formalism based on Gaussian multiple-Coulomb scattering theory. The design criterion was to create a flat beam that would be suitable for fields up to 25 x 25 cm2 at 100 cm from the primary scattering foil. Radial planar fluence profiles for poly-energetic beams with energy spreads ranging from 0.5 MeV to 6.5 MeV were calculated using two methods: (a) analytically by summing beam profiles for a range of mono-energetic beams through the scattering foil system, and (b) by Monte Carlo using the EGS/BEAM code. The analytic calculations facilitated fine adjustments to the foil design, and the Monte Carlo calculations enabled us to verify the results of the analytic calculation and to determine the phase-space characteristics of the broadened beam. Results showed that the flatness of the scattered beam is fairly insensitive to the width of the input energy spectrum. Also, results showed that dose calculated by the analytical and Monte Carlo methods agreed very well in the central portion of the beam. Outside the useable field area, the differences between the analytical and Monte Carlo results were small but significant, possibly due to the small angle approximation. However, these did not affect the conclusion that a scattering foil system designed for a mono-energetic beam will be suitable for a poly

  10. Precision fast kickers for kiloampere electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G.J.; Chen, Y.J.; Weir, J.T.

    1999-10-06

    These kickers will be used to make fast dipoles and quadrupoles which are driven by sharp risetime pulsers to provide precision beam manipulations for high current kA electron beams. This technology will be used on the 2nd axis of the DARHT linac at LANL. It will be used to provide 4 micropulses of pulse width 20 to 120 nsec. selected from a 2 {micro}sec., 2kA, 20MeV macropulse. The fast pulsers will have amplitude modulation capability to compensate for beam-induced steering effects and other slow beam centroid motion to within the bandwidth of the kicker system. Scaling laws derived from theory will be presented along with extensive experimental data obtained on the test bed ETA-II.

  11. Electron gun jitter effects on beam bunching

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M. S.; Iqbal, M.

    2014-02-15

    For routine operation of Beijing Electron Positron Collider II (BEPCII) linac, many factors may affect the beam bunching process directly or indirectly. We present the measurements and analyses of the gun timing jitter, gun high voltage jitter, and beam energy at the exit of the standard acceleration section of the linac quantitatively. Almost 80 mV and more than 200 ps of gun high voltage and time jitters have ever been measured, respectively. It was analyzed that the gun timing jitter produced severe effects on beam energy than the gun high voltage jitter, if the timing jitter exceeded 100 ps which eventually deteriorates both the beam performance and the injection rate to the storage ring.

  12. Helical relativistic electron beam Vlasov equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H. M.

    1980-08-01

    Three existing helical relativistic electron beam models are discussed and compared. Both Yoshikawa's and Lawson's models are shown to be derivable from appropriate Vlasov equilibria. A new helical Vlasov equilibrium with energy spread is presented and studied. Unlike Auer's axial current model in which the allowance of an energy spread limits the total current in the relativistic beam case, the present model, with the addition of an azimuthal current, permits solutions with arbitrarily large current. On the other hand, like the model studied by Kan and Lai, the present model leads to nonhollowed-out beam solutions in which, the larger the beam current, the more force-free is the magnetic field configuration.

  13. Auroral electron beams near the magnetic equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcilwain, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Intense beams of electrons traveling parallel to the local magnetic field have been observed at a magnetic latitude of 11 deg and a radial distance of 6.6 earth radii. The distribution function for electrons traveling within 8 deg of the field line direction is typically flat or slightly rising up to a break point beyond which it decreases as inversely as the 5-10th power of v. The energy corresponding to the break point velocity is usually between 0.1 and 10 keV. These beams are found to occur on closed field lines at the inner edge of the plasma sheet and thus at the root of the earth's magnetotail. Beams with break point energies greater than 2 keV seem to occur only within the first 10 minutes after the onset of hot plasma injection associated with a magnetospheric substorm.

  14. Production of multicharged radioactive ion beams: New results for the 1+-->n+ method with the MINIMAFIOS and SARA-CAPRICE electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, T.; Bruandet, J.-F.; Chauvin, N.; Curdy, J.-C.; Fruneau, M.; Geller, R.; Gimond, G.; Sole, P.; Vieux-Rochas, J.-L.; Gaubert, G.; Maunoury, L.; Sortais, P.; Villari, A. C. C.

    1998-02-01

    The backward and forward injection of a 1+ ion beam in a MINIMAFIOS type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) have given good results for the 1+→n+ method. Due to the technological simplicity of the forward injection, additional experiments have been performed with this configuration. Different primary sources (1+) have been used for the injection (2.45 GHz ECRIS, hollow cathode source, simplified 10 GHz NANOGAN type ECRIS), an increase of the performances has already been obtained (Zn, Kr, Ar), and a measurement of the absolute efficiency with the NANOGAN type-MINIMAFIOS association is performed. Due to the high performance of the 10 GHz CAPRICE source used as a highly charged ion injector in the first cyclotron of SARA (Système Accélérateur Rhône-Alpes), it has been tested as a different n+ source for the 1+→n+ method. In this purpose, a low energy spread-low emittance thermoionization Rb ion source has been used as 1+ injector. A standard operation of the SARA-CAPRICE source has been kept with respect to the microwave coupling. The spectra of the Rbn+ ions extracted are compared when using N2 and O2 as support gases. The highest efficiency is obtained for the Rb13+.

  15. Production of multicharged radioactive ion beams: New results for the 1+-->n+ method with the MINIMAFIOS and SARA-CAPRICE electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, T.; Bruandet, J.-F.; Chauvin, N.; Curdy, J.-C.; Fruneau, M.; Geller, R.; Gimond, G.; Sole, P.; Vieux-Rochas, J.-L.; Gaubert, G.; Maunoury, L.; Sortais, P.; Villari, A. C. C.

    1998-03-01

    The backward and forward injection of a 1+ ion beam in a MINIMAFIOS type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) have given good results for the 1+→n+ method. Due to the technological simplicity of the forward injection, additional experiments have been performed with this configuration. Different primary sources (1+) have been used for the injection (2.45 GHz ECRIS, hollow cathode source, simplified 10 GHz NANOGAN type ECRIS), an increase of the performances has already been obtained (Zn, Kr, Ar), and a measurement of the absolute efficiency with the NANOGAN type-MINIMAFIOS association is performed. Due to the high performance of the 10 GHz CAPRICE source used as a highly charged ion injector in the first cyclotron of SARA (Système Accélérateur Rhône-Alpes), it has been tested as a different n+ source for the 1+→n+ method. In this purpose, a low energy spread-low emittance thermoionization Rb ion source has been used as 1+ injector. A standard operation of the SARA-CAPRICE source has been kept with respect to the microwave coupling. The spectra of the Rbn+ ions extracted are compared when using N2 and O2 as support gases. The highest efficiency is obtained for the Rb13+.

  16. Toward a cold electron beam in the Fermilab's Electron Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Vitali S. Tupikov et al.

    2004-05-12

    Fermilab is developing a high-energy electron cooling system to cool 8.9-GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring [1]. Cooling of antiprotons requires a round electron beam with a small angular spread propagating through 20-m long cooling section with a kinetic energy of 4.3 MeV. To confine the electron beam tightly and to keep its transverse angles below 0.1 mrad, the cooling section will be immersed into a solenoidal field of 50-150G. This paper describes the technique of measuring and adjusting the magnetic field quality in the cooling section and presents preliminary results of beam quality measurements in the cooler prototype.

  17. Electron beam puts a shine on leather

    SciTech Connect

    Berberich, S.

    1986-02-01

    A technique for curing leather using either ultraviolet or electron-beam radiation has been developed. This type of radiation curing saves at least 60 percent of the energy cost of conventional leather finishing and can also result in considerable savings in plant space and labor. The implications of the new technology in international balance of trade are discussed.

  18. SLC polarized beam source electron optics design

    SciTech Connect

    Eppley, K.R.; Lavine, T.L.; Early, R.A.; Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.; Miller, R.H.; Schultz, D.C.; Spencer, C.M.; Yeremian, A.D.

    1991-05-01

    This paper describes the design of the beam-line from the polarized electron gun to the linac injector in the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The polarized electron source is a GaAs photocathode, requiring 10{sup {minus}11}-Torr-range pressure for adequate quantum efficiency and longevity. The photocathode is illuminated by 3-nsec-long laser pulses. The quality of the optics for the 160-kV beam is crucial since electron-stimulated gas desorption from beam loss in excess of 0.1% of the 20-nC pulses may poison the photocathode. Our design for the transport line consists of a differential pumping region isolated by a pair of valves. Focusing is provided by a pair of Helmholtz coils and by several iron-encased solenoidal lenses. Our optics design is based on beam transport simulations using 2{1/2}-D particle-in-cell codes to model the gun and to solve the fully-relativistic time-dependent equations of motion in three dimensions for electrons in the presence of azimuthally symmetric electromagnetic fields. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  19. The CMS Beam Halo Monitor electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, N.; Dabrowski, A. E.; Fabbri, F.; Grassi, T.; Hughes, E.; Mans, J.; Montanari, A.; Orfanelli, S.; Rusack, R.; Torromeo, G.; Stickland, D. P.; Stifter, K.

    2016-02-01

    The CMS Beam Halo Monitor has been successfully installed in the CMS cavern in LHC Long Shutdown 1 for measuring the machine induced background for LHC Run II. The system is based on 40 detector units composed of synthetic quartz Cherenkov radiators coupled to fast photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The readout electronics chain uses many components developed for the Phase 1 upgrade to the CMS Hadronic Calorimeter electronics, with dedicated firmware and readout adapted to the beam monitoring requirements. The PMT signal is digitized by a charge integrating ASIC (QIE10), providing both the signal rise time, with few nanosecond resolution, and the charge integrated over one bunch crossing. The backend electronics uses microTCA technology and receives data via a high-speed 5 Gbps asynchronous link. It records histograms with sub-bunch crossing timing resolution and is read out via IPbus using the newly designed CMS data acquisition for non-event based data. The data is processed in real time and published to CMS and the LHC, providing online feedback on the beam quality. A dedicated calibration monitoring system has been designed to generate short triggered pulses of light to monitor the efficiency of the system. The electronics has been in operation since the first LHC beams of Run II and has served as the first demonstration of the new QIE10, Microsemi Igloo2 FPGA and high-speed 5 Gbps link with LHC data.

  20. Beam by design: Laser manipulation of electrons in modern accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsing, Erik; Stupakov, Gennady; Xiang, Dao; Zholents, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    Accelerator-based light sources such as storage rings and free-electron lasers use relativistic electron beams to produce intense radiation over a wide spectral range for fundamental research in physics, chemistry, materials science, biology, and medicine. More than a dozen such sources operate worldwide, and new sources are being built to deliver radiation that meets with the ever-increasing sophistication and depth of new research. Even so, conventional accelerator techniques often cannot keep pace with new demands and, thus, new approaches continue to emerge. In this article, a variety of recently developed and promising techniques that rely on lasers to manipulate and rearrange the electron distribution in order to tailor the properties of the radiation are reviewed. Basic theories of electron-laser interactions, techniques to create microstructures and nanostructures in electron beams, and techniques to produce radiation with customizable waveforms are reviewed. An overview of laser-based techniques for the generation of fully coherent x rays, mode-locked x-ray pulse trains, light with orbital angular momentum, and attosecond or even zeptosecond long coherent pulses in free-electron lasers is presented. Several methods to generate femtosecond pulses in storage rings are also discussed. Additionally, various schemes designed to enhance the performance of light sources through precision beam preparation including beam conditioning, laser heating, emittance exchange, and various laser-based diagnostics are described. Together these techniques represent a new emerging concept of "beam by design" in modern accelerators, which is the primary focus of this article.

  1. An electron beam detector for the FLASH II beam dump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, J.; Kube, G.; Leuschner, N.; Perlick, F.; Sachwitz, M.; Schmitz, M.; Wittenburg, K.; Wohlenberg, T.

    2013-05-01

    After the generation of the laser light, a dipole deflects the highly energetic electron beam of FLASH (Free Electron Laser Hamburg) into a dump. A detector is developed to monitor the position, dimensions and profile of the electron beam. Scintillation light is emitted due to the electrons hitting a luminescent screen located in front of the dump aperture. This light is guided by an optical system external to the vacuum to a CCD camera for optical analysis of the generated image. In this paper the layouts of two different optical systems are presented, both of which will be redundantly installed at FLASH II. The conventional lens-mirror-arrangement, consisting of three single collecting lenses, two mirrors and a zoom lens, is supposed to have a theoretical resolution of 0.25 mm. The second optical system is based on radiation-hard optical fibres. For the latter it is planned to test the impact of radiation on the optical qualities of the bundle by installing it into a "radioactive hot spot" at the bunch compressor in the FLASH accelerator. This test setup will also be presented.

  2. High-throughput electron-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinerman, Alan D.; Crewe, David A.; Perng, Dung-Ching; Shoaf, S. E.; Crewe, Albert V.

    1992-08-01

    A new approach for fabricating arrays of electron beam columns by stacking silicon wafers with micron accuracy has been developed. This approach combines the precision of semiconductor processing and fiber optic technologies. A (100) silicon wafer is anisotropically etched to create an array of apertures on the top or bottom of the wafer and four orthogonal v- grooves on both surfaces of the wafer. Precision pyrex fibers align and bond the v-grooves on the top of one wafer to the bottom of the next wafer. This procedure is repeated to create thick structures and a stack of six wafers is used to create arrays of scanning electron microscopes (SEMs). This technique is suitable for fabricating 1 - 30 mm long electron optical columns. The optimum size is determined by the desired array size, operating voltage, resolution, field of view, and working distance. The first wafer contains an array of micromachined field emission electron sources. The next three wafers accelerate and focus the electron beams. The last two wafers in the stack have electrodes to deflect each beam and correct for astigmatism. The performance of an SEM improves as its length is reduced and a subcm 2 keV SEM with a field emission source should have approximately 7 nm resolution.

  3. Beam shuttering interferometer and method

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Lassahn, Gordon D.

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus resulting in the simplification of phase shifting interferometry by eliminating the requirement to know the phase shift between interferograms or to keep the phase shift between interferograms constant. The present invention provides a simple, inexpensive means to shutter each independent beam of the interferometer in order to facilitate the data acquisition requirements for optical interferometry and phase shifting interferometry. By eliminating the requirement to know the phase shift between interferograms or to keep the phase shift constant, a simple, economical means and apparatus for performing the technique of phase shifting interferometry is provide which, by thermally expanding a fiber optical cable changes the optical path distance of one incident beam relative to another.

  4. Beam shuttering interferometer and method

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Lassahn, G.D.

    1993-07-27

    A method and apparatus resulting in the simplification of phase shifting interferometry by eliminating the requirement to know the phase shift between interferograms or to keep the phase shift between interferograms constant. The present invention provides a simple, inexpensive means to shutter each independent beam of the interferometer in order to facilitate the data acquisition requirements for optical interferometry and phase shifting interferometry. By eliminating the requirement to know the phase shift between interferograms or to keep the phase shift constant, a simple, economical means and apparatus for performing the technique of phase shifting interferometry is provide which, by thermally expanding a fiber optical cable changes the optical path distance of one incident beam relative to another.

  5. Electron beam driven disordering in small particles

    SciTech Connect

    Vanfleet, R.R.; Mochel, J.

    1997-11-01

    Small metal particles in the range of a few nanometers in diameter are seen to progressively disorder when the 100 keV electron beam of a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) is held stationary on the particle. The diffraction pattern of the individual particle is seen to progress from an initial array of indexable diffraction spots to a mixture of diffraction spots and amorphous-like rings and finally to rings with no persistent diffraction spots. After the electron beam is removed, the particles will recrystallize after minutes or hours. Only particles below a critical size are seen to fully disorder. The authors have observed this in platinum, palladium, rhodium, and iridium and based on the model of disordering process believe it is a universal effect. It has also been observed with a platinum ruthenium alloy. They discuss the mechanism of this disordering and the structure of the resulting disordering particle for the case of platinum clusters.

  6. MULTIPLE ELECTRON BEAM ION PUMP AND SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, R.E.

    1962-02-27

    A vacuum pump is designed which operates by ionizing incoming air and by withdrawing the ions from the system by means of electrical fields. The apparatus comprises a cylindrical housing communicable with the vessel to be evacuated and having a thin wall section in one end. Suitable coils provide a longitudinal magnetic field within the cylinder. A broad cathode and an anode structure is provided to establish a plurality of adjacent electron beams which are parallel to the cylinder axis. Electron reflector means are provided so that each of the beams constitutes a PIG or reflex discharge. Such structure provides a large region in which incoming gas molecules may be ionized by electron bombardment. A charged electrode assembly accelerates the ions through the thin window, thereby removing the gas from the system. The invention may also be utilized as a highly efficient ion source. (AEC)

  7. Beam injection improvement for electron cyclotron resonance charge breeders

    SciTech Connect

    Lamy, T.; Angot, J.; Sortais, P.; Thuillier, T.

    2012-02-15

    The injection of a 1+ beam into an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) charge breeder is classically performed through a grounded tube placed on its axis at the injection side. This tube presents various disadvantages for the operation of an ECR charge breeder. First experiments without a grounded tube show a better use of the microwave power and a better charge breeding efficiency. The optical acceptance of the charge breeder without decelerating tube allows the injection of high intensity 1+ ion beams at high energy, allowing metals sputtering inside the ion source. The use of this method for refractory metallic ion beams production is evaluated.

  8. Electrical measurement techniques for pulsed high current electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Struve, K.W.

    1986-04-01

    The advent of high current (1 to 100 kA), moderate energy (>10 MeV), short pulse (1 to 100 ns) electron accelerators used for charged particle beam research has motivated a need to complement standard diagnostics with development of new diagnostic techniques to measure electron beam parameters. A brief survey is given of the diagnostics for measuring beam current, position, size, energy, and emittance. While a broad scope of diagnostics will be discussed, this survey will emphasize diagnostics used on the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) and Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA). Focus is placed on diagnostics measuring beam current, position and size. Among the diagnostics discussed are resistive wall current monitors, B/sub theta/ loops, Rogowski coils, Faraday cups, and x-ray wire diagnostics. Operation at higher current levels also increases radiation and electromagnetic pulse interference. These difficulties and methods for circumventing them are also discussed.

  9. Generating a uniform transverse distributed electron beam along a beam line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yi; Cui, Xiao-Hao

    2015-11-01

    It has been reported that transverse distribution shaping can help to further enhance the energy extraction efficiency in a terawatt, tapered X-ray free-electron laser. Thus, methods of creating and keeping an almost uniform transverse distributed (UTD) beam within undulators are required. This study shows that a UTD electron beam can be generated within evenly distributed drift sections where undulators can be placed, by means of octupoles and particular optics. A specific design is presented, and numerical simulations are performed to verify the proposed method. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475202, 11405187) and Youth Innovation Promotion Association of Chinese Academy of Sciences (2015009)

  10. Characterization of a low-voltage electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berejka, Anthony J.

    2004-09-01

    Growing interests in low-voltage electron beam (EB) processing in areas that may require regulatory compliance, such as the curing of inks and coatings for food packaging materials and in the surface disinfection of medicinal and food containers, lead to the characterization of a low-voltage EB by two methods: a widely used thin radiochromic film and a film strip made on a continuous basis with an alanine coating. Using a laboratory unit, beam currents and voltages were varied and then optical density and alanine/matrix ratios were, respectively, determined. No inferences as to "dose" were made. The radiochromic film was found to be insensitive to slight changes at low beam currents and to show considerable divergence and a broadening in response as current was increased across a meaningful range at the three applied beam voltages of 80, 100 and 120 kV. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) increase in response of the alanine coated film taken as a ratio to an internal reference material within the test instrument itself was shown to have a linear response with respect to beam current and no divergence as current increased. The use of an alanine coating of thickness greater than that of the extrapolated range of the electron penetration offers a method for the characterization of the output of such very low-voltage beams.